Science.gov

Sample records for maximum wind velocity

  1. Maximum Possible Transverse Velocity in Special Relativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medhekar, Sarang

    1991-01-01

    Using a physical picture, an expression for the maximum possible transverse velocity and orientation required for that by a linear emitter in special theory of relativity has been derived. A differential calculus method is also used to derive the expression. (Author/KR)

  2. Instrument remotely measures wind velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, J. S.; Mccleese, D. J.; Seaman, C. H.; Shumate, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    Doppler-shift spectrometer makes remote satellite measurements of atmospheric wind velocity and temperature at specified altitudes. As in correlation spectrometer, spectrum of gas in reference cell and spectrum of same gas in atmosphere are correlated both in emission and absorption.

  3. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of the Wind Velocity from Minisodar Measurement Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakhin, V. A.; Cherepanov, O. S.; Shamanaeva, L. G.

    2016-04-01

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of the three wind velocity components in the atmospheric boundary layer is analyzed on the basis of Doppler minisodar measurements. The data were processed and analyzed with the help of robust nonparametric methods based on the weighted maximum likelihood method and classical methods. Distribution laws were obtained for each wind velocity component. There are outliers in the distribution functions; both right and left asymmetry of the distributions are observed. For the x- and ycomponents, the width of the distribution increases as the observation altitude is increased, but the maximum of the distribution function decreases, which is in agreement with the data available in the literature. For the zcomponents the width of the distribution remains practically constant, but the value of the maximum also decreases with altitude. Analysis of the hourly semidiurnal dynamics showed that all three components have maxima in the morning and evening hours. For the y- and z-components the maxima in the evening hours are more strongly expressed than in the morning hours. For the x- and y-components the horizontal wind shear is closely tracked in the evening hours. It is shown that adaptive estimates on the efficiency significantly exceed the classical parametric estimates and allow one to analyze the spatiotemporal dynamics of the wind velocity, and reveal jets and detect wind shears.

  4. Latitudinal Variation of Solar Wind Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthakrishnan, S.; Balasubramanian, V.; Janardhan, P.

    1995-04-01

    Single station solar wind velocity measurements using the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT) in India (operating at 327 MHz) are reported for the period August 1992 to August 1993. Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations on a large number of compact radio sources covering a latitudinal range of ±80° were used to derive solar wind velocities using the method of fitting a power law model to the observed IPS spectra. The data shows a velocity versus heliographic latitude pattern which is similar to that reported by Rickett and Coles (1991) for the 1981 1982 period. However, the average of the measured equatorial velocities are higher, being about 470 km s-1 compared to their value of 400 km s-1. The distribution of electron density variations (ΔN e ) between 50R⊙ and 90R⊙ was also determined and it was found that ΔN e was about 30% less at the poles as compared to the equator.

  5. Satellite-tracked cumulus velocities. [for determining wind velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T. T.; Pearl, E. W.; Shenk, W. E.

    1973-01-01

    The research indicates that extreme caution must be exercised in converting cloud velocities into winds. The motion of fair-weather cumuli obtained by tracking their shadows over Springfield, Missouri revealed that the standard deviation in the individual cloud motion is several times the tracking error. The motion of over-ocean cumuli near Barbados clearly indicated the complicated nature of cumulus velocities. Analysis of whole-sky images obtained near Tampa, Florida failed to show significant continuity and stability of cumulus plumes, less than 0.3 mile in diameter. Cumulus turrets with 0.3 to 2 mile in size appear to be the best target to infer the mean wind within the subcloud layers. Cumulus or stratocumulus cells consisting of x number of turrets do not always move with wind. The addition and deletion of turrets belonging to a specific cell appear to be the cause of the erratic motion of a tracer cell. It may by concluded that the accuracy of wind estimates is unlikely to be better than 2m/sec unless the physical and dynamical characteristics of cumulus motion is futher investigated.

  6. Effects of increasing tip velocity on wind turbine rotor design.

    SciTech Connect

    Resor, Brian Ray; Maniaci, David Charles; Berg, Jonathan Charles; Richards, Phillip William

    2014-05-01

    A reduction in cost of energy from wind is anticipated when maximum allowable tip velocity is allowed to increase. Rotor torque decreases as tip velocity increases and rotor size and power rating are held constant. Reduction in rotor torque yields a lighter weight gearbox, a decrease in the turbine cost, and an increase in the capacity for the turbine to deliver cost competitive electricity. The high speed rotor incurs costs attributable to rotor aero-acoustics and system loads. The increased loads of high speed rotors drive the sizing and cost of other components in the system. Rotor, drivetrain, and tower designs at 80 m/s maximum tip velocity and 100 m/s maximum tip velocity are created to quantify these effects. Component costs, annualized energy production, and cost of energy are computed for each design to quantify the change in overall cost of energy resulting from the increase in turbine tip velocity. High fidelity physics based models rather than cost and scaling models are used to perform the work. Results provide a quantitative assessment of anticipated costs and benefits for high speed rotors. Finally, important lessons regarding full system optimization of wind turbines are documented.

  7. Friction velocity scaling in wind wave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Peter A. E. M.; Komen, Gerbrand J.; de Voogt, Willem J. P.

    1987-01-01

    This note is devoted to the problem of the appropriate scaling of parameters relevant for sea waves, such as wave height, peak frequency, duration, and fetch. In the past, the growth of sea waves has often been analysed in terms of the wind velocity at a fixed height, despite the fact that many authors have stressed the importance of scaling with the friction velocity. This problem would be immaterial if the ratio between the friction velocity and the wind speed at a fixed height were a constant. There is, however, ample evidence that this ratio increases with wind speed (Smith and Banke, 1975; Smith, 1980), in agreement with dimensional considerations by Charnock (1955) on the friction height. As a result, the scaling problem is an important one. In this note we conjecture that the correct procedure is to scale wave parameters with friction velocity, and we discuss experimental evidence for the correctness of this conjecture. Comparing two independent datasets (‘JONSWAP’ and ‘KNMI’), we find some evidence supporting our ideas. Further confirmation remains desirable, however, and suggestions are made as to how this might be obtained.

  8. Maximum wind speeds and US hurricane losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murnane, R. J.; Elsner, J. B.

    2012-08-01

    There is academic, commercial, and public interest in estimating loss from hurricanes striking land and understanding how loss might change as a result of future variations in climate. Here we show that the relationship between wind speed and loss is exponential and that loss increases with wind speed at a rate of 5% per m s-1. The relationship is derived using quantile regression and a data set comprising wind speeds of hurricanes hitting the United States and normalized economic losses. We suggest that the “centercepts” for the different quantiles account for exposure-related factors such as population density, precipitation, and surface roughness, and that once these effects are accounted for, the increase in loss with wind speed is consistent across quantiles. An out-of-sample test of this relationship correctly predicts economic losses from Hurricane Irene in 2011. The exponential relationship suggests that increased wind speeds will produce significantly higher losses; however, increases in exposed property and population are expected to be a more important factor for near future losses.

  9. Radionuclide counting technique for measuring wind velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.J.; Khandelwal, G.S.

    1981-12-01

    A technique for measuring wind velocities of meteorological interest is described. It is based on inverse-square-law variation of the counting rates as the radioactive source-to-counter distance is changed by wind drag on the source ball. Results of a feasibility study using a weak bismuth 207 radiation source and three Geiger-Muller radiation counters are reported. The use of the technique is not restricted to Martian or Mars-like environments. A description of the apparatus, typical results, and frequency response characteristics are included. A discussion of a double-pendulum arrangement is presented. Measurements reported herein indicate that the proposed technique may be suitable for measuring wind speeds up to 100 m/sec, which are either steady or whose rates of fluctuation are less than 1 kHz.

  10. Wind Velocity and Position Sensor-less Operation for PMSG Wind Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senjyu, Tomonobu; Tamaki, Satoshi; Urasaki, Naomitsu; Uezato, Katsumi; Funabashi, Toshihisa; Fujita, Hideki

    Electric power generation using non-conventional sources is receiving considerable attention throughout the world. Wind energy is one of the available non-conventional energy sources. Electrical power generation using wind energy is possible in two ways, viz. constant speed operation and variable speed operation using power electronic converters. Variable speed power generation is attractive, because maximum electric power can be generated at all wind velocities. However, this system requires a rotor speed sensor, for vector control purpose, which increases the cost of the system. To alleviate the need of rotor speed sensor in vector control, we propose a new sensor-less control of PMSG (Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator) based on the flux linkage. We can estimate the rotor position using the estimated flux linkage. We use a first-order lag compensator to obtain the flux linkage. Furthermore‚we estimate wind velocity and rotation speed using a observer. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated thorough simulation results.

  11. On the maximum grain size entrained by photoevaporative winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, Mark A.; Laibe, Guillaume; Maddison, Sarah T.

    2016-09-01

    We model the behaviour of dust grains entrained by photoevaporation-driven winds from protoplanetary discs assuming a non-rotating, plane-parallel disc. We obtain an analytic expression for the maximum entrainable grain size in extreme-UV radiation-driven winds, which we demonstrate to be proportional to the mass loss rate of the disc. When compared with our hydrodynamic simulations, the model reproduces almost all of the wind properties for the gas and dust. In typical turbulent discs, the entrained grain sizes in the wind are smaller than the theoretical maximum everywhere but the inner disc due to dust settling.

  12. Wind-driven nutrient pulses to the subsurface chlorophyll maximum in seasonally stratified shelf seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Charlotte; Sharples, Jonathan; Mahaffey, Claire; Rippeth, Tom

    2013-10-01

    seas are an important global carbon sink. In the seasonal thermocline, the subsurface chlorophyll maximum (SCM) supports almost half of summer shelf production. Using observations from the seasonally stratified Celtic Sea (June 2010), we identify wind-driven inertial oscillations as a mechanism for supplying the SCM with the nitrate needed for phytoplankton growth and carbon fixation. Analysis of wind, currents, and turbulent dissipation indicates that inertial oscillations are triggered by a change in the wind velocity. High magnitude, short-lived dissipation spikes occur when the shear and wind vectors align, increasing the daily nitrate flux to the SCM by a factor of at least 17. However, it is likely that the sampling resolution of turbulent dissipation does not always capture the maximum wind-driven peak in mixing. We estimate that wind-driven inertial oscillations supply the SCM with ~33% to 71% of the nitrate required for new production in shelf seas during summer.

  13. Maximum wind energy extraction strategies using power electronic converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Quincy Qing

    2003-10-01

    This thesis focuses on maximum wind energy extraction strategies for achieving the highest energy output of variable speed wind turbine power generation systems. Power electronic converters and controls provide the basic platform to accomplish the research of this thesis in both hardware and software aspects. In order to send wind energy to a utility grid, a variable speed wind turbine requires a power electronic converter to convert a variable voltage variable frequency source into a fixed voltage fixed frequency supply. Generic single-phase and three-phase converter topologies, converter control methods for wind power generation, as well as the developed direct drive generator, are introduced in the thesis for establishing variable-speed wind energy conversion systems. Variable speed wind power generation system modeling and simulation are essential methods both for understanding the system behavior and for developing advanced system control strategies. Wind generation system components, including wind turbine, 1-phase IGBT inverter, 3-phase IGBT inverter, synchronous generator, and rectifier, are modeled in this thesis using MATLAB/SIMULINK. The simulation results have been verified by a commercial simulation software package, PSIM, and confirmed by field test results. Since the dynamic time constants for these individual models are much different, a creative approach has also been developed in this thesis to combine these models for entire wind power generation system simulation. An advanced maximum wind energy extraction strategy relies not only on proper system hardware design, but also on sophisticated software control algorithms. Based on literature review and computer simulation on wind turbine control algorithms, an intelligent maximum wind energy extraction control algorithm is proposed in this thesis. This algorithm has a unique on-line adaptation and optimization capability, which is able to achieve maximum wind energy conversion efficiency through

  14. Three dimensional winds: A maximum cross-correlation application to elastic lidar data

    SciTech Connect

    Buttler, W.T.

    1996-05-01

    Maximum cross-correlation techniques have been used with satellite data to estimate winds and sea surface velocities for several years. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently using a variation of the basic maximum cross-correlation technique, coupled with a deterministic application of a vector median filter, to measure transverse winds as a function of range and altitude from incoherent elastic backscatter lidar (light detection and ranging) data taken throughout large volumes within the atmospheric boundary layer. Hourly representations of three-dimensional wind fields, derived from elastic lidar data taken during an air-quality study performed in a region of complex terrain near Sunland Park, New Mexico, are presented and compared with results from an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved laser doppler velocimeter. The wind fields showed persistent large scale eddies as well as general terrain-following winds in the Rio Grande valley.

  15. Estimating maximum global wind power availability and associated climatic consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Lee; Gans, Fabian; Kleidon, Axel

    2010-05-01

    Estimating maximum global wind power availability and associated climatic consequences Wind speed reflects the continuous generation of kinetic energy and its dissipation, primarily in the atmospheric boundary layer. When wind turbines extract kinetic wind energy, less kinetic energy remains in the atmosphere in the mean state. While this effect does not play a significant role for a single turbine, it becomes a critical factor for the estimation of large-scale wind power availability. This extraction of kinetic energy by turbines also competes with the natural processes of kinetic energy dissipation, thus setting fundamental limits on extractability that are not considered in previous large-scale studies [1,2,3]. Our simple momentum balance model using ECMWF climate data illustrates a fundamental limit to global wind power extractability and thereby electricity potential (93TW). This is independent of engineering advances in turbine design and wind farm layout. These results are supported by similar results using a global climate model of intermediate complexity. Varying the surface drag coefficient with different simulations allows us to directly relate changes in atmospheric and boundary layer dissipation with resulting climate indices and wind power potential. These new estimates of the maximum power generation by wind turbines are well above the currently installed capacity. Hence, present day installations are unlikely to have a global impact. However, when compared to the current human energy demand of 17TW combined with plans by the US and EU to drastically increase onshore and offshore wind turbine installations [4,5,6], understanding the climatic response and ultimate limitations of wind power as a large-scale renewable energy source is critical. [1] Archer, C., and M.Z. Jacobson, (2005) Evaluation of global wind power, J. Geophys. Res. 110:D12110. [2] Lu, X., M.B. McElroy, and J. Kiviluoma, (2009) Global potential for wind-generated electricity, Proc

  16. Wave Tank Studies of Phase Velocities of Short Wind Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, S.; Sergievskaya, I.; Shchegolkov, Yu.

    Wave tank studies of phase velocities of short wind waves have been carried out using Ka-band radar and an Optical Spectrum Analyser. The phase velocities were retrieved from measured radar and optical Doppler shifts, taking into account measurements of surface drift velocities. The dispersion relationship was studied in centimetre (cm)- and millimetre(mm)-scale wavelength ranges at different fetches and wind speeds, both for a clean water surface and for water covered with surfactant films. It is ob- tained that the phase velocities do not follow the dispersion relation of linear capillary- gravity waves, increasing with fetch and, therefore, depending on phase velocities of dominant decimetre (dm)-centimetre-scale wind waves. One thus can conclude that nonlinear cm-mm-scale harmonics bound to the dominant wind waves and propagat- ing with the phase velocities of the decimetric waves are present in the wind wave spectrum. The resulting phase velocities of short wind waves are determined by re- lation between free and bound waves. The relative intensity of the bound waves in the spectrum of short wind waves is estimated. It is shown that this relation depends strongly on the surfactant concentration, because the damping effect due to films is different for free and bound waves; this results to changes of phase velocities of wind waves in the presence of surfactant films. This work was supported by MOD, UK via DERA Winfrith (Project ISTC 1774P) and by RFBR (Project 02-05-65102).

  17. Fixed pitch wind turbine control to generate the maximum power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Rodrigo, Fernando

    This Doctoral Thesis firstly shows the state of the art about wind power, wind turbines and alternating current generators. A part is intended for the state of the art of the commercial small wind turbines: their applications, the technology used, the elements topology according to the application type, the investigation lines in this field, the political respects that have an influence in using or not small turbines, and lastly it analyses in detail four commercial small turbines. One chapter contains the models and equations of the alternating current generators used in the Doctoral Thesis, which are the induction generator and the permanent magnets generator. Other chapter explains some methods to control the alternating current generators speed. Chapter 7 is oriented to the induction machines speed estimators. These estimators will let to eliminate the generators speed sensor. In the Thesis, some of them are simulated to test their behaviour. It presents an original analysis, which is oriented to choose the most right estimators for such an application as small wind turbines. Chapter 8 introduces the control systems developed for wind turbines. They let to extract the maximum power for every wind speed. The base of all of them is the algorithm proposed in the Thesis. Some control systems are proposed for squirrel cage induction generators and permanent magnets generators, which use voltage source and current source schemes. Some of them use generator speed sensors and others use speed estimators. The schemes do not need wind speed sensor.

  18. Radar Wind Profiler Radial Velocity: A Comparison with Doppler Lidar.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Stephen A.; Goodrich, R. Kent

    2002-12-01

    The accuracy of the radial wind velocity measured with a radar wind profiler will depend on turbulent variability and instrumental noise. Radial velocity estimates of a boundary layer wind profiler are compared with those estimated by a Doppler lidar over 2.3 h. The lidar resolution volume was much narrower than the profiler volume, but the samples were well matched in range and time. The wind profiler radial velocity was computed using two common algorithms [profiler online program (POP) and National Center for Atmospheric Research improved moments algorithm (NIMA)]. The squared correlation between radial velocities measured with the two instruments was R2 = 0.99, and the standard deviation of the difference was about r = 0.20-0.23 m s1 for radial velocities of greater than 1 m s1 and r = 0.16-0.35 m s1 for radial velocities of less than 1 m s1. Small radial velocities may be treated differently in radar wind profiler processing because of ground-clutter mitigation strategies. A standard deviation of r = 0.23 m s1 implies an error in horizontal winds from turbulence and noise of less than 1 m s1 for a single cycle through the profiler beam directions and of less than 0.11-0.27 m s1 for a 30-min average measurement, depending on the beam pointing sequence. The accuracy of a wind profiler horizontal wind measurement will also depend on assumptions of spatial and temporal inhomogeneity of the atmosphere, which are not considered in this comparison. The wind profiler radial velocities from the POP and NIMA are in good agreement. However, the analysis does show the need for improvements in wind profiler processing when radial velocity is close to zero.

  19. Analytical expressions for maximum wind turbine average power in a Rayleigh wind regime

    SciTech Connect

    Carlin, P.W.

    1996-12-01

    Average or expectation values for annual power of a wind turbine in a Rayleigh wind regime are calculated and plotted as a function of cut-out wind speed. This wind speed is expressed in multiples of the annual average wind speed at the turbine installation site. To provide a common basis for comparison of all real and imagined turbines, the Rayleigh-Betz wind machine is postulated. This machine is an ideal wind machine operating with the ideal Betz power coefficient of 0.593 in a Rayleigh probability wind regime. All other average annual powers are expressed in fractions of that power. Cases considered include: (1) an ideal machine with finite power and finite cutout speed, (2) real machines operating in variable speed mode at their maximum power coefficient, and (3) real machines operating at constant speed.

  20. Radionuclide counting technique for measuring wind velocity and direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An anemometer utilizing a radionuclide counting technique for measuring both the velocity and the direction of wind is described. A pendulum consisting of a wire and a ball with a source of radiation on the lower surface of the ball is positioned by the wind. Detectors and are located in a plane perpendicular to pendulum (no wind). The detectors are located on the circumferene of a circle and are equidistant from each other as well as the undisturbed (no wind) source ball position.

  1. Calibration of Instruments for Measuring Wind Velocity and Direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogler, Raymond D.; Pilny, Miroslav J.

    1950-01-01

    Signal Corps wind equipment AN/GMQ-1 consisting of a 3-cup anemometer and wind vane was calibrated for wind velocities from 1 to 200 miles per hour. Cup-shaft failure prevented calibration at higher wind velocities. The action of the wind vane was checked and found to have very poor directional accuracy below a velocity of 8 miles per hour. After shaft failure was reported to the Signal Corps, the cup rotors were redesigned by strengthening the shafts for better operation at high velocities. The anemometer with the redesigned cup rotors was recalibrated, but cup-shaft failure occurred again at a wind velocity of approximately 220 miles per hour. In the course of this calibration two standard generators were checked for signal output variation, and a wind-speed meter was calibrated for use with each of the redesigned cup rotors. The variation of pressure coefficient with air-flow direction at four orifices on a disk-shaped pitot head was obtained for wind velocities of 37.79 53.6, and 98.9 miles per hour. A pitot-static tube mounted in the nose of a vane was calibrated up to a dynamic pressure of 155 pounds per square foot, or approximately 256 miles per hour,

  2. Exploratory Meeting on Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, G. H. (Editor); Kaufman, J. W. (Editor); Vaughan, W. W. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The scientific interests and applications of the Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Velocity Measurement System to severe storms and local weather are discussed. The main areas include convective phenomena, local circulation, atmospheric boundary layer, atmospheric dispersion, and industrial aerodynamics.

  3. An estimate of the maximum speed of the solar wind, 1938-1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Feynman, J.; Garrett, H. B.

    1990-01-01

    In an effort to estimate the highest flow velocity that the solar wind has exhibited at earth during the past 50 years, geomagnetic storms that occurred from 1938 to 1989 were surveyed, and the storms that were preceded by a major proton flare were selected. For each identified flare-storm pair, the average speed ('transit speed') of the associated interplanetary shock from the interval between the flare onset and the sudden commencement of the geomagnetic storm was calculated. In each case, the maximum solar wind flow speed was inferred from an empirical relationship (derived for a sample of recent events) between the shock transit speed and the peak flow velocity of the associated transient stream, obtaining a distribution of maximum solar wind speeds, which presumably corresponds to a sample of the most energetic events of this 50-yr period. Results show no evidence for bulk flow velocities greater than the about 2000 km/sec value deduced by Zastenker et al. (1978) and Grunwaldt (1975) for the August 4, 1972 event.

  4. Estimation of friction velocity from the wind-wave spectrum at extremely high wind speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagaki, N.; Komori, S.; Suzuki, N.

    2016-05-01

    The equilibrium range of wind-waves at normal and extremely high wind speeds was investigated experimentally using a high-speed wind-wave tank together with field measurements at normal wind speeds. Water level fluctuations at normal and extremely high wind speeds were measured with resistance-type wave gauges, and the wind-wave spectrum and significant phase velocity were calculated. The equilibrium range constant was estimated from the wind-wave spectrum and showed the strong relationship with inverse wave age at normal and extremely high wind speeds. Using the strong relation between the equilibrium range constant and inverse wave age, a new method for estimating the wind speed at 10-m height (U 10) and friction velocity (u*) was proposed. The results suggest that U 10 and u* can be estimated from wave measurements alone at extremely high wind speeds in oceans under tropical cyclones.

  5. 14 CFR 25.237 - Wind velocities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... velocities. (a) For land planes and amphibians, the following applies: (1) A 90-degree cross component of...) Icing conditions with the landing ice accretion defined in appendix C. (b) For seaplanes and...

  6. 14 CFR 25.237 - Wind velocities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... velocities. (a) For land planes and amphibians, the following applies: (1) A 90-degree cross component of...) Icing conditions with the landing ice accretion defined in appendix C. (b) For seaplanes and...

  7. 14 CFR 25.237 - Wind velocities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... velocities. (a) For land planes and amphibians, the following applies: (1) A 90-degree cross component of...) Icing conditions with the landing ice accretion defined in appendix C. (b) For seaplanes and...

  8. 14 CFR 25.237 - Wind velocities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... velocities. (a) For land planes and amphibians, the following applies: (1) A 90-degree cross component of...) Icing conditions with the landing ice accretion defined in appendix C. (b) For seaplanes and...

  9. 14 CFR 25.237 - Wind velocities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... velocities. (a) For land planes and amphibians, the following applies: (1) A 90-degree cross component of...) Icing conditions with the landing ice accretion defined in appendix C. (b) For seaplanes and...

  10. Velocity Distributions and Proton Beam Production in the Solar Wind

    SciTech Connect

    Pierrard, Viviane; Voitenko, Yuriy

    2010-03-25

    Helios, Ulysses, and Wind spacecraft have observed the velocity distribution functions (VDFs) of solar wind particles deviating significantly from Maxwellians. We review recent models using different approximations and mechanisms that determine various observed characteristics of the VDFs for the electrons, protons and minor ions. A new generation mechanism is proposed for super-Alfvenic proton beams and tails that are often observed in the fast solar wind. The mechanism is based on the proton trapping and acceleration by kinetic Alfven waves (KAWs), which carry a field-aligned potential well propagating with super-Alfven velocities.

  11. High-velocity tails on the velocity distribution of solar wind ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Geiss, J.; Gloeckler, G.; Berdichevsky, D.; Wilken, B.

    1993-01-01

    Recent observations of the solar wind using the SWICS instrument on the Ulysses spacecraft have shown the presence of high-velocity 'tails' on the velocity distribution of protons. Similar features have also been observed on the velocity distributions of helium and oxygen ions. Of the order of 1 percent of the solar wind density is involved in these tails, which are approximately exponential in shape and persist to V = V(B) + 10V(th) or beyond, where VB is the bulk velocity and V(th) the thermal velocity of the solar wind. This paper contains a preliminary description of the phenomenon. It is clear that it is ultimately connected with the passage of interplanetary shocks past the spacecraft and that particle acceleration at oblique shocks is involved.

  12. Modelling the maximum voluntary joint torque/angular velocity relationship in human movement.

    PubMed

    Yeadon, Maurice R; King, Mark A; Wilson, Cassie

    2006-01-01

    The force exerted by a muscle is a function of the activation level and the maximum (tetanic) muscle force. In "maximum" voluntary knee extensions muscle activation is lower for eccentric muscle velocities than for concentric velocities. The aim of this study was to model this "differential activation" in order to calculate the maximum voluntary knee extensor torque as a function of knee angular velocity. Torque data were collected on two subjects during maximal eccentric-concentric knee extensions using an isovelocity dynamometer with crank angular velocities ranging from 50 to 450 degrees s(-1). The theoretical tetanic torque/angular velocity relationship was modelled using a four parameter function comprising two rectangular hyperbolas while the activation/angular velocity relationship was modelled using a three parameter function that rose from submaximal activation for eccentric velocities to full activation for high concentric velocities. The product of these two functions gave a seven parameter function which was fitted to the joint torque/angular velocity data, giving unbiased root mean square differences of 1.9% and 3.3% of the maximum torques achieved. Differential activation accounts for the non-hyperbolic behaviour of the torque/angular velocity data for low concentric velocities. The maximum voluntary knee extensor torque that can be exerted may be modelled accurately as the product of functions defining the maximum torque and the maximum voluntary activation level. Failure to include differential activation considerations when modelling maximal movements will lead to errors in the estimation of joint torque in the eccentric phase and low velocity concentric phase. PMID:16389087

  13. Double-hump H+ velocity distribution in the polar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakat, A. R.; Barghouthi, I. A.; Schunk, R. W.

    The polar wind is an ambipolar plasma outflow from the terrestrial ionosphere at high latitudes. As the ions drift upward along geomagnetic flux tubes, they move from collision-dominated (ion barosphere) to collisionless (ion exosphere) regions. A transition layer is embedded between these two regions where the ion characteristics change rapidly. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to study the steady-state flow of H+ ions through a background of O+ ions. The simulation domain covered the collision-dominated, transition, and collisionless regions. The model properly accounted for the divergence of magnetic field lines, the gravitational force, the electrostatic field, and H+-O+ collisions. The H+ velocity distribution, f(H+), was found to be very close to Maxwellian at low altitudes (deep in the barosphere). As the ions drifted to higher altitudes, f(H+) formed an upward tail. In the transition layer, the upward tail evolved into a second peak with a kidney bean shape, and hence, f(H+) developed a double-humped shape. The second peak grew with altitude and eventually became dominant as the ions reached the exosphere. This behavior is due to the interplay between the electrostatic force and the velocity-dependent Coulomb collisions. Moreover, the H+ heat flux, q(H+), was found to change rapidly with altitude in the transition layer from a positive maximum to a negative minimum. This remarkable feature of q(H+) is closely related to the coincident formation of the double-humped structure of f(H+). The double-hump distribution might destabilize the plasma or, at least, cause enhanced thermal fluctuations. The double-hump f(H+), and the associated wave turbulence, have several consequences with regard to our understanding of the polar wind and similar space physics problems. The plasma turbulence can significantly alter the behavior of the plasma in and above the transition region and, therefore, should be considered in future polar wind models. The wave turbulence can

  14. Relationships between wind velocity and underwater irradiance in a shallow lake (Lake Okeechobee, Florida, USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanlon, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; McPherson, B.F.

    1998-01-01

    Relationships between wind velocity and the vertical light attenuation coefficient (K0) were determined at two locations in a large, shallow lake (Lake Okeechobee, Florida, USA). K0 was significantly correlated with antecedent wind conditions, which explained as much as 90 percent of the daily variation in K0. Sub-surface irradiance began to change within 60 to 90 minutes of the time when wind velocity exceeded or dropped below a threshold value. Maximum one hour changes in K0 were > 50 percent, however, 20 to 30 percent changes were more common. The magnitude of change in K0 varied spatially based on differences in sediment type. K0 never exceeded 2.8 at a location where bottom sediments were dominated by a mixture of coarse sand and shells. In comparison, K0 exceeded 9 during episodic wind events where the bottom sediment was comprised of fine grain mud. Underwater irradiance data can be used to determine threshold wind velocity and account for the influence sediment type has on K0. Once a threshold velocity has been established, the frequency, rate, and duration of expected change in underwater irradiance can be evaluated. This is critical information for scientists who are studying algal productivity or other light-related phenomena.Relationships between wind velocity and the vertical light attenuation coefficient (K0) were determined at two locations in a large, shallow lake (Lake Okeechobee, Florida, USA). K0 was significantly correlated with antecedent wind conditions, which explained as much as 90 percent of the daily variation in K0. Sub-surface irradiance began to change within 60 to 90 minutes of the time when wind velocity exceeded or dropped below a threshold value. Maximum one hour changes in K0 were >50 percent, however, 20 to 30 percent changes were more common. The magnitude of change in K0 varied spatially based on differences in sediment type. K0 never exceeded 2.8 at a location where bottom sediments were dominated by a mixture of coarse sand

  15. A proposed method for wind velocity measurement from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Censor, D.; Levine, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation was made of the feasibility of making wind velocity measurements from space by monitoring the apparent change in the refractive index of the atmosphere induced by motion of the air. The physical principle is the same as that resulting in the phase changes measured in the Fizeau experiment. It is proposed that this phase change could be measured using a three cornered arrangement of satellite borne source and reflectors, around which two laser beams propagate in opposite directions. It is shown that even though the velocity of the satellites is much larger than the wind velocity, factors such as change in satellite position and Doppler shifts can be taken into account in a reasonable manner and the Fizeau phase measured. This phase measurement yields an average wind velocity along the ray path through the atmosphere. The method requires neither high accuracy for satellite position or velocity, nor precise knowledge of the refractive index or its gradient in the atmosphere. However, the method intrinsically yields wind velocity integrated along the ray path; hence to obtain higher spatial resolution, inversion techniques are required.

  16. On the long-tail solar wind electron velocity distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlesinger, Michael F.; Coplan, Michael A.

    1988-01-01

    The role of the log-normal distribution in the description of the high-energy tail of the electron velocity distribution in the solar wind plasma is examined. Specifically, it is shown that the core-halo solar wind distribution function can be understood in terms of a simple phenomenological model of general applicability in which the core has a Maxwellian or normal distribution and the halo a log-normal distribution. In the presence of structures in the interplanetary medium capable of interacting with the electrons, the model predicts a transition at the highest velocities to a secondary halo distribution.

  17. Terminal velocities of the winds from rapidly rotating OB stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friend, David B.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents measurements of terminal velocities of OB stars which are rapid rotators, based on archival high-dispersion IUE spectra of the C IV resonance doublet. The terminal velocities of the most rapidly rotating stars appear to be systematically lower than those of the less rapidly rotating stars (at least for the cooler stars), although the number of very rapid rotators is only three. The modified line-radiation driven wind model of Friend and Abbott, which takes into account the finite size of the star as well as its rotation, predicts that the terminal velocity should drop with increasing rotational velocity. However, when a smaller but very homogeneous subset of the data is used (BO giants only), the correlation between terminal velocity and rotational velocity disappears.

  18. The turbulence structure of katabatic flows below and above wind-speed maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grachev, Andrey; Leo, Laura; Di Sabatino, Silvana; Fernando, Harindra; Pardyjak, Eric; Fairall, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Measurements of atmospheric small-scale turbulence made over the complex-terrain at the US Army Dugway Proving Grounds in Utah during the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) Program are used to describe the turbulence structure of katabatic flows. Turbulent and mean meteorological data were continuously measured at multiple levels (up to seven) on four towers deployed along East lower slope (2-4 degrees) of Granite Mountain. The multi-level, multi-tower observations obtained during a 30-day long MATERHORN-Fall field campaign in September-October 2102 allow studying temporal and spatial structure of nocturnal slope flows in detail. In this study, we focus on the various statistics (fluxes, variances, spectra, cospectra, etc.) of the small-scale turbulence of katabatic winds. Observed vertical profiles of velocity, turbulent fluxes, and other quantities show steep gradients near the surface but in the layer above the slope jet these variables vary with height more slowly than near the surface. It is found that vertical momentum flux and horizontal heat (buoyancy) flux in a slope-following coordinate system change their sign below and above the wind maximum of a katabatic flow. The vertical momentum flux is directed downward (upward) whereas the horizontal heat flux is downslope (upslope) below (above) the wind maximum. Our study, therefore, suggests that a position of the jet speed maximum can be derived from linear interpolation between positive and negative values of the momentum flux (or the horizontal heat flux) and determination of a height where a flux becomes zero. It is shown that the standard deviations of all wind speed components (and therefore the turbulent kinetic energy) and the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy have a local minimum, whereas the standard deviation of air temperature has an absolute maximum at the height of wind speed maximum. We report several cases when the destructive effect of vertical heat

  19. Velocity shear layers in solar winds affect Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-09-01

    Human society is increasingly reliant on technology that can be disrupted by space weather. For instance, geomagnetic storms can cause high-latitude air fights to be rerouted, costing as much as $100,000 per fight; induce errors of up to 46 meters in GPS systems; and affect satellites and the International Space Station. Space weather is determined by how the solar wind, a stream of hot plasma from the Sun, interacts with Earth's magnetic field. In studying space weather, scientists have largely neglected the fact that the solar wind contains layers of very strong velocity shear. Scientists understand very little about how these wind shears affect space weather.

  20. Measurement of turbulent wind velocities using a rotating boom apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Sandborn, V.A.; Connell, J.R.

    1984-04-01

    The present report covers both the development of a rotating-boom facility and the evaluation of the spectral energy of the turbulence measured relative to the rotating boom. The rotating boom is composed of a helicopter blade driven through a pulley speed reducer by a variable speed motor. The boom is mounted on a semiportable tower that can be raised to provide various ratios of hub height to rotor diameter. The boom can be mounted to rotate in either the vertical or horizontal plane. Probes that measure the three components of turbulence can be mounted at any location along the radius of the boom. Special hot-film sensors measured two components of the turbulence at a point directly in front of the rotating blade. By using the probe rotated 90/sup 0/ about its axis, the third turbulent velocity component was measured. Evaluation of the spectral energy distributions for the three components of velocity indicates a large concentration of energy at the rotational frequency. At frequencies slightly below the rotational frequency, the spectral energy is greatly reduced over that measured for the nonrotating case measurements. Peaks in the energy at frequencies that are multiples of the rotation frequency were also observed. We conclude that the rotating boom apparatus is suitable and ready to be used in experiments for developing and testing sensors for rotational measurement of wind velocity from wind turbine rotors. It also can be used to accurately measure turbulent wind for testing theories of rotationally sampled wind velocity.

  1. Biomechanical Insights Into Differences Between the Mid-Acceleration and Maximum Velocity Phases of Sprinting.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiabin; Sun, Yuliang; Yang, Chen; Wang, Donghai; Yin, Keyi; Herzog, Walter; Liu, Yu

    2016-07-01

    Yu, J, Sun, Y, Yang, C, Wang, D, Yin, K, Herzog, W, and Liu, Y. Biomechanical insights into differences between the mid-acceleration and maximum velocity phases of sprinting. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1906-1916, 2016-Investigating the differences between distinct phases of sprint running may increase the knowledge about the specific physical abilities needed for different phases of sprinting. Differences between the mid-acceleration and maximum velocity phases of sprint running have not yet been adequately investigated. Twenty male sprinters performed maximum-effort sprint runs, and measurements were made at 12 m from start for the mid-acceleration phase and at 40 m from the start for the maximum velocity phase. Kinematic data and ground reaction forces (GRFs) were collected at a rate of 200 and 1000 Hz, respectively. Intersegmental dynamics analysis was performed to investigate the interaction of muscle torque (MUS) with other passive torques. The peak horizontal braking force was significantly lower for the acceleration compared with that for the maximal velocity phase, whereas the peak horizontal propulsive force was similar for both phases. The peak MUS at the hip and knee joints for the braking phase was significantly smaller in the acceleration phase than in the maximum velocity phase. In conclusion, compared with the maximum velocity phase, the lower horizontal braking force was the primary cause for the increase in running velocity during the mid-acceleration phase. The force produced by lower limb muscles required to counteract external torques caused by the horizontal braking force in the braking phase was smaller during the acceleration phase than the maximum velocity phase. Therefore, training aimed at reducing the horizontal braking force might be more important than increasing the force produced by the lower limb muscles for success of the mid-acceleration phase. PMID:27331914

  2. Visibility-Graph Analysis of the Solar Wind Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suyal, Vinita; Prasad, Awadhesh; Singh, Harinder P.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze in situ measurements of the solar wind velocity obtained by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) and the Helios spacecraft during the years 1998 - 2012 and 1975 - 1983, respectively. The data mainly belong to solar cycles 23 (1996 - 2008) and 21 (1976 - 1986). We used the directed horizontal-visibility-graph (DHVg) algorithm and estimated a graph functional, namely, the degree distance ( D), which is defined using the Kullback-Leibler divergence (KLD) to understand the time irreversibility of solar wind time-series. We estimated this degree-distance irreversibility parameter for these time-series at different phases of the solar activity cycle. The irreversibility parameter was first established for known dynamical data and was then applied to solar wind velocity time-series. It is observed that irreversibility in solar wind velocity fluctuations show a similar behavior at 0.3 AU ( Helios data) and 1 AU (ACE data). Moreover, the fluctuations change over the phases of the activity cycle.

  3. MODELING HIGH-VELOCITY QSO ABSORBERS WITH PHOTOIONIZED MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC DISK WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Behar, Ehud

    2010-11-10

    We extend our modeling of the ionization structure of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accretion-disk winds, previously applied to Seyfert galaxies, to a population of quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) of much lower X-ray-to-UV flux ratios, i.e., smaller {alpha}{sub ox} index, motivated by UV/X-ray ionized absorbers with extremely high outflow velocities in UV-luminous QSOs. We demonstrate that magnetically driven winds ionized by a spectrum with {alpha}{sub ox} {approx_equal} -2 can produce the charge states responsible for C IV and Fe XXV/Fe XXVI absorption in wind regions with corresponding maximum velocities of v(C IV) {approx_lt}0.1c and v(Fe XXV) {approx_lt} 0.6c (where c is the speed of light) and column densities N {sub H} {approx} 10{sup 23}-10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}, in general agreement with observations. In contrast to the conventional radiation-driven wind models, high-velocity flows are always present in our MHD-driven winds but manifest in the absorption spectra only for {alpha}{sub ox} {approx_lt} -2, as larger {alpha}{sub ox} values ionize the wind completely out to radii too large to demonstrate the presence of these high velocities. We thus predict increasing velocities of these ionized absorbers with decreasing (steeper) {alpha}{sub ox}, a quantity that emerges as the defining parameter in the kinematics of the active galactic nucleus UV/X-ray absorbers.

  4. An experimental study of a plasma actuator in absence of free airflow: Ionic wind velocity profile

    SciTech Connect

    Mestiri, R.; Hadaji, R.; Ben Nasrallah, S.

    2010-08-15

    In this study, we are interested in the direct current electrical corona discharge created between two wire electrodes. The experimental results are related to some electroaerodynamic actuators based on the direct current corona discharge at the surface of a dielectric material. Several geometrical forms are selected for the dielectric surface, such as a plate, a cylinder, and a NACA 0015 aircraft wing. The current density-electric field characteristics are presented for different cases in order to determine the discharge regimes. The corona discharge produces nonthermal plasma, so it is called plasma discharge. Plasma discharge creates a tangential ionic wind above the surface at the vicinity of the wall. The ionic wind induced by the corona discharge is measured in absence of free external airflow. The ionic wind velocity profiles and the maximum induced tangential force are given for different surface forms, so it is possible to compare the actuators effect based on the span of the ionic wind velocity and thrust values. The higher ionic wind velocity is obtained with the NACA profile, which shows the effectiveness of this actuator for the airflow control.

  5. The stellar wind velocity field of HD 77581

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manousakis, A.; Walter, R.

    2015-12-01

    Aims: The early acceleration of stellar winds in massive stars is poorly constrained. The scattering of hard X-ray photons emitted by the pulsar in the high-mass X-ray binary Vela X-1 can be used to probe the stellar wind velocity and density profile close to the surface of its supergiant companion HD 77581. Methods: We built a high signal-to-noise and high resolution hard X-ray lightcurve of Vela X-1 measured by Swift/BAT over 300 orbital periods of the system and compared it with the predictions of a grid of hydrodynamic simulations. Results: We obtain very good agreement between observations and simulations for a narrow set of parameters, implying that the wind velocity close to the stellar surface is twice higher than usually assumed with the standard beta law. Locally a velocity gradient of β ~ 0.5 is favoured. Even if still incomplete, hydrodynamic simulations successfully reproduce several observational properties of Vela X-1.

  6. Solar wind velocity distribution on the heliospheric current sheet during Carrington rotations 1787-1795

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, B.; Prabhakaran Nayar, S. R.

    1995-08-01

    The solar wind velocity distribution in the heliosphere is best represented using a v-map, where velocity contours are plotted in heliographic latitude-longitude coordinates. It has already been established that low-speed regions of the solar wind on the source surface correspond to the maximum bright regions of the K-corona and the neutral line of the coronal magnetic field. In this analysis, v-maps on the source surface for Carrington rotations (CRs) 1787-1795, during 1987, have been prepared using the interplanetary scintillation measurements at Research Institute of Atmospherics (RIA), Nagoya Univ., Japan. These v-maps were then used to study the time evolution of the low-speed (leq450 km s-1) belt of the solar wind and to deduce the distribution of solar wind velocity on the heliospheric current sheet. The low-speed belt of the solar wind on the source surface was found to change from one CR to the next, implying a time evolution. Instead of a slow and systematic evolution, the pattern of distribution of solar wind changed dramatically at one particular solar rotation (CR 1792) and the distributions for the succeeding rotations were similar to this pattern. The low-speed region, in most cases, was found to be close to the solar equator and almost parallel to it. However, during some solar rotations, they were found to be organised in certain longitudes, leaving regions with longitudinal width greater than 30° free of low-speed solar wind, i.e. these regions were occupied by solar wind with velocities greater than 450 km s-1. It is also noted from this study that the low-speed belt, in general, followed the neutral line of the coronal magnetic field, except in certain cases. The solar wind velocity on the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) varied in the range 300-585 km s-1 during the period of study, and the pattern of velocity distribution varied from rotation to rotation.

  7. Analysis of the velocity law in the wind of the Be star Lambda Pavonis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Haiqi; Ringuelet, Adela; Sahade, Jorge; Kondo, Yoji

    1989-01-01

    This paper reanalyzes the IUE spectra of Lambda Pavonis secured in 1982 (Sahade et al.). It is found that the profiles of the broad UV lines are either rotationally broadened or nonrotationally broadened and that the rotationally broadened profiles can be sorted out in two groups characterized by rotational velocity values of 170 km/s and of 210 km/s, respectively. From the analysis of the rotational and of the radial velocities it is possible to distinguish two regions in the extended atmosphere of the star, namely, a region which is rotating and a region which is expanding. In the rotating region, the radial velocities are about zero, and the rotational velocity increases from 170 km/s to 250 km/s. In the expanding region, the rotational energy dissipates, the wind is accelerated to a maximum of -155 km/s, and farther out it decelerates.

  8. CFD wind tunnel test: Field velocity patterns of wind on a building with a refuge floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C. K.; Yuen, K. K.; Lam, K. M.; Lo, S. M.

    2005-10-01

    This paper reports a CFD wind tunnel study of wind patterns on a square-plan building with a refuge floor at its mid-height level. In this study, a technique of using calibrated power law equations of velocity and turbulent intensity applied as the boundary conditions in CFD wind tunnel test is being evaluated by the physical wind tunnel data obtained by the Principal Author with wind blowing perpendicularly on the building without a refuge floor. From the evaluated results, an optimised domain of flow required to produce qualitative agreement between the wind tunnel data and simulated results is proposed in this paper. Simulated results with the evaluated technique are validated by the wind tunnel data obtained by the Principal Author. The results contribute to an understanding of the fundamental behaviour of wind flow in a refuge floor when wind is blowing perpendicularly on the building. Moreover, the results reveal that the designed natural ventilation of a refuge floor may not perform desirably when the wind speed on the level is low. Under this situation, the refuge floor may become unsafe if smoke was dispersed in the leeward side of the building at a level immediately below the refuge floor.

  9. Estimation of power in low velocity vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath, S. S.; Shetty, Sawan; Chithirai Pon Selvan, M.

    2015-06-01

    The present work involves in the construction of a vertical axis wind turbine and the determination of power. Various different types of turbine blades are considered and the optimum blade is selected. Mechanical components of the entire setup are built to obtain maximum rotation per minute. The mechanical energy is converted into the electrical energy by coupling coaxially between the shaft and the generator. This setup produces sufficient power for consumption of household purposes which is economic and easily available.

  10. The Enhanced-model Ladar Wind Sensor and Its Application in Planetary Wind Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soreide, D. C.; Mcgann, R. L.; Erwin, L. L.; Morris, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    For several years we have been developing an optical air-speed sensor that has a clear application as a meteorological wind-speed sensor for the Mars landers. This sensor has been developed for aircraft use to replace the familiar, pressure-based Pitot probe. Our approach utilizes a new concept in the laser-based optical measurement of air velocity (the Enhanced-Mode Ladar), which allows us to make velocity measurements with significantly lower laser power than conventional methods. The application of the Enhanced-Mode Ladar to measuring wind speeds in the martian atmosphere is discussed.

  11. Sources of the solar wind at solar activity maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, M.; Liewer, P. C.; Smith, E. J.; Skoug, R. M.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2002-12-01

    The photospheric sources of solar wind observed by the Ulysses and ACE spacecraft from 1998 to early 2001 are determined through a two-step mapping process. Solar wind speed measured at the spacecraft is used in a ballistic model to determine a foot point on a source surface at a solar distance of 2.5 solar radii. A potential-field source-surface model is then used to trace the field and flow from the source surface to the photosphere. Comparison of the polarity of the measured interplanetary field with the polarity of the photospheric source region shows good agreement for spacecraft latitudes equatorward of 60°. At higher southern latitudes, the mapping predicts that Ulysses should have observed only outward directed magnetic fields, whereas both polarities were observed. A detailed analysis is performed on four of the solar rotations for which the mapped and observed polarities were in generally good agreement. For those rotations, the solar wind mapped to both coronal holes and active regions. These findings for a period of high solar activity differ from the findings of a similar study of the solar wind in 1994-1995 when solar activity was very low. At solar minimum the fastest wind mapped to the interior of large polar coronal holes while slower wind mapped to the boundaries of those holes or to smaller low-latitude coronal holes. For the data examined in the present study, neither spacecraft detected wind from the small polar coronal holes when they existed and the speed was never as high as that observed by Ulysses at solar minimum. The principal difference between the solar wind from coronal holes and from active regions is that the O7+/O6+ ion ratio is lower for the coronal hole flow, but not as low as in the polar coronal hole flow at solar minimum. Furthermore, the active-region flows appear to be organized into several substreams unlike the more monolithic structure of flows from coronal holes. The boundaries between plasma flows from neighboring

  12. Low-level nocturnal wind maximum over the Central Amazon Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greco, Steven; Ulanski, Stanley; Garstang, Michael; Houston, Samuel

    1992-01-01

    A low-level nocturnal wind maximum is shown to exist over extensive and nearly undisturbed rainforest near the central Amazon city of Manaus. Meteorological data indicate the presence of this nocturnal wind maximum during both the wet and dry seasons of the Central Amazon Basin. Daytime wind speeds which are characteristically 3-7 m/s between 300 and 1000 m increase to 10-15 m/s shortly after sunset. The wind-speed maximum is reached in the early evening, with wind speeds remaining high until several hours after sunrise. The nocturnal wind maximum is closely linked to a strong low-level inversion formed by radiational cooling of the rainforest canopy. Surface and low-level pressure gradients between the undisturbed forest and the large Amazon river system and the city of Manaus are shown to be responsible for much of the nocturnal wind increase. The pressure gradients are interpreted as a function of the thermal differences between undisturbed forest and the river/city. The importance of both the frictional decoupling and the horizontal pressure gradient suggest that the nocturnal wind maximum does not occur uniformly over all Amazonia. Low-level winds are thought to be pervasive under clear skies and strong surface cooling and that, in many places (i.e., near rivers), local pressure gradients enhance the low-level nocturnal winds.

  13. Characteristics of Wind Velocity and Temperature Change Near an Escarpment-Shaped Road Embankment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Moon; You, Ki-Pyo; You, Jang-Youl

    2014-01-01

    Artificial structures such as embankments built during the construction of highways influence the surrounding airflow. Various types of damage can occur due to changes in the wind velocity and temperature around highway embankments. However, no study has accurately measured micrometeorological changes (wind velocity and temperature) due to embankments. This study conducted a wind tunnel test and field measurement to identify changes in wind velocity and temperature before and after the construction of embankments around roads. Changes in wind velocity around an embankment after its construction were found to be influenced by the surrounding wind velocity, wind angle, and the level difference and distance from the embankment. When the level difference from the embankment was large and the distance was up to 3H, the degree of wind velocity declines was found to be large. In changes in reference wind velocities around the embankment, wind velocity increases were not proportional to the rate at which wind velocities declined. The construction of the embankment influenced surrounding temperatures. The degree of temperature change was large in locations with large level differences from the embankment at daybreak and during evening hours when wind velocity changes were small. PMID:25136681

  14. Characteristics of wind velocity and temperature change near an escarpment-shaped road embankment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Moon; You, Ki-Pyo; You, Jang-Youl

    2014-01-01

    Artificial structures such as embankments built during the construction of highways influence the surrounding airflow. Various types of damage can occur due to changes in the wind velocity and temperature around highway embankments. However, no study has accurately measured micrometeorological changes (wind velocity and temperature) due to embankments. This study conducted a wind tunnel test and field measurement to identify changes in wind velocity and temperature before and after the construction of embankments around roads. Changes in wind velocity around an embankment after its construction were found to be influenced by the surrounding wind velocity, wind angle, and the level difference and distance from the embankment. When the level difference from the embankment was large and the distance was up to 3H, the degree of wind velocity declines was found to be large. In changes in reference wind velocities around the embankment, wind velocity increases were not proportional to the rate at which wind velocities declined. The construction of the embankment influenced surrounding temperatures. The degree of temperature change was large in locations with large level differences from the embankment at daybreak and during evening hours when wind velocity changes were small. PMID:25136681

  15. The maximum shortening velocity of muscle should be scaled with activation.

    PubMed

    Chow, J W; Darling, W G

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the maximum shortening velocity (Vmax) in Hill's mechanical model (A. V. Hill. Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. B. 126: 136-195, 1938) should be scaled with activation, measured as a fraction of the maximum isometric force (Fmax). By using the quick-release method, force-velocity (F-V) relationships of the wrist flexors were gathered at five different activation levels (20-100% of maximum at intervals of 20%) from four subjects. The F-V data at different activation levels can be fitted remarkably well with Hill's characteristic equation. In general, the shortening velocity decreases with activation. With the assumption of nonlinear relationships between Hill constants and activation level, a scaled Vmax model was developed. When the F-V curves for submaximal activation were forced to converge at the Vmax obtained with maximum activation (constant Vmax model), there were drastic changes in the shape of the curves. The differences in Vmax values generated by the scaled and constant Vmax models were statistically significant. These results suggest that, when a Hill-type model is used in musculoskeletal modeling, the Vmax should be scaled with activation. PMID:10066719

  16. Velocity diffusion of energetic electrons in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volokitin, A.; Krafft, C.

    2016-03-01

    Particle diffusion in velocity space is studied on the basis of 1D simulations of Langmuir turbulence generated by electron beams in solar wind plasmas. Using a large amount of particle trajectories calculated with a great accuracy and over long times and analyzing them with statistical algorithms, the diffusion coefficients of particles in wave packets are estimated, as well as their relation to the waves' intensities and spectra and their dependence on the average level of background plasma density fluctuations. Results are compared with analytical solutions provided by the quasilinear theory of weak turbulence.

  17. Potential for coherent Doppler wind velocity lidar using neodymium lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, T. J.; Byer, R. L.; Zhou, B.

    1984-01-01

    Existing techniques for the frequency stabilization of Nd:YAG lasers operating at 1.06 micron, and the high-gain amplification of radiation at that wavelength, make possible the construction of a coherent Doppler wind velocity lidar using Nd:YAG. Velocity accuracy and range resolution are better at 1.06 micron than at 10.6 microns at the same level of the SNR. Backscatter from the atmosphere at 1.06 micron is greater than that at 10.6 microns by about 2 orders of magnitude, but the quantum-limited noise is higher by 100 also. Near-field attenuation and turbulent effects are more severe at 1.06 micron. In some configurations and environments, the 1.06-micron wavelength may be the better choice, and there may be technological advantages favoring the use of solid-state lasers in satellite systems.

  18. Maximum wave velocity in the moments system of a relativistic gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boillat, Guy; Ruggeri, Tommaso

    We consider the system of moments associated with the relativistic Boltzmann-Chernikov equation. Using the particular symmetric form obtained by the closure procedure of Extended Thermodynamics we deduce a lower bound for the maximum velocity of wave propagation in terms of the number of moments for a non-degenerate gas. When the number of moments increases this velocity tends to the speed of light. We also give the lower bound estimate in the limit cases of ultrarelativistic fluids and in the non relativistic approximation.

  19. The analysis and kinetic energy balance of an upper-level wind maximum during intense convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Jedlovec, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the formation and maintenance of the upper-level wind maximum which formed between 1800 and 2100 GMT, April 10, 1979, during the AVE-SESAME I period, when intense storms and tornadoes were experienced (the Red River Valley tornado outbreak). Radiosonde stations participating in AVE-SESAME I are plotted (centered on Oklahoma). National Meteorological Center radar summaries near the times of maximum convective activity are mapped, and height and isotach plots are given, where the formation of an upper-level wind maximum over Oklahoma is the most significant feature at 300 mb. The energy balance of the storm region is seen to change dramatically as the wind maximum forms. During much of its lifetime, the upper-level wind maximum is maintained by ageostrophic flow that produces cross-contour generation of kinetic energy and by the upward transport of midtropospheric energy. Two possible mechanisms for the ageostrophic flow are considered.

  20. Maximum group velocity in a one-dimensional model with a sinusoidally varying staggered potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Tanay; Sen, Diptiman; Dutta, Amit

    2015-06-01

    We use Floquet theory to study the maximum value of the stroboscopic group velocity in a one-dimensional tight-binding model subjected to an on-site staggered potential varying sinusoidally in time. The results obtained by numerically diagonalizing the Floquet operator are analyzed using a variety of analytical schemes. In the low-frequency limit we use adiabatic theory, while in the high-frequency limit the Magnus expansion of the Floquet Hamiltonian turns out to be appropriate. When the magnitude of the staggered potential is much greater or much less than the hopping, we use degenerate Floquet perturbation theory; we find that dynamical localization occurs in the former case when the maximum group velocity vanishes. Finally, starting from an "engineered" initial state where the particles (taken to be hard-core bosons) are localized in one part of the chain, we demonstrate that the existence of a maximum stroboscopic group velocity manifests in a light-cone-like spreading of the particles in real space.

  1. The relationship between consistency of propulsive cycles and maximum angular velocity during wheelchair racing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong Tai; Vrongistinos, Konstantinos Dino; Xu, Dali

    2008-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the consistency of wheelchair athletes' upper-limb kinematics in consecutive propulsive cycles and to investigate the relationship between the maximum angular velocities of the upper arm and forearm and the consistency of the upper-limb kinematical pattern. Eleven elite international wheelchair racers propelled their own chairs on a roller while performing maximum speeds during wheelchair propulsion. A Qualisys motion analysis system was used to film the wheelchair propulsive cycles. Six reflective markers placed on the right shoulder, elbow, wrist joints, metacarpal, wheel axis, and wheel were automatically digitized. The deviations in cycle time, upper-arm and forearm angles, and angular velocities among these propulsive cycles were analyzed. The results demonstrated that in the consecutive cycles of wheelchair propulsion the increased maximum angular velocity may lead to increased variability in the upper-limb angular kinematics. It is speculated that this increased variability may be important for the distribution of load on different upper-extremity muscles to avoid the fatigue during wheelchair racing. PMID:18843158

  2. Dependence of US hurricane economic loss on maximum wind speed and storm size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Alice R.; Jiang, Jonathan H.

    2014-05-01

    Many empirical hurricane economic loss models consider only wind speed and neglect storm size. These models may be inadequate in accurately predicting the losses of super-sized storms, such as Hurricane Sandy in 2012. In this study, we examined the dependences of normalized US hurricane loss on both wind speed and storm size for 73 tropical cyclones that made landfall in the US from 1988 through 2012. A multi-variate least squares regression is used to construct a hurricane loss model using both wind speed and size as predictors. Using maximum wind speed and size together captures more variance of losses than using wind speed or size alone. It is found that normalized hurricane loss (L) approximately follows a power law relation with maximum wind speed (V max) and size (R), L = 10c V maxa R b , with c determining an overall scaling factor and the exponents a and b generally ranging between 4-12 and 2-4 respectively. Both a and b tend to increase with stronger wind speed. Hurricane Sandy’s size was about three times of the average size of all hurricanes analyzed. Based on the bi-variate regression model that explains the most variance for hurricanes, Hurricane Sandy’s loss would be approximately 20 times smaller if its size were of the average size with maximum wind speed unchanged. It is important to revise conventional empirical hurricane loss models that are only dependent on maximum wind speed to include both maximum wind speed and size as predictors.

  3. ALADIN: an atmosphere laser doppler wind lidar instrument for wind velocity measurements from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Rodolphe; Ghibaudo, Jean-Bernard; Labandibar, Jean-Yves; Willetts, David V.; Vaughan, M.; Pearson, G.; Harris, M. R.; Flamant, Pierre H.; Salamitou, P.; Dabas, Alain; Charasse, R.; Midavaine, Thierri; Royer, Michel; Heimel, H.

    1995-12-01

    AEROSPATIALE, leading a European team, has just conducted a successful study, under ESA contract, to demonstrate the feasibility of a spaceborne Doppler wind lidar instrument meeting the scientific requirements of wind velocity measurements from space with high spatial resolution. A first parametric investigation, based upon the initial set of mission requirements, and supported by dedicated models and detailed trade-off studies, took account of capabilities of the most promising signal processing algorithms and calibration/validation constrains: it yielded a large conically scanned instrument deemed technologically risky. A risk analysis was then carried out to propose a less challenging instrument meeting most key mission requirements. The fixed line-of-sight concept with return signal accumulation appeared as most attractive. A second set of requirements agreed upon by scientific users was therefore issued, with relaxed constraints mainly on horizontal resolution, keeping roughly the same level of wind velocity measurement accuracy. A second instrument and subsystem trade- off was then performed to eventually produce an attractive instrument concept based upon a pair of small diameter telescopes each one associated to one scanning mirror rotating stepwise around the telescope axis, which drastically reduces the detection bandwidth. Following the main contract, studies of accommodation on the International Space Station have been performed, confirming the interest of such an instrument for wind measurements from space.

  4. ALADIN: an atmospheric laser Doppler wind lidar instrument for wind velocity measurements from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Rodolphe; Ghibaudo, Jean-Bernard; Labandibar, Jean-Yves; Willetts, David V.; Vaughan, M.; Pearson, G.; Harris, M. R.; Flamant, Pierre H.; Salamitou, P.; Dabas, Alain; Lieutaud, F.; Charasse, R.; Midavaine, Thierri; Royer, Michel; Heimel, H.

    1996-10-01

    AEROSPATIALE, leading a European team, has just conducted a successful study, under ESA contract, to demonstrate the feasibility of a spaceborne Doppler wind lidar instrument meeting the scientific requirements of wind velocity measurements from space with high spatial resolution. A first parametric investigation, based upon the initial set of mission requirements, and supported by dedicated models and detailed trade-off studies, took account of capabilities of most promising signal processing algorithms and calibration/validation constraints: it yielded a large conically scanned instrument deemed technologically risky. A risk analysis was then carried out to propose a less challenging instrument meeting most key mission requirements. The fixed line-of-sight concept with return signal accumulation appeared as most attractive. A second set of requirements agreed upon by scientific users was therefore issued, with relaxed constraints mainly on horizontal resolution, keeping roughly the same level of wind velocity measurement accuracy. A second instrument and subsystem trade-off was then performed to eventually produce an attractive instrument concept based upon a pair of small diameter telescopes each one associated to one scanning mirror rotating stepwise around the telescope axis, which drastically reduces the detection bandwidth. Following the main contract, studies of accommodation on the International Space Station have been performed, confirming the interest of such an instrument for wind measurements from space.

  5. Pulsar Wind Nebulae, Space Velocities and Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The original proposal for this LTSA grant was for X-ray studies of pulsars, and especially pulsar wind nebulae and what they could tell us about pulsar properties, especially their space velocities. By any metric, this program has been very successful. No fewer than 14 papers on directly related topics (and several dozen more on related topics) have been published in refereed journals with the PI as lead or co-author, all observational results that have had significant impact on the field. These include the first X-ray detection of the "Duck" pulsar, a clear demonstration that estimated pulsar ages can be off by over an order of magnitude (via observations of the young supernova remnant G11.2-0.3) and the detection of the first pulsar wind nebula around a millisecond pulsar. These publications have also resulted in 4 press releases. Moreover, they also represent the thesis work of two PhD students at MIT (Froney Crawford and Mike Pivovaroff) and one postdoctoral fellow, Bryan Gaensler, now Assistant Professor at Harvard.

  6. Variance Anisotropy of Solar Wind Velocity and Magnetic Field Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oughton, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Wan, M.

    2015-12-01

    At MHD scales in the solar wind, velocity and magnetic fieldfluctuations are typically observed to have much more energy in thecomponents transverse to the mean magnetic field, relative to theparallel components [eg, 1,2]. This is often referred to asvariance anisotropy. Various explanations for it have been suggested,including that the fluctuations are predominantly shear Alfvén waves[1] and that turbulent dynamics leads to such states [eg, 3].Here we investigate the origin and strength of such varianceanisotropies, using spectral method simulations of thecompressible (polytropic) 3D MHD equations. We report on results from runs with several different classes ofinitial conditions. These classes include(i) fluctuations polarized only in the same sense as shear Alfvénwaves (aka toroidal polarization),(ii) randomly polarized fluctuations, and(iii) fluctuations restricted so that most of the energy is inmodes which have their wavevectors perpendicular, or nearly so, to thebackground magnetic field: quasi-2D modes. The plasma beta and Mach number dependence [4] of quantities like the variance anisotropy, Alfven ratio, and fraction of the energy in the toroidal fluctuations will be examined, along with the timescales for the development of any systematic features.Implications for solar wind fluctuations will be discussed. References:[1] Belcher & Davis 1971, J. Geophys. Res, 76, 3534.[2] Oughton et al 2015, Phil Trans Roy Soc A, 373, 20140152.[3] Matthaeus et al 1996, J. Geophys. Res, 101, 7619.[4] Smith et al 2006, J. Geophys. Res, 111, A09111.

  7. An estimate of maximum ground surface motion for non zero surface velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecker, Alain

    2004-09-01

    The increasing need for probability seismic hazard assessment (PSHA) of critical facilities sometimes leads to unrealistic earthquake scenarios with very high induced ground motions. From a physical standpoint these high motions cannot exist because of the limiting resistance capacity of the soil strata through which the seismic waves travel. A simple analytical model is proposed to bound the maximum ground surface acceleration that any soil deposit can transfer. This model is an extension to non zero ground surface velocity of a previously presented model. To cite this article: A. Pecker, C. R. Mecanique 332 (2004).

  8. Probabilistic estimates of maximum acceleration and velocity in rock in the contiguous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Algermissen, Sylvester Theodore; Perkins, D.M.; Thenhaus, P.C.; Hanson, S.L.; Bender, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    Maximum horizontal accelerations and velocities caused by earthquakes are mapped for exposure times of 10, 50 and 250 years at the 90-percent probability level of nonexceedance for the contiguous United States. In many areas these new maps differ significantly from the 1976 probabilistic acceleration map by Algermlssen and Perkins because of the increase in detail, resulting from greater emphasis on the geologic basis for seismic source zones. This new emphasis is possible because of extensive data recently acquired on Holocene and Quaternary faulting in the western United States and new interpretations of geologic structures controlling the seismicity pattern in the central and eastern United States.

  9. The epoch state navigation filter. [for maximum likelihood estimates of position and velocity vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battin, R. H.; Croopnick, S. R.; Edwards, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The formulation of a recursive maximum likelihood navigation system employing reference position and velocity vectors as state variables is presented. Convenient forms of the required variational equations of motion are developed together with an explicit form of the associated state transition matrix needed to refer measurement data from the measurement time to the epoch time. Computational advantages accrue from this design in that the usual forward extrapolation of the covariance matrix of estimation errors can be avoided without incurring unacceptable system errors. Simulation data for earth orbiting satellites are provided to substantiate this assertion.

  10. Solar wind driving of magnetospheric ULF waves: Pulsations driven by velocity shear at the magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudepierre, S. G.; Elkington, S. R.; Wiltberger, M.

    2008-05-01

    We present results from global, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the solar wind/magnetosphere interaction. These MHD simulations are used to study ultra low frequency (ULF) pulsations in the Earth's magnetosphere driven by shear instabilities at the flanks of the magnetopause. We drive the simulations with idealized, constant solar wind input parameters, ensuring that any discrete ULF pulsations generated in the simulation magnetosphere are not due to fluctuations in the solar wind. The simulations presented in this study are driven by purely southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions, changing only the solar wind driving velocity while holding all of the other solar wind input parameters constant. We find surface waves near the dawn and dusk flank magnetopause and show that these waves are generated by the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. We also find that two KH modes are generated near the magnetopause boundary. One mode, the magnetopause KH mode, propagates tailward along the magnetopause boundary. The other mode, the inner KH mode, propagates tailward along the inner edge of the boundary layer (IEBL). We find large vortical structures associated with the inner KH mode that are centered on the IEBL. The phase velocities, wavelengths, and frequencies of the two KH modes are computed. The KH waves are found to be fairly monochromatic with well-defined wavelengths. In addition, the inner and magnetopause KH modes are coupled and lead to a coupled oscillation of the low-latitude boundary layer. The boundary layer thickness, d, is computed and we find maximum wave growth for kd = 0.5-1.0, where k is the wave number, consistent with the linear theory of the KH instability. We comment briefly on the effectiveness of these KH waves in the energization and transport of radiation belt electrons.

  11. Phase diagrams on an unsignalized intersection for the cases of different maximum velocities of vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi-Lang; Wang, Bing-Hong; Liu, Mu-Ren

    2012-01-01

    Using the cellular automaton traffic flow model, we investigate an unsignalized intersection which consists of two perpendicular one-lane roads. Both the roads cross at a point and the intersecting roads are cyclic. Each vehicle may pass or occupy the intersection where all the vehicles on both roads are not allowed to turn. Different from Ishibashi and Fukui's studies in which the update is carried out for both roads in turn, the parallel update is proposed and its detailed rules are presented in our model. In this work, the cases of different maximum vehicle velocities on both roads are considered. Based on simulation results and the principle for constructing phase diagrams, phase diagrams are mapped out and their specific flow formulas for all the regions in the phase diagrams are obtained for various vehicle densities, which are seldom done in previous studies. One also finds that the topology of phase diagrams depends on the update rules of eastbound and northbound roads and their maximum velocities of vehicles.

  12. Determination of the Wind-Velocity Vector Above the Ocean Surface Using the Image Spectrum of a Polarimetric Radar with Synthesized Aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panfilova, M. A.; Kanevsky, M. B.; Balandina, G. N.; Karaev, V. Yu.; Stoffelen, A.; Verkhoev, A.

    2015-09-01

    We propose a new method for determining the wind-velocity vector above the ocean surface using the data of a polarimetric synthetic aperture radar. The preliminary calculations show that for wind waves, the location of the maximum in the radar image is unambiguously related to the wind velocity, whereas the wind direction is retrieved with an uncertainty of 180°, which is related to the central symmetry of the image spectrum. To eliminate the ambiguity when determining the wind direction, a criterion based on the information on the sign of the coefficient of correlation among the complex signals on the co- and cross polarizations is used. It is shown that using the polarimetric radar, it is theoretically possible to obtain information on both the wind velocity and direction without exact radar calibration.

  13. Thermal acclimation effects differ between voluntary, maximum, and critical swimming velocities in two cyprinid fishes.

    PubMed

    O'Steen, Shyril; Bennett, Albert F

    2003-01-01

    Temperature acclimation may be a critical component of the locomotor physiology and ecology of ectothermic animals, particularly those living in eurythermal environments. Several studies of fish report striking acclimation of biochemical and kinetic properties in isolated muscle. However, the relatively few studies of whole-animal performance report variable acclimation responses. We test the hypothesis that different types of whole-animal locomotion will respond differently to temperature acclimation, probably due to divergent physiological bases of locomotion. We studied two cyprinid fishes, tinfoil barbs (Puntius schwanenfeldii) and river barbels (Barbus barbus). Study fish were acclimated to either cold or warm temperatures for at least 6 wk and then assayed at four test temperatures for three types of swimming performance. We measured voluntary swimming velocity to estimate routine locomotor behavior, maximum fast start velocity to estimate anaerobic capacity, and critical swimming velocity to estimate primarily aerobic capacity. All three performance measures showed some acute thermal dependence, generally a positive correlation between swimming speed and test temperature. However, each performance measure responded quite differently to acclimation. Critical speeds acclimated strongly, maximum speeds not at all, and voluntary speeds uniquely in each species. Thus we conclude that long-term temperature exposure can have very different consequences for different types of locomotion, consistent with our hypothesis. The data also address previous hypotheses that predict that polyploid and eurythermal fish will have greater acclimation abilities than other fish, due to increased genetic flexibility and ecological selection, respectively. Our results conflict with these predictions. River barbels are eurythermal polyploids and tinfoil barbs stenothermal diploids, yet voluntary swimming acclimated strongly in tinfoil barbs and minimally in river barbels, and

  14. A Statistical Analysis of 50 Years of Daily Solar Wind Velocity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, K. J.; ZHANNG, J.; FENG, W.

    2016-05-01

    Daily mean value of solar wind velocity measured by various spacecraft near the Earth’s orbit from 1963 November 27 to 2013 December 31 given by OMNIWeb is utilized to investigate its characteristics through statistical analyses. The percent probability distribution of solar wind velocity can be described well by the Γ distribution function with the most probable velocity to be 373 {km} {{{s}}}-1. It is found that solar wind could be statistically classified into three groups: (1) the low-velocity wind, v\\lt 450 {km} {{{s}}}-1, which positively responds to, and in the cycle phase lags, the solar activity cycle; (2) the high-velocity wind, 450≤slant v\\lt 725 {km} {{{s}}}-1, which negatively responds to, and in the cycle phase leads, the solar activity cycle, but in a short timescale (one-rotation-period) lags the solar activity cycle; and (3) the extreme-high-velocity wind, v≥slant 725 {km} {{{s}}}-1, which positively responds to, and in cycle phase leads, the solar activity cycle. A period of about 27 days is determined for solar wind in the first two groups, so that solar wind in the groups is modulated by the solar rotation and related with solar long-life magnetic structures. Solar wind of extreme high velocity appears mainly at the descending phases of the solar cycles.

  15. Effect of wind tunnel air velocity on VOC flux rates from CAFO manure and wastewater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind tunnels and flux chambers are often used to estimate volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from animal feeding operations (AFOs) without regard to air velocity or sweep air flow rates. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of wind tunnel air velocity on VOC emission ...

  16. On the terminal velocities of winds in central stars of planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of radiatively driven stellar winds is applied to the central stars of planetary nebulae, and the predicted relation between escape velocity and terminal velocity of the wind is assessed. Ultraviolet spectra obtained with IUE indicate that the terminal velocities of winds from planetary nuclei, which range from 600 to 3600 km/sec, are strongly correlated with stellar temperature. The theory of radiative winds predicts that the terminal velocity of the wind = T(1.2), the constant of proportionality being a function of stellar mass and line-force parameter, alpha. Given a mass of 0.60 solar mass for central stars with winds, the line-force parameter alpha = 0.70, a value higher than Abbott's predictions, alpha = 0.61 (1982).

  17. Generalized multidemensional propagation velocity equations for pool-boiling superconducting windings

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, E.H.; O'Loughlin, J.M.

    1984-09-01

    Several finite difference, finite element detailed analyses of propagation velocities in up to three dimensions in pool-boiling windings have been conducted for different electromagnetic and cryogenic environments. Likewise, a few full scale simulated winding and magnet tests have measured propagation velocities. These velocity data have been correlated in terms of winding thermophysical parameters. This analysis expresses longitudinal and transverse propagation velocities in the form of power function regression equations for a wide variety of windings and electromagnetic and thermohydraulic environments. The generalized velocity equations are considered applicable to well-ventilated, monolithic conductor windings. These design equations are used piecewise in a gross finite difference mode as functions of field to predict the rate of normal zone growth during quench conditions. A further check of the validity of these predictions is available through total predicted quench durations correlated with actual quench durations of large magnets.

  18. Mechanisms underlying reduced maximum shortening velocity during fatigue of intact, single fibres of mouse muscle

    PubMed Central

    Westerblad, Håkan; Dahlstedt, Anders J; Lännergren, Jan

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism behind the reduction in shortening velocity in skeletal muscle fatigue is unclear. In the present study we have measured the maximum shortening velocity (V0) with slack tests during fatigue produced by repeated, 350 ms tetani in intact, single muscle fibres from the mouse. We have focused on two possible mechanisms behind the reduction in V0: reduced tetanic Ca2+ and accumulation of ADP. During fatigue V0 initially declined slowly, reaching 90 % of the control after about forty tetani. The rate of decline then increased and V0 fell to 70 % of the control in an additional twenty tetani. The reduction in isometric force followed a similar pattern. Exposing unfatigued fibres to 10 μM dantrolene, which reduces tetanic Ca2+, lowered force by about 35 % but had no effect on V0. In order to see if ADP might increase rapidly during ongoing contractions, we used a protocol with a tetanus of longer duration bracketed by standard-duration tetani. V0 in these three tetani were not significantly different in control, whereas V0 was markedly lower in the longer tetanus during fatigue and in unfatigued fibres where the creatine kinase reaction was inhibited by 10 μM dinitrofluorobenzene. We conclude that the reduction in V0 during fatigue is mainly due to a transient accumulation of ADP, which develops during contractions in fibres with impaired phosphocreatine energy buffering. PMID:9625883

  19. Gas transfer velocities measured at low wind speed over a lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crusius, J.; Wanninkhof, R.

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between gas transfer velocity and wind speed was evaluated at low wind speeds by quantifying the rate of evasion of the deliberate tracer, SF6, from a small oligotrophic lake. Several possible relationships between gas transfer velocity and low wind speed were evaluated by using 1-min-averaged wind speeds as a measure of the instantaneous wind speed values. Gas transfer velocities in this data set can be estimated virtually equally well by assuming any of three widely used relationships between k600 and winds referenced to 10-m height, U10: (1) a bilinear dependence with a break in the slope at ???3.7 m s-1, which resulted in the best fit; (2) a power dependence; and (3) a constant transfer velocity for U10 3.7 m s-1 which, coupled with the typical variability in instantaneous wind speeds observed in the field, leads to average transfer velocity estimates that are higher than those predicted for steady wind trends. The transfer velocities predicted by the bilinear steady wind relationship for U10 < ???3.7 m s-1 are virtually identical to the theoretical predictions for transfer across a smooth surface.

  20. Wind Observations of Anomalous Cosmic Rays from Solar Minimum to Maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; McDonald, F. B.

    2003-01-01

    We report the first observation near Earth of the time behavior of anomalous cosmic-ray N, O, and Ne ions through the period surrounding the maximum of the solar cycle. These observations were made by the Wind spacecraft during the 1995-2002 period spanning times from solar minimum through solar maximum. Comparison of anomalous and galactic cosmic rays provides a powerful tool for the study of the physics of solar modulation throughout the solar cycle.

  1. Radial gradient of solar wind velocity from 1 to 5 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collard, H. R.; Wolfe, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Solar wind velocities have been measured on a daily basis from data obtained by the Ames Research Center plasma analyzers on both Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11. A comparison between the time profiles of the solar wind velocities observed at the two spacecraft shows that the solar wind has the same major features, such as high velocity streams, out to at least 5 astronomical units (AU) from the sun. Major features in the velocity time profile observed first at Pioneer 11 are seen later at Pioneer 10 with a delay consistent with the respective heliocentric longitudes of the two spacecraft, their radial distances from the sun, and the solar wind velocity. A more detailed comparison between the velocity measurements made at Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11 shows that the range of solar wind velocities decreases with increasing radial distance from the sun. Although the average value of the solar wind velocity as measured over a sufficiently long period is approximately the same at both spacecraft, the deviations to higher and lower velocities are less at a greater radial distance from the sun.

  2. Analysis of the Velocity Distribution in Partially-Filled Circular Pipe Employing the Principle of Maximum Entropy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The flow velocity distribution in partially-filled circular pipe was investigated in this paper. The velocity profile is different from full-filled pipe flow, since the flow is driven by gravity, not by pressure. The research findings show that the position of maximum flow is below the water surface, and varies with the water depth. In the region of near tube wall, the fluid velocity is mainly influenced by the friction of the wall and the pipe bottom slope, and the variation of velocity is similar to full-filled pipe. But near the free water surface, the velocity distribution is mainly affected by the contractive tube wall and the secondary flow, and the variation of the velocity is relatively small. Literature retrieval results show relatively less research has been shown on the practical expression to describe the velocity distribution of partially-filled circular pipe. An expression of two-dimensional (2D) velocity distribution in partially-filled circular pipe flow was derived based on the principle of maximum entropy (POME). Different entropies were compared according to fluid knowledge, and non-extensive entropy was chosen. A new cumulative distribution function (CDF) of partially-filled circular pipe velocity in terms of flow depth was hypothesized. Combined with the CDF hypothesis, the 2D velocity distribution was derived, and the position of maximum velocity distribution was analyzed. The experimental results show that the estimated velocity values based on the principle of maximum Tsallis wavelet entropy are in good agreement with measured values. PMID:26986064

  3. Analysis of the Velocity Distribution in Partially-Filled Circular Pipe Employing the Principle of Maximum Entropy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yulin; Li, Bin; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The flow velocity distribution in partially-filled circular pipe was investigated in this paper. The velocity profile is different from full-filled pipe flow, since the flow is driven by gravity, not by pressure. The research findings show that the position of maximum flow is below the water surface, and varies with the water depth. In the region of near tube wall, the fluid velocity is mainly influenced by the friction of the wall and the pipe bottom slope, and the variation of velocity is similar to full-filled pipe. But near the free water surface, the velocity distribution is mainly affected by the contractive tube wall and the secondary flow, and the variation of the velocity is relatively small. Literature retrieval results show relatively less research has been shown on the practical expression to describe the velocity distribution of partially-filled circular pipe. An expression of two-dimensional (2D) velocity distribution in partially-filled circular pipe flow was derived based on the principle of maximum entropy (POME). Different entropies were compared according to fluid knowledge, and non-extensive entropy was chosen. A new cumulative distribution function (CDF) of partially-filled circular pipe velocity in terms of flow depth was hypothesized. Combined with the CDF hypothesis, the 2D velocity distribution was derived, and the position of maximum velocity distribution was analyzed. The experimental results show that the estimated velocity values based on the principle of maximum Tsallis wavelet entropy are in good agreement with measured values. PMID:26986064

  4. Comparing satellite and meteorological data on wind velocity over the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmashov, A. V.; Kubryakov, A. A.; Shokurov, M. V.; Stanichny, S. V.; Toloknov, Yu. N.; Korovushkin, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    Wind-velocity data obtained from in situ measurements at the Golitsyno-4 marine stationary platform have been compared with QuikSCAT scatterometer data; NCEP, MERRA, and ERA-Interim global reanalyses and MM5 regional atmospheric reanalysis. In order to adjust wind velocity measured at a height of 37 m above the sea surface to a standard height of 10 m with stratification taken into account, the Monin-Obukhov theory and regional atmospheric reanalysis data are used. Data obtained with the QuikSCAT scatterometer most adequately describe the real variability of wind over the Black Sea. Errors in reanalysis data are not high either: the regression coefficient varies from 0.98 to 1.06, the rms deviation of the velocity amplitude varies from 1.90 to 2.24 m/s, and the rms deviation of the direction angle varies from 26° to 36°. Errors in determining the velocity and direction of wind depend on its amplitude: under weak winds (<3 m/s), the velocity of wind is overestimated and errors significantly increase in determining its direction; under strong winds (>12 m/s), its velocity is underestimated. The influence of these errors on both spatial and temporal estimates of the characteristics of wind over the Black Sea is briefly considered.

  5. C. elegans maximum velocity correlates with healthspan and is maintained in worms with an insulin receptor mutation

    PubMed Central

    Hahm, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Sunhee; DiLoreto, Race; Shi, Cheng; Lee, Seung-Jae V.; Murphy, Coleen T.; Nam, Hong Gil

    2015-01-01

    Ageing is marked by physical decline. Caenorhabditis elegans is a valuable model for identifying genetic regulatory mechanisms of ageing and longevity. Here we report a simple method to assess C. elegans' maximum physical ability based on the worms' maximum movement velocity. We show maximum velocity declines with age, correlates well with longevity, accurately reports movement ability and, if measured in mid-adulthood, is predictive of maximal lifespan. Contrary to recent findings, we observe that maximum velocity of worm with mutations in daf-2(e1370) insulin/IGF-1 signalling scales with lifespan. Because of increased odorant receptor expression, daf-2(e1370) mutants prefer food over exploration, causing previous on-food motility assays to underestimate movement ability and, thus, worm health. Finally, a disease-burden analysis of published data reveals that the daf-2(e1370) mutation improves quality of life, and therefore combines lifespan extension with various signs of an increased healthspan. PMID:26586186

  6. C. elegans maximum velocity correlates with healthspan and is maintained in worms with an insulin receptor mutation.

    PubMed

    Hahm, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Sunhee; DiLoreto, Race; Shi, Cheng; Lee, Seung-Jae V; Murphy, Coleen T; Nam, Hong Gil

    2015-01-01

    Ageing is marked by physical decline. Caenorhabditis elegans is a valuable model for identifying genetic regulatory mechanisms of ageing and longevity. Here we report a simple method to assess C. elegans' maximum physical ability based on the worms' maximum movement velocity. We show maximum velocity declines with age, correlates well with longevity, accurately reports movement ability and, if measured in mid-adulthood, is predictive of maximal lifespan. Contrary to recent findings, we observe that maximum velocity of worm with mutations in daf-2(e1370) insulin/IGF-1 signalling scales with lifespan. Because of increased odorant receptor expression, daf-2(e1370) mutants prefer food over exploration, causing previous on-food motility assays to underestimate movement ability and, thus, worm health. Finally, a disease-burden analysis of published data reveals that the daf-2(e1370) mutation improves quality of life, and therefore combines lifespan extension with various signs of an increased healthspan. PMID:26586186

  7. Biomarkers affected by impact velocity and maximum strain of cartilage during injury.

    PubMed

    Waters, Nicole Poythress; Stoker, Aaron M; Carson, William L; Pfeiffer, Ferris M; Cook, James L

    2014-09-22

    Osteoarthritis is one of the most common, debilitating, musculoskeletal diseases; 12% associated with traumatic injury resulting in post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). Our objective was to develop a single impact model with cartilage "injury level" defined in terms of controlled combinations of strain rate to a maximum strain (both independent of cartilage load resistance) to study their sensitivity to articular cartilage cell viability and potential PTOA biomarkers. A servo-hydraulic test machine was used to measure canine humeral head cartilage explant thickness under repeatable pressure, then subject it (except sham and controls) to a single impact having controlled constant velocity V=1 or 100mm/s (strain rate 1.82 or 182/s) to maximum strain ε=10%, 30%, or 50%. Thereafter, explants were cultured in media for twelve days, with media changed at day 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 12. Explant thickness was measured at day 0 (pre-injury), 6 and 12 (post-injury). Cell viability, and tissue collagen and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) were analyzed immediately post-injury and day 12. Culture media were tested for biomarkers: GAG, collagen II, chondroitin sulfate-846, nitric oxide, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Detrimental effects on cell viability, and release of GAG and PGE2 to the media were primarily strain-dependent, (PGE2 being more prolonged and sensitive at lower strains). The cartilage injury model appears to be useful (possibly superior) for investigating the relationship between impact severity of injury and the onset of PTOA, specifically for discovery of biomarkers to evaluate the risk of developing clinical PTOA, and to compare effective treatments for arthritis prevention. PMID:25005436

  8. Uncertainties in wind speed dependent CO2 transfer velocities due to airflow distortion at anemometer sites on ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griessbaum, F.; Moat, B. I.; Narita, Y.; Yelland, M. J.; Klemm, O.; Uematsu, M.

    2009-09-01

    Data from research vessels and merchant ships are used to estimate ocean CO2 uptake via parameterizations of the gas transfer velocity (k) and measurements of the difference between the concentration of CO2 in the ocean (pCO2sw) and atmosphere (pCO2atm) and of wind speed. Gas transfer velocities estimated using wind speed dependent parameterisations may be in error due to air flow distortion by the ship's hull and superstructure introducing biases into the measured wind speed. The effect of airflow distortion on estimates of the transfer velocity was examined by modelling the airflow around the three-dimensional geometries of the research vessels Hakuho Maru and Mirai, using the Large Eddy Simulation code GERRIS. For airflows within ±45° of the bow the maximum bias was +16%. For wind speed of 10 m s-1 to 15 m s-1, a +16% bias in wind speed would cause an overestimate in the calculated value of k of 30% to 50%, depending on which k parameterisation is used. This is due to the propagation of errors when using quadratic or cubic parameterizations. Recommendations for suitable anemometer locations on research vessels are given. The errors in transfer velocity may be much larger for typical merchant ships, as the anemometers are generally not as well-exposed as those on research vessels. Flow distortion may also introduce biases in the wind speed dependent k parameterizations themselves, since these are obtained by relating measurements of the CO2 flux to measurements of the wind speed and the CO2 concentration difference. To investigate this, flow distortion effects were estimated for three different platforms from which wind speed dependent parameterizations are published. The estimates ranged from -4% to +14% and showed that flow distortion may have a significant impact on wind speed dependent parameterizations. However, the wind biases are not large enough to explain the differences at high wind speeds in parameterizations which are based on eddy covariance and

  9. Uncertainties in wind speed dependent CO2 transfer velocities due to airflow distortion at anemometer sites on ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griessbaum, F.; Moat, B. I.; Narita, Y.; Yelland, M. J.; Klemm, O.; Uematsu, M.

    2010-06-01

    Data from platforms, research vessels and merchant ships are used to estimate ocean CO2 uptake via parameterisations of the gas transfer velocity (k) and measurements of the difference between the partial pressures of CO2 in the ocean (pCO2 sw) and atmosphere (pCO2 atm) and of wind speed. Gas transfer velocities estimated using wind speed dependent parameterisations may be in error due to air flow distortion by the ship's hull and superstructure introducing biases into the measured wind speed. The effect of airflow distortion on estimates of the transfer velocity was examined by modelling the airflow around the three-dimensional geometries of the research vessels Hakuho Maru and Mirai, using the Large Eddy Simulation code GERRIS. For airflows within ±45° of the bow the maximum bias was +16%. For wind speed of 10 m s-1 to 15 m s-1, a +16% bias in wind speed would cause an overestimate in the calculated value of k of 30% to 50%, depending on which k parameterisation is used. This is due to the propagation of errors when using quadratic or cubic parameterisations. Recommendations for suitable anemometer locations on research vessels are given. The errors in transfer velocity may be much larger for typical merchant ships, as the anemometers are generally not as well-exposed as those on research vessels. Flow distortion may also introduce biases in the wind speed dependent k parameterisations themselves, since these are obtained by relating measurements of the CO2 flux to measurements of the wind speed and the CO2 concentration difference. To investigate this, flow distortion effects were estimated for three different platforms from which wind speed dependent parameterisations are published. The estimates ranged from -4% to +14% and showed that flow distortion may have a significant impact on wind speed dependent parameterisations. However, the wind biases are not large enough to explain the differences at high wind speeds in parameterisations which are based on eddy

  10. The stellar wind velocity function for red supergiants determined in eclipsing binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Imad A.; Stencel, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    The potential for direct measurement of the acceleration of stellar winds from the supergiant component of Zeta Aurigae-type binary stars is discussed. The aberration angle of the interaction shock cone centered on the hot star provides a measure of the velocity of the cool star wind at the orbit of the secondary. This is confirmed by direct observations of stellar wind (P Cygni) line profile variations. This velocity is generally smaller than the final (terminal) velocity of the wind, deduced from the P Cygni line profiles. The contrast between these results and previously published supergiant wind models is discussed. The implication on the physics of energy source dissipation predicted in the theoretical models is considered.

  11. Solar wind velocity and temperature in the outer heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazis, P. R.; Barnes, A.; Mihalov, J. D.; Lazarus, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    At the end of 1992, the Pioneer 10, Pioneer 11, and Voyager 2 spacecraft were at heliocentric distances of 56.0, 37.3, and 39.0 AU and heliographic latitudes of 3.3 deg N, 17.4 deg N, and 8.6 deg S, respectively. Pioneer 11 and Voyager 2 are at similar celestial longitudes, while Pioneer 10 is on the opposite side of the Sun. All three spacecraft have working plasma analyzers, so intercomparison of data from these spacecraft provides important information about the global character of the solar wind in the outer heliosphere. The averaged solar wind speed continued to exhibit its well-known variation with solar cycle: Even at heliocentric distances greater than 50 AU, the average speed is highest during the declining phase of the solar cycle and lowest near solar minimum. There was a strong latitudinal gradient in solar wind speed between 3 deg and 17 deg N during the last solar minimum, but this gradient has since disappeared. The solar wind temperature declined with increasing heliocentric distance out to a heliocentric distance of at least 20 AU; this decline appeared to continue at larger heliocentric distances, but temperatures in the outer heliosphere were suprisingly high. While Pioneer 10 and Voyager 2 observed comparable solar wind temperatures, the temperature at Pioneer 11 was significantly higher, which suggests the existence of a large-scale variation of temperature with heliographic longitude. There was also some suggestion that solar wind temperatures were higher near solar minimum.

  12. Design of a Non-scanning Lidar for Wind Velocity and Direction Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Peng, Zhangxian

    2016-06-01

    A Doppler lidar system for wind velocity and direction measurement is presented. The lidar use a wide field of view (FOV) objective lens as an optical antenna for both beam transmitting and signal receiving. By four fibers coupled on different position on the focal plane, the lidar can implement wind vector measurement without any scanning movement.

  13. A simple method to estimate threshold friction velocity of wind erosion in the field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nearly all wind erosion models require the specification of threshold friction velocity (TFV). Yet determining TFV of wind erosion in field conditions is difficult as it depends on both soil characteristics and distribution of vegetation or other roughness elements. While several reliable methods ha...

  14. MEASUREMENT OF MOTION CORRECTED WIND VELOCITY USING AN AEROSTAT LOFTED SONIC ANEMOMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    An aerostat-lofted, sonic anemometer was used to determine instantaneous 3 dimensional wind velocities at altitudes relevant to fire plume dispersion modeling. An integrated GPS, inertial measurement unit, and attitude heading and reference system corrected the wind data for th...

  15. Weakest solar wind of the space age and the current 'MINI' solar maximum

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D. J.; Angold, N.; Elliott, H. A.; Livadiotis, G.; Schwadron, N. A.; Smith, C. W.; Skoug, R. M.

    2013-12-10

    The last solar minimum, which extended into 2009, was especially deep and prolonged. Since then, sunspot activity has gone through a very small peak while the heliospheric current sheet achieved large tilt angles similar to prior solar maxima. The solar wind fluid properties and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) have declined through the prolonged solar minimum and continued to be low through the current mini solar maximum. Compared to values typically observed from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s, the following proton parameters are lower on average from 2009 through day 79 of 2013: solar wind speed and beta (∼11%), temperature (∼40%), thermal pressure (∼55%), mass flux (∼34%), momentum flux or dynamic pressure (∼41%), energy flux (∼48%), IMF magnitude (∼31%), and radial component of the IMF (∼38%). These results have important implications for the solar wind's interaction with planetary magnetospheres and the heliosphere's interaction with the local interstellar medium, with the proton dynamic pressure remaining near the lowest values observed in the space age: ∼1.4 nPa, compared to ∼2.4 nPa typically observed from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s. The combination of lower magnetic flux emergence from the Sun (carried out in the solar wind as the IMF) and associated low power in the solar wind points to the causal relationship between them. Our results indicate that the low solar wind output is driven by an internal trend in the Sun that is longer than the ∼11 yr solar cycle, and they suggest that this current weak solar maximum is driven by the same trend.

  16. Quasi-decadal variations in total ozone content, wind velocity, temperature, and geopotential height over the Arosa station (Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visheratin, K. N.

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of the analysis of the phase relationships between the quasi-decadal variations (QDVs) (in the range from 8 to 13 years) in the total ozone content (TOC) at the Arosa station for 1932-2012 and a number of meteorological parameters: monthly mean values of temperature, meridional and zonal components of wind velocity, and geopotential heights for isobaric surfaces in the layer of 10-925 hPa over the Arosa station using the Fourier methods and composite and cross-wavelet analysis. It has been shown that the phase relationships of the QDVs in the TOC and meteorological parameters with an 11-year cycle of solar activity change in time and height; starting with cycle 24 of solar activity (2008-2010), the variations in the TOC and a number of meteorological parameters occur in almost counter phase with the variations in solar activity. The periods of the maximum growth rate of the temperature at isobaric surfaces 50-100 hPa nearly correspond to the TOC's maximum periods, and the periods of the maximum temperature correspond the periods of the decrease of the peak TOC rate. The highest correlation coefficients between the meridional wind velocity and temperature are observed at 50 hPa at positive and negative delays of ~27 months. The times of the maxima (minima) of the QDVs in the meridional wind velocity nearly correspond to the periods of the maximum amplification (attenuation) rate of the temperature of the QDVs. The QDVs in the geopotential heights of isobaric surfaces fall behind the variations in the TOC by an average of 1.5 years everywhere except in the lower troposphere. In general, the periods of variations in the TOC and meteorological parameters in the range of 8-13 years are smaller than the period of variations in the level of solar activity.

  17. Structure of Turbulence in Katabatic Flows Below and Above the Wind-Speed Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grachev, Andrey A.; Leo, Laura S.; Sabatino, Silvana Di; Fernando, Harindra J. S.; Pardyjak, Eric R.; Fairall, Christopher W.

    2016-06-01

    Measurements of small-scale turbulence made in the atmospheric boundary layer over complex terrain during the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) Program are used to describe the structure of turbulence in katabatic flows. Turbulent and mean meteorological data were continuously measured on four towers deployed along the east lower slope (2-4°) of Granite Mountain near Salt Lake City in Utah, USA. The multi-level (up to seven) observations made during a 30-day long MATERHORN field campaign in September-October 2012 allowed the study of temporal and spatial structure of katabatic flows in detail, and herein we report turbulence statistics (e.g., fluxes, variances, spectra, and cospectra) and their variations in katabatic flow. Observed vertical profiles show steep gradients near the surface, but in the layer above the slope jet the vertical variability is smaller. It is found that the vertical (normal to the slope) momentum flux and horizontal (along-slope) heat flux in a slope-following coordinate system change their sign below and above the wind maximum of a katabatic flow. The momentum flux is directed downward (upward) whereas the along-slope heat flux is downslope (upslope) below (above) the wind maximum. This suggests that the position of the jet-speed maximum can be obtained by linear interpolation between positive and negative values of the momentum flux (or the along-slope heat flux) to derive the height where the flux becomes zero. It is shown that the standard deviations of all wind-speed components (and therefore of the turbulent kinetic energy) and the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy have a local minimum, whereas the standard deviation of air temperature has an absolute maximum at the height of wind-speed maximum. We report several cases when the destructive effect of vertical heat flux is completely cancelled by the generation of turbulence due to the along-slope heat flux. Turbulence above the wind

  18. RW Sextantis, a disk with a hot, high-velocity wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstein, J. L.; Oke, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    The continuum spectrum of the flickering blue variable RW Sex was observed from 10,000 to 1150 A. The star is a cataclysmic variable currently stabilized at maximum, and the spectrum is dominated by an accretion disk, with flat spectrum in the ultraviolet, except at more than 5000 A, where a blackbody near 7000 K is seen. A distance of 400 pc is derived, if the latter arises from an F type main sequence star. The accretion rate required is near 10 to the -8th solar masses per year. Only weak emission is seen, except for Lyman alpha; strong, broad UV absorption lines are seen with centers displaced up to -3000 km/s, with terminal velocities up to -4500 km/s, the velocity of escape from a white dwarf. The low X-ray flux may arise from absorption within an unusually dense, hot wind from the innermost portions of the disk. The estimated mass loss rate is nearly 10 to the -12th solar masses per year.

  19. Density, Velocity and Ionization Structure in Accretion-Disc Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor); Long, Knox

    2004-01-01

    This was a project to exploit the unique capabilities of FUSE to monitor variations in the wind- formed spectral lines of the luminous, low-inclination, cataclysmic variables(CV) -- RW Sex. (The original proposal contained two additional objects but these were not approved.) These observations were intended to allow us to determine the relative roles of density and ionization state changes in the outflow and to search for spectroscopic signatures of stochastic small-scale structure and shocked gas. By monitoring the temporal behavior of blue-ward extended absorption lines with a wide range of ionization potentials and excitation energies, we proposed to track the changing physical conditions in the outflow. We planned to use a new Monte Carlo code to calculate the ionization structure of and radiative transfer through the CV wind. The analysis therefore was intended to establish the wind geometry, kinematics and ionization state, both in a time-averaged sense and as a function of time.

  20. Influence of wind velocity on pollen concentration in urban canopy layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospisil, J.; Jícha, M.

    2009-09-01

    POLLEN RELEASE Temperature is the basic parameter for prediction of the beginning of the pollen season and identification days with good potential for pollen release. Different approaches are used for determination of the start of the pollen season: i) the sum of daily pollen counts = x criterion (Arnold 2002), ii) the mean temperature method during pre-defined period (Sparks, 2000), iii) the temperature sum method (Jones 1992). Another parameters influencing pollen release are: day light length, morning temperature gradient, relative humidity. The mentioned parameters enable to create the "statistical” model for determination of timing of pollen potential release. But, the correct determination of pollen release timing is only the first step to correct prediction of pollen concentration in air. The above mentioned collection of parameters isn't complete for correct pollen production prediction without inclusion of the actual wind velocity. The wind velocity directly influences the pollen release rate from mother plant and subsequently transport of pollen grains. From this reason, influence of wind conditions has to be considered as exactly as possible in complex prediction models. WIND VELOCITY AND POLLEN CONCENTRATION Results of in-situ measurements were used for carried out analysis of the relation between wind velocity and pollen concentration in an urban canopy layer. The mean daily wind velocities and the mean daily pollen concentrations were used as the input data describing the pollen season 2005 in an inner part of the city of Brno (pop. 400 000). The mean daily pollen concentrations were matched to corresponding mean daily wind velocity and depicted in graphs. This procedure was done for all locally monitored aeroallergens, namely Alnus, Ambrosia, Betula, Artemis, Corylus, Fraxinus, Poaceae and Quercus. Only days with significant pollen concentration (above 10% of maximal pollen season concentration) were considered for detail analysis. Clear

  1. The influence of velocity variability on the determination of wind profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rottger, J.

    1986-01-01

    High sensitivity radars allow the determination of velocity estimates at time resolutions down to one minute or better. Because of the variability introduced to the mean wind due to turbulence and waves, the high resolution profiles may not be too useful for forecasting applications, although they yield the most realistic estimate of the instantaneous wind profile. Profiles of wind speed and direction, vertical velocity and echo power, which were deduced in real-time on 23 August 1981 with the spaced antenna drift mode of the SOUSY-VHF-Radar are shown. Whereas these profiles were measured within 1 minute, the operating routine allowed the selection of variable (longer) measuring periods, and one has to search for the optimum duration of the data averaging period. A high time resolution wind vector diagram is given which gives an idea of the temporal variability. The data were obtained with the spaced antenna technique, which allows a good estimate of the horizontal wind without having to correct for the vertical velocity component. The wind vectors specifically indicate a quasi-periodic variation in direction. This is assumed to be due to gravity waves since the vertical velocity also shows periodical variations with the same period. The consistency of these spaced-antenna VHF radar results along with the radiosonde data convinced researchers that the method is quite suitable for wind profiling applications.

  2. Radial gradient of solar wind velocity from 1 to 5 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collard, H. R.; Wolfe, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Solar wind velocity measurements made by Pioneers 10 and 11 are compared to investigate radial variations in the velocity at heliocentric distances of 1 to 5 AU. Two hundred days of corresponding Pioneer 10 and 11 data are plotted, the velocity profiles for 25-day segments are compared, and the same general pattern of peaks and troughs is found in the corresponding profiles. A comparison of the relative smoothness of the profiles clearly shows that velocity amplitudes in the solar wind stream structure decrease dramatically with increasing radial distance from the sun, although the rate of decrease is not as clear. It is hypothesized that stream-stream interactions play a dominant part in inhibiting the classical radial expansion process in the solar wind and produce scattering centers which prevent the observation of a significant galactic cosmic ray gradient in this region of space.

  3. Comparison of zonal neutral winds with equatorial plasma bubble and plasma drift velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapagain, Narayan P.; Fisher, Daniel J.; Meriwether, John W.; Chau, Jorge L.; Makela, Jonathan J.

    2013-04-01

    A one-year dataset spanning March 2011 to March 2012 of coincident observations of nighttime thermospheric zonal neutral winds, equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) velocities, and zonal plasma drifts is used to examine the relationship between the thermosphere and the ionosphere near the geomagnetic equator over Peru. Thermospheric neutral winds are determined by using a bistatic Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) experiment located at Merihill and Nazca in Peru. The ambient plasma drift velocities were obtained using the incoherent scatter radar at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory in Peru. The EPB zonal velocities were estimated utilizing images of the OI 630.0 nm emission recorded by a narrow-field optical imaging system at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. The joint analysis of these datasets illustrates that the nighttime and night-to-night variations in the zonal neutral winds, EPB velocities, and plasma drifts are well correlated. This consistent result of the local time variations of the neutral winds with that of EPB and plasma drifts illustrates that the F-region dynamo is, in general, fully activated. However, at times, the magnitude of the EPB velocities and the plasma drifts are different from the neutral winds. It is plausible that such a difference is due either to the effect of polarization electric fields developed inside the EPB or due to the latitudinal gradient of the neutral winds and EPB velocity measurements since the EPB velocities are estimated at a higher latitude, corresponding to an apex altitude of ~400 km, than the wind estimates, which derive from an apex altitude of ~250 km.

  4. The validity of an assessment of maximum angular velocity of knee extension (KE) using a gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Arai, Takeshi; Obuchi, Shuichi; Shiba, Yoshitaka; Omuro, Kazuya; Inaba, Yasuko; Kojima, Motonaga

    2012-01-01

    Although it is more important to assess the muscular power of the lower extremities than the strength, no simplified method for doing so has been found. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of the assessment of the angular velocity of KE using a gyroscope. Participants included 105 community-dwelling older people (55 women, 50 men, age ± standard deviation (SD) 75±5.3). Pearson correlation coefficients and Spearman rank-correlation coefficients were used to examine the relationships between the angular velocity of KE and functional performance measurements, a self-efficacy scale and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The data from the gyroscope were significantly correlated with some physical functions such as muscle strength (r=0.304, p<0.01), and walking velocity (r=0.543, p<0.001). In addition, the joint angular velocity was significantly correlated with self-efficacy (r=0.219-0.329, p<0.01-0.05) and HRQOL (r=0.207-0.359, p<0.01-0.05). The absolute value of the correlation coefficient of angular velocity tended to be greater than that of the muscle strength for mobility functions such as walking velocity and the timed-up-and-go (TUG) test. In conclusion, it was found that the assessment of the angular velocity of the knee joint using a gyroscope could be a feasible and meaningful measurement in the geriatrics field. PMID:22100108

  5. Relationships among daily mean and maximum wind speeds, with application to data quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graybeal, Daniel Y.

    2006-01-01

    A growing number of climate change and variability studies, as well as applied research toward improving engineering design climatographies, require high-quality, long-term, extreme-value climate data sets for accurate and reliable estimates and assessments. As part of a historical weather data rescue project of the US government, new data quality control procedures are being developed and applied for daily maximum wind speeds. Not only are existing quality assurance procedures mostly lacking for such data but the climatological relationships upon which such quality checks may be based are also grossly underexploited. Therefore, this study seeks to elucidate relationships among peak-gust, fastest-mile, and fastest 5-min wind speeds, utilizing the peak gust factor model but generalizing it for these and other extreme wind-speed elements. The relationship between peak-gust factor and daily mean wind speed is also adapted for quality assurance and for a wider range of climates than previously studied. Fastest-interval wind-speed factors are found to follow Gaussian, gamma, or Weibull probability distributions, included within mixed models to handle zeros. Resistant prediction interval estimates about a resistant regression were developed for quality assurance of peak-gust factor, given the daily mean wind speed. Flagging thresholds were estimated using parametric bootstrapping. Flag rates from 0.05 to 0.5% are in line with rates reported in the literature, from work with similar data sets; overall Type I and Type II error rates are in the range 0.03-0.3%. The approach outlined lends itself straightforwardly to application in data quality assurance.

  6. Magnetic Cloud Field Intensities and Solar Wind Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Walter D.; Clau de Gonzalez, Alicia D.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Arballo, John K.

    1997-01-01

    For the sets of magnetic clouds studied in this work we have shown that there is a general relationship between their magnetic fields strength and velocities. With a clear tendency that the faster the speed of the cloud the higher the magnetic field.

  7. Low-velocity variability in the stellar wind of HD 152408 (O8: Iafpe)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinja, Raman K.; Fullerton, A. W.

    1994-01-01

    We describe high-quality, spectroscopic time series observations of variability at low velocities in the stellar wind of the extreme O-supergiant HD 152408. These observations were obtained during a monitoring campaign coordinated between Australia and Chile in 1992 July. Systematic variability on hourly time scales is particularly apparent in the He I lambda 5876 P Cygni profile, which diagnoses the deeper, denser region of the wind. These changes indicate the presence of evolving wind structure, which takes the form of blueward-migrating, discrete optical depth enhancements. Four distinct features are identified over approximately 5 days, spanning a velocity range of about -50 km/s at formation to about -500 km/s (i.e., greater than or approximately equal to 0.5 of the terminal velocity) at the blue edge of the He I absorption trough. Sympathetic variations are also apparent in the Balmer emission lines of HD 152408. The characteristics of these features, including their widths, column densities, and accelerations, suggest similarities to discrete absorption components commonly seen at larger velocities in UV P Cygni profiles of other O-type stars. These optical results demonstrate that frequent, systematic wind variability is present down to very large depths, and provide constraints on the stability of the low-velocity regime of hot-star winds.

  8. Hydrogen and helium velocities in the solar wind.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Zwally, H. J.

    1972-01-01

    Examination of separately determined helium and hydrogen bulk speeds in the solar wind show these to be equal, both on time scales of 30 min and 3 min. Observations of two interplanetary shocks and 12 discontinuities show the changes in bulk speed across them to take place simultaneously for the two species. Observations made at times of high helium abundance following an interplanetary shock, and at times of observation of colliding streams in the plasma, confirm the conclusion that, if bulk speed differences between species occur, they do so very rarely.

  9. FIS/ANFIS Based Optimal Control for Maximum Power Extraction in Variable-speed Wind Energy Conversion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadhir, Ahmad; Naba, Agus; Hiyama, Takashi

    An optimal control for maximizing extraction of power in variable-speed wind energy conversion system is presented. Intelligent gradient detection by fuzzy inference system (FIS) in maximum power point tracking control is proposed to achieve power curve operating near optimal point. Speed rotor reference can be adjusted by maximum power point tracking fuzzy controller (MPPTFC) such that the turbine operates around maximum power. Power curve model can be modelled by using adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). It is required to simply well estimate just a few number of maximum power points corresponding to optimum generator rotor speed under varying wind speed, implying its training can be done with less effort. Using the trained fuzzy model, some estimated maximum power points as well as their corresponding generator rotor speed and wind speed are determined, from which a linear wind speed feedback controller (LWSFC) capable of producing optimum generator speed can be obtained. Applied to a squirrel-cage induction generator based wind energy conversion system, MPPTFC and LWSFC could maximize extraction of the wind energy, verified by a power coefficient stay at its maximum almost all the time and an actual power line close to a maximum power efficiency line reference.

  10. Effect of Wind Velocity on Flame Spread in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Kuldeep; Olson, Sandra L.; Nakamura, Yuji; Fujita, Osamu; Nishizawa, Katsuhiro; Ito, Kenichi; Kashiwagi, Takashi; Simons, Stephen N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A three-dimensional, time-dependent model is developed describing ignition and subsequent transition to flame spread over a thermally thin cellulosic sheet heated by external radiation in a microgravity environment. A low Mach number approximation to the Navier Stokes equations with global reaction rate equations describing combustion in the gas phase and the condensed phase is numerically solved. The effects of a slow external wind (1-20 cm/s) on flame transition are studied in an atmosphere of 35% oxygen concentration. The ignition is initiated at the center part of the sample by generating a line-shape flame along the width of the sample. The calculated results are compared with data obtained in the 10s drop tower. Numerical results exhibit flame quenching at a wind speed of 1.0 cm/s, two localized flames propagating upstream along the sample edges at 1.5 cm/s, a single line-shape flame front at 5.0 cm/s, three flames structure observed at 10.0 cm/s (consisting of a single line-shape flame propagating upstream and two localized flames propagating downstream along sample edges) and followed by two line-shape flames (one propagating upstream and another propagating downstream) at 20.0 cm/s. These observations qualitatively compare with experimental data. Three-dimensional visualization of the observed flame complex, fuel concentration contours, oxygen and reaction rate isosurfaces, convective and diffusive mass flux are used to obtain a detailed understanding of the controlling mechanism, Physical arguments based on lateral diffusive flux of oxygen, fuel depletion, oxygen shadow of the flame and heat release rate are constructed to explain the various observed flame shapes.

  11. IPS observations of the solar wind velocity and the acceleration mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Davila, J. M.; Coles, W. A.; Grall, R. R.; Klinglesmith, M. T.

    1997-01-01

    Coronal holes are well know sources of high speed solar wind, however, the exact acceleration mechanism of the wind is still unknown. Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations indicate that the fast solar wind reaches an average velocity of 800 km s(exp -1) within several solar radii with large velocity fluctuations. However, the origin of the IPS velocity spread below 10 solar radii is unclear. A previously developed coronal home model with a more realistic initial state is applied, and time-dependent, nonlinear, resistive 2.5-DMHD equations are numerically solved. It is found that nonlinear solitary-like waves with a supersonic phase speed are generated in coronal holes by torisonal Alfven waves in the radial flow velocity. The outward propagating nonlinear waves are similar in properties to sound solitons. When these waves are present, the solar wind speed and density fluctuate considerably on a time scale of an hour and on spatial scales of several solar radii in addition to the Alfvenic fluctuations. This is in qualitative agreement with the IPS velocity observations beyond 10 solar radii.

  12. Predictions for mass-loss rates and terminal wind velocities of massive O-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muijres, L. E.; Vink, Jorick S.; de Koter, A.; Müller, P. E.; Langer, N.

    2012-01-01

    Context. Mass loss from massive stars forms an important aspect of the evolution of massive stars, as well as for the enrichment of the surrounding interstellar medium. Aims: Our goal is to predict accurate mass-loss rates and terminal wind velocities. These quantities can be compared to empirical values, thereby testing radiation-driven wind models. One specific topical issue is that of the so-called "weak-wind problem", where empirically derived mass-loss rates and (modified) wind momenta fall orders of magnitude short of predicted values. Methods: We employ an established Monte Carlo model and a recently suggested new line acceleration formalism to solve the wind dynamics more consistently. Results: We provide a new grid of mass-loss rates and terminal wind velocities of O-type stars, and compare the values to empirical results. Our models fail to provide mass-loss rates for main-sequence stars below a luminosity of log(L/L⊙) = 5.2, where we appear to run into a fundamental limit. At luminosities below this critical value there is insufficient momentum transferred to the wind in the region below the sonic point in order to kick-start the acceleration of the flow. This problem occurs at almost the exact location of the onset of the weak-wind problem. For O dwarfs, the boundary between being able to start a wind, and failing to do so, is at spectral type O6/O6.5. The direct cause of this failure for O6.5 stars is a combination of the lower luminosity and a lack of Fe v lines at the base of the wind. This might indicate that - in addition to radiation pressure - another mechanism is required to provide the necessary driving to initiate the wind acceleration. Conclusions: For stars more luminous than 105.2 L⊙, our new mass-loss rates are in excellent agreement with the mass-loss prescription by Vink et al. (2000, A&A, 362, 295) using our terminal wind velocities as input to this recipe. This implies that the main assumption entering the method of the Vink et al

  13. Long-term variation of the polar wind velocity and its implication for the ion acceleration process: Akebono/suprathermal ion mass spectrometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Takumi; Yau, Andrew W.; Watanabe, Shigeto; Yamada, Manabu; Sagawa, Eiichi

    2004-09-01

    We present the solar activity dependence and seasonal variation of H+ and O+ polar wind velocity profiles observed by the suprathermal ion mass spectrometer (SMS) on Akebono. These observations spanned a solar cycle and covered a wide range of altitudes and invariant latitudes (ILAT) in the polar ionosphere and a variety of geomagnetic activity conditions from 1500 km to 8500 km altitude and from the poleward edge of the ionospheric trough (˜60° ILAT) to the polar cap (>85° ILAT). At low (high) altitudes below (above) 4000 km, the increase of the averaged H+ and O+ ion velocities with altitude was larger (smaller) at solar minimum than at solar maximum. For example, the averaged H+ velocity on the dayside at 4000 km altitude was approximately 8 km s-1 at low solar activity but ˜5 km s-1 at high activity. This suggests that the averaged polar wind velocity correlates differently with solar activity and the dominant acceleration process may be different at low and high altitudes, respectively. For both H+ and O+ the observed ion velocity at high altitude was largest in the summer under essentially all magnetic and solar activity conditions. The O+ velocity at high altitude (>4000 km) was significant and largest in the summer at solar maximum, when the solar energy input into the polar cap was largest; theoretically, the velocity of O+ ions in the polar wind is expected to be negligible below 10,000 km. We consider geophysical processes that may contribute to the observed velocities and their solar activity and seasonal dependences, including the possible contributions of photoelectrons and elevated electron temperatures to the ambipolar electric field that drives the polar wind.

  14. Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Monitoring with AMSU-A: Estimation of Maximum Sustained Wind Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Roy; Braswell, William D.; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The first Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit temperature sounder (AMSU-A) was launched on the NOAA-15 satellite on 13 May 1998. The AMSU-A's higher spatial and radiometric resolutions provide more useful information on the strength of the middle and upper tropospheric warm cores associated with tropical cyclones than have previous microwave temperature sounders. The gradient wind relationship suggests that the temperature gradient near the core of tropical cyclones increases nonlinearly with wind speed. We recast the gradient wind equation to include AMSU-A derived variables. Stepwise regression is used to determine which of these variables is most closely related to maximum sustained winds (V(sub max)). The satellite variables investigated include the radially averaged gradients at two spatial resolutions of AMSU-A channels 1 through 10 T(sub b) data (delta(sub r)T(sub b)), the squares of these gradients, a channel 15 based scattering index (SI-89), and area averaged T(sub b). Calculations of Tb and delta(sub r)T(sub b) from mesoscale model simulations of Andrew reveal the effects of the AMSU spatial sampling on the cyclone warm core presentation. Stepwise regression of 66 AMSU-A terms against National Hurricane Center (NHC) V(sub max) estimates from the 1998 and 1999 Atlantic hurricane season confirms the existence of a nonlinear relationship between wind speed and radially averaged temperature gradients near the cyclone warm core. Of six regression terms, four are dominated by temperature information, and two are interpreted as correcting for hydrometeor contamination. Jackknifed regressions were performed to estimate the algorithm performance on independent data. For the 82 cases that had in situ measurements of V(sub max), the average error standard deviation was 4.7 m/s. For 108 cases without in situ wind data, the average error standard deviation was 7.5 m/s. Operational considerations, including the detection of weak cyclones and false alarm reduction are

  15. Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Monitoring with AMSU-A: Estimation of Maximum Sustained Wind Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Roy W.; Braswell, William D.

    2001-01-01

    The first Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit temperature sounder (AMSU-A) was launched on the NOAA-15 satellite on 13 May 1998. The AMSU-A's higher spatial and radiometric resolutions provide more useful information on the strength of the middle- and upper-tropospheric warm cores associated with tropical cyclones than have previous microwave temperature sounders. The gradient wind relationship suggests that the temperature gradient near the core of tropical cyclones increases nonlinearly with wind speed. The gradient wind equation is recast to include AMSU-A-derived variables, Stepwise regression is used to determine which of these variables is most closely related to maximum sustained winds (V(sub max)). The satellite variables investigated include the radially averaged gradients at two spatial resolutions of AMSU-A channels 1-10 T(sub b) data (delta(sub r)T(sub B)), the squares of these gradients, a channel-15-based scattering index (SI(sub 89)), and area-averaged T(sub B). Calculations of T(sub B) and delta(sub r)T(sub B) from mesoscale model simulations of Andrew reveal the effects of the AMSU spatial sampling on the cyclone warm core presentation. Stepwise regression of 66 AMSU-A terms against National Hurricane Center V(sub max) estimates from the 1998 and 1999 Atlantic hurricane season confirms the existence of a nonlinear relationship between wind speed and radially averaged temperature gradients near the cyclone warm core. Of six regression terms, four are dominated by temperature information, and two are interpreted as correcting for hydrometeor contamination. Jackknifed regressions were performed to estimate the algorithm performance on independent data. For the 82 cases that had in situ measurements of V(sub max), the average error standard deviation was 4.7 m/s. For 108 cases without in situ wind data, the average error standard deviation was 7.5 m/s Operational considerations, including the detection of weak cyclones and false alarm reduction, are also

  16. Latitude dependence of solar wind velocity observed > or approx. =1 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, D.G.; Roelof, E.C.; Wolfe, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The large-scale solar wind velocity structure in the outer heliosphere has been systematically analyzed for Carrington rotations 1587-1541 (March 1972 to April 1976). Spacecraft data were taken from Imp 7/8 at earth, Pioneer 6, 8, and 9 near 1AU, and Pioneer 10 and 11 between 1.6 and 5 AU. Using the constant radial velocity solar wind approximation to map all of the velocity data to its high coronal emission heliolongitude, we examined the velocity structure observed at different spacecraft for latitudinal dependence and compared it with coronal structure in soft X rays and Ha absorption features. The constant radial velocity approximation usually remains self-consistent in decreasing or constant velocity solar wind out to 5 AU, enabling us to separate radial from latitudinal propagation effects. We found several examples of sharp nonmeridional stream boundaries in interplanetary space (approx.5/sup 0/ latitude in width), often directly associated with features in coronal X rays and Ha. In one structure there is evidence for significant (up to 40/sup 0/) nonradial flow of the plasma in the corona below the altitude of transition to super-Alfvenic flow.

  17. Latitude dependence of solar wind velocity observed at not less than 1 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, D. G.; Roelof, E. C.; Wolfe, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    The large-scale solar wind velocity structure in the outer heliosphere has been systematically analyzed for Carrington rotations 1587-1541 (March 1972 to April 1976). Spacecraft data were taken from Imp 7/8 at earth, Pioneer 6, 8, and 9 near 1 AU, and Pioneer 10 and 11 between 1.6 and 5 AU. Using the constant radial velocity solar wind approximation to map all of the velocity data to its high coronal emission heliolongitude, the velocity structure observed at different spacecraft was examined for latitudinal dependence and compared with coronal structure in soft X-rays and H-alpha absorption features. The constant radial velocity approximation usually remains self-consistent in decreasing or constant velocity solar wind out to 5 AU, enabling us to separate radial from latitudinal propagation effects. Several examples of sharp nonmeridional stream boundaries in interplanetary space (about 5 deg latitude in width), often directly associated with features in coronal X-rays and H-alpha were found.

  18. The Post-Glacial Species Velocity of Picea glauca following the Last Glacial Maximum in Alaska.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, B. D.; Napier, J.; Kelly, R.; Li, B.; Heath, K.; Hug, B.; Hu, F.; Greenberg, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is leading to dramatic fluctuations to Earth's biodiversity that has not been observed since past interglacial periods. There is rising concern that Earth's warming climate will have significant impacts to current species ranges and the ability of a species to persist in a rapidly changing environment. The paleorecord provides information on past species distributions in relation to climate change, which can illuminate the patterns of potential future distributions of species. Particularly in areas where there are multiple potential limiting factors on a species' range, e.g. temperature, radiation, and evaporative demand, the spatial patterns of species migrations may be particularly complex. In this study, we assessed the change in the distributions of white spruce (Picea glauca) from the Last Glacial Maxima (LGM) to present-day for the entire state of Alaska. To accomplish this, we created species distribution models (SDMs) calibrated from modern vegetation data and high-resolution, downscaled climate surfaces at 60m. These SDMs were applied to downscaled modern and paleoclimate surfaces to produce estimated ranges of white spruce during the LGM and today. From this, we assessed the "species velocity", the rate at which white spruce would need to migrate to keep pace with climate change, with the goal of determining whether the expansion from the LGM to today originated from microclimate refugia. Higher species velocities indicate locations where climate changed drastically and white spruce would have needed to migrate rapidly to persist and avoid local extinction. Conversely, lower species velocities indicated locations where the local climate was changing less rapidly or was within the center of the range of white spruce, and indicated locations where white spruce distributions were unlikely to have changed significantly. Our results indicate the importance of topographic complexity in buffering the effects of climate change

  19. Calibration of a system for measuring low air flow velocity in a wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krach, Andrzej; Kruczkowski, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    This article presents the calibration of a system for measuring air flow velocity in a wind tunnel with a multiple-hole orifice. The comparative method was applied for the calibration. The method consists in equalising the air flow velocity in a test section of the tunnel with that of the hot-wire anemometer probe which should then read zero value. The hot-wire anemometer probe moves reciprocally in the tunnel test section with a constant velocity, aligned and opposite to the air velocity. Air velocity in the tunnel test section is adjusted so that the minimum values of a periodic hot-wire anemometer signal displayed on an oscilloscope screen reach the lowest position (the minimum method). A sinusoidal component can be superimposed to the probe constant velocity. Then, the air flow velocity in the tunnel test section is adjusted so that, when the probe moves in the direction of air flow, only the second harmonic of the periodically variable velocity superimposed on the constant velocity (second harmonic method) remains at the output of the low-pass filter to which the hot-wire anemometer signal, displayed on the oscilloscope screen, is supplied. The velocity of the uniform motion of the hot-wire anemometer probe is measured with a magnetic linear encoder. The calibration of the system for the measurement of low air velocities in the wind tunnel was performed in the following steps: 1. Calibration of the linear encoder for the measurement of the uniform motion velocity of the hot-wire anemometer probe in the test section of the tunnel. 2. Calibration of the system for measurement of low air velocities with a multiple-hole orifice for the velocities of 0.1 and 0.25 m s‑1: - (a) measurement of the probe movement velocity setting; - (b) measurement of air velocity in the tunnel test section with comparison according to the second harmonic method; - (c) measurement of air velocity in the tunnel with comparison according to the minimum method. The calibration

  20. Combined vertical-velocity observations with Doppler lidar, cloud radar and wind profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bühl, J.; Leinweber, R.; Görsdorf, U.; Radenz, M.; Ansmann, A.; Lehmann, V.

    2015-08-01

    Case studies of combined vertical-velocity measurements of Doppler lidar, cloud radar and wind profiler are presented. The measurements were taken at the Meteorological Observatory, Lindenberg, Germany. Synergistic products are presented that are derived from the vertical-velocity measurements of the three instruments: a comprehensive classification mask of vertically moving atmospheric targets and the terminal fall velocity of water droplets and ice crystals corrected for vertical air motion. It is shown that this combination of instruments can up-value the measurement values of each single instrument and may allow the simultaneous sensing of atmospheric targets and the motion of clear air.

  1. The winds of O-stars. II - The terminal velocities of stellar winds of O-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.; Pauldrach, A. W. A.

    1989-01-01

    The SEI method (Lamers et al., 1987) is used to obtain P Cygni profiles of the UV resonance lines of C IV, N V, and S IV and of the subordinate UV lines of N IV and C III observed in the spectra of 27 O-type stars. Theoretical profiles which include the turbulence effects agree well with the observations, and they can account for the deep absorption troughs, the shape of the violet absorption wings, and the wavelength of the emission peak. The resulting terminal velocities of the stellar winds are found to be systematically lower by about 400 km/s than previous estimates obtained using the Sobolev approximation (Castor and Lamers, 1979), suggesting that the narrow absorption components, observed in the UV resonance lines of O and B stars, reach the terminal velocity of the winds.

  2. Reduction of Near-Inertial Energy by Ocean-Surface-Velocity-Dependent Wind Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Willi; Greatbatch, Richard; Zhai, Xiaoming

    2013-04-01

    This study aims at understanding the effect of including or neglecting the surface velocity of the ocean into the wind stress parameterization for the strength and distribution of near-inertial oscillations. Wind-generated near-inertial oscillations are an important source of energy for surface mixed layer deepening as well as for internal wave breaking and the associated diapycnal mixing at depth which, in turn, is thought to be important for driving the meridional overturning circulation. By using a realistic primitive equation model of the Southern Ocean at eddying resolution, we find that including ocean surface velocities into the wind stress leads to a large reduction of both wind power input into near-inertial oscillations (WPI) and near-inertial energy (NIE) in the surface mixed layer. The relative reduction of WPI can be as large as 30 percent and the relative reduction of NIE can be as large as 50 percent. Using both, the primitive equation model and a simple linear local slab-ocean model for illustration, we find that a large part of this reduction can be explained by the leading order modification to the wind stress if ocean surface velocities are included. We also find that the strength of the reduction is modulated by the inverse of the ocean surface mixed layer depth.

  3. Understanding the Benefits and Limitations of Increasing Maximum Rotor Tip Speed for Utility-Scale Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, A.; Dykes, K.

    2014-06-01

    For utility-scale wind turbines, the maximum rotor rotation speed is generally constrained by noise considerations. Innovations in acoustics and/or siting in remote locations may enable future wind turbine designs to operate with higher tip speeds. Wind turbines designed to take advantage of higher tip speeds are expected to be able to capture more energy and utilize lighter drivetrains because of their decreased maximum torque loads. However, the magnitude of the potential cost savings is unclear, and the potential trade-offs with rotor and tower sizing are not well understood. A multidisciplinary, system-level framework was developed to facilitate wind turbine and wind plant analysis and optimization. The rotors, nacelles, and towers of wind turbines are optimized for minimum cost of energy subject to a large number of structural, manufacturing, and transportation constraints. These optimization studies suggest that allowing for higher maximum tip speeds could result in a decrease in the cost of energy of up to 5% for land-based sites and 2% for offshore sites when using current technology. Almost all of the cost savings are attributed to the decrease in gearbox mass as a consequence of the reduced maximum rotor torque. Although there is some increased energy capture, it is very minimal (less than 0.5%). Extreme increases in tip speed are unnecessary; benefits for maximum tip speeds greater than 100-110 m/s are small to nonexistent.

  4. Mean Velocity, Turbulence Intensity and Turbulence Convection Velocity Measurements for a Convergent Nozzle in a Free Jet Wind Tunnel. Comprehensive Data Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccolgan, C. J.; Larson, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of flight on the mean flow and turbulence properties of a 0.056m circular jet were determined in a free jet wind tunnel. The nozzle exit velocity was 122 m/sec, and the wind tunnel velocity was set at 0, 12, 37, and 61 m/sec. Measurements of flow properties including mean velocity, turbulence intensity and spectra, and eddy convection velocity were carried out using two linearized hot wire anemometers. This report contains the raw data and graphical presentations. The final technical report includes a description of the test facilities, test hardware, along with significant test results and conclusions.

  5. The Evolution of the Spectrum of Velocity Fluctuations in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Dana Aaron

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the power spectra of the magnetic field and velocity in the solar wind do not evolve in the same way with heliocentric distance. In particular, the velocity spectrum remains flatter for a substantial distance. However, Voyager observations of the velocity spectrum have demonstrated a likely asymptotic state in which the spectrum steepens to having a spectral index of -5/3, finally matching the magnetic spectrum and the theoretical expectation of Kolmogoroff turbulence. Here we examine evidence from other spacecraft, in particular studying Ulysses spectra to determine if the Voyager result, based on a very few sufficiently complete intervals, is correct. Preliminary results confirm the -5/3 slope for velocity fluctuations at -5 AU from the Sun in the ecliptic. We will examine many intervals to develop a more general picture of the spectral evolution in various conditions, and how magnetic and velocity spectra differ in these cases.

  6. Vertical velocities and momentum fluxes derived from wind measurements in the dusk auroral oval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, M. F.; Mikkelsen, I. S.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on a chemical release experiment carried out on March 20, 1985 in connection with NASA's Cooperative Observations of Polar Electrodynamics I campaign. Simultaneous neutral wind measurements in E region were carried out at three separate locations over a triangular region with sides of about 150 km in the dusk auroral oval, and the three wind profiles were used to calculate values of divergence and vorticity over the area. The vertical velocity over the hight range was calculated using the mass continuity equation, and the instantaneous vertical momentum fluxes in the E region were derived using the combination of horizontal-wind measurements and calculated vertical velocities. Results show that there is strong coupling between layers in the E region and that the momentum-flux-induced accelerations are at least comparable in magnitude to the pressure gradient and Coriolis force accelerations.

  7. Thermal creep-assisted dust lifting on Mars: Wind tunnel experiments for the entrainment threshold velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küpper, Markus; Wurm, Gerhard

    2015-07-01

    In this work we present laboratory measurements on the reduction of the threshold friction velocity necessary for lifting dust if the dust bed is illuminated. Insolation of a porous soil establishes a temperature gradient. At low ambient pressure this gradient leads to thermal creep gas flow within the soil. This flow leads to a subsurface overpressure which supports lift imposed by wind. The wind tunnel was run with Mojave Mars Simulant and air at 3, 6, and 9mbar, to cover most of the pressure range at Martian surface levels. Our first measurements imply that the insolation of the Martian surface can reduce the entrainment threshold velocity between 4% and 19% for the conditions sampled with our experiments. An insolation activated soil might therefore provide additional support for aeolian particle transport at low wind speeds.

  8. On the stability of the moments of the maximum entropy wind wave spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, H.G.

    1983-03-01

    The stability of some current wind wave parameters as a function of high-frequency cut-off and degrees of freedom of the spectrum has been numerically investigated when computed in terms of the moments of the wave energy spectrum. From the Pierson-Moskovitz wave spectrum type, a sea surface profile is simulated and its wave energy spectrum is estimated by the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM). As the degrees of freedom of the MEM spectral estimation are varied, the results show a much better stability of the wave parameters as compared to the classical periodogram and correlogram spectral approaches. The stability of wave parameters as a function of high-frequency cut-off has the same result as obtained by the classical techniques.

  9. Passive A-band Wind Sounder (PAWS) for measuring tropospheric wind velocity profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miecznik, Grzegorz; Pierce, Robert; Huang, Pei; Slaymaker, Philip A.; Kaptchen, Paul; Roark, Shane; Johnson, Brian R.; Heath, Donald F.

    2007-09-01

    The Passive A-Band Wind Sounder (PAWS) was funded through NASA's Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) to determine the feasibility of measuring tropospheric wind speed profiles from Doppler shifts in absorption O II A-band. It is being pursued as a low-cost and low-risk alternative capable of providing better wind data than is currently available. The instrument concept is adapted from the Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) sensor on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. The operational concept for PAWS is to view an atmospheric limb over an altitude range from the surface to 20 km with a Doppler interferometer in a sun-synchronous low-earth orbit. Two orthogonal views of the same sampling volume will be used to resolve horizontal winds from measured line-of-sight winds. A breadboard instrument was developed to demonstrate the measurement approach and to optimize the design parameters for the subsequent engineering unit and future flight sensor. The breadboard instrument consists of a telescope, collimator, filter assembly, and Michelson interferometer. The instrument design is guided by a retrieval model, which helps to optimize key parameters, spectral filter and optical path difference in particular.

  10. A Survey of Velocity Distributions of Solar Wind Ions : ACE/SWICS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, L.; Marsch, E.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    The state of solar wind ions is generally described by a small set of state variables. In detail these aretotal density (or flux), center of mass (or bulk) velocity, and temperature. These variables are obtainedfrom measured velocity distributions either by fitting a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution or by calculatingthe zeroth, first, and second order moments of the distribution. Obviously the first approach requires athermalized distribution to yield meaningful results, while the second approach is universally valid.However, in both cases the shape of the distribution can not be reproduced by the derived parameters.From observations of solar wind protons and alpha particles it is known that the assumption of a thermalized distribution is not valid, at least for the majority of observations. For heavy solar wind ions most observationsare severely limited by statistics and do not even allow to distinguish whether the distribution is thermal or not.This often insufficient characterization of the solar wind VDF severely limits the information which can beobtained for more detailed studies, especially about microscopic kinetic physics and the associatedwave-particle interactions. These naturally yield deviations from Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions.To address this problem we have analyzed ten years worth of data from the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS)and the Magnetometer (MAG) on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE). From our analysis we obtained reduced 1D velocity spectra in 12 minute cadence for some 40 solar wind ions, from protons and alpha particles up to iron.Using the magnetic field vector information we were able to study periods where the reduced 1D spectra representthe parallel and perpendicular shape of the velocity distributions. We present our results and discussthem in the aforementioned context.

  11. Bulk Flow Velocity and First-Order Anisotropy of Solar Energetic Particles Observed on Wind Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L. C.; Reames, D. V.; Ng, C. K.

    2006-12-01

    We have developed a technique to calculate the bulk flow velocity and first-order anisotropy of solar energetic particles (SEPs) with MeV per nucleon energies. Using the technique we have selected and analyzed three "gradual" SEP events recorded by the Low-Energy Matrix Telescope (LEMT) of the Energetic Particles: Acceleration, Composition, and Transport experiment (EPACT) on the Wind spacecraft. Since in our selected events, the interplanetary magnetic field upstream of interplanetary (IP) shock is nearly perpendicular to the solar-wind velocity, the effect of SEP scattering centers can be clearly discerned. From the observations of H, He, O, and Fe ions at different energies, we find that upstream of IP shock the bulk flow direction of heavy ions is opposite to that of protons. In addition, the ion velocity/rigidity dependence of the first-order anisotropy of SEPs is different between the onset and the upstream region. The implication of our observations will be discussed.

  12. An investigation into the contraction of the hurricane radius of maximum wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieu, Chanh Q.

    2012-01-01

    The radius of the maximum tangential wind (RMW) associated with the hurricane primary circulation has been long known to undergo continuous contraction during the hurricane development. In this study, we document some characteristic behaviors of the RMW contraction in a series of ensemble real-time simulations of Hurricane Katrina (2005) and in idealized experiments using the Rotunno and Emanuel (Mon Weather Rev 137:1770-1789, 1987) axisymmetric hurricane model. Of specific interest is that the contraction appears to slow down abruptly at the middle of the hurricane intensification, and the RMW becomes nearly stationary subsequently, despite the rapidly strengthening rotational flows. A kinematic model is then presented to examine such behaviors of the RMW in which necessary conditions for the RMW to stop contracting are examined. Further use of the Emanuel's (J Atmos Sci 43:585-605, 1986) analytical hurricane theory reveals a connection between the hurricane maximum potential intensity and the hurricane eye size, an issue that has not been considered adequately in previous studies.

  13. The de-correlation of westerly winds and westerly-wind stress over the Southern Ocean during the Last Glacial Maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Lu, Jian; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xie, Shang-Ping; Liu, Zhengyu; Zhu, Jiang

    2015-02-22

    This paper investigates the changes of the Southern Westerly Winds (SWW) and Southern Ocean (SO) upwelling between the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and preindustrial (PI) in the PMIP3/CMIP5 simulations, highlighting the role of the Antarctic sea ice in modulating the wind stress effect on the ocean. Particularly, a discrepancy may occur between the changes in SWW and westerly wind stress, caused primarily by an equatorward expansion of winter Antarctic sea ice that undermines the wind stress in driving the liquid ocean. Such discrepancy may reflect the LGM condition in reality, in view of that the model simulates this condition has most credible simulation of modern SWW and Antarctic sea ice. The effect of wind stress on the SO upwelling is further explored via the wind-induced Ekman pumping, which is reduced under the LGM condition in all models, in part by the sea-ice “capping” effect present in the models.

  14. The Silicon and Calcium High-velocity Features in Type Ia Supernovae from Early to Maximum Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xulin; Wang, Xiaofeng; Maeda, Keiichi; Sai, Hanna; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhang, Jujia; Huang, Fang; Rui, Liming; Zhou, Qi; Mo, Jun

    2015-09-01

    The high-velocity features (HVFs) in optical spectra of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are examined with a large sample including very early-time spectra (e.g., t < -7 days). Multiple Gaussian fits are applied to examine the HVFs and their evolutions, using constraints on expansion velocities for the same species (i.e., Si ii 5972 and Si ii 6355). We find that strong HVFs tend to appear in SNe Ia with smaller decline rates (e.g., Δm15(B) ≲ 1.4 {mag}), clarifying that the finding by Childress et al. for the Ca-HVFs in near-maximum-light spectra applies both to the Si-HVFs and Ca-HVFs in the earlier phase. The Si-HVFs seem to be more common in rapidly expanding SNe Ia, which is different from the earlier result that Ca-HVFs are associated with SNe Ia that have slower Si ii 6355 velocities at maximum light (i.e., VSimax). Moreover, SNe Ia with both stronger HVFs at early phases and larger VSimax are found to have noticeably redder B-V colors and to occur preferentially in the inner regions of their host galaxies, while those with stronger HVFs but smaller VSimax show opposite tendencies, suggesting that these two subclasses have different explosion environments and their HVFs may have different origins. We further examine the relationships between the absorption features of Si ii 6355 and Ca ii IR lines, and find that their photospheric components are well correlated in velocity and strength but that the corresponding HVFs show larger scatter. These results cannot be explained with ionization and/or thermal processes alone, and different mechanisms are required for the creation of HVF-forming regions in SNe Ia.

  15. Estimations of One Repetition Maximum and Isometric Peak Torque in Knee Extension Based on the Relationship Between Force and Velocity.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Yoshito; Hatanaka, Yasuhiko; Arai, Tomoaki; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Kanada, Yoshikiyo

    2016-04-01

    Sugiura, Y, Hatanaka, Y, Arai, T, Sakurai, H, and Kanada, Y. Estimations of one repetition maximum and isometric peak torque in knee extension based on the relationship between force and velocity. J Strength Cond Res 30(4): 980-988, 2016-We aimed to investigate whether a linear regression formula based on the relationship between joint torque and angular velocity measured using a high-speed video camera and image measurement software is effective for estimating 1 repetition maximum (1RM) and isometric peak torque in knee extension. Subjects comprised 20 healthy men (mean ± SD; age, 27.4 ± 4.9 years; height, 170.3 ± 4.4 cm; and body weight, 66.1 ± 10.9 kg). The exercise load ranged from 40% to 150% 1RM. Peak angular velocity (PAV) and peak torque were used to estimate 1RM and isometric peak torque. To elucidate the relationship between force and velocity in knee extension, the relationship between the relative proportion of 1RM (% 1RM) and PAV was examined using simple regression analysis. The concordance rate between the estimated value and actual measurement of 1RM and isometric peak torque was examined using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Reliability of the regression line of PAV and % 1RM was 0.95. The concordance rate between the actual measurement and estimated value of 1RM resulted in an ICC(2,1) of 0.93 and that of isometric peak torque had an ICC(2,1) of 0.87 and 0.86 for 6 and 3 levels of load, respectively. Our method for estimating 1RM was effective for decreasing the measurement time and reducing patients' burden. Additionally, isometric peak torque can be estimated using 3 levels of load, as we obtained the same results as those reported previously. We plan to expand the range of subjects and examine the generalizability of our results. PMID:26382131

  16. Wind Velocity Predictions over the Penghu Islands of Taiwan during Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, C. C.

    2014-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to forecast the hourly wind velocity over the Penghu Islands during tropical cyclones, and to determine the effects of the Central Mountain Range (CMR) terrain of Taiwan over the Penghu Islands based on typhoon tracks. On average, a destructive typhoon hits the Penghu Islands every 15-20 years. As a typhoon approaches Penghu Islands, its track and intensity are influenced by the CMR topography. Therefore, CMR complicates the wind forecast of the Penghu Islands. Six main typhoon tracks (Classes I-VI) are classified based on typhoon directions, as follows: (I) the direction of direct westward movement across CMR of Taiwan, (II) the direction of northward movement traveling through Taiwan Strait, (III) the direction of northward movement along the western coast of Taiwan, (IV) the direction of westward movement traveling through Luzon Strait, (V) the direction of westward movement traveling through the southern East China Sea (near Northern Taiwan), and (VI) the irregular track direction. The adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and multilayer perceptron neural network (MLPNN) were used as the forecasting technique to predict the wind velocity. We analyzed 49 typhoons from 2000 to 2012. Results showed that the ANFIS models provided high-reliability predictions for wind velocity, and the ANFIS achieved more favorable performance than did the MLPNN. In addition, we provide a detailed discussion on the interaction of the CMR with the Penghu Islands based on various track directions.

  17. The Evolution of the Spectrum of Velocity Fluctuations in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Recent work has shown that at 1AU from the Sun the power spectrum of the solar wind magnetic field has the -5/3 spectral slope expected for Kolmogorov turbulence, but that the velocity has closer to a -3/2 spectrum. This paper traces the changes in solar wind velocity spectra from 0.3 to 5 AU using data from the Helios and Ulysses spacecraft to show that this is a transient stage in the evolution. The spectrum of the velocity is found to be flatter than that of the magnetic field for the higher frequencies examined for all cases until the slopes become equal (at -5/3) well past 1 AU when the wind is relatively nonAlfvenic. In some respects, in particular in the evolution of the frequency at which the spectrum changes from flatter at larger scales to a traditionally turbulent spectrum at smaller scales, the velocity field evolves more rapidly that the magnetic, and this is associated with the dominance of the magnetic energy over the kinetic at "inertial range" scales. The Alfvenicity of the fluctuations, not the speed of the flow, is shown to control the rate of the spectral evolution. This study shows that, for the solar wind ., the idea of a simple "inertial range" with uniform spectral properties is not realistic, and new phenomenologies will be needed to capture the true situation. In addition a flattening of the velocity spectrum persists at times for small scales, which may provide a clue to the nature of the small-scale interactions.

  18. Two-dimensional airflow modeling underpredicts the wind velocity over dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelsen, Britt; Strobl, Severin; Parteli, Eric J. R.; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the average turbulent wind field over a barchan dune by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics. We find that the fractional speed-up ratio of the wind velocity over the three-dimensional barchan shape differs from the one obtained from two-dimensional calculations of the airflow over the longitudinal cut along the dune’s symmetry axis — that is, over the equivalent transverse dune of same size. This finding suggests that the modeling of the airflow over the central slice of barchan dunes is insufficient for the purpose of the quantitative description of barchan dune dynamics as three-dimensional flow effects cannot be neglected.

  19. Two-dimensional airflow modeling underpredicts the wind velocity over dunes

    PubMed Central

    Michelsen, Britt; Strobl, Severin; Parteli, Eric J. R.; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the average turbulent wind field over a barchan dune by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics. We find that the fractional speed-up ratio of the wind velocity over the three-dimensional barchan shape differs from the one obtained from two-dimensional calculations of the airflow over the longitudinal cut along the dune’s symmetry axis — that is, over the equivalent transverse dune of same size. This finding suggests that the modeling of the airflow over the central slice of barchan dunes is insufficient for the purpose of the quantitative description of barchan dune dynamics as three-dimensional flow effects cannot be neglected. PMID:26572966

  20. Two-dimensional airflow modeling underpredicts the wind velocity over dunes.

    PubMed

    Michelsen, Britt; Strobl, Severin; Parteli, Eric J R; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the average turbulent wind field over a barchan dune by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics. We find that the fractional speed-up ratio of the wind velocity over the three-dimensional barchan shape differs from the one obtained from two-dimensional calculations of the airflow over the longitudinal cut along the dune's symmetry axis - that is, over the equivalent transverse dune of same size. This finding suggests that the modeling of the airflow over the central slice of barchan dunes is insufficient for the purpose of the quantitative description of barchan dune dynamics as three-dimensional flow effects cannot be neglected. PMID:26572966

  1. Low-latitude thermospheric neutral winds determined from AE-E measurements of the 6300-A nightglow at solar maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrage, M. D.; Abreu, V. J.; Fesen, C. G.

    1990-01-01

    Atmosphere Explorer E (AE-E) measurements of the O(1D) 6300-A emission in the nighttime equatorial thermosphere are used to infer the height of the F2 layer peak as a function of latitude and local time. The investigation is conducted both for northern hemisphere winter solstice and for spring equinox, under solar maximum conditions. The layer heights are used to derive magnetic meridional components of the transequatorial neutral wind, in conjunction with the MSIS-86 model and previous Jicamarca incoherent scatter measurements of the zonal electric field. The AE-E wind estimates indicate a predominant summer to winter flow for the winter solstice case. Comparisons are made with the empirical horizontal wind model HWM87 and with winds generated by the thermospheric general circulation model. The model predictions and experimental results are generally in good agreement, confirming the applicability of visible airglow data to studies of the global neutral wind pattern.

  2. The power associated with density fluctuations and velocity fluctuations in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    Direct observations from Pioneer 6 of solar-wind-proton fluctuations have been used to obtain the power spectra associated with solar-wind-proton number density and velocity fluctuations in the frequency range of 0.001 to 0.01 Hz, extending previous analyses by an order of magnitude at the higher frequencies. The slopes of the power spectra associated with the density fluctuations and the velocity fluctuations are similar and are in agreement with the shape of the power spectra found at the lower frequencies. The power spectra indicate that the power-law density spectrum observed at lower frequencies extends to at least 0.01 Hz. This smooth variation in the spectrum at these frequencies is consistent with previous extrapolations of both spacecraft and interplanetary scintillation observations.

  3. Bulk Velocity and Thermal Properties of the Solar Wind in the Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weberg, M. J.; Raines, J. M.; Gershman, D. J.; Lepri, S. T.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2015-12-01

    Despite over 50 years of satellite exploration beyond near-Earth space, only sparse in-situ observations have been made of the solar wind in the inner heliosphere (distances of less than 1 AU). In recent years, the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft was able to measure the bulk and thermal speeds of protons in the solar wind at distances of 0.3 - 0.5 AU. Using data from FIPS, we build upon the work of Gershman et al. (2012) and present a detailed study of the bulk velocity and thermal properties of the solar wind for the time period of March 2011 to March 2015. We compare and contrast the FIPS observations at 0.3 - 0.5 AU with measurements from the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite at 1 AU. Of particular interest is the radial evolution of proton thermal speeds inside Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs), Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs), and quiescent solar wind. This study represents the most complete survey of solar wind plasma inside 0.5 AU since the Helios mission in the early 1980's. Furthermore, our results provide a preview of the exciting science possible with the upcoming launches of Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus in 2018.

  4. Helium atoms in interstellar and interplanetary media. III - Temperature and velocity of the interstellar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, V. G.; Mironova, E. N.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Dalode, F.

    1984-03-01

    The temperature and velocity of the interstellar wind were determined by observations of background radiation in the He I 584-A line performed in interplanetary space by Prognoz-6. Values of 13,500 + or - 2000 K and 25 + or - 2 km/s were obtained. The density of neutral helium atoms beyond the heliosphere ranges from 0.008 to 0.028/cu cm.

  5. Development of tunable high pressure CO2 laser for lidar measurements of pollutants and wind velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.; Guerra, M.; Javan, A.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of laser energy extraction at a tunable monochromatic frequency from an energetic high pressure CO2 pulsed laser plasma, for application to remote sensing of atmospheric pollutants by Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) and of wind velocities by Doppler Lidar, was investigated. The energy extraction principle analyzed is based on transient injection locking (TIL) at a tunable frequency. Several critical experiments for high gain power amplification by TIL are presented.

  6. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of the Variance of the Wind Velocity from Mini-Sodar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnenko, N. P.; Kapegesheva, O. F.; Tarasenkov, M. V.; Shamanaeva, L. G.

    2015-12-01

    Statistical trends of the spatiotemporal dynamics of the variance of the three wind velocity components in the atmospheric boundary layer have been established from Doppler mini-sodar measurements. Over the course of a 5-day period of measurements in the autumn time frame from 12 to 16 September 2003, values of the variance of the x- and y-components of the wind velocity lay in the interval from 0.001 to 10 m2/s2, and for the z-component, from 0.001 to 1.2 m2/s2. They were observed to grow during the morning hours (around 11:00 local time) and in the evening (from 18:00 to 22:00 local time), which is explained by the onset of heating and subsequent cooling of the Earth's surface, which are accompanied by an increase in the motion of the air masses. Analysis of the obtained vertical profiles of the standard deviations of the three wind velocity components showed that growth of σ x and σ y with altitude is well described by a power-law dependence with its exponent varying from 0.22 to 1.3 as a function of the time of day while σ z varies according to a linear law. At night (from 00:00 to 5:00 local time) the variance of the z-component changes from 0.01 to 0.56 m2/s2, which is in good agreement with the data available in the literature. Fitting parameters are found and the error of the corresponding fits is estimated, which makes it possible to describe the diurnal dynamics of the wind velocity variance.

  7. Eddy and deep chlorophyl maximum response to wind-shear in the lee of Gran Canaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basterretxea, G.; Barton, E. D.; Tett, P.; Sangrá, P.; Navarro-Perez, E.; Arístegui, J.

    2002-06-01

    The physical and biological properties of the warm wake of Gran Canaria were examined during a survey carried out in June 1998. The sampling region was dominated by the presence of a warm triangular region downwind the island and an anticyclonic eddy spun off the island. Convergent and divergent frontal regions were generated by the wind shear zones extending along either side of the sheltered region of the warm wake. With increasing distance from shore, evidence of convergent/divergent frontal regions weakened, but the influence of the eddy increased. Both structures, frontal regions and the eddy, clearly altered the vertical phytoplankton biomass distribution as indicated by chlorophyll-fluorescence. Downwelling on the convergent boundary moved the 26.2 kg m -3 isopycnal and its associated deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) below the 1% light zone. Upwelling at the divergent boundary not only elevated the DCM with its associated isopycnal but also, because of the increased light levels, allowed a shift in the DCM to higher (deeper) density surfaces (26.4 kg m -3). However, the highest integrated chlorophyll occurred in the central wake.

  8. A radionuclide counting technique for measuring wind velocity. [drag force anemometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Mall, G. H.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for measuring wind velocities of meteorological interest is described. It is based on inverse-square-law variation of the counting rates as the radioactive source-to-counter distance is changed by wind drag on the source ball. Results of a feasibility study using a weak bismuth 207 radiation source and three Geiger-Muller radiation counters are reported. The use of the technique is not restricted to Martian or Mars-like environments. A description of the apparatus, typical results, and frequency response characteristics are included. A discussion of a double-pendulum arrangement is presented. Measurements reported herein indicate that the proposed technique may be suitable for measuring wind speeds up to 100 m/sec, which are either steady or whose rates of fluctuation are less than 1 kHz.

  9. Tracing Slow Winds from T Tauri Stars via Low Velocity Forbidden Line Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Molly; Pascucci, Ilaria; Edwards, Suzan; Feng, Wanda; Rigliaco, Elisabetta; Gorti, Uma; Hollenbach, David J.; Tuttle Keane, James

    2016-06-01

    Protoplanetary disks are a natural result of star formation, and they provide the material from which planets form. The evolutional and eventual dispersal of protoplanetary disks play critical roles in determining the final architecture of planetary systems. Models of protoplanetary disk evolution suggest that viscous accretion of disk gas onto the central star and photoevaporation driven by high-energy photons from the central star are the main mechanisms that drive disk dispersal. Understanding when photoevaporation begins to dominate over viscous accretion is critically important for models of planet formation and planetary migration. Using Keck/HIRES (resolution of ~ 7 km/s) we analyze three low excitation forbidden lines ([O I] 6300 Å, [O I] 5577 Å, and [S II] 6731 Å) previously determined to trace winds (including photoevaporative winds). These winds can be separated into two components, a high velocity component (HVC) with blueshifts between ~30 – 150 km/s, and a low velocity component (LVC) with blueshifts on the order of ~5 km/s (Hartigan et al. 1995). We selected a sample of 32 pre-main sequence T Tauri stars in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region (plus TW Hya) with disks that span a range of evolutionary stages. We focus on the origin of the LVC specifically, which we are able to separate into a broad component (BC) and a narrow component (NC) due to the high resolution of our optical spectra. We focus our analysis on the [O I] 6300 Å emission feature, which is detected in 30/33 of our targets. Interestingly, we find wind diagnostics consistent with photoevaporation for only 21% of our sample. We can, however, conclude that a specific component of the LVC is tracing a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wind rather than a photoevaporative wind. We will present the details behind these findings and the implications they have for planet formation more generally.

  10. A method of calibrating wind velocity sensors with a modified gas flow calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stump, H. P.

    1978-01-01

    A procedure was described for calibrating air velocity sensors in the exhaust flow of a gas flow calibrator. The average velocity in the test section located at the calibrator exhaust was verified from the mass flow rate accurately measured by the calibrator's precision sonic nozzles. Air at elevated pressures flowed through a series of screens, diameter changes, and flow straighteners, resulting in a smooth flow through the open test section. The modified system generated air velocities of 2 to 90 meters per second with an uncertainty of about two percent for speeds below 15 meters per second and four percent for the higher speeds. Wind tunnel data correlated well with that taken in the flow calibrator.

  11. Helium atoms in interstellar and interplanetary media, part 3: Temperature and velocity of interstellar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, V. G.; Mironova, Y. N.; Berto, Z. L.; Dalode, F.

    1984-10-01

    The distribution of intensities over the celestial sphere in the neutral helium line ar lambda=584 A which is obtained from background radiation observations on the Prognoz-6 satellite with a 4 channel photometer was used to find the temperature and magnitude of the velocity vector of the interstellar wind. The direction of motin of the interstellar medium relative to the sun was determined from the same observations. Interaction of neutral helium in the interstellar medium with the gravitational field of the sun and resonant scattering on intereplanetary helium are calculated. The temperature and velocity of the model which best agree with the results were determined separately for each of six measurement sessions onboard the satellite. The average temperature was 11,600 K, velocity 25.3 km/s. It is found that the mean density of helium in space near the sun is be 0.018 cm -3.

  12. An equatorial solar wind model with angular momentum conservation and nonradial magnetic fields and flow velocities at an inner boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasnim, S.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2016-06-01

    An analytic, self-consistent, theoretical model for the solar wind is developed that generalizes previous models to include all of the following: conservation of angular momentum, frozen-in magnetic fields, both radial (r) and azimuthal (ϕ) components of the magnetic field (Br and Bϕ) and velocity (vr and vϕ) from the inner boundary rs to 1 AU, and the detailed tracing back of observations at 1 AU to the inner boundary and all intervening (r,ϕ). The new model applies near the solar equatorial plane, assumes constant radial wind speed at each heliolongitude, and enforces corotation at the inner boundary. It is shown that the new theoretical model can be reduced to the previous models in the appropriate limits. We apply the model to two solar rotations of Wind spacecraft data, one near solar minimum (1-27 August 2010) and one near solar maximum (1-27 July 2002). The model analytically predicts the Alfvénic critical radius ra from the radial Alfvénic Mach number observed at 1 AU. Typically, the values are less than 15 solar radii, in agreement with some recent observations, and vary with longitude. Values of vϕ(r,ϕ) are predicted from the model, being always in the sense of corotation but varying in magnitude with r and ϕ. Reasonable and self-consistent results are found for Br(r,ϕ), Bϕ(r,ϕ), vϕ(r,ϕ), and n(r,ϕ) from rs to 1 AU. Both the azimuthal and radial magnetic fields at rs vary with time by more than an order of magnitude and usually |Br(rs,ϕs)|≥|Bϕ(rs,ϕs)|. Typically, though not always, magnetic contributions to the total angular momentum are small. Interestingly, however, the azimuthal flow velocities observed at 1 AU are not always in the corotation direction and usually have much larger magnitudes than predicted by the model. Conservation of angular momentum alone cannot explain these azimuthal velocities and the standard interpretation involving stream-stream interactions and dynamical behavior seems reasonable. Issues regarding the

  13. An empirical model to forecast solar wind velocity through statistical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Ridley, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    The accurate prediction of the solar wind velocity has been a major challenge in the space weather community. Previous studies proposed many empirical and semi-empirical models to forecast the solar wind velocity based on either the historical observations, e.g. the persistence model, or the instantaneous observations of the sun, e.g. the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model. In this study, we use the one-minute WIND data from January 1995 to August 2012 to investigate and compare the performances of 4 models often used in literature, here referred to as the null model, the persistence model, the one-solar-rotation-ago model, and the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model. It is found that, measured by root mean square error, the persistence model gives the most accurate predictions within two days. Beyond two days, the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model serves as the best model, though it only slightly outperforms the null model and the one-solar-rotation-ago model. Finally, we apply the least-square regression to linearly combine the null model, the persistence model, and the one-solar-rotation-ago model to propose a 'general persistence model'. By comparing its performance against the 4 aforementioned models, it is found that the accuracy of the general persistence model outperforms the other 4 models within five days. Due to its great simplicity and superb performance, we believe that the general persistence model can serve as a benchmark in the forecast of solar wind velocity and has the potential to be modified to arrive at better models.

  14. Climatologies of nighttime thermospheric winds and temperatures from Fabry-Perot interferometer measurements: From solar minimum to solar maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Daniel J.; Makela, Jonathan J.; Meriwether, John W.; Buriti, Ricardo A.; Benkhaldoun, Zouhair; Kaab, Mohamed; Lagheryeb, Amine

    2015-08-01

    We present a climatology of quiet time thermospheric winds and temperatures estimated from high-resolution Fabry-Perot interferometer measurements of the 630.0 nm airglow emission spectral line shape. Three locations are examined in this long-term study: northeastern Brazil (August 2009 to August 2014), a midlatitude site in North Carolina, USA (June 2011 to December 2014), and a midlatitude site in Morocco (November 2013 to December 2014). We discuss the day-to-day, seasonal, and solar cycle trends and variations of thermospheric meridional winds, zonal winds, neutral temperatures, and for the first time vertical winds. Observations made from solar minimum to solar maximum (with F10.7 values ranging from ˜70 to ˜159 solar flux units) confirm that neutral temperatures have a strong solar cycle dependence. However, this data set shows that the neutral winds are more closely tied to the seasonal variation, rather than the solar cycle. We also present comparisons between the two midlatitude sites and include neutral wind comparisons to the updated Horizontal Wind Model 14.

  15. Detection of a second high-velocity component in the highly ionized wind from PG 1211+143

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pounds, Ken; Lobban, Andrew; Reeves, James; Vaughan, Simon

    2016-04-01

    An extended XMM-Newton observation of the luminous narrow line Seyfert galaxy PG1211+143 in 2014 has revealed a more complex highly ionized, high-velocity outflow. The detection of previously unresolved spectral structure in Fe K absorption finds a second outflow velocity component of the highly ionized wind, with an outflow velocity of v ˜ 0.066 ± 0.003c, in addition to a still higher velocity outflow of v ˜ 0.129 ± 0.002c consistent with that first seen in 2001. We note that chaotic accretion, consisting of many prograde and retrograde events, offers an intriguing explanation of the dual velocity wind. In that context the persisting outflow velocities could relate to physically distinct orientations of the inner accretion flow, with prograde accretion yielding a higher launch velocity than retrograde accretion in a ratio close to that observed.

  16. Solar wind acceleration obtained from kinetic models based on electron velocity distribution functions with suprathermal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrard, V.; Pieters, M.; Lazar, M.; Voitenko, Y.; Lamy, H.; Echim, M.

    2014-12-01

    Astrophysical and space plasmas are commonly found to be out ofthermal equilibrium, i.e., the velocity distribution functions (VDF)of plasma particles cannot be described well enough by Maxwelliandistribution functions. The suprathermal populations are ubiquitousenhancing the high-energy tail of the distribution. A kinetic model has been developed to successfullydescribe such plasmas with tails decreasing as a power law of thevelocity. In the present work, we show that a natural heating ofsolar and stellar coronas automatically appears when an enhancedpopulation of suprathermal particles is present at low altitude inthe solar (or stellar) atmosphere. This is true not only forelectrons and protons, but also for the minor ions which exhibit atemperature increase proportional to their mass. Moreover,suprathermal electrons contribute to the acceleration of stellarwinds to high bulk velocities when Coulomb collisions are neglected.These results are illustrated by using a global model of the solarcorona and solar wind based on VDF with suprathermal tails for thedifferent particle species. The energetic particles are non-collisional (without Coulomb collisions) even when thermalparticles are submitted to collisions. In the presence of long-rangecorrelations supplied by the fields and plasma instabilities,turbulence can play a role in the generation of such suprathermaltails. Solar wind observations are used as boundary conditions to determine the VDF in the other regions of the heliosphere. Consequences of suprathermal particles are also illustratedfor other space plasmas like the plasmasphere and the polar wind ofthe Earth and other planets.

  17. The de-correlation of westerly winds and westerly-wind stress over the Southern Ocean during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Lu, Jian; Leung, L. Ruby; Xie, Shang-Ping; Liu, Zhengyu; Zhu, Jiang

    2015-12-01

    Motivated by indications from paleo-evidence, this paper investigates the changes of the Southern Westerly Winds (SWW) and westerly-wind stress between the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and pre-industrial in the PMIP3/CMIP5 simulations, highlighting the role of Antarctic sea ice in modulating the wind effect on ocean. Particularly, a de-correlation occurs between the changes in SWW and westerly-wind stress, caused primarily by an equatorward expansion of winter Antarctic sea ice that undermines the efficacy of wind in generating stress over the liquid ocean. Such de-correlation may reflect the LGM condition in reality, in view of the fact that the model which simulates this condition has most fidelity in simulating modern SWW and Antarctic sea ice. Therein two models stand out for their agreements with paleo-evidence regarding the change of SWW and the westerly-wind stress. They simulate strengthened and poleward-migrated LGM SWW in the atmosphere, consistent with the indications from dust records. Whilst in the ocean, they well capture an equatorward-shifted pattern of the observed oceanic front shift, with most pronounced equatorward-shifted westerly wind stress during the LGM.

  18. Anorthite sputtering by H+ and Arq+ (q = 1-9) at solar wind velocities

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hijazi, Hussein Dib; Bannister, Mark E.; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Barghouty, A. F.; Rickman, D. L.; Meyer, Fred W.

    2014-10-16

    Here, we report sputtering measurements of anorthite-like material, taken to be representative of soils found in the lunar highlands, impacted by singly and multicharged ions representative of the solar wind. The ions investigated include protons, as well as singly and multicharged Ar ions (as proxies for the nonreactive heavy solar wind constituents), in the charge state range +1 to +9, at fixed solar wind-relevant impact velocities of 165 and 310 km/s (0.25 keV/amu and 0.5 keV/amu). A quartz microbalance approach (QCM) for determination of total sputtering yields was used. The goal of the measurements was to determine the sputtering contributionmore » of the heavy, multicharged minority solar wind constituents in comparison to that due to the dominant H+ fraction. The QCM results show a yield increase of a factor of about 80 for Ar+ versus H+ sputtering and an enhancement by a factor of 1.67 between Ar9+ and Ar+, which is a clear indication of a potential sputtering effect.« less

  19. Anorthite sputtering by H+ and Arq+ (q = 1-9) at solar wind velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijazi, H.; Bannister, M. E.; Meyer, H. M.; Rouleau, C. M.; Barghouty, A. F.; Rickman, D. L.; Meyer, F. W.

    2014-10-01

    We report sputtering measurements of anorthite-like material, taken to be representative of soils found in the lunar highlands, impacted by singly and multicharged ions representative of the solar wind. The ions investigated include protons, as well as singly and multicharged Ar ions (as proxies for the nonreactive heavy solar wind constituents), in the charge state range +1 to +9, at fixed solar wind-relevant impact velocities of 165 and 310 km/s (0.25 keV/amu and 0.5 keV/amu). A quartz microbalance approach (QCM) for determination of total sputtering yields was used. The goal of the measurements was to determine the sputtering contribution of the heavy, multicharged minority solar wind constituents in comparison to that due to the dominant H+ fraction. The QCM results show a yield increase of a factor of about 80 for Ar+ versus H+ sputtering and an enhancement by a factor of 1.67 between Ar9+ and Ar+, which is a clear indication of a potential sputtering effect.

  20. A simple method to estimate threshold friction velocity of wind erosion in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junran; Okin, Gregory S.; Herrick, Jeffrey E.; Belnap, Jayne; Munson, Seth M.; Miller, Mark E.

    2010-05-01

    This study provides a fast and easy-to-apply method to estimate threshold friction velocity (TFV) of wind erosion in the field. Wind tunnel experiments and a variety of ground measurements including air gun, pocket penetrometer, torvane, and roughness chain were conducted in Moab, Utah and cross-validated in the Mojave Desert, California. Patterns between TFV and ground measurements were examined to identify the optimum method for estimating TFV. The results show that TFVs were best predicted using the air gun and penetrometer measurements in the Moab sites. This empirical method, however, systematically underestimated TFVs in the Mojave Desert sites. Further analysis showed that TFVs in the Mojave sites can be satisfactorily estimated with a correction for rock cover, which is presumably the main cause of the underestimation of TFVs. The proposed method may be also applied to estimate TFVs in environments where other non-erodible elements such as postharvest residuals are found.

  1. Lidar determination of winds by aerosol inhomogeneities: motion velocity in the planetary boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Kolev, I; Parvanov, O; Kaprielov, B

    1988-06-15

    The paper presents results from lidar measurements of wind velocity in the planetary boundary layer using correlation data processing. Two lidars are used in our experiments: a ruby lidar operating along slant paths and a YAG:Nd lidar operating for near vertical sounding used by us for the first time. On the basis of our experience the optimal sizes of aerosol inhomogeneities (30-300 m), the duration of the experiments (2-10 min), and the repetition rate of laser shots (fractions of hertz to several hertz) are determined. The results are compared to independent data obtained from anemometer measurements, theodolite- and radar-tracked pilot balloons. The range of differences is ~1-2 m/s in speed and 10-15 degrees in direction. Preliminary results from the use of lidar data to remotely sound the wind speed for various atmospheric stratifications and synoptic situations are described as well. PMID:20531786

  2. Wind velocity measurements in the neutral boundary layer above hilly prairie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugita, Michiaki; Brutsaert, Wilfried

    1990-01-01

    The Flint Hills region in eastern Kansas is characterized by a strongly dissected rolling to hilly terrain with an average about 25 m of relief between steep ridges and valleys, and with ridges typically separated by distances of the order of 600 m. Intensive radiosonde observations during summer and fall of 1987 allowed the determination of some aspects of the wind regime in the region. For an assumed ground-surface reference of 330 m above sea level (asl), analysis of neutral profiles yielded a value z(0) of about 1.05 m, approximately. Good agreement was obtained between the values of friction velocity derived from wind profiles and values determined independently from the corresponding humidity profiles.

  3. Inferring global wind energetics from a simple Earth system model based on the principle of maximum entropy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkar, S.; Paillard, D.

    2015-03-01

    The question of total available wind power in the atmosphere is highly debated, as well as the effect large scale wind farms would have on the climate. Bottom-up approaches, such as those proposed by wind turbine engineers often lead to non-physical results (non-conservation of energy, mostly), while top-down approaches have proven to give physically consistent results. This paper proposes an original method for the calculation of mean annual wind energetics in the atmosphere, without resorting to heavy numerical integration of the entire dynamics. The proposed method is derived from a model based on the Maximum of Entropy Production (MEP) principle, which has proven to efficiently describe the annual mean temperature and energy fluxes, despite its simplicity. Because the atmosphere is represented with only one vertical layer and there is no vertical wind component, the model fails to represent the general circulation patterns such as cells or trade winds. However, interestingly, global energetic diagnostics are well captured by the mere combination of a simple MEP model and a flux inversion method.

  4. Dynamics of Low-latitude Thermosphere-Ionosphere from Coincident Observations of Zonal Neutral Winds and EPB Velocity from Brazil and Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapagain, N. P.; Makela, J. J.; Meriwether, J. W.; Fisher, D. J.; Chau, J. L.; Buriti, R.

    2013-05-01

    The Remote Equatorial Nighttime Observatory of Ionospheric Regions (RENOIR) experiment comprises a suite of instruments operating in northeastern Brazil at Cajazeiras (6.86°S, 38.56°W) and Cariri (7.38°S, 36.53°W) since 2009. This experiment consists of a wide-angle imaging system at Cajazeiras and Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPI) at each site. As part of a separate experiment, two FPIs were deployed in western Peru at Merihill (11.96°S, 76.86°W) and Nazca (14.97°S, 74.89°W) in 2010. In this presentation, we discuss the results obtained from these experiments. When operating individually, each FPI provides measurements of the zonal or meridional neutral winds in the cardinal look directions. A second mode is available, the common volume mode, in which two FPIs (in either Brazil or Peru) make coordinated and collocated measurements of both the zonal and meridional winds. Using the resultant data, we present the climatology of thermospheric neutral winds during the transition from the deep solar minimum to the impending solar maximum conditions from both the east and west coasts of South America. Furthermore, we discuss the coupling between the thermosphere and ionosphere through an analysis of coincident observations of the zonal neutral winds and the drift velocities of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs). The results show the neutral winds and EPB drift velocities agree well, illustrating that the F-region dynamo is, in general, fully developed. However, in the early evening hours, the EPB drift velocity is slower than that of the neutral winds on several occasions suggesting the F-region dynamo is not fully activated during the development phase of the EPBs.

  5. Maximum tension and force-velocity properties of fatigued, single Xenopus muscle fibres studied by caffeine and high K+.

    PubMed Central

    Lännergren, J; Westerblad, H

    1989-01-01

    1. The importance of reduced maximum force-generating capacity in the development of skeletal muscle fatigue has been studied using potassium and caffeine contractures as tools. 2. Single, intact fibres isolated from the lumbrical and iliofibularis muscles of Xenopus were fatigued by repeated tetanic stimulations until they produced close to 40% of the original tetanic tension (P0). Using this stimulation scheme three major types of fibres can be distinguished: easily fatigued (type 1), fatigue resistant (type 2), and very fatigue-resistant (type 3) fibres (Westerblad & Lännergren, 1986). 3. When activated by 8-15 mM-caffeine-Ringer solutions fatigued fibres of all three types developed tensions similar to those of controls (81.0 +/- 6.6 vs. 83.9 +/- 4.2% of P0, respectively; means +/- S.D.). 4. Tension output also increased markedly when fatigued fibres were depolarized by 190 mM-K+ solution. The tension produced was in this case fibre type dependent: 71.4 +/- 6.6, 81.3 +/- 2.5 and 95.0 +/- 4.4% of P0 in fibre types 1, 2 and 3, respectively. 5. Force-velocity measurements were performed during caffeine contractures in fatigued iliofibularis fibres (types 1 and 2) to obtain more information about the functional state of cross-bridges. 6. In fatigued type 1 fibres the shortening velocity was reduced to about 25% of that in controls, while it was not significantly depressed in type 2 fibres. 7. It is concluded that cross-bridges of fatigued fibres can produce nearly full tension, but they may work at a much slower rate in this state. 8. Fibre types 1 and 2 mostly display a long-lasting, reversible state of severely depressed tension production during the recovery period, which has been named post-contractile depression, PCD (Westerblad & Lännergren, 1986). Fibres tested in this state generated full caffeine-activated tension and the shortening velocity was not significantly reduced. The tension output during K+ contractures was, however, markedly depressed (12

  6. The Northern Extent of the Southern Hemisphere Westerly Wind Belt since the Last Glacial Maximum Tracked via Sediment Provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzese, A. M.; Goldstein, S. L.; Hemming, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Southern Hemisphere Westerlies are known to be important for climate due to their effects on the global carbon cycle and on the global thermohaline circulation. Many proxy records suggest that the strength and position of the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds have changed significantly since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at ~21,000 years BP. However, a recent compilation of all available evidence for Southern Hemisphere westerly wind changes during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) led to the conclusion that "their strength and position in colder and warmer climates relative to today remain a wide open question" (Kohfeld et al. (2013) Quaternary Science Reviews, 68). This paper finds that an equatorward displacement of the glacial winds is consistent with observations, but cannot rule out other, competing hypotheses. Using the geochemical characteristics of deep-sea sediments deposited along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, I test the hypothesis that the LGM Southern Hemisphere Westerlies were displaced northward. In the central South Atlantic, dust can be delivered from South America via the Westerlies, or from Africa via the Trade Winds. The continental sources of South America and Africa have very different geochemical signatures, making it possible to distinguish between eolian transport via the Westerlies vs. the Trade Winds. Any northward shift in the Southern Hemisphere Westerlies would increase the northward extent of a South American provenance in sediments dominated by eolian sources. I will present geochemical provenance data (radiogenic isotope ratios; major and trace element concentrations) in a latitudinal transect of cores along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge that document whether, in fact, such a shift occurred, and put an important constraint on how far north the wind belts shifted during the LGM.

  7. Maximum voluntary joint torque as a function of joint angle and angular velocity: model development and application to the lower limb.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Dennis E; Madigan, Michael L; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of human strength can be important during analyses of physical activities. Such measurements have often taken the form of the maximum voluntary torque at a single joint angle and angular velocity. However, the available strength varies substantially with joint position and velocity. When examining dynamic activities, strength measurements should account for these variations. A model is presented of maximum voluntary joint torque as a function of joint angle and angular velocity. The model is based on well-known physiological relationships between muscle force and length and between muscle force and velocity and was tested by fitting it to maximum voluntary joint torque data from six different exertions in the lower limb. Isometric, concentric and eccentric maximum voluntary contractions were collected during hip extension, hip flexion, knee extension, knee flexion, ankle plantar flexion and dorsiflexion. Model parameters are reported for each of these exertion directions by gender and age group. This model provides an efficient method by which strength variations with joint angle and angular velocity may be incorporated into comparisons between joint torques calculated by inverse dynamics and the maximum available joint torques. PMID:17485097

  8. Revised Model of the Steady-state Solar Wind Halo Electron Velocity Distribution Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Kim, Sunjung; Choe, G. S.; moon, Y.-J.

    2016-08-01

    A recent study discussed the steady-state model for solar wind electrons during quiet time conditions. The electrons emanating from the Sun are treated in a composite three-population model—the low-energy Maxwellian core with an energy range of tens of eV, the intermediate ∼102–103 eV energy-range (“halo”) electrons, and the high ∼103–105 eV energy-range (“super-halo”) electrons. In the model, the intermediate energy halo electrons are assumed to be in resonance with transverse EM fluctuations in the whistler frequency range (∼102 Hz), while the high-energy super-halo electrons are presumed to be in steady-state wave–particle resonance with higher-frequency electrostatic fluctuations in the Langmuir frequency range (∼105 Hz). A comparison with STEREO and WIND spacecraft data was also made. However, ignoring the influence of Langmuir fluctuations on the halo population turns out to be an unjustifiable assumption. The present paper rectifies the previous approach by including both Langmuir and whistler fluctuations in the construction of the steady-state velocity distribution function for the halo population, and demonstrates that the role of whistler-range fluctuation is minimal unless the fluctuation intensity is arbitrarily raised. This implies that the Langmuir-range fluctuations, known as the quasi thermal noise, are important for both halo and super-halo electron velocity distribution.

  9. Estimation of Venus wind velocities from high-resolution infrared spectra. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. A. H.

    1978-01-01

    Zonal velocity profiles in the Venus atmosphere above the clouds were estimated from measured asymmetries of HCl and HF infrared absorption lines in high-resolution Fourier interferometer spectra of the planet. These asymmetries are caused by both pressure-induced shifts in the positions of the hydrogen-halide lines perturbed by CO2 and Doppler shifts due to atmospheric motions. Particularly in the case of the HCl 2-0 band, the effects of the two types of line shifts can be easily isolated, making it possible to estimate a profile of average Venus equatorial zonal velocity as a function of pressure in the region roughly 60 to 70 km above the surface of the planet. The mean profiles obtained show strong vertical shear in the Venus zonal winds near the cloud-top level, and both the magnitude and direction of winds at all levels in this region appear to vary greatly with longitude relative to the sub-solar point.

  10. Revised Model of the Steady-state Solar Wind Halo Electron Velocity Distribution Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Kim, Sunjung; Choe, G. S.; moon, Y.-J.

    2016-08-01

    A recent study discussed the steady-state model for solar wind electrons during quiet time conditions. The electrons emanating from the Sun are treated in a composite three-population model—the low-energy Maxwellian core with an energy range of tens of eV, the intermediate ˜102–103 eV energy-range (“halo”) electrons, and the high ˜103–105 eV energy-range (“super-halo”) electrons. In the model, the intermediate energy halo electrons are assumed to be in resonance with transverse EM fluctuations in the whistler frequency range (˜102 Hz), while the high-energy super-halo electrons are presumed to be in steady-state wave–particle resonance with higher-frequency electrostatic fluctuations in the Langmuir frequency range (˜105 Hz). A comparison with STEREO and WIND spacecraft data was also made. However, ignoring the influence of Langmuir fluctuations on the halo population turns out to be an unjustifiable assumption. The present paper rectifies the previous approach by including both Langmuir and whistler fluctuations in the construction of the steady-state velocity distribution function for the halo population, and demonstrates that the role of whistler-range fluctuation is minimal unless the fluctuation intensity is arbitrarily raised. This implies that the Langmuir-range fluctuations, known as the quasi thermal noise, are important for both halo and super-halo electron velocity distribution.

  11. Three-dimensional velocity measurements around a rotating vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletti, Filippo; Ryan, Kevin; Dabiri, John; Eaton, John

    2013-11-01

    Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWT) can be more closely spaced than conventional horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT), which points to a potentially greater power that can be extracted from a given wind farm footprint. In order to optimize the inter-turbine spacing and to investigate the potential for constructive aerodynamic interactions, the complex dynamics of VAWT wakes need to be analyzed. To date, only single-point or at best two-dimensional measurements of such wakes have been documented. We have measured the full three-component mean velocity field around and downstream the scaled-down model of a rotating VAWT by Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry (MRV). The high spatial resolution allows to quantitatively explore the structure of the wake, its interaction with the floor, and its development. The flow is shown to be highly three-dimensional and asymmetric for the whole investigated region (up to 7 diameters downstream of the turbine). These results can inform low-order models to predict the performance of turbine arrays.

  12. Nearly Dissipationless Evolution of Solar Wind Velocity Fluctuations Near the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, D.

    2012-12-01

    Various observations have suggested that there is a need for a strong dissipation mechanism in the solar wind at Solar Probe distances in order to bring agreement between coronal and in situ observations of fluctuations in the plasma velocity. This paper will show that using the best data we have, from the SOHO SUMER and UVCS measurements in the corona and Helios measurements from 0.3 to 1 AU, that the observations match quite well a nearly dissipationless (WKB) evolution apart from the turbulent dissipation known to take place in the heliosphere. The evolution of the amplitudes, especially in unstructured slow or fast solar wind, is consistent with a model in which the turbulent dissipation begins to be important some distance out in the heliosphere (0.2 AU?), and does not play a strong role closer in. Fluctuations in more structured, less Alfvénic, wind may have undergone more dissipation, but are consistent with the same level of fluctuations near the Sun as the Alfvénic regions.

  13. Vertical velocity variance in the mixed layer from radar wind profilers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eng, K.; Coulter, R.L.; Brutsaert, W.

    2003-01-01

    Vertical velocity variance data were derived from remotely sensed mixed layer turbulence measurements at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) facility in Butler County, Kansas. These measurements and associated data were provided by a collection of instruments that included two 915 MHz wind profilers, two radio acoustic sounding systems, and two eddy correlation devices. The data from these devices were available through the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE) database operated by Argonne National Laboratory. A signal processing procedure outlined by Angevine et al. was adapted and further built upon to derive vertical velocity variance, w_pm???2, from 915 MHz wind profiler measurements in the mixed layer. The proposed procedure consisted of the application of a height-dependent signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) filter, removal of outliers plus and minus two standard deviations about the mean on the spectral width squared, and removal of the effects of beam broadening and vertical shearing of horizontal winds. The scatter associated with w_pm???2 was mainly affected by the choice of SNR filter cutoff values. Several different sets of cutoff values were considered, and the optimal one was selected which reduced the overall scatter on w_pm???2 and yet retained a sufficient number of data points to average. A similarity relationship of w_pm???2 versus height was established for the mixed layer on the basis of the available data. A strong link between the SNR and growth/decay phases of turbulence was identified. Thus, the mid to late afternoon hours, when strong surface heating occurred, were observed to produce the highest quality signals.

  14. Vertical velocity variance in the mixed layer from radar wind profilers.

    SciTech Connect

    Eng, K.; Coulter, R. L.; Brutsaert, W.; Environmental Research; Cornell Univ.

    2003-11-01

    Vertical velocity variance data were derived from remotely sensed mixed layer turbulence measurements at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) facility in Butler County, Kansas. These measurements and associated data were provided by a collection of instruments that included two 915 MHz wind profilers, two radio acoustic sounding systems, and two eddy correlation devices. The data from these devices were available through the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE) database operated by Argonne National Laboratory. A signal processing procedure outlined by Angevine et al. was adapted and further built upon to derive vertical velocity variance, {omega}'{sup 2}, from 915 MHz wind profiler measurements in the mixed layer. The proposed procedure consisted of the application of a height-dependent signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) filter, removal of outliers plus and minus two standard deviations about the mean on the spectral width squared, and removal of the effects of beam broadening and vertical shearing of horizontal winds. The scatter associated with {omega}'{sup 2} was mainly affected by the choice of SNR filter cutoff values. Several different sets of cutoff values were considered, and the optimal one was selected which reduced the overall scatter on {omega}'{sup 2} and yet retained a sufficient number of data points to average. A similarity relationship of {omega}'{sup 2} versus height was established for the mixed layer on the basis of the available data. A strong link between the SNR and growth/decay phases of turbulence was identified. Thus, the mid to late afternoon hours, when strong surface heating occurred, were observed to produce the highest quality signals.

  15. Electron Velocity Distribution Function in Magnetic Clouds in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieves-Chinchil, Teresa; Vinas, Adolfo F.; Bale, Stuart D.

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of the kinetic properties of the electron velocity distribution functions within magnetic clouds, since they are the dominant thermal component. The study is based on high time resolution data from the GSFC WIND/SWE electron spectrometer and the Berkeley 3DP electron plasma instruments. Recent studies on magnetic clouds have shown observational evidence of anti-correlation between the total electron density and electron temperature, which suggest a polytrope law P(sub e) = alpha(Nu(sub e) (sup gamma)) for electrons with the constant gamma approximates 0.5 < 1. This anti-correlation and small polytropic gamma-values is interpreted in the context of the presence of highly non-Maxwellian electron distributions (i.e. non-thermal) within magnetic clouds. These works suggested that the non-thermal electrons can contribute as much as 50% of the total electron pressure within magnetic clouds. We have revisited some of the magnetic cloud events previously studied and attempted to quantify the nature of the non-thermal electrons by modeling the electron velocity distribution function using a kappa distribution function to characterize the kinetic non-thermal effects. If non-thermal tail effects are the source for the anti-correlation between the moment electron temperature and density and if the kappa distribution is a reasonable representative model of non-thermal effects, then the electron velocity distribution within magnetic clouds should show indication for small K-values when gamma < 1.

  16. Measuring air-sea gas exchange velocities in a large scale annular wind-wave tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesarchaki, E.; Kräuter, C.; Krall, K. E.; Bopp, M.; Helleis, F.; Williams, J.; Jähne, B.

    2014-06-01

    In this study we present gas exchange measurements conducted in a large scale wind-wave tank. Fourteen chemical species spanning a wide range of solubility (dimensionless solubility, α = 0.4 to 5470) and diffusivity (Schmidt number in water, Scw = 594 to 1194) were examined under various turbulent (u10 = 0.8 to 15 m s-1 conditions. Additional experiments were performed under different surfactant modulated (two different concentration levels of Triton X-100) surface states. This paper details the complete methodology, experimental procedure and instrumentation used to derive the total transfer velocity for all examined tracers. The results presented here demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method, and the derived gas exchange velocities are shown to be comparable to previous investigations. The gas transfer behaviour is exemplified by contrasting two species at the two solubility extremes, namely nitrous oxide (N2O) and methanol (CH3OH). Interestingly, a strong transfer velocity reduction (up to a factor of three) was observed for N2O under a surfactant covered water surface. In contrast, the surfactant affected CH3OH, the high solubility tracer only weakly.

  17. THE LICK AGN MONITORING PROJECT: VELOCITY-DELAY MAPS FROM THE MAXIMUM-ENTROPY METHOD FOR Arp 151

    SciTech Connect

    Bentz, Misty C.; Barth, Aaron J.; Walsh, Jonelle L.; Horne, Keith; Bennert, Vardha Nicola; Treu, Tommaso; Canalizo, Gabriela; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Gates, Elinor L.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Minezaki, Takeo; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2010-09-01

    We present velocity-delay maps for optical H I, He I, and He II recombination lines in Arp 151, recovered by fitting a reverberation model to spectrophotometric monitoring data using the maximum-entropy method. H I response is detected over the range 0-15 days, with the response confined within the virial envelope. The Balmer-line maps have similar morphologies but exhibit radial stratification, with progressively longer delays for H{gamma} to H{beta} to H{alpha}. The He I and He II response is confined within 1-2 days. There is a deficit of prompt response in the Balmer-line cores but strong prompt response in the red wings. Comparison with simple models identifies two classes that reproduce these features: free-falling gas and a half-illuminated disk with a hot spot at small radius on the receding lune. Symmetrically illuminated models with gas orbiting in an inclined disk or an isotropic distribution of randomly inclined circular orbits can reproduce the virial structure but not the observed asymmetry. Radial outflows are also largely ruled out by the observed asymmetry. A warped-disk geometry provides a physically plausible mechanism for the asymmetric illumination and hot spot features. Simple estimates show that a disk in the broad-line region of Arp 151 could be unstable to warping induced by radiation pressure. Our results demonstrate the potential power of detailed modeling combined with monitoring campaigns at higher cadence to characterize the gas kinematics and physical processes that give rise to the broad emission lines in active galactic nuclei.

  18. The microscopic state of the solar wind: Links between composition, velocity distributions, waves and turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsch, E.

    1995-01-01

    An overview is given of the microscopic state of the solar wind with emphasis on recent Ulysses high-latitude observations and previous Helios in-ecliptic observations. The possible links between composition, ionization state. velocity distribution functions of electrons, protons and heavy ions. kinetic plasma waves and MHD-scale turbulence are elaborated. Emphasis is placed on a connection of interplanetary kinetic-scale phenomena with their generating microscopic processes in the corona. The fast streams seem to consist of mesoscale pressure-balanced plasma filaments and magnetic flux tubes, reminiscent of the supergranular-size structures building the open corona, from which copious Alfven waves emanate. The wind from the magnetically structured and active corona shows developed compressive turbulence and considerable abundance and ionization state variations. Some modelling attempts to explain the observed element fractionation are briefly reviewed. The causes of the nonthermal particle features. such as proton-ion differential streaming, ion beams. temperature anisotropies, and skewed distributions associated with collisionless heat conduction, are ultimately to be searched in the fact, that the corona is never quiescent but fundamentally variable in space and time. Consequently, the radial evolution of the internal state of the wind resembles at all latitudes a complicated relaxation process, in the course of which the free (in comparison with LTE conditions) particle kinetic energy is converted into plasma waves and MHD turbulence on a wide range of scales. This leads to intermittent wave-particle interactions and unsteady anomalous transport, mixed with the weak effects of the rare Coulomb collisions. Spherical expansion and large-scale inhomogeneity forces the wind to attain microscopically a complex internal state of dynamic statistical equilibrium.

  19. Estimations of relative effort during sit-to-stand increase when accounting for variations in maximum voluntary torque with joint angle and angular velocity.

    PubMed

    Bieryla, Kathleen A; Anderson, Dennis E; Madigan, Michael L

    2009-02-01

    The main purpose of this study was to compare three methods of determining relative effort during sit-to-stand (STS). Fourteen young (mean 19.6+/-SD 1.2 years old) and 17 older (61.7+/-5.5 years old) adults completed six STS trials at three speeds: slow, normal, and fast. Sagittal plane joint torques at the hip, knee, and ankle were calculated through inverse dynamics. Isometric and isokinetic maximum voluntary contractions (MVC) for the hip, knee, and ankle were collected and used for model parameters to predict the participant-specific maximum voluntary joint torque. Three different measures of relative effort were determined by normalizing STS joint torques to three different estimates of maximum voluntary torque. Relative effort at the hip, knee, and ankle were higher when accounting for variations in maximum voluntary torque with joint angle and angular velocity (hip=26.3+/-13.5%, knee=78.4+/-32.2%, ankle=27.9+/-14.1%) compared to methods which do not account for these variations (hip=23.5+/-11.7%, knee=51.7+/-15.0%, ankle=20.7+/-10.4%). At higher velocities, the difference in calculating relative effort with respect to isometric MVC or incorporating joint angle and angular velocity became more evident. Estimates of relative effort that account for the variations in maximum voluntary torque with joint angle and angular velocity may provide higher levels of accuracy compared to methods based on measurements of maximal isometric torques. PMID:17720539

  20. Calculation of area-averaged vertical profiles of the horizontal wind velocity from volume-imaging lidar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schols, J. L.; Eloranta, E. W.

    1992-01-01

    Area-averaged horizontal wind measurements are derived from the motion of spatial inhomogeneities in aerosol backscattering observed with a volume-imaging lidar. Spatial averaging provides high precision, reducing sample variations of wind measurements well below the level of turbulent fluctuations, even under conditions of very light mean winds and strong convection or under the difficult conditions represented by roll convection. Wind velocities are measured using the two-dimensional spatial cross correlation computed between successive horizontal plane maps of aerosol backscattering, assembled from three-dimensional lidar scans. Prior to calculation of the correlation function, three crucial steps are performed: (1) the scans are corrected for image distortion by the wind during a finite scan time; (2) a temporal high pass median filtering is applied to eliminate structures that do not move with the wind; and (3) a histogram equalization is employed to reduce biases to the brightest features.

  1. Two-dimensional Cascade Investigation of the Maximum Exit Tangential Velocity Component and Other Flow Conditions at the Exit of Several Turbine Blade Designs at Supercritical Pressure Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, Cavour H; Plohr, Henry W

    1951-01-01

    The nature of the flow at the exit of a row of turbine blades for the range of conditions represented by four different blade configurations was evaluated by the conservation-of-momentum principle using static-pressure surveys and by analysis of Schlieren photographs of the flow. It was found that for blades of the type investigated, the maximum exit tangential-velocity component is a function of the blade geometry only and can be accurately predicted by the method of characteristics. A maximum value of exit velocity coefficient is obtained at a pressure ratio immediately below that required for maximum blade loading followed by a sharp drop after maximum blade loading occurs.

  2. Maximum wind radius estimated by the 50 kt radius: improvement of storm surge forecasting over the Western North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, H.; Wu, W.

    2015-10-01

    Even though the maximum wind radius (Rmax) is an important parameter in determining the intensity and size of tropical cyclones, it has been overlooked in previous storm surge studies. This research reviewed the existing estimation methods of Rmax based on the central pressure or maximum wind speed. These over or underestimated Rmax because of the substantial variety of the data, though an average radius could be moderately estimated. Alternatively, we proposed an Rmax estimation method based on the radius of the 50 knot wind (R50). The data obtained during the passage of strong typhoons by a meteorological station network in the Japanese archipelago enabled us to derive the following formula, Rmax = 0.23R50. Although this new method substantially improved the estimation of Rmax compared to the existing models, an estimation error was unavoidable because of fundamental uncertainties regarding the typhoon's structure or insufficient number of available typhoon data. In fact, a numerical simulation from 2013 Typhoon Haiyan demonstrated a substantial difference in the storm surge height for different Rmax. Therefore, the variability of Rmax should be taken into account in storm surge simulations, independently of the model used, to minimize the risk of over or underestimation of storm surges. The proposed method is expected to increase the reliability of storm surge prediction and contribute to disaster risk management, particularly in the Western North Pacific, including countries such as Japan, China, Taiwan, Philippines, and Vietnam.

  3. Design of a near-IR coherent lidar for high spatial and velocity resolution wind measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grund, Christian J.; Post, Madison J.

    1992-01-01

    A coherent Doppler lidar based on a CW diode-pumped, injection seeded, Th:YAG laser operating at approx. 2.02 microns is currently under development. This system is optimized for measurements of boundary layer winds with high spatial, temporal, and velocity resolution. Initially, the system will run alongside a new high repetition rate (5-10 kHz) CO2 mini-Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (mini-MOPA) Doppler lidar, which will provide simultaneous range-resolved Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) water vapor measurements. Water vapor DIAL operation of the 2 micron system is being considered as a future option. The anticipated specifications and the preliminary design are discussed.

  4. Wind tunnel investigation of the effect of high relative velocities on the structural integrity of birds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bresnahan, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in a supersonic wind tunnel to determine the effect a sudden high velocity headwind had on the physical deformation and structural breakup characteristics of birds. Several sizes of recently killed birds were dropped into the test section at free-stream Mach numbers ranging from 0.2 to 0.8 and photographed with high-speed motion-picture cameras. These conditions simulated flow conditions encountered when birds are ingested into the inlets of high speed aircraft, thereby constituting a safety hazard to the aircraft and its occupants. The investigation shows that, over the range of headwind conditions tested, the birds remained structurally intact and did not suffer any appreciable deformation or structural breakup.

  5. Horizontal plasma flow velocities in the ionosphere of Mars - A test case for the solar wind interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, R. P.; Whitten, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    On the apparently nonmagnetic planets Mars and Venus, ionospheric plasma can be driven from the day to the nightside by two different mechanisms: (1) the pressure gradient force across the terminator, and (2) a solar wind-induced force via a viscous boundary layer interaction. Calculations of the horizontal flow velocities in the ionosphere of Mars using the two mechanisms produce results differing by an order of magnitude. It is pointed out that the detailed observations of the horizontal flow velocity in the ionosphere of Mars may provide a test case for the resolution of some problems relating to the interaction of the solar wind with the planets Mars and Venus.

  6. Measurement of the horizontal velocity of wind perturbations in the middle atmosphere by spaced MF radar systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meek, C. E.; Manson, A. H.; Smith, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    Two remote receiving sites have been set up at a distance of approx 40 km from the main MF radar system. This allows measurement of upper atmosphere winds from 60-120 km (3 km resolution) at the corners of an approximately equilateral triangle of side approx 20 km. Some preliminary data are compared through cross correlation and cross spectral analysis in an attempt to determine the horizontal velocity of wind perturbations and/or the horizontal wavelength and phase velocity of gravity waves.

  7. AXAOTHER XL -- A spreadsheet for determining doses for incidents caused by tornadoes or high-velocity straight winds

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, A.A.

    1996-09-01

    AXAOTHER XL is an Excel Spreadsheet used to determine dose to the maximally exposed offsite individual during high-velocity straight winds or tornado conditions. Both individual and population doses may be considered. Potential exposure pathways are inhalation and plume shine. For high-velocity straight winds the spreadsheet has the capability to determine the downwind relative air concentration, however for the tornado conditions, the user must enter the relative air concentration. Theoretical models are discussed and hand calculations are performed to ensure proper application of methodologies. A section has also been included that contains user instructions for the spreadsheet.

  8. Flying Drosophila stabilize their vision-based velocity controller by sensing wind with their antennae

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Sawyer Buckminster; Straw, Andrew D.; Peek, Martin Y.; Murray, Richard M.; Dickinson, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Flies and other insects use vision to regulate their groundspeed in flight, enabling them to fly in varying wind conditions. Compared with mechanosensory modalities, however, vision requires a long processing delay (~100 ms) that might introduce instability if operated at high gain. Flies also sense air motion with their antennae, but how this is used in flight control is unknown. We manipulated the antennal function of fruit flies by ablating their aristae, forcing them to rely on vision alone to regulate groundspeed. Arista-ablated flies in flight exhibited significantly greater groundspeed variability than intact flies. We then subjected them to a series of controlled impulsive wind gusts delivered by an air piston and experimentally manipulated antennae and visual feedback. The results show that an antenna-mediated response alters wing motion to cause flies to accelerate in the same direction as the gust. This response opposes flying into a headwind, but flies regularly fly upwind. To resolve this discrepancy, we obtained a dynamic model of the fly’s velocity regulator by fitting parameters of candidate models to our experimental data. The model suggests that the groundspeed variability of arista-ablated flies is the result of unstable feedback oscillations caused by the delay and high gain of visual feedback. The antenna response drives active damping with a shorter delay (~20 ms) to stabilize this regulator, in exchange for increasing the effect of rapid wind disturbances. This provides insight into flies’ multimodal sensory feedback architecture and constitutes a previously unknown role for the antennae. PMID:24639532

  9. Development of a Convection Risk Index to forecast severe weather, and application to predict maximum wind speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuiyan, M. A. E.; Wanik, D. W.; Scerbo, D.; Anagnostou, E. N.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a tool, the Convection Risk Index (CRI), to represent the severity, timing and location of convection for select geographic areas. The CRI is calculated from the Convection Risk Matrix (CRM), a tabulation of numerous meteorological parameters which are categorized into four broad factors that contribute to convection (surface and lower level moisture, atmospheric instability, vertical wind shear, and lift); each of these factors have historically been utilized by meteorologists to predict the likelihood for development of thunderstorms. The CRM ascribes a specific threshold value to each parameter in such a way that it creates a unique tool used to calculate the risk for seeing the development of thunderstorms. The parameters were combined using a weighted formula and which when calculated, yields the Convection Risk Index 1 to 4 scale, with 4 being the highest risk for seeing strong convection. In addition, we also evaluated the performance of the parameters in the CRM and CRI for predicting the maximum wind speed in areas where we calculated the CRI using nonparametric tree-based model, Bayesian additive trees (BART). The use of the CRI and the predicted wind speeds from BART can be used to better inform emergency preparedness efforts in government and industry.We have developed a tool, the Convection Risk Index (CRI), to represent the severity, timing and location of convection for select geographic areas. The CRI is calculated from the Convection Risk Matrix (CRM), a tabulation of numerous meteorological parameters which are categorized into four broad factors that contribute to convection (surface and lower level moisture, atmospheric instability, vertical wind shear, and lift); each of these factors have historically been utilized by meteorologists to predict the likelihood for development of thunderstorms. The CRM ascribes a specific threshold value to each parameter in such a way that it creates a unique tool used to calculate the risk for

  10. Estimating wind velocity standard deviation values in the inertial sublayer from observations in the roughness sublayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falabino, Simona; Trini Castelli, Silvia

    2016-05-01

    In air quality practice, observed data are often input to air pollution models to simulate the pollutants dispersion and to estimate their concentration. When the area of interest includes urban sites, observed data collected at urban or suburban stations can be available, and it can happen to use them for estimating surface layer parameters given in input to the models. In such case, roughness sublayer quantities may enter the parameterizations of the turbulence variables as if they were representative of the inertial sublayer, possibly leading to a not appropriate application of the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. We investigate whether it is possible to derive suitable values of the wind velocity standard deviations for the inertial sublayer using the friction velocity and stability parameter observed in the roughness sublayer, inside a similarity-like analytical function. For this purpose, an analysis of sonic anemometer data sets collected in suburban and urban sites is proposed. The values derived through this approach are compared to actual observations in the inertial sublayer. The transferability of the empirical coefficients estimated for the similarity functions between different sites, characterized by similar or different morphologies, is also addressed. The derived functions proved to be a reasonable approximation of the actual data. This method was found to be feasible and generally reliable, and can be a reference to keep using, in air pollution models, the similarity theory parameterizations when measurements are available only in the roughness sublayer.

  11. Design of a control scheme for a maximum power extraction in low power wind turbine-generator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henao Bravo, Elkin Edilberto

    This document presents the modeling of a wind turbine-generator system and developing a control scheme for maximum power extraction. The system comprises a low-power variable speed wind rotor coupled to a squirrel cage induction generator through gearbox. The generator delivers electrical energy to a DC load through a PWM three phase rectifier which control variables are duty cycle and the fundamental frequency of the modulated signal. The control scheme maintains constant relationship voltage/frequency in the stator of the generator to operate the machine with constant air gap flow at its nominal value, thereby decreasing electrical losses in the circuit of the stator and rotor. The controller is based on MPPT algorithms for determining the operating point the system and achieve the proper mechanical speed shaft. The performance is evaluated through simulations in MatlabRTM/simulink. and presents this type of control as a good alternative for handling low-power wind turbine-generator systems effectively and efficiently

  12. A dual velocity in the highly ionized wind of the luminous narrow line Seyfert galaxy PG 1211+143

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pounds, K. A.; Lobban, A.; Reeves, J. N.; Vaughan, S.

    2016-05-01

    An extended XMM-Newton observation of the luminous narrow line Seyfert galaxy PG 1211+143 in 2014 has revealed a complex high velocity outflow, with components distinguished in velocity, ionization and short-term variability. We report here the detection of previously unseen spectral structure in Fe K absorption, finding a second velocity component of the highly ionized wind, apparently co-moving with a low ionization flow detected in the soft X-ray spectrum. Comparison with the first observation in 2001 finds a similar outflow energy rate.

  13. Effect of Wind Tunnel Air Velocity on VOC Flux from Standard Solutions and CAFO Manure/Wastewater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers and practitioners have used wind tunnels and flux chambers to quantify the flux of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide and estimate emission factors from animal feeding operations (AFOs) without accounting for effects of air velocity or sweep air flow rate. L...

  14. Statistical mapping of ULF Pc3 velocity fluctuations in the Earth's dayside magnetosheath as a function of solar wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmock, A. P.; Nykyri, K.; Osmane, A.; Pulkkinen, T. I.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a statistical study of Pc3 velocity fluctuations in the Earth's dayside magnetosheath. There exists a notable dawn-dusk asymmetry, such that velocity fluctuations generally exhibit enhanced spectral power in the magnetosheath downstream of the quasi-parallel shock. The fluctuations in the central magnetosheath and close to bow shock tend to dampen with increasing tail-ward distance while the opposite trend is observed close to the magnetopause. This strongly suggests that velocity shear driven processes such as the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability drive Pc3 flow variations close to the magnetopause as the velocity shear increases with increasing tail-ward distance. We also show strong evidence that Pc3 velocity fluctuations are significantly enhanced during intervals of faster solar wind speeds. We see negligible differences between data collected during northward and southward IMF orientations, but in general, a dawn-favoured asymmetry persists.

  15. The Evolution of the Spectrum of Solar Wind Velocity Fluctuations from 0.3 to 5 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Recent work has shown that at 1 AU from the Sun the power spectrum of the solar wind magnetic field has the -5/3 spectral slope expected for Kolmogorov turbulence, but that the velocity has closer to a -3/2 spectrum. This paper traces the changes in solar wind velocity spectra from 0.3 to 5 AU using data from the Helios and Ulysses spacecraft to show that this is a transient stage in solar-wind evolution. The spectrum of the velocity is found to be flatter than that of the magnetic field for the higher frequencies examined for all cases until the slopes become equal (at -5/3) well past 1 AU when the wind is relatively nonAlfvenic. In some respects, in particular in the evolution of the frequency at which the spectrum changes from flatter at larger scales to a "turbulent" spectrum at smaller scales, the velocity field evolves more rapidly than the magnetic, and this is associated with the dominance of the magnetic energy over the kinetic at "inertial range" scales. The speed of the flow is argued to be largely unrelated to the spectral slopes, consistent with previous work, whereas high Alfvenicity appears to slow the spectral evolution, as expected from theory. This study shows that, for the solar wind, the idea of a simple "inertial range" with uniform spectral properties is not realistic, and new phenomenologies will be needed to capture the true situation. It is also noted that a flattening of the velocity spectrum often occurs at small scales.

  16. Covariance statistics of turbulence velocity components for wind-energy-conversion system design-homogeneous, isotropic case

    SciTech Connect

    Fichtl, G.H.

    1983-09-01

    When designing a wind energy converison system (WECS), it may be necessary to take into account the distribution of wind across the disc of rotation. The specific engineering applications include structural strength, fatigue, and control. This wind distribution consists of two parts, namely that associated with the mean wind profile and that associated with the turbulence velocity fluctuation field. The work reported herein is aimed at the latter, namely the distribution of turbulence velocity fluctuations across the WECS disk of rotation. A theory is developed for the two-time covariance matrix for turbulence velocity vector components for wind energy conversion system (WECS) design. The theory is developed for homogeneous and iotropic turbulance with the assumption that Taylor's hypothesis is valid. The Eulerian turbulence velocity vector field is expanded about the hub of the WECS. Formulae are developed for the turbulence velocity vector component covariance matrix following the WECS blade elements. It is shown that upon specification of the turbulence energy spectrum function and the WECS rotation rate, the two-point, two-time covariance matrix of the turbulent flow relative to the WECS bladed elements is determined. This covariance matrix is represented as the sum of nonstationary and stationary contributions. Generalized power spectral methods are used to obtain two-point, double frequency power spectral density functions for the turbulent flow following the blade elements. The Dryden turbulence model is used to demonstrate the theory. A discussion of linear system response analysis is provided to show how the double frequency turbulence spectra might be used to calculate response spectra of a WECS to turbulent flow. Finally the spectrum of the component of turbulence normal to the WECS disc of rotation, following the blade elements, is compared with experimental results.

  17. Aging of solar wind magnetic and velocity fluctuations from observations in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, M. E.; Dasso, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Weygand, J. M.; Marsch, E.

    2010-12-01

    The heliosphere is a natural laboratory to study several aspects of Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. MHD fluctuations are ubiquitous in the solar wind (SW) and 'in situ' observations of plasma properties and magnetic field are one of the keys to unveil the secrets of MHD turbulence. In the interplanetary medium, MHD scale fluctuations are usually anisotropic, and these fluctuations frequently present different properties in regions of quasi-stationary SW with different bulk plasma parameters, or in regions associated with the presence of transients (e.g., magnetic clouds). It is known that the spatial structure of magnetic and velocity correlation functions evolves in the inner heliosphere. This evolution in terms of the aging of plasma parcels, as observed by the spacecrafts Helios 1-2, is the subject of the work presented here. Particular interest is put on the evolution of anisotropies in the integral length scale. Results are consistent with driving modes with wavevectors parallel to the direction of the local mean magnetic field near Sun, and a progressive spectral transfer of energy to modes with perpendicular wavevectors. Advances made in this direction, as those presented here, will be usefull to refine models used to describe the propagation and diffusion of charged solar and galactic energetic particles in the inner heliosphere, and will contribute to understand the MHD Alfvenic wave activity for this system.

  18. Diode laser lidar wind velocity sensor using a liquid-crystal retarder for non-mechanical beam-steering.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Peter John; Iversen, Theis F Q; Hu, Qi; Pedersen, Christian

    2014-11-01

    We extend the functionality of a low-cost CW diode laser coherent lidar from radial wind speed (scalar) sensing to wind velocity (vector) measurements. Both speed and horizontal direction of the wind at ~80 m remote distance are derived from two successive radial speed estimates by alternately steering the lidar probe beam in two different lines-of-sight (LOS) with a 60° angular separation. Dual-LOS beam-steering is implemented optically with no moving parts by means of a controllable liquid-crystal retarder (LCR). The LCR switches the polarization between two orthogonal linear states of the lidar beam so it either transmits through or reflects off a polarization splitter. The room-temperature switching time between the two LOS is measured to be in the order of 100 μs in one switch direction but 16 ms in the opposite transition. Radial wind speed measurement (at 33 Hz rate) while the lidar beam is repeatedly steered from one LOS to the other every half a second is experimentally demonstrated - resulting in 1 Hz rate estimates of wind velocity magnitude and direction at better than 0.1 m/s and 1° resolution, respectively. PMID:25401817

  19. REINTERPRETATION OF SLOWDOWN OF SOLAR WIND MEAN VELOCITY IN NONLINEAR STRUCTURES OBSERVED UPSTREAM OF EARTH'S BOW SHOCK

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, G. K.; Lin, N.; Lee, E.; Hong, J.; Fu, S. Y.; McCarthy, M.; Cao, J. B.; Liu, Y.; Shi, J. K.; Goldstein, M. L.; Canu, P.; Dandouras, I.; Reme, H.

    2013-07-10

    Two of the many features associated with nonlinear upstream structures are (1) the solar wind (SW) mean flow slows down and deviates substantially and (2) the temperature of the plasma increases in the structure. In this Letter, we show that the SW beam can be present throughout the entire upstream event maintaining a nearly constant beam velocity and temperature. The decrease of the velocity is due to the appearance of new particles moving in the opposite direction that act against the SW beam and reduce the mean velocity as computed via moments. The new population, which occupies a larger velocity space, also contributes to the second moment, increasing the temperature. The new particles include the reflected SW beam at the bow shock and another population of lower energies, accelerated nearby at the shock or at the boundary of the nonlinear structures.

  20. Limits imposed by solenoid damage on the maximum velocity achieved by an electromagnetic coilgun: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavan, S.; Sijoy, C. D.; Pahari, S.; Chaturvedi, S.

    2012-06-01

    CAD has set up an electromagnetic acceleration and impact facility for studies of material fracture and deformation at high strain rates. The target is to reach projectile velocities of 200-500 m/s. The mechanical strength of the solenoid coil and potting material is an important factor affecting coil survival during experiments. We have performed a computational study, using the materials and coil and circuit parameters typically used in experiments, and found the operating limits up to which the coil can survive without breaking.

  1. Maximum wind radius estimated by the 50 kt radius: improvement of storm surge forecasting over the western North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Hiroshi; Wu, Wenjie

    2016-03-01

    Even though the maximum wind radius (Rmax) is an important parameter in determining the intensity and size of tropical cyclones, it has been overlooked in previous storm surge studies. This study reviews the existing estimation methods for Rmax based on central pressure or maximum wind speed. These over- or underestimate Rmax because of substantial variations in the data, although an average radius can be estimated with moderate accuracy. As an alternative, we propose an Rmax estimation method based on the radius of the 50 kt wind (R50). Data obtained by a meteorological station network in the Japanese archipelago during the passage of strong typhoons, together with the JMA typhoon best track data for 1990-2013, enabled us to derive the following simple equation, Rmax = 0.23 R50. Application to a recent strong typhoon, the 2015 Typhoon Goni, confirms that the equation provides a good estimation of Rmax, particularly when the central pressure became considerably low. Although this new method substantially improves the estimation of Rmax compared to the existing models, estimation errors are unavoidable because of fundamental uncertainties regarding the typhoon's structure or insufficient number of available typhoon data. In fact, a numerical simulation for the 2013 Typhoon Haiyan as well as 2015 Typhoon Goni demonstrates a substantial difference in the storm surge height for different Rmax. Therefore, the variability of Rmax should be taken into account in storm surge simulations (e.g., Rmax = 0.15 R50-0.35 R50), independently of the model used, to minimize the risk of over- or underestimating storm surges. The proposed method is expected to increase the predictability of major storm surges and to contribute to disaster risk management, particularly in the western North Pacific, including countries such as Japan, China, Taiwan, the Philippines, and Vietnam.

  2. The effect of wind velocity on transpiration in a mixed broadleaved deciduous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Oren, R.; Oishi, A. C.; Hsieh, C.; Phillips, N. G.; Novick, K. A.; Stoy, P. C.

    2013-12-01

    Wind velocity (U) within and above forest canopies can alter the coupling between the vapor-saturated sub-stomatal airspace and the drier atmosphere aloft, thereby influencing transpiration rates. In practice, however, the actual increase in transpiration with increasing U depends on the aerodynamic resistance (RA) to vapor transfer compared to canopy resistance to water vapor flux out of leaves (RC, dominated by stomatal resistance, Rstom), and the rate at which RA decreases with increasing U. We investigated the effect of U on transpiration at the canopy scale using filtered meteorological data and sap flux measurements gathered from six diverse species of a mature broadleaved deciduous forest. Only under high light conditions, stand transpiration (EC) increased slightly (6.5%) with increasing U ranging from ~0.7 to ~4.7 m s-1. Under other conditions, sap flux density (Js) and EC responded weakly or did not change with U. RA, estimated from Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, decreased with increasing U, but this decline was offset by increasing RC, estimated from a rearranged Penman-Monteith equation, due to a concurrent increase in vapor pressure deficit (D). The increase of RC with D over the observed range of U was consistent with increased Rstom by ~40% based on hydraulic theory. Except for very rare half-hourly values, the proportion of RA to total resistance (RT) remained < 15% over the observed range of conditions. These results suggest that in similar forests and conditions, accounting for the effects of U-D relationship on Rstom would reduce the uncertainty of modeling canopy gas exchange more than accounting for the direct effect of U on RA.

  3. Effect of beam broadening on the VHF Doppler mini-radar simple method for correcting wind velocity errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candusso, J.-P.; Crochet, M.

    2001-01-01

    A Doppler VHF mini-radar has been developed at LSEET (Laboratoire de Sondages de l'Environnement Terrestre) to permit investigations at low altitudes, where classical large ST-VHF profilers are blind in the first kilometers of the atmosphere, and UHF boundary layer radars are disturbed by precipitations, birds and insects echoes. Due to a small size of the antenna array, beam broadening effects are important and can provide errors in the atmospheric parameter estimation (reflectivity and wind velocity). A simple overlapping correction method based on the decomposition of the power spectrum is employed to retrieve wind velocity profiles. Measurements from a high-resolution ST radar are used as a benchmark which allows data comparisons and evaluation of this new method.

  4. On the minimum variance direction of magnetic field fluctuations in the azimuthal velocity structure of the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solodyna, C. V.; Belcher, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    The paper examines the properties of microscale magnetic field fluctuations for diverse classes of large-scale azimuthal velocity structures in the solar wind, with particular reference to the orientation of the wave normal vector for MHD waves in the interplanetary medium. It is shown that the direction of minimum variance does not exhibit any characteristic refraction pattern with respect to large-scale velocity structures in the solar wind. It is suggested that the direction of minimum variance is not indicative of the wave normal vector directions. The determination of the wave normal vector directions for the predominantly transverse MHD waves in the interplanetary medium is presently beyond the capability of single spacecraft observations.

  5. Effects of errors in velocity tilt on maximum longitudinal compression during neutralized drift compression of intense beam pulses: I. general description

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Massidda, Scottt; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-21

    Neutralized drift compression offers an effective means for particle beam pulse compression and current amplification. In neutralized drift compression, a linear longitudinal velocity tilt (head-to-tail gradient) is applied to the non-relativistic beam pulse, so that the beam pulse compresses as it drifts in the focusing section. The beam current can increase by more than a factor of 100 in the longitudinal direction. We have performed an analytical study of how errors in the velocity tilt acquired by the beam in the induction bunching module limit the maximum longitudinal compression. It is found that the compression ratio is determined by the relative errors in the velocity tilt. That is, one-percent errors may limit the compression to a factor of one hundred. However, a part of the beam pulse where the errors are small may compress to much higher values, which are determined by the initial thermal spread of the beam pulse. It is also shown that sharp jumps in the compressed current density profile can be produced due to overlaying of different parts of the pulse near the focal plane. Examples of slowly varying and rapidly varying errors compared to the beam pulse duration are studied. For beam velocity errors given by a cubic function, the compression ratio can be described analytically. In this limit, a significant portion of the beam pulse is located in the broad wings of the pulse and is poorly compressed. The central part of the compressed pulse is determined by the thermal spread. The scaling law for maximum compression ratio is derived. In addition to a smooth variation in the velocity tilt, fast-changing errors during the pulse may appear in the induction bunching module if the voltage pulse is formed by several pulsed elements. Different parts of the pulse compress nearly simultaneously at the target and the compressed profile may have many peaks. The maximum compression is a function of both thermal spread and the velocity errors. The effects of the

  6. Vibratory hub load data reduction and analysis from the reverse velocity rotor wind tunnel test, phase 2B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    The vibratory hub loads data analysis from the reverse velocity rotor wind tunnel test is reported. Vibratory loads were obtained from the rotating hub balance and also by synthesis of generalized coordinates from the blade flap bending moments. Load trends were defined as a function of speed, rotor thrust and 2 per rev cyclic from each of the data methods. These trends were compared to determine the degree of agreement between each method and provide substantiation for the generalized coordinate approach.

  7. Maximum drift velocity of electrons in selectively doped InAlAs/InGaAs/InAlAs heterostructures with InAs inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Silenas, A.; Pozela, Yu. Pozela, K.; Juciene, V.; Vasil'evskii, I. S.; Galiev, G. B.; Pushkarev, S. S.; Klimov, E. A.

    2013-03-15

    The dependence of the electron mobility and drift velocity on the growth conditions, thickness, and doping of an InAs insert placed at the center of the quantum well in a selectively doped InAlAs/InGaAs/InAlAs heterostructure has been investigated. Record enhancement of the maximum drift velocity to (2-4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} cm/s in an electric field of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} V/cm has been obtained in a 17-nm-wide quantum well with an undoped 4-nm-thick InAs insert. In the structures with additional doping of the InAs insert, which facilitates an increase in the density of electrons in the quantum well to 4.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}, the maximum drift velocity is as high as 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} cm/s in an electric field of 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} V/cm.

  8. Critical wind velocity for arresting upwind gas and smoke dispersion induced by near-wall fire in a road tunnel.

    PubMed

    Hu, L H; Peng, W; Huo, R

    2008-01-15

    In case of a tunnel fire, toxic gas and smoke particles released are the most fatal contaminations. It is important to supply fresh air from the upwind side to provide a clean and safe environment upstream from the fire source for people evacuation. Thus, the critical longitudinal wind velocity for arresting fire induced upwind gas and smoke dispersion is a key criteria for tunnel safety design. Former studies and thus, the models built for estimating the critical wind velocity are all arbitrarily assuming that the fire takes place at the centre of the tunnel. However, in many real cases in road tunnels, the fire originates near the sidewall. The critical velocity of a near-wall fire should be different with that of a free-standing central fire due to their different plume entrainment process. Theoretical analysis and CFD simulation were performed in this paper to estimate the critical velocity for the fire near the sidewall. Results showed that when fire originates near the sidewall, it needs larger critical velocity to arrest the upwind gas and smoke dispersion than when fire at the centre. The ratio of critical velocity of a near-wall fire to that of a central fire was ideally estimated to be 1.26 by theoretical analysis. Results by CFD modelling showed that the ratio decreased with the increase of the fire size till near to unity. The ratio by CFD modelling was about 1.18 for a 500kW small fire, being near to and a bit lower than the theoretically estimated value of 1.26. However, the former models, including those of Thomas (1958, 1968), Dangizer and Kenndey (1982), Oka and Atkinson (1995), Wu and Barker (2000) and Kunsch (1999, 2002), underestimated the critical velocity needed for a fire near the tunnel sidewall. PMID:17544576

  9. Study of the wind velocity-layered structure in the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere by using infrasound probing of the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunchuzov, I.; Kulichkov, S.; Perepelkin, V.; Popov, O.; Firstov, P.; Assink, J. D.; Marchetti, E.

    2015-09-01

    The wind velocity structure in the upper stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere (MLT) is studied with the recently developed method of infrasound probing of the atmosphere. The method is based on the effect of infrasound scattering from highly anisotropic wind velocity and temperature inhomogeneities in the middle and upper atmosphere. The scattered infrasound field propagates in the acoustic shadow zones, where it is detected by microbarometers. The vertical profiles of the wind velocity fluctuations in the upper stratosphere (30-52 km) and MLT (90-140 km) are retrieved from the waveforms and travel times of the infrasound signals generated by explosive sources such as volcanoes and surface explosions. The fine-scale wind-layered structure in these layers was poorly observed until present time by other remote sensing methods, including radars and satellites. It is found that the MLT atmospheric layer (90-102 km) can contain extremely high vertical gradients of the wind velocity, up to 10 m/s per 100 m. The effect of a fine-scale wind velocity structure on the waveforms of infrasound signals is studied. The vertical wave number spectra of the retrieved wind velocity fluctuations are obtained for the upper stratosphere. Despite the difference in the locations of the explosive sources all the obtained spectra show the existence of high vertical wave number spectral tail with a -3 power law decay. The obtained spectral characteristics of the wind fluctuations are necessary for improvement of gravity wave drag parameterizations for numerical weather forecast.

  10. A statistical study on the occurrence of discrete frequencies in the high velocity solar wind and in the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Matteo, Simone; Villante, Umberto

    2016-04-01

    The possible occurrence of oscillations at discrete frequencies in the solar wind and their possible correspondence with magnetospheric field oscillations represent an interesting aspect of the solar wind/magnetopheric research. We analyze a large set of high velocity streams following interplanetary shocks in order to ascertain the possible occurrence of preferential sets of discrete frequencies in the oscillations of the solar wind pressure in such structures. We evaluate, for each event, the power spectrum of the dynamic pressure by means of two methods (Welch and multitaper windowing) and accept the common spectral peaks that also pass a harmonic F-test at the 95% confidence level. We compare these frequencies with those detected at geosynchronous orbit in the magnetospheric field components soon after the manifestation of the corresponding Sudden Impulses.

  11. Some techniques for reducing the tower shadow of the DOE/NASA mod-0 wind turbine tower. [wind tunnel tests to measure effects of tower structure on wind velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, R. R.; Savino, J. M.; Wagner, L. H.; Diedrich, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    Wind speed profile measurements to measure the effect of a wind turbine tower on the wind velocity are presented. Measurements were made in the wake of scale models of the tower and in the wake of certain full scale components to determine the magnitude of the speed reduction (tower shadow). Shadow abatement techniques tested on the towers included the removal of diagonals, replacement of diagonals and horizontals with round cross section members, installation of elliptical shapes on horizontal members, installation of airfoils on vertical members, and application of surface roughness to vertical members.

  12. Observations of the relationship between ionospheric central polar cap and dayside throat convection velocities, and solar wind/IMF driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, W. A.; Amata, E.; Spaleta, J.; Marcucci, M. F.

    2015-06-01

    Convection observations from the Southern Hemisphere Super Dual Auroral Radar Network are presented and examined for their relationship to solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions, restricted to periods of steady IMF. Analysis is concentrated on two specific regions, the central polar cap and the dayside throat region. An example time series is discussed in detail with specific examples of apparent direct control of the convection velocity by the solar wind driver. Closer examination, however, shows that there is variability in the flows that cannot be explained by the driving. Scatterplots and histograms of observations from all periods in the year 2013 that met the selection criteria are given and their dependence on solar wind driving is examined. It is found that on average the flow velocity depends on the square root of the rate of flux entry to the polar cap. It is also found that there is a large level of variability that is not strongly related to the solar wind driving.

  13. Imprints of a high velocity wind on the soft x-ray spectrum of PG1211+143

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pounds, K. A.; Lobban, A.; Reeves, J. N.; Vaughan, S.; Costa, M.

    2016-04-01

    An extended XMM-Newton observation of the luminous narrow line Seyfert galaxy PG1211+143 in 2014 has revealed a more complex high velocity wind, with components distinguished in velocity, ionization level, and column density. Here we report soft x-ray emission and absorption features from the ionized outflow, finding counterparts of both high velocity components, v˜0.129c and v˜0.066c, recently identified in the highly ionized Fe K absorption spectrum. The lower ionization of the co-moving soft x-ray absorbers imply a distribution of higher density clouds embedded in the main outflow, while much higher column densities for the same flow component in the hard x-ray spectra suggest differing sight lines to the continuum x-ray source.

  14. Imprints of a high-velocity wind on the soft X-ray spectrum of PG1211+143

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pounds, K. A.; Lobban, A.; Reeves, J. N.; Vaughan, S.; Costa, M.

    2016-07-01

    An extended XMM-Newton observation of the luminous narrow-line Seyfert galaxy PG1211+143 in 2014 has revealed a more complex high-velocity wind, with components distinguished in velocity, ionization level, and column density. Here we report soft X-ray emission and absorption features from the ionized outflow, finding counterparts of both high-velocity components, v ˜ 0.129c and v ˜ 0.066c, recently identified in the highly ionized Fe K absorption spectrum. The lower ionization of the comoving soft X-ray absorbers imply a distribution of higher density clouds embedded in the main outflow, while much higher column densities for the same flow component in the hard X-ray spectra suggest differing sightlines to the continuum X-ray source.

  15. Influence of current velocity and wind speed on air-water gas exchange in a mangrove estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, David T.; Coffineau, Nathalie; Hickman, Benjamin; Chow, Nicholas; Koffman, Tobias; Schlosser, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of air-water gas transfer velocities and water residence times is necessary to study the fate of mangrove derived carbon exported into surrounding estuaries and ultimately to determine carbon balances in mangrove ecosystems. For the first time, the 3He/SF6 dual tracer technique, which has been proven to be a powerful tool to determine gas transfer velocities in the ocean, is applied to Shark River, an estuary situated in the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. The mean gas transfer velocity was 3.3 ± 0.2 cm h-1 during the experiment, with a water residence time of 16.5 ± 2.0 days. We propose a gas exchange parameterization that takes into account the major sources of turbulence in the estuary (i.e., bottom generated shear and wind stress).

  16. The Rule Of Maximum Gross Bedform-Normal Transport: Constraining Aeolian Bedform Morphology And Formative Wind Regime Using Solely Orbital Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenton, L. K.

    2012-12-01

    Although the formative wind regime and bedform morphology of several dune fields have been determined through extensive field work, nearly all planetary and many terrestrial dune fields are located in remote regions for which the only existing morphological data are spacecraft images. In the absence of other forms of data (e.g., anemometry, migration patterns), what can be determined about the sand-transporting winds that built these dune fields? We demonstrate that the rule of maximum gross bedform-normal transport (MGBNT) of Rubin and Hunter (1987) and Rubin and Ikeda (1990) can be applied in many remote situations to constrain both the potential wind regime and bedform type. By determining two formative wind directions from nearby unidirectional features (e.g., yardangs, wind streaks), the relative strengths of dune-building winds can be constrained by comparison of MGBNT to bedform orientation. In cases where only one formative wind direction can be identified, a second wind may be partially determined by "inverse-MGBNT" analysis. In these instances, a second wind may be identified from those that combine with a known (or assumed) sand-transporting wind to produce observed dune crestline orientations. We first demonstrate this method in a terrestrial setting where the bedform type and wind regime is well constrained, following with an example in Ganges Chasma on Mars. If the initial assumptions regarding likely sand-transporting wind directions are robust, then this technique proves to be reliable; in many locations on Mars and Titan it can be used as a constraint for atmospheric modeling. a) Linear or oblique dunes in a portion of the largest dune field in Ganges Chasma on Mars. b) Histogram of dune crestline orientations from a). c) Maximum gross bedform-normal transport analysis constraining the transport ratio of two likely sand-transporting winds. A southwesterly wind (black) combines with an east-southeasterly wind (black) with a transport ratio between 1

  17. Threshold wind velocities for sand movement in the Mescalero Sands of southeastern New Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind erosion activity was studied at two Chihuahuan Desert sites, the Gnome site which was contaminated with radioactivity from a nuclear device in 1961 and Near Field, a reference site. Saltation activity was measured with piezoelectric sensors, and those data were used to calculate threshold wind...

  18. Detection of high-velocity material from the wind-wind collision zone of Eta Carinae across the 2009.0 periastron passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groh, J. H.; Nielsen, K. E.; Damineli, A.; Gull, T. R.; Madura, T. I.; Hillier, D. J.; Teodoro, M.; Driebe, T.; Weigelt, G.; Hartman, H.; Kerber, F.; Okazaki, A. T.; Owocki, S. P.; Millour, F.; Murakawa, K.; Kraus, S.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Schertl, D.

    2010-07-01

    We report near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the Eta Carinae massive binary system during 2008-2009 using the CRIRES spectrograph mounted on the 8 m UT 1 Very Large Telescope (VLT Antu). We detect a strong, broad absorption wing in He i λ10833 extending up to -1900 km s-1 across the 2009.0 spectroscopic event. Analysis of archival Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph ultraviolet and optical data identifies a similar high-velocity absorption (up to -2100 km s-1) in the ultraviolet resonance lines of Si iv λλ1394, 1403 across the 2003.5 event. Ultraviolet resonance lines from low-ionization species, such as Si ii λλ1527, 1533 and C ii λλ1334, 1335, show absorption only up to -1200 km s-1, indicating that the absorption with velocities -1200 to -2100 km s-1 originates in a region markedly more rapidly moving and more ionized than the nominal wind of the primary star. Seeing-limited observations obtained at the 1.6 m OPD/LNA telescope during the last four spectroscopic cycles of Eta Carinae (1989-2009) also show high-velocity absorption in He i λ10833 during periastron. Based on the large OPD/LNA dataset, we determine that material with velocities more negative than -900 km s-1 is present in the phase range 0.976 ≤ ϕ ≤ 1.023 of the spectroscopic cycle, but absent in spectra taken at ϕ ≤ 0.94 and ϕ ≥ 1.049. Therefore, we constrain the duration of the high-velocity absorption to be 95 to 206 days (or 0.047 to 0.102 in phase). We propose that the high-velocity absorption component originates in shocked gas in the wind-wind collision zone, at distances of 15 to 45 AU in the line-of-sight to the primary star. With the aid of three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of the wind-wind collision zone, we find that the dense high-velocity gas is along the line-of-sight to the primary star only if the binary system is oriented in the sky such that the companion is behind the primary star during periastron, corresponding to a

  19. IPS analysis on relationship among velocity, density and temperature of the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, K.; Tokumaru, M.; Fujiki, K.

    2015-12-01

    The IPS(Interplanetary Scintillation)-MHD(magnetohydrodynamics) tomography is a method we have developed to determine three-dimensional MHD solution of the solar wind that best matches the line-of-sight IPS solar-wind speed data (Hayashi et al., 2003). The tomographic approach is an iteration method in which IPS observations are simulated in MHD steady-state solution, then differences between the simulated observation and the actual IPS observation is reduced by modifying solar-wind boundary map at 50 solar radii. This forward model needs to assume solar wind density and temperature as function of speed. We use empirical functions, N(V) and T(V), derived from Helios in-situ measurement data within 0.5 AU in 1970s. For recent years, especially after 2006, these functions yield higher densities and lower temperatures than in-situ measurements indicate. To characterize the differences between the simulated and actual solar wind plasma, we tune parameters in the functions so that agreements with in-situ data (near the Earth and at Ulysses) will be optimized. This optimization approach can help better simulations of the solar corona and heliosphere, and will help our understandings on roles of magnetic field in solar wind heating and acceleration.

  20. The Common-origin of Kinetic Turbulence and Electron-Halo of Velocity Distribution Function in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Haihong

    2015-04-01

    Observations of solar wind show that the power spectra of magnetic fluctuations break from Kolmogorov scaling law at ion inertial length. In addition, the electron velocity distribution function of solar wind exhibits an isotropic halo. What causes the spectral break and electron halo are two puzzles in heliophysics. I present a new model (Che et al., PRL 112, 2014 and ApJL, 795, 2014) that accounts for both puzzles--the kinetic turbulence and electron halo of solar wind originate from the nanoflare-accelerated keV electron beams in the inner corona. With PIC simulations, we found that the keV electron beams drive strong two-stream instabilities. The nonlinear evolution of the two-stream instability gives rise to an isotropic electron halo, kinetic Alfvenic wave and whistler wave turbulence through forward and inverse energy cascades.The most important predictions of this model include: 1) the energy injection plateau in the magnetic power spectra; 2) the enhanced parallel electrostatic fluctuation in the solar wind; 3) the core-halo relative drift, a relic of the saturated two-stream instability; 4) the temperature ratio of core-halo is determined by the two-stream instability heating property and the core-halo density ratio. The generation of Langmuir waves can produce type III micro-radio bursts that resemble the well-studied type III bursts observed in solar flares.

  1. Development of pitch angle anisotropy and velocity diffusion of pickup ion shell distribution by solar wind turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Ziebell, L. F.

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of pitch angle anisotropy in initially isotropic spherical shell distribution of pickup ions subjected to a continuous influence of weak or moderate intrinsic solar wind turbulence is investigated using a physical model which assumes that the wave of the solar wind turbulence is propagating mainly in the direction parallel to the ambient magnetic field. It is shown that, because of the pitch angle dependence of the velocity diffusion process, a significant pitch angle anisotropy of pickup ion shell distribution develops in the early stage of the diffusion process. Although it is smeared out later on, the result can be of significant importance, especially if the pickup ion density is large, because the pitch angle anisotropy can excite collective instabilities and increase the wave level, thus accelerating the diffusion process.

  2. Competing mechanisms of plasma transport in inhomogeneous configurations with velocity shear: the solar-wind interaction with earth's magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Faganello, M; Califano, F; Pegoraro, F

    2008-01-11

    Two-dimensional simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in an inhomogeneous compressible plasma with a density gradient show that, in a transverse magnetic field configuration, the vortex pairing process and the Rayleigh-Taylor secondary instability compete during the nonlinear evolution of the vortices. Two different regimes exist depending on the value of the density jump across the velocity shear layer. These regimes have different physical signatures that can be crucial for the interpretation of satellite data of the interaction of the solar wind with the magnetospheric plasma. PMID:18232777

  3. Wind-wave-induced velocity in ATI SAR ocean surface currents: First experimental evidence from an airborne campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Adrien C. H.; Gommenginger, Christine; Marquez, Jose; Doody, Sam; Navarro, Victor; Buck, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    Conventional and along-track interferometric (ATI) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) senses the motion of the ocean surface by measuring the Doppler shift of reflected signals. Measurements are affected by a Wind-wave-induced Artifact Surface Velocity (WASV) which was modeled theoretically in past studies and has been estimated empirically only once before with Envisat ASAR by Mouche et al. (2012). An airborne campaign in the tidally dominated Irish Sea served to evaluate this effect and the current retrieval capabilities of a dual-beam SAR interferometer known as Wavemill. A comprehensive collection of Wavemill airborne data acquired in a star pattern over a well-instrumented validation site made it possible for the first time to estimate the magnitude of the WASV, and its dependence on azimuth and incidence angle from data alone. In light wind (5.5 m/s) and moderate current (0.7 m/s) conditions, the wind-wave-induced contribution to the measured ocean surface motion reaches up to 1.6 m/s upwind, with a well-defined second-order harmonic dependence on direction to the wind. The magnitude of the WASV is found to be larger at lower incidence angles. The airborne WASV results show excellent consistency with the empirical WASV estimated from Envisat ASAR. These results confirm that SAR and ATI surface velocity estimates are strongly affected by WASV and that the WASV can be well characterized with knowledge of the wind knowledge and of the geometry. These airborne results provide the first independent validation of Mouche et al. (2012) and confirm that the empirical model they propose provides the means to correct airborne and spaceborne SAR and ATI SAR data for WASV to obtain accurate ocean surface current measurements. After removing the WASV, the airborne Wavemill-retrieved currents show very good agreement against ADCP measurements with a root-mean-square error (RMSE) typically around 0.1 m/s in velocity and 10° in direction.

  4. High-velocity, multistage, nozzled, ion driven wind generator and method of operation of the same adaptable to mesoscale realization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn-Rankin, Derek (Inventor); Rickard, Matthew J. A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Gas flows of modest velocities are generated when an organized ion flux in an electric field initiates an ion-driven wind of neutral molecules. When a needle in ambient air is electrically charged to a potential sufficient to produce a corona discharge near its tip, such a gas flow can be utilized downstream of a ring-shaped or other permeable earthed electrode. In view of the potential practical applications of such devices, as they represent blowers with no moving parts, a methodology for increasing their flow velocities includes exploitation of the divergence of electric field lines, avoidance of regions of high curvature on the second electrode, control of atmospheric humidity, and the use of linear arrays of stages, terminating in a converging nozzle. The design becomes particularly advantageous when implemented in mesoscale domains.

  5. Survey of the spectral properties of turbulence in the solar wind, the magnetospheres of Venus and Earth, at solar minimum and maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echim, Marius M.

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the European FP7 project STORM ("Solar system plasma Turbulence: Observations, inteRmittency and Multifractals") we analyze the properties of turbulence in various regions of the solar system, for the minimum and respectively maximum of the solar activity. The main scientific objective of STORM is to advance the understanding of the turbulent energy transfer, intermittency and multifractals in space plasmas. Specific analysis methods are applied on magnetic field and plasma data provided by Ulysses, Venus Express and Cluster, as well as other solar system missions (e.g. Giotto, Cassini). In this paper we provide an overview of the spectral properties of turbulence derived from Power Spectral Densities (PSD) computed in the solar wind (from Ulysses, Cluster, Venus Express) and at the interface of planetary magnetospheres with the solar wind (from Venus Express, Cluster). Ulysses provides data in the solar wind between 1992 and 2008, out of the ecliptic, at radial distances ranging between 1.3 and 5.4 AU. We selected only those Ulysses data that satisfy a consolidated set of selection criteria able to identify "pure" fast and slow wind. We analyzed Venus Express data close to the orbital apogee, in the solar wind, at 0.72 AU, and in the Venus magnetosheath. We investigated Cluster data in the solar wind (for time intervals not affected by planetary ions effects), the magnetosheath and few crossings of other key magnetospheric regions (cusp, plasma sheet). We organize our PSD results in three solar wind data bases (one for the solar maximum, 1999-2001, two for the solar minimum, 1997-1998 and respectively, 2007-2008), and two planetary databases (one for the solar maximum, 2000-2001, that includes PSD obtained in the terrestrial magnetosphere, and one for the solar minimum, 2007-2008, that includes PSD obtained in the terrestrial and Venus magnetospheres and magnetosheaths). In addition to investigating the properties of turbulence for the minimum

  6. Blowing in the Wind: I. Velocities of Chondrule-sized Particles in a Turbulent Protoplanetary Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Hogan, Robert C.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Small but macroscopic particles - chondrules, higher temperature mineral inclusions, metal grains, and their like - dominate the fabric of primitive meteorites. The properties of these constituents, and their relationship to the fine dust grains which surround them, suggest that they led an extended existence in a gaseous protoplanetary nebula prior to their incorporation into their parent primitive bodies. In this paper we explore in some detail the velocities acquired by such particles in a turbulent nebula. We treat velocities in inertial space (relevant to diffusion), velocities relative to the gas and entrained microscopic dust (relevant to accretion of dust rims), and velocities relative to each other (relevant to collisions). We extend previous work by presenting explicit, closed-form solutions for the magnitude and size dependence of these velocities in this important particle size regime, and compare these expressions with new numerical calculations. The magnitude and size dependence of these velocities have immediate applications to chondrule and CAI rimming by fine dust, and to their diffusion in the nebula, which we explore separately.

  7. New measurements of vertical thermal structure and wind velocities in the Venusian mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widemann, T.; Sandor, B. J.; Clancy, R. T.; Lellouch, E.

    2009-04-01

    The Venus mesosphere is a highly variable transition region, in latitude, local time and over short time scales, between the zonal circulation of the lower atmosphere and the diurnal, sub-solar to anti-solar circulation in the upper atmosphere. In the framework of European Space Agency's second campaign of ground-based observations (Feb 8-22, 2009) in support of the Venus-Express mission, we coordinated new observations sampling a large range of altitudes in the Venus mesosphere on Feb. 7-8 and Feb. 14-15 : (1) James Clerk Maxwell Submillimeter Telescope (JCMT) submillimeter lines observations of mesospheric CO spectral lines measurements of temperature, CO mixing ratio and winds over the 95-115 km altitude range (Clancy et al., 2008), while SO2, SO and HDO observations were also probed in the 70-100 km range ; (2) Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) optical spectropolarimeter ESPaDOnS observations of visible Solar Fraunhofer lines measuring the winds at cloud tops near 70 km and visible CO2 lines 1-2 scale heights above (Widemann et al., 2007, 2008). Synchronization of wind measurements helps characterize possible correlation patterns between wind variations in the lower and middle mesosphere over a day time scale. Preliminary results will be presented at the meeting. Clancy, R.T., Sandor, B.J., and Moriarty-Schieven, G.H. 2008, Planet. Space Sci. 56, 1320-1334. Widemann, T., Lellouch, E., and Campargue, A. 2007, New Wind Measurements in Venus' Lower Mesosphere From Visible Spectroscopy, Planet. Space Sci. 55, 1741-1756 Widemann, T., Lellouch, E., Donati, J.-F., 2008, Venus Doppler winds at Cloud Tops Observed with ESPaDOnS at CFHT, Planet. Space Sci. 56, 1320-133 --

  8. THE ORIGIN OF NON-MAXWELLIAN SOLAR WIND ELECTRON VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION: CONNECTION TO NANOFLARES IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Che, H.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2014-11-10

    The formation of the observed core-halo feature in the solar wind electron velocity distribution function is a long-time puzzle. In this Letter, based on the current knowledge of nanoflares, we show that the nanoflare-accelerated electron beams are likely to trigger a strong electron two-stream instability that generates kinetic Alfvén wave and whistler wave turbulence, as we demonstrated in a previous paper. We further show that the core-halo feature produced during the origin of kinetic turbulence is likely to originate in the inner corona and can be preserved as the solar wind escapes to space along open field lines. We formulate a set of equations to describe the heating processes observed in the simulation and show that the core-halo temperature ratio of the solar wind is insensitive to the initial conditions in the corona and is related to the core-halo density ratio of the solar wind and to the quasi-saturation property of the two-stream instability at the time when the exponential decay ends. This relation can be extended to the more general core-halo-strahl feature in the solar wind. The temperature ratio between the core and hot components is nearly independent of the heliospheric distance to the Sun. We show that the core-halo relative drift previously reported is a relic of the fully saturated two-stream instability. Our theoretical results are consistent with the observations while new tests for this model are provided.

  9. High velocity wind tunnels : their application to ballistics, aerodynamics, and aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huguenard, E

    1925-01-01

    The object of this article is to set forth the particular properties of swiftly-moving air, how these affect the installation of a wind tunnel, the experimental results already obtained, the possible applications of such a tunnel, and what can be easily accomplished at the present time.

  10. Differential Velocity between Solar Wind Protons and Alpha Particles in Pressure Balance Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Yohei; Suess, Steven T.; Steinberg, John T.; Sakurai, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    Pressure balance structures (PBSs) are a common high-plasma beta feature in high-latitude, high-speed solar wind. They have been proposed as remnants of coronal plumes. If true, they should reflect the observation that plumes are rooted in unipolar magnetic flux concentrations in the photosphere and are heated as oppositely directed flux is advected into and reconnects with the flux concentration. A minimum variance analysis (MVA) of magnetic discontinuities in PBSs showed there is a larger proportion of tangential discontinuities than in the surrounding high-speed wind, supporting the hypothesis that plasmoids or extended current sheets are formed during reconnection at the base of plumes. To further evaluate the character of magnetic field discontinuities in PBSs, differential streaming between alpha particles and protons is analyzed here for the same sample of PBSs used in the MVA. Alpha particles in high-speed wind generally have a higher radial flow speed than protons. However, if the magnetic field is folded back on itself, as in a large-amplitude Alfven wave, alpha particles will locally have a radial flow speed less than protons. This characteristic is used here to distinguish between folded back magnetic fields (which would contain rotational discontinuities) and tangential discontinuities using Ulysses high-latitude, high-speed solar wind data. The analysis indicates that almost all reversals in the radial magnetic field in PBSs are folded back field lines. This is found to also be true outside PBSs, supporting existing results for typical high-speed, high-latitude wind. There remains a small number of cases that appear not to be folds in the magnetic field and which may be flux tubes with both ends rooted in the Sun. The distinct difference in MVA results inside and outside PBSs remains unexplained.

  11. Differential Velocity Between Solar Wind Protons and Alpha Particles in Pressure Balance Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Y.; Suess, S. T.; Steinberg, J. T.; Sakurai, T.

    2003-01-01

    Pressure balance structures (PBSs) are a common high plasma beta feature in high latitude, high speed solar wind. They have been proposed as remnants of coronal plumes. If true, they should reflect the observation that plumes are rooted in unipolar magnetic flux concentrations in the photosphere and are heated as oppositely directed flux is advected into and reconnects with the flux concentration. A minimum variance analysis (MVA) of magnetic discontinuities in PBSs showed there is a larger proportion of tangential discontinuities than in the surrounding high speed wind, supporting the hypothesis that plasmoids or extended current sheets are formed during reconnection at the base of plumes. To further evaluate the character of magnetic field discontinuities in PBSs, differential streaming between alpha particles and protons is analyzed here for the same sample of PBSs used in the MVA. Alpha particles in high speed wind generally have a higher radial flow speed than protons. However, if the magnetic field is folded back on itself, as in a large amplitude Alfven wave, alpha particles will locally have a radial flow speed less than protons. This characteristic is used here to distinguish between folded back magnetic fields (which would contain rotational discontinuities) and tangential discontinuities using Ulysses high latitude, high speed solar wind data. The analysis indicates that almost all reversals in the radial magnetic field in PBSs are folded back field lines. This is found to also be true outside PBSs, supporting existing results for typical high speed, high latitude wind. There remains a small number of cases that appear not to be folds in the magnetic field and which may be flux tubes with both ends rooted in the Sun. The distinct difference in MVA results inside and outside PBSs remains unexplained.

  12. Comparative Solar Wind Properties at 9AU between the maximum and late declining phases of the Solar Cycle and possible implications for the magnetospheric dynamics of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Went, D. R.; Jackman, C. M.; Forsyth, R. J.; Dougherty, M. K.; Crary, F. J.

    2009-04-01

    We compare and contrast the general plasma and magnetic field properties of the solar wind upstream of Saturn (8.5-9.5 AU) at solar maximum (Pioneer-11 encounter) and the late-declining (Cassini approach) phase of the solar cycle. In both cases we find a highly structured solar wind dominated by co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs), merged interaction regions (MIRs) and Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) that temporarily disrupt an otherwise clear two sector interplanetary magnetic field structure. Solar rotations generally contain two CIR compressions with embedded crossings of the heliospheric current sheet. There is no conclusive evidence for (persistent) departures from the Parker Spiral IMF model in this region of the heliosphere at either phase of the solar cycle, consistent with previous analyses (Thomas and Smith 1980, Jackman et al. 2008). However it is clear that average plasma properties vary significantly between the maximum and late declining phases of the cycle and there are a number of small but notable deviations. In particular, the average dynamic pressure of the solar wind varies by a factor of roughly two between solar maximum and solar minimum with potentially important consequences for the dynamics of Saturn's magnetosphere. These consequences should become apparent as Cassini enters its extended Equinox Mission which should encompass the rising phase and eventually maximum of Solar Cycle 24. They will be discussed and predictions will be made for future Cassini observations.

  13. Large-scale vertical motion calculations in the AVE IV Experiment. [of atmospheric wind velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, G. S.

    1976-01-01

    Using 3- and 6-h consecutive rawinsonde and surface data from NASA's AVE IV Experiment, synoptic-scale vertical motion calculations are made using an adiabatic technique and three variations of the kinematic technique. Both subjective and objective comparisons in space and time between the sign and magnitude of the computed vertical velocities and precipitation intensities are made. These comparisons are conducted to determine which method would consistently produce realistic magnitudes, patterns, and vertical profiles of vertical velocity essential to the diagnostic study of the relationship between severe convective storms and their environment in AVE IV. The kinematic method, adjusted to the adiabatic value at 100 mb, proved to produce the best overall vertical velocities.

  14. Solar wind proton velocity distributions - Comparison of the bi-Maxwellian based 16-moment expansion with observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demars, H. G.; Schunk, R. W.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the possible types of velocity distributions that can be obtained from the bi-Maxwellian based 16-moment expansion of the distribution function, assuming macroscopic parameter values characteristic of the range of solar wind conditions. While previous studies also took heat flow into account, the theoretical expansions for f and the definitions of the physical moments adopted in these studies were different from those used in this paper. The choice of the 16-moment expansion and corresponding moment definitions was motivated by the fact that this is the correct generalization of the widely-used Maxwellian-based 13-moment expansion to the case where the zeroth-order distribution is a bi-Maxwellian. It is found that most of the features characteristic of solar wind proton distributions can be reproduced with the 16-moment distribution, including the appearance of secondary peaks. It is also shown how each of the physically significant velocity moments affects the shape of the distribution function.

  15. Non-axisymmetric relativistic wind accretion with velocity gradients on to a rotating black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Osorio, A.; Lora-Clavijo, F. D.

    2016-08-01

    We model, for the first time, the Bondi-Hoyle accretion of a fluid with velocity gradients on to a Kerr black hole, by numerically solving the fully relativistic hydrodynamics equations. Specifically, we consider a supersonic ideal gas, which has velocity gradients perpendicular to the relative motion. We measure the mass and specific angular accretion rates to illustrate whether the fluid presents unstable patterns or not. The initial parameters, we consider in this work, are the velocity gradient ɛv, the black hole spin a, the asymptotic Mach number M_{∞} and adiabatic index Γ. We show that the flow accretion reaches a fairly stationary regime, unlike in the Newtonian case, where significant fluctuations of the mass and angular momentum accretion rates are found. On the other hand, we consider a special case where both density and velocity gradients of the fluid are taken into account. The spin of the black hole and the asymptotic Newtonian Mach number, for this case, are a = 0.98 and M_{∞}=1, respectively. A kind of flip-flop behaviour is found at the early times; nevertheless, the system also reaches a steady state.

  16. Non-axisymmetric relativistic wind accretion with velocity gradients on to a rotating black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Osorio, A.; Lora-Clavijo, F. D.

    2016-08-01

    We model, for the first time, the Bondi-Hoyle accretion of a fluid with velocity gradients onto a Kerr black hole, by numerically solving the fully relativistic hydrodynamics equations. Specifically, we consider a supersonic ideal gas, which has velocity gradients perpendicular to the relative motion. We measure the mass and specific angular accretion rates to illustrate whether the fluid presents unstable patterns or not. The initial parameters, we consider in this work, are the velocity gradient $\\epsilon_{v}$, the black hole spin $a$, the asymptotic Mach number ${\\cal M}_{\\infty}$ and adiabatic index $\\Gamma$. We show that the flow accretion reaches a fairly stationary regime, unlike in the Newtonian case, where significant fluctuations of the mass and angular momentum accretion rates are found. On the other hand, we consider a special case where both density and velocity gradients of the fluid are taken into account. The spin of the black hole and the asymptotic Newtonian Mach number, for this case, are $a=0.98$ and ${\\cal M}_{\\infty}=1$, respectively. A kind of flip-flop behavior is found at the early times; nevertheless, the system also reaches a steady state.

  17. Estimations of the maximum tangential velocity V θm in the vortex core region and also the mean rotational velocity V oi near the concave wall surface in the returned flow type cyclone dust collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Akira

    2010-12-01

    There are many types of cyclone dust collectors for separating the fine solid and dust particles from gases in the various industries and also in the home used purposes. For estimating the power loss and the collection efficiency, one of the most important factors is the maximum tangential velocity V θm in the vortex core region in the cyclone body. In order to determine V θm by the simple method, it is useful to apply the mechanical balance of the angular momentum fluxes under the assumption of Ogawa combined vortex model which is composed of the quasi-forced vortex in the vortex core region and also the quasi-free vortex surrounded the vortex core region and also under the assumption of the introduction of equivalent length Heq corresponding to the cone spaces of the cyclone body and the dust bunker. On the other hand, the mean rotational velocity V oi near the concave wall surface is also estimated by the mechanical balance of angular momentum fluxes with the moment of viscous friction force. For confirming the general applications of the obtained equations, the returned flow types cyclones changed the throat diameter D3 are designed. The material of the cyclone is the transparent acrylic resin. Therefore the inner surface of the cyclone body can be regarded as smooth surface. The comparisons of the measured velocities V θm and V oi by a cylindrical Pitot tube are shown in good agreement with those of the proposed equations. The above stated results are described in detail.

  18. Measuring air-sea gas-exchange velocities in a large-scale annular wind-wave tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesarchaki, E.; Kräuter, C.; Krall, K. E.; Bopp, M.; Helleis, F.; Williams, J.; Jähne, B.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we present gas-exchange measurements conducted in a large-scale wind-wave tank. Fourteen chemical species spanning a wide range of solubility (dimensionless solubility, α = 0.4 to 5470) and diffusivity (Schmidt number in water, Scw = 594 to 1194) were examined under various turbulent (u10 = 0.73 to 13.2 m s-1) conditions. Additional experiments were performed under different surfactant modulated (two different concentration levels of Triton X-100) surface states. This paper details the complete methodology, experimental procedure and instrumentation used to derive the total transfer velocity for all examined tracers. The results presented here demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method, and the derived gas-exchange velocities are shown to be comparable to previous investigations. The gas transfer behaviour is exemplified by contrasting two species at the two solubility extremes, namely nitrous oxide (N2O) and methanol (CH3OH). Interestingly, a strong transfer velocity reduction (up to a factor of 3) was observed for the relatively insoluble N2O under a surfactant covered water surface. In contrast, the surfactant effect for CH3OH, the high solubility tracer, was significantly weaker.

  19. Wind motor applications for transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Lysenko, G.P.; Grigoriev, B.V.; Karpin, K.B.

    1996-12-31

    Motion equation for a vehicle equipped with a wind motor allows, taking into account the drag coefficients, to determine the optimal wind drag velocity in the wind motor`s plane, and hence, obtain all the necessary data for the wind wheel blades geometrical parameters definition. This optimal drag velocity significantly differs from the flow drag velocity which determines the maximum wind motor power. Solution of the motion equation with low drag coefficients indicates that the vehicle speed against the wind may be twice as the wind speed. One of possible transportation wind motor applications is its use on various ships. A ship with such a wind motor may be substantially easier to steer, and if certain devices are available, may proceed in autonomous control mode. Besides, it is capable of moving within narrow fairways. The cruise speed of a sailing boat and wind-motored ship were compared provided that the wind velocity direction changes along a harmonic law with regard to the motion direction. Mean dimensionless speed of the wind-motored ship appears to be by 20--25% higher than that of a sailing boat. There was analyzed a possibility of using the wind motors on planet rovers in Mars or Venus atmospheric conditions. A Mars rover power and motor system has been assessed for the power level of 3 kW.

  20. Velocity profile similarity for viscous flow development along a longitudinally slotted wind-tunnel wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Goradia, Suresh H.

    1988-01-01

    A discussion of the flow field measurements on the slot centerline of two different longitudinally slotted wind-tunnel walls is presented. The longitudinal and transverse components of these data are then transformed using the concept of flow similarity to demonstrate the applicability of the technique to the development of the viscous shear flow along and through a slotted wall. Results are presented showing the performance of the similarity transformations with variations in tunnel station, Mach number, and airfoil-induced curvature of the tunnel free stream.

  1. Optical fiber-based laser remote sensor for airborne measurement of wind velocity and turbulence.

    PubMed

    Spuler, Scott M; Richter, Dirk; Spowart, Michael P; Rieken, Kathrin

    2011-02-20

    We discuss an optical fiber-based continuous-wave coherent laser system for measuring the wind speed in undisturbed air ahead of an aircraft. The operational principles of the instrument are described, and estimates of performance are presented. The instrument is demonstrated as a single line of sight, and data from the inaugural test flight of August 2010 is presented. The system was successfully operated under various atmospheric conditions, including cloud and clear air up to 12 km (40,300 ft). PMID:21343963

  2. Variable Speed Wind Power Generation System Using Direct Torque Control Suited for Maximum Power Control within Voltage and Current Limitations of Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Yukinori; Morimoto, Shigeo; Sanada, Masayuki

    This paper proposes a variable speed wind generation system using a direct torque controlled interior permanent magnet synchronous generator. The proposed system has no wind speed and generator position sensors, and thus, it is considered that the proposed system has cost and reliability advantages. The proposed direct torque control (DTC) system in wind power generation has several advantages over conventional current control. First, DTC is well suited for the maximum power point tracking (MPPT) control that is implemented by controlling the generator torque. Second, the method of flux-weakening to maintain the terminal voltage at the limiting value of the converter is simple. Finally, a novel method is proposed for torque limiting, which makes it easy to maintain the armature current at the limiting value. The proposed method accomplishes current limiting using the reactive torque, which is calculated as the inner product of the flux and current. This does not require generator parameters such as magnet flux and inductances. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed system using a wind turbine emulator instead of the actual wind turbine.

  3. The WR/LBV system HD 5980: wind-velocity - brightness correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenigsberger, Gloria; Georgiev, Leonid; Hillier, D. John; Morrell, Nidia; Barbá, Rodolfo; Gamen, Roberto

    2011-07-01

    The massive eclipsing system HD 5980 in the Small Magellanic Cloud presented sudden ~1-3 mag eruptive events in 1993-1994, the nature of which is still unexplained. We recently showed that these brief eruptions occurred at the beginning of an extended high state of activity which is characterized by large emission-line intensities and that this high state is currently ending (Koenigsberger et al. 2010). Star A, the more massive member of the 19-day binary, is responsible for the spectacular spectral variations observed over the past 3 decades (see Figure 1). It has a He-enriched stellar wind and is over-luminous for its mass, implying an advanced evolutionary state (Koenigsberger et al. 1998). Data obtained over the past 3 decades show that Star A's wind speed slowed down as the system brightened. Also present in these data is a correlated increase in emission-line strength, visual and UV brigthness. The latter suggests that the high activity state in HD 5980 may be attributed to a bolometric luminosity increase, consistent with the results of Drissen et al. (2001). Hence, HD 5980 may be providing the important clues needed for understanding the behavior of other luminous blue variables and for understainding the evolutionary transition between massive O-type stars and Wolf-Rayet stars.

  4. A Study of the Coronal Non-thermal Velocity in Polar Regions During the Rise from Solar Minimum to Solar Maximum in Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harra, L.; Baker, D.; Edwards, S. J.; Hara, H.; Howe, R.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.

    2015-11-01

    We explore the changes in coronal non-thermal velocity ( V nt) measurements at the poles from solar minimum to solar maximum using Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer data. We find that although the intensity in the corona at the poles does tend to increase with the cycle, there are no significant changes in the V nt values. The locations of enhanced V nt values measured do not always have a counterpart in intensity, and they are sometimes located in weak emission regions. Unipolar magnetic streams, created through diffusion of the following polarity of the decaying active regions, slowly progress towards the poles. These streams are expected to be related to magnetic nulls as locations that indicate an increased likelihood for magnetic reconnection to occur. Through global potential field source-surface modelling, we determine how the number of nulls varied during the cycle and find that those that lie at < 1.1 solar radii vary significantly. We search for a correlation between the variation of the magnetic nulls and the V nt values, as it may be expected that with an increasing number of nulls, the V nt values in the corona increase as well. There is no correlation with the V nt values, however. This indicates that the magnetic structures that create the enhanced V nt behaviour are small-scale features and hence not easily measurable at the poles. Because they do not change during the solar cycle, they are likely to be created by a local dynamo. The variation of the upper range of V nt is reduced, which highlights that strongly dynamic behaviour is reduced as the solar maximum approaches. This is likely to be due to the reduced area of the polar coronal hole, which allows fewer opportunities for reconnection to occur between open and closed magnetic fields.

  5. Crustal seismicity and the earthquake catalog maximum moment magnitudes (Mcmax) in stable continental regions (SCRs): correlation with the seismic velocity of the lithosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mooney, Walter D.; Ritsema, Jeroen; Hwang, Yong Keun

    2012-01-01

    A joint analysis of global seismicity and seismic tomography indicates that the seismic potential of continental intraplate regions is correlated with the seismic properties of the lithosphere. Archean and Early Proterozoic cratons with cold, stable continental lithospheric roots have fewer crustal earthquakes and a lower maximum earthquake catalog moment magnitude (Mcmax). The geographic distribution of thick lithospheric roots is inferred from the global seismic model S40RTS that displays shear-velocity perturbations (δVS) relative to the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM). We compare δVS at a depth of 175 km with the locations and moment magnitudes (Mw) of intraplate earthquakes in the crust (Schulte and Mooney, 2005). Many intraplate earthquakes concentrate around the pronounced lateral gradients in lithospheric thickness that surround the cratons and few earthquakes occur within cratonic interiors. Globally, 27% of stable continental lithosphere is underlain by δVS≥3.0%, yet only 6.5% of crustal earthquakes with Mw>4.5 occur above these regions with thick lithosphere. No earthquakes in our catalog with Mw>6 have occurred above mantle lithosphere with δVS>3.5%, although such lithosphere comprises 19% of stable continental regions. Thus, for cratonic interiors with seismically determined thick lithosphere (1) there is a significant decrease in the number of crustal earthquakes, and (2) the maximum moment magnitude found in the earthquake catalog is Mcmax=6.0. We attribute these observations to higher lithospheric strength beneath cratonic interiors due to lower temperatures and dehydration in both the lower crust and the highly depleted lithospheric root.

  6. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of SSMI surface wind speed, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, AMI surface wind velocity, TOPEX/POSEIDON sea surface height, and ECMWF surface wind velocity during 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, D.; Fu, L.; Knauss, W.; Pihos, G.; Brown, O.; Freilich, M.; Wentz, F.

    1995-01-01

    The following monthly mean global distributions for 1993 are presented with a common color scale and geographical map: 10-m height wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) on a United States (U.S.) Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR/2) on a U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellite; 10-m height wind speed and direction estimated from the Active Microwave Instrument (AMI) on the European Space Agency (ESA) European Remote Sensing (ERS-1) satellite; sea surface height estimated from the joint U.S.-France Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/POSEIDON spacecraft; and 10-m height wind speed and direction produced by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). Charts of annual mean, monthly mean, and sampling distributions are displayed.

  7. A study of the geographic coverage properties of a satellite borne Doppler lidar wind velocity measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pate, T. H.

    1982-01-01

    Geographic coverage frequency and geographic shot density for a satellite borne Doppler lidar wind velocity measuring system are measured. The equations of motion of the light path on the ground were derived and a computer program devised to compute shot density and coverage frequency by latitude-longitude sections. The equations for the coverage boundaries were derived and a computer program developed to plot these boundaries, thus making it possible, after an application of a map coloring algorithm, to actually see the areas of multiple coverage. A theoretical cross-swath shot density function that gives close approximations in certain cases was also derived. This information should aid in the design of an efficient data-processing system for the Doppler lidar.

  8. Transducer Shadowing Explains Observed Underestimates in Vertical Wind Velocity from Non-orthogonal Sonic Anemometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, J. M.; Massman, W. J.; Swiatek, E.; Zimmerman, H.; Ewers, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    Sonic anemometry is fundamental to all eddy-covariance studies of surface energy and ecosystem carbon and water balance. While recent studies have shown that some anemometers underestimate vertical wind, we hypothesize that this is caused by the lack of transducer shadowing correction in non-orthogonal models. We tested this in an experiment comparing three sonic anemometer designs: orthogonal (O), non-orthogonal (NO), and quasi-orthogonal (QO); using four models: K-probe (O) and A-probe (NO) (Applied Technologies, Inc.) and CSAT3 (NO) and CSAT3V (QO) (Campbell Scientific, Inc.). For each of a 12-week experiment at the GLEES AmeriFlux site, five instruments from a pool of twelve (three of each model) were randomly selected and located around a control (CSAT3); mid-week all but the control were re-mounted horizontally. We used Bayesian analysis to test differences between models in half-hour standard deviations (σu, σv, σw, and σT), turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), and the ratio between vertical/horizontal TKE (VHTKE). The K-probe experiences horizontal transducer shadowing which is effectively corrected using an established wind-tunnel derived algorithm. We constructed shadow correction algorithms for the NO/QO anemometers by applying the K-probe function to each non-orthogonal transducer pair (SC1) as well as a stronger correction of twice the magnitude (SC2). While the partitioning of VHTKE was higher in O than NO/QO anemometers, the application of SC1 explained 45-60% of this discrepancy while SC2 overcorrected it. During the horizontal manipulation changes in the NO/QO were moderate in σu (4-8% decrease), very strong in σv (9-11% decrease), and minimal in σw (-3 to 4% change) while only σu measurements changed (3% decrease) with the K-probe. These changes were predicted by both shadow correction algorithms, with SC2 better explaining the data. This confirms our hypothesis while eliminating others that attribute the underestimate to a systematic bias in

  9. Estimation of neutral wind velocity in the ionospheric heights by HF-Doppler technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitamura, T.; Takefu, M.; Hiroshige, N.

    1985-01-01

    Three net stations located about 100 kilometers apart were set up around the station of the standard frequency and time signals (JJY) in central Japan and measurements of atmospheric gravity waves in the ionospheric heights (F-region, 200 to 400 km) were made by means of the HF-Doppler technique during the period of February 1983 to December 1983. The frequencies of the signals received are 5.0, 8.0 and 10.0 MHz, but only the 8.0 MHz signals are used for the present study, because no ambiguities due to the interference among other stations such as BPM, BSF, etc. exist by the use of 8.0 MHz. Two main results concerning the horizontal phase velocity of the atmospheric gravity waves with periods of 40 to 70 min may be summarized as follows: (1) the value of the phase velocity ranges from 50 m/s to 300 m/s; (2) the direction of the gravity wave propagation shows a definite seasonal variation. The prevailing direction of the gravity waves in winter is from north to south, which is consistent with the results obtained from other investigations. On the other hand, the two directions, from northeast to southwest and from southeast to northeast, dominate in summer.

  10. Calibration of the maximum carboxylation velocity (Vcmax) using data mining techniques and ecophysiological data from the Brazilian semiarid region, for use in Dynamic Global Vegetation Models.

    PubMed

    Rezende, L F C; Arenque-Musa, B C; Moura, M S B; Aidar, S T; Von Randow, C; Menezes, R S C; Ometto, J P B H

    2016-06-01

    The semiarid region of northeastern Brazil, the Caatinga, is extremely important due to its biodiversity and endemism. Measurements of plant physiology are crucial to the calibration of Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs) that are currently used to simulate the responses of vegetation in face of global changes. In a field work realized in an area of preserved Caatinga forest located in Petrolina, Pernambuco, measurements of carbon assimilation (in response to light and CO2) were performed on 11 individuals of Poincianella microphylla, a native species that is abundant in this region. These data were used to calibrate the maximum carboxylation velocity (Vcmax) used in the INLAND model. The calibration techniques used were Multiple Linear Regression (MLR), and data mining techniques as the Classification And Regression Tree (CART) and K-MEANS. The results were compared to the UNCALIBRATED model. It was found that simulated Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) reached 72% of observed GPP when using the calibrated Vcmax values, whereas the UNCALIBRATED approach accounted for 42% of observed GPP. Thus, this work shows the benefits of calibrating DGVMs using field ecophysiological measurements, especially in areas where field data is scarce or non-existent, such as in the Caatinga. PMID:26959950

  11. Contributions of the secondary jet to the maximum tangential velocity and to the collection efficiency of the fixed guide vane type axial flow cyclone dust collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Akira; Anzou, Hideki; Yamamoto, So; Shimagaki, Mituru

    2015-11-01

    In order to control the maximum tangential velocity Vθm(m/s) of the turbulent rotational air flow and the collection efficiency ηc (%) using the fly ash of the mean diameter XR50=5.57 µm, two secondary jet nozzles were installed to the body of the axial flow cyclone dust collector with the body diameter D1=99mm. Then in order to estimate Vθm (m/s), the conservation theory of the angular momentum flux with Ogawa combined vortex model was applied. The comparisons of the estimated results of Vθm(m/s) with the measured results by the cylindrical Pitot-tube were shown in good agreement. And also the estimated collection efficiencies ηcth (%) basing upon the cut-size Xc (µm) which was calculated by using the estimated Vθ m(m/s) and also the particle size distribution R(Xp) were shown a little higher values than the experimental results due to the re-entrainment of the collected dust. The best method for adjustment of ηc (%) related to the contribution of the secondary jet flow is principally to apply the centrifugal effect Φc (1). Above stated results are described in detail.

  12. Characteristics of electron velocity distribution functions in the solar wind derived from the Helios plasma experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilipp, W. G.; Muehlhaeuser, K.-H.; Miggenrieder, H.; Montgomery, M. D.; Rosenbauer, H.

    1987-01-01

    The details of the shapes of three typical electron distribution functions observed by the Helios 1 and 2 probes in the solar wind between 0.3 AU and 1 AU are analyzed and compared with theoretical predictions. These are (1) a distribution function with a narrow 'strahl' (narrow beam), which is extremely anisotropic and skewed with respect to the magnetic field direction at particle energies above 100 eV; (2) a distribution function with a broad 'strahl', less anisotropic and skewed; and (3) a nearly isotropic distribution function. For each distribution function, a sudden change in the slope was discerned, separating the 'core' at lower energies from the 'halo' at higher energies. The most obvious differences of the analyzed electron distribution functions were observed at energies above 50-100 eV. The possible origins for the observed features of the distribution functions are discussed.

  13. Pitch angle and velocity diffusions of newborn ions by turbulence in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, Peter H.

    1990-01-01

    The temporal evolution of the distribution function of newborn ions under the influence of intrinsic low-frequency solar wind turbulences is studied. In particular, an initial ring-beam distribution of newborn ions under the influence of hydromagnetic waves is considered. A simplified treatment of the resonance broadening effect is given, and its role in the pickup process is discussed. Two different configurations of wave polarization amd direction of propagation are considered. The conditions that lead either to the formation of anisotropic shells as a long-duration transient state or to rapid isotropization of the ion pitch angle distribution are discussed, as are the conditions which lead to significant acceleration of the ions.

  14. On the prediction of threshold friction velocity of wind erosion using soil reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junran; Flagg, Cody; Okin, Gregory S.; Painter, Thomas H.; Dintwe, Kebonye; Belnap, Jayne

    2015-12-01

    Current approaches to estimate threshold friction velocity (TFV) of soil particle movement, including both experimental and empirical methods, suffer from various disadvantages, and they are particularly not effective to estimate TFVs at regional to global scales. Reflectance spectroscopy has been widely used to obtain TFV-related soil properties (e.g., moisture, texture, crust, etc.), however, no studies have attempted to directly relate soil TFV to their spectral reflectance. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between soil TFV and soil reflectance in the visible and near infrared (VIS-NIR, 350-2500 nm) spectral region, and to identify the best range of wavelengths or combinations of wavelengths to predict TFV. Threshold friction velocity of 31 soils, along with their reflectance spectra and texture were measured in the Mojave Desert, California and Moab, Utah. A correlation analysis between TFV and soil reflectance identified a number of isolated, narrow spectral domains that largely fell into two spectral regions, the VIS area (400-700 nm) and the short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) area (1100-2500 nm). A partial least squares regression analysis (PLSR) confirmed the significant bands that were identified by correlation analysis. The PLSR further identified the strong relationship between the first-difference transformation and TFV at several narrow regions around 1400, 1900, and 2200 nm. The use of PLSR allowed us to identify a total of 17 key wavelengths in the investigated spectrum range, which may be used as the optimal spectral settings for estimating TFV in the laboratory and field, or mapping of TFV using airborne/satellite sensors.

  15. On the prediction of threshold friction velocity of wind erosion using soil reflectance spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Junran; Flagg, Cody B.; Okin, Gregory S.; Painter, Thomas H.; Dintwe, Kebonye; Belnap, Jayne

    2015-01-01

    Current approaches to estimate threshold friction velocity (TFV) of soil particle movement, including both experimental and empirical methods, suffer from various disadvantages, and they are particularly not effective to estimate TFVs at regional to global scales. Reflectance spectroscopy has been widely used to obtain TFV-related soil properties (e.g., moisture, texture, crust, etc.), however, no studies have attempted to directly relate soil TFV to their spectral reflectance. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between soil TFV and soil reflectance in the visible and near infrared (VIS–NIR, 350–2500 nm) spectral region, and to identify the best range of wavelengths or combinations of wavelengths to predict TFV. Threshold friction velocity of 31 soils, along with their reflectance spectra and texture were measured in the Mojave Desert, California and Moab, Utah. A correlation analysis between TFV and soil reflectance identified a number of isolated, narrow spectral domains that largely fell into two spectral regions, the VIS area (400–700 nm) and the short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) area (1100–2500 nm). A partial least squares regression analysis (PLSR) confirmed the significant bands that were identified by correlation analysis. The PLSR further identified the strong relationship between the first-difference transformation and TFV at several narrow regions around 1400, 1900, and 2200 nm. The use of PLSR allowed us to identify a total of 17 key wavelengths in the investigated spectrum range, which may be used as the optimal spectral settings for estimating TFV in the laboratory and field, or mapping of TFV using airborne/satellite sensors.

  16. Full field flow visualization and computer-aided velocity measurements in a bank of cylinders in a wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. J.; Canacci, V. A.; Russell, L. M.

    1992-01-01

    The full field flow tracking (FFFT) method that is presented in this paper uses a laser-generated, mechanically strobed planar sheet of light, a low luminosity TV camera coupled with a long distance microscope, and a computer-controlled video recorder to study nonintrusively and qualitatively the flow structures in a bank of cylinders that are placed in a wind tunnel. This setup simulates an upscale version of the geometry of internal cooling passageways characteristic of small air-cooled radial turbines. The qualitative images supplied by the FFFT system are processed by means of a computer-integrated image quantification (CIIQ) method into quantitative information, trajectories and velocities, that describe the flow upstream of and within the bank of cylinders. The tracking method is Lagrangian in concept, and permits identification and tracking of the same particle, thus facilitating construction of time dependent trajectories and the calculation of true velocities and accelerations. The error analysis evaluates the accuracy with which the seed particles follow the flow and the errors incurred during the quantitative processing of the raw data derived from the FFFT/CIIQ method.

  17. Full field flow visualization and computer-aided velocity measurements in a bank of cylinders in a wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, M. J.; Canacci, V. A.; Russell, L. M.

    1992-06-01

    The full field flow tracking (FFFT) method that is presented in this paper uses a laser-generated, mechanically strobed planar sheet of light, a low luminosity TV camera coupled with a long distance microscope, and a computer-controlled video recorder to study nonintrusively and qualitatively the flow structures in a bank of cylinders that are placed in a wind tunnel. This setup simulates an upscale version of the geometry of internal cooling passageways characteristic of small air-cooled radial turbines. The qualitative images supplied by the FFFT system are processed by means of a computer-integrated image quantification (CIIQ) method into quantitative information, trajectories and velocities, that describe the flow upstream of and within the bank of cylinders. The tracking method is Lagrangian in concept, and permits identification and tracking of the same particle, thus facilitating construction of time dependent trajectories and the calculation of true velocities and accelerations. The error analysis evaluates the accuracy with which the seed particles follow the flow and the errors incurred during the quantitative processing of the raw data derived from the FFFT/CIIQ method.

  18. Traveling solar-wind bulk-velocity fluctuations and their effects on electron heating in the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahr, Hans J.; Chashei, Igor V.; Verscharen, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Ambient plasma electrons undergo strong heating in regions associated with compressive bulk-velocity jumps ΔU that travel through the interplanetary solar wind. The heating is generated by their specific interactions with the jump-inherent electric fields. After this energy gain is thermalized by the shock passage through the operation of the Buneman instability, strong electron heating occurs that substantially influences the radial electron temperature profile. We previously studied the resulting electron temperature assuming that the amplitude of the traveling velocity jump remains constant with increasing solar distance. Now we aim at a more consistent view, describing the change in jump amplitude with distance that is caused by the heated electrons. We describe the reduction of the jump amplitude as a result of the energy expended by the traveling jump structure. We consider three effects: energy loss due to heating of electrons, energy loss due to work done against the pressure gradient of the pick-up ions, and an energy gain due to nonlinear jump steepening. Taking these effects into account, we show that the decrease in jump amplitude with solar distance is more pronounced when the initial jump amplitude is higher in the inner solar system. Independent of the initial jump amplitude, it eventually decreases with increasing distance to a value of about ΔU/U ≃ 0.1 at the position of the heliospheric termination shock, where ΔU is the jump amplitude, and U is the average solar-wind bulk velocity.The electron temperature, on the other hand, is strongly correlated with the initial jump amplitude and leads to electron temperatures between 6000 K and 20 000 K at distances beyond 50 AU. We compare our results with in situ measurements of the electron-core temperature from the Ulysses spacecraft in the plane of the ecliptic for 1.5 AU ≤ r ≤ 5 AU, where r is the distance from the Sun. Our results agree very well with these observations, which corroborates our

  19. Investigations of the air flow velocity field structure above the wavy surface under severe wind conditions by particle image velosimetry technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Kandaurov, Alexander; Sergeev, Daniil; Ermakova, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Preliminary experiments devoted to measuring characteristics of the air flow above the waved water surface for the wide range of wind speeds were performed with the application of modified Particle Image Velosimetry (PIV) technique. Experiments were carried out at the Wind - wave stratified flume of IAP RAS (length 10 °, cross section of air channel 0.4×0.4 m) for four different axial wind speeds: 8.7, 13.5, 19 and 24 m/s, corresponding to the equivalent 10-m wind speeds 15, 20, 30 40 m/s correspondingly. Intensive wave breaking with forming foam crest and droplets generations was occurred for two last wind conditions. The modified PIV-method based on the use of continuous-wave (CW) laser illumination of the airflow seeded by tiny particles and with highspeed video. Spherical 20 μm polyamide particles with density 1.02 g/sm3 and inertial time 7•10-3 s were used for seeding airflow with special injecting device. Green (532 nm) CW laser with 4 Wt output power was used as a source for light sheet. High speed digital camera Videosprint was used for taking visualized air flow images with the frame rate 2000 Hz s and exposure time 10 ms Combination including iteration Canny method [1] for obtaining curvilinear surface from the images in the laser sheet view and contact measurements of surface elevation by wire wave gauge installed near the border of working area for the surface wave profile was used. Then velocity air flow field was retrieved by PIV images processing with adaptive cross-correlation method on the curvilinear grid following surface wave profile. The mean wind velocity profiles were retrieved by averaging over obtained ensembles of wind velocity field realizations and over a wave period even for the cases of intensive wave breaking and droplets generation. To verify the PIV method additional measurements of mean velocity profiles over were carried out by the contact method using the Pitot tube. In the area of overlap, wind velocity profiles measured by

  20. Threshold wind velocity dynamics as a driver of aeolian sediment mass flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Nicholas P.; Galloza, Magda S.; Zobeck, Ted M.; Herrick, Jeffrey E.

    2016-03-01

    Horizontal (saltation) mass flux is a key driver of aeolian dust emission. Estimates of the horizontal mass flux underpin assessments of the global dust budget and influence our understanding of the dust cycle and its interactions. Current equations for predicting horizontal mass flux are based on limited field data and are constrained to representing transport-limited equilibrium saltation, driven by the wind momentum flux in excess of an entrainment threshold. This can result in large overestimation of the sediment mass flux. Here we compare measurements of the soil entrainment threshold, horizontal mass flux, and their temporal variability for five undisturbed dryland soils to explore the role of threshold in controlling the magnitude of mass flux. Average and median entrainment threshold showed relatively small variability among sites and relatively small variability between seasons, despite significant differences in soil surface conditions. Physical and biological soil crusts had little effect on the threshold value, and threshold appeared to play a minor role in determining the magnitude of sediment transport. Our results suggest that horizontal mass flux was controlled more by the supply limitation and abrasion efficiency of saltators present as loose erodible material or originating from neighboring soil sources. The omission of sediment supply and explicit representation of saltation bombardment from horizontal flux equations is inconsistent with the process representation in dust emission schemes and contributes to uncertainty in model predictions. This uncertainty can be reduced by developing greater process fidelity in models to predict horizontal mass flux under both supply- and transport-limited conditions.

  1. Monte Carlo studies of ocean wind vector measurements by SCATT: Objective criteria and maximum likelihood estimates for removal of aliases, and effects of cell size on accuracy of vector winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    The scatterometer on the National Oceanic Satellite System (NOSS) is studied by means of Monte Carlo techniques so as to determine the effect of two additional antennas for alias (or ambiguity) removal by means of an objective criteria technique and a normalized maximum likelihood estimator. Cells nominally 10 km by 10 km, 10 km by 50 km, and 50 km by 50 km are simulated for winds of 4, 8, 12 and 24 m/s and incidence angles of 29, 39, 47, and 53.5 deg for 15 deg changes in direction. The normalized maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) is correct a large part of the time, but the objective criterion technique is recommended as a reserve, and more quickly computed, procedure. Both methods for alias removal depend on the differences in the present model function at upwind and downwind. For 10 km by 10 km cells, it is found that the MLE method introduces a correlation between wind speed errors and aspect angle (wind direction) errors that can be as high as 0.8 or 0.9 and that the wind direction errors are unacceptably large, compared to those obtained for the SASS for similar assumptions.

  2. Wind-tunnel and Flight Investigations of the Use of Leading-Edge Area Suction for the Purpose of Increasing the Maximum Lift Coefficient of a 35 Degree Swept-Wing Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzhauser, Curt A; Bray, Richard S

    1956-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the increase in maximum lift coefficient that could be obtained by applying area suction near the leading edge of a wing. This investigation was performed first with a 35 degree swept-wing model in the wind tunnel, and then with an operational 35 degree swept-wing airplane which was modified in accord with the wind-tunnel results. The wind-tunnel and flight tests indicated that the maximum lift coefficient was increased more than 50 percent by the use of area suction. Good agreement was obtained in the comparison of the wind-tunnel results with those measured in flight.

  3. Estimation of the path-averaged wind velocity by cross-correlation of the received power and the shift of laser beam centroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marakasov, Dmitri A.; Tsvyk, Ruvim S.

    2015-11-01

    We consider the problem of estimation of the average wind speed on atmospheric path from measurements of time series of average power of the laser radiation detected through the receiving aperture and the position of the centroid of the image of the laser beam. It is shown that the mutual correlation function of these series has a maximum, whose position characterizes the average speed of the cross wind on the path. The dependence of the coordinates and magnitude of the maximum of the correlation function from the size of the receiving aperture and the distribution of turbulence along the atmospheric path.

  4. A numerical method for three-dimensional vortical structure of spiral vortex in wind turbine with two-dimensional velocity data at plural azimuthal angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Katsuyuki; Mizushima, Lucas Dias; Murata, Junsuke; Maeda, Takao

    2016-06-01

    A numerical method is presented to extract three-dimensional vortical structure of a spiral vortex (wing tip vortex) in a wind turbine, from two-dimensional velocity data at several azimuthal angles. This numerical method contributes to analyze a vortex observed in experiment where three-dimensional velocity field is difficult to be measured. This analysis needs two-dimensional velocity data in parallel planes at different azimuthal angles of a rotating blade, which facilitates the experiment since the angle of the plane does not change. The vortical structure is specified in terms of the invariant flow topology derived from eigenvalues and eigenvectors of three-dimensional velocity gradient tensor and corresponding physical properties. In addition, this analysis enables to investigate not only vortical flow topology but also important vortical features such as pressure minimum and vortex stretching that are derived from the three-dimensional velocity gradient tensor.

  5. Simulation comparison of a decoupled longitudinal control system and a velocity vector control wheel steering system during landings in wind shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimball, G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A simulator comparison of the velocity vector control wheel steering (VCWS) system and a decoupled longitudinal control system is presented. The piloting task was to use the electronic attitude direction indicator (EADI) to capture and maintain a 3 degree glide slope in the presence of wind shear and to complete the landing using the perspective runway included on the EADI. The decoupled control system used constant prefilter and feedback gains to provide steady state decoupling of flight path angle, pitch angle, and forward velocity. The decoupled control system improved the pilots' ability to control airspeed and flight path angle during the final stages of an approach made in severe wind shear. The system also improved their ability to complete safe landings. The pilots preferred the decoupled control system in severe winds and, on a pilot rating scale, rated the approach and landing task with the decoupled control system as much as 3 to 4 increments better than use of the VCWS system.

  6. Spatiotemporal patterns in methane flux and gas transfer velocity at low wind speeds: Implications for upscaling studies on small lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilder, J.; Bastviken, D.; Hardenbroek, M.; Heiri, O.

    2016-06-01

    Lakes contribute significantly to the global natural emissions of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide. However, to accurately incorporate them into the continental carbon balance more detailed surveys of lacustrine greenhouse gas emissions are needed, especially in respect to spatiotemporal variability and to how this affects the upscaling of results. We investigated CH4 flux from a small, wind-shielded lake during 10 field trips over a 14 month period. We show that floating chambers may be used to calibrate the relationship between gas transfer velocity (k) and wind speed at 10 m height (U10) to the local system, in order to obtain more accurate estimates of diffusive CH4 flux than by applying general models predicting k based on U10. We confirm earlier studies indicating strong within-lake spatial variation in this relationship and in ebullitive CH4 flux within the lake basin. However, in contrast to the pattern reported in other studies, ebullitive CH4 flux was highest in the central parts of the lake. Our results indicate positive relationships between k and U10 at very low U10 (0-3 m s-1), which disagrees with earlier suggestions that this relationship may be negligible at low U10 values. We estimate annually averaged open water CH4 emission from Lake Gerzensee to be 3.6-5.8 mmol m-2 d-1. Our data suggest that estimates of greenhouse gas emissions from aquatic systems to the atmosphere based on the upscaling of short-term and small-scale measurements can be improved if both spatial and temporal variabilities of emissions are taken into account.

  7. RETRACTED: The influence of sand diameter and wind velocity on sand particle lift-off and incident angles in the windblown sand flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Tian-Li; Zheng, Xiao-Jing; Duan, Shao-Zhen; Liang, Yi-Rui

    2013-05-01

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal. This article has been retracted at the request of the Editors-in-Chief. This article also contains significant similarity with parts of text, written by the same author(s), that have appeared in Tian-Li Bo, Xiao-Jing Zheng, Shao-Zhen Duan, Yi-Rui Liang, The influence of wind velocity and sand grain diameter on the falling velocities of sand particles, Powder Technology, Volume 241, June 2013, Pages 158-165. Tian-Li Bo, Xiao-Jing Zheng, Shao-Zhen Duan, Yi-Rui Liang, Analysis of sand particles' lift-off and incident velocities in wind-blown sand flux, Acta Mechanica Sinica, April 2013, Volume 29, Issue 2, pp 158-165. Tian-Li Bo, Xiao-Jing Zheng, Shao-Zhen Duan, Yi-Rui Liang, Influence of sand grain diameter and wind velocity on lift-off velocities of sand particles, The European Physical Journal E, May 2013, 36:50. Tian-Li Bo, Shao-Zhen Duan, Xiao-Jing Zheng, Yi-Rui Liang, The influence of sand bed temperature on lift-off and falling parameters in windblown sand flux, Geomorphology, Volume 204, 1 January 2014, Pages 477-484. The scientific community takes a very strong view on this matter and apologies are offered to readers of the journal that this was not detected during the submission process.

  8. VELOCITY-SHEAR-INDUCED MODE COUPLING IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE AND SOLAR WIND: IMPLICATIONS FOR PLASMA HEATING AND MHD TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Hollweg, Joseph V.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Kaghashvili, Edisher Kh. E-mail: ekaghash@aer.com

    2013-06-01

    We analytically consider how velocity shear in the corona and solar wind can cause an initial Alfven wave to drive up other propagating signals. The process is similar to the familiar coupling into other modes induced by non-WKB refraction in an inhomogeneous plasma, except here the refraction is a consequence of velocity shear. We limit our discussion to a low-beta plasma, and ignore couplings into signals resembling the slow mode. If the initial Alfven wave is propagating nearly parallel to the background magnetic field, then the induced signals are mainly a forward-going (i.e., propagating in the same sense as the original Alfven wave) fast mode, and a driven signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave but polarized like the fast mode; both signals are compressive and subject to damping by the Landau resonance. For an initial Alfven wave propagating obliquely with respect to the magnetic field, the induced signals are mainly forward- and backward-going fast modes, and a driven signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave but polarized like the fast mode; these signals are all compressive and subject to damping by the Landau resonance. A backward-going Alfven wave, thought to be important in the development of MHD turbulence, is also produced, but it is very weak. However, we suggest that for oblique propagation of the initial Alfven wave the induced fast-polarized signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave may interact coherently with the initial Alfven wave and distort it at a strong-turbulence-like rate.

  9. The effect of the time interval used to calculate mean wind velocity on the calculated drift potential, relative drift potential, and resultant drift direction for sands from three deserts in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengcai; Dong, Zhibao; Zhao, Aiguo

    2016-01-01

    Wind is the power behind many erosion processes and is responsible for many of the characteristics of arid zone geomorphology. Wind velocity is a key factor in determining the potential sand transport, but the nature of the wind velocity data can strongly affect assessments of the risk of blowing sand. In this study, we obtained real-time wind velocity data in a region of the Tengger Desert with shifting sands, in the Badain Jaran Desert, and in the Madoi desertification land, with the data obtained at 1-min intervals, and used the data to determine the influence of how the wind velocity was calculated (mean versus mid-point values and the averaging time used to calculate these values) on sand drift potential. In the three regions, for both the mean and the mid-point wind velocities, the estimated drift potential decreased with increasing averaging time. The relationships between velocities calculated using the different averaging time intervals and the value calculated using a 1-min interval could be expressed as linear functions. The drift potential calculated using the mid-point wind velocity was larger than that calculated using the mean wind velocity.

  10. Solar-wind velocity measurements from near-Sun comets C/2011 W3 (Lovejoy), C/2011 L4 (Pan-STARRS), and C/2012 S1 (ISON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanjooloo, Y.; Jones, G. H.; Coates, A.; Owens, M. J.; Battams, K.

    2014-07-01

    Since the mid-20th century, comets' plasma (type I) tails have been studied as natural probes of the solar wind [1]. Comets have induced magnetotails, formed through the draping of the heliospheric magnetic field by the velocity shear in the mass-loaded solar wind. These can be easily observed remotely as the comets' plasma tails, which generally point away from the Sun. Local solar-wind conditions directly influence the morphology and dynamics of a comet's plasma tail. During ideal observing geometries, the orientation and structure of the plasma tail can reveal large-scale and small-scale variations in the local solar-wind structure. These variations can be manifested as tail condensations, kinks, and disconnection events. Over 50 % of observed catalogued comets are sungrazing comets [2], fragments of three different parent comets. Since 2011, two bright new comets, C/2011 W3 [3] (from hereon comet Lovejoy) and C/2012 S1 [4] (hereon comet ISON) have experienced extreme solar-wind conditions and insolation of their nucleus during their perihelion passages, approaching to within 8.3×10^5 km (1.19 solar radii) and 1.9×10^6 km (2.79 solar radii) of the solar centre. They each displayed a prominent plasma tail, proving to be exceptions amongst the observed group of sungrazing comets. These bright sungrazers provide unprecedented access to study the solar wind in the heretofore unprobed innermost region of the solar corona. The closest spacecraft in-situ sampling of the solar wind by the Helios probes reached 0.29 au. For this study, we define a sungrazing comet as one with its perihelion within the solar Roche limit (3.70 solar radii). We also extend this study to include C/2011 L4 [5] (comet Pan-STARRS), a comet with a much further perihelion distance of 0.302 au. The technique employed in this study was first established by analysing geocentric amateur observations of comets C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) and C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) [7]. These amateur images, obtained with modern

  11. 33 CFR 156.320 - Maximum operating conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Requirements for the Gulf of Mexico § 156.320 Maximum operating conditions. Unless otherwise specified, the....320 Section 156.320 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... of the following conditions exist: (1) The wind velocity is 56 km/hr (30 knots) or more; or (2)...

  12. 33 CFR 156.320 - Maximum operating conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Requirements for the Gulf of Mexico § 156.320 Maximum operating conditions. Unless otherwise specified, the....320 Section 156.320 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... of the following conditions exist: (1) The wind velocity is 56 km/hr (30 knots) or more; or (2)...

  13. Constant wind regimes during the Last Glacial Maximum and early Holocene: evidence from Little Llangothlin Lagoon, New England Tablelands, eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulmeister, James; Kemp, Justine; Fitzsimmons, Kathryn E.; Gontz, Allen

    2016-07-01

    Here we present the results of a multi-proxy investigation - integrating geomorphology, ground-penetrating radar, and luminescence dating - of a high-elevation lunette and beach berm in northern New South Wales, eastern Australia. The lunette occurs on the eastern shore of Little Llangothlin Lagoon and provides evidence for a lake high stand combined with persistent westerly winds at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM - centring on 21.5 ka) and during the early Holocene (ca. 9 and 6 ka). The reconstructed atmospheric circulation is similar to the present-day conditions, and we infer no significant changes in circulation at those times, as compared to the present day. Our results suggest that the Southern Hemisphere westerlies were minimally displaced in this sector of Australasia during the latter part of the last ice age. Our observations also support evidence for a more positive water balance at the LGM and early Holocene in this part of the Australian sub-tropics.

  14. EnKF OSSE Experiments Assessing the Impact of HIRAD Wind Speed and HIWRAP Radial Velocity Data on Analysis of Hurricane Karl (2010)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, Cerese; Sippel, Jason A.; Braun, Scott A.; Miller, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies (e.g., Zhang et al. 2009, Weng et al. 2011) have shown that radial velocity data from airborne and ground-based radars can be assimilated into ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) systems to produce accurate analyses of tropical cyclone vortices, which can reduce forecast intensity error. Recently, wind speed data from SFMR technology has also been assimilated into the same types of systems and has been shown to improve the forecast intensity of mature tropical cyclones. Two instruments that measure these properties were present during the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) field experiment in 2010 which sampled Hurricane Karl, and will next be co-located on the same aircraft for the subsequent NASA HS3 experiment. The High Altitude Wind and Rain Profiling Radar (HIWRAP) is a conically scanning Doppler radar mounted upon NASAs Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle, and the usefulness of its radial velocity data for assimilation has not been previously examined. Since the radar scans from above with a fairly large fixed elevation angle, it observes a large component of the vertical wind, which could degrade EnKF analyses compared to analyses with data taken from lesser elevation angles. The NASA Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a passive microwave radiometer similar to SFMR, and measures emissivity and retrieves hurricane surface wind speeds and rain rates over a much wider swath. Thus, this study examines the impact of assimilating simulated HIWRAP radial velocity data into an EnKF system, simulated HIRAD wind speed, and HIWRAP+HIRAD with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and compares the results to no data assimilation and also to the Truth from which the data was simulated for both instruments.

  15. Solar Wind Halo Formation by the Scattering of the Strahl via Direct Cluster/PEACE Observations of the 3D Velocity Distribution Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Gurgiolo, Chris A.; Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested by a number of authors that the solar wind electron halo can be formed by the scattering of the strahl. On frequent occasions we have observed in electron angular skymaps (Phi/Theta-plots) of the electron 3D velocity distribution functions) a bursty-filament of particles connecting the strahl to the solar wind core-halo. These are seen over a very limited energy range. When the magnetic field is well off the nominal solar wind flow direction such filaments are inconsistent with any local forces and are probably the result of strong scattering. Furthermore, observations indicates that the strahl component is frequently and significantly anisotropic (Tper/Tpal approx.2). This provides a possible free energy source for the excitation of whistler waves as a possible scattering mechanism. The empirical observational evidence between the halo and the strahl suggests that the strahl population may be, at least in part, the source of the halo component.

  16. Results from 1984 airborne Doppler lidar wind measurement program. Flight 6: Analysis of line-of-sight elevation angle errors and apparent Doppler velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry

    1987-01-01

    During the summer of 1984 the Marshall Space Flight Center's Airborne Doppler Lidar System (ADLS) made a series of wind measurements in the California Central Valley. This study quantifies the lidar beam angle errors and velocity errors through analysis of ground return signals. Line-of-sight elevation (LOSE) angle errors are under 1 deg. Apparent Doppler ground velocities, as large as 2m/s, are considerably less than in a previous flight experiment in 1981. No evidence was found of a Schuler resonance phenomenon common to inertial navigation systems (INS), however the aperiodic nature of the apparent velocities implies an error in the INS-derived ground speeds. Certain features and subtleties in the ground returns are explained in terms of atmospheric structure and characteristics of the ADLS hardware and software. Finally, least squares and low-pass filtering techniques are suggested for eliminating errors during post-processing.

  17. Ground and space based cloud-top wind velocities using CFHT/ESPaDOnS (Doppler velocimetry) and VEx/VIRTIS (cloud tracking) coordinated measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Pedro; Widemann, Thomas; Peralta, Javier; Gonçalves, Rúben; Donati, Jean-François; Luz, David

    2016-04-01

    We will present wind velocity results based in the measurements of the horizontal wind field at the cloud top level of the atmosphere of Venus, near 70 km altitude. Our aim is contribute to the characterisation of the zonal and meridional wind latitudinal profiles on hour and day-timescales. This will be done by tracking Doppler shift of solar and CO2 lines over the dayside hemisphere in coordination with ESA's Venus Express orbiter. Our observations measured winds at cloud tops at latitudes 60°S-60°N, while Vex/VIRTIS privileged southern latitudes poleward of 45°S. This coordination effort intended to provide a combined monitoring of short-term changes of wind amplitude and directions with extensive spatial coverage. We present results based on inter comparison of ground-based Doppler velocimetry of cloud-top winds and cloud tracking measurements from the Venus Express spacecraft. Doppler wind velocimetry obtained with the 3.60 m Canada-France-Hawaii telescope (CFHT) and the Visible Spectrograph ESPaDOnS in April 2014 consisted of high-resolution spectra of Fraunhofer lines in the visible range (0.37-1.05 μm) to measure the wind velocity using the Doppler shift of solar radiation scattered by cloud top particles in the observer's direction. The complete optical spectrum was collected at a phase angle Φ = (76 ± 0.3)°, at a resolution of about 80000. Both ground-based and Venus Express measurements show considerable day-to-day variability revealing wave propagation and angular momentum transport in latitude which needs to be carefully assessed. ESPaDOnS and the sequential technique of visible Doppler velocimetry has proven a reference technique to measure instantaneous winds. These measurements are necessary to help validating Global Circulation Models (GCMs), to extend the temporal coverage of available datasets. The ground-based observations in the base of this project are critical in their complementarity with Venus Express, which was recently

  18. Orientation Cues for High-Flying Nocturnal Insect Migrants: Do Turbulence-Induced Temperature and Velocity Fluctuations Indicate the Mean Wind Flow?

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Andy M.; Reynolds, Don R.; Smith, Alan D.; Chapman, Jason W.

    2010-01-01

    Migratory insects flying at high altitude at night often show a degree of common alignment, sometimes with quite small angular dispersions around the mean. The observed orientation directions are often close to the downwind direction and this would seemingly be adaptive in that large insects could add their self-propelled speed to the wind speed, thus maximising their displacement in a given time. There are increasing indications that high-altitude orientation may be maintained by some intrinsic property of the wind rather than by visual perception of relative ground movement. Therefore, we first examined whether migrating insects could deduce the mean wind direction from the turbulent fluctuations in temperature. Within the atmospheric boundary-layer, temperature records show characteristic ramp-cliff structures, and insects flying downwind would move through these ramps whilst those flying crosswind would not. However, analysis of vertical-looking radar data on the common orientations of nocturnally migrating insects in the UK produced no evidence that the migrants actually use temperature ramps as orientation cues. This suggests that insects rely on turbulent velocity and acceleration cues, and refocuses attention on how these can be detected, especially as small-scale turbulence is usually held to be directionally invariant (isotropic). In the second part of the paper we present a theoretical analysis and simulations showing that velocity fluctuations and accelerations felt by an insect are predicted to be anisotropic even when the small-scale turbulence (measured at a fixed point or along the trajectory of a fluid-particle) is isotropic. Our results thus provide further evidence that insects do indeed use turbulent velocity and acceleration cues as indicators of the mean wind direction. PMID:21209956

  19. Orientation cues for high-flying nocturnal insect migrants: do turbulence-induced temperature and velocity fluctuations indicate the mean wind flow?

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Andy M; Reynolds, Don R; Smith, Alan D; Chapman, Jason W

    2010-01-01

    Migratory insects flying at high altitude at night often show a degree of common alignment, sometimes with quite small angular dispersions around the mean. The observed orientation directions are often close to the downwind direction and this would seemingly be adaptive in that large insects could add their self-propelled speed to the wind speed, thus maximising their displacement in a given time. There are increasing indications that high-altitude orientation may be maintained by some intrinsic property of the wind rather than by visual perception of relative ground movement. Therefore, we first examined whether migrating insects could deduce the mean wind direction from the turbulent fluctuations in temperature. Within the atmospheric boundary-layer, temperature records show characteristic ramp-cliff structures, and insects flying downwind would move through these ramps whilst those flying crosswind would not. However, analysis of vertical-looking radar data on the common orientations of nocturnally migrating insects in the UK produced no evidence that the migrants actually use temperature ramps as orientation cues. This suggests that insects rely on turbulent velocity and acceleration cues, and refocuses attention on how these can be detected, especially as small-scale turbulence is usually held to be directionally invariant (isotropic). In the second part of the paper we present a theoretical analysis and simulations showing that velocity fluctuations and accelerations felt by an insect are predicted to be anisotropic even when the small-scale turbulence (measured at a fixed point or along the trajectory of a fluid-particle) is isotropic. Our results thus provide further evidence that insects do indeed use turbulent velocity and acceleration cues as indicators of the mean wind direction. PMID:21209956

  20. WIND VELOCITIES AND SAND FLUXES IN MESQUITE DUNE-LANDS IN THE NORTHERN CHIHUAHUAN DESERT: A COMPARISON BETWEEN FIELD MEASUREMENTS AND THE QUIC (QUICK URBAN AND INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX) MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The poster shows comparisons of wind velocities and sand fluxes between field measurements and a computer model, called QUIC (Quick Urban & Industrial Complex). The comparisons were made for a small desert region in New Mexico.

  1. Some features of the radial-velocity variations of lines of different intensity in the spectrum of HD 93521. Variability of the stellar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzaev, A. Kh.

    2007-12-01

    CCD spectra taken with the PFES echelle spectrograph of the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences are used to perform a detailed study of the variability of the profiles of Hell, H β, and H α lines in the spectrum of HD 93521. The pattern and nature of the variability of the Hell lines are similar to those of weak HeI lines and are due to nonradial pulsations. The period and amplitude of the radial-velocity variations are the same for the blue and red halves of the absorption profile but their phases are opposite. The behavior of the variations of H β and H α hydrogen lines relative to their mean profiles is the same as that of strong HeI line and is due to nonradial pulsations. The period and phase of the radial-velocity oscillations are the same for the blue and red halves of the absorption profile but their amplitude are different. The behavior of the radial-velocity variations of the absorption and emission components of the H α line indicates that the latter also are caused by nonradial pulsations. All this is indicative of the complex structure of the stellar wind in the region of its origin. The behavior of variability and wind kinematics differ in different directions and for different regions of the atmosphere and/or envelope.

  2. Discovery of very high velocity outflow in V Hydra - Wind from an accretion disk in a binary?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahai, R.; Wannier, P. G.

    1988-01-01

    High-resolution observations of lines from the CO v = 1-0 vibration-rotation band at 4.6 microns, taken with the FTS/KPNO 4-m telescope, are reported for the carbon-rich red giant V Hydra, which is surrounded by an extended expanding molecular envelope resulting from extensive mass loss. The spectrum shows, in addition to the expected absorption at the outflow velocity of the envelope, absorption extending up to 120 km/s bluewards of the stellar velocity. A comparison of the spectrum observed at two epochs shows that the high-velocity absorption features change with time. It is suggested that the observed high-velocity features in V Hydra arise in a high-velocity polar outflow from an accretion disk in a binary system, as proposed in the mass-loss model for bipolar envelopes by Morris (1988).

  3. MACS, An Instrument and a Methodology for Simultaneous and Global Measurements of the Coronal Electron Temperature and the Solar Wind Velocity on the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reginald, Nelson L.

    2000-01-01

    In Cram's theory for the formation of the K-coronal spectrum he observed the existence of temperature sensitive anti-nodes, which were separated by temperature insensitive nodes, at certain wave-lengths in the K-coronal spectrum. Cram also showed these properties were remarkably independent of altitude above the solar limb. In this thesis Cram's theory has been extended to incorporate the role of the solar wind in the formation of the K-corona, and we have identified both temperature and wind sensitive intensity ratios. The instrument, MACS, for Multi Aperture Coronal Spectrometer, a fiber optic based spectrograph, was designed for global and simultaneous measurements of the thermal electron temperature and the solar wind velocity in the solar corona. The first ever experiment of this nature was conducted in conjunction with the total solar eclipse of 11 August 1999 in Elazig, Turkey. Here twenty fiber optic tips were positioned in the focal plane of the telescope to observe simultaneously at many different latitudes and two different radial distances in the solar corona. The other ends were vertically stacked and placed at the primary focus of the spectrograph. By isolating the K-coronal spectrum from each fiber the temperature and the wind sensitive intensity ratios were calculated.

  4. Anorthite sputtering by H+ and Arq+ (q = 1-9) at solar wind velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Hijazi, Hussein Dib; Bannister, Mark E.; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Barghouty, A. F.; Rickman, D. L.; Meyer, Fred W.

    2014-10-16

    Here, we report sputtering measurements of anorthite-like material, taken to be representative of soils found in the lunar highlands, impacted by singly and multicharged ions representative of the solar wind. The ions investigated include protons, as well as singly and multicharged Ar ions (as proxies for the nonreactive heavy solar wind constituents), in the charge state range +1 to +9, at fixed solar wind-relevant impact velocities of 165 and 310 km/s (0.25 keV/amu and 0.5 keV/amu). A quartz microbalance approach (QCM) for determination of total sputtering yields was used. The goal of the measurements was to determine the sputtering contribution of the heavy, multicharged minority solar wind constituents in comparison to that due to the dominant H+ fraction. The QCM results show a yield increase of a factor of about 80 for Ar+ versus H+ sputtering and an enhancement by a factor of 1.67 between Ar9+ and Ar+, which is a clear indication of a potential sputtering effect.

  5. A theory of local and global processes which affect solar wind electrons. I - The origin of typical 1 AU velocity distribution functions - Steady state theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Olbert, S.

    1979-01-01

    A kinetic theory for the velocity distribution of solar wind electrons which illustrates the global and local properties of the solar wind expansion is proposed. By means of the Boltzmann equation with the Krook collision operator accounting for Coulomb collisions, it is found that Coulomb collisions determine the population and shape of the electron distribution function in both the thermal and suprathermal energy regimes. For suprathermal electrons, the cumulative effects of Coulomb interactions are shown to take place on the scale of the heliosphere itself, whereas the Coulomb interactions of thermal electrons occur on a local scale near the point of observation (1 AU). The bifurcation of the electron distribution between thermal and suprathermal electrons is localized to the deep solar corona (1 to 10 solar radii).

  6. A theory of local and global processes which affect solar wind electrons. 1: The origin of typical 1 AU velocity distribution functions: Steady state theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    A detailed first principle kinetic theory for electrons which is neither a classical fluid treatment nor an exospheric calculation is presented. This theory illustrates the global and local properties of the solar wind expansion that shape the observed features of the electron distribution function, such as its bifurcation, its skewness and the differential temperatures of the thermal and suprathermal subpopulations. Coulomb collisions are substantial mediators of the interplanetary electron velocity distribution function and they place a zone for a bifurcation of the electron distribution function deep in the corona. The local cause and effect precept which permeates the physics of denser media is modified for electrons in the solar wind. The local form of transport laws and equations of state which apply to collision dominated plasmas are replaced with global relations that explicitly depend on the relative position of the observer to the boundaries of the system.

  7. MACS, An Instrument, and a Methodology for Simulations and Global Measurements of the Coronal Electron Temperature and the Solar Wind Velocity on the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reginald, Nelson L.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The determination of the radial and latitudinal temperature and wind profiles of the solar corona is of great importance in understanding the coronal heating mechanism and the dynamics of coronal expansion. Cram presented the theory for the formation of the K-coronal spectrum and identified two important observations. He observed the existence of temperature sensitive anti-nodes at certain wavelengths in the theoretical K-coronal spectra. The anti-nodes are separated by temperature-insensitive nodes. Remarkably, Cram showed that the wavelengths of the nodes and anti-nodes are almost independent of altitude above the solar limb. Because of these features, Cram suggested that the intensity ratios at two anti-nodes could be used as a diagnostic of the electron temperature in the K-corona. Based on this temperature diagnostic technique prescribed by Cram a slit-based spectroscopic study was performed by Ichimoto et al. on the solar corona in conjunction with the total solar eclipse of 3 Nov 1994 in Putre, Chile to determine the temperature profile of the solar corona. In this thesis Cram's theory has been extended to incorporate the role of the solar wind in the formation of the K-corona, and we have identified both temperature and wind sensitive intensity ratios. The instrument, MACS, for Multi Aperture Coronal Spectrometer, a fiber optic based spectrograph, was designed for global and simultaneous measurement of the thermal electron temperature and the solar wind velocity in the solar corona. The first ever experiment of this nature was conducted in conjunction with the total solar eclipse of 11 Aug 1999 in Elazig, Turkey. In this instrument one end of each of twenty fiber optic tips were positioned in the focal plane of the telescope in such a way that we could observe conditions simultaneously at many different latitudes and two different radial distances in the solar corona. The other ends of the fibers were vertically aligned and placed at the primary focus of

  8. Introduction to Voigt's wind power plant. [energy conversion efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkin, J.

    1973-01-01

    The design and operation of a 100 kilowatt wind driven generator are reported. Its high speed three-bladed turbine operates at a height of 50 meters. Blades are rigidly connected to the hub and turbine revolutions change linearly with wind velocity, maintaining a constant speed ratio of blade tip velocity to wind velocity over the full predetermined wind range. Three generators installed in the gondola generate either dc or ac current. Based on local wind conditions, the device has a maximum output of 720 kilowatts at a wind velocity of 16 meters per second. Total electrical capacity is 750 kilowatts, and power output per year is 2,135,000 kilowatt/hours.

  9. The ejection of shells in the stellar wind of P CYG - The most plausible explanation of the Balmer-line radial velocity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markova, N.

    1986-07-01

    Our new data of the Balmer line radial velocities in the P Cygni spectrum are compared to the measurments published by de Groot (1969), Kolka (1983) and Markova (1986). The observed variations are analysed in terms of a model proposed by Kolka (1983) which implies a multiple ejection of shells in the stellar wind of P Cygni. It is shown that all data agree to an ejection time scale of about 200 days. The estimated accelerations for the three data groups are very close which supposes a stability of the ejection mechanism over an interval of about 40 yr. The radial velocities of nalmer and the FeII and FeIII (far UV) lines are compared. The identity of the Balmer and the FeII and FeIII shells is discussed.

  10. Empirical Relation Between Induced Velocity, Thrust, and Rate of Descent of a Helicopter Rotor as Determined by Wind-tunnel Tests on Four Model Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castles, Walter, Jr; Gray, Robin B

    1951-01-01

    The empirical relation between the induced velocity, thrust, and rate of vertical descent of a helicopter rotor was calculated from wind tunnel force tests on four model rotors by the application of blade-element theory to the measured values of the thrust, torque, blade angle, and equivalent free-stream rate of descent. The model tests covered the useful range of C(sub t)/sigma(sub e) (where C(sub t) is the thrust coefficient and sigma(sub e) is the effective solidity) and the range of vertical descent from hovering to descent velocities slightly greater than those for autorotation. The three bladed models, each of which had an effective solidity of 0.05 and NACA 0015 blade airfoil sections, were as follows: (1) constant-chord, untwisted blades of 3-ft radius; (2) untwisted blades of 3-ft radius having a 3/1 taper; (3) constant-chord blades of 3-ft radius having a linear twist of 12 degrees (washout) from axis of rotation to tip; and (4) constant-chord, untwisted blades of 2-ft radius. Because of the incorporation of a correction for blade dynamic twist and the use of a method of measuring the approximate equivalent free-stream velocity, it is believed that the data obtained from this program are more applicable to free-flight calculations than the data from previous model tests.

  11. Empirical relation between induced velocity, thrust, and rate of descent of a helicopter rotor as determined by wind-tunnel tests on four model rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castles, Walter, Jr.; Gray, Robin B.

    1951-01-01

    The empirical relation between the induced velocity, thrust, and rate of vertical descent of a helicopter rotor was calculated from wind tunnel force tests on four model rotors by the application of blade-element theory to the measured values of the thrust, torque, blade angle, and equivalent free-stream rate of descent. The model tests covered the useful range of C(sub t)/sigma(sub e) (where C(sub t) is the thrust coefficient and sigma(sub e) is the effective solidity) and the range of vertical descent from hovering to descent velocities slightly greater than those for autorotation. The three bladed models, each of which had an effective solidity of 0.05 and NACA 0015 blade airfoil sections, were as follows: (1) constant-chord, untwisted blades of 3-ft radius; (2) untwisted blades of 3-ft radius having a 3/1 taper; (3) constant-chord blades of 3-ft radius having a linear twist of 12 degrees (washout) from axis of rotation to tip; and (4) constant-chord, untwisted blades of 2-ft radius. Because of the incorporation of a correction for blade dynamic twist and the use of a method of measuring the approximate equivalent free-stream velocity, it is believed that the data obtained from this program are more applicable to free-flight calculations than the data from previous model tests.

  12. Source localization corrections for airborne acoustic platforms based on a climatological assessment of temperature and wind velocity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostashev, Vladimir E.; Cheinet, Sylvain; Collier, Sandra L.; Reiff, Christian; Ligon, David A.; Wilson, D. Keith; Noble, John M.; Alberts, W. C. Kirkpatrick, II

    2012-06-01

    Acoustic sensors are being employed on airborne platforms, such as Persistent Threat Detection System (PTDS) and Persistent Ground Surveillance System (PGSS), for source localization. Under certain atmospheric conditions, airborne sensors oer a distinct advantage over ground sensors. The performance of both ground and airborne sensors is aected by environmental factors, such as atmospheric turbulence and wind and temperature proles. For airborne sensors, the eects of refraction must be accounted for in order to determine the source coordinates. Such a method for ground-to-air applications has been developed and is further rened here. Ideally, knowledge of the exact atmospheric proles will allow for the most accurate mitigation of refractive eects. However, acoustic sensors deployed in theater are rarely supported by atmospheric sensing systems that retrieve real-time temperature and wind elds. Atmospheric conditions evolve through seasons, time of day, and are strongly location dependent. Therefore, the development of an atmospheric proles database based on a long time series climatological assessment will provide knowledge for use in physics-based bearing estimation algorithms, where otherwise no correction would have been performed. Long term atmospheric data sets from weather modeling systems are used for a climatological assessment of the refraction corrections and localization errors over selected sites.

  13. Forward velocity effects on fan noise and the suppression characteristics of advanced inlets as measured in the NASA Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel: Acoustic data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, M. T.

    1981-01-01

    Forward velocity effects on the forward radiated fan noise and on the suppression characteristics of three advanced inlets relative to a baseline cylindrical inlet were measured in a wind tunnel. A modified JT15D turbofan engine in a quiet nacelle was the source of fan noise; the advanced inlets were a CTOL hybrid inlet, an STOL hybrid inlet, and a treated deflector inlet. Also measured were the static to flight effects on the baseline inlet noise and the effects on the fan noise of canting the baseline inlet 4 deg downward to simulate typical wing mounted turbofan engines. The 1/3 octave band noise data from these tests are given along with selected plots of 1/3 octave band spectra and directivity and full scale PNL directivities. The test facilities and data reduction techniques used are also described.

  14. Estimating vertical velocity and radial flow from Doppler radar observations of tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. L.; Lee, W. C.; MacDonald, A. E.

    2006-01-01

    The mesoscale vorticity method (MVM) is used in conjunction with the ground-based velocity track display (GBVTD) to derive the inner-core vertical velocity from Doppler radar observations of tropical cyclone (TC) Danny (1997). MVM derives the vertical velocity from vorticity variations in space and in time based on the mesoscale vorticity equation. The use of MVM and GBVTD allows us to derive good correlations among the eye-wall maximum wind, bow-shaped updraught and echo east of the eye-wall in Danny. Furthermore, we demonstrate the dynamically consistent radial flow can be derived from the vertical velocity obtained from MVM using the wind decomposition technique that solves the Poisson equations over a limited-area domain. With the wind decomposition, we combine the rotational wind which is obtained from Doppler radar wind observations and the divergent wind which is inferred dynamically from the rotational wind to form the balanced horizontal wind in TC inner cores, where rotational wind dominates the divergent wind. In this study, we show a realistic horizontal and vertical structure of the vertical velocity and the induced radial flow in Danny's inner core. In the horizontal, the main eye-wall updraught draws in significant surrounding air, converging at the strongest echo where the maximum updraught is located. In the vertical, the main updraught tilts vertically outwards, corresponding very well with the outward-tilting eye-wall. The maximum updraught is located at the inner edge of the eye-wall clouds, while downward motions are found at the outer edge. This study demonstrates that the mesoscale vorticity method can use high-temporal-resolution data observed by Doppler radars to derive realistic vertical velocity and the radial flow of TCs. The vorticity temporal variations crucial to the accuracy of the vorticity method have to be derived from a high-temporal-frequency observing system such as state-of-the-art Doppler radars.

  15. Forward velocity effects on fan noise and the suppression characteristics of advanced inlets as measured in the NASA-Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, M. T.

    1980-01-01

    Forward velocity effects on the forward radiated fan noise and on the suppression characteristics of three advanced inlets relative to a baseline cylindrical inlet were measured in the NASA Ames Research Center 40 x 80 foot Wind Tunnel. A modified JT15D turbofan engine in a quiet nacelle was the source of fan noise; the advanced inlets were a Conventional Takeoff/Landing (CTOL) hybrid inlet, a Short Takeoff/Landing (STOL) hybrid inlet, and a treated deflector inlet. Also measured were the static to flight effects on the fan noise of canting the baseline inlet 4 deg downward to simulate typical wing mounted turbofan engines. The CTOL hybrid inlet suppressed the high tip speed fan noise as much as 18 PNdB on a 61 m (200 ft) sideline scaled to a CF6 size engine while the STOL hybrid inlet suppressed the low tip speed fan noise as much as 13 PNdB on a 61 m (200 ft) sideline scaled to a OCSEE size engine. The deflector inlet suppressed the high tip speed fan noise as much as 13 PNdB at 61 m (200 ft) overhead scaled to a CF6 size engine. No significant changes in fan noise suppression for the CTOL and STOL hybrid inlets occurred for forward velocity changes above 21 m/s (68 ft/s) or for angle of attack changes up to 15 deg. However, changes in both forward velocity and angle of attack changed the deflector inlet noise unpredictably due to the asymmetry of the inlet flow field into the fan.

  16. VisibleWind: wind profile measurements at low altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkerson, Tom; Bradford, Bill; Marchant, Alan; Apedaile, Tom; Wright, Cordell

    2009-09-01

    VisibleWindTM is developing an inexpensive rapid response system, for accurately characterizing wind shear and small scale wind phenomena in the boundary layer and for prospecting suitable locations for wind power turbines. The ValidWind system can also collect reliable "ground truth" for other remote wind sensors. The system employs small (0.25 m dia.) lightweight balloons and a tracker consisting of an Impulse 200 XL laser rangefinder coupled to a PC for automated data recording. Experiments on balloon trajectories demonstrate that the laser detection of range (+/- 0.5 m), together with measured azimuth and altitude, is an inexpensive, convenient, and capable alternative to other wind tracking methods. The maximum detection range has been increased to 2200 meters using micro-corner-cube retroreflector tape on balloons. Low power LEDs enable nighttime tracking. To avoid large balloon gyrations about the mean trajectory, we use balloons having low ascent rates and subcritical Reynolds numbers. Trajectory points are typically recorded every 4 - 7 seconds. Atmospheric features observed under conditions of inversions or "light and variable winds" include abrupt onsets of shear at altitudes of 100-250 m, velocity changes of order 1-3 m/s within layers of 10-20 m thickness, and veering of the wind direction by 180 degrees or more as altitude increases from 300 to 500 m. We have previously reported comparisons of balloon-based wind profiles with the output of a co-located sodar. Even with the Impulse rangefinder, our system still requires a "man in the loop" to track the balloon. A future system enhancement will automate balloon tracking, so that laser returns are obtained automatically at 1 Hz. While balloon measurements of large-scale, high altitude wind profiles are well known, this novel measurement system provides high-resolution, real-time characterization of the fluctuating local wind fields at the bottom of the boundary layer where wind power turbines and other

  17. Microburst vertical wind estimation from horizontal wind measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan D.

    1994-01-01

    The vertical wind or downdraft component of a microburst-generated wind shear can significantly degrade airplane performance. Doppler radar and lidar are two sensor technologies being tested to provide flight crews with early warning of the presence of hazardous wind shear. An inherent limitation of Doppler-based sensors is the inability to measure velocities perpendicular to the line of sight, which results in an underestimate of the total wind shear hazard. One solution to the line-of-sight limitation is to use a vertical wind model to estimate the vertical component from the horizontal wind measurement. The objective of this study was to assess the ability of simple vertical wind models to improve the hazard prediction capability of an airborne Doppler sensor in a realistic microburst environment. Both simulation and flight test measurements were used to test the vertical wind models. The results indicate that in the altitude region of interest (at or below 300 m), the simple vertical wind models improved the hazard estimate. The radar simulation study showed that the magnitude of the performance improvement was altitude dependent. The altitude of maximum performance improvement occurred at about 300 m.

  18. Dry deposition velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1984-03-01

    Dry deposition velocities are very difficult to predict accurately. In this article, reported values of dry deposition velocities are summarized. This summary includes values from the literature on field measurements of gas and particle dry deposition velocities, and the uncertainties inherent in extrapolating field results to predict dry deposition velocities are discussed. A new method is described for predicting dry deposition velocity using a least-squares correlation of surface mass transfer resistances evaluated in wind tunnel experiments. 14 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  19. Generation of temperature anisotropy for alpha particle velocity distributions in solar wind at 0.3 AU: Vlasov simulations and Helios observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, D.; Bourouaine, S.; Valentini, F.; Marsch, E.; Veltri, P.

    2014-04-01

    Solar wind "in situ" measurements from the Helios spacecraft in regions of the Heliosphere close to the Sun (˜0.3 AU), at which typical values of the proton plasma beta are observed to be lower than unity, show that the alpha particle distribution functions depart from the equilibrium Maxwellian configuration, displaying significant elongations in the direction perpendicular to the background magnetic field. In the present work, we made use of multi-ion hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell simulations to provide theoretical support and interpretation to the empirical evidences above. Our numerical results show that, at variance with the case of βp≃1 discussed in Perrone et al. (2011), for βp=0.1 the turbulent cascade in the direction parallel to the ambient magnetic field is not efficient in transferring energy toward scales shorter than the proton inertial length. Moreover, our numerical analysis provides new insights for the theoretical interpretation of the empirical evidences obtained from the Helios spacecraft, concerning the generation of temperature anisotropy in the particle velocity distributions.

  20. Predicting species' maximum dispersal distances from simple plant traits.

    PubMed

    Tamme, Riin; Götzenberger, Lars; Zobel, Martin; Bullock, James M; Hooftman, Danny A P; Kaasik, Ants; Pärtel, Meelis

    2014-02-01

    Many studies have shown plant species' dispersal distances to be strongly related to life-history traits, but how well different traits can predict dispersal distances is not yet known. We used cross-validation techniques and a global data set (576 plant species) to measure the predictive power of simple plant traits to estimate species' maximum dispersal distances. Including dispersal syndrome (wind, animal, ant, ballistic, and no special syndrome), growth form (tree, shrub, herb), seed mass, seed release height, and terminal velocity in different combinations as explanatory variables we constructed models to explain variation in measured maximum dispersal distances and evaluated their power to predict maximum dispersal distances. Predictions are more accurate, but also limited to a particular set of species, if data on more specific traits, such as terminal velocity, are available. The best model (R2 = 0.60) included dispersal syndrome, growth form, and terminal velocity as fixed effects. Reasonable predictions of maximum dispersal distance (R2 = 0.53) are also possible when using only the simplest and most commonly measured traits; dispersal syndrome and growth form together with species taxonomy data. We provide a function (dispeRsal) to be run in the software package R. This enables researchers to estimate maximum dispersal distances with confidence intervals for plant species using measured traits as predictors. Easily obtainable trait data, such as dispersal syndrome (inferred from seed morphology) and growth form, enable predictions to be made for a large number of species. PMID:24669743

  1. Wind Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Dr. Jack Cermak, Director of Fluid Dynamics and Diffusion Laboratory, developed the first wind tunnel to simulate the changing temperatures, directions and velocities of natural winds. In this work, Cermak benefited from NASA technology related to what is known as the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL).

  2. A Monte Carlo comparison of the recovery of winds near upwind and downwind from the SASS-1 model function by means of the sum of squares algorithm and a maximum likelihood estimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, W. J., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Backscatter measurements at upwind and crosswind are simulated for five incidence angles by means of the SASS-1 model function. The effects of communication noise and attitude errors are simulated by Monte Carlo methods, and the winds are recovered by both the Sum of Square (SOS) algorithm and a Maximum Likelihood Estimater (MLE). The SOS algorithm is shown to fail for light enough winds at all incidence angles and to fail to show areas of calm because backscatter estimates that were negative or that produced incorrect values of K sub p greater than one were discarded. The MLE performs well for all input backscatter estimates and returns calm when both are negative. The use of the SOS algorithm is shown to have introduced errors in the SASS-1 model function that, in part, cancel out the errors that result from using it, but that also cause disagreement with other data sources such as the AAFE circle flight data at light winds. Implications for future scatterometer systems are given.

  3. Full-scale-wind-tunnel Tests of a 35 Degree Sweptback Wing Airplane with High-velocity Blowing over the Training-edge Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Mark W; Tolhurst, William H JR

    1955-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation was made to determine the effects of ejecting high-velocity air near the leading edge of plain trailing-edge flaps on a 35 degree sweptback wing. The tests were made with flap deflections from 45 degrees to 85 degrees and with pressure ratios across the flap nozzles from sub-critical up to 2.9. A limited study of the effects of nozzle location and configuration on the efficiency of the flap was made. Measurements of the lift, drag, and pitching moment were made for Reynolds numbers from 5.8 to 10.1x10(6). Measurements were also made of the weight rate of flow, pressure, and temperature of the air supplied to the flap nozzles.The results show that blowing on the deflected flap produced large flap lift increments. The amount of air required to prevent flow separation on the flap was significantly less than that estimated from published two-dimensional data. When the amount of air ejected over the flap was just sufficient to prevent flow separation, the lift increment obtained agreed well with linear inviscid fluid theory up to flap deflections of 60 degrees. The flap lift increment at 85 degrees flap deflection was about 80 percent of that predicted theoretically.With larger amounts of air blown over the flap, these lift increments could be significantly increased. It was found that the performance of the flap was relatively insensitive to the location of the flap nozzle, to spacers in the nozzle, and to flow disturbances such as those caused by leading-edge slats or discontinuities on the wing or flap surfaces. Analysis of the results indicated that installation of this system on an F-86 airplane is feasible.

  4. Maximum Jailbreak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, B.

    First formulated one hundred and fifty years ago by the heretical scholar Nikolai Federov, the doctrine of cosmism begins with an absolute refusal to treat the most basic factors conditioning life on Earth ­ gravity and death ­ as necessary constraints on action. As manifest through the intoxicated cheers of its early advocates that humans should storm the heavens and conquer death, cosmism's foundational gesture was to conceive of the earth as a trap. Its duty was therefore to understand the duty of philosophy, economics and design to be the creation of means to escape it. This could be regarded as a jailbreak at the maximum possible scale, a heist in which the human species could steal itself from the vault of the Earth. After several decades of relative disinterest new space ventures are inspiring scientific, technological and popular imaginations, this essay explores what kind of cosmism might be constructed today. In this paper cosmism's position as a means of escape is both reviewed and evaluated by reflecting on the potential of technology that actually can help us achieve its aims and also through the lens and state-ofthe-art philosophy of accelerationism, which seeks to outrun modern tropes by intensifying them.

  5. Wind machine

    SciTech Connect

    Gaston, E. E.

    1985-01-15

    To generate power from wind economically, a feathering vane is pivotally mounted perpendicular to a tail vane and shifts the orientation of a sprocket assembly controlled by the tail vane in response to wind velocity. The sprocket assembly changes the orientation of blades which orbit about and rotate the main power shaft so that, as wind velocity changes, the blade orientations are shifted in a compensating direction under the control of the tail vane. A lever shifts the position of the blades to positions that balance wind power and brake the rotation for maintenance purposes. The speed-control mechanism includes a damper to avoid being excessively affected by wind gusts. The main shaft is connected through a speed increaser which has less mass at the high-speed end than the low-speed end to an induction generator when used for cogeneration, the field of the induction generator being excited by the cogeneration frequency.

  6. Wind loads on flat plate photovoltaic array fields. Phase III, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.D.; Zimmerman, D.K.

    1981-04-01

    The results of an experimental analysis (boundary layer wind tunnel test) of the aerodynamic forces resulting from winds acting on flat plate photovoltaic arrays are presented. Local pressure coefficient distributions and normal force coefficients on the arrays are shown and compared to theoretical results. Parameters that were varied when determining the aerodynamic forces included tilt angle, array separation, ground clearance, protective wind barriers, and the effect of the wind velocity profile. Recommended design wind forces and pressures are presented, which envelop the test results for winds perpendicular to the array's longitudinal axis. This wind direction produces the maximum wind loads on the arrays except at the array edge where oblique winds produce larger edge pressure loads.

  7. The Relevance of Surface Roughness Data Qualities in Diagnostic Modeling of Wind Velocity in Complex Terrain: A Case Study from the Śnieżnik Massif (SW Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jancewicz, Kacper; Szymanowski, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Numerical modeling of wind velocity above complex terrain has become a subject of numerous contemporary studies. Regardless of the methodical approach (dynamic or diagnostic), it can be observed that information about surface roughness is indispensable to achieve realistic results. In this context, the current state of GIS and remote sensing development allows access to a number of datasets providing information about various properties of land coverage in a broad spectrum of spatial resolution. Hence, the quality of roughness information may vary depending on the properties of primary land coverage data. As a consequence, the results of the wind velocity modeling are affected by the accuracy and spatial resolution of roughness data. This paper describes further attempts to model wind velocity using the following sources of roughness information: LiDAR data (Digital Surface Model and Digital Terrain Model), database of topographical objects (BDOT10k) and both raster and vector versions of Corine Land Cover 2006 (CLC). The modeling was conducted in WindStation 4.0.2 software which is based on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) diagnostic solver Canyon. Presented experiment concerns three episodes of relatively strong and constant synoptic forcing: 26 November 2011, 25 May 2012 and 26 May 2012. The modeling was performed in the spatial resolution of 50 and 100 m. Input anemological data were collected during field measurements while the atmosphere boundary layer parameters were derived from the meteorological stations closest to the study area. The model's performance was verified using leave-one-out cross-validation and calculation of error indices such as bias error, root mean square error and index of wind speed. Thus, it was possible to compare results of using roughness datasets of different type and resolution. The study demonstrates that the use of LiDAR-based roughness data may result in an improvement of the model's performance in 100 and 50 m resolution

  8. Wind regime and sand transport in China's Badain Jaran Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengcai; Dong, Zhibao; Li, Chunxiao

    2015-06-01

    Wind controls the formation and development of aeolian dunes, therefore understanding the wind environment is necessary in aeolian dune research. In recent years, climate has changed in and around the Badain Jaran Desert, and the factors that control aeolian dune development have changed with it. In this paper, we analyzed characteristics of the desert's wind regime based on data from seven weather stations in and around the desert. The temporal and spatial variation in the wind regime's characteristics have different effects on dune formation and development. The annual mean wind velocity, maximum wind velocity, and the proportion of the time the wind exceeded the sand-entrainment threshold are largest at the northern margin of the desert, and these values decrease from north to south and from east to west. The dominant winds are from the northwest, northeast, and southwest. The drift potential (DP) in the desert decreases from north to south, and can be divided into three regions: high in the north, intermediate in the central region, and low in the south. The effects of climate change on the calculated DP will be complex; although DP increased with increasing mean wind velocity and temperature, there was little or no relationship with precipitation and relative humidity.

  9. Wind tunnel investigation on wind turbine wakes and wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iungo, G. V.; Coëffé, J.; Porté-Agel, F.

    2012-04-01

    The interaction between atmospheric boundary layer and wind farms leads to flow modifications, which need to be deeply characterized in order to relate them to wind farm performance. The wake flow produced from a wind farm is the result of a strong interaction between multiple turbine wakes, so that the wind farm configuration turns out to be one of the dominant features to enhance power production. For the present work a wind tunnel investigation was carried out with hot-wire anemometry and velocity measurements performed with multi-hole pressure probes. The tested wind farms consist of miniature three-bladed wind turbine models. Preliminarily, the wake flow generated from a single wind turbine is surveyed, which is characterized by a strong velocity defect lying in proximity of the wind turbine hub height. The wake gradually recovers by moving downstream; the characteristics of the incoming boundary layer and wind turbulence intensity can strongly affect the wake recovery, and thus performance of following wind turbines. An increased turbulence level is typically detected downstream of each wind turbine for heights comparable to the wind turbine blade top-tip. These wake flow fluctuations produce increased fatigue loads on the following wind turbines within a wind farm, which could represent a significant hazard for real wind turbines. Dynamics of vorticity structures present in wind turbine wakes are also investigated; particular attention is paid to the downstream evolution of the tip helicoidal vortices and to oscillations of the hub vortex. The effect of wind farm layout on power production is deeply investigated. Particular emphasis is placed on studying how the flow adjusts as it moves inside the wind farm and can affect the power production. Aligned and staggered wind farm configurations are analysed, also with varying separation distances in the streamwise and spanwise directions. The present experimental results are being used to test and guide the

  10. Wind power generating system

    SciTech Connect

    Schachle, Ch.; Schachle, E. C.; Schachle, J. R.; Schachle, P. J.

    1985-03-12

    Normally feathered propeller blades of a wind power generating system unfeather in response to the actuation of a power cylinder that responds to actuating signals. Once operational, the propellers generate power over a large range of wind velocities. A maximum power generation design point signals a feather response of the propellers so that once the design point is reached no increase in power results, but the system still generates power. At wind speeds below this maximum point, propeller speed and power output optimize to preset values. The propellers drive a positive displacement pump that in turn drives a positive displacement motor of the swash plate type. The displacement of the motor varies depending on the load on the system, with increasing displacement resulting in increasing propeller speeds, and the converse. In the event of dangerous but not clandestine problems developing in the system, a control circuit dumps hydraulic pressure from the unfeathering cylinder resulting in a predetermined, lower operating pressure produced by the pump. In the event that a problem of potentially cladestine consequence arises, the propeller unfeathering cylinder immediately unloads. Upon startup, a bypass around the motor is blocked, applying a pressure across the motor. The motor drives the generator until the generator reaches a predetermined speed whereupon the generator is placed in circuit with a utility grid and permitted to motor up to synchronous speed.

  11. PULSED ALFVEN WAVES IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J. T.; Tian, H.; Phan, T. D.

    2011-08-20

    Using 3 s plasma and magnetic field data from the Wind spacecraft located in the solar wind well upstream from Earth, we report observations of isolated, pulse-like Alfvenic disturbances in the solar wind. These isolated events are characterized by roughly plane-polarized rotations in the solar wind magnetic field and velocity vectors away from the directions of the underlying field and velocity and then back again. They pass over Wind on timescales ranging from seconds to several minutes. These isolated, pulsed Alfven waves are pervasive; we have identified 175 such events over the full range of solar wind speeds (320-550 km s{sup -1}) observed in a randomly chosen 10 day interval. The large majority of these events are propagating away from the Sun in the solar wind rest frame. Maximum field rotations in the interval studied ranged from 6 Degree-Sign to 109 Degree-Sign . Similar to most Alfvenic fluctuations in the solar wind at 1 AU, the observed changes in velocity are typically less than that predicted for pure Alfven waves (Alfvenicity ranged from 0.28 to 0.93). Most of the events are associated with small enhancements or depressions in magnetic field strength and small changes in proton number density and/or temperature. The pulse-like and roughly symmetric nature of the magnetic field and velocity rotations in these events suggests that these Alfvenic disturbances are not evolving when observed. They thus appear to be, and probably are, solitary waves. It is presently uncertain how these waves originate, although they may evolve out of Alfvenic turbulence.

  12. Assessing the vegetation canopy influences on wind flow using wind tunnel experiments with artificial plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Youngjoo; Kim, Dongyeob; Im, Sangjun

    2016-04-01

    Wind erosion causes serious problems and considerable threat in most regions of the world. Vegetation on the ground has an important role in controlling wind erosion by covering soil surface and absorbing wind momentum. A set of wind tunnel experiments was performed to quantitatively examine the effect of canopy structure on wind movement. Artificial plastic vegetations with different porosity and canopy shape were introduced as the model canopy. Normalized roughness length ( Z 0/ H) and shear velocity ratio ( R) were analyzed as a function of roughness density ( λ). Experiments showed that Z 0/ H increases and R decreases as λ reaches a maximum value, λ max, while the values of Z 0/ H and R showed little change with λ value beyond as λ max.

  13. Assessing the vegetation canopy influences on wind flow using wind tunnel experiments with artificial plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Youngjoo; Kim, Dongyeob; Im, Sangjun

    2016-04-01

    Wind erosion causes serious problems and considerable threat in most regions of the world. Vegetation on the ground has an important role in controlling wind erosion by covering soil surface and absorbing wind momentum. A set of wind tunnel experiments was performed to quantitatively examine the effect of canopy structure on wind movement. Artificial plastic vegetations with different porosity and canopy shape were introduced as the model canopy. Normalized roughness length (Z 0/H) and shear velocity ratio (R) were analyzed as a function of roughness density (λ). Experiments showed that Z 0/H increases and R decreases as λ reaches a maximum value, λ max, while the values of Z 0/H and R showed little change with λ value beyond as λ max.

  14. Development of thermal image velocimetry techniques to measure the water surface velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saket, A.; Peirson, W. L.; Banner, M. L.; Barthelemy, X.

    2016-05-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a state-of-the-art non-intrusive technique for velocity and fluid flow measurements. Due to ongoing improvements in image hardware and processing techniques, the diversity of applications of the PIV method continues to increase. This study presents an accurate thermal image velocimetry (TIV) technique using a CO2 laser source to measure the surface wave particle velocity using infrared imagery. Experiments were carried out in a 2-D wind wave flume with glass side walls for deep-water monochromatic and group waves. It was shown that the TIV technique is robust for both unforced and wind-forced group wave studies. Surface wave particles attain their highest velocity at the group crest maximum and slow down thereafter. As previously observed, each wave crest slows down as it approaches its crest maximum but this study demonstrates that the minimum crest speed coincides with maximum water velocity at the wave crest. Present results indicate that breaking is initiated once the water surface particle velocity at the wave crest exceeds a set proportion of the velocity of the slowing crest as it passes through the maximum of a wave group.

  15. Microburst wind structure and evaluation of Doppler radar for airport wind shear detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Roberts, R. D.; Kessinger, C.; Mccarthy, J.

    1984-01-01

    The horizontal and vertical structure of airflow within microbursts has been determined using Doppler weather radar data from the Joint Airport Weather Studies (JAWS) Project. It is shown that the downdraft typically associated with microbursts is about 1 km wide and begins to spread horizontally at a height below 1 km. The median time from initial divergence at the surface to maximum differential wind velocity across the microburst is five minutes. The height of maximum differential velocity is about 75 m, and the median velocity differential is 22 m/s over an average distance of 3.1 km. The outflow of the air is asymmetric, averaging twice as strong along the maximum axis compared to the mininum axis. Some technical requirements for a radar system to detect microbursts and to provide aircraft with early warnings of the onset of windshear are identified.

  16. Long and short term variations of the polar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Takumi

    We present long-term and short-term variations of the polar wind in the mid-altitude (2000- 9000) km polar ionosphere from Akebono (EXOS-D) suprathermal ion mass spectrometer (SMS) observations. In particular, we will discuss a dominant process for the thermal ion acceleration to cause a variation of the ion outflow flux in such a time scale. The polar wind is a thermal ion outflow driven by the ambipolar electric field as a result of plasma pressure gradient along the geomagnetic field under typical ionospheric condition. Therefore, the polar wind velocity largely depends on a vertical density profile of thermal plasma in the high-latitude polar ionosphere. In general, the thermal plasma density profile is strongly influenced by the magnitude of EUV energy input from the Sun. The Akebono observations show a weak correlation between the H+ and O+ polar wind velocity profile and the solar F10.7 index in the time scale of several to ten days, and it is suggestive of such a causal relationship. It is also found in the Akebono observations that the polar wind velocity variation has a component corresponding to a daily variation of the geomagnetic activity. In the present analysis, the velocity profile is defined by two parameters; 1) the lowest altitude where the polar wind acceleration is identified, 2) velocity variation ratio with respect to the altitude. Our analysis indicates that the magnitude of F10.7 and the geomagnetic activity are influential in determining the polar wind velocity profile. The solar-activity dependence and seasonal variation of the polar wind velocity profiles are also investigated by the data from the Akebono. These observations spanned a solar cycle, and covered a wide range of altitudes and invariant latitudes and a variety of geomagnetic activity conditions. At low (high) altitudes below (above) 4000 km, the increase of the averaged H+ and O+ ion velocities with altitude was larger (smaller) at solar minimum than at solar maximum. For

  17. Wind loads on flat plate photovoltaic array fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. D.; Zimmerman, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an experimental analysis (boundary layer wind tunnel test) of the aerodynamic forces resulting from winds acting on flat plate photovoltaic arrays are presented. Local pressure coefficient distributions and normal force coefficients on the arrays are shown and compared to theoretical results. Parameters that were varied when determining the aerodynamic forces included tilt angle, array separation, ground clearance, protective wind barriers, and the effect of the wind velocity profile. Recommended design wind forces and pressures are presented, which envelop the test results for winds perpendicular to the array's longitudinal axis. This wind direction produces the maximum wind loads on the arrays except at the array edge where oblique winds produce larger edge pressure loads. The arrays located at the outer boundary of an array field have a protective influence on the interior arrays of the field. A significant decrease of the array wind loads were recorded in the wind tunnel test on array panels located behind a fence and/or interior to the array field compared to the arrays on the boundary and unprotected from the wind. The magnitude of this decrease was the same whether caused by a fence or upwind arrays.

  18. Quantitative analysis of a wind energy conversion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucker, Florian; Gräbner, Anna; Strunz, Andreas; Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2015-03-01

    A rotor of 12 cm diameter is attached to a precision electric motor, used as a generator, to make a model wind turbine. Output power of the generator is measured in a wind tunnel with up to 15 m s-1 air velocity. The maximum power is 3.4 W, the power conversion factor from kinetic to electric energy is cp = 0.15. The v3 power law is confirmed. The model illustrates several technically important features of industrial wind turbines quantitatively.

  19. Fuzzy Regulator Design for Wind Turbine Yaw Control

    PubMed Central

    Koulouras, Grigorios

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes the development of an advanced fuzzy logic controller which aims to perform intelligent automatic control of the yaw movement of wind turbines. The specific fuzzy controller takes into account both the wind velocity and the acceptable yaw error correlation in order to achieve maximum performance efficacy. In this way, the proposed yaw control system is remarkably adaptive to the existing conditions. In this way, the wind turbine is enabled to retain its power output close to its nominal value and at the same time preserve its yaw system from pointless movement. Thorough simulation tests evaluate the proposed system effectiveness. PMID:24693237

  20. Upstream proton cyclotron waves at Venus near solar maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delva, M.; Bertucci, C.; Volwerk, M.; Lundin, R.; Mazelle, C.; Romanelli, N.

    2015-01-01

    magnetometer data of Venus Express are analyzed for the occurrence of waves at the proton cyclotron frequency in the spacecraft frame in the upstream region of Venus, for conditions of rising solar activity. The data of two Venus years up to the time of highest sunspot number so far (1 Mar 2011 to 31 May 2012) are studied to reveal the properties of the waves and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions under which they are observed. In general, waves generated by newborn protons from exospheric hydrogen are observed under quasi- (anti)parallel conditions of the IMF and the solar wind velocity, as is expected from theoretical models. The present study near solar maximum finds significantly more waves than a previous study for solar minimum, with an asymmetry in the wave occurrence, i.e., mainly under antiparallel conditions. The plasma data from the Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms instrument aboard Venus Express enable analysis of the background solar wind conditions. The prevalence of waves for IMF in direction toward the Sun is related to the stronger southward tilt of the heliospheric current sheet for the rising phase of Solar Cycle 24, i.e., the "bashful ballerina" is responsible for asymmetric background solar wind conditions. The increase of the number of wave occurrences may be explained by a significant increase in the relative density of planetary protons with respect to the solar wind background. An exceptionally low solar wind proton density is observed during the rising phase of Solar Cycle 24. At the same time, higher EUV increases the ionization in the Venus exosphere, resulting in higher supply of energy from a higher number of newborn protons to the wave. We conclude that in addition to quasi- (anti)parallel conditions of the IMF and the solar wind velocity direction, the higher relative density of Venus exospheric protons with respect to the background solar wind proton density is the key parameter for the higher number of

  1. Shipboard acoustic Doppler profiler velocity observations near Point Conception: Spring 1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, J. A.; Brink, K. H.

    1987-04-01

    During April 1983, shipboard Doppler acoustic log current profiles were collected in an effort to characterize the flow field near points Conception and Arguello, California. Subsurface velocity maps derived from these profiles have been used to describe spatial flow structures both on and off the shelf and to investigate flow variability as a function of time and of wind stress. Persistent westward flow out of the northern half of the Santa Barbara Channel and eastward flow into its southern half were observed regardless of the direction of the local wind stress. During one well-documented upwelling-favorable wind event, currents responded in the form of an energetic (maximum 21-m speeds of >60 cm s-1) offshore squirt of cold water. During weak or downwelling-favorable winds, currents continuous with the Santa Barbara Channel outflow were observed flowing to the northwest following the local isobaths before turning offshore west of Point Arguello. Evidence for wind forcing of current fluctuations nearshore between the points and north of Point Arguello was found. Lack of a thermal wind balance between directly measured velocity shear and horizontal density gradient was explained by the presence of large accelerations in the momentum equations. Lack of a consistent relation between velocity and temperature gradient illustrates the difficulty in estimating velocity from temperature information alone in this area.

  2. Velocity and rolling-moment measurements in the wake of a swept-wing model in the 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, V. J.; Corsiglia, V. R.; Schwind, R. G.; Frick, J. K. D.; Lemmer, O. J.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements were made in the wake of a swept wing model to study the structure of lift generated vortex wakes shed by conventional span loadings and by several span loadings designed to reduce wake velocities. Variations in the span loading on the swept wing generator were obtained by deflecting seven flap segments on each side by amounts determined by vortex lattice theory to approximate the desired span loadings. The resulting wakes were probed with a three component, hot wire probe to measure velocity, and with a wing to measure the rolling moment that would be induced on a following aircraft. The experimental techniques are described herein, and the measured velocity and rolling moments are presented, along with some comparisons with the applicable theories.

  3. Numerical simulations of flow fields through conventionally controlled wind turbines & wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emre Yilmaz, Ali; Meyers, Johan

    2014-06-01

    In the current study, an Actuator-Line Model (ALM) is implemented in our in-house pseudo-spectral LES solver SP-WIND, including a turbine controller. Below rated wind speed, turbines are controlled by a standard-torque-controller aiming at maximum power extraction from the wind. Above rated wind speed, the extracted power is limited by a blade pitch controller which is based on a proportional-integral type control algorithm. This model is used to perform a series of single turbine and wind farm simulations using the NREL 5MW turbine. First of all, we focus on below-rated wind speed, and investigate the effect of the farm layout on the controller calibration curves. These calibration curves are expressed in terms of nondimensional torque and rotational speed, using the mean turbine-disk velocity as reference. We show that this normalization leads to calibration curves that are independent of wind speed, but the calibration curves do depend on the farm layout, in particular for tightly spaced farms. Compared to turbines in a lone-standing set-up, turbines in a farm experience a different wind distribution over the rotor due to the farm boundary-layer interaction. We demonstrate this for fully developed wind-farm boundary layers with aligned turbine arrangements at different spacings (5D, 7D, 9D). Further we also compare calibration curves obtained from full farm simulations with calibration curves that can be obtained at a much lower cost using a minimal flow unit.

  4. Maximum bow force revisited.

    PubMed

    Mores, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Schelleng [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 53, 26-41 (1973)], Askenfelt [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 86, 503-516 (1989)], Schumacher [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 96, 1985-1998 (1994)], and Schoonderwaldt, Guettler, and Askenfelt [Acta Acust. Acust. 94, 604-622 (2008)] formulated-in different ways-how the maximum bow force relates to bow velocity, bow-bridge distance, string impedance, and friction coefficients. Issues of uncertainty are how to account for friction or for the rotational admittance of the strings. Related measurements at the respective transitions between regimes of Helmholtz motion and non-Helmholtz motion employ a variety of bowing machines and stringed instruments. The related findings include all necessary parameters except the friction coefficients, leaving the underlying models unconfirmed. Here, a bowing pendulum has been constructed which allows precise measurement of relevant bowing parameters, including the friction coefficients. Two cellos are measured across all strings for three different bow-bridge distances. The empirical data suggest that-taking the diverse elements of existing models as options-Schelleng's model combined with Schumacher's velocity term yields the best fit. Furthermore, the pendulum employs a bow driving mechanism with adaptive impedance which discloses that mentioned regimes are stable and transitions between them sometimes require a hysteresis on related parameters. PMID:27586745

  5. Effects of atmospheric stability on the evolution of wind turbine wakes: Volumetric LiDAR scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valerio Iungo, Giacomo; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    Aerodynamic optimization of wind farm layout is a fundamental task to reduce wake effects on downstream wind turbines, thus to maximize wind power harvesting. However, downstream evolution and recovery of wind turbine wakes are strongly affected by the characteristics of the incoming atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow, like the vertical profiles of the mean wind velocity and the turbulence intensity, which are in turn affected by the ABL stability regime. Therefore, the characterization of the variability of wind turbine wakes under different ABL stability regimes becomes fundamental to better predict wind power harvesting and improve wind farm efficiency. To this aim, wind velocity measurements of the wake produced by a 2 MW Enercon E-70 wind turbine were performed with three scanning Doppler wind Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) instruments. One LiDAR was typically devoted to the characterization of the incoming wind, in particular wind velocity, shear and turbulence intensity at the height of the rotor disc. The other two LiDARs performed scans in order to characterize the wake velocity field produced by the tested wind turbine. The main challenge in performing field measurements of wind turbine wakes is represented by the varying wind conditions, and by the consequent adjustments of the turbine yaw angle needed to maximize power production. Consequently, taking into account possible variations of the relative position between LiDAR measurement volume and wake location, different LiDAR measurement procedures were carried out in order to perform 2-D and 3-D characterizations of the mean wake velocity field. However, larger measurement volumes and higher spatial resolution require longer sampling periods; thus, to investigate wake turbulence tests were also performed by staring the LiDAR laser beam over fixed directions and with the maximum sampling frequency. Furthermore, volumetric scans of the wind turbine wake were performed under different wind

  6. Wind speeds in two tornadic storms and a tornado, deduced from Doppler Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Zrnic, D.; Istok, M.

    1980-12-01

    Doppler spectra of a tornado were collected with a radar having a large unambiguous velocity range, +- 91 m s/sup -1/. Thus for the first time a presentation of nonaliased spectra was possible, showing direct measurement of radial velocities. By fitting the tornado model spectrum to data, the radius of maximum winds and tornado center location are deduced. Tornado spectral signature is defined as a double peak, symmetric with respect to the mean wind spectrum. Histograms of maximum measured wind speeds (from spectrum skirts) for two tornadic storms are obtained, and the histograms of velocity difference (between the left and right spectrum skirt) suggest that smaller scale turbulence (<500 m) is principally responsible for spectrum broadness.

  7. Wind tunnel measurements of the power output variability and unsteady loading in a micro wind farm model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossuyt, Juliaan; Howland, Michael; Meneveau, Charles; Meyers, Johan

    2015-11-01

    To optimize wind farm layouts for a maximum power output and wind turbine lifetime, mean power output measurements in wind tunnel studies are not sufficient. Instead, detailed temporal information about the power output and unsteady loading from every single wind turbine in the wind farm is needed. A very small porous disc model with a realistic thrust coefficient of 0.75 - 0.85, was designed. The model is instrumented with a strain gage, allowing measurements of the thrust force, incoming velocity and power output with a frequency response up to the natural frequency of the model. This is shown by reproducing the -5/3 spectrum from the incoming flow. Thanks to its small size and compact instrumentation, the model allows wind tunnel studies of large wind turbine arrays with detailed temporal information from every wind turbine. Translating to field conditions with a length-scale ratio of 1:3,000 the frequencies studied from the data reach from 10-4 Hz up to about 6 .10-2 Hz. The model's capabilities are demonstrated with a large wind farm measurement consisting of close to 100 instrumented models. A high correlation is found between the power outputs of stream wise aligned wind turbines, which is in good agreement with results from prior LES simulations. Work supported by ERC (ActiveWindFarms, grant no. 306471) and by NSF (grants CBET-113380 and IIA-1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project).

  8. UVCS/SOHO Observations of Coronal Holes from Solar Minimum to Solar Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles, M. P.; Cranmer, S. R.; Esser, R.; Kohl, J. L.

    2001-12-01

    Coronal holes are open field, low-density source regions of the solar wind. At solar minimum, large coronal holes are present at the poles and are the dominant source of the solar wind flow for this part of the solar cycle. At solar maximum, coronal holes of varying sizes and shapes appear at all latitudes and last for several rotations. During this stage of the cycle, the dominant component is mainly slow wind, but fast wind streams are generated by large coronal holes. UVCS/SOHO has been used to measure the plasma properties in several types of coronal holes from 1996 to 2001. Spectroscopic diagnostics of O5+ velocity distributions and outflow velocities are derived from measurements of intensities and line widths for O~VI 103.2 and 103.7 nm as a function of height. We compare the plasma properties of coronal holes from solar minimum to solar maximum and discuss the evolution of coronal holes during the solar cycle. We also study the compatibility between the growing database of coronal hole plasma properties and theoretical models of extended coronal heating via ion cyclotron resonance. This work is supported by NASA under Grant NAG5-10093 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by the Italian Space Agency and by PRODEX (Swiss contribution).

  9. Wind Erosion Potential of Lacustrine and Alluvial Soils Before and After Disturbance in the Eastern Great Basin, USA: Estimating Threshold Friction Velocity Using Easier-to-Measure Soil Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brungard, C. W.; Boettinger, J. L.; Hipps, L.

    2015-12-01

    Disturbance of lacustrine and alluvial soils could increase aeolian dust emissions in the eastern Great Basin, but little is known about the susceptibility of these land surfaces to wind erosion. Threshold friction velocity (u*t ), a necessary parameter to estimate wind erosion potential, is difficult to accurately measure; methods to estimate u*t from alternate measurements would be useful. We measured u*t and sediment production rate with a portable wind tunnel, and quantified relationships between u*t and eleven easier-to-measure soil surface properties for both undisturbed and disturbed lacustrine and alluvial soils in Snake Valley, Utah. Soil surface type and disturbance significantly influenced u*t, sediment production rate, and the relationships between u*t and easier-to-measure soil surface properties. Only soils with surficial rock fragments and weak physical crusts reached u*t before disturbance, whereas all surface types reached u*t following disturbance. Soils with weak physical crusts had the lowest average u*t and highest average sediment production rate before and after disturbance. Surprisingly, however, disturbance reduced sediment production rate. Soils with weak physical crusts and surficial rock cover are likely the most susceptible to wind erosion and subsequent dust generation both before and after disturbance. Silt concentration and penetrometer resistance were significant predictors of u*t in undisturbed soils with weak physical crusts and surficial rock cover. Following disturbance, clay concentration and aggregate stability were significant predictors for soils with hard salt crusts and surficial rock cover. Prediction of u*t using alternate measurements is promising, but measurement uncertainty must be considered.

  10. Energy from the Wind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelka, David G.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The large-scale generation of electrical power by wind turbine fields is discussed. It is shown that the maximum power that can be extracted by a wind turbine is 16/27 of the power available in the wind. (BB)

  11. High-velocity blueshifted Fe II absorption in the dwarf star-forming galaxy PHL 293B: evidence for a wind driven supershell?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terlevich, Roberto; Terlevich, Elena; Bosch, Guillermo; Díaz, Ángeles; Hägele, Guillermo; Cardaci, Mónica; Firpo, Verónica

    2014-12-01

    X-shooter and WHT-ISIS spectra of the star-forming galaxy PHL 293B also known as A2228-00 and SDSS J223036.79-000636.9 are presented in this paper. We find broad (FWHM = 1000 km s-1) and very broad (FWZI = 4000 km s-1) components in the Balmer lines, narrow absorption components in the Balmer series blueshifted by 800 km s-1, previously undetected Fe II multiplet (42) absorptions also blueshifted by 800 km s-1, IR Ca II triplet stellar absorptions consistent with [Fe/H] < -2.0 and no broad components or blueshifted absorptions in the He I lines. Based on historical records, we found no optical variability at the 5σ level of 0.02 mag between 2005 and 2013 and no optical variability at the level of 0.1 mag for the past 24 yr. The lack of variability rules out transient phenomena like luminous blue variables or Type IIn supernovae as the origin of the blueshifted absorptions of H I and Fe II. The evidence points to either a young and dense expanding supershell or a stationary cooling wind, in both cases driven by the young cluster wind.

  12. Wind velocity measurement accuracy with highly stable 12 mJ/pulse high repetition rate CO2 laser master oscillator power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilbro, James W.; Johnson, Steven C.; Rothermel, Jeffry

    1987-01-01

    A coherent CO2 lidar operating in a master oscillator power amplifier configuration (MOPA) is described for both ground-based and airborne operation. Representative data taken from measurements against stationary targets in both the ground-based and airborne configurations are shown for the evaluation of the frequency stability of the system. Examples of data are also given which show the results of anomalous system operation. Overall results demonstrate that velocity measurements can be performed consistently to an accuracy of + or - 0.5 m/s and in some cases + or - 0.1 m/s.

  13. Terminal velocity of wind, mass loss, and absorption lines of the central star of the planetary nebula 75 + 35.1 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feibelman, Walter A.; Bruhweiler, Frederick C.

    1989-01-01

    The high-galactic latitude planetary nebula 75 + 35.1 deg was observed in the high-dispersion mode of the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite in the wavelength range 1150-1950 A. The N V resonance doublet at 1240 A and O V subordinate line at 1371 A exhibit strong stellar P Cygni profiles with absorption extending to -2150 km/s and -1000 km/s, respectively. Application of the first moment method implies a mass-loss rate of M = (1-3) x 10 to the -8th solar mass/yr. The high ionization of the wind lines and the presence of strong Fe VI and Fe V lines in the stellar photosphere support that this object is quite hot. A Teff of 75,000 + or - 10,000 K was adopted, although Tc = 94,000 K was found previously from low-resolution IUE data.

  14. Terminal velocity of wind, mass loss, and absorption lines of the central star of the planetary nebula 75 + 35. 1 deg

    SciTech Connect

    Feibelman, W.A.; Bruhweiler, F.C. Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC )

    1989-12-01

    The high-galactic latitude planetary nebula 75 + 35.1 deg was observed in the high-dispersion mode of the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite in the wavelength range 1150-1950 A. The N V resonance doublet at 1240 A and O V subordinate line at 1371 A exhibit strong stellar P Cygni profiles with absorption extending to -2150 km/s and -1000 km/s, respectively. Application of the first moment method implies a mass-loss rate of M = (1-3) x 10 to the -8th solar mass/yr. The high ionization of the wind lines and the presence of strong Fe VI and Fe V lines in the stellar photosphere support that this object is quite hot. A Teff of 75,000 + or - 10,000 K was adopted, although Tc = 94,000 K was found previously from low-resolution IUE data. 18 refs.

  15. Efficient Low-Speed Flight in a Wind Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    A new software tool was needed for flight planning of a high altitude, low speed unmanned aerial vehicle which would be flying in winds close to the actual airspeed of the vehicle. An energy modeled NLP (non-linear programming) formulation was used to obtain results for a variety of missions and wind profiles. The energy constraint derived included terms due to the wind field and the performance index was a weighted combination of the amount of fuel used and the final time. With no emphasis on time and with no winds the vehicle was found to fly at maximum lift to drag velocity, V(sub md). When flying in tail winds the velocity was less than V(sub md), while flying in head winds the velocity was higher than V(sub md). A family of solutions was found with varying times of flight and varying fuel amounts consumed which will aid the operator in choosing a flight plan depending on a desired landing time. At certain parts of the flight, the turning terms in the energy constraint equation were found to be significant. An analysis of a simpler vertical plane cruise optimal control problem was used to explain some of the characteristics of the vertical plane NLP results.

  16. Characteristics of the disastrous wind-sand environment along railways in the Gobi area of Xinjiang, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jian-jun; Jiang, Fu-qiang; Xue, Chun-xiao; Xin, Guo-wei; Li, Kai-chong; Yang, Yin-hai

    2015-02-01

    Based on detailed long-term data of wind regimes collected from typical ventilation sites along the railways in the Gobi area of Xinjiang, this study systematically analyzes the characteristics of the disastrous wind-sand environment along the railways by combining gradient sand sampling data collected by a wind-drift sand monitoring system and site survey data. Wind direction and speed rose diagrams revealed the prevailing wind direction in each wind area along the railways, and this is the wind direction from which the maximum frequency of sandstorms occurred. Drift potential characteristic parameters (RDP, RDD) and the direction variability (RDP/DP) showed that each wind area along the Gobi railway featured a long wind period, with strong power in a single wind direction. The special geological environment of the Gobi determines the wind-drift sand that features gravel of large grain size and unsaturation, which are different from the wind-drift sand in deserts. With increasing wind velocity, the density of the wind-drift sand increased steadily; however, at a certain critical value, the density surged. This study on the wind-sand environment of the Gobi has significance for railway safety. The critical value of wind velocity corresponded to an abrupt increase in the wind-drift sand density and should be taken into account during the planning process of railway safety passage, since this will lead to a decrease in frontal visual distance, and an associated decrease in safety. Additionally, the specific features of wind-drift sand activities, such as the abruptness and higher than usual sand height, should be considered during the process of designing sand-damage-control engineering measures.

  17. Wind tunnel simulation of a wind turbine wake in neutral, stable and unstable wind flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, P. E.; Zhang, S.; Pascheke, F.; Hayden, P.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of mean velocity, Reynolds stresses, temperature and heat flux have been made in the wake of a model wind turbine in the EnFlo meteorology wind tunnel, for three atmospheric boundary layer states: the base-line neutral case, stable and unstable. The full-to-model scale is approximately 300:1. Primary instrumentation is two-component LDA combine with cold-wire thermometry to measure heat flux. In terms of surface conditions, the stratified cases are weak, but there is a strong 'imposed' condition in the stable case. The measurements were made between 0.5D and 10D, where D is the turbine disk diameter. In the stable case the velocity deficit decreases more slowly; more quickly in the unstable case. Heights at which quantities are maximum or minimum are greater in the unstable case and smaller in the stable case. In the stable case the wake height is suppressed but the width is increased, while in the unstable case the height is increased and the width (at hub height) reaches a maximum and then decreases. The turbulence in the wake behaves in a complex way. Further work needs to be done, to cover stronger levels of surface condition, requiring more extensive measurements to properly capture the wake development.

  18. An entropy-based surface velocity method for estuarine discharge measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechle, Adam J.; Wu, Chin H.

    2014-07-01

    An entropy-based method is developed to estimate estuarine river discharge from surface velocity measurements. A two-dimensional velocity profile based on the principle of maximum entropy is employed to express the mean velocity as a function of average surface velocity. The entropy-based flow profile is parameterized by the location of maximum velocity in the channel and the shape of the velocity distribution. The entropy parameters are quantified over the tidal cycle to account for the unsteady nature of estuarine flow. The method was tested using experiments conducted at the Danshui River, the largest estuarine system in Taiwan. Surface velocities were measured using an Automated River-Estuary Discharge Imaging System (AREDIS), and full-channel velocity profiles were measured with a moving-boat ADP survey. Entropy parameters were calibrated over the tidal cycle and linearly correlated with the average surface velocity to facilitate estimation from AREDIS measurements. The discharge calculated from average surface velocity and entropy relationships exhibits a 7.7% relative error compared to the ADP velocity profiles. The error nearly doubles when the mean values for entropy parameters are used instead of the variable parameters, indicating the importance of accounting for the unsteady nature of estuarine flows. Furthermore, the effects of measurement coverage area, types of entropy distribution, and wind-induced drift current on the surface velocity-based discharge measurement are evaluated and discussed. Overall, surface velocity measurements in conjunction with the entropy profiles well represent the flow in a complex estuarine environment to provide a reliable estimate of discharge.

  19. Wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Cheney, Jr., Marvin C.

    1982-01-01

    A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

  20. VAWT stochastic wind simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.H.

    1987-04-01

    A stochastic wind simulation for VAWTs (VSTOC) has been developed which yields turbulent wind-velocity fluctuations for rotationally sampled points. This allows three-component wind-velocity fluctuations to be simulated at specified nodal points on the wind-turbine rotor. A first-order convection scheme is used which accounts for the decrease in streamwise velocity as the flow passes through the wind-turbine rotor. The VSTOC simulation is independent of the particular analytical technique used to predict the aerodynamic and performance characteristics of the turbine. The VSTOC subroutine may be used simply as a subroutine in a particular VAWT prediction code or it may be used as a subroutine in an independent processor. The independent processor is used to interact with a version of the VAWT prediction code which is segmented into deterministic and stochastic modules. Using VSTOC in this fashion is very efficient with regard to decreasing computer time for the overall calculation process.

  1. From dust devil to sustainable swirling wind energy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingxu; Luo, Xilian; Li, Tianyu; Zhang, Liyuan; Meng, Xiangzhao; Kase, Kiwamu; Wada, Satoshi; Yu, Chuck Wah; Gu, Zhaolin

    2015-01-01

    Dust devils are common but meteorologically unique phenomena on Earth and on Mars. The phenomenon produces a vertical vortex motion in the atmosphere boundary layer and often occurs in hot desert regions, especially in the afternoons from late spring to early summer. Dust devils usually contain abundant wind energy, for example, a maximum swirling wind velocity of up to 25 m/s, with a 15 m/s maximum vertical velocity and 5 m/s maximum near-surface horizontal velocity can be formed. The occurrences of dust devils cannot be used for energy generation because these are generally random and short-lived. Here, a concept of sustained dust-devil-like whirlwind is proposed for the energy generation. A prototype of a circular shed with pre-rotation vanes has been devised to generate the whirlwind flow by heating the air inflow into the circular shed. The pre-rotation vanes can provide the air inflow with angular momentum. The results of numerical simulations and experiment illustrate a promising potential of the circular shed for generating swirling wind energy via the collection of low-temperature solar energy. PMID:25662574

  2. From Dust Devil to Sustainable Swirling Wind Energy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingxu; Luo, Xilian; Li, Tianyu; Zhang, Liyuan; Meng, Xiangzhao; Kase, Kiwamu; Wada, Satoshi; Yu, Chuck Wah; Gu, Zhaolin

    2015-01-01

    Dust devils are common but meteorologically unique phenomena on Earth and on Mars. The phenomenon produces a vertical vortex motion in the atmosphere boundary layer and often occurs in hot desert regions, especially in the afternoons from late spring to early summer. Dust devils usually contain abundant wind energy, for example, a maximum swirling wind velocity of up to 25 m/s, with a 15 m/s maximum vertical velocity and 5 m/s maximum near-surface horizontal velocity can be formed. The occurrences of dust devils cannot be used for energy generation because these are generally random and short-lived. Here, a concept of sustained dust-devil-like whirlwind is proposed for the energy generation. A prototype of a circular shed with pre-rotation vanes has been devised to generate the whirlwind flow by heating the air inflow into the circular shed. The pre-rotation vanes can provide the air inflow with angular momentum. The results of numerical simulations and experiment illustrate a promising potential of the circular shed for generating swirling wind energy via the collection of low-temperature solar energy. PMID:25662574

  3. Erosion by Wind: Modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Models of wind erosion are used to investigate fundamental processes and guide resource management. Many models are similar in that - temporal variables control soil wind erodibility; erosion begins when friction velocity exceeds a threshold; and transport capacity for saltation/creep is proportion...

  4. Characterization of Wind Meandering in Low-Wind-Speed Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortarini, Luca; Stefanello, Michel; Degrazia, Gervasio; Roberti, Debora; Trini Castelli, Silvia; Anfossi, Domenico

    2016-06-01

    Investigation of low-wind cases observed during the Urban Turbulent Project campaign (Torino, Italy) and at the Santa Maria meteorological station (Santa Maria, Brazil) provides insight into the wind-meandering phenomenon, i.e. large, non-turbulent oscillations of horizontal wind speed and temperature. Meandering and non-meandering cases are identified through analysis of the Eulerian autocorrelation functions of the horizontal wind-velocity components and temperature. When all three autocorrelation functions oscillate, meandering is present. As with weak turbulence, meandering shows no dependence on stability but is influenced by presence of buildings and depends on wind speed. We show that, while the standard deviation of the horizontal velocity is always large in low-wind conditions, the standard deviation of the vertical velocity shows very different behaviour in meandering and non-meandering conditions. In particular, the value of the ratio of the standard deviations of the vertical and horizontal velocities typifies the meandering condition.

  5. Wind-Turbine Wakes in a Convective Boundary Layer: A Wind-Tunnel Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Markfort, Corey D.; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2013-02-01

    Thermal stability changes the properties of the turbulent atmospheric boundary layer, and in turn affects the behaviour of wind-turbine wakes. To better understand the effects of thermal stability on the wind-turbine wake structure, wind-tunnel experiments were carried out with a simulated convective boundary layer (CBL) and a neutral boundary layer. The CBL was generated by cooling the airflow to 12-15 °C and heating up the test section floor to 73-75 °C. The freestream wind speed was set at about 2.5 m s-1, resulting in a bulk Richardson number of -0.13. The wake of a horizontal-axis 3-blade wind-turbine model, whose height was within the lowest one third of the boundary layer, was studied using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (S-PIV) and triple-wire (x-wire/cold-wire) anemometry. Data acquired with the S-PIV were analyzed to characterize the highly three-dimensional turbulent flow in the near wake (0.2-3.2 rotor diameters) as well as to visualize the shedding of tip vortices. Profiles of the mean flow, turbulence intensity, and turbulent momentum and heat fluxes were measured with the triple-wire anemometer at downwind locations from 2-20 rotor diameters in the centre plane of the wake. In comparison with the wake of the same wind turbine in a neutral boundary layer, a smaller velocity deficit (about 15 % at the wake centre) is observed in the CBL, where an enhanced radial momentum transport leads to a more rapid momentum recovery, particularly in the lower part of the wake. The velocity deficit at the wake centre decays following a power law regardless of the thermal stability. While the peak turbulence intensity (and the maximum added turbulence) occurs at the top-tip height at a downwind distance of about three rotor diameters in both cases, the magnitude is about 20 % higher in the CBL than in the neutral boundary layer. Correspondingly, the turbulent heat flux is also enhanced by approximately 25 % in the lower part of the wake, compared to that

  6. Aeolian processes on Mars - Erosive velocities, settling velocities, and yellow clouds.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    Extremely high atmospheric wind velocities are needed to erode particulate matter on Mars. Settling velocities are roughly equivalent to terrestrial settling velocities for clay to fine sand-size particles; suspension transport may be dominant for fine particles on Mars. Yellow clouds suggest that required threshold erosion velocities are reached and that a great deal of fine-grained material is carried in suspension. Yellow cloud origins are concentrated over the southern latitudes and areas of major topographic relief. The cloud distribution pattern suggests that high threshold velocities are attained by transient atmospheric disturbances such as slope winds and dust devils.-

  7. CAT LIDAR wind shear studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goff, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The studies considered the major meteorological factors producing wind shear, methods to define and classify wind shear in terms significant from an aircraft perturbation standpoint, the significance of sensor location and scan geometry on the detection and measurement of wind shear, and the tradeoffs involved in sensor performance such as range/velocity resolution, update frequency and data averaging interval.

  8. AGN Obscuration Through Dusty Infrared Dominated Flows. 1; Radiation-Hydrodynamics Solution for the Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorodnitsyn, A.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan. G. S.; Kallman, T.

    2011-01-01

    We construct a radiation-hydrodynamics model for the obscuring toroidal structure in active galactic nuclei. In this model the obscuration is produced at parsec scale by a dense, dusty wind which is supported by infrared radiation pressure on dust grains. To find the distribution of radiation pressure, we numerically solve the 2D radiation transfer problem in a flux limited diffusion approximation. We iteratively couple the solution with calculations of stationary 1D models for the wind, and obtain the z-component of the velocity. Our results demonstrate that for AGN luminosities greater than 0.1 L(sub edd) external illumination can support a geometrically thick obscuration via outflows driven by infrared radiation pressure. The terminal velocity of marginally Compton-thin models (0.2 < tau(sub T) < 0.6), is comparable to or greater than the escape velocity. In Compton thick models the maximum value of the vertical component of the velocity is lower than the escape velocity, suggesting that a significant part of our torus is in the form of failed wind. The results demonstrate that obscuration via normal or failed infrared-driven winds is a viable option for the AGN torus problem and AGN unification models. Such winds can also provide an important channel for AGN feedback.

  9. Wind profiler signal detection improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, G. F.; Divis, Dale H.

    1992-01-01

    Research is described on potential improvements to the software used with the NASA 49.25 MHz wind profiler located at Kennedy Space Center. In particular, the analysis and results are provided of a study to (1) identify preferred mathematical techniques for the detection of atmospheric signals that provide wind velocities which are obscured by natural and man-made sources, and (2) to analyze one or more preferred techniques to demonstrate proof of the capability to improve the detection of wind velocities.

  10. Analysis of Change in the Wind Speed Ratio according to Apartment Layout and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Hyung, Won-gil; Kim, Young-Moon; You, Ki-Pyo

    2014-01-01

    Apartment complexes in various forms are built in downtown areas. The arrangement of an apartment complex has great influence on the wind flow inside it. There are issues of residents' walking due to gust occurrence within apartment complexes, problems with pollutant emission due to airflow congestion, and heat island and cool island phenomena in apartment complexes. Currently, the forms of internal arrangements of apartment complexes are divided into the flat type and the tower type. In the present study, a wind tunnel experiment and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation were performed with respect to internal wind flows in different apartment arrangement forms. Findings of the wind tunnel experiment showed that the internal form and arrangement of an apartment complex had significant influence on its internal airflow. The wind velocity of the buildings increased by 80% at maximum due to the proximity effects between the buildings. The CFD simulation for relaxing such wind flows indicated that the wind velocity reduced by 40% or more at maximum when the paths between the lateral sides of the buildings were extended. PMID:24688430

  11. 33 CFR 156.320 - Maximum operating conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... wave height is 3 meters (10 feet) or more. (b) Cargo transfer operations shall cease and transfer hoses shall be drained when— (1) The wind velocity exceeds 82 km/hr (44 knots); or (2) Wave heights exceed...

  12. 33 CFR 156.320 - Maximum operating conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... wave height is 3 meters (10 feet) or more. (b) Cargo transfer operations shall cease and transfer hoses shall be drained when— (1) The wind velocity exceeds 82 km/hr (44 knots); or (2) Wave heights exceed...

  13. The initiation of grain movement by wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickling, William G.

    1987-11-01

    When air blows across the surface of dry, loose sand, a critical shear velocity must be achieved to initiate motion. Since most natural sediments consist of a range of grain sizes, fluid threshold for any sediment cannot really be defined by a finite value but should be viewed as a threshold range which is a function of the mean size, sorting, and packing of the sediment. In order to investigate the initiation of particle movement by wind, a series of wind tunnel tests were carried out on a range of screened sands and commercially available glass beads of differing size, sorting, and shape characteristics. In addition, individual samples of the glass beads were mixed to produce rather poorly sorted bimodal distributions. Test results suggest the when velocity is slowly increased over the sediment surface the smaller or more exposed grains are first engrained by the fluid drag of the air either in surface creep or in saltation. As velocity continues to rise, the larger more protected grains may also be moved by fluid drag. The data also indicate that predicted values based on the modified Bagnold equation fall within the range of threshold values defined by the transition section of the grain movement/shear velocity plots. Moreover, the predicted values are very similar to the threshold values derived for the point maximum inflection on the curves.

  14. The initiation of grain movement by wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickling, W. G.

    1986-05-01

    When air blows across the surface of dry, loose sand, a critical shear velocity must be achieved to inititate motion. Since most natural sediments consist of a range of grain sizes, fluid threshold for any sediment cannot really be defined by a finite value but should be viewed as a threshold range which is a function of the mean size, sorting, and packing of the sediment. In order to investigate the initiation of particle movement by wind, a series of wind tunnel tests were carried out on a range of screened sands and commercially available glass beads of differing sizes, sorting, and shape characteristics. In addition, individual samples of the glass beads were mixed to produce rather poorly sorted bimodal distributions. Test results suggest that when velocity is slowly increased over the sediment surface the smaller or more exposed grains are first entrained by the fluid drag of the air either in surface creep or in saltation. As velocity continues to rise, the larger more protected grains may also be moved by fluid drag. The data also indicate that predicted values based on the modified Bagnold equation fall within the range of threshold values defined by the transition section of the grain movement/shear velocity plots. Moreover, the predicted values are very similar to the threshold values derived for the point maximum inflection on the curves.

  15. The impact of T-TREC-retrieved wind and radial velocity data assimilation using EnKF and effects of assimilation window on the analysis and prediction of Typhoon Jangmi (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingjun; Xue, Ming; Zhao, Kun

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the relative impact of assimilating T-TREC-retrieved winds (VTREC) versus radial velocity (Vr) on the analysis and forecast of Typhoon Jangmi (2008) using an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF). The VTREC and Vr data at 30 min intervals are assimilated into the ARPS model at 3 km grid spacing over four different assimilation windows that cover, respectively, 0000-0200, 0200-0400, 0400-0600, and 0000-0600 UTC, 28 September 2008. The assimilation of VTREC data produces better analyses of the typhoon structure and intensity than the assimilation of Vr data during the earlier assimilation windows, but during the later assimilation windows when the coverage of Vr data on the typhoon from four Doppler radars is much improved, the assimilation of Vr outperforms VTREC data. The combination of VTREC and Vr data, either by assimilating both VTREC and Vr data in all cycles or by assimilating VTREC in the first cycle and Vr in the remaining cycles (labeled VTFVR), further improves the analyses of the typhoon structure and intensity compared to assimilating VTREC or Vr data alone. Quantitative verifications of 24 h forecasts of the typhoon show that the VTFVR assimilation experiments produces forecasts that best match the best track data and also have the highest precipitation prediction skills. The track forecast errors in experiment that assimilate VTREC data through the later cycles are the largest. The behaviors are discussed based on the coverage, information content, and accuracy of the various forms of data.

  16. Optimization of Wind Turbine Airfoils/Blades and Wind Farm Layouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaomin

    by the turbine can be significantly increased. Parametric studies are also conducted by varying the turbine diameter. In addition, a simplified dynamic inflow model is integrated into the BEM theory. It is shown that the improved BEM theory has superior performance in capturing the instantaneous behavior of wind turbines due to the existence of wind turbine wake or temporal variations in wind velocity. The dissertation also considers the Wind Farm layout optimization problem using a genetic algorithm. Both the Horizontal --Axis Wind Turbines (HAWT) and Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT) are considered. The goal of the optimization problem is to optimally position the turbines within the wind farm such that the wake effects are minimized and the power production is maximized. The reasonably accurate modeling of the turbine wake is critical in determination of the optimal layout of the turbines and the power generated. For HAWT, two wake models are considered; both are found to give similar answers. For VAWT, a very simple wake model is employed. Finally, some preliminary investigation of shape optimization of 3D wind turbine blades at low Reynolds numbers is conducted. The optimization employs a 3D straight untapered wind turbine blade with cross section of NACA 0012 airfoils as the geometry of baseline blade. The optimization objective is to achieve maximum Cl/Cd as well as maximum Cl. The multi-objective genetic algorithm is employed together with the commercially available software FLUENT for calculation of the flow field using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations in conjunction with a one-equation Sparlart-Allmaras turbulence model. The results show excellent performance of the optimized wind turbine blade and indicate the feasibility of optimization on real wind turbine blades with more complex shapes in the future. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  17. Velocity and velocity bounds in static spherically symmetric metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arraut, Ivan; Batic, Davide; Nowakowski, Marek

    2011-08-01

    We find simple expressions for velocity of massless particles with dependence on the distance, r, in Schwarzschild coordinates. For massive particles these expressions give an upper bound for the velocity. Our results apply to static spherically symmetric metrics. We use these results to calculate the velocity for different cases: Schwarzschild, Schwarzschild-de Sitter and Reissner-Nordström with and without the cosmological constant. We emphasize the differences between the behavior of the velocity in the different metrics and find that in cases with naked singularity there always exists a region where the massless particle moves with a velocity greater than the velocity of light in vacuum. In the case of Reissner-Nordström-de Sitter we completely characterize the velocity and the metric in an algebraic way. We contrast the case of classical naked singularities with naked singularities emerging from metric inspired by noncommutative geometry where the radial velocity never exceeds one. Furthermore, we solve the Einstein equations for a constant and polytropic density profile and calculate the radial velocity of a photon moving in spaces with interior metric. The polytropic case of radial velocity displays an unexpected variation bounded by a local minimum and maximum.

  18. Maximum power tracking

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, G.

    1983-03-01

    By definition, a maximum power tracking device causes the photovoltaic array to operate on the locus of maximum power points within a specified accuracy. There are limitations to the application of maximum power tracking. A prerequisite is that the load be capable of absorbing all of the power availble at all times. Battery chargers, electrical heaters, water pumps, and most significantly, returning power to the utility grid, are prime examples of applications that are adaptable to maximum power tracking. Maximum power tracking is available to either dc or ac loads. An inverter equipped with a means of changing input voltage by controlling its input impedance can deliver maximum power to ac loads. The inverter can be fixed or variable frequency and fixed or variable voltage, but must be compatible with the ac load. The discussion includes applications, techniques, and cost factors.

  19. Dust-driven winds of AGB stars: The critical interplay of atmospheric shocks and luminosity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljegren, S.; Höfner, S.; Nowotny, W.; Eriksson, K.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Winds of AGB stars are thought to be driven by a combination of pulsation-induced shock waves and radiation pressure on dust. In dynamic atmosphere and wind models, the stellar pulsation is often simulated by prescribing a simple sinusoidal variation in velocity and luminosity at the inner boundary of the model atmosphere. Aims: We experiment with different forms of the luminosity variation in order to assess the effects on the wind velocity and mass-loss rate, when progressing from the simple sinusoidal recipe towards more realistic descriptions. This will also give an indication of how robust the wind properties derived from the dynamic atmosphere models are. Methods: Using state-of-the-art dynamical models of C-rich AGB stars, a range of different asymmetric shapes of the luminosity variation and a range of phase shifts of the luminosity variation relative to the radial variation are tested. These tests are performed on two stellar atmosphere models. The first model has dust condensation and, as a consequence, a stellar wind is triggered, while the second model lacks both dust and wind. Results: The first model with dust and stellar wind is very sensitive to moderate changes in the luminosity variation. There is a complex relationship between the luminosity minimum, and dust condensation: changing the phase corresponding to minimum luminosity can either increase or decrease mass-loss rate and wind velocity. The luminosity maximum dominates the radiative pressure on the dust, which in turn, is important for driving the wind. An earlier occurrence of the maximum, with respect to the propagation of the pulsation-induced shock wave, then increases the wind velocity, while a later occurrence leads to a decrease. These effects of changed luminosity variation are coupled with the dust formation. In contrast there is very little change to the structure of the model without dust. Conclusions: Changing the luminosity variation, both by introducing a phase shift

  20. Dust-driven winds of AGB stars: The critical interplay of atmospheric shocks and luminosity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljegren, S.; Höfner, S.; Nowotny, W.; Eriksson, K.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Winds of AGB stars are thought to be driven by a combination of pulsation-induced shock waves and radiation pressure on dust. In dynamic atmosphere and wind models, the stellar pulsation is often simulated by prescribing a simple sinusoidal variation in velocity and luminosity at the inner boundary of the model atmosphere. Aims: We experiment with different forms of the luminosity variation in order to assess the effects on the wind velocity and mass-loss rate, when progressing from the simple sinusoidal recipe towards more realistic descriptions. This will also give an indication of how robust the wind properties derived from the dynamic atmosphere models are. Methods: Using state-of-the-art dynamical models of C-rich AGB stars, a range of different asymmetric shapes of the luminosity variation and a range of phase shifts of the luminosity variation relative to the radial variation are tested. These tests are performed on two stellar atmosphere models. The first model has dust condensation and, as a consequence, a stellar wind is triggered, while the second model lacks both dust and wind. Results: The first model with dust and stellar wind is very sensitive to moderate changes in the luminosity variation. There is a complex relationship between the luminosity minimum, and dust condensation: changing the phase corresponding to minimum luminosity can either increase or decrease mass-loss rate and wind velocity. The luminosity maximum dominates the radiative pressure on the dust, which in turn, is important for driving the wind. An earlier occurrence of the maximum, with respect to the propagation of the pulsation-induced shock wave, then increases the wind velocity, while a later occurrence leads to a decrease. These effects of changed luminosity variation are coupled with the dust formation. In contrast there is very little change to the structure of the model without dust. Conclusions: Changing the luminosity variation, both by introducing a phase shift

  1. Parameters of the turbulence of the interplanetary plasma derived from scintillation observations of the quasars 3C 48 and 3C 298 at the solar-activity maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glubokova, S. K.; Glyantsev, A. V.; Tyul'bashev, S. A.; Chashei, I. V.; Shishov, V. I.

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of temporal spectra of interplanetary scintillations of the radio sources 3C 48 and 3C 298 observed at 111 MHz on the Big Scanning Antenna of the Lebedev Physical Institute at the maximum of the 24th solar-activity cycle is reported. The measured temporal spectra of the scintillations are used to estimate the velocity of the in homogeneities and the index of the spatial spectrum of the turbulence. The dependence of the spectral index of the turbulence on the solar-wind speed persists in periods of high solar activity, when the global spatial structure of the solar wind is strongly modulated by the activity cycle.

  2. Wind Measurements from Arc Scans with Doppler Wind Lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Clifton, Andy; Pryor, S. C.

    2015-11-25

    When defining optimal scanning geometries for scanning lidars for wind energy applications, we found that it is still an active field of research. Our paper evaluates uncertainties associated with arc scan geometries and presents recommendations regarding optimal configurations in the atmospheric boundary layer. The analysis is based on arc scan data from a Doppler wind lidar with one elevation angle and seven azimuth angles spanning 30° and focuses on an estimation of 10-min mean wind speed and direction. When flow is horizontally uniform, this approach can provide accurate wind measurements required for wind resource assessments in part because of its high resampling rate. Retrieved wind velocities at a single range gate exhibit good correlation to data from a sonic anemometer on a nearby meteorological tower, and vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed, though derived from range gates located on a conical surface, match those measured by mast-mounted cup anemometers. Uncertainties in the retrieved wind velocity are related to high turbulent wind fluctuation and an inhomogeneous horizontal wind field. Moreover, the radial velocity variance is found to be a robust measure of the uncertainty of the retrieved wind speed because of its relationship to turbulence properties. It is further shown that the standard error of wind speed estimates can be minimized by increasing the azimuthal range beyond 30° and using five to seven azimuth angles.

  3. Wind Measurements from Arc Scans with Doppler Wind Lidar

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, H.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Clifton, Andy; Pryor, S. C.

    2015-11-25

    When defining optimal scanning geometries for scanning lidars for wind energy applications, we found that it is still an active field of research. Our paper evaluates uncertainties associated with arc scan geometries and presents recommendations regarding optimal configurations in the atmospheric boundary layer. The analysis is based on arc scan data from a Doppler wind lidar with one elevation angle and seven azimuth angles spanning 30° and focuses on an estimation of 10-min mean wind speed and direction. When flow is horizontally uniform, this approach can provide accurate wind measurements required for wind resource assessments in part because of itsmore » high resampling rate. Retrieved wind velocities at a single range gate exhibit good correlation to data from a sonic anemometer on a nearby meteorological tower, and vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed, though derived from range gates located on a conical surface, match those measured by mast-mounted cup anemometers. Uncertainties in the retrieved wind velocity are related to high turbulent wind fluctuation and an inhomogeneous horizontal wind field. Moreover, the radial velocity variance is found to be a robust measure of the uncertainty of the retrieved wind speed because of its relationship to turbulence properties. It is further shown that the standard error of wind speed estimates can be minimized by increasing the azimuthal range beyond 30° and using five to seven azimuth angles.« less

  4. Impact of wind on the dynamics of explosive volcanic plumes inferred from analog experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carazzo, G.; Girault, F.; Aubry, T. J.; Bouquerel, H.; Kaminski, E. C.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic plumes produced by explosive eruptions commonly interact with atmospheric wind causing plume bending and a reduction of its maximum height. Strength of the wind field and intensity of the eruption control the behavior of the column in the atmosphere, which may form either a strong plume that is little affected by the presence of wind or a weak plume that is bent-over in the wind field. To better understand the transition between weak and strong plumes, we present a series of new laboratory reproducing a buoyant jet rising in a stratified environment with a uniform cross-flow. The experiments consist in injecting downward fresh water in a tank containing an aqueous NaCl solution with linear density stratification. The jet source is towed at a constant speed through the stationary fluid in order to produce a cross-flow. We show that depending on the environmental and source conditions, the buoyant jet may form either a strong, distorted, or weak plume. The transition from one dynamical regime to another is governed by the strength of the horizontal wind velocity compared to the vertical buoyant rise of the plume. A review of field data on historical eruptions confirms that the experimentally-determined transition curves capture the behavior of volcanic columns. We quantify the impact of wind on the maximum height reached by the column, and we propose a universal scaling relationship to link the mass discharge rate feeding an eruption to its observed maximum height in the presence of wind.

  5. New Sensors For Flow Velocity And Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1991-01-01

    Paper describes two sensor-development programs at Fluid Mechanics Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center. One program for digital image velocimetry (DIV) sensors, and other program, for advanced acoustic sensors for wind tunnels. DIV measures, in real time, instantaneous velocity fields of time-varying flow or of collection of objects moving with varying velocities. Advanced acoustic sensors for wind tunnels being developed to reduce effects of interference from wind noise, noise from interactions between flows and sensors, flow-induced vibrations of sensors, deflections of accoustic waves by boundary layers induced by sensors, and reflections from walls and sensor supports.

  6. Maxometers (peak wind speed anemometers)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, J. W.; Camp, D. W.; Turner, R. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An instrument for measuring peak wind speeds under severe environmental conditions is described, comprising an elongated cylinder housed in an outer casing. The cylinder contains a piston attached to a longitudinally movable guided rod having a pressure disk mounted on one projecting end. Wind pressure against the pressure disk depresses the movable rod. When the wind reaches its maximum speed, the rod is locked by a ball clutch mechanism in the position of maximum inward movement. Thereafter maximum wind speed or pressure readings may be taken from calibrated indexing means.

  7. The aeolian wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iversen, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    The aeolian wind tunnel is a special case of a larger subset of the wind tunnel family which is designed to simulate the atmospheric surface layer winds to small scale (a member of this larger subset is usually called an atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel or environmental wind tunnel). The atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel is designed to simulate, as closely as possible, the mean velocity and turbulence that occur naturally in the atmospheric boundary layer (defined as the lowest portion of the atmosphere, of the order of 500 m, in which the winds are most greatly affected by surface roughness and topography). The aeolian wind tunnel is used for two purposes: to simulate the physics of the saltation process and to model at small scale the erosional and depositional processes associated with topographic surface features. For purposes of studying aeolian effects on the surface of Mars and Venus as well as on Earth, the aeolian wind tunnel continues to prove to be a useful tool for estimating wind speeds necessary to move small particles on the three planets as well as to determine the effects of topography on the evolution of aeolian features such as wind streaks and dune patterns.

  8. Dynamic stall occurrence on a horizontal axis wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, D.E.; Miller, M.S.; Robinson, M.C.

    1995-09-01

    Surface pressure data from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s ``Combined Experiment`` were analyzed to provide a statistical representation of dynamic stall occurrence on a downwind horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT). Over twenty thousand blade rotational cycles were each characterized at four span locations by the maximum leading edge suction pressure and by the azimuth, velocity, and yaw at which it occurred. Peak suction values at least twice that seen in static wind tunnel tests were taken to be indicative of dynamic stall. The occurrence of dynamic stall at all but the inboard station (30% span) shows good quantitative agreement with the theoretical limits on inflow velocity and yaw that should yield dynamic stall. Two hypotheses were developed to explain the discrepancy at 30% span. Estimates are also given for the frequency of dynamic stall occurrence on upwind turbines. Operational regimes were identified which minimize the occurrence of dynamic stall events.

  9. Maximum thrust mode evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Nobbs, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    Measured reductions in acceleration times which resulted from the application of the F-15 performance seeking control (PSC) maximum thrust mode during the dual-engine test phase is presented as a function of power setting and flight condition. Data were collected at altitudes of 30,000 and 45,000 feet at military and maximum afterburning power settings. The time savings for the supersonic acceleration is less than at subsonic Mach numbers because of the increased modeling and control complexity. In addition, the propulsion system was designed to be optimized at the mid supersonic Mach number range. Recall that even though the engine is at maximum afterburner, PSC does not trim the afterburner for the maximum thrust mode. Subsonically at military power, time to accelerate from Mach 0.6 to 0.95 was cut by between 6 and 8 percent with a single engine application of PSC, and over 14 percent when both engines were optimized. At maximum afterburner, the level of thrust increases were similar in magnitude to the military power results, but because of higher thrust levels at maximum afterburner and higher aircraft drag at supersonic Mach numbers the percentage thrust increase and time to accelerate was less than for the supersonic accelerations. Savings in time to accelerate supersonically at maximum afterburner ranged from 4 to 7 percent. In general, the maximum thrust mode has performed well, demonstrating significant thrust increases at military and maximum afterburner power. Increases of up to 15 percent at typical combat-type flight conditions were identified. Thrust increases of this magnitude could be useful in a combat situation.

  10. Sensitivities of eyewall replacement cycle to model physics, vortex structure, and background winds in numerical simulations of tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhenduo; Zhu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    series of sensitivity experiments by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used to investigate the impact of model physics, vortex axisymmetric radial structure, and background wind on secondary eyewall formation (SEF) and eyewall replacement cycle (ERC) in three-dimensional full physics numerical simulations. It is found that the vertical turbulent mixing parameterization can substantially affect the concentric ring structure of tangential wind associated with SEF through a complicated interaction among eyewall and outer rainband heating, radial inflow in the boundary layer, surface layer processes, and shallow convection in the moat. Large snow terminal velocity can substantially change the vertical distribution of eyewall diabatic heating to result in a strong radial inflow in the boundary layer, and thus, favors the development of shallow convection in the moat allowing the outer rainband convection to move closer to the inner eyewall, which may leave little room both temporally and spatially for a full development of a secondary maximum of tangential wind. Small radius of maximum wind (RMW) of a vortex and small potential vorticity (PV) skirt outside the RMW tend to generate double-eyewall replacement and may lead to an ERC without a clean secondary concentric maximum of tangential wind. A sufficiently large background wind can smooth out an ERC that would otherwise occur without background wind for a vortex with a small or moderate PV skirt. However, background wind does not appear to have an impact on an ERC if the vortex has a sufficiently large PV skirt.

  11. Pickup Ion Velocity Distributions at Titan: Effects of Spatial Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, R. E.; Sittler, E. C.

    2004-01-01

    The principle source of pickup ions at Titan is its neutral exosphere, extending well above the ionopause into the magnetosphere of Saturn or the solar wind, depending on the moon's orbital position. Thermal and nonthermal processes in the thermosphere generate the distribution of neutral atoms and molecules in the exosphere. The combination of these processes and the range of mass numbers, 1 to over 28, contribute to an exospheric source structure that produces pickup ions with gyroradii that are much larger or smaller than the corresponding scale heights of their neutral sources. The resulting phase space distributions are dependent on the spatial structure of the exosphere as well as that of the magnetic field and background plasma. When the pickup ion gyroradius is less than the source gas scale height, the pickup ion velocity distribution is characterized by a sharp cutoff near the maximum speed, which is twice that of the ambient plasma times the sine of the angle between the magnetic field and the flow velocity. This was the case for pickup H(sup +) ions identified during the Voyager 1 flyby. In contrast, as the gyroradius becomes much larger than the scale height, the peak of the velocity distribution in the source region recedes from the maximum speed. Iri addition, the amplitude of the distribution near the maximum speed decreases. These more beam like distributions of heavy ions were not observed from Voyager 1 , but should be observable by more sensitive instruments on future spacecraft, including Cassini. The finite gyroradius effects in the pickup ion velocity distributions are studied by including in the analysis the possible range of spatial structures in the neutral exosphere and background plasma.

  12. Maximum Power Training and Plyometrics for Cross-Country Running.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebben, William P.

    2001-01-01

    Provides a rationale for maximum power training and plyometrics as conditioning strategies for cross-country runners, examining: an evaluation of training methods (strength training and maximum power training and plyometrics); biomechanic and velocity specificity (role in preventing injury); and practical application of maximum power training and…

  13. Horizontal Velocity Structure in Waterspouts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwiesow, R. L.

    1981-04-01

    We have measured the spatial variation of a single horizontal component of the velocity in a number of waterspouts using an airborne infrared Doppler lidar. In 21 data sets, maximum velocities range from 4.2 to 33.6 m s1 and visible funnel diameters from 6.6 to 90 m. Data were taken at altitudes between 675 m, near cloud base, and 95 m above the surface. The sequences show time development of the velocity as a function of radius at a fixed altitude and the velocity structure at different altitudes and sequential times with a horizontal resolution of 0.75 m between data points. The variation in velocity structure between waterspouts is large, with some showing marked azimuthal asymmetry and mixing with the ambient flow, and others showing multiple concentric vortex shells.

  14. Coronal Holes and Solar Wind High-Speed Streams: I. Forecasting the Solar Wind Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vršnak, Bojan; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid M.

    2007-02-01

    We analyze the relationship between the coronal hole (CH) area/position and physical characteristics of the associated corotating high-speed stream (HSS) in the solar wind at 1 AU. For the analysis we utilize the data in the period DOY 25 125 of 2005, characterized by a very low coronal mass ejection (CME) activity. Distinct correlations between the daily averaged CH parameters and the solar wind characteristics are found, which allows us to forecast the solar wind velocity v, proton temperature T, proton density n, and magnetic field strength B, several days in advance in periods of low CME activity. The forecast is based on monitoring fractional areas A, covered by CHs in the meridional slices embracing the central meridian distance ranges [-40°,-20°], [-10°,10°], and [20°,40°]. On average, the peaks in the daily values of n, B, T, and v appear delayed by 1, 2, 3, and 4 days, respectively, after the area A attains its maximum in the central-meridian slice. The peak values of the solar wind parameters are correlated to the peak values of A, which provides also forecasting of the peak values of n, B, T, and v. The most accurate prediction can be obtained for the solar wind velocity, for which the average relative difference between the calculated and the observed peak values amounts to overline{\\vertδ\\vert}≈10 %. The forecast reliability is somewhat lower in the case of T, B, and n ( overline{\\vertδ\\vert}≈20 , 30, and 40%, respectively). The space weather implications are discussed, including the perspectives for advancing the real-time calculation of the Sun Earth transit times of coronal mass ejections and interplanetary shocks, by including more realistic real-time estimates of the solar wind characteristics.

  15. ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS OBSCURATION THROUGH DUSTY INFRARED-DOMINATED FLOWS. I. RADIATION-HYDRODYNAMICS SOLUTION FOR THE WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Dorodnitsyn, A.; Kallman, T.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.

    2011-11-01

    We construct a radiation-hydrodynamics model for the obscuring toroidal structure in active galactic nuclei. In this model the obscuration is produced at parsec scales by a dense, dusty wind which is supported by infrared radiation pressure on dust grains. To find the distribution of radiation pressure, we numerically solve the two-dimensional radiation transfer problem in a flux-limited diffusion approximation. We iteratively couple the solution with calculations of stationary one-dimensional models for the wind and obtain the z-component of the velocity. Our results demonstrate that for active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosities greater than 0.1 L{sub edd}, external illumination can support a geometrically thick obscuration via outflows driven by infrared radiation pressure. The terminal velocity of marginally Compton-thin models (0.2 < {tau}{sub T} < 0.6) is comparable to or greater than the escape velocity. In Compton-thick models the maximum value of the vertical component of the velocity is lower than the escape velocity, suggesting that a significant part of our torus is in the form of failed wind. The results demonstrate that obscuration via normal or failed infrared-driven winds is a viable option for the AGN torus problem and AGN unification models. Such winds can also provide an important channel for AGN feedback.

  16. Industry guidelines for the calibration of maximum anemometers

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, B.H.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to report on a framework of guidelines for the calibration of the Maximum Type 40 anemometer. This anemometer model is the wind speed sensor of choice in the majority of wind resource assessment programs in the U.S. These guidelines were established by the Utility Wind Resource Assessment Program. In addition to providing guidelines for anemometers, the appropriate use of non-calibrated anemometers is also discussed. 14 refs., 1 tab.

  17. A wind tunnel investigation of wind turbine wakes: Boundary-layer turbulence and surface roughness effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, L.; Porte-Agel, F.

    2008-12-01

    Wind turbine wakes are known to have an important effect on power generation and fatigue loads in wind energy parks. Wake characteristics are expected to depend on the incoming atmospheric boundary layer flow statistics (mean velocity and turbulence levels). Here, results are presented from a wind tunnel experiment carried out at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel to study turbulence levels in the wake of a model wind turbine placed over both rough and smooth surfaces. How-wire anemometry was used to characterize the cross-sectional distribution of turbulent intensity, kinematic shear stress and mean velocity at different locations downwind of the turbine for both surface roughness cases. Non-axisymmetric behavior of the wake is observed over both roughness types in response to the non- uniformity of the incoming boundary layer flow and the presence of the surface. Nevertheless, the velocity deficit with respect to the average incoming flow is nearly axisymmetric everywhere except near the surface in the far wake, where the wake interacts with the surface. It was found that the wind turbine induces a large enhancement of turbulence levels in the upper part of the wake. This is due to the effect of relatively large velocity fluctuations associated with helicoidal tip vortices near the wake edge. In the lower part of the wake, where the incoming flow has lower average velocity and higher turbulence levels, the turbulence intensity shows a small reduction. The non-axisymmetry of the turbulent intensity distribution of the wake is found to be stronger over the rough surface, where the incoming flow is less uniform at the turbine level. It was found that the average turbulent intensity produced by the wake, its positive and negative components and its local maximum decay as a power law of downwind distance (with a power of -0.3 to -0.5 for the rough surface and with a wider range for the smooth surface). Preliminary results will also

  18. LIDAR wind speed measurements at a Taiwan onshore wind park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Ting; Lin, Ta-Hui; Hsuan, Chung-Yao; Li, Yu-Cheng; Yang, Ya-Fei; Tai, Tzy-Hwan; Huang, Chien-Cheng

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of wind speed and wind direction were carried out using a Leosphere Windcube LIDAR system at a Taiwan onshore wind park. The Lidar shot a total of five laser beams to the atmosphere to collect the light-of-sight (LOS) velocity. Four beams were sent successively in four cardinal directions along a 28° scanning cone angle, followed by a fifth, vertical beam. An unchangeable sampling rate of approximately 1.2 Hz was set in the LIDAR system to collect the LOS velocity. The supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) data from two GE 1.5 MW wind turbines near the LIDAR deployment site were acquired for the whole measuring period from February 4 to February 16 of 2015. The SCADA data include the blade angular velocity, the wind velocity measured at hub height from an anemometer mounted on the nacelle, the wind turbine yaw angle, and power production; each parameter was recorded as averages over 1-min periods. The data analysis involving the LIDAR measurements and the SCADA data were performed to obtain the turbulent flow statistics. The results show that the turbine power production has significant dependence to the wind speed, wind direction, turbulence intensity and wind shear.

  19. Winds over saltcedar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Hylckama, T. E. A.

    1970-01-01

    An analysis of hourly wind speeds above and within a stand of saltcedar near Buckeye, Arizona, reveals that in 90% of all observed cases, the wind profiles above the stand can be represented by the simple logarithmic equation: uz = u* k 1n ( z z0) where uz is the velocity at height z. The roughness length (z0), (disregarding zero displacement), varies with a stability ratio similar to Richardson's number. The friction velocity, u*, depends on the wind speeds above the vegetation. Von Karman's constant, k, equals 0.41. Within the thickets there is considerable turbulence, and irregular wind inversions occur during daylight hours. The results are important for estimating water losses by evapotranspiration by either the energy-budget or the mass-transfer formulae. ?? 1970.

  20. Solar wind travel time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.

    A useful rule of thumb in solar terrestrial studies is that the solar wind travels 4 Earth radii (RE) per minute. Long-term studies of solar wind velocity [e.g., Luhmann et al., 1993; 1994] show that the median velocity is about 420 km/s, corresponding to 3.96 RE min-1. The quartiles are about 370 km/s and 495 km/s, corresponding to 3.48 Re min-1 and 4.66 Re min-1 respectively. This number helps estimate the delays expected when observing a discontinuity at a solar wind monitor; one example is ISEE-3 when it was at the forward libration point (about 60 min). It is also helpful for estimating how much time passes before the dayside magnetosphere is compressed as denser solar wind flows by (about 2.5 min).

  1. A Theoretical Analysis of the Wind Power Generation System Using a Simulated Windmill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amei, Kenji; Iida, Tadashi; Ohji, Takahisa; Sakui, Masaaki

    The new constitution method of the wind power generation simulator considering output characteristics of the windmill is proposed. The rotational speed of the windmill changes by not only wind velocity but also condition of the load connected with the generator. Therefore, the technique which fed back the torque of the generator was verified for the estimation of the rotational speed in addition to wind velocity and characteristics of the windmill. Characteristics of the operation of the simulator resembled actual windmill, and the validity of the simulator was approximately confirmed. In addition, derivation technique of the maximum power point proposed in advance was applied to this equipment, and the operating characteristic was verified by the experiment.

  2. Performance of a 2-micrometer coherent Doppler lidar for wind measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frehlich, Rod; Hannon, Stephen M.; Henderson, Sammy W.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of boundary layer winds are presented using a 2-micrometer coherent Doppler lidar and the optimal performance of the maximum likelihood estimator. The systematic error for single-shot estimates was estimated as 3.6 cm/s using measurements from a stationary hard target. The estimation error for measurements of the radial component of the wind field was determined, as well as the fraction of the estimates that are randomly distributed over the velocity search space, when the signal power is low and speckle fading is important. The results from actual data are compared with the results from ideal simulations. The first direct estimation of the spatial structure function of the radial wind field and of the energy dissipation rate is presented for both horizontal and vertical directions of propagation. The rms estimation error of the velocity estimates is found to be within 30% of ideal performance based on simulation.

  3. Prediction of solar energetic particle event histories using real-time particle and solar wind measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelof, E. C.; Gold, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    The comparatively well-ordered magnetic structure in the solar corona during the decline of Solar Cycle 20 revealed a characteristic dependence of solar energetic particle injection upon heliographic longitude. When analyzed using solar wind mapping of the large scale interplanetary magnetic field line connection from the corona to the Earth, particle fluxes display an approximately exponential dependence on heliographic longitude. Since variations in the solar wind velocity (and hence the coronal connection longitude) can severely distort the simple coronal injection profile, the use of real-time solar wind velocity measurements can be of great aid in predicting the decay of solar particle events. Although such exponential injection profiles are commonplace during 1973-1975, they have also been identified earlier in Solar Cycle 20, and hence this structure may be present during the rise and maximum of the cycle, but somewhat obscured by greater temporal variations in particle injection.

  4. Evaluation of wind electric energy based on martian wind measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Y.; Kurita, K.

    2012-12-01

    Since Mars is characterized by strong surface wind, electric power generation by the wind activity has been proposed as a possible power source for martian base station as well as that for exploration module (George James et al., 1999, Vimal Kumar et al., 2010). George and Vimal estimated total power as 19kW and 500W, which they conclude is sufficient value as a power source of small exploration module. These values seem comparable to that used in MER( 900Wh per day ). But their estimate largely depends on the model of wind velocity and reevaluation is necessary based on plausible wind model as well as more realistic assumptions about power generation. This study evaluates plausible range of available power by using surface wind model estimated by Viking Lander measurements. Meteorological package of Viking Lander measured wind velocity and its direction at 1.6m hight at every 60 min. for 200 sols. We estimate wind statistics by using Weibull distribution function and elevation offset. We calculate the wind energy by wind turbines as the integrated value of power produced in a Martian day, and compare with solar panel and nuclear battery under various conditions (Mars ground roughness, blade length, shape of wind turbine and rotor height from the ground). As a result of the calculations, we obtain reasonable amount of wind electricity (1000 Wh per day ), which can be used if we select proper locations and suitable wind turbine.

  5. Three-dimensional Numerical Simulations of Magnetized Winds of Solar-like Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidotto, A. A.; Opher, M.; Jatenco-Pereira, V.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2009-07-01

    By means of self-consistent three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) numerical simulations, we analyze magnetized solar-like stellar winds and their dependence on the plasma-β parameter (the ratio between thermal and magnetic energy densities). This is the first study to perform such analysis solving the fully ideal three-dimensional MHD equations. We adopt in our simulations a heating parameter described by γ, which is responsible for the thermal acceleration of the wind. We analyze winds with polar magnetic field intensities ranging from 1 to 20 G. We show that the wind structure presents characteristics that are similar to the solar coronal wind. The steady-state magnetic field topology for all cases is similar, presenting a configuration of helmet streamer-type, with zones of closed field lines and open field lines coexisting. Higher magnetic field intensities lead to faster and hotter winds. For the maximum magnetic intensity simulated of 20 G and solar coronal base density, the wind velocity reaches values of ~1000 km s-1 at r ~ 20r 0 and a maximum temperature of ~6 × 106 K at r ~ 6r 0. The increase of the field intensity generates a larger "dead zone" in the wind, i.e., the closed loops that inhibit matter to escape from latitudes lower than ~45° extend farther away from the star. The Lorentz force leads naturally to a latitude-dependent wind. We show that by increasing the density and maintaining B 0 = 20 G the system recover back to slower and cooler winds. For a fixed γ, we show that the key parameter in determining the wind velocity profile is the β-parameter at the coronal base. Therefore, there is a group of magnetized flows that would present the same terminal velocity despite its thermal and magnetic energy densities, as long as the plasma-β parameter is the same. This degeneracy, however, can be removed if we compare other physical parameters of the wind, such as the mass-loss rate. We analyze the influence of γ in our results and we

  6. Low-latitude Coronal Holes during Solar Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles, M.; Cranmer, S.; Kohl, J.

    Analyses of in situ observations have shown that some small coronal holes are sources of slow solar wind near solar maximum when polar coronal holes become smaller and disappear. However, not all coronal holes at solar maximum produce slow wind. The Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) aboard SOHO has been used to observe large low-latitude coronal holes during solar maximum that produced fast solar wind. UVCS observations show that large equatorial holes at solar maximum have plasma properties that seem to bridge the gap between solar minimum polar coronal holes and streamers. The ion kinetic temperatures in equatorial holes are about 2 times larger than those in a solar minimum equatorial streamer, and about a factor of 2 smaller than those in polar coronal holes above 2 R . The outflow speeds for the large equatorial holes observed by UVCS are only about 100 km s-1 , a factor of 4 smaller than those in polar holes, at 3 R . However, in situ data corresponding to these equatorial coronal holes showed asymptotic wind speeds of 600-700 km s-1 . These wind speeds are similar to those observed over polar coronal holes at solar minimum. In contrast to the polar coronal holes, the bulk of the solar wind acceleration in large equatorial coronal holes at solar maximum must occur above 3 R . Thus, the combination of spectroscopic measurements in the extended corona, where the primary solar wind acceleration occurs, and in situ measurements made in the solar wind can be used to obtain the solar wind acceleration as a function of heliocentric distance. These observations provide detailed empirical constraints for theoretical models and may be key to understanding how the various types of solar wind plasma are heated and accelerated. This work is supported by NASA under Grant NAG5-11420 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by the Italian Space Agency and by PRODEX (Swiss contribution).

  7. Wind Speed Estimation and Wake model Re-calibration for Downregulated Offshore Wind Farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göçmen Bozkurt, Tuhfe; Giebel, Gregor; Kjølstad Poulsen, Niels; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan; Mirzaei, Mahmood

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, the wind farm sizes have increased tremendously and with increasing installed capacity, the wind farms are requested to downregulate from their maximum possible power more frequently, especially in the offshore environment. Determination of the possible (or available) power is crucial not only because the reserve power has considerable market value but also for wind farm developers to be properly compensated for the loss during downregulation. While the available power calculation is straightforward for a single turbine, it gets rather complicated for the whole wind farm due to the change in the wake characteristics. In fact, the wake losses generated by the upstream turbine(s) decrease during downregulation and the downstream turbines therefore see more wind compared to the normal operation case. Currently, the Transmission System Operators (TSOs) have no real way to determine exactly the available power of a whole wind farm which is downregulated. Therefore, the PossPOW project aims to develop a verified and internationally accepted way to determine the possible power of a down-regulated offshore wind farm. The first phase of the project is to estimate the rotor effective wind speed. Since the nacelle anemometers are not readily available and are known to have reliability issues, the proposed method is to use power, pitch angle and rotational speed as inputs and combine it with a generic Cp model to estimate the wind speed. The performance of the model has been evaluated for both normal operation and downregulation periods using two different case studies: Horns Rev-I wind farm and NREL 5MW single turbine. During downregulation, the wake losses are not as severe and the velocity deficits at the downstream turbines are smaller as if also the wake is "downregulated". On the other hand, in order to calculate the available power, the wakes that would have been produced normally (if the turbines were not curtailed) are of importance, not the

  8. Effect of wind turbulence and shear on landing performance of jet transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blick, E. F.; Mccarthy, J.; Bensch, R. R.; Sarabudla, N. R.

    1978-01-01

    Computer simulations of a Boeing 727 class aircraft landing in turbulence were developed by programming the longitudinal aircraft equations of motion into a digital computer with various input values of vertical and horizontal wind speeds. Turbulent wind data was fed to the computer in one-second intervals. The computer computed in one-second intervals the aircraft speed, altitude, horizontal distance traveled, rate-of-descent, pitch attitude, glide path angle (from edge of runway) and elevator angle. All computer runs were made in the 'stick-fixed' mode. The RMS values of altitude and velocity perturbations (from equilibrium) were found to be large when horizontal wind gusts had sinusoidal components at or near the phugoid (long period) frequency. Maximum RMS altitude deviations occurred when the vertical wind had sinusoidal components which were 1/10 to 1/5 of the phugoid frequency. When real wind data (obtained from NCAR Queen Air) were used as input winds good correlations were found to exist between RMS velocity perturbations and both horizontal and vertical wind shears.

  9. Interaction of katabatic wind and local surface mass balance at Scharffenbergbotnen Blue Ice Area, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwinger, T.; Malm, T.; Schäfer, M.; Stenberg, R.; Moore, J. C.

    2015-04-01

    We model the wind causing the formation of a blue ice area in Scharffenbergbotnen valley, Antarctica, using the finite element code Elmer. The high resolution numerical simulations of the local wind flow from katabatic wind fronts show highly spatially variable wind impact patterns and good congruence between places of enhanced wind-impact and the blue ice area. The results were fortuitously confirmed by the destruction of a field camp located in a high wind speed area and its subsequent redistribution to low velocity areas. In addition we perform wind simulations on an altered glacier geometry that resembles the thicker ice cover at the Late Glacial Maximum (LGM). These simulations indicate that the pronounced spatial wind-impact patterns depend on present day geometry and did not occur during the LGM. This leads to the conclusion that the formation of the blue ice area that is situated more inside the valley of Scharffenbergbotnen started only after the lowering of the ice surface, later than the LGM. Experiments with smoothed surface topography suggest that detailed positions of the high wind regions and hence individual blue ice fields, may have varied as the ice sheet lowered. The experiments and the field observations are consistent with localized violent katabatic events, rather than synoptic scale storms, playing the dominant role in the formation and maintenance of this, and perhaps many blue ice areas.

  10. Characteristics of winter-time meridional thermospheric winds over Tromsø during solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hongtao; Zhan, Weijia; Huang, Dingjuan; Li, Fei; Zhou, Kangjun; Shen, Ge; Willian McCrea, Ian; Ma, Shuying

    2015-04-01

    The background of the winter-time thermospheric wind over Tromsø (69 °N, 19 °E) were focused on in this paper. The meridional component of the neutral wind in F-region were derived from the field-aligned ion velocity detected by the European incoherent scattering (EISCAT) radar. In order to eliminate possible influences from solar activity variances and geomagnetic disturbance, only measurements accomplished under geomagnetically quiet conditions (with maximum Kp ≤ 3) around the winter solstice during solar minimum (2008-2009) were chosen in present work. Two major characteristics of the radar derived winds are revealed. The first feature is the vertical variations of the meridional winds. Magnitudes of the equatorward winds observed show a hint of increasing with altitudes during nighttime. The second one is the persistent equatorward winds at altitudes higher than 280 km height during daytime, especially around local noon, whilst the prevailing poleward winds appear at lower altitudes. Thus, significant shears of horizontal winds are expected in the vertical direction. Detail comparisons with models and discussions of the possible driving forces for the day-time equatorward winds will be presented in the report.

  11. Understanding soil-gas velocity leads to new sampling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, K.A.

    1989-12-01

    Predicting when periods of maximum vertical gas velocity occur for any geographic point mightily increases the sensitivity and reliability of detection. This article discusses sampling programs. Sampling programs can be completed during periods of maximum velocity, allowing field workers to collect the maximum amount of contaminant in trace-gas form per given unit of time.

  12. Water Velocity and Suspended Solids Measurements by In-situ Instruments in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, Jeffrey W.; Wellman, Roy E.; Wood, Tamara M.; Cheng, Ralph T.

    2007-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey conducted hydrodynamic measurements in Upper Klamath Lake during four summer seasons (approximately mid-June to mid-September) during 2003 to 2006. Measurements included water current profiles made by acoustic Doppler current profilers at a number of fixed locations in the lake during all four years as well as from a moving boat during 2005 and 2006. Measurements of size distribution of suspended material were made at four locations in the lake during 2004-2006. Raw (unfiltered) data are presented as time series of measurements. In addition, water-velocity data have been filtered to remove wind-induced variations with periods less than thirty hours from the measurements. Bar graphs of horizontal and vertical water speed and acoustic backscatter have been generated to discern diurnal variations, especially as they relate to wind patterns over the lake. Mean speeds of the horizontal currents in the lake range between about 3.5 to 15 cm/s with the higher speeds at the deep locations in the trench on the west side of the lake. Current directions generally conform to the lake's bathymetry contours and the water circulation pattern is usually in a clockwise direction around the lake as established by the prevailing north to northwesterly surface winds in the region. Diurnal patterns in horizontal currents probably relate to diurnal wind patterns with minimum wind speeds near noon and maximum wind speeds near 2100. Diurnal variations in vertical velocities do not appear to be related to wind patterns; they do appear to be related to expected patterns of vertical migration of Aphanizomenon flos aquae, (AFA) the predominant species of blue-green algae in the lake. Similarly, diurnal variations in acoustic backscatter, especially near the lake's surface, are probably related to the vertical migration of AFA.

  13. VARIABLE WINDS AND DUST FORMATION IN R CORONAE BOREALIS STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Zhang Wanshu; Geballe, T. R. E-mail: wzhan21@lsu.edu

    2013-08-01

    We have observed P-Cygni and asymmetric, blue-shifted absorption profiles in the He I {lambda}10830 lines of 12 R Coronae Borealis stars over short (1 month) and long (3 yr) timescales to look for variations linked to their dust-formation episodes. In almost all cases, the strengths and terminal velocities of the line vary significantly and are correlated with dust formation events. Strong absorption features with blue-shifted velocities {approx}400 km s{sup -1} appear during declines in visible brightness and persist for about 100 days after recovery to maximum brightness. Small residual winds of somewhat lower velocity are present outside of the decline and recovery periods. The correlations support models in which recently formed dust near the star is propelled outward at high speed by radiation pressure and drags the gas along with it.

  14. Effects of Thermal Stability and Incoming Boundary-Layer Flow Characteristics on Wind-Turbine Wakes: A Wind-Tunnel Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, Leonardo P.; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2010-09-01

    Wind-tunnel experiments were carried out to study turbulence statistics in the wake of a model wind turbine placed in a boundary-layer flow under both neutral and stably stratified conditions. High-resolution velocity and temperature measurements, obtained using a customized triple wire (cross-wire and cold wire) anemometer, were used to characterize the mean velocity, turbulence intensity, turbulent fluxes, and spectra at different locations in the wake. The effect of the wake on the turbulence statistics is found to extend as far as 20 rotor diameters downwind of the turbine. The velocity deficit has a nearly axisymmetric shape, which can be approximated by a Gaussian distribution and a power-law decay with distance. This decay in the near-wake region is found to be faster in the stable case. Turbulence intensity distribution is clearly non-axisymmetric due to the non-uniform distribution of the incoming velocity in the boundary layer. In the neutral case, the maximum turbulence intensity is located above the hub height, around the rotor tip location and at a distance of about 4-5.5 rotor diameters, which are common separations between wind turbines in wind farms. The enhancement of turbulence intensity is associated with strong shear and turbulent kinetic energy production in that region. In the stable case, the stronger shear in the incoming flow leads to a slightly stronger and larger region of enhanced turbulence intensity, which extends between 3 and 6 rotor diameters downwind of the turbine location. Power spectra of the streamwise and vertical velocities show a strong signature of the turbine blade tip vortices at the top tip height up to a distance of about 1-2 rotor diameters. This spectral signature is stronger in the vertical velocity component. At longer downwind distances, tip vortices are not evident and the von Kármán formulation agrees well with the measured velocity spectra.

  15. Wind turbine wake characterization using long-range Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, M.; Lundquist, J. K.; Hestmark, K.; Banta, R. M.; Pichugina, Y.; Brewer, A.

    2012-12-01

    Wind turbines extract energy from the freestream flow, resulting in a waked region behind the rotor which is characterized by reduced wind speed and increased turbulence. The velocity deficit in the wake diminishes with distance, as faster-moving air outside is gradually entrained. In a concentrated group of turbines, then, downwind machines experience very different inflow conditions compared to those in the front row. As utility-scale turbines rarely exist in isolation, detailed knowledge of the mean flow and turbulence structure inside wakes is needed to correctly model both power production and turbine loading at modern wind farms. To this end, the Turbine Wake and Inflow Characterization Study (TWICS) was conducted in the spring of 2011 to determine the reduction in wind speeds downstream from a multi-MW turbine located at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) near Boulder, Colorado. Full-scale measurements of wake dynamics are hardly practical or even possible with conventional sensors, such as cup anemometers mounted on meteorological (met) masts. Accordingly, the High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL) developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Earth System Research Laboratory was employed to investigate the formation and propagation of wakes under varying levels of ambient wind speed, shear, atmospheric stability, and turbulence. HRDL remotely senses line-of-sight wind velocities and has been used in several previous studies of boundary layer aerodynamics. With a fully steerable beam and a maximum range up to about 5 km, depending on atmospheric conditions, HRDL performed a comprehensive survey of the wind flow in front of and behind the turbine to study the shape, meandering, and attenuation of wakes. Due in large part to limited experimental data availability, wind farm wake modeling is still subject to an unacceptable amount of uncertainty, particularly in complex terrain. Here, analytical

  16. Quality, precision and accuracy of the maximum No. 40 anemometer

    SciTech Connect

    Obermeir, J.; Blittersdorf, D.

    1996-12-31

    This paper synthesizes available calibration data for the Maximum No. 40 anemometer. Despite its long history in the wind industry, controversy surrounds the choice of transfer function for this anemometer. Many users are unaware that recent changes in default transfer functions in data loggers are producing output wind speed differences as large as 7.6%. Comparison of two calibration methods used for large samples of Maximum No. 40 anemometers shows a consistent difference of 4.6% in output speeds. This difference is significantly larger than estimated uncertainty levels. Testing, initially performed to investigate related issues, reveals that Gill and Maximum cup anemometers change their calibration transfer functions significantly when calibrated in the open atmosphere compared with calibration in a laminar wind tunnel. This indicates that atmospheric turbulence changes the calibration transfer function of cup anemometers. These results call into question the suitability of standard wind tunnel calibration testing for cup anemometers. 6 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Longitudinal variation and waves in Jupiter's south equatorial wind jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Rogers, John H.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Choi, David; Allison, Michael D.; Adamoli, Gianluigi; Mettig, Hans-Joerg

    2012-04-01

    A detailed study of the chevron-shaped dark spots on the strong southern equatorial wind jet near 7.5°S planetographic latitude shows variations in velocity with longitude and time. The presence of the large anticyclonic South Equatorial Disturbance (SED) has a profound effect on the chevron velocity, causing slower velocities to its east and increasing with distance from the disturbance. The chevrons move with velocities near the maximum wind jet velocity of ˜140 m/s, as deduced by the history of velocities at this latitude and the magnitude of the symmetric wind jet near 7°N latitude. Their repetitive nature is consistent with a gravity-inertia wave (n = 75-100) with phase speed up to 25 m/s, relative to the local flow, but the identity of this wave mode is not well constrained. However, for the first time, high spatial resolution movies from Cassini images show that the chevrons oscillate in latitude with a 6.7 ± 0.7-day period. This oscillating motion has a wavelength of ˜20° and a speed of 101 ± 3 m/s, following a pattern similar to that seen in the Rossby wave plumes of the North Equatorial Zone, and possibly reinforced by it. All dates show chevron latitude variability, but it is unclear if this larger wave is present during other epochs, as there are no other suitable time series movies that fully delineate it. In the presence of multiple wave modes, the difference in dominant cloud appearance between 7°N and 7.5°S is likely due to the presence of the Great Red Spot, either through changes in stratification and stability or by acting as a wave boundary.

  18. Longitudinal Variation and Waves in Jupiter's South Equatorial Wind Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Choi, David; Rogers, John H.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Allison, Michael D.; Adamoli, Gianluigi; Mettig, Hans-Joerg

    2012-01-01

    A detailed study of the chevron-shaped dark spots on the strong southern equatorial wind jet near 7.5 S planetographic latitude shows variations in velocity with longitude and time. The presence of the large anticyclonic South Equatorial Disturbance (SED) has a profound effect on the chevron velocity, causing slower velocities to its east and accelerations over distance from the disturbance. The chevrons move with velocities near the maximum wind jet velocity of approx 140 m/s, as deduced by the history of velocities at this latitude and the magnitude of the symmetric wind jet near 7 N latitude. Their repetitive nature is consistent with a gravity-inertia wave (n = 75 to 100) with phase speed up to 25 m/s, relative to the local flow, but the identity of this wave mode is not well constrained. However, for the first time, high spatial resolution movies from Cassini images show that the chevrons oscillate in latitude with a 6.7 +/- 0.7-day period. This oscillating motion has a wavelength of approx 20 and a speed of 101 +/- 3 m/s, following a pattern similar to that seen in the Rossby wave plumes of the North Equatorial Zone, and possibly reinforced by it. All dates show chevron latitude variability, but it is unclear if this larger wave is present during other epochs, as there are no other suitable time series movies that fully delineate it. In the presence of mUltiple wave modes, the difference in dominant cloud appearance between 7 deg N and 7.5 deg S is likely due to the presence of the Great Red Spot, either through changes in stratification and stability or by acting as a wave boundary.

  19. On the Effect of Offshore Wind Parks on Ocean Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludewig, E.; Pohlmann, T.

    2012-12-01

    Nowadays renewable energy resources play a key role in the energy supply discussion and especially an increasingly interest in wind energy induces intensified installations of wind parks. At this offshore wind energy gains in popularity in the course of higher and more consistent energy availability than over land. For example Germany's government adopted a national interurban offshore wind energy program comprising the construction of hundreds of wind turbines within Germany's Exclusive Economic Zone to ensure up to 50% of Germany's renewable energy supply. The large number of installation in coastal regions asks for analyzing the impact of offshore wind parks (OWPs) on the atmosphere and the ocean. As known from literature such wind parks excite also-called wake-effect and such an influence on the wind field in turn affects ocean circulation. To cover OWP's impact on ocean dynamics we evaluate model simulations using the Hamburg Shelf-Ocean-Model (HAMSOM). All simulations were driven with a wind forcing produced by the Mesoscale Atmosphere Model of the Hamburg University (METRAS) which has implemented wind turbines. Wind forcing data were generated in collaboration with and by courtesy of the Meteorological Institute of the University of Hamburg, Department Technical Meteorology, Numeric Modeling-METRAS. To evaluate dynamical changes forced by the OWP's wind wake-effect we did a sensitivity study with a theoretical setup of a virtual ocean of 60m depth with a flat bottom and a temperature and salinity stratification according to common North Sea's conditions. Here our results show that already a small OWP of 12 wind turbines, placed in an area of 4 km^2, lead to a complex change in ocean dynamics. Due to the wake-effect zones of upwelling and downwelling are formed within a minute after turning-on wind turbines. The evolving vertical cells have a size of around 15x15 kilometers with a vertical velocity in order of 10^-2 mm/sec influencing the dynamic of an area

  20. Observation of high-resolution wind fields and offshore wind turbine wakes using TerraSAR-X imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gies, Tobias; Jacobsen, Sven; Lehner, Susanne; Pleskachevsky, Andrey

    2014-05-01

    coast of Borkum, Germany, and consists of twelve 5-Megawatt wind power turbines. The retrieved results are validated by comparing with QuikSCAT measurements, the results of the German Weather Service (DWD) atmospheric model and in-situ measurements of wind speed and wind direction, obtained from the research platform FiNO1, installed 400 m west of Alpha Ventus. 4. Conclusion In the presented case study we quantify the wake characteristics of wake length, wake width, maximum velocity de?cit, wake merging and wake meandering. We show that SAR has the capability to map the sea surface two-dimensionally in high spatial resolution which provides a unique opportunity to observe spatial characteristics of offshore wind turbine wakes. The SAR derived information can support offshore wind farming with respect to optimal siting and design and help to estimate their effects on the environment.

  1. Observations of sunspot umbral velocity oscillations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatnagar, A.; Livingston, W. C.; Harvey, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Review of sunspot umbral velocity measurements obtained free from any cross talk introduced by photospheric and penumbral scattered light by using lines formed only in the sunspot umbrae and showing no Zeeman effect. The maximum peak-to-peak amplitude of the umbral oscillatory velocity component is found to be of the order of 0.5 km per sec.

  2. A Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Wind-Turbine Wakes: Boundary-Layer Turbulence Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, Leonardo P.; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2009-07-01

    Wind-tunnel experiments were performed to study turbulence in the wake of a model wind turbine placed in a boundary layer developed over rough and smooth surfaces. Hot-wire anemometry was used to characterize the cross-sectional distribution of mean velocity, turbulence intensity and kinematic shear stress at different locations downwind of the turbine for both surface roughness cases. Special emphasis was placed on the spatial distribution of the velocity deficit and the turbulence intensity, which are important factors affecting turbine power generation and fatigue loads in wind energy parks. Non-axisymmetric behaviour of the wake is observed over both roughness types in response to the non-uniform incoming boundary-layer flow and the effect of the surface. Nonetheless, the velocity deficit with respect to the incoming velocity profile is nearly axisymmetric, except near the ground in the far wake where the wake interacts with the surface. It is found that the wind turbine induces a large enhancement of turbulence levels (positive added turbulence intensity) in the upper part of the wake. This is due to the effect of relatively large velocity fluctuations associated with helicoidal tip vortices near the wake edge, where the mean shear is strong. In the lower part of the wake, the mean shear and turbulence intensity are reduced with respect to the incoming flow. The non-axisymmetry of the turbulence intensity distribution of the wake is found to be stronger over the rough surface, where the incoming flow is less uniform at the turbine level. In the far wake the added turbulent intensity, its positive and negative contributions and its local maximum decay as a power law of downwind distance (with an exponent ranging from -0.3 to -0.5 for the rough surface, and with a wider variation for the smooth surface). Nevertheless, the effect of the turbine on the velocity defect and added turbulence intensity is not negligible even in the very far wake, at a distance of

  3. Stellar winds on the main-sequence. I. Wind model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, C. P.; Güdel, M.; Lüftinger, T.; Toth, G.; Brott, I.

    2015-05-01

    Aims: We develop a method for estimating the properties of stellar winds for low-mass main-sequence stars between masses of 0.4 M⊙ and 1.1 M⊙ at a range of distances from the star. Methods: We use 1D thermal pressure driven hydrodynamic wind models run using the Versatile Advection Code. Using in situ measurements of the solar wind, we produce models for the slow and fast components of the solar wind. We consider two radically different methods for scaling the base temperature of the wind to other stars: in Model A, we assume that wind temperatures are fundamentally linked to coronal temperatures, and in Model B, we assume that the sound speed at the base of the wind is a fixed fraction of the escape velocity. In Paper II of this series, we use observationally constrained rotational evolution models to derive wind mass loss rates. Results: Our model for the solar wind provides an excellent description of the real solar wind far from the solar surface, but is unrealistic within the solar corona. We run a grid of 1200 wind models to derive relations for the wind properties as a function of stellar mass, radius, and wind temperature. Using these results, we explore how wind properties depend on stellar mass and rotation. Conclusions: Based on our two assumptions about the scaling of the wind temperature, we argue that there is still significant uncertainty in how these properties should be determined. Resolution of this uncertainty will probably require both the application of solar wind physics to other stars and detailed observational constraints on the properties of stellar winds. In the final section of this paper, we give step by step instructions for how to apply our results to calculate the stellar wind conditions far from the stellar surface.

  4. Application of a method for the automatic detection and Ground-Based Velocity Track Display (GBVTD) analysis of a tornado crossing the Hong Kong International Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, P. W.; Wurman, J.; Shun, C. M.; Robinson, P.; Kosiba, K.

    2012-03-01

    A weak tornado with a maximum Doppler velocity shear of about 40 m s - 1 moved across the Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) during the evening of 20 May 2002. The tornado caused damage equivalent to F0 on the Fujita Scale, based on a damage survey. The Doppler velocity data from the Hong Kong Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) are studied using the Ground-Based Velocity Track Display (GBVTD) method of single Doppler analysis. The GBVTD analysis is able to clearly depict the development and decay of the tornado though it appears to underestimate its magnitude. In the pre-tornadic state, the wind field is characterized by inflow toward the center near the ground and upward motion near the center. When the tornado attains its maximum strength, an eye-like structure with a downdraft appears to form in the center. Several minutes later the tornado begins to decay and outflow dominates at low levels. Assuming cyclostrophic balance, the pressure drop 200 m from the center of the tornado at its maximum strength is calculated to be about 6 hPa. To estimate the maximum ground-relative wind speed of the tornado, the TDWR's Doppler velocities are adjusted for the ratio of the sample-volume size of the radar and the radius of the tornado, resulting in a peak wind speed of 28 m s - 1 , consistent with the readings from a nearby ground-based anemometers and the F0 damage observed. An automatic tornado detection algorithm based on Doppler velocity difference (delta-V) and temporal and spatial continuity is applied to this event. The locations and the core flow radii of the tornado as determined by the automatic method and by subjective analysis agree closely.

  5. Maximum mixing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjorth, Jens

    The unique feature of MEM is that C(-1)(z) = exp(z) amplifies all scales equally. Narayan & Nityananda (1986) have shown that this leads to Gaussian deconvolved peaks. In MMM different scales are treated differently, depending on the choice of C. This gives different peak shapes, but also allows one to experiment with the degree of peak sharpening as a function of peak height. In fact, despite its strong information-theoretic background, MEM is known to redistribute flux incorrectly during deconvolution, thus making the method problematic if the goal is to get correct intensities out. MMM could remedy this problem by using an alternative to the entropy. In conclusion, some ideas connecting the physics of blurring with a proposed reconstruction scheme, dubbed Maximum Mixing Method, have been presented. It has been shown that this physically motivated, non-information theoretic, non-probabilistic, non-Bayesian approach can be turned into a powerful deconvolution technique, competitive with, and having as a special case, the Maximum Entropy Method. Further work within the proposed framework is required to fully explore the consequences of the theory. A paper including proofs and examples is in preparation.

  6. Velocity measurement of the interplanetary hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Frederic

    2011-10-01

    We are proposing to use HST/STIS over a single orbit to make Lyman-alpha observations of the interplanetary hydrogen during the March-April period of this year {2012}. This special request is driven by a recent reanalysis of HST data {Vincent et al. 2011, published after the last call for proposals}.The heliospheric interface results from the interaction of the solar wind and the interstellar medium {ISM}. Within the heliosphere, the interplanetary hydrogen {IPH} flows at an average speed of about 23 km/sec, carrying the signature of the ISM and the heliospheric interface. The IPH has been observed for decades through the backscattering of solar Lyman-alpha photons and solar cycle 23 provided the first partial temporal map of the IPH velocity. It is now well established that the IPH velocity depends on solar activity. Moreover some analyses suggested that it may be also affected by the obliquity of the interstellar magnetic field, yielding a change of 1-2 km/sec.However a combination of the uncertainty of some measurements {e.g. GHRS} and the clustering of others near points on the cycle make it difficult to identify an unambiguous trend. Only one limited set is able to show a cycle dependence, but these represent an annual average and do not match the existing models. The best approach to address these issues is a new set of yearly spectroscopic measurements for at least a half solar cycle. Since we are currently just leaving a solar maximum, it is essential to start immediately in order to have an adequate baseline for temporal measurements.

  7. The F2 wind tunnel at Fauga-Mauzac

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afchain, D.; Broussaud, P.; Frugier, M.; Rancarani, G.

    1984-01-01

    Details on the French subsonic wind-tunnel F2 that becomes operational on July 1983 are presented. Some of the requirements were: (1) installation of models on any wall of the facility, (2) good observation points due to transparent walls, (3) smooth flow, (4) a laser velocimeter, and (5) easy access and handling. The characteristics include a nonpressurized return circuit, dimensions of 5 x 1.4 x 1.8 m, maximum velocity of 100 m/s and a variable speed fan of 683 kW.

  8. Exploration of Solar Wind Acceleration Region Using Interplanetary Scintillation of Water Vapor Maser Source and Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Yamauchi, Yohei; Kondo, Tetsuro

    2001-01-01

    Single-station observations of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) at three microwave frequencies; 2 GHz, 8 GHz and 22 GHz have been carried out between 1989 and 1998 using a large (34 m farad) radio telescope at the Kashima Space Research Center of the Communications Research Laboratory. The aim of these observations is to explore the near-sun solar wind, which is the key region for the study of the solar wind acceleration mechanism. Strong quasars; 3C279 and 3C273B were used for Kashima IPS observations at 2 GHz and 8 GHz, and a water vapor maser source, IRC20431 was used for the IPS observations at 22 GHz. Solar wind velocities derived from Kashima IPS data suggest that the solar wind acceleration takes place at radial distances between 10 and 30 solar radii (R(sub s)) from the sun. Properties of the turbulence spectrum (e.g. anisotropy, spectral index, inner scale) inferred from Kashima data are found to change systematically in the solar wind acceleration region. While the solar wind in the maximum phase appears to be dominated by the slow wind, fast and rarefied winds associated with coronal holes are found to develop significantly at high latitudes as the solar activity declines. Nevertheless, Kashima data suggests that the location of the acceleration region is stable throughout the solar cycle.

  9. Wind-speed measurements with a scanning elastic-backscatter lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Buttler, W.T.; Eichinger, W.E.

    1994-01-01

    During the 1992 Summer Olympics, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) lidar team participated in the Barcelona Air Quality Initiative (BAQI). One of the main objectives of this experiment was the remote measurement of wind speeds around the city to verify wind speeds and directions predicted by the Nonhydrostatic Mesoscale Model (MEMO). Remote determination of wind velocities in the mixing layer is important for the verification and determination of critical input parameters of urban-pollution transport models. Most present elastic-backscatter-lidar wind-speed-measurement methods rely on data acquired over time periods between 5 to 10 minutes (Matsui, 1990) and 30 minutes to 1 hour (Schols, et al. 1992). Lidar can measure the spatial properties of the wind field over large volumes of space. This capability is an improvement over present methods, which rely on instruments attached to balloons that measure only those winds along the path the balloon travels. The material that follows describes the principles implicit in the measurement of winds with an elastic-backscatter lidar, as well as the maximum cross-correlation algorithm used to extract wind speeds from lidar data acquired during the Summer Olympics at Barcelona, Spain, in July 1992.

  10. Understanding extreme winds in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Gudrun Nina

    2015-04-01

    Iceland is a fairly windy country, due to it's location adjacent the North Atlantic storm track. The orography of the island is rugged, mountains are steep and fjords and valleys narrow, and this impacts local winds. Thus, mountain wind phenomena such as low level jets, gap winds, down-slope wind storms, mountain waves and wind wakes are common. To increase our knowledge of the behaviour of wind in Iceland an extreme value analysis was conducted based on observations from 61 automatic weather stations, applying the Peak Over Threshold technique on maximum daily wind speed and maximum daily wind gust at each site. The time series included at least 10 years of data and the threshold was chosen as the 0.9 quantile of maximum mean wind speed/maximum wind gust at each location. Among the results is the larger impact the local orography has on the extreme wind gusts compared to the mean wind. With extreme value models in place, a few significant weather events were selected from recent years and the observed wind speeds compared to the models in order to evaluate how extreme the events were and how large area they impacted. Actually, in most of these events the observed wind speed only turned out to be extreme at a few stations, emphasising the local effects. However, in an event from December 2007, when the observed maximum wind speed exceeded 23 m/s in most of western Iceland, the event was estimated as rare at a number of weather stations. Clearly this gives indication for further studying this particular weather event. An automatic system has been set up, running once an hour, comparing observed wind measurements to the extreme value models and producing maps of the return periods for all sites. This system gives us the possibility to, on a daily basis, evaluate the extremeness of each situation and simultaneously increase our knowledge of extreme wind behaviour in Iceland. This work is a foundation for studying changes in extreme winds in Iceland.

  11. Wind farm array wake losses

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.W.; McCarthy, E.F.

    1997-12-31

    A wind turbine wake study was conducted in the summer of 1987 at an Altamont Pass wind electric generating facility. The wind speed deficits, turbulence, and power deficits from an array consisting of several rows of wind turbines is discussed. A total of nine different test configurations were evaluated for a downwind spacing ranging from 7 rotor diameters (RD) to 34 RD and a cross wind spacing of 1.3 RD and 2.7 RD. Wake power deficits of 15% were measured at 16 RD and power losses of a few percent were even measurable at 27 RD for the closer cross wind spacing. For several rows of turbines separated by 7-9 RD the wake zones overlapped and formed compound wakes with higher velocity deficits. The wind speed and direction turbulence in the wake was much higher than the ambient turbulence. The results from this study are compared to the findings from other similar field measurements.

  12. Wind Simulation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-12-31

    The Software consists of a spreadsheet written in Microsoft Excel that provides an hourly simulation of a wind energy system, which includes a calculation of wind turbine output as a power-curve fit of wind speed.

  13. Stationary Plasma Thruster Ion Velocity Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzella, David H.

    1994-01-01

    A nonintrusive velocity diagnostic based on laser induced fluorescence of the 5d4F(5/2)-6p4D(5/2) singly ionized xenon transition was used to interrogate the exhaust of a 1.5 kW Stationary Plasma Thruster (SPT). A detailed map of plume velocity vectors was obtained using a simplified, cost-effective, nonintrusive, semiconductor laser based scheme. Circumferential velocities on the order of 250 m/s were measured which implied induced momentum torques of approximately 5 x 10(exp -2) N-cm. Axial and radial velocities were evaluated one mm downstream of the cathode at several locations across the width of the annular acceleration channel. Radial velocities varied linearly with radial distance. A maximum radial velocity of 7500 m/s was measured 8 mm from the center of the channel. Axial velocities as large as 16,500 m/s were measured.

  14. Development of a wind gust model to estimate gust speeds and their return periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seregina, Larisa; Haas, Rabea; Born, Kai; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2014-05-01

    Spatially dense observations of gust speeds are necessary for various applications, but their availability is limited in space and time. This work presents an approach to help to overcome this problem. The main objective is the generation of synthetic wind gust velocities. With this aim, theoretical wind and gust distributions are estimated from ten years of hourly observations collected at 123 synoptic weather stations provided by the German Weather Service. In a first step, an exposure correction is applied on measurements of the mean wind velocity to reduce the influence of local urban and topographic effects. In a second step, a transfer function is built between distribution parameters of wind and gust velocities. The aim of this step is to estimate the parameters of gusts at stations where only wind speed data is available. These parameters can be used in a third step to generate synthetic gusts, which can improve the accuracy of return periods at test sites with a lack of observations. The second objective is to determine return periods much longer than the nominal length of the original time series by considering extreme value statistics. Estimates for both local maximum return periods and average return periods for single historical events are provided. The comparison of maximum and average return periods shows that even storms with short average return periods may lead to local wind gusts with return periods of several decades. Despite uncertainties caused by the short length of the observational records, the method leads to consistent results, enabling a wide range of possible applications.

  15. Maximum windmill efficiency in finite time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huleihil, Mahmoud

    2009-05-01

    The fraction of the kinetic energy of the wind impinging on the rotor-swept area that a wind turbine can convert to useful power has been shown by Betz in an idealized laminar-flow model to have an upper limit of 16/27 or 59% approximately [I. H. Shames, Mechanics of Fluids, 2nd ed. (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1982), pp. A26-A31]. This figure is known as Betz number. Other studies [A. Rauh and W. Seelret, Appl. Energy 17, 15 (1984)] suggested that this figure should be considered as a guideline. In this paper, a new model is introduced and its efficiency at maximum power output is derived. The derived value is shown to be a function of the Betz number B and given by the formula ηmp=1-√1-B . This value is 36.2%, which agrees well with those of actually operating wind turbines. As a guideline, the wind turbine efficiency can be considered to be within the range of the two numbers of merit, the Betz number and ηmp.

  16. Meaningful wind chill indicators derived from heat transfer principles.

    PubMed

    Brauner, N; Shacham, M

    1995-08-01

    The wind chill index (WCI) and the more widely used wind chill equivalent temperature represent an attempt to combine several weather-related variables (temperature, wind velocity and solar radiation) into a single index which can indicate human comfort. Since its introduction in 1945, the WCI has been criticized mainly on the ground that the underlying model does not comply with modern heat transfer theory. In spite of that, the WCI, "calibrated" to human comfort, has proven to be successful in predicting discomfort and tolerance of man to the cold. Nevertheless, neither the WCI nor the wind chill equivalent temperature can be actually measured and, therefore, without the additional 'calibration' they are meaningless. In this study we have shown that the WCI represents the instantaneous rate of heat loss from bare skin at the moment of exposure to the cold, and as such, it correlates reasonably well with measurable variables that represent a feeling of cold. Two new wind chill indicators have been introduced: exposed skin temperature and maximum exposure time. These indicators yield more information than the WCI provides, are measurable, have physical meaning and are based on established heat transfer principles. PMID:7558408

  17. Meaningful wind chill indicators derived from heat transfer principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauner, Neima; Shacham, M.

    1995-03-01

    The wind chill index (WCI) and the more widely used wind chill equivalent temperature represent an attempt to combine several weather-related variables (temperature, wind velocity and solar radiation) into a single index which can indicate human comfort. Since its introduction in 1945, the WCI has been criticized mainly on the ground that the underlying model does not comply with modern heat transfer theory. In spite of that, the WCI, “calibrated” to human comfort, has proven to be successful in predicting discomfort and tolerance of man to the cold. Nevertheless, neither the WCI nor the wind chill equivalent temperature can be actually measured and, therefore, without the additional ‘calibration’ they are meaningless. In this study we have shown that the WCI represents the instantaneous rate of heat loss from bare skin at the moment of exposure to the cold, and as such, it correlates reasonably well with measurable variables that represent a feeling of cold. Two new wind chill indicators have been introduced: exposed skin temperature and maximum exposure time. These indicators yield more information than the WCI provides, are measurable, have physical meaning and are based on established heat transfer principles.

  18. Long term variability of B supergiant winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, Derck L.

    1995-01-01

    The object of this observing proposal was to sample wind variability in B supergiants on a daily basis over a period of several days in order to determine the time scale with which density variability occurs in their winds. Three stars were selected for this project: 69 Cyg (B0 Ib), HD 164402 (B0 Ib), and HD 47240 (B1 Ib). Three grey scale representations of the Si IV lambda lambda 1400 doublet in each star are attached. In these figures, time (in days) increases upward, and the wavelength (in terms of velocity relative to the rest wavelength of the violet component of the doublet) is the abscissa. The spectra are normalized by a minimum absorption (maximum flux) template, so that all changes appear as absorptions. As a result of these observations, we can now state with some certainty that typical B supergiants develop significant wind inhomogeneities with recurrence times of a few days, and that some of these events show signs of strong temporal coherence.

  19. Generalized Maximum Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheeseman, Peter; Stutz, John

    2005-01-01

    A long standing mystery in using Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) is how to deal with constraints whose values are uncertain. This situation arises when constraint values are estimated from data, because of finite sample sizes. One approach to this problem, advocated by E.T. Jaynes [1], is to ignore this uncertainty, and treat the empirically observed values as exact. We refer to this as the classic MaxEnt approach. Classic MaxEnt gives point probabilities (subject to the given constraints), rather than probability densities. We develop an alternative approach that assumes that the uncertain constraint values are represented by a probability density {e.g: a Gaussian), and this uncertainty yields a MaxEnt posterior probability density. That is, the classic MaxEnt point probabilities are regarded as a multidimensional function of the given constraint values, and uncertainty on these values is transmitted through the MaxEnt function to give uncertainty over the MaXEnt probabilities. We illustrate this approach by explicitly calculating the generalized MaxEnt density for a simple but common case, then show how this can be extended numerically to the general case. This paper expands the generalized MaxEnt concept introduced in a previous paper [3].

  20. An improved instantaneous laser Doppler velocity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desio, Charles V.; Olcmen, Semih; Schinetsky, Philip

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, improvements made on a single velocity component instantaneous laser Doppler velocimetry (ILDV) system are detailed. The ILDV system developed in this research effort is capable of measuring a single velocity component at a rate as high as two megahertz. The current system accounts for the effects of the laser intensity variation on the measured velocity and eliminates the use of a Pockels cell used in previous ILDV systems. The system developed in the current effort was tested using compressible, subsonic jet flows. The ILDV system developed would be most beneficial where a high data capture rate is needed such as in shock tubes, and high-speed wind tunnels.

  1. Field Tests of Wind Turbine Unit with Tandem Wind Rotors and Double Rotational Armatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galal, Ahmed Mohamed; Kanemoto, Toshiaki

    This paper discusses the field tests of the wind turbine unit, in which the front and the rear wind rotors drive the inner and the outer armatures of the synchronous generator. The wind rotors were designed conveniently by the traditional procedure for the single wind rotor, where the diameters of the front and the rear wind rotors are 2 m and 1.33 m. The tests were done on a pick-up type truck driven straightly at constant speed. The rotational torque of the unit is directly proportional to the induced electric current irrespective of the rotational speeds of the wind rotors, while the induced voltage is proportional to the relative rotational speed. The performance of the unit is significantly affected not only by the wind velocity, but also by the blade setting angles of both wind rotors and the applied load especially at lower wind velocity.

  2. Optimization of wind fence enclosures for infrasonic wind noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, JohnPaul Russell

    A large porous wind barrier enclosure has been built and tested to optimize wind noise reduction at infrasonic frequencies between 0.01-10 Hz in order to develop a technology that is simple, cost effective, and improves upon the limitations of pipe and porous hose arrays. The effects of varying the fence's porosity, modifying its top condition and bottom gap, doubling the height and diameter, and adding a secondary wind barrier were investigated. A simple mathematical model which estimates the wind noise measured at the center of the enclosure was derived based on the measured turbulence and velocity profiles measure outside the enclosure, inside the enclosure, and incident to its surface. The wind fence enclosure achieves wind noise reduction by minimizing the turbulence and velocity gradients at its center, and by decorrelating and area averaging the pressure fluctuations at its surface. The optimum wind fence has a surface porosity of 40-55%, a porous roof, no bottom gap, is very tall, wide, and is supplemented by a secondary wind barrier. The optimum wind fence can achieve a wind noise reduction of 20-27 dB over the 2-4 Hz frequency band, at least a 5 dB noise reduction for frequencies from 0.1 to 20 Hz, and a constant 4-6 dB of noise reduction for frequencies with turbulence wavelengths larger than the fence. At high wind speeds, 3-6 m/s, the optimized wind fence enclosure reduces wind noise sufficiently to detect microbaroms.

  3. Wind-driven coastal upwelling and westward circulation in the Yucatan shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Castillo, Eugenio; Gomez-Valdes, Jose; Sheinbaum, Julio; Rioja-Nieto, Rodolfo

    2016-04-01

    The wind-driven circulation and wind-induced coastal upwelling in a large shelf sea with a zonally oriented coast are examined. The Yucatan shelf is located to the north of the Yucatan peninsula in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. This area is a tropical shallow body of water with a smooth sloping bottom and is one of the largest shelves in the world. This study describes the wind-driven circulation and wind-induced coastal upwelling in the Yucatan shelf, which is forced by easterly winds throughout the year. Data obtained from hydrographic surveys, acoustic current profilers and environmental satellites are used in the analysis. Hydrographic data was analyzed and geostrophic currents were calculated in each survey. In addition an analytical model was applied to reproduce the currents. The results of a general circulation model were used with an empirical orthogonal function analysis to study the variability of the currents. The study area is divided in two regions: from the 40 m to the 200 m isobaths (outer shelf) and from the coast to the 40 m isobath (inner shelf). At the outer shelf, observations revealed upwelling events throughout the year, and a westward current with velocities of approximately 0.2 m s-1 was calculated from the numerical model output and hydrographic data. In addition, the theory developed by Pedlosky (2007) for a stratified fluid along a sloping bottom adequately explains the current's primary characteristics. The momentum of the current comes from the wind, and the stratification is an important factor in its dynamics. At the inner shelf, observations and numerical model output show a wind-driven westward current with maximum velocities of 0.20 m s-1. The momentum balance in this region is between local acceleration and friction. A cold-water band is developed during the period of maximum upwelling.

  4. Wind and turbine characteristics needed for integration of wind turbine arrays into a utility system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, G. L.

    1982-01-01

    Wind data and wind turbine generator (WTG) performance characteristics are often available in a form inconvenient for use by utility planners and engineers. The steps used by utility planners are summarized and the type of wind and WTG data needed for integration of WTG arrays suggested. These included long term yearly velocity averages for preliminary site feasibility, hourly velocities on a 'wind season' basis for more detailed economic analysis and for reliability studies, worst-case velocity profiles for gusts, and various minute-to-hourly velocity profiles for estimating the effect of longer-term wind fluctuations on utility operations. wind turbine data needed includes electrical properties of the generator, startup and shutdown characteristics, protection characteristics, pitch control response and control strategy, and electro-mechanical model for stability analysis.

  5. Detection of Solar Wind Disturbances: Mexican Array Radio Telescope IPS Observations at 140 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Hernandez, E.; Gonzalez-Esparza, J. A.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Ontiveros-Hernandez, V.; Villanueva-Hernandez, P.

    2015-09-01

    The interplanetary scintillation (IPS) technique is a remote-sensing method for monitoring solar-wind perturbations. The Mexican Array Radio Telescope (MEXART) is a single-station instrument operating at 140 MHz, fully dedicated to performing solar-wind studies employing the IPS technique. We report MEXART solar-wind measurements (scintillation indices and solar-wind velocities) using data obtained during the 2013 and 2014 campaigns. These solar-wind measurements were calculated employing a new methodology based on the wavelet transform (WT) function. We report the variation of the scintillation indices versus the heliocentric distance for two IPS sources (3C48 and 3C147). We found different average conditions of the solar-wind density fluctuations in 2013 and 2014. We used the fittings of the radial dependence of the scintillation index to calculate g-indices. Based on the g-index value, we identified 17 events that could be associated with strong compression regions in the solar wind. We present the first ICME identifications in our data. We associated 14 IPS events with preceding CME counterparts by employing white-light observations from the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft. We found that most of the IPS events, detected during the solar maximum of Cycle 24 were associated with complex CME events. For the IPS events associated with single CME counterparts, we found a deceleration tendency of the CMEs as they propagate in the interplanetary medium. These results show that the instrument detects solar-wind disturbances, and the WT methodology provides solar-wind information with good accuracy. The MEXART observations will complement solar-wind IPS studies using other frequencies, and the tracking of solar-wind disturbances by other stations located at different longitudes.

  6. Application of Wind Fetch and Wave Models for Habitat Rehabilitation and Enhancement Projects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rohweder, Jason J.; Rogala, James T.; Johnson, Barry L.; Anderson, Dennis; Clark, Steve; Chamberlin, Ferris; Runyon, Kip

    2008-01-01

    Models based upon coastal engineering equations have been developed to quantify wind fetch length and several physical wave characteristics including significant height, length, peak period, maximum orbital velocity, and shear stress. These models, developed using Environmental Systems Research Institute's ArcGIS 9.2 Geographic Information System platform, were used to quantify differences in proposed island construction designs for three Habitat Rehabilitation and Enhancement Projects (HREPs) in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers St. Paul District (Capoli Slough and Harpers Slough) and St. Louis District (Swan Lake). Weighted wind fetch was calculated using land cover data supplied by the Long Term Resource Monitoring Program (LTRMP) for each island design scenario for all three HREPs. Figures and graphs were created to depict the results of this analysis. The difference in weighted wind fetch from existing conditions to each potential future island design was calculated for Capoli and Harpers Slough HREPs. A simplistic method for calculating sediment suspension probability was also applied to the HREPs in the St. Paul District. This analysis involved determining the percentage of days that maximum orbital wave velocity calculated over the growing seasons of 2002-2007 exceeded a threshold value taken from the literature where fine unconsolidated sediments may become suspended. This analysis also evaluated the difference in sediment suspension probability from existing conditions to the potential island designs. Bathymetric data used in the analysis were collected from the LTRMP and wind direction and magnitude data were collected from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Climatic Data Center.

  7. Semiannual variation of the geomagnetic activity and solar wind parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, M.; Moreno, G.; Parisi, M.; Storini, M.

    1993-10-01

    The semiannual variation of the geomagnetic activity is investigated in connection with a large set of solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field data (4494 daily averages from 1965 to 1987). Our analysis confirms that the geomagnetic activity (described by the aa index), is mainly modulated by the southward component of the magnetic field (BS), as suggested by Russell and McPherron. On the other hand, it is also found that the solar wind velocity (V) has a relevant role in this phenomenon. In fact, the amplitude of the aa modulation is best correlated with the function BSV2. We also explore the linkage between the annual trend of aa and the sunspot activity (1868-1989), showing that the modulation of the geomagnetic activity follows a more regular pattern during the descending phase of the solar cycle than during the rising and maximum parts.

  8. Erosion: Wind

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind erosion refers to the detachment, transport and deposition of sediment by wind. It is a dynamic, physical process where loose, dry, bare soils are transported by strong winds. Wind erosion is a soil degrading process that affects over 500 million ha of land worldwide and creates between 500 an...

  9. Meteorology (Wind)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-09-25

    Wind speed at 50 m (m/s) The average and percent difference minimum and ... are given.   Percent of time for ranges of wind speed at 50 m (percent) Percentage [frequency] of time that wind ... be adjusted to heights from 10 to 300 meters using the Gipe power law. Wind speeds may be adjusted for different terrain by selecting from ...

  10. A Windmill's Theoretical Maximum Extraction of Power from the Wind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inglis, David Rittenhouse

    1979-01-01

    Explains that the efficiency and the useful power available from a windmill turbine, of a laminar-flow model, will vary due to rotational kinetic energy of the downwind stream and turbulent mixing from outside the boundaries of the idealized stream. (GA)

  11. Optimum windings for linear induction machines.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    The matrix method of calculating linear induction machine performance as a function of winding current distribution was extended to determine the winding current distribution for maximum efficiency. Application of the method to typical magnetohydrodynamic generator geometries showed that electrical efficiencies of 0.5 to 0.6 are possible with fractional wavelength windings and without insulating vanes in the flow.

  12. WIND VARIABILITY IN BZ CAMELOPARDALIS

    SciTech Connect

    Honeycutt, R. K.; Kafka, S.; Robertson, J. W. E-mail: skafka@dtm.ciw.edu

    2013-02-01

    Sequences of spectra of the nova-like cataclysmic variable (CV) BZ Cam were acquired on nine nights in 2005-2006 in order to study the time development of episodes of wind activity known to occur frequently in this star. We confirm the results of Ringwald and Naylor that the P-Cygni absorption components of the lines mostly evolve from higher expansion velocity to lower velocity as an episode progresses. We also commonly find blueshifted emission components in the H{alpha} line profile, whose velocities and durations strongly suggest that they are also due to the wind. Curiously, Ringwald and Naylor reported common occurrences of redshifted H{alpha} emission components in their BZ Cam spectra. We have attributed these emission components in H{alpha} to occasions when gas concentrations in the bipolar wind (both front side and back side) become manifested as emission lines as they move beyond the disk's outer edge. We also suggest, based on changes in the P-Cygni profiles during an episode, that the progression from larger to smaller expansion velocities is due to the higher velocity portions of a wind concentration moving beyond the edge of the continuum light of the disk first, leaving a net redward shift of the remaining absorption profile. We derive a new orbital ephemeris for BZ Cam, using the radial velocity of the core of the He I {lambda}5876 line, finding P = 0.15353(4). Using this period, the wind episodes in BZ Cam are found to be concentrated near the inferior conjunction of the emission line source. This result helps confirm that the winds in nova-like CVs are often phase dependent, in spite of the puzzling implication that such winds lack axisymmetry. We argue that the radiation-driven wind in BZ Cam receives an initial boost by acting on gas that has been lifted above the disk by the interaction of the accretion stream with the disk, thereby imposing flickering timescales onto the wind events, as well as leading to an orbital modulation of the wind

  13. Kinetic and Potential Sputtering of Lunar Regolith: Contribution of Solar-Wind Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, F. W.; Harris, P. R.; Meyer, H. M., III; Hijiazi, H.; Barghouty, A. F.

    2013-01-01

    Sputtering of lunar regolith by protons as well as solar-wind heavy ions is considered. From preliminary measurements of H+, Ar+1, Ar+6 and Ar+9 ion sputtering of JSC-1A AGGL lunar regolith simulant at solar wind velocities, and TRIM simulations of kinetic sputtering yields, the relative contributions of kinetic and potential sputtering contributions are estimated. An 80-fold enhancement of oxygen sputtering by Ar+ over same-velocity H+, and an additional x2 increase for Ar+9 over same-velocity Ar+ was measured. This enhancement persisted to the maximum fluences investigated is approximately 1016/cm (exp2). Modeling studies including the enhanced oxygen ejection by potential sputtering due to the minority heavy ion multicharged ion solar wind component, and the kinetic sputtering contribution of all solar wind constituents, as determined from TRIM sputtering simulations, indicate an overall 35% reduction of near-surface oxygen abundance. XPS analyses of simulant samples exposed to singly and multicharged Ar ions show the characteristic signature of reduced (metallic) Fe, consistent with the preferential ejection of oxygen atoms that can occur in potential sputtering of some metal oxides.

  14. Kinetic and potential sputtering of lunar regolith: The contribution of the heavy (minority) solar wind ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. W.; Harris, P. R.; Meyer, H. M., III; Hijazi, H.; Barghouty, A. F.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper the sputtering of lunar regolith by protons and solar wind heavy ions is considered. From preliminary measurements of H+, Ar+1, Ar+6 and Ar+9 ion sputtering of JSC-1A AGGL lunar regolith simulant at solar wind velocities, and TRIM simulations of kinetic sputtering yields, the relative contributions of kinetic and potential sputtering contributions are estimated. An 80-fold enhancement of oxygen sputtering by Ar+ over same-velocity H+, and an additional x2 increase for Ar+9 over same-velocity Ar+ was measured. This enhancement persisted to the maximum fluences investigated (~1016/cm2). Modeling studies including the enhanced oxygen ejection by potential sputtering due to the minority heavy ion multicharged ion solar wind component, and the kinetic sputtering contribution of all solar wind constituents, as determined from TRIM sputtering simulations, indicate an overall 35% reduction of near-surface oxygen abundance. XPS analyses of simulant samples exposed to singly and multicharged Ar ions show the characteristic signature of reduced (metallic) Fe, consistent with the preferential ejection of oxygen atoms that can occur in potential sputtering of some metal oxides.

  15. Instrumentation in wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takashima, K.

    1986-01-01

    Requirements in designing instrumentation systems and measurements of various physical quantities in wind tunnels are surveyed. Emphasis is given to sensors used for measuring pressure, temperature, and angle, and the measurements of air turbulence and boundary layers. Instrumentation in wind tunnels require accuracy, fast response, diversity and operational simplicity. Measurements of force, pressure, attitude angle, free flow, pressure distribution, and temperature are illustrated by a table, and a block diagram. The LDV (laser Doppler velocimeter) method for measuring air turbulence and flow velocity and measurement of skin friction and flow fields using laser holograms are discussed. The future potential of these techniques is studied.

  16. Solar cycle variations of the thermospheric meridional wind over Japan derived from measurements of hmF2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igi, Seiji; Oliver, William L.; Ogawa, Tadahiko

    1999-10-01

    This paper describes an analysis of the meridional equivalent neutral wind for geomagnetically quiet conditions as determined from data collected at the Kokubunji ionosonde station (35.7N, 139.5E), Japan over one solar cycle (1981-1991). The wind is derived from the altitude of peak F2 layer electron density using the Field Line Interhemispheric Plasma (FLIP) model. For low and moderate solar activity the wind is poleward in the daytime and equatorward in the nighttime. For high solar activity the wind is weak and almost always poleward throughout the day. In winter the local time of peak poleward velocity occurs in the afternoon for low solar activity but in the night for high solar activity. In summer the peak poleward wind occurs in the morning for all levels of solar activity. The diurnal amplitude decreases with increasing solar activity. It also reaches its maximum around the solstices and its minimum around the equinoxes. The mean wind is larger at solar maximum than solar minimum, except for the year 1984. The daily-mean wind is smallest in summer and largest in winter. Qualitatively, the meridional wind at Asian midlatitudes has characteristics similar to those seen in other sectors (such as Millstone Hill, Boulder, Wallops Island, King George Island, and Saint-Santin), but the details in behavior are different and warrant further investigation.

  17. Equatorial thermospheric wind changes during the solar cycle - Measurements at Arequipa, Peru, from 1983 to 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biondi, M. A.; Meriwether, J. W., Jr.; Fejer, B. G.; Gonzalez, S. A.; Hallenbeck, D. C.

    1991-01-01

    Near-equatorial thermospheric wind velocities at Arequipa, Peru, are determined over about two-thirds of a solar cycle using Fabry-Perot interferometer measurements of Doppler shifts in the nightglow 630-nm emission line. Mean monthly nocturnal variations in the meridional and zonal wind components are calculated from the nightly data to remove short-term (day-to-day) variability as well as any additional changes introduced by the progression of the solar cycle. For most of the years, at the winter solstice, there is a weak (more than 100 m/s) transequatorial flow from the summer to the winter hemisphere in the early and the late night, with essentially zero velocities in between. At the equinoxes, an early-night poleward (southward) flow at solar minimum (1986) is replaced by an equatorward (northward) flow at solar maximum (1989-1990).

  18. Multi-spacecraft observations of heliographic latitude-longitude structure in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, E. J., Jr.; Smith, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    The heliographic latitude-longitude structure of high speed solar winds observed prior to the maximum of sunspot cycle 20 is investigated by multi-spacecraft comparisons. It is shown that differences in solar wind structures are due to two different kinds of spatial structures. One structure is found to be consistent with the simultaneous existence of a single, broad stream at latitudes above 7 deg N and a series of narrow streams at lower latitudes, while the other is consistent with the existence of a latitudinally sloping stream boundary near the solar equator. For latitude separations less than 3.5 deg, cross-correlations of Explorer-Mariner velocities show only previously reported systematic increases in velocity with latitude, and for latitude separations from 3.5 to 6.2 deg, differences in high speed streams shift in longitude and/or amplitude are also identified on a timescale of one solar rotation.

  19. Pore Velocity Estimation Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devary, J. L.; Doctor, P. G.

    1982-08-01

    Geostatistical data analysis techniques were used to stochastically model the spatial variability of groundwater pore velocity in a potential waste repository site. Kriging algorithms were applied to Hanford Reservation data to estimate hydraulic conductivities, hydraulic head gradients, and pore velocities. A first-order Taylor series expansion for pore velocity was used to statistically combine hydraulic conductivity, hydraulic head gradient, and effective porosity surfaces and uncertainties to characterize the pore velocity uncertainty. Use of these techniques permits the estimation of pore velocity uncertainties when pore velocity measurements do not exist. Large pore velocity estimation uncertainties were found to be located in the region where the hydraulic head gradient relative uncertainty was maximal.

  20. Impact of wind on ambient noise recorded by seismic array in northern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepore, Simone; Markowicz, Krzysztof; Grad, Marek

    2016-03-01

    Seismic interferometry and beam-forming techniques were applied to the ambient noise recorded during January 2014 at the "13 BB star" array composed of thirteen seismic stations located in northern Poland. The circular and symmetric geometry of the array allowed the evaluation of the azimuths of noise sources and the velocities of recovered surface waves with a good reliability. After having pre-processed the raw records of the ambient noise in time- and frequency-domain, we studied the associated power spectral density to identify the frequency bands suitable for the recovery of the surface waves. Then the crosscorrelation was performed between all the station pairs of the array to retrieve the Green's function, from which the velocity range of the surface waves can be determined. Making use of that analysis, the direction of the noise wavefield was linked to the maximum amplitude of the beam-power, estimated by the mixing in the frequency-domain of all the corresponding noise records. The results were related day by day to the mean wind velocity around Europe at 10 m above ground level obtained from global surveys carried out during the same month. Significant correlation between the direction of maximum beam-power associated to the ambient noise recorded at "13 BB star" and the average wind velocity was found.

  1. Impact of wind on ambient noise recorded by seismic array in northern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepore, Simone; Markowicz, Krzysztof; Grad, Marek

    2016-06-01

    Seismic interferometry and beam-forming techniques were applied to the ambient noise recorded during January 2014 at the `13 BB star' array composed of thirteen seismic stations located in northern Poland. The circular and symmetric geometry of the array allowed the evaluation of the azimuths of noise sources and the velocities of recovered surface waves with a good reliability. After having pre-processed the raw records of the ambient noise in time- and frequency-domain, we studied the associated power spectral density to identify the frequency bands suitable for the recovery of the surface waves. Then the cross-correlation was performed between all the station pairs of the array to retrieve the Green's function, from which the velocity range of the surface waves can be determined. Making use of that analysis, the direction of the noise wavefield was linked to the maximum amplitude of the beam-power, estimated by the mixing in the frequency-domain of all the corresponding noise records. The results were related day by day to the mean wind velocity around Europe at 10 m above ground level obtained from global surveys carried out during the same month. Significant correlation between the direction of maximum beam-power associated to the ambient noise recorded at `13 BB star' and the average wind velocity was found.

  2. An Investigation of a Mathematical Model for the Internal Velocity Profile of Conical Diffusers Applied to DAWTs.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Disterfano L M; Vaz, Jerson R P; Figueiredo, Sávio W O; De Oliveira e Silva, Marcelo; Lins, Erb F; Mesquita, André L A

    2015-01-01

    The Diffuser Augmented Wind Turbines (DAWTs) have been widely studied, since the diffusers improve the power coefficient of the wind turbine, particularly of small systems. The diffuser is a device which has the function of causing an increase on the flow velocity through the wind rotor plane due to pressure drop downstream, therefore resulting in an increase of the rotor power coefficient. This technology aids the turbine to exceed the Betz limit, which states that the maximum kinetic energy extracted from the flow is 59.26%. Thus, the present study proposes a mathematical model describing the behavior of the internal velocity for three conical diffusers, taking into account the characteristics of flow around them. The proposed model is based on the Biot-Savart's Law, in which the vortex filament induces a velocity field at an arbitrary point on the axis of symmetry of the diffusers. The results are compared with experimental data obtained for the three diffusers, and present good agreement. PMID:25923169

  3. Wind tunnel simulations of wind turbine wake interactions in neutral and stratified wind flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, P. E.; Pascheke, F.

    2010-09-01

    A second programme of work is about to commence as part of a further four years of funding for the UK-EPSRC SUPERGEN-Wind large-wind-farm consortium. The first part of the initial programme at Surrey was to establish and set up appropriate techniques for both on- and off-shore boundary layers (though with an emphasis on the latter) at a suitable scale, and to build suitable rotating model wind turbines. The EnFlo wind tunnel, a UK-NCAS special facility, is capable of creating scaled neutral, stable and unstable boundary layers in its 20m long working section. The model turbines are 1/300-scale of 5MW-size, speed controlled with phase-lock measurement capability, and the blade design takes into account low Reynolds-number effects. Velocity measurements are primarily made using two-component LDA, combined with a ‘cold-wire' probe in order to measure the local turbulent heat flux. Simulation of off-shore wakes is particularly constrained because i) at wind tunnel scale the inherently low surface roughness can be below that for fully rough conditions, ii) the power required to stratify the flow varies as the square of the flow speed, and could easily be impractically large, iii) low blade Reynolds number. The boundary layer simulations, set up to give near-equilibrium conditions in terms of streamwise development, and the model turbines have been designed against these constraints, but not all constraints can be always met simultaneously in practice. Most measurements so far have been made behind just one or two turbines in neutral off- and on-shore boundary layers, at stations up to 12 disk diameters downstream. These show how, for example, the wake of a turbine affects the development of the wake of a downwind turbine that is laterally off-set by say half or one diameter, and how the unaffected part from the first turbine merges with the affected wake of the second. As expected a lower level of atmospheric turbulence causes the wakes to develop and fill-in more

  4. Aeolian transport of biota with dust: A wind tunnel experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, J. A., Jr.; Gill, T. E.; Van Pelt, R. S.; Walsh, E.

    2015-12-01

    Ephemeral wetlands are ideal sources for dust emission, as well as repositories for dormant stages of aquatic invertebrates. An important component of invertebrate dispersal and colonization to new areas is the ability to be entrained into the atmosphere. Aquatic invertebrate eggs fall within the size of dust and sand grains (30-600μm), are less dense and aerodynamically shaped. We have shown previously that aquatic invertebrates can be dispersed long distances in dust storms but the extent of transport of taxa based on diapausing egg size/morphology has not been investigated. Here, we control the wind erosion process in a wind tunnel to test entrainment of diapausing stages of brine shrimp, clam shrimp, tadpole shrimp, fairy shrimp, Daphnia, and the rotifers Brachionus plicatilis and B. calyciflorus into the air by saltation. Diapausing eggs were mixed with sterilized wind-erodible soil. The soil/egg mixture was moistened with distilled water and air dried to form a crust. Dust was generated in a wind tunnel by releasing sand grains that act as saltator material similar to wind-entrained natural sands. Maximum wind velocity was 10m/s and entrained particles were sampled through an isokinetic horizontal intake opening. Aeolian sediment was collected from three points in the system; transfer section for coarse sediment, the pan subtending a settling chamber for finer saltation-sized sediment, and two paper filters for suspension-sized sediment. Samples were then passed through 250 and 350 μm sieves to remove abrader sand and rehydrated with various sterile media depending on the type of organism. We retrieved viable brine, fairy, and tadpole shrimp, ostracods, Daphnia, and diapausing eggs of the rotifers after hydration. This experiment demonstrates that resting stages of many invertebrates can be wind-eroded due to size and egg morphology and remain viable under controlled conditions mimicking dust emission.

  5. Wind information display system user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, J.; Smith, G.

    1977-01-01

    The Wind Information Display System (WINDS) provides flexible control through system-user interaction for collecting wind shear data, processing this data in real time, displaying the processed data, storing raw data on magnetic tapes, and post-processing raw data. The data are received from two asynchronous laser Doppler velocimeters (LDV's) and include position, velocity and intensity information. The raw data is written onto magnetic tape for permanent storage and is also processed in real time to depict wind velocities in a given spacial region.

  6. On the theory of the horizontal-axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, O.

    The fluid mechanical theory of horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT) in homogeneous, steady flows is presented. HAWT aerodynamic performance is governed by rotor torque and drag, the angular velocity, and power output, with governing equations for momentum, mass, and energy. The lift force and profile drag acting on the airfoil blades depend on the flow velocity, the chord length, the angle of attack, and the lift and drag coefficients. Single streamtube and multiple-stream tube and angular momentum analyses are employed to quantify the maximum wind turbine performance. Optimization studies for HAWT blades have indicated that a considerable amount of blade twist and taper enhances HAWT performance. Blade-element and vortex theory combined with panel methods are used to study optimum blade shapes. Techniques for assuring that wind tunnel studies of scale models are valid for full scale machines are defined. Sample runs have shown the accuracy of the blade element theory and the inaccuracies of two-dimensional analyses when stall is reached. The acquisition of more aerodynamic data on HAWT performance is indicated.

  7. Maximum range three-dimensional lifting planetary entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickmanns, E. D.

    1972-01-01

    Variational equations for maximum range three-dimensional quasisteady glide are given. Nonlinear oscillatory maximum range trajectories obtained with a refined gradient program are approximated by a superposition of quasisteady glide and linearized perturbation equation results. A basic control law is found which is closely followed for maximum cross-range trajectories. The effect of a reradiative heating constraint involving velocity, altitude and angle of attack on a maximum cross-range trajectory for a space shuttle orbiter-type vehicle reentering the earth's atmosphere is investigated numerically.

  8. Wind fence enclosures for infrasonic wind noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Abbott, JohnPaul; Raspet, Richard; Webster, Jeremy

    2015-03-01

    A large porous wind fence enclosure has been built and tested to optimize wind noise reduction at infrasonic frequencies between 0.01 and 10 Hz to develop a technology that is simple and cost effective and improves upon the limitations of spatial filter arrays for detecting nuclear explosions, wind turbine infrasound, and other sources of infrasound. Wind noise is reduced by minimizing the sum of the wind noise generated by the turbulence and velocity gradients inside the fence and by the area-averaging the decorrelated pressure fluctuations generated at the surface of the fence. The effects of varying the enclosure porosity, top condition, bottom gap, height, and diameter and adding a secondary windscreen were investigated. The wind fence enclosure achieved best reductions when the surface porosity was between 40% and 55% and was supplemented by a secondary windscreen. The most effective wind fence enclosure tested in this study achieved wind noise reductions of 20-27 dB over the 2-4 Hz frequency band, a minimum of 5 dB noise reduction for frequencies from 0.1 to 20 Hz, constant 3-6 dB noise reduction for frequencies with turbulence wavelengths larger than the fence, and sufficient wind noise reduction at high wind speeds (3-6 m/s) to detect microbaroms. PMID:25786940

  9. Design of a nonlinear backstepping control strategy of grid interconnected wind power system based PMSG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errami, Y.; Obbadi, A.; Sahnoun, S.; Benhmida, M.; Ouassaid, M.; Maaroufi, M.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents nonlinear backstepping control for Wind Power Generation System (WPGS) based Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator (PMSG) and connected to utility grid. The block diagram of the WPGS with PMSG and the grid side back-to-back converter is established with the dq frame of axes. This control scheme emphasises the regulation of the dc-link voltage and the control of the power factor at changing wind speed. Besides, in the proposed control strategy of WPGS, Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) technique and pitch control are provided. The stability of the regulators is assured by employing Lyapunov analysis. The proposed control strategy for the system has been validated by MATLAB simulations under varying wind velocity and the grid fault condition. In addition, a comparison of simulation results based on the proposed Backstepping strategy and conventional Vector Control is provided.

  10. Fuzzy logic based intelligent control of a variable speed cage machine wind generation system

    SciTech Connect

    Simoes, M.G.; Bose, B.K.; Spiegel, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    The paper describes a variable speed wind generation system where fuzzy logic principles are used for efficiency optimization and performance enhancement control. A squirrel cage induction generator feeds the power to a double-sided pulse width modulated converter system which pumps power to a utility grid or can supply to an autonomous system. The generation system has fuzzy logic control with vector control in the inner loops. A fuzzy controller tracks the generator speed with the wind velocity to extract the maximum power. A second fuzzy controller programs the machine flux for light load efficiency improvement, and a third fuzzy controller gives robust speed control against wind gust and turbine oscillatory torque. The complete control system has been developed, analyzed, and validated by simulation study. Performances have then been evaluated in detail.

  11. Expansion of the solar wind from a two-hole corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. C.

    1983-01-01

    A one-fluid model is employed to study the global expansion of the solar wind from a two-hole corona, under the assumptions that the holes are confined to polar caps within 30 deg of heliographic colatitude, the flow is steady and axisymmetric, and the geometry of streamlines is prescribed. The boundary conditions are adjusted in such a way that the calculated solar-wind properties at 1 AU are in reasonable agreement with observational results. A series of numerical solutions are obtained, the series produces a maximum terminal speed of 829 km/s at the pole. The calculated solar-wind speeds are strongly latitude-dependent and are positively correlated with local divergence factor of a stream tube. The solutions imply that most plasma properties are highly inhomogeneous at the polar caps. The flow velocity, the temperature, the proton-number flux and the conduction-heat flux all increase towards the hole center.

  12. Solar wind composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Coplan, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    Advances in instrumentation have resulted in the determination of the average abundances of He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe in the solar wind to approximately 10%. Comparisons with solar energetic particle (SEP) abundances and galactic cosmic ray abundances have revealed many similarities, especially when compared with solar photospheric abundances. It is now well established that fractionation in the corona results in an overabundance (with respect to the photosphere) of elements with first ionization potentials less than 10 eV. These observations have in turn led to the development of fractionation models that are reasonably successful in reproducing the first ionization (FIP) effect. Under some circumstances it has been possible to relate solar wind observations to particular source regions in the corona. The magnetic topologies of the source regions appear to have a strong influence on the fractionation of elements. Comparisons with spectroscopic data are particularly useful in classifying the different topologies. Ions produced from interstellar neutral atoms are also found in the solar wind. These ions are picked up by the solar wind after ionization by solar radiation or charge exchange and can be identified by their velocity in the solar wind. The pick-up ions provide most of the pressure in the interplanetary medium at large distances. Interstellar abundances can be derived from the observed fluxes of solar wind pick-up ions.

  13. Wind height distribution influence on offshore wind farm feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benassai, Guido; Della Morte, Renata; Matarazzo, Antonio; Cozzolino, Luca

    2015-04-01

    The economic feasibility of offshore wind power utilization depends on the favourable wind conditions offshore as compared to sites on land. The higher wind speeds have to compensate the additional cost of offshore developments. However, not only the mean wind speed is different, but the whole flow regime, as can be seen in the vertical wind speed profile. The commonly used models to describe this profile have been developed mainly for land sites, so they have to be verified on the basis of field data. Monin-Obukhov theory is often used for the description of the wind speed profile at a different height with respect to a measurement height. Starting from the former, , the profile is predicted using two parameters, Obukhov length and sea surface roughness. For situations with near-neutral and stable atmospheric stratification and long (>30km) fetch, the wind speed increase with height is larger than what is predicted from Monin-Obukhov theory. It is also found that this deviation occurs at wind speeds important for wind power utilization, mainly at 5-9 ms-1. In the present study the influence of these aspects on the potential site productivity of an offshore wind farm were investigated, namely the deviation from the theory of Monin-Obukhov due to atmospheric stability and the influence of the fetch length on the Charnock model. Both these physical effects were discussed and examined in view of a feasibility study of a site for offshore wind farm in Southern Italy. Available data consisted of time histories of wind speeds and directions collected by National Tidegauge Network (Rete Mareografica Nazionale) at the height of 10m a.s.l. in ports. The theory of Monin-Obukhov was used to extrapolate the data to the height of the wind blades, while the Charnock model was used to extend the wind speed on the sea surface from the friction velocity on the ground. The models described were used to perform calculations for a feasibility study of an offshore wind farm in Southern

  14. Threshold friction velocity of soils within the Columbia Plateau

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind erosion only occurs when the friction velocity exceeds the threshold friction velocity (TFV) of the surface. The TFV of loessial soils commonly found across the Columbia Plateau region of the U.S. Pacific Northwest is virtually unknown even though these soils are highly erodible and a source of...

  15. Two dimensional velocity distribution in open channels using Renyi entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumbhakar, Manotosh; Ghoshal, Koeli

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the entropy concept is employed for describing the two-dimensional velocity distribution in an open channel. Using the principle of maximum entropy, the velocity distribution is derived by maximizing the Renyi entropy by assuming dimensionless velocity as a random variable. The derived velocity equation is capable of describing the variation of velocity along both the vertical and transverse directions with maximum velocity occurring on or below the water surface. The developed model of velocity distribution is tested with field and laboratory observations and is also compared with existing entropy-based velocity distributions. The present model has shown good agreement with the observed data and its prediction accuracy is comparable with the other existing models.

  16. Note on one-fluid modeling of low-frequency Alfvénic fluctuations in a solar wind plasma with multi-ion components

    SciTech Connect

    Nariyuki, Y.; Umeda, T.; Suzuki, T. K.; Hada, T.

    2015-12-15

    A simple point of view that non-zero Alfvén ratio (residual energy) appears as a consequence of one-fluid modeling of uni-directional Alfvén waves in a solar wind plasma is presented. Since relative speeds among ions are incorporated into the one-fluid model as a pressure anisotropy, the Alfvén ratio can be finite due to the decrease in the phase velocity. It is shown that a proton beam component typically found in the solar wind plasma can contribute to generating non-zero Alfvén ratio observed in the solar wind plasma. Local equilibrium velocity distribution functions of each ion component are also discussed by using maximum entropy principle.

  17. Effects of Zonal Wind on Stratospheric Ozone Variations over Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidinma Okoro, Eucharia,

    2016-07-01

    The effects of zonal wind on stratospheric ozone variation over Nigeria have been studied. The areas covered in this study include; Maiduguri, Ikeja, Port-Harcourt, Calabar, Makurdi, Ilorin, Akure, Yola, Minna, Jos, Kano and Enugu in Nigeria, from 1986 to 2008. Zonal wind was computed from the iso-velocity map employing MATLAB software. The mean monthly variations of AAM and LOD at pressure levels of 20, 30 and 50 mb in the atmosphere depict a trend of maximum amplitude between April and September, and minimum amplitude between December and March. The trend observed in seasonal variation of O3 column data in the low latitude had maximum amount from May through August and minimum values from December through February. The mean monthly maximum O3 concentrations was found to be 284.70 Du (Kano) occurring in May 1989 while, an average monthly minimum O3 concentration was found to be 235.60 Du (Port-Harcourt and Calabar) occurring in January 1998. It has been established in this study that, the variation in atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) caused by variation of the universal time or length of day (LOD) transfer ozone (O3) by means of zonal wind from the upper troposphere to the lower stratosphere in the stations understudy. The strong effect of the pressure levels of the atmosphere on O3 variation could be attributed to its effect on the AAM and LOD. Variation in the LOD is significant in the tropics, suggesting that, the effects of the extra-tropical suction pump (ETSP) action is not the only driver responsible for O3 transportation from the tropics to extra-tropical zones. Consequently, these findings lead to a deduction that weather pattern alteration observed due to these changes could lead to climate change. Keywords: ozone variations; dynamical processes; harmattan wind; ETSP; and climatic variability

  18. Viscosity of the flexor muscles of the elbow joint under maximum contraction condition.

    PubMed

    Niku, S; Henderson, J M

    1989-01-01

    The maximum contractile moments developed by the elbow flexors of eleven normal subjects at different elbow angles were measured, both isometrically and at various shortening velocities. The results were used to predict the damping coefficient of the viscous element of the elbow flexor muscles and soft tissue under maximum contraction condition for various angles and shortening velocities. PMID:2808437

  19. Wind turbine system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, O.J.

    1982-05-18

    A wind turbine system utilizes a bicycle wheel type turbine having airfoils mounted on various spoke pairs. The vertical yaw axis lies in the horizontal projection of the airfoils to offer better control of the system; for example, automatic stowage in the case of excessive wind is provided since the superstructure of the turbine provides a torque around the vertical yaw axis which moves the wheel into a stowed position. At the same time, the wheel diameter can be made larger and thus heavier since the drive connection to the generator also helps support the weight of the wheel, since it is a rim drive. Greater electrical generation is also provided since an air scoop facing into the wind allows the effective generator capacity to be increased with air velocity. Lastly, the radial rate of change of the angle of the airfoils can be closely controlled.

  20. Observing Equatorial Thermospheric Winds and Temperatures with a New Mapping Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faivre, M. W.; Meriwether, J. W.; Sherwood, P.; Veliz, O.

    2005-12-01

    Application of the Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) at Arequipa, Peru (16.4S, 71.4 W) to measure the Doppler shifts and Doppler broadenings in the equatorial O(1D) 630-nm nightglow has resulted in numerous detections of a large-scale thermospheric phenomenon called the Midnight Temperature Maximum (MTM). A recent detector upgrade with a CCD camera has improved the accuracy of these measurements by a factor of 5. Temperature increases of 50 to 150K have been measured during nights in April and July, 2005, with error bars less than 10K after averaging in all directions. Moreover, the meridional wind measurements show evidence for a flow reversal from equatorward to poleward near local midnight for such events. A new observing strategy based upon the pioneering work of Burnside et al.[1981] maps the equatorial wind and temperature fields by observing in eight equally-spaced azimuth directions, each with a zenith angle of 60 degrees. Analysis of the data obtained with this technique gives the mean wind velocities in the meridional and zonal directions as well as the horizontal gradients of the wind field for these directions. Significant horizontal wind gradients are found for the meridional direction but not for the zonal direction. The zonal wind blows eastward throughout the night with a maximum speed of ~150 m/s near the middle of the night and then decreases towards zero just before dawn. In general, the fastest poleward meridional wind is observed near mid-evening. By the end of the night, the meridional flow tends to be more equatorward at speeds of about 50 m/s. Using the assumption that local time and longitude are equivalent over a period of 30 minutes, a map of the horizontal wind field vector field is constructed over a range of 12 degrees latitude centered at 16.5 S. Comparison between MTM nights and quiet nights (no MTM) revealed significant differences in the horizontal wind fields. Using the method of Fourier decomposition of the line-of-sight winds

  1. Optimum propeller wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, R. J.; Archer, R. D.

    1983-12-01

    The Prandtl-Betz-Theodorsen theory of heavily loaded airscrews has been adapted to the design of propeller windmills which are to be optimized for maximum power coefficient. It is shown that the simpler, light-loading, constant-area wake assumption can generate significantly different 'optimum' performance and geometry, and that it is therefore not appropriate to the design of propeller wind turbines when operating in their normal range of high-tip-speed-to-wind-speed ratio. Design curves for optimum power coefficient are presented and an example of the design of a typical two-blade optimum rotor is given.

  2. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003927.htm Nerve conduction velocity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see how ...

  3. Numerical simulations and observations of the role of katabatic winds in the creation and maintenance of Scharffenbergbotnen blue ice area, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwinger, T.; Malm, T.; Schafer, M.; Stenberg, R.; Moore, J. C.

    2015-08-01

    We model the role of katabatic winds in the formation and maintenance of a blue ice area in Scharffenbergbotnen valley, Antarctica, using the finite element code Elmer. The high-horizontal-resolution (50-200 m) numerical simulations of the local wind flow from katabatic wind fronts show high spatial variability in wind-impact patterns and good congruence between places with high near-surface wind speeds and the blue ice area. In addition we perform wind simulations on an altered glacier geometry that resembles the thicker ice cover at the Late Glacial Maximum (LGM). These simulations indicate that the pronounced spatial wind-impact patterns depend on present-day geometry and did not occur during the LGM. This leads to the conclusion that the formation of the inner blue ice area of the Scharffenbergbotnen valley started only after the lowering of the ice surface, i.e. after the LGM. Experiments with smoothed surface topography suggest that detailed positions of the high wind regions, and hence individual blue ice fields, may have varied as the ice sheet lowered. The simulation results obtained with the present-day geometry were fortuitously confirmed by the destruction of a field camp located in a high-wind-speed area and its subsequent redistribution to low-velocity areas. The experiments and the field observations are consistent with localized violent katabatic events rather than synoptic-scale storms, playing the dominant role in the formation and maintenance of this and perhaps many blue ice areas.

  4. RAWS: The spaceborne radar wind sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Richard K.

    1991-09-01

    The concept of the Radar Wind Sounder (RAWS) is discussed. The goals of the RAWS is to estimate the following three qualities: the echo power, to determine rain rate and surface wind velocity; the mean Doppler frequency, to determine the wind velocity in hydrometers; and the spread of the Doppler frequency, to determine the turbulent spread of the wind velocity. Researchers made significant progress during the first year. The feasibility of the concept seems certain. Studies indicate that a reasonably sized system can measure in the presence of ice clouds and dense water clouds. No sensitivity problems exist in rainy environments. More research is needed on the application of the radar to the measurement of rain rates and winds at the sea surface.

  5. Stellar winds driven by Alfven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, J. W.; Olbert, S.

    1973-01-01

    Models of stellar winds were considered in which the dynamic expansion of a corona is driven by Alfven waves propagating outward along radial magnetic field lines. In the presence of Alfven waves, a coronal expansion can exist for a broad range of reference conditions which would, in the absence of waves, lead to static configurations. Wind models in which the acceleration mechanism is due to Alfven waves alone and exhibit lower mass fluxes and higher energies per particle are compared to wind models in which the acceleration is due to thermal processes. For example, winds driven by Alfven waves exhibit streaming velocities at infinity which may vary between the escape velocity at the coronal base and the geometrical mean of the escape velocity and the speed of light. Upper and lower limits were derived for the allowed energy fluxes and mass fluxes associated with these winds.

  6. RAWS: The spaceborne radar wind sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Richard K.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of the Radar Wind Sounder (RAWS) is discussed. The goals of the RAWS is to estimate the following three qualities: the echo power, to determine rain rate and surface wind velocity; the mean Doppler frequency, to determine the wind velocity in hydrometers; and the spread of the Doppler frequency, to determine the turbulent spread of the wind velocity. Researchers made significant progress during the first year. The feasibility of the concept seems certain. Studies indicate that a reasonably sized system can measure in the presence of ice clouds and dense water clouds. No sensitivity problems exist in rainy environments. More research is needed on the application of the radar to the measurement of rain rates and winds at the sea surface.

  7. Electronic excitation and charge transfer processes in collisions of H{sup +}, H{sub 2}{sup +}, and H{sub 3}{sup +} ions with carbon monoxide at typical solar-wind velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Werbowy, S.; Pranszke, B.

    2014-01-10

    Luminescence in the 200-580 nm spectral region was observed in the collisions of H{sup +}, H{sub 2}{sup +}, and H{sub 3}{sup +} with CO in the 50-1000 eV projectile energy range. Using computer simulations, we have identified emission of the following products in the observed spectra: the CO{sup +}(A-X) comet-tail system, CO{sup +}(B-X) first negative system, CO{sup +}(B-A) Baldet-Johnson system, and CO(b-a) third positive system. Also, an emission from atomic hydrogen (H{sub β} line at 486nm) has been observed. From the analysis of the experimental spectra, we have determined the absolute emission cross-sections for the formation of the observed products. Computer simulations gave the excited-product population distributions over vibrational and rotational energy levels. The vibrational level distribution from the CO{sup +}(A-X) comet-tail system is compared with the data for CO excited by 100 eV electrons and extreme ultraviolet radiation (XUV) photons. We have used these data to analyze the excitation conditions in the comet Humason (1961e). From the vibrational population distributions observed in the comet, we found that this distribution can be reproduced if electrons produce 25%, protons 70%, and XUV photons produce 5% of the emitting molecules. We find that the ratio of the CO{sup +}(B-X) emission to the sum of two main emissions (CO{sup +}(A-X)+CO{sup +}(B-X)) is velocity dependent and does not depend on the projectile ion type. For small velocities (below 100 km s{sup –1}) the ratio is about 5%, while for higher velocities it increases to 30%. For these data, we have found an empirical formula that satisfactorily describes the experimental data: R = R {sub max}(1 – v {sub th}/v), (where R {sub max} = 33%, v {sub th} = 87 km s{sup –1}). This could be used to infer the velocity of ions producing the observed emission of CO{sup +} products.

  8. "SPURS" in the North Atlantic Salinity Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Raymond

    2014-05-01

    The North Atlantic Salinity Maximum is the world's saltiest open ocean salinity maximum and was the focus of the recent Salinity Processes Upper-ocean Regional Study (SPURS) program. SPURS was a joint venture between US, French, Irish, and Spanish investigators. Three US and two EU cruises were involved from August, 1012 - October, 2013 as well as surface moorings, glider, drifter and float deployments. Shipboard operations included underway meteorological and oceanic data, hydrographic surveys and turbulence profiling. The goal is to improve our understanding of how the salinity maximum is maintained and how it may be changing. It is formed by an excess of evaporation over precipitation and the wind-driven convergence of the subtropical gyre. Such salty areas are getting saltier with global warming (a record high SSS was observed in SPURS) and it is imperative to determine the relative roles of surface water fluxes and oceanic processes in such trends. The combination of accurate surface flux estimates with new assessments of vertical and horizontal mixing in the ocean will help elucidate the utility of ocean salinity in quantifying the changing global water cycle.

  9. The Average Velocity in a Queue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frette, Vidar

    2009-01-01

    A number of cars drive along a narrow road that does not allow overtaking. Each driver has a certain maximum speed at which he or she will drive if alone on the road. As a result of slower cars ahead, many cars are forced to drive at speeds lower than their maximum ones. The average velocity in the queue offers a non-trivial example of a mean…

  10. Calculations of the cosmic ray modulation in interplanetary space taking into account the possible dependence of the transport travel for the scattering of the particles and of the velocity of the solar winds on the angles they make with the helioequator plane: The case of isotropic diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorman, L. I.; Kobilinski, Z.

    1975-01-01

    The modulation of galactic cosmic rays is studied by the magnetic heterogeneities stream on the assumption that the diffusion coefficient is reduced whereas the solar wind velocity is increased with the growth of the angle between the sun's rotation axis and the direction of solar plasma motion. The stationary plane problem of isotropic diffusion is solved as it applies to two cases: (1) with due account of particle retardation by the antiphermium mechanism; and (2) without an account of the above mechanism. This problem is solved by the grid method in the polar coordinate system. The results of the calculations are followed by a discussion of the method of solution and of the errors.

  11. Dust particle velocity measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thielman, L. O.

    1976-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter was used to measure the velocity distributions for particles entering a vacuum chamber from the atmosphere through calibrated leaks. The relative number of particles per velocity interval was obtained for particulates of three size distributions and two densities passing through six different leak geometries. The velocity range 15 to 320 meters per second was investigated. Peak particle velocities were found to occur in the 15 to 150 meters per second range depending upon type of particle and leak geometry. A small fraction of the particles were found to have velocities in the 150 to 320 meters per second range.

  12. Effect of radial inflow on vortex intensification and its application to wind vortex generators

    SciTech Connect

    Ide, H.

    1982-01-01

    A new wind vortex turbine, called tornado-type wind generator system, was studied both theoretically and experimentally for the purpose of better understanding the basic nature of a vortex flow and further improvement of its power efficiencies. Analytical solutions were obtained from the Navier-Stokes equations for the velocity distributions along the radial distance. The result demonstrates the important nature of a vortex structure that, in order to intensify a vortex inside the tower, radial inflow must be provided from the side walls. Based upon this concept, the essential contribution of the experimental work was to furnish the radial inflow by utilizing the dynamic head of incoming wind. Static pressure measurements in the vortex core of the large spiral model showed that the maximum static pressure drop at the vortex center was more than 10 times the dynamic head of the wind with the radial inflow supply. The radial inflow lowered the pressure in the vortex core, a consequence of vortex intensification. In conclusion, extracting wind energy by creating and maintaining an extremely low pressure region of an intensified vortex at the turbine exit through viscous pumping is an improvement for wind machines in the aspect of C/sub p/ and, consequently, is a cost effective procedure.

  13. On the correlation between interplanetary nano dust particles and solar wind properties from STEREO/SWAVES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issautier, K.; LE CHAT, G.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Belheouane, S.; Zaslavsky, A.; Zouganelis, I.; Mann, I.; Maksimovic, M.

    2012-12-01

    Dust particles provide an important fraction of the matter composing the interplanetary medium, their mass density at 1 AU being comparable to the one of the solar wind. Among them, dusts of nanometer size-scale can be detected using radio and plasma waves instruments because they move at roughly the solar wind speed. The high velocity impact of a dust particle generates a small crater on the spacecraft: the dust particle and the crater material are vaporized. This produces a plasma cloud whose associated electrical charge induces an electric pulse measured with radio and plasma instruments. Since their first detection in the interplanetary medium (Meyer-Vernet et al. 2009), nanodusts have been routinely measured using STEREO/WAVES instrument (Zaslavsky et al. 2012) We present the nanodust properties during the 2007-2012 period on STEREO. Since the maximum size of the plasma cloud is larger for smaller local solar wind density, we expect to observe an anticorrelation between the detected voltage amplitude and the ambient solar wind density, as suggested recently by Le Chat et al. (2012). Moreover, the variations in solar wind speed and magnetic field are expected to affect the nano dust dynamics. Using STEREO/WAVES/Low Frequency Receiver (LFR) data, we study correlations of in situ solar wind properties and detection of nanodust impacts as well as some possible effects of Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) on nanodusts acceleration.

  14. Hot relativistic winds and the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimura, F. S.; Kennel, C. F.

    1981-01-01

    Efforts to formulate a self-consistent model of pulsar magnetospheres which links the particle source near the pulsar to the outflowing relativistic wind and couples the wind to the surrounding nebula are reviewed. The use of a relativistic MHD wind is recommended to account for global photon emission and the invisibility of the method of plasma transport. Consideration of a magnetic monopole relativistic wind due to an axially symmetric aligned rotator is combined with calculations of the initial velocity of the wind to show that the flow velocity in such a model will never exceed Mach 1. Extending the solution to the case of a hot relativistic wind at supersonic speeds is noted to yield results consistent with observations of the Crab Nebula

  15. Minimizing the probable maximum flood

    SciTech Connect

    Woodbury, M.S.; Pansic, N. ); Eberlein, D.T. )

    1994-06-01

    This article examines Wisconsin Electric Power Company's efforts to determine an economical way to comply with Federal Energy Regulatory Commission requirements at two hydroelectric developments on the Michigamme River. Their efforts included refinement of the area's probable maximum flood model based, in part, on a newly developed probable maximum precipitation estimate.

  16. Wind influence on the course of sedimentation processes of the laminated lacustrine sediments of Lake Czechowskie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiśniewska, Daria; Kramkowski, Mateusz; Tyszkowski, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The studies of the laminated lacustrine sediments play a very important role in the analysis of climate change. They provide valuable information related to the response of the ecosystem to changes in the environment. The condition for the development of the annual lamination is calm sedimentation, which can be compromised by the movement of water caused by waving. The depth to which this movement affects depends on the shape of the lake basin as well as the velocity and direction of the wind. During the study of sedimentary processes of laminated deposits in Lake Czechowskie (Tuchola Forest, North Poland, 53°52'N, 18°14' E, 108 m asl), the following question arose: How strong was the influence of the wind on the processes of lacustrine sedimentation? The key in getting the answers was the use of GIS techniques. Lake Czechowskie has an area of 76.6 hectares; it has two deeps separated by a threshold: a deeper one of 33 m (maximum depth of the basin) in the central-eastern part, and a shallower of 13 m in the western part. The speed of movement of water that is able to move sediment from the bottom of the lake, called the orbital wave velocity, is the basis for the designation of areas where re-suspension takes place. To calculate the wave parameters, the process of mixing, as well as the designation of re-suspension zones, the tool-script Wave Model (Rohweder et al. 2008) in the program ArsGIS 10.1 was used. The input data were wind direction and velocity from the meteorological station of Wirty about 15 km away, bathymetric data from acoustic profiling, and the Maximum Orbital Wave Velocity. The elements taken into account include maximum wind velocity of the multi-year 1996-2013, with particular emphasis on hurricanes Ksawery (December 2013) and Yoda (November 2011), during which wind velocity exceeded 120 km/h. In addition, maximum wind velocity ever recorded in the Polish Lowlands was considered. On the basis of the modelling, the authors delimited the areas

  17. Kinematics and aerodynamics of the velocity vector roll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, Wayne C.; Lutze, Frederick H.; Mason, W.

    1993-01-01

    The velocity vector roll is an angular rotation of an aircraft about its instantaneous velocity vector, constrained to be performed at constant angle-of-attack (AOA), no sideslip, and constant velocity. Consideration of the aerodynamic force equations leads to requirements for body-axis yawing and pitching rotations that satisfy these constraints. Here, the body axis rotations, and the constraints, are used in the moment equations to determine the aerodynamic moments required to perform the velocity vector roll. For representative tactical aircraft, the conditions for maximum pitching moment are a function of orientation, occurring at about 90 deg of bank in a level trajectory. Maximum required pitching moment occurs at peak roll rate, and is achieved at AOA above 45 deg. The conditions for maximum rolling moment depend on the value of the roll mode time constant. For a small time constant (fast response) the maximum rolling moment occurs at maximum roll acceleration and zero AOA, largely independent of aircraft orientation; for a large time constant, maximum required rolling moment occurs at maximum roll rate, at maximum AOA, and at 180 deg of bank in level flight. Maximum yawing moment occurs at maximum roll acceleration, maximum AOA, and is largely independent of airplane orientation.

  18. Surface wind characteristics of some Aleutian Islands. [for selection of windpowered machine sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentink, T., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The wind power potential of Alaska is assessed in order to determine promising windpower sites for construction of wind machines and for shipment of wind derived energy. Analyses of near surface wind data from promising Aleutian sites accessible by ocean transport indicate probable velocity regimes and also present deficiencies in available data. It is shown that winds for some degree of power generation are available 77 percent of the time in the Aleutians with peak velocities depending on location.

  19. Observed drag coefficients in high winds in the near offshore of the South China Sea

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bi, Xueyan; Liu, Yangan; Gao, Zhiqiu; Liu, Feng; Song, Qingtao; Huang, Jian; Huang, Huijun; Mao, Weikang; Liu, Chunxia

    2015-07-14

    This paper investigates the relationships between friction velocity, 10 m drag coefficient, and 10 m wind speed using data collected at two offshore observation towers (one over the sea and the other on an island) from seven typhoon episodes in the South China Sea from 2008 to 2014. The two towers were placed in areas with different water depths along a shore-normal line. The depth of water at the tower over the sea averages about 15 m, and the depth of water near the island is about 10 m. The observed maximum 10 min average wind speed at a heightmore » of 10 m is about 32 m s⁻¹. Momentum fluxes derived from three methods (eddy covariance, inertial dissipation, and flux profile) are compared. The momentum fluxes derived from the flux profile method are larger (smaller) over the sea (on the island) than those from the other two methods. The relationship between the 10 m drag coefficient and the 10 m wind speed is examined by use of the data obtained by the eddy covariance method. The drag coefficient first decreases with increasing 10 m wind speed when the wind speeds are 5–10 m s⁻¹, then increases and reaches a peak value of 0.002 around a wind speed of 18 m s⁻¹. The drag coefficient decreases with increasing 10 m wind speed when 10 m wind speeds are 18–27 m s⁻¹. A comparison of the measurements from the two towers shows that the 10 m drag coefficient from the tower in 10 m water depth is about 40% larger than that from the tower in 15 m water depth when the 10 m wind speed is less than 10 m s⁻¹. Above this, the difference in the 10 m drag coefficients of the two towers disappears.« less

  20. Impacts of winds on volcanic plumes - Do crossflows challenge the Morton, Turner and Taylor entrainment assumptions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubry, T. J.; Jellinek, M.; Carazzo, G.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic plumes rising into Earth's atmosphere are influenced strongly by tropospheric and stratospheric winds. In the absence of wind effects, Morton, Taylor and Turner (MTT, 1956) used a similarity theory to show that the maximum height for these flows is governed mostly by the atmospheric stratification and the buoyancy flux at the vent. Crucially, in developing this theory MTT introduced the "entrainment hypothesis" in which the rate of entrainment of atmospheric air by the large eddies forming at the edge of the plume is proportional to some bulk velocity. In the presence of wind a key question is whether the additional stirring deforms eddies sufficiently to alter their mixing properties. In particular, under what conditions will wind effects enhance or reduce entrainment? Can these effects be captured in a modified form of the MTT similarity theory or is a new theory required? We use an extensive set of experiments on wind-forced turbulent plumes in order to overcome the restricted dynamical conditions explored in previous experimental studies. We introduce a new regime parameter allowing to quantitatively separate three distinct plume regimes. Remarkably, we show that for reasonable conditions on Earth, the major effects of wind can still be captured by a modified scaling law derived from the self-similar theory of MTT, with an entrainment rate including the contributions of wind. However, analysis of the turbulence motions in our experiments shows that even weak winds introduce large asymmetries in the structure of entraining eddies. Our successful application of a mean entrainment rate at the plume edge and a modified MTT similarity theory is, thus, surprising. Does this apparent contradiction simply reveal the way turbulent instabilities driven by wind manifest themselves?

  1. Observed drag coefficients in high winds in the near offshore of the South China Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Xueyan; Liu, Yangan; Gao, Zhiqiu; Liu, Feng; Song, Qingtao; Huang, Jian; Huang, Huijun; Mao, Weikang; Liu, Chunxia

    2015-07-14

    This paper investigates the relationships between friction velocity, 10 m drag coefficient, and 10 m wind speed using data collected at two offshore observation towers (one over the sea and the other on an island) from seven typhoon episodes in the South China Sea from 2008 to 2014. The two towers were placed in areas with different water depths along a shore-normal line. The depth of water at the tower over the sea averages about 15 m, and the depth of water near the island is about 10 m. The observed maximum 10 min average wind speed at a height of 10 m is about 32 m s⁻¹. Momentum fluxes derived from three methods (eddy covariance, inertial dissipation, and flux profile) are compared. The momentum fluxes derived from the flux profile method are larger (smaller) over the sea (on the island) than those from the other two methods. The relationship between the 10 m drag coefficient and the 10 m wind speed is examined by use of the data obtained by the eddy covariance method. The drag coefficient first decreases with increasing 10 m wind speed when the wind speeds are 5–10 m s⁻¹, then increases and reaches a peak value of 0.002 around a wind speed of 18 m s⁻¹. The drag coefficient decreases with increasing 10 m wind speed when 10 m wind speeds are 18–27 m s⁻¹. A comparison of the measurements from the two towers shows that the 10 m drag coefficient from the tower in 10 m water depth is about 40% larger than that from the tower in 15 m water depth when the 10 m wind speed is less than 10 m s⁻¹. Above this, the difference in the 10 m drag coefficients of the two towers disappears.

  2. Wind profiles for Space Shuttle loads analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1978-01-01

    The small scale wind velocity perturbations in vertical wind profiles at Cape Kennedy, Florida were analyzed in order to derive information for simulations of space shuttle ascent through the perturbed atmosphere. The available statistical data does not permit specification of various aspects of idealized singularities and wavelike perturbations with a reasonable degree of confidence. The information developed as a result of the analysis described in Section 3 of this report is suitable for the further development of idealized models. The term perturbation is used instead of the more common term, gust. According to the conventional approach, a gust profile is calculated by applying a high pass digital filter to a Jimsphere profile; all the speeds in the filtered profile are defined as gusts. The high pass filtered profile is defined as a residual profile and the maximum residual in the vicinity of a specified reference height is defined as the gust. Gusts defined in this manner represent the perturbation peaks. A detailed discussion of the calculation of residual profiles and gusts is given. The meteorological coordinate system, the data sample, and Jimsphere profiles are also described. Recommendations and conclusions are presented.

  3. Tiber winding pack design

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.R.

    1985-08-19

    A preliminary winding pack design was performed with the goal of showing feasibility of producing 10-T maximum field with a pack current density of 40 A.mm/sup -2/ while accepting 2.7 kW per coil nuclear heating. A cable-in-conduit conductor design (CIC), reported at the 6th Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy, was based on several key issues.

  4. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan M.

    1996-01-01

    Airfoils for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length.

  5. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    1996-10-08

    Airfoils are disclosed for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length. 10 figs.

  6. VELOCITY INDICATOR FOR EXTRUSION PRESS

    DOEpatents

    Digney, F.J. Jr.; Bevilacqua, F.

    1959-04-01

    An indicator is presented for measuring the lowspeed velocity of an object in one direction where the object returns in the opposite direction at a high speed. The indicator comprises a drum having its axis of rotation transverse to the linear movement of the object and a tape wound upon the drum with its free end extending therefrom and adapted to be connected to the object. A constant torque is applied to the drum in a direction to wind the tape on the drum. The speed of the tape in the unwinding direction is indicated on a tachometer which is coupled through a shaft and clutch means to the drum only when the tape is unwinding.

  7. High Velocity Outflows in Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Fred; Rodriguez Hidalgo, Paola; Nestor, Daniel

    2006-02-01

    High velocity (HV) outflows are important components of SMBH growth and evolution. The ability of SMBHs to accrete matter and light up as AGN probably requires that outflows are present to carry away angular momentum. Outflows during the luminous AGN phase might also play a critical role in ``unveiling" young dust-enshrouded AGN and in ``polluting" the intergalactic medium with metals at high redshifts. Nonetheless, AGN outflows remain poorly understood. We have begun a program to study a nearly unexplored realm of AGN outflow parameter space: HV winds with v> 10,000 km/s up to v~ 0.2c but small velocity dispersions (narrow absorption lines), such that v/(Delta) v ≫ 1. These extreme outflows have been detected so far in just a few quasars, but they might be ubiquitous if, as expected, the flows subtend a small solid angle as seen from the central engine. Narrow-line HV flows merit specific attention because they pose unique challenges for theoretical models of the wind acceleration, mass loss rates, launch radii, etc. They might also comprise a significant fraction of absorbers previously attributed to unrelated (interveinng) gas or galaxies. We have compiled a list of bright quasars with candidate HV outflow lines (CIV 1550 A) in existing SDSS spectra. We now propose to observe ~50 of these candidates with the 2.1m GoldCam to i) identify/confirm some of the true outflow systems (based on line variability), ii) place a firm lower limit on the fraction of quasars with narrow-line HV outflows, iii) compile a short list of confirmed HV outflow sources for future study, and iv) use the combined SDSS and GoldCam data to measure or constrain basic outflow properties, such as the kinematics, locations, and physical conditions.

  8. How to hit home runs: Optimum baseball bat swing parameters for maximum range trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicki, Gregory S.; Hubbard, Mont; Stronge, William J.

    2003-11-01

    Improved models for the pitch, batting, and post-impact flight phases of a baseball are used in an optimal control context to find bat swing parameters that produce maximum range. The improved batted flight model incorporates experimental lift and drag profiles (including the drag crisis). An improved model for bat-ball impact includes the dependence of the coefficient of restitution on the approach relative velocity and the dependence of the incoming pitched ball angle on speed. The undercut distance and bat swing angle are chosen to maximize the range of the batted ball. The sensitivity of the maximum range is calculated for all model parameters including bat and ball speed, bat and ball spin, and wind speed. Post-impact conditions are found to be independent of the ball-bat coefficient of friction. The lift is enhanced by backspin produced by undercutting the ball during batting. An optimally hit curve ball will travel farther than an optimally hit fastball or knuckleball due to increased lift during flight.

  9. Angular velocity discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments designed to investigate the ability of naive observers to discriminate rotational velocities of two simultaneously viewed objects are described. Rotations are constrained to occur about the x and y axes, resulting in linear two-dimensional image trajectories. The results indicate that observers can discriminate angular velocities with a competence near that for linear velocities. However, perceived angular rate is influenced by structural aspects of the stimuli.

  10. Spall velocity measurements from laboratory impact craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanskey, Carol A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1986-01-01

    Spall velocities were measured for a series of impacts into San Marcos gabbro. Impact velocities ranged from 1 to 6.5 km/sec. Projectiles varied in material and size with a maximum mass of 4g for a lead bullet to a minimum of 0.04 g for an aluminum sphere. The spall velocities were calculated both from measurements taken from films of the events and from estimates based on range measurements of the spall fragments. The maximum spall velocity observed was 27 m/sec, or 0.5 percent of the impact velocity. The measured spall velocities were within the range predicted by the Melosh (1984) spallation model for the given experimental parameters. The compatability between the Melosh model for large planetary impacts and the results of these small scale experiments is considered in detail. The targets were also bisected to observe the internal fractures. A series of fractures were observed whose location coincided with the boundary of the theoretical near surface zone predicted by Melosh. Above this boundary the target material should receive reduced levels of compressive stress as compared to the more highly shocked region below.

  11. Cluster observations on linear magnetic decreases in the solar wind at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, T.; Shi, Q.; Tian, A.; Fu, S.; Pu, Z.; Zong, Q.; Sun, W.; Lucek, E. A.; Reme, H.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic decreases (MDs) are structures observed in interplanetary space with significant decreases in the magnetic field magnitude, of which the events with no or little change in the field direction are linear magnetic decreases (LMDs). Xiao et al., (2010) have reported that the geometrical shape of LMDs observed in the solar wind at 1 AU was consistent with rotational ellipsoid, and the occurrence rate was about 3.7 LMDs/d. It was found that not only the occurrence rate but also the geometrical shape of LMDs had no significant change from 0.72 AU to 1 AU in comparison with Zhang et al., (2008)'s results, which may infer that most of LMDs observed at 1 AU were formed and fully developed before 0.72 AU. Recently, we have focused on the magnetic field and plasma (e.g. ion density and velocity) characteristics of those LMD structures observed during the period of 2001 to 2009. Compared with the average solar wind condition, it is shown that the LMDs prefer to be observed in the region with relatively lower magnetic field magnitude, higher ion density, larger plasma β (ratio of the thermal pressure to the magnetic pressure) and slower solar wind velocity. We also investigated the LMDs which located in the interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICME) or the sheath of the ICME. It is found that the events related to ICMEs could account for more than 20% of LMDs during solar maximum. Therefore, the ICME should be an important source of the LMDs during the solar maximum. However, other mechanisms during the solar minimum may be more important, because the occurrence rate of LMDs during the solar minimum is higher than that of the solar maximum. We also calculate the propagation speed of the structures in the solar wind frame to infer the generation mechanism of these structures.

  12. Studying Wake Deflection of Wind Turbines in Yaw using Drag Disk Experiments and Actuator Disk Modeling in LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howland, Michael; Bossuyt, Juliaan; Meyers, Johan; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-11-01

    Recently, there has been a push towards the optimization in the power output of entire large wind farms through the control of individual turbines, as opposed to operating each turbine in a maximum power point tracking manner. In this vane, the wake deflection by wind turbines in yawed conditions has generated considerable interest in recent years. In order to effectively study the wake deflection according to classical actuator disk momentum theory, a 3D printed drag disk model with a coefficient of thrust of approximately 0.75 - 0.85 and a diameter of 3 cm is used, studied under uniform inflow in a wind tunnel with test section of 1 m by 1.3 m, operating with a negligible inlet turbulence level at an inflow velocity of 10 m/s. Mean velocity profile measurements are performed using Pitot probes. Different yaw angles are considered, including 10, 20, and 30 degrees. We confirm earlier results that (e.g.) a 30 degree yaw angle deflects the center of the wake around 1/2 of a rotor diameter when it impinges on a downstream turbine. Detailed comparisons between the experiments and Large Eddy Simulations using actuator disk model for the wind turbines are carried out in order to help validate the CFD model. Work supported by NSF (grants CBET-113380 and IIA-1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project) and by ERC (ActiveWindFarms, grant no. 306471).

  13. About measuring velocity dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellhauer, M.

    A lot of our knowledge about the dynamics and total masses of pressure dominated stellar systems relies on measuring the internal velocity disper- sion of the system. We assume virial equilibrium and that we are able to measure only the bound stars of the system without any contamination. This article shows how likely it is to measure the correct velocity dispersion in reality. It will show that as long as we have small samples of velocity mea- surements the distribution of possible outcomes can be very large and as soon as we have a source of error the velocity dispersion can wrong by several standard deviations especially in large samples.

  14. Towers for Offshore Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurian, V. J.; Narayanan, S. P.; Ganapathy, C.

    2010-06-01

    Increasing energy demand coupled with pollution free production of energy has found a viable solution in wind energy. Land based windmills have been utilized for power generation for more than two thousand years. In modern times wind generated power has become popular in many countries. Offshore wind turbines are being used in a number of countries to tap the energy from wind over the oceans and convert to electric energy. The advantages of offshore wind turbines as compared to land are that offshore winds flow at higher speed than onshore winds and the more available space. In some land based settings, for better efficiency, turbines are separated as much as 10 rotor diameters from each other. In offshore applications where only two wind directions are likely to predominate, the distances between the turbines arranged in a line can be shortened to as little as two or four rotor diameters. Today, more than a dozen offshore European wind facilities with turbine ratings of 450 kw to 3.6 MW exist offshore in very shallow waters of 5 to 12 m. Compared to onshore wind turbines, offshore wind turbines are bigger and the tower height in offshore are in the range of 60 to 80 m. The water depths in oceans where offshore turbines can be located are within 30 m. However as the distance from land increases, the costs of building and maintaining the turbines and transmitting the power back to shore also increase sharply. The objective of this paper is to review the parameters of design for the maximum efficiency of offshore wind turbines and to develop types offshore towers to support the wind turbines. The methodology of design of offshore towers to support the wind turbine would be given and the environmental loads for the design of the towers would be calculated for specific cases. The marine corrosion on the towers and the methods to control the corrosion also would be briefly presented. As the wind speeds tend to increase with distance from the shore, turbines build father

  15. Three-Dimensional Venturi Sensor for Measuring Extreme Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zysko, Jan A.; Perotti, Jose M.; Amis, Christopher; Randazzo, John; Blalock, Norman; Eckhoff, Anthony

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) Venturi sensor is being developed as a compact, rugged means of measuring wind vectors having magnitudes of as much as 300 mph (134 m/s). This sensor also incorporates auxiliary sensors for measuring temperature from -40 to +120 F (-40 to +49 C), relative humidity from 0 to 100 percent, and atmospheric pressure from 846 to 1,084 millibar (85 to 108 kPa). Conventional cup-and-vane anemometers are highly susceptible to damage by both high wind forces and debris, due to their moving parts and large profiles. In addition, they exhibit slow recovery times contributing to an inaccurately high average-speed reading. Ultrasonic and hot-wire anemometers overcome some of the disadvantages of the cup and-vane anemometers, but they have other disadvantageous features, including limited dynamic range and susceptibility to errors caused by external acoustic noise and rain. In contrast, the novel 3D Venturi sensor is less vulnerable to wind damage because of its smaller profile and ruggedness. Since the sensor has no moving parts, it provides increased reliability and lower maintenance costs. It has faster response and recovery times to changing wind conditions than traditional systems. In addition, it offers wide dynamic range and is expected to be relatively insensitive to rain and acoustic energy. The Venturi effect in this sensor is achieved by the mirrored double-inflection curve, which is then rotated 360 to create the desired detection surfaces. The curve is optimized to provide a good balance of pressure difference between sensor ports and overall maximum fluid velocity while in the shape. Four posts are used to separate the two shapes, and their size and location were chosen to minimize effects on the pressure measurements. The 3D Venturi sensor has smart software algorithms to map the wind pressure exerted on the surfaces of the design. Using Bernoulli's equation, the speed of the wind is calculated from the differences among the pressure

  16. Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayda, Edward A.; van Dam, C.P.; Chao, David D.; Berg, Dale E.

    2008-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  17. Arctic Sea Ice Maximum 2011

    NASA Video Gallery

    AMSR-E Arctic Sea Ice: September 2010 to March 2011: Scientists tracking the annual maximum extent of Arctic sea ice said that 2011 was among the lowest ice extents measured since satellites began ...

  18. Coastal Ohio Wind Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Bingman, Verner

    2014-04-04

    reduced the wake size and enhanced the vortices in the flow downstream of the turbine-tower compared with the tower alone case. Mean and rms velocity distributions from hot wire anemometer data confirmed that in a downwind configuration, the wake of the tower dominates the flow, thus the flow fields of a tower alone and tower-turbine combinations are nearly the same. For the upwind configuration, the mean velocity shows a narrowing of the wake compared with the tower alone case. The downwind configuration wake persisted longer than that of an upwind configuration; however, it was not possible to quantify this difference because of the size limitation of the wind tunnel downstream of the test section. The water tunnel studies demonstrated that the scale model studies could be used to adequately produce accurate motions to model the motions of a wind turbine platform subject to large waves. It was found that the important factors that affect the platform is whether the platform is submerged or surface piercing. In the former, the loads on the platform will be relatively reduced whereas in the latter case, the structure pierces the wave free surface and gains stiffness and stability. The other important element that affects the movement of the platform is depth of the sea in which the wind turbine will be installed. Furthermore, the wildlife biology component evaluated migratory patterns by different monitoring systems consisting of marine radar, thermal IR camera and acoustic recorders. The types of radar used in the project are weather surveillance radar and marine radar. The weather surveillance radar (1988 Doppler), also known as Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD), provides a network of weather stations in the US. Data generated from this network were used to understand general migratory patterns, migratory stopover habitats, and other patterns caused by the effects of weather conditions. At a local scale our marine radar was used to complement the datasets from NEXRAD and

  19. A new analytical model for wind farm power prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niayifar, Amin; Porte-Agel, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    In this study, a new analytical approach is presented and validated to predict wind farm power production. The new model assumes a Gaussian distribution for the velocity deficit in the wake which has been recently proposed by Bastankhah and Porté-Agel (2014). To estimate the velocity deficit in the wake, this model needs the local wake growth rate parameter which is calculated based on the local turbulence intensity in the wind farm. The interaction of the wakes is modeled by use of the velocity deficit superposition principle. Finally, the power curve is used to estimate the power production from the wind turbines. The wind farm model is compared to large-eddy simulation (LES) data of Horns Rev wind farm for a wide range of wind directions. Reasonable agreement between the proposed analytical model and LES data is obtained. This prediction is substantially better than the one obtained with common wind farm softwares such as WAsP.

  20. Wind-induced ground motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderyan, Vahid; Hickey, Craig J.; Raspet, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Wind noise is a problem in seismic surveys and can mask the seismic signals at low frequency. This research investigates ground motions caused by wind pressure and shear stress perturbations on the ground surface. A prediction of the ground displacement spectra using the measured ground properties and predicted pressure and shear stress at the ground surface is developed. Field measurements are conducted at a site having a flat terrain and low ambient seismic noise. Triaxial geophones are deployed at different depths to study the wind-induced ground vibrations as a function of depth and wind velocity. Comparison of the predicted to the measured wind-induced ground displacement spectra shows good agreement for the vertical component but significant underprediction for the horizontal components. To validate the theoretical model, a test experiment is designed to exert controlled normal pressure and shear stress on the ground using a vertical and a horizontal mass-spring apparatus. This experiment verifies the linear elastic rheology and the quasi-static displacements assumptions of the model. The results indicate that the existing surface shear stress models significantly underestimate the wind shear stress at the ground surface and the amplitude of the fluctuation shear stress must be of the same order of magnitude as the normal pressure. Measurement results show that mounting the geophones flush with the ground provides a significant reduction in wind noise on all three components of the geophone. Further reduction in wind noise with depth of burial is small for depths up to 40 cm.