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1

Comparative Study of Oral and Vaginal Misoprostol for Induction of Labour, Maternal and Foetal Outcome  

PubMed Central

Background: Misoprostol is a new promising agent for cervical ripening and induction of labour .The ideal dose, route and frequency of administration of misoprostol are still under investigation. Although, vaginal application of misoprostol has been validated as a reasonable mean of induction, there is a patient resistance to digital examination and there is a risk of ascending infection. For this reason, oral administration of misoprostol for cervical ripening and labour induction has been tried. Aims and Objectives: To compare 50?g of oral misoprostol versus 25?g of intravaginal misoprostol for induction of labour at term and maternal, foetal outcomes. Methods: Two hundred women who were at term, with indication for induction of labour and Bishop scores of ?5 were randomly assigned to receive misoprostol 50?g or 25?g intravaginal, every 4-6 hours, for a maximum of 5 doses. In either group, pregnant females with inadequate uterine contractions despite being given maximum 5 doses of misoprostol, were augmented using oxytocin. The primary outcome measure was time-interval from induction to vaginal delivery and vaginal delivery rate within 24 hours. Results: The median induction to vaginal delivery time in oral group (12.92h) and vaginal group (14.04 h) was not significant. Oral misoprostol resulted in more number of vaginal deliveries as compared to vaginal misoprostol (94% as compared to 86%), which was not significant. There was a significantly higher incidence of uterine tachysystole in the vaginal group, as compared to oral group. There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to oxytocin augmentation, caesarean section rate, analgesic requirement and neonatal outcome. Conclusion: Oral misoprostol is as efficacious as vaginal misoprostol because of shorter induction delivery interval, lower caesarean section rates, and lower incidence of failed induction rates. Lower incidence of foetal distress and easy intake are observed if the drug is administered orally. PMID:24551660

Komala, Kambhampati; Reddy, Meherlatha; Quadri, Iqbal Jehan; B., Suneetha; V., Ramya

2013-01-01

2

Effectiveness of a single dose of oral misoprostol 600 ?g for treatment in early pregnancy failure.  

PubMed

Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness, side-effects and acceptability of a single dose of oral misoprostol 600 ?g for treatment of 1st trimester pregnancy failure. A prospective descriptive study was conducted on pregnant women of < 13 weeks' gestation, diagnosed as 1st trimester pregnancy failure. Patients were assigned to receive a single dose of misoprostol 600 ?g orally and then evaluated 48 h after drug administration for complete abortion. A total of 55 women were recruited to the study. The complete abortion rate was 65.5%. Pain and diarrhoea were the most common side-effects. Acceptability and satisfactory rates were 70.9% and 70.9%, respectively. In conclusion, a single dose of oral misoprostol 600 ?g is a fair method for the management of 1st trimester pregnancy failure. Side-effects are tolerable and satisfaction is high. Thus, this method may be used as an alternative treatment. PMID:24988526

Benchamanon, R; Phupong, V

2014-11-01

3

Oral misoprostol for preventing postpartum haemorrhage in home births in rural Bangladesh: how effective is it?  

PubMed Central

Aims Evidence exists about prevention of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) by oral administration of misoprostol in low-income countries, but effectiveness of prevention by lay community health workers (CHW) is not sufficient. This study aimed to investigate whether a single dose (400 µg) of oral misoprostol could prevent PPH in a community home-birth setting and to assess its acceptability and feasibility among rural Bangladeshi women. Methods This quasi-experimental trial was conducted among 2,017 rural women who had home deliveries between November 2009 and February 2010 in two rural districts of northern Bangladesh. In the intervention district 1,009 women received 400 µg of misoprostol immediately after giving birth by the lay CHWs, and in the control district 1,008 women were followed after giving birth with no specific intervention against PPH. Primary PPH (within 24 hours) was measured by women's self-reported subjective measures of the normality of blood loss using the ‘cultural consensus model.’ Baseline data provided socio-economic, reproductive, obstetric, and bleeding disorder information. Findings The incidence of primary PPH was found to be lower in the intervention group (1.6%) than the control group (6.2%) (p<0.001). Misoprostol provided 81% protection (RR: 0.19; 95% CI: 0.08–0.48) against developing primary PPH. The proportion of retained and manually removed placentae was found to be higher in the control group compared to the intervention group. Women in the control group were more likely to need an emergency referral to a higher level facility and blood transfusion than the intervention group. Unexpectedly few women experienced transient side effects of misoprostol. Eighty-seven percent of the women were willing to use the drug in future pregnancy and would recommend to other pregnant women. Conclusion Community-based distribution of oral misoprostol (400 µg) by CHW appeared to be effective, safe, acceptable, and feasible in reducing the incidence of PPH in rural areas of Bangladesh. This strategy should be scaled up across the country where access to skilled attendance is limited. PMID:21845143

Nasreen, Hashima-E-; Nahar, Shamsun; Al Mamun, Mahfuz; Afsana, Kaosar; Byass, Peter

2011-01-01

4

Randomized Trial of Oral Misoprostol Treatment for Cervical Ripening Before Tandem Application in Cervix Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of oral misoprostol administered to facilitate tandem application to the cervix as a part of brachytherapy in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Eighty patients with cervical cancer who had been planned to undergo brachytherapy at Dr. Luetfi Kirdar Kartal Training and Research Hospital were evaluated in a double-blind, prospective, randomized trial. Patients were divided randomly into two groups of 40 patients. The first and second groups received 400 {mu}g of misoprostol orally and placebo, respectively, 3 h before tandem application. The two groups were compared in terms of age, diameter of tumor, parity, age at first intercourse, amount of bleeding and pain at first tandem application, length of endometrial cavity measured by hysterometer, and size of Hegar dilators used for cervical dilatation. Results: Of all cases, 63.6%, 16.3%, 10%, 6.3%, 2.5%, and 1.3% were Stage IIB, IIIB, IIIA, IVA, IIA and IIC, respectively. Mean ({+-}SD) age (range) was 49.3 {+-} 13.1 (25-83) years and 56.6 {+-} 13.2 (30-78) years in the study and control groups, respectively (p = 0.015). Age at first intercourse, diameter of tumor, parity, amount of bleeding at first tandem application, and length of endometrial cavity measured by hysterometer were not significantly different between the two groups. Pain score was significantly higher in the control group (p < 0.001). Application was significantly easier in the study group compared with controls (p < 0.001). Average size of initial Hegar dilators used for cervical dilatation was significantly higher in the study group compared with controls (p = 0.017). Conclusion: Administration of misoprostol 400 {mu}g orally for cervical ripening before tandem application facilitates the procedure, increases patient tolerability and comfort, and may decrease complication rates.

Cepni, Kimia; Gul, Sule [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ministry of Health, Dr. Lutfi Kirdar Kartal Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Cepni, Ismail [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Gueralp, Onur, E-mail: dronur@hotmail.com [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Sal, Veysel [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Mayadagli, Alpaslan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ministry of Health, Dr. Lutfi Kirdar Kartal Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey)

2011-11-01

5

[Misoprostol--oral prostanoid--the first clinical trial for use in patients with peripheral vascular disease].  

PubMed

Misoprostol, the oral analogue of alprostadil was used for the treatment of 20 patients (aged 40-60) with peripheral arterial disease according to Fontaine's classification at stages IIa and IIb (PAD). All patients received 200 micrograms of misoprostol 3 times a day during a month. The therapy with misoprostol resulted in a clinical improvement in all patients. Elongation of pain free (before treatment 129 m +/- 78 m, after treatment 214 m +/- 109 m) and maximum walking distance (before treatment 304 m +/- 169 m, after treatment 471 m +/- 264 m) was observed. At the same time a shortening of the pain duration was noted (before treatment 100 sec +/- 37 sec, after treatment 71 sec +/- 23 sec). The ankle/arm pressure ratio (AAPR) and arterial blood flow increased in both limbs after 4 weeks of the treatment. Activation of the fibrinolytic system was seen in the course of the therapy (shortening of euglobulin clot lysis time-ECLT and increase in t-PA activity). The platelets became less sensitive to ADP and collagen after intake of misoprostol. The results justify administration of misoprostol as a new therapeutic agent for the treatment of patients with PAD. PMID:9480458

Goszcz, A; Grodzi?ska, L; Kostka-Trabka, E; Biero?, K; S?awi?ski, M; Jachym, R; Ochma?ski, W

1997-01-01

6

The MisoPROM study: A multicenter randomized comparison of oral misoprostol and oxytocin for premature rupture of membranes at term  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThis study was undertaken to determine whether induction of labor with oral misoprostol will result in fewer cesarean deliveries than intravenous oxytocin in nulliparous women with premature rupture of membranes at term.

Ellen Mozurkewich; Julie Horrocks; Suzanne Daley; Paul Von Oeyen; Melissa Halvorson; Mary Johnson; Michael Zaretsky; Mitra Tehranifar; Lucy Bayer-Zwirello; Alfred Robichaux; Sabine Droste; Garry Turner

2003-01-01

7

A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study to assess the effect of oral contraceptive pills on the outcome of medical abortion with mifepristone and misoprostol  

Microsoft Academic Search

This was a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial to determine the effect of oral contraceptive (OC) pills taken immediately after medical abortion on the duration of bleeding and complete abortion rate. Two hundred women in the first 49 days of pregnancy were given 200 mg mifepristone orally followed by 400 mg misoprostol vaginally 48 h later. One day later, they were

Oi Shan Tang; Pei Pei Gao; Linan Cheng; Sharon W. H. Lee; Pak Chung Ho

1999-01-01

8

A Comparison of the Efficacy of Sublingual and Oral Misoprostol 400 Microgram in the Management of Early Pregnancy Failure: A Randomized Controlled Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To compare repeated doses of sublingual with oral misoprostol in the medical management of early pregnancy failure. Material and Method: One hundred and thirty eight women with a period of gestation less than 20 week calculated by her last menstrual period and less than 12 weeks by size were sequentially allocated to two groups to receive either 400 ?g

Yongyoth Herabutya; Boonsri Chanrachakul; Pratak O-Prasertsawat

9

Safety and Efficacy of Misoprostol versus Oxytocin for the Prevention of Postpartum Hemorrhage  

PubMed Central

Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is the commonest cause of maternal death worldwide. Studies suggest that the use of misoprostol may be beneficial in clinical settings where oxytocin is unavailable. The aim of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of oxytocin and misoprostol when used in the prevention of PPH. In a double-blind randomized controlled trial, 400 pregnant women who had a vaginal delivery were assigned into two groups: to receive either 20 IU of oxytocin in 1000?mL Ringer's solution and two placebo tablets or 400?mcg oral misoprostol (as two tablets) and 2?mL normal saline in 1000?mL Ringer's solution. The quantity of blood loss was higher in the oxytocin group in comparison to the misoprostol group. There was no significant difference in the decrease in hematocrit and hemoglobin between the two groups. Although there was no significant difference in the need for transfusions between the two groups, the patients in the oxytocin group had greater need for additional oxytocin. Results from this study indicate that it may be considered as an alternative for oxytocin in low resource clinical settings. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01863706. PMID:24734184

Rajaei, Minoo; Karimi, Samieh; Shahboodaghi, Zohreh; Khorgoei, Tahereh; Rajaei, Farzam

2014-01-01

10

Cervical Priming Before Diagnostic Operative Hysteroscopy in Infertile Women: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Comparison of 2 Vaginal Misoprostol Doses  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of vaginal misoprostol for cervical priming at doses of 200 mcg and 400 mcg, 12 to 15 hours before diagnostic office hysteroscopy (OH) without anesthesia in patients with infertility. Sixty infertile patients requiring a diagnostic office hysteroscopy for investigation of infertility were included in the study. The patients were randomly allocated into 3 vaginally administered misoprostol groups: (1) control group, (2) 200-mcg dose group, and (3) 400-mcg dose group. Misoprostol significantly facilitated the procedure of OH: cervical entry was easier; procedural time was shorter; baseline cervical width was larger; and pain scoring was lower in the misoprostol groups compared with the control group. Increasing the dose of misoprostol from 200 mcg to 400 mcg did not improve the effect on cervical dilation. Misoprostol is a promising analog to use for cervical priming before OH. Since doses of 200 mcg and 400 mcg vaginal misoprostol 12 hours before the OH both have proven to be effective regimens, 200 mcg may be preferred. However, before routine clinical usage, further research is needed through large, randomized, controlled trials powered to detect a difference in complications to determine whether misoprostol reduces complications in OH. PMID:23701149

Bastu, Ercan; Celik, Cem; Nehir, Asli; Dogan, Murat; Yuksel, Bahar; Ergun, Bulent

2013-01-01

11

Efficacy of Two Regimens of Misoprostol for Early Second-Trimester Pregnancy Termination  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To compare the efficacy of a combined regimen of misoprostol with vaginal misoprostol for early 2nd-trimester pregnancy termination. Methods: This is a prospective study that includes 79 pregnant women who requested legal termination of 2nd-trimester pregnancy between 13 and 22 weeks. Two regimens of misoprostol were used. Group 1: 400 ?g of oral plus 400 ?g vaginal misoprostol every

Cristina Guix; Montse Palacio; Francesc Figueras; Mar Bennasar; Luis Zamora; Oriol Coll; Vicenç Cararach

2005-01-01

12

Dose and side effects of sublingual misoprostol for treatment of postpartum hemorrhage: what difference do they make?  

PubMed Central

Background Shivering and fever are common side effects of misoprostol. An unexpectedly high rate of fever above 40°C was documented among Ecuadorian women given treatment with 800mcg of sublingual misoprostol to manage postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) (36%). Much lower rates have been reported elsewhere (0-9%). Methods From February to July 2010, an open-label pilot study was conducted in Quito, Ecuador to determine whether a lower dose--600mcg sublingual misoprostol--would result in a lower incidence of high fever (?40°C). Rates of shivering and fever with 600mcg sublingual regimen were compared to previously documented rates in Ecuador following PPH treatment with 800mcg sublingual misoprostol. Results The 600mcg dose resulted in a 55% lower rate of high fever compared with the 800mcg regimen (8/50; 16% vs. 58/163; 36%; relative risk 0.45 95% CI 0.23-0.88). Only one woman had severe shivering following the 600mcg dose compared with 19 women in the 800mcg cohort (2% vs. 12%; relative risk 0.17 (0.02-1.25)). No cases of delirium/altered sensorium were reported with the 600mcg dose and women’s assessment of severity/tolerability of shivering and fever was better with the lower dose. Conclusions 600mcg sublingual misoprostol was found to decrease the occurrence of high fever among Ecuadorian women when given to treat PPH. This study however was not powered to examine the efficacy of this treatment regimen and cannot be recommended at this time. Future research is needed to confirm whether other populations, outside of Quito, Ecuador, experience unusually high rates of elevated body temperature following sublingual administration of misoprostol for treatment of PPH. If indeed similar trends are found elsewhere, larger trials to confirm the efficacy of lower dosages may be justified. Trial Registration Clinical trials.gov, Registry No. NCT01080846 PMID:22769055

2012-01-01

13

Pharmacokinetics of different routes of administration of misoprostol  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The pharmacokinetic parameters of four different routes of administration of a single dose of 400 µg of misoprostol were studied. METHODS: A total of 40 women undergoing termination of pregnancy by suction evacuation was randomized by computer model to receive 400 µg of misoprostol by one of four routes: (i) sublingual (ii) oral (iii) vaginal and (iv) vaginal with

Oi Shan Tang; Horst Schweer; H. W. Seyberth; Sharon W. H. Lee; Pak Chung Ho

14

Misoprostol for prevention and treatment of postpartum hemorrhage: what do we know? What is next?  

PubMed

Misoprostol is an effective and safe uterotonic for the prevention and treatment of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). A 600-?g oral dose of misoprostol has been shown to prevent PPH in community-based randomized controlled trials. An 800-?g sublingual dose of misoprostol appears to be a good first-line treatment for controlling PPH. Adverse effects after use of misoprostol for PPH prevention or treatment may include shivering and fever. These effects are transient, resolve on their own, and are not life threatening. Misoprostol can play an important role in settings with limited access to oxytocin, and where there is no other option for PPH care. PMID:22883912

Raghavan, Sheila; Abbas, Dina; Winikoff, Beverly

2012-10-01

15

Misoprostol: pharmacokinetic profiles, effects on the uterus and side-effects.  

PubMed

Misoprostol, a synthetic prostaglandin E1 analogue, is commonly used for medical abortion, cervical priming, the management of miscarriage, induction of labor and the management of postpartum hemorrhage. It can be given orally, vaginally, sublingually, buccally or rectally. Studies of misoprostol's pharmacokinetics and effects on uterine activity have demonstrated the properties of the drug after various routes of administration. These studies can help to discover the optimal dose and route of administration of misoprostol for individual clinical applications. Misoprostol is a safe drug but serious complications and teratogenicity can occur with unsupervised use. PMID:17963768

Tang, O S; Gemzell-Danielsson, K; Ho, P C

2007-12-01

16

Effects of misoprostol on cisplatin-induced renal damage in rats.  

PubMed

Cisplatin (CP) is a potent anticancer drug. However, it has side effects on kidney such as nephrotoxicity. Abnormal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been accused in the etiology of CP-induced nephrotoxicity. Several ROS scavengers have been reported to prevent nephrotoxicity after CP administration. In this study, we used prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) analogues misoprostol (MP) to reduce this damage. MP has gained considerable interest as a ROS scavenger. Rats were received a single injection of CP (5 mg/kg, i.p.) with or without MP pretreatment (200 mcg/kg, orally). The renal tissue morphology was investigated by light microscopy. Trunk blood was also obtained to determine lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) and activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT). CP administration increased MDA production and decreased SOD and CAT levels in the kidney tissue when compared to the control group. Morphological damage in CP administrated rats was also severe in the kidney tissue. MP treatment after CP application protected the renal tissues from CP's side effect. These findings indicate that MP has beneficial effects on CP induced nephrotoxicity in rats. PMID:21458517

Ozer, Mehmet Kaya; Asci, Halil; Oncu, Meral; Calapoglu, Mustafa; Savran, Mehtap; Yesilot, Sukriye; Candan, Ibrahim Aydin; Cicek, Ekrem

2011-07-01

17

MISOPROSTOL TO REDUCE INTRAOPERATIVE AND POSTOPERATIVE HEMORRHAGE DURING CESAREAN DELIVERY: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the efficacy and safety of prophylactic misoprostol use at cesarean delivery for reducing intraoperative and postoperative hemorrhage. STUDY DESIGN Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. RESULTS Seventeen studies (3174 women) were included of which 7 evaluated misoprostol versus oxytocin and 8 evaluated misoprostol plus oxytocin versus oxytocin. Overall, there were no significant differences in intraoperative and postoperative hemorrhage between sublingual or oral misoprostol and oxytocin. Rectal misoprostol, compared with oxytocin, was associated with a significant reduction in intraoperative and postoperative hemorrhage. The combined use of sublingual misoprostol and oxytocin, compared with the use of oxytocin alone, was associated with a significant reduction in the mean decrease in hematocrit (mean difference, ?2.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI], ?3.4 to ?0.8) and use of additional uterotonic agents (relative risk, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.18-0.62). Compared with oxytocin alone, buccal misoprostol plus oxytocin reduced the use of additional uterotonic agents; rectal misoprostol plus oxytocin decreased intraoperative and postoperative blood loss, mean fall in hematocrit, and use of additional uterotonic agents; and intrauterine misoprostol plus oxytocin reduced the mean fall in hemoglobin and hematocrit. Women receiving misoprostol, alone or combined with oxytocin, had a higher risk of shivering and pyrexia. CONCLUSION Misoprostol combined with oxytocin appears to be more effective than oxytocin alone in reducing intraoperative and postoperative hemorrhage during caesarean section. There were no significant differences in intraoperative and postoperative hemorrhage when misoprostol was compared to oxytocin. However, these findings were based on a few trials with methodological limitations. PMID:23507545

CONDE-AGUDELO, Agustin; NIETO, Anibal; ROSAS-BERMUDEZ, Anyeli; ROMERO, Roberto

2013-01-01

18

Silent uterine rupture with the use of misoprostol for second trimester termination of pregnancy : a case report.  

PubMed

Uterine rupture is an uncommon, but a life-threatening, complication following second trimester medical termination of pregnancy (TOP). The reported cases have been in both the scarred and unscarred uterus (Rajesh et al. 2002, Drey et al. 2006, and Dickinson). A 27-year-old with two previous deliveries, no previous caesarean section, no history of induced abortions, and no gynaecological operations. She presented with amenorrhoea, and according to her last normal menstruation, she was 10 weeks and 5 days. Ultrasound was done, and it reported 16 weeks and 5 days. She asked for TOP. According to the clinic's protocol, misoprostol 800?mcg (4 tabs) were given to be used vaginally as a loading dose and another three to be taken orally after that. In the following day when she attended the clinic for follow up, a manual vacuum aspiration (MVA). A manual vacuum aspiration was indicated as an incomplete abortion. During the procedure, a uterine rupture was found in the uterine lower segment. A laparotomy was done and a lineal uterine rupture was found and sutured. The patient had a good postoperative recovery and was discharged from hospital after four days. The clinician dealing with second trimester terminations should be aware of the possibility of having a uterine rupture, especially in patients with a uterine scar in order to make an early diagnosis. PMID:21765835

Cuellar Torriente, Martin

2011-01-01

19

Silent Uterine Rupture with the Use of Misoprostol for Second Trimester Termination of Pregnancy : A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Uterine rupture is an uncommon, but a life-threatening, complication following second trimester medical termination of pregnancy (TOP). The reported cases have been in both the scarred and unscarred uterus (Rajesh et al. 2002, Drey et al. 2006, and Dickinson). A 27-year-old with two previous deliveries, no previous caesarean section, no history of induced abortions, and no gynaecological operations. She presented with amenorrhoea, and according to her last normal menstruation, she was 10 weeks and 5 days. Ultrasound was done, and it reported 16 weeks and 5 days. She asked for TOP. According to the clinic's protocol, misoprostol 800?mcg (4 tabs) were given to be used vaginally as a loading dose and another three to be taken orally after that. In the following day when she attended the clinic for follow up, a manual vacuum aspiration (MVA). A manual vacuum aspiration was indicated as an incomplete abortion. During the procedure, a uterine rupture was found in the uterine lower segment. A laparotomy was done and a lineal uterine rupture was found and sutured. The patient had a good postoperative recovery and was discharged from hospital after four days. The clinician dealing with second trimester terminations should be aware of the possibility of having a uterine rupture, especially in patients with a uterine scar in order to make an early diagnosis. PMID:21765835

Cuellar Torriente, Martin

2011-01-01

20

Efficacy of intra-cervical misoprostol in the management of early pregnancy failure.  

PubMed

The aim of this prospective study was to assess the efficacy of intra-cervical misoprostol in the management of early pregnancy failure. Twenty women with early pregnancy failure received intra-cervical misoprostol via an endometrial sampling cannula. The first dose was 50??g of misoprostol dissolved in 5?ml of normal saline. The administration was repeated after 12?h if there was no vaginal bleeding or pain. Nine (45%) women received 1 dose and 11 (55%) women received 2 doses of intra-cervical misoprostol. Abortion within 24?h occurred in 16 (80%) women, and complete abortion was achieved in 14 (70%) cases. Two women with incomplete abortion were managed with 600??g of misoprostol orally (1 case) and surgical intervention (1 case). The mean time interval between the first dose and the abortion was 10.6 ± 6.3?h. Two women did not respond within 24?h of treatment initiation, 1 woman withdrew consent after the first treatment, and 1 woman developed heavy vaginal bleeding after the first dose and underwent surgical management. Intra-cervical misoprostol is a promising method of medical treatment of early pregnancy failure. Further randomized clinical trials are needed to validate its safety and efficacy. PMID:25418083

Rouzi, Abdulrahim A; Almansouri, Nisma; Sahly, Nora; Alsenani, Nawal; Abed, Hussam; Darhouse, Khalid; Bondagji, Nabil

2014-01-01

21

Reduction of aspirin-induced fecal blood loss with low-dose misoprostol tablets in man  

SciTech Connect

Misoprostol (SC-29333), a synthetic prostaglandin E1 methyl ester analog, was given simultaneously with acetylsalicylic acid in a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized prospective study of 32 healthy human male subjects. Fecal blood loss was measured for eight days using the /sup 51/Cr-labeled red blood cell technique. Aspirin (650 mg qid) and misoprostol (25 micrograms qid) or placebo were given during days 3, 4, and 5. There was a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in median blood loss (modified Friedman test) from 0.81 to 6.05 ml/day in the aspirin with placebo group (N = 16). Median blood loss was increased (from 0.75 to 3.75 ml/day) in the aspirin with misoprostol group (N = 16), but this was significantly less (Mann-Whitney U test, P less than 0.01) than the placebo group. Mean serum salicylate concentrations in the placebo and misoprostol groups were similar (7.8 and 6.8 micrograms/ml, respectively). There were no significant changes in laboratory values in any of the subjects studied, nor were any major side-effects encountered. This study demonstrates that oral misoprostol reduces aspirin-induced gastrointestinal bleeding even when administered simultaneously and at a dose level below its threshold for significant acid inhibition. This indicates a potential role for misoprostol in the prevention of gastric mucosal damage in selected patients.

Cohen, M.M.; Clark, L.; Armstrong, L.; D'Souza, J.

1985-07-01

22

Efficacy of intra-cervical misoprostol in the management of early pregnancy failure  

PubMed Central

The aim of this prospective study was to assess the efficacy of intra-cervical misoprostol in the management of early pregnancy failure. Twenty women with early pregnancy failure received intra-cervical misoprostol via an endometrial sampling cannula. The first dose was 50??g of misoprostol dissolved in 5?ml of normal saline. The administration was repeated after 12?h if there was no vaginal bleeding or pain. Nine (45%) women received 1 dose and 11 (55%) women received 2 doses of intra-cervical misoprostol. Abortion within 24?h occurred in 16 (80%) women, and complete abortion was achieved in 14 (70%) cases. Two women with incomplete abortion were managed with 600??g of misoprostol orally (1 case) and surgical intervention (1 case). The mean time interval between the first dose and the abortion was 10.6 ± 6.3?h. Two women did not respond within 24?h of treatment initiation, 1 woman withdrew consent after the first treatment, and 1 woman developed heavy vaginal bleeding after the first dose and underwent surgical management. Intra-cervical misoprostol is a promising method of medical treatment of early pregnancy failure. Further randomized clinical trials are needed to validate its safety and efficacy.

Rouzi, Abdulrahim A.; Almansouri, Nisma; Sahly, Nora; Alsenani, Nawal; Abed, Hussam; Darhouse, Khalid; Bondagji, Nabil

2014-01-01

23

Umbilical vein injection of misoprostol versus normal saline for the treatment of retained placenta: intrapartum placebo-controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background The third stage of labour may be complicated by retained placenta, which should be managed promptly because it may cause severe bleeding and infection, with a potentially fatal outcome. This study evaluated the effectiveness of umbilical vein injection of misoprostol for the treatment of retained placenta in a hospital setting. Methods This hospital-based placebo-controlled trial was conducted at the Maternity Teaching Hospital, Erbil City, Kurdistan region, Northern Iraq from April 2011 to February 2012. The inclusion criteria were: gestational age of at least 28 weeks, vaginal delivery, and failure of the placenta to separate within 30 minutes after delivery of the infant despite active management of the third stage of labour. Forty-six women with retained placentas were eligible for inclusion. After informed consent was obtained, the women were alternately allocated to receive umbilical vein injection of either 800 mcg misoprostol dissolved in 20 mL of normal saline (misoprostol group) or 20 mL of normal saline only (saline group). The women were blinded to the group allocation, but the investigator who administered the injection was not. The trial was registered by the Research Ethics Committee of Hawler Medical University. Results After umbilical vein injection, delivery of the placenta occurred in 91.3% of women in the misoprostol group and 69.5% of women in the saline group, which was not a significant difference between the two groups. The median vaginal blood loss from the time of injection until delivery of the placenta was significantly less in the misoprostol group (100 mL) than in the saline group (210 mL) (p value?misoprostol is an effective treatment for retained placenta, and reduces the volume of vaginal blood loss with few adverse effects. Clinical Trial Registration Current Controlled Trial HMU: N252.1.2011 PMID:24444360

2014-01-01

24

Misoprostol for preventing and treating postpartum hemorrhage in the community: a closer look at the evidence.  

PubMed

The lack of clear interpretation of clinical and operational evidence on misoprostol use for postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) in the community may jeopardize the realization of its full potential for improving women's survival. This paper highlights the usefulness of misoprostol in addressing PPH in the community within the limits of available research evidence. There is now substantial evidence to support the beneficial effects of 600 ?g of oral misoprostol for PPH prevention in the community, with a trend toward better protection against severe PPH morbidity, and particularly when administered by less skilled or lay caregivers. Although there is tangible evidence to show that 800 ?g of sublingual misoprostol has important benefits for PPH treatment where there is no access to oxytocin, there is presently no direct evidence to indicate that less skilled or lay caregivers can safely use it to treat PPH in the community. Operational research evidence indicates that advance community distribution of misoprostol to pregnant women for postpartum self-use is a feasible strategy to ensure availability of the drug at the time of birth. The evidence is, however, limited by its quality to establish whether the benefits of such a strategy truly outweigh the potential harms. It is time for the international community to focus on improving PPH-related outcomes by scaling up what is currently guided by hard evidence and join forces to address unanswered questions through high-quality research. PMID:22968139

Oladapo, Olufemi T

2012-11-01

25

Treatment of peripheral vascular disease with misoprostol (Cytotec): a pilot study.  

PubMed

Misoprostol, the oral analogue of alprostadil, was used to treat 20 patients (aged 40-60 years) with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) according to Fontaine's classification at stages IIa and IIb. All patients received 200 micrograms of misoprostol 3 times a day during a month. The therapy with misoprostol resulted in clinical improvement in all patients. Elongation of pain-free (before treatment: 129 m +/- 78 m; after treatment: 214 m +/- 109 m) and maximum walking distance (before treatment: 304 m +/- 169 m; after treatment: 471 m +/- 264 m) was observed. At the same time, a shortening of the duration of pain was noted (before treatment: 100 sec +/- 37 sec; after treatment: 71 sec +/- 23 sec). The ankle/arm pressure ratio (AAPR) and arterial blood flow increased in both limbs after 4 weeks of treatment. Activation of the fibrinolytic system was seen in the course of therapy (shortening of euglobulin clot lysis time (ECLT) and increase in t-PA activity). The platelets became less sensitive to ADP and collagen after intake of misoprostol. The results justify administration of misoprostol as a new therapeutic agent for the treatment of patients with PAD. PMID:9701783

Goszcz, A; Grodzinska, L; Kostka-Trabka, E; Bieron, K; Slawinski, M; Jachym, R; Ochmanski, W

1998-06-01

26

Misoprostol for postpartum hemorrhage prevention at home birth: an integrative review of global implementation experience to date  

PubMed Central

Background Hemorrhage continues to be a leading cause of maternal death in developing countries. The 2012 World Health Organization guidelines for the prevention and management of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) recommend oral administration of misoprostol by community health workers (CHWs). However, there are several outstanding questions about distribution of misoprostol for PPH prevention at home births. Methods We conducted an integrative review of published research studies and evaluation reports from programs that distributed misoprostol at the community level for prevention of PPH at home births. We reviewed methods and cadres involved in education of end-users, drug administration, distribution, and coverage, correct and incorrect usage, and serious adverse events. Results Eighteen programs were identified; only seven reported all data of interest. Programs utilized a range of strategies and timings for distributing misoprostol. Distribution rates were higher when misoprostol was distributed at a home visit during late pregnancy (54.5-96.9%) or at birth (22.5-83.6%), compared to antenatal care (ANC) distribution at any ANC visit (22.5-49.1%) or late ANC visit (21.0-26.7%). Coverage rates were highest when CHWs and traditional birth attendants distributed misoprostol and lower when health workers/ANC providers distributed the medication. The highest distribution and coverage rates were achieved by programs that allowed self-administration. Seven women took misoprostol prior to delivery out of more than 12,000 women who were followed-up. Facility birth rates increased in the three programs for which this information was available. Fifty-one (51) maternal deaths were reported among 86,732 women taking misoprostol: 24 were attributed to perceived PPH; none were directly attributed to use of misoprostol. Even if all deaths were attributable to PPH, the equivalent ratio (59 maternal deaths/100,000 live births) is substantially lower than the reported maternal mortality ratio in any of these countries. Conclusions Community-based programs for prevention of PPH at home birth using misoprostol can achieve high distribution and use of the medication, using diverse program strategies. Coverage was greatest when misoprostol was distributed by community health agents at home visits. Programs appear to be safe, with an extremely low rate of ante- or intrapartum administration of the medication. PMID:23421792

2013-01-01

27

Stakeholder perceptions of misoprostol: a qualitative investigation  

PubMed Central

The study aimed to explore perceptions of stakeholders regarding misoprostol use in Cambodia, a setting with high maternal mortality. Semi-structured expert interviews were conducted with 21 participants in the capital, Phnom Penh. The sample included participants involved in providing reproductive health services through international and local health agencies and the pharmaceutical industry. A theme of controversy over the role of misoprostol in the context of reproductive health services emerged, along with a need to reconcile legitimate viewpoints in order to understand the place of misoprostol in the Cambodian reproductive health setting. Understanding stakeholder perspectives on misoprostol can shed light on the drug’s role in reproductive health programming where maternal mortality is high and health facilities are still improving. PMID:24748820

Bazzano, Alessandra N; Jones, Lea; Ngo, Thoai D

2014-01-01

28

Treatment of incomplete abortion and miscarriage with misoprostol  

Microsoft Academic Search

A literature review was conducted to determine whether misoprostol is an effective treatment for incomplete abortion and, if so, to recommend an appropriate regimen. All English language articles published before October 2007 using misoprostol in at least one of the study arms were reviewed to determine the efficacy of misoprostol when used to treat incomplete abortion in the first trimester.

J. Blum; B. Winikoff; K. Gemzell-Danielsson; P. C. Ho; R. Schiavon

2007-01-01

29

Introduction of misoprostol for the treatment of incomplete abortion beyond 12 weeks of pregnancy in Benin.  

PubMed

Improving the care of women who have undergone a spontaneous or induced abortion is an important step in reducing abortion-related morbidity and mortality. Both the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) and the World Health Organization recommend the use of manual vacuum aspiration (MVA) and misoprostol rather than sharp curettage to treat incomplete abortion. MVA was introduced into the public healthcare service in Benin in 2006 and since 2008 misoprostol has been available in 3 large maternity hospitals. The present study opted to use an oral dose of 800 ?g and not to limit to pregnancies of up to 12 weeks, but to include women with second trimester abortions. After 5 years, results show that around three-quarters of the women treated with misoprostol at 13-18 weeks of pregnancy required MVA to complete uterine evacuation and approximately one-quarter had severe bleeding, confirming that the indication of misoprostol for incomplete abortion should be limited to pregnancies of up to 12 weeks. PMID:24800660

Adisso, Sosthène; Hounkpatin, Benjamin I B; Komongui, Gounnou D; Sambieni, Olivier; Perrin, René X

2014-07-01

30

Misoprostol  

MedlinePLUS

... who take certain arthritis or pain medicines, including aspirin, that can cause ulcers. It protects the stomach ... and nonprescription medications you are taking, especially antacids, aspirin, arthritis medications, and vitamins.tell your doctor if ...

31

75 FR 16211 - MCG Capital Corporation; Notice of Application  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Release No. 29191; File No. 812-13694] MCG Capital Corporation; Notice of Application...SUMMARY: Summary of the Application: MCG Capital Corporation (the ``Applicant...Participants'') pursuant to the MCG Capital Corporation 2006 Employee...

2010-03-31

32

mcg/kg/min: Alprostadil (PgE1)  

E-print Network

PICU/CVICU DRIPS mcg/kg/min: Alprostadil (PgE1) Range: 0.025-0.1 mcg/kg/min Amiodarone Range: kg 5-15 mcg/kg/min >50 kg 1 mg/min Cisatracurium Range: 0.5-4 mcg/kg/min Dobutamine Range: 3-10 mcg/kg/min Dopamine Range: 3-12 mcg/kg/min Epinephrine Range: 0.01-0.2 mcg/kg/min Esmolol Range: 50-400 mcg/kg/min

Kay, Mark A.

33

Contraceptive vaginal ring use for women has less adverse metabolic effects than an oral contraceptive  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThis study compared metabolic, hormonal and lipid profiles before and during use of a contraceptive vaginal ring (RING) releasing 15 mcg ethinyl estradiol (EE) and 120 mcg etonogestrel per day (NuvaRing®, Organon USA Inc., Roseland, NJ) versus a low-dose oral contraceptive (PILL) containing 20 mcg EE and 100 mcg levonorgestrel daily (Aviane, Barr Pharmaceuticals Inc., Pomona, NY).

Karen E. Elkind-Hirsch; Carmen Darensbourg; Beverly Ogden; Lauren F. Ogden; Philip Hindelang

2007-01-01

34

Indices and Detectors for Fetal MCG Actography  

PubMed Central

Several recent studies have demonstrated the usefulness of fetal magnetocardiogram (fMCG) actography, a relatively new method of detecting fetal movement that can be performed in conjunction with fMCG assessment of fetal heart rate and rhythm. In this work, we formulate indices of fetal activity that incorporate information from all channels to achieve improved sensitivity. We also utilize statistical detection to provide an objective means of inferring significant fetal activity. PMID:21427015

Lutter, William J.

2011-01-01

35

Misoprostol: An effective agent for cervical ripening and labor induction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Our purpose was to compare the safety and efficacy of intravaginal misoprostol versus intracervical prostaglandin E2 gel (dinoprostone) for preinduction cervical ripening and induction of labor.Study design: Two hundred seventy-six patients with indications for induction of labor and unfavorable cervices were randomly assigned to receive either intravaginal misoprostol or intracervical dinoprostone. Twenty-five micrograms of misoprostol were placed in the

Deborah A. Wing; Ann Rahall; Margaret M. Jones; T. Murphy Goodwin; Richard H. Paul

1995-01-01

36

Efficacy of Rectal Misoprostol for Prevention of Postpartum Hemorrhage  

PubMed Central

Postpartum hemorrhage is an important cause of maternal morbidity and mortality after delivery. Active management of postpartum hemorrhage by an uterotonic drug decreases the rate of postpartum hemorrhage. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of rectal misoprostol for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage. This double blind randomized clinical trial was performed on full term pregnant women candidate for vaginal delivery, referred to Zahedan Imam Ali Hospital during 2008-2009. They were randomly divided into two groups of rectal misoprostol and oxytocin. The women in misoprostol group received 400 ?g rectal misoprostol after delivery and the women in oxytocin group received 3 IU oxytocin in 1 L ringer serum, intravenously. Rate of bleeding, need to any surgery interventions, rate of transfusion and changes in hemoglobin and hematocrite were compared between two groups. A total of 400 patients (200 cases in misoprostol group and 200 in oxytocin group) entered to the study. Rate of bleeding > 500 cc was significantly higher in oxytocin group than misoprostol group (33% vs. 19%) (p = 0.005). Also, need to excessive oxytocin for management of postpartum hemorrhage was significantly lower in misoprostol group than oxytocin group (18% vs. 30%) (p = 0.003). Decrease in hematocrite was significantly more observed in oxytocin group than misoprostol group (mean decrease of hematocrite was 1.3 ± 1.6 in misoprostol group and 1.6 ± 2.2 in oxytocin group). Two groups were similar in terms of side-effects. Rectal misoprostol as an uterotonic drug can decrease postpartum hemorrhage and also can prevent from decrease of hemoglobin as compared to oxytocin. PMID:24250623

Mirteimouri, Masoumeh; Tara, Fatemeh; Teimouri, Batool; Sakhavar, Nahid; Vaezi, Afsaneh

2013-01-01

37

Comparison of oral versus vaginal misoprostol & continued use of misoprostol after mifepristone for early medical abortion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background & objectives: Medical abortion though legalized in India, is still not very popular. A disadvantage of medical abortion is the longer duration of bleeding compared with surgical abortion which may reduce acceptability. Due consideration needs to be given to the issues related to medical abortion for improving the reproductive health status of women suffering from consequences of unsafe and

Suneeta Mittal; Sonika Agarwal; Sunesh Kumar; Ashima Batra

38

Acute Coronary Artery Vasospasm Associated with Misoprostol for Termination of Pregnancy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prostaglandin E1 analogues, gemeprost and misoprostol, are the most widely used drugs for medical termination of pregnancy within the first two trimesters of pregnancy. Gemeprost has been reported to be associated with acute cardiovascular accidents in a few cases, but no adverse cardiovascular events have been reported with misoprostol. For this reason, misoprostol has been considered a potentially safer drug

Miriam Illa; Mar Bennasar; Elisenda Eixarch; Raquel Berge; Montse Palacio

2010-01-01

39

Optimal reduction of MCG in fetal MEG recordings.  

PubMed

Recording fetal magnetoencephalographic (fMEG) signals in-utero is a demanding task due to biological interference, especially maternal and fetal magnetocardiographic (MCG) signals. A method based on orthogonal projection of MCG signal space vectors (OP) was evaluated and compared with independent component analysis (ICA). The evaluation was based on MCG amplitude reduction and signal-to-noise ratio of fetal brain signals using exemplary datasets recorded during ongoing studies related to auditory evoked fields. The results indicate that the OP method is the preferable approach for attenuation of MCG and for preserving the fetal brain signals in fMEG recordings. PMID:16916111

McCubbin, J; Robinson, S E; Cropp, R; Moiseev, A; Vrba, J; Murphy, P; Preissl, H; Eswaran, H

2006-08-01

40

Uterine Rupture during Second Trimester Abortion with Misoprostol  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Data are limited regarding the use of misoprostol in the midtrimester, therefore few cases with uterine rupture during the second trimester with a previous uterine scar have been reported in the literature. Case Report: A 23-year-old woman with a prior low transverse cesarean section presented at 26 weeks’ gestation for pregnancy termination for a fetal abnormality. She was given

Umit Nayki; Cuneyt Eftal Taner; Tolga Mizrak; Cenk Nayki; Gulsen Derin

2005-01-01

41

SÍNDROME DE MOEBIUS RELACIONADA AO USO DO MISOPROSTOL (CYTOTEC®) COMO ABORTIVO Moebius syndrome related to misoprostol (cytotec®) use as an abortifacient  

Microsoft Academic Search

RESUMO A síndrome de Moebius constitui uma doença congênita caracterizada por paralisia dos nervos facial e abducente associada a malformações de membros. Além da etiologia genética, fatores causais de origem ambiental foram propostos devido ao aumento do número de casos da síndrome associados ao emprego de misoprostol durante a gravidez. O misoprostol é o princípio ativo do Cytotec®, uma droga

Renata Cavalcante Barbosa; Marcelo Bezerra Nogueira; Célia Maria Giacheti

42

Misoprostol for abortion up to 9 weeks' gestation in adolescents.  

PubMed

The objectives of the present clinical study were to evaluate the safety and efficacy of misoprostol (Cytotec) self-administered into the vagina for medical abortion in adolescents under the age of 18 years. After obtaining written consent from the patients and parents or guardians, a group of 150 adolescents with gestations between 35 and 63 days received 800 microg of vaginal misoprostol every 24 h, up to a maximum of three main doses, for abortion. Outcomes assessed included successful abortion (complete abortion without surgery), side-effects, decrease in hemoglobin, mean time of vaginal bleeding, mean expulsion time and mean time for the return of menses. Complete abortion occurred in 133/150 (88.7%, 95% confidence interval 82-93) patients. The frequencies of nausea, vomiting and diarrhea were statistically significantly higher when compared to those obtained for adult females. Vaginal bleeding lasted for 12.7 +/- 5.7 days (median 12 days, range 1-23 days). The mean expulsion time was 6.8 +/- 2.4 h (median 6 h, range 3-14 h) for those who aborted after the first misoprostol dose. The mean time for the return of menses, for those who aborted with misoprostol, was 34.7 +/- 3.4 days. The mean decrease in hemoglobin was statistically significant (p = 0.001), but had no clinical relevance. Taking into account the high abortion rate obtained, we could conclude that misoprostol alone is a valid method for terminating unwanted pregnancies in adolescents under the age of 18 years. PMID:11245549

Velazco, A; Varela, L; Tanda, R; Sánchez, C; Barambio, S; Chami, S; Valero, F; Aragón, S; Marí, J; Carbonell, J L

2000-12-01

43

Effects of topical application of misoprostol on cervical relaxation in mares.  

PubMed

Mares who have not delivered a foal early in life may experience limitations in cervical relaxation, primarily during oestrus. A closed cervix prevents intrauterine deposition of semen during natural breeding, may delay uterine clearance after insemination leading to intrauterine fluid accumulation in, and subsequent infertility. Therefore, a reliable pharmacological method of dilating the equine cervix would have practical application in veterinary medicine. The goal of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of topically applied, synthetic prostaglandin E1 analogue (PGE1 ) for stimulating dilation of the equine cervix. Ten mares in dioestrus were randomly assigned to one of two treatments in a single-blind crossover study: (treatment) PGE1 gel (1000 mcg compounded misoprostol cream) applied topically to the external cervical os (n = 5), and (control) a vehicle cream applied topically to the external cervical os (n = 5). Transrectal palpation and ultrasonographic measurements of the cervix were performed prior to, six and 24 h post-treatment. Digital measurements were taken, per vagina, at six and 24 h post-treatment. Mares were monitored through the subsequent oestrous cycle for ovulation. Mares were assigned to the opposite treatment group such that each mare served as her own control (crossover). Data were analysed using parametric (split-plot anova), as well as nonparametric (Kruskal-Wallis anova, Wilcoxon's rank-sum test) methods. At six and 24 h there were no significant differences for tone, length, height, degree of relaxation or echotexture between control and PGE1 treated groups at the measured time points (p > 0.05). Topical cervical application of PGE1 did not induce a measurable degree of cervical relaxation under the conditions of this experiment. PMID:25363694

McNaughten, J; Pozor, M; Macpherson, M; Kelleman, A; Woodward, E; Troedsson, M

2014-12-01

44

Modeling maternal mortality in Bangladesh: the role of misoprostol in postpartum hemorrhage prevention  

PubMed Central

Background Bangladesh is one of the few countries that may actually achieve the fifth Millennium Development Goal (MDG) in time, despite skilled birth attendance remaining low. The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential role misoprostol can play in the decline of maternal deaths attributed to postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) in Bangladesh. Methods Using data from a misoprostol and blood loss measurement tool feasibility study in Bangladesh, observed cause specific maternal mortality ratios (MMRs) were estimated and contrasted with expected ratios using estimates from the Bangladesh Maternal Mortality Survey (BMMS) data. Using Crystal Ball 7 we employ Monte Carlo simulation techniques to estimate maternal deaths in four scenarios, each with different levels of misoprostol coverage. These scenarios include project level misoprostol coverage (69%), no (0%), low (40%), and high (80%) misoprostol coverage. Data on receipt of clean delivery kit, use of misoprostol, experience of PPH, and cause of death were used in model assumptions. Results Using project level misoprostol coverage (69%), the mean number of PPH deaths expected was 40 (standard deviation?=?8.01) per 100,000 live births. Assuming no misoprostol coverage (0%), the mean number of PPH deaths expected was 51 (standard deviation?=?9.30) per 100,000 live births. For low misoprostol coverage (40%), the mean number of PPH deaths expected was 45 (standard deviation?=?8.26) per 100,000 live births, and for high misoprostol coverage (80%), the mean number of PPH deaths expected was 38 (standard deviation?=?7.04) per 100,000 live births. Conclusion This theoretical exercise hypothesizes that prophylactic use of misoprostol at home births may contribute to a reduction in the risk of death due to PPH, in addition to reducing the incidence of PPH. If findings from this modeling exercise are accurate and uterotonics can prevent maternal death, misoprostol could be the tool countries need to further reduce maternal mortality at home births. PMID:24555848

2014-01-01

45

Misoprostol (cytotec) in the treatment of peripheral ischaemic disease.  

PubMed

The stable prostacyclin analogue-iloprost and prostaglandin E1 (Alprostadil) showed a beneficial effect on activated platelets and leukocytes, and thrombocyte and leukocyte vessel interaction and damaged endothelium, improving microvascular perfusion and were useful in treatment of patients with peripheral arterial disease. The 4 weeks therapy with misoprostol caused a clinical improvement in all 14 patients and resulted in vasorelaxation and showed antiplatelet and fibrinolytic effects. PMID:9328617

Goszcz, A; Grodzinska, L; Kostka-Trebka, E; Bieron, K; Slawinski, M; Jachym, R

1996-01-01

46

The use of misoprostol in termination of second-trimester pregnancy.  

PubMed

Misoprostol, a synthetic prostaglandin E1 analog, is initially used to prevent peptic ulcer. The initial US Food and Drug Administration-approved indication in the product labeling is the treatment and prevention of intestinal ulcer disease resulting from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs use. In recent two decades, misoprostol has approved to be an effective agent for termination of pregnancy in various gestation, cervical ripening, labor induction in term pregnancy, and possible management of postpartum hemorrhage. For the termination of second-trimester pregnancy using the combination of mifepristone and misoprostol seems to have the highest efficacy and the shortest time interval of abortion. When mifepristone is not available, misoprostol alone is a good alternative. Misoprostol, 400 ?g given vaginally every 3-6 hours, is probably the optimal regimen for second-trimester abortion. More than 800 ?g of misoprostol is likely to have more side effects, especially diarrhea. Although misoprostol can be used in women with scarred uterus for termination of second-trimester pregnancy, it is recommended that women with a scarred uterus should receive lower doses and do not double the dose if there is no initial response. It is also important for us to recognize the associated teratogenic effects of misoprostol and thorough consultation before prescribing this medication to patients regarding these risks, especially when failure of abortion occurs, is needed. PMID:22030039

Lin, Chen-Ju; Chien, Shu-Chin; Chen, Chih-Ping

2011-09-01

47

Vaginal versus sublingual misoprostol for labor induction at term and post term: a randomized prospective study.  

PubMed

We want to compare the efficacy and safety of vaginal versus sublingual misoprostol for cervical ripening and induction of labor. This randomized clinical trial was performed on 140 women with medical or obstetric indications for labor induction. The patients were randomly divided into two groups: vaginal and sublingual administration of misoprostol. In first group, 25 µg misoprostol was placed in the posterior fornix of the vagina and second group received 25 µg misoprostol sublingually, every 6 hours for 24 h. Maternal and neonatal outcomes were analyzed. There was no significant difference in the demographic characteristics between two groups. The main indication for cesarean section in both groups was fetal distress, followed by absence of active labor progress. Evaluation of cesarean indication was not significantly different in two groups; including fetal distress, absence of active labor, uterine over activity and failure to progress. The maternal complication in sublingual group included residual placenta (2%), tachysystole (2%), vomiting (12%), atoni (3.3%) and abdominal pain (5.5%), although there was no significant difference between two groups. Sublingual misoprostol is as effective as vaginal misoprostol for induction of labor at term. However, sublingual misoprostol has the advantage of easy administration and may be more suitable than vaginal misoprostol. PMID:24734084

Ayati, Sedigheh; Vahidroodsari, Fatemeh; Farshidi, Farnoosh; Shahabian, Masoud; Afzal Aghaee, Monavar

2014-01-01

48

Acute coronary artery vasospasm associated with misoprostol for termination of pregnancy.  

PubMed

Prostaglandin E(1) analogues, gemeprost and misoprostol, are the most widely used drugs for medical termination of pregnancy within the first two trimesters of pregnancy. Gemeprost has been reported to be associated with acute cardiovascular accidents in a few cases, but no adverse cardiovascular events have been reported with misoprostol. For this reason, misoprostol has been considered a potentially safer drug and is widely recommended as a first-choice drug in combination with mifepristone. We report a case of a 32-year-old woman with active smoking and obesity, who developed an episode of transient acute coronary artery vasospasm following the administration of intravaginal misoprostol. This report illustrates that misoprostol can also be associated with acute coronary events, although it remains to be evaluated whether the risk is similar or lower to gemeprost. PMID:20224253

Illa, Miriam; Bennasar, Mar; Eixarch, Elisenda; Berge, Raquel; Font, Carme; Palacio, Montse

2010-01-01

49

Probing MCG6-30-15 with the Chandra HETGS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Chandra HETGS spectra of the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15 show numerous narrow, unresolved (FWHM ≈ < 200 m s-1) absorption lines from a wide range of ionization states of N, O, Mg, Ne, Si, S, Ar, and Fe. The initial analysis of these data, presented in Lee et al. (2001), shows that a dusty warm absorber is reasonable for

J. C. Lee; C. R. Canizares; T. Fang; R. Morales; A. C. Fabian; H. L. Marshall; N. S. Schulz

2002-01-01

50

Complete Cervical Avulsion with Intravaginal Misoprostol for Second Trimester Pregnancy Termination  

PubMed Central

Intravaginal misoprostol, a synthetic PGE1 analogue, has largely replaced all other techniques for pregnancy termination in II trimester, because of its successful results. Incidence of II trimester pregnancy termination has also increased in the present days, because of prenatal diagnosis of pregnancies with serious fetal abnormalities like cardiovascular and skeletal malformations. But there are serious and life threatening complications reported with the use of intravaginal misoprostol. Here we are reporting a case of complete avulsion of cervix from lower part of the uterus, with the use of intravaginal misoprostol, for II trimester termination of pregnancy. So, clinicians dealing with II trimester termination of pregnancy should be aware of such complications. PMID:22919526

Sajjan, G. R.; Patil, Neelamma; Kaur, Manpreet; Shirgur, Shobha; Nandi, Suvarna; Ashwini, V.

2012-01-01

51

Misoprostol: pharmacoeconomics of its use as prophylaxis against gastroduodenal damage induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.  

PubMed

Misoprostol effectively prevents nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID)-induced gastric ulcer and is the only agent currently indicated for this purpose. In addition, misoprostol is effective as prophylaxis against NSAID-induced duodenal ulcer. Because of the widespread use of NSAIDs, the cost of routine misoprostol prophylaxis would be high, and thus its pharmacoeconomic evaluation is an important factor in assessing the most appropriate role of misoprostol in this group of patients. Current cost-benefit analyses undertaken in major European centres and the US have generally indicated that, depending on initial assumptions, misoprostol prophylaxis over a 3-month period is cost-saving in patients with osteoarthritis taking NSAIDs. The net savings (costs) realised were dependent on several variables, including the acquisition cost of misoprostol, silent ulcer rate and patients' compliance. Importantly, misoprostol prophylaxis was consistently more cost-beneficial in elderly patients aged greater than 60 to 65 years than in their younger counterparts. In contrast, in one study misoprostol was found to reduce patients' quality of life and, although misoprostol therapy is potentially cost-saving to society, patients generally preferred no therapy. A single study assessing the cost-effectiveness of misoprostol prophylaxis in preventing ulcerative complications concluded that primary treatment was not an economically viable option for all NSAID users. Misoprostol was most cost-effective in the prevention of recurrent or secondary gastric ulcer complications in 'high-risk' patients, for example patients aged over 60 years and patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Thus, although there are areas of interest awaiting further pharmacoeconomic investigation, misoprostol prophylaxis appears to be cost-effective in elderly and high risk patients receiving NSAIDs. Additionally, misoprostol prophylaxis is cost-saving in elderly patients with osteoarthritis requiring NSAID therapy. PMID:10146962

Barradell, L B; Whittington, R; Benfield, P

1993-02-01

52

Clinical evaluation of different applications of misoprostol and aglepristone for induction of abortion in bitches.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to compare the clinical and endocrinological effects of different applications of misoprostol (MIS) and aglepristone (AGL) for the induction of abortion in bitches. For this purpose, 28 healthy pregnant bitches from different breeds, ages, body weights (Body weigt, BWs, 10-40 kg), and between Days 25 to 35 of gestation were used. Bitches were randomly assigned to four groups. In group 1 (GI, n = 7), AGL (10 mg/kg BW, s.c. on 2 consecutive days); in group 2 (GII, n = 7), AGL (as in GI), intravaginal MIS (IVag, 200 ?g for bitches with ?20 kg BW, 400 ?g for bitches with >20 kg BW, daily intravaginally until completion of abortion); in group 3 (GIII, n = 7), AGL (as in GI), ICVag (as in GII), per os MIS (400 ?g for bitches with ?20 kg BW, 800 ?g for bitches with >20 kg BW, daily orally, until completion of abortion); in group 4 (GIV, n = 7), AGL (as in GI), per os MIS (as GIII) were used. Clinical, vaginal, and ultrasonographic examinations were performed daily until abortion was completed. For measurement of serum progesterone, blood samples were collected in all groups immediately after the first AGL administration and every other day until completion of abortion. No statistical differences were found between groups concerning the duration until completion of abortion after treatment (nonsignificant); however, in GII, one bitch completed abortion 2 days after the start of treatment. PMID:24576713

Agaoglu, A R; Aslan, S; Emre, B; Korkmaz, O; Ozdemir Salci, E S; Kocamuftuoglu, M; Seyrek-Intas, K; Schäfer-Somi, S

2014-04-15

53

MCG measurement in the environment of active magnetic shield.  

PubMed

MCG (Magnetocardiography) measurement by a SQUID gradiometer was attempted with only active magnetic shielding (active shielding). A three-axis-canceling-coil active shielding system, where three 16-10-16 turns-coil sets were put in the orthogonal directions, produces a homogeneous magnetic field in a considerable volume surrounding the center. Fluxgate sensors were used as the reference sensors of the system. The system can reduce environmental magnetic noise at low frequencies of less than a few Hz, at 50 Hz and at 150 Hz. Reducing such disturbances stabilizes biomagnetic measurement conditions for SQUIDs in the absence of magnetically shielded rooms (MSR). After filtering and averaging the measured MCG data by a first-order SQUID gradiometer with only the active shielding during the daytime, the QRS complex and T wave was clearly presented. PMID:16012640

Yamazaki, K; Kato, K; Kobayashi, K; Igarashi, A; Sato, T; Haga, A; Kasai, N

2004-01-01

54

The combination of mifepristone and misoprostol for the termination of pregnancy.  

PubMed

The combination of 200mg of mifepristone followed by 25 ?g to 800 ?g (depending on gestational age) of misoprostol has been shown to be effective for the termination of pregnancy throughout gestation. The dose of misoprostol should be reduced as gestational age increases. Mifepristone is not indicated for induction of labor with a live fetus because there are no data to confirm that it does not have a possible deleterious fetal effect. The course of treatment and prerequisites for medical abortion and recommended mifepristone and misoprostol regimens for different gestational ages are described, along with the side effects, management of complications, and postabortion care. The use of the mifepristone-misoprostol combination regimen for induction of labor in cases of fetal death is also described. PMID:21872858

Faúndes, Anibal

2011-10-01

55

Misoprostol vaginal insert for induction of labor: a delivery system with accurate dosing and rapid discontinuation.  

PubMed

Labor induction and cervical ripening are widely utilized and new methods are constantly being investigated. Prostaglandins have been shown to be effective labor induction agents and, in particular, were compared with other prostaglandin preparations; vaginal misoprostol used off-label was associated with reduced failure to achieve vaginal delivery. The challenge is to provide this medication with the correct dosing for this indication and with the ability to discontinue the medication if needed, all while ensuring essential maternal and neonatal safety. The misoprostol vaginal insert initiates cervical ripening using a delivery system that controls misoprostol release and can be rapidly removed. This article reviews the development, safety and efficacy of the misoprostol vaginal insert for induction of labor and cervical ripening, and will focus on vaginally administered prostaglandins. PMID:24328596

Stephenson, Megan L; Hawkins, J Seth; Powers, Barbara L; Wing, Deborah A

2014-01-01

56

Second trimester medical abortion with mifepristone-misoprostol and misoprostol alone: a review of methods and management.  

PubMed

Second trimester abortions constitute 10-15% of all induced abortions worldwide but are responsible for two-thirds of major abortion-related complications. During the last decade, medical methods for second trimester induced abortion have been considerably improved and become safe and more accessible. Today, in most cases, safe and efficient medical abortion services can be offered or improved by minor changes in existing health care facilities. Second trimester medical abortion can be provided by a nurse-midwife with the back-up of a gynaecologist. Because of the potential for heavy vaginal bleeding and serious complications, it is advisable that second trimester terminations take place in a health care facility where blood transfusion and emergency surgery (including laparotomy) are available. This article provides basic information on regimens recommended for second trimester medical abortion. The combination of mifepristone and misoprostol is now an established and highly effective method for second trimester abortion. Where mifepristone is not available or affordable, misoprostol alone has also been shown to be effective, although a higher total dose is needed and efficacy is lower than for the combined regimen. Therefore, whenever possible, the combined regimen should be used. Efforts should be made to reduce unnecessary surgical evacuation of the uterus after expulsion of the fetus. Future studies should focus on improving pain management, the treatment of women with failed medical abortion after 24 hours, and the safety of medical abortion regimens in women with a previous caesarean section or uterine scar. PMID:18772097

Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina; Lalitkumar, Sujata

2008-05-01

57

The kinematically decoupled core of MCG-6-30-15  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Seyfert galaxy MCG-6-30-15 has recently been observed in the infrared using SINFONI on the VLT, reaching a very high spatial resolution of 0.1 arcsec. This allowed us for the first time to detect a stellar kinematically decoupled core in the inner r < 125 pc of the galaxy. Here we summarise the main theories for the formation of the decoupled core and the implications on the study of this galaxy.

Raimundo, Sandra I.

2014-07-01

58

A comparison of misoprostol and prostaglandin E 2 gel for preinduction cervical ripening and labor induction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Our purpose was to compare the safety ad efficacy of intravaginal misoprostal versus intracervical prostaglandin E2 (dinoprostone) gel for preinduction cervical ripening and induction of labor.Study design: One hundred thirty-five patients with indications for induction of labor and unfavorable cercices were randomly assigned to receive either intravaginal misoprostol or intracervical dinoprostate. Fifty microgram tablets of misoprostol were placed in

Deborah A. Wing; Margaret M. Jones; Ann Rahall; T. Murphy Goodwin; Richard H. Paul

1995-01-01

59

Probing MCG-6-30-15 with the Chandra HETGS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Chandra HETGS spectra of the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15 show numerous narrow, unresolved (FWHM ? < 200 m s-1) absorption lines from a wide range of ionization states of N, O, Mg, Ne, Si, S, Ar, and Fe. The initial analysis of these data, presented in Lee et al. (2001), shows that a dusty warm absorber is reasonable for explaining the soft X-ray spectral features ?> 0.48 keV (?< 26 Å ). The implied Hydrogen column density needed to explain the Fe I L edge feature at ~0.707 keV agrees with that obtained from earlier reddening studies. Both results point to dust embedded in the ionized absorber of MCG-6-30-15 (given the relatively lower observed X-ray absorption by cold gas). This conclusion is contrary to the results reported from XMM which call for relativistically broadened soft X-ray emission line. We also report on preliminary results from Lee et al. (in preparation) based on a full treatment of the warm absorber in MCG-6-30-15 in the Chandra spectral bandpass, which shows a distribution of v and NH which depend on ? and may point to an outflow in the warm absorber of MCG-6-30-15. The results of the in-depth analysis are consistent with those previously published. This proceeding is intended as a review of the findings for the soft 0.5-1 keV X-ray spectrum of MCG-6-30-15 presented by Lee et al. (2001a,b) for the ~67 ks subset of the Chandra HETGS (Lee et al. 2001a,b) AO1 observation corresponding to the period with high continuum flux. Preliminary results (as presented during this meeting) for the full length of the 120 ks integration are reported as highlights from Lee et al., in preparation. Details from the initial papers can be found in Lee et al., 2001, ApJ., 554, L13, and the conference proceeding from ``X-ray emission from Accretion onto Black Holes''

Lee, J. C.; Canizares, C. R.; Fang, T.; Morales, R.; Fabian, A. C.; Marshall, H. L.; Schulz, N. S.

60

A randomized trial to compare the use of sublingual misoprostol with or without an additional 1 week course for the management of first trimester silent miscarriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: This randomized controlled trial compared the use of sublingual misoprostol with or without an additional 1 week course of sublingual misoprostol for the medical management of silent miscarriage. METHODS: A total of 180 women who had silent miscarriage (<13 weeks) was given 600 g of misoprostol every 3 h for a maximum of three doses. These women were randomized

Oi Shan Tang; Charas Y. T. Ong; Ka Yu Tse; Ernest H. Y. Ng; Sharon W. H. Lee

61

Misoprostol alone or in combination with methotrexate for termination of pregnancy at first trimester.  

PubMed

Abortion is an important problem in obstetrics throughout the world. The common and standard method for pregnancy termination at first trimester is surgery (curettage). Nowadays, an effective method of pregnancy termination at first trimester is medical treatments. The aim of this study is to compare misoprostol alone or in combination with methotrexate for pregnancy termination at first trimester. This study is a randomized clinical trial. A total of 200 pregnant women at first trimester were randomizedly divided into two groups for termination of pregnancy. The first group received 800 ?g vaginal misoprostol. If conceptus residual remained, the same dose of misoprostol was repeated. The second group received 50 mg/m² intramuscular methotrexate, and then 800 ?g vaginal misoprostol was administered after 72 h. If conceptus residual remained, the same dose of misoprostol was repeated after 24 h. Abdominal ultrasonography was performed at seventh day for both groups. Should conceptus residual remained or if pregnancy continued, curettage was performed. The results were analyzed statistically in terms of chi-square, and student's t-test, using the SPSS software. A P-value equal or smaller than 0.05, was considered statistically significant. In this study, 83% of the first group and 81% of the second group had successful abortion. There was a significant correlation between the dose of misoprostol and abortion (P = 0.001) and between type of pregnancy and need for curettage (P < 0.000) in both groups, but there was no significant correlation between gestational age and the numberof doses administered (P = 0.932).In conclusion it seems that pregnancy termination by misoprostol alone or in combination with methotrexate is a safe and cost-effective method. PMID:24363712

Vahid Roudsari, Fatemeh; Ayati, Sedigheh; Saghafy, Nafiseh; Shakeri, Mohamadtaghi

2010-01-01

62

Comparison of Vaginal Misoprostol with Foley Catheter for Cervical Ripening and Induction of Labor  

PubMed Central

At times, despite an unripe cervix, induction of labor may be needed. In these cases, a safe and suitable method should be considered for cervical ripening and pregnancy termination. The aim of this study is the comparison of vaginal misoprostol with Foley catheter for cervical ripening and induction of labor. This randomized clinical trial was performed on 108 pregnant women who had referred to the teaching hospitals of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences during a time period of September 2007 to March 2008. These women were randomly divided into two groups: Misoprostol (including 49 patients) and Foley catheter (including 59 patients). For the first group, 25 microgram vaginal misoprostol was administered every 4 h up to maximum 6 doses. For the second group, Foley catheter 18 F, inflated with 50 cc of sterile water, was placed through the internal os of the cervix. Data was analyzed using SPSS software. p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Two groups were similar in the view of demographic characteristics, cesarean indications, maternal and fetal outcomes and neonatal outcomes. Vaginal delivery was significantly higher in misoprostol group (89.9 vs. 62.7, p < 0.01). The mean of delivery time was significantly shorter in misoprostol group (11.08 ± 5.6 vs. 13.6 ± 16.0 h, p < 0.05). In the cases of pregnancy termination and unripe cervix, two methods of misoprostol and Foley catheter were considered suitable, but it seemed that misoprostol decreases the delivery time and was needed for the cesarean section. PMID:24363694

Vahid Roudsari, Fatemeh; Ayati, Sedigheh; Ghasemi, Marzieh; Hasanzadeh Mofrad, Maliheh; Shakeri, Mohamad Taghi; Farshidi, Farnoush; Shahabian, Masoud

2011-01-01

63

Genetic and functional properties of uncultivated MCG archaea assessed by metagenome and gene expression analyses  

PubMed Central

The Miscellaneous Crenarchaeota group (MCG) Archaea is one of the predominant archaeal groups in anoxic environments and may have significant roles in the global biogeochemical cycles. However, no isolate of MCG has been cultivated or characterized to date. In this study, we investigated the genetic organization, ecophysiological properties and evolutionary relationships of MCG archaea with other archaeal members using metagenome information and the result of gene expression experiments. A comparison of the gene organizations and similarities around the 16S rRNA genes from all available MCG fosmid and cosmid clones revealed no significant synteny among genomic fragments, demonstrating that there are large genetic variations within members of the MCG. Phylogenetic analyses of large-subunit+small-subunit rRNA, concatenated ribosomal protein genes and topoisomerases IB gene (TopoIB) all demonstrate that MCG constituted a sister lineage to the newly proposed archaeal phylum Aigarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota. Genes involved in protocatechuate degradation and chemotaxis were found in a MCG fosmid 75G8 genome fragment, suggesting that this MCG member may have a role in the degradation of aromatic compounds. Moreover, the expression of a putative 4-carboxymuconolactone decarboxylase was observed when the sediment was supplemented with protocatechuate, further supporting the hypothesis that this MCG member degrades aromatic compounds. PMID:24108328

Meng, Jun; Xu, Jun; Qin, Dan; He, Ying; Xiao, Xiang; Wang, Fengping

2014-01-01

64

Role of Sublingual Misoprostol for Cervical Priming in First Trimester Medical Termination of Pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of sublingual misoprostol as facilitator in first trimester medical termination of pregnancy (MTP) by surgical method. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective open label study conducted at a tertiary center. A total 150 patients at 6-12 wks gestation requesting for MTP were randomized into two groups. Patients in study group (n=75) received sublingual misoprostol three hours before surgical abortion and in control group (n=75) directly underwent surgical abortion without prior cervical priming with misoprostol. The outcomes of both groups were recorded in terms of baseline cervical dilatation, need of additional cervical dilatation, intraoperative blood loss, operative time and procedure related complications. The results were statistically analyzed using student-t test and chi-square test. p-value of <0.05 and <0.001 were considered significant and highly significant respectively. Results: The mean baseline cervical dilatation was significantly more in study group compared to control group (8.6±1.3mm versus 5±2.3mm; p <0.001) and the operative time and intraoperative blood loss were also less (p<0.001). Higher incidence of side effects like nausea, vomiting and pyrexia were recorded in sublingual misoprostol group but were well tolerable to the patients. Conclusion: Sublingual misoprostol is an effective and safe drug for cervical priming prior to surgical evacuation and has good patient acceptability.

Rani, Jyotsna; Vijayshree

2014-01-01

65

Lack of evidence for neonatal misoprostol neurodevelopmental toxicity in C57BL6/J mice.  

PubMed

Misoprostol is a synthetic analogue of prostaglandin E1 that is administered to women at high doses to induce uterine contractions for early pregnancy termination and at low doses to aid in cervical priming during labor. Because of the known teratogenic effects of misoprostol when given during gestation and its effects on axonal growth in vitro, we examined misoprostol for its potential as a neurodevelopmental toxicant when administered to neonatal C57BL6/J mice. Mice were injected subcutaneously (s.c.) with 0.4, 4 or 40 µg/kg misoprostol on postnatal day 7, the approximate developmental stage in mice of human birth, after which neonatal somatic growth, and sensory and motor system development were assessed. These doses were selected to span the range of human exposure used to induce labor. In addition, adult mice underwent a battery of behavioral tests relevant to neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism including tests for anxiety, stereotyped behaviors, social communication and interactions, and learning and memory. No significant effects of exposure were found for any measure of development or behavioral endpoints. In conclusion, the results of the present study in C57BL/6J mice do not provide support for neurodevelopmental toxicity after misoprostol administration approximating human doses and timed to coincide with the developmental stage of human birth. PMID:22719983

Koenig, Claire M; Walker, Cheryl K; Qi, Lihong; Pessah, Isaac N; Berman, Robert F

2012-01-01

66

Comparison effect of intravenous tranexamic acid and misoprostol for postpartum haemorrhage  

PubMed Central

Background: Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is the third-most common cause of maternal death in the United States and it is still the first prevalent cause of maternal death in developing countries. Active prevention of haemorrhage with an uterotonic or other new drugs leads to a decrease in postpartum vaginal haemorrhage. The aim of this study was to compare anti-haemorrhagic effect of Tranexamic acid (TXA) and Misoprostol for PPH. Patients and Methods: In a double-blinded randomised control clinical trial, 200 women were included after Caesarean or natural vaginal delivery with abnormal PPH. They were divided into two equal intervention and control groups. Effect of intravenous TXA and Misoprostol for postpartum haemorrhage was examined. Results: The mean age of patients was 26.7 ± 6.5 years which ranged from 14 to 43 years. The sonographic gestational age in the group treated with TXA was 37.7 ± 3.4 weeks and it was 37.4 ± 3.3 weeks for the other group (P = 0.44). The haemorrhage in the TXA and Misoprostol groups was 1.2 ± 0.33 litres and 1.18 ± 0.47 litres, respectively (P = 0.79). The haemoglobin levels after 6-12 hours of labour, in TXA group was more than that of the Misoprostol group, but this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.22 and P = 0.21, respectively). Conclusion: Regarding to the superior results in Misoprostol group in one hand and lack of significant differences between two groups in haemorrhage during labour, post-partum haemoglobin level and discharge haemoglobin level, we can state that Misoprostol has no specific preferences to TXA, but more studies with greater population are needed. PMID:25114373

Sahhaf, Farnaz; Abbasalizadeh, Shamsi; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Velayati, Atefeh; Khandanloo, Roya; Saleh, Parviz; Piri, Reza; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad

2014-01-01

67

Advance distribution of misoprostol for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) at home births in two districts of Liberia  

PubMed Central

Background A postpartum hemorrhage prevention program to increase uterotonic coverage for home and facility births was introduced in two districts of Liberia. Advance distribution of misoprostol was offered during antenatal care (ANC) and home visits. Feasibility, acceptability, effectiveness of distribution mechanisms and uterotonic coverage were evaluated. Methods Eight facilities were strengthened to provide PPH prevention with oxytocin, PPH management and advance distribution of misoprostol during ANC. Trained traditional midwives (TTMs) as volunteer community health workers (CHWs) provided education to pregnant women, and district reproductive health supervisors (DRHSs) distributed misoprostol during home visits. Data were collected through facility and DRHS registers. Postpartum interviews were conducted with a sample of 550 women who received advance distribution of misoprostol on place of delivery, knowledge, misoprostol use, and satisfaction. Results There were 1826 estimated deliveries during the seven-month implementation period. A total of 980 women (53.7%) were enrolled and provided misoprostol, primarily through ANC (78.2%). Uterotonic coverage rate of all deliveries was 53.5%, based on 97.7% oxytocin use at recorded facility vaginal births and 24.9% misoprostol use at home births. Among 550 women interviewed postpartum, 87.7% of those who received misoprostol and had a home birth took the drug. Sixty-three percent (63.0%) took it at the correct time, and 54.0% experienced at least one minor side effect. No serious adverse events reported among enrolled women. Facility-based deliveries appeared to increase during the program. Conclusions The program was moderately effective at achieving high uterotonic coverage of all births. Coverage of home births was low despite the use of two channels of advance distribution of misoprostol. Although ANC reached a greater proportion of women in late pregnancy than home visits, 46.3% of expected deliveries did not receive education or advance distribution of misoprostol. A revised community-based strategy is needed to increase advance distribution rates and misoprostol coverage rates for home births. Misoprostol for PPH prevention appears acceptable to women in Liberia. Correct timing of misoprostol self-administration needs improved emphasis during counseling and education. PMID:24894566

2014-01-01

68

MCG 06-45-001 - Not a local group galaxy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Observations of (C-12)O and (C-13)O J = 1 to 0 for MCG 06-45-001 are examined. It is argued that two features of CO emission with velocities of 1 and 10 km/s indicate that the object is similar to the Galactic molecular clouds in the immediate vicinity, and not to a spiral galaxy as suggested previously. It is considered that CO emission cannot arise from a spiral galaxy at a distance of 2-5 Mpc and that the object is unlikely to be a nearby dwarf. The feature at 10 km/s is considered to arise from a molecular cloud associated with an H II region, which produces the observed IRAS flux.

Shore, Steven N.; Sage, Leslie J.

1990-01-01

69

Misoprostol in the prevention of NSAID-induced gastric ulcer: a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.  

PubMed

A multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of the synthetic prostaglandin E1 analog misoprostol in preventing and healing gastric ulcer induced by nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID) in patients receiving chronic NSAID therapy for osteoarthritis (OA). A total of 420 patients with OA and NSAID-associated abdominal pain who were receiving ibuprofen, piroxicam or naproxen were enrolled in the study. Endoscopy was performed at study entry and after 1, 2 and 3 months of continuous therapy with misoprostol 100 micrograms, misoprostol 200 micrograms or placebo given q.i.d. while NSAID therapy was continued. Treatment failure was defined as development of gastric ulcer (greater than 0.3 cm in diameter). The occurrence of ulcer in each misoprostol group (5.6% and 1.4% for 100 micrograms and 200 micrograms, respectively) was significantly lower (p less than 0.001) than that in the placebo group (21.7%). The statistically significant difference persisted when comparisons were restricted to development of ulcer greater than 0.5 cm in diameter (12.3, 4.2 and 0.7% for placebo, misoprostol 100 micrograms q.i.d. and misoprostol 200 micrograms q.i.d., respectively). Mild-to-moderate, self-limiting diarrhea was the most frequently reported adverse event attributed to misoprostol use. PMID:2109073

Roth, S H

1990-02-01

70

Prevention of NSAID-induced gastric ulcer with misoprostol: multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.  

PubMed

A double-blind, placebo-controlled study was carried out to see whether the synthetic E prostaglandin, misoprostol, would prevent gastric ulcer induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). 420 patients with osteoarthritis and NSAID-associated abdominal pain were studied; they were receiving ibuprofen, piroxicam, or naproxen. Endoscopy was done at entry and after 1, 2, and 3 months of continuous treatment with 100 micrograms or 200 micrograms misoprostol or placebo, given four times daily with meals and at bedtime, concurrently with the NSAID. Abdominal pain was rated independently by patients and physicians. A treatment failure was defined as development of a gastric ulcer. Gastric ulcers (0.3 cm in diameter or greater) occurred less frequently (p less than 0.001) in both misoprostol treatment groups (5.6% 100 micrograms and 1.4% 200 micrograms) than in the placebo group (21.7%). The significant difference in ulcer formation between the placebo and the misoprostol treatment groups remained when comparisons were restricted to ulcers greater than 0.5 cm in diameter (12.3% placebo, 4.2% 100 micrograms misoprostol, and 0.7% 200 micrograms misoprostol). Mild to moderate, self-limiting diarrhoea was the most frequently reported adverse effect attributed to misoprostol. These results provide the first clear indication that NSAID-induced ulcers are preventable. PMID:2904006

Graham, D Y; Agrawal, N M; Roth, S H

1988-12-01

71

Misoprostol preferable to ethacridine lactate for abortions at 13-20 weeks of pregnancy: Cuban experience.  

PubMed

Outdated second trimester abortion methods are still being used in some countries, and very few studies have compared them to currently recommended methods. To this end, we studied the efficacy and safety of vaginal misoprostol used alone for abortions in 189 women at 13-20 weeks gestation, in 2004-2006. We also retrospectively collated similar data from an historical cohort of 189 women drawn consecutively and chronologically from hospital records from 2003-2006, also at 13-20 weeks gestation, who had had abortions with a combination of extra-amniotic 0.1% ethacridine lactate solution, oxytocin and sharp curettage. At 24 hours, misoprostol was 92.6% effective in inducing abortion versus 76.2% with the ethacridine lactate regimen (OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.3-8.0). The misoprostol cohort experienced fewer complications than the ethacridine cohort (4 vs. 38 cases, OR 0.086, 95% CI 0.03-0.23). We conclude that in the absence of mifepristone, misoprostol alone is preferable to the ethacridine regimen for the termination of pregnancy in the second trimester, because it works faster, has a higher success rate in a shorter period of time, and fewer complications. PMID:18772100

Boza, Alejandro Velazco; de León, Rodolfo Gómez Ponce; Castillo, Luis Salas; Mariño, Dania Rebeca Yi; Mitchell, Ellen M H

2008-05-01

72

Misoprostol Preferable to Ethacridine Lactate for Abortions at 13–20 Weeks of Pregnancy: Cuban Experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Outdated second trimester abortion methods are still being used in some countries, and very few studies have compared them to currently recommended methods. To this end, we studied the efficacy and safety of vaginal misoprostol used alone for abortions in 189 women at 13–20 weeks gestation, in 2004–2006. We also retrospectively collated similar data from an historical cohort of 189

Alejandro Velazco Boza; Rodolfo Gómez Ponce de León; Luis Salas Castillo; Dania Rebeca Yi Mariño; Ellen MH Mitchell

2008-01-01

73

Safety of misoprostol as a cervical ripening agent in vaginal birth after cesarean delivery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: In women who underwent vaginal birth after cesarean delivery (VBAC), we assessed the risk of uterine rupture and other complications in those who received misoprostol and oxytocin (M+O) compared with two other groups: VBAC patients who had spontaneous labor (SL) and those who received oxytocin alone (OA).Methods: From 1996 to 1999, we compared risks for fetal and maternal complications

Victor Nwachuku; Antonio Sison; Carlene Quashie; Andrew Chau; Sze-Ya Yeh

2001-01-01

74

Safety of misoprostol as a cervical ripening agent in vaginal birth after cesarean section  

Microsoft Academic Search

In women who underwent vaginal birth after cesarean section (VBAC), we assessed the risk of uterine rupture in those who received misoprostol and oxytocin (M+O) compared with that in two other groups—VBAC patients who had spontaneous labor (SL) and those who received oxytocin alone (OA). From 1996 to 1999, we compared risks for fetal and maternal complications, including uterine rupture,

Victor Nwachuku; Antonio Sison; Carlene Quashie; Andrew Chau; Sze-Ya Yeh

2001-01-01

75

Uterine Rupture Associated with Vaginal Birth after Cesarean Section: A Complication of Intravaginal Misoprostol?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intravaginal misoprostol has become increasingly employed for labor induction among patients with an unfavorable Bishop’s score. Almost all of the reported studies have specifically excluded patients with prior uterine surgery. There has been, therefore, very little information concerning its usage among patients attempting vaginal birth after cesarean section. We report a patient with two prior low transverse uterine incisions who

Robert B. Gherman; Susan McBrayer; Joseph Browning

2000-01-01

76

A comparison of misoprostol with and without laminaria tents for induction of second-trimester abortion  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to determine whether intracervical placement of laminaria tents would improve the effectiveness of the prostaglandin analog misoprostol for the elective termination of pregnancies in the second trimester. STUDY DESIGN: Sixty-eight women between 12 and 22 weeks of gestation with either an intrauterine fetal death (n = 40) or medical or genetic indications for pregnancy termination (n

John K. Jain; Daniel R. Mishell

1996-01-01

77

Misoprostol hepatoprotection against ischemia-reperfusion-induced liver injury in the rat  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hepatoprotective effects of misoprostol, a PGE1 analog, against ischemiareperfusion liver injury were studied using a rat partial liver ischemia model. Serum ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OCT) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels were determined as biochemical indices of injury. Hepatic cell necrosis was assessed histologically using tetranitroblue tetrazolium (TNBT) and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. With placebo treatment, 90 min of partial

Sook Ping Lim; Fiona J. Andrews; Chris Christophi; Paul E. O'Brien

1992-01-01

78

Misoprostol but not antacid prevents endotoxin-induced gastric mucosal injury  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many of the complications of septic shock are believed to be a consequence of elevated circulating levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF), which is an important mediator of tissue injury. Prostaglandins (PGs) of the E series have recently been reported to inhibit TNF productionin vitro. We investigated thein vivo effect of misoprostol, a PGE1 analog, on endotoxin-induced gastric mucosal injury

Mahendra Mahatma; Naurang Agrawal; Esam Z. Dajani; Steve Nelson; Chester nakamura; John Sitton

1991-01-01

79

Effect of longterm misoprostol coadministration with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: a histological study.  

PubMed Central

Prostaglandins are widely used in the prevention and healing of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) induced gastric and duodenal ulcers, but their longterm effect on the human gastric mucosa is unknown. This study assessed the effect of coadministration of prostaglandins with NSAIDs on the histology of the gastroduodenal mucosa. Histological appearances (using the Sydney system) of gastric biopsy specimens from 180 patients receiving longterm NSAID treatment of whom 90 had been receiving misoprostol (400-800 micrograms/day) for one to two years were studied. Both groups of patients were comparable with regard to clinical and demographic details. There was no significant difference (p > 0.1) in the prevalence of chronic gastritis (total, corpus or antrum only) between patients receiving (36 of 90 (40%)) or not receiving misoprostol (35 of 90 (39%)). Chronic gastritis was equally associated with the presence of Helicobacter pylori, 86% and 73% (p > 0.1), respectively, in the two groups. Significantly fewer patients receiving misoprostol had reactive gastritis than those receiving only NSAIDs (8 (9%) versus 27 (30%), p < 0.01). Reactive gastritis was not associated with H pylori. Thirty nine (43%) of the misoprostol treated patients had normal histology compared with 16 (18%) receiving only NSAIDs (p < 0.01). These results show two different patterns of gastric damage in patients receiving NSAIDs, namely chronic and reactive gastritis. Misoprostol treatment was associated with a significantly reduced prevalence of reactive gastritis and it is suggested that this, along with its antisecretory action, may explain the reduced prevalence of gastroduodenal lesions when coadministered with NSAIDs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7557567

Shah, K; Price, A B; Talbot, I C; Bardhan, K D; Fenn, C G; Bjarnason, I

1995-01-01

80

Monitoring the Reprocessed Flux in MCG-5-23-16 with ASCA and XTE  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents a final technical report and summary of research on Monitoring the Reprocessed Flux in MCG-5-23-16 with ASCA (Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics) and XTE (X Ray Timing Explorer).

Weaver, Kimberly Ann

1998-01-01

81

Iron K Reverberation In Mcg-5-23-16  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

X-ray reverberation has emerged recently as a powerful tool to probe the environs of black holes. X-ray radiation emitted close to the black hole is seen directly and through reflection off the dense surrounding matter. A time delay is expected in the variability of these two components. Careful analysis of these lags, their change with energy and time- scale is offering a new tool to learn about the enigmatic black hole surroundings. This proposal aims to study iron K reverberation in MCG-5-23-16, an optimally bright and variable AGN. Using data from our recently accepted proposal to observe the source for 300 ks, we will: 1- measure time-scale and energy-dependent time lags (using a recently developed maximum likelihood technique). 2- study the detailed broadband X-ray spectrum. This will allow us to constrain the emission region by directly measuring light-crossing time differences. Detailed lag-energy spectra in at least three time-scales will allow us to probe the structure of the inner accretion disk in an unprecedented manner that is independent and complementary to pure spectroscopy. The work in the project directly addresses one of the questions in NASA science goals in Astrophysics: 'How do matter, energy, space and time behave under the extraordinary conditions of the cosmos?'. In particular, the project has the objective understanding the nature of gravity at its extreme through black holes and their environments.

Zoghbi, Abderahmen

82

One year follow-up of patients treated with misoprostol in acute phase of viral hepatitis B  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study was undertaken to determine the long-term effect of misoprostol, on hepatitis B virus (HBV) elimination in patients treated during acute phase of viral hepatitis B. Forty male patients were evaluated 12 months after treatment with misoprostol (M-group) or sylimarin (S-group). HBsAg clearance, as an indicator of HBV elimination, and serum bilirubin concentration, prothrombin index, and activities of alanine

Robert Flisiak; Danuta Prokopowicz

2000-01-01

83

Investigations of sensitivity and resolution of ECG and MCG in a realistically shaped thorax model.  

PubMed

Solving the inverse problem of electrocardiography (ECG) and magnetocardiography (MCG) is often referred to as cardiac source imaging. Spatial properties of ECG and MCG as imaging systems are, however, not well known. In this modelling study, we investigate the sensitivity and point-spread function (PSF) of ECG, MCG, and combined ECG+MCG as a function of source position and orientation, globally around the ventricles: signal topographies are modelled using a realistically-shaped volume conductor model, and the inverse problem is solved using a distributed source model and linear source estimation with minimal use of prior information. The results show that the sensitivity depends not only on the modality but also on the location and orientation of the source and that the sensitivity distribution is clearly reflected in the PSF. MCG can better characterize tangential anterior sources (with respect to the heart surface), while ECG excels with normally-oriented and posterior sources. Compared to either modality used alone, the sensitivity of combined ECG+MCG is less dependent on source orientation per source location, leading to better source estimates. Thus, for maximal sensitivity and optimal source estimation, the electric and magnetic measurements should be combined. PMID:25365547

Mäntynen, Ville; Konttila, Teijo; Stenroos, Matti

2014-12-01

84

Chronic effects of misoprostol in combination with the NSAID, diclofenac, on gastrointestinal tract of pigs  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine the mode of protective effects of misoprostol against the chronic gastrointestinal ulceration from the NSAID, diclofenac, studies were undertaken in domestic pigs, a model of human gastrointestinal ulceration, to determine (1) the effects of repeated daily dosing for 10 days of diclofenac 5 mg\\/kg\\/day twice a day (as Voltaren tablets) on the gastrointestinal morphology,59Fe-red blood loss, mucosal myeloperoxidase

K. D. Rainsford; W. E. Perkins; P. I. Stetsko

1995-01-01

85

Treatment of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug-induced gastric ulcers with misoprostol  

Microsoft Academic Search

One hundred sixty-two patients chronically ingesting ibuprofen, piroxicam, or naproxen for osteoarthritis, who had abdominal pain and an endoscopically proven gastric ulcer were evaluated for eight weeks in a randomized, double-blind trial comparing misoprostol (200 µg four times daily with meals and at bedtime) (N=77) with placeboN=85). Patients discontinued their usual daily dose of antiarthritic medication throughout the study period,

Richard Jaszewski; David Y. Graham; Scott C. Stromatt

1992-01-01

86

Claims of misoprostol use based on blood sampling should be viewed with skepticism.  

PubMed

Efforts to prosecute women for induced abortion have included allegations that misoprostol was found in body fluids. These claims, however, are questionable owing to the timing of specimen collection for accurate results, the scarcity and expense of validated assays, and the onerous lab procedures required to determine the presence of the substance. Adequate scrutiny should be applied each time such a claim is made. PMID:25220862

Frye, Laura J; Winikoff, Beverly; Meckstroth, Karen

2014-11-01

87

New hope: community-based misoprostol use to prevent postpartum haemorrhage.  

PubMed

The wide gap in maternal mortality ratios worldwide indicates major inequities in the levels of risk women face during pregnancy. Two priority strategies have emerged among safe motherhood advocates: increasing the quality of emergency obstetric care facilities and deploying skilled birth attendants. The training of traditional birth attendants, a strategy employed in the 1970s and 1980s, is no longer considered a best practice. However, inadequate access to emergency obstetric care and skilled birth attendants means women living in remote areas continue to die in large numbers from preventable maternal causes. This paper outlines an intervention to address the leading direct cause of maternal mortality, postpartum haemorrhage. The potential for saving maternal lives might increase if community-based birth attendants, women themselves, or other community members could be trained to use misoprostol to prevent postpartum haemorrhage. The growing body of evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of misoprostol for this indication raises the question: if achievement of the fifth Millennium Development Goal is truly a priority, why can policy makers and women's health advocates not see that misoprostol distribution at the community level might have life-saving benefits that outweigh risks? PMID:22879523

Prata, Ndola; Passano, Paige; Bell, Suzanne; Rowen, Tami; Potts, Malcolm

2013-07-01

88

Misoprostol-induced radioprotection of Syrian hamster embryo cells in utero from cell death and oncogenic transformation  

SciTech Connect

Misoprostol, a PGE analog, is an effective radioprotector of murine intestine and hematopoietic and hair cell renewal systems. The radioprotective nature of misoprostol was extended to examine its ability to influence clonogenic cell survival and induction of oncogenic transformation in Syrian hamster embryo cells exposed to X rays in utero and assayed in vitro. Hamsters in their 12th day of pregnancy were injected subcutaneously with misoprostal, and 2 h later the pregnant hamsters were exposed to graded doses of X rays. Immediately after irradiation, hamsters were euthanized and embryonic tissue was explanted into culture dishes containing complete growth medium. After a 2-week incubation period, clongenic cell survival and morphologically transformed foci were determined. Survival of misoprostol-treated SHE cells was increased and yielded a dose reduction factor of 1.5 compared to SHE cells treated with X rays alone. In contrast, radiation-induced oncogenic transformation of misoprostol-treated cells was reduced by a factor of 20 compared to cells treated with X rays alone. These studies suggest that misoprostol not only protects normal tissues in vivo from acute radiation injury, but also protects cells, to a large extent, from injury leading to transforming events. 26 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Miller, R.C.; LaNasa, P.; Hanson, W.R. [Loyola Univ., Maywood, IL (United States)

1994-07-01

89

Comparative efficacy and safety of vaginal misoprostol versus dinoprostone vaginal insert in labor induction at term: a randomized trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  To compare efficacy and safety of vaginal misoprostol (PGE1 analog) with dinoprostone (PGE2 analog) vaginal insert for labor induction in term pregnancies.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Study design  A total of 112 women with singleton pregnancies of ?37 weeks of gestation, and low Bishop scores underwent labor induction.\\u000a The subjects were randomized to receive either 50 ?g misoprostol intravaginally every 4 h to a maximum of five doses

Sebiha Özkan; Eray Çal??kan; Emek Do?er; ?zzet Yücesoy; Semih Özeren; Birol Vural

2009-01-01

90

Hypertension and oral contraceptives.  

PubMed

Large prospective epidemiologic studies have shown that long-term use of oral contraceptives containing estrogen induce an increase in blood pressure and sharply increase the risk of hypertension. Susceptibility to the hypertensive effects of oral contraceptives is heightened where risk factors such as age, family history of hypertension, preexisting or occult renal disease, parity and obesity exist. Hypertension among pill users usually develops within the first 6 months of usage and occasionally is delayed for as long as 6 years. Anitihypertensive therapy is seldom needed as the hypertension that developes is generally mild and uncomplicated, and rapidly reverses when the pills are discontinued. However, a small percentage of patients develop severe, even life-threatening hypertension and the hypertensive effects are felt long after the pills are discontinued. Cases of malignant hypertension and irreversible renal failure requiring maintenance hemodialysis, bilateral nephrectomy, and renal transplantation have occurred following administration of oral contraceptive pills. The mechanism by which oral pills induce hypertension in susceptible women is not known and needs further research. Before oral contraceptives are prescribed, physicians should take a careful history and perform a detailed physicial examination with special attention to the cardiovascular system. Multiple blood pressure measurements should be made and routine laboratory studies including urinalysis, blood urea and nitrogen and serum creatinine should be performed. It is preferable to start with a relatively low (50 mcg) estrogenic content preparation. Patients who develop hypertension (diastolic pressure, 90 mm Hg) on oral contraceptives should stop taking the pills immediately, and should be considered to have estrogen-induced hypertension. They should never again receive estrogen-containing oral pills, although they can try pills containing only progestogen. There is no contraindication to pregnancy in these patients, as most women who become hypertensive on oral pills go on to have normotensive pregnancies. Pregnancy in women who are susceptible to essential hypertension however should be treated as high risk. PMID:12263383

Oparil, S

1981-04-01

91

ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in MCG-01-60-044  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from both the quadruple 14-cm "Brutus" telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii and the double 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, towards the galaxy MCG-01-60-044:

Stanek, K. Z.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Davis, A. B.; Shappee, B. J.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Brimacombe, J.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.

2014-08-01

92

ASAS-SN Discovery of a Likely Supernova in MCG+06-29-001  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Brutus" telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii, we discovered a new transient source, probably a supernova, in the outskirts of MCG+06-29-001 Object RA (J2000) DEC (J2000) Disc. ...

Shappee, B. J.; Brimacombe, J.; Stanek, K. Z.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Jencson, J.; Basu, U.; Davis, B.; Beacom, J. F.; Prieto, J. L.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.; Bersier, D.

2014-05-01

93

Resolvability of MUSIC algorithm in solving multiple-dipole biomagnetic localization from spatiotemporal MCG data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The MUSIC (Multiple Signal Classification) algorithm is a recently proposed method in solving multiple dipole localization problem from spatio-temporal magnetocardiograph (MCG) data. There are many factors that may effect the resolvability of MUSIC method in solving MCG inverse problem. For example, the number and space arrangement of sensors, the signal-noise ratio of measurement data, the relative position of dipole to the sensors, the direction of dipole. In the case of multiple dipoles are assumed, the distance and time correlation between the dipoles may take a great effect on the solution accuracy. We need a quantitative method of evaluate the resolvability of MUSIC algorithm. In this paper spherically symmetric conductor model is applied as the forward model. The statistical performance of the MUSIC algorithm is discussed by using the MUSIC error covariance matrix. The Cramer-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB) on localization errors for MCG current source dipole models is presented. The performance of MUSIC algorithm is compared with the ultimate performance corresponding to CRLB. The numerical studies with simulated MCG data are presented in two cases: one dipole is assumed and two dipoles are assumed.

Chen, Jiange; Niki, Noboru; Nakaya, Yutaka; Nishitani, Hiroshi; Kang, Y. M.

1998-06-01

94

A incidência de anomalias ortopédicas em portadores da seqüência de Möbius e sua associação com o uso do misoprostol * Prevalence of orthopedic abnormalities in patients with Möbius Sequence and its association to the use of misoprostol  

Microsoft Academic Search

Möbius Sequence (MS) consists in the congenital paralysis of the VI and VII cranial pairs, and its etiology may be associated to the use of misoprostol as an abortive agent. Objective: To RESUMO Objetivo: Descrever as anomalias ortopédicas em porta- dores de SM, investigando possível associação de tais alte- rações entre casos em que as mães não usaram misopros- tol

BRANDÃO VAZ DE ALMEIDA; CARLOS TEIXEIRA BRANDT; JAIRO DE ANDRADE LIMA; EPITÁCIO LEITE; ROLIM FILHO; HENRIQUE ALVES; MALHEIROS JÚNIOR; VANESSA VAN DER LINDEN; EDUARDO DUQUE

95

Demonstration of specific E-type prostaglandin receptors using enriched preparations of canine parietal cells and (/sup 3/H)misoprostol free acid  

SciTech Connect

High-affinity, E-type prostaglandin binding sites in enriched canine parietal cell preparations were identified with (/sup 3/H) misoprostol free acid, a prostaglandin E1 analogue. Saturable, reversible, and highly stereospecific binding was identified, with approximately 8000 binding sites per cell. Prostaglandin I and F bound weakly, and cimetidine and histamine did not bind. The results indicate that (/sup 3/H) misoprostol free acid binds to E-type prostaglandin receptors, which suggests that the ulcer-healing inhibition of gastric acid secretion by misoprostol results from its interaction with a specific E-type prostaglandin receptor.

Tsai, B.S.; Kessler, L.K.; Schoenhard, G.; Collins, P.W.; Bauer, R.F.

1987-07-27

96

A 3-D model-based registration approach for the PET, MR and MCG cardiac data fusion.  

PubMed

In this paper, a new approach is presented for the assessment of a 3-D anatomical and functional model of the heart including structural information from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and functional information from positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetocardiography (MCG). The method uses model-based co-registration of MR and PET images and marker-based registration for MRI and MCG. Model-based segmentation of MR anatomical images results in an individualized 3-D biventricular model of the heart including functional parameters from PET and MCG in an easily interpretable 3-D form. PMID:12946476

Mäkelä, Timo; Pham, Quoc Cuong; Clarysse, Patrick; Nenonen, Jukka; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Sipilä, Outi; Hänninen, Helena; Lauerma, Kirsi; Knuuti, Juhani; Katila, Toivo; Magnin, Isabelle E

2003-09-01

97

Acute intestinal injury induced by acetic acid and casein: prevention by intraluminal misoprostol  

SciTech Connect

Acute injury was established in anesthetized rabbits by intraluminal administration of acetic acid with and without bovine casein, into loops of distal small intestine. Damage was quantified after 45 minutes by the blood-to-lumen movement of {sup 51}Cr-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-tagged bovine serum albumin as well as luminal fluid histamine levels. The amount of titratable acetic acid used to lower the pH of the treatment solutions to pH 4.0 was increased by the addition of calcium gluconate. Luminal acetic acid caused a 19-fold increase in {sup 51}Cr-EDTA accumulation over saline controls; casein did not modify this effect. In saline controls, loop fluid histamine levels bordered on the limits of detection (1 ng/g) but were elevated 19-fold by acetic acid exposure and markedly increased (118-fold) by the combination of acid and casein. Intraluminal misoprostol (3 or 30 micrograms/mL), administered 30 minutes before acetic acid, significantly attenuated the increase in epithelial permeability (luminal {sup 51}Cr-EDTA, fluorescein isothiocyanate-bovine serum albumin accumulation) and histamine release (P less than 0.05). Diphenhydramine, alone or in combination with cimetidine, and indomethacin (5 mg/kg IV) were not protective. It is concluded that exposure of the epithelium to acetic acid promotes the transepithelial movement of casein leading to enhanced mast cell activation and mucosal injury. Damage to the epithelial barrier can be prevented by misoprostol.

Miller, M.J.; Zhang, x.J.; Gu, x.A.; Clark, D.A. (Department of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University School of Medicine, New Orleans (USA))

1991-07-01

98

Cellulase production in continuous and fed-batch culture by Trichoderma reesei MCG80  

Microsoft Academic Search

Continuous culture of Natick's strain MCG80 of Trichoderma reesei at a dilution rate of 0.028 h⁻¹ has yielded a cellulase titer of over 61 U\\/mL using 5% lactose as the sole carbon source. Enzyme productivity at this dilution rate is 168 IU\\/L\\/h. Repeated fed-batch cultures using this strain on lactose as the carbon source have titers of 10 IU\\/mL with

A. L. Allen; R. E. Andreotti

1982-01-01

99

Prevention of NSAID-Associated Gastroduodenal Injury in Healthy Volunteers-A Randomized, Double-Blind, Multicenter Study Comparing DA-9601 with Misoprostol  

PubMed Central

In addition to inhibiting cyclooxygenase and prostaglandin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may cause gastroduodenal injuries due to reactive oxygen species produced by recruited inflammatory cells. DA-9601 is a novel antioxidant with anti-inflammatory and cyto-protective effects. This study was conducted to compare the efficacy and safety of DA-9601 with misoprostol for preventing NSAID-associated gastroduodenal injury. In this randomized, double-blind, multicenter, noninferiority trial we compared the extents of protection of gastric and duodenal mucosae by endoscopy after 4 weeks of treatment with DA-9601 60 mg or misoprostol 200 µg three times daily, in subjects with normal baseline endoscopic findings who received an NSAID twice daily for 4 weeks. A total of 266 subjects were randomized to treatment. At week 4, the gastric protection rates with DA-9601 and misoprostol were 85.1% and 95.2%, respectively; the difference between the groups was -10.1% (var = 0.001), which was shown to indicate noninferiority of DA-9601 compared to misoprostol. Adverse events were lower in the DA-9601 group, 56.4% (95% CI, 48.0%-64.8%) than in the misoprostol group, 69.2% (95% CI, 61.3%-77.0%) (P = 0.031). DA-9601 is not inferior to misoprostol for preventing NSAID-associated gastroduodenal injury, and superior to it with respect to treatment-related side effects. PMID:21860559

Lee, Kang Nyeong; Lee, Oh Young; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Choi, Seok Reyol; Lee, Dong Ho; Lee, Yong Chan; Kim, Tae Nyeun; Choi, Suck Chei; Rew, Jong Sun

2011-01-01

100

A Case of Toxic Shock due to Clandestine Abortion by Misoprostol self-administration.  

PubMed

Maternal mortality and morbidity are the leading causes of death and illness, respectively, among women of reproductive age in many countries throughout the world. Of all maternal deaths, those related to unsafe abortions are the most widely underestimated, but they are also the most largely preventable. Medical abortion is a safe and reliable method for termination of a pregnancy in early gestation, although it is important to be aware of signs and symptoms of severe infection and toxic shock syndrome after the medical termination of pregnancy; case studies in literature are rarely fatal events. We report the first case of septic shock syndrome following a clandestine pregnancy termination with a misoprostol-only regimen (12 tablets 200 ?g each). Autopsy findings and histopathological examination proved that the woman died from septic shock. This case suggests to improve the forensic investigations in case of unsafe, often clandestine, abortion is suspected. PMID:25041279

Cittadini, Francesca; Loyola, Giovanni; Caradonna, Letizia; Minelli, Natalia; Rossi, Riccardo

2014-11-01

101

Herpes - oral  

MedlinePLUS

... HSV-2 is spread to the mouth during oral sex, causing oral herpes. Herpes viruses spread easily. You ... if someone has oral herpes. Do not have oral sex if you have oral herpes, especially if you ...

102

Second trimester abortion by laminaria followed by vaginal misoprostol or intrauterine prostaglandin F2?: a randomized trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intra-amniotic injection, as well as intravaginal application of prostaglandins, have been used to terminate second trimester pregnancies. There is as yet no consensus as to the most efficient protocol of such late abortions. Our goal was to compare the efficacy of intra-amniotic injection of prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2?) and intravaginal application of misoprostol in terminating second trimester pregnancies after pretreatment

B Paz; G Ohel; T Tal; S Degani; E Sabo; Z Levitan

2002-01-01

103

BeppoSAX observations of Mrk 509 and MCG +8-11-11  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

BeppoSAX observations of the Seyfert galaxies Mrk 509 and MCG +8-11-11 are presented. Earlier evidence of a soft excess in Mrk 509 is confirmed. This excess is found to be better represented by a power law than by a black body: with a photon slope Gamma_s of 2.5, its extrapolation matches the flux recorded in the far UV. An ASCA observation, which appeared to exclude the presence of the excess while showing instead evidence of a warm absorber, turns out to be compatible with the coexistence of the excess seen with BeppoSAX and of the warm absorber. The hard power law of Mrk 509 is seen for the first time to be affected by a cut-off at high energies, with an e-folding energy of about 70 keV. In MCG +8-11-11 the cut-off is found at about 170 keV, consistent within the combined errors with a previous estimate from a ASCA+OSSE/CGRO observation. In both objects the reflection component is clearly detected. In Mrk 509 its strength, together with that of the iron K line, indicates a solid angle Omega , subtended by the reprocessing gas in the accretion disk, much less than 2pi , but lacking a valid constraint on the inclination angle this evidence is not as convincing as that found with BeppoSAX in IC 4329A. In MCG +8-11-11 the same parameters are instead consistent with Omega =2pi , but the comparison with an ASCA observation, when the flux level was about 2.5 times weaker, suggests that a substantial fraction of the angle might be associated with gas farther out than the accretion disk.

Perola, G. C.; Matt, G.; Fiore, F.; Grandi, P.; Guainazzi, M.; Haardt, F.; Maraschi, L.; Mineo, T.; Nicastro, F.; Piro, L.

2000-06-01

104

Localization of an idiotope on the L chain dimer and intact IgG1 immunoglobulin from the patient Mcg.  

PubMed

A monoclonal anti-idiotype (M3.9) raised against the covalently linked Mcg lambda chain dimer binds with a similar affinity to the Mcg IgG immunoglobulin and covalent heterodimers of Mcg with other human L chains. Despite having identical amino acid sequences, the two light chains in the Mcg dimer adopt different conformations with monomer 1 acting as a heavy chain analog and monomer 2 behaving like a light chain component of an Fab. As the lambda chain in the Mcg IgG and at least one hybrid L chain dimer (Mcg X Weir) assumes a conformation similar to that of monomer 2 and the binding of anti-idiotype requires only the presence of a single Mcg lambda chain, we conclude that the idiotope is restricted to the monomer 2 type of the Mcg lambda chain conformational isomer. Cooperative binding of two molecules of rhodamine 123 in the main cavity of the Mcg dimer block the binding of the anti-idiotype whereas the binding of one molecule of bis(DNP)lysine has no significant effect on the idiotype-anti-idiotype system. Previous crystallographic analyses indicated that bound rhodamine 123 protrudes outside the rim while bis(DNP)lysine is completely immersed in the cavity. At high concns bis(DNP)lysine penetrates through the floor of the main cavity and forms a virtually irreversible complex with the dimer. Production of this complex is accompanied by conformational changes, which are presumed to be correlated with observed inhibition of binding with the anti-idiotype M3.9. Expression of the idiotope probably involves more than one linear sequence since reduction and alkylation of the intra- and inter-chain disulphide bonds in 8 M urea leads to a complete loss of binding of the anti-idiotype. The inhibition data suggest involvement of residues on or near the rim of the main cavity. Distribution of potential contact residues for rhodamine 123 is asymmetric only in the case of aspartic acid 97, which is located on the cavity rim in only one conformational isomer (monomer 2). The homologous residue in monomer 1 is directed away from the cavity and is unlikely to participate in the epitope recognized by M3.9. Attempts to define the epitope in more detail by simulation with multiple peptides have been initiated in collaboration with the laboratory of H. M. Geysen. PMID:3116412

Raison, R L; Edmundson, A B

1987-09-01

105

Is Low Dose Vaginal Misoprostol Better Than Dinoprostone Gel For Induction of Labor: A Randomized Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

Objective: To compare the efficacy and safety profile of low dose vaginal misoprostol with dinoprostone gel for induction of labor in term pregnancies. Methods: The study was conducted at Lady Hardinge Medical College and Smt Sucheta Kriplani Hospital on 100 pregnant women with term pregnancy after application of inclusion and exclusion criteria. The women were randomized in 2 groups of 50 women each. Group I received misoprostol 25?g at every six hour vaginally for a maximum of five doses for induction of labor; while group II received dinoprostone gel 0.5 mg every six hourly for a maximum of three doses. Maternal outcomes such as mode of delivery and induction delivery interval; and fetal outcomes such as APGAR score and incidence of NICU admission were assessed in both the groups. Statistical analysis was done using student t-test and chi-square test. Results: There was no significant difference in the mean induction to delivery interval in both the groups (14.32±0.13 hours in Group I and 14.92±0.18 hours in Group II, p=0.75), mode of delivery, indication of cesarean section and perinatal outcome. However, significant difference was observed in requirement of oxytocin augmentation in both the groups (32% in Group I and 68% in Group II, p=0.005). Conclusion: Vaginal misoprostol in low doses is similar in efficacy and safety to dinoprostone gel for cervical ripening and labor induction in term pregnancy. PMID:25386492

Agrawal, Swati; Puri, Manju; Nigam, Aruna; Kaur, Harvinder; Trivedi, Shubha Sagar

2014-01-01

106

The Infall of the MCG+10+24-117 Into the NGC 6338 Galaxy Cluster  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present preliminary results of an X-ray analysis of 47 ksec with the Chandra satellite aimed at the cluster NGC 6338. The hot ISM density profile of MCG+10+24-117 shows a sharp edge at about 6 kpc from its center in the direction of NGC 6338. The discontinuity is consistent with a cold front, where gradient factors of about 1.7 both in density and in gas temperature are measured with no significant radial pressure gradient. We argue that the front is due to an ram pressure stripping of the galaxy gas, caused by its subsonic motion through the surrounding intracluster medium.

Dupke, Renato A.; Martins, S.

2013-04-01

107

Cellulase production in continuous and fed-batch culture by Trichoderma reesei MCG80  

SciTech Connect

Continuous culture of Natick's strain MCG80 of Trichoderma reesei at a dilution rate of 0.028 h/sup -1/ has yielded a cellulase titer of over 61 U/mL using 5% lactose as the sole carbon source. Enzyme productivity at this dilution rate is 168 IU/L/h. Repeated fed-batch cultures using this strain on lactose as the carbon source have titers of 10 IU/mL with productivities in excess of 100 IU/L/h. 5 figures, 1 table.

Allen, A.L.; Andreotti, R.E.

1982-01-01

108

Cagen:. a Modern, PC Based Computer Modeling Tool for Explosive MCG Generators and Attached Loads  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We will describe the PC based computer program CAGEN. CAGEN models the performance of many varieties of Magneto-Cumulative-Generators (MCG) or Magnetic Flux Compression Generators (FCG) that are energized with High Explosive (HE). CAGEN models helical wound or coaxial types, which have HE on the interior. Any materials and any HE types may be used. The cylindrical radius of the windings (or outer conductor) and the radius of the armature may vary with axial position. Variable winding width, thickness, and pitch can be represented, and divided windings are allowed. The MHD equations are used to advance the diffusion of magnetic field into the conductors in order to compute resistance, melting, and contact effects. Magnetic pressure effects are included. The MCG model is treated as part of a lumped circuit, which includes the priming circuit, an opening fuse switch, an inline storage inductance, a transformer or a voltage dividing fuse, peaking-circuit, and several interesting load models. A typical problem will complete in a few seconds to a few minutes. Graphical input, run control, and analysis of results is provided by MathGraf, which is a CARE'N CO. application.

Chase, J. B.; Chato, D.; Peterson, G.; Pincosy, P.; Kiuttu, G. F.

2004-11-01

109

Automatic artifact component removal using a neural network in MCG signal.  

PubMed

An algorithm combining a neural network and a principal component analysis (PCA) is proposed to remove a pulse-type artifact which often occurs in the 61 channel MCG system installed at Samsung Medical Center in Seoul, Korea. In the proposed work, the acquired signal is first decomposed into components by the PCA, and the components corresponding to the artifact are identified and removed by the neural network. The neural network is an essential component in the automation procedure. Unlike existing artifact rejection algorithms, the proposed algorithm is on a component-by-component basis, and the restored signal is used for further processing once the artifact components are successfully removed. Seven parameters are extracted from each time-domain component and are used as the input to the neural network. They are maximum, minimum, peak-to-peak value, variance, mean, skewness, and kurtosis. In the experiments with volunteers, 97% of the decisions made by the neural network are identical to those by the human experts. Using the proposed technique, the artifact was successfully removed from the MCG signal. PMID:16012688

Ahn, C B; Lee, D H

2004-01-01

110

A two-component ionized reflection model of MCG--6-30-15  

E-print Network

Ionized reflection has often been considered as the explanation for the unusual Fe K variability observed in MCG--6-30-15. In this paper, we test this model using a 325 ks observation of MCG--6-30-15 by XMM-Newton and BeppoSAX. The data are fit between 2.5 and 80 keV with the constant density models of Ross & Fabian. The best fit ionized reflection model requires the Fe K line to be split into two reprocessing events: one from the inner disc to build up the red wing, and the other from the outer accretion disc to fit the blue horn. The implied geometry is a disc which becomes strongly warped or flared at large radii. A good fit was obtained with a solar abundance of iron and a reflection fraction (R) of unity for the inner reflector. The combination of the two reflection spectra can appear to have R>2 as required by the BeppoSAX data. The inner reflector has an ionization parameter \\log \\xi =3.8, but the outer one is neutral with an inner radius ~70 gravitational radii (r_g), corresponding to a light crossing time of about an hour for a 10^7 Msun black hole. Applying this model to time-resolved spectra shows that the inner reflector becomes more ionized as the source brightens. This reduces the strength of the red wing at high flux states. The X-ray source is constrained to arise from a narrow annulus at ~5 r_g, with only 6 per cent of the 2-10 keV flux due to the outer reprocessor. This amount of localized energy generation is extremely difficult to produce without resorting to other energy sources such as the black hole spin. In fact, all the Fe K models fit to XMM-Newton spectra of MCG--6-30-15 require a large increase in energy production at the inner edge of the accretion disc.

D. R. Ballantyne; S. Vaughan; A. C. Fabian

2003-02-14

111

A Variable Partial Covering Model for the Seyfert 1 Galaxy MCG -6-30-15  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a simple spectral model for the Seyfert 1 Galaxy MCG -6-30-15 that can explain most of the 1-40 keV spectral variation by a change of the partial covering fraction, similar to that proposed by Miller, Turner, and Reeves (2008, A&A, 483, 437). Our spectral model is composed of three continuum components: (1) a direct power-law component, (2) a heavily absorbed power-law component by mildly ionized intervening matter, and (3) a cold-disk reflection component far from the black hole with a moderate solid-angle (?/2? ? 0.3) accompanying a narrow fluorescent iron line. The first two components are affected by the surrounding thin highly ionized absorber with NH ? 1023.4 cm-2 and log ? ? 3.4. The heavy absorber in the second component is fragmented into many clouds, each of which is composed of radial zones with different ionization states and different column densities, a main body (NH ?1024.2 cm-2, log ? ? 1.6), an envelope (NH ? 1022.1 cm-2, log ? ? 1.9), and presumably a completely opaque core. Not only the intrinsic spectral shape of the X-ray source but also these parameters of the ionized absorbers are unchanged at all. The central X-ray source extends moderately, and its luminosity is not significantly variable. The observed flux and spectral variations are mostly explained by the variation of the geometrical partial covering fraction of the central source ranging from 0 (uncovered) to ˜0.63 by the intervening ionized clouds in the line of sight. The ionized iron K-edge of the heavily absorbed component explains most of the seemingly broad line-like features, a well-known spectral characteristic of MCG -6-30-15. The direct component and the absorbed one are negatively correlated, and their variations cancel out each other, so that the fractional spectral variation becomes the minimum at the iron-energy band; thus, another observational characteristic of MCG -6-30-15 is explained.

Miyakawa, Takehiro; Ebisawa, Ken; Inoue, Hajime

2012-12-01

112

Misoprostol Abortion: Ultrasonography versus Beta-hCG Testing for Verification of Effectiveness  

PubMed Central

Background and Objective: Miscarriage is a common complication of early pregnancy with medical and psychological consequences. Dilation and Curettage are considered as two standard caring ways for early pregnancy failure. Alternatively misoprostol has been used as a single agent for termination of early pregnancy. Aim of the present study was to compare the usefulness of serum ?-hCG measurement and ultrasound examination to predict complete abortion after medical induction. Methods: There were one hundred and thirty three patients experiencing missed abortion or blighted ovum. Ultrasound examination and serum ?-hCG test were performed before treatment and during follow-up in all these patients. Results: Treatment was successful without any need for surgical intervention in 92.4% of the cases. Both methods could verify the complete abortion among all the patients at the end of the study (4th week). Kappa agreement coefficient for the two methods of diagnosis was 0.327 (P < 0.5). Conclusion: Based on our results, ?- hCG is as effective as ultrasound in confirming a successful medically induced abortion in early pregnancy, but it should be used as supplements to clinical assessments. PMID:24550955

Behnamfar, Fariba; Mahdian, Mehrdad; Rahimi, Fereshteh; Samimi, Mansoureh

2013-01-01

113

Performance comparison of independent component analysis algorithms for fetal cardiac signal reconstruction: a study on synthetic fMCG data.  

PubMed

Independent component analysis (ICA) algorithms have been successfully used for signal extraction tasks in the field of biomedical signal processing. We studied the performances of six algorithms (FastICA, CubICA, JADE, Infomax, TDSEP and MRMI-SIG) for fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG). Synthetic datasets were used to check the quality of the separated components against the original traces. Real fMCG recordings were simulated with linear combinations of typical fMCG source signals: maternal and fetal cardiac activity, ambient noise, maternal respiration, sensor spikes and thermal noise. Clusters of different dimensions (19, 36 and 55 sensors) were prepared to represent different MCG systems. Two types of signal-to-interference ratios (SIR) were measured. The first involves averaging over all estimated components and the second is based solely on the fetal trace. The computation time to reach a minimum of 20 dB SIR was measured for all six algorithms. No significant dependency on gestational age or cluster dimension was observed. Infomax performed poorly when a sub-Gaussian source was included; TDSEP and MRMI-SIG were sensitive to additive noise, whereas FastICA, CubICA and JADE showed the best performances. Of all six methods considered, FastICA had the best overall performance in terms of both separation quality and computation times. PMID:16467594

Mantini, D; Hild, K E; Alleva, G; Comani, S

2006-02-21

114

Performance comparison of independent component analysis algorithms for fetal cardiac signal reconstruction: a study on synthetic fMCG data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Independent component analysis (ICA) algorithms have been successfully used for signal extraction tasks in the field of biomedical signal processing. We studied the performances of six algorithms (FastICA, CubICA, JADE, Infomax, TDSEP and MRMI-SIG) for fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG). Synthetic datasets were used to check the quality of the separated components against the original traces. Real fMCG recordings were simulated with linear combinations of typical fMCG source signals: maternal and fetal cardiac activity, ambient noise, maternal respiration, sensor spikes and thermal noise. Clusters of different dimensions (19, 36 and 55 sensors) were prepared to represent different MCG systems. Two types of signal-to-interference ratios (SIR) were measured. The first involves averaging over all estimated components and the second is based solely on the fetal trace. The computation time to reach a minimum of 20 dB SIR was measured for all six algorithms. No significant dependency on gestational age or cluster dimension was observed. Infomax performed poorly when a sub-Gaussian source was included; TDSEP and MRMI-SIG were sensitive to additive noise, whereas FastICA, CubICA and JADE showed the best performances. Of all six methods considered, FastICA had the best overall performance in terms of both separation quality and computation times.

Mantini, D.; Hild, K. E., II; Alleva, G.; Comani, S.

2006-02-01

115

Reconstruction of fetal cardiac vectors from multichannel fMCG data using recursively applied and projected multiple signal classification.  

PubMed

Previous attempts at unequivocal specification of signal strength in fetal magnetocardiographic (fMCG) recordings have used an equivalent current dipole (ECD) to estimate the cardiac vector at the peak of the averaged QRS complex. However, even though the magnitude of fetal cardiac currents are anticipated to be relatively stable, ECD-based estimates of signal strength show substantial and unrealistic variation when comparing results from different time windows of the same recording session. The present study highlights the limitations of the ECD model, and proposes a new methodology for fetal cardiac source reconstruction. The proposed strategy relies on recursive subspace projections to estimate multiple dipoles that account for the distributed myocardial currents. The dipoles are reconstructed from spatio-temporal fMCG data, and are subsequently used to derive estimators of the cardiac vector over the entire QRS. The new method is evaluated with respect to simulated data derived from a model of ventricular depolarization, which was designed to account for the complexity of the fetal cardiac source configuration on the QRS interval. The results show that the present methodology overcomes the drawbacks of conventional ECD fitting, by providing robust estimators of the cardiac vector. Additional evaluation with real fMCG data show fetal cardiac vectors whose morphology closely resembles that obtained in adult MCG. PMID:17153214

Popescu, Mihai; Popescu, Elena-Anda; Fitzgerald-Gustafson, Kathleen; Drake, William B; Lewine, Jeffrey D

2006-12-01

116

An Extended Multi-Zone Model for the MCG-6-30-15 Warm Absorber  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The variable warm absorber seen with ASCA in the X-ray spectrum of MCG 6-30-15 shows complex time behaviour in which the optical depth of O VIII anticorrelates with the flux whereas that of O VII is unchanging. The explanation in terms of a two zone absorber has since been challenged by BeppoSAX observations. These present a more complicated behaviour for the O VII edge. The explanation we offer for both ASCA and BeppoSAX observations requires a very simple photoionization model together with the presence of a third, intermediate, zone and a period of very low luminosity. In practice warm absorbers are likely to be extended, multi-zone regions of which only part causes directly observable absorption edges at any given time depending on the value of the luminosity.

Morales, R.; Fabian, A. C.; Reynolds, C. S.

2000-01-01

117

XMM-Newton observation of the bright Seyfert 1 galaxy, MCG+8-11-11  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the XMM-Newton observation of the bright Seyfert 1 galaxy, MCG+8-11-11. Data from the EPIC/p-n camera, the Reflection Gratings Spectrometers (RGS), and the Optical Monitor (OM) were analyzed. The p-n spectrum was fitted well by a power law, a spectrally unresolved Fe K? line, a Compton reflection component (whose high value, when compared to the iron line equivalent width, suggests iron underabundance), and absorption by warm material. Absorption lines are apparent in the RGS spectra, but their identification is uncertain and would require large matter velocities. The UV fluxes measured by the OM are well above the extrapolation of the X-ray spectrum, indicating the presence of a UV bump.

Matt, G.; Bianchi, S.; de Rosa, A.; Grandi, P.; Perola, G. C.

2006-01-01

118

Electro-mechanical imaging of the heart using tagged MRI and ECG/MCG arrays.  

PubMed

We develop a computational framework for estimating simultaneously mechanical properties (active stress, passive elasticities, and mechanical activation time) and electrical properties (current density and electrical activation time.) First, we present a method for estimating the mechanical properties, active stress and passive elasticity modulus, of the in vivo heart using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tissue-tagging and intra-ventricular pressure measurements. Next, we present an algorithm for estimating the current density of the heart using electrocardiography (ECG) and magnetocardiography (MCG) sensor arrays. Finally, we present an inverse electro-mechanical model based on the excitation-contraction coupling and dynamic analysis which includes inertial forces and moving mesh. The proposed model has significant potential for studying the coupling effects in the whole heart. PMID:17271851

Jeremic, Aleksandar; Nehorai, Arye

2004-01-01

119

X-RAY ABSORPTION ANALYSIS OF MCG -6-30-15: DISCERNING THREE KINEMATIC SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

By analyzing the X-ray spectrum of MCG -6-30-15 obtained with the High Energy Transmission Grating (HETGS) spectrometer on board the Chandra observatory, we identify three kinematically distinct absorption systems; two outflow components intrinsic to MCG -6-30-15, and one local at z = 0. The slow outflow at -100 +- 50 km s{sup -1} has a large range of ionization manifested by absorption from 24 different charge states of Fe, which enables a detailed reconstruction of the absorption measure distribution (AMD). This AMD spans 5 orders of magnitude in ionization parameter: -1.5 < log xi < 3.5 (erg s{sup -1} cm), with a total column density of N{sub H} = (5.3 +- 0.7) x 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}. The fast outflow at -1900 +- 150 km s{sup -1} has a well-defined ionization parameter with log xi = 3.82 +- 0.03 (erg s{sup -1} cm) and column density N{sub H} = 8.1 +- 0.7 x 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}. Assuming this component is a thin, uniform, spherical shell, it can be estimated to lie within 11 light days of the active galactic nucleus center. The third component, most clearly detected in the lower oxygen charge states O{sup +1}-O{sup +6}, has been confused in the past with the fast outflow, but is identified here with local gas (z = 0) and a total column density N{sub H} of a few 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2}. Finally, we exploit the excellent spectral resolution of the HETGS and use the present spectrum to determine the rest-frame wavelengths of oxygen inner-shell lines that were previously uncertain.

Holczer, Tomer [Department of Physics, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Behar, Ehud [Code 662, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Arav, Nahum, E-mail: tomer@physics.technion.ac.i, E-mail: behar@physics.technion.ac.i, E-mail: arav@vt.ed [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

2010-01-10

120

A Chandra-HETG View of MCG +8-11-11  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a spectral analysis of the 118 ks Chandra High Energy Transmission Gratings (HETG) observation of the X-ray bright Seyfert 1.5 galaxy MCG +8-11-11, in conjunction with 100 ks of archival Suzaku data, aimed at investigating the signatures of warm absorption and Compton reflection reported from previous Suzaku and XMM-Newton studies of the source. Contrary to previous results, we find that warm absorption is not required by the data. Instead, we report upper limits on absorption lines that are below previous (marginal) detections. Fe K? line emission is clearly detected and is likely resolved with ? ~ 0.02 keV with the HETG data. We applied self-consistent, broadband spectral-fitting models to the Chandra and Suzaku data to investigate this and other signatures of distant absorption and reflection. Utilizing in particular the MYTorus model, we find that the data are consistent with reprocessing by a distant, neutral torus that is marginally Compton-thick ( N H ~1024cm–2) and out of the line of sight. However, we do not find compelling evidence of a relativistically broadened Fe K emission line, which is often expected from type 1 active galactic nuclei. This is consistent with some, although not all, previous studies of MCG +8-11-11. A well-measured edge is identified by the HETG near 0.5 keV, indicating neutral absorption in the line of sight that is consistent with galactic absorption; however, the absorption may be partially intrinsic to the source. The HETG data are consistent with the presence of a soft excess, a feature that may be missed by considering the Suzaku data alone.

Murphy, K. D.; Nowak, M. A.

2014-12-01

121

Hubble Space Telescope images of the Seyfert galaxies NGC 5929 and MCG 8-11-11  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present the initial results of a program to obtain high resolution images of Seyfert galaxies with the Planetary Camera aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). In this paper we discuss the images of the type 2 Seyfert NGC 5929 and the type 1.5 Seyfert MCG 8-11-11 (= UGC 3374). The images were obtained in the emission lines of (O III) lambda lambda 4959 and 5007 A and H alpha + (N II) lambda lambda 6548 and 6583 A and their adjacent continua. The high-excitation gas in the narrow line region (NLR) of NGC 5929 is resolved into individual clouds in the central 1 sec .5. Although the (O III) emission is clearly not spherically symmetric with respect to the nucleus, it does not define a distinct 'bicone' morphology, as observed by the HST in a few other Seyfert galaxies. We find no direct evidence for the reddening and/or obscuration effects characteristic of a dusty torus, which, in the context of 'unified models', is expected to obscure the active galactic nucleus (AGN) in type 2 Seyfert galaxies. The correspondence between the emission line gas and the radio morphology suggests that the structure of the NLR in NGC 5929 is governed by matter ejected from the AGN. A comparison of the recombination rate of hydrogen in the brightest emission line cloud with an upper limit on the ionizing luminosity emitted toward Earth provides no evidence that the central ionizing source radiates anisotropically. The images of MCG 8-11-11 show only an unresolved nuclear source. No emission line gas associated with the extended radio source is detected. We estimate upper limits on the intensity of extended line emission in this galaxy and examine their significance.

Bower, Gary A.; Wilson, Andrew S.; Mulchaey, John S.; Miley, George K.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Krolik, Julian H.

1994-01-01

122

Principal component analysis of MCG-06-30-15 with XMM-Newton  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We analyse the spectral variability of MCG-06-30-15 with 600 k s of XMM-Newton data, including 300 k s of new data from the joint XMM-Newton and NuSTAR 2013 observational campaign. We use principal component analysis to find high-resolution, model-independent spectra of the different variable components of the spectrum. We find that over 99 per cent of the variability can be described by just three components, which are consistent with variations in the normalization of the power-law continuum (˜97 per cent), the photon index (˜2 per cent) and the normalization of a relativistically blurred reflection spectrum (˜0.5 per cent). We also find a fourth significant component but this is heavily diluted by noise, and we can attribute all the remaining spectral variability to noise. All three components are found to be variable on time-scales from 20 down to 1 k s, which corresponds to a distance from the central black hole of less than 70 gravitational radii. We compare these results with those derived from spectral fitting, and find them to be in very good agreement with our interpretation of the principal components. We conclude that the observed relatively weak variability in the reflected component of the spectrum of MCG-06-30-15 is due to the effects of light-bending close to the event horizon of the black hole, and demonstrate that principal component analysis is an effective tool for analysing spectral variability in this regime.

Parker, M. L.; Marinucci, A.; Brenneman, L.; Fabian, A. C.; Kara, E.; Matt, G.; Walton, D. J.

2014-01-01

123

Oral Medication  

MedlinePLUS

... Size: A A A Listen En Español Oral Medication The first treatment for type 2 diabetes blood ... new — even over-the-counter items. Explore: Oral Medication How Much Do Oral Medications Cost? Save money ...

124

Polymeric delivery of the active isomer of misoprostol reduces systemic availability and uterotonic activity.  

PubMed

SC-30249 is the active isomer of misoprostol responsible for its mucosal protective effects against nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS). Linkage of SC-30249 to a polybutadiene polymer results in a delivery system (SC-55307) that releases the active component only under the acidic conditions of the stomach. This approach could be used to minimize side effects and systemic availability of synthetic prostaglandins. These studies were done to determine whether uterotonic activity could be recorded after treatment with SC-55307. Female beagles were implanted with uterine strain gauge force transducers, allowed 10 days for recovery and treated with estrogen to sensitize the uterus to the actions of prostaglandins. Base-line responses were determined with SC-30249, i.v., and then a randomized series of four treatments were given: SC-30249, IG, 10 micrograms/kg; SC-55307, IG, equivalent to 30 and 100 micrograms/kg of SC-30249; and a blank polymer control. HCI was given IG to provide an acid environment in the stomach, uterine responses were obtained for up to 4 h and plasma concentrations of SC-30249 free acid was determined. No uterotonic effect was seen after a low dose of SC-55307, whereas the high dose caused a brief but statistically significant increase equal to 8.8% and 17.8% of the responses to SC-30249, i.v. and IG, respectively. Peak plasma levels of SC-30249 free acid were 176.4 +/- 17.4 and 59.5 +/- 10.6 pg/ml after SC-30249, i.v. and IG, respectively, but were only 3.9 +/- 1.7 and 15.5 +/- 6.6 pg/ml after low and high doses of SC-55307, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7791082

Gullikson, G W; Loeffler, R F; Mehrotra, D V; Casler, J J; Bianchi, R G; Schmidt, R E; Khoshaba, N; Perkins, W E

1995-06-01

125

[The illegal market for gender-related drugs as portrayed in the Brazilian news media: the case of misoprostol and women].  

PubMed

This article analyzes how the Brazilian news media covers the illegal market for misoprostol, the main drug used to induce abortion. A total of 1,429 news stories were retrieved from 220 print and electronic media channels from 2004 to 2009. The analysis included 524 stories from 62 regional and national newspapers. Misoprostol appeared repeatedly in the news, but was usually approached from a criminal perspective, unlike abortion as a whole, which the Brazilian media routinely covers as a religious, political, and public health issue. Misoprostol is part of the illegal gender-related drug market, along with drugs for weight loss and erectile dysfunction and anabolic steroids. Sixty-four (12%) of the news stories told life histories of women who had aborted with misoprostol. The women's ages ranged from 13 to 46 years, and socioeconomic status was associated with different experiences with abortion. Three characters appeared in the women's abortion itineraries: girlfriends (confidantes), go-betweens, and physicians. Stories of late-stage abortion are confused with the criminal characterization of infanticide and provide the extreme cases in the media's narrative on abortion. PMID:21340108

Diniz, Debora; Castro, Rosana

2011-01-01

126

On the origin of the broad, relativistic iron line of MCG-6-30-15 observed by XMM-Newton  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The relativistic iron line profile recently observed by XMM-Newton in the spectrum of the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15 (Wilms et al. \\cite{Wilms01}) is discussed in the framework of the lamp-post model. It is shown that the steep disc emissivity, the large line equivalent width and the amount of Compton reflection can be self-consistently reproduced in this scenario.

Martocchia, A.; Matt, G.; Karas, V.

2002-03-01

127

A multi-wavelength study of the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15  

E-print Network

We present a multiwaveband spectroscopic study of the nearby Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15. New optical spectra from the Anglo-Australian Telescope are presented which clearly show the effects of dust extinction/reddening on both the emission line spectrum and the non-stellar AGN continuum. The reddening is constrained to be in the range E(B-V)=0.61-1.09. Spectroscopy in the X-ray band, with both ROSAT and ASCA, reveal absorption by the warm absorber but little or no neutral absorption expected to accompany the dust responsible for the optical reddening. The dusty warm absorber solution to this discrepancy is discussed and photoionization models of such warm absorbers are constructed. The optical spectrum also displays the relatively strong `coronal' lines of [FeX]6375, [FeXI]7892 and [FeXIV]5303. We show that these lines may plausibly originate from the outer regions of the warm absorber, although better calculations of the collision strengths for these transitions are required in order to conclusively address this issue. We also present new ultraviolet data from the International Ultraviolet Explorer and suggest that much of the observed UV flux is scattered into our line of sight (with a scattering fraction of 1-5 per cent). We conclude with a discussion of the global energetics of this system.

C. S. Reynolds; M. J. Ward; A. C. Fabian; A. Celotti

1997-07-14

128

Revealing the Dusty Warm Absorber in MCG--6-30-15 with the Chandra HETG  

E-print Network

We present detailed evidence for a warm absorber in the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG--6-30-15 and dispute earlier claims for relativistic O line emission. The HETG spectra show numerous narrow, unresolved (FWHM 5) O VII resonance lines, and a neutral Fe L absorption complex. The shape of the Fe L feature is nearly identical to that seen in the spectra of several X-ray binaries, and in laboratory data. The implied dust column density agrees with that obtained from reddening studies, and gives the first direct X-ray evidence for dust embedded in a warm absorber. The O VIII resonance lines and weak edge are also detected, and the spectral rollover below 2 keV is explained by the superposition of numerous absorption lines and edges. We identify, for the first time, a KLL resonance in the O VI photoabsorption cross section, giving a measure of the O VI column density. The O VII (f) emission detected at the systemic velocity implies a covering fraction of ~5% (depending on the observed vs. time-averaged ionizing flux). Our observations show that a dusty warm absorber model is not only adequate to explain all the spectral features > 0.48 keV (< 26 \\AA) the data REQUIRE it. This contradicts the interpretation of Branduardi-Raymont et al. (2001) that this spectral region is dominated by highly relativistic line emission from the vicinity of the black hole.

J. C. Lee; P. M. Ogle; C. R. Canizares; H. L. Marshall; N. S. Schulz; R. Morales; A. C. Fabian; K. Iwasawa

2001-01-04

129

Revealing the Warm Absorber in MCG--6-30-15 with the Chandra HETG  

E-print Network

We present detailed evidence for a warm absorber in the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG--6-30-15 and refute earlier claims for relativistic O line emission. The HETG spectra show numerous absorption lines from a wide range of ionization states of N, O, Mg, Ne, Si, S, Ar, Ca and Fe. The O VII edge and 1s^2--1snp resonance line series to n=9 are clearly detected at rest in the AGN frame. We attribute previous reports of an apparently highly redshifted O VII edge to the 1s^2--1snp (n > 5) O VII resonance lines, and a neutral Fe L absorption complex. The shape of the Fe L feature is nearly identical to that seen in the spectra of several X-ray binaries and gives the first direct X-ray evidence for dust embedded in a warm absorber. The O VIII resonance lines and weak edge are also detected, and the spectral rollover below ~ 2 keV is explained by the superposition of numerous absorption lines and edges. We identify, for the first time, a KLL resonance in the O VI photoabsorption cross section, giving a measure of the O VI col...

Lee, J C; Canizares, C R; Marshall, H L; Schulz, N S; Morales, R; Fabian, A C; Iwasawa, K

2001-01-01

130

The black hole and central stellar population of MCG-6-30-15  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the first near-IR integral field spectroscopy observations of the galaxy MCG-6-30-15. The H-band data studied in this paper cover the central 500 pc of the galaxy at the best resolution (0.1 arcsec) so far. The spectra of the innermost regions are dominated by broad Brackett series emission lines and non-stellar continuum, under which we are able to trace the distribution and kinematics of the stars and also the [Fe II] line emission. We find that there is a counter-rotating stellar core extending out to 125 pc, which appears to be associated with the [Fe II] emission. Based on the mass-to-light ratio, and the presence of this emission line, we estimate the age of the central stellar population to be of the order of 65 Myr. We show that the gas needed to fuel the black hole is, at most, only 1 per cent of that needed to form these stars. We derive independent constraints on the black hole mass using the dynamical information and determine an upper limit for the black hole mass, MBH < 6 × 107 M?, that is consistent with other estimates.

Raimundo, S. I.; Davies, R. I.; Gandhi, P.; Fabian, A. C.; Canning, R. E. A.; Ivanov, V. D.

2013-05-01

131

The changing X-ray time lag in MCG-6-30-15  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

MCG-6-30-15 is one of the most observed narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies in the X-ray band. In this paper, we examine the X-ray time lags in this source using a total of 600 ks in observations (440 ks exposure) taken with the XMM-Newton telescope (300 ks in 2001 and 300 ks in 2013). Both the old and new observations show the usual hard lag that increases with energy; however, the hard lag turns over to a soft lag at frequencies below ˜10-4 Hz. The highest frequencies (˜10-3 Hz) in this source show a clear soft lag, as previously presented for the first 300 ks observation, but no clear iron K lag is detected in either the old or new observation. The soft lag is more significant in the old observation than the new. The observations are consistent with a reverberation interpretation, where the soft, reflected emission is delayed with respect to the hard power-law component. These spectral timing results suggest that two distinct variability mechanisms are important in this source: intrinsic coronal variations (which lead to correlated variability in the reprocessed emission) and geometrical changes in the corona. Variability due to geometrical changes does not result in correlated variability in the reflection, and therefore inhibits the clear detection of an iron K lag.

Kara, E.; Fabian, A. C.; Marinucci, A.; Matt, G.; Parker, M. L.; Alston, W.; Brenneman, L. W.; Cackett, E. M.; Miniutti, G.

2014-11-01

132

Baseline drift removal and denoising of MCG data using EEMD: role of noise amplitude and the thresholding effect.  

PubMed

We adopt the Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) method, with an appropriate thresholding on the Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs), to denoise the magnetocardiography (MCG) signal. To this end, we discuss the two associated problems that relate to: (i) the amplitude of noise added to the observed signal in the EEMD method with a view to prevent mode mixing and (ii) the effect of direct thresholding that causes discontinuities in the reconstructed denoised signal. We then denoise the MCG signals, having various signal-to-noise ratios, by using this method and compare the results with those obtained by the standard wavelet based denoising method. We also address the problem of eliminating the high frequency baseline drift such as the sudden and discontinuous changes in the baseline of the experimentally measured MCG signal using the EEMD based method. We show that the EEMD method used for denoising and the elimination of baseline drift is superior in performance to other standard methods such as wavelet based techniques and Independent Component Analysis (ICA). PMID:25074650

Mariyappa, N; Sengottuvel, S; Parasakthi, C; Gireesan, K; Janawadkar, M P; Radhakrishnan, T S; Sundar, C S

2014-10-01

133

A computer model of human ventricular myocardium for simulation of ECG, MCG, and activation sequence including reentry rhythms.  

PubMed

A computer model is presented for simulation of the spread of activation and repolarization in ventricular myocardium. The program calculating the activation sequence is based on an algorithm similar to Huygen's principle of constructing wavefronts. Physiological parameters of the heart, such as areas of early activation on the endocardium, conduction velocity, anisotropy of propagation, duration of action potentials and refractory periods are taken into account. The time-course of ECG and MCG is calculated using the equations of the bidomain model. Simulation of pathologic cases of activation is performed through variation of the physiological heart parameters. The simulations presented here show good agreement of ECG and MCG with measurements in the normal case, the case of bundle branch block and abnormal repolarization. A special feature of the model is the possibility of simulating reentry rhythms following a premature stimulus in ventricular myocardium. Two kinds of reentry are simulated: reentry around an anatomical obstacle and the leading-circle model. The widespread capability for investigating not only ECG but also MCG and various kinds of pathologic activation patterns including reentry rhythms indicates that the model may be useful in studying numerous problems in cardiologic research. PMID:2818440

Wach, P; Killmann, R; Dienstl, F; Eichtinger, C

1989-01-01

134

A thin film magnetic field sensor of sub-pT resolution and magnetocardiogram (MCG) measurement at room temperature  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We developed a very sensitive high-frequency carrier-type thin film sensor with a sub-pT resolution using a transmission line. The sensor element consists of Cu conductor with a meander pattern (20 mm in length, 0.8 mm in width, and 18 ?m in thickness), a ground plane, and amorphous CoNbZr film (4 ?m in thickness). The amplitude modulation technique was employed to enhance the magnetic field resolution for measurement of the high-frequency field (499 kHz), a resolution of 7.10×10 -13 T/Hz 1/2 being achieved, when we applied an AC magnetic field at 499 kHz. The phase detection technique was applied for measurement of the low frequency field (around 1 Hz). A small phase change was detected using a dual mixer time difference method. A high phase change of 130°/Oe was observed. A magnetic field resolution of 1.35×10 -12 T/Hz 1/2 was obtained when a small AC field at 1 Hz was applied. We applied the sensor for magnetocardiogram (MCG) measurement using the phase detection technique. We succeeded in measuring the MCG signal including typical QRS and T waves, and compared the MCG with a simultaneously obtained conventional electrocardiogram (ECG) signal.

Yabukami, S.; Kato, K.; Ohtomo, Y.; Ozawa, T.; Arai, K. I.

2009-04-01

135

The intravaginal application of misoprostol improves induction of abortion with aglepristone.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to compare the clinical and endocrinological effects of four different treatments for the induction of abortion in bitches. For this purpose, 28 pregnant bitches between days 25 and 35 of gestation, were randomly assigned to four groups. In group I (n = 7), only aglepristone (AGL, 10mg/kg bw, two injections 24 h apart, s.c.) was administered. In group II (n = 7), AGL (as in group I), cabergolin (CAB, 5 ?g/kg, daily p.o., until completion of abortion) and misoprostol (MIS, 200 ?g for bitches with ? 20 kg bw, 400 ?g for bitches with > 20 kg bw, daily intravaginally, until completion of abortion) were administered. In group III (n = 7), AGL (as in group I) and MIS (as in group II) were administered. In group IV (n = 7) AGL, (as in group I) and cloprostenol (CLO, 1?g/kg bw, s.c., two injections 24 h apart with the AGL injections) were combined. In all groups, bitches were examined daily, clinically and ultrasonographically to monitor resorptions/abortions. To measure serum progesterone (P4) and total estrogen (TE) concentrations, blood samples were collected in all groups immediately after the first AGL administration and every other day until completion of abortion. No statistical differences were found between groups concerning the duration until completion of abortion following treatment (n.s.); however, in Group III, 6 d after the start of treatment all pregnancies were terminated whereas in Group I, II and IV, only 57.1% (4/7), 85.7 % (6/7) and 42.8 % (3/7) of pregnancies were terminated. In the latter groups, all pregnancies were terminated between days 8 and 10 after the start of treatment. In Group IV, P4 concentrations on days two and one before the beginning of abortion and the day the abortion started was significantly lower than in the other groups (P < 0.01). No statistical differences were found between groups for TE concentrations (P > 0.05). In Groups I, II and III, no severe side effects occurred. Severe vomiting after each treatment and until the end of abortion was observed in Group IV only. In conclusion, only when a combination of AGL and MIS was used abortion was completed within 6 d in all bitches whereas the additional use of CAB did not improve the treatment. PMID:21458052

Agaoglu, A R; Schäfer-Somi, S; Kaya, D; Kucukaslan, I; Emre, B; Gultiken, N; Mulaz?moglu, B S; Colak, A; Aslan, S

2011-07-01

136

Sublingual Misoprostol versus Intramuscular Oxytocin for Prevention of Postpartum Hemorrhage in Uganda: A Double-Blind Randomized Non-Inferiority Trial  

PubMed Central

Background Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a leading cause of maternal death in sub-Saharan Africa. Although the World Health Organization recommends use of oxytocin for prevention of PPH, misoprostol use is increasingly common owing to advantages in shelf life and potential for sublingual administration. There is a lack of data about the comparative efficacy of oxytocin and sublingual misoprostol, particularly at the recommended dose of 600 µg, for prevention of PPH during active management of labor. Methods and Findings We performed a double-blind, double-dummy randomized controlled non-inferiority trial between 23 September 2012 and 9 September 2013 at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital in Uganda. We randomized 1,140 women to receive 600 µg of misoprostol sublingually or 10 IU of oxytocin intramuscularly, along with matching placebos for the treatment they did not receive. Our primary outcome of interest was PPH, defined as measured blood loss ?500 ml within 24 h of delivery. Secondary outcomes included measured blood loss ?1,000 ml; mean measured blood loss at 1, 2, and 24 h after delivery; death; requirement for blood transfusion; hemoglobin changes; and use of additional uterotonics. At 24 h postpartum, primary PPH occurred in 163 (28.6%) participants in the misoprostol group and 99 (17.4%) participants in the oxytocin group (relative risk [RR] 1.64, 95% CI 1.32 to 2.05, p<0.001; absolute risk difference 11.2%, 95% CI 6.44 to 16.1). Severe PPH occurred in 20 (3.6%) and 15 (2.7%) participants in the misoprostol and oxytocin groups, respectively (RR 1.33, 95% CI 0.69 to 2.58, p?=?0.391; absolute risk difference 0.9%, 95% CI ?1.12 to 2.88). Mean measured blood loss was 341.5 ml (standard deviation [SD] 206.2) and 304.2 ml (SD 190.8, p?=?0.002) at 2 h and 484.7 ml (SD 213.3) and 432.8 ml (SD 203.5, p<0.001) at 24 h in the misoprostol and oxytocin groups, respectively. There were no significant differences between the two groups in any other secondary outcomes. Women in the misoprostol group more commonly experienced shivering (RR 1.91, 95% CI 1.65 to 2.21, p<0.001) and fevers (RR 5.20, 95% CI 3.15 to 7.21, p?=?0.005). This study was conducted at a regional referral hospital with capacity for emergency surgery and blood transfusion. High-risk women were excluded from participation. Conclusions Misoprostol 600 µg is inferior to oxytocin 10 IU for prevention of primary PPH in active management of labor. These data support use of oxytocin in settings where it is available. While not powered to do so, the study found no significant differences in rate of severe PPH, need for blood transfusion, postpartum hemoglobin, change in hemoglobin, or use of additional uterotonics between study groups. Further research should focus on clarifying whether and in which sub-populations use of oxytocin would be preferred over sublingual misoprostol. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01866241 Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:25369200

Atukunda, Esther C.; Siedner, Mark J.; Obua, Celestino; Mugyenyi, Godfrey R.; Twagirumukiza, Marc; Agaba, Amon G.

2014-01-01

137

[Oral ulcers].  

PubMed

Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology. PMID:16277953

Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

2005-10-29

138

Variability of serum drug level following a single oral dose of dipyridamole  

SciTech Connect

Serum dipyridamole levels were measured in 27 patients undergoing planar thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy after receiving a 300 mg oral dose. Mean serum dipyridamole level was 2.9 +/- 1.6 mcg/ml (range 0.2-5.7). No correlation was found between serum level and symptoms, heart rate or blood pressure response, peak heart to lung thallium activity ratio, peak heart to liver thallium activity ratio, or peak myocardial thallium washout. Serum level following a single oral dose of dipyridamole is unpredictable and patients with low drug levels cannot be easily identified at the time of study.

Segall, G.M.; Davis, M.J.

1988-10-01

139

The effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on medical abortion with mifepristone and misoprostol at 13-22 weeks gestation  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit the biosynthesis of prostaglandins and concerns have been expressed that they might attenuate the effects of exogenous prostaglandins. This randomized study was conducted to evaluate whether NSAID given during medical abortion with mifepristone\\/misoprostol in the second trimester has a negative effect on the efficacy of the abortifacient by prolonging the induction-to-abortion interval. METHODS: Seventy-four

C. Fiala; M. L. Swahn; O. Stephansson; K. Gemzell-Danielsson

2005-01-01

140

Efficacy and Tolerability of Pantoprazole Compared with Misoprostol for the Prevention of NSAID-Related Gastrointestinal Lesions and Symptoms in Rheumatic Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim: To compare the efficacy and tolerability of pantoprazole 20 mg once daily (o.d.) with misoprostol 200 ?g twice daily (b.i.d.), administered for 6 months to rheumatic patients who required long-term therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and who were at increased risk of developing gastrointestinal lesions. Methods: This randomized, double-blind, multicenter, parallel group comparison study was performed with rheumatic

T. Stupnicki; K. Dietrich; P. González-Carro; A. Straszak; A. Terjung; K. B. Thomas; R. Lühmann; R. Fischer

2003-01-01

141

Results of a safety trial on single-dose treatments with 400 mcg/kg of ivermectin in bancroftian filariasis.  

PubMed

Two groups of Polynesian Wuchereria bancrofti carriers, 17 females aged 21 to 84 years and 20 males aged 26 to 57 years, in whom microfilaraemia ranged from 1 to 10,121 mf/ml and from 1 to 6,484 mf/ml, respectively, were given a supervised singledose treatment with 400 mcg/kg of ivermectin. Carriers were examined and questioned regarding their experience of adverse reactions, which were graded 0 to 3 according to severity, at 6, 12 and 24 hours and at 4 days after treatment. Biological examinations which included determination of microfilaraemia, complete blood count, liver function tests and assessment of creatinine and urea levels were performed at 4 days before and 4 days after treatment. Adverse reactions were observed in 65% of female and in 70% of male carriers; they were of grade > or = 2 in 35% of carriers in both groups. None as considered serious; they all disappeared in 24-48 hours. The main symptoms were headache, fever > or = 37.5 degrees C and myalgia in females. One male vomited 3 hours after treatment; as a result the drug was not ingested and no decrease of microfilaraemia was noted. Twelve days afterwards, he was given a second 400 mcg/kg dose, he experienced again a grade 1 reaction and his microfilaraemia fell to zero. The 37 carriers in the present study were matched with 37 other Polynesian carriers treated with a 100 mcg/kg single dose of ivermectin in previous trials for pretreatment mf density and sex: no significant difference could be found in adverse reactions between the 2 treatment groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1293733

Cartel, J L; Moulia-Pelat, J P; Glaziou, P; Nguyen, L N; Chanteau, S; Roux, J F

1992-12-01

142

Soft X-ray observations of the complex warm absorber in MCG-6-30-15 with BeppoSAX  

E-print Network

We report on soft X-ray observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15 with the Low and Medium Energy Concentrator Spectrometers on board BeppoSAX. The time averaged 0.1-4 keV spectrum shows evidence for a complex warm absorber. K-edges of highly ionized oxygen (O vii and O viii) can only partly describe the soft X-ray spectrum below 2 keV. A spectral variability study reveales large and rapid changes in absorption at the energy of the O viii K-edge and in the continuum shape and count rate. These fluctuations are not simply correlated.

Astrid Orr; S. Molendi; F. Fiore; P. Grandi; A. N. Parmar; Alan Owens

1997-06-13

143

RXTE and BeppoSAX Observations of MCG-5-23-16: Reflection From Distant Cold Material  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We examine the spectral variability of the Seyfert 1.9 galaxy MCG-5-23-16 using RXTE and BeppoSAX observations spanning 2 years from April 1996 to April 1998. During the first year the X-ray source brightens by a factor of approximately 25% on timescales of days to months. During this time, the reprocessed continuum emission seen with RXTE does not respond measurably to the continuum increase. However, by the end of the second year during the BeppoSAX epoch the X-ray source has faded again. This time, the reprocessed emission has also faded, indicating that the reprocessed flux has responded to the continuum. If these effects are caused by time delays due to the distance between the X-ray source and the reprocessing region, we derive a light crossing time of between approximately 1 light day and approximately 1.5 light years. This corresponds to a distance of 0.001 pc to 0.55 pc, which implies that the reprocessed emission originates between 3 x 10(exp 15) cm and 1.6 x 10(exp l8) cm from the X-ray source. In other words, the reprocessing in MCG-5-23-16 is not dominated by the inner regions of a standard accretion disk.

Mattson, B. J.; Weaver, K. A.

2003-01-01

144

MCG+00-32-16: An Irregular Galaxy Close to the Lowest Redshift Absorber on the 3C 273 Line of Sight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present H I synthesis array mapping and CCD photometry in B and R for MCG+00-32-16. The H I disk is rotating in such a way that the side of the galaxy closer to the sight-line to the quasar has the larger velocity difference from the absorber.

Hoffman, G. L.; Lu, N. Y.; Salpeter, E. E.; Connell, B. M.; Fromhold-Treu, R.

1998-01-01

145

ASCA observations of the warm absorber in MCG-6-30-15: The discovery of a change in column density  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We report the first X-ray observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15 obtained at medium spectral resolution. The partially-ionized, 'warm' absorber is resolved and shown to be due to O VII and O VIII. The main absorption edge agrees with that of O VII at the redshift of the galaxy to within 1%. The column density of the absorbing material is greater by a factor of 2 in the first of our two obsevations, which were 3 weeks apart, while the mean flux is slightly lower and the ionization parameter slightly higher. We also discuss the flourescent iron emssion line seen in the source, which is at 6.40 keV. The line is significantly broadened, with a Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of about 0.4 keV.

Fabian, Andrew C.; Kunieda, Hideyo; Inoue, Shigeru; Matsuoka, Masaru; Mihara, Tatehiro; Miyamoto, Sigenori; Otani, Chiko; Ricker, George; Tanaka, Yasuo; Yamauchi, Makoto

1994-01-01

146

BeppoSAX confirms extreme relativistic effects in the X-ray spectrum of MCG-6-30-15  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report in this Letter the first simultaneous measure of the X-ray broadband (0.1-200 keV) continuum and of the iron K_? fluorescent line profile in the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15. Our data confirms the ASCA detection of a skewed and redshifted line profile (Tanaka et al. 1995). The most straightforward explanation is that the line photons are emitted in the innermost regions of a X-ray illuminated relativistic disk. The line Equivalent Width (=~ 200 eV) is perfectly consistent with the expected value for solar abundances, given the observed amount of Compton reflection. We report also the discovery of a cut-off in the nuclear primary emission at the energy of =~ 160 keV.

Guainazzi, M.; Matt, G.; Molendi, S.; Orr, A.; Fiore, F.; Grandi, P.; Matteuzzi, A.; Mineo, T.; Perola, G. C.; Parmar, A. N.; Piro, L.

1999-01-01

147

X-ray observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxies AKN120 and MCG8-11-11  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new X-ray source, H0523-00, with the optically variable Seyfert 1 galaxy AKN 120 is identified. The source has a 2-10 keV X-ray flux of 2 x 10 to the -11th ergs/sq cm s which corresponds to a 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity of 10 to the 44th ergs/s. X-ray observations over a 1.5 year time span combined with contemporaneous optical photometry show a decrease in the optical with no corresponding decrease in the X-ray. In contrast, similar observations of MCG 8-11-11 show a contemporaneous decrease in optical and X-ray fluxes. It is noted that the infrared and X-ray spectral slopes for these two objects are similar, with the optical being steeper by roughly one unit.

Mushotzky, R.; Marshall, F. E.

1980-01-01

148

X-ray observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxies AKN 120 and MCG 8-11-11  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new X-ray source, H0523-00, with the optically variable Seyfert 1 galaxy AKN 120 is identified. The source has a 2-10 keV X-ray flux of 2 x 10 to the -11th ergs/sq cm s which corresponds to a 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity of 10 to the 44th ergs/s. X-ray observations over a 1.5 year time span combined with contemporaneous optical photometry show a decrease in the optical with no corresponding decrease in the X-ray. In contrast, similar observations of MCG 8-11-11 show a contemporaneous decrease in optical and X-ray fluxes. It is noted that the infrared and X-ray spectral slopes for these two objects are similar, with the optical being steeper by roughly one unit.

Mushotzky, R. F.; Marshall, F. E.

1980-01-01

149

The radio source in the very luminous gamma-ray Seyfert galaxy MCG 8-11-11  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

VLA high resolution observations of the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy MCG 8-11-11 at 2 and 6 cm show the center of the galaxy to contain a triple radio source of 400 pc, with a less than 30-pc diameter central component that may be identified as the center of the galaxy. The triple source is in turn embedded in more diffuse emission which has a major axis position angle similar to that in the optical galaxy, but differing from the position angle of the triple source by 50 deg. While the overall morphology of the source is S-shaped, the curvature of the triple source at the ends is abrupt rather than continuous and gradual. It appears that the core radio emission in Seyfert 1 and 1.5 galaxies may be weakly correlated with their X-ray emission.

Ulvestad, J. S.; Wilson, A. S.

1986-01-01

150

The reprocessing features in the X-ray spectrum of the NELG MCG -5-23-16  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present results from the spectral analysis of the Seyfert 1.9 galaxy MCG -5-23-16, based on ASCA, BeppoSAX, Chandra and XMM-Newton observations. The spectrum of this object shows a complex iron K? emission line, which is best modeled by a superposition of a narrow and a broad (possibly relativistic) iron line, together with a Compton reflection component. Comparing results from all (six) available observations, we do not find any significant variation in the flux of both line components. The moderate flux continuum variability (about 25% difference between the brightest and faintest states), however, does not permit us to infer much about the location of the line-emitting material. The amount of Compton reflection is lower than expected from the total iron line EW, implying either an iron overabundance or that one of the two line components (most likely the narrow one) originates in Compton-thin matter.

Balestra, I.; Bianchi, S.; Matt, G.

2004-02-01

151

Oral Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... the frequency of speech/swallowing treatment, and the motivation of the patient. In some cases, reconstructive plastic ... consistency to exercises for weak oral muscles to learning totally new ways to swallow. In many cases, ...

152

Oral Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings Loan Repayment Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral ...

153

Oral biopsy: oral pathologist's perspective.  

PubMed

Many oral lesions may need to be diagnosed by removing a sample of tissue from the oral cavity. Biopsy is widely used in the medical field, but the practice is not quite widespread in dental practice. As oral pathologists, we have found many artifacts in the tissue specimen because of poor biopsy technique or handling, which has led to diagnostic pitfalls and misery to both the patient and the clinician. This article aims at alerting the clinicians about the clinical faults arising preoperatively, intraoperatively and postoperatively while dealing with oral biopsy that may affect the histological assessment of the tissue and, therefore, the diagnosis. It also reviews the different techniques, precautions and special considerations necessary for specific lesions. PMID:22842360

Kumaraswamy, K L; Vidhya, M; Rao, Prasanna Kumar; Mukunda, Archana

2012-01-01

154

The broad-band X-ray spectrum of the Seyfert 1 galaxy, MCG+8-11-11  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aims: Evidence is mounting that the main ingredients of the unification models of active galactic nuclei may behave differently from expectations, and be intimately related to fundamental physical parameters. The availability of high signal-to-noise broad-band X-ray spectra provides us with the opportunity to study in detail all the contributions from the materials invoked in these models, and infer their general properties, including whether their presence or absence is related to other quantities. Methods: We present a long (100 ks) Suzaku observation of one of the X-ray brightest AGN, MCG+8-11-11. These data are complemented with the 54-month Swift BAT spectrum, allowing us to perform a broad-band fit to the 0.6-150 keV range. Results: The fits performed in the 0.6-10 keV band provide results consistent with those of a a previous XMM-Newton observation, i.e. a lack of a soft excess, warm absorption along the line of sight, a large Compton reflection component (R ? 1), and an absence of a relativistic component of the neutral iron K? emission line. However, when the PIN and Swift BAT data are included, the reflection amount drops significantly (R ? 0.2-0.3), and a relativistic iron line is required, the latter being confirmed by a phenomenological analysis in a restricted energy band (3-10 keV). When a self-consistent model is applied to the whole broad-band data, the observed reflection component appears to be entirely associated with the relativistic component of the iron K? line. Conclusions: The implied scenario, though strongly model-dependent, requires that all the reprocessing spectral components from Compton-thick material be associated with the accretion disc, and no evidence of a classical pc-scale torus is found. The narrow core of the neutral iron K? line is therefore produced in Compton-thin material, such as the BLR, similarly to what is found in another Seyfert galaxy, NGC 7213, but with the notable difference that MCG+8-11-11 presents spectral signatures from an accretion disc. The very low accretion rate of NGC 7213 could explain the lack of relativistic signatures in its spectrum, but the absence of the torus in both sources is more difficult to explain, since their luminosities are comparable, and their accretion rates are completely different.

Bianchi, S.; de Angelis, I.; Matt, G.; La Parola, V.; de Rosa, A.; Grandi, P.; Jiménez Bailón, E.; Piconcelli, E.

2010-11-01

155

Oral tolerance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability of the mucosal immune system to distinguish between harmful and harmless antigens is essential for mounting protective immune responses and preventing the induction of mucosal pathology yet the basis for this remains unclear. As fed antigen can also exert systemic effects understanding oral tolerance and priming will also have important consequences for therapy and vaccination. Here we will

P Garside; A. McI Mowat

2001-01-01

156

Extended Neutral Hydrogen in the Aligned Shell Galaxies Arp 230 and MCG -5-7-1: Formation of Disks in Merging Galaxies?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As part of an ongoing study of the neutral hydrogen (H I) morphology and kinematics of "shell" elliptical galaxies, we present Very Large Array observations of two shell galaxies with aligned shells, Arp 230 and MCG -5-7-1. Our data provide the first H I images of Arp 230 and deeper images of MCG -5-7-1 than previously reported. Optical images of Arp 230 reveal a bright, aligned, interleaved shell system, making it an ideal candidate for "phase-wrapped" shell formation following a radial encounter with a smaller companion. The fainter, non-interleaved shells of MCG -5-7-1 do not clearly favor a particular formation scenario. The H I we detect in both galaxies extends to nearly the same projected distance as the optical shells. In Arp 230 this gas appears to be anti-correlated with the aligned shells, consistent with our expectations for phase-wrapped shells produced in a radial encounter. In MCG -5-7-1, we observe gas associated with the shells making a "spatial wrapping" or looping scenario more plausible. Although the extended gas component in both galaxies is unevenly distributed, the gas kinematics are surprisingly regular, looking almost like complete disks in rotation. We use the H I kinematics and optical data to determine mass-to-light ratios M/LB of 2.4+3.0 -0.5 (at 13.5 kpc, 4.5 Re ) for Arp 230 and M/LB of 30 ± 7 (at 40 kpc, 7 Re ) in MCG -5-7-1. In both systems we find that this ratio changes as a function of radius, indicating the presence of a dark halo. By comparing orbital and precession timescales, we conclude that the potentials are slightly flattened. We infer a 5%-10% flattening for Arp 230 and less flattening in the case of MCG -5-7-1. Finally, we present images of the H I associated with the inner disk or (polar) ring of each galaxy and discuss possible explanations for their different present-day star formation rates. We detect total H I masses of 1.1 × 109 M ? in Arp 230 and 3.7 × 109 M ? in MCG -5-7-1. Both systems have H I masses, scale sizes, and regular kinematics similar to those of non-aligned shell galaxies we have previously studied (Cen A and NGC 2865). Furthermore, we (re-)emphasize in this paper that shell galaxies such as MCG -5-7-1, along with previously studied galaxies NGC 5128 (Cen A) and NGC 2865, are unique in that they provide evidence of recent accretion with gas and collisionless stars showing clear association, though the displacement suggests the presence of significant gas-dynamical interaction.

Schiminovich, David; van Gorkom, J. H.; van der Hulst, J. M.

2013-02-01

157

The Broadband Spectral Variability of MCG-6-30-15 Observed by NuSTAR and XMM-Newton  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

MCG-6-30-15, at a distance of 37 Mpc (z = 0.008), is the archetypical Seyfert 1 galaxy showing very broad Fe K? emission. We present results from a joint NuSTAR and XMM-Newton observational campaign that, for the first time, allows a sensitive, time-resolved spectral analysis from 0.35 keV up to 80 keV. The strong variability of the source is best explained in terms of intrinsic X-ray flux variations and in the context of the light-bending model: the primary, variable emission is reprocessed by the accretion disk, which produces secondary, less variable, reflected emission. The broad Fe K? profile is, as usual for this source, well explained by relativistic effects occurring in the innermost regions of the accretion disk around a rapidly rotating black hole. We also discuss the alternative model in which the broadening of the Fe K? is due to the complex nature of the circumnuclear absorbing structure. Even if this model cannot be ruled out, it is disfavored on statistical grounds. We also detected an occultation event likely caused by broad-line region clouds crossing the line of sight.

Marinucci, A.; Matt, G.; Miniutti, G.; Guainazzi, M.; Parker, M. L.; Brenneman, L.; Fabian, A. C.; Kara, E.; Arevalo, P.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Boggs, S. E.; Cappi, M.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Elvis, M.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Reynolds, C. S.; Risaliti, G.; Stern, D. K.; Walton, D. J.; Zhang, W.

2014-05-01

158

Oral calcitonin  

PubMed Central

Calcitonin is a hormone secreted by the C-cells of the thyroid gland in response to elevations of the plasma calcium level. It reduces bone resorption by inhibiting mature active osteoclasts and increases renal calcium excretion. It is used in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis, Paget’s disease of bone, and malignancy-associated hypercalcemia. Synthetic and recombinant calcitonin preparations are available; both have similar pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. As calcitonin is a peptide, the traditional method of administration has been parenteral or intranasal. This hinders its clinical use: adherence with therapy is notoriously low, and withdrawal from clinical trials has been problematic. An oral formulation would be more attractive, practical, and convenient to patients. In addition to its effect on active osteoclasts and renal tubules, calcitonin has an analgesic action, possibly mediated through ?-endorphins and the central modulation of pain perception. It also exerts a protective action on cartilage and may be useful in the management of osteoarthritis and possibly rheumatoid arthritis. Oral formulations of calcitonin have been developed using different techniques. The most studied involves drug-delivery carriers such as Eligen® 8-(N-2hydroxy-5-chloro-benzoyl)-amino-caprylic acid (5-CNAC) (Emisphere Technologies, Cedar Knolls, NJ). Several factors affect the bioavailability and efficacy of orally administered calcitonin, including amount of water used to take the tablet, time of day the tablet is taken, and proximity to intake of a meal. Preliminary results looked promising. Unfortunately, in two Phase III studies, oral calcitonin (0.8 mg with 200 mg 5-CNAC, once a day for postmenopausal osteoporosis and twice a day for osteoarthritis) failed to meet key end points, and in December 2011, Novartis Pharma AG announced that it would not pursue further clinical development of oral calcitonin for postmenopausal osteoporosis or osteoarthritis. A unique feature of calcitonin is that it is able to uncouple bone turnover, reducing bone resorption without affecting bone formation and therefore increasing bone mass and improving bone quality. This effect, however, may be dose-dependent, with higher doses inhibiting both resorption and formation. Because so many factors affect the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of calcitonin, especially orally administered calcitonin, much work remains to be done to explore the full pharmacologic spectrum and potential of calcitonin and determine the optimum dose and timing of administration, as well as water and food intake. PMID:23071417

Hamdy, Ronald C; Daley, Dane N

2012-01-01

159

Comparative evaluation of midazolam and clonidine as pediatric oral premedication  

PubMed Central

Background: Clonidine provides many desirable effects like sedation, analgesia, anxiolysis, and hemodynamic stability and these properties make it a potentially useful anesthetic premedication in the pediatric settings. The aim of this study was to compare oral midazolam (0.5 mg/kg), which is considered gold standard with oral clonidine (5 mcg/kg) as a premedication in pediatric patients. Materials and Methods: Sixty children classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I, aged between 2 and 12, who were scheduled to undergo an elective surgery, were enrolled for a prospective, randomized, and double blind controlled trial. They received either oral midazolam (Group M) or oral clonidine (Group C) 60 minutes before induction of anesthesia and were submitted to an evaluation of anxiety and sedation scores. We also evaluated secondary outcomes such as palatability, parental separation, effect on hemodynamic status, co-operation during venipuncture and facemask application, postoperative analgesic requirement, and recovery profile. Results: Oral midazolam had better efficacy in the preoperative period as sedative and anxiolytic (P < 0.001), allowed better cooperation during venipuncture and facemask application (P < 0.001), whereas, oral clonidine provided better palatability (P < 0.001), parental satisfaction (P < 0.001), stable perioperative hemodynamics (P < 0.001), better postoperative analgesia (P < 0.001), and night sleep pattern (P < 0.05) without any noticeable side effects (P > 0.05). Conclusion: We conclude that under the conditions of this study, oral midazolam is a better medication than clonidine in children in preoperative period while clonidine is a better medication postoperatively with added advantage of palatability, hemodynamic stability, and no significant side effects.

Sahoo, Sangeeta; Kaur, Manpreet; Tripathy, Hemant Kumar; Kumar, Ajeet; Kohli, Santavana; Nanda, Samridhi

2013-01-01

160

Oral candidiasis  

PubMed Central

Oral candidiasis is a common opportunistic infection of the oral cavity caused by an overgrowth of Candida species, the commonest being Candida albicans. The incidence varies depending on age and certain predisposing factors. There are three broad groupings consisting of acute candidiasis, chronic candidiasis, and angular cheilitis. Risk factors include impaired salivary gland function, drugs, dentures, high carbohydrate diet, and extremes of life, smoking, diabetes mellitus, Cushing's syndrome, malignancies, and immunosuppressive conditions. Management involves taking a history, an examination, and appropriate antifungal treatment with a few requiring samples to be taken for laboratory analysis. In certain high risk groups antifungal prophylaxis reduces the incidence and severity of infections. The prognosis is good in the great majority of cases. PMID:12185216

Akpan, A; Morgan, R

2002-01-01

161

Oral tuberculosis.  

PubMed

Tuberculous lesions of the oral cavity have become so infrequent that it is virtually a forgotten disease entity and may pose a diagnostic problem. Fifteen patients with conditions that were histologically diagnosed as oral tuberculosis were reviewed. All were men ranging in age from 29 to 78 years. The most common clinical presentation was odynophagia with a duration from less than 1 week to several years. The most frequently affected sites were the tongue base and gingiva. The oral lesions took the form of an irregular ulceration or a discrete granular mass. Mandibular bone destruction was evident in two patients. Two patients had a fever, and four had cervical lymphadenopathy. Eight cases were clinically suspicious for malignancy before biopsy. Only four patients had a history of tuberculosis, but 14 of the 15 patients were later found to have active pulmonary tuberculosis. Acid-fast bacilli were demonstrated in all patients. Tuberculosis should be considered in patients with an inflamed ulcer lesion. A biopsy specimen for histologic study, acid-fast stains, and cultures should be obtained for confirmation and differential diagnosis with other conditions. If a tuberculous lesion is suspected, a chest radiograph is indicated to investigate the possibility of pulmonary involvement. PMID:8705586

Eng, H L; Lu, S Y; Yang, C H; Chen, W J

1996-04-01

162

A comparison of effects of oral premedication with clonidine and metoprolol on intraoperative hemodynamics and surgical conditions during functional endoscopic sinus surgery  

PubMed Central

Context: Establishing a near perfect surgical field during functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) is essential and even a minor bleeding can severely compromise an already restricted view. So, if controlled hypotension can be provided without compromising the safety of patient by a relatively effortless method, surgical field can be improved greatly. Aims: The aim of this study was to compare the hemodynamic changes and surgical conditions during FESS following oral premedication with clonidine and metoprolol. Settings and Design: A total of 40 patients undergoing FESS were included in this prospective, randomized controlled study. Subjects and Methods: Patients were divided into two equal groups. Group A patients were premedicated with oral clonidine 300 mcg and Group B with oral metoprolol 50 mg, 2 h before surgery. All patients received fentanyl 2 mcg/kg and induced with propofol 2 mg/kg. Intubation was done following vecuronium 1 mg/kg. Anesthesia was maintained with 66% N2O, 33% O2 and 1% isoflurane. The heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were measured before induction and thereafter every 15 min up to 2 h. The surgeons were asked to estimate the quality of the operative field using a pre-defined category scale with scores 1-5. Statistical Analysis: Difference within the groups was analyzed using analysis of variance and post-hoc test was used to test the difference between individual groups. Chi-square test was used to find out the association between categorical variables. Results: Comparison of category scale revealed a lower score in Group A up to 60 min. Group B patients showed a statistically lower HR from pre-induction up to 90 min while systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP) and mean arterial pressure did not show a significant difference. Conclusions: Oral premedication with 300 mcg of clonidine produced a better operative field than oral metoprolol 50 mg during FESS.

Puthenveettil, Nitu; Rajan, Sunil; Kumar, Lakshmi; Nair, Suresh Gangadharan

2013-01-01

163

Training Traditional Birth Attendants on the Use of Misoprostol and a Blood Measurement Tool to Prevent Postpartum Haemorrhage: Lessons Learnt from Bangladesh  

PubMed Central

A consensus emerged in the late 1990s among leaders in global maternal health that traditional birth attendants (TBAs) should no longer be trained in delivery skills and should instead be trained as promoters of facility-based care. Many TBAs continue to be trained in places where home deliveries are the norm and the potential impacts of this training are important to understand. The primary objective of this study was to gain a more nuanced understanding of the full impact of training TBAs to use misoprostol and a blood measurement tool (mat) for the prevention of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) at home deliveries through the perspective of those involved in the project. This qualitative study, conducted between July 2009 and July 2010 in Bangladesh, was nested within larger operations research, testing the feasibility and acceptability of scaling up community-based provision of misoprostol and a blood measurement tool for prevention of PPH. A total of 87 in-depth interviews (IDIs) were conducted with TBAs, community health workers (CHWs), managers, and government-employed family welfare visitors (FWVs) at three time points during the study. Computer-assisted thematic data analysis was conducted using ATLAS.ti (version 5.2). Four primary themes emerged during the data analysis, which all highlight changes that occurred following the training. The first theme describes the perceived direct changes linked to the two new interventions. The following three themes describe the indirect changes that interviewees perceived: strengthened linkages between TBAs and the formal healthcare system; strengthened linkages between TBAs and the communities they serve; and improved quality of services/service utilization. The data indicate that training TBAs and CHW supervisors resulted in perceived broader and more nuanced changes than simply improvements in TBAs’ knowledge, attitudes, and practices. Acknowledgeing TBAs’ important role in the community and in home deliveries and integrating them into the formal healthcare system has the potential to result in changes similar to those seen in this study. PMID:24847601

Passano, Paige; Bohl, Daniel D.; Islam, Arshadul; Prata, Ndola

2014-01-01

164

Oral Haemangioma  

PubMed Central

Vascular anomalies comprise a widely heterogeneous group of tumours and malformations. Haemangioma is the most common benign tumour of vascular origin of the head and neck region. The possible sites of occurrence in oral cavity are lips, tongue, buccal mucosa, and palate. Despite its benign origin and behaviour, it is always of clinical importance to the dental profession and requires appropriate management. This case study reports a rare case of capillary haemangioma on the palatal gingiva in a 14-year-old female. PMID:22431929

Gill, Jaspreet Singh; Gill, Sharanjeet; Bhardwaj, Amit; Grover, Harpreet Singh

2012-01-01

165

Outcomes of medical abortion through 63 days in women with twin gestations  

PubMed Central

Background Twin gestation is not considered a contraindication to medical abortion with mifepristone and misoprostol. However, data comparing the efficacy of medical abortion for singleton gestations as compared with multiple gestations are limited. We examined medical abortion outcomes for twin gestations through 63 days. Study Design We performed a secondary analysis of treatment efficacy and side effects using pooled data from two randomized medical abortion trials. All subjects received mifepristone 200 mg orally and misoprostol 800 mcg vaginally. Outcomes in women with singleton and twin gestations were compared. Results Of 2208 subjects, 24 (1.1%) women had twins. Treatment success was not statistically different for twin and singleton gestations (91% vs. 97%, p=0.19). Perceived bleeding and pain were not significantly different between groups. Conclusions Treatment success of medical abortion for twins is not significantly different than for singletons, although small differences cannot be excluded due to the limited number of twins. PMID:22018125

Hayes, Jennifer L.; Achilles, Sharon L.; Creinin, Mitchell D.; Reeves, Matthew F.

2014-01-01

166

Oral dirofilariasis.  

PubMed

Filariasis affecting animals can rarely cause infections in human beings through the accidental bite of potential vectors. The resulting infection in man, known as zoonotic filariasis occur worldwide. Human dirofilariasis, the most common zoonotic filariasis, is caused by the filarial worm belonging to the genus Dirofilaria. Dirofilarial worms, which are recognized as pathogenic in man can cause nodular lesions in the lung, subcutaneous tissue, peritoneal cavity or eyes. Oral dirofilariasis is extremely rare and only a few cases have been documented. We report an interesting case of dirofilariasis due to Dirofilaria repens involving buccal mucosa in a patient who presented with a facial swelling. The clinical features, diagnostic issues and treatment aspects are discussed. This paper stresses the importance of considering dirofilariasis as differential diagnosis for subcutaneous swelling of the face, especially in areas where it is endemic. PMID:24992859

Janardhanan, Mahija; Rakesh, S; Savithri, Vindhya

2014-01-01

167

KAIT Discovery and Robotic Follow-up of a Possible Young SN Candidate in MCG-01-10-039: PSN J03490564-0303283  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the discovery, with the 0.76-m Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT) at Lick Observatory, of a possible new supernova in the nearby galaxy MCG-01-10-039 (z=0.013504 ). The new object, dubbed PSN J03490564-0303283 (by the IAU), is located at (J2000.0) coordinates RA = 03:49:05.64, Dec = -03:03:28.3. Following discovery in an unfiltered image obtained at 08:27 UT on 2013 Nov. 09, KAIT autonomously began a sequence of triggered follow-up observations in the U, B, V, R, I, and clear (roughly R) filters beginning only 5 minutes later.

Zheng, W.; Li, W.; Filippenko, A. V.; Cenko, S. B.

2013-11-01

168

Diclofenac and Misoprostol  

MedlinePLUS

... who have a high risk of developing stomach ulcers. Diclofenac is in a class of medications called ... a class of medications called prostaglandins. It prevents ulcers caused by diclofenac by protecting the stomach lining ...

169

DISCOVERY OF Fe K{alpha} X-RAY REVERBERATION AROUND THE BLACK HOLES IN MCG-5-23-16 AND NGC 7314  

SciTech Connect

Several X-ray observations have recently revealed the presence of reverberation time delays between spectral components in active galactic nuclei. Most of the observed lags are between the power-law Comptonization component, seen directly, and the soft excess produced by reflection in the vicinity of the black hole. NGC 4151 was the first object to show these lags in the iron K band. Here, we report the discovery of reverberation lags in the Fe K band in two other sources: MCG-5-23-16 and NGC 7314. In both objects, the 6-7 keV band, where the Fe K{alpha} line peaks, lags the bands at lower and higher energies with a time delay of {approx}1 ks. These lags are unlikely to be due to the narrow Fe K{alpha} line. They are fully consistent with reverberation of the relativistically broadened iron K{alpha} line. The measured lags, their time scale, and spectral modeling indicate that most of the radiation is emitted at {approx}5 and 24 gravitational radii for MCG-5-23-16 and NGC 7314, respectively.

Zoghbi, A.; Reynolds, C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Cackett, E. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, 666 W. Hancock St, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Miniutti, G. [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), Dep. de Astrosica, P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Kara, E.; Fabian, A. C., E-mail: azoghbi@astro.umd.edu [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

2013-04-20

170

Discovery of Fe K? X-Ray Reverberation around the Black Holes in MCG-5-23-16 and NGC 7314  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several X-ray observations have recently revealed the presence of reverberation time delays between spectral components in active galactic nuclei. Most of the observed lags are between the power-law Comptonization component, seen directly, and the soft excess produced by reflection in the vicinity of the black hole. NGC 4151 was the first object to show these lags in the iron K band. Here, we report the discovery of reverberation lags in the Fe K band in two other sources: MCG-5-23-16 and NGC 7314. In both objects, the 6-7 keV band, where the Fe K? line peaks, lags the bands at lower and higher energies with a time delay of ~1 ks. These lags are unlikely to be due to the narrow Fe K? line. They are fully consistent with reverberation of the relativistically broadened iron K? line. The measured lags, their time scale, and spectral modeling indicate that most of the radiation is emitted at ~5 and 24 gravitational radii for MCG-5-23-16 and NGC 7314, respectively.

Zoghbi, A.; Reynolds, C.; Cackett, E. M.; Miniutti, G.; Kara, E.; Fabian, A. C.

2013-04-01

171

Columbia Oral History Columbia University Center for Oral History  

E-print Network

Columbia Oral History Columbia University Center for Oral History Annual Report AUGUST 1, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Rule of Law Oral History Project Carnegie Corporation Oral History Project BIOGRAPHICAL INTERVIEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Oral History Master of Arts Summer Institute 2012 Oral History Workshop Series 2011­12 Oral

Kim, Philip

172

Section three: oral cancers.  

PubMed

Oral cancers are uncommon in the United States. Risk factors for oral cancer include tobacco use, alcohol consumption, and high-risk oral human papillomavirus infection. Precancerous lesions, such as leukoplakia, may lead to oral cancers, but the majority of precancerous lesions never undergo malignant transformation. Management and prognosis for oral cancers vary widely depending on the site of the cancer. Lip cancers typically are detected early and have the greatest likelihood for cure and long-term patient survival. Cancers of the pharynx and tonsil have poor survival rates even when diagnosed in early stages. The best approach to preventing oral cancers is to control risk factors. PMID:24328950

Hueston, William J; Kaur, Dipinpreet

2013-12-01

173

Kinematics and ionization of extended ionized gas in active galaxies. I - The X-ray luminous galaxies NGC 2110, NGC 5506, and MCG -5-23-16  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Direct CCD imaging and long-slit Vidicon spectroscopy have been used to map the emission-line ratios, profiles, and velocity fields over the extended narrow-line regions in three nearby Seyfert galaxies, NGC 2110, NGC 5506, and MCG -5-23-16. The gas in the letter is spatially unresolved. Similarities between the other two nebulae include the excitation mechanism (photoionization by a central nonthermal source) and the overall profiles of the very broad emission lines close to the nucleus. The nebulae are, however, quite different in their global kinematic behavior. In NGC 2110, the gas appears to lie in a disk or flattened spheroid and to be in ordered rotation, with a classical rotation curve, about an axis parallel to the minor axis of the stellar isophotes. The velocity field of NGC 5506 is quite irregular, but a component of rotation in the plane of the galaxy seems to exist.

Wilson, A. S.; Baldwin, J. A.; Ulvestad, J. S.

1985-01-01

174

Observations of MCG-5-23-16 with Suzaku, XMM-Newton and NuSTAR: Disk Tomography and Compton Hump Reverberation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

MCG-5-23-16 is one of the first active galactic nuclei (AGNs) where relativistic reverberation in the iron K line originating in the vicinity of the supermassive black hole was found, based on a short XMM-Newton observation. In this work, we present the results from long X-ray observations using Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and NuSTAR designed to map the emission region using X-ray reverberation. A relativistic iron line is detected in the lag spectra on three different timescales, allowing the emission from different regions around the black hole to be separated. Using NuSTAR coverage of energies above 10 keV reveals a lag between these energies and the primary continuum, which is detected for the first time in an AGN. This lag is a result of the Compton reflection hump responding to changes in the primary source in a manner similar to the response of the relativistic iron K line.

Zoghbi, A.; Cackett, E. M.; Reynolds, C.; Kara, E.; Harrison, F. A.; Fabian, A. C.; Lohfink, A.; Matt, G.; Balokovic, M.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W.; Hailey, C. J.; Stern, D.; Zhang, W. W.

2014-07-01

175

Use of organic waste for the production of added-value holocellulases with Cellulomonas flavigena PR-22 and Trichoderma reesei MCG 80.  

PubMed

We evaluated the production of holocellulases from the cellulolytic microorganisms Cellulomonas flavigena PR-22 and Trichoderma reesei MCG 80 using as substrates the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and digestates from a hydrogenogenic-methanogenic bioenergy production process. The first set of experiments (E1) used the mutant actinobacteria C. flavigena PR-22 whereas another set (E2) used the mutant filamentous fungi T. reesei MCG 80. In E1 with OFMSW as substrate, xylanolytic activities ranged from 1800 to 3900 international units g(holocellulose)(-1) (IU g(hol)(-1)), whereas the cellulolytic activities ranged from 220 to 420 IU g(hol)(-1). The variation of agitation speed did not have a significant effect on enzyme activity, whereas the increase of substrate concentration had a significant negative effect on both xylanolytic and cellulolytic activities on a holocellulose feed basis. Regarding E2, the OFMSW was evaluated at 1, 2 and 3 % volatile solids (VS). At 2 % VS the best filter paper activities were 1200 filter paper units (FPU) l(-1); however, in a holocellulase basis the best result was 67 FPU g(hol)(-1), corresponding to 1 % VS. Next, OFMSW was compared with OFMSW supplemented with lactose, digested solids from hydrogenogenic fermentation (D1) and digested solids from a two-stage process (D2). Against expectations, no positive effect was found in OFMSW due to lactose. The best enzymatic titres were in the order D1 > OFMSW ? OFMSW + lactose > D2. The use of digestates from hydrogenogenic fermentation for enzyme production holds promise for waste management. It promotes energy and added-value bioproduct generation-a green alternative to common practice of management and disposal of organic wastes. PMID:23877254

Escamilla-Alvarado, Carlos; Poggi-Varaldo, Héctor M; Ponce-Noyola, M Teresa

2013-08-01

176

Nicotine Oral Inhalation  

MedlinePLUS

Nicotine oral inhalation is used to help people stop smoking. Nicotine oral inhalation should be used together with ... you understand why you were not able to stop smoking and make plans to try again.

177

Rich Crank Oral History  

E-print Network

Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer People in Kansas Rich Crank Oral History Interviewed by Tami Albin December 7, 2008 http..., Transgender, Intersex and Queer People and Kansas Copyright and permissions All oral histories in the Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer People in Kansas are copyrighted and protected by copyright...

Crank, Rich; Albin, Tami

2010-11-24

178

Prospective study of medical abortion in Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital (NMCTH). A one year experience.  

PubMed

A combination of antiprogesterone mifepristone and prostaglandin analogue misoprostol provides an effective non surgical method for termination of pregnancy up to gestational age of 63 days. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of this medical regimen for termination of pregnancy up to 63 days of pregnancy. A hospital based prospective study was carried out in department of obstetrics and gynecology at Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital (NMCTH) for a period of one year where 100 women requesting for medical abortion were enrolled. The medical regimen used was mifepristone 200 mg orally followed 24 hours later by misoprostol 800 micrograms administered buccally. Most of the women were in age group 20-29 years (50%), were nulliparous (81%) and were within 42 days of pregnancy (47%). The overall success rate of this regimen was 93.6%. Where success was defined as achieving complete abortion without needing surgical evacuation. Surgical evacuation was needed in 6 (6.4%) patients i.e. 5 for incomplete abortion and one for continued viable pregnancy. The combination of oral mifepristone 200mg followed 24 hours later by buccal misoprostol 800mcg is effective method of medical termination of pregnancy. PMID:22808819

Giri, A; Tuladhar, H; Tuladhar, A S; Maharjan, M; Dhakal, N

2011-09-01

179

Haloperidol-stomach lesions attenuation by pentadecapeptide BPC 157, omeprazole, bromocriptine, but not atropine, lansoprazole, pantoprazole, ranitidine, cimetidine and misoprostol in mice.  

PubMed

The focus was on haloperidol (central dopamine antagonist)-stomach lesion, a longly described suitable counterpart of dopamine blocker cysteamine-duodenal lesion. In this, the contribution of blockade of central/peripheral dopamine receptors and prostaglandins synthesis, along with influence of antiulcer agents was evaluated in mice. Male NMRI Hannnover mice were sacrificed 24 h after haloperidol (25 mg/kg b.w. i.p., given alone or with saline (haloperidol+saline) (i) or in combination (ii,iii)). Supporting central dopamine predominance for haloperidol stomach lesion induction, co-administration of peripheral dopamine receptor antagonist domperidone (5 mg/kg i.p.) (haloperidol+ domperidone) (ii), or prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor indomethacin (10 mg/kg s.c.) (haloperidol+ indomethacin) (iii) did not aggravate this lesion. (i) In haloperidol+saline challenged mice the lesions were inhibited by co-administration (/kg i.p.) of a gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157, GlyGluProProProGlyLysProAlaAspAspAlaGlyLeuVal, M.W. 1419 (10 microg, 10 ng, 10 pg, but not 1 pg, 100 fg, 10 fg), bromocriptine (10 mg), omeprazole (10 mg, 100 mg, but not 1 mg). Atropine (10, 100, 200 mg), pirenzepine (10, 100, 200 mg), misoprostol (10, 100, 200 microg), pantoprazole (1, 10, 100 mg), lansoprazole (0.1, 1, 10 mg), cimetidine (10, 100, 200 mg) and ranitidine (10, 100, 200 mg) were not effective. (ii) Dopamine peripheral blockade influence: in haloperidol+domperidone mice, previously effective bromocriptine, pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (10 microg) or omeprazole (10 mg) did not attenuate stomach lesions. (iii) Prostaglandins synthesis blockade effect: in haloperidol+indomethacin mice, previously effective agents, bromocriptine or omeprazole were not active, while BPC 157 effect was only lessened. PMID:11292068

Bilic, I; Zoricic, I; Anic, T; Separovic, J; Stancic-Rokotov, D; Mikus, D; Buljat, G; Ivankovic, D; Aralica, G; Prkacin, I; Perovic, D; Mise, S; Rotkvic, I; Petek, M; Rucman, R; Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P

2001-03-01

180

Improving oral health and oral health care delivery for children.  

PubMed

National and state-level evidence has documented ongoing disparities in children's health and utilization of oral health care services, prompting a re-examination of factors associated with poor oral health and low use of oral health services. These efforts have yielded a wide array of proposals for improving children's oral health and oral health care delivery. This paper offers a perspective on the current context of efforts to improve children's oral health and oral health care delivery. PMID:21485933

Crall, James J

2011-02-01

181

On the Lack of X-Ray Iron Line Reverberation in MCG -6-30-15: Implications for the Black Hole Mass and Accretion Disk Structure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use the method of Press, Rybicki, & Hewitt to search for time lags and time leads between different energy bands of the RXTE data for MCG -6-30-15. We tailor our search in order to probe any reverberation signatures of the fluorescent iron K? line that is thought to arise from the inner regions of the black hole accretion disk. In essence, an optimal reconstruction algorithm is applied to the continuum band (2-4 keV) light curve that smooths out noise and interpolates across the data gaps. The reconstructed continuum band light curve can then be folded through trial transfer functions in an attempt to find lags or leads between the continuum band and the iron line band (5-7 keV). We find reduced fractional variability in the line band. The spectral analysis of Lee et al. reveals this to be due to a combination of an apparently constant iron line flux (at least on timescales of few×104 s) and flux-correlated changes in the photon index. We also find no evidence for iron line reverberation and exclude reverberation delays in the range 0.5-50 ks. This extends the conclusions of Lee et al. and suggests that the iron line flux remains constant on timescales as short as 0.5 ks. The large black hole mass (>108 Msolar) naively suggested by the constancy of the iron line flux is rejected on other grounds. We suggest that the black hole in MCG -6-30-15 has a mass of MBH~106-107 Msolar and that changes in the ionization state of the disk may produce the puzzling spectral variability. Finally, it is found that the 8-15 keV band lags the 2-4 keV band by 50-100 s. This result is used to place constraints on the size and geometry of the Comptonizing medium responsible for the hard X-ray power law in this AGN.

Reynolds, Christopher S.

2000-04-01

182

Oral cancer treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Opinion statement  Oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer in the world, and it continues to represent a serious public health problem. Oral\\u000a cancer is a preventable disease, related to behavioral and lifestyle factors, including tobacco and alcohol. Prevention and\\u000a early detection of oral cancer remain the goals of national efforts to reduce the impact of this disease on the

Terry A. Day; Betsy K. Davis; M. Boyd Gillespie; John K. Joe; Megan Kibbey; Bonnie Martin-Harris; Brad Neville; Susan G. Reed; Mary S. Richardson; Steven Rosenzweig; Anand K. Sharma; Michelle M. Smith; Stacy Stewart; Robert K. Stuart

2003-01-01

183

Pat Miller Oral History  

E-print Network

Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer People in Kansas Pat Miller Oral History Interviewed by Tami Albin March 21, 2008 http...://kuscholarworks.ku.edu/dspace/handle/1808/5558 This interview was made possible by the generous support of the University of Kansas Libraries and the University of Kansas grants 2302114, 2301283, 2301334. © Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual...

Miller, Pat; Albin, Tami

2009-10-28

184

Kelly Barth Oral History  

E-print Network

Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer People in Kansas Kelly Barth Oral History Interviewed by Tami Albin February 5, 2008 http://hdl.handle.net/1808.../13170 This interview was made possible by the generous support of the University of Kansas Libraries and the University of Kansas grants 2302114, 2301283, 2301334. © Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer...

Barth, Kelly; Albin, Tami

2014-03-13

185

Gilbert Baker Oral History  

E-print Network

Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer People in Kansas Gilbert Baker Oral History Interviewed by Tami Albin June 19, 2008 http... law (Title 17, U. S. Code). Requests for permission to publish quotations beyond “fair use” from this collection should be addressed to: Tami Albin (albin@ku.edu or tami.albin@gmail.com ) Director of Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of GLBTIQ...

Baker, Gilbert; Albin, Tami

2010-11-24

186

Switching between oral anticoagulants.  

PubMed

Until about 4 years ago, warfarin was the only oral anticoagulant approved in the United States, and switching between oral anticoagulants has become an option since the emergence of the novel oral anticoagulants dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban. What are the reasons one may switch between the agents and how is this done? Discussed in this article are the 4 agents approved in the United States, their characteristics, reasons one may switch, and methods for conversion. After a thorough search of original trial data and recent expert review articles, we have summarized the most recent recommendations below and briefly discuss upcoming oral anticoagulants that show promise. PMID:25255408

Strasser, Kristen M; Qasem, Abdulraheem; Madhusudhana, Sheshadri

2014-08-01

187

David Ollington Oral History  

E-print Network

's Oral History in KU ScholarWorks Tami Albin, Director for Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of GLBTQ People in Kansas Anschutz Library University of Kansas 1301 Hoch Auditoria Drive Lawrence, KS 66045 Phone: 785-691-5748 All oral histories... this collection should be addressed to: Tami Albin (albin@ku.edu or tami.albin@gmail.com ) Director of Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of GLBTIQ People in Kansas Anschutz Library 1301 Hoch Auditoria Dr. University of Kansas Lawrence, KS 66045 Requestors must...

Ollington, David; Albin, Tami

2010-01-11

188

X-ray polarimetry as a new tool to discriminate reflection from absorption scenarios - predictions for MCG-6-30-15  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present modelling of X-ray polarization spectra emerging from the two competing scenarios that are proposed to explain the broad Fe K? line in the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15. The polarization signature of complex absorption is studied for a partial covering scenario using a clumpy wind and compared to a reflection model based on the lamppost geometry. The shape of the polarization percentage and angle as a function of photon energy are found to be distinctly different between the reflection and the absorption cases. Relativistic reflection produces significantly stronger polarization in the 1-10 keV energy band than absorption. The spectrum of the polarization angle adds additional constraints: in the absorption case it shows a constant shape, whereas the relativistic reflection scenario typically leads to a smooth rotation of the polarization angle with photon energy. Based on this work, we conclude that a soft X-ray polarimeter onboard a small X-ray satellite may already discriminate between the absorption and the reflection scenarios. A promising opportunity may arise with the X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer mission, which has been proposed to the European Space Agency in response to a small-size (S-class) mission call due for launch in 2017.

Marin, F.; Goosmann, R. W.; Dov?iak, M.; Muleri, F.; Porquet, D.; Grosso, N.; Karas, V.; Matt, G.

2012-10-01

189

Probing Supermassive Black Hole Spins in MCG--6-30-15 and NGC 1365 with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on detailed spectral modeling of the Seyfert 1 AGNs NGC 1365 and MCG--6-30-15 using simultaneous, broadband X-ray spectra from XMM-Newton and NuSTAR. Both of these galaxies show evidence for relativistic reflection from the inner accretion disk in addition to complex, variable absorption. The high signal-to-noise across the 0.3-79 keV energy band enabled by these observations allows us to definitively disentangle the spectral signatures of the continuum, warm and cold absorption, and reflection from the torus and the inner disk in both sources. These deep pointings also enable the use of time-resolved spectral fitting in order to assess the role of each component in driving the spectral and temporal variability of the AGNs. This type of analysis allows us to isolate the relativistic reflection signatures in each object, facilitating the most accurate, precise constrains ever obtained on the spins of their supermassive black holes. We present our spin measurements, as well as a discussion of sources of systematic error. Finally, we place our results in the context of relativistic light-bending models in an effort to characterize the structure of the innermost regions of these AGNs.

Brenneman, Laura; Walton, Dom; Marinucci, Andrea; Matt, Giorgio; Risaliti, Guido; Harrison, Fiona; Stern, Daniel

2014-08-01

190

Measuring Supermassive Black Hole Spins in NGC 1365 and MCG--6-30-15 Using XMM-Newton and NuSTAR  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on detailed spectral modeling of the Seyfert 1 AGN NGC 1365 and MCG--6-30-15 using simultaneous, broadband X-ray spectra from XMM-Newton and NuSTAR. Both of these galaxies show evidence for relativistic reflection from the inner accretion disk in addition to complex, variable absorption. The high signal-to-noise across the 0.2-79 keV energy band enabled by these observations allows us to definitively disentangle the spectral signatures of the continuum, warm and cold absorption, and reflection from the torus and the inner disk in both sources. These deep pointings also enable the use of time-resolved spectral fitting in order to assess the role of each component in driving the spectral and temporal variability of the AGN. This type of analysis allows us to isolate the relativistic reflection signatures in each object, facilitating the most accurate, precise constrains ever obtained on the spins of their supermassive black holes.

Brenneman, Laura; Marinucci, Andrea; Walton, Dom; Risaliti, Guido; Matt, Giorgio; Harrison, Fiona; Stern, Daniel

2014-06-01

191

Steven Brown Oral History  

E-print Network

Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of GLBTQ People in Kansas Steven Brown Oral History Part 2 video platform video management video solutionsvideo player Part 3 video platform video management video solutionsvideo player... Part 4 video platform video management video solutionsvideo player Part 5 video platform video management video solutionsvideo player Part 6 video platform video management video solutionsvideo player Part 7 video platform video...

Brown, Steven; Albin, Tami

2010-11-24

192

Misoprostol for pre-term labor induction in the second trimester: Role of medical history and clinical parameters for prediction of time to delivery  

PubMed Central

Objective Serious fetal malformations and/or chromosome aberrations detected by modern diagnostic tools in early pregnancy require discussions on induced abortion with pregnant women. Competent counseling includes prediction of the time needed for the whole abortion process. In an attempt to refine our predictions, we evaluated the impact of 11 medical history and clinical variables on time to delivery. Material and Methods We performed a retrospective chart analysis on 79 women submitted for pre-term abortion because of fetal anomalies. Abortion was induced by vaginal application of misoprostol (prostaglandine E1, Cytotec™, Pfizer, New York, USA). We investigated 11 medical history and clinical variables for their impact on the percentage of women delivering within 24 hours (primary endpoint) and on the mean induction-delivery time interval (secondary endpoint). Results Fifty-three percent (42/79) of women delivered within 24 hours; 83.6% (66/79) delivered within 48 hours. A total of 83.3% of women with a history of late abortion delivered within 24 hours, whereas 50.7% without this history did. Mean induction-delivery time interval was 12.3 hours versus 35.5 hours, respectively. For history of early abortion, the figures were 65.2% versus 48.2% for delivery within 24 hours and 15.6 hours versus 32.5 hours for mean induction-delivery time interval. Current weight of fetus >500 g, weight of last previous newborn of ?3500 g, previous pregnancies, premature rupture of membranes, and an elevated CRP of >0.5 mg/dL also cut time to delivery. Surprisingly, maternal and gestational age had no remarkable or consistent impact on the mean induction-delivery time interval. None of the differences reached statistical significance. Eighty-three percent of women needed 1000 ?g or less for successful delivery. Conclusion Neither variables of medical history nor specific clinical variables allow for precise prediction of time to delivery in the second trimester. Certain parameters, however, show a trend to reduce the induction-delivery time interval. Our results might serve as initial guidance for patient counseling.

di Liberto, Alexander; Endrikat, Jan; Frohn, Sandra; Solomayer, Erich; Ertan, Kubilay

2014-01-01

193

American Academy of Oral Medicine  

MedlinePLUS

... the Date! AAOM: Representing the Discipline of Oral Medicine Oral Medicine is the discipline of dentistry concerned with the ... offers credentialing, resources and professional community for oral medicine practitioners. Our membership provides care to thousands We ...

194

Literatura Oral Hispanica (Hispanic Oral Literature).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of a class in Hispanic Oral Literature, students collected pieces of folklore from various Hispanic residents in the region known as "Siouxland" in Iowa. Consisting of some of the folklore recorded from the residents, this paper includes 18 "cuentos y leyendas" (tales and legends), 48 "refranes" (proverbs), 17 "chistes" (jokes), 1…

McAlpine, Dave

195

ADHA Oral Health Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by the American Dental Hygienists' Association, this site's resources are valuable for both dental patients and hygienists to help understand "the importance of oral health to total health." Patients will find informative fact sheets describing potential oral health problems as well as tips for preventing them. Hygienists will find the free posters useful as well as the instructions included for proper brushing and flossing techniques in order to educate and support their patients. The site underscores dental hygienists' roles in tobacco cessation efforts, a major topic of concern in the allied health professions. Providing free "life-saving advice", the ADHA hopes to promote overall heath beginning with oral care.

2006-11-10

196

Ryan Campbell Oral History  

E-print Network

Return to Ryan Campbell's Oral History in KU ScholarWorks Tami Albin, Director for Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of GLBTQ People in Kansas Anschutz Library University of Kansas 1301 Hoch Auditoria Drive Lawrence, KS 66045 Phone: 785-691-5748 All... beyond "fair use" from this collection should be addressed to: Tami Albin (albin@ku.edu or tami.albin@gmail.com ) Director of Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of GLBTIQ People in Kansas Anschutz Library 1301 Hoch Auditoria Dr. University of Kansas...

Campbell, Ryan; Albin, Tami

2009-12-16

197

Clinical and economic outcomes for patients initiating fluticasone propionate/salmeterol combination therapy (250/50 mcg) versus anticholinergics in a comorbid COPD/depression population  

PubMed Central

Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently associated with comorbid depression and anxiety. Managing COPD symptoms and exacerbations through use of appropriate and adequate pharmacotherapy in this population may result in better COPD-related outcomes. Methods This retrospective, observational study used administrative claims of patients aged 40 years and older with COPD and comorbid depression/anxiety identified from January 1, 2004 through June 30, 2008. Patients were assigned to fluticasone propionate/salmeterol 250/50 mcg combination (FSC) or anticholinergics (AC) based on their first (index) prescription. The risks of COPD exacerbations and healthcare utilization and costs were compared between cohorts during 1 year of follow-up. Results The adjusted risk of a COPD-related exacerbation during the 1-year follow-up period was 30% higher in the AC cohort (n = 2923) relative to the FSC cohort (n = 1078) (odds ratio [OR]: 1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.08–1.56) after controlling for baseline differences in covariates. The risks of COPD-related hospitalizations and emergency department visits were 56% and 65% higher, respectively, in the AC cohort compared with the FSC cohort. The average number of COPD-related hospitalizations during the follow-up period was 46% higher for the AC cohort compared with the FSC cohort (incidence rate ratio [IRR]: 1.46, 95% CI: 1.01–2.09, P = 0.041). The savings from lower COPD-related medical costs ($692 vs $1042, P < 0.050) kept the COPD-related total costs during the follow-up period comparable to those in the AC cohort ($1659 vs $1677, P > 0.050) although the pharmacy costs were higher in the FSC cohort. Conclusions FSC compared with AC was associated with more favorable COPD-related outcomes and lower COPD-related utilization and medical costs among patients with COPD and comorbid anxiety/depression. PMID:22315518

Dalal, Anand A; Shah, Manan; D'Souza, Anna O; Chaudhari, Sham; Crater, Glenn

2012-01-01

198

A Chandra HETGS Spectral Study of the Iron K Bandpass in MCG-6-30-15: A Narrow View of the Broad Iron Line  

E-print Network

We present a high resolution X-ray spectrum of the iron K bandpass in MCG-6-30-15 based on a 522 ksec observation with Chandra's High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer. The Chandra spectrum is consistent with the presence of a relativistically broadened, highly redshifted iron K alpha emission line with a similar profile to previous observations. A number of narrow features are detected above 2 keV, including a narrow Fe K alpha emission line and narrow absorption lines from H- and He-like Fe, H-like S and H-like Si. This absorption is well described by a photoionized plasma with a column density log N_H = 23.2 and an ionization parameter log xi = 3.6, assuming the iron abundance has the Solar value and a velocity dispersion parameter b = 100 km/s. Applying this absorption model to a high fidelity XMM-Newton EPIC-pn spectrum we find that a broad iron line is still required with emission extending to within 1.9 gravitational radii of the black hole. If the iron line comes from an accretion disk truncated at the innermost stable circular orbit, this indicates that the black hole must be spinning rapidly with a>0.95. Ionized absorption models attempting to explain the 3-6 keV spectral curvature without strong gravity predict absorption lines in the 6.4-6.6 keV range that are inconsistent with the Chandra spectrum. The H- and He-like iron absorption lines in the Chandra spectrum are blueshifted by 2.0 (+0.7/-0.9) x 10^3 km/s compared to the source frame, and may originate in a high velocity, high ionization component of the warm absorber outflow. This high ionization component may dominate the energy budget of the outflow, and account for a significant fraction of the outflowing mass. (Abstract truncated).

A. J. Young; J. C. Lee; A. C. Fabian; C. S. Reynolds; R. R. Gibson; C. R. Canizares

2005-06-03

199

What Are Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers?  

MedlinePLUS

... oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? What are oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? Oral cavity cancer, or just ... parts of the mouth and throat. The oral cavity (mouth) and oropharynx (throat) The oral cavity includes ...

200

Oral Chemotherapy: What You Need to Know  

MedlinePLUS

Oral Chemotherapy: What You Need to Know Oral chemo is any drug you take by mouth to treat cancer. ... be ready for oral chemo. What is oral chemotherapy? There are many types of chemotherapy (chemo). Oral ...

201

Garrett Fugate Oral History  

E-print Network

Oral history interview with Garrett Fugate conducted by Jeremy Adkison in 2010. In this interview, University of Kansas student Garrett Fugate discusses his childhood experiences as a member of the Greek Orthodox community, ...

Fugate, Garrett; Adkison, Jeremy

2010-01-01

202

Edith Bogart Oral History  

E-print Network

Oral history interview with Edith Bogart conducted by Timothy Miller in Lawrence, Kansas, on September 14, 2010. In this interview, Edith Bogart discusses her experiences with a variety of denominations, including Episcopalian, Jehovah's Witnesses...

Bogart, Edith; Miller, Timothy

2010-09-14

203

Kansas Lawsonians Oral History  

E-print Network

Oral history interview with John and Paula Mook and George Hunergaaurd conducted by Jamie Reeve in Wichita, Kansas, on December 8, 2009. In this interview, John and Paul Mook and George Hunergaaurd discuss the biography ...

Mook, John; Mook, Paula; Hunergaaurd, George; Reeve, Jamie

2009-12-08

204

Anna Manning Oral History  

E-print Network

Oral history interview with Anna Manning conducted by Sean Manning in Overland Park, Kansas, on November 5, 2009. In this interview, Anna Manning discusses the Hispanic ministries in Catholic Churches in Johnson County, ...

Manning, Anna; Manning, Sean

2009-11-05

205

Barnabas Senecal Oral History  

E-print Network

Oral history interview with Abbot Barnabas Senecal of St. Benedict’s Abbey in Atchison, Kansas, conducted by Ben Nelson on December 9, 2009. In this interview, Abbot Barnabas discusses his childhood ties with the Catholic Church, the history...

Senecal, Barnabas; Nelson, Ben

2009-12-09

206

Communication (Oral & Written) Leadership  

E-print Network

Team Work Communication (Oral & Written) Leadership Decision Making Creativity Ethics Computer Organization REQUIRED SKILLS Sport Teams Public Recreation Facilities Health/Fitness Centers and Event Management POSSIBLE EMPLOYERS EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES What Can I Do With a Major in... Sport

Jiang, Huiqiang

207

Oral compound nevus.  

PubMed

The melanocytic nevus is a benign and focal proliferation of nevus cells that can be congenital or acquired. Intraoral lesions are uncommon, and the etiology and pathogenesis are poorly understood. The occurrence rate of oral compound nevus is about 5.9% to 16.5% of all oral melanocytic nevi. A 22-year-old male patient presented with a dark brown macule on the buccal mucosa of the maxilla in the region of tooth 26. The lesion was elliptical, 0.7 x 0.5 cm, well circumscribed, asymptomatic, and the evolution time was unknown. An excisional biopsy was performed and microscopic analysis revealed nests of nevus cells in the epithelium and underlying connective tissue that were compatible with melanocytic compound nevus. Owing to the clinical similarity between oral melanocytic nevus and oral melanoma, a histopathological analysis is mandatory for definitive diagnosis. PMID:24612575

Cardoso, Lyzete Berriel; Consalaro, Alberto; da Silva Santos, Paulo Sérgio; da Silva Sampieri, Marcelo Bonifácio; Tinoco-Araújo, José Endrigo

2014-02-01

208

Leni Salkind Oral History  

E-print Network

Oral history interview with Leni Salkind conducted by Timothy Miller in Lawrence, Kansas, on November 11, 2009. In this interview, Leni Salkind describes her experiences as a member of the Jewish community in Lawrence. She discusses the issue...

Salkind, Leni; Miller, Timothy

2009-11-11

209

Phil Friedl Oral History  

E-print Network

Oral history interview with Phil Friedl conducted by Sara Vestal and Rachel Gadd-Nelson in Delia, Kansas, on November 11, 2009. Phil Friedl is a follower of David Bawden, who is also known as Pope Michael. In this interview, ...

Friedl, Phil; Vestal, Sara; Gadd-Nelson, Rachel

2009-11-11

210

Justin Jenkins Oral History  

E-print Network

Oral history interview with Justin Jenkins conducted by Emily Stratton in Lawrence, Kansas, on June 6, 2013. Justin Jenkins is the founder and lead pastor of Velocity Church. Velocity Church is a recent non-denominational ...

Jenkins, Justin; Stratton, Emily

2013-06-06

211

Virgil Dean Oral History  

E-print Network

Oral history interview with Virgil Dean conducted by Timothy Miller in Lawrence, Kansas on November 9, 2010. In this interview, Virgil Dean, director for publications for the Kansas State Historical Society and editor of ...

Dean, Virgil; Miller, Timothy

2010-11-09

212

Oral Cancer Prevention  

MedlinePLUS

... partners of people with HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer . Sun exposure Being exposed to sunlight may increase the risk of lip cancer. Lip ... factors, such as drinking alcohol, HPV infection, and sun exposure, increase the risk of oral cancer. It ...

213

Eleanor Symons Oral History  

E-print Network

Oral history interview with Eleanor Symons conducted by Timothy Miller in Lawrence, Kansas, on October 14, 2009. In this interview, Eleanor Symons, a retired University of Kansas librarian, discusses the history of the ...

Symons, Eleanor; Miller, Timothy

2009-10-14

214

Naomi Nelson Oral History  

E-print Network

Oral history interview with Naomi Nelson conducted by Rachel Gadd-Nelson in Kansas City, Kansas, on September 18, 2009. In this interview, Naomi Nelson describes her early childhood experiences attending church in Wilsey, ...

Nelson, Naomi; Gadd-Nelson, Rachel

2009-09-18

215

Oral Cancer Exam  

MedlinePLUS

... and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings Loan Repayment Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral ...

216

Oral Crohn's disease.  

PubMed

'Crohn's disease' is an inflammatory granulomatous disease of the gastrointestinal tract with extra-intestinal manifestations. Oral lesions may precede the intestinal disease and serve as a source for histological diagnosis. We present a case of orofacial Crohn's disease where orofacial symptoms were present for about 13 years and occasional constipation was present, since 6 months. Oral examination plays an important role in early diagnosis of Crohn's disease. PMID:25364165

Padmavathi, Bn; Sharma, Smriti; Astekar, Madhusudan; Rajan, Y; Sowmya, Gv

2014-09-01

217

Oral Crohn's disease  

PubMed Central

’Crohn's disease’ is an inflammatory granulomatous disease of the gastrointestinal tract with extra-intestinal manifestations. Oral lesions may precede the intestinal disease and serve as a source for histological diagnosis. We present a case of orofacial Crohn's disease where orofacial symptoms were present for about 13 years and occasional constipation was present, since 6 months. Oral examination plays an important role in early diagnosis of Crohn's disease. PMID:25364165

Padmavathi, BN; Sharma, Smriti; Astekar, Madhusudan; Rajan, Y; Sowmya, GV

2014-01-01

218

George Paris Oral History  

E-print Network

management video solutionsvideo player Part 7 video platform video management video solutionsvideo player Return to George Paris's Oral History in KU ScholarWorks Tami Albin, Director for Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of GLBTQ People... are copyrighted and protected by copyright law (Title 17, U. S. Code). Requests for permission to publish quotations beyond "fair use" from this collection should be addressed to: Tami Albin (albin@ku.edu or tami.albin@gmail.com ) Director of Under the Rainbow...

Paris, George; Albin, Tami

2010-01-11

219

ORAL HYGIENE AND INSTITUTIONALIZED ELDERS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The oral hygiene of institutionalized elders is poor. This population exhibits an increased risk of oral infections such as periodontal disease, caries, inflammatory mucosal disorders, and denture-related problems. Poor oral health has been associated with systemic infections, such as respiratory infections, and nutritional inadequa- cies. Thus the maintenance of oral health among institu- tionalized elders is of significant value as

ALNAR ALTANI; C. C. L. WYATT

2002-01-01

220

Menopause and oral health.  

PubMed

Different phases of a woman's life: Puberty, menses, pregnancy, and menopause have varied influence on her oral health. During the menopause, women go through biological and endocrine changes, particularly in their sex steroid hormone production, affecting their health. Because the oral mucosa contains estrogen receptors, variations in hormone levels directly affect the oral cavity. A few oral conditions and or diseases are seen more frequently during post menopausal years. Role of hormones affecting the health of oro-dental tissues, as well as treatment by HRT in ameliorating these conditions is not clear. There is paucity of randomized controlled trials in this field and more data is needed, before the recommendations for oral health care in post menopausal women can be made. A gynecologist sitting in menopausal clinic should be aware of oral changes happening during this period, and dental needs of these women and should refer them to the dental specialists accordingly. On the other hand, a dentist should also be sensitized about the menopausal status of the woman, her HRT status and special preventive and treatment needs. PMID:25316996

Suri, Vanita; Suri, Varun

2014-07-01

221

Menopause and oral health  

PubMed Central

Different phases of a woman's life: Puberty, menses, pregnancy, and menopause have varied influence on her oral health. During the menopause, women go through biological and endocrine changes, particularly in their sex steroid hormone production, affecting their health. Because the oral mucosa contains estrogen receptors, variations in hormone levels directly affect the oral cavity. A few oral conditions and or diseases are seen more frequently during post menopausal years. Role of hormones affecting the health of oro-dental tissues, as well as treatment by HRT in ameliorating these conditions is not clear. There is paucity of randomized controlled trials in this field and more data is needed, before the recommendations for oral health care in post menopausal women can be made. A gynecologist sitting in menopausal clinic should be aware of oral changes happening during this period, and dental needs of these women and should refer them to the dental specialists accordingly. On the other hand, a dentist should also be sensitized about the menopausal status of the woman, her HRT status and special preventive and treatment needs. PMID:25316996

Suri, Vanita; Suri, Varun

2014-01-01

222

Oral and systemic photoprotection.  

PubMed

Photoprotection can be provided not only by ultraviolet (UV) blockers but also by oral substances. Epidemiologically identified associations between foods and skin cancer and interventional experiments have discovered mechanisms of UV skin damage. These approaches have identified oral substances that are photoprotective in humans. UV inhibits adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production causing an energy crisis, which prevents optimal skin immunity and DNA repair. Enhancing ATP production with oral nicotinamide protects from UV immunosuppression, enhances DNA repair and reduces skin cancer in humans. Reactive oxygen species also contribute to photodamage. Nontoxic substances consumed in the diet, or available as oral supplements, can protect the skin by multiple potential mechanisms. These substances include polyphenols in fruit, vegetables, wine, tea and caffeine-containing foods. UV-induced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) contributes to photodamage. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and food substances reduce production of this lipid mediator. Fish oils are photoprotective, at least partially by reducing PGE2 . Orally consumed substances, either in the diet or as supplements, can influence cutaneous responses to UV. A current research goal is to develop an oral supplement that could be used in conjunction with other sun protective strategies in order to provide improved protection from sunlight. PMID:24313740

Chen, Andrew C; Damian, Diona L; Halliday, Gary M

2014-01-01

223

Aerodigestive cancers: oral cancer.  

PubMed

Worldwide, approximately 260,000 new cases of oral cancer occur, and more than 125,000 mortalities are attributed to oral cancers each year. Oral cancers most commonly arise in the tongue, followed by the floor of the mouth and the lower gum. Tobacco and alcohol use are the major risk factors, although human papillomavirus has been identified as an etiology in a small percentage of oral squamous cell cancers. Although the evidence to support routine annual screening for oral cancers is inconclusive, family physicians and dental practitioners should be attentive to precursor lesions, such as leukoplakia and erythroplakia, and strongly consider obtaining or referring for biopsy patients with suspicious lesions. Depending on stage, management of oral cancers often involves surgery, with or without postoperative radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Patients who have been treated for these cancers should undergo close surveillance by otolaryngology subspecialists, but their family physicians primarily will be responsible for their long-term care. Complications relating to management, including difficulties with speech, swallowing, and chewing, will need to be addressed. For patients with advanced-stage disease, family physicians also may be responsible for palliative and end-of-life care. PMID:25198382

Haws, Luke; Haws, Bryn Taylor

2014-09-01

224

HPV-associated oral warts.  

PubMed

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is strictly epitheliotropic, infecting stratified squamous cutaneous and mucosal epithelial cells. Oral HPV infection may be subclinical or putatively associated with benign or malignant oral neoplasms. The benign HPV-associated oral lesions, focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck disease), oral squamous cell papilloma, oral verruca vulgaris (common wart) and oral condyloma acuminatum, are collectively referred to as oral warts. Oral warts are usually asymptomatic, may be persistent or uncommonly, may regress spontaneously. HPV-associated oral warts have a prevalence of 0.5% in the general population, occur in up to 5% of HIV-seropositive subjects, and in up to 23% of HIV-seropositive subjects on highly active antiretroviral therapy. This paper is a clinico-pathological review of HPV-associated oral warts. PMID:21608502

Feller, L; Khammissa, R A G; Wood, N H; Marnewick, J C; Meyerov, R; Lemmer, J

2011-03-01

225

The Canine Oral Microbiome  

PubMed Central

Determining the bacterial composition of the canine oral microbiome is of interest for two primary reasons. First, while the human oral microbiome has been well studied using molecular techniques, the oral microbiomes of other mammals have not been studied in equal depth using culture independent methods. This study allows a comparison of the number of bacterial taxa, based on 16S rRNA-gene sequence comparison, shared between humans and dogs, two divergent mammalian species. Second, canine oral bacteria are of interest to veterinary and human medical communities for understanding their roles in health and infectious diseases. The bacteria involved are mostly unnamed and not linked by 16S rRNA-gene sequence identity to a taxonomic scheme. This manuscript describes the analysis of 5,958 16S rRNA-gene sequences from 65 clone libraries. Full length 16S rRNA reference sequences have been obtained for 353 canine bacterial taxa, which were placed in 14 bacterial phyla, 23 classes, 37 orders, 66 families, and 148 genera. Eighty percent of the taxa are currently unnamed. The bacterial taxa identified in dogs are markedly different from those of humans with only 16.4% of oral taxa are shared between dogs and humans based on a 98.5% 16S rRNA sequence similarity cutoff. This indicates that there is a large divergence in the bacteria comprising the oral microbiomes of divergent mammalian species. The historic practice of identifying animal associated bacteria based on phenotypic similarities to human bacteria is generally invalid. This report describes the diversity of the canine oral microbiome and provides a provisional 16S rRNA based taxonomic scheme for naming and identifying unnamed canine bacterial taxa. PMID:22558330

Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Klein, Erin A.; Thompson, Emily C.; Blanton, Jessica M.; Chen, Tsute; Milella, Lisa; Buckley, Catherine M. F.; Davis, Ian J.; Bennett, Marie-Lousie; Marshall-Jones, Zoe V.

2012-01-01

226

Miconazole in oral candidiasis.  

PubMed Central

Twenty-four patients were treated with oral miconazole (250 mg) for a total of 35 episodes of oral candidiasis. Sixteen had various forms of leukaemia and all were massively predisposed to fungal infection because of granulocytopenia and treatment with prednisolone and antibiotics. Clinical cure was observed in all 35 of the treated episodes, with a mean treatment time of five days, cure being observed in two to three days. When patients violating the protocol were excluded, the mycological cure rate was 97%. In 21 episodes there was a recurrence less than one month after miconazole treatment, probably because of reinfection. No side-effects ascribable to miconazole were observed, even in the severely debilitated patients, and the orally administered drug appeared to be superior to other commercially available antimycotic preparations. Images p29-a PMID:122644

Brincker, H

1977-01-01

227

Christopher Draven Oral History  

E-print Network

is and they should just accept me for who and what I am. But when I was growing up if someone would come to me after I came out—if they would come to me and say, Are you gay, then I wouldn't deny it, I would tell them the truth. But I never brought it up in class... Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer People in Kansas Christopher Draven Oral History Interviewed by Tami Albin February 9, 2008 http...

Draven, Christopher; Albin, Tami

2010-01-12

228

Immunology of oral candidiasis  

PubMed Central

A successful pathogen is one that is able to effectively survive and evade detection by the host immune defense. Oral candidiasis has adopted strategies, which evade host defense and eventually cause disease in at-risk patients. Host defense against infections with Candida spp. depends on rapid activation of an acute inflammatory response by innate immunity, followed by an incremental stimulation of specific immune responses mediated by T-cells (cellular immunity) or B-cells (humoral immunity). Understanding these complex pathways of immune evasion can potentially contribute to the development of novel therapeutic strategies against oral candidiasis. PMID:25210393

Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Sivakumar, Muniapillai; Karthikeyan, M.; Udayakumar, P.; Shanmugam, K. T.; Kesavan, G.

2014-01-01

229

Michael Johnson Oral History  

E-print Network

support groups or whatever like that and then it just turned into, Well there's Michael Johnson January 4, 2009 5 Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of GLBTIQ People in Kansas porn online too. (laugh) So it's like—it's like you just kind... stepmother had found my Xanga site as well. Along with that she had found, on his computer, links to porn site—like gay porn Michael Johnson January 4, 2009 7 Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of GLBTIQ People in Kansas sites, right...

Johnson, Michael; Albin, Tami

2009-12-16

230

College of Dentistry ODM Oral Diagnosis and Oral Medicine  

E-print Network

AND MAXILLOFACIAL RADIOLOGY. (2) Thiscoursepresentsthebasicprinciplesoforalandmaxillofacialradiology. Prereq: Admission to the College of Dentistry. ODM 820 ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL RADIOLOGY AND DIAGNOSTIC

MacAdam, Keith

231

Curriculum Guidelines for Predoctoral Oral Diagnosis/Oral Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oral diagnosis is the area of dental practice that deals with gathering, recording, and evaluating information contributing to the identification of abnormalities of the head and neck region. A statement of general curricular goals in oral diagnosis/oral medicine is presented. (MLW)

Journal of Dental Education, 1987

1987-01-01

232

signal processing and oral communication  

E-print Network

communication Introduction 4 Dysarthria #12;SPOClab signal processing and oral communication Automatic speech processing and oral communication Dysarthria Neuro-motor articulatory difficulties resulting Dysarthria and ASR word accuracy Non-dysarthric Dysarthric Background 7 #12;SPOClab signal processing

Penn, Gerald

233

Kidney Disease (and Oral Health)  

MedlinePLUS

Kidney Disease Oral Effects At the Dentist Oral Effects People with kidney disease often have other health issues. They often have ... body cannot absorb calcium properly. Therefore, people with kidney disease are at risk for losing bone from their ...

234

Lin Tongqi : an oral history  

E-print Network

In this thesis, I explore the life of Professor Lin Tongqi, a well-known scholar of American Chinese studies, by using an oral history methodology. This oral history is named "Suffering and Thinking," and my goal is to ...

Chen, Xin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01

235

Oral Anticoagulant Therapy  

PubMed Central

Background: The objective of this article is to summarize the published literature concerning the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral anticoagulant drugs that are currently available for clinical use and other aspects related to their management. Methods: We carried out a standard review of published articles focusing on the laboratory and clinical characteristics of the vitamin K antagonists; the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate; and the direct factor Xa inhibitor, rivaroxaban Results: The antithrombotic effect of each oral anticoagulant drug, the interactions, and the monitoring of anticoagulation intensity are described in detail and discussed without providing specific recommendations. Moreover, we describe and discuss the clinical applications and optimal dosages of oral anticoagulant therapies, practical issues related to their initiation and monitoring, adverse events such as bleeding and other potential side effects, and available strategies for reversal. Conclusions: There is a large amount of evidence on laboratory and clinical characteristics of vitamin K antagonists. A growing body of evidence is becoming available on the first new oral anticoagulant drugs available for clinical use, dabigatran and rivaroxaban. PMID:22315269

Gallus, Alexander S.; Wittkowsky, Ann; Crowther, Mark; Hylek, Elaine M.; Palareti, Gualtiero

2012-01-01

236

Ann Cobb Oral History  

E-print Network

Oral history interview with Ann Cobb conducted by Dr. Timothy Miller in Smith Hall on the University of Kansas campus on November 18, 2009. In this interview, Ann Cobb discusses growing up as a Catholic in Seneca, Kansas, and her later conversion...

Cobb, Ann; Miller, Timothy

2009-11-18

237

Oral Health Presentation Objectives  

E-print Network

and mouth care we can develop dental caries or tooth decay. This is caused by bacteria in our mouths and direction, amount of tooth paste, and timing (2 times per day and after sugary snack). 2. Flossing Teeth, increase calcium intake, tobacco prevention (chew r/t oral cancer and dental decay). 4. Dental Decay

Maxwell, Bruce D.

238

Learning Oral Presentation Skills  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE Oral presentation skills are central to physician-physician communication; however, little is known about how these skills are learned. Rhetoric is a social science which studies communication in terms of context and explores the action of language on knowledge, attitudes, and values. It has not previously been applied to medical discourse. We used rhetorical principles to qualitatively study how students learn oral presentation skills and what professional values are communicated in this process. DESIGN Descriptive study. SETTING Inpatient general medicine service in a university-affiliated public hospital. PARTICIPANTS Twelve third-year medical students during their internal medicine clerkship and 14 teachers. MEASUREMENTS One-hundred sixty hours of ethnographic observation. including 73 oral presentations on rounds. Discoursed-based interviews of 8 students and 10 teachers. Data were qualitatively analyzed to uncover recurrent patterns of communication. MAIN RESULTS Students and teachers had different perceptions of the purpose of oral presentation, and this was reflected in performance. Students described and conducted the presentation as a rule-based, data-storage activity governed by “order” and “structure.” Teachers approached the presentation as a flexible means of “communication” and a method for “constructing” the details of a case into a diagnostic or therapeutic plan. Although most teachers viewed oral presentations rhetorically (sensitive to context), most feedback that students received was implicit and acontextual, with little guidance provided for determining relevant content. This led to dysfunctional generalizations by students, sometimes resulting in worse communication skills (e.g., comment “be brief” resulted in reading faster rather than editing) and unintended value acquisition (e.g., request for less social history interpreted as social history never relevant). CONCLUSIONS Students learn oral presentation by trial and error rather than through teaching of an explicit rhetorical model. This may delay development of effective communication skills and result in acquisition of unintended professional values. Teaching and learning of oral presentation skills may be improved by emphasizing that context determines content and by making explicit the tacit rules of presentation. PMID:11359549

Haber, Richard J; Lingard, Lorelei A

2001-01-01

239

Probiotics and oral health.  

PubMed

Probiotics are living microorganisms (e.g., bacteria) that are either the same as or similar to organisms found naturally in the human body and may be beneficial to health. Current researches have shown that the balance between beneficial and pathogenic bacteria is essential in order to maintain the oral health. Therefore, oral cavity has recently been suggested as a relevant target for probiotic applications. Dental caries can be seen as a microbial imbalance where the oral microbiota shift towards community dominance which produces acidogenic and acid-tolerant gram positive bacteria. Similarly, the accumulation of bacteria within the biofilm, facilitated by poor oral hygiene, predisposes to allogenic shifts in the microbial community, leading to the onset of periodontal inflammation. Probiotic bacteria belonging to the genus of Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and Streptococcus have been proven effective for preventing caries by reducing the number of cariogenic bacteria in saliva after a short period of consuming the probiotic. In contrast, the effect of probiotics on improving gingivitis and periodontitis has been less investigated. The currently available studies on the effect of probiotics on periodontal pathogens and clinical periodontal parameters showed differing results depending on the strains used and the endpoints analyzed. Many of the clinical studies are pilot in nature and with low quality, therefore, properly conducted clinical trials, using probiotic strains with in vitro proven periodontal probiotic effects, are needed. The putative beneficial effects of probiotics on oral malodour have also been evaluated, but further evidence is needed to fully explore the potential of probiotics for preventing malodour. PMID:22632388

Bizzini, Bernard; Pizzo, Giuseppe; Scapagnini, Giovanni; Nuzzo, Domenico; Vasto, Sonya

2012-01-01

240

A History of Oral Interpretation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This historical account of the oral interpretation of literature establishes a chain of events comprehending 25 centuries of verbal tradition from the Homeric Age through 20th Century America. It deals in each era with the viewpoints and contributions of major historical figures to oral interpretation, as well as with oral interpretation's…

Bahn, Eugene; Bahn, Margaret L.

241

Minor Oral Injuries in Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Traumatic injuries involving the oral cavity in children often result from falls or collisions with stationary objects. Repair of lacerations involving the soft tissue structures within the oral cavity is described. These injuries often can be managed by emergency department personnel, with referral to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon for follow-up care. Initial management of more extensive injuries such as

KATHY BANKS; PHYLLIS G. MERLINO

242

Oral health policies in Brazil.  

PubMed

Since Oral Health policies in Brazil have been constructed according to circumstances and possibilities, they should be understood within a given context. The present analysis contextualizes several issues of the Brazilian Oral Health Policy, called "Smiling Brazil", and describes its present stage of development. Today it involves re-organizing basic oral health care by deploying Oral Health Teams within the Family Health strategy, setting up Centers of Dental Specialists within an Oral Health network as a secondary care measure, setting up Regional Laboratories of Dental Prosthesis and a more extensive fluoridation of the public water supply. PMID:19838553

Pucca, Gilberto Alfredo; Costa, José Felipe Riani; Chagas, Luciana de Deus; Sivestre, Rosa Maria

2009-01-01

243

Immunopharmacology of oral betalactams.  

PubMed

Among the oral beta-lactam antibiotics only cefaclor has demonstrated a consistent in vitro and in vivo immunopharmacological effect which favors phagocytic chemotaxis and antimicrobial potential by inducing a T-helper 1 or pro-inflammatory response. Together with cefpimizole, cefaclor significantly reduces the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) against some bacterial species when cultured together with a suspension of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, as opposed to some other oral beta-lactams, co-amoxiclav and cefixime, which do not show this effect. The pro-inflammatory component of cefaclor's activity explains the clinical success of this antibiotic in a high percentage of cases, even when laboratory tests indicate in vitro resistance by the pathogen. PMID:9603632

Periti, P

1998-04-01

244

Kristi Parker Oral History  

E-print Network

before she goes into the system. So that's kind of how that all happened. And so they snagged me before I went into the adoption process. And it was all done through a private attorney with contracts and whatnot. And I asked my mom just recently... level of 1 Added and edited by narrator during the review process. 2 Added and edited by narrator during the review process. 2 Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of GLBTIQ People in Kansas Kristi...

Parker, Kristi; Albin, Tami

2012-09-15

245

Oral Cavity Surgery Codes  

Cancer.gov

Oral Cavity Lip C000–C009, Base of Tongue C019, Other Parts of Tongue C020–C029, Gum C030–C039, Floor of Mouth C040–C049, Palate C050–C059, Other Parts of Mouth C060–C069 (Except for M9727, 9733, 9741-9742, 9764-9809, 9832, 9840-9931, 9945-9946, 9950-9967,

246

Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Worldwide, in the year 2000, there were approx 450,000 new cases of and 240,000 deaths attributable to cancer of the lip,\\u000a oral cavity, pharynx, and salivary glands (ICD-9 140–149) (1). A diagnosis of cancer at these sites is important because it can result in facial disfigurement, speech impairment, chewing\\u000a and\\/or swallowing difficulties, mental anguish, a decreased quality of life, and

Douglas E. Morse

247

Kristie Stremel Oral History  

E-print Network

Part 3 video platform video management video solutionsvideo player Part 4 video platform video management video solutionsvideo player Return to Kristie Stremel Oral History in KU ScholarWorks Tami Albin, Director for Under the Rainbow..., Intersex and Queer People in Kansas are copyrighted and protected by copyright law (Title 17, U. S. Code). Requests for permission to publish quotations beyond "fair use" from this collection should be addressed to: Tami Albin (albin@ku.edu or tami.albin...

Stremel, Kristie; Albin, Tami

2009-10-27

248

Skylab oral health studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Evaluation of Skylab crewmembers for mission related effects on oral health in relation to possible dental injuries provided the following distinctive changes: (1) increased counts of specific anaerobic and streptococcal components; (2) elevations in levels of secretory IgA concurrent with diminutions of salivary lysozyme; and (3) increases in dental calculus and gingival inflammations. The clinical changes are considered to be more influenced by the preexisting state of dental health than by any mission related effects.

Brown, L. R.; Frome, W. J.; Handler, S.; Wheatcroft, M. G.; Rider, L. J.

1977-01-01

249

Oral burn contractures in children.  

PubMed

Oral burn contractures in children present major reconstructive problem. Only few reports in literature discussed oral burns in children. Electrical, chemical, and thermal agents are the main causative agents for oral burns. Oral contractures can be classified into anterior, posterior, and total. Anterior contractures are usually caused by electrical burns and involve the oral commissure, lips, anterior buccal sulcus and surrounding mucosa, and anterior tongue. Posterior oral contractures are caused by caustic ingestion and involve the posterior buccal mucosa, posterior tongue, retro-molar area and oro-pharynx. Total oral contractures involve the lips, tongue, oral cavity, and oro-pharyngeal mucosa and are caused by lye caustic ingestion. This report reviews three children; one with posterior, two with total oral cavity contracture. All cases were managed by linear release of scar contracture and skin grafting followed by a prolonged intra-oral splinting with a fixed mouth-block and commissural splint. A successful outcome was observed in all cases. PMID:14595182

Hashem, Fuad K; Al Khayal, Zikra

2003-11-01

250

Oral tuberculosis following successful treatment of oral malignancy.  

PubMed

Coexistence of tuberculosis and neoplastic lesion in the oral cavity is a rare phenomenon. Till date, only three such cases have been reported in the English literature. A case of oral tuberculosis manifesting 3 months following the successful treatment of cancer of the oral tongue with chemoradiotherapy is presented. The diagnostic dilemma it posed, and its eventual successful control by anti-tubercular treatment, is discussed. PMID:23361293

Bagga, Preeti; Dewan, Abhinav; Agarwal, Pankaj; Garg, Charu; Datta, Niloy R

2012-01-01

251

Clinical guidelines. Labor induction abortion in the second trimester.  

PubMed

Labor induction abortion is effective throughout the second trimester. Patterns of use and gestational age limits vary by locality. Earlier gestations (typically 12 to 20 weeks) have shorter abortion times than later gestational ages, but differences in complication rates within the second trimester according to gestational age have not been demonstrated. The combination of mifepristone and misoprostol is the most effective and fastest regimen. Typically, mifepristone 200 mg is followed by use of misoprostol 24-48 h later. Ninety-five percent of abortions are complete within 24 h of misoprostol administration. Compared with misoprostol alone, the combined regimen results in a clinically significant reduction of 40% to 50% in time to abortion and can be used at all gestational ages. However, mifepristone is not widely available. Accordingly, prostaglandin analogues without mifepristone (most commonly misoprostol or gemeprost) or high-dose oxytocin are used. Misoprostol is more widely used because it is inexpensive and stable at room temperature. Misoprostol alone is best used vaginally or sublingually, and doses of 400 mcg are generally superior to 200 mcg or less. Dosing every 3 h is superior to less frequent dosing, although intervals of up to 12 h are effective when using higher doses (600 or 800 mcg) of misoprostol. Abortion rates at 24 h are approximately 80%-85%. Although gemeprost has similar outcomes as compared to misoprostol, it has higher cost, requires refrigeration, and can only be used vaginally. High-dose oxytocin can be used in circumstances when prostaglandins are not available or are contraindicated. Osmotic dilators do not shorten induction times when inserted at the same time as misoprostol; however, their use prior to induction using misoprostol has not been studied. Preprocedure-induced fetal demise has not been studied systematically for possible effects on time to abortion. While isolated case reports and retrospective reviews document uterine rupture during second-trimester induction with misoprostol, the magnitude of the risk is not known. The relationship of individual uterotonic agents to uterine rupture is not clear. Based on existing evidence, the Society of Family Planning recommends that, when labor induction abortion is performed in the second trimester, combined use of mifepristone and misoprostol is the ideal regimen to effect abortion quickly and completely. The Society of Family Planning further recommends that alternative regimens, primarily misoprostol alone, should only be used when mifepristone is not available. PMID:21664506

Borgatta, Lynn; Kapp, Nathalie

2011-07-01

252

Oral Lesions and Lymphoproliferative Disorders  

PubMed Central

Lymphoproliferative disorders are heterogeneous malignancy characterized by the expansion of a lymphoid clone more or less differentiated. At the level of the oral cavity, the lymphoproliferative disorder can occur in various ways, most commonly as lymphoid lesions with extranodal externalization, but sometimes, oral lesions may represent a localization of a disease spread. With regard to the primary localizations of lymphoproliferative disorders, a careful examination of the head and neck, oral, and oropharyngeal area is necessary in order to identify suspicious lesions, and their early detection results in a better prognosis for the patient. Numerous complications have been described and frequently found at oral level, due to pathology or different therapeutic strategies. These complications require precise diagnosis and measures to oral health care. In all this, oral pathologists, as well as dental practitioners, have a central role in the treatment and long-term monitoring of these patients. PMID:20871659

Castellarin, P.; Pozzato, G.; Tirelli, G.; Di Lenarda, R.; Biasotto, M.

2010-01-01

253

Oral tuberculosis: unusual radiographic findings  

PubMed Central

Oral tuberculosis and its radiographic findings are not commonly encountered in an oral and maxillofacial radiology practice. Literature has occasional mention of the radiographic findings of oral tuberculosis, which are still ambiguous. When affected, it is manifested majorly in the oral mucosa and rarely in the jaw bones. Here, we report certain unusual radiographic findings of oral tuberculosis which have been rarely mentioned in the literature. Four illustrative cases describe bony resorption, condylar resorption, resorption of the inferior border of the mandible and rarefaction of the alveolar bone as radiographic findings of oral tuberculosis. Follow up of the first case demonstrated regeneration of the condylar head after anti-Kochs therapy was completed, a hitherto unreported phenomenon. The importance of including tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis of some of the unusual radiographic manifestations is emphasized. PMID:21493882

Sansare, K; Gupta, A; Khanna, V; Karjodkar, F

2011-01-01

254

Katherine Oral History  

E-print Network

about whether or not I was gay or not would have been during summer camp. I went to summer camp for ten summers—nine summers and then there was a big break and then the tenth summer I went back as a counselor. ALBIN: So what year at summer camp... system, or they were then. And it was at that point that I had come to the realization that I was gay— ALBIN: And do you think— 6 Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of GLBTIQ People in Kansas Kathrine May 31, 2008 KATHERINE: And again...

Albin, Tami

2014-03-13

255

Route 66 Oral Histories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The folks at Missouri State University have interviewed a range of business owners along the celebrated Route 66 to tell the amazing story of what life was like living along this American landmark. Visitors can read through interviews with a variety of people, including the long-time owner of the Boots Motel in Carthage, Missouri and Sheldon and Julia Chaney, owner of a popular gas station. It's the type of popular oral history that makes for excellent reading and contemplation. They plan on adding more material in the future, so curious visitors would do well to make return visits to see what's added next.

256

The World Oral Literature Project  

E-print Network

. Consider the option of submitting an opinion piece – between 750 and 1 250 words. Show respect to all by not using language that is discriminatory, obscene or abusive, or that could be construed as hate speech or as a personal attack. If you feel that any... language is not just about words, syntax and grammar. Languages convey unique forms of cultural knowledge; speech forms encode oral traditions and provide form for oral literatures. The broad term ‘oral literature’ includes ritual texts, curative chants...

Anon.

2010-04-12

257

[Oral transmission of Chagas' disease].  

PubMed

The traditional transmission pathways of Chagas' disease are vectorial, transfusional, transplacental and organ transplantation. However, oral transmission is gaining importance. The first evidence of oral transmission was reported in Brazil in 1965. Nowadays the oral route is the transmission mode in 50% of cases in the Amazon river zone. Oral infection is produced by the ingestion of infected triatomine bugs or their feces, undercooked meat from infested host animals and food contaminated with urine or anal secretion of infected marsupials. Therefore travelers to those zones should be advised about care to be taken with ingested food. In Chile, this new mode of transmission should be considered in public health policies. PMID:21773665

Toso M, Alberto; Vial U, Felipe; Galanti, Norbel

2011-02-01

258

Archives, Oral History and Oral Tradition: A RAMP Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Records and Archives Management Programme (RAMP) report provides information on the nature of oral tradition/history; the role of recorded oral history as documentation in the absence of written records, or as a supplement where written records exist; problems in recording and administering such materials; and basic considerations involved in…

Moss, William W.; Mazikana, Peter C.

259

Le Discours Oral (Oral Discourse). Melanges Pedagogiques, 1972.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The contrast between written language and oral language did not really begin to attract attention until second language teaching defined as its goal the acquisition of a communicative tool rather than a literary tool. This focus on communication made necessary the distinction between language used for oral communication and language used for…

Boulanger, C.; And Others

260

Tobacco Use and Oral Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oral disease risks regarding the use of tobacco arise not only from smoking but also from the oral use of tobacco in the form of snuff. Such diseases range from simple tooth decay to various forms of cancer. A fact list is suggested for presenting the risks to school-age youth. (JN)

Seffrin, John R.; Randall, B. Grove

1982-01-01

261

Pan-Hispanic Oral Tradition  

Microsoft Academic Search

We are concerned here with the oral traditions of Hispanic or Iberian peoples: speakers of Spanish (Castilian), Portuguese, Catalan, and Judeo- Spanish, and also various Spanish and Portuguese creoles in South America, Africa, and Asia. Basque, as an indigenous language of the Iberian Peninsula, should also definitely be counted as part of the Hispanic world. Oral tradition involves any manifestation

Samuel G. Armistead

2004-01-01

262

Learning Strategies for Oral Communication.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the study of learning strategies employed by successful (defined in terms of oral communicative abilities) Chinese learners of English. These strategies are compared to those of less successful learners and those of other population types from other studies. The test of oral communicative abilities is described. A strategies…

Huang, Xiao-Hua; van Naerssen, Margaret

1987-01-01

263

Progestin-Only Oral Contraceptives  

MedlinePLUS

... If you have had a miscarriage or an abortion, you can start taking progestin-only oral contraceptives the next day.Progestin-only oral contraceptives are safe for use by breast-feeding mothers. If you are fully breastfeeding (not giving your ...

264

Estrogen and Progestin (Oral Contraceptives)  

MedlinePLUS

... as scheduled and use a backup method of birth control until your questions are answered. ... about which oral contraceptive or other method of birth control may be the best choice for you.Oral contraceptives may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual ...

265

Why Is Oral Health Important for Women?  

MedlinePLUS

... desktop! more... Why Is Oral Health Important for Women? Article Chapters Why Is Oral Health Important for ... changing. Reviewed: January 2012 Previous Next Related Articles: Women's Oral Health Burning Mouth Syndrome in Middle-aged ...

266

Women’s Oral Health Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because oral health is an integral part of general health, oral problems specific to the female population have to be addressed.\\u000a Women have special oral health needs and considerations that men do not have.

Barbara J. Steinberg; Joan I. Gluch; Susanne K. Giorgio

267

42 CFR 423.2124 - Oral argument.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...PRESCRIPTION DRUG BENEFIT Reopening, ALJ Hearings, MAC review, and Judicial Review § 423.2124 Oral... An enrollee may request to appear before the MAC to present oral argument. (a) The MAC grants a request for oral argument if it...

2011-10-01

268

42 CFR 423.2124 - Oral argument.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...PRESCRIPTION DRUG BENEFIT Reopening, ALJ Hearings, MAC review, and Judicial Review § 423.2124 Oral... An enrollee may request to appear before the MAC to present oral argument. (a) The MAC grants a request for oral argument if it...

2013-10-01

269

42 CFR 423.2124 - Oral argument.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...PRESCRIPTION DRUG BENEFIT Reopening, ALJ Hearings, MAC review, and Judicial Review § 423.2124 Oral... An enrollee may request to appear before the MAC to present oral argument. (a) The MAC grants a request for oral argument if it...

2012-10-01

270

Why Is Oral Health Important for Men?  

MedlinePLUS

... desktop! more... Why is Oral Health Important for Men? Article Chapters Why is Oral Health Important for ... then the other. Updated: February 2007 Related Articles: Men's Oral Health Is Kissing Dangerous to Your Health? ...

271

American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons  

MedlinePLUS

The American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons Oral and maxillofacial surgeons: The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery Visit our ...

272

Fluoride in the oral environment.  

PubMed

A predominant part of the cariostatic activity of fluoride is a function of its concentration in the fluid environment of the teeth. The fluoride exposure results in a slightly elevated steady-state level of fluoride in the oral fluids, primarily in saliva and plaque fluid. So far, however, little is known about the intra-oral fluoride concentration necessary to achieve a cariostatic effect at the site of action. Following fluoride intake, the fluoride remaining in the oral cavity is diluted by the saliva pool. The remaining fluoride may be found in several compartments in the oral cavity. It may be ionized in saliva, ionized in plaque (plaque fluid), bound in plaque, bound as calcium fluoride, bound to enamel, and bound to soft tissues. Fluoride is also distributed to the oral tissues and into the dental plaque by diffusion. It is well established that plaque, after fluoride exposure, becomes a fluoride reservoir which stores for some time and releases fluoride. The present review gives an insight into the important parameters that determine the disposition and fate of fluoride in the oral environment. To achieve in-depth understanding, and hence formulation of the optimal fluoride therapy, more information is needed to consolidate our understanding of the distribution, retention, and elimination of fluoride in the oral cavity. Such knowledge will form a better basis for providing our patients with more effective dental fluoride products and regimens. PMID:10777136

Ekstrand, J; Oliveby, A

1999-12-01

273

Severe manifestation of oral pemphigus.  

PubMed

This article describes a case of pemphigus vulgaris in a relatively young patient with exacerbated characteristics, widespread lesions, and rapid evolution. A 40-year-old woman sought treatment, complaining about severe oral pain and dysphagia. Intraoral inspection revealed ulcerated lesions on the lips, buccal mucosa, and floor of the mouth. The number of lesions quickly increased and resembled erythema multiforme. She also presented blistering lesions on the back, abdomen, neck, and eyes. Incisional oral biopsy revealed pemphigus vulgaris. This report emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis of an oral biopsy in systemic diseases and the management of the lesions. PMID:20434809

Munhoz, Etiene de Andrade; Cardoso, Camila Lopes; Barreto, Jaison Antônio; Soares, Cleverson Teixeira; Damante, José Humberto

2011-01-01

274

Sarcoidosis: oral and perioral manifestations  

PubMed Central

A 46-year-old white woman with lesions on the lower lip, perioral area and in the soft tissues of the oral cavity (gingivae and palate) was examined. The clinical signs were recorded, and incisional biopsies from the oral lesions were taken. The diagnosis of sarcoidosis was established by the histopathological evidence of typical non-caseating granulomas from tissue biopsy, supported by serum ACE- 57.9 U/L, blood calcium 16.83 mEq/L and 24-hrs urine calcium 600 mg). Oral lesions may be the first or the only sign of sarcoidosis in an otherwise healthy patient. PMID:19561785

Kolokotronis, A E; Belazi, M A; Haidemenos, G; Zaraboukas, T K; Antoniades, D Z

2009-01-01

275

Oral Health Status and Oral Health Behaviors in Chinese Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of the study were to describe the oral health status and treatment needs of the 5- to 6-year-old and 12-year-old children in Southern China; to describe the patterns of oral health behaviors, knowledge, and attitudes among the 12-year-olds; and to assess the effects of socio-behavioral factors on the 12-year-old children's dental caries experiences. The study sample was comprised

M. C. M. Wong; E. C. M. Lo; E. Schwarz; H. G. Zhang

2001-01-01

276

Melanin: the biophysiology of oral melanocytes and physiological oral pigmentation  

PubMed Central

The presence of melanocytes in the oral epithelium is a well-established fact, but their physiological functions are not well defined. Melanin provides protection from environmental stressors such as ultraviolet radiation and reactive oxygen species; and melanocytes function as stress-sensors having the capacity both to react to and to produce a variety of microenvironmental cytokines and growth factors, modulating immune, inflammatory and antibacterial responses. Melanocytes also act as neuroendocrine cells producing local neurotransmitters including acetylcholine, catecholamines and opioids, and hormones of the melanocortin system such as proopiomelanocortin, adrenocorticotropic hormone and ?-melanocyte stimulating hormone, that participate in intracellular and in intercellular signalling pathways, thus contributing to tissue homeostasis. There is a wide range of normal variation in melanin pigmentation of the oral mucosa. In general, darker skinned persons more frequently have oral melanin pigmentation than light-skinned persons. Variations in oral physiological pigmentation are genetically determined unless associated with some underlying disease. In this article, we discuss some aspects of the biophysiology of oral melanocytes, of the functions of melanin, and of physiological oral pigmentation. PMID:24661309

2014-01-01

277

History (of oral contraceptives).  

PubMed

This article summarizes the interest and research in oral contraceptives, with particular attention given to recent discoveries in the field. Development of the present day pill was impossible until scientific discoveries of female ovarian hormones during pregnancy. Scientific work in the 1920s identified the 2 hormones, estrogen and progesterone, and scientists showed that use of the 2 together influenced ovulation and eased dysmenorrhea. It was not until 1944 that a scientist produced progesterone from a plant steroid; today synthetic steroids are available. Margaret Sanger, a pioneer in the American Family Planning Movement, financed and encouraged early human volunteer trials and later clinical trials with contraceptive pills. By 1957, the pills were approved by the FDA for use in treating menstrual disorders. In January 1962, they were released on the market as contraceptives. By 1976-77, the pill was used by 80-100 million women around the world. A dated table summarizes the information in the article in a timetable fashion. PMID:12308937

1978-02-01

278

Basil G. Bibby Library Eastman Institute for Oral Health  

E-print Network

Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants · The lowest subscription rate to Clinical Oral Implants to Journal of Oral Implantology American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology · Subscription to Oral

Goldman, Steven A.

279

Oral Health and Bone Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... Size | S S M M L L Bone Basics Osteoporosis Osteogenesis Imperfecta Paget?s Disease of Bone Related Topics News Glossary ... Rest and Immobilization Exercise Exercise (??) Exercise and Osteogenesis Imperfecta Overtraining Risks for Women Smoking Partner Resources Oral ...

280

Oral contraceptives and hepatocellular carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

A series of 26 white women aged under 50 who developed hepatocellular carcinoma in a non-cirrhotic liver were studied for the possible role of oral contraceptives. Eighteen of the women had used the \\

J Neuberger; D Forman; R Doll; R Williams

1986-01-01

281

Multicultural Issues in Oral Health  

PubMed Central

Synopsis Demographic changes over the coming decades will heighten the challenges to the dental profession and to the nation. The expected growth in the numbers of racial and ethnic minorities, and the concomitant growth of immigrant populations are likely to lead to worsening of oral health disparities. Their consequences are becoming increasingly evident as the profession strives to improve the oral health of all Americans. The increasing diversity of the population, together with the importance of cultural beliefs and behaviors that affect health outcomes, will require ways to enhance provider-patient communications and oral health literacy. We discuss the nature and challenges presented by multicultural patient populations. One important means by which to promote oral health in diverse populations is to develop a dental workforce that is both culturally and linguistically competent, as well as one that is as culturally diverse as the American population. PMID:18329446

Garcia, Raul I.; Cadoret, Cindy; Henshaw, Michelle

2008-01-01

282

The Greenhouse Culture Oral History  

E-print Network

Oral history interview with Jared Scholz and Kalah Sipp conducted by Emily Stratton in Lawrence, Kansas, on June 26, 2013. Jared Scholz is the founder and Senior Pastor of The Greenhouse Culture; Kalah Sipp is The Greenhouse ...

Scholz, Jared; Sipp, Kalah; Stratton, Emily

2013-06-26

283

Kent A. Wagner Oral History  

E-print Network

Oral history interview with Kent A. Wagner conducted by Emily Stratton in Wichita, Kansas, on June 20, 2013. Kent A. Wagner is the founder and lead pastor of Epic Church, a recent church-plant in the Wichita, Kansas, area. ...

Wagner, Kent A; Stratton, Emily

2013-06-20

284

Oral Tradition in Historical Research  

E-print Network

This article will chronicle how those professionals called archivist, charged with collecting, preserving, and making primary source materials including oral history resources available to the public, view their role in this endeavor. This article...

Hankins, Rebecca

285

The relevance of the pharmacologic properties of a progestational agent to its clinical effects as a combination oral contraceptive.  

PubMed Central

Levonorgestrel (LNg) is known for its marked progestational/contraceptive activity. As shown in animal experiments, however, high doses of LNg are required to elicit an androgenic response; in contrast, considerably lower doses of LNg are required for antiovulatory (contraceptive) action. Thus, a large dose separation exists between androgenic and contraceptive activity. When LNg is combined with an estrogen, as in the contraceptive formulations, the androgenic response is attenuated or negated. The results of recent clinical trials have demonstrated that the androgenic activity of LNg is not expressed at contraceptive doses, particularly when LNg is combined with ethinyl estradiol (EE), as in the low-dose monophasic/triphasic formulations (monophasic [Nordette]: 150 mcg LNg/30 mcg EE; triphasic [Triphasil/Trinordiol]: six days, 50 mcg LNg/30 mcg EE; five days, 75 mcg LNg/40 mcg EE; ten days, 125 mcg LNg/30 mcg EE). Clinical evidence from several trials confirms that sex hormone-binding globulin levels are increased, plasma androgen levels are decreased, and acne is markedly improved with the use of Triphasil and Nordette, suggesting a non-androgenic profile. Images FIG. 4 PMID:2534253

Upton, G. V.; Corbin, A.

1989-01-01

286

Recent advances in Oral Oncology.  

PubMed

This paper reviews the main papers related to oral squamous cell carcinoma published in 2006 in oral oncology - an international interdisciplinary journal which publishes high quality original research, clinical trials and review articles, and all other scientific articles relating to the aetiopathogenesis, epidemiology, prevention, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and management of patients with neoplasms in the head and neck, and orofacial disease in patients with malignant disease. PMID:17275742

Scully, Crispian; Bagan, Jose V

2007-02-01

287

Diseases of the Oral Mucosa  

PubMed Central

This article provides a clinical approach to the more common oral mucosal lesions. Histologic diagnoses are not included, apart from their use in diagnosis and management. In a small number of oral mucosal lesions, clinical appearance is sufficiently distinctive to permit accurate diagnosis, but a biopsy is usually necessary. Clinical appearance is important in directing further investigations such as culture and serologic testing. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:21253207

Bradley, G.

1988-01-01

288

Why Must Physicians Know About Oral Diseases?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Poor oral health reflects social inequalities, hence the prevention of oral diseases should be a priority in developed and underdeveloped countries around the world. Medical practitioners must play an active role in oral health promotion. Summary: Proper knowledge of oral diseases is crucial in medical practice due to the following reasons: (a) Periodontal disease is associated with multiple systemic

Jorge Hernán Ramirez; Roger Arce; Adolfo Contreras

2010-01-01

289

Perceived Oral Health in a Diverse Sample  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measures of perceived oral health represent subjective, individual perspectives of one's health. One measure commonly used is the single-item perceived oral health rating: How would you rate your overall oral health? These analyses examine the associations among age, ethnicity, and perceived oral health within the context of a comprehensive battery of 21 predisposing, enabling, and need variables. The study compares

K. A. Atchison; H. C. Gift

1997-01-01

290

19 CFR 148.12 - Oral declarations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... § 148.12 Oral declarations. (a) Generally...States may make an oral declaration under the conditions...However, written declarations may be required...permitted. Oral declarations may be permitted under...resident may make an oral declaration if: (i)...

2010-04-01

291

Trends in oral cancer mortality in Europe  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mortality from oral cancer has been rising appreciably in most European countries up to the late 1980s, essentially for men. To update trends in oral cancer, death certification data from oral and pharyngeal cancer for 27 European countries were abstracted and analysed from the WHO mortality database over the period 1980–99. Oral cancer mortality in men has started to decline

Carlo La Vecchia; Franca Lucchini; Eva Negri; Fabio Levi

2004-01-01

292

Developing Oral History in Chinese Libraries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared with oral history in most Western countries, oral history theory and practice in Mainland China lag behind in both study and practice. This paper outlines the experience of oral history work in the Shantou university library, and the types and features of the oral history collected by the library. It examines problems in the development…

Songhui, Zheng

2008-01-01

293

Oral health as a predictive factor for oral mucositis  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: Oral mucositis is a complication frequently associated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, decreasing a patient's quality of life and increasing the occurrence of opportunistic infections. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and severity of oral mucositis and to assess the correlation of this disease with the oral health of an individual at the time of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. METHODS: Before transplantation, patients' oral health and inflammatory conditions were determined using the gingival index and the plaque index, which are based on gingival bleeding and the presence of dental plaque, respectively. Additionally, the dental health status was determined using the decayed, missing, and filled teeth index. The monitoring of oral mucositis was based on the World Health Organization grading system and was performed for five periods: from Day 0 to D+5, from D+6 to D+10, from D+11 to D+15, from D+16 to D+20, and from D+21 to D+30. RESULTS: A total of 97 patients (56% male and 44% female) who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at the Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo between January 2008 and July 2009 were prospectively examined. The incidence of ulcerative mucositis was highest from days +6 to +10 and from days +11 to +15 in the patients who underwent autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, respectively. CONCLUSION: The data, including the dental plaque and periodontal status data, showed that these oral health factors were predictive of the incidence and severity of oral mucositis in a cohort of patients with similar conditioning regimens before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:23778491

Coracin, Fabio Luiz; da Silva Santos, Paulo Sergio; Gallottini, Marina H. C.; Saboya, Rosaura; Musqueira, Priscila Tavares; Barban, Alessandra; de Alencar Fischer Chamone, Dalton; Dulley, Frederico Luiz; Nunes, Fabio Daumas

2013-01-01

294

The global burden of oral diseases and risks to oral health  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper outlines the burden of oral diseases worldwide and describes the influence of major sociobehavioural risk factors in oral health. Despite great improvements in the oral health of populations in several countries, global problems still persist. The burden of oral disease is particularly high for the disadvantaged and poor population groups in both developing and developed countries. Oral diseases

Poul Erik Petersen; Denis Bourgeois; Hiroshi Ogawa; Saskia Estupinan-Day; Charlotte Ndiaye

2005-01-01

295

Antifungal drug resistance of oral fungi  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fungi comprise a minor component of the oral microbiota but give rise to oral disease in a significant proportion of the population.\\u000a The most common form of oral fungal disease is oral candidiasis, which has a number of presentations. The mainstay for the\\u000a treatment of oral candidiasis is the use of polyenes, such as nystatin and amphotericin B, and azoles

Masakazu Niimi; Norman A. Firth; Richard D. Cannon

2010-01-01

296

Oral and Non-Oral Combination Therapy for Erectile Dysfunction  

PubMed Central

An estimated 30 million men in the United States suffer from varying degrees of erectile dysfunction. Increasing age and comorbidities are likely to increase the number of men who are initially refractory or become refractory to phosphodiesterase (PDE)-5 inhibitors, the most popular oral therapy. Combination therapy, a concept well proved in other areas of medicine, is therefore of increasing importance. Combination oral and non-oral (intracavernosal injection and intraurethral application) therapies have been shown to salvage monotherapy. The early introduction of combination therapy has been shown to expedite both the return of natural function and PDE-5 inhibitor responsiveness in post-prostatectomy patients with no reports of serious adverse events. Larger controlled studies are needed to corroborate those encouraging findings. PMID:17934566

Nehra, Ajay

2007-01-01

297

Headache and oral parafunctional behaviors.  

PubMed

This study tested the hypotheses that individuals with headaches would show significantly more oral parafunctional behaviors than non-headache controls, be diagnosed with one or more temporomandibular disorders (TMD) significantly more frequently than controls, and would report significantly less pain and other symptoms of headache after participating in a habit reversal treatment to reduce oral parafunctional behaviors, compared to a wait list control. In Phase I, individuals with and without self-reported headaches were examined by a blinded examiner and participated in a week-long experience sampling protocol (ESM) to assess oral parafunctional behaviors, pain, and emotional states. In Phase II, those with headaches were randomly assigned to either a habit reversal treatment or to a wait list control group. In the last, sixth week of the program, participants again completed an ESM protocol. Results showed that headache patients were significantly more likely to report oral parafunctional behaviors than non-headache controls and to receive a Research Diagnostic Criteria/TMD diagnosis. Results from Phase II showed general improvement in both groups on pain and parafunctions. Individuals with headaches engage in significantly higher rates and intensities of oral parafunctional behaviors. Treatment of these behaviors using habit reversal techniques appears to have the same effect on pain as waiting. PMID:24519847

Glaros, Alan G; Hanson, Anne H; Ryen, Chris C

2014-03-01

298

Oral immunotherapy for allergic conjunctivitis.  

PubMed

: Antigen-specific immunotherapy is expected to be a desirable treatment for allergic diseases. Currently, antigen-specific immunotherapy is performed by administering disease-causing antigens subcutaneously or sublingually. These approaches induce long-term remission in patients with allergic rhinitis or asthma. The oral route is an alternative to subcutaneous and sublingual routes, and can also induce long-term remission, a phenomenon known as "oral tolerance." The effectiveness of oral tolerance has been reported in the context of autoimmune diseases, food allergies, asthma, atopic dermatitis, and allergic rhinitis in both human patients and animal models. However, few studies have examined its efficacy in animal models of allergic conjunctivitis. Previously, we showed that ovalbumin feeding suppressed ovalbumin-induced experimental allergic conjunctivitis, indicating the induction of oral tolerance is effective in treating experimental allergic conjunctivitis. In recent years, transgenic rice has been developed that can induce oral tolerance and reduce the severity of anaphylaxis. The major Japanese cedar pollen antigens in transgenic rice, Cryptomeria japonica 1 and C. japonica 2, were deconstructed by molecular shuffling, fragmentation, and changes in the oligomeric structure. Thus, transgenic rice may be an effective treatment for allergic conjunctivitis. PMID:25289722

Ishida, Waka; Fukuda, Ken; Harada, Yosuke; Yagita, Hideo; Fukushima, Atsuki

2014-11-01

299

Oral manifestations of Crohn's disease.  

PubMed Central

In a systematic study of 100 patients with Crohn's disease, 100 with ulcerative colitis, and of 100 normal subjects matched for age, sex, and denture status, nine patients with Crohn's disease, two with ulcerative colitis, and one normal control were found to have oral lesions. In Crohn's disease, the macroscopic and histological appearances resembled those encountered elsewhere in the gastrointestinal tract and their incidence was related to the activity of the disorder. The lesions in the other two groups were different macroscopically and histologically. Production of salivary IgA was found to be reduced in Crohn's patients with active bowel disease. It is suggested that the occurrence of oral lesions in patients with Crohn's disease might represent a local immunological reaction to oral antigens. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Fig 6 Fig 7 PMID:1132799

Asquith, P; Thompson, R A; Cooke, W T

1975-01-01

300

Oral myiasis: a case report.  

PubMed

Myiasis is a condition caused by the invasion of tissues by larvae of Diptera flies. This phenomenon is well documented in the skin especially among animals and people in tropical and subtropical areas. The condition causes extensive tissue destruction as the larvae, at least for a certain period, feed on the host's dead or living tissue, liquid body substances, or ingested food. Mouth breathing during sleep, poor oral hygiene, alcoholism, senility, mental disability, cerebral palsy, and hemiplegia may facilitate the development of myiasis. We present a case report of oral myiasis in a 22-year-old male with cerebral palsy and severe mental retardation treated successfully by manual removal of the larvae by topical application of turpentine oil and oral systemic therapy with ivermectin. PMID:24382372

Zachariah, Jane Emily; Sehgal, Khushboo; Dixit, Uma B; Bhatia, Rupinder

2014-01-01

301

Modified oral metronidazole desensitization protocol  

PubMed Central

The Center for Disease Control guidelines recommend desensitization to metronidazole in patients with trichomoniasis and hypersensitivity to metronidazole. There is only one published oral metronidazole desensitization protocol. The purpose of this study was to design a new, more gradual oral desensitization protocol to decrease systemic reactions that may occur when using the previously published protocol. We present two patients with presumed IgE-mediated allergy to metronidazole who underwent oral desensitization using our modified protocol. Case 1 was a 65-year-old woman with trichomoniasis who presented for metronidazole desensitization with a history of intraoperative anaphylaxis and positive skin tests to metronidazole. The patient tolerated six doses of the modified desensitization but developed systemic symptoms of nasal congestion and diffuse pruritus after the 25- and 100-mg doses. Both reactions were treated with intravenous (i.v.) antihistamines. Because of gastrointestinal irritation, the desensitization was completed at a dose of 250 mg orally every 6 hours. Case 2 was a 42-year-old woman with trichomoniasis and a history of hives immediately after administration of i.v. metronidazole who presented for desensitization. The patient had negative skin-prick and intradermal testing to metronidazole. She developed lip tingling and pruritus on her arms 15 minutes after the 10-mg dose. Fexofenadine at 180 mg was given orally and symptoms resolved. She tolerated the rest of the protocol without reaction and received a total dose of 2 g of metronidazole. Our oral metronidazole desensitization for presumed IgE-mediated reactions offers a second option for physicians wishing to use a more gradual escalation in dose. PMID:24612959

Pien, Lily C.; Gutta, Ravi C.; Abouhassan, Susan R.

2014-01-01

302

Smoking related systemic and oral diseases.  

PubMed

This article reviewed smoking related systemic diseases and oral diseases. Smoking is related to lung cancer, cardiovascular diseases and many other systemic diseases. Cigarette smoke affects the oral cavity first, so it is evident that smoking has many negative influences on oral cavity, for example, staining of teeth and dental restorations, wound healing, reduction of the ability to smell and taste, and development of oral diseases such as oral cancer, periodontitis, smoker's palate, smoker's melanosis, hairy tongue, leukoplakia, oral candidiasis and implant survival rate. The article also discusses the relationship between smoking and dental caries in detail. PMID:18254267

Vellappally, Sajith; Fiala, Zden?k; Smejkalová, Jindra; Jacob, Vimal; Somanathan, Rakesh

2007-01-01

303

Pharmacokinetics and potential advantages of a new oral solution of levothyroxine vs. other available dosage forms.  

PubMed

To better understand the pharmacokinetics and potential advantages of a levothyroxine oral solution vs. tablets and soft gel capsules.4 randomized, 2-treatment, single-dose (600 mcg levothyroxine), 2-way crossover bioequivalence studies in 84 healthy subjects were analyzed. Samples were collected before dosing and until 48-72?h post-dose to calculate noncompartmental baseline-adjusted pharmacokinetic parameters: maximum concentration, time to maximum concentration, and area-under-the-concentration-time-curve from 0 to 48?h and from 0 to 2?h.Mean pharmacokinetic parameters (±standard deviation) for tablets, capsules and solution, respectively, were: area-under-the-concentration-time-curve from 0 to 2?h (ng*h/mL)=68.4±32.8, 64.4±24.4, 99.1±22.7; area-under-the-concentration-time-curve from 0 to 48?h (ng*h/mL)=1?632±424, 1?752±445, 1?862±439; maximum concentration (ng/mL)=67.6±20.9, 68.0±15.9, 71.4±16.0; time of maximum concentration (hours)=2.25±0.99, 2.38±1.58, 1.96±1.07. Overall rate and extent of exposure were not statistically different between formulations, but a faster onset of absorption for the solution was suggested (greater area-under-the-concentration-time-curve from 0 to 2?h and faster time to maximum concentration by an average of 30?min).Levothyroxine rate and extent of exposure are similar between tested formulations. The solution appears however to reach systemic circulation quicker as dissolution is not needed before absorption starts. The solution's greater early exposure and a faster time to maximal concentration of around 30?min may be of benefit to minimize drug-food interactions and deserves further investigations. PMID:23154888

Yue, C S; Scarsi, C; Ducharme, M P

2012-12-01

304

UBC Professors Emeriti Oral History Project  

E-print Network

UBC Professors Emeriti Oral History Project fonds Compiled by Christopher Hives (2004 of Creation / Physical Description o Administrative History o Scope and Content o Note Item List Catalogue entry (UBC Library catalogue) #12; Fonds Description UBC Professors Emeriti Oral History

Handy, Todd C.

305

Oral health care for hospitalized children.  

PubMed

Oral health care may be the greatest unmet health need of children in the U.S. Half of the children in the U.S. suffer from tooth decay by 8 years of age. The consequences of poor oral health are many, including mouth pain, inability to chew and eat, abscess and soft tissue infection, diminished self-esteem, and impaired school performance. Numerous medical conditions, such as asthma and diabetes, and developmental disabilities, such as cerebral palsy and autism, have associated oral health implications. Oral health care is often neglected by nondental health providers. Nurses are in a unique position to contribute to the improvement of this national health problem by promoting oral health care among hospitalized children and their families. A hospital program for oral health care is proposed, including assessment of teeth and gingiva, ensuring oral care for all, as well as oral health education as part of patient education. PMID:22132567

Blevins, Jo Young

2011-01-01

306

American Academy of Oral & Maxillofacial Pathology  

MedlinePLUS

... care and practice. The Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology (AAOMP) represents the dental specialty that identifies and manages diseases affecting the oral and maxillofacial regions and investigates the causes, processes and effects ...

307

Find an Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon  

MedlinePLUS

... OMS" is a searchable directory of oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMS) who are fellows and members of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS). This is not a referral service ...

308

Oral Steroids (Steroid Pills and Syrups)  

MedlinePLUS

... Lung Diseases > Quick-Relief Medications > Oral Steroids Oral Steroids (Steroid Pills and Syrups) How are steroid pills and ... Want to learn more about steroids? How are steroid pills and syrups used? Steroid pills and syrups ...

309

War, Journalism, and Oral History.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a project where students conducted oral history with either a war correspondent or a U.S. combat veteran for the course "War and the News Media: From Vietnam through Desert Storm and Beyond." Discusses how the students prepared for the interviews and the evaluation of their projects. (CMK)

Rice, Gary

2000-01-01

310

Gaelic Singing and Oral Tradition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A recent report by UNESCO placed Scots Gaelic on a list of 2500 endangered languages highlighting the perilous state of a key cornerstone of Scottish culture. Scottish Gaelic song, poems and stories have been carried through oral transmission for many centuries reflecting the power of indigenous peoples to preserve cultural heritage from…

Sheridan, Mark; MacDonald, Iona; Byrne, Charles G.

2011-01-01

311

College of Dentistry ORAL SCIENCES  

E-print Network

College of Dentistry ORAL SCIENCES Mailing Address: College of Dentistry (MC 621) 801 South (PhD) Telephone: (312) 996-0213 E-mail: marucha@uic.edu Web Site: http://dentistry.uic.edu/admissions/ms/ (MS); http://dentistry.uic.edu/admissions/phd/ (PhD) Director of Graduate Studies: Phillip T. Marucha

Illinois at Chicago, University of

312

Oral leukoplakia: a Clinicopathological review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Leukoplakia is the most common premalignant or potentially malignant lesion of the oral mucosa. It seems preferable to use the term leukoplakia as a clinical term only. When a biopsy is taken, the term leukoplakia should be replaced by the diagnosis obtained histologically. The annual percentage of malignant transformation varies in different parts of the world, probably as a result

I. van der Waal; K. P. Schepman; E. H. van der Meij; L. E. Smeele

1997-01-01

313

Oral Interpretation as Performing Performance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A three-step process of description, reduction, and interpretation is employed in this paper in disentangling the complex of relationships involved in oral interpretation. In the description, contributions from various disciplines are synthesized; among the topics discussed are the communication process model usually employed in descriptions of…

Peterson, Eric E.

314

Assessing Proofs via Oral Interviews  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this qualitative study, we explored how oral interviews can inform instructors about students' understanding of abstract algebra and their ability to construct a proof in this setting. Our findings indicate that some students had a good understanding of the ideas needed for a subgroup proof, but could not write a coherent proof. On the other…

Soto-Johnson, Hortensia; Fuller, Evan

2012-01-01

315

Oral Diadochokinesis in Neurological Dysarthrias  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rapid syllable repetitions require alternating articulatory movements and, thus, provide a test for oral diadochokinesis. The present study performed an acoustic analysis of rapid syllable repetitions in patients suffering from idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (n = 17), Huntington’s chorea (n = 14), Friedreich’s ataxia (n = 9), or from a purely cerebellar syndrome (n = 13). Four parameters were considered: the

Hermann Ackermann; Ingo Hertrich; Thomas Hehr

1995-01-01

316

Oral Hygiene. Learning Activity Package.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This learning activity package on oral hygiene is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, a list of definitions, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics…

Hime, Kirsten

317

IMRT in oral cavity cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Except for early T1,2 N0 stages, the prognosis for patients with oral cavity cancer (OCC) is reported to be worse than for carcinoma in other sites of the head and neck (HNC). The aim of this work was to assess disease outcome in OCC following IMRT. Between January 2002 and January 2007, 346 HNC patients have been treated with

Gabriela Studer; Roger A Zwahlen; Klaus W Graetz; Bernard J Davis; Christoph Glanzmann

2007-01-01

318

Oral Communication across the Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Proficiency in oral communication is necessary in school and in society. To do well in the different curriculum areas, pupils must speak with clarity and understanding. For example, in a discussion group in the social studies involving the topic "the pros and cons of raising taxes," pupils need to express knowledgeable ideas with appropriate voice…

Ediger, Marlow

2011-01-01

319

Older Adults (and Oral Health)  

MedlinePLUS

... people benefit from sucking sugarless hard candy or chewing sugarless gum. For more information, visit NIDCR's dry mouth web page . Back to Top Oral (Mouth) Cancer Myth: If you don’t use chewing tobacco, you don’t need to worry about ...

320

The patient with recurrent oral ulceration.  

PubMed

This paper discusses the range of recurrent oral ulceration which affects the oral mucosa. Types of ulceration covered in this paper include traumatic, infective, aphthous, ulceration related to the oral dermatoses, drug-induced, ulceration as a manifestation of systemic disease and ulceration indicating malignancy. Aspects of the aetiology, diagnosis and management of common oral recurrent ulcerative conditions are reviewed from a clinical perspective as an aid to practising dentists. PMID:20553241

Talacko, A A; Gordon, A K; Aldred, M J

2010-06-01

321

Oral Diseases / Review Oral mucosa lesions in hypereosinophilic syndrome: an update  

E-print Network

: Hypereosinophilic syndrome and oral ulcers Keywords: hypereosinophilic syndrome, oral ulcers, myeloproliferative. Oral mucosa ulcerations can be early clinical signs in severe forms. They are discrete, round or oval, sometimes confluent ulcers or erosions, located on non-keratinized, unattached oral mucosa. In the last

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

322

A standard picture of healthy oral mucosae by direct oral microscopy  

PubMed Central

Introduction Direct oral microscopy constitutes a novel technique of in vivo oral mucosae examination. The basic principles of this method derive from colposcopy and dermoscopy. The main goal of direct oral microscopy is the earliest possible detection of oral precancerous lesions in order to implement their treatment as quickly as possible and prevent malignant transformation. Aim To establish a standard picture of healthy oral mucosae with direct oral microscopy applying standard colposcopic criteria in order to create a reference point for further diagnosis of precancerous lesions. Material and methods Thirty patients of both genders with clinically unaltered oral mucosae were examined. For every individual, clinical examination with the naked eye was performed, followed by direct oral microscopy with colposcopic assessment criteria. Oral mucosae at various sites (lip, cheek, floor of mouth, ventral and lateral sides of the tongue, alveolar ridge and soft palate) were examined. Results Subepithelial blood vessel patterns, mucosal surface, colour tone and transparency were described for healthy oral mucosae. Moreover, cases with clinically unaltered oral mucosae where direct oral microscopy revealed subclinical alterations were described. Conclusions Direct oral microscopy with colposcopic assessment criteria enables establishment of a repeated picture of unaltered oral mucosae. The standard picture of healthy oral mucosae is an essential reference point for application of this technique to early diagnose potentially malignant oral mucosal lesions as well as apply their early treatment. PMID:24278068

Drogoszewska, Barbara; Michcik, Adam; Polcyn, Adam

2013-01-01

323

The Telling Lives Oral History Curriculum Guide The Columbia University Center for Oral History  

E-print Network

The Telling Lives Oral History Curriculum Guide The Columbia University Center for Oral History (formerly the Oral History Research Office) Written by Gerry Albarelli and Amy Starecheski April 2005 Columbia University, 2005 #12;Telling Lives Oral History Curriculum Guide 1 Table of Contents Introduction

Salzman, Daniel

324

Improving Oral Reports: A Heuristic Approach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A student's fear of giving oral reports and the instructor's objection to using too much class time on oral reports are often seen as the major barriers that prevent an oral communication unit from being included in a business or management communications course. One approach to easing both concerns is the use of videotaping as a self-discovery…

Glossner, Alan J.

325

Oral Reading in the School Literacy Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores more deeply the role of oral reading in instructional practice, primarily in the elementary grades and with students who struggle in reading. Attempts to conceptualize more fully the positive role oral reading may play in classroom instruction, notes ways in which some persisting forms of oral reading practice in classrooms are counter to…

Rasinski, Timothy V.; Hoffman, James V.

2003-01-01

326

Oral White Lesions Associated with Chewing Khat  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRODUCTION: Khat is a cultivated plant whose leaves when chewed elevate mood. Unlike the chewing of betel nut, no association between the white oral mucosal lesions in khat users and oral malignancies has been reported. Chewing of khat has been documented in many countries and has increased with worldwide migration. The impact of chewing khat upon the oral mucosa is

Meir Gorsky; Joel B. Epstein; Harel Levi; Noam Yarom

2004-01-01

327

TUDE DU RETENTISSEMENT DE LA CONTRACEPTION ORALE  

E-print Network

�TUDE DU RETENTISSEMENT DE LA CONTRACEPTION ORALE SUR DIVERS M�TABOLISMES G. LE LORIER, G'étude du retentissement de la contraception orale sur le métabolisme des lipides, le métabolisme des classiques de la contraception orale : fibrome, frottis suspects, adénome ou kyste du sein. Les explorations

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

328

Oral phosphate binders: History and prospects  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of an oral phosphate binder is a promising and most practical strategy for the prevention of vascular calcification in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). To secure the safety: 1) the oral phosphate binder must not cause adverse effects in the gastrointestinal tract; 2) the oral phosphate binder should be non-absorbable or barely absorbable through the gastrointestinal tract,

Junichiro James Kazama

2009-01-01

329

Epidemiology and prevention of oral cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Descriptive epidemiology of oral and pharyngeal cancer over the last four decades is reviewed, with specific focus on Europe. Substantial rises in mortality rates have been observed for younger males, mostly in eastern Europe. The independent role of alcohol and tobacco and their interaction on oral carcinogenesis is discussed, since these factors account for about three quarters of oral cancers

C. La Vecchia; A. Tavani; S. Franceschi; F. Levi; G. Corrao; E. Negri

1997-01-01

330

Interleukin18 and oral mucosal immunity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oral mucosal cells such as epithelial cells and fibroblasts are the first cells encountered by bacteria in our body. In addition to acting as a physical barrier, oral mucosal cells appear to express adhesion molecules and secrete many proinflammatory mediators, implying that the cells actively participate in mucosal immunity. Oral epithelial cells express a precursor form of interleukin (IL)-18, an

Shunji Sugawara

2005-01-01

331

Healthy People 2010: Oral Health Toolkit  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this Toolkit is to provide guidance, technical tools, and resources to help states, territories, tribes and communities develop and implement successful oral health components of Healthy People 2010 plans as well as other oral health plans. These plans are useful for: (1) promoting, implementing and tracking oral health objectives;…

Isman, Beverly

2007-01-01

332

29 CFR 2700.77 - Oral argument.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Oral argument. 2700.77 Section...Continued) FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION PROCEDURAL RULES...by the Commission § 2700.77 Oral argument. Oral argument may be ordered by...

2011-07-01

333

29 CFR 2700.77 - Oral argument.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oral argument. 2700.77 Section...Continued) FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION PROCEDURAL RULES...by the Commission § 2700.77 Oral argument. Oral argument may be ordered by...

2010-07-01

334

Dual epithelial origin of vertebrate oral teeth  

Microsoft Academic Search

The oral cavity of vertebrates is generally thought to arise as an ectodermal invagination. Consistent with this, oral teeth are proposed to arise exclusively from ectoderm, contributing to tooth enamel epithelium, and from neural crest derived mesenchyme, contributing to dentin and pulp. Yet in many vertebrate groups, teeth are not restricted only to the oral cavity, but extend posteriorly as

Vladimír Soukup; Hans-Henning Epperlein; Ivan Horácek; Robert Cerny

2008-01-01

335

Building Advanced Oral Proficiency Skills for Managers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document consists of two closely related papers given at the same conference session: "Oral Proficiency for Managers: A Design for Portuguese" (Maria Antonia Cowles), and "Oral Proficiency for Managers: A Design for German" (Doris Kirchner). These papers discuss program design and strategies for developing oral foreign language proficiency in…

Cowles, Antonia; Kirchner, Doris

336

46 CFR 502.241 - Oral argument.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Decision § 502.241 Oral argument. (a) The Commission may hear oral argument either on its own motion or upon the written...application, or in the reply thereto. If the Commission determines to hear oral argument, a notice will be issued setting forth the...

2010-10-01

337

42 CFR 423.2124 - Oral argument.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... (b) The MAC may decide on its own that oral argument is necessary to decide the issues in the case. If the MAC decides to hear oral argument, it informs the enrollee of the time and place of the oral argument at least 10 calendar days before the...

2010-10-01

338

Colorado Oral History Projects: A Directory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

More than 100 oral history projects in the state of Colorado are described. Information was collected from public libraries, historical societies, public schools, colleges, and universities in order to develop a statewide "locator file" of oral history tapes. This directory lists only those projects which have interview tapes and related oral…

Whistler, Nancy, Comp.

339

Associations between Indigenous Australian oral health literacy and self-reported oral health outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES: To determine oral health literacy (REALD-30) and oral health literacy-related outcome associations, and to calculate if oral health literacy-related outcomes are risk indicators for poor self-reported oral health among rural-dwelling Indigenous Australians. METHODS: 468 participants (aged 17-72 years, 63% female) completed a self-report questionnaire. REALD-30 and oral health literacy-related outcome associations were determined through bivariate analysis. Multivariate modelling was

Eleanor J Parker; Lisa M Jamieson

2010-01-01

340

Expression of Ki-67 in normal oral epithelium, leukoplakic oral epithelium and oral squamous cell carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Aims and Objective: To demonstrate the presence, location and pattern of cell proliferation in different histological grades of oral epithelial dysplasia (OED), oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and normal oral epithelium (NOE) using an antibody directed against the Ki-67 antigen and its intensity of staining evaluated respectively. Materials and Methods: A total number of 100 archival paraffin embedded blocks obtained from Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology were studied. The case details were retrieved which consisted of histopathologically diagnosed cases of OSCC (n = 20), low risk OED (n = 30), high risk OED (n = 30) and normal appearing mucosa (n = 20) were taken as standard for comparison. Ki-67 immunostaining was detected. Ki-67 positive cells were counted in the five random high power fields in each case. Results: Ki-67 labeling Index (LI) was restricted to the basal and parabasal layers of the normal oral epithelium irrespective of age, sex and site whereas it was seen in the basal, suprabasal and spinous layers in OED. Ki-67 LI is increased in high risk cases than the low risk cases of OED. Ki-67 positive cells in OSCC were located in the periphery of the tumor nests than the center, where frequent mitoses were observed. Conclusion: The architectural alteration evaluated by Ki-67 antibody in proliferating cell distribution in the layers of epithelial dysplasias may provide useful information to evaluate the grading of OED. Ki-67 LI increased in high risk cases than low risk cases of OED. This study showed that over expression of Ki-67 antigen between well-differentiated and poorly differentiated OSCC was in accordance with histologic grade of malignancy but not in accordance with moderately differentiated OSCC. PMID:25328294

Birajdar, Smita Shrishail; Radhika, MB; Paremala, K; Sudhakara, M; Soumya, M; Gadivan, Mohsin

2014-01-01

341

J Oral Maxillofac Surg 63:529-535, 2005  

E-print Network

Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons J Oral Maxillofac Surg 63:529-535, 2005 The use of platelet *Assistant Professor, Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dental and Oral Surgery, Columbia. ¶Professor and Chair, Hospital Dentistry/Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dental and Oral Surgery

Lu, Helen H.

342

Oral History in the Digital Age  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Oral History in the Digital Age website connects interested persons and organizations to a range of resources related to crafting a meaningful and dynamic oral history project. Crafted by people at Michigan State University with funds from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), the site contains critical essays, How-To guides, and an elaborate wiki. The Getting Started area is a good place to begin, as it features helpful playlists about oral history projects. The Essays tab leads to another highly informative section of the site. The short pieces in this section are divided into three topics: Collecting, Curating, and Disseminating. The individual essays include "Enhancing Discovery: Connecting Users to Your Oral History Collections Online" and "Oral History and Social Networks: From Promotion to Relationship Building." Finally, the Ask Doug option features expert responses to key questions on oral history projects from noted oral historian Doug Boyd.

2013-01-01

343

Epithelial Dysplasia in Oral Cavity  

PubMed Central

Among oral lesions, we encounter a series of malignant epithelial lesions that go through clinical and histopathologic processes in order to be diagnosed. Identifying these processes along with the etiology knowledge of these lesions is very important in prevention and early treatments. Dysplasia is the step preceding the formation of squamous cell carcinoma in lesions which have the potential to undergo dysplasia. Identification of etiological factors, clinical and histopathologic methods has been the topic of many articles. This article, reviews various articles presenting oral cavity dysplasia, new clinical methods of identifying lesions, and the immunohistochemical research which proposes various markers for providing more precise identification of such lesions. This article also briefly analyzes new treatment methods such as tissue engineering. PMID:25242838

Shirani, Samaneh; Kargahi, Neda; Razavi, Sayed Mohammad; Homayoni, Solmaz

2014-01-01

344

Oral complications in radiation therapy.  

PubMed

The dentist is integral to managing care for patients with head and neck cancer. Oral complications may manifest during and/or following radiation therapy and can last for the lifetime of the individual. This article reviews a number of these complications as well as the resources available to dentists for managing care of radiation oncology patients and improving their quality of life. PMID:15055655

Harrison, Jody S; Dale, Robert A; Haveman, Carl W; Redding, Spencer W

2003-01-01

345

Modern oral contraceptives and dysmenorrhoea.  

PubMed

Women with primary dysmenorrhoea not sufficiently helped by triphasic oral contraceptives (OCs) were offered a modern, low-dose monophasic OC containing 30 micrograms of ethinylestradiol and 150 micrograms of desogestrel. The study shows that for these women, the monophasic pill was the better alternative. The fact that 19 of 23 women who continue treatment on the monophasic OC indicates that this type of pill may be chosen as the first alternative for women with primary dysmenorrhoea. PMID:2149696

Nabrink, M; Birgersson, L; Colling-Saltin, A S; Solum, T

1990-09-01

346

Novel, Orally Effective Cyanide Antidotes  

PubMed Central

A series of prodrugs of 3-mercaptopyruvate (3-MP), the substrate for the enzyme 3-mercaptopyruvate/cyanide sulfurtransferase (3-MPST) that converts cyanide to the nontoxic thiocyanate, which are highly effective cyanide antidotes, have been developed. These prodrugs of 3-MP are unique in being not only orally bioavailable, but may be administered up to an hour prior to cyanide as a prophylactic agent and are both rapid- or slow-acting when given parenterally. PMID:18038966

Nagasawa, Herbert T.; Goon, David J. W.; Crankshaw, Daune L.; Vince, Robert; Patterson, Steven E.

2007-01-01

347

Orally Active Carbapenem Antibiotics I  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to design orally active carbapenem antibiotics effective against ?-lactam-resistant pathogens, such as penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP) and ?-lactamase non-producing ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae (BLNAR), a series of novel 2-phenylcarbapenems and some 2-thienyl derivatives were synthesized and tested for antibacterial activities. These compounds were highly active against PRSP, BLNAR, and major Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that cause community-acquired infections. Their

Makoto Sunagawa; Yutaka Ueda; Shin-ichiro Okada; Shoji Watanabe; Takahiko Hashizuka; Seiji Hori; Akira Sasaki; Yoshiro Eriguchi; Katsunori Kanazawa

2005-01-01

348

Urban legends series: oral leukoplakia.  

PubMed

To date, the term oral leukoplakia (OL) should be used to recognize 'predominantly white plaques of questionable risk, having excluded (other) known diseases or disorders that carry no increased risk of cancer'. In this review, we addressed four controversial topics regarding oral leukoplakias (OLs): (i) Do tobacco and alcohol cause OLs?, (ii) What percentage of OLs transform into oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC)?, (iii) Can we distinguish between premalignant and innocent OLs?, and (iv) Is proliferative verrucous leukoplakia (PVL) a specific entity or just a form of multifocal leukoplakia? Results of extensive literature search suggest that (i) no definitive evidence for direct causal relationship between smoked tobacco and alcohol as causative factors of OLs, (ii and iii) the vast majority of OLs follow a benign course and do not progress into a cancer, and no widely accepted and/or validated clinical and/or biological factors can predict malignant transformation, and (iv) the distinction between multifocal/multiple leukoplakias and PVL in their early presentation is impossible; the temporal clinical progression and the high rate of recurrences and development of cancer of PVL are the most reliable features for diagnosis. PMID:23379968

Arduino, P G; Bagan, J; El-Naggar, A K; Carrozzo, M

2013-10-01

349

The permeability of oral leukoplakia.  

PubMed

The significant increase in oral cancer mortality necessitates further research on the mechanisms of tumorigenesis. It was the aim of this study to compare the permeability, lipid composition and histopathological characteristics of oral leukoplakia with non-lesional specimens of the same region in 30 cases as well as 11 specimens originating from healthy control buccal mucosa. The permeability (Kp) of tissue biopsies to tritiated nitrosonornicotine was determined in a continuous through-flow perfusion system, lipids were extracted and identified by thin-layer chromatography, and thickness of epithelium and keratin layer assessed by histopathological methods. Results of the measurements showed that the permeability to the tobacco carcinogen, nitrosonornicotine for leukoplakic tissue was higher than for normal control buccal specimens. Non-lesional areas of buccal mucosa, adjacent to leukoplakias, showed hyperplasia and significantly higher permeability values than both leukoplakic and normal buccal control mucosa. The lipid content of the non-lesional sites was intermediate between the increased values of the leukoplakic lesion and of normal control mucosa. The data strongly suggest that the presence of tobacco in the oral cavity may bring about generalized changes even in regions that do not show leukoplakia. PMID:12887396

Bánóczy, Jolán; Squier, Christopher A; Kremer, Mary; Wertz, Philip W; Kövesi, György; Szende, Béla; Dombi, Csaba

2003-08-01

350

Oral health, nutrition, and oral health-related quality of life among Korean older adults.  

PubMed

Oral health affects older adults and their quality of life. Oral care is reported to have a low priority in nursing care of older adults, and repeated assessments to detect oral health problems are seldom performed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among level of oral health, nutrition, and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQL) and to identify predictors of OHRQL in Korean older adults. The design was a descriptive, correlational study. The level of oral pain contributed most significantly to OHRQL, followed by nutrition and number of teeth. These three predictor variables explained 46.4% of the variance in OHRQL. Older adults could benefit from oral health care, such as routine screening for oral health and nutritional status. Nurses are at the forefront in providing such services, and it is recommended they integrate oral health care into their routine nursing care plans. PMID:18942537

Jung, Young-Mi; Shin, Dong-Soo

2008-10-01

351

The global burden of oral diseases and risks to oral health.  

PubMed Central

This paper outlines the burden of oral diseases worldwide and describes the influence of major sociobehavioural risk factors in oral health. Despite great improvements in the oral health of populations in several countries, global problems still persist. The burden of oral disease is particularly high for the disadvantaged and poor population groups in both developing and developed countries. Oral diseases such as dental caries, periodontal disease, tooth loss, oral mucosal lesions and oropharyngeal cancers, human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS)-related oral disease and orodental trauma are major public health problems worldwide and poor oral health has a profound effect on general health and quality of life. The diversity in oral disease patterns and development trends across countries and regions reflects distinct risk profiles and the establishment of preventive oral health care programmes. The important role of sociobehavioural and environmental factors in oral health and disease has been shown in a large number of socioepidemiological surveys. In addition to poor living conditions, the major risk factors relate to unhealthy lifestyles (i.e. poor diet, nutrition and oral hygiene and use of tobacco and alcohol), and limited availability and accessibility of oral health services. Several oral diseases are linked to noncommunicable chronic diseases primarily because of common risk factors. Moreover, general diseases often have oral manifestations (e.g. diabetes or HIV/AIDS). Worldwide strengthening of public health programmes through the implementation of effective measures for the prevention of oral disease and promotion of oral health is urgently needed. The challenges of improving oral health are particularly great in developing countries. PMID:16211157

Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Estupinan-Day, Saskia; Ndiaye, Charlotte

2005-01-01

352

Evaluating awareness regarding oral hygiene practices and exploring gender differences among patients attending for oral prophylaxis  

PubMed Central

Background: Oral hygiene is intimated in health of all parts of the body including oral cavity. The understanding of actual practices in keeping the oral heath at standard based on patient's perceptions of oral health care is vital. Understanding the effect of gender on oral health would facilitate the development of successful attitude and behavior modification approach towards sustainable oral health. Purpose of Study: To evaluate awareness regarding oral hygiene practices and exploring gender differences among patients attending for oral prophylaxis. Materials and Methods: A survey was conducted among 250 patients attending the department of periodontology, Maulana Azad institute of dental sciences for oral prophylaxis. A structured questionnaire was used to collect information regarding practices and perception about oral hygiene. Results: Majority of the patients (60.4%) felt that oral hygiene is mandatory for overall health of the body. The use of toothpaste and toothbrush (83.6%) was the most preferred cleaning aid among the study population in the present study. The major constraint for avoiding dental examination was no felt need (41.2%) followed by cost of dental treatment (26.8%) and time constraints (24.0%). Conclusions: Professional plaque removal and regular follow-up combined with oral hygiene instructions to the patients can minimize the level of gingival inflammation and swelling. The poor resources for dental care, common malpractices and nonavailability of professional care are the main barriers in seeking optimum oral hygiene. PMID:25024553

Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh; Mohanty, Vikrant; Mahajan, Ananya; Oberoi, Avneet

2014-01-01

353

[New direct oral oral anticoagulants (DOACs) - indications of DOACs].  

PubMed

The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) were developed because of the urgent therapeutic need due to the deficits of vitamin K antagonist therapy. The predominant indications in internal medicine are the acute treatment and secondary prevention of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) as well as stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. For the acute therapy and secondary prevention of DVT/PE the DOACS were non inferior to low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) plus vitamin K antagonists at a significantly reduced rate of severe bleeding complications. Only Rivaroxaban is currently approved for this indication, with Dabigatran, Apixaban and Edoxaban still awaiting approval. For stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation Dabigatran, Rivaroxaban and Apixaban are approved. The efficacy of Dabigatran (150mg bid) and Apixaban (5mg bid) are superior to warfarin, with Rivaroxaban being non-inferior to warfarin for stroke prevention. The rate of bleeding complications with Apixaban and Dabigatran (110mg bid) were significantly lower as with warfarin. The DOACs do represent a major therapeutic advantage in oral anticoagulation therapy of patients for the approved indications. PMID:24711238

Darius, Harald

2014-03-01

354

Marathon Maternity Oral History Project  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To explore how birthing and maternity care are understood and valued in a rural community. Design Oral history research. Setting The rural community of Marathon, Ont, with a population of approximately 3500. Participants A purposive selection of mothers, grandmothers, nurses, physicians, and community leaders in the Marathon medical catchment area. Methods Interviews were conducted with a purposive sample, employing an oral history research methodology. Interviews were conducted non-anonymously in order to preserve the identity and personhood of participants. Interview transcripts were edited into short narratives. Oral histories offer perspectives and information not revealed in other quantitative or qualitative research methodologies. Narratives re-personalize and humanize medical research by offering researchers and practitioners the opportunity to bear witness to the personal stories affected through medical decision making. Main findings Eleven stand-alone narratives, published in this issue of Canadian Family Physician, form the project’s findings. Similar to a literary text or short story, they are intended for personal reflection and interpretation by the reader. Presenting the results of these interviews as narratives requires the reader to participate in the research exercise and take part in listening to these women’s voices. The project’s narratives will be accessible to readers from academic and non-academic backgrounds and will interest readers in medicine and allied health professions, medical humanities, community development, gender studies, social anthropology and history, and literature. Conclusion Sharing personal birthing experiences might inspire others to reevaluate and reconsider birthing practices and services in other communities. Where local maternity services are under threat, Marathon’s stories might contribute to understanding the meaning and challenges of local birthing, and the implications of losing maternity services in rural Canada. PMID:24452565

Orkin, Aaron; Newbery, Sarah

2014-01-01

355

Oral and maxillofacial surgery residency education.  

PubMed

Oral and maxillofacial surgery is the recognized specialty of dentistry that is responsible for the diagnosis and surgical and adjunctive treatment of diseases, injuries and defects involving both the functional and esthetic aspects of the bone and soft tissues of the oral and maxillofacial region. This article will present a review of the educational process for residents in oral and maxillofacial surgery as it has evolved and current training standards. PMID:15622705

Felsenfeld, Alan L; Casagrande, Angelle

2004-10-01

356

Oral phosphate binders: history and prospects.  

PubMed

The use of an oral phosphate binder is a promising and most practical strategy for the prevention of vascular calcification in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). To secure the safety: 1) the oral phosphate binder must not cause adverse effects in the gastrointestinal tract; 2) the oral phosphate binder should be non-absorbable or barely absorbable through the gastrointestinal tract, or 3) if partially absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract, it must be eliminated from circulation through a pathway other than urinary excretion, and 4) even if it accumulates in the body, it should not cause organ dysfunctions. Metal salt type oral phosphate binder is the most classical type of oral phosphate binders that includes aluminum hydroxide gel and lanthanum carbonate. These oral phosphate binders effectively adsorb phosphate ions, however, have a potential risk for accumulation and intoxication. Calcium salt type oral phosphate binder was the most widely prescribed oral phosphate binder in the last decade but is now believed to exert potential harm, favoring progression of vascular calcification through excessive intestinal calcium load. However, recent studies failed to detect an inferiority of calcium salt type oral phosphate binders as compared to non-calcium salt type oral phosphate binders in terms of mortality and/or morbidity of hemodialysis patients. Polymerized resin type is a safe and relatively effective oral phosphate binder, which is supported by many clinical evidences. However, it sometimes causes severe constipation, especially in Japanese patients. Among metal compound type oral phosphate binder, other promising compounds include boehmite-type aluminum and hydrotalcite-like compounds but they are not yet available in the clinical setting. PMID:19442621

Kazama, Junichiro James

2009-07-01

357

A comparative study of the effects of an estradiol-releasing vaginal ring combined with an oral gestagen versus transdermal estrogen combined with a levonorgestrel-releasing IUD: clinical findings and endometrial response.  

PubMed

At the outpatient obstetric-gynecologic clinic of Areteion Hospital in Athens, Greece, 56 postmenopausal women, 48-76 years old and with signs and symptoms of estrogen deficiency-induced atrophic vaginitis, were randomly assigned to either the group using a silicon vaginal ring containing 2 mg micronized 17-beta- estradiol and oral medroxyprogesterone acetate for 7 days at the beginning of each month (group A) or the group using a combination of 50 mcg estradiol via a transdermal patch and a levonorgestrel-releasing IUD (group B). The women were using these regimens for 12 months. The purpose of the study was to compare the clinical and endometrial effects of the new vaginal ring with an oral progestin with those of the established hormone replacement regimen of transdermal estrogen and a levonorgestrel-releasing IUD. Vaginal ultrasound and pathologic examination of uterine curettage samples were used to determine endometrial effects. The urogenital complaints of all 56 women disappeared. The mean endometrial thickness before treatment was similar for both groups (2.9 mm for group A and 3 mm for group B) and was not significantly different than endometrial thickness after treatment (2.6 and 2.8 mm, respectively). Endometrial proliferation was not observed. The mean endometrial thickness at baseline predicted normal endometrium. After 3 months of treatment, vaginal bleeding patterns were similar in both groups. These findings confirm that both regimens effectively treat estrogen deficiency-induced urogenital disorders and do not increase the risk of endometrial proliferation. PMID:9010746

Kalogirou, D; Antoniou, G; Karakitsos, P; Kalogirou, O; Antoniou, D; Giannikos, L

1996-01-01

358

Alcohol and oral squamous cell carcinoma.  

PubMed

Alcohol is a risk factor for oral squamous cell carcinoma. It enhances the permeability of the oral epithelium, acts as a solvent for tobacco carcinogens, induces basal-cell proliferation, and generates free radicals and acetaldehyde, which have the capacity to cause DNA damage. Alcohol-associated malnutrition and immune suppression may further promote carcinogenesis. However, acetaldehyde, the first metabolite of ethanol, is the critical agent by which prolonged and excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages increases the risk of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Alcohol also acts synergistically with the products of tobacco combustion in the pathogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:23971298

Feller, L; Chandran, R; Khammissa, R A G; Meyerov, R; Lemmer, J

2013-05-01

359

Oral manifestations of smokeless tobacco use.  

PubMed

Smokeless tobacco (SLT) has been smoked, chewed, and inhaled in various forms for hundreds of years. The primary oral, mucosal, and hard tissue changes associated with SLT use include SLT keratosis (STK); gingival inflammation, periodontal inflammation, and alveolar bone damage; and dental caries, tooth abrasion, and dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Some high-risk STKs are human papillomavirus associated, and the highest level of transition of STK to dysplasia or oral SCC appears to be in those lesions that have a diffuse velvety or papillary texture clinically. There is minimal risk for oral cancer associated with SLT use. PMID:21093622

Greer, Robert O

2011-02-01

360

Oral health disparities in older adults: oral bacteria, inflammation, and aspiration pneumonia.  

PubMed

Poor oral hygiene has been suggested to be a risk factor for aspiration pneumonia in the institutionalized and disabled elderly. Control of oral biofilm formation in these populations reduces the numbers of potential respiratory pathogens in the oral secretions, which in turn reduces the risk for pneumonia. Together with other preventive measures, improved oral hygiene helps to control lower respiratory infections in frail elderly hospital and nursing home patients. PMID:25201541

Scannapieco, Frank A; Shay, Kenneth

2014-10-01

361

Self-Reported Oral Hygiene Habits and Oral Health Problems of Kuwaiti Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The aims of this study were to examine self-reported oral hygiene habits and oral health problems of a sample of adult Kuwaitis. Materials and Methods: A self-administered, anonymous, structured questionnaire was distributed to 2,400 adult Kuwaiti nationals from all 6 governates of Kuwait assessing socio-demographic variables, oral hygiene habits, and oral health problems. Results: Of the 2,400 questionnaires, 1,925

Khalaf F. Al-Shammari; Jassem M. Al-Ansari; Areej K. Al-Khabbaz; Asmahan Dashti; Eino J. Honkala

2007-01-01

362

Leukoencephalopathy due to oral methotrexate.  

PubMed

Methotrexate (MTX) is considered the main agent for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Neurotoxicity is often mild, but severe encephalopathy can develop, especially with intrathecal or intravenous administration. In rare cases, this syndrome has been observed in patients on long-term low-dose oral administration. A 68-year-old male was diagnosed with RA and on treatment with oral MTX 25 mg weekly for 4 years. The patient started with progressive dysarthria, ataxia and cognitive dysfunction. Complementary tests were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed hyperintense lesions in both cerebellar hemispheres on T2-weighted and FLAIR images with a diffusion restriction on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and on the apparent diffusion coefficient map (ADC). On postgadolinium T1-weighted images, there were mild enhancements. Spectroscopy showed a demyelinating pattern. A pharmacogenetics determination was made, showing a heterozygous genotype in the MTHFR and ABCB1 genes. Medication with antirheumatic drug was stopped immediately on admission, and the patient gradually improved. MTX-induced leukoencephalopathy can occur even with low-dose administration. The exact pathogenic mechanism is still unknown, but it is hypothesised that it could be the result of a cumulative toxic effect on the blood-brain barrier. The nature of the relationship between the polymorphism and CNS toxicity is still unclear, and thus, further studies are warranted. Often located in the occipital lobes, the involvement of the cerebellum is quite rare. Early recognition of the condition and withdrawal of the drug lead to a better prognosis. PMID:24068485

González-Suárez, I; Aguilar-Amat, M J; Trigueros, M; Borobia, A M; Cruz, A; Arpa, J

2014-02-01

363

Oral Health Status of Vietnamese Adults: Findings From the National Oral Health Survey of Vietnam  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. The National Oral Health Survey of Vietnam 1999 was conducted to inform policy development. Aims. This article aims to describe the oral health status, analyze its socioeconomic distribution, and evaluate change over time in the oral health of the adult population of Vietnam. Methods. A multistaged stratified sampling process was used. Adults aged 18+ years completed a social survey

Loc Giang Do; Andrew John Spencer; Kaye Frances Roberts-Thomson; Hai Dinh Trinh; Thuy Thanh Nguyen

2011-01-01

364

Oral Health Status of Vietnamese Children: Findings From the National Oral Health Survey of Vietnam 1999  

Microsoft Academic Search

The National Oral Health Survey of Vietnam 1999 was conducted to inform policy development. Aims. The aims were to describe the oral health status, to analyze its socioeconomic distribution, and to evaluate change over time in the oral health of Vietnamese children. Methods. A multistaged stratified sampling process was employed. Children aged 6 to 17 years were examined by trained

Loc Giang Do; Andrew John Spencer; Kaye Frances Roberts-Thomson; Hai Dinh Trinh; Thuy Thanh Nguyen

2011-01-01

365

Scripting Oral History: An Examination of Structural Differences between Oral and Written Narratives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The availability of both oral and written historical narratives provides the Readers Theater adapter with a rich opportunity to experiment with mixing oral and written narrative styles in documentary form. Those who plan to use such mixing must consider the differences between oral and written narratives. Writers and readers have almost unlimited…

Miller, Gail

366

An Oral History Bibliography A Research Guide by the Columbia University Center for Oral History  

E-print Network

An Oral History Bibliography *** A Research Guide by the Columbia University Center for Oral History #12;2 Table of Contents I. Manuals and Practical Guides 3 II. Methodology and Theory 4 III. Education 18 X. Human Rights and the Law 19 XI. Memory 22 XII. Narrative, Orality and History 25 XIII

Salzman, Daniel

367

Oral health and quality of life in New Zealand: A social perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study addresses the social dimensions of oral health by relating oral quality of life (i.e. dental symptoms, perceived oral well-being and oral functioning) to oral health status. We propose a conceptual model which postulates that socioeconomic status, oral health behavior and oral health status each influence oral quality of life. Using data from the New Zealand National Oral Health

Meei-Shia Chen; Peter Hunter

1996-01-01

368

Does maternal oral health predict child oral health-related quality of life in adulthood?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  A parental\\/family history of poor oral health may influence the oral-health-related quality of life (OHRQOL) of adults.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objectives  To determine whether the oral health of mothers of young children can predict the OHRQOL of those same children when they\\u000a reach adulthood.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Oral examination and interview data from the Dunedin Study's age-32 assessment, as well as maternal self-rated oral health\\u000a data from

Dara M Shearer; W Murray Thomson; Jonathan M Broadbent; Richie Poulton

2011-01-01

369

Midwestern Rural Adolescents' Oral Sex Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: This study examined the prevalence of oral sexual activity in rural Midwestern adolescents. We also examined the correlates of a series of risk behaviors with oral sexual activity. Methods: A questionnaire based on the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System was distributed to 2121 rural middle and high school students in grades 6-12…

Dake, Joseph A.; Price, James H.; Ward, Britney L.; Welch, Philip J.

2011-01-01

370

Antimicrobial Activity of Propolis on Oral Microorganisms  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   Formation of dental caries is caused by the colonization and accumulation of oral microorganisms and extracellular polysaccharides\\u000a that are synthesized from sucrose by glucosyltransferase of Streptococcus mutans. The production of glucosyltransferase from oral microorganisms was attempted, and it was found that Streptococcus mutans produced highest activity of the enzyme. Ethanolic extracts of propolis (EEP) were examined whether EEP inhibit

Yong K. Park; Michel H. Koo; José A. S. Abreu; Masaharu Ikegaki; Jaime A. Cury; Pedro L. Rosalen

1998-01-01

371

Underlying skills of oral and silent reading.  

PubMed

Many studies have examined reading and reading development. The majority of these studies, however, focused on oral reading rather than on the more dominant silent reading mode. Similarly, it is common practice to assess oral reading abilities rather than silent reading abilities in schools and in diagnosis of reading impairments. More important, insights gained through examinations of oral reading tend to be generalized to silent reading. In the current study, we examined whether such generalizations are justified. We directly compared oral and silent reading fluency by examining whether these reading modes relate to the same underlying skills. In total, 132 fourth graders read words, sentences, and text orally, and 123 classmates read the same material silently. As underlying skills, we considered phonological awareness, rapid naming, and visual attention span. All skills correlated significantly with both reading modes. Phonological awareness contributed equally to oral and silent reading. Rapid naming, however, correlated more strongly with oral reading than with silent reading. Visual attention span correlated equally strongly with both reading modes but showed a significant unique contribution only to silent reading. In short, we showed that oral and silent reading indeed are fairly similar reading modes, based on the relations with reading-related cognitive skills. However, we also found differences that warrant caution in generalizing findings across reading modes. PMID:25173643

van den Boer, Madelon; van Bergen, Elsje; de Jong, Peter F

2014-12-01

372

College of Dentistry OBI Oral Biology  

E-print Network

College of Dentistry OBI Oral Biology KEY: # = new course * = course changed = course dropped of the College of Dentistry or consent of instructor. OBI 651 ORAL BIOLOGY FOR POSTGRADUATE DENTAL STUDENTS II to the College of Dentistry. (Same as BCH 812). OBI 813 NEUROPHYSIOLOGY. (1) The brain uses electrical signals

MacAdam, Keith

373

Oral Language and Reading in Bilingual Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the question: Do lexical, syntactic, fluency, and discourse measures of oral language collected under narrative conditions predict reading achievement both within and across languages for bilingual children? More than 1,500 Spanish-English bilingual children attending kindergarten-third grade participated. Oral narratives…

Miller, Jon F.; Heilmann, John; Nockerts, Ann; Iglesias, Aquiles; Fabiano, Leah; Francis, David J.

2006-01-01

374

Oral Presentation Track 7: Dental Biomechanics  

E-print Network

Oral Presentation Track 7: Dental Biomechanics 7.5. Biomechanical Problems in the Dental Area Abstract: 4529 Citation: Journal of Biomechanics 2006; Vol. 39 Suppl. 1, page S205 The duration of Oral Biology, School of Dental Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel The periodontal ligament (PDL

Gefen, Amit

375

Oral myiasis treated with ivermectin: case report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oral myiasis is a rare pathology and a risk to the patient's life. Conventional treatment is mechanical removal of the larvae (maggots) one by one, which is painful, distressing, and embarrassing both to the patient and to the dentist. We present a case report of a patient with cerebral palsy that had oral myiasis treated successfully with ivermectin. The use

Elio Hitoshi Shinohara; Marcelo Zillo Martini; Humberto Gomes de Oliveira Neto; André Takahashi

2004-01-01

376

Vesiculobullous disorders affecting the oral cavity.  

PubMed

Vesiculobullous disorders of the oral cavity managed by oral medicine specialists include erythema multiforme, pemphigus vulgaris, paraneoplastic pemphigus and mucous membrane pemphigoid. These conditions can have significant effects on quality of life and potentially serious sequelae if not identified early. PMID:25216166

Shephard, Martina; Hodgson, Tim; Hegarty, Anne M

2014-09-01

377

Oral vaccination with immune stimulating complexes  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a need for non-living adjuvant vectors which will induce a full range of local and systemic immune responses to orally administered purified antigens. Here we describe our experience with lipophilic immune stimulating complexes (ISCOMS) containing the saponin adjuvant Quil A. When given orally, ISCOMS containing the model protein antigen ovalbumin (OVA) induce a wide range of systemic immune

Allan McI Mowat; Rosemary E Smith; Anne M Donachie; Elizabeth Furrie; Dubravka Grdic; Nils Lycke

1999-01-01

378

Oral involvement in autoimmune bullous diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

The oral mucosa is frequently involved by autoimmune bullous diseases and often this is the first site of manifestation. In this site the lesions are very similar, making the clinical diagnosis difficult; therefore, the definition of the immunohistopathologic characteristics of each one becomes essential for a differential diagnosis. The authors review the clinical-pathological and therapeutic aspect of these oral injuries

Marcia Ramos-e-Silva; Adriana Ferreira; Claudio de-Moura-Castro Jacques

2011-01-01

379

Causes and consequences of oral contraceptive noncompliance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Compliance difficulties are more common among oral contraceptive users than is generally appreciated. Inconsistent use and method discontinuation are estimated to account for approximately 20% of the annual 3.5 million annual unintended pregnancies in the United States. In the past research focused on adolescents, for whom predictors of poor oral contraceptive compliance include multiple sex partners, low evaluation of personal

Michael Rosenberg; Michael S. Waugh

1999-01-01

380

Oral contraceptives and the risk of cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explores the risk of cancer associated with the use of oral contraceptives. It is based on the results of follow up of the Royal College of General Practitioners' (GPs') oral contraceptive study. The outcome of interest in this prospective cohort study was the incidence of some selected cancers. The study was started in mid-1968 and recruited about 46

Selvaraj S; Angus V; Iversen L

2008-01-01

381

Oral Reading Observation System Observer's Training Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A self-instructional program for use by teachers of the handicapped, this training manual was developed to teach accurate coding with the Oral Reading Observation System (OROS)an observation system designed to code teacher-pupil verbal interaction during oral reading instruction. The body of the manual is organized to correspond to the nine…

Brady, Mary Ella; And Others

382

42 CFR 405.1124 - Oral argument.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oral argument. 405.1124...Section 405.1124 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE...MEDICARE PROGRAM FEDERAL HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE AGED...Review § 405.1124 Oral argument. A...

2010-10-01

383

42 CFR 405.1124 - Oral argument.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Oral argument. 405.1124...Section 405.1124 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE...MEDICARE PROGRAM FEDERAL HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE AGED...Review § 405.1124 Oral argument. A...

2011-10-01

384

Oral History and the Black Studies Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Black Studies means an indepth investigation of the Black Experience. Without oral history methods, this will be prostituted to mean a superficial view of opinions set forth by white society. All the broad areas of Black scholarship must begin to relate to the problems of capturing the life of the race on tape and retaining it for posterity. Oral…

Simmons, Henry E.

385

Using Oral Interpretation to Affect Public Policy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To dramatize the human resource potential of persons over 65 years old and of the disabled, oral interpretation presentations using oral histories were developed. These presentations were designed to lead to a stimulating exchange of ideas concerning the potential contribution to daily life of the elderly and of the disabled, and to pose questions…

Hartman, Maryann; And Others

386

Orality in Northern Cree Indigenous Worlds.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the importance and centrality of orality, rather than literacy, in the shared lives of the Cree of northern Alberta. Discusses orality consciousness related to the practice of shared memories and personal and communal healing during the "dance of the ancestors" or "ghost dance." Includes a short history of the Cree people and their…

Weber-Pillwax, Cora

2001-01-01

387

HIV Trainings and Preceptorships for Oral Health  

E-print Network

schools and hospitals where they will observe faculty providing direct oral health care and/or HIV primary study clubs, dental societies and community health centers throughout New York and New Jersey. We work Department of Health � AIDS Institute, a Regional Resource Center for Oral Health of the NY/NJ AETC, has

Garfunkel, Eric

388

21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030 Section...Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in...

2010-04-01

389

21 CFR 872.6510 - Oral irrigation unit.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oral irrigation unit. 872.6510 Section 872.6510...Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6510 Oral irrigation unit. (a) Identification. An oral irrigation unit is an AC-powered device...

2012-04-01

390

21 CFR 872.6510 - Oral irrigation unit.  

...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oral irrigation unit. 872.6510 Section 872.6510...Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6510 Oral irrigation unit. (a) Identification. An oral irrigation unit is an AC-powered device...

2014-04-01

391

21 CFR 872.6510 - Oral irrigation unit.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oral irrigation unit. 872.6510 Section 872.6510...Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6510 Oral irrigation unit. (a) Identification. An oral irrigation unit is an AC-powered device...

2013-04-01

392

21 CFR 872.6510 - Oral irrigation unit.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oral irrigation unit. 872.6510 Section 872.6510...Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6510 Oral irrigation unit. (a) Identification. An oral irrigation unit is an AC-powered device...

2010-04-01

393

21 CFR 872.6510 - Oral irrigation unit.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oral irrigation unit. 872.6510 Section 872.6510...Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6510 Oral irrigation unit. (a) Identification. An oral irrigation unit is an AC-powered device...

2011-04-01

394

21 CFR 520.390 - Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms. 520.390...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.390 Chloramphenicol oral dosage...

2011-04-01

395

21 CFR 520.445 - Chlortetracycline oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Chlortetracycline oral dosage forms. 520.445...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.445 Chlortetracycline oral dosage...

2011-04-01

396

21 CFR 520.2160 - Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms. 520.2160...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage...

2010-04-01

397

21 CFR 520.82 - Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms. 520.82 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...82 Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage...

2011-04-01

398

21 CFR 520.1696 - Penicillin oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Penicillin oral dosage forms. 520.1696...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696 Penicillin oral dosage...

2010-04-01

399

21 CFR 520.300 - Cambendazole oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Cambendazole oral dosage forms. 520.300...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.300 Cambendazole oral dosage...

2010-04-01

400

21 CFR 520.2520 - Trichlorfon oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Trichlorfon oral dosage forms. 520.2520...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520 Trichlorfon oral dosage...

2010-04-01

401

21 CFR 520.1242 - Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms. 520.1242...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...1242 Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage...

2011-04-01

402

21 CFR 520.1720 - Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms. 520.1720...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1720 Phenylbutazone oral dosage...

2010-04-01

403

21 CFR 520.905 - Fenbendazole oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Fenbendazole oral dosage forms. 520.905...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.905 Fenbendazole oral dosage...

2011-04-01

404

21 CFR 520.2261 - Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms. 520.2261...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...2261 Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage...

2010-04-01

405

21 CFR 520.903 - Febantel oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Febantel oral dosage forms. 520.903...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.903 Febantel oral dosage...

2011-04-01

406

21 CFR 520.2345 - Tetracycline oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Tetracycline oral dosage forms. 520.2345...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2345 Tetracycline oral dosage...

2011-04-01

407

21 CFR 520.620 - Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms. 520.620...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.620 Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage...

2010-04-01

408

21 CFR 520.154 - Bacitracin oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Bacitracin oral dosage forms. 520.154...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.154 Bacitracin oral dosage...

2010-04-01

409

21 CFR 520.540 - Dexamethasone oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Dexamethasone oral dosage forms. 520.540...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.540 Dexamethasone oral dosage...

2010-04-01

410

21 CFR 520.2220c - Sulfadimethoxine oral suspension.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Sulfadimethoxine oral suspension. 520.2220c...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2220c Sulfadimethoxine oral suspension. (a)...

2010-04-01

411

21 CFR 520.390 - Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms. 520.390...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.390 Chloramphenicol oral dosage...

2010-04-01

412

21 CFR 520.390c - Chloramphenicol palmitate oral suspension.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Chloramphenicol palmitate oral suspension. 520.390c ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS... Chloramphenicol palmitate oral suspension. (a)...

2011-04-01

413

21 CFR 20.104 - Summaries of oral discussions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Summaries of oral discussions. 20.104 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... § 20.104 Summaries of oral discussions. (a) All written summaries of oral discussions,...

2011-04-01

414

21 CFR 520.2220 - Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms. 520.2220...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2220 Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage...

2011-04-01

415

21 CFR 520.154 - Bacitracin oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Bacitracin oral dosage forms. 520.154...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.154 Bacitracin oral dosage...

2011-04-01

416

21 CFR 520.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms. 520.1044...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1044 Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage...

2011-04-01

417

21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.763 Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage...

2011-04-01

418

21 CFR 520.970 - Flunixin oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Flunixin oral dosage forms. 520.970...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.970 Flunixin oral dosage...

2011-04-01

419

21 CFR 520.1696 - Penicillin oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Penicillin oral dosage forms. 520.1696...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696 Penicillin oral dosage...

2011-04-01

420

21 CFR 520.88 - Amoxicillin oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Amoxicillin oral dosage forms. 520.88 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.88 Amoxicillin oral dosage...

2010-04-01

421

21 CFR 520.620 - Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms. 520.620...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.620 Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage...

2011-04-01

422

21 CFR 520.2473 - Tioxidazole oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Tioxidazole oral dosage forms. 520.2473...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2473 Tioxidazole oral dosage...

2011-04-01

423

21 CFR 520.970 - Flunixin oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Flunixin oral dosage forms. 520.970...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.970 Flunixin oral dosage...

2010-04-01

424

21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.763 Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage...

2010-04-01

425

21 CFR 520.2520 - Trichlorfon oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Trichlorfon oral dosage forms. 520.2520...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520 Trichlorfon oral dosage...

2011-04-01

426

21 CFR 520.2325 - Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms. 520.2325...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2325 Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage...

2011-04-01

427

21 CFR 520.1120 - Haloxon oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Haloxon oral dosage forms. 520.1120...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1120 Haloxon oral dosage...

2011-04-01

428

21 CFR 520.300 - Cambendazole oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Cambendazole oral dosage forms. 520.300...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.300 Cambendazole oral dosage...

2011-04-01

429

21 CFR 520.622 - Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms. 520.622...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS... Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage...

2010-04-01

430

21 CFR 520.90 - Ampicillin oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Ampicillin oral dosage forms. 520.90 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.90 Ampicillin oral dosage...

2010-04-01

431

21 CFR 520.2345 - Tetracycline oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Tetracycline oral dosage forms. 520.2345...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2345 Tetracycline oral dosage...

2010-04-01

432

21 CFR 520.2380 - Thiabendazole oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Thiabendazole oral dosage forms. 520.2380...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2380 Thiabendazole oral dosage...

2011-04-01

433

21 CFR 520.2473 - Tioxidazole oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Tioxidazole oral dosage forms. 520.2473...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2473 Tioxidazole oral dosage...

2010-04-01

434

21 CFR 520.2160 - Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms. 520.2160...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage...

2011-04-01

435

21 CFR 520.2260 - Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms. 520.2260...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2260 Sulfamethazine oral dosage...

2010-04-01

436

21 CFR 520.2325 - Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms. 520.2325...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2325 Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage...

2010-04-01

437

21 CFR 520.2150 - Stanozolol oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Stanozolol oral dosage forms. 520.2150...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2150 Stanozolol oral dosage...

2010-04-01

438

21 CFR 520.1450 - Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms. 520.1450...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1450 Morantel tartrate oral dosage...

2011-04-01

439

21 CFR 520.1120 - Haloxon oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Haloxon oral dosage forms. 520.1120...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1120 Haloxon oral dosage...

2010-04-01

440

21 CFR 520.90 - Ampicillin oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Ampicillin oral dosage forms. 520.90 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.90 Ampicillin oral dosage...

2011-04-01

441

21 CFR 520.905 - Fenbendazole oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Fenbendazole oral dosage forms. 520.905...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.905 Fenbendazole oral dosage...

2010-04-01

442

21 CFR 520.2123 - Spectinomycin oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Spectinomycin oral dosage forms. 520.2123...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2123 Spectinomycin oral dosage...

2010-04-01

443

21 CFR 520.82 - Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms. 520.82 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...82 Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage...

2010-04-01

444

21 CFR 520.2380 - Thiabendazole oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Thiabendazole oral dosage forms. 520.2380...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2380 Thiabendazole oral dosage...

2010-04-01

445

21 CFR 520.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms. 520.1044...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1044 Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage...

2010-04-01

446

21 CFR 520.445 - Chlortetracycline oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Chlortetracycline oral dosage forms. 520.445...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.445 Chlortetracycline oral dosage...

2010-04-01

447

21 CFR 520.1450 - Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms. 520.1450...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1450 Morantel tartrate oral dosage...

2010-04-01

448

21 CFR 520.622 - Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms. 520.622...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS... Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage...

2011-04-01

449

21 CFR 520.2158c - Dihydrostreptomycin oral suspension.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Dihydrostreptomycin oral suspension. 520.2158c...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...2158c Dihydrostreptomycin oral suspension. (a)...

2010-04-01

450

21 CFR 520.88 - Amoxicillin oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Amoxicillin oral dosage forms. 520.88 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.88 Amoxicillin oral dosage...

2011-04-01

451

21 CFR 520.2158c - Dihydrostreptomycin oral suspension.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Dihydrostreptomycin oral suspension. 520.2158c...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...2158c Dihydrostreptomycin oral suspension. (a)...

2011-04-01

452

21 CFR 520.2220 - Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms. 520.2220...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2220 Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage...

2010-04-01

453

21 CFR 520.2261 - Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms. 520.2261...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...2261 Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage...

2011-04-01

454

21 CFR 520.2260 - Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms. 520.2260...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2260 Sulfamethazine oral dosage...

2011-04-01

455

21 CFR 520.540 - Dexamethasone oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Dexamethasone oral dosage forms. 520.540...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.540 Dexamethasone oral dosage...

2011-04-01

456

21 CFR 520.45 - Albendazole oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Albendazole oral dosage forms. 520.45 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.45 Albendazole oral dosage...

2011-04-01

457

21 CFR 520.2220c - Sulfadimethoxine oral suspension.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Sulfadimethoxine oral suspension. 520.2220c...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2220c Sulfadimethoxine oral suspension. (a)...

2011-04-01

458

21 CFR 520.2150 - Stanozolol oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Stanozolol oral dosage forms. 520.2150...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2150 Stanozolol oral dosage...

2011-04-01

459

21 CFR 520.903 - Febantel oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Febantel oral dosage forms. 520.903...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.903 Febantel oral dosage...

2010-04-01

460

21 CFR 520.1720 - Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms. 520.1720...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1720 Phenylbutazone oral dosage...

2011-04-01

461

21 CFR 520.2123 - Spectinomycin oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Spectinomycin oral dosage forms. 520.2123...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2123 Spectinomycin oral dosage...

2011-04-01

462

21 CFR 520.45 - Albendazole oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Albendazole oral dosage forms. 520.45 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.45 Albendazole oral dosage...

2010-04-01

463

21 CFR 520.1242 - Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms. 520.1242 Section 520...PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1242 Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage...

2010-04-01

464

Harvard Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Associates OMS Care Center @ Mass General  

E-print Network

Harvard Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Associates OMS Care Center @ Mass General OMS Care Center/Physician's Phone: _____________________ Harvard Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Associates Patient Referral to or physician for oral and maxillofacial surgery treatment or consultation. The information below will help you

Mootha, Vamsi K.

465

42 CFR 493.1220 - Condition: Oral pathology.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Condition: Oral pathology. 493.1220 Section 493.1220... § 493.1220 Condition: Oral pathology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Oral pathology, the laboratory must meet the...

2011-10-01

466

42 CFR 493.1220 - Condition: Oral pathology.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Condition: Oral pathology. 493.1220 Section 493.1220... § 493.1220 Condition: Oral pathology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Oral pathology, the laboratory must meet the...

2010-10-01

467

42 CFR 493.1220 - Condition: Oral pathology.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Condition: Oral pathology. 493.1220 Section 493.1220... § 493.1220 Condition: Oral pathology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Oral pathology, the laboratory must meet the...

2013-10-01

468

42 CFR 493.1220 - Condition: Oral pathology.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Condition: Oral pathology. 493.1220 Section 493.1220... § 493.1220 Condition: Oral pathology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Oral pathology, the laboratory must meet the...

2012-10-01

469

46 CFR 502.203 - Depositions upon oral examination.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...502.203 Depositions upon oral examination. (a) Notice...deposition of any person upon oral examination shall give...lieu of participating in the oral examination, parties served...unless such examination and reading are waived by the...

2010-10-01

470

47 CFR 1.277 - Exceptions; oral arguments.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...parties who participated in the oral argument. (f) Any commissioner who is not present at oral argument and who is otherwise authorized...participate in making that decision after reading the transcript of oral argument. (Sec. 409, 48...

2010-10-01

471

Acute Urticaria Induced by Oral Methylprednisolone  

PubMed Central

Although corticosteroids have immunosuppressive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-allergic effects, allergic reactions are rare. We report a case involving a 52-year-old-female with acute urticaria caused by oral methylprednisolone. The patient had experienced aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) for 13 years with frequent asthma exacerbations. Symptoms of asthma exacerbations improved with short-term treatments of systemic steroids, including methylprednisolone or deflazacort, which had been well tolerated. However, the current admission was prompted by the development of acute generalized urticaria following the oral ingestion of methylprednisolone (8 mg) for relief of symptoms. An oral provocation test with 4 mg oral methylprednisolone led to generalized urticaria 20 minutes later, confirming the causal association. This is the first report of acute urticaria caused by oral methylprednisolone in a patient with AERD. PMID:21966609

Jang, Eun Jung; Jin, Hyun Jung; Nam, Young Hee; Kim, Joo Hee; Ye, Young-Min

2011-01-01

472

An effective oral health promoting message?  

PubMed

This paper questions the effectiveness of current oral health promoting activities in reducing social inequalities in oral health. An attempt is made to address the needs of dental professionals and nutritionists in communicating an understanding of biological aspects of the aetiology of caries and erosion. With a clear understanding of the disease process oral health promoters can possibly reduce social inequalities in oral health. A clear common message which satisfies both dental and nutritional professionals is presented. The issues of commonality and ambiguity are fundamental to effective behavioural/teaching practice. Currently the evidence base suggests that dietary messages are inconsistent and ambiguous. Therefore, a clear common and unambiguous dietary message, based on science, could go some way to improving oral health inequalities. PMID:22158167

Richards, W; Filipponi, T

2011-12-01

473

Interactions between sleep disorders and oral diseases.  

PubMed

Dental sleep medicine is a rapidly growing field that is in close and direct interaction with sleep medicine and comprises many aspects of human health. As a result, dentists who encounter sleep health and sleep disorders may work with clinicians from many other disciplines and specialties. The main sleep and oral health issues that are covered in this review are obstructive sleep apnea, chronic mouth breathing, sleep-related gastroesophageal reflux, and sleep bruxism. In addition, edentulism and its impact on sleep disorders are discussed. Improving sleep quality and sleep characteristics, oral health, and oral function involves both pathophysiology and disease management. The multiple interactions between oral health and sleep underscore the need for an interdisciplinary clinical team to manage oral health-related sleep disorders that are commonly seen in dental practice. PMID:23815461

Huynh, N T; Emami, E; Helman, J I; Chervin, R D

2014-04-01

474

Chapter Oral Health Advocates: A Nationwide Model for Pediatrician Peer Education and Advocacy about Oral Health  

PubMed Central

Objective. (1) To describe an innovative program training US pediatricians to be Chapter Oral Health Advocates (COHAs). (2) To provide insight into COHAs' experiences disseminating oral health knowledge to fellow pediatricians. Patients and Methods. Interviews with 40 COHAs who responded to an email request, from a total of 64 (62% response). Transcripts were analyzed for common themes about COHA activities, facilitators, and barriers. Results. COHAs reported positive experiences at the AAP oral health training program. A subset of academic COHAs focused on legislative activity and another on resident education about oral health. Residents had an easier time adopting oral health activities while practicing pediatricians cited time constraints. COHAs provided insights into policy, barriers, and facilitators for incorporating oral health into practice. Conclusions. This report identifies factors influencing pediatricians' adoption of oral health care into practice. COHAs reported successes in training peers on integrating oral health into pediatric practice, identified opportunities and challenges to oral health implementation in primary care, and reported issues about the state of children's oral health in their communities. With ongoing support, the COHA program has a potential to improve access to preventive oral health services in the Medical Home and to increase referrals to a Dental Home. PMID:24228032

Lewis, Charlotte W.; Barone, Lauren; Quinonez, Rocio B.; Boulter, Suzanne; Mouradian, Wendy E.

2013-01-01

475

Chicago Architects Oral History Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From the artistic statements of Louis Sullivan to the brutally Modern statements of Walter Netsch, architecture in Chicago is nothing if not eclectic. Given the important legacy of those architects practicing in and around Chicago, it is refreshing to note that the Art Institute of Chicago has been collecting the oral histories of these men and women since 1983. With substantial financial support from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts and the Illinois Humanities Council, the Art Institute of Chicago has placed complete transcripts for over fifty of these interviews online here for access by architectural historians and the general public. Here visitors will find the recollections of Stanley Tigerman, Harry Weese, Bertrand Goldberg, and Carter Manny. Visitors will also be glad to find that female architects are well-represented here, and include such individuals as Gertrude Lempp Kerbis and Natalie De Blois.

476

[Psychosomatic aspects of oral contraception].  

PubMed

Oral contraceptive use is influenced by multiple emotional factors. Physiological and psychological effects are closely correlated. Contraception may assist women in pursuing important psychosocial goals, on the other hand, it may cause a number of problems. Many unconscious wishes or fears may interfere with the clear separation of sexuality from fertility. Ambivalence about pregnancy, neurotic personalities and problems in partner relationship may cause psychic conflicts with regard to contraception. Anxiety, side effects, misuse of contraceptives or problems in the relationship between doctor and patient may result. As a further development psychosomatic symptoms such as discomfort, nervousness, sleep disturbance, fatigue, nausea and sexual disorders may appear. The physician must take contradictory feelings of the patient into consideration, including her anxiety and her possible ambivalence with respect to pregnancy. PMID:1794682

Schanzer, K

1991-12-01

477

Oral immunotherapy for food allergy.  

PubMed

Current management of food allergy involves strict avoidance, education on recognizing and managing allergic reactions, and carrying an adrenaline autoinjector. This approach is burdensome and associated with reduced quality of life. Patients with food allergy would benefit greatly from a treatment that could achieve desensitization or long-term tolerance. Recent studies have shown that oral immunotherapy (OIT) can induce desensitization and modulate allergen-specific immune responses; however, it remains uncertain whether OIT can induce long-term tolerance. Nevertheless, successful desensitization provides a major advance in management by reducing the risk of reaction to low amounts of allergen. Allergic reactions during OIT are common, although severe reactions are less common. Therefore, OIT should be performed in specialist centers under close medical supervision and would ideally be conducted as part of ongoing research studies. OIT holds promise as a novel approach to managing food allergy. PMID:19063824

Tang, Mimi L K

2009-01-01

478

Oral sumatriptan in acute migraine.  

PubMed

The efficacy in acute migraine of oral sumatriptan was assessed in a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, crossover study of 61 patients (mean age 39 [SD 10] years). 41 completed treatment of four attacks, two with sumatriptan 100 mg and two with placebo. The response rate (reduction in headache from moderate or severe to mild or absent at 2 h) was 51% (45/89) with sumatriptan and 10% (9/93) with placebo (p less than 0.01); rescue medication was needed at 2 h in 41% and 88%, respectively. Of 28 patients headache-free at 24 h, 11 (39%) had recurrent headache within 24 h. There were no substantial side-effects. Thus, sumatriptan is an effective well-tolerated treatment for acute migraine attacks. PMID:1681162

Goadsby, P J; Zagami, A S; Donnan, G A; Symington, G; Anthony, M; Bladin, P F; Lance, J W

1991-09-28

479

Pancake Syndrome (Oral Mite Anaphylaxis)  

PubMed Central

Oral mite anaphylaxis is a new syndrome characterized by severe allergic manifestations occurring in atopic patients shortly after the intake of foods made with mite-contaminated wheat flour. This clinical entity, observed more frequently in tropical/subtropical environments, is more often triggered by pancakes and for that reason it has been designated "pancake syndrome". Because cooked foods are able to induce the symptoms, it has been proposed that thermoresistant allergens are involved in its production. A novel variety of this syndrome occurs during physical exercise and therefore has been named dust mite ingestion-associated exercise-induced anaphylaxis. To prevent mite proliferation and the production of anaphylaxis, it has been recommended that wheat flour be stored at low temperatures in the refrigerator. PMID:23283016

2009-01-01

480

Oral Manifestations in the American Tegumentary Leishmaniasis  

PubMed Central

Introduction American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) can affect the skin or mucosa (mucocutaneous leishmaniasis – MCL) including the oral cavity. MCL oral lesions are often confused with other oral diseases, delaying diagnosis and specific treatment, and increasing the likelihood of sequelae. Thus, increasing the knowledge of the evolution of ATL oral lesions can facilitate its early diagnosis improving the prognosis of healing. Objectives Evaluate the frequency of ATL oral lesion and describe its clinical, laboratory and therapeutic peculiarities. Methods A descriptive transversal study was carried out, using data from medical records of 206 patients with MCL examined at the outpatient clinics-IPEC-Fiocruz between 1989 and 2013. Proportions were calculated for the categorical variables and the association among them was assessed by the Pearson's chi-square test. Measures of central tendency and dispersion were used for the continuous variables and their differences were assessed by both parametric (t test) and non parametric (Mann-Whitney) tests. P-values <0.05 were considered as significant. Results The most affected site was the nose, followed by the mouth, pharynx and larynx. Seventy eight (37.9%) have oral lesions and the disease presented a lower median of the evolution time than in other mucous sites as well as an increased time to heal. The presence of oral lesion was associated with: the presence of lesions in the other three mucosal sites; a smaller median of the leishmanin skin test values; a longer healing time of the mucosal lesions; a higher recurrence frequency; and a smaller frequency of treatment finishing and healing. When the oral lesion was isolated, it was associated with an age 20 years lower than when the oral lesion was associated with other mucosal sites. Conclusion Considering the worst therapy results associated with the presence of oral lesions, we suggest that lesions in this location represent a factor of worse prognosis for MCL. PMID:25386857

da Costa, Daniel Cesar Silva; Palmeiro, Mariana Reuter; Moreira, João Soares; Martins, Ana Cristina da Costa; da Silva, Aline Fagundes; de Fátima Madeira, Maria; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira; Confort, Eliame Mouta; de Oliveira Schubach, Armando; da Conceição Silva, Fátima; Valete-Rosalino, Cláudia Maria

2014-01-01