Science.gov

Sample records for maxwell statistics

  1. Maxwell's Daemon: information versus particle statistics.

    PubMed

    Plesch, Martin; Dahlsten, Oscar; Goold, John; Vedral, Vlatko

    2014-01-01

    Maxwell's daemon is a popular personification of a principle connecting information gain and extractable work in thermodynamics. A Szilard Engine is a particular hypothetical realization of Maxwell's daemon, which is able to extract work from a single thermal reservoir by measuring the position of particle(s) within the system. Here we investigate the role of particle statistics in the whole process; namely, how the extractable work changes if instead of classical particles fermions or bosons are used as the working medium. We give a unifying argument for the optimal work in the different cases: the extractable work is determined solely by the information gain of the initial measurement, as measured by the mutual information, regardless of the number and type of particles which constitute the working substance. PMID:25385291

  2. Maxwell's Daemon: Information versus Particle Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Plesch, Martin; Dahlsten, Oscar; Goold, John; Vedral, Vlatko

    2014-01-01

    Maxwell's daemon is a popular personification of a principle connecting information gain and extractable work in thermodynamics. A Szilard Engine is a particular hypothetical realization of Maxwell's daemon, which is able to extract work from a single thermal reservoir by measuring the position of particle(s) within the system. Here we investigate the role of particle statistics in the whole process; namely, how the extractable work changes if instead of classical particles fermions or bosons are used as the working medium. We give a unifying argument for the optimal work in the different cases: the extractable work is determined solely by the information gain of the initial measurement, as measured by the mutual information, regardless of the number and type of particles which constitute the working substance. PMID:25385291

  3. Maxwell Montes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The highest mountain range on Venus, situated in the upland region Ishtar Terra, and centered at 65.2 °N, 3.3 °E. It extends for 797 km, and contains the highest point on the planet, nearly 12 km above Venus's average surface level (comparable in this respect to Earth's Mount Everest). It is the only Venusian feature to bear a male name, honoring James Clerk Maxwell. The range showed up prominent...

  4. Velocity of a Molecule Evaporated from a Water Nanodroplet: Maxwell-Boltzmann Statistics versus Non-Ergodic Events.

    PubMed

    Abdoul-Carime, Hassan; Berthias, Francis; Feketeová, Linda; Marciante, Mathieu; Calvo, Florent; Forquet, Valérian; Chermette, Henry; Farizon, Bernadette; Farizon, Michel; Märk, Tilmann D

    2015-12-01

    The velocity of a molecule evaporated from a mass-selected protonated water nanodroplet is measured by velocity map imaging in combination with a recently developed mass spectrometry technique. The measured velocity distributions allow probing statistical energy redistribution in ultimately small water nanodroplets after ultrafast electronic excitation. As the droplet size increases, the velocity distribution rapidly approaches the behavior expected for macroscopic droplets. However, a distinct high-velocity contribution provides evidence of molecular evaporation before complete energy redistribution, corresponding to non-ergodic events. PMID:26473406

  5. Statistically-averaged rate equations for intense nonneutral beam propagation through a periodic solenoidal focusing field based on the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, R.C.; Lee, W.W.; Stoltz, P.

    1997-08-01

    This paper presents a detailed formulation and analysis of the rate equations for statistically-averaged quantities for an intense nonneutral beam propagating through a periodic solenoidal focusing field B{sup sol}(x). The analysis is based on the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations in the electrostatic approximation, assuming a thin beam with characteristic beam radius r{sub b} {much_lt} S. The results are applied to investigate the nonlinear evolution of the generalized entropy, mean canonical angular momentum {l_angle}P{sub {theta}}{r_angle}, center-of-mass motion for {l_angle}X{r_angle} and {l_angle}Y{r_angle}, mean kinetic energy (1/2) {l_angle}X{sup {prime}2} + Y{sup {prime}2}{r_angle}, mean-square beam radius {l_angle}X{sup 2} + Y{sup 2}{r_angle}, and coupled rate equations for the unnormalized transverse emittance {epsilon}(s) and root-mean-square beam radius R{sub b}(s) = {l_angle}X{sup 2} + Y{sup 2}{r_angle}{sup 1/2}. Global energy balance is discussed, and the coupled rate equations for {epsilon}(s) and R{sub b}(s) are examined for the class of axisymmetric beam distributions F{sub b}.

  6. RANDOMNESS of Numbers DEFINITION(QUERY:WHAT? V HOW?) ONLY Via MAXWELL-BOLTZMANN CLASSICAL-Statistics(MBCS) Hot-Plasma VS. Digits-Clumping Log-Law NON-Randomness Inversion ONLY BOSE-EINSTEIN QUANTUM-Statistics(BEQS) .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Z.; Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig

    2011-03-01

    RANDOMNESS of Numbers cognitive-semantics DEFINITION VIA Cognition QUERY: WHAT???, NOT HOW?) VS. computer-``science" mindLESS number-crunching (Harrel-Sipser-...) algorithmics Goldreich "PSEUDO-randomness"[Not.AMS(02)] mea-culpa is ONLY via MAXWELL-BOLTZMANN CLASSICAL-STATISTICS(NOT FDQS!!!) "hot-plasma" REPULSION VERSUS Newcomb(1881)-Weyl(1914;1916)-Benford(1938) "NeWBe" logarithmic-law digit-CLUMPING/ CLUSTERING NON-Randomness simple Siegel[AMS Joint.Mtg.(02)-Abs. # 973-60-124] algebraic-inversion to THE QUANTUM and ONLY BEQS preferentially SEQUENTIALLY lower-DIGITS CLUMPING/CLUSTERING with d = 0 BEC, is ONLY VIA Siegel-Baez FUZZYICS=CATEGORYICS (SON OF TRIZ)/"Category-Semantics"(C-S), latter intersection/union of Lawvere(1964)-Siegel(1964)] category-theory (matrix: MORPHISMS V FUNCTORS) "+" cognitive-semantics'' (matrix: ANTONYMS V SYNONYMS) yields Siegel-Baez FUZZYICS=CATEGORYICS/C-S tabular list-format matrix truth-table analytics: MBCS RANDOMNESS TRUTH/EMET!!!

  7. Cold Atoms and Maxwell's Demon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steck, Daniel A.

    2013-12-01

    Recent experiments have focused on realizing and studying asymmetric potential barriers for ultracold atoms. Practically speaking, asymmetric barriers, or "atomtronic diodes", open up newmethods for controlling cold atoms, and possibly methods for laser cooling atoms and molecules that are not amenable to present laser-cooling techniques. More fundamentally, asymmetric barriers are interesting as realizations of the textbook statistical-mechanics scenario of Maxwell's demon. This chapter reviews experimental progress in this area, as well as some related practical and theoretical issues.

  8. Maxwell's silver theramin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Sheila

    2012-12-01

    I found Nicole Yunger-Halpern's Lateral Thoughts on "Fiddling around with physics" (September p60) quite amusing, but I am sure James Clerk Maxwell would have preferred to play the theramin instead of the electric guitar.

  9. Unmasking Maxwell's Demon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.; Allahverdyan, Armen E.

    2002-11-01

    Maxwell's demon is a tiny but fine-fingered being, capable to extract work from a system at instantaneous equilibrium, without needing energy input or information erasure. In the 20'th century many workers have claimed that the demon cannot operate. Here the point of view is taken that this exorcism of the demon never applied, since one did not consider Maxwell's original invention. For a Brownian particle coupled to a quantum bath it was shown by us that quantum entanglement can allow extraction of work from a non-equilibrium system coupled to a single bath. And mesoscopic work sources may establish work extraction cycles even when they are coupled to equilibrium mesoscopic systems immersed in a macroscopic thermal bath. Quantum entanglement and mesocopicity are now identified with (true) Maxwell demons.

  10. Obtaining Maxwell's equations heuristically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, Gerhard; Weissbarth, Jürgen; Grossmann, Frank; Schmidt, Rüdiger

    2013-02-01

    Starting from the experimental fact that a moving charge experiences the Lorentz force and applying the fundamental principles of simplicity (first order derivatives only) and linearity (superposition principle), we show that the structure of the microscopic Maxwell equations for the electromagnetic fields can be deduced heuristically by using the transformation properties of the fields under space inversion and time reversal. Using the experimental facts of charge conservation and that electromagnetic waves propagate with the speed of light, together with Galilean invariance of the Lorentz force, allows us to finalize Maxwell's equations and to introduce arbitrary electrodynamics units naturally.

  11. Maxwell's Demon and the Second Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leff, Harvey S.; Rex, Andrew F.

    2002-11-01

    Maxwell's demon emanates from a thought experiment proposed by James Clerk Maxwell in 1867 to illustrate the statistical nature of the second law of thermodynamics. Subsequently researchers wondered whether such a demon could in fact violate the second law. Leon Brillouin argued that the entropy produced during the demon's measurement precluded such a violation. Years later Oliver Penrose and Charles Bennett observed (independently) that a Maxwell's demon gathers information and stores it in a memory. Penrose showed that erasure of such a memory sends sufficient entropy to the environment to preclude violation of the second law. Notably this is so even when measurement produces arbitrarily little entropy. Bennett obtained the same result using Rolf Landauer's seminal research on the thermodynamics of computation. The stunning shift in focus from measurement to erasure provided the impetus to better understand the role of information in quantum mechanics and thermodynamics. Indeed the linkage of information with physics is the principal legacy of Maxwell's demon. Szilard's one-particle classical "gas" model and its quantum mechanical extension, together with postulated connections between entropy and algorithmic information, have provided useful insights. We review the long history of Maxwell's demon and assess the current status of the second law in the context of the demon's operations.

  12. Photonic Maxwell's Demon.

    PubMed

    Vidrighin, Mihai D; Dahlsten, Oscar; Barbieri, Marco; Kim, M S; Vedral, Vlatko; Walmsley, Ian A

    2016-02-01

    We report an experimental realization of Maxwell's demon in a photonic setup. We show that a measurement at the few-photons level followed by a feed-forward operation allows the extraction of work from intense thermal light into an electric circuit. The interpretation of the experiment stimulates the derivation of an equality relating work extraction to information acquired by measurement. We derive a bound using this relation and show that it is in agreement with the experimental results. Our work puts forward photonic systems as a platform for experiments related to information in thermodynamics. PMID:26894692

  13. Photonic Maxwell's Demon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidrighin, Mihai D.; Dahlsten, Oscar; Barbieri, Marco; Kim, M. S.; Vedral, Vlatko; Walmsley, Ian A.

    2016-02-01

    We report an experimental realization of Maxwell's demon in a photonic setup. We show that a measurement at the few-photons level followed by a feed-forward operation allows the extraction of work from intense thermal light into an electric circuit. The interpretation of the experiment stimulates the derivation of an equality relating work extraction to information acquired by measurement. We derive a bound using this relation and show that it is in agreement with the experimental results. Our work puts forward photonic systems as a platform for experiments related to information in thermodynamics.

  14. Engineering Maxwell's Demon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhiyue; Mandal, Dibyendu; Jarzynski, Christopher

    2015-03-01

    We describe a hypothetical machine, with moving, mechanical components, that acts as an autonomous Maxwell's demon. The machine operates in two useful modes. It can act as an information engine by rectifying the thermal motions of surrounding gas particles to lift a mass against gravity, while writing information to a stream of bits. Alternatively, it can act as an eraser, harnessing the energy of a falling mass to erase information from a stream of bits. We solve for the phase diagram and compute the efficiency of our model, both analytically and numerically. Our model provides a simple example of a mechanical machine that is driven by the information entropy of a stream of bits, rather than a difference in temperatures or chemical potentials. This research is supported by the U.S. Army Research Office under Contract Number W911NF-13-1-0390.

  15. Quantum Behavior of an Autonomous Maxwell Demon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Adrian; Miyake, Akimasa

    2015-03-01

    A Maxwell Demon is an agent that can exploit knowledge of a system's microstate to perform useful work. The second law of thermodynamics is only recovered upon taking into account the work required to irreversibly update the demon's memory, bringing information theoretic concepts into a thermodynamic framework. Recently, there has been interest in modeling a classical Maxwell demon as an autonomous physical system to study this information-work tradeoff explicitly. Motivated by the idea that states with non-local entanglement structure can be used as a computational resource, we ask whether these states have thermodynamic resource quality as well by generalizing a particular classical autonomous Maxwell demon to the quantum regime. We treat the full quantum description using a matrix product operator formalism, which allows us to handle quantum and classical correlations in a unified framework. Applying this, together with techniques from statistical mechanics, we are able to approximate nonlocal quantities such as the erasure performed on the demon's memory register when correlations are present. Finally, we examine how the demon may use these correlations as a resource to outperform its classical counterpart.

  16. James Clerk Maxwell and the Kinetic Theory of Gases: A Review Based on Recent Historical Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brush, Stephen G.

    1971-01-01

    Maxwell's four major papers and some shorter publications relating to kinetic theory and statistical mechanics are discussed in the light of subsequent research. Reviews Maxwell's ideas on such topics as velocity, distribution law, the theory of heat conduction, the mechanism of the radiometer effect, the ergodic hypothesis, and his views on the…

  17. Quantum discord and Maxwell's demons

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Wojciech Hubert

    2003-01-01

    Quantum discord was proposed as an information-theoretic measure of the 'quantumness' of correlations. I show that discord determines the difference between the efficiency of quantum and classical Maxwell's demons - that is, entities that can or cannot measure nonlocal observables or carry out conditional quantum operations - in extracting work from collections of correlated quantum systems.

  18. Statistics

    Cancer.gov

    Links to sources of cancer-related statistics, including the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program, SEER-Medicare datasets, cancer survivor prevalence data, and the Cancer Trends Progress Report.

  19. James Clerk Maxwell: Life and science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Philip L.

    2016-07-01

    Maxwell's life and science are presented with an account of the progression of Maxwell's research on electromagnetic theory. This is appropriate for the International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies, 2015. Maxwell's own confidence in his 1865 electromagnetic theory of light is examined, along with some of the difficulties he faced and the difficulties faced by some of his followers. Maxwell's interest in radiation pressure and electromagnetic stress is addressed, as well as subsequent developments. Some of Maxwell's other contributions to physics are discussed with an emphasis on the kinetic and molecular theory of gases. Maxwell's theistic perspective on science is illustrated, accompanied by examples of perspectives on Maxwell and his science provided by his peers and accounts of his interactions with those peers. Appendices examine the peer review of Maxwell's 1865 electromagnetic theory paper and the naming of the Maxwell Garnett effective media approximation and provide various supplemental perspectives. From Maxwell's publications and correspondence there is evidence he had a high regard for Michael Faraday. Examples of Maxwell's contributions to electromagnetic terminology are noted.

  20. Helices of fractionalized Maxwell fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Muhammad; Abro, Kashif Ali; Khan, Najeeb Alam

    2015-12-01

    In this paper the helical flows of fractionalized Maxwell fluid model, through a circular cylinder, is studied. The motion is produced by the cylinder that at the initial moment begins to rotate around its axis with an angular velocity Omegatp, and to slide along the same axis with linear velocity Utp. The solutions that have been obtained using Laplace and finite Hankel transforms and presented in series form in terms of the newly defined special function M(z), satisfy all imposed initial and boundary conditions. Moreover, the corresponding solutions for ordinary Maxwell and Newtonian fluid obtained as special cases of the present general solution. Finally, the influence of various pertinent parameters on fluid motion as well as the comparison among different fluids models is analyzed by graphical illustrations.

  1. Structural mapping of Maxwell Montes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keep, Myra; Hansen, Vicki L.

    1993-01-01

    Four sets of structures were mapped in the western and southern portions of Maxwell Montes. An early north-trending set of penetrative lineaments is cut by dominant, spaced ridges and paired valleys that trend northwest. To the south the ridges and valleys splay and graben form in the valleys. The spaced ridges and graben are cut by northeast-trending graben. The northwest-trending graben formed synchronously with or slightly later than the spaced ridges. Formation of the northeast-trending graben may have overlapped with that of the northwest-trending graben, but occurred in a spatially distinct area (regions of 2 deg slope). Graben formation, with northwest-southeast extension, may be related to gravity-sliding. Individually and collectively these structures are too small to support the immense topography of Maxwell, and are interpreted as parasitic features above a larger mass that supports the mountain belt.

  2. Joseph Maxwell on mediumistic personifications.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Carlos S

    2016-09-01

    The study of mediumship received much impetus from the work of psychical researchers. This included ideas about the phenomena of personation, or changes in attitudes, dispositions and behaviours shown by some mediums that supposedly indicated discarnate action. The aim of this Classic Text is to reprint passages about this topic from the writings of French psychical researcher Joseph Maxwell (1858-1938), which were part of the contributions of some psychical researchers to reconceptualize the manifestations in psychological terms. Maxwell suggested these changes in mediums were a production of their subconscious mind. His ideas are a reflection of previous theorization about secondary personalities and a particular example of the contributions of psychical researchers to understand the psychology of mediumship. PMID:27473729

  3. Introducing polarization and magnetization into Maxwell's equations: A modified approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakoby, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of electric polarization and magnetization—the density of electric and magnetic dipole moments respectively—into Maxwell's equations requires establishing their respective relation to polarization charges and magnetization currents. Using a method introduced by Feynman in his famous lectures on physics and considering statistically distributed dipoles on the microscopic scale, the desired relations can be established in a manner that may be more intuitive to undergraduate students.

  4. New family of Maxwell like algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concha, P. K.; Durka, R.; Merino, N.; Rodríguez, E. K.

    2016-08-01

    We introduce an alternative way of closing Maxwell like algebras. We show, through a suitable change of basis, that resulting algebras are given by the direct sums of the AdS and the Maxwell algebras already known in the literature. Casting the result into the S-expansion method framework ensures the straightaway construction of the gravity theories based on a found enlargement.

  5. Vortex shedding and Maxwell's problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelin, Sebastien; Smith, Stefan Llewellyn

    2006-11-01

    The coupled problem of a flow around a solid body has applications from the fall of objects in a fluid to the computation of forces on wind-exposed structures. A simplified 2D model is proposed here for the interaction between solid bodies and potential flows. Potential flows over sharp edges generate singular velocities at the edges. To satisfy the Kutta condition, vorticity sheets must be shed from the edges to remove these singularities. Here 2D vorticity sheets are represented as discrete point-vortices with monotically varying intensity. From the fluid momentum conservation, an equation of motion for these vortices, the Brown and Michael equation, is derived and mechanical efforts applied by the fluid on the body are computed. The set of dynamical equations obtained for the fluid-body system is closed and is applied to Maxwell's problem of the 2D fall of a plate in an inviscid fluid initially at rest.

  6. Maxwell demons in phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrondo, J. M. R.; Granger, L.

    2015-07-01

    Although there is not a complete "proof" of the second law of thermodynamics based on microscopic dynamics, two properties of Hamiltonian systems have been used to prove the impossibility of work extraction from a single thermal reservoir: Liouville's theorem and the adiabatic invariance of the volume enclosed by an energy shell. In this paper we analyze these two properties in the Szilard engine and other systems related with the Maxwell demon. In particular, we recall that the enclosed volume is no longer an adiabatic invariant in non ergodic systems and explore the consequences of this on the second law. This article is supplemented with comments by H. Ouerdane and Lawrence S. Schulman and a final reply by the authors.

  7. The Proell Effect: A Macroscopic Maxwell's Demon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauen, Kenneth M.

    2011-12-01

    Maxwell's Demon is a legitimate challenge to the Second Law of Thermodynamics when the "demon" is executed via the Proell effect. Thermal energy transfer according to the Kinetic Theory of Heat and Statistical Mechanics that takes place over distances greater than the mean free path of a gas circumvents the microscopic randomness that leads to macroscopic irreversibility. No information is required to sort the particles as no sorting occurs; the entire volume of gas undergoes the same transition. The Proell effect achieves quasi-spontaneous thermal separation without sorting by the perturbation of a heterogeneous constant volume system with displacement and regeneration. The classical analysis of the constant volume process, such as found in the Stirling Cycle, is incomplete and therefore incorrect. There are extra energy flows that classical thermo does not recognize. When a working fluid is displaced across a regenerator with a temperature gradient in a constant volume system, complimentary compression and expansion work takes place that transfers energy between the regenerator and the bulk gas volumes of the hot and cold sides of the constant volume system. Heat capacity at constant pressure applies instead of heat capacity at constant volume. The resultant increase in calculated, recyclable energy allows the Carnot Limit to be exceeded in certain cycles. Super-Carnot heat engines and heat pumps have been designed and a US patent has been awarded.

  8. Green`s function of Maxwell`s equations and corresponding implications for iterative methods

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, B.S.; Fainberg, E.B.

    1996-12-31

    Energy conservation law imposes constraints on the norm and direction of the Hilbert space vector representing a solution of Maxwell`s equations. In this paper, we derive these constrains and discuss the corresponding implications for the Green`s function of Maxwell`s equations in a dissipative medium. It is shown that Maxwell`s equations can be reduced to an integral equation with a contracting kernel. The equation can be solved using simple iterations. Software based on this algorithm have successfully been applied to a wide range of problems dealing with high contrast models. The matrix corresponding to the integral equation has a well defined spectrum. The equation can be symmetrized and solved using different approaches, for instance one of the conjugate gradient methods.

  9. Maxwellians and the Remaking of Maxwell's Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Bruce

    2012-02-01

    Although James Clerk Maxwell first formulated his theory of the electromagnetic field in the early 1860s, it went through important changes before it gained general acceptance in the 1890s. Those changes were largely the work of a group of younger physicists, the Maxwellians, led by G. F. FitzGerald in Ireland, Oliver Lodge and Oliver Heaviside in England, and Heinrich Hertz in Germany. Together, they extended, refined, tested, and confirmed Maxwell's theory, and recast it into the set of four vector equations known ever since as ``Maxwell's equations.'' By tracing how the Maxwellians remade and disseminated Maxwell's theory between the late 1870s and the mid-1890s, we can gain a clearer understanding not just of how the electromagnetic field was understood at the end of the 19th century, but of the collaborative nature of work at the frontiers of physics.

  10. How Maxwell's equations came to light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahon, Basil

    2015-01-01

    The nineteenth-century Scottish physicist James Clerk Maxwell made groundbreaking contributions to many areas of science including thermodynamics and colour vision. However, he is best known for his equations that unified electricity, magnetism and light.

  11. Maxwell Duality, Lorentz Invariance, and Topological Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowling, J.; Williams, C.; Franson, J.

    1999-01-01

    We discuss the Maxwell electromagnetic duality relations between the Aharonov-Bohm, Aharonov-Casher, and He-McKellar-Wilkens topological phases, which allows a unified description of all three phenomena.

  12. Shock waves: The Maxwell-Cattaneo case.

    PubMed

    Uribe, F J

    2016-03-01

    Several continuum theories for shock waves give rise to a set of differential equations in which the analysis of the underlying vector field can be done using the tools of the theory of dynamical systems. We illustrate the importance of the divergences associated with the vector field by considering the ideas by Maxwell and Cattaneo and apply them to study shock waves in dilute gases. By comparing the predictions of the Maxwell-Cattaneo equations with shock wave experiments we are lead to the following conclusions: (a) For low compressions (low Mach numbers: M) the results from the Maxwell-Cattaneo equations provide profiles that are in fair agreement with the experiments, (b) as the Mach number is increased we find a range of Mach numbers (1.27≈M_{1}Maxwell-Cattaneo equations cannot be found, and PMID:27078450

  13. Axially Symmetric Brans-Dicke-Maxwell Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, S.

    1981-05-01

    Following a method of John and Goswami new solutions of coupled Brans-Dicke-Maxwell theory are generated from Zipoy's solutions in oblate and prolate spheroidal coordinates for source-free gravitational field. All these solutions become Euclidean at infinity. The asymptotic behavior and the singularity of the solutions are discussed and a comparative study made with the corresponding Einstein-Maxwell solutions. The possibility of a very large red shift from the boundary of the spheroids is also discussed.

  14. Magnetic monopoles, Galilean invariance, and Maxwell's equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Frank S.

    1992-02-01

    Maxwell's equations have space reserved for magnetic monopoles. Whether or not they exist in our part of the universe, monopoles provide a useful didactic tool to help us recognize relations among Maxwell's equations less easily apparent in the approach followed by many introductory textbooks, wherein Coulomb's law, Biot and Savart's law, Ampere's law, Faraday's law, Maxwell's displacement current, etc., are introduced independently, ``as demanded by experiment.'' Instead a conceptual path that deduces all of Maxwell's equations from the near-minimal set of assumptions: (a) Inertial frames exist, in which Newton's laws hold, to a first approximation; (b) the laws of electrodynamics are Galilean invariant-i.e., they have the same form in every inertial frame, to a first approximation; (c) magnetic poles (as well as the usual electric charges) exist; (d) the complete Lorentz force on an electric charge is known; (e) the force on a monopole at rest is known; (f) the Coulomb-like field produced by a resting electric charge and by a resting monopole are known. Everything else is deduced. History is followed in the assumption that Newtonian mechanics have been discovered, but not special relativity. (Only particle velocities v<Maxwell's equations (Maxwell did not need special relativity, so why should we,) but facing Einstein's paradox, the solution of which is encapsulated in the Einstein velocity-addition formula.

  15. Operational derivation of Boltzmann distribution with Maxwell's demon model.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Akio; Maruyama, Koji; Shikano, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    The resolution of the Maxwell's demon paradox linked thermodynamics with information theory through information erasure principle. By considering a demon endowed with a Turing-machine consisting of a memory tape and a processor, we attempt to explore the link towards the foundations of statistical mechanics and to derive results therein in an operational manner. Here, we present a derivation of the Boltzmann distribution in equilibrium as an example, without hypothesizing the principle of maximum entropy. Further, since the model can be applied to non-equilibrium processes, in principle, we demonstrate the dissipation-fluctuation relation to show the possibility in this direction. PMID:26598363

  16. Maxwell's demon. (I) A thermodynamic exorcism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyftopoulos, Elias P.

    2002-05-01

    It is shown that Maxwell's demon is unable to accomplish his task not because of considerations related to irreversibility, acquisition of information, and computers and erasure of information but because of limitations imposed by the properties of the system on which he is asked to perform his demonic manipulations. The limitations emerge from two recent but related developments of which Maxwell was completely unaware. One is an exposition of thermodynamics as a nonstatistical theory, valid for all systems, both large and small, including a system with only one degree of (translational) freedom, and for all states, both thermodynamic or stable equilibrium states and states that are not thermodynamic equilibrium, including states encountered in mechanics. In this theory, entropy is proven to be a nondestructible, nonstatistical property of any state in the same sense that inertial mass is a nonstatistical property of any state. In Part I, the demon is shown to be incapable of accomplishing his task because this would be equivalent either to reducing the nondestructible and nonstatistical entropy of air in a container without compensation by any other system, including himself, or to extracting only energy from the air under conditions that require the extraction of both energy and entropy. The second development is a unified, quantum-theoretic interpretation of mechanics and the thermodynamics just cited. In this theory: (a) the quantum-theoretic probabilities of measurement results are represented by a density operator ρ that corresponds to a homogeneous ensemble of identical systems, identically prepared; homogeneous is an ensemble in which every member is described by the same density operator ρ as any other member, that is, the ensemble is not a statistical mixture of projectors (wave functions); said differently, experimentally (as opposed to algebraically) the homogeneous ensemble cannot be decomposed into mixtures either of pure states or other mixtures

  17. Venus - Maxwell Montes and Cleopatra Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This Magellan full-resolution image shows Maxwell Montes, and is centered at 65 degrees north latitude and 6 degrees east longitude. Maxwell is the highest mountain on Venus, rising almost 11 kilometers (6.8 miles) above mean planetary radius. The western slopes (on the left) are very steep, whereas the eastern slopes descend gradually into Fortuna Tessera. The broad ridges and valleys making up Maxwell and Fortuna suggest that the topography resulted from compression. Most of Maxwell Montes has a very bright radar return; such bright returns are common on Venus at high altitudes. This phenomenon is thought to result from the presence of a radar reflective mineral such as pyrite. Interestingly, the highest area on Maxwell is less bright than the surrounding slopes, suggesting that the phenomenon is limited to a particular elevation range. The pressure, temperature, and chemistry of the atmosphere vary with altitude; the material responsible for the bright return probably is only stable in a particular range of atmospheric conditions and therefore a particular elevation range. The prominent circular feature in eastern Maxwell is Cleopatra. Cleopatra is a double-ring impact basin about 100 kilometers (62 miles) in diameter and 2.5 kilometers (1.5 miles) deep. A steep-walled, winding channel a few kilometers wide breaks through the rough terrain surrounding the crater rim. A large amount of lava originating in Cleopatra flowed through this channel and filled valleys in Fortuna Tessera. Cleopatra is superimposed on the structures of Maxwell Montes and appears to be undeformed, indicating that Cleopatra is relatively young.

  18. Euclideanization of Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Daniel Alan

    We quantize the theory of electromagnetism in 2 + 1-spacetime dimensions with the addition of the topological Chern-Simons term using an indefinite metric formalism. In the process, we also quantize the Proca and pure Maxwell theories, which are shown to be related to the Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory. Next, we Euclideanize these three theories, obtaining path space formulae and investigating Osterwalder-Schrader positivity in each case. Finally, we obtain a characterization of those Euclidean states that correspond to physical states in the relativistic theories.

  19. 21 CFR 886.1435 - Maxwell spot.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Maxwell spot. 886.1435 Section 886.1435 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES...-powered device that is a light source with a red and blue filter intended to test macular function....

  20. Shock waves: The Maxwell-Cattaneo case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, F. J.

    2016-03-01

    Several continuum theories for shock waves give rise to a set of differential equations in which the analysis of the underlying vector field can be done using the tools of the theory of dynamical systems. We illustrate the importance of the divergences associated with the vector field by considering the ideas by Maxwell and Cattaneo and apply them to study shock waves in dilute gases. By comparing the predictions of the Maxwell-Cattaneo equations with shock wave experiments we are lead to the following conclusions: (a) For low compressions (low Mach numbers: M ) the results from the Maxwell-Cattaneo equations provide profiles that are in fair agreement with the experiments, (b) as the Mach number is increased we find a range of Mach numbers (1.27 ≈M1Maxwell-Cattaneo equations cannot be found, and (c) for greater Mach numbers (M >M2) shock wave solutions can be found though they differ significantly from experiments.

  1. A Modification to Maxwell's Needle Apparatus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soorya, Tribhuvan N.

    2015-01-01

    Maxwell's needle apparatus is used to determine the shear modulus (?) of the material of a wire of uniform cylindrical cross section. Conventionally, a single observation is taken for each observable, and the value of ? is calculated in a single shot. A modification to the above apparatus is made by varying one of the observables, namely the mass…

  2. Maxwell Equations for Slow-Moving Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozov, Andrey

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, the Minkowski equations obtained on the basis of theory of relativity are used to describe electromagnetic fields in moving media. But important electromagnetic processes run under non-relativistic conditions of slow-moving media. Therefore, one should carry out its description in terms of classical mechanics. Hertz derived electrodynamic equations for moving media within the frame of classical mechanics on the basis of the Maxwell theory. His equations disagree with the experimental data concerned with the moving dielectrics. In the paper, a way of description of electromagnetic fields in slow-moving media on the basis of the Maxwell theory within the frame of classical mechanics is offered by combining the Hertz approach and the experimental data concerned with the movement of dielectrics in electromagnetic fields. Received Maxwell equations lack asymmetry in the description of the reciprocal electrodynamic action of a magnet and a conductor and conform to known experimental data. Comparative analysis of the Minkowski and Maxwell models is carried out.

  3. Maxwell's electromagnetic theory and special relativity.

    PubMed

    Hall, Graham

    2008-05-28

    This paper presents a brief history of electromagnetic theory from ancient times up to the work of Maxwell and the advent of Einstein's special theory of relativity. It is divided into five convenient periods and the intention is to describe these developments for the benefit of a lay scientific audience and with the minimum of technical detail. PMID:18218598

  4. Fractional statistics and confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaete, P.; Wotzasek, C.

    2005-02-01

    It is shown that a pointlike composite having charge and magnetic moment displays a confining potential for the static interaction while simultaneously obeying fractional statistics in a pure gauge theory in three dimensions, without a Chern-Simons term. This result is distinct from the Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory that shows a screening nature for the potential.

  5. What physics is encoded in Maxwell's equations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosyakov, B. P.

    2005-08-01

    We reconstruct Maxwell's equations showing that a major part of the information encoded in them is taken from topological properties of spacetime, and the residual information, divorced from geometry, which represents the physical contents of electrodynamics, %these equations, translates into four assumptions:(i) locality; (ii) linearity; %of the dynamical law; (iii) identity of the charge-source and the charge-coupling; and (iv) lack of magnetic monopoles. However, a closer inspection of symmetries peculiar to electrodynamics shows that these assumptions may have much to do with geometry. Maxwell's equations tell us that we live in a three-dimensional space with trivial (Euclidean) topology; time is a one-dimensional unidirectional and noncompact continuum; and spacetime is endowed with a light cone structure readable in the conformal invariance of electrodynamics. Our geometric feelings relate to the fact that Maxwell's equations are built in our brain, hence our space and time orientation, our visualization and imagination capabilities are ensured by perpetual instinctive processes of solving Maxwell's equations. People are usually agree in their observations of angle relations, for example, a right angle is never confused with an angle slightly different from right. By contrast, we may disagree in metric issues, say, a colour-blind person finds the light wave lengths quite different from those found by a man with normal vision. This lends support to the view that conformal invariance of Maxwell's equations is responsible for producing our notion of space. Assuming that our geometric intuition is guided by our innate realization of electrodynamical laws, some abnormal mental phenomena, such as clairvoyance, may have a rational explanation.

  6. Altered Maxwell equations in the length gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, H. R.

    2013-09-01

    The length gauge uses a scalar potential to describe a laser field, thus treating it as a longitudinal field rather than as a transverse field. This distinction is manifested by the fact that the Maxwell equations that relate to the length gauge are not the same as those for transverse fields. In particular, a source term is necessary in the length-gauge Maxwell equations, whereas the Coulomb-gauge description of plane waves possesses the basic property of transverse fields that they propagate with no source terms at all. This difference is shown to be importantly consequential in some previously unremarked circumstances; and it explains why the Göppert-Mayer gauge transformation does not provide the security that might be expected of full gauge equivalence.

  7. Maxwell's demons in multipartite quantum correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Helena C.; Rulli, Clodoaldo C.; de Oliveira, Thiago R.; Sarandy, Marcelo S.

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the extraction of thermodynamic work by a Maxwell's demon in a multipartite quantum correlated system. We begin by adopting the standard model of a Maxwell's demon as a Turing machine, either in a classical or quantum setup depending on its ability to implement classical or quantum conditional dynamics. Then, for an n -partite system (A1,A2,⋯,An) , we introduce a protocol of work extraction that bounds the advantage of the quantum demon over its classical counterpart through the amount of multipartite quantum correlation present in the system, as measured by a thermal version of the global quantum discord. This result is illustrated for an arbitrary n -partite pure state of qubits with Schmidt decomposition, where it is shown that the thermal global quantum discord exactly quantifies the quantum advantage. Moreover, we also consider the work extraction via mixed multipartite states, where examples of tight upper bounds can be obtained.

  8. Maxwell electrodynamics subjected to quantum vacuum fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Gevorkyan, A. S.; Gevorkyan, A. A.

    2011-06-15

    The propagation of electromagnetic waves in the vacuum is considered taking into account quantum fluctuations in the limits of Maxwell-Langevin (ML) equations. For a model of 'white noise' fluctuations, using ML equations, a second order partial differential equation is found which describes the quantum distribution of virtual particles in vacuum. It is proved that in order to satisfy observed facts, the Lamb Shift etc, the virtual particles should be quantized in unperturbed vacuum. It is shown that the quantized virtual particles in toto (approximately 86 percent) are condensed on the 'ground state' energy level. It is proved that the extension of Maxwell electrodynamics with inclusion of the vacuum quantum field fluctuations may be constructed on a 6D space-time continuum with a 2D compactified subspace. Their influence on the refraction indexes of vacuum is studied.

  9. Venus: detailed mapping of maxwell montes region.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Y N; Crymov, A A; Kotelnikov, V A; Petrov, G M; Rzhiga, O N; Sidorenko, A I; Sinilo, V P; Zakharov, A I; Akim, E L; Basilevski, A T; Kadnichanski, S A; Tjuflin, Y S

    1986-03-14

    From October 1983 to July 1984, the north hemisphere of Venus, from latitude 30 degrees to latitude 90 degrees , was mapped by means of the radar imagers and altimeters of the spacecraft Venera 15 and Venera 16. This report presents the results of the radar mapping of the Maxwell Montes region, one of the most interesting features of Venus' surface. A radar mosaic map and contour map have been compiled. PMID:17839563

  10. Loading relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zenitani, Seiji

    2015-04-15

    Numerical algorithms to load relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle-in-cell (PIC) and Monte-Carlo simulations are presented. For stationary relativistic Maxwellian, the inverse transform method and the Sobol algorithm are reviewed. To boost particles to obtain relativistic shifted-Maxwellian, two rejection methods are proposed in a physically transparent manner. Their acceptance efficiencies are ≈50% for generic cases and 100% for symmetric distributions. They can be combined with arbitrary base algorithms.

  11. Venus - Detailed mapping of Maxwell Montes region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Yu. N.; Crymov, A. A.; Kotelnikov, V. A.; Petrov, G. M.; Rzhiga, O. N.; Sidorenko, A. I.; Sinilo, V. P.; Zakharov, A. I.; Akim, E. L.; Basilevski, A. T.; Kadnichanski, S. A.; Tjuflin, Yu. S.

    1986-03-01

    From October 1983 to July 1984, the north hemisphere of Venus, from latitude 30° to latitude 90°, was mapped by means of the radar imagers and altimeters of the spacecraft Venera 15 and Venera 16. This report presents the results of the radar mapping of the Maxwell Montes region, one of the most interesting features of Venus' surface. A radar mosaic map and contour map have been compiled.

  12. Multipartite information flow for multiple Maxwell demons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Jordan M.

    2015-03-01

    The second law of thermodynamics dictates the fundamental limits to the amount of energy and information that can be exchanged between physical systems. In this work, we extend a thermodynamic formalism describing this flow of energy and information developed for a pair of bipartite systems to many multipartite systems. We identify a natural thermodynamic quantity that describes the information exchanged among these systems. We then introduce and discuss a refined version. Our results are illustrated with a model of two, competing Maxwell demons.

  13. Loading relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenitani, Seiji

    2015-04-01

    Numerical algorithms to load relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle-in-cell (PIC) and Monte-Carlo simulations are presented. For stationary relativistic Maxwellian, the inverse transform method and the Sobol algorithm are reviewed. To boost particles to obtain relativistic shifted-Maxwellian, two rejection methods are proposed in a physically transparent manner. Their acceptance efficiencies are ≈50 % for generic cases and 100% for symmetric distributions. They can be combined with arbitrary base algorithms.

  14. Maxwell: A new vision of the world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maystre, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    The paper outlines the crucial contributions of James Clerk Maxwell to Physics and more generally to our vision of the world. He achieved 150 years ago a synthesis of the pioneering works in magnetostatics, electrostatics, induction and, by introducing the notion of displacement current, gave birth to Electromagnetics. Then, he deduced the existence of electromagnetic waves and identified light as one of them. Maxwell equations deeply changed a Newtonian conception of the world based on particle interactions by pointing out the vital role of waves in physics. This new conception had a strong influence on the development of quantum physics. Finally, the invariance of light velocity in Galilean frames led to Lorentz transformations, a key step toward the theory of relativity. Par ailleurs, les équations de Maxwell ont profondément changé une conception du monde newtonienne basée sur l'interaction entre particules en révélant le rôle essentiel des ondes en physique, ce qui eut une influence déterminante sur le développement de la physique quantique. Enfin, l'invariance de la vitesse de la lumière dans les repères galiléens a entraîné la découverte des transformations de Lorentz, une étape capitale vers la théorie de la relativité.

  15. The Pseudo-Maxwell Equations Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavroudis, Orestes N.

    1982-02-01

    The so-called pseudo-Maxwell are a set of partial differential eauations that strongly resemble the Maxwell equations, yet are based only on Fermat's principle, the idea of an orthotomic system of rays, and certain theorems from differential gecmetry. From Fermat's principle, applying the Euler equation from the variational calculus, one obtains the ray equation whose solutions describe ray paths in an inhomogeneous medium. We define an aggregate of such rays as an orthotomic system if it is possible to find a sur-face orthogonal to all rays in the aggregate. Making use of the Frenet equations from differential geometry, one may derive relationships between certain geometrical vectors and their derivatives. These are the pseudo-Maxwell equations. Their existence is' paradoxical. Are they merely a mathematical artifact, an accidental quirk of the notation we are accustomed to use? Or do they indicate that there is more geometry lurking in the physics of electricity and magnetism than we ever dreamed of in our philosophies?

  16. Deforming the Maxwell-Sim algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, G. W.; Gomis, Joaquim; Pope, C. N.

    2010-09-15

    The Maxwell algebra is a noncentral extension of the Poincare algebra, in which the momentum generators no longer commute, but satisfy [P{sub {mu}},P{sub {nu}}]=Z{sub {mu}{nu}}. The charges Z{sub {mu}{nu}} commute with the momenta, and transform tensorially under the action of the angular momentum generators. If one constructs an action for a massive particle, invariant under these symmetries, one finds that it satisfies the equations of motion of a charged particle interacting with a constant electromagnetic field via the Lorentz force. In this paper, we explore the analogous constructions where one starts instead with the ISim subalgebra of Poincare, this being the symmetry algebra of very special relativity. It admits an analogous noncentral extension, and we find that a particle action invariant under this Maxwell-Sim algebra again describes a particle subject to the ordinary Lorentz force. One can also deform the ISim algebra to DISim{sub b}, where b is a nontrivial dimensionless parameter. We find that the motion described by an action invariant under the corresponding Maxwell-DISim algebra is that of a particle interacting via a Finslerian modification of the Lorentz force. In an appendix is it shown that the DISim{sub b} algebra is isomorphic to the extended Schroedinger algebra with its standard deformation parameter z, when b=(1/1-z).

  17. Infinite Maxwell fisheye inside a finite circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yangjié; Chen, Huanyang

    2015-12-01

    This manuscript proposes a two-dimensional heterogeneous imaging medium composed of an isotropic refractive index. We exploit conformal-mapping to transfer the full Maxwell fisheye into a finite circle. Unlike our previous design that requires a mirror of Zhukovski airfoil shape, this approach can work without a mirror, while offering a comparable imaging resolution. This medium may also be used as an isotropic gradient index lens to transform a light source inside it into two identical sources of null interference. A merit of this approach is reduction of the near-zero-index area from an infinite zone into a finite one, which shall ease its realization.

  18. Maxwell's demon based on a single qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekola, J. P.; Golubev, D. S.; Averin, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    We propose and analyze Maxwell's demon based on a single qubit with avoided level crossing. Its operation cycle consists of adiabatic drive to the point of minimum energy separation, measurement of the qubit state, and conditional feedback. We show that the heat extracted from the bath at temperature T can ideally approach the Landauer limit of kBT ln2 per cycle even in the quantum regime. Practical demon efficiency is limited by the interplay of Landau-Zener transitions and coupling to the bath. We suggest that an experimental demonstration of the demon is fully feasible using one of the standard superconducting qubits.

  19. Maxwell's demon. (II) A quantum-theoretic exorcism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyftopoulos, Elias P.

    2002-05-01

    In Part II of this two-part paper we prove that Maxwell's demon is unable to accomplish his task of sorting air molecules into swift and slow because in air in a thermodynamic equilibrium state there are no such molecules. The proof is based on the principles of a unified quantum theory of mechanics and thermodynamics. The key idea of the unified theory is that von Neumann's concept of a homogeneous ensemble of identical systems, identically prepared, is valid not only for a density operator ρ equal to a projector (every member of the ensemble is assigned the same projector, ρi=| ψi> < ψi|= ρi2, or the same wave function ψ i as any other member) but also for a density operator that is not a projector (every member of the ensemble is assigned the same density operator, ρ>ρ 2, as any other member). So, the latter ensemble is not a statistical mixture of projectors. The broadening of the validity of the homogeneous ensemble is consistent with the quantum-theoretic postulates about observables, measurement results, and value of any observable. In the context of the unified theory, among the many novel results is the theorem that each molecule of a system in a thermodynamic equilibrium state has zero value of momentum, that is, each molecule is at a standstill and, therefore, there are no molecules to be sorted as swift and slow. Said differently, if Maxwell were cognizant of quantum theory, he would not have conceived of the idea of the demon. It is noteworthy that the zero value of momentum is not the result of averaging over different momenta of many molecules. Under the specified conditions, it is the quantum-theoretic value of the momentum of any one molecule, and the same result is valid even if the system consists of only one molecule.

  20. Comparing Teaching Approaches About Maxwell's Displacement Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karam, Ricardo; Coimbra, Debora; Pietrocola, Maurício

    2014-08-01

    Due to its fundamental role for the consolidation of Maxwell's equations, the displacement current is one of the most important topics of any introductory course on electromagnetism. Moreover, this episode is widely used by historians and philosophers of science as a case study to investigate several issues (e.g. the theory-experiment relationship). Despite the consensus among physics educators concerning the relevance of the topic, there are many possible ways to interpret and justify the need for the displacement current term. With the goal of understanding the didactical transposition of this topic more deeply, we investigate three of its domains: (1) The historical development of Maxwell's reasoning; (2) Different approaches to justify the term insertion in physics textbooks; and (3) Four lectures devoted to introduce the topic in undergraduate level given by four different professors. By reflecting on the differences between these three domains, significant evidence for the knowledge transformation caused by the didactization of this episode is provided. The main purpose of this comparative analysis is to assist physics educators in developing an epistemological surveillance regarding the teaching and learning of the displacement current.

  1. Maxwell and creation: Acceptance, criticism, and his anonymous publication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Philip L.

    2007-08-01

    Although James Clerk Maxwell's religious views and discussions on atoms having the properties of ``manufactured articles'' have been discussed, some aspects of the responses by his contemporaries to his remarks on creation have been neglected. Various responses quoted here include a book from 1878 by ``Physicus'' (George John Romanes) attributing ``arrogance'' to Maxwell for his inferences. Relevant aspects of the evolution of the perspective of Romanes are noted. A response by B. F. Westcott indicated that Maxwell was the author of a related anonymous publication concerned with what eventually became known as the heat death of the universe. In his teaching to theology students, Westcott, a friend of Maxwell, emphasized Maxwell's reasoning based on the dissipation of energy. There are similarities between Maxwell's perspective on creation and Biblical commentaries by fellow Eranus Club members Westcott and J. B. Lightfoot. Interest in Maxwell's remarks extended into the twentieth century. The principal Baptist chapel attended by Maxwell and his wife when in London in the 1860s is identified and some relevant attributes of the chapel and of its pastor are described.

  2. Chaotic magnetic fields in Vlasov-Maxwell equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Janaki, M. S.; Dasgupta, Brahmananda; Bandyopadhyay, Alak

    2014-03-15

    Stationary solutions of Vlasov-Maxwell equations are obtained by exploiting the invariants of single particle motion leading to linear or nonlinear functional relations between current and vector potential. For a specific combination of invariants, it is shown that Vlasov-Maxwell equilibria have an associated Hamiltonian that exhibits chaos.

  3. Maxwell Equations and the Redundant Gauge Degree of Freedom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Chun Wa

    2009-01-01

    On transformation to the Fourier space (k,[omega]), the partial differential Maxwell equations simplify to algebraic equations, and the Helmholtz theorem of vector calculus reduces to vector algebraic projections. Maxwell equations and their solutions can then be separated readily into longitudinal and transverse components relative to the…

  4. Post-Newtonian approximation in Maxwell-like form

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Jeffrey D.; Nichols, David A.; Thorne, Kip S.

    2009-12-15

    The equations of the linearized first post-Newtonian approximation to general relativity are often written in 'gravitoelectromagnetic' Maxwell-like form, since that facilitates physical intuition. Damour, Soffel, and Xu (DSX) (as a side issue in their complex but elegant papers on relativistic celestial mechanics) have expressed the first post-Newtonian approximation, including all nonlinearities, in Maxwell-like form. This paper summarizes that DSX Maxwell-like formalism (which is not easily extracted from their celestial mechanics papers), and then extends it to include the post-Newtonian (Landau-Lifshitz-based) gravitational momentum density, momentum flux (i.e. gravitational stress tensor), and law of momentum conservation in Maxwell-like form. The authors and their colleagues have found these Maxwell-like momentum tools useful for developing physical intuition into numerical-relativity simulations of compact binaries with spin.

  5. Nondiffracting accelerating wave packets of Maxwell's equations.

    PubMed

    Kaminer, Ido; Bekenstein, Rivka; Nemirovsky, Jonathan; Segev, Mordechai

    2012-04-20

    We present the nondiffracting spatially accelerating solutions of the Maxwell equations. Such beams accelerate in a circular trajectory, thus generalizing the concept of Airy beams to the full domain of the wave equation. For both TE and TM polarizations, the beams exhibit shape-preserving bending which can have subwavelength features, and the Poynting vector of the main lobe displays a turn of more than 90°. We show that these accelerating beams are self-healing, analyze their properties, and find the new class of accelerating breathers: self-bending beams of periodically oscillating shapes. Finally, we emphasize that in their scalar form, these beams are the exact solutions for nondispersive accelerating wave packets of the most common wave equation describing time-harmonic waves. As such, this work has profound implications to many linear wave systems in nature, ranging from acoustic and elastic waves to surface waves in fluids and membranes. PMID:22680719

  6. The Life of James Clerk Maxwell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Lewis; Garnett, William

    2010-06-01

    Preface; Part I. Biographical Outline: 1. Birth and parentage; 2. Glenlair - childhood, 1831-1841; 3. Boyhood, 1841-1844; 4. Adolescence, 1844-1847; 5. Opening manhood, 1847-1850; 6. Undergraduate life at Cambridge, 1850-1854; 7. Bachelor-scholar and fellow of Trinity, 1854-1856; 8. Essays at Cambridge, 1853-1856; 9. Death of his father. Professorship at Aberdeen, 1856-1857; 10. Aberdeen. Marriage, 1857-1860; 11. King's College, London. Glenair, 1860-1870; 12. Cambridge, 1871-1879; 13. Illness and death, 1879; 14. Last essays at Cambridge; Part II. Contributions to Science: 1. Experiments on colour vision, and other contributions to optics; 2. Investigations respecting elastic solids; 3. Pure geometry; 4. Mechanics; 5. Saturn's rings; 6. Faraday's lines of force, and Maxwell's theory of the electromagnetic field; 7. Molecular physics; Part III. Poems: 1. Juvenile verses and translations; 2. Occasional pieces; 3. Serio-comic verse; Index.

  7. Fractional vector calculus and fractional Maxwell's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2008-11-15

    The theory of derivatives and integrals of non-integer order goes back to Leibniz, Liouville, Grunwald, Letnikov and Riemann. The history of fractional vector calculus (FVC) has only 10 years. The main approaches to formulate a FVC, which are used in the physics during the past few years, will be briefly described in this paper. We solve some problems of consistent formulations of FVC by using a fractional generalization of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. We define the differential and integral vector operations. The fractional Green's, Stokes' and Gauss's theorems are formulated. The proofs of these theorems are realized for simplest regions. A fractional generalization of exterior differential calculus of differential forms is discussed. Fractional nonlocal Maxwell's equations and the corresponding fractional wave equations are considered.

  8. Relativistic Entanglement From Maxwell's Classical Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, John E.; Quarterman, Adrian H.

    2013-09-01

    With the help of light cone coordinates and light cone field representations of Maxwell's classical equations, quantum polarization entanglement is explained using the relativistic results of a companion paper that shows how conventional or reference waves can have an adjoint wave, travelling in phase with the reference wave, but in a proper relativistic frame that travels in the opposing direction to the proper frame of the reference wave. This subsequently allows waves, travelling in opposite directions, to have the same proper frame and consequently such waves can be regarded as relativistically local. The light cone coordinates offer a classical form of a quantum wave function and demonstrate a classical equivalent of a mixed quantum state.

  9. Mechanical Weyl Modes in Topological Maxwell Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocklin, D. Zeb; Chen, Bryan Gin-ge; Falk, Martin; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Lubensky, T. C.

    2016-04-01

    We show that two-dimensional mechanical lattices can generically display topologically protected bulk zero-energy phonon modes at isolated points in the Brillouin zone, analogs of massless fermion modes of Weyl semimetals. We focus on deformed square lattices as the simplest Maxwell lattices, characterized by equal numbers of constraints and degrees of freedom, with this property. The Weyl points appear at the origin of the Brillouin zone along directions with vanishing sound speed and move away to the zone edge (or return to the origin) where they annihilate. Our results suggest a design strategy for topological metamaterials with bulk low-frequency acoustic modes and elastic instabilities at a particular, tunable finite wave vector.

  10. Mechanical Weyl Modes in Topological Maxwell Lattices.

    PubMed

    Rocklin, D Zeb; Chen, Bryan Gin-Ge; Falk, Martin; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Lubensky, T C

    2016-04-01

    We show that two-dimensional mechanical lattices can generically display topologically protected bulk zero-energy phonon modes at isolated points in the Brillouin zone, analogs of massless fermion modes of Weyl semimetals. We focus on deformed square lattices as the simplest Maxwell lattices, characterized by equal numbers of constraints and degrees of freedom, with this property. The Weyl points appear at the origin of the Brillouin zone along directions with vanishing sound speed and move away to the zone edge (or return to the origin) where they annihilate. Our results suggest a design strategy for topological metamaterials with bulk low-frequency acoustic modes and elastic instabilities at a particular, tunable finite wave vector. PMID:27081989

  11. Anomalous Maxwell equations for inhomogeneous chiral plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbar, E. V.; Shovkovy, I. A.; Vilchinskii, S.; Rudenok, I.; Boyarsky, A.; Ruchayskiy, O.

    2016-05-01

    Using the chiral kinetic theory we derive the electric and chiral current densities in inhomogeneous relativistic plasma. We also derive equations for the electric and chiral chemical potentials that close the Maxwell equations in such a plasma. The analysis is done in the regimes with and without a drift of the plasma as a whole. In addition to the currents present in the homogeneous plasma (Hall current, chiral magnetic, chiral separation, and chiral electric separation effects, as well as Ohm's current) we derive several new terms associated with inhomogeneities of the plasma. Apart from various diffusionlike terms, we find also new dissipationless terms that are independent of relaxation time. Their origin can be traced to the Berry curvature modifications of the kinetic theory.

  12. Thermodynamics with information flow: Applications to Maxwell demons and biochemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Jordan

    2015-03-01

    Information is often perceived as an immaterial entity. However, since the birth of statistical physics, it has been argued, based on thought experiments by the likes of Maxwell, that there are physical thermodynamic implications to information manipulation. In this talk, I will discuss a unified framework for the information transfers between continuously interacting systems, describing how information generated in an auxiliary system can be utilized by another as a fuel for an otherwise impossible process. Indeed, while the joint system satisfies the second law, the entropy balance of each system is modified by an information term related to the mutual information between the pair of systems. I will then show how this result incorporates the traditional analysis of Maxwell's demon. In addition, I will use this framework to analyze the thermodynamics and energetics of biological sensory adaptation, employing the biochemical sensing network of E. Coli chemotaxis as a representative example.

  13. Adaptive node techniques for Maxwell's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, D W

    2000-04-01

    The computational mesh in numerical simulation provides a framework on which to monitor the spatial dependence of function and their derivatives. Spatial mesh is therefore essential to the ability to integrate systems in time without loss of fidelity. Several philosophies have emerged to provide such fidelity (Eulerian, Lagrangian, Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian ALE, Adaptive Mesh Refinement AMR, and adaptive node generation/deletion). Regardless of the type of mesh, a major difficulty is in setting up the initial mesh. Clearly a high density of grid points is essential in regions of high geometric complexity and/or regions of intense, energetic activity. For some problems, mesh generation is such a crucial part of the problem that it can take as much computational effort as the run itself, and these tasks are now taking weeks of massively parallel CPU time. Mesh generation is no less crucial to electromagnetic calculations. In fact EM problem set up can be even more challenging without the clues given by fluid motion in hydrodynamic systems. When the mesh is advected with the fluid (Lagrangian), mesh points naturally congregate in regions of high activity. Similarly in AMR algorithms, strong gradients in the fluid flow are one of the triggers for mesh refinement. In the hyperbolic Maxwell's equations without advection, mesh point placement/motion is not so intuitive. In fixed geometry systems, it at least feasible to finely mesh high leverage, geometrically challenged areas. For other systems, where the action takes place far from the boundaries and, likely, changes position in time, the options are limited to either using a high resolution (expensive) mesh in all regions that could require such resolution or adaptively generating nodes to resolve the physics as it evolves. The authors have developed a new time of adaptive node technique for Maxwell's equations to deal with this set of issues.

  14. Electromagnetic mirrors in the sky: Accessible applications of Maxwell's equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, Paul

    2015-06-01

    All too often, Maxwell's equations are taught as mathematical abstractions without any connections to students' personal experiences. However, the interaction of radio waves with Earth's ionosphere provides an opportunity to apply Maxwell's equations in scenarios that have some connections to students' daily lives. A description of how electromagnetic waves propagate through a plasma is derived from Maxwell's equations. This description is used to show how the reflection of radio waves by the ionosphere can be used to enable long range radio communications, to establish that the Sun's emission varies over the solar cycle, and to measure physical properties of the ionosphere.

  15. Reconstruction of symmetric Dirac-Maxwell equations using nonassociative algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalauni, Pushpa; Barata, J. C. A.

    2015-01-01

    In the presence of sources, the usual Maxwell equations are neither symmetric nor invariant with respect to the duality transformation between electric and magnetic fields. Dirac proposed the existence of magnetic monopoles for symmetrizing the Maxwell equations. In the present work, we obtain the fully symmetric Dirac-Maxwell's equations (i.e. with electric and magnetic charges and currents) as a single equation by using 4 × 4 matrix presentation of fields and derivative operators. This matrix representation has been derived with the help of the algebraic properties of quaternions and octonions. Such description gives a compact representation of electric and magnetic counterparts of the field in a single equation.

  16. A Maxwell formulation for the equations of a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Richard J.; Moeller, Trevor M.

    2012-01-15

    In light of the analogy between the structure of electrodynamics and fluid dynamics, the fluid equations of motion may be reformulated as a set of Maxwell equations. This analogy has been explored in the literature for incompressible turbulent flow and compressible flow but has not been widely explored in relation to plasmas. This letter introduces the analogous fluid Maxwell equations and formulates a set of Maxwell equations for a plasma in terms of the species canonical vorticity and its cross product with the species velocity. The form of the source terms is presented and the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) limit restores the typical variety of MHD waves.

  17. Generalized gravitational entropy of interacting scalar field and Maxwell field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wung-Hong

    2014-12-01

    The generalized gravitational entropy proposed recently by Lewkowycz and Maldacena is extended to the interacting real scalar field and Maxwell field system. Using the BTZ geometry we first investigate the case of free real scalar field and then show a possible way to calculate the entropy of the interacting scalar field. Next, we investigate the Maxwell field system. We exactly solve the wave equation and calculate the analytic value of the generalized gravitational entropy. We also use the Einstein equation to find the effect of backreaction of the Maxwell field on the area of horizon. The associated modified area law is consistent with the generalized gravitational entropy.

  18. Deformed Maxwell Algebras and their Realizations

    SciTech Connect

    Gomis, Joaquim; Kamimura, Kiyoshi; Lukierski, Jerzy

    2009-12-15

    We study all possible deformations of the Maxwell algebra. In D = d+1not =3 dimensions there is only one-parameter deformation. The deformed algebra is isomorphic to so(d+1, 1)+so(d, 1) or to so(d, 2)+so(d, 1) depending on the signs of the deformation parameter. We construct in the dS(AdS) space a model of massive particle interacting with Abelian vector field via nonlocal Lorentz force. In D = 2+1 the deformations depend on two parameters b and k. We construct a phase diagram, with two parts of the (b, k) plane with so(3, 1)+so(2, 1) and so( 2, 2)+so(2, 1) algebras separated by a critical curve along which the algebra is isomorphic to Iso(2, 1)+so(2, 1). We introduce in D = 2+1 the Volkov-Akulov type model for a Abelian Goldstone-Nambu vector field described by a non-linear action containing as its bilinear term the free Chern-Simons Lagrangean.

  19. Quantum Maxwell's demon in thermodynamic cycles.

    PubMed

    Dong, H; Xu, D Z; Cai, C Y; Sun, C P

    2011-06-01

    We study the physical mechanism of Maxwell's demon (MD), which helps do extra work in thermodynamic cycles with the heat engine. This is exemplified with one molecule confined in an infinitely deep square potential with a movable solid wall. The MD is modeled as a two-level system (TLS) for measuring and controlling the motion of the molecule. The processes in the cycle are described in a quantum fashion. It is discovered that a MD with quantum coherence or one at a temperature lower than the molecule's heat bath can enhance the ability of the whole working substance, formed by the heat engine plus the MD, to do work outside. This observation reveals that the essential role of the MD is to drive the whole working substance off equilibrium, or equivalently, to work between two heat baths with different effective temperatures. The elaborate studies with this model explicitly reveal the effect of finite size off the classical limit or thermodynamic limit, which contradicts common sense on a Szilard heat engine (SHE). The quantum SHE's efficiency is evaluated in detail to prove the validity of the second law of thermodynamics. PMID:21797303

  20. Weyl, Dirac and Maxwell Quantum Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo; Tosini, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    Recent advances on quantum foundations achieved the derivation of free quantum field theory from general principles, without referring to mechanical notions and relativistic invariance. From the aforementioned principles a quantum cellular automata (QCA) theory follows, whose relativistic limit of small wave-vector provides the free dynamics of quantum field theory. The QCA theory can be regarded as an extended quantum field theory that describes in a unified way all scales ranging from an hypothetical discrete Planck scale up to the usual Fermi scale. The present paper reviews the automaton theory for the Weyl field, and the composite automata for Dirac and Maxwell fields. We then give a simple analysis of the dynamics in the momentum space in terms of a dispersive differential equation for narrowband wave-packets. We then review the phenomenology of the free-field automaton and consider possible visible effects arising from the discreteness of the framework. We conclude introducing the consequences of the automaton dispersion relation, leading to a deformed Lorentz covariance and to possible effects on the thermodynamics of ideal gases.

  1. Construction of Three Dimensional Solutions for the Maxwell Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yefet, A.; Turkel, E.

    1998-01-01

    We consider numerical solutions for the three dimensional time dependent Maxwell equations. We construct a fourth order accurate compact implicit scheme and compare it to the Yee scheme for free space in a box.

  2. Propagation of ultra-short solitons in stochastic Maxwell's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt, Levent; Schäfer, Tobias

    2014-01-15

    We study the propagation of ultra-short short solitons in a cubic nonlinear medium modeled by nonlinear Maxwell's equations with stochastic variations of media. We consider three cases: variations of (a) the dispersion, (b) the phase velocity, (c) the nonlinear coefficient. Using a modified multi-scale expansion for stochastic systems, we derive new stochastic generalizations of the short pulse equation that approximate the solutions of stochastic nonlinear Maxwell's equations. Numerical simulations show that soliton solutions of the short pulse equation propagate stably in stochastic nonlinear Maxwell's equations and that the generalized stochastic short pulse equations approximate the solutions to the stochastic Maxwell's equations over the distances under consideration. This holds for both a pathwise comparison of the stochastic equations as well as for a comparison of the resulting probability densities.

  3. Holographic superconductors for the Power-Maxwell field with backreactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Jiliang; Jiang, Li; Pan, Qiyuan

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the properties of holographic superconductors for the Power-Maxwell field with backreactions in the background of a d-dimensional AdS black hole. Studying the marginally stable modes of the system numerically, we find that stronger backreaction, larger power parameter of the Power-Maxwell field and lower dimension of the spacetime make it harder for the scalar hair to form. We improve the Sturm-Liouville method to confirm the numerical findings and argue that this analytical method is still powerful to study holographic superconductors for the Power-Maxwell field even if we consider the backreactions. Moreover, we observe that the critical exponent for condensation operators always takes the mean-field value, which is independent of the backreactions and Power-Maxwell field.

  4. Complete Vector Spherical Harmonic Expansion for Maxwell's Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Conventional expansions of solutions to Maxwell's equations in vector spherical harmonics apply only outside the sources. The complete solution, applying both inside and outside the sources, is given here. Harmonic time dependence is assumed. (Author/GA)

  5. Maxwell-Garnett effective medium theory: Quantum nonlocal effects

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, Afshin

    2015-04-15

    We develop the Maxwell-Garnett theory for the effective medium approximation of composite materials with metallic nanoparticles by taking into account the quantum spatial dispersion effects in dielectric response of nanoparticles. We derive a quantum nonlocal generalization of the standard Maxwell-Garnett formula, by means the linearized quantum hydrodynamic theory in conjunction with the Poisson equation as well as the appropriate additional quantum boundary conditions.

  6. Variational formulations of guiding-center Vlasov-Maxwell theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brizard, Alain J.; Tronci, Cesare

    2016-06-01

    The variational formulations of guiding-center Vlasov-Maxwell theory based on Lagrange, Euler, and Euler-Poincaré variational principles are presented. Each variational principle yields a different approach to deriving guiding-center polarization and magnetization effects into the guiding-center Maxwell equations. The conservation laws of energy, momentum, and angular momentum are also derived by Noether method, where the guiding-center stress tensor is now shown to be explicitly symmetric.

  7. Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations with Revised Maxwell's Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuxi; Racke, Reinhard

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the compressible Navier-Stokes equations where the constitutive law for the stress tensor given by Maxwell's law is revised to a system of relaxation equations for two parts of the tensor. The global well-posedness is proved as well as the compatibility with the classical compressible Navier-Stokes system in the sense that, for vanishing relaxation parameters, the solutions to the Maxwell system are shown to converge to solutions of the classical system.

  8. Effects of slip on oscillating fractionalized Maxwell fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    The flow of an incompressible fractionalized Maxwell fluid induced by an oscillating plate has been studied, where the no-slip assumption between the wall and the fluid is no longer valid. The solutions obtained for the velocity field and the associated shear stress, written in terms of H-functions, using discrete Laplace transform, satisfy all imposed initial and boundary conditions. The no-slip contributions, that appeared in the general solutions, as expected, tend to zero when slip parameter θ → 0. Furthermore, the solutions for ordinary Maxwell and Newtonian fluids, performing the same motion, are obtained as limiting cases of general solutions. The solutions for fractionalized and ordinary Maxwell fluids for noslip condition also obtained as a special cases and they are similar to the solutions of classical Stokes' first problem of fractionalized and ordinary Maxwell fluid, if oscillating parameter ω = 0. Finally, the influence of the material, slip and the fractional parameters on the fluid motion, as well as a comparison among fractionalized Maxwell, ordinary Maxwell and Newtonian fluids is also analyzed by graphical illustrations.

  9. Complex and biofluids: From Maxwell to nowadays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misbah, Chaouqi

    2009-11-01

    Complex fluids are the rule in biology and in many industrial applications. Typical examples are blood, cartilage, and polymer solutions. Unlike water (as well as domestic oils, soft clear drinks, and so on), the law(s) describing the behavior of complex fluids are not yet fully established. The complexity arises from strong coupling between microscopic scales (like the motion of a red blood cell in the case of blood, or a polymer molecule for a polymer solution) and the global scale of the flow (say at the scale of a blood artery, or a channel in laboratory experiments). In this issue entitled Complex and Biofluids a large panel of experimental and theoretical problems of complex fluids is exposed. The topics range from dilute polymer solutions, food products, to biology (blood flow, cell and tissue mechanics). One of the earliest model put forward as an attempt to describe a complex fluid was suggested a long time ago by James Clerk Maxwell (in 1867). Other famous scientists, like Einstein (in 1906), and Taylor (in 1932) have made important contributions to the field, but the topic of complex fluids still continues to pose a formidable challenge to science. This field has known during the past decade an unbelievable upsurge of interest in many branches of science (physics, mechanics, chemistry, biology, medical science, mathematics, and so on). Understanding complex fluids is viewed as one of the biggest challenge of the present century. This synthesis will provide a simple introduction to the topic, summarize the main contribution of this issue, and list major open questions in this field. To cite this article: C. Misbah, C. R. Physique 10 (2009).

  10. CSR Fields: Direct Numerical Solution of the Maxwell___s Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A.; /SLAC

    2011-06-22

    We discuss the properties of the coherent electromagnetic fields of a very short, ultra-relativistic bunch in a rectangular vacuum chamber inside a bending magnet. The analysis is based on the results of a direct numerical solution of Maxwell's equations together with Newton's equations. We use a new dispersion-free time-domain algorithm which employs a more efficient use of finite element mesh techniques and hence produces self-consistent and stable solutions for very short bunches. We investigate the fine structure of the CSR fields including coherent edge radiation. This approach should be useful in the study of existing and future concepts of particle accelerators and ultrafast coherent light sources. The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) fields have a strong action on the beam dynamics of very short bunches, which are moving in the bends of all kinds of magnetic elements. They are responsible for additional energy loss and energy spread; micro bunching and beam emittance growth. These fields may bound the efficiency of damping rings, electron-positron colliders and ultrafast coherent light sources, where high peak currents and very short bunches are envisioned. This is relevant to most high-brightness beam applications. On the other hand these fields together with transition radiation fields can be used for beam diagnostics or even as a powerful resource of THz radiation. A history of the study of CSR and a good collection of references can be found in [1]. Electromagnetic theory suggests several methods on how to calculate CSR fields. The most popular method is to use Lienard-Wiechert potentials. Other approach is to solve numerically the approximate equations, which are a Schrodinger type equation. These numerical methods are described in [2]. We suggest that a direct solution of Maxwell's equations together with Newton's equations can describe the detailed structure of the CSR fields [3].

  11. On the Correct Analysis of the Maxwell Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalanov, Temur Z.

    2006-04-01

    The critical analysis of the Maxwell distribution is proposed. The main results of the analysis are as follows. (1) As is known, an experimental device for studying the Maxwell distribution consists of the following basic physical subsystems: (a) ideal molecular gas enclosed in a vessel (gas is in the equilibrium state); (b) molecule beam which is emitted from the small aperture of the vessel (the small aperture is a stochastic source of quantum particles). (2) The energy of the molecule of the beam does not represent random quantity, since molecules does not collide with each other. In this case, only the set of the monoenergetic molecules emitted by the stochastic source is a random quantity. This set is called a quantum gas. The probability pk that the quantum gas has the energy Enk is given by the Gibbs quantum canonical distribution: pk=p0,,-Enk / Enk T) . - T), k=0,;1,; where k is the number of molecules with energy En; T is temperature of the molecule in the vessel. (3) The average number of the molecules with energyEn represents the Planck distribution function: f=∑k=0^∞kpk ≡f(Planck). (4) In classical case, the expression Enf(Planck) represents the Maxwell distribution function: f(Maxwell)˜En,(Planck)˜v^2,;(-mv^2 / mv^2 2T) . - 2T). Consequently, the generally accepted statement that the Maxwell distribution function describes gas enclosed in a vessel is a logical error.

  12. TWO-GRID METHODS FOR MAXWELL EIGENVALUE PROBLEMS

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, J.; HU, X.; ZHONG, L.; SHU, S.; CHEN, L.

    2015-01-01

    Two new two-grid algorithms are proposed for solving the Maxwell eigenvalue problem. The new methods are based on the two-grid methodology recently proposed by Xu and Zhou [Math. Comp., 70 (2001), pp. 17–25] and further developed by Hu and Cheng [Math. Comp., 80 (2011), pp. 1287–1301] for elliptic eigenvalue problems. The new two-grid schemes reduce the solution of the Maxwell eigenvalue problem on a fine grid to one linear indefinite Maxwell equation on the same fine grid and an original eigenvalue problem on a much coarser grid. The new schemes, therefore, save total computational cost. The error estimates reveals that the two-grid methods maintain asymptotically optimal accuracy, and the numerical experiments presented confirm the theoretical results. PMID:26190866

  13. Hamiltonian time integrators for Vlasov-Maxwell equations

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yang; Xiao, Jianyuan; Zhang, Ruili; Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong; Sun, Yajuan

    2015-12-15

    Hamiltonian time integrators for the Vlasov-Maxwell equations are developed by a Hamiltonian splitting technique. The Hamiltonian functional is split into five parts, which produces five exactly solvable subsystems. Each subsystem is a Hamiltonian system equipped with the Morrison-Marsden-Weinstein Poisson bracket. Compositions of the exact solutions provide Poisson structure preserving/Hamiltonian methods of arbitrary high order for the Vlasov-Maxwell equations. They are then accurate and conservative over a long time because of the Poisson-preserving nature.

  14. Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory with a boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasi, A.; Maggiore, N.; Magnoli, N.; Storace, S.

    2010-08-01

    The Maxwell-Chern-Simons (MCS) theory with a planar boundary is considered. The boundary is introduced according to Symanzik's basic principles of locality and separability. A method of investigation is proposed, which, avoiding the straight computation of correlators, is appealing for situations where the computation of propagators, modified by the boundary, becomes quite complex. For the MCS theory, the outcome is that a unique solution exists, in the form of chiral conserved currents, satisfying a Kač-Moody algebra, whose central charge does not depend on the Maxwell term.

  15. Combining micromagnetism and magnetostatic Maxwell equations for multiscale magnetic simulations.

    PubMed

    Bruckner, Florian; Vogler, Christoph; Bergmair, Bernhard; Huber, Thomas; Fuger, Markus; Suess, Dieter; Feischl, Michael; Fuehrer, Thomas; Page, Marcus; Praetorius, Dirk

    2013-10-01

    Magnetostatic Maxwell equations and the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation are combined to a multiscale method, which allows to extend the problem size of traditional micromagnetic simulations. By means of magnetostatic Maxwell equations macroscopic regions can be handled in an averaged and stationary sense, whereas the LLG allows to accurately describe domain formation as well as magnetization dynamics in some microscopic subregions. The two regions are coupled by means of their strayfield and the combined system is solved by an optimized time integration scheme. PMID:24092951

  16. Combining micromagnetism and magnetostatic Maxwell equations for multiscale magnetic simulations☆

    PubMed Central

    Bruckner, Florian; Vogler, Christoph; Bergmair, Bernhard; Huber, Thomas; Fuger, Markus; Suess, Dieter; Feischl, Michael; Fuehrer, Thomas; Page, Marcus; Praetorius, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Magnetostatic Maxwell equations and the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert (LLG) equation are combined to a multiscale method, which allows to extend the problem size of traditional micromagnetic simulations. By means of magnetostatic Maxwell equations macroscopic regions can be handled in an averaged and stationary sense, whereas the LLG allows to accurately describe domain formation as well as magnetization dynamics in some microscopic subregions. The two regions are coupled by means of their strayfield and the combined system is solved by an optimized time integration scheme. PMID:24092951

  17. Combining micromagnetism and magnetostatic Maxwell equations for multiscale magnetic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckner, Florian; Vogler, Christoph; Bergmair, Bernhard; Huber, Thomas; Fuger, Markus; Suess, Dieter; Feischl, Michael; Fuehrer, Thomas; Page, Marcus; Praetorius, Dirk

    2013-10-01

    Magnetostatic Maxwell equations and the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation are combined to a multiscale method, which allows to extend the problem size of traditional micromagnetic simulations. By means of magnetostatic Maxwell equations macroscopic regions can be handled in an averaged and stationary sense, whereas the LLG allows to accurately describe domain formation as well as magnetization dynamics in some microscopic subregions. The two regions are coupled by means of their strayfield and the combined system is solved by an optimized time integration scheme.

  18. Maxwell boundary condition and velocity dependent accommodation coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Struchtrup, Henning

    2013-11-15

    A modification of Maxwell's boundary condition for the Boltzmann equation is developed that allows to incorporate velocity dependent accommodation coefficients into the microscopic description. As a first example, it is suggested to consider the wall-particle interaction as a thermally activated process with three parameters. A simplified averaging procedure leads to jump and slip boundary conditions for hydrodynamics. Coefficients for velocity slip, temperature jump, and thermal transpiration flow are identified and compared with those resulting from the original Maxwell model and the Cercignani-Lampis model. An extension of the model leads to temperature dependent slip and jump coefficients.

  19. A spinor representation of Maxwell equations and Dirac equation

    SciTech Connect

    Vaz, J. Jr.; Rodrigues, W.A. Jr.

    1993-02-01

    Using the Clifford bundle formalism and starting from the free Maxwell equations dF = {delta}F = 0 we show by writing F = b{psi}{gamma}{sup 1}{gamma}{sup 2}{psi}{sup *}, where {psi} is a Dirac-Hestenes spinor field, that the Dirac-Hestenes equation (which is the representative of the standard Dirac equation in the Clifford bundle over Minkowski spacetime) is equivalent under general assumptions to those free Maxwell equations. We briefly discuss the implications of our findings for the interpretation of quantum mechanics. 15 refs.

  20. Generalized dilaton-Maxwell cosmic string and wall solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, John R.

    2006-09-01

    The class of static solutions found by Gibbons and Wells for dilaton-electrodynamics in flat spacetime, which describe nontopological strings and walls that trap magnetic flux, is extended to a class of dynamical solutions supporting arbitrarily large, nondissipative traveling waves, using techniques previously applied to global and local topological defects. These solutions can then be used in conjunction with S-duality to obtain more general solitonic solutions for various axidilaton-Maxwell theories. As an example, a set of dynamical solutions is found for axion, dilaton, and Maxwell fields in low energy heterotic string theory using the SL(2,R) invariance of the equations of motion.

  1. Multiparticle quantum Szilard engine with optimal cycles assisted by a Maxwell's demon.

    PubMed

    Cai, C Y; Dong, H; Sun, C P

    2012-03-01

    We present a complete-quantum description of a multiparticle Szilard engine that consists of a working substance and a Maxwell's demon. The demon is modeled as a multilevel quantum system with specific quantum control, and the working substance consists of identical particles obeying Bose-Einstein or Fermi-Dirac statistics. In this description, a reversible scheme to erase the demon's memory by a lower-temperature heat bath is used. We demonstrate that (1) the quantum control of the demon can be optimized for a single-particle Szilard engine so that the efficiency of the demon-assisted thermodynamic cycle could reach the Carnot cycle's efficiency and (2) the low-temperature behavior of the working substance is very sensitive to the quantum statistics of the particles and the insertion position of the partition. PMID:22587045

  2. Mixed weak-perturbative solution method for Maxwell's equations of diffusion with Müller's partial stress tensor in the low velocity limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faliagas, A. C.

    2016-03-01

    Maxwell's theory of multicomponent diffusion and subsequent extensions are based on systems of mass and momentum conservation equations. The partial stress tensor, which is involved in these equations, is expressed in terms of the gradients of velocity fields by statistical and continuum mechanical methods. We propose a method for the solution of Maxwell's equations of diffusion coupled with Müller's expression for the partial stress tensor. The proposed method consists in a singular perturbation process, followed by a weak (finite element) analysis of the resulting PDE systems. The singularity involved in the obtained equations was treated by a special technique, by which lower-order systems were supplemented by proper combinations of higher-order equations. The method proved particularly efficient for the solution of the Maxwell-Müller system, eventually reducing the number of unknown fields to that of the classical Navier-Stokes/Fick system. It was applied to the classical Stefan tube problem and the Hagen-Poiseuille flow in a hollow-fiber membrane tube. Numerical results for these problems are presented, and compared with the Navier-Stokes/Fick approximation. It is shown that the 0-th order term of the Maxwell-Müller equations differs from a properly formulated Navier-Stokes/Fick system, by a numerically insignificant amount. Numerical results for 1st-order terms indicate a good agreement of the classical approximation (with properly formulated Navier-Stokes and Fick's equations) with the Maxwell-Müller system, in the studied cases.

  3. Maxwell-Higgs equation on higher dimensional static curved spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Mulyanto; Akbar, Fiki Taufik Gunara, Bobby Eka

    2015-09-30

    In this paper we consider a class of solutions of Maxwell-Higgs equation in higher dimensional static curved spacetimes called Schwarzchild de-Sitter spacetimes. We obtain the general form of the electric fields and magnetic fields in background Schwarzchild de-Sitter spacetimes. However, determining the interaction between photons with the Higgs scalar fields is needed further studies.

  4. Radiation and Maxwell Stress Stabilization of Liquid Bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marr-Lyon, M. J.; Thiessen, D. B.; Blonigen, F. J.; Marston, P. L.

    1999-01-01

    The use of both acoustic radiation stress and the Maxwell stress to stabilize liquid bridges is reported. Acoustic radiation stress arises from the time-averaged acoustic pressure at the surface of an object immersed in a sound field. Both passive and active acoustic stabilization schemes as well as an active electrostatic method are examined.

  5. A geometric description of Maxwell field in a Kerr spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jezierski, Jacek; Smołka, Tomasz

    2016-06-01

    We consider the Maxwell field in the exterior of a Kerr black hole. For this system, we propose a geometric construction of generalized Klein–Gordon equation called Fackerell–Ipser equation. Our model is based on conformal Yano–Killing tensor (CYK tensor). We present non-standard properties of CYK tensors in the Kerr spacetime which are useful in electrodynamics.

  6. Soliton solutions of coupled Maxwell-Bloch equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, S.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we study the soliton solutions of the coupled Maxwell-Bloch equations which describe pulse propagation in an active optical medium with coherent three-level atomic transitions and inhomogeneous broadening. The soliton solutions and polarization shifts due to soliton interactions are investigated. An infinite set of conservation laws as well as the soliton trace formulae are derived.

  7. Colliding superposed waves in the Einstein-Maxwell theory

    SciTech Connect

    Halilsoy, M.

    1989-04-15

    We reformulate the initial data on the characteristic surface for colliding waves in the Einstein-Maxwell theory. This approach takes into account the superposition principle for gravitational and electromagnetic waves. Finding exact solutions for colliding superposed waves happens to be a rather challenging problem.

  8. Exact Faraday rotation in the cylindrical Einstein-Maxwell waves

    SciTech Connect

    Arafah, M.R.; Fakioglu, S.; Halilsoy, M. )

    1990-07-15

    We obtain the exact behavior of the cross-polarized cylindrical Einstein-Maxwell waves that generalizes the well-known Einstein-Rosen waves. In the presence of the second mode of polarization the outgoing waves interact with the incoming ones to exhibit an analogous effect of the Faraday rotation.

  9. Comparing Teaching Approaches about Maxwell's Displacement Current

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karam, Ricardo; Coimbra, Debora; Pietrocola, Maurício

    2014-01-01

    Due to its fundamental role for the consolidation of Maxwell's equations, the displacement current is one of the most important topics of any introductory course on electromagnetism. Moreover, this episode is widely used by historians and philosophers of science as a case study to investigate several issues (e.g. the theory-experiment…

  10. Maxwell-Vlasov equations as a continuous Hamiltonian system

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, P.J.

    1980-11-01

    The well-known Maxwell-Vlasov equations that describe a collisionless plasma are cast into Hamiltonian form. The dynamical variables are the physical although noncanonical variables E, B, and f. We present a Poisson bracket which acts on these variables and the energy functional to produce the equations of motion.

  11. Maxwell-Vlasov equations as a continuous Hamiltonian system

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, P.J.

    1980-09-01

    The well-known Maxwell-Vlasov equations that describe a collisionless plasma are cast into Hamiltonian form. The dynamical variables are the physical although noncanonical variables E, B and f. We present a Poisson bracket which acts on these variables and the energy functional to produce the equations of motion.

  12. Galilean symmetry of Maxwell's equations in classical electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotel'Nikov, G. A.

    1985-08-01

    It is shown that the Galilean group, like the Lorentz group, is a group of exact symmetry of Maxwell's equation. The Galilean group differs in that, while the field transformations are linear and global in the relativistic case, they are nonlinear in the Galilean and, generally speaking, depend on the coordinates of the event through some weight functions.

  13. Mechanic-Like Resonance in the Maxwell-Bloch Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meziane, Belkacem

    2008-01-01

    We show that, in their unstable regime of operation, the "Maxwell-Bloch" equations that describe light-matter interactions inside a bad-cavity-configured laser carry the same resonance properties as any externally driven mechanic or electric oscillator. This finding demonstrates that the nonlinearly coupled laser equations belong to the same…

  14. Entanglement entropy of a Maxwell field on the sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casini, Horacio; Huerta, Marina

    2016-05-01

    We compute the logarithmic coefficient of the entanglement entropy on a sphere for a Maxwell field in d =3 +1 dimensions. In spherical coordinates the problem decomposes into one-dimensional ones along the radial coordinate for each angular momentum. We show that the entanglement entropy of a Maxwell field is equivalent to one of two identical massless scalars from which the mode of l =0 has been removed. This shows the relation clogM=2 (clogS-clogSl =0) between the logarithmic coefficient in the entropy for a Maxwell field clogM , the one for a d =3 +1 massless scalar clogS , and the logarithmic coefficient clogSl =0 for a d =1 +1 scalar with a Dirichlet boundary condition at the origin. Using the accepted values for these coefficients clogS=-1 /90 and clogSl =0=1 /6 , we get clogM=-16 /45 , which coincides with Dowker's calculation, but does not match the coefficient -31/45 in the trace anomaly for a Maxwell field. We have numerically evaluated these three numbers clogM , clogS and clogSl =0, verifying the relation, as well as checked that they coincide with the corresponding logarithmic term in mutual information of two concentric spheres.

  15. How to Obtain the Covariant Form of Maxwell's Equations from the Continuity Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heras, Jose A.

    2009-01-01

    The covariant Maxwell equations are derived from the continuity equation for the electric charge. This result provides an axiomatic approach to Maxwell's equations in which charge conservation is emphasized as the fundamental axiom underlying these equations.

  16. 77 FR 46114 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ... Archaeology, Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, MSC01 1050, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131... should contact David Phillips, Curator of Archaeology, Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, MSC01...

  17. 77 FR 65403 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New... to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology.... Heather Edgar, Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, MSC01 1050, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM...

  18. Representing the Electromagnetic Field: How Maxwell's Mathematics Empowered Faraday's Field Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tweney, Ryan D.

    2011-01-01

    James Clerk Maxwell "translated" Michael Faraday's experimentally-based field theory into the mathematical representation now known as "Maxwell's Equations." Working with a variety of mathematical representations and physical models Maxwell extended the reach of Faraday's theory and brought it into consistency with other results in the physics of…

  19. Computational modeling of femtosecond optical solitons from Maxwell's equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, Peter M.; Taflove, Allen; Joseph, Rose M.; Hagness, Susan C.

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm is developed that permits the direct time integration of full-vector nonlinear Maxwell's equations. This capability permits the modeling of both linear and nonlinear instantaneous and dispersive effects in the electric polarization in material media. The modeling of the optical carrier is retained. The fundamental innovation is to notice that it is possible to treat the linear and nonlinear convolution integrals, which describe the dispersion, as new dependent variables. A coupled system of nonlinear second-order ordinary differential equations can then be derived for the linear and nonlinear convolution integrals, by differentiating them in the time domain. These equations, together with Maxwell's equations, are solved to determine the electromagnetic fields in nonlinear dispersive media. Results are presented of calculations in one dimension of the propagation and collision of femtosecond electromagnetic solitons that retain the optical carrier, taking into account as the Kerr and Raman interactions.

  20. Maxwell, electromagnetism, and fluid flow in resistive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, T. N.

    Common wisdom has it that Darcy [1856] founded the modern field of fluid flow through porous media with his celebrated 1856 experiment on the steady flow of water through a sand column. For considerable time, Darcy's empirical observation, in conjunction with Fourier's [1807] heat equation, was used to analyze fluid flow in porous media simply by mathematical analogy. Hubbert [1940] is credited with placing Darcy's work on sound hydrodynamic foundations. Among other things, he defined an energy potential, interpreted permeability in the context of balancing impelling and resistive forces, and derived an expression for the refraction of flow lines. In 1856, James Clerk Maxwell constructed a theory for the flow of an incompressible fluid in a resistive medium as a metaphor for comprehending the emerging field of electromagnetism [Maxwell, 1890].

  1. Experimental violation of Tsirelson's bound by Maxwell fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeau, N.; Akhouayri, H.; Matzkin, A.; Durt, T.

    2016-05-01

    In analogy with quantum optics it is possible to impose nonseparability between different degrees of freedom of an optical beam. The resulting correlations between these degrees of freedom can be investigated with correlations functions traditionally employed in quantum mechanics, such as the well-known Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) correlation function. In this paper we present results achieving a maximal violation of Tsirelson's bound on CHSH correlations between spatial and polarization degrees of freedom of classical (Maxwell) fields. We describe the theoretical method, based on the realization of a nonunitary gate, and then proceed to its experimental implementation carried out with classical optical techniques. Our approach relies on the realization at the level of classical Maxwell fields of a so-called POVM (positive operator valued measure) which is traditionally discussed in the realm of quantum physics.

  2. Class of Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton-axion space-times

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, Tonatiuh; Miranda, Galaxia; Sanchez-Sanchez, Ruben; Wiederhold, Petra

    2009-06-15

    We use the harmonic maps ansatz to find exact solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton-axion (EMDA) equations. The solutions are harmonic maps invariant to the symplectic real group in four dimensions Sp(4,R){approx}O(5). We find solutions of the EMDA field equations for the one- and two-dimensional subspaces of the symplectic group. Specially, for illustration of the method, we find space-times that generalize the Schwarzschild solution with dilaton, axion, and electromagnetic fields.

  3. Algorithm development for Maxwell's equations for computational electromagnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, Peter M.

    1990-01-01

    A new algorithm has been developed for solving Maxwell's equations for the electromagnetic field. It solves the equations in the time domain with central, finite differences. The time advancement is performed implicitly, using an alternating direction implicit procedure. The space discretization is performed with finite volumes, using curvilinear coordinates with electromagnetic components along those directions. Sample calculations are presented of scattering from a metal pin, a square and a circle to demonstrate the capabilities of the new algorithm.

  4. MAXWELL-LORENTZ EQUATIONS IN GENERAL FRENET-SERRET COORDINATES

    SciTech Connect

    Kabel, A

    2004-09-17

    We consider the trajectory of a charged particle in an arbitrary external magnetic field. A local orthogonal coordinate system is given by the tangential, curvature, and torsion vectors. We write down Maxwell's equations in this coordinate system. The resulting partial differential equations for the magnetic fields fix conditions among its local multipole components, which can be viewed as a generalization of the usual multipole expansion of the fields of magnetic elements.

  5. Transient growth in stable linearized Vlasov-Maxwell plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podesta, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    Large amplitude transient growth of kinetic scale perturbations in stable collisionless magnetized plasmas has recently been demonstrated using a linearized Landau fluid model. Initial perturbations with lengthscales of the order of the ion gyroradius were shown to have transient timescales that in some cases were long compared to the ion gyroperiod, Ωit≫1. Moreover, it was suggested that such perturbations are not rare but instead form a large class within the set of all possible initial conditions. For collisionless plasmas, the Vlasov-Maxwell equations provide a more complete description of kinetic physics and the existence of transient growth of solutions for the linearized Vlasov-Maxwell system is an interesting question. The existence of transient growth of solutions is demonstrated here for a special case of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations, namely, the one dimensional Vlasov-Poisson system. The analysis is different from the standard approach of nonmodal analysis since the initial value problem is described by a Volterra integral equation of the second kind, reflecting the fact that the time evolution of the system depends on the memory of the state from time zero through time t. For the case of a thermal equilibrium plasma, it is shown how initial conditions may be constructed to obtain solutions that grow linearly in time; the duration of this growth is the time required for a thermal electron to traverse the wavelength of the initial perturbation, a timescale that can last for many plasma periods 2π/ωpe, thus demonstrating the existence of transient growth of solutions for the linearized Vlasov-Poisson system. The results suggest that the phenomenon of transient growth may be a common feature of the linearized Vlasov-Maxwell system as well as for Landau fluid models.

  6. Charged Particle Tunnels from the Einstein-Maxwell Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Deyou; Yang, Shuzheng

    Considering the self-gravitation interaction and the unfixed background space-time, we study the Hawking radiation of the Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion (EMDA) black hole by the radial geodesic method and the Hamilton-Jacobi method. Both sets of results agree with Parikh and Wilczek's and show that the actual radiation spectrum deviates from the purely thermal one and the tunneling probability is related to the change of Bekenstein-Hawking entropy, which satisfies an underlying unitary theory.

  7. Maxwell electromagnetism as an emergent phenomenon in condensed matter.

    PubMed

    Rehn, J; Moessner, R

    2016-08-28

    The formulation of a complete theory of classical electromagnetism by Maxwell is one of the milestones of science. The capacity of many-body systems to provide emergent mini-universes with vacua quite distinct from the one we inhabit was only recognized much later. Here, we provide an account of how simple systems of localized spins manage to emulate Maxwell electromagnetism in their low-energy behaviour. They are much less constrained by symmetry considerations than the relativistically invariant electromagnetic vacuum, as their substrate provides a non-relativistic background with even translational invariance broken. They can exhibit rich behaviour not encountered in conventional electromagnetism. This includes the existence of magnetic monopole excitations arising from fractionalization of magnetic dipoles; as well as the capacity of disorder, by generating defects on the lattice scale, to produce novel physics, as exemplified by topological spin glassiness or random Coulomb magnetism.This article is part of the themed issue 'Unifying physics and technology in light of Maxwell's equations'. PMID:27458263

  8. An analysis of peristaltic motion of compressible convected Maxwell fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, A.; Ahmad, I.; Ali, N.; Hayat, T.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study for peristaltic flow of a non-Newtonian compressible Maxwell fluid through a tube of small radius. Constitutive equation of upper convected Maxwell model is used for the non-Newtonian rheology. The governing equations are modeled for axisymmetric flow. A regular perturbation method is used for the radial and axial velocity components up to second order in dimensionless amplitude. Exact expressions for the first-order radial and axial velocity components are readily obtained while second-order mean axial velocity component is obtained numerically due to presence of complicated non-homogenous term in the corresponding equation. Based on the mean axial velocity component, the net flow rate is calculated through numerical integration. Effects of various emerging parameters on the net flow rate are discussed through graphical illustrations. It is observed that the net flow rate is positive for larger values of dimensionless relaxation time λ1. This result is contrary to that of reported by [D. Tsiklauri and I. Beresnev, "Non-Newtonian effects in the peristaltic flow of a Maxwell fluid," Phys. Rev. E. 64 (2001) 036303]." i.e. in the extreme non-Newtonian regime, there is a possibility of reverse flow.

  9. The Maxwell-Stefan description of binary diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringuier, E.

    2013-09-01

    The paper deals with interdiffusion in a two-component fluid (also called binary or mutual diffusion) near isothermal equilibrium. The historical approach of Maxwell and Stefan, developed in an ideal gaseous mixture, is updated by introducing the chemical potentials of the components subsequently devised by Gibbs, which enable one to implement the Maxwell-Stefan picture of interdiffusion in an arbitrary fluid mixture. The pattern of the interdiffusion law reduces to Fick's in the high-dilution limit, but care should be taken of the reference frame in which the laws of diffusion are written. For a third-year university student, the assets of the modern Maxwell-Stefan description, besides its simplicity and inborn connection with thermodynamics, are (i) manifest Galilean invariance (the principle of relativity of motion); (ii) straightforward compatibility with fluid dynamics; and (iii) simple generalization to a multicomponent fluid in future, graduate-level studies. The value of the mutual-diffusion coefficient, which is not given by the macroscopic description, was calculated by Stefan in an ideal gaseous mixture and found to be independent of the composition. That independence is often observed in real mixtures and is taken as evidence against the mean-free-path account of diffusion. Yet a mixture of components of disparate masses shows a dependence of the mutual-diffusion coefficient on its composition, and we examine why Stefan's calculation can be invalid for this mixture.

  10. Explicit and implicit ode solvers using Krylov subspace optimization: Application to the diffusion equation and parabolic Maxwell`s system

    SciTech Connect

    Druskin, V.; Knizhnerman, L.

    1994-12-31

    The authors solve the Cauchy problem for an ODE system Au + {partial_derivative}u/{partial_derivative}t = 0, u{vert_bar}{sub t=0} = {var_phi}, where A is a square real nonnegative definite symmetric matrix of the order N, {var_phi} is a vector from R{sup N}. The stiffness matrix A is obtained due to semi-discretization of a parabolic equation or system with time-independent coefficients. The authors are particularly interested in large stiff 3-D problems for the scalar diffusion and vectorial Maxwell`s equations. First they consider an explicit method in which the solution on a whole time interval is projected on a Krylov subspace originated by A. Then they suggest another Krylov subspace with better approximating properties using powers of an implicit transition operator. These Krylov subspace methods generate optimal in a spectral sense polynomial approximations for the solution of the ODE, similar to CG for SLE.

  11. Algorithmic information content, Church-Turing thesis, physical entropy, and Maxwell's demon

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, W.H.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements convert alternative possibilities of its potential outcomes into the definiteness of the record'' -- data describing the actual outcome. The resulting decrease of statistical entropy has been, since the inception of the Maxwell's demon, regarded as a threat to the second law of thermodynamics. For, when the statistical entropy is employed as the measure of the useful work which can be extracted from the system, its decrease by the information gathering actions of the observer would lead one to believe that, at least from the observer's viewpoint, the second law can be violated. I show that the decrease of ignorance does not necessarily lead to the lowering of disorder of the measured physical system. Measurements can only convert uncertainty (quantified by the statistical entropy) into randomness of the outcome (given by the algorithmic information content of the data). The ability to extract useful work is measured by physical entropy, which is equal to the sum of these two measures of disorder. So defined physical entropy is, on the average, constant in course of the measurements carried out by the observer on an equilibrium system. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  12. A Maxwell Demon Model Connecting Information and Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Pei-Yan; Duan, Chang-Kui

    2016-08-01

    In the past decade several theoretical Maxwell's demon models have been proposed exhibiting effects such as refrigerating, doing work at the cost of information, and some experiments have been done to realise these effects. Here we propose a model with a two level demon, information represented by a sequence of bits, and two heat reservoirs. Which reservoir the demon interact with depends on the bit. If information is pure, one reservoir will be refrigerated, on the other hand, information can be erased if temperature difference is large. Genuine examples of such a system are discussed.

  13. SCUBA: A Camera for the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gear, W. K.; Cunningham, C. R.

    We briefly describe the Submillimetre Common User Bolometer Array which has been built and is currently being tested at Edinburgh for the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope in Hawaii. This instrument will define the state-of-the-art in submillimetre continuum astronomical instrumentation. SCUBA has 2 arrays covering a field of two and a half arcminutes simultaneously in 2 submillimetre bands, plus 3 longer wavelength individual pixels for photometry. The detectors are germanium bolometers cooled to 0.1K with a dilution fridge and all pixels are background-limited.

  14. Demons: Maxwell's demon, Szilard's engine and Landauer's erasure-dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kish, Laszlo B.; Granqvist, Claes G.; Khatri, Sunil P.; Wen, He

    2014-09-01

    This talk addressed the following questions in the public debate at HoTPI: (i) energy dissipation limits of switches, memories and control; (ii) whether reversible computers are possible, or does their concept violate thermodynamics; (iii) Szilard's engine, Maxwell's demon and Landauer's principle: corrections to their exposition in the literature; (iv) whether Landauer's erasure-dissipation principle is valid, if the same energy dissipation holds for writing information, or if it is invalid; and (v) whether (non-secure) erasure of memories, or the writing of the same amount of information, dissipates most heat.

  15. Climate Controlled Sedimentation in Maxwell Bay, King George Island, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hass, H.; Kuhn, G.; Wittenberg, N.; Woelfl, A.; Betzler, C.

    2012-12-01

    Climatic change in Antarctica is strongest over the Antarctic Peninsula where in places the annual mean temperatures increased by 0.5 K per decade through the past 60 years. The impact of this warming trend is clearly visible in the form of retreating glaciers and melting ice sheets, loss of sea ice and strong meltwater discharge into the coastal zone. While it is generally accepted that the rapidity of the present climate change bears a significant anthropogenic aspect, it is not clear whether the effects caused by the warming trend are exceptional and unprecedented or whether the reaction of the environment is similar to that of earlier climate phases such as the Medieval Warm Period (MWP) about 1,000 years ago. One of the major goals of the joint international research project IMCOAST is to investigate the strength of the recent warming trend and its impact on the marine environment of the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP). The study we present here reveals the Upper Holocene climatic history based on high-resolution sediment cores from Maxwell Bay (King George Island, WAP) and information on the actual processes triggered or altered by the recent warming trend based on sedimentologic and hydroacoustic investigations in Potter Cove, a tributary fjord to Maxwell Bay. Long sediment cores from Maxwell Bay reveal grain-size changes that can be linked to cold and warm phases such as the Little Ice Age (LIA) and the MWP. Generally, warm phases are finer grained than cold phases as a result of longer and stronger melting processes during the warm phases. It is suggested that meltwater plumes carry fine-grained sediment out of the surrounding fjords into Maxwell Bay where it settles in suitable areas to produce sediments that have a modal value around 16 μm. This mode is largely absent in sediments deposited during e.g. the LIA. However, post LIA sediments are depleted in the 16 μm-mode sediment suggesting slightly different conditions during the last century. One reason

  16. Three-dimensional asymptotically flat Einstein-Maxwell theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnich, Glenn; Lambert, Pierre-Henry; Mao, Pujian

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell theory with non-trivial asymptotics at null infinity is solved. The symmetry algebra is a Virasoro-Kac-Moody type algebra that extends the bms3 algebra of the purely gravitational case. Solution space involves logarithms and provides a tractable example of a polyhomogeneous solution space. The associated surface charges are non-integrable and non-conserved due to the presence of electromagnetic news. As in the four-dimensional purely gravitational case, their algebra involves a field-dependent central charge.

  17. Consequences of Moduli Stabilization in the Einstein-Maxwell Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asensio, César; Seguí, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    A toy landscape sector is introduced as a compactification of the Einstein-Maxwell model on a product of two spheres. Features of the model include moduli stabilization, a distribution of the effective cosmological constant of the dimensionally reduced 1+1 spacetime, which is different from the analogous distribution of the Bousso-Polchinski landscape, and the absence of the so-called α* problem. This problem arises when the Kachru-Kallosh-Linde-Trivedi stabilization mechanism is naively applied to the states of the Bousso-Polchinski landscape. The model also contains anthropic states, which can be readily constructed without needing any fine-tuning.

  18. Perturbative charged rotating 5D Einstein-Maxwell black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Lérida, Francisco

    2010-12-01

    We present perturbative charged rotating 5D Einstein-Maxwell black holes with spherical horizon topology. The electric charge Q is the perturbative parameter, the perturbations being performed up to 4th order. The expressions for the relevant physical properties of these black holes are given. The gyromagnetic ratio g, in particular, is explicitly shown to be non-constant in higher order, and thus to deviate from its lowest order value, g = 3. Comparison of the perturbative analytical solutions with their non-perturbative numerical counterparts shows remarkable agreement.

  19. Light wave propagation through a dilaton-Maxwell domain wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, J. R.; Schulze-Halberg, A.

    2015-10-01

    We consider the propagation of electromagnetic waves through a dilaton-Maxwell domain wall of the type introduced by Gibbons and Wells [G. W. Gibbons and C. G. Wells, Classical and Quantum Gravity 11, 2499 (1994)]. It is found that if such a wall exists within our observable Universe, it would be absurdly thick, or else have a magnetic field in its core which is much stronger than observed intergalactic fields. We conclude that it is highly improbable that any such wall is physically realized.

  20. Time-harmonic Maxwell equations with asymptotically linear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Dongdong; Tang, Xianhua

    2016-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the following time-harmonic semilinear Maxwell equation: nabla× (nabla× u)+λ u=f(x,u), &in Ω ν × u=0, &on partialΩ, where {Ωsubset {R}3} is a bounded, convex domain and {ν : partial Ωto {R}3} is the exterior normal. Motivated by recent work of Bartsch and Mederski and based on some observations and new techniques, we study above equation by developing the generalized Nehari manifold method. Particularly, existence of ground-state solutions of Nehari-Pankov type for the equation is established with asymptotically linear nonlinearity.

  1. The Remote Maxwell Demon as Energy Down-Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossenfelder, S.

    2016-04-01

    It is demonstrated that Maxwell's demon can be used to allow a machine to extract energy from a heat bath by use of information that is processed by the demon at a remote location. The model proposed here effectively replaces transmission of energy by transmission of information. For that we use a feedback protocol that enables a net gain by stimulating emission in selected fluctuations around thermal equilibrium. We estimate the down conversion rate and the efficiency of energy extraction from the heat bath.

  2. Role of measurement-feedback separation in autonomous Maxwell's demons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Naoto; Ito, Sosuke; Kawaguchi, Kyogo; Sagawa, Takahiro

    2015-04-01

    We introduce an information heat engine that is autonomous (i.e., without any time-dependent parameter) but has separated measurement and feedback processes. This model serves as a bridge between different types of information heat engines inspired by Maxwell's demon; from the original Szilard-engine type systems to the autonomous demonic setups. By analyzing our model on the basis of a general framework introduced in our previous paper (Shiraishi and Sagawa 2015 Phys. Rev. E 91 012130), we clarify the role of the separation of measurement and feedback in the integral fluctuation theorems.

  3. How an autonomous quantum Maxwell demon can harness correlated information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Adrian; Miyake, Akimasa

    2015-12-01

    We study an autonomous quantum system which exhibits refrigeration under an information-work trade-off like a Maxwell demon. The system becomes correlated as a single "demon" qubit interacts sequentially with memory qubits while in contact with two heat reservoirs of different temperatures. Using strong subadditivity of the von Neumann entropy, we derive a global Clausius inequality to show thermodynamic advantages from access to correlated information. It is demonstrated, in a matrix product density operator formalism, that our demon can simultaneously realize refrigeration against a thermal gradient and erasure of information from its memory, which is impossible without correlations. The phenomenon can be even enhanced by the presence of quantum coherence.

  4. Derivation of special relativity from Maxwell and Newton.

    PubMed

    Dunstan, D J

    2008-05-28

    Special relativity derives directly from the principle of relativity and from Newton's laws of motion with a single undetermined parameter, which is found from Faraday's and Ampère's experimental work and from Maxwell's own introduction of the displacement current to be the -c(-2) term in the Lorentz transformations. The axiom of the constancy of the speed of light is quite unnecessary. The behaviour and the mechanism of the propagation of light are not at the foundations of special relativity. PMID:18218595

  5. SIM(1)-VSR Maxwell-Chern-Simons electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufalo, R.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we propose a very special relativity (VSR)-inspired generalization of the Maxwell-Chern-Simons (MCS) electrodynamics. This proposal is based upon the construction of a proper study of the SIM (1)-VSR gauge-symmetry. It is shown that the VSR nonlocal effects present a significant and healthy departure from the usual MCS theory. The classical dynamics is analysed in full detail, by studying the solution for the electric field and static energy for this configuration. Afterwards, the interaction energy between opposite charges is derived and we show that the VSR effects play an important part in obtaining a (novel) finite expression for the static potential.

  6. By design: James Clerk Maxwell and the evangelical unification of science.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Matthew

    2012-03-01

    James Clerk Maxwell's electromagnetic theory famously unified many of the Victorian laws of physics. This essay argues that Maxwell saw a deep theological significance in the unification of physical laws. He postulated a variation on the design argument that focused on the unity of phenomena rather than Paley's emphasis on complexity. This argument of Maxwell's is shown to be connected to his particular evangelical religious views. His evangelical perspective provided encouragement for him to pursue a unified physics that supplemented his other philosophical, technical and social influences. Maxwell's version of the argument from design is also contrasted with modern 'intelligent-design' theory. PMID:22702031

  7. Application of Block Krylov Subspace Spectral Methods to Maxwell's Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Lambers, James V.

    2009-10-08

    Ever since its introduction by Kane Yee over forty years ago, the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method has been a widely-used technique for solving the time-dependent Maxwell's equations. This paper presents an alternative approach to these equations in the case of spatially-varying electric permittivity and/or magnetic permeability, based on Krylov subspace spectral (KSS) methods. These methods have previously been applied to the variable-coefficient heat equation and wave equation, and have demonstrated high-order accuracy, as well as stability characteristic of implicit time-stepping schemes, even though KSS methods are explicit. KSS methods for scalar equations compute each Fourier coefficient of the solution using techniques developed by Gene Golub and Gerard Meurant for approximating elements of functions of matrices by Gaussian quadrature in the spectral, rather than physical, domain. We show how they can be generalized to coupled systems of equations, such as Maxwell's equations, by choosing appropriate basis functions that, while induced by this coupling, still allow efficient and robust computation of the Fourier coefficients of each spatial component of the electric and magnetic fields. We also discuss the implementation of appropriate boundary conditions for simulation on infinite computational domains, and how discontinuous coefficients can be handled.

  8. Fundamental Physical Basis for Maxwell-Heaviside Gravitomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyambuya, Golden Gadzirayi

    2015-08-01

    Gravitomagnetism is universally and formally recognised in contemporary physics as being the linear first-order approximation of Einstein's field equations emerging from the General Theory of Relativity (GTR). Herein, we argue that, as has been done by others in the past, gravitomagnetism can be viewed as a fully-fledged independent theory of gravitomagnetism that can be divorced from Professor Einstein's GTR. The gravitomagnetic theory whose exposition we give herein is exactly envisioned by Professor Maxwell and Dr. Heaviside. The once speculative Maxwell-Heaviside Gravitomagnetic theory now finds full justification as a fully fledged theory from Professor José Hera's Existence Theorem which states that all that is needed for there to exist the four Max-well-type field equations is that a mass-current conservation law be obeyed. Our contribution in the present work, if any, is that we demonstrate conclusively that like electromagnetism, the gravitomagnetic phenomenon leads to the prediction of gravitomagnetic waves that travel at the speed of light. Further, we argue that for the gravitational phenomenon, apart from the Newtonian gravitational potential, there are four more potentials and these operate concurrently with the Newtonian potential. At the end of it, it is seen that the present work sets the stage for a very interesting investigation of several gravitational anomalies such as the ponderous Pioneer Anomaly, the vexing Flyby Anomalies, the mysterious Anomalous Rotation Curves of Spiral Galaxies and as well, the possibility of the generation of stellar magnetic fields by rotating gravitational masses.

  9. A Maxwell elasto-brittle rheology for sea ice modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dansereau, Véronique; Weiss, Jérôme; Saramito, Pierre; Lattes, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    A new rheological model is developed that builds on an elasto-brittle (EB) framework used for sea ice and rock mechanics, with the intent of representing both the small elastic deformations associated with fracturing processes and the larger deformations occurring along the faults/leads once the material is highly damaged and fragmented. A viscous-like relaxation term is added to the linear-elastic constitutive law together with an effective viscosity that evolves according to the local level of damage of the material, like its elastic modulus. The coupling between the level of damage and both mechanical parameters is such that within an undamaged ice cover the viscosity is infinitely large and deformations are strictly elastic, while along highly damaged zones the elastic modulus vanishes and most of the stress is dissipated through permanent deformations. A healing mechanism is also introduced, counterbalancing the effects of damaging over large timescales. In this new model, named Maxwell-EB after the Maxwell rheology, the irreversible and reversible deformations are solved for simultaneously; hence drift velocities are defined naturally. First idealized simulations without advection show that the model reproduces the main characteristics of sea ice mechanics and deformation: strain localization, anisotropy, intermittency and associated scaling laws.

  10. A multigrid method for variable coefficient Maxwell's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J E; Lee, B

    2004-05-13

    This paper presents a multigrid method for solving variable coefficient Maxwell's equations. The novelty in this method is the use of interpolation operators that do not produce multilevel commutativity complexes that lead to multilevel exactness. Rather, the effects of multilevel exactness are built into the level equations themselves--on the finest level using a discrete T-V formulation, and on the coarser grids through the Galerkin coarsening procedure of a T-V formulation. These built-in structures permit the levelwise use of an effective hybrid smoother on the curl-free near-nullspace components, and these structures permit the development of interpolation operators for handling the curl-free and divergence-free error components separately, with the resulting block diagonal interpolation operator not satisfying multilevel commutativity but having good approximation properties for both of these error components. Applying operator-dependent interpolation for each of these error components leads to an effective multigrid scheme for variable coefficient Maxwell's equations, where multilevel commutativity-based methods can degrade. Numerical results are presented to verify the effectiveness of this new scheme.

  11. Einstein-Maxwell-Anti-de-Sitter spinning solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herdeiro, Carlos; Radu, Eugen

    2016-06-01

    Electrostatics on global Anti-de-Sitter (AdS) spacetime is sharply different from that on global Minkowski spacetime. It admits a multipolar expansion with everywhere regular, finite energy solutions, for every multipole moment except the monopole [1]. A similar statement holds for global AdS magnetostatics. We show that everywhere regular, finite energy, electric plus magnetic fields exist on AdS in three distinct classes: (I) with non-vanishing total angular momentum J; (II) with vanishing J but non-zero angular momentum density, Tφt ; (III) with vanishing J and Tφt . Considering backreaction, these configurations remain everywhere smooth and finite energy, and we find, for example, Einstein-Maxwell-AdS solitons that are globally - Type I - or locally (but not globally) - Type II - spinning. This backreaction is considered first perturbatively, using analytical methods and then non-perturbatively, by constructing numerical solutions of the fully non-linear Einstein-Maxwell-AdS system. The variation of the energy and total angular momentum with the boundary data is explicitly exhibited for one example of a spinning soliton.

  12. Holography and hydrodynamics for EMD theory with two Maxwell fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolic, Milena

    2013-03-01

    We use `generalized dimensional reduction' to relate a specific Einstein-Max-well-Dilaton (EMD) theory, including two gauge fields, three neutral scalars and an axion, to higher-dimensional AdS gravity (with no higher-dimensional Maxwell field). In general, this is a dimensional reduction over compact Einstein spaces in which the dimension of the compact space is continued to non-integral values. Specifically, we perform a non-diagonal Kaluza-Klein (KK) reduction over a torus, involving two KK gauge fields. Our aim is to determine the holographic dictionary and hydrodynamic behaviour of the lower-dimensional theory by performing the generalized dimensional reduction on AdS. We study a specific example of a black brane carrying a wave, whose universal sector is described by gravity coupled to two Maxwell fields, three neutral scalars and an axion, and compute the first order transport coefficients of the dual theory. In these theories {{widehat{ζ}}_s}/widehat{η}<2( {1/( {d-1} )-widehat{c}_s^2} ) , where {{widehat{c}}_s} is the speed of sound, violating a conjectured bound, but an alternative bound is satisfied.

  13. Maxwell's demon and the management of ignorance in stochastic thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Ian J.

    2016-07-01

    It is nearly 150 years since Maxwell challenged the validity of the second law of thermodynamics by imagining a tiny creature who could sort the molecules of a gas in such a way that would decrease entropy without exerting any work. The demon has been discussed largely using thought experiments, but it has recently become possible to exert control over nanoscale systems, just as Maxwell imagined, and the status of the second law has become a more practical matter, raising the issue of how measurements manage our ignorance in a way that can be exploited. The framework of stochastic thermodynamics extends macroscopic concepts such as heat, work, entropy and irreversibility to small systems and allows us explore the matter. Some arguments against a successful demon imply a second law that can be suspended indefinitely until we dissipate energy in order to remove the records of his operations. In contrast, under stochastic thermodynamics, the demon fails because on average, more work is performed upfront in making a measurement than can be extracted by exploiting the outcome. This requires us to exclude systems and a demon that evolve under what might be termed self-sorting dynamics, and we reflect on the constraints on control that this implies while still working within a thermodynamic framework.

  14. Einstein-aether theory with a Maxwell field: General formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Balakin, Alexander B.; Lemos, José P.S.

    2014-11-15

    We extend the Einstein-aether theory to include the Maxwell field in a nontrivial manner by taking into account its interaction with the time-like unit vector field characterizing the aether. We also include a generic matter term. We present a model with a Lagrangian that includes cross-terms linear and quadratic in the Maxwell tensor, linear and quadratic in the covariant derivative of the aether velocity four-vector, linear in its second covariant derivative and in the Riemann tensor. We decompose these terms with respect to the irreducible parts of the covariant derivative of the aether velocity, namely, the acceleration four-vector, the shear and vorticity tensors, and the expansion scalar. Furthermore, we discuss the influence of an aether non-uniform motion on the polarization and magnetization of the matter in such an aether environment, as well as on its dielectric and magnetic properties. The total self-consistent system of equations for the electromagnetic and the gravitational fields, and the dynamic equations for the unit vector aether field are obtained. Possible applications of this system are discussed. Based on the principles of effective field theories, we display in an appendix all the terms up to fourth order in derivative operators that can be considered in a Lagrangian that includes the metric, the electromagnetic and the aether fields.

  15. Impact of the integration of a Maxwell-elastic-brittle rheology in NEMO-LIM3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulier, Jonathan; Fichefet, Thierry; Legat, Vincent; Weiss, Jérôme; Dansereau, Véronique

    2015-04-01

    Satellite observations of the Arctic sea ice show the existence of a dense mesh of leads constantly opening and closing over short time scales. Those leads are highly linked to the presence of linear kinematic features which are quasi linear patterns present in the strain field that stretch all across the Arctic basin. Current sea ice models fail to reproduce those linear kinematic features and the observed statistical distribution of deformation rate. In order to refine the physical representation of sea ice dynamics into sea ice models, a new approach has been adopted for the rheology of sea ice. This approach, based on a Maxwell elasto-brittle rheology, is being integrated in the NEMO-LIM3 global ocean-sea ice model (\\url{www.nemo-ocean.eu} ; \\url{www.elic.ucl.ac.be/lim}). In the present study, we examine the influence of the new rheology on the statistical characteristics of the simulated deformation rate and on the ability of the model to reproduce the existence of leads within the ice pack. We will also address the impact of the representation of leads on the fluxes between atmosphere and ocean.

  16. 76 FR 56468 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New... Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico has completed an inventory of human remains, in... itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Maxwell Museum of...

  17. 77 FR 46116 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New... Museum of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains in consultation with the appropriate... Maxwell Museum of Anthropology at the address below by September 4, 2012. ADDRESSES: Heather...

  18. Analyticity of strictly static and strictly stationary, inheriting and non-inheriting Einstein-Maxwell solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tod, Paul

    2007-07-01

    Following the technique of Müller zum Hagen (Proc. Camb. Phil. Soc. 67: 415-421, 1970) we show that strictly static and strictly stationary solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations are analytic in harmonic coordinates. This holds whether or not the Maxwell field inherits the symmetry.

  19. The Covariant Formulation of Maxwell's Equations Expressed in a Form Independent of Specific Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heras, Jose A.; Baez, G.

    2009-01-01

    The covariant formulation of Maxwell's equations can be expressed in a form independent of the usual systems of units by introducing the constants alpha, beta and gamma into these equations. Maxwell's equations involving these constants are then specialized to the most commonly used systems of units: Gaussian, SI and Heaviside-Lorentz by giving…

  20. Maxwell's contrived analogy: An early version of the methodology of modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Giora; Goldstein, Bernard R.

    2012-11-01

    The term "analogy" stands for a variety of methodological practices all related in one way or another to the idea of proportionality. We claim that in his first substantial contribution to electromagnetism James Clerk Maxwell developed a methodology of analogy which was completely new at the time or, to borrow John North's expression, Maxwell's methodology was a "newly contrived analogue". In his initial response to Michael Faraday's experimental researches in electromagnetism, Maxwell did not seek an analogy with some physical system in a domain different from electromagnetism as advocated by William Thomson; rather, he constructed an entirely artificial one to suit his needs. Following North, we claim that the modification which Maxwell introduced to the methodology of analogy has not been properly appreciated. In view of our examination of the evidence, we argue that Maxwell gave a new meaning to analogy; in fact, it comes close to modeling in current usage.

  1. Tidal dissipation in heterogeneous bodies: Maxwell vs Andrade rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behounkova, M.; Cadek, O.

    2014-04-01

    The tremendous volcanism on Jupiter's moon Io as well as the huge activity at the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus show that tidal dissipation is a very strong source of energy for some bodies in the Solar System. Outside the Solar System, tidal heating in short-period exoplanets may cause Io-like volcanism, large-scale melting and even thermal runaways [1-4]. Here we further develop the method to compute tidal heating in heterogeneous bodies [5]. Especially, we concentrate on the Andrade rheology implementation. We study the impact of the improved model on bodies with large lateral viscosity variation such as Enceladus and tidally locked exoEarth with a large surface temperature contrast due to uneven insolation [6]. We discuss the influence of empirical parameters describing the Andrade rheology and compare the tidal heating and tidal stress obtained for the Andrade rheology with frequently used Maxwell models for different forcing frequencies.

  2. Using Maxwell's Equations in the late 1800s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchwald, Jed

    2012-02-01

    Between the publication of Maxwell's Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism in 1873 and the early 1900s his field equations were not considered to be fundamental by many Cambridge-trained physicists Instead, they were thought to derive from Hamilton's principle given an appropriate energy expression. Such an expression usually assigned a velocity or a position function to field quantities, though this was not invariably done. Precisely because the Hamiltonian, and not the derivative field equations, was taken to be basic, new effects could be generated by adding terms to the energy expression. This was how the Faraday and Kerr magneto-optic effects were handled. The program however never did generate a method for incorporating dissipative phenomena, as Oliver Heaviside (who disliked the use of Hamilton's principle) demonstrated. The procedure was in the end decisively abandoned when J. G. Leathem, a student of Joseph Larmor a Cambridge, demonstrated that it could not handle a particularly subtle magneto-optic process.

  3. How an autonomous quantum Maxwell demon can harness correlated information.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Adrian; Miyake, Akimasa

    2015-12-01

    We study an autonomous quantum system which exhibits refrigeration under an information-work trade-off like a Maxwell demon. The system becomes correlated as a single "demon" qubit interacts sequentially with memory qubits while in contact with two heat reservoirs of different temperatures. Using strong subadditivity of the von Neumann entropy, we derive a global Clausius inequality to show thermodynamic advantages from access to correlated information. It is demonstrated, in a matrix product density operator formalism, that our demon can simultaneously realize refrigeration against a thermal gradient and erasure of information from its memory, which is impossible without correlations. The phenomenon can be even enhanced by the presence of quantum coherence. PMID:26764650

  4. Maxwell's demon in biochemical signal transduction with feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Ito, Sosuke; Sagawa, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Signal transduction in living cells is vital to maintain life itself, where information transfer in noisy environment plays a significant role. In a rather different context, the recent intensive research on 'Maxwell's demon'-a feedback controller that utilizes information of individual molecules-have led to a unified theory of information and thermodynamics. Here we combine these two streams of research, and show that the second law of thermodynamics with information reveals the fundamental limit of the robustness of signal transduction against environmental fluctuations. Especially, we find that the degree of robustness is quantitatively characterized by an informational quantity called transfer entropy. Our information-thermodynamic approach is applicable to biological communication inside cells, in which there is no explicit channel coding in contrast to artificial communication. Our result could open up a novel biophysical approach to understand information processing in living systems on the basis of the fundamental information-thermodynamics link. PMID:26099556

  5. On the locally rotationally symmetric Einstein-Maxwell perfect fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliese, D.; Valiente Kroon, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    We examine the stability of Einstein-Maxwell perfect fluid configurations with a privileged radial direction by means of a 1+1+2-tetrad formalism. We use this formalism to cast in a quasilinear symmetric hyperbolic form the equations describing the evolution of the system. This hyperbolic reduction is used to discuss the stability of linear perturbations in some special cases. By restricting the analysis to isotropic fluid configurations, we assume a constant electrical conductivity coefficient for the fluid. As a result of this analysis we provide a complete classification and characterization of various stable and unstable configurations. We find, in particular, that in many cases the stability conditions are strongly determined by the constitutive equations and the electric conductivity. A threshold for the emergence of the instability appears in both contracting and expanding systems.

  6. Marginal and irrelevant disorder in Einstein-Maxwell backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-García, Antonio M.; Loureiro, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    We study analytically the effect of a weak random chemical potential of zero average in an Einstein-Maxwell background. For uncorrelated disorder this perturbation is relevant; however we show that it can become marginal or even irrelevant by tuning disorder correlations. At zero temperature we find that, to leading order in the disorder strength, the correction to the conductivity for irrelevant perturbations vanishes. In the marginal case, in order to renormalize a logarithmic divergence, we carry out a resummation of the perturbative expansion of the metric that leads to a Lifshitz-like geometry in the infrared. Disorder in this case also induces a positive correction to the conductivity. At finite temperature the black hole acquires an effective charge and the thermal conductivity has the expected Drude peak that signals the breaking of translational invariance. However the electric conductivity is not affected by the random chemical potential to leading order in the disorder strength.

  7. Skyrme-Maxwell solitons in 2+1 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Gladikowski, J.; Piette, B.M.; Schroers, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    A gauged (2+1)-dimensional version of the Skyrme model is investigated. The gauge group is U(1) and the dynamics of the associated gauge potential is governed by a Maxwell term. In this model there are topologically stable soliton solutions carrying magnetic flux which is not topologically quantized. The properties of static, rotationally symmetric solitons of degree one and two are discussed in detail. It is shown that the electric field of such solutions is necessarily zero. The solitons{close_quote} shape, mass, and magnetic flux depend on the U(1) coupling constant, and this dependence is studied numerically from very weak to very strong coupling. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  8. Structures of general relativity in dilaton-Maxwell electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kechkin, O. V.; Mosharev, P. A.

    2016-08-01

    It is shown that electro (magneto) static sector of Maxwell’s electrodynamics coupled to the dilaton field in a string theory form possesses the symmetry group of the stationary General Relativity in vacuum. Performing the Ernst formalism, we develope a technique for generation of exact solutions in this modified electrodynamics on the base of the normalized Ehlers symmetry transformation. In the electrostatic case, we construct and study a general class of spherically symmetric solutions that describes a pointlike source of the Coulomb type. It is demonstrated that this source is characterized by finite and singularity-free interaction at short distances. Also it is established that the total electrostatic energy of this source is finite and inversely proportional to the dilaton-Maxwell coupling constant.

  9. Maxwell's Demons Everywhere: Evolving Design as the Arrow of Time

    PubMed Central

    Bejan, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Science holds that the arrow of time in nature is imprinted on one-way (irreversible) phenomena, and is accounted for by the second law of thermodynamics. Here I show that the arrow of time is painted much more visibly on another self-standing phenomenon: the occurrence and change (evolution in time) of flow organization throughout nature, animate and inanimate. This other time arrow has been present in science but not recognized as such since the birth of thermodynamics. It is Maxwell's demon. Translated in macroscopic terms, this is the physics of the phenomenon of design, which is the universal natural tendency of flow systems to evolve into configurations that provide progressively greater access over time, and is summarized as the constructal law of design and evolution in nature. Knowledge is the ability to effect design changes that facilitate human flows on the landscape. Knowledge too flows. PMID:24510201

  10. Experiments on Maxwell's fish-eye dynamics in elastic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Gautier; Dubois, Marc; Beauvais, Romain; Achaoui, Younes; Ing, Ros Kiri; Guenneau, Sébastien; Sebbah, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that a Duraluminium thin plate with a thickness profile varying radially in a piecewise constant fashion as h ( r ) = h ( 0 ) ( 1 + (r / R max ) 2 ) 2 , with h(0) = 0.5 mm, h(Rmax) = 2 mm, and Rmax = 10 cm, behaves in many ways as Maxwell's fish-eye lens in optics. Its imaging properties for a Gaussian pulse with central frequencies 30 kHz and 60 kHz are very similar to those predicted by ray trajectories (great circles) on a virtual sphere (rays emanating from the North pole meet at the South pole). However, the refocusing time depends on the carrier frequency as a direct consequence of the dispersive nature of flexural waves in thin plates. Importantly, experimental results are in good agreement with finite-difference-time-domain simulations.

  11. Conformally invariant thermodynamics of a Maxwell-Dilaton black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Monsalvo, C. S.; Nettel, F.; Quevedo, H.

    2013-12-01

    The thermodynamics of Maxwell-Dilaton black holes has been extensively studied. It has served as a fertile ground to test ideas about temperature through various definitions of surface gravity. In this paper, we make an independent analysis of this black hole solution in both, Einstein and Jordan, frames. We explore a set of definitions for the surface gravity and observe the different predictions they make for the near extremal configuration of this black hole. Finally, motivated by the singularity structure in the interior of the event horizon, we use a holographic argument to remove the micro-states from the disconnected region of this solution. In this manner, we construct a frame independent entropy from which we obtain a temperature which agrees with the standard results in the non-extremal regime, and has a desirable behaviour around the extremal configurations according to the third law of black hole mechanics.

  12. How can an autonomous quantum Maxwell demon harness correlated information?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Adrian; Miyake, Akimasa; CQuIC Thermodynamics Team

    We study an autonomous quantum system, which exhibits refrigeration under an information-work tradeoff like a Maxwell demon. The system becomes correlated as a single ``demon'' qubit interacts sequentially with memory qubits while in contact with two heat reservoirs of different temperatures. Using strong subadditivity of the von Neumann entropy, we derive a global Clausius inequality to show thermodynamical advantages from access to correlated information. It is demonstrated, in a matrix product density operator formalism, that our demon can simultaneously realize refrigeration against a thermal gradient and erasure of information from its memory, which is impossible without correlations. The phenomenon can be even enhanced by the presence of quantum coherence. The work was supported in part by National Science Foundation Grants PHY-1212445 and PHY-1521016.

  13. Maxwell's demon in biochemical signal transduction with feedback loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Sosuke; Sagawa, Takahiro

    2015-06-01

    Signal transduction in living cells is vital to maintain life itself, where information transfer in noisy environment plays a significant role. In a rather different context, the recent intensive research on `Maxwell's demon'--a feedback controller that utilizes information of individual molecules--have led to a unified theory of information and thermodynamics. Here we combine these two streams of research, and show that the second law of thermodynamics with information reveals the fundamental limit of the robustness of signal transduction against environmental fluctuations. Especially, we find that the degree of robustness is quantitatively characterized by an informational quantity called transfer entropy. Our information-thermodynamic approach is applicable to biological communication inside cells, in which there is no explicit channel coding in contrast to artificial communication. Our result could open up a novel biophysical approach to understand information processing in living systems on the basis of the fundamental information-thermodynamics link.

  14. A Generalization of the Einstein-Maxwell Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotton, Fredrick

    2016-03-01

    The proposed modifications of the Einstein-Maxwell equations include: (1) the addition of a scalar term to the electromagnetic side of the equation rather than to the gravitational side, (2) the introduction of a 4-dimensional, nonlinear electromagnetic constitutive tensor and (3) the addition of curvature terms arising from the non-metric components of a general symmetric connection. The scalar term is defined by the condition that a spherically symmetric particle be force-free and mathematically well-behaved everywhere. The constitutive tensor introduces two auxiliary fields which describe the particle structure. The additional curvature terms couple both to particle solutions and to electromagnetic and gravitational wave solutions. http://sites.google.com/site/fwcotton/em-30.pdf

  15. Foxboro, Bradley gear combined at Maxwell House plant

    SciTech Connect

    Maggs, J.

    1986-02-03

    In what is described as an unusual installation, industrial process control equipment from the Foxboro Co., Foxboro, Mass., and Allen Bradley Co., Milwaukee, was combined at General Foods' Maxwell House plant in Houston, and is working together with a Hewlett-Packard 1000 computer to improve product quality and cut energy costs, according to Kevin McCormick, decaffeination business manager. As a result, the process controls are expected to reduce energy costs at the facility by 5 to 10%, he said. Four Foxboro model 300 systems were installed to provide monitoring and analog control of four processes - coffee bean decaffeination, instant coffee preparation, Minute Rice preparation, and separate Foxboro system to control the plant's two boilers, which are fired with natural gas and with waste coffee grounds.

  16. Black Holes and Quasiblack Holes in Einstein-Maxwell Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinel, Reinhard; Breithaupt, Martin; Liu, Yu-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Continuous sequences of asymptotically flat solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell equations describing regular equilibrium configurations of ordinary matter can reach a black hole limit. For a distant observer, the spacetime becomes more and more indistinguishable from the metric of an extreme Kerr-Newman black hole outside the horizon when approaching the limit. From an internal perspective, a still regular but non-asymptotically flat spacetime with the extreme Kerr-Newman near-horizon geometry at spatial infinity forms at the limit. Interesting special cases are sequences of Papapetrou-Majumdar distributions of electrically counterpoised dust leading to extreme Reissner-Nordström black holes and sequences of rotating uncharged fluid bodies leading to extreme Kerr black holes.

  17. Development and Application of Compatible Discretizations of Maxwell's Equations

    SciTech Connect

    White, D; Koning, J; Rieben, R

    2005-05-27

    We present the development and application of compatible finite element discretizations of electromagnetics problems derived from the time dependent, full wave Maxwell equations. We review the H(curl)-conforming finite element method, using the concepts and notations of differential forms as a theoretical framework. We chose this approach because it can handle complex geometries, it is free of spurious modes, it is numerically stable without the need for filtering or artificial diffusion, it correctly models the discontinuity of fields across material boundaries, and it can be very high order. Higher-order H(curl) and H(div) conforming basis functions are not unique and we have designed an extensible C++ framework that supports a variety of specific instantiations of these such as standard interpolatory bases, spectral bases, hierarchical bases, and semi-orthogonal bases. Virtually any electromagnetics problem that can be cast in the language of differential forms can be solved using our framework. For time dependent problems a method-of-lines scheme is used where the Galerkin method reduces the PDE to a semi-discrete system of ODE's, which are then integrated in time using finite difference methods. For time integration of wave equations we employ the unconditionally stable implicit Newmark-Beta method, as well as the high order energy conserving explicit Maxwell Symplectic method; for diffusion equations, we employ a generalized Crank-Nicholson method. We conclude with computational examples from resonant cavity problems, time-dependent wave propagation problems, and transient eddy current problems, all obtained using the authors massively parallel computational electromagnetics code EMSolve.

  18. 78 FR 45963 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Item: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Item: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology...: The Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native... the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control...

  19. Parasitic extraction and magnetic analysis for transformers, inductors and igbt bridge busbar with maxwell 2d and maxwell 3d simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ning

    This thesis presents the parasitic extraction and magnetic analysis for transformers, inductors, and IGBT bridge busbars with Maxwell 2D and Maxwell 3D simulation. In the first chapter, the magnetic field of a transformer in Maxwell 2D is analyzed. The parasitic capacitance between each winding of the transformer are extracted by Maxwell 2D. According to the actual dimensions, the parasitic capacitances are calculated. The results are verified by comparing with the measurement results from 4395A impedance analyzer. In the second chapter, two CM inductors are simulated in Maxwell 3D. One is the conventional winding inductor, the other one is the proposed one. The magnetic field distributions of different winding directions are analyzed. The analysis is verified by the simulation result. The last chapter introduces a technique to analyze, extract, and measure the parasitic inductance of planar busbars. With this technique, the relationship between self-inductance and mutual-inductance is analyzed. Secondly, a total inductance is calculated based on the developed technique. Thirdly, the current paths and the inductance on a planar busbar are investigated with DC-link capacitors. Furthermore, the analysis of the inductance is addressed. Ansys Q3D simulation and analysis are presented. Finally, the experimental verification is shown by the S-parameter measurement.

  20. James Clerk Maxwell, a precursor of system identification and control science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittanti, Sergio

    2015-12-01

    One hundred and fifty years ago James Clerk Maxwell published his celebrated paper 'Dynamical theory of electromagnetic field', where the interaction between electricity and magnetism eventually found an explanation. However, Maxwell was also a precursor of model identification and control ideas. Indeed, with the paper 'On Governors' of 1869, he introduced the concept of feedback control system; and moreover, with his essay on Saturn's rings of 1856 he set the basic principle of system identification. This paper is a tutorial exposition having the aim to enlighten these latter aspects of Maxwell's work.

  1. ON THE ROLE OF INVOLUTIONS IN THE DISCONTINUOUS GALERKIN DISCRETIZATION OF MAXWELL AND MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SYSTEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    The role of involutions in energy stability of the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) discretization of Maxwell and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) systems is examined. Important differences are identified in the symmetrization of the Maxwell and MHD systems that impact the construction of energy stable discretizations using the DG method. Specifically, general sufficient conditions to be imposed on the DG numerical flux and approximation space are given so that energy stability is retained These sufficient conditions reveal the favorable energy consequence of imposing continuity in the normal component of the magnetic induction field at interelement boundaries for MHD discretizations. Counterintuitively, this condition is not required for stability of Maxwell discretizations using the discontinuous Galerkin method.

  2. The nonlinear stability of the trivial solution to the Maxwell-Born-Infeld system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, Jared

    2012-08-01

    In this article, we use an electromagnetic gauge-free framework to establish the existence of small-data global solutions to the Maxwell-Born-Infeld (MBI) system on the Minkowski spacetime background in 1+3 dimensions. Because the nonlinearities in the system have a special null structure, we are also able to show that these solutions decay at least as fast as solutions to the linear Maxwell-Maxwell system. In addition, we show that on any Lorentzian manifold, the MBI system is hyperbolic in the interior of the field-strength regime in which its Lagrangian is real-valued.

  3. Self-dual Maxwell field in 3D gravity with torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Blagojevic, M.; Cvetkovic, B.

    2008-08-15

    We study the system of a self-dual Maxwell field coupled to 3D gravity with torsion, with the Maxwell field modified by a topological mass term. General structure of the field equations reveals a new, dynamical role of the classical central charges, and gives a simple correspondence between self-dual solutions with torsion and their Riemannian counterparts. We construct two exact self-dual solutions, corresponding to the sectors with a massless and massive Maxwell field, and calculate their conserved charges.

  4. Mathematical analysis of plasmonic resonances for nanoparticles: The full Maxwell equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammari, Habib; Ruiz, Matias; Yu, Sanghyeon; Zhang, Hai

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we use the full Maxwell equations for light propagation in order to analyze plasmonic resonances for nanoparticles. We mathematically define the notion of plasmonic resonance and analyze its shift and broadening with respect to changes in size, shape, and arrangement of the nanoparticles, using the layer potential techniques associated with the full Maxwell equations. We present an effective medium theory for resonant plasmonic systems and derive a condition on the volume fraction under which the Maxwell-Garnett theory is valid at plasmonic resonances.

  5. Cosmic statistics of statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szapudi, István; Colombi, Stéphane; Bernardeau, Francis

    1999-12-01

    The errors on statistics measured in finite galaxy catalogues are exhaustively investigated. The theory of errors on factorial moments by Szapudi & Colombi is applied to cumulants via a series expansion method. All results are subsequently extended to the weakly non-linear regime. Together with previous investigations this yields an analytic theory of the errors for moments and connected moments of counts in cells from highly non-linear to weakly non-linear scales. For non-linear functions of unbiased estimators, such as the cumulants, the phenomenon of cosmic bias is identified and computed. Since it is subdued by the cosmic errors in the range of applicability of the theory, correction for it is inconsequential. In addition, the method of Colombi, Szapudi & Szalay concerning sampling effects is generalized, adapting the theory for inhomogeneous galaxy catalogues. While previous work focused on the variance only, the present article calculates the cross-correlations between moments and connected moments as well for a statistically complete description. The final analytic formulae representing the full theory are explicit but somewhat complicated. Therefore we have made available a fortran program capable of calculating the described quantities numerically (for further details e-mail SC at colombi@iap.fr). An important special case is the evaluation of the errors on the two-point correlation function, for which this should be more accurate than any method put forward previously. This tool will be immensely useful in the future for assessing the precision of measurements from existing catalogues, as well as aiding the design of new galaxy surveys. To illustrate the applicability of the results and to explore the numerical aspects of the theory qualitatively and quantitatively, the errors and cross-correlations are predicted under a wide range of assumptions for the future Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The principal results concerning the cumulants ξ, Q3 and Q4 is that

  6. Rectifying thermal fluctuations: Minimal pumping and Maxwell's demon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Dibyendu

    Molecular complexes with movable components form the basis of nanoscale machines. Their inherent stochastic nature makes it a challenge to generate any controllable movement. Rather than fighting these fluctuations, one can utilize them by the periodic modulation of system parameters, or stochastic pumping. For the no-pumping theorem (NPT), which establishes minimal conditions for directed pumping, we present a simplified proof using an elementary graph theoretical construction. Motivated by recent experiments, we propose a new class of "hybrid" models combining elements of both the purely discrete and purely continuous descriptions prevalent in the field. We formulate the NPT in this hybrid framework to give a detailed justification of the original experiment observation. We also present an extension of the NPT to open stochastic systems. Next we consider the paradox of "Maxwell's demon," an imaginary intelligent being that rectifies thermal fluctuations in a manner that seems to violate the second law of thermodynamics. We present two exactly solvable, autonomous models that can reproduce the actions of the demon. Of necessity, both of these models write information on a memory device as part of their operation. By exposing their explicit, transparent mechanisms, our models offer simple paradigms to investigate the autonomous rectification of thermal fluctuations and the thermodynamics of information processing.

  7. Maxwell's conjecture on three point charges with equal magnitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ya-Lun

    2015-08-01

    Maxwell's conjecture on three point charges states that the number of non-degenerate equilibrium points of the electrostatic field generated by them in R3 is at most four. We prove the conjecture in the cases when three point charges have equal magnitudes and show the number of isolated equilibrium points can only be zero, two, three, or four. Specifically, fixing positions of two positive charges in R3, we know exactly where to place the third positive charge to have two, three, or four equilibrium points. All equilibrium points are isolated and there are no other possibilities for the number of isolated equilibrium points. On the other hand, if both two of the fixed charges have negative charge values, there are always two equilibrium points except when the third positive charge lies in the line segment connecting the two negative charges. The exception cases are when the field contains only a curve of equilibrium points. In this paper, computations assisted by computer involve symbolic and exact integer computations. Therefore, all the results are proved rigorously.

  8. From Maxwell's Electrodynamics to Relativity, a Geometric Journey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Felix T.

    2015-05-01

    Since Poincaré and Minkowski recognized ict as a fourth coordinate in a four-space associated with the Lorentz transformation, the occurrence of that imaginary participant in the relativistic four-vector has been a mystery of relativistic dynamics. A reexamination of Maxwell's equations (ME) shows that one of their necessary implications is to bring to light a constraint that distorts the 3-space of our experience from strict Euclidean zero curvature by a time-varying, spatially isotropic term creating a minute curvature Kcurv(t) and therefore a radius of curvature rcurv(t) =Kcurv- 1 / 2 (t). In the light of Michelson-Morley and the Lorentz transformation, this radius must be imaginary, and the geometric curvature K must be negative. From the time dependence of the ME the rate of change of the curvature radius is shown to be drcurv / dt = ic , agreeing exactly with the Hubble expansion. The imaginary magnitude is the radius of curvature; the time itself is not imaginary. Minkowski's space-time is unjustified. Important consequences for the foundations of special relativity follow.

  9. Maxwell's mixing equation revisited: characteristic impedance equations for ellipsoidal cells.

    PubMed

    Stubbe, Marco; Gimsa, Jan

    2015-07-21

    We derived a series of, to our knowledge, new analytic expressions for the characteristic features of the impedance spectra of suspensions of homogeneous and single-shell spherical, spheroidal, and ellipsoidal objects, e.g., biological cells of the general ellipsoidal shape. In the derivation, we combined the Maxwell-Wagner mixing equation with our expression for the Clausius-Mossotti factor that had been originally derived to describe AC-electrokinetic effects such as dielectrophoresis, electrorotation, and electroorientation. The influential radius model was employed because it allows for a separation of the geometric and electric problems. For shelled objects, a special axial longitudinal element approach leads to a resistor-capacitor model, which can be used to simplify the mixing equation. Characteristic equations were derived for the plateau levels, peak heights, and characteristic frequencies of the impedance as well as the complex specific conductivities and permittivities of suspensions of axially and randomly oriented homogeneous and single-shell ellipsoidal objects. For membrane-covered spherical objects, most of the limiting cases are identical to-or improved with respect to-the known solutions given by researchers in the field. The characteristic equations were found to be quite precise (largest deviations typically <5% with respect to the full model) when tested with parameters relevant to biological cells. They can be used for the differentiation of orientation and the electric properties of cell suspensions or in the analysis of single cells in microfluidic systems. PMID:26200856

  10. Maxwell stress induced optical torque upon gold prolate nanospheroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Jiunn-Woei; Chen, Ying-Syuan; Kuo, Mao-Kuen

    2016-03-01

    This study theoretically analyzes the surface traction on an elongated Au prolate nanospheroid to examine the resultant optical torque exerted by an optical tweezers. The multiple multipole method is applied to evaluate quantitatively the electromagnetic field induced by a linearly polarized plane wave illuminating a nanospheroid, then obtaining the surface traction in terms of Maxwell stress tensor. The optical torque is calculated by the surface integral of the cross product of position vector and traction over the nanospheroid's surface. Our results show that two pairs of positive and negative traction zones at the two apexes of the nanospheroid play a critical role. Furthermore, the resultant optical torque is wavelength-dependent. If the wavelength is shorter than the longitudinal surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the nanospheroid, the optical torque rotates the long axis of nanospheroid perpendicular to the polarization direction of the incident wave. In contrast, if the wavelength is longer than the LSPR the long axis is pushed parallel to the polarization direction. The turning point with a null torque, between the perpendicular and parallel modes, is at the LSPR. The optical performance of Au nanospheroid is equivalent to that of Au NR with the same volume and aspect ratio, but the LSPR of Au NR is little red-shifted from that of an equivalent prolate spheroid.

  11. Relation of magnetism and electricity beyond Faraday-Maxwell electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkin, M. I.; Orlova, N. B.

    2014-11-01

    A comparison has been performed between the Landau-Dzyaloshinskii-Astrov magnetoelectric effects and the electromagnetic effects caused by the electromagnetic Faraday induction and Maxwell displacement currents. The requirement for the spontaneous violation of symmetry relative to space inversion and time reversion is formulated as the condition for the existence of magnetoelectric effects. An analysis is performed of some results obtained by E.A. Turov both personally and in association with colleagues, which made a significant contribution to the development of the science of magnetoelectricity. These results include the development of the scheme of a simplified symmetry analysis for describing collinear spin structures; the use of this scheme for the invariant expansion of thermodynamic potentials for the magnetic materials with different types of magnetic ordering; the formulation of the microscopic model of magnetoelectricity with the use of the relation between spins and electroactive optical phonons; the study of the phenomena of the enhancement of magnetoelectric effects upon the magnetic resonance; the analysis of the opportunities of electrodipole excitation and of the detection of different signals of magnetic resonance; and the study of the manifestations of magnetoelectric effects in magnetoacoustics and optics.

  12. Gravitational spreading of Danu, Freyja and Maxwell Montes, Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smrekar, Suzanne E.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1991-01-01

    The potential energy of elevated terrain tends to drive the collapse of the topography. This process of gravitational spreading is likely to be more important on Venus than on Earth because the higher surface temperature weakens the crust. The highest topography on Venus is Ishtar Terra. The high plateau of Lakshmi Planum has an average elevation of 3 km above mean planetary radius, and is surrounded by mountain belts. Freyja, Danu, and Maxwell Montes rise, on average, an additional 3, 0.5, and 5 km above the plateau, respectively. Recent high resolution Magellan radar images of this area, east of approx. 330 deg E, reveal widespread evidence for gravity spreading. Some observational evidence is described for gravity spreading and the implications are discussed in terms of simple mechanical models. Several simple models predict that gravity spreading should be an important process on Venus. One difficulty in using remote observations to infer interior properties is that the observed features may not have formed in response to stresses which are still active. Several causes of surface topography are briefly examined.

  13. Presliding friction identification based upon the Maxwell Slip model structure.

    PubMed

    Rizos, Demosthenis D; Fassois, Spilios D

    2004-06-01

    The problem of presliding friction identification based upon the Maxwell Slip model structure, which is capable of accounting for the presliding hysteresis with nonlocal memory, is considered. The model structure's basic properties are examined, based upon which a priori identifiability is established, the role of initial conditions on identification is investigated, and the necessary and sufficient conditions for a posteriori identifiability are derived. Using them, guidelines for excitation signal design are also formulated. Building upon these results, two new methods, referred to as Dynamic Linear Regression (DLR) and NonLinear Regression (NLR), are postulated for presliding friction identification. Both may be thought of as different extensions of the conventional Linear Regression (LR) method that uses threshold preassignment: The DLR by introducing extra dynamics in the form of a vector finite impulse response filter, and the NLR by relaxing threshold preassignment through a special nonlinear regression procedure. The effectiveness of both methods is assessed via Monte Carlo experiments and identification based upon laboratory signals. The results indicate that both methods achieve significant improvements over the LR. The DLR offers the highest accuracy, with the NLR striking a very good balance between accuracy and parametric complexity. PMID:15189071

  14. Relativistic plasma expansion with Maxwell-Juettner distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yongsheng; Wang, Naiyan; Tang, Xiuzhang; Shi, Yijin

    2013-11-15

    A self-similar analytical solution is proposed to describe the relativistic ion acceleration with the local Maxwell-Juettner relativistic distribution electrons. It is an alternative to the existing static model [M. Passoni and M. Lontano, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 115001 (2008)], which exploits a limited solution for the acceleration potential. With our model, the potential is finite naturally and has an upper limitation proportional to the square root of the electron temperature. The divergent potential in the non-relativistic case is the linear items of the Taylor expansion of that obtained relativistic one here. The energy distribution of ions and the dependence of the ion momentum on the acceleration time are obtained analytically. Maximum ion energy has an upper limitation decided by the finite potential difference. In the ultra-relativistic region, the ion energy at the ion front is proportional to t{sup 4/5} and the energy of the ions behind the ion front is proportional to t{sup 2/3} since the field there is shielded by the ions beyond them and the field at the ion front is the most intense.

  15. From Maxwell's Equations to Polarimetric SAR Images: A Simulation Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sant'Anna, Sidnei J. S.; da S. Lacava, J. C.; Fernandes, David

    2008-01-01

    A new electromagnetic approach for the simulation of polarimetric SAR images is proposed. It starts from Maxwell's equations, employs the spectral domain full-wave technique, the moment method, and the stationary phase method to compute the far electromagnetic fields scattered by multilayer structures. A multilayer structure is located at each selected position of a regular rectangular grid of coordinates, which defines the scene area under imaging. The grid is determined taking into account the elementary scatter size and SAR operational parameters, such as spatial resolution, pixel spacing, look angle and platform altitude. A two-dimensional separable “sinc” function to represent the SAR spread point function is also considered. Multifrequency sets of single-look polarimetric SAR images are generated, in L-, C- and X-bands and the images are evaluated using several measurements commonly employed in SAR data analysis. The evaluation shows that the proposed simulation process is working properly, since the obtained results are in accordance with those presented in the literature. Therefore, this new approach becomes suitable for carrying out theoretical and practical studies using polarimetric SAR images.

  16. Classification of the static and asymptotically flat Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton spacetimes with a photon sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho; Lazov, Boian

    2016-04-01

    We consider the problem for the classification of static and asymptotically flat Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton spacetimes with a photon sphere. It is first proven that the photon spheres in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity have constant mean and constant scalar curvature. Then we derive some relations between the mean curvature and the physical characteristics of the photon spheres. Using further the symmetries of the dimensionally reduced Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton field equations we show that the lapse function, the electrostatic potential, and the dilaton field are functionally dependent in the presence of a photon sphere. Using all this we prove the main classification theorem by explicitly constructing all Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton solutions possessing a nonextremal photon sphere.

  17. Characterization of thunderstorm induced Maxwell current densities in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baginski, Michael Edward

    1989-01-01

    Middle atmospheric transient Maxwell current densities generated by lightning induced charge perturbations are investigated via a simulation of Maxwell's equations. A time domain finite element analysis is employed for the simulations. The atmosphere is modeled as a region contained within a right circular cylinder with a height of 110 km and radius of 80 km. A composite conductivity profile based on measured data is used when charge perturbations are centered about the vertical axis at altitudes of 6 and 10 km. The simulations indicate that the temporal structure of the Maxwell current density is relatively insensitive to altitude variation within the region considered. It is also shown that the electric field and Maxwell current density are not generally aligned.

  18. 5D Einstein-Maxwell solitons and concentric rotating dipole black rings

    SciTech Connect

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.

    2008-09-15

    We discuss the application of the solitonic techniques to the 5D Einstein-Maxwell gravity. As an illustration we construct a new exact solution describing two concentric rotating dipole black rings. The properties of the solution are investigated.

  19. Maxwell solvers for the simulations of the laser-matter interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuter, Rachel; Grech, Mickael; Gonzalez de Alaiza Martinez, Pedro; Bonnaud, Guy; d'Humières, Emmanuel

    2014-06-01

    With the advent of high intensity laser beams, solving the Maxwell equations with a free-dispersive algorithm is becoming essential. Several Maxwell solvers, implemented in Particle-In-Cell codes, have been proposed. We present here some of them by describing their computational stencil in two-dimensional geometry and defining their stability area as well as their numerical dispersion relation. Numerical simulations of Backward Raman amplification and laser wake-field are presented to compare these different solvers.

  20. Thermodynamics of higher dimensional topological dilation black holes with a power-law Maxwell field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangeneh, M. Kord; Sheykhi, A.; Dehghani, M. H.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we extend the study on the nonlinear power-law Maxwell field to dilaton gravity. We introduce the (n +1 ) -dimensional action in which gravity is coupled to a dilaton and power-law nonlinear Maxwell field, and we obtain the field equations by varying the action. We construct a new class of higher dimensional topological black hole solutions of Einstein-dilaton theory coupled to a power-law nonlinear Maxwell field and investigate the effects of the nonlinearity of the Maxwell source as well as the dilaton field on the properties of the spacetime. Interestingly enough, we find that the solutions exist provided one assumes three Liouville-type potentials for the dilaton field, and in the case of the Maxwell field, one of the Liouville potentials vanishes. After studying the physical properties of the solutions, we compute the mass, charge, electric potential and temperature of the topological dilaton black holes. We also study the thermodynamics and thermal stability of the solutions and disclose the effects of the dilaton field and the power-law Maxwell field on the thermodynamics of these black holes. Finally, we comment on the dynamical stability of the obtained solutions in four dimensions.

  1. Representing the Electromagnetic Field: How Maxwell's Mathematics Empowered Faraday's Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tweney, Ryan D.

    2011-07-01

    James Clerk Maxwell `translated' Michael Faraday's experimentally-based field theory into the mathematical representation now known as `Maxwell's Equations.' Working with a variety of mathematical representations and physical models Maxwell extended the reach of Faraday's theory and brought it into consistency with other results in the physics of electricity and magnetism. Examination of Maxwell's procedures opens many issues about the role of mathematical representation in physics and the learning background required for its success. Specifically, Maxwell's training in `Cambridge University' mathematical physics emphasized the use of analogous equations across fields of physics and the repeated solving of extremely difficult problems in physics. Such training develops an array of overlearned mathematical representations supported by highly sophisticated cognitive mechanisms for the retrieval of relevant information from long term memory. For Maxwell, mathematics constituted a new form of representation in physics, enhancing the formal derivational and calculational role of mathematics and opening a cognitive means for the conduct of `experiments in the mind' and for sophisticated representations of theory.

  2. 2+1 dimensional magnetically charged solutions in Einstein-power-Maxwell theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazharimousavi, S. Habib; Gurtug, O.; Halilsoy, M.; Unver, O.

    2011-12-01

    We obtain a class of magnetically charged solutions in 2+1 dimensional Einstein-Power-Maxwell theory. In the linear Maxwell limit, such horizonless solutions are known to exist. We show that in 3D geometry, black hole solutions with magnetic charge do not exist even if it is sourced by the power-Maxwell field. Physical properties of the solution with particular power k of the Maxwell field is investigated. The true timelike naked curvature singularity develops when k>1 which constitutes one of the striking effects of the power-Maxwell field. For specific power parameter k, the occurrence of a timelike naked singularity is analyzed in the quantum mechanical point of view. Quantum test fields obeying the Klein-Gordon and the Dirac equations are used to probe the singularity. It is shown that the class of static pure magnetic spacetime in the power-Maxwell theory is quantum-mechanically singular when it is probed with fields obeying Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations in the generic case.

  3. Language Individuation and Marker Words: Shakespeare and His Maxwell's Demon

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, John; Budden, David; Craig, Hugh; Moscato, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Background Within the structural and grammatical bounds of a common language, all authors develop their own distinctive writing styles. Whether the relative occurrence of common words can be measured to produce accurate models of authorship is of particular interest. This work introduces a new score that helps to highlight such variations in word occurrence, and is applied to produce models of authorship of a large group of plays from the Shakespearean era. Methodology A text corpus containing 55,055 unique words was generated from 168 plays from the Shakespearean era (16th and 17th centuries) of undisputed authorship. A new score, CM1, is introduced to measure variation patterns based on the frequency of occurrence of each word for the authors John Fletcher, Ben Jonson, Thomas Middleton and William Shakespeare, compared to the rest of the authors in the study (which provides a reference of relative word usage at that time). A total of 50 WEKA methods were applied for Fletcher, Jonson and Middleton, to identify those which were able to produce models yielding over 90% classification accuracy. This ensemble of WEKA methods was then applied to model Shakespearean authorship across all 168 plays, yielding a Matthews' correlation coefficient (MCC) performance of over 90%. Furthermore, the best model yielded an MCC of 99%. Conclusions Our results suggest that different authors, while adhering to the structural and grammatical bounds of a common language, develop measurably distinct styles by the tendency to over-utilise or avoid particular common words and phrasings. Considering language and the potential of words as an abstract chaotic system with a high entropy, similarities can be drawn to the Maxwell's Demon thought experiment; authors subconsciously favour or filter certain words, modifying the probability profile in ways that could reflect their individuality and style. PMID:23826143

  4. Tracer diffusion coefficients in a sheared inelastic Maxwell gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzó, Vicente; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2016-07-01

    We study the transport properties of an impurity in a sheared granular gas, in the framework of the Boltzmann equation for inelastic Maxwell models. We investigate here the impact of a nonequilibrium phase transition found in such systems, where the tracer species carries a finite fraction of the total kinetic energy (ordered phase). To this end, the diffusion coefficients are first obtained for a granular binary mixture in spatially inhomogeneous states close to the simple shear flow. In this situation, the set of coupled Boltzmann equations are solved by means of a Chapman–Enskog-like expansion around the (local) shear flow distributions for each species, thereby retaining all the hydrodynamic orders in the shear rate a. Due to the anisotropy induced by the shear flow, three tensorial quantities D ij , D p,ij , and D T,ij are required to describe the mass transport process instead of the conventional scalar coefficients. These tensors are given in terms of the solutions of a set of coupled algebraic equations, which can be exactly solved as functions of the shear rate a, the coefficients of restitution {αsr} and the parameters of the mixture (masses and composition). Once the forms of D ij , D p,ij , and D T,ij are obtained for arbitrary mole fraction {{x}1}={{n}1}/≤ft({{n}1}+{{n}2}\\right) (where n r is the number density of species r), the tracer limit ({{x}1}\\to 0 ) is carefully considered for the above three diffusion tensors. Explicit forms for these coefficients are derived showing that their shear rate dependence is significantly affected by the order-disorder transition.

  5. Global smooth flows for compressible Navier-Stokes-Maxwell equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiang; Cao, Hongmei

    2016-08-01

    Umeda et al. (Jpn J Appl Math 1:435-457, 1984) considered a rather general class of symmetric hyperbolic-parabolic systems: A0zt+sum_{j=1}nAjz_{xj}+Lz=sum_{j,k=1}nB^{jk}z_{xjxk} and showed optimal decay rates with certain dissipative assumptions. In their results, the dissipation matrices {L} and {B^{jk}(j,k=1,ldots,n)} are both assumed to be real symmetric. So far there are no general results in case that {L} and {B^{jk}} are not necessarily symmetric, which is left open now. In this paper, we investigate compressible Navier-Stokes-Maxwell (N-S-M) equations arising in plasmas physics, which is a concrete example of hyperbolic-parabolic composite systems with non-symmetric dissipation. It is observed that the Cauchy problem for N-S-M equations admits the dissipative mechanism of regularity-loss type. Consequently, extra higher regularity is usually needed to obtain the optimal decay rate of {L1({mathbb{R}}^3)}-{L^2({mathbb{R}}^3)} type, in comparison with that for the global-in-time existence of smooth solutions. In this paper, we obtain the minimal decay regularity of global smooth solutions to N-S-M equations, with aid of {L^p({mathbb{R}}^n)}-{Lq({mathbb{R}}^n)}-{Lr({mathbb{R}}^n)} estimates. It is worth noting that the relation between decay derivative orders and the regularity index of initial data is firstly found in the optimal decay estimates.

  6. Generalized transport coefficients for inelastic Maxwell mixtures under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Garzó, Vicente; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    The Boltzmann equation framework for inelastic Maxwell models is considered to determine the transport coefficients associated with the mass, momentum, and heat fluxes of a granular binary mixture in spatially inhomogeneous states close to the simple shear flow. The Boltzmann equation is solved by means of a Chapman-Enskog-type expansion around the (local) shear flow distributions f(r)(0) for each species that retain all the hydrodynamic orders in the shear rate. Due to the anisotropy induced by the shear flow, tensorial quantities are required to describe the transport processes instead of the conventional scalar coefficients. These tensors are given in terms of the solutions of a set of coupled equations, which can be analytically solved as functions of the shear rate a, the coefficients of restitution α(rs), and the parameters of the mixture (masses, diameters, and composition). Since the reference distribution functions f(r)(0) apply for arbitrary values of the shear rate and are not restricted to weak dissipation, the corresponding generalized coefficients turn out to be nonlinear functions of both a and α(rs). The dependence of the relevant elements of the three diffusion tensors on both the shear rate and dissipation is illustrated in the tracer limit case, the results showing that the deviation of the generalized transport coefficients from their forms for vanishing shear rates is in general significant. A comparison with the previous results obtained analytically for inelastic hard spheres by using Grad's moment method is carried out, showing a good agreement over a wide range of values for the coefficients of restitution. Finally, as an application of the theoretical expressions derived here for the transport coefficients, thermal diffusion segregation of an intruder immersed in a granular gas is also studied. PMID:26651684

  7. Generalized transport coefficients for inelastic Maxwell mixtures under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzó, Vicente; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    The Boltzmann equation framework for inelastic Maxwell models is considered to determine the transport coefficients associated with the mass, momentum, and heat fluxes of a granular binary mixture in spatially inhomogeneous states close to the simple shear flow. The Boltzmann equation is solved by means of a Chapman-Enskog-type expansion around the (local) shear flow distributions fr(0 ) for each species that retain all the hydrodynamic orders in the shear rate. Due to the anisotropy induced by the shear flow, tensorial quantities are required to describe the transport processes instead of the conventional scalar coefficients. These tensors are given in terms of the solutions of a set of coupled equations, which can be analytically solved as functions of the shear rate a , the coefficients of restitution αr s, and the parameters of the mixture (masses, diameters, and composition). Since the reference distribution functions fr(0 ) apply for arbitrary values of the shear rate and are not restricted to weak dissipation, the corresponding generalized coefficients turn out to be nonlinear functions of both a and αr s. The dependence of the relevant elements of the three diffusion tensors on both the shear rate and dissipation is illustrated in the tracer limit case, the results showing that the deviation of the generalized transport coefficients from their forms for vanishing shear rates is in general significant. A comparison with the previous results obtained analytically for inelastic hard spheres by using Grad's moment method is carried out, showing a good agreement over a wide range of values for the coefficients of restitution. Finally, as an application of the theoretical expressions derived here for the transport coefficients, thermal diffusion segregation of an intruder immersed in a granular gas is also studied.

  8. The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Spectral Legacy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plume, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Helmich, F.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Roberts, H.; Bowey, J.; Buckle, J.; Butner, H.; Caux, E.; Ceccarelli, C.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Friberg, P.; Gibb, A. G.; Hatchell, J.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Matthews, H.; Millar, T. J.; Mitchell, G.; Moore, T. J. T.; Ossenkopf, V.; Rawlings, J. M. C.; Richer, J.; Roellig, M.; Schilke, P.; Spaans, M.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Thompson, M. A.; Viti, S.; Weferling, B.; White, Glenn J.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2007-01-01

    Stars form in the densest, coldest, most quiescent regions of molecular clouds. Molecules provide the only probes that can reveal the dynamics, physics, chemistry, and evolution of these regions, but our understanding of the molecular inventory of sources and how this is related to their physical state and evolution is rudimentary and incomplete. The Spectral Legacy Survey (SLS) is one of seven surveys recently approved by the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Board of Directors. Beginning in 2007, the SLS will produce a spectral imaging survey of the content and distribution of all the molecules detected in the 345 GHz atmospheric window (between 332 and 373 GHz) toward a sample of five sources. Our intended targets are a low-mass core (NGC 1333 IRAS 4), three high-mass cores spanning a range of star-forming environments and evolutionary states (W49, AFGL 2591, and IRAS 20126), and a photodissociation region (the Orion Bar). The SLS will use the unique spectral imaging capabilities of HARP-B/ACSIS (Heterodyne Array Receiver Programme B/Auto-Correlation Spectrometer and Imaging System) to study the molecular inventory and the physical structure of these objects, which span different evolutionary stages and physical environments and to probe their evolution during the star formation process. As its name suggests, the SLS will provide a lasting data legacy from the JCMT that is intended to benefit the entire astronomical community. As such, the entire data set (including calibrated spectral data cubes, maps of molecular emission, line identifications, and calculations of the gas temperature and column density) will be publicly available.

  9. Descriptive statistics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Runhua; McLarty, Jerry W

    2009-10-01

    In this article, we introduced basic concepts of statistics, type of distributions, and descriptive statistics. A few examples were also provided. The basic concepts presented herein are only a fraction of the concepts related to descriptive statistics. Also, there are many commonly used distributions not presented herein, such as Poisson distributions for rare events and exponential distributions, F distributions, and logistic distributions. More information can be found in many statistics books and publications. PMID:19891281

  10. Statistical Diversions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petocz, Peter; Sowey, Eric

    2008-01-01

    As a branch of knowledge, Statistics is ubiquitous and its applications can be found in (almost) every field of human endeavour. In this article, the authors track down the possible source of the link between the "Siren song" and applications of Statistics. Answers to their previous five questions and five new questions on Statistics are presented.

  11. Statistical Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callamaras, Peter

    1983-01-01

    This buyer's guide to seven major types of statistics software packages for microcomputers reviews Edu-Ware Statistics 3.0; Financial Planning; Speed Stat; Statistics with DAISY; Human Systems Dynamics package of Stats Plus, ANOVA II, and REGRESS II; Maxistat; and Moore-Barnes' MBC Test Construction and MBC Correlation. (MBR)

  12. Bayesian Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Donald L.

    Bayesian statistical methodology and its possible uses in the behavioral sciences are discussed in relation to the solution of problems in both the use and teaching of fundamental statistical methods, including confidence intervals, significance tests, and sampling. The Bayesian model explains these statistical methods and offers a consistent…

  13. Numerical Vlasov-Maxwell modelling of space plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasson, Bengt Erik

    The Vlasov equation describes the evolution of the distribution function of particles in phase space (x, v), where the particles interact with long-range forces, but where short-range “collisional” forces are neglected. A space plasma consists of low-mass electrically charged particles, and therefore the most important long-range forces acting in the plasma are the Lorentz forces created by electromagnetic fields. What makes the numerical solution of the Vlasov equation a challenging task is that the fully three-dimensional problem leads to a partial differential equation in the six-dimensional phase space, plus time, making it hard even to store a discretised solution in a computer's memory. Solutions to the Vlasov equation have also a tendency of becoming oscillatory in velocity space, due to free streaming terms (ballistic particles), in which steep gradients are created and problems of calculating the ν (velocity) derivative of the function accurately increase with time. In the present thesis, the numerical treatment is limited to one- and two-dimensional systems, leading to solutions in two- and four-dimensional phase space, respectively, plus time. The numerical method developed is based on the technique of Fourier transforming the Vlasov equation in velocity space and then solving the resulting equation, in which the small-scale information in velocity space is removed through outgoing wave boundary conditions in the Fourier transformed velocity space. The Maxwell equations are rewritten in a form which conserves the divergences of the electric and magnetic fields, by means of the Lorentz potentials. The resulting equations are solved numerically by high order methods, reducing the need for numerical over-sampling of the problem. The algorithm has been implemented in Fortran 90, and the code for solving the one-dimensional Vlasov equation has been parallelised by the method of domain decomposition, and has been implemented using the Message Passing

  14. A class of staggered grid algorithms and analysis for time-domain Maxwell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlesworth, Alexander E.

    We describe, implement, and analyze a class of staggered grid algorithms for efficient simulation and analysis of time-domain Maxwell systems in the case of heterogeneous, conductive, and nondispersive, isotropic, linear media. We provide the derivation of a continuous mathematical model from the Maxwell equations in vacuum; however, the complexity of this system necessitates the use of computational methods for approximately solving for the physical unknowns. The finite difference approximation has been used for partial differential equations and the Maxwell Equations in particular for many years. We develop staggered grid based finite difference discrete operators as a class of approximations to continuous operators based on second order in time and various order approximations to the electric and magnetic field at staggered grid locations. A generalized parameterized operator which can be specified to any of this class of discrete operators is then applied to the Maxwell system and hence we develop discrete approximations through various choices of parameters in the approximation. We describe analysis of the resulting discrete system as an approximation to the continuous system. Using the comparison of dispersion analysis for the discrete and continuous systems, we derive a third difference approximation, in addition to the known (2, 2) and (2, 4) schemes. We conclude by providing the comparison of these three methods by simulating the Maxwell system for several choices of parameters in the system.

  15. 77 FR 19697 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ... May 2, 2012. ADDRESSES: David Phillips, Curator of Archaeology, Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, MSC01... culturally affiliated with the sacred objects should contact David Phillips, Curator of Archaeology,...

  16. Statistical databases

    SciTech Connect

    Kogalovskii, M.R.

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents a review of problems related to statistical database systems, which are wide-spread in various fields of activity. Statistical databases (SDB) are referred to as databases that consist of data and are used for statistical analysis. Topics under consideration are: SDB peculiarities, properties of data models adequate for SDB requirements, metadata functions, null-value problems, SDB compromise protection problems, stored data compression techniques, and statistical data representation means. Also examined is whether the present Database Management Systems (DBMS) satisfy the SDB requirements. Some actual research directions in SDB systems are considered.

  17. Morbidity statistics

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alwyn

    1969-01-01

    This paper is based on an analysis of questionnaires sent to the health ministries of Member States of WHO asking for information about the extent, nature, and scope of morbidity statistical information. It is clear that most countries collect some statistics of morbidity and many countries collect extensive data. However, few countries relate their collection to the needs of health administrators for information, and many countries collect statistics principally for publication in annual volumes which may appear anything up to 3 years after the year to which they refer. The desiderata of morbidity statistics may be summarized as reliability, representativeness, and relevance to current health problems. PMID:5306722

  18. Statistical Diversions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petocz, Peter; Sowey, Eric

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors focus on hypothesis testing--that peculiarly statistical way of deciding things. Statistical methods for testing hypotheses were developed in the 1920s and 1930s by some of the most famous statisticians, in particular Ronald Fisher, Jerzy Neyman and Egon Pearson, who laid the foundations of almost all modern methods of…

  19. Upscaling for the time-harmonic Maxwell equations with heterogeneous magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhard, Jens P.

    2005-09-01

    This paper presents a theoretical method for the upscaling of the time-harmonic Maxwell equations. We use the eddy current approximation of the Maxwell equations to describe the fields in heterogeneous materials. The magnetic permeability of the media is assumed to have random heterogeneities given by a Gaussian random field. The upscaling is based on the coarse graining method which applies projections and Green’s function formalism in Fourier space to scale the electric field. An upscaled Maxwell equation is derived which includes an effective magnetic permeability tensor. The effective permeability explicitly depends on the given scale for the upscaling. The scale-dependent permeability is calculated by a second-order perturbative expansion, and we discuss the future verification and the application of the results.

  20. Ludwig Boltzmann als Experimentalphysiker: Frühe Bestätigung der Maxwell-Theorie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpf, Klemens; Granitzer, Petra

    2006-09-01

    Am Beispiel von Boltzmanns Experimenten zur Bestätigung der Maxwell-Theorie wird dessen hervorragende Begabung auch als Experimentalphysiker deutlich. Die dargestellten Arbeiten fanden etwa 15 Jahre vor den Hertzschen Experimenten statt, zu einem Zeitpunkt also, als die noch junge Maxwell-Theorie dringend experimenteller Bestätigung bedurfte. Boltzmann konnte mit seinen experimentellen Untersuchungen eine direkte Konsequenz der Maxwellschen elektromagnetischen Theorie, die so genannte Maxwell-Relation, bestätigen. Seine Experimente stellten nicht nur lange Zeit den stärksten Beleg für die Richtigkeit der Maxwellschen Lichttheorie dar, sondern waren eine experimentelle Spitzenleistung an der Grenze des damals Möglichen. Besonders Boltzmanns Bestimmung der Dielektrizitätskonstanten von Gasen fand noch Jahrzehnte später Erwähnung in namhaften Lehrbüchern.

  1. Thermodynamics and efficiency of an autonomous on-chip Maxwell's demon.

    PubMed

    Kutvonen, Aki; Koski, Jonne; Ala-Nissila, Tapio

    2016-01-01

    In his famous letter in 1870, Maxwell describes how Joule's law can be violated "only by the intelligent action of a mere guiding agent", later coined as Maxwell's demon by Lord Kelvin. In this letter we study thermodynamics of information using an experimentally feasible Maxwell's demon setup based a single electron transistor capacitively coupled to a single electron box, where both the system and the Demon can be clearly identified. Such an engineered on-chip Demon measures and performes feedback on the system, which can be observed as cooling whose efficiency can be adjusted. We present a detailed analysis of the system and the Demon, including the second law of thermodynamics for bare and coarse grained entropy production and the flow of information as well as efficiency of information production and utilization. Our results demonstrate how information thermodynamics can be used to improve functionality of modern nanoscale devices. PMID:26887504

  2. Numerical Simulations of Light Bullets, Using The Full Vector, Time Dependent, Nonlinear Maxwell Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, Peter M.; Silberberg, Yaron; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper will present results in computational nonlinear optics. An algorithm will be described that solves the full vector nonlinear Maxwell's equations exactly without the approximations that we currently made. Present methods solve a reduced scalar wave equation, namely the nonlinear Schrodinger equation, and neglect the optical carrier. Also, results will be shown of calculations of 2-D electromagnetic nonlinear waves computed by directly integrating in time the nonlinear vector Maxwell's equations. The results will include simulations of 'light bullet' like pulses. Here diffraction and dispersion will be counteracted by nonlinear effects. The time integration efficiently implements linear and nonlinear convolutions for the electric polarization, and can take into account such quantum effects as Karr and Raman interactions. The present approach is robust and should permit modeling 2-D and 3-D optical soliton propagation, scattering, and switching directly from the full-vector Maxwell's equations.

  3. Numerical Simulations of Light Bullets, Using the Full Vector, Time Dependent, Nonlinear Maxwell Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, Peter M.; Silberberg, Yaron; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper will present results in computational nonlinear optics. An algorithm will be described that solves the full vector nonlinear Maxwell's equations exactly without the approximations that are currently made. Present methods solve a reduced scalar wave equation, namely the nonlinear Schrodinger equation, and neglect the optical carrier. Also, results will be shown of calculations of 2-D electromagnetic nonlinear waves computed by directly integrating in time the nonlinear vector Maxwell's equations. The results will include simulations of 'light bullet' like pulses. Here diffraction and dispersion will be counteracted by nonlinear effects. The time integration efficiently implements linear and nonlinear convolutions for the electric polarization, and can take into account such quantum effects as Kerr and Raman interactions. The present approach is robust and should permit modeling 2-D and 3-D optical soliton propagation, scattering, and switching directly from the full-vector Maxwell's equations.

  4. Numerical Simulations of Light Bullets, Using The Full Vector, Time Dependent, Nonlinear Maxwell Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, Peter M.; Silberberg, Yaron; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper will present results in computational nonlinear optics. An algorithm will be described that solves the full vector nonlinear Maxwell's equations exactly without the approximations that are currently made. Present methods solve a reduced scalar wave equation, namely the nonlinear Schrodinger equation, and neglect the optical carrier. Also, results will be shown of calculations of 2-D electromagnetic nonlinear waves computed by directly integrating in time the nonlinear vector Maxwell's equations. The results will include simulations of 'light bullet' like pulses. Here diffraction and dispersion will be counteracted by nonlinear effects. The time integration efficiently implements linear and nonlinear convolutions for the electric polarization, and can take into account such quantum effects as Kerr and Raman interactions. The present approach is robust and should permit modeling 2-D and 3-D optical soliton propagation, scattering, and switching directly from the full-vector Maxwell's equations.

  5. ‘Square root’ of the Maxwell Lagrangian versus confinement in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazharimousavi, S. Habib; Halilsoy, M.

    2012-04-01

    We employ the 'square root' of the Maxwell Lagrangian (i.e. √{FμνFμν }), coupled with gravity to search for the possible linear potentials which are believed to play role in confinement. It is found that in the presence of magnetic charge no confining potential exists in such a model. Confining field solutions are found for radial geodesics in pure electrically charged Nariai-Bertotti-Robinson (NBR)-type spacetime with constant scalar curvature. Recently, Guendelman, Kaganovich, Nissimov and Pacheva (2011) [7] have shown that superposed square root with standard Maxwell Lagrangian yields confining potentials in spherically symmetric spacetimes with new generalized Reissner-Nordström-de Sitter/anti-de Sitter black hole solutions. In NBR spacetimes we show that confining potentials exist even when the standard Maxwell Lagrangian is relaxed.

  6. Scaling theory for homogenization of the Maxwell equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, Alexei P.

    1997-11-01

    The wide application of composite materials is a distinctive feature of modern technologies. This encourages scientists dealing with radio physics and optics, to search for new type of artificial materials. Recently such investigations have shifted in the field of materials with weak spatial dispersion: chiral, omega materials, artificial magnets, etc. By weak spatial dispersion we mean that the constitutive relations are still local but constitutive parameters depend upon a wavenumber k. It is the dependence that is responsible for non-encountered-in-nature properties of the materials such as chirality [a first order in (ka) effect] or artificial magnetism [a second order in (ka effect)]. Here a is a typical size of an inclusion. Certainly, all these effects are small enough unless there is a resonance interaction of electromagnetic wave with an inclusion. Near the resonance frequency the effects are significant and perturbation theory in (ka) fails. Nevertheless it is convenient to describe the effects in terms of orders in (ka), understanding this as a matter of classification. In spite of physical clarity of the classification the constitutive relations are treated in terms of multipole expansion. The multipoles naturally appear at field expansion in (d/R) where d is the source size and R is the distance between the source and recorder. Such an expansion is useful in 'molecular optics' approximation where d very much less than r, with r to be a mean distance between the 'molecules.' Though the 'molecular optics' ceases to be a good approximation if we deal with composites where d approximately equals r, the mean current in the right hand side of the Maxwell equations is still expressed through multipoles (see Fig. 1). Below we consider the reasons justifying this sight on things even if we are working beyond the 'molecular optics' approximation. To repel an accusation in abstract contemplation let us consider examples of the 'multipole' media. Permeable

  7. A nonmolecular derivation of Maxwell's thermal-creep boundary condition in gases and liquids via application of the LeChatelier-Braun principle to Maxwell's thermal stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Howard

    2009-05-01

    According to the LeChatelier-Braun principle, when a closed quiescent system initially in an equilibrium or unstressed steady state is subjected to an externally imposed "stress" it responds in a manner tending to alleviate that stress. Use of this entropically based qualitative rule, in combination with the notion of Maxwell thermal stresses existing in nonisothermal gases and liquids, enables one to (i) derive Maxwell's thermal-creep boundary condition prevailing at the boundary between a solid and a fluid (either gas or liquid) and (ii) rationalize the phenomenon of thermophoresis in liquids, for which, in contrast with the case of gases, an elementary explanation is currently lacking. These two objectives are achieved by quantitatively interpreting the heretofore qualitative LeChatelier-Braun notion of stress in the present context as being the fluid's stress tensor, the latter including Maxwell's thermal stress. In effect, thermophoretic particle motion is interpreted as the manifestation of the fluid's attempt to expel the particle from its interior so as to alleviate the thermal stress that would otherwise ensue were the particle to remain at rest (thus obeying the traditional no slip rather than thermal-creep boundary condition) following its introduction into the previously stress-free quiescent fluid. With Kn the Knudsen number in the case of rarefied gases, Maxwell's thermal stress constitutes a noncontinuum phenomenon of O(Kn2), whereas his thermal-creep phenomenon constitutes a continuum phenomenon of O(Kn). That these two phenomena can, nevertheless, be proved to be synonymous (in the sense, so to speak, of being two sides of the same coin), as is done in the present paper, supports the "ghost effect" findings of Sone [Y. Sone, "Flows induced by temperature fields in a rarefied gas and their ghost effect on the behavior of a gas in the continuum limit," Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech 32, 779 (2000)], which, philosophically, imply the artificiality of the

  8. Cosmological solutions in five-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezelbash, A. M.

    2015-04-01

    We construct new classes of exact cosmological solutions to five-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory with two coupling constants for the dilaton-Maxwell term and the dilaton-cosmological constant term. All the solutions are nonstationary, and the solutions where both coupling constants are nonzero are almost regular everywhere. The size of the spatial section of the asymptotic metric shrinks to zero at early times and increases to infinitely large at very late times. The cosmological constant depends on the dilaton coupling constant and can take positive, zero, or negative values.

  9. Reconciling the eigenmode analysis with the Maxwell Bloch equations approach to superradiance in the linear regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedberg, Richard; Manassah, Jamal T.

    2008-07-01

    The superradiance from a slab of inverted two-level atoms is theoretically analyzed in the linear regime from both the perspective of the expansion in eigenfunctions of the integral equation with the Lienard-Wiechert potential as kernel, and that of linearizing the Maxwell-Bloch equations. We show the equivalence of both approaches. We show that the so-called Reduced Maxwell-Bloch equations do not yield even approximately the correct solution when applied in the obvious way, but that they can be made to give the correct solution by adding a fictitious input field.

  10. The Einstein-Maxwell Equations and Conformally Kähler Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBrun, Claude

    2016-06-01

    Page's Einstein metric on {{{CP}}_2#overline{{CP}}_2} is conformally related to an extremal Kähler metric. Here we construct a family of conformally Kähler solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations that deforms the Page metric, while sweeping out the entire Kähler cone of {{{CP}}_2#overline{{CP}}_2}. The same method also yields analogous solutions on every Hirzebruch surface. This allows us to display infinitely many geometrically distinct families of solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations on the smooth 4-manifolds {S^2 × S^2} and {{{CP}}_2#overline{{CP}}_2}.

  11. Thermodynamics of noncommutative geometry inspired black holes based on Maxwell-Boltzmann smeared mass distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jun; Liu, Yan-Chun; Zhu, Qiao

    2014-02-01

    In order to further explore the effects of non-Gaussian smeared mass distribution on the thermodynamical properties of noncommutative black holes, we consider noncommutative black holes based on Maxwell-Boltzmann smeared mass distribution in (2+1)-dimensional spacetime. The thermodynamical properties of the black holes are investigated, including Hawking temperature, heat capacity, entropy and free energy. We find that multiple black holes with the same temperature do not exist, while there exists a possible decay of the noncommutative black hole based on Maxwell-Boltzmann smeared mass distribution into the rotating (commutative) BTZ black hole.

  12. A stochastic multi-symplectic scheme for stochastic Maxwell equations with additive noise

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Jialin; Zhang, Liying

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we investigate a stochastic multi-symplectic method for stochastic Maxwell equations with additive noise. Based on the stochastic version of variational principle, we find a way to obtain the stochastic multi-symplectic structure of three-dimensional (3-D) stochastic Maxwell equations with additive noise. We propose a stochastic multi-symplectic scheme and show that it preserves the stochastic multi-symplectic conservation law and the local and global stochastic energy dissipative properties, which the equations themselves possess. Numerical experiments are performed to verify the numerical behaviors of the stochastic multi-symplectic scheme.

  13. The Maxwell Montes region, surveyed by the Venera 15, Venera 16 orbiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotelnikov, V. A.; Akim, E. L.; Aleksandrov, Y. N.; Armand, N. A.; Bazilevskij, A. T.; Bogomolov, A. F.; Vyshlov, A. S.; Dubrovin, V. M.; Zherikhin, N. V.; Zakharov, A. I.; Zimov, V. E.; Kaevitser, V. I.; Kovtunenko, V. M.; Kremnev, R. S.; Krivtsov, A. P.; Krylov, G. A.; Krymov, A. A.; Kucheryavenkova, I. L.; Molotov, E. P.; Petrov, G. M.; Rzhiga, O. N.; Selivanov, A. S.; Sidorenko, A. I.; Sinilo, V. P.; Sknarya, A. V.; Sokolov, G. A.; Sorokin, V. P.; Sukhanov, K. G.; Tikhonov, V. F.; Tyuflin, Y. S.; Feldman, B. Y.; Shakhovskoj, A. M.; Shubin, V. A.

    1984-12-01

    Between November 1983 and July 1984 the radar systems on the Venera 15 and 16 orbiters mapped much of the Venus northern hemisphere at high resolution. In particular, Maxwell Montes (the highest range on Venus) and a large part of the surrounding terrain exhibit horizontal tectonic deformations of compressive origin resembling mountain folds on the earth. The plains contiguous to Maxwell Montes may comprise basaltic extrusions, like the maria found on other terrestrial planets and the moon. The 100-km depression called Patera Cleopatra actually has a structure analogous to double-ring impact craters rather than volcanic calderas.

  14. Spectrum structure and behavior of the Vlasov-Maxwell-Boltzmann system without angular cutoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongting

    2016-02-01

    The spectrum structure and behavior of the Vlasov-Maxwell-Boltzmann (VMB) system with physical angular non-cutoff intermolecular collisions are studied in this paper. The analysis shows the effect of the Lorentz force induced by the electro-magnetic field leads to some different spectrum structure from the non-cutoff Boltzmann equation. The spectrum structure in high frequency, quite different from the VMB system with angular cutoff assumption, also illustrates the hyperbolic structure of the Maxwell equation. Furthermore, the large time behavior and optimal convergence rates to the equilibrium of the non-cutoff VMB system are established on the spectrum analysis.

  15. - criticality of AdS black hole in the Einstein-Maxwell-power-Yang-Mills gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming; Yang, Zhan-Ying; Zou, De-Cheng; Xu, Wei; Yue, Rui-Hong

    2015-02-01

    We study the - critical behaivor of N-dimensional AdS black holes in Einstein-Maxwell-power-Yang-Mills gravity. Our results show the existence of the Van der Waals like small-large black hole phase transitions when taking some special values of charges of the Maxwell and Yang-Mills fields. Further to calculate the critical exponents of the black holes at the critical point, we find that they are the same as those in the Van der Waals liquid-gas system.

  16. Statistics Clinic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiveson, Alan H.; Foy, Millennia; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Fiedler, James

    2014-01-01

    Do you have elevated p-values? Is the data analysis process getting you down? Do you experience anxiety when you need to respond to criticism of statistical methods in your manuscript? You may be suffering from Insufficient Statistical Support Syndrome (ISSS). For symptomatic relief of ISSS, come for a free consultation with JSC biostatisticians at our help desk during the poster sessions at the HRP Investigators Workshop. Get answers to common questions about sample size, missing data, multiple testing, when to trust the results of your analyses and more. Side effects may include sudden loss of statistics anxiety, improved interpretation of your data, and increased confidence in your results.

  17. Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer statistics across the world. U.S. Cancer Mortality Trends The best indicator of progress against cancer is ... the number of cancer survivors has increased. These trends show that progress is being made against the ...

  18. SEER Statistics

    Cancer.gov

    The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute works to provide information on cancer statistics in an effort to reduce the burden of cancer among the U.S. population.

  19. Statistical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, Claudine

    Statistical Physics bridges the properties of a macroscopic system and the microscopic behavior of its constituting particles, otherwise impossible due to the giant magnitude of Avogadro's number. Numerous systems of today's key technologies - such as semiconductors or lasers - are macroscopic quantum objects; only statistical physics allows for understanding their fundamentals. Therefore, this graduate text also focuses on particular applications such as the properties of electrons in solids with applications, and radiation thermodynamics and the greenhouse effect.

  20. Colliding-wave generalizations of the Nutku-Halil metric in the Einstein-Maxwell theory

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia Diaz, A.

    1988-08-01

    A class of nondiagonal cylindrically symmetric algebraically general solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations is given. These solutions are interpretable as gravitational colliding waves supporting an electromagnetic field; they are generalizations of the Nutku-Halil solution. The new metric, derived by a Harrison transformation, is endowed with four free parameters.

  1. Canonical quantization of lattice Higgs-Maxwell-Chern-Simons fields: Krein Self-adjointness

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Daniel A.; Challifour, John L.

    2006-10-15

    It is shown how techniques from constructive quantum field theory may be applied to indefinite metric gauge theories in Hilbert space for the case of a Higgs-Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory on a lattice. The Hamiltonian operator is shown to be Krein essentially self-adjoint by means of unbounded but Krein unitary transformations relating the Hamiltonian to an essentially maximal accretive operator.

  2. Canonical quantization of lattice Higgs-Maxwell-Chern-Simons fields: Osterwalder-Schrader positivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Daniel A.; Challifour, John L.

    2011-03-15

    A Euclidean representation is given for a canonically quantized relativistic Maxwell-Chern-Simons field on a lattice, which approximates a complex measure on a space of distributions. Using a path-space formula for the nonself-adjoint Hamiltonian, the relation between Euclidean Osterwalder-Schrader positivity, the Krein metric, and Gauss' law is examined.

  3. An Exact Solution of Einstein-Maxwell Gravity Coupled to a Scalar Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turyshev, S. G.

    1995-01-01

    The general solution to low-energy string theory representing static spherically symmetric solution of the Einstein-Maxwell gravity with a massless scalar field has been found. Some of the partial cases appear to coincide with known solutions to black holes, naked singularities, and gravity and electromagnetic fields.

  4. Analysis of a three phase induction motor directly from Maxwell's equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Shayak

    2012-01-01

    The torque developed in a three phase AC squirrel cage motor is usually expressed in terms of resistances and reactances of the stator, the rotor, and the motor as a whole. We use Maxwell's equations to find the torque in terms of geometrical parameters. This formulation allows us to estimate the torque developed by a motor without knowing the details of its circuitry.

  5. Quantum Gravity Effects on the Tunneling Radiation of the Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Tianhu; Ren, Ruyi; Chen, Deyou; Liu, Zixiang; Li, Guopin

    2016-07-01

    Taking into account effects of quantum gravity, we investigate the evaporation of an Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion black hole. The corrected Hawking temperature is gotten respectively by the scalar particle's and the fermion's tunneling across the horizon. This temperature is lower than the original one derived by Hawking, which means quantum gravity effects slow down the rise of the temperature.

  6. A 3+1 formalism for quantum electrodynamical corrections to Maxwell equations in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétri, J.

    2015-08-01

    Magnetized neutron stars constitute a special class of compact objects harbouring gravitational fields that deviate strongly from the Newtonian weak field limit. Moreover, strong electromagnetic fields anchored into the star give rise to non-linear corrections to Maxwell equations described by quantum electrodynamics (QED). Electromagnetic fields close to or above the critical value of BQ = 4.4 × 109 T are probably present in some pulsars and for most of the magnetars. To account properly for emission emanating from the neutron star surface like for instance thermal radiation and its polarization properties, it is important to include general relativistic (GR) effects simultaneously with non-linear electrodynamics. This can be achieved through a 3+1 formalism known in general relativity and that incorporates QED perturbations to Maxwell equations. Starting from the lowest order corrections to the Lagrangian for the electromagnetic field, as given for instance by Born-Infeld or Euler-Heisenberg theory, we derive the non-linear Maxwell equations in general relativity including quantum vacuum effects. We also derive a prescription for the force-free limit and show that these equations can be solved with classical finite volume methods for hyperbolic conservation laws. It is therefore straightforward to include general relativity and QED in the description of neutron star magnetospheres by using standard classical numerical techniques borrowed from Maxwell and Newton theory. As an application, we show that spin-down luminosity corrections associated with QED effects are negligible with respect to GR corrections.

  7. Physical Variables of d=3 Maxwell-Chern-Simons Theory by Symplectic Projector Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helayel-Neto, J. A.; Santos, M. A.; Vancea, I. V.

    2006-12-01

    The Symplectic Projector Method is applied to derive the local physical degrees of freedom and the physical Hamiltonian of the Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory in $d=1+2$. The results agree with the ones obtained in the literature through different approaches.

  8. A numerical Maxwell Schrödinger model for intense laser matter interaction and propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorin, E.; Chelkowski, S.; Bandrauk, A.

    2007-12-01

    We present in this paper an original ab initio Maxwell-Schrödinger model and a methodology to simulate intense ultrashort laser pulses interacting with a 3D H +2-gas in the nonlinear nonperturbative regime under and beyond Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The model we present is the first one to our knowledge (excepted in [E. Lorin, S. Chelkowski, A. Bandrauk, A Maxwell-Schrödinger model for non-perturbative laser-molecule interaction and some methods of numerical computation, Proceeding CRM, vol. 41, American Mathematics Society, 2007], where a one-dimensional version is presented) to be totally nonperturbative, vectorial and multidimensional, taking into account ionization, and high order nonlinearities going far beyond classical nonlinear Maxwell or Schrödinger models. After a presentation of the model and a short mathematical study, we examine some numerical approximations for its computation. In particular, we focus on the polarization computation allowing an efficient coupling between the Maxwell and time dependent Schrödinger equations (TDSE), and on an efficient parallelization. Examples of numerical computations of high order harmonic generation and of electric field propagation are presented for one molecule and up to 512, thus highlighting cooperative effects in harmonic generation at high order.

  9. The Space-Time CE/SE Method for Solving Maxwell's Equations in Time-Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Chen, C. L.; Liu, Yen

    2002-01-01

    An innovative finite-volume-type numerical method named as the space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method is applied to solve time-dependent Maxwell's equations in this paper. Test problems of electromagnetics scattering and antenna radiation are solved for validations. Numerical results are presented and compared with the analytical solutions, showing very good agreements.

  10. Simple Derivation of the Maxwell Stress Tensor and Electrostrictive Effects in Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juretschke, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    Shows that local equilibrium and energy considerations in an elastic dielectric crystal lead to a simple derivation of the Maxwell stress tensor in anisotropic dielectric solids. The resulting equilibrium stress-strain relations are applied to determine the deformations of a charged parallel plate capacitor. (MLH)