Science.gov

Sample records for mcg oral misoprostol

  1. A prospective study of a monophasic oral contraceptive containing 30 mcg ethinyl oestradiol and 150 mcg desogestrel (Marvelon).

    PubMed

    Ismail, M T

    1994-06-01

    Marvelon, a monophasic oral contraceptive (OC) containing 30 mcg of ethinyl estradiol and 150 mcg of desogestrel, has been available to Malaysian women through the national family planning program since 1982. To assess the safety, effectiveness, and side effects associated with this OC, 247 women who requested the pill were enrolled in a multicenter prospective study that included follow-up after the first, third, and sixth cycles of use. 81% of participants had never used any form of contraception before Marvelon. 194 women (79%) completed the 6-month study. There were no pregnancies recorded. Although women reported a slightly increased incidence of nausea, breast tenderness, and headache in the first treatment cycle, these side effects had abated by the end of the third cycle. After six cycles, mean body weight had decreased by an average of 0.4 kg. Both systolic and diastolic blood pressure were unaffected. An unexpected finding was a decrease in the severity of acne with continuous use of Marvelon. Although both spotting and breakthrough bleeding increased slightly in the first two cycles, irregular bleeding returned to pretreatment levels by the third cycle. The length of the withdrawal bleed in the pill-free week was reduced. The incidence of irregular bleeding and other side effects was substantially lower in this sample of Malaysian women than in Asian and Caucasian Marvelon users surveyed in other studies. PMID:12320338

  2. Randomized Trial of Oral Misoprostol Treatment for Cervical Ripening Before Tandem Application in Cervix Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cepni, Kimia; Gul, Sule; Cepni, Ismail; Gueralp, Onur; Sal, Veysel; Mayadagli, Alpaslan

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of oral misoprostol administered to facilitate tandem application to the cervix as a part of brachytherapy in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Eighty patients with cervical cancer who had been planned to undergo brachytherapy at Dr. Luetfi Kirdar Kartal Training and Research Hospital were evaluated in a double-blind, prospective, randomized trial. Patients were divided randomly into two groups of 40 patients. The first and second groups received 400 {mu}g of misoprostol orally and placebo, respectively, 3 h before tandem application. The two groups were compared in terms of age, diameter of tumor, parity, age at first intercourse, amount of bleeding and pain at first tandem application, length of endometrial cavity measured by hysterometer, and size of Hegar dilators used for cervical dilatation. Results: Of all cases, 63.6%, 16.3%, 10%, 6.3%, 2.5%, and 1.3% were Stage IIB, IIIB, IIIA, IVA, IIA and IIC, respectively. Mean ({+-}SD) age (range) was 49.3 {+-} 13.1 (25-83) years and 56.6 {+-} 13.2 (30-78) years in the study and control groups, respectively (p = 0.015). Age at first intercourse, diameter of tumor, parity, amount of bleeding at first tandem application, and length of endometrial cavity measured by hysterometer were not significantly different between the two groups. Pain score was significantly higher in the control group (p < 0.001). Application was significantly easier in the study group compared with controls (p < 0.001). Average size of initial Hegar dilators used for cervical dilatation was significantly higher in the study group compared with controls (p = 0.017). Conclusion: Administration of misoprostol 400 {mu}g orally for cervical ripening before tandem application facilitates the procedure, increases patient tolerability and comfort, and may decrease complication rates.

  3. Evaluating misoprostol content in pregnant women with hourly oral administration during labor induction by microElution solid phase extraction combined with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hung, Cheng-Han; Cheng, Shi-Yann; Chan, Tzu-Min; Lee, Maw-Rong

    2015-09-01

    Misoprostol is a widely used alternative of prostaglandin for labor induction. Based on previous studies, we envision that small and frequent oral dosage of misoprostol is an effective method for labor induction. To monitor the misoprostol content during labor induction, a rapid, sensitive, and selective microElution solid phase extraction (?Elution SPE) combined with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed. Using ?Elution SPE could minimize the sample consumption and elution volume in order to maximize the sample enrichment and throughput. The misoprostol acid, a metabolite of misoprostol, was gradient separated in a Bidentate C18 column, then quantified by highly-selective reaction monitoring (H-SRM) in a total run time of 6min. The developed method was optimized and validated in human plasma, and showed linear range of 0.01-10ng/mL. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.001ng/mL. The recovery ranged from 89.0 to 96.0%, and no significant matrix effect or carryover was observed. The precision, accuracy and stability were met with the criteria of U.S. FDA guidance. The developed method was successfully applied to evaluate misoprostol concentration during labor induction in pregnant women. The concentration-time profiles approves that hourly oral administration of misoprostol is a safe and effective method without drug accumulation for labor induction. PMID:26245361

  4. Congenital abnormalities in Brazilian children associated with misoprostol misuse in first trimester of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, C H; Marques-Dias, M J; Kim, C A; Sugayama, S M; Da Paz, J A; Huson, S M; Holmes, L B

    1998-05-30

    In Brazil and other South and Central American countries where abortion is illegal, misoprostol is widely available and commonly used to induce abortion. However, misoprostol is not very effective as an abortifacient agent and can cause fetal abnormalities. The present study reviewed the cases of 42 infants from Sao Paulo, Brazil, who were exposed to misoprostol during the first trimester of pregnancy and then born with a congenital abnormality. 17 children had equinovarus with cranial nerve deficiencies and 10 had equinovarus as part of a more extensive arthrogryposis. The most distinctive phenotypes were arthrogryposis confined to the legs (5 cases) and terminal transverse limb defects (9 cases). Congenital hydrocephalus was present in 8 children. The most commonly taken dose of misoprostol was 800 mcg (range, 200-16,000 mcg). Greater awareness of the widespread use of misoprostol to induce abortion should lead to public health interventions to prevent teratogenic effects. PMID:9620717

  5. Diclofenac and Misoprostol

    MedlinePLUS

    ... such as diclofenac may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestine. Misoprostol is taken ... like coffee grounds, blood in the stool, or black and tarry stools. before you begin your treatment ...

  6. Exacerbation of Celecoxib-Induced Renal Injury by Concomitant Administration of Misoprostol in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Dustin L.; Murrell, Derek E.; Conder, Christopher M.; Palau, Victoria E.; Campbell, Grace E.; Lynch, Shaun P.; Denham, James W.; Hanley, Angela V.; Bullins, Kenny W.; Panus, Peter C.; Singh, Krishna; Harirforoosh, Sam

    2014-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can produce adverse effects by inhibiting prostaglandin (PG) synthesis. A PGE1 analogue, misoprostol, is often utilized to alleviate NSAID-related gastrointestinal side effects. This study examined the effect of misoprostol on celecoxib renal toxicity. Additionally, the effects of these drugs on cardiovascular parameters were evaluated. Four randomized rat groups were orally gavaged for 9 days, two groups receiving vehicle and two groups receiving misoprostol (100 µg/kg) twice daily. Celecoxib (40 mg/kg) was co-administered once daily to one vehicle and one misoprostol group from days 3 to 9. Urine and blood samples were collected and blood pressure parameters were measured during the study period. Hearts and kidneys were harvested on final day. Day 2 urinary electrolyte samples revealed significant reductions in sodium excretion in misoprostol (0.12±0.05 µmol/min/100 g) and misoprostol+celecoxib groups (0.07±0.02 µmol/min/100 g). At day 3, all treatment groups showed significantly reduced sodium excretion. Potassium excretion diminished significantly in vehicle+celecoxib and misoprostol+celecoxib groups from day 3 onward. Urinary kidney injury molecule-1 levels were significantly increased in vehicle+celecoxib (0.65±0.02 vs. 0.35±0.07 ng/mL, p?=?0.0002) and misoprostol+celecoxib (0.61±0.06 vs. 0.37±0.06 ng/mL, p?=?0.0015) groups when compared to baseline; while plasma levels of cardiac troponin I increased significantly in vehicle+celecoxib (p?=?0.0040) and misoprostol+misoprostol (p?=?0.0078) groups when compared to vehicle+vehicle. Blood pressure parameters increased significantly in all misoprostol treated groups. Significant elevation in diastolic (p?=?0.0071) and mean blood pressure (p?=?0.0153) was noted in misoprostol+celecoxib compared to vehicle+celecoxib. All treatments produced significant tubular dilatation/necrosis compared to control. No significant myocardial changes were noticed; however, three animals presented with pericarditis. Kidney, heart, and plasma celecoxib levels revealed no significant change between vehicle+celecoxib and misoprostol+celecoxib. Concomitant misoprostol administration did not prevent celecoxib renal toxicity, and instead exacerbated renal side effects. Misoprostol did not alter plasma or tissue celecoxib concentrations suggesting no pharmacokinetic interaction between celecoxib and misoprostol. PMID:24586517

  7. Effects of a combined oral contraceptive containing 20?mcg of ethinylestradiol and 3?mg of drospirenone on the blood pressure, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, insulin resistance, and androgenic profile of healthy young women.

    PubMed

    Giribela, Cassiana Rosa Galvão; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda Marciano; Nisenbaum, Marcelo Gil; Moraes, Tercio Lemos de; Giribela, Aricia Helena Galvão; Baracat, Edmund Chada; Melo, Nilson Roberto de

    2015-11-01

    Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) may increase the risk for cardiovascular disease depending on the ethynyl estradiol (EE) dose and the androgenicity of the progestogens. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of a COC containing 20?mcg EE?+?3?mg drospirenone on blood pressure (BP), renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, insulin resistance, and androgenic profile of healthy young women. Eighty-one healthy young women aged 30?±?1 years (case group, n?=?49, received COC; control group, n?=?32, used no COC) were assessed twice, before and after the 6-month study. Statistical analysis employed the paired t-tests and expressed the data in mean and standard deviation. Results were as follows: no changes in BP or in BMI; a significant increase in aldosterone, plasma renin activity, triglycerides, and total cholesterol levels, but a non-significant increase in HDL and no significant changes in LDL levels (these parameters remained within normal ranges); a significant increase in the HOMA-IR index and a significant decrease in dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (SDHEA), androstenedione, total testosterone, and free testosterone levels; no significant variations in the control group parameters. An oral contraceptive combination of a low EE dose and an anti-androgenic progestogen does not negatively influence the risk factors for a cardiovascular disease. PMID:26172927

  8. Misoprostol for Labour Induction after Previous Caesarean Section – Forever a “No Go”?

    PubMed Central

    Rath, W.; Tsikouras, P.

    2015-01-01

    Misoprostol in oral or vaginal form is an established method of labour induction worldwide. Its use after previous caesarean section is associated with a high rate of uterine rupture; according to international guidelines it is therefore contraindicated in this setting. However the evidence base for this recommendation comprises case reports, one randomised trial that was discontinued prematurely, and numerous low quality retrospective data analyses published between 1997 and 2004. New insights into e.g. resorption kinetics, dosage and application intervals, dose dependant uterine hyperstimulation rates, as well as increasing clinical experience with misoprostol have lead to a critical reappraisal of these “historical” studies. Accordingly the evidence supporting a ban on vaginal and particularly oral misoprostol for labour induction in the context of a scarred uterus is currently insufficient for a convincing guideline recommendation. In view of the clear advantages of misoprostol over prostaglandin E2 (cheaper, more effective) a retrospective review of registry data should be conducted to determine the incidence of uterine rupture following misoprostol and the circumstances in which it occurs. A prospective, randomised trial could then be conducted on the basis of these findings (e.g. oral misoprostol vs. vaginal prostaglandin E2); known risk factors for uterine rupture including the type of uterine scar would need to be taken into account when selecting patients for vaginal delivery. Until new data from well-designed studies are available, misoprostol will continue to be contraindicated in clinical guidelines for use in labour induction after previous caesarean section. PMID:26719597

  9. MISOPROSTOL TO REDUCE INTRAOPERATIVE AND POSTOPERATIVE HEMORRHAGE DURING CESAREAN DELIVERY: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    CONDE-AGUDELO, Agustín; NIETO, Aníbal; ROSAS-BERMUDEZ, Anyeli; ROMERO, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the efficacy and safety of prophylactic misoprostol use at cesarean delivery for reducing intraoperative and postoperative hemorrhage. STUDY DESIGN Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. RESULTS Seventeen studies (3174 women) were included of which 7 evaluated misoprostol versus oxytocin and 8 evaluated misoprostol plus oxytocin versus oxytocin. Overall, there were no significant differences in intraoperative and postoperative hemorrhage between sublingual or oral misoprostol and oxytocin. Rectal misoprostol, compared with oxytocin, was associated with a significant reduction in intraoperative and postoperative hemorrhage. The combined use of sublingual misoprostol and oxytocin, compared with the use of oxytocin alone, was associated with a significant reduction in the mean decrease in hematocrit (mean difference, ?2.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI], ?3.4 to ?0.8) and use of additional uterotonic agents (relative risk, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.18-0.62). Compared with oxytocin alone, buccal misoprostol plus oxytocin reduced the use of additional uterotonic agents; rectal misoprostol plus oxytocin decreased intraoperative and postoperative blood loss, mean fall in hematocrit, and use of additional uterotonic agents; and intrauterine misoprostol plus oxytocin reduced the mean fall in hemoglobin and hematocrit. Women receiving misoprostol, alone or combined with oxytocin, had a higher risk of shivering and pyrexia. CONCLUSION Misoprostol combined with oxytocin appears to be more effective than oxytocin alone in reducing intraoperative and postoperative hemorrhage during caesarean section. There were no significant differences in intraoperative and postoperative hemorrhage when misoprostol was compared to oxytocin. However, these findings were based on a few trials with methodological limitations. PMID:23507545

  10. Reduction of aspirin-induced fecal blood loss with low-dose misoprostol tablets in man

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.M.; Clark, L.; Armstrong, L.; D'Souza, J.

    1985-07-01

    Misoprostol (SC-29333), a synthetic prostaglandin E1 methyl ester analog, was given simultaneously with acetylsalicylic acid in a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized prospective study of 32 healthy human male subjects. Fecal blood loss was measured for eight days using the /sup 51/Cr-labeled red blood cell technique. Aspirin (650 mg qid) and misoprostol (25 micrograms qid) or placebo were given during days 3, 4, and 5. There was a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in median blood loss (modified Friedman test) from 0.81 to 6.05 ml/day in the aspirin with placebo group (N = 16). Median blood loss was increased (from 0.75 to 3.75 ml/day) in the aspirin with misoprostol group (N = 16), but this was significantly less (Mann-Whitney U test, P less than 0.01) than the placebo group. Mean serum salicylate concentrations in the placebo and misoprostol groups were similar (7.8 and 6.8 micrograms/ml, respectively). There were no significant changes in laboratory values in any of the subjects studied, nor were any major side-effects encountered. This study demonstrates that oral misoprostol reduces aspirin-induced gastrointestinal bleeding even when administered simultaneously and at a dose level below its threshold for significant acid inhibition. This indicates a potential role for misoprostol in the prevention of gastric mucosal damage in selected patients.

  11. Ethynilestradiol 20?mcg plus Levonorgestrel 100?mcg: Clinical Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Estroprogestins (EPs) are combinations of estrogen and progestin with several actions on women's health. The different pharmacological composition of EPs is responsible for different clinical effects. One of the most used low-dose EP associations is ethinylestradiol 20?mcg plus levonorgestrel 100?mcg in monophasic regimen (EE20/LNG100). This review summarizes clinical pharmacology, cycle control, and effects on lipid and glucose metabolism, coagulation, body weight/body composition, acne, and sexuality of EE20/LNG100. Overall, EE20/LNG100 combination is safe and well tolerated, and in several studies the incidence of adverse events in the treated group was comparable to that of the placebo group. Cycle control was effective and body weight/body composition did not vary among treated and untreated groups in most studies. The EE20/LNG100 combination shows mild or no effect on lipid and glucose metabolism. Lastly, EE20/LNG100 is associated with a low risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). In conclusion, in the process of decision making for the individualization of EPs choice, EE20/LNG100 should be considered for its favorable clinical profile. PMID:25477960

  12. Misoprostol: serious cardiovascular events, even after a single dose.

    PubMed

    2015-07-01

    A French Regional Pharmacovigilance Centre identified serious cardiovascular adverse effects linked to misoprostol and reported worldwide up to the end of 2012. Dozens of cases of myocardial infarction, angina and stroke had been reported, including after a single dose in gynaecology and obstetrics, for instance in elective abortion. This risk appears higher in smokers, women aged over 35 years, obese women, and after high-dose vaginal administration. The incidence is unknown. The bioavailability of misoprostol is higher with the vaginal than the oral route, especially when water is added to the tablet before vaginal administration. In practice, this risk must be taken into account, especially in women with risk factors for cardiovascular disease, or when using high doses or the vaginal route. When a high cardiovascular risk is identified, it is best to warn patients of the cardiac effects of this drug and advise them to consult a doctor if they experience chest tightness, or to propose an alternative method. Whenever possible, these women should not be alone when they take misoprostol. PMID:26240884

  13. Misoprostol for postpartum hemorrhage prevention at home birth: an integrative review of global implementation experience to date

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hemorrhage continues to be a leading cause of maternal death in developing countries. The 2012 World Health Organization guidelines for the prevention and management of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) recommend oral administration of misoprostol by community health workers (CHWs). However, there are several outstanding questions about distribution of misoprostol for PPH prevention at home births. Methods We conducted an integrative review of published research studies and evaluation reports from programs that distributed misoprostol at the community level for prevention of PPH at home births. We reviewed methods and cadres involved in education of end-users, drug administration, distribution, and coverage, correct and incorrect usage, and serious adverse events. Results Eighteen programs were identified; only seven reported all data of interest. Programs utilized a range of strategies and timings for distributing misoprostol. Distribution rates were higher when misoprostol was distributed at a home visit during late pregnancy (54.5-96.9%) or at birth (22.5-83.6%), compared to antenatal care (ANC) distribution at any ANC visit (22.5-49.1%) or late ANC visit (21.0-26.7%). Coverage rates were highest when CHWs and traditional birth attendants distributed misoprostol and lower when health workers/ANC providers distributed the medication. The highest distribution and coverage rates were achieved by programs that allowed self-administration. Seven women took misoprostol prior to delivery out of more than 12,000 women who were followed-up. Facility birth rates increased in the three programs for which this information was available. Fifty-one (51) maternal deaths were reported among 86,732 women taking misoprostol: 24 were attributed to perceived PPH; none were directly attributed to use of misoprostol. Even if all deaths were attributable to PPH, the equivalent ratio (59 maternal deaths/100,000 live births) is substantially lower than the reported maternal mortality ratio in any of these countries. Conclusions Community-based programs for prevention of PPH at home birth using misoprostol can achieve high distribution and use of the medication, using diverse program strategies. Coverage was greatest when misoprostol was distributed by community health agents at home visits. Programs appear to be safe, with an extremely low rate of ante- or intrapartum administration of the medication. PMID:23421792

  14. Stakeholder perceptions of misoprostol: a qualitative investigation

    PubMed Central

    Bazzano, Alessandra N; Jones, Lea; Ngo, Thoai D

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to explore perceptions of stakeholders regarding misoprostol use in Cambodia, a setting with high maternal mortality. Semi-structured expert interviews were conducted with 21 participants in the capital, Phnom Penh. The sample included participants involved in providing reproductive health services through international and local health agencies and the pharmaceutical industry. A theme of controversy over the role of misoprostol in the context of reproductive health services emerged, along with a need to reconcile legitimate viewpoints in order to understand the place of misoprostol in the Cambodian reproductive health setting. Understanding stakeholder perspectives on misoprostol can shed light on the drug’s role in reproductive health programming where maternal mortality is high and health facilities are still improving. PMID:24748820

  15. Stakeholder perceptions of misoprostol: a qualitative investigation.

    PubMed

    Bazzano, Alessandra N; Jones, Lea; Ngo, Thoai D

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to explore perceptions of stakeholders regarding misoprostol use in Cambodia, a setting with high maternal mortality. Semi-structured expert interviews were conducted with 21 participants in the capital, Phnom Penh. The sample included participants involved in providing reproductive health services through international and local health agencies and the pharmaceutical industry. A theme of controversy over the role of misoprostol in the context of reproductive health services emerged, along with a need to reconcile legitimate viewpoints in order to understand the place of misoprostol in the Cambodian reproductive health setting. Understanding stakeholder perspectives on misoprostol can shed light on the drug's role in reproductive health programming where maternal mortality is high and health facilities are still improving. PMID:24748820

  16. Misoprostol

    MedlinePLUS

    ... who take certain arthritis or pain medicines, including aspirin, that can cause ulcers. It protects the stomach ... and nonprescription medications you are taking, especially antacids, aspirin, arthritis medications, and vitamins.tell your doctor if ...

  17. Misoprostol and illegal abortion in Fortaleza, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Coêlho, H L; Teixeira, A C; Santos, A P; Forte, E B; Morais, S M; La Vecchia, C; Tognoni, G; Herxheimer, A

    1993-05-15

    Misoprostol, a prostaglandin E1 analogue indicated for ulcer treatment, has been widely used as an abortifacient by women in Brazil, where abortion is legal only in cases of rape or incest, or to save the woman's life. Because misoprostol is an inefficient abortifacient, many women who use it have incomplete abortions and need uterine evacuation. We reviewed the records of women admitted to the main obstetric hospital of Fortaleza, capital of Ceará state, Brazil, between January, 1990, and July, 1992, for uterine evacuation after induced abortion. The number of incomplete abortions induced by misoprostol increased substantially during the first half of 1990, and declined thereafter. Of the 593 cases in 1991, 75% were related to misoprostol, 10% to the use of other specified drugs, and 6% to unspecified drugs. For the remaining 9% the procedure used was not recorded; these included 3% in whom abortion had been induced by a clandestine abortionist. The number of uterine evacuations per month fell from 89 in August, 1990, to 62 in July, 1991, when sales of misoprostol in Ceará state were suspended. The fall continued after the sale of misoprostol ceased, to about 20 cases in December, 1991; numbers remained around this level until June, 1992, sustained by clandestine sales. The lack of access to contraception is the main reason for the large numbers of unplanned pregnancies and is a major public health issue for Brazilian women. The prohibition of abortion creates a void in which misuse of medicines is one extra complication, mainly because of the poor control of drug marketing. PMID:8098403

  18. The effectiveness of using misoprostol with and without letrozole for successful medical abortion: A randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Naghshineh, Elham; Allame, Zahra; Farhat, Faezah

    2015-01-01

    Background: In developing countries it is important to the exploration of available and safe regimens for medical abortion. The present study was designed to assess the effect of letrozole compared to placebo pretreatment followed by sublingual misoprostol for therapeutic abortion in eligible women with gestational age less than 17 weeks. Materials and Methods: In this randomized control trail, 130 women eligible for legal abortions were randomly divided into two groups of case and controls. Cases received daily oral dose of 10 mg letrozole 10 mg letrozole for three days followed by sublingual misoprostol. Controls received daily oral dose of placebo followed by sublingual misoprostol. The dose of misoprostol was administrated according to ACOG guidelines based on patients’ gestational age. The rate of complete abortion, induction-of-abortion time, and side-effects were assessed as main outcomes. Results: Complete abortion was observed in 46 (76.7%) letrozole group and 26 (42.6%) controls (P < 0.0001). Also, in 14 subjects of letrozole group and 35 subjects in placebo group, the placenta was not delivered during follow-up and curettage was performed. The mean interval induction-to-abortion was 5.1 h in letrozole group and 8.9 h in control (P < 0.0001). The cumulative rates of the induction-of-abortion time were a significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.0001). The incidence and severity of side-effects was comparable for the two groups (P = 0.9). Conclusion: Letrozole could be a quite beneficial adjuvant to misoprostol for induction of complete abortion in those who are candidates for legal medical abortion. PMID:26600834

  19. Effects of misoprostol on cell migration and transit in the dog stomach

    SciTech Connect

    Goodlad, R.A.; Madgwick, A.J.; Moffatt, M.R.; Levin, S.; Allen, J.L.; Wright, N.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Prostaglandins of the E series increase stomach mucosal mass by inducing hyperplasia, which could be the result either of increased cell production or of decreased cell loss. This report describes an investigation of the effect of the prostaglandin E1 analogue, misoprostol, on cell migration and transit. 3H-thymidine was used to label those cells synthesizing deoxyribonucleic acid in dogs that had been given an oral dose of 300 micrograms/kg per day misoprostol for 11 weeks. The animals were killed at timed intervals, and tissue from the gastric fundus was prepared for autoradiography. The distribution of labeled cells at various times after labeling was used to follow the movement of the wave of label and to calculate median cell migration rates and transit times. The migration rate of cells toward the gastric lumen was significantly increased from 1.4 +/- 0.3 to 3.6 +/- 0.6 cell positions per day in the misoprostol-treated group (p less than 0.001); however, the gland length (from the most basal mucous neck cell to the luminal surface) was also increased (from 52.1 +/- 1.1 to 74.0 +/- 1.6; p less than 0.001), thus there was no significant difference in the (transit) time taken for cells to reach the top of the gland (control, 17.5 +/- 9.8 days; test, 12.2 +/- 7.1 days).

  20. Reflections on MCG--6-30-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, D. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Vaughan, S.

    2002-12-01

    Ionized reflection has often been considered as the explanation for the unusual Fe K? line variability observed in MCG--6-30-15. In this paper, we present ionized reflection fits to a 325 ks observation of MCG--6-30-15 by XMM-Newton and BeppoSAX to test this model. The data are fit between 2.5 and 80 keV using the constant density models of Ross & Fabian. Our best fit model requires the Fe K? line to be split into two reprocessing events: one from the inner disc to build up the red wing, and the other from more distant material to fit the blue horn. A good fit was obtained with a solar abundance of iron and a reflection fraction (R) of one for the inner reflector. However, the combination of the two reflection spectra mimics one with R>2 as required by the BeppoSAX data. The inner reflector is ionized with log ? =3.8, and the outer reflector is neutral. The distant reflector has an inner radius of 71 gravitational radii (rg) which corresponds to a light crossing time of about an hour for a 107 Msun black hole. Thus, the double reflector model can explain many of the Fe K? variability characteristics previously observed in MCG--6-30-15. However, the ionized reflection spectrum from the inner component, which contributes 94% of the 2--10 keV flux, is constrained to arise from a narrow annulus between 4.93 and 5.01 rg. This is extremely difficult to produce without resorting to other energy sources such as the black hole spin.

  1. Effectiveness of Misoprostol for Induction of First-Trimester Miscarriages

    PubMed Central

    Ambusaidi, Qamariya; Zutshi, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Non-invasive methods of inducing a miscarriage are now considered an effective alternative to surgical evacuation (dilatation and curettage). This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of misoprostol in the termination of first-trimester miscarriages. Methods: This prospective study was conducted between October 2009 and September 2010 and assessed all patients admitted to the Royal Hospital in Muscat, Oman, for the termination of first-trimester miscarriages during the study period. All patients received misoprostol and the rates of successful termination were measured. Patient satisfaction was assessed using a short questionnaire. Results: A total of 290 women were included in the study. Termination with misoprostol was successful in 61.38% of the subjects. Of the remaining subjects requiring additional surgical evacuation (n = 112), 58.93% required evacuation due to failed termination with misoprostol and 65.18% underwent early evacuation (?24 hours since their last misoprostol dose). The majority of patients experienced no side-effects due to misoprostol (89.66%). Pain was controlled with simple analgesics in 70.00% of the subjects. A high satisfaction rate (94.83%) with the misoprostol treatment was reported. Conclusion: Misoprostol was a well-tolerated drug which reduced the rate of surgical evacuation among the study subjects. This medication can therefore be used safely in the management of incomplete miscarriages. PMID:26629383

  2. Möbius Syndrome: Misoprostol Use and Speech and Language Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Zelita Caldeira Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction?Möbius syndrome (MS; VI and VII palsy) is a rare disease that in Brazil has a great frequency because of the use of misoprostol during pregnancy. Objective?Verify if the speech and language performance of children with MS whose mothers reported use of misoprostol (Cytotec, Pfizer, Connecticut, USA) are different from the performance of children of mothers who did not report use. Methods?The stomatognathic system beyond receptive and expressive language and speech was evaluated in children with MS, and their mothers were questioned whether they used misoprostol during the pregnancy. Results?During the interview, 61.11% of mothers reported that they took misoprostol during the pregnancy. Most of the subjects (83.3%) whose mothers took misoprostol presented bilateral palsy beyond bad mobility of the tongue (90.9%) and speech disorders (63.6%). Conclusion?The number of mothers who took misoprostol without knowing the risk for MS was great. The lack of facial expressions and speech disorders were common characteristics of the individuals with MS, whether the mothers took misoprostol during the pregnancy or not. PMID:25992099

  3. Foley Catheter versus Vaginal Misoprostol for Labour Induction

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Nasreen; Ansari, Mehkat; Ali, S. Manazir; Parveen, Shazia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the efficacy and safety of intravaginal misoprostol with transcervical Foley catheter for labour induction. Material and Methods. One hundred and four women with term gestation, with Bishop score < 4, and with various indications for labour induction were randomly divided into two groups. In Group I, 25??g of misoprostol tablet was placed intravaginally, 4 hourly up to maximum 6 doses. In Group II, Foley catheter 16F was placed through the internal os of the cervix under aseptic condition and then inflated with 50 cc of sterile saline. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS software. Results. The induction to delivery interval was 14.03 ± 7.61 hours versus 18.40 ± 8.02 hours (p < 0.01). The rate of vaginal delivery was 76.7% versus 56.8% in misoprostol and transcervical Foley catheter group, respectively. Uterine hyperstimulation was more common with misoprostol. Neonatal outcome was similar in both the groups. Conclusion. Intravaginal misoprostol is associated with a shorter induction to delivery interval as compared to Foley's catheter and it increases the rate of vaginal delivery in cases of unripe cervix at term. Transcervical Foley catheter is associated with a lower incidence of uterine hyperstimulation during labour. PMID:26557725

  4. Modeling maternal mortality in Bangladesh: the role of misoprostol in postpartum hemorrhage prevention

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bangladesh is one of the few countries that may actually achieve the fifth Millennium Development Goal (MDG) in time, despite skilled birth attendance remaining low. The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential role misoprostol can play in the decline of maternal deaths attributed to postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) in Bangladesh. Methods Using data from a misoprostol and blood loss measurement tool feasibility study in Bangladesh, observed cause specific maternal mortality ratios (MMRs) were estimated and contrasted with expected ratios using estimates from the Bangladesh Maternal Mortality Survey (BMMS) data. Using Crystal Ball 7 we employ Monte Carlo simulation techniques to estimate maternal deaths in four scenarios, each with different levels of misoprostol coverage. These scenarios include project level misoprostol coverage (69%), no (0%), low (40%), and high (80%) misoprostol coverage. Data on receipt of clean delivery kit, use of misoprostol, experience of PPH, and cause of death were used in model assumptions. Results Using project level misoprostol coverage (69%), the mean number of PPH deaths expected was 40 (standard deviation?=?8.01) per 100,000 live births. Assuming no misoprostol coverage (0%), the mean number of PPH deaths expected was 51 (standard deviation?=?9.30) per 100,000 live births. For low misoprostol coverage (40%), the mean number of PPH deaths expected was 45 (standard deviation?=?8.26) per 100,000 live births, and for high misoprostol coverage (80%), the mean number of PPH deaths expected was 38 (standard deviation?=?7.04) per 100,000 live births. Conclusion This theoretical exercise hypothesizes that prophylactic use of misoprostol at home births may contribute to a reduction in the risk of death due to PPH, in addition to reducing the incidence of PPH. If findings from this modeling exercise are accurate and uterotonics can prevent maternal death, misoprostol could be the tool countries need to further reduce maternal mortality at home births. PMID:24555848

  5. Recommendations for scale-up of community-based misoprostol distribution programs.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Nuriya; Kapungu, Chisina; Carnahan, Leslie; Geller, Stacie

    2014-06-01

    Community-based distribution of misoprostol for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) in resource-poor settings has been shown to be safe and effective. However, global recommendations for prenatal distribution and monitoring within a community setting are not yet available. In order to successfully translate misoprostol and PPH research into policy and practice, several critical points must be considered. A focus on engaging the community, emphasizing the safe nature of community-based misoprostol distribution, supply chain management, effective distribution, coverage, and monitoring plans are essential elements to community-based misoprostol program introduction, expansion, or scale-up. PMID:24680582

  6. Novel Cultivation-Based Approach To Understanding the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group (MCG) Archaea from Sedimentary Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Harald; Meador, Travis; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Thomm, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The uncultured miscellaneous crenarchaeotic group (MCG) archaea comprise one of the most abundant microbial groups in the Earth's subsurface environment. However, very little information is available regarding the lifestyle, physiology, and factors controlling the distribution of members of this group. We established a novel method using both cultivation and molecular techniques, including a pre-PCR propidium monoazide treatment, to investigate viable members of the MCG in vitro. Enrichment cultures prepared from estuarine sediment were provided with one of a variety of carbon substrates or cultivation conditions and incubated for 3 weeks. Compared with the samples from time zero, there was an order-of-magnitude increase in the number of MCG 16S rRNA genes in almost all cultures, indicating that MCG archaea are amenable to in vitro cultivation. None of the tested substrates or conditions significantly stimulated growth of MCG archaea more than the basal medium alone; however, glycerol (0.02%) had a significantly inhibitory effect (P < 0.05). Diversity analysis of populations resulting from four culture treatments (basal medium, addition of amino acids, H2-CO2 as the gas phase, or initial aerobic conditions) revealed that the majority of viable MCG archaea were affiliated with the MCG-8 and MCG-4 clusters. There were no significant differences in MCG diversity between these treatments, also indicating that some members of MCG-4 and MCG-8 are tolerant of initially oxic conditions. The methods outlined here will be useful for further investigation of MCG archaea and comparison of substrates and cultivation conditions that influence their growth in vitro. PMID:23934495

  7. Methotrexate and misoprostol for early abortion: a multicenter trial. Acceptability.

    PubMed

    Creinin, M D; Burke, A E

    1996-07-01

    A prospective trial was conducted including 300 pregnant women seeking elective abortion to evaluate the efficacy and acceptability of methotrexate and misoprostol for abortion at < or = 56 days gestation. Subjects received methotrexate 50 mg/m2 intramuscularly followed 7 days later by misoprostol 800 micrograms vaginally. The misoprostol dose was repeated the next day if the abortion did not occur. Efficacy is reported elsewhere. Subjects were questioned before the study as to their reasons for choosing a medical abortion and past experience with surgical abortion. After the study was completed, the women were questioned about their medical abortion experience. All questions were asked in an open-ended manner. Main outcome measures included reasons for abortion and study participation, attitudes about the nonsurgical abortion experience, and feelings about preference of nonsurgical or surgical abortion. The most common reason cited as to why women chose to have a nonsurgical abortion was to avoid some aspect of the surgery (48.4%). The percent of women who cited that avoiding surgery was an important reason in their choice of nonsurgical abortion varied by study site and according to whether the woman had a prior surgical abortion. Upon completion of the study, 73.4% of women stated it was a good experience, 19.5% a neutral experience, 7.1% a bad experience, and 1.0% gave no response. When asked what method they would choose if they had to have another abortion, 83.5% would choose this method of medical abortion rather than a surgical abortion. Intramuscular methotrexate and vaginal misoprostol are an acceptable and desirable method of abortion. PMID:8804803

  8. Isosorbide Mononitrate versus Misoprostol for Cervical Ripening and Induction of Labour at Term.

    PubMed

    Guha, K; Fatema, A; Biswas, P K; Haque, E

    2015-04-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of isosorbide mononitrate (IMN) compared with misoprostol for cervical ripening and labour induction at term. In this comparative study two hundred term pregnant women with indication for induction of labour were randomly divided to receive either 40 mg IMN tablet vaginally (n=100) or 50 ?g misoprostol tablet vaginally (n=100) every 6 hours interval for a maximum of 4 doses. Progress & outcome of cervical ripening, labour induction and adverse effects were assessed. Change in cervical score was higher in misoprostol group than IMN group. Time from start of medication to vaginal delivery in IMN group was significantly longer, 28.66 ± 5.283 hours, than in misoprostol group, 16.12 ± 5.581 hours. Vaginal delivery occurred in 77% in IMN group and 69% in misoprostol group. There were no tachysystole or uterine hyper stimulation in the IMN group while in misoprostol group it was 17% and 11% respectively. Maternal satisfaction was higher in IMN group. Cervical ripening is satisfactory with IMN. Though misoprostol is singly more effective than IMN but IMN with oxytocin results in more vaginal delivery. Fetal and maternal side effects are less in IMN group. PMID:26007264

  9. Misoprostol modulates cytokine expression through a cAMP pathway: Potential therapeutic implication for liver disease.

    PubMed

    Gobejishvili, Leila; Ghare, Smita; Khan, Rehan; Cambon, Alexander; Barker, David F; Barve, Shirish; McClain, Craig; Hill, Daniell

    2015-12-01

    Dysregulated cytokine metabolism plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of many forms of liver disease, including alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver disease. In this study we examined the efficacy of Misoprostol in modulating LPS-inducible TNF? and IL-10 expression in healthy human subjects and evaluated molecular mechanisms for Misoprostol modulation of cytokines in vitro. Healthy subjects were given 14day courses of Misoprostol at doses of 100, 200, and 300?g four times a day, in random order. Baseline and LPS-inducible cytokine levels were examined ex vivo in whole blood at the beginning and the end of the study. Additionally, in vitro studies were performed using primary human PBMCs and the murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, to investigate underlying mechanisms of misoprostol on cytokine production. Administration of Misoprostol reduced LPS inducible TNF production by 29%, while increasing IL-10 production by 79% in human subjects with no significant dose effect on ex vivo cytokine activity; In vitro, the effect of Misoprostol was largely mediated by increased cAMP levels and consequent changes in CRE and NF?B activity, which are critical for regulating IL-10 and TNF expression. Additionally, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) studies demonstrated that Misoprostol treatment led to changes in transcription factor and RNA Polymerase II binding, resulting in changes in mRNA levels. In summary, Misoprostol was effective at beneficially modulating TNF and IL-10 levels both in vivo and in vitro; these studies suggest a potential rationale for Misoprostol use in ALD, NASH and other liver diseases where inflammation plays an etiologic role. PMID:26408955

  10. Acceptability of medical abortion with methotrexate and misoprostol.

    PubMed

    Creinin, M D; Park, M

    1995-07-01

    A clinical trial of efficacy of methotrexate and misoprostol for abortion was performed involving 86 women requesting an abortion at < 56 days gestation. An acceptability evaluation was included in the design of the trial. Subjects were questioned before the study about their reasons for choosing a medical abortion and past experience with surgical abortion. After the study was completed, the women were questioned about their medical abortion experience. All questions were asked in an open-ended manner. Eighty-five of 86 (99%) patients completed both questionnaires. The most common reason cited as to why women chose to have a medical abortion was to avoid some aspect of the surgery (48%). Forty-one (48%) women had experienced a surgical abortion; 49% of these women chose to have a medical abortion because of a "bad" past experience related to the surgical procedure. Upon completion of this study, 67 (79%) patients stated the medical abortion was a good experience, 12(14%) a bad experience, and 6 (7%) had a neutral response. When asked what method they would choose if they were to have another abortion, 89% would choose this method of medical abortion rather than a surgical abortion. In women who choose to participate in a clinical research trail, methotrexate and vaginal misoprostol are an acceptable and desirable method of abortion. PMID:8521713

  11. Histopathology and oxidative stress analysis of concomitant misoprostol and celecoxib administration.

    PubMed

    Murrell, Derek E; Denham, James W; Harirforoosh, Sam

    2015-07-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), non-selective or selective inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and -2), reduce pain and inflammation associated with arthritic diseases. Celecoxib, a COX-2-selective inhibitor providing decreased gastric injury relative to non-selective NSAIDs, is commonly prescribed. Misoprostol, a prostaglandin analog, supplements NSAID-inhibited prostaglandin levels. As concomitant celecoxib and misoprostol administration has been shown to intensify renal adverse effects, this article examined the influence of concomitant administration on hepatic histopathology, oxidative stress, and celecoxib concentration. On days 1 and 2, rat groups (n = 6) were gavaged twice daily (two groups with vehicle and two groups with 100 ?g/kg misoprostol). From day 3 to day 9, one celecoxib dose (40 mg/kg) replaced a vehicle dose of one group and one group received celecoxib in addition to misoprostol. Livers were harvested on day 10. No hepatic abnormalities were observed denoting a lack of influence by either drug. Also no change in mean biomarker levels was detected. The changes in hepatic celecoxib concentration in the misoprostol-receiving group compared to control were not significant. Thus misoprostol does not influence hepatic celecoxib effects in terms of histopathology, oxidative stress, or celecoxib concentration level at the dosage and duration examined. PMID:26441478

  12. Effect of misoprostol for cervical priming before gynecological procedures on nonpregnant premenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Monimala; Chakraborty, Aparna; Chattopadhyay, Sandip; Saha, Subhendu; Paul, Joydip; Das, Anjan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Misoprostol is very effective in cervical ripening and is used for termination of pregnancy. A similar effect on the nonpregnant uterus will facilitate gynecological operations, and hence we assessed the effect of misoprostol on the nonpregnant uterus of premenopausal women. Materials and Methods: In a prospective double-blinded randomized controlled trial, 280 women were randomly allocated into two groups (12 women did not complete the intervention). Study (A) and control (B) group received 400 ?g of misoprostol or 400 mg of metronidazole tablets (as a placebo) respectively in the posterior vaginal wall 6 h prior to gynecological procedures. Results: The mean cervical dilatation was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) in misoprostol compared to placebo group (4.6 ± 0.96 mm vs. 3.6 ± 0.82 mm), benefit were also observed on secondary outcome measures which were need for further dilatation, time taken for further dilatation, ease of dilatation, subjective assessment of pain by visual analog scale. Only 3.61% patients complained of intolerable pain during dilatation in the study group while in control group 48.74% complained of intolerable pain and required anesthesia. Most common side effects of misoprostol were abdominal pain and mild vaginal bleeding. Conclusion: Misoprostol was effective in cervical ripening of nonpregnant premenopausal uterus to facilitate gynecological procedures.

  13. Histopathology and oxidative stress analysis of concomitant misoprostol and celecoxib administration

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Derek E.; Denham, James W.; Harirforoosh, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), non-selective or selective inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and -2), reduce pain and inflammation associated with arthritic diseases. Celecoxib, a COX-2-selective inhibitor providing decreased gastric injury relative to non-selective NSAIDs, is commonly prescribed. Misoprostol, a prostaglandin analog, supplements NSAID-inhibited prostaglandin levels. As concomitant celecoxib and misoprostol administration has been shown to intensify renal adverse effects, this article examined the influence of concomitant administration on hepatic histopathology, oxidative stress, and celecoxib concentration. On days 1 and 2, rat groups (n = 6) were gavaged twice daily (two groups with vehicle and two groups with 100 ?g/kg misoprostol). From day 3 to day 9, one celecoxib dose (40 mg/kg) replaced a vehicle dose of one group and one group received celecoxib in addition to misoprostol. Livers were harvested on day 10. No hepatic abnormalities were observed denoting a lack of influence by either drug. Also no change in mean biomarker levels was detected. The changes in hepatic celecoxib concentration in the misoprostol-receiving group compared to control were not significant. Thus misoprostol does not influence hepatic celecoxib effects in terms of histopathology, oxidative stress, or celecoxib concentration level at the dosage and duration examined. PMID:26441478

  14. Investigations of sensitivity and resolution of ECG and MCG in a realistically shaped thorax model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäntynen, Ville; Konttila, Teijo; Stenroos, Matti

    2014-12-01

    Solving the inverse problem of electrocardiography (ECG) and magnetocardiography (MCG) is often referred to as cardiac source imaging. Spatial properties of ECG and MCG as imaging systems are, however, not well known. In this modelling study, we investigate the sensitivity and point-spread function (PSF) of ECG, MCG, and combined ECG+MCG as a function of source position and orientation, globally around the ventricles: signal topographies are modelled using a realistically-shaped volume conductor model, and the inverse problem is solved using a distributed source model and linear source estimation with minimal use of prior information. The results show that the sensitivity depends not only on the modality but also on the location and orientation of the source and that the sensitivity distribution is clearly reflected in the PSF. MCG can better characterize tangential anterior sources (with respect to the heart surface), while ECG excels with normally-oriented and posterior sources. Compared to either modality used alone, the sensitivity of combined ECG+MCG is less dependent on source orientation per source location, leading to better source estimates. Thus, for maximal sensitivity and optimal source estimation, the electric and magnetic measurements should be combined.

  15. Instability of Misoprostol Tablets Stored Outside the Blister: A Potential Serious Concern for Clinical Outcome in Medical Abortion

    PubMed Central

    Berard, Veronique; Fiala, Christian; Cameron, Sharon; Bombas, Teresa; Parachini, Mirella; Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Misoprostol (Cytotec) is recognised to be effective for many gynaecological indications including termination of pregnancy, management of miscarriage and postpartum haemorrhage. Although not licensed for such indications, it has been used for these purposes by millions of women throughout the world. Misoprostol tablets are most often packaged as multiple tablets within an aluminium strip, each within an individual alveolus. When an alveolus is opened, tablets will be exposed to atmospheric conditions. Objective To compare the pharmaco technical characteristics (weight, friability), water content, misoprostol content and decomposition product content (type A misoprostol, type B misoprostol and 8-epi misoprostol) of misoprostol tablets Cytotec (Pfizer) exposed to air for periods of 1 hour to 720 hours (30 days), to those of identical non exposed tablets. Methods Four hundred and twenty (420) tablets of Cytotec (Pfizer) were removed from their alveoli blister and stored at 25°C/60% relative humidity. Water content, and misoprostol degradation products were assayed in tablets exposed from 1 to 720 hours (30 days). Comparison was made with control tablets (N?=?60) from the same batch stored in non-damaged blisters. Statistical analyses were carried out using Fisher’s exact test for small sample sizes. Results By 48 hours, exposed tablets demonstrated increased weight (+4.5%), friability (+1 300%), and water content (+80%) compared to controls. Exposed tablets also exhibited a decrease in Cytotec active ingredient dosage (?5.1% after 48 hours) and an increase in the inactive degradation products (+25% for type B, +50% for type A and +11% for 8-epi misoprostol after 48 hours) compared to controls. Conclusion Exposure of Cytotec tablets to ‘typical’ European levels of air and humidity results in significant time-dependent changes in physical and biological composition that could impact adversely upon clinical efficacy. Health professionals should be made aware of the degradation of misoprostol with inappropriate storage of misoprostol tablets. PMID:25502819

  16. Perceptions of misoprostol among providers and women seeking post-abortion care in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Maternowska, M Catherine; Mashu, Alexio; Moyo, Precious; Withers, Mellissa; Chipato, Tsungai

    2015-02-01

    In Zimbabwe, abortions are legally restricted and complications from unsafe abortions are a major public health concern. This study in 2012 explored women's and providers' perspectives in Zimbabwe on the acceptability of the use of misoprostol as a form of treatment for complications of abortion in post-abortion care. In-depth interviews were conducted with 115 participants at seven post-abortion care facilities. Participants included 73 women of reproductive age who received services for incomplete abortion and 42 providers, including physicians, nurses, midwives, general practitioners and casualty staff. Only 29 providers had previously used misoprostol with their own patients, and only 21 had received any formal training in its use. Nearly all women and providers preferred misoprostol to surgical abortion methods because it was perceived as less invasive, safer and more affordable. Women also generally preferred the non-surgical method, when given the option, as fears around surgery and risk were high. Most providers favoured removing legal restrictions on abortion, particularly medical abortion. Approving use of misoprostol for post-abortion care in Zimbabwe is important in order to reduce unsafe abortion and its related sequelae. Legal, policy and practice reforms must be accompanied by effective reproductive health curricula updates in medical, nursing and midwifery schools, as well as through updated training for current and potential providers of post-abortion care services nationwide. Our findings support the use of misoprostol in national post-abortion care programmes, as it is an acceptable and potentially life-saving treatment option. PMID:25702065

  17. Lack of Evidence for Neonatal Misoprostol Neurodevelopmental Toxicity in C57BL6/J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Claire M.; Walker, Cheryl K.; Qi, Lihong; Pessah, Isaac N.; Berman, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Misoprostol is a synthetic analogue of prostaglandin E1 that is administered to women at high doses to induce uterine contractions for early pregnancy termination and at low doses to aid in cervical priming during labor. Because of the known teratogenic effects of misoprostol when given during gestation and its effects on axonal growth in vitro, we examined misoprostol for its potential as a neurodevelopmental toxicant when administered to neonatal C57BL6/J mice. Mice were injected subcutaneously (s.c.) with 0.4, 4 or 40 µg/kg misoprostol on postnatal day 7, the approximate developmental stage in mice of human birth, after which neonatal somatic growth, and sensory and motor system development were assessed. These doses were selected to span the range of human exposure used to induce labor. In addition, adult mice underwent a battery of behavioral tests relevant to neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism including tests for anxiety, stereotyped behaviors, social communication and interactions, and learning and memory. No significant effects of exposure were found for any measure of development or behavioral endpoints. In conclusion, the results of the present study in C57BL/6J mice do not provide support for neurodevelopmental toxicity after misoprostol administration approximating human doses and timed to coincide with the developmental stage of human birth. PMID:22719983

  18. Does Induction with Misoprostol Impact the Small for Gestational Age Neonate?

    PubMed

    Foeller, Megan E; Cruz, Meredith O; Kominiarek, Michelle A; Hibbard, Judith U

    2015-12-01

    Objective?To compare outcomes in small for gestational age neonates induced with misoprostol to other cervical ripening agents. We hypothesized that misoprostol use will demonstrate no significant difference in outcomes compared with alternative agents. Study Design?Small for gestational age neonates (<10th percentile for gestational age) from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) sponsored Consortium on Safe Labor database were analyzed. Neonates induced with misoprostol?±?oxytocin (n?=?451) were compared with neonates induced with prostaglandin E2?±?oxytocin and/or mechanical dilation?±?oxytocin (n?=?663). Primary outcomes included intrapartum fetal distress, cesarean section for fetal distress, cesarean section for any reason, neonatal intensive care unit admission, low 5-minute Apgar, and composite neonatal morbidity. Multiple logistic regression was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (aORs). Data were analyzed using SAS. Results?Small for gestational age neonates induced with misoprostol?±?oxytocin compared with alternative agents had decreased low 5-minute Apgar scores (aOR 0.27 [0.10-0.71]). No significant differences were demonstrated among very small for gestational age neonates (<5th percentile for gestational age). Conclusion?Our results suggest that misoprostol does not increase risk of adverse outcomes in small for gestational age neonates; however, prospective studies are warranted to further assess optimal cervical ripening agents in this population. PMID:26352682

  19. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in MCG +06-49-027

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimacombe, J.; Masi, G.; Brown, J. S.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Falco, E.; Wozniak, P. R.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.; Kiyota, S.

    2015-08-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Brutus" telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy MCG +06-49-027.

  20. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in MCG -01-07-004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyota, S.; Brown, J. S.; Prieto, J. L.; Kochanek, C. S.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Brimacombe, J.; Falco, E.; Wozniak, P. R.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.; Masi, G.

    2015-08-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Brutus" telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy MCG -01-07-004.

  1. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in MCG -02-16-004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Dong, Subo; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Godoy-Rivera, D.; Basu, U.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Chen, Ping; Brimacombe, J.; Kiyota, S.; Masi, G.; Nicholls, B.

    2015-11-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy MCG -02-16-004.

  2. Severe morbidities associated with induced abortions among misoprostol users and non-users in a tertiary public hospital in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Misoprostol has become a popular over the counter self-administered abortifacient in Ghana. This study aimed to compare the socio-demographic characteristics and clinical complications associated with misoprostol and non-misoprostol induced abortions among patients admitted to a tertiary public health facility in Ghana. Methods This was a cross sectional study conducted at the gynaecological ward of Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH), over a four-month period using a structured pre-tested questionnaire. Data were analysed using Chi-square, Fisher’s exact and student t-tests. Factors associated with severe morbidity were examined using Poisson regression with robust error variance to estimate crude and adjusted relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Overall, 126 misoprostol users and 126 misoprostol non-users were recruited into the study. About 71% of the clients had self-induced abortions. Misoprostol users were more likely to be younger (p < 0.001), single (p < 0.001), nulliparous (p = 0.001), of higher educational background (p = 0.001), and unemployed (p < 0.001), than misoprostol non-users. Misoprostol users were more likely than non-users to undergo termination of pregnancy because they wanted to continue schooling (p < 0.001) or were not earning regular income to support a family (p = 0.001). Overall, 182 (72.2%) of the women (79.4% misoprostol users vs. 65.1% misoprostol non-users; p = 0.01) suffered severe morbidity. Nulliparous women (adjusted RR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.08-1.52) and those who had induced abortion after 12 weeks’ gestation (adjusted RR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.18-1.57) were at increased risks of experiencing severe morbidity. The association between mode of abortion induction and severe morbidity was not statistically significant (p = 0.06). Conclusion Self-induced abortions using misoprostol is a common practice among women in this study; nearly three quarters of them suffered severe morbidity. Nonetheless, severe morbidity among misoprostol users and non-users did not differ significantly but was directly related to the gestational age at which the induced abortions occurred. Health education on the dangers of self-induced abortions and appropriate use of medication abortion could help reduce complications associated with induced abortions in Ghana. PMID:25074294

  3. A critical appraisal of the misoprostol removable, controlled-release vaginal delivery system of labor induction

    PubMed Central

    Patte, Charlotte; Deruelle, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Background Induction of labor is a major issue in pregnancy management. Finding strategies to increase rate and decrease time to vaginal delivery is an important goal, but maternal or neonatal safety must remain the primary objective. Misoprostol is a synthetic analogue of prostaglandin used off label to ripen the cervix and induce labor. The misoprostol vaginal insert (MVI) was designed to allow a controlled-release delivery of misoprostol (from 50 to 200 ?g) with a removal tape. The objective of this review was to make a critical appraisal of this device referring to the literature. Methods A literature search was performed in the PubMed and Cochrane databases using the keywords “vaginal misoprostol insert”. Results Several studies compared different doses of MVI (50, 100, 150, and 200 ?g) with the 10 mg dinoprostone insert. The 100 ?g MVI compared with the dinoprostone vaginal insert (DVI) showed similar efficacy and no significant differences in cesarean delivery rate. MVI 200 ?g compared with DVI showed a reduced time to vaginal delivery and oxytocin need but had an increased risk of uterine hyperstimulation. The rate of hyperstimulation syndrome was two to three times more frequent with the 200 ?g MVI than the 100 ?g. Conclusion Current data suggest that the 100 ?g MVI would provide the best balance between efficacy and safety. Further studies should be performed to evaluate this dose, especially in high-risk situations needing induction of labor. PMID:26648758

  4. Potential Cost-Effectiveness of Prenatal Distribution of Misoprostol for Prevention of Postpartum Hemorrhage in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Lubinga, Solomon J.; Atukunda, Esther C.; Wasswa-Ssalongo, George; Babigumira, Joseph B.

    2015-01-01

    Background In settings where home birth rates are high, prenatal distribution of misoprostol has been advocated as a strategy to increase access to uterotonics during the third stage of labor to prevent postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). Our objective was to project the potential cost-effectiveness of this strategy in Uganda from both governmental (the relevant payer) and modified societal perspectives. Methods and Findings To compare prenatal misoprostol distribution to status quo (no misoprostol distribution), we developed a decision analytic model that tracked the delivery pathways of a cohort of pregnant women from the prenatal period, labor to delivery without complications or delivery with PPH, and successful treatment or death. Delivery pathway parameters were derived from the Uganda Demographic and Health Survey. Incidence of PPH, treatment efficacy, adverse event and case fatality rates, access to misoprostol, and health resource use and cost data were obtained from published literature and supplemented with expert opinion where necessary. We computed the expected incidence of PPH, mortality, disability adjusted life years (DALYs), costs and incremental cost effectiveness ratios (ICERs). We conducted univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses to examine robustness of our results. In the base-case analysis, misoprostol distribution lowered the expected incidence of PPH by 1.0% (95% credibility interval (CrI): 0.55%, 1.95%), mortality by 0.08% (95% CrI: 0.04%, 0.13%) and DALYs by 0.02 (95% CrI: 0.01, 0.03). Mean costs were higher with prenatal misoprostol distribution from governmental by US$3.3 (95% CrI: 2.1, 4.2) and modified societal (by US$1.3; 95% CrI: -1.6, 2.8) perspectives. ICERs were US$191 (95% CrI: 82, 443) per DALY averted from a governmental perspective, and US$73 (95% CI: -86, 256) per DALY averted from a modified societal perspective. Conclusions Prenatal distribution of misoprostol is potentially cost-effective in Uganda and should be considered for national-level scale up for prevention of PPH. PMID:26560140

  5. NOTE: Entropy-based automated classification of independent components separated from fMCG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comani, S.; Srinivasan, V.; Alleva, G.; Romani, G. L.

    2007-03-01

    Fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) is a noninvasive technique suitable for the prenatal diagnosis of the fetal heart function. Reliable fetal cardiac signals can be reconstructed from multi-channel fMCG recordings by means of independent component analysis (ICA). However, the identification of the separated components is usually accomplished by visual inspection. This paper discusses a novel automated system based on entropy estimators, namely approximate entropy (ApEn) and sample entropy (SampEn), for the classification of independent components (ICs). The system was validated on 40 fMCG datasets of normal fetuses with the gestational age ranging from 22 to 37 weeks. Both ApEn and SampEn were able to measure the stability and predictability of the physiological signals separated with ICA, and the entropy values of the three categories were significantly different at p <0.01. The system performances were compared with those of a method based on the analysis of the time and frequency content of the components. The outcomes of this study showed a superior performance of the entropy-based system, in particular for early gestation, with an overall ICs detection rate of 98.75% and 97.92% for ApEn and SampEn respectively, as against a value of 94.50% obtained with the time-frequency-based system.

  6. Coagulation profile in women on low-dose oral contraceptive pills.

    PubMed

    Roshidah, I; Khalid, H; Baharum, Y

    1990-12-01

    The effect of low dose combined oral contraceptives containing 30 mcg ethinyl estradiol and either 150 mcg levonorgestrel or 150 mcg desogestrel on coagulation indices in Malaysian women was examined. 50 women who had been using the pills for 1 year or more, were compared to 75 non-users. All were attending the Maternity Clinic of the General Hospital, Kuala Lumpur. Pill users registered shorter prothrombin time, 11.5 vs. 11.1 seconds (p=0.016), and partial thromboplastin time, 40.1 vs 35.1 seconds (p=0.000). Since there were no significant differences in Factors II, V, VII, or VIII, the overall effects of low-dose pills on coagulation is probably not clinically significant. PMID:12343152

  7. Oral Warts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for providing oral care. NIDCR > Image Gallery > Oral Health > Oral Warts Oral Warts Main Content Title: Oral Warts Description: Warts are small, white, gray, or pinkish rough bumps that look like cauliflower. They can appear inside the lips and on ...

  8. Medical abortion with mifepristone and home administration of misoprostol up to 63 days’ gestation

    PubMed Central

    Løkeland, Mette; Iversen, Ole Erik; Engeland, Anders; Økland, Ingrid; Bjørge, Line

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the acceptability and efficacy of medical abortion at home up to 63 days’ gestation without limits on travel distance to a registered institution. Design Observational prospective study. Setting Haukeland University Hospital between May 2006 and May 2009. Population A total of 1018 women requesting abortion before 63 days’ gestation who chose medical termination with mifepristone and home administration of misoprostol. Methods The women took 200 mg mifepristone under nurse supervision and self-administered 800 ?g misoprostol vaginally 36–48 h later at home. All were contacted by phone for follow-up and assessment of bleeding, pain and acceptability. Main outcome measures Evacuation rate, pain, bleeding, acceptability, influence of distance on treatment. Results Median gestational age was 50 (range 35–63) days and 70 (7.1%) of the women lived more than 60 min travel from the clinic. The rate of completed abortion was 93.6% and surgical evacuation was performed in 50 (4.9%) cases. Two women requested treatment on the day of misoprostol use. Moderate to strong pain was experienced by 68.4%, and 74.7% reported moderate to heavy bleeding. Parous women experienced less pain than nulliparous women (odds ratio 0.27; 95% confidence interval 0.19–0.34). In all, 95.1% of the women were satisfied with staying at home. Travel distance did not influence treatment outcome variables. Conclusions In our experience, home administration of misoprostol is an effective and acceptable method for abortion up to 63 days of gestation and women should be eligible for this treatment option regardless of their travel distance from hospital. PMID:24766569

  9. Development and validation of LC methods for the separation of misoprostol related substances and diastereoisomers.

    PubMed

    Kahsay, Getu; Song, Huiying; Eerdekens, Fran; Tie, Yaxin; Hendriks, Danny; Van Schepdael, Ann; Cabooter, Deirdre; Adams, Erwin

    2015-07-10

    Misoprostol is a synthetic prostaglandin E1 analogue which is mainly used for prevention and treatment of gastric ulcers, but also for abortion due to its labour inducing effect. Misoprostol exists as a mixture of diastereoisomers (1:1) and has several related impurities owing to its instability at higher temperatures and moisture. A simple and robust reversed phase liquid chromatographic (RPLC) method is described for the separation of the related substances and a normal phase (NP) LC method for the separation of misoprostol diastereoisomers. The RPLC method was performed using an Ascentis Express C18 (150 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 ?m) column kept at 35 °C. The mobile phase was a gradient mixture of mobile phase A (ACN-H2O-MeOH, 28:69:3 v/v/v) and mobile phase B (ACN-H2O-MeOH, 47:50:3 v/v/v) eluted at a flow rate of 1.5 mL/min. UV detection was performed at 200 nm. The NPLC method was undertaken by using an XBridge bare silica (150 mm × 2.1 mm, 3.5 ?m) column at 35 °C. The mobile phase contained 1-propanol-heptane-TFA (4:96:0.1%, v/v/v), pumped at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. UV detection was performed at 205 nm. This LC method can properly separate the two diastereoisomers (Rs > 2) within an analysis time of less than 20 min. Both methods were validated according to the ICH guidelines. Furthermore, these new LC methods have been successfully applied for purity control and diastereoisomers ratio determination of misoprostol bulk drug, tablets and dispersion. PMID:25880239

  10. Première expérience de l'utilisation du Misoprostol comme soin après avortement (SAA) à Libreville, Gabon

    PubMed Central

    Mayi-Tsonga, Sosthène; Minkobame, Ulysse; Mbila, Arielle; Assoumou, Pamphile; Diop, Ayisha; Winikoff, Beverly

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Une étude a été menée afin de déterminer le taux d'acceptabilité de 400µg de misoprostol par voie sublinguale comme traitement de première intention de l'avortement incomplet et de préciser le taux d'avortement complet ou vacuité utérine. Méthodes Les femmes éligibles avaient un diagnostic clinique d'avortement incomplet avec une taille utérine inférieure à celle d'un utérus de 12 semaines d'aménorrhées (SA). Chacune a reçu 400µg de misoprostol par voie sublinguale. Les femmes ont été revues après une semaine. A J7, celles qui n'avaient pas complètement expulsé ont eu le choix entre une nouvelle consultation de suivi à J14 et la pratique d'une évacuation chirurgicale immédiate. Résultats 145 patientes ont été éligibles et ont toutes accepté la méthode (100%). L’âge moyen était de 25,9 ± 6 ans. A J7, 120 patientes étaient guéries (85,7%). A J14, le taux de réussitea été de 95,7% soit 134 patientes guéries. Les patientes guéries ont déclaré être très satisfaites (57,5%), satisfaites (41,8%) et insatisfaite (0,7%). Au total,128 femmes (95,5%) ont dit être prêtes à utiliser de nouveau le misoprostol comme méthode d’évacuation utérine en cas d'avortement incomplet. Conclusion L’étude démontre que le 400µg misoprostol par voie sublinguale nous permet de prendre en charge d'une manière adéquate l'avortement incomplet surtout dans les pays à faible ressource et notamment dans les structures sanitaires de première ligne ou éloignées. PMID:25469194

  11. Sodium caprate-induced increases in intestinal permeability and epithelial damage are prevented by misoprostol.

    PubMed

    Brayden, David J; Maher, Sam; Bahar, Bojlul; Walsh, Edwin

    2015-08-01

    Epithelial damage caused by intestinal permeation enhancers is a source of debate concerning safety. The medium chain fatty acid, sodium caprate (C10), causes reversible membrane perturbation at high dose levels required for efficacy in vivo, so the aim was to model it in vitro. Exposure of Caco-2 monolayers to 8.5mM C10 for 60min followed by incubation in fresh buffer led to (i) recovery in epithelial permeability (i.e. transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of [(14)C]-mannitol), (ii) recovery of cell viability parameters (monolayer morphology, plasma membrane potential, mitochondrial membrane potential, and intracellular calcium) and (iii) reduction in mRNA expression associated with inflammation (IL-8). Pre-incubation of monolayers with a mucosal prostaglandin cytoprotectant was attempted in order to further decipher the mechanism of C10. Misoprostol (100nM), inhibited C10-induced changes in monolayer parameters, an effect that was partially attenuated by the EP1 receptor antagonist, SC51322. In rat isolated intestinal tissue mucosae and in situ loop instillations, C10-induced respective increases in the [(14)C]-mannitol Papp and the AUC of FITC-dextran 4000 (FD-4) were similarly inhibited by misoprostol, with accompanying morphological damage spared. These data support a temporary membrane perturbation effect of C10, which is linked to its capacity to mainly increase paracellular flux, but which can be prevented by pre-exposure to misoprostol. PMID:26026287

  12. A novel misoprostol delivery system for induction of labor: clinical utility and patient considerations

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Megan L; Wing, Deborah A

    2015-01-01

    Induction of labor is one of the most commonly performed obstetric procedures and will likely become more common as the reproductive population in developed nations changes. As the proportion of women undergoing induction grows, there is a constant search for more efficacious ways to induce labor while maintaining fetal and maternal safety as well as patient satisfaction. With almost half of induced labors requiring cervical ripening, methods for achieving active labor and vaginal delivery are constantly being investigated. Prostaglandins have been shown to be effective induction agents, and specifically vaginal misoprostol, used off-label, have been widely utilized to initiate cervical ripening and active labor. The challenge is to administer this medication accurately while maintaining the ability to discontinue the medication when needed. The misoprostol vaginal insert initiates cervical ripening utilizing a delivery system that controls medication release and can be rapidly removed. This paper reviews the design, development, and clinical utility of the misoprostol vaginal insert for induction of labor as well as patient considerations related to the delivery system. PMID:25960635

  13. Misoprostol-induced radioprotection of Syrian hamster embryo cells in utero from cell death and oncogenic transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.C.; LaNasa, P.; Hanson, W.R.

    1994-07-01

    Misoprostol, a PGE analog, is an effective radioprotector of murine intestine and hematopoietic and hair cell renewal systems. The radioprotective nature of misoprostol was extended to examine its ability to influence clonogenic cell survival and induction of oncogenic transformation in Syrian hamster embryo cells exposed to X rays in utero and assayed in vitro. Hamsters in their 12th day of pregnancy were injected subcutaneously with misoprostal, and 2 h later the pregnant hamsters were exposed to graded doses of X rays. Immediately after irradiation, hamsters were euthanized and embryonic tissue was explanted into culture dishes containing complete growth medium. After a 2-week incubation period, clongenic cell survival and morphologically transformed foci were determined. Survival of misoprostol-treated SHE cells was increased and yielded a dose reduction factor of 1.5 compared to SHE cells treated with X rays alone. In contrast, radiation-induced oncogenic transformation of misoprostol-treated cells was reduced by a factor of 20 compared to cells treated with X rays alone. These studies suggest that misoprostol not only protects normal tissues in vivo from acute radiation injury, but also protects cells, to a large extent, from injury leading to transforming events. 26 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Cellulase production in continuous and fed-batch culture by Trichoderma reesei MCG80

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, A.L.; Andreotti, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Continuous culture of Natick's strain MCG80 of Trichoderma reesei at a dilution rate of 0.028 h/sup -1/ has yielded a cellulase titer of over 61 U/mL using 5% lactose as the sole carbon source. Enzyme productivity at this dilution rate is 168 IU/L/h. Repeated fed-batch cultures using this strain on lactose as the carbon source have titers of 10 IU/mL with productivities in excess of 100 IU/L/h. 5 figures, 1 table.

  15. Safety and tolerability of once-daily umeclidinium/vilanterol 125/25 mcg and umeclidinium 125 mcg in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: results from a 52-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) umeclidinium (UMEC) and the combination of UMEC with the long-acting ?2-agonist (LABA) vilanterol (UMEC/VI) are approved maintenance treatments for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the US and EU. They are not indicated for the treatment of asthma. Methods In this 52-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group safety study (GSK study DB2113359; NCT01316887), patients were randomized 2:2:1 to UMEC/VI 125/25 mcg, UMEC 125 mcg, or placebo. Study endpoints included adverse events (AEs), clinical chemistry and hematology parameters, vital signs, 12-lead, and 24-hour Holter electrocardiograms. COPD exacerbations and rescue medication use were assessed as safety parameters; lung function was also evaluated. Results The incidence of on-treatment AEs, serious AEs (SAEs), and drug-related AEs was similar between treatment groups (AEs: 52–58%; SAEs: 6–7%; drug-related AEs: 12–13%). Headache was the most common AE in each treatment group (8–11%). AEs associated with the LAMA and LABA pharmacologic classes occurred at a low incidence across treatment groups. No clinically meaningful effects on vital signs or laboratory assessments were reported for active treatments versus placebo. The incidences of atrial arrhythmias with UMEC/VI 125/25 mcg were similar to placebo; for UMEC 125 mcg, the incidences of ectopic supraventricular beats, sustained supraventricular tachycardia, and ectopic supraventricular rhythm were ?2% greater than placebo. With active treatments, COPD exacerbations were fewer (13–15% of patients reporting ?1 exacerbation) and on average less rescue medication was required (1.6–2.2 puffs/day) versus placebo (24% reporting ?1 exacerbation, 2.6 puffs/day). Both active treatments improved lung function versus placebo. Conclusion UMEC/VI 125/25 mcg and UMEC 125 mcg were well tolerated over 12 months in patients with COPD. PMID:25015176

  16. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... kinds of oral cancer: oral cavity cancer and oropharyngeal cancer. The most common symptom of oral cancer ... the oral cavity. • HPV infection The number of oropharyngeal cancers linked to human papilloma virus (HPV) has ...

  17. A two-component ionized reflection model of MCG-6-30-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, D. R.; Vaughan, S.; Fabian, A. C.

    2003-06-01

    Ionized reflection has often been considered as the explanation for the unusual Fe K? variability observed in MCG-6-30-15. In this paper, we test this model using a 325-ks observation of MCG-6-30-15 by XMM-Newton and BeppoSAX. The data are fitted between 2.5 and 80 keV with the constant-density models of Ross & Fabian. The best-fitting ionized reflection model requires the Fe K? line to be split into two reprocessing events: one from the inner disc to build up the red wing, and the other from the outer accretion disc to fit the blue horn. The implied geometry is a disc that becomes strongly warped or flared at large radii. A good fit was obtained with a solar abundance of iron and a reflection fraction (R) of unity for the inner reflector. The combination of the two reflection spectra can appear to have R > 2 as required by the BeppoSAX data. The inner reflector has an ionization parameter of log ?= 3.8, but the outer one is neutral with an inner radius of ~70 gravitational radii (rg), corresponding to a light crossing time of approximately an hour for a 107 Msolar black hole. Applying this model to time-resolved spectra shows that the inner reflector becomes more ionized as the source brightens. This reduces the strength of the red wing at high flux states. The X-ray source is constrained to arise from a narrow annulus at ~5rg, with only 6 per cent of the 2-10 keV flux being due to the outer reprocessor. This amount of localized energy generation is extremely difficult to produce without resorting to other energy sources such as the black hole spin. In fact, all the Fe K? models fitted to XMM-Newton spectra of MCG-6-30-15 require a large increase in energy production at the inner edge of the accretion disc.

  18. Performance comparison of independent component analysis algorithms for fetal cardiac signal reconstruction: a study on synthetic fMCG data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantini, D.; Hild, K. E., II; Alleva, G.; Comani, S.

    2006-02-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) algorithms have been successfully used for signal extraction tasks in the field of biomedical signal processing. We studied the performances of six algorithms (FastICA, CubICA, JADE, Infomax, TDSEP and MRMI-SIG) for fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG). Synthetic datasets were used to check the quality of the separated components against the original traces. Real fMCG recordings were simulated with linear combinations of typical fMCG source signals: maternal and fetal cardiac activity, ambient noise, maternal respiration, sensor spikes and thermal noise. Clusters of different dimensions (19, 36 and 55 sensors) were prepared to represent different MCG systems. Two types of signal-to-interference ratios (SIR) were measured. The first involves averaging over all estimated components and the second is based solely on the fetal trace. The computation time to reach a minimum of 20 dB SIR was measured for all six algorithms. No significant dependency on gestational age or cluster dimension was observed. Infomax performed poorly when a sub-Gaussian source was included; TDSEP and MRMI-SIG were sensitive to additive noise, whereas FastICA, CubICA and JADE showed the best performances. Of all six methods considered, FastICA had the best overall performance in terms of both separation quality and computation times.

  19. Implications of the X-ray Variability for the Mass of MCG-6-30-15

    E-print Network

    Michael A. Nowak; James Chiang

    2000-01-14

    The bright Seyfert 1 galaxy \\mcg shows large variability on a variety of time scales. We study the $\\aproxlt 3$ day time scale variability using a set of simultaneous archival observations that were obtained from \\rxte and the {\\it Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics} (\\asca). The \\rxte\\ observations span nearly $10^6$ sec and indicate that the X-ray Fourier Power Spectral Density has an rms variability of 16%, is flat from approximately 10^{-6} - 10^{-5} Hz, and then steepens into a power law $\\propto f^{-\\alpha}$ with $\\alpha\\aproxgt 1$. A further steepening to $\\alpha \\approx 2$ occurs between 10^{-4}-10^{-3} Hz. The shape and rms amplitude are comparable to what has been observed in \

  20. Occultation Mapping of the Central Engine in the Active Galaxy MCG -6-30-15

    E-print Network

    B. McKernan; T. Yaqoob

    1998-04-24

    The colossal power output of active galactic nuclei (AGN) is believed to be fueled by the accretion of matter onto a supermassive black hole. This central accreting region of AGN has hitherto been spatially unresolved and its structure therefore unknown. Here we propose that a previously reported `deep minimum' in the X-ray intensity of the AGN MCG-6-30-15, was due to a unique X-ray occultation event and that it probes structure of the central engine on scales occultation interpretation is controversial in the sense that X-ray variability in AGNs is normally attributed to intrinsic physical changes in the X-ray emission region, such as disk or coronal instabilities.

  1. Improvement of fertility in artificially inseminated ewes following vaginal treatment with misoprostol plus terbutaline sulphate.

    PubMed

    Horta, A E M; Barbas, J P; Marques, C C; Baptista, M C; Vasques, M I; Pereira, R M; Mascarenhas, R D; Cavaco-Gonçalves, S

    2010-12-01

    The effect of vaginal administration of misoprostol plus terbutaline sulphate 6?h prior to artificial insemination (AI) upon the site of AI (vaginal or cervical) and fertility was studied using a total of 87 estrous synchronized Serra da Estrela ewes (control n?=?42 and treated n?=?45). Artificial insemination was performed using refrigerated semen at 54-55?h after sponge removal. Lambing rate (fertility) and prolificacy were compared between control and treated ewes. The effect of the site of semen deposition on fertility was also evaluated. Prolificacy rate was not different between control (1.5) and treated (1.59) ewes. The proportion of cervical AI achieved in control (45.2%) and treated (37.8%) ewes was not significantly different. Overall, fertility was significantly lower in control than in treated ewes (42.9% vs 64.4%; p?misoprostol plus terbutaline sulphate 6?h prior to artificial insemination did not affect the proportion of cervical inseminations but significantly improved the fertility of treated ewes. Although needing confirmation, it was hypothesized that drugs might have induced local secretory modifications leading to an increase of cervical ability to retain more viable spermatozoa for fertilization. PMID:20210884

  2. A Chandra-HETG view of MCG +8-11-11

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, K. D.; Nowak, M. A.

    2014-12-10

    We present a spectral analysis of the 118 ks Chandra High Energy Transmission Gratings (HETG) observation of the X-ray bright Seyfert 1.5 galaxy MCG +8-11-11, in conjunction with 100 ks of archival Suzaku data, aimed at investigating the signatures of warm absorption and Compton reflection reported from previous Suzaku and XMM-Newton studies of the source. Contrary to previous results, we find that warm absorption is not required by the data. Instead, we report upper limits on absorption lines that are below previous (marginal) detections. Fe K? line emission is clearly detected and is likely resolved with ? ? 0.02 keV with the HETG data. We applied self-consistent, broadband spectral-fitting models to the Chandra and Suzaku data to investigate this and other signatures of distant absorption and reflection. Utilizing in particular the MYTorus model, we find that the data are consistent with reprocessing by a distant, neutral torus that is marginally Compton-thick ( N {sub H} ?10{sup 24}cm{sup –2}) and out of the line of sight. However, we do not find compelling evidence of a relativistically broadened Fe K emission line, which is often expected from type 1 active galactic nuclei. This is consistent with some, although not all, previous studies of MCG +8-11-11. A well-measured edge is identified by the HETG near 0.5 keV, indicating neutral absorption in the line of sight that is consistent with galactic absorption; however, the absorption may be partially intrinsic to the source. The HETG data are consistent with the presence of a soft excess, a feature that may be missed by considering the Suzaku data alone.

  3. Principal component analysis of MCG-06-30-15 with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, M. L.; Marinucci, A.; Brenneman, L.; Fabian, A. C.; Kara, E.; Matt, G.; Walton, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    We analyse the spectral variability of MCG-06-30-15 with 600 k s of XMM-Newton data, including 300 k s of new data from the joint XMM-Newton and NuSTAR 2013 observational campaign. We use principal component analysis to find high-resolution, model-independent spectra of the different variable components of the spectrum. We find that over 99 per cent of the variability can be described by just three components, which are consistent with variations in the normalization of the power-law continuum (˜97 per cent), the photon index (˜2 per cent) and the normalization of a relativistically blurred reflection spectrum (˜0.5 per cent). We also find a fourth significant component but this is heavily diluted by noise, and we can attribute all the remaining spectral variability to noise. All three components are found to be variable on time-scales from 20 down to 1 k s, which corresponds to a distance from the central black hole of less than 70 gravitational radii. We compare these results with those derived from spectral fitting, and find them to be in very good agreement with our interpretation of the principal components. We conclude that the observed relatively weak variability in the reflected component of the spectrum of MCG-06-30-15 is due to the effects of light-bending close to the event horizon of the black hole, and demonstrate that principal component analysis is an effective tool for analysing spectral variability in this regime.

  4. Oral Herpes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Improving the Nation's Oral Health National Institutes of Health Español Staff Directory A– ... Index Search Text size: Website Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum Disease TMJ Disorders Oral ...

  5. Oral Myiasis

    PubMed Central

    Saravanan, Thalaimalai; Mohan, Mathan A; Thinakaran, Meera; Ahammed, Saneem

    2015-01-01

    Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy. PMID:25709196

  6. 15d-PGJ2 inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis of MCG-803 human gastric cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun-Xian; Zhong, Xue-Yun; Qin, Yan-Fang; Bing, Wang; He, Li-Zhen

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the influence of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?) ligand, 15-deoxy-?12, 14-prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2) on the proliferation and apoptosis of MCG-803 human gastric cancer cell lines. METHODS: Cell proliferation was measured by 3H-TdR assay. Apoptosis was determined by ELISA and TUNEL staining. Protein and mRNA level of bcl-2 family and COXs were measured by Western blotting and Northern blotting respectively. PGE2 production was examined by RIA. RESULTS: 15dPGJ2 inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis of MCG-803 cells. The COX-2 and bcl-2/bax ratios were decreased following 15dPGJ2 treatment. The PGE2 production in supernatants was also decreased. These changes were in a dose-dependent manner. CONCLUSION: 15dPGJ2 may be a useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:14562367

  7. Performance comparison of six independent components analysis algorithms for fetal signal extraction from real fMCG data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hild, Kenneth E.; Alleva, Giovanna; Nagarajan, Srikantan; Comani, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    In this study we compare the performance of six independent components analysis (ICA) algorithms on 16 real fetal magnetocardiographic (fMCG) datasets for the application of extracting the fetal cardiac signal. We also compare the extraction results for real data with the results previously obtained for synthetic data. The six ICA algorithms are FastICA, CubICA, JADE, Infomax, MRMI-SIG and TDSEP. The results obtained using real fMCG data indicate that the FastICA method consistently outperforms the others in regard to separation quality and that the performance of an ICA method that uses temporal information suffers in the presence of noise. These two results confirm the previous results obtained using synthetic fMCG data. There were also two notable differences between the studies based on real and synthetic data. The differences are that all six ICA algorithms are independent of gestational age and sensor dimensionality for synthetic data, but depend on gestational age and sensor dimensionality for real data. It is possible to explain these differences by assuming that the number of point sources needed to completely explain the data is larger than the dimensionality used in the ICA extraction.

  8. A multi-wavelength study of the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15

    E-print Network

    C. S. Reynolds; M. J. Ward; A. C. Fabian; A. Celotti

    1997-07-14

    We present a multiwaveband spectroscopic study of the nearby Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15. New optical spectra from the Anglo-Australian Telescope are presented which clearly show the effects of dust extinction/reddening on both the emission line spectrum and the non-stellar AGN continuum. The reddening is constrained to be in the range E(B-V)=0.61-1.09. Spectroscopy in the X-ray band, with both ROSAT and ASCA, reveal absorption by the warm absorber but little or no neutral absorption expected to accompany the dust responsible for the optical reddening. The dusty warm absorber solution to this discrepancy is discussed and photoionization models of such warm absorbers are constructed. The optical spectrum also displays the relatively strong `coronal' lines of [FeX]6375, [FeXI]7892 and [FeXIV]5303. We show that these lines may plausibly originate from the outer regions of the warm absorber, although better calculations of the collision strengths for these transitions are required in order to conclusively address this issue. We also present new ultraviolet data from the International Ultraviolet Explorer and suggest that much of the observed UV flux is scattered into our line of sight (with a scattering fraction of 1-5 per cent). We conclude with a discussion of the global energetics of this system.

  9. Supernova 2011at = PSN J09285756-1448206 in MCG -02-24-27

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2011-03-01

    Announces the discovery of SN 2011at = PSN J09285756-1448206 in MCG -02-24-27 by Lou Cox, Jack Newton, and Tim Puckett (Ellijay, GA, in the course of the Puckett Observatory Supernova Search) on 2011 March 10.214 UT at unfiltered CCD magnitude 14.5. Spectra obtained March 11.81 UT with the Swift satellite (+UVOT) by F. Bufano (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica (INAF), Osservatorio Astronomico di Catania), S. Benetti (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova), and A. Pastorello (Queen's University, Belfast, et al.); and on March 12 UT with the F. L. Whipple Observatory 1.5-m telescope (+FAST) by M. Calkins (reported by G. H. Marion, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), on behalf of the CfA Supernova Group) show SN 2011at to be a type-Ia supernova a few days before/around maximum. The object was designated PSN J09285756-1448206 when posted on the Central Bureau's Transient Objects Confirmation Page (TOCP) webpage. Initially announced in CBET 2676 (Daniel W. ! E. Green, ed.). Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details.

  10. Oral Ulcerations

    E-print Network

    Fetterolf, Brandon; Zabella, Alexandra; Strote, Jared

    2015-01-01

    of Emergency Medicine Fetterolf et al. Oral UlcerationsOral Ulcerations Brandon Fetterolf, DO* Alexandra Zaballa, BS † Jared Strote, MD, MS ‡ * Madigan Army Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine,

  11. Effects of a single rectal dose of Misoprostol prior to abdominal hysterectomy in women with symptomatic leiomyoma: a randomized double blind clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabai, Afsarosadat; Karimi-Zarchi, Mojgan; Meibodi, Bahare; Vaghefi, Marzie; Yazdian, Pouria; Zeidabadi, Mahbube; Dehghani, Atefe; Teimoori, Soraya; Jamali, Azadeh; Akhondi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background Fibroma, the most common benign pelvic tumor in women, affects 25 to 30% of women of reproductive age. Primary treatment for patients with symptomatic or large fibroma is surgery. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a single rectal dose of Misoprostol on bleeding during abdominal hysterectomy. Methods This double blind randomized clinical trial was conducted with 80 candidates for abdominal hysterectomy, due to uterine myoma, in the Shahid Sadoughi hospital of Yazd in 2012. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of single rectal dose of Misoprostol on peri-operational abdominal hysterectomy bleeding. Following administration of 400 micrograms of Misoprostol in the case group (n=40), predetermined criteria were compared with control group (n=40). Results Volume of bleeding during the operation was significantly lower in cases where Misoprostol was used. (268.71 ± 156.85 vs. 350.38 ± 152.61 cc in the case and control groups, respectively). Our findings also showed that Hemoglobin (Hb) levels before, 8, and 30 hours following the operation differed significantly (p=0.001), but these changes were similar in both groups. Pre-operative Hb levels were 11.90 ± 1.7 and 11.90 ± 2.0 in the case and control groups, respectively. Conclusion A single rectal dose of Misoprostol has positive effect on reducing peri-operational bleeding in women undergoing abdominal hysterectomy due to symptomatic leiomyoma. PMID:26516444

  12. Once-daily fluticasone furoate 50 mcg in mild-to-moderate asthma: a 24-week placebo-controlled randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Busse, W W; Bateman, E D; O'Byrne, P M; Lötvall, J; Woodcock, A; Medley, H; Forth, R; Jacques, L

    2014-01-01

    Background Inhaled glucocorticosteroids (ICS) are the mainstay of treatment in asthma. Fluticasone furoate (FF) is a novel, once-daily ICS asthma therapy. This study investigated the efficacy and safety of FF 50 mcg in patients with mild-to-moderate persistent asthma. Methods A 24-week, multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled and active-controlled, double-blind, double-dummy, parallel-group phase III study. Three hundred and fifty-one patients (aged ?12 years; uncontrolled by non-ICS therapy) were randomized to treatment (1 : 1 : 1) with once-daily FF 50 mcg dosed in the evening, twice-daily fluticasone propionate (FP) 100 mcg or placebo. The primary endpoint was change from baseline in evening trough forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) at Week 24. Secondary endpoints were change from baseline in the percentage of rescue-free 24-h periods (powered endpoint), change from baseline in evening and morning peak expiratory flow, change from baseline in the percentage of symptom-free 24-h periods and number of withdrawals due to lack of efficacy. Results Evening trough FEV1 at Week 24 was not statistically significantly increased with FF 50 mcg once-daily (37 ml [95% CI: ?55, 128]; P = 0.430), but was with FP 100 mcg twice daily (102 ml [10, 194]; P = 0.030), vs placebo. No consistent trends were observed across other endpoints, including the powered secondary endpoint. No safety concerns were raised for either active treatment. Conclusions FP 100 mcg twice daily improved evening trough FEV1 in patients with mild-to-moderate persistent asthma, but FF 50 mcg once daily did not demonstrate a significant effect. Secondary endpoints showed variable results. No safety concerns were identified for FF or FP. PMID:25040613

  13. A Suzaku Observation of MCG -2-58-22: Constraining the Geometry of the Circumnuclear Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, Elizabeth; Markowitz, Alex; Rothschild, Richard

    2011-05-01

    We have analyzed a long-look Suzaku observation of the active galactic nucleus MCG -2-58-22, a type 1.5 Seyfert with very little X-ray absorption in the line of sight and prominent features arising from reflection off circumnuclear material: the Fe line and Compton reflection hump. We place tight constraints on the power-law photon index (? = 1.80 ± 0.02), the Compton reflection strength (R = 0.69 ± 0.05), and the Fe K emission line energy centroid and width (E = 6.40 ± 0.02 keV, v FWHM < 7100 km s-1). We find no significant evidence either for emission from strongly ionized Fe, or for a strong, relativistically broadened Fe line, indicating that perhaps there is no radiatively efficient accretion disk very close in to the central black hole. In addition, we test a new self-consistent physical model from Murphy and Yaqoob, the "MYTORUS" model, consisting of a donut-shaped torus of material surrounding the central illuminating source and producing both the Compton hump and the Fe K line emission. From the application of this model we find that the observed spectrum is consistent with a Compton-thick torus of material (column density N H = 3.6+1.3 - 0.8 × 1024 cm-2) lying outside of the line of sight to the nucleus, leaving it bare of X-ray absorption in excess of the Galactic column. We calculate that this material is sufficient to produce all of the Fe line flux without the need for any flux contribution from additional Compton-thin circumnuclear material.

  14. Fibrinolytic response in women on low-dose oral contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Ishak, R; Ahmad, R; Gudum, H R; Hassan, K; Ang, E S

    1992-06-01

    Long term use of low doses of combination oral contraceptives appears to increase plasminogen level, thereby increasing fibrinolytic activity and reducing the risk of thromboembolism. Blood levels of plasminogen, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI), were measured before and after stress (5 minutes of stair climbing) in a group of 30 women, 23-40 years old, who had taken 30 mcg of ethinyl estradiol with 150 mcg of desogestrel or levonorgestrel for at least 1 year. Similar measurements were taken from a control group of 30 women matched for age, height, and weight. Plasminogen and tPA levels in both groups increased significantly after exercise. The level of PAI did not change significantly with stress in either group. The level of plasminogen was significantly higher in the group taking contraceptives, whether before or after exercise, when compared to the control group. Levels of tPA and PAI, although slightly increased in the oral contraceptive group, were not significantly different between the two groups. The increase in plasminogen may be due to the estrogen component of the contraceptives. Stress seems to increase fibrinolytic response. PMID:12345026

  15. Soft X-Ray Emission Lines from a Relativistic Accretion Disk in MCG -6-30-15 and Mrk 766

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Sako, M.; Kahn, S. M.; Brinkman, A. C.; Kaastra, J. S.; Page, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) spectra of the Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies MCG -6-30-15 and Mrk 766 are physically and spectroscopically inconsistent with standard models comprising a power-law continuum absorbed by either cold or ionized matter. We propose that the remarkably similar features detected in both objects in the 5 - 35 A band are H-like oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon emission lines, gravitation- ally redshifted and broadened by relativistic effects in the vicinity of a Kerr black hole. We discuss the implications of our interpretation, and demonstrate that the derived parameters can be physically self-consistent.

  16. Morphological Findings in Trophozoites during Amoebic Abscess Development in Misoprostol-Treated BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aceves-Cano, Andrés; Gaytán-Ochoa, Rocío; Ramos-Martínez, Ernesto; Erosa de la Vega, Gilberto; González-Horta, Carmen; Talamás-Rohana, Patricia; Sánchez-Ramírez, Blanca

    2015-01-01

    During amoebic liver abscess (ALA) formation in susceptible animals, immune response is regulated by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) dependent mechanisms. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of misoprostol (MPL), a PGE1 analogue, on ALA formation in BALB/c mice. Male mice from BALB/c strain were intrahepatically infected with 7.5 × 105 trophozoites of E. histolytica strain HM1:IMSS and treated with 10?4?M of MPL daily until sacrifice at 2, 4, and 7 days postinfection (p.i.). ALA formation was evaluated at 2, 4, and 7 days postinfection; trophozoite morphology was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and image analysis. Results showed an increase in frequency of ALA formation in infected and MPL-treated mice only at 2 days p.i. (P = 0.03). A significant diminution in the size of trophozoites was detected in abscesses from mice independently of MPL treatment (from 5.8 ± 1.1?µm at 2 days p.i. to 2.7 ± 1.9?µm at 7 days p.i.) compared with trophozoites dimensions observed in susceptible hamsters (9.6 ± 2.7?µm) (P < 0.01). These results suggest that MPL treatment may modify the adequate control of inflammatory process to allow the persistence of trophozoites in the liver; however, natural resistance mechanisms cannot be discarded. PMID:26090455

  17. RXTE and BeppoSAX Observations of MCG-5-23-16: Reflection From Distant Cold Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattson, B. J.; Weaver, K. A.

    2003-01-01

    We examine the spectral variability of the Seyfert 1.9 galaxy MCG-5-23-16 using RXTE and BeppoSAX observations spanning 2 years from April 1996 to April 1998. During the first year the X-ray source brightens by a factor of approximately 25% on timescales of days to months. During this time, the reprocessed continuum emission seen with RXTE does not respond measurably to the continuum increase. However, by the end of the second year during the BeppoSAX epoch the X-ray source has faded again. This time, the reprocessed emission has also faded, indicating that the reprocessed flux has responded to the continuum. If these effects are caused by time delays due to the distance between the X-ray source and the reprocessing region, we derive a light crossing time of between approximately 1 light day and approximately 1.5 light years. This corresponds to a distance of 0.001 pc to 0.55 pc, which implies that the reprocessed emission originates between 3 x 10(exp 15) cm and 1.6 x 10(exp l8) cm from the X-ray source. In other words, the reprocessing in MCG-5-23-16 is not dominated by the inner regions of a standard accretion disk.

  18. Cycle-Related Changes in Mood, Sexual Desire, and Sexual Activity in Oral Contraception-Using and Nonhormonal-Contraception-Using Couples.

    PubMed

    Elaut, Els; Buysse, Ann; De Sutter, Petra; Gerris, Jan; De Cuypere, Griet; T'Sjoen, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Findings on women's sexuality across the menstrual cycle are inconsistent. One relatively consistent finding is a midcycle and premenstrual peak in sexual desire in freely cycling women. Results on the cycle-related effects on sexual behavior are less clear. Large proportions of reproductive-aged women use combined oral contraception (COC), but studies on potential cycle-related shifts in sexual desire and behavior are sparse. A prospective diary study assessed sexual desire, sexual behavior, and mood in 89 heterosexual couples. Women were using one of four contraceptive methods: (1) nonhormonal contraception, (2) low-dose COC containing 20 mcg ethinylestradiol and 75 mcg gestoden or desogestrel, (3) COC containing 35 mcg ethinylestradiol and 2 mg cyproteronacetate, and (4) COC containing 30 mcg ethinylestradiol and 3 mg drospirenone. No cycle effects of sexual desire were established in the COC group, but frequency of sexual intercourse declined in the last days of active pill taking. These results were similar in both female and male partners. Negative affect did not covary with sexual desire. PMID:25420716

  19. [The illegal market for gender-related drugs as portrayed in the Brazilian news media: the case of misoprostol and women].

    PubMed

    Diniz, Debora; Castro, Rosana

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes how the Brazilian news media covers the illegal market for misoprostol, the main drug used to induce abortion. A total of 1,429 news stories were retrieved from 220 print and electronic media channels from 2004 to 2009. The analysis included 524 stories from 62 regional and national newspapers. Misoprostol appeared repeatedly in the news, but was usually approached from a criminal perspective, unlike abortion as a whole, which the Brazilian media routinely covers as a religious, political, and public health issue. Misoprostol is part of the illegal gender-related drug market, along with drugs for weight loss and erectile dysfunction and anabolic steroids. Sixty-four (12%) of the news stories told life histories of women who had aborted with misoprostol. The women's ages ranged from 13 to 46 years, and socioeconomic status was associated with different experiences with abortion. Three characters appeared in the women's abortion itineraries: girlfriends (confidantes), go-betweens, and physicians. Stories of late-stage abortion are confused with the criminal characterization of infanticide and provide the extreme cases in the media's narrative on abortion. PMID:21340108

  20. Abortion after deliberate Arthrotec® addition to food. Mass spectrometric detection of diclofenac, misoprostol acid, and their urinary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Watzer, Bernhard; Lusthof, Klaas J; Schweer, Horst

    2015-07-01

    Arthrotec(®) (AT) is a combination of diclofenac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and misoprostol (MP), a synthetic analogue of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1). MP is a lipophilic methyl ester prodrug. It is readily metabolized to the biologically active misoprostol acid (MPA). During the last few years, medical studies exhibited MP to be an excellent abortive. In this paper, we describe a rare criminal case of MP abortion, initiated by the expectant father. After the abortion, samples of vomit and urine were collected. Systemic exposure to MP is difficult to prove, because both MP and the active metabolite MPA are hardly excreted in urine. Therefore, in addition to routine toxicological analysis, we used slightly modified, well-established liquid and gas chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS and GC/MS/MS) methods, for the direct and the indirect detection of MPA and its metabolites. In this case, we were able to demonstrate the presence of the major MP metabolites 2,3-dinor-MPA and 2,3,4,5-tetranor-MPA in the urine of the victim. We also detected paracetamol, 3-methoxyparacetamol and diclofenac-glucuronide in the urine. In the vomit of the victim, we detected diclofenac and MPA. These results, combined with the criminal investigations, showed that the accused had mixed MP into the food of his pregnant girlfriend. Finally, these investigations contributed to a confession of the accused. PMID:25524762

  1. Effect of combined low-dose oral contraceptives on blood viscosity and haematocrit.

    PubMed

    Ishak, R; Loh Chooi Khim

    1991-06-01

    Researchers compared the results of hematocrit and blood viscosity tests of 16 women using a combined oral contraceptive (COC) with 30 mcg ethinyl estradiol/150 mcg desogestrel (group 1), 11 women using a COC with 30 mcg ethinyl estradiol/150 mcg levonorgestrel (group 2), and 16 women who did not use any OCs (control group), all who attended the National Population and Family Development Clinic at the General Hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. They wanted to examine the effects of COCs on blood viscosity, which is inversely related to blood flow, and hematocrit. The women were matched for age. The hematocrit level of women who took the ethinyl estradiol/desogestrel COC was significantly higher than that of the control group (41.5% vs. 37.4%; p.001). On the other hand, the hematocrit level of women who took the ethinyl estradiol/levonorgestrel COC was close to that of the control group (38.5% vs. 37.4%). Even though the mean whole blood viscosity for group 2 was higher than that of group 1 and the control group (6.6 cps vs. 5.5 cps), the difference was insignificant. Yet whole blood viscosity of group 2 at the higher shear rates (46, 115, and 230 per second) was significantly higher than the control group (p.05). The whole blood viscosities of group 1 and the control group did not differ considerably. This supported the theory that hematocrit contributes to blood viscosity. Further these results agreed with those of another study which also showed increased blood viscosity and hematocrit in healthy women taking OCs. Thus thromboembolic events in women taking OCs could be a result of a drop in rate of blood flow which at the lower shear rates could increase red cell aggregation and clotting. In conclusion, health providers could use these indicators to monitor women who have used OCs over a considerable period for thrombotic risks to determine if OC use should continue. PMID:12317443

  2. Ampicillin Oral

    MedlinePLUS

    ... capsule, liquid, and pediatric drops to take by mouth. It is usually taken every 6 hours (four ... blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin), atenolol (Tenormin), oral contraceptives, probenecid (Benemid), rifampin, sulfasalazine, and vitamins.tell ...

  3. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... swallowing A lump in your neck An earache Oral cancer treatments may include surgery, radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Some patients have a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  4. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... oral cancer during regular checkups. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) also make note of unusual or abnormal growths ... examinations and provide referrals to appropriate medical professionals. SLPs are important members of the cancer team. They ...

  5. Constraints on the absorption-dominated model for the X-ray spectrum of MCG-6-30-15

    E-print Network

    Reynolds, Christopher S; Brenneman, Laura W; Miniutti, Giovanni; Uttley, Phil; Gallo, Luigi C

    2009-01-01

    Complexities in the X-ray spectrum of the nearby Seyfert 1.2 galaxy MCG-6-30-15 are commonly interpreted in terms of a broad iron line and the associated Compton reflection hump from the innermost relativistic regions of an accretion disk around a rapidly spinning black hole. However, an alternative model has recently been proposed in which these spectral features are caused entirely by complex (ionized and partial-covering) absorption. By considering the fluorescent emission that must accompany photoelectric absorption, we show that the absorption-dominated model over-predicts the 6.4keV iron line flux unless the marginally Compton-thick absorber responsible for the hard X-ray hump satisfies very restrictive geometric constraints. In the absence of a specific model that both obeys these geometrical constraints and is physically-plausible, the relativistic-reflection model is favoured.

  6. Relativistic Iron K Emission and Absorption in the Seyfert 1.9 Galaxy MCG-05-23-16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braito, V.; Reeves, J. N.; Dewangan, G. C.; George, I.; Griffiths, R.; Markowitz, A.; Nandra, K.; Porquet, D.; Ptak, A.; Turner, T. J.; Yaqoob, T.; Weaver, K.

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of the simultaneous deep XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the bright Seyfert 1.9 galaxy MCG-5-23-16, which is thought to have one of the best known examples of a relativistically broadened iron Kalpha line. We detected a narrow sporadic absorption line at 7.7 keV which appears to be variable on a time-scale of 20 ksec. If associated with FeXXVI this absorption is indicative of a possible variable high ionization, high velocity outflow. The time averaged spectral analysis shows that the iron K-shell complex is best modeled with an unresolved narrow emission component (FWHM less than 5000 kilometers per second, EW approx. 60 eV) plus a broad component. This latter component has FWHM approx. 44000 kilometers per second, an EW approx. 50 eV and its profile is well described with an emission line originating from the accretion disk viewed with an inclination angle approx. 40 deg. and with the emission arising from within a few tens of gravitational radii of the central black hole. The time-resolved spectral analysis of the XMM-Newton EPIC-pn spectrum shows that both the narrow and broad components of the Fe K emission line appear to be constant within the errors. The analysis of the XMM-Newton/RGS spectrum reveals that the soft X-ray emission of MCG-5-23-16 is likely dominated by several emission lines superimposed on an unabsorbed scattered power-law continuum. The lack of strong Fe L shell emission together with the detection of a strong forbidden line in the O VII triplet supports a scenario where the soft X ray emission lines are produced in a plasma photoionized by the nuclear emission.

  7. Sublingual Misoprostol versus Intramuscular Oxytocin for Prevention of Postpartum Hemorrhage in Uganda: A Double-Blind Randomized Non-Inferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    Atukunda, Esther C.; Siedner, Mark J.; Obua, Celestino; Mugyenyi, Godfrey R.; Twagirumukiza, Marc; Agaba, Amon G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a leading cause of maternal death in sub-Saharan Africa. Although the World Health Organization recommends use of oxytocin for prevention of PPH, misoprostol use is increasingly common owing to advantages in shelf life and potential for sublingual administration. There is a lack of data about the comparative efficacy of oxytocin and sublingual misoprostol, particularly at the recommended dose of 600 µg, for prevention of PPH during active management of labor. Methods and Findings We performed a double-blind, double-dummy randomized controlled non-inferiority trial between 23 September 2012 and 9 September 2013 at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital in Uganda. We randomized 1,140 women to receive 600 µg of misoprostol sublingually or 10 IU of oxytocin intramuscularly, along with matching placebos for the treatment they did not receive. Our primary outcome of interest was PPH, defined as measured blood loss ?500 ml within 24 h of delivery. Secondary outcomes included measured blood loss ?1,000 ml; mean measured blood loss at 1, 2, and 24 h after delivery; death; requirement for blood transfusion; hemoglobin changes; and use of additional uterotonics. At 24 h postpartum, primary PPH occurred in 163 (28.6%) participants in the misoprostol group and 99 (17.4%) participants in the oxytocin group (relative risk [RR] 1.64, 95% CI 1.32 to 2.05, p<0.001; absolute risk difference 11.2%, 95% CI 6.44 to 16.1). Severe PPH occurred in 20 (3.6%) and 15 (2.7%) participants in the misoprostol and oxytocin groups, respectively (RR 1.33, 95% CI 0.69 to 2.58, p?=?0.391; absolute risk difference 0.9%, 95% CI ?1.12 to 2.88). Mean measured blood loss was 341.5 ml (standard deviation [SD] 206.2) and 304.2 ml (SD 190.8, p?=?0.002) at 2 h and 484.7 ml (SD 213.3) and 432.8 ml (SD 203.5, p<0.001) at 24 h in the misoprostol and oxytocin groups, respectively. There were no significant differences between the two groups in any other secondary outcomes. Women in the misoprostol group more commonly experienced shivering (RR 1.91, 95% CI 1.65 to 2.21, p<0.001) and fevers (RR 5.20, 95% CI 3.15 to 7.21, p?=?0.005). This study was conducted at a regional referral hospital with capacity for emergency surgery and blood transfusion. High-risk women were excluded from participation. Conclusions Misoprostol 600 µg is inferior to oxytocin 10 IU for prevention of primary PPH in active management of labor. These data support use of oxytocin in settings where it is available. While not powered to do so, the study found no significant differences in rate of severe PPH, need for blood transfusion, postpartum hemoglobin, change in hemoglobin, or use of additional uterotonics between study groups. Further research should focus on clarifying whether and in which sub-populations use of oxytocin would be preferred over sublingual misoprostol. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01866241 Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:25369200

  8. Oral Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening (PDQ®) What is screening? ... are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Key Points Oral cancer is ...

  9. Oral Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®) What is prevention? ... and How to Quit General Information About Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Key Points Oral cavity cancer ...

  10. Oral Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... mouth A lump, rough spot, or other change Pain, tenderness, or numbness anywhere in the mouth or on the lips Problems chewing, swallowing, speaking, or moving the jaw or tongue A change in the way the teeth fit together Thrush. Thrush is also called oral ...

  11. If we can do it for misoprostol, why not for mifepristone? The case for taking mifepristone out of the office in medical abortion.

    PubMed

    Gold, Marji; Chong, Erica

    2015-09-01

    Given the highly political nature of abortion in the United States, the provision of medical abortion with mifepristone (Mifeprex®) and misoprostol has always occurred under a unique set of circumstances. The Food and Drug Administration-approved regimen requires clinicians to administer the mifepristone in the office and also requires women to return to the office for the misoprostol. In the US, where off-label drug use is an accepted practice when supportive evidence exists, most clinicians give women the misoprostol at the initial visit for her to take at home, eliminating an unnecessary visit to the office. This commentary suggests that, based on current studies, there is also enough evidence to offer women the option to self-administer mifepristone out of the office and that this is just another feature of off-label use. Six studies, enrolling over 1800 women, found that the option of taking mifepristone out of the office was popular and acceptable among women and providers. Given that it is safe, highly acceptable and not burdensome on providers, outside-office-use of mifepristone should be offered to all women as part of routine medical abortion services. PMID:26093187

  12. Oral calcitonin.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, Ronald C; Daley, Dane N

    2012-01-01

    Calcitonin is a hormone secreted by the C-cells of the thyroid gland in response to elevations of the plasma calcium level. It reduces bone resorption by inhibiting mature active osteoclasts and increases renal calcium excretion. It is used in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis, Paget's disease of bone, and malignancy-associated hypercalcemia. Synthetic and recombinant calcitonin preparations are available; both have similar pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. As calcitonin is a peptide, the traditional method of administration has been parenteral or intranasal. This hinders its clinical use: adherence with therapy is notoriously low, and withdrawal from clinical trials has been problematic. An oral formulation would be more attractive, practical, and convenient to patients. In addition to its effect on active osteoclasts and renal tubules, calcitonin has an analgesic action, possibly mediated through ?-endorphins and the central modulation of pain perception. It also exerts a protective action on cartilage and may be useful in the management of osteoarthritis and possibly rheumatoid arthritis. Oral formulations of calcitonin have been developed using different techniques. The most studied involves drug-delivery carriers such as Eligen(®) 8-(N-2hydroxy-5-chloro-benzoyl)-amino-caprylic acid (5-CNAC) (Emisphere Technologies, Cedar Knolls, NJ). Several factors affect the bioavailability and efficacy of orally administered calcitonin, including amount of water used to take the tablet, time of day the tablet is taken, and proximity to intake of a meal. Preliminary results looked promising. Unfortunately, in two Phase III studies, oral calcitonin (0.8 mg with 200 mg 5-CNAC, once a day for postmenopausal osteoporosis and twice a day for osteoarthritis) failed to meet key end points, and in December 2011, Novartis Pharma AG announced that it would not pursue further clinical development of oral calcitonin for postmenopausal osteoporosis or osteoarthritis. A unique feature of calcitonin is that it is able to uncouple bone turnover, reducing bone resorption without affecting bone formation and therefore increasing bone mass and improving bone quality. This effect, however, may be dose-dependent, with higher doses inhibiting both resorption and formation. Because so many factors affect the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of calcitonin, especially orally administered calcitonin, much work remains to be done to explore the full pharmacologic spectrum and potential of calcitonin and determine the optimum dose and timing of administration, as well as water and food intake. PMID:23071417

  13. The Broadband Spectral Variability of MCG-6-30-15 Observed by Nustar and XMM-NEWTON

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marinucci, A.; Matt, G.; Miniutti, G.; Guainazzi, M.; Parker, M. L.; Brenneman, L.; Fabian, A. C.; Kara, E.; Arevalo, P.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Boggs, S. E.; Cappi, M.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Elvis, M.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Reynolds, C. S.; Risaliti, G.; Stern, D. K; Walton, D. J.; Zhang, W.

    2014-01-01

    MCG-6-30-15, at a distance of 37 Mpc (z = 0.008), is the archetypical Seyfert 1 galaxy showing very broad Fe K(alpha) emission. We present results from a joint NuSTAR and XMM-Newton observational campaign that, for the first time, allows a sensitive, time-resolved spectral analysis from 0.35 keV up to 80 keV. The strong variability of the source is best explained in terms of intrinsic X-ray flux variations and in the context of the light-bending model: the primary, variable emission is reprocessed by the accretion disk, which produces secondary, less variable, reflected emission. The broad Fe K(alpha) profile is, as usual for this source, well explained by relativistic effects occurring in the innermost regions of the accretion disk around a rapidly rotating black hole. We also discuss the alternative model in which the broadening of the Fe K(alpha) is due to the complex nature of the circumnuclear absorbing structure. Even if this model cannot be ruled out, it is disfavored on statistical grounds.We also detected an occultation event likely caused by broad-line region clouds crossing the line of sight.

  14. The broadband spectral variability of MCG–6-30-15 observed by nuSTAR and XMM-Newton

    SciTech Connect

    Marinucci, A.; Matt, G.; Miniutti, G.; Guainazzi, M.; Parker, M. L.; Fabian, A. C.; Kara, E.; Brenneman, L.; Elvis, M.; Risaliti, G.; Arevalo, P.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Boggs, S. E.; Cappi, M.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Reynolds, C. S.; Stern, D. K.; and others

    2014-05-20

    MCG–6-30-15, at a distance of 37 Mpc (z = 0.008), is the archetypical Seyfert 1 galaxy showing very broad Fe K? emission. We present results from a joint NuSTAR and XMM-Newton observational campaign that, for the first time, allows a sensitive, time-resolved spectral analysis from 0.35 keV up to 80 keV. The strong variability of the source is best explained in terms of intrinsic X-ray flux variations and in the context of the light-bending model: the primary, variable emission is reprocessed by the accretion disk, which produces secondary, less variable, reflected emission. The broad Fe K? profile is, as usual for this source, well explained by relativistic effects occurring in the innermost regions of the accretion disk around a rapidly rotating black hole. We also discuss the alternative model in which the broadening of the Fe K? is due to the complex nature of the circumnuclear absorbing structure. Even if this model cannot be ruled out, it is disfavored on statistical grounds. We also detected an occultation event likely caused by broad-line region clouds crossing the line of sight.

  15. Oral dirofilariasis.

    PubMed

    Desai, R S; Pai, N; Nehete, A P; Singh, J S

    2015-01-01

    Dirofilaria is parasitic nematodes of domestic and wild animals that can infect humans accidentally via vectors. Its occurrence in the oral cavity is extremely rare. The most frequent presentation of human dirofilariasis is a single submucosal nodule without signs of inflammation. We hereby, report a case of human dirofilariasis affecting the buccal mucosa in a 32-year-old farmer caused by D. repens. PMID:26470974

  16. Oral Sex, Oral Health and Orogenital Infections

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Rajiv; Saini, Santosh; Sharma, Sugandha

    2010-01-01

    Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active male-female and same-gender couples of various ages, including adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus and analingus. Oral sex is infrequently examined in research on adolescents; oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital pathogens. Oral health has a direct impact on the transmission of infection; a cut in your mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of infection. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection and safer sex precautions. There are various methods of preventing infection during oral sex such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues and oral hygiene and dental issues. The lesions or unhealthy periodontal status of oral cavity accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex. PMID:20300419

  17. Oral Contraceptives and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePLUS

    ... endometrial cancer risk? How do oral contraceptives affect cervical cancer risk? How do oral contraceptives affect liver cancer ... oral contraceptives ( 11 ). How do oral contraceptives affect cervical cancer risk? Long-term use of oral contraceptives (5 ...

  18. DISCOVERY OF Fe K{alpha} X-RAY REVERBERATION AROUND THE BLACK HOLES IN MCG-5-23-16 AND NGC 7314

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, A.; Reynolds, C.; Cackett, E. M.; Miniutti, G.; Kara, E.; Fabian, A. C.

    2013-04-20

    Several X-ray observations have recently revealed the presence of reverberation time delays between spectral components in active galactic nuclei. Most of the observed lags are between the power-law Comptonization component, seen directly, and the soft excess produced by reflection in the vicinity of the black hole. NGC 4151 was the first object to show these lags in the iron K band. Here, we report the discovery of reverberation lags in the Fe K band in two other sources: MCG-5-23-16 and NGC 7314. In both objects, the 6-7 keV band, where the Fe K{alpha} line peaks, lags the bands at lower and higher energies with a time delay of {approx}1 ks. These lags are unlikely to be due to the narrow Fe K{alpha} line. They are fully consistent with reverberation of the relativistically broadened iron K{alpha} line. The measured lags, their time scale, and spectral modeling indicate that most of the radiation is emitted at {approx}5 and 24 gravitational radii for MCG-5-23-16 and NGC 7314, respectively.

  19. Study of rigevidon for oral contraception in a family planning clinic in Kota Bahru, Kelantan.

    PubMed

    Ang Eng Suan; Karim, H A

    1990-06-01

    A clinical trial was carried out in Kota Bahru to study the acceptability and effectiveness of the 30 mg ethinylestradiol (EE) and 150 mcg levonorgestrel (LNG) oral contraceptive formulation in a new packaging offered as Rigevidon (R). The 30/50 mcg EE/LNG pill is available in the National Family Planning Program in Malaysia since the mid-1970's as Nordetter (R) and Microgynon 30 (R). A total of 87 women entered the study in 1988 and were followed up for a period of 1 year; however, only 83 cases were used in the analysis. 96.4% of the selected women were Malays, 2.4% were Indians, and 1.2% were Chinese. Additional characteristics include a mean age of 28, 74.7% had 6 years of formal education, and an average parity of 2.8 children with 50.6% having 1-2 children and 12% having 5 or more children. During the last 3 months, 47% of the acceptors had used the oral contraceptive pills previously and 41% had not used any contraceptive methods. 81.9% of the acceptors were using the methods for birth spacing. This small study showed that Rigevidon (R) is an effective and safe oral contraceptive. The gross cumulative continuation rate was 89.5 at 3 months, 86.7 at 6 months, 74.8 at 9 months, and 71.3 at 12 months. Reasons for termination include medical reasons (n=12) such as weight increase, dysmenorrhea, nausea, and headache and personal (n=8) reasons. The most frequently reported side effects include nausea, dizziness, and headache; however, there was a decrease in reported complaints by the end of the 8th month. It was observed that the amount of menstrual flow decreased significantly and complaints of dysmenorrhea reduced from 24.1% to 4.2% at 8 months. The acceptability of this method is high and comparable to the other low dose preparations utilized in the National Program; the continuation rate/100 women for Rigevidon was 74.8 after 9 months of use compared to Gestoden's continuation rate of 72.2. This preparation widens the number of low dose formulation (30 mcg estrogen pills) available to our women in their choice for family planning. (author's modified). PMID:12316342

  20. Nicotine Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePLUS

    Nicotine oral inhalation is used to help people stop smoking. Nicotine oral inhalation should be used together with a ... support groups, counseling, or specific behavioral change techniques. Nicotine inhalation is in a class of medications called ...

  1. Observations of MCG-5-23-16 with Suzaku, XMM-Newton and NuSTAR: Disk tomography and compton hump reverberation

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, A.; Reynolds, C.; Lohfink, A.; Cackett, E. M.; Kara, E.; Fabian, A. C.; Harrison, F. A.; Balokovic, M.; Matt, G.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W.; Christensen, F. E.; Hailey, C. J.; Stern, D.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-07-01

    MCG-5-23-16 is one of the first active galactic nuclei (AGNs) where relativistic reverberation in the iron K line originating in the vicinity of the supermassive black hole was found, based on a short XMM-Newton observation. In this work, we present the results from long X-ray observations using Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and NuSTAR designed to map the emission region using X-ray reverberation. A relativistic iron line is detected in the lag spectra on three different timescales, allowing the emission from different regions around the black hole to be separated. Using NuSTAR coverage of energies above 10 keV reveals a lag between these energies and the primary continuum, which is detected for the first time in an AGN. This lag is a result of the Compton reflection hump responding to changes in the primary source in a manner similar to the response of the relativistic iron K line.

  2. Observations of MCG-5-23-16 with Suzaku, XMM-Newton and NuSTAR: Disk Tomography and Compton Hump Reverberation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoghbi, A.; Cackett, E. M.; Reynolds, C.; Kara, E.; Harrison, F. A.; Fabian, A. C.; Lohfink, A.; Matt, G.; Stern, D.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-01-01

    MCG-5-23-16 is one of the first active galactic nuclei (AGNs) where relativistic reverberation in the iron K line originating in the vicinity of the supermassive black hole was found, based on a short XMM-Newton observation. In this work, we present the results from long X-ray observations using Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and NuSTAR designed to map the emission region using X-ray reverberation. A relativistic iron line is detected in the lag spectra on three different timescales, allowing the emission from different regions around the black hole to be separated. Using NuSTAR coverage of energies above 10 keV reveals a lag between these energies and the primary continuum, which is detected for the first time in an AGN. This lag is a result of the Compton reflection hump responding to changes in the primary source in a manner similar to the response of the relativistic iron K line.

  3. Coronal Properties of the Seyfert 1.9 Galaxy MCG-05-23-016 Determined from Hard X-Ray Spectroscopy with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balokovi?, M.; Matt, G.; Harrison, F. A.; Zoghbi, A.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Esmerian, C. J.; Fabian, A. C.; Fürst, F.; Hailey, C. J.; Marinucci, A.; Parker, M. L.; Reynolds, C. S.; Stern, D.; Walton, D. J.; Zhang, W. W.

    2015-02-01

    Measurements of the high-energy cut-off in the coronal continuum of active galactic nuclei have long been elusive for all but a small number of the brightest examples. We present a direct measurement of the cut-off energy in the nuclear continuum of the nearby Seyfert 1.9 galaxy MCG-05-23-016 with unprecedented precision. The high sensitivity of NuSTAR up to 79 keV allows us to clearly disentangle the spectral curvature of the primary continuum from that of its reflection component. Using a simple phenomenological model for the hard X-ray spectrum, we constrain the cut-off energy to 116-5+6 keV with 90% confidence. Testing for more complex models and nuisance parameters that could potentially influence the measurement, we find that the cut-off is detected robustly. We further use simple Comptonized plasma models to provide independent constraints for both the kinetic temperature of the electrons in the corona and its optical depth. At the 90% confidence level, we find kTe = 29 ± 2 keV and ? e = 1.23 ± 0.08 assuming a slab (disk-like) geometry, and kTe = 25 ± 2 keV and ? e = 3.5 ± 0.2 assuming a spherical geometry. Both geometries are found to fit the data equally well and their two principal physical parameters are correlated in both cases. With the optical depth in the ? e >~ 1 regime, the data are pushing the currently available theoretical models of the Comptonized plasma to the limits of their validity. Since the spectral features and variability arising from the inner accretion disk have been observed previously in MCG-05-23-016, the inferred high optical depth implies that a spherical or disk-like corona cannot be homogeneous.

  4. CORONAL PROPERTIES OF THE SEYFERT 1.9 GALAXY MCG-05-23-016 DETERMINED FROM HARD X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY WITH NuSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Balokovi?, M.; Harrison, F. A.; Esmerian, C. J.; Fürst, F.; Walton, D. J.; Matt, G.; Marinucci, A.; Zoghbi, A.; Reynolds, C. S.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Christensen, F. E.; Fabian, A. C.; Parker, M. L.; Hailey, C. J.; Stern, D.; Zhang, W. W.

    2015-02-10

    Measurements of the high-energy cut-off in the coronal continuum of active galactic nuclei have long been elusive for all but a small number of the brightest examples. We present a direct measurement of the cut-off energy in the nuclear continuum of the nearby Seyfert 1.9 galaxy MCG-05-23-016 with unprecedented precision. The high sensitivity of NuSTAR up to 79 keV allows us to clearly disentangle the spectral curvature of the primary continuum from that of its reflection component. Using a simple phenomenological model for the hard X-ray spectrum, we constrain the cut-off energy to 116{sub ?5}{sup +6} keV with 90% confidence. Testing for more complex models and nuisance parameters that could potentially influence the measurement, we find that the cut-off is detected robustly. We further use simple Comptonized plasma models to provide independent constraints for both the kinetic temperature of the electrons in the corona and its optical depth. At the 90% confidence level, we find kT{sub e} = 29 ± 2 keV and ? {sub e} = 1.23 ± 0.08 assuming a slab (disk-like) geometry, and kT{sub e} = 25 ± 2 keV and ? {sub e} = 3.5 ± 0.2 assuming a spherical geometry. Both geometries are found to fit the data equally well and their two principal physical parameters are correlated in both cases. With the optical depth in the ? {sub e} ? 1 regime, the data are pushing the currently available theoretical models of the Comptonized plasma to the limits of their validity. Since the spectral features and variability arising from the inner accretion disk have been observed previously in MCG-05-23-016, the inferred high optical depth implies that a spherical or disk-like corona cannot be homogeneous.

  5. DNA METHYLTRANSFERASE 1 is involved in (m)CG and (m)CCG DNA methylation and is essential for sporophyte development in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Yaari, Rafael; Noy-Malka, Chen; Wiedemann, Gertrud; Auerbach Gershovitz, Nitzan; Reski, Ralf; Katz, Aviva; Ohad, Nir

    2015-07-01

    DNA methylation has a crucial role in plant development regulating gene expression and silencing of transposable elements. Maintenance DNA methylation in plants occurs at symmetrical (m)CG and (m)CHG contexts ((m) = methylated) and is maintained by DNA METHYLTRANSFERASE 1 (MET1) and CHROMOMETHYLASE (CMT) DNA methyltransferase protein families, respectively. While angiosperm genomes encode for several members of MET1 and CMT families, the moss Physcomitrella patens, serving as a model for early divergent land plants, carries a single member of each family. To determine the function of P. patens PpMET we generated ?Ppmet deletion mutant which lost (m)CG and unexpectedly (m)CCG methylation at loci tested. In order to evaluate the extent of (m)CCG methylation by MET1, we reexamined the Arabidopsis thaliana Atmet1 mutant methylome and found a similar pattern of methylation loss, suggesting that maintenance of DNA methylation by MET1 is conserved through land plant evolution. While ?Ppmet displayed no phenotypic alterations during its gametophytic phase, it failed to develop sporophytes, indicating that PpMET plays a role in gametogenesis or early sporophyte development. Expression array analysis revealed that the deletion of PpMET resulted in upregulation of two genes and multiple repetitive sequences. In parallel, expression analysis of the previously reported ?Ppcmt mutant showed that lack of PpCMT triggers overexpression of genes. This overexpression combined with loss of (m)CHG and its pleiotropic phenotype, implies that PpCMT has an essential evolutionary conserved role in the epigenetic control of gene expression. Collectively, our results suggest functional conservation of MET1 and CMT families during land plant evolution. A model describing the relationship between MET1 and CMT in CCG methylation is presented. PMID:25944663

  6. Essentials of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators. PMID:26617944

  7. Effect of the oral contraceptive pill on protein S and antithrombin-III levels in Malaysian women.

    PubMed

    Wong, K K; Ng, S C; Koong, P L

    Studies focusing on the relationship between oral contraceptive (OC) usage and occurrence of thromboembolism have been conducted for over 3 decades. Those studies centered on the effects OC use has on blood proteins and on measurable physiological changes that occurred in women with venous thrombosis. This article reports the findings of a study that investigated the effects of OC use on the levels of the anticoagulants antithrombin-III (AT-III), protein C (PC), and protein S (PS) in a group of Asian women. Previous studies had mostly been based on Caucasian women. Of the 21 women studied, 16 were Malaysian, 3 were Chinese, and 2 were Indian. Low-dose OCs containing 30 mcg of ethinyl estradiol and 150 mcg of either desogestrel or levonorgestrel were used. Blood was tested before OC use and 3 and 6 months after starting OC use. Levels of AT-III and PS were measured using the Laurell rocket immunoelectrophoresis technique. Statistical analysis was performed using the paired Student's t-test and an analysis of variance test. No statistically significant differences were found for the mean levels of AT-III and total PS when comparing the pre-OC with the 3- and 6-month post-OC values. Earlier studies based mostly on Caucasian women have reported lower levels of both total PS and free PS in OC users. PMID:12288974

  8. Effect of oral glucose on serum zinc in the elderly

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.L.; Kohrs, M.B.; Horwitz, D.L.; Cyborski, C.K.; Czajka-Narins, D.M.; Kamath, S.

    1986-03-05

    To determine the effect of glucose loading on serum zinc concentrations, 34 elderly subjects aged 60-86 y were studied. Anthropometric data, medical and dietary histories were obtained. Serum zinc and glucose concentrations were obtained fasting and 1/2, 1, 1 1/2, 2 and 3 h after 75 g oral glucose load; glycohemoglobin and fasting serum lipids were also determined. For comparison, the subjects were categorized as: normal or low serum zinc concentrations; normal or high body mass index BMI; normal or high sum of skinfolds and normal or high serum cholesterol. Results showed that low serum zinc concentrations increased significantly over baseline values after the glucose load and did not return to fasting levels. On the other hand, mean serum zinc concentrations significantly declined without recovery for those with normal zinc values. For the total group, no significant differences were noted between fasting values and subsequent time periods. No correlations were noted between fasting serum zinc and area under the curve for zinc except in the high BMI group (positive correlation observed). For the high BMI group, fasting serum zinc differed significantly from the succeeding measurements except for 30 min. For the group as a whole, mean serum zinc concentration was within normal limits (76.9 +/- 2.8 mcg/ml): mean zinc intake was less than 2/3rds the RDA. They conclude that glucose ingestion may alter serum zinc and should be considered in interpreting these levels.

  9. Allison Oral History

    E-print Network

    Albin, Tami; Allison

    2014-03-13

    Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer People in Kansas Allison Oral History Interviewed by Tami Albin August 23, 2009 http://hdl.handle.net/1808.../13171 This interview was made possible by the generous support of the University of Kansas Libraries and the University of Kansas grants 2302114, 2301283, 2301334. © Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer...

  10. Mechanisms of Oral Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Commins, Scott P

    2015-12-01

    Oral tolerance is an active process of local and systemic immune unresponsiveness to orally ingested antigens such as food. The gut immune system must balance responses to commensal bacteria (microbiome), innocuous antigens, and pathogens. Although it is clear that specialized populations of immune cells and lymph nodes create a unique environment in the gut, there remains evidence to suggest that systemic effector sites also are critical to establishing and maintaining oral tolerance. PMID:26456448

  11. George Paris Oral History

    E-print Network

    Paris, George; Albin, Tami

    2010-01-11

    Histories of GLBTQ People in Kansas George Paris Oral History Part 1 video platform video management video solutionsvideo player Part 2 video platform video management video solutionsvideo player Part 3 video platform video management video... platform video management video solutionsvideo player Return to George Paris's Oral History in KU ScholarWorks Tami Albin, Director for Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of GLBTQ People in Kansas Anschutz Library University of Kansas 1301 Hoch...

  12. [Oral precancer and cancer].

    PubMed

    López-López, José; Omaña-Cepeda, Carlos; Jané-Salas, Enric

    2015-11-01

    We reviewed the concept of oral precancerous lesions, oral cancer, and the possibility of early diagnosis. With the keywords: premalignant oral lesions prevention, a search was performed over the past 10 years. Also clinical trials are searched from January 2011 until today with the keywords: oral cancer prevention AND dentistry. It is emphasized that there can be no significant changes related to the concept of precancerous lesions and cancer, and those relating to the early diagnosis. Despite the numerous described methods of screening, biopsy remains the most useful test, and therefore it is essential, mainly if we consider the new possibilities of molecular studies. PMID:25638423

  13. Anti-inflammatory effects of salmeterol/fluticasone propionate 50/250 mcg combination therapy in Japanese patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Kazuhisa; Kobayashi, Akihiro; Makihara, Yukio; Johnson, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Using sputum neutrophils as the primary measure, and other inflammation biomarkers, this study evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of the combination salmeterol 50 mcg and fluticasone propionate 250 mcg (SFC 250) in Japanese patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Patients and methods Patients were treated in a randomized, double-blind, parallel group, placebo-controlled trial with SFC 250 twice daily (n=26) or placebo (n=26) for 12 weeks. At the start and end of treatment, inflammation biomarkers (sputum and serum), lung function, and health status (COPD Assessment Test [CAT] questionnaire) were measured. Results Although a numerical decrease in differential neutrophil count was observed from baseline, SFC 250 did not significantly reduce sputum neutrophils compared with placebo, nor were there significant changes from baseline in the other biomarkers (sputum or serum), lung function, or CAT, versus placebo. Squamous epithelial cell contamination in some sputum samples rendered them unacceptable for analysis, which reduced the sample size to n=19 (SFC 250) and n=10 (placebo). However, inclusion of contaminated samples did not affect the overall trend of the outcome. Ad hoc bootstrap statistical analysis showed a 27.9% (SFC 250) and 1.3% (placebo) decrease in sputum neutrophils. Sputum IL-8 decreased by 43.2% after SFC 250 but increased by 48.3% with placebo. Responder analyses showed 42% of patients had ?20% decrease in neutrophils from baseline; and 47% of patients had a ?200 pg/mL change in sputum IL-8 following SFC 250 versus 20% after placebo; both changes are considered clinically relevant. Conclusion This study provides additional information about inflammation in Japanese COPD patients and is the first to study the anti-inflammatory effects of SFC 250 in this context and population. In the primary analysis, SFC 250 did not produce significant changes from baseline in sputum neutrophil levels or other sputum or serum inflammatory markers compared with placebo. Secondary ad hoc statistical analysis showed that SFC 250 reduced the number of sputum neutrophils and IL-8 compared with placebo. PMID:25945045

  14. Effects of oral montelukast on airway function in acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Cýllý, A; Kara, A; Ozdemir, T; O?ü?, C; Gülkesen, K H

    2003-05-01

    Montelukast, a specific cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonist, has been shown to improve pulmonary function within 1 h of ingestion. This study was undertaken to compare the effects on peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) of oral montelukast added to intravenous steroid, intravenous steroid alone and placebo during the 24 h period following administration. Seventy asthmatic patients (FEV1 40-80% predicted and > or = 15% improvement after inhaled beta agonist) were enrolled in a single blind study to receive oral montelukast (10 mg) plus intravenous prednisolone (1 mg/kg), intravenous prednisolone (1 mg/kg) or placebo in a randomised fashion. The patients received one ofthe above three groups of medication before any other treatments. This was immediately followed by the aerosol treatments of 100 mcg of terbutaline sulphate divided into three doses during 1 h as described in the consensus statement. Thereafter, patients were observed for 24 h to document the effects on PEFR, Borg dyspnoea score and need for rescue medication. The primary end point was percentage change at different time points. Secondary end points were Borg dyspnoea score and use of rescue medication. Compared with placebo, montelukast added to the prednisolone group and the prednisolone alone group had significant percentage change from baseline in PEFR in the entire 24 h period (P<0.05). The difference in PEFR between montelukast plus prednisolone group and prednisolone group favoured the montelukast plus prednisolone group but did not reach statistical significance. Furthermore, montelukast plus prednisolone group required less inhaled short-acting beta agonistthan other two groups. The results of this study indicate that adding montelukast to steroid in acute asthma may have some additive improvement in lung functions. PMID:12735671

  15. Sarcoidosis: Oral and extra-oral manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sanjay; Tripathi, Amitandra Kumar; Kumar, Vivek; Saimbi, Charanjit Singh

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease, which is usually associated with the formation of noncaseating granulomas in affected tissues and organs. It is mostly present with bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, pulmonary infiltration, ocular, and cutaneous lesions. Oral manifestations of this disease are relatively rare. The present case report shows a 40-year-old male with lesions in the soft tissue of oral cavity (buccal mucosa, gingiva, and palate) and a diagnosis of sarcoidosis was established following hematological, biochemical and pulmonary function tests, chest radiograph, and histopathological investigation.

  16. Tongue piercing (oral body art).

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Chen, M

    1994-02-01

    Oral body art is a relatively recent fashion in the West where jewelry is inserted in the oral soft tissues. A patient who had tongue-piercing is presented, and the subject of oral piercing reviewed. PMID:8136338

  17. American Academy of Oral Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 5, 2016 AAOM: Representing the Discipline of Oral Medicine Oral Medicine is the discipline of dentistry concerned with the ... offers credentialing, resources and professional community for oral medicine practitioners. Our membership provides care to thousands We ...

  18. Thrush (Oral Candidiasis) in Children

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A A A In oral candidiasis, normal mouth yeast overgrows, causing white, slightly elevated lesions. Overview Thrush ( ... candidiasis), also known as oral moniliasis, is a yeast infection of the mouth or throat (the oral ...

  19. Oral Melanotic Macule

    MedlinePLUS

    ... oral melanotic macule appears as a solitary, flat, tan-to-dark-brown spot usually less than 7 mm in diameter. It has a well-defined border and a uniform color. People can have more than one oral melanotic macule. Self-Care Guidelines There are no self-care measures ...

  20. Literatura Oral Hispanica (Hispanic Oral Literature).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlpine, Dave

    As part of a class in Hispanic Oral Literature, students collected pieces of folklore from various Hispanic residents in the region known as "Siouxland" in Iowa. Consisting of some of the folklore recorded from the residents, this paper includes 18 "cuentos y leyendas" (tales and legends), 48 "refranes" (proverbs), 17 "chistes" (jokes), 1…

  1. Use of Simulated Patients to Evaluate Combined Oral Contraceptive Dispensing Practices of Community Pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Obreli-Neto, Paulo Roque; Pereira, Leonardo Régis Leira; Guidoni, Camilo Molino; Baldoni, André de Oliveira; Marusic, Srecko; de Lyra-Júnior, Divaldo Pereira; de Almeida, Kelsen Luis; Pazete, Ana Claudia Montolezi; do Nascimento, Janaina Dutra; Kos, Mitja; Girotto, Edmarlon; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2013-01-01

    Background Combined oral contraceptive (COC) use is the most commonly used reversible method of birth control. The incorrect use of COCs is frequent and one of the most common causes of unintended pregnancies. Community pharmacists (CPs) are in a strategic position to improve COC use because they are the last health professional to interact with patients before drug use. Objective To evaluate the COC dispensing practices of CPs in a developing country. Method A cross-sectional study was conducted in community pharmacies of Assis and Ourinhos microregions, Brazil, between June 1, 2012, and October 30, 2012. Four simulated patients (SPs) (with counseled audio recording) visited community pharmacies with a prescription for Ciclo 21® (a COC containing ethinyl estradiol 30 mcg + levonorgestrel 15 mcg). The audio recording of every SP visit was listened to independently by 3 researchers to evaluate the COC dispensing practice. The percentage of CPs who performed a screening for safe use of COCs (i.e., taking of patients’ medical and family history, and measuring of blood pressure) and provided counseling, as well as the quality of the screening and counseling, were evaluated. Results Of the 185 CPs contacted, 41 (22.2%) agreed to participate in the study and finished the study protocol. Only 3 CPs asked the SP a question (1 question asked by each professional), and all of the questions were closed-ended, viz., “do you smoke?” (n = 2) and “what is your age?” (n = 1). None of the CPs measured the patient’s blood pressure. Six CPs provided counseling when dispensing COCs (drug dosing, 5 CPs; possible adverse effects, 2 CPs), and one CP provided counseling regarding both aspects. Conclusion The CPs evaluated did not dispense COC appropriately and could influence in the occurrence of negatives therapeutic outcomes such as adverse effects and treatment failure. PMID:24324584

  2. What Are Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? What are oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? Oral cavity cancer, or just ... parts of the mouth and throat. The oral cavity (mouth) and oropharynx (throat) The oral cavity includes ...

  3. Oral Chemotherapy: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePLUS

    Oral Chemotherapy: What You Need to Know Oral chemo is any drug you take by mouth to treat cancer. ... be ready for oral chemo. What is oral chemotherapy? There are many types of chemotherapy (chemo). Oral ...

  4. Stuttering and oral stereognosis.

    PubMed

    Martin, R R; Lawrence, B A; Haroldson, S K; Gunderson, D

    1981-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate oral stereognostic performance of stutterers. In Exp. I, stutterers and controls responded "same"--"different" to two oral forms placed successively on their tongues. In Exp. II, stutterers and controls underwent two procedures. For half the items, the task was the same as in Exp. I; for the other half, subjects were presented a single form and visually identified that form from among others on a placard. In both experiments, stutterers made significantly more oral stereognostic errors than did their matched controls. PMID:7290864

  5. Oral sex and oral health: An enigma in itself

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Tarun; Puri, Gagan; Aravinda, Konidena; Arora, Neha; Patil, Deepa; Gupta, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active couples of various age groups, including male-female and same-gender adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus, and analingus. Oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital infections from one site in body to the other. Oral health has a direct correlation on the transmission of infection; a cut in the mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of life-threatening infections. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues, and oral hygiene and dental issues. The ulcerations or unhealthy periodontium in mouth accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus, consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex. PMID:26692602

  6. Oral Communications: Survey and Suggestions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyllie, James

    1980-01-01

    Argues that oral communication is important in business but is rarely taught in business communication courses. Provides five suggestions to teachers of oral communication: teach organization, teach different types of oral communication, offer training in the use of visual aids, use cassettes or videotape, and stress functional oral communication.…

  7. David Nelson Oral History

    E-print Network

    Nelson, David; Gadd-Nelson, Rachel

    2009-10-31

    Oral history interview with David Nelson conducted by Rachel Gadd-Nelson in Kansas City, Kansas, on October 31, 2009. In this interview, David Nelson discusses his journey from his childhood experiences in the Swedish Lutheran church in Burdick...

  8. Glenn Lindell Oral History

    E-print Network

    Lindell, Glenn; Caton, Jeffrey

    2009-10-24

    Oral history interview with Glenn Lindell conducted by Jeffrey Caton in Johnson County, Kansas, on October 24, 2009. In this interview, Glen Lindell, pastor emeritus of the Hillcrest Covenant Church in Prairie Village, Kansas, discusses his training...

  9. Brandon Brillhart Oral History

    E-print Network

    Brillhart, Brandon; Stratton, Emily

    2013-07-18

    Oral history interview with Brandon Brillhart conducted by Emily Stratton in Lawrence, Kansas, on July 18, 2013. This interview features Brandon Brillhart, the founder and lead pastor of Relevate Church. Relevate Church was planted in Lawrence...

  10. Jan Helmer Oral History

    E-print Network

    Helmer, Jan; Helmer, Lauren

    2010-12-29

    Oral history interview with Jan Helmer conducted by Lauren Helmer in Marion, Kansas, on December 29, 2010. In this interview, Jan Helmer discusses her recollections of attending Valley Methodist Church in Marion, Kansas, including youth group...

  11. Molly Marshall Oral History

    E-print Network

    Marshall, Molly; Hobson, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Oral history interview with Molly Marshall conducted by Katie Hobson on July 02, 2015. This interview features the president at Central Baptist Theological Seminary in Shawnee, Kansas. Questions address President Marshall's experiences...

  12. Kansas Lawsonians Oral History

    E-print Network

    Mook, John; Mook, Paula; Hunergaaurd, George; Reeve, Jamie

    2009-12-08

    Oral history interview with John and Paula Mook and George Hunergaaurd conducted by Jamie Reeve in Wichita, Kansas, on December 8, 2009. In this interview, John and Paul Mook and George Hunergaaurd discuss the biography of Alfred Lawson, the history...

  13. Flunisolide Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePLUS

    Flunisolide oral inhalation is used to prevent difficulty breathing, chest tightness, wheezing, and coughing caused by asthma in adults ... Flunisolide comes as an aerosol to inhale by mouth. It usually is inhaled twice daily. Try to ...

  14. Beclomethasone Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePLUS

    Beclomethasone comes as an aerosol to inhale by mouth using an inhaler. It usually is inhaled twice ... doctor about how you should use your other oral and inhaled medications for asthma during your treatment ...

  15. Pentobarbital Oral and Rectal

    MedlinePLUS

    ... as a capsule and liquid to take by mouth and as a suppository to be used rectally. ... Grisactin), medications for depression or seizures, metronidazole (Flagyl), oral contraceptives, propranolol (Inderal), quinidine, rifampin, sedatives, sleeping pills, ...

  16. Ciclesonide Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePLUS

    Ciclesonide oral inhalation is used to prevent difficulty breathing, chest tightness, wheezing, and coughing caused by asthma in adults ... Ciclesonide comes as an aerosol to inhale by mouth using an inhaler. Ciclesonide is usually inhaled twice ...

  17. Leona Anderson Oral History

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Leona; Gadd-Nelson, Rachel

    2009-09-18

    Oral history interview with Leona Anderson conducted by Rachel Gadd-Nelson in Burdick, Kansas, on September 18, 2009. In this interview, Leona Anderson discusses her experiences as a member of the Missouri Synod Lutheran ...

  18. Joseph Luben Oral History

    E-print Network

    Luben, Joseph; Manning, Sean

    2009-11-05

    Oral history interview with Joseph Luben conducted by Sean Manning in Overland Park, Kansas, on November 5, 2009. In this interview, Joseph Luben discusses being raised with both Pentecostal and Jewish influences in Galena, Kansas. He also describes...

  19. Oral Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in the rate of occurrence of oral and oropharyngeal cancers. There are two distinct pathways by which most ... If you add the sub category of laryngeal throat cancers, the rates of occurrence (about 12,000 additional ...

  20. Gene Carlson Oral History

    E-print Network

    Carlson, Gene; Shriner, Clint

    2009-12-10

    Oral history interview with Gene Carlson conducted by Clint Shriner on December 10, 2009. In this interview, Gene Carlson, lead pastor at Westlink Christian Church, discusses the formative experiences that resulted in his decision to join...

  1. Oral pigmentation: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sreeja, C.; Ramakrishnan, K.; Vijayalakshmi, D.; Devi, M.; Aesha, I.; Vijayabanu, B.

    2015-01-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations. PMID:26538887

  2. Oral vs. salivary diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Joana; Corby, Patricia M.; Barber, Cheryl A.; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    The field of "salivary diagnostics" includes studies utilizing samples obtained from a variety of sources within the oral cavity. These samples include; whole unstimulated saliva, stimulated whole saliva, duct saliva collected directly from the parotid, submandibular/sublingual glands or minor salivary glands, swabs of the buccal mucosa, tongue or tonsils, and gingival crevicular fluid. Many publications state "we collected saliva from subjects" without fully describing the process or source of the oral fluid. Factors that need to be documented in any study include the time of day of the collection, the method used to stimulate and collect the fluid, and how much fluid is being collected and for how long. The handling of the oral fluid during and post-collection is also critical and may include addition of protease or nuclease inhibitors, centrifugation, and cold or frozen storage prior to assay. In an effort to create a standard protocol for determining a biomarker's origin we carried out a pilot study collecting oral fluid from 5 different sites in the mouth and monitoring the concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines detected using MesoScaleDiscovery (MSD) electrochemiluminesence assays. Our data suggested that 3 of the cytokines are primarily derived from the submandibular gland, while 7 of the cytokines come from a source other than the major salivary glands such as the minor salivary glands or cells in the oral mucosae. Here we review the literature on monitoring biomarkers in oral samples and stress the need for determining the blood/saliva ratio when a quantitative determination is needed and suggest that the term oral diagnostic be used if the source of an analyte in the oral cavity is unknown.

  3. Extending virial black hole mass estimates to low-luminosity or obscured AGN: the cases of NGC 4395 and MCG -01-24-012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Franca, F.; Onori, F.; Ricci, F.; Sani, E.; Brusa, M.; Maiolino, R.; Bianchi, S.; Bongiorno, A.; Fiore, F.; Marconi, A.; Vignali, C.

    2015-05-01

    In the last decade, using single epoch (SE) virial based spectroscopic optical observations, it has been possible to measure the black hole (BH) mass on large type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGN) samples. However this kind of measurements cannot be applied on those obscured type 2 and/or low-luminosity AGN where the nuclear component does not dominate in the optical. We have derived new SE relationships, based on the full width at half-maximum and luminosity of the broad-line region component of the Pa? emission line and/or the hard X-ray luminosity in the 14-195 keV band, which have the prospect of better working with low luminosity or obscured AGN. The SE relationships have been calibrated in the 105-109 M? mass range, using a sample of AGN, whose BH masses have been previously measured using reverberation mapping techniques. Our tightest relationship between the reverberation-based BH mass and the SE virial product has an intrinsic spread of 0.20 dex. Thanks to these SE relations, in agreement with previous estimates, we have measured a BH mass of M_BH = 1.7^{+1.3}_{-0.7} × 10^5 M? for the low luminosity, type 1, AGN NGC 4395 (one of the smallest active galactic BH known). We also measured, for the first time, a BH mass of M_BH = 1.5^{+1.1}_{-0.6} × 10^7 M? for the Seyfert 2 galaxy MCG -01-24-012.

  4. The Canine Oral Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Klein, Erin A.; Thompson, Emily C.; Blanton, Jessica M.; Chen, Tsute; Milella, Lisa; Buckley, Catherine M. F.; Davis, Ian J.; Bennett, Marie-Lousie; Marshall-Jones, Zoe V.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the bacterial composition of the canine oral microbiome is of interest for two primary reasons. First, while the human oral microbiome has been well studied using molecular techniques, the oral microbiomes of other mammals have not been studied in equal depth using culture independent methods. This study allows a comparison of the number of bacterial taxa, based on 16S rRNA-gene sequence comparison, shared between humans and dogs, two divergent mammalian species. Second, canine oral bacteria are of interest to veterinary and human medical communities for understanding their roles in health and infectious diseases. The bacteria involved are mostly unnamed and not linked by 16S rRNA-gene sequence identity to a taxonomic scheme. This manuscript describes the analysis of 5,958 16S rRNA-gene sequences from 65 clone libraries. Full length 16S rRNA reference sequences have been obtained for 353 canine bacterial taxa, which were placed in 14 bacterial phyla, 23 classes, 37 orders, 66 families, and 148 genera. Eighty percent of the taxa are currently unnamed. The bacterial taxa identified in dogs are markedly different from those of humans with only 16.4% of oral taxa are shared between dogs and humans based on a 98.5% 16S rRNA sequence similarity cutoff. This indicates that there is a large divergence in the bacteria comprising the oral microbiomes of divergent mammalian species. The historic practice of identifying animal associated bacteria based on phenotypic similarities to human bacteria is generally invalid. This report describes the diversity of the canine oral microbiome and provides a provisional 16S rRNA based taxonomic scheme for naming and identifying unnamed canine bacterial taxa. PMID:22558330

  5. Oral Leukoplakia – an Update

    PubMed Central

    PARLATESCU, Ioanina; GHEORGHE, Carmen; COCULESCU, Elena; TOVARU, Serban

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper was to assess the current state of science on oral leukoplakia. Although it is considered a potentially malignant disorder the overall malignant progression of oral leukoplakia is of the order of 5% and even more. Nowadays there are no currently accepted markers to distinguish those that may progress to cancer from those that may not. The current golden standard is considered the presence of epithelial dysplasia on the tissue biopsy of the lesion. Proliferative verrucous leukoplakia is a rare form of OL which has multiple recurrences, is refractory to treatment and has malignant transformation in a short period. It is considered a true premalignant lesion. The management of oral leukoplakia varies from a "wait and see" attitude and topical chemopreventive agents to complete surgical removal. PMID:25553134

  6. Oral Carcinogenesis and Oral Cancer Chemoprevention: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takuji; Tanaka, Mayu; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the major global threats to public health. The development of oral cancer is a tobacco-related multistep and multifocal process involving field cancerization and carcinogenesis. The rationale for molecular-targeted prevention of oral cancer is promising. Biomarkers of genomic instability, including aneuploidy and allelic imbalance, are possible to measure the cancer risk of oral premalignancies. Understanding of the biology of oral carcinogenesis will yield important advances for detecting high-risk patients, monitoring preventive interventions, and assessing cancer risk and pharmacogenomics. In addition, novel chemopreventive agents based on molecular mechanisms and targets against oral cancers will be derived from studies using appropriate animal carcinogenesis models. New approaches, such as molecular-targeted agents and agent combinations in high-risk oral individuals, are undoubtedly needed to reduce the devastating worldwide consequences of oral malignancy. PMID:21660266

  7. The Human Oral Microbiome? † ?

    PubMed Central

    Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Chen, Tuste; Izard, Jacques; Paster, Bruce J.; Tanner, Anne C. R.; Yu, Wen-Han; Lakshmanan, Abirami; Wade, William G.

    2010-01-01

    The human oral cavity contains a number of different habitats, including the teeth, gingival sulcus, tongue, cheeks, hard and soft palates, and tonsils, which are colonized by bacteria. The oral microbiome is comprised of over 600 prevalent taxa at the species level, with distinct subsets predominating at different habitats. The oral microbiome has been extensively characterized by cultivation and culture-independent molecular methods such as 16S rRNA cloning. Unfortunately, the vast majority of unnamed oral taxa are referenced by clone numbers or 16S rRNA GenBank accession numbers, often without taxonomic anchors. The first aim of this research was to collect 16S rRNA gene sequences into a curated phylogeny-based database, the Human Oral Microbiome Database (HOMD), and make it web accessible (www.homd.org). The HOMD includes 619 taxa in 13 phyla, as follows: Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chlamydiae, Chloroflexi, Euryarchaeota, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria, Proteobacteria, Spirochaetes, SR1, Synergistetes, Tenericutes, and TM7. The second aim was to analyze 36,043 16S rRNA gene clones isolated from studies of the oral microbiota to determine the relative abundance of taxa and identify novel candidate taxa. The analysis identified 1,179 taxa, of which 24% were named, 8% were cultivated but unnamed, and 68% were uncultivated phylotypes. Upon validation, 434 novel, nonsingleton taxa will be added to the HOMD. The number of taxa needed to account for 90%, 95%, or 99% of the clones examined is 259, 413, and 875, respectively. The HOMD is the first curated description of a human-associated microbiome and provides tools for use in understanding the role of the microbiome in health and disease. PMID:20656903

  8. Immunology of oral candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Sivakumar, Muniapillai; Karthikeyan, M.; Udayakumar, P.; Shanmugam, K. T.; Kesavan, G.

    2014-01-01

    A successful pathogen is one that is able to effectively survive and evade detection by the host immune defense. Oral candidiasis has adopted strategies, which evade host defense and eventually cause disease in at-risk patients. Host defense against infections with Candida spp. depends on rapid activation of an acute inflammatory response by innate immunity, followed by an incremental stimulation of specific immune responses mediated by T-cells (cellular immunity) or B-cells (humoral immunity). Understanding these complex pathways of immune evasion can potentially contribute to the development of novel therapeutic strategies against oral candidiasis. PMID:25210393

  9. Arla Jones Oral History

    E-print Network

    Jones, Arla; Albin, Tami

    2010-10-06

    'll start this one off the way I start off all the oral histories so far which is, where were you born and when? 00:00:27 JONES: Well I was born in Great Bend, Kansas March 23, 1960. And Great Bend is right in the middle of the state. Lived in Great... of this do bells and whistles start to really go off?5 8 Added by narrator during the review process. Arla Jones March 10, 2008 8 Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of GLBTIQ People in Kansas...

  10. Curriculum Guidelines for Predoctoral Oral Diagnosis/Oral Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Oral diagnosis is the area of dental practice that deals with gathering, recording, and evaluating information contributing to the identification of abnormalities of the head and neck region. A statement of general curricular goals in oral diagnosis/oral medicine is presented. (MLW)

  11. Oral Health and Bone Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... supported by your browser. Home Bone Basics Lifestyle Oral Health and Bone Disease Publication available in: PDF (58 ... Imperfecta Overtraining Risks for Women Smoking Partner Resources Oral Health FAQs (OWH) Periodontal (Gum) Disease (NIDCR) Seal Out ...

  12. Lin Tongqi : an oral history

    E-print Network

    Chen, Xin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, I explore the life of Professor Lin Tongqi, a well-known scholar of American Chinese studies, by using an oral history methodology. This oral history is named "Suffering and Thinking," and my goal is to ...

  13. Mometasone Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... use your other oral and inhaled medications for asthma during your treatment with mometasone inhalation. If you were taking an ... your doctor if your asthma worsens during your treatment. Call your doctor immediately if you have an asthma attack that does not stop when you use ...

  14. Indra Macmillan Oral History

    E-print Network

    Macmillan, Indra; Miller, Timothy

    2010-10-26

    Oral history interview with Indra MacMillan conducted by Timothy Miller in Lawrence, Kansas, on October 26, 2010. In this interview, Indra MacMillan discusses his childhood growing up as a member of the Brethren in Scotland. He describes his...

  15. Paul Gray Oral History

    E-print Network

    Gray, Paul; Stratton, Emily

    2010-12-10

    Oral history interview with Paul Gray conducted by Emily Stratton in Lawrence, Kansas, on December 10, 2010. In this interview, Paul Gray, lead pastor at the New Life in Christ Church, describes his journey from his background as a working jazz...

  16. Justin Jenkins Oral History

    E-print Network

    Jenkins, Justin; Stratton, Emily

    2013-06-06

    Oral history interview with Justin Jenkins conducted by Emily Stratton in Lawrence, Kansas, on June 6, 2013. Justin Jenkins is the founder and lead pastor of Velocity Church. Velocity Church is a recent non-denominational church-plant in Lawrence...

  17. WRITING ORAL DRILLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NEY, JAMES W.

    ALL ORAL LANGUAGE DRILLS MAY BE SEPARATED INTO TWO TYPES--(1) MIM-MEM OR MIMICRY MEMORIZATION DRILLS OR (2) PATTERN PRACTICE DRILLS. THESE TWO LARGER CATEGORIES CAN BE SUB-DIVIDED INTO A NUMBER OF OTHER TYPES, SUCH AS TRANSFORMATION AND SUBSTITUTION DRILLS. THE USE OF ANY PARTICULAR TYPE DEPENDS ON THE PURPOSE TO WHICH THE DRILL IS PUT. IN ANY…

  18. Lakota Oral Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    One Feather, Vivian

    Course objectives for the three credit hour Lakota Oral Literature (college level English) course presented in this publication are to: perceive through the reading and hearing of Lakota legends a better understanding of the known world of the Lakota people which existed prior to white contact; understand the origin of the laws which the Lakota…

  19. Oral Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gallus, Alexander S.; Wittkowsky, Ann; Crowther, Mark; Hylek, Elaine M.; Palareti, Gualtiero

    2012-01-01

    Background: The objective of this article is to summarize the published literature concerning the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral anticoagulant drugs that are currently available for clinical use and other aspects related to their management. Methods: We carried out a standard review of published articles focusing on the laboratory and clinical characteristics of the vitamin K antagonists; the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate; and the direct factor Xa inhibitor, rivaroxaban Results: The antithrombotic effect of each oral anticoagulant drug, the interactions, and the monitoring of anticoagulation intensity are described in detail and discussed without providing specific recommendations. Moreover, we describe and discuss the clinical applications and optimal dosages of oral anticoagulant therapies, practical issues related to their initiation and monitoring, adverse events such as bleeding and other potential side effects, and available strategies for reversal. Conclusions: There is a large amount of evidence on laboratory and clinical characteristics of vitamin K antagonists. A growing body of evidence is becoming available on the first new oral anticoagulant drugs available for clinical use, dabigatran and rivaroxaban. PMID:22315269

  20. Pope Michael Oral History

    E-print Network

    Pope Michael; Bawden, David; Asadi, Torang

    2010-09-02

    Oral history interview with Pope Michael (David Bawden) conducted by Torang Asadi in Delia, Kansas, on September 2, 2010. In this interview, Pope Michael describes how his family came to be in Kansas, how he came to believe that Pope John Paul II...

  1. Warren Wiebe Oral History

    E-print Network

    Wiebe, Warren; Roane, Jordan

    2014-01-01

    Oral history interview of Warren Wiebe conducted by Jordan Roane in Lawrence, Kansas, on November 12, 2014. Warren grew up in the small western Kansas town of Hillsboro. Hillsboro is known for its Mennonite community as well as the Mennonite college...

  2. Ryan Campbell Oral History

    E-print Network

    Campbell, Ryan; Albin, Tami

    2009-12-16

    be addressed to: Tami Albin (albin@ku.edu or tami.albin@gmail.com ) Director of Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of GLBTIQ People in Kansas Anschutz Library 1301 Hoch Auditoria Dr. University of Kansas Lawrence, KS 66045 Requestors must identify: 1. Type...

  3. David Ollington Oral History

    E-print Network

    Ollington, David; Albin, Tami

    2010-01-11

    @ku.edu or tami.albin@gmail.com ) Director of Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of GLBTIQ People in Kansas Anschutz Library 1301 Hoch Auditoria Dr. University of Kansas Lawrence, KS 66045 Requestors must identify: 1. Type of publication 2. Proposed title 3...

  4. Michael Johnson Oral History

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Michael; Albin, Tami

    2009-12-16

    and protected by copyright law (Title 17, U. S. Code). Requests for permission to publish quotations beyond "fair use" from this collection should be addressed to: Tami Albin (albin@ku.edu or tami.albin@gmail.com ) Director of Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories...

  5. Oral Communication in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Noting that oral communication skills need continuous refinement, this document outlines various methods of practicing these skills, such as literature circles in reading; a reader's theater; presentations of book reports; story telling; a poetry reading club; and choral reading. The document describes literature circles as small groups of readers…

  6. [Off-label drug use of the misoprostol in gynecology & obstetrics: From a medico-economics benefit to a potential legal risk].

    PubMed

    Decamps-Mini, D; Pelofi, J; Treisser, A

    2015-06-01

    The scandal of the Mediator® case led the legislature to take measures in order to regulate off-label drugs prescriptions. Indeed the law issued in December 29th, 2011 on strengthening the safety of drugs and all derivative health products came to pave the way for an "over-cautious" practice of medicine in line with the precautionary principle erected as a constitutional principle. The supervision of off-label prescribing has had a direct impact on the exercise of the medical profession and has resurrected the issues related to the freedom of prescription, the obligation to provide information to patients and in general their whole responsibility. It is important to mention that the prescribing act is part of the freedom and the strict prerogative of those skilled in the art: the physician in this case. The off-label prescription is commonly accepted in certain specialties, such as anesthesia and intensive care, oncology or pediatrics where it is even subject of a memorandum of use because of concerns regarding the availability of forms adapted to children. However, the physician must ensure that no appropriate therapeutic alternative is available and inform the patient, fundamental principle of the right to respect for the will of the person. Off-label use of the prostaglandin-E1 analogue misoprostol in obstetrics and gynecology is a good example. In fact, this drug obtained a marketing authorization for the treatment or prevention of peptic ulcers and other stomach disorders, is commonly used off-label when inducing labour or intrauterine device insertion. These are the issues that need to be clarify and carefully assessed in order to help physicians to understand the impact of the law and the state of the jurisprudence on the exercise of their profession. PMID:26032707

  7. A History of Oral Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahn, Eugene; Bahn, Margaret L.

    This historical account of the oral interpretation of literature establishes a chain of events comprehending 25 centuries of verbal tradition from the Homeric Age through 20th Century America. It deals in each era with the viewpoints and contributions of major historical figures to oral interpretation, as well as with oral interpretation's…

  8. ORAL PRESENTATION A PRACTICAL GUIDE

    E-print Network

    Xie, Tao

    ORAL PRESENTATION SKILLS A PRACTICAL GUIDE © C. STORZ and the English language teachers of the Institut national de télécommunications, EVRY FRANCE. #12;Carl Storz et al. Oral Presentation Skills Août provides the essential elements and some tips on preparing and organizing a successful oral presentation

  9. Oral and Perioral Piercing Complications

    PubMed Central

    Escudero-Castaño, N; Perea-García, M.A; Campo-Trapero, J; Cano-Sánchez; Bascones-Martínez, A

    2008-01-01

    Background. The oral an perioral piercing has a long history as part of religious, tribal,cultural or sexual symbolism and nowdays there is a high incidence of oral and perioral piercing in the adolescent population. This practice has a long history as part of religious, tribal, cultural or sexual symbolism. This article reviews current knowledge on injuries or diseases that might be produced by piercing in the oral cavity. We propose a classification to diagnosed the pathologies related to oral an perioral piercing Methods. A search was conducted of articles in PubMed, Scielo published between 1997 and 2007, using the key words ``oral and perioral, piercing ´´, ``oral, piercing and disease”, ``recessions and oral piercing´´. It has reviewed about twentythree articles 17 were narrative reviews and 6 case series Results. A review was carried out on the origins of oral and perioral body piercing and its local implications, classifying the different alterations like recessions, systemic implications that it can produce in the oral and perioral cavity. Conclusion. Patients with oral and perioral piercing should be regularly followed up because of the possible development of different types of adverse effects. Clinical implications. Adverse effects of oral and perioral piercing can be systemic, with transmission of infectious diseases such as hepatitis B or C, or can be local, with alteration of oral mucosae or even of dental structures. PMID:19444317

  10. Oral Manifestations of Vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Anitha; Masthan, Mahaboob Kader; Sankar, Leena Sankari; Narayanasamy, Aravindha Babu; Elumalai, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vitiligo is one of the disorder that has social impact. Both skin and mucous membrane show depigmentation in vitiligo. Depigmentation in oral cavity can be more easily observed and the patient can be given awareness regarding the condition if they are unaware of vitiligo elsewhere in their body and can be guided for treatment. Aim and objectives: The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of occurrence of oral mucosal vitiligo in vitiligo patients and to determine the most commonly involved oral mucosal site. Materials and methods: The study sample included 100 vitiligo patients. The patients of all age groups and both genders were included. Vitiligo patients associated with systemic conditions such as thyroid disorders, juvenile diabetes mellitus, pernicious anemia, Addison's disease were excluded in this study. Results: Out of 100 vitiligo patients 44 % male and 56% were female. The oral presentation of vitiligo in this study showed depigmentation of buccal mucosa in 5% of patients, labial mucosa in 5% of patients, palate in 8% of patients, gingiva in 2% of patients and alveolar mucosa 1%. Depigmentation of lip was seen in 42% of patients. Lip involvement refers to depigmentation of both the lips or either lip. Also vermilion border involvement was noted in majority of cases. In some cases, the depigmentation of lip extended to the facial skin also. Conclusion: In this study 55 patients out of 100 patients showed depigmentation in the oral cavity. Lip involvement was most common in this study showing about 42% of patients. Intraoral mucosal involvement was found in 21% of patients. Among intraoral mucosal site palate was common followed by buccal and labial mucosa, gingiva. Two patients had lip pigmentation as the only manifestation without any depigmentation in the skin. PMID:25657420

  11. Canine oral melanoma.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Philip J

    2007-05-01

    Melanoma is the most common oral malignancy in the dog. Oral and/or mucosal melanoma has been routinely considered an extremely malignant tumor with a high degree of local invasiveness and high metastatic propensity. Primary tumor size has been found to be extremely prognostic. The World Health Organization staging scheme for dogs with oral melanoma is based on size, with stage I = <2-cm-diameter tumor, stage II = 2- to <4-cm-diameter tumor, stage III = > or = 4cm tumor and/or lymph node metastasis, and stage IV = distant metastasis. Median survival times for dogs with oral melanoma treated with surgery are approximately 17 to 18, 5 to 6, and 3 months with stage I, II, and III disease, respectively. Significant negative prognostic factors include stage, size, evidence of metastasis, and a variety of histologic criteria. Standardized treatments such as surgery, coarse-fractionation radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have afforded minimal to modest stage-dependent clinical benefits and death is usually due to systemic metastasis. Numerous immunotherapeutic strategies have been employed to date with limited clinical efficacy; however, the use of xenogeneic DNA vaccines may represent a leap forward in clinical efficacy. Oral melanoma is a spontaneous syngeneic cancer occurring in outbred, immunocompetent dogs and appears to be a more clinically faithful therapeutic model for human melanoma; further use of canine melanoma as a therapeutic model for human melanoma is strongly encouraged. In addition, the development of an expanded but clinically relevant staging system incorporating the aforementioned prognostic factors is also strongly encouraged. PMID:17591290

  12. Good Oral Health and Diet

    PubMed Central

    Scardina, G. A.; Messina, P.

    2012-01-01

    An unhealthy diet has been implicated as risk factors for several chronic diseases that are known to be associated with oral diseases. Studies investigating the relationship between oral diseases and diet are limited. Therefore, this study was conducted to describe the relationship between healthy eating habits and oral health status. The dentistry has an important role in the diagnosis of oral diseases correlated with diet. Consistent nutrition guidelines are essential to improve health. A poor diet was significantly associated with increased odds of oral disease. Dietary advice for the prevention of oral diseases has to be a part of routine patient education practices. Inconsistencies in dietary advice may be linked to inadequate training of professionals. Literature suggests that the nutrition training of dentists and oral health training of dietitians and nutritionists is limited. PMID:22363174

  13. Damaging Oral Habits

    PubMed Central

    Kamdar, Rajesh J; Al-Shahrani, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Oral habits, if persist beyond certain developmental age, can pose great harm to the developing teeth, occlusion, and surrounding oral tissues. In the formative years, almost all children engage in some non-nutritive sucking habits. Clinicians, by proper differential diagnosis and thorough understanding of natural growth and developmental processes, should take a decision for intervening. This article describes case series reports of thumb sucking, finger sucking, and tongue thrusting habits, which have been successfully treated by both removable and fixed orthodontic appliances. The cases shown are ranging from the age group of 9-19 years presenting combination of both mixed and permanent dentition development. All cases show satisfactory correction of habits and stable results. PMID:25954079

  14. Oral Cavity Surgery Codes

    Cancer.gov

    Oral Cavity Lip C000–C009, Base of Tongue C019, Other Parts of Tongue C020–C029, Gum C030–C039, Floor of Mouth C040–C049, Palate C050–C059, Other Parts of Mouth C060–C069 (Except for M9727, 9733, 9741-9742, 9764-9809, 9832, 9840-9931, 9945-9946, 9950-9967,

  15. Skylab oral health studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, L. R.; Frome, W. J.; Handler, S.; Wheatcroft, M. G.; Rider, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Evaluation of Skylab crewmembers for mission related effects on oral health in relation to possible dental injuries provided the following distinctive changes: (1) increased counts of specific anaerobic and streptococcal components; (2) elevations in levels of secretory IgA concurrent with diminutions of salivary lysozyme; and (3) increases in dental calculus and gingival inflammations. The clinical changes are considered to be more influenced by the preexisting state of dental health than by any mission related effects.

  16. Oral manifestations in transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Nappalli, Deepika; Lingappa, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Organ transplantation is a widely undertaken procedure and has become an important alternative for the treatment of different end-stage organ diseases that previously had a poor prognosis. The field of organ transplant and hematopoietic stem cell transplant is developing rapidly. The increase in the number of transplant recipients also has an impact on oral and dental services. Most of the oral problems develop as a direct consequence of drug-induced immunosuppression or the procedure itself. These patients may present with oral complaints due to infections or mucosal lesions. Such lesions should be identified, diagnosed, and treated. New treatment strategies permit continuous adaptation of oral care regimens to the changing scope of oral complications. The aim of this review is to analyze those oral manifestations and to discuss the related literature. PMID:26005458

  17. [Epidemiology of oral cancer].

    PubMed

    Döbrossy, Lajos

    2007-04-01

    In Hungary, the mortality rate from oral cancer is dramatically increasing, causing great concern. Smoking, drinking and poor oral hygiene are the major risk factors, and their combined effect could only be prevented by primary preventive measures in a long time period and therefore the benefit from primary prevention can be detected much later. The possibilities of the secondary preventive measures are much better to identify the premalignant conditions and lesions for these cancers. Screening could be used to detect both precancerous lesions and early invasive cancers, however, no study as yet has demonstrated a reduced mortality from screening, therefore, sui generis regular, organised screening, based on personal call-and-recall system, is not recommended. In the same time, regular opportunistic screening by clinical examination, i.e. visual inspection, using dental mirror, and palpation of the region in asymptomatic persons at high risk offers prime opportunity for early detection and early treatment. Recently, the government has decided to take action by promoting the clinical examination. To this effect, a Working Group consisting of subject experts and headed by the Chief Medical Officer has been appointed and charged with elaboration of a workable plan of action. In terms of action, priority',should be given to men and women above 40 years of age who are heavy smokers and drinkers; socioeconomic differentials should be taken into account. In the first place, dentist-patient encounters provide opportunity for such an examination, but primary care physicians and those engaged in occupational medicine are also requested to take part in the endeavour. As a prerequisite, the screening method needs to be incorporated in the curriculum of dental/medical education. From all these, the oral cancer-related epidemiological situation is expected to improve in Hungary. PMID:17546894

  18. Oral Tradition in Historical Research 

    E-print Network

    Hankins, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Emminent scholar, Dr. Ali A. Mazrui in his article titled African Archives and the Oral Tradition discusses the pros and cons of the oral vs. written traditions in African communities. Mazrui calls the oral tradition the oldest form of communication..., 1984. 3. Learning from History, The Historians, USA Weekend, Feb. 6-8, 2004: 8-18 4. Mazrui, Ali A. ?African Archives and the Oral tradition.? The Courier, February 1985, No. 2: 13-15. 5. Robyns, Marcus C. ?The Archivist as Educator: Integrating...

  19. Oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Huber, Michaell A; Tantiwongkosi, Bundhit

    2014-11-01

    Oral and oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is a complex and often relentless malignancy prone to local invasion and dissemination. Despite advances in understanding of the disease and improved therapeutic interventions, it continues to be diagnosed at an advanced stage and the survival rate remains poor. The financial cost of treating OPC may be the highest of all cancers in the United States and survivors often experience major detriments to quality of life. Major risk factors for OPC are tobacco, alcohol, areca nut, and human papillomavirus infection. This article updates medical practitioners on the causes, presentation, diagnosis, and management of OPC. PMID:25443678

  20. Vicki Copp Oral History

    E-print Network

    Copp, Vicki; Hobson, Katie

    2015-01-01

    of the Department of Religious Studies. Note: All oral histories in the Religion in Kansas Project are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. Katie: (1-:28) Rev. Copp, I wonder if you could just... on the district who was looking at a position that was opening and wondering if she should apply. (Clip 4) I had talked to the pastor previously about her giftedness and encouraged her to apply and she got the job. I’ve sent references for women clergy who...

  1. Rich Crank Oral History

    E-print Network

    Crank, Rich; Albin, Tami

    2010-11-24

    of publication Citing Under the Rainbow Oral History Interviews Your citation should include information that will allow people to find this transcript. Please consult a citation guide (Chicago, MLA, ALA) for the correct citation style for audio/video... to do in high school, going out with people and going on dates and maybe having sex too, depending—I had never—It was totally beyond me until I came to KU, and that's kind of what got me into big trouble was that I was learning the stuff too late...

  2. [Heroin and oral health].

    PubMed

    Brand, H S; Van Zalingen, D; Veerman, E C I

    2009-09-01

    Heroin is a half synthetic opiate with. It is used by a relatively small number of the general population, but relatively frequently by homeless people and prisoners. Since heroin has an inhibitory effect on the nervous system and on breathing, an overdose of heroin can have fatal consequences. Sudden abstinence of heroin results in general discomfort, restlessness, muscle cramps, perspiration, nausea, shivers and goose bumps. Oral effects of heroin include increased risks of caries, periodontitis and bruxism. Saliva has the potential of detecting heroin abuse. PMID:19791491

  3. Kami Oral History

    E-print Network

    Albin, Tami; Kami

    2010-01-11

    Kami: Narrator Tami Albin: Interviewer TAMI ALBIN: And we're going. Excellent. Okay, so today is May 20, 2009, and I'm here with Kami. Thank you so much for participating, I really appreciate it. I'll start off this interview the way... that I start off all the oral histories which is, Tell me where you were born and when. KAMI: I was born in Salt Lake City, Utah in August, 1950. And my father was at the University of Utah in school. And they lived in Layton, so we lived in...

  4. Long-term monitoring of the archetype Seyfert galaxy MCG-6-30-15: X-ray, optical and near-IR variability of the corona, disc and torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lira, P.; Arévalo, P.; Uttley, P.; McHardy, I. M. M.; Videla, L.

    2015-11-01

    We present long-term monitoring of MCG-6-30-15 in X-rays, optical and near-IR wavelengths, collected over 5 yr of monitoring. We determine the power spectrum density of all the observed bands and show that after taking into account the host contamination similar power is observed in the optical and near-IR bands. There is evidence for a correlation between the light curves of the X-ray photon flux and the optical B band, but it is not possible to determine a lag with certainty, with the most likely value being around 0 d. Strong correlation is seen between the optical and near-IR bands. Cross-correlation analysis shows some complex probability distributions and lags that range from 10 to 20 d, with the near-IR following the optical variations. Filtering the light curves in frequency space shows that the strongest correlations are those corresponding to the shortest time-scales. We discuss the nature of the X-ray variability and conclude that this is intrinsic and cannot be accounted for by absorption episodes due to material intervening in the line of sight. It is also found that the lags agree with the relation ? ? ?4/3, as expected for an optically thick geometrically thin accretion disc, although for a larger disc than that predicted by the estimated black hole mass and accretion rate in MCG-6-30-15. The cross-correlation analysis suggests that the torus is located at ˜20 light-days from the central source and at most at ˜50 light-days from the central region. This implies an active galactic nucleus bolometric luminosity of ˜3 × 1043 erg s-1 cm-2.

  5. Oral allergy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yasuto; Urisu, Atsuo

    2009-12-01

    Oral allergy syndrome (OAS) is defined as the symptoms of IgE-mediated immediate allergy localized in the oral mucosa, and the characteristics depend on the lability of the antigen. Another term used for this syndrome is pollen-food allergy (PFS); the patient is sensitized with pollen via the airways and exhibits an allergic reaction to food antigen with a structural similarity to the pollen (class 2 food allergy). In addition to PFS, latex-fruit syndrome is also well-known as the disease exhibiting OAS. In treating the condition, it must be noted that most but not all symptoms of PFS are those of OAS. In many cases, antigens become edible by heating, but some are resistant to heating. Also, since the exacerbation of atopic dermatitis is occasionally observed after the intake of cooked antigens in asymptomatic individuals, careful inquiry of the history is important in designing the treatment. Immunotherapy against the cross-reacting pollen has also been attempted in PFS. PMID:19847095

  6. Reversal of Oral Anticoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Limdi, Nita A.

    2013-01-01

    Although the use of dabigatran and rivaroxaban are increasing, data on reversal of their effects are limited. The lack of reliable monitoring methods and specific reversal agents renders treatment strategies empirical and as a result, , treatment consists mainly of supportive measures. Therefore, we performed a systematic search of the PubMed database to find studies and reviews pertaining to oral anticoagulation reversal strategies. This review discusses current anticoagulation reversal recommendations for the oral anticoagulants warfarin, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban for patients at a heightened risk of bleeding, actively bleeding or those in need for pre-procedural anticoagulation reversal. We highlight the literature that shaped these recommendations and provide directions for future research to address knowledge gaps. While reliable recommendations are available for anticoagulation reversal in patients treated with warfarin, guidance on reversal of dabigatran and rivaroxaban is varied and equivocal. Given the increasing use of the newer agents, focused research is needed to identify effective reversal strategies and develop and implement an accurate method (assay) to guide reversal of the newer agents. Determining patient-specific factors that influence the effectiveness of reversal treatments and comparing the effectiveness of various treatment strategies are pertinent areas for future anticoagulation reversal research. PMID:23606318

  7. Apixaban and oral implications

    PubMed Central

    Bagán, Jose V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Thrombotic disorders remain a leading cause of death in the Western world, and in this regard a number of anticoagulation treatment have been used, including heparins, fondaparinux, vitamin K antagonists (warfarin, acenocoumarol), and new oral anticoagulants such as apixaban. For years there has been great controversy regarding the use of anticoagulants in planning dental treatments that imply bleeding. The main concerns about using new oral anticoagulants in invasive dental procedures are bleeding due to the lack of an antidote, and the thrombotic risk of the disease for which anticoagulation was indicated in the first place. Material and Methods A literature search was conducted through May 2014 using the keyword “apixaban” for publications in the ISI Web of Knowledge. The search was extended to other databases (PubMed, Scopus and the Cochrane Library). Results Based on the results of the different studies, apixaban seems to be a good alternative to conventional anticoagulation and a reasonable treatment option, though its main and most common adverse effect is bleeding. Dose adjustment is needed in some patients, though regular laboratory monitoring is not required. The use of the drug in different patient populations will define its final indications and doses. Conclusions Regarding the use of apixaban in the dental setting, there is a compelling need for further clinical studies in order to establish more evidence-based guidelines for patients requiring antithrombotic treatment. Key words:Apixaban, dental treatment, dental implications. PMID:26535102

  8. [Oral jewelry: a review].

    PubMed

    Jeger, Franziska; Lussi, Adrian; Zimmerli, Brigitte

    2009-01-01

    Oral jewelry is popular. One of the most widely spread types are so-called tooth diamonds made of composite materials which are applied to the teeth with an adhesive. Note that parents are required to sign a release form for under-aged patients in Switzerland. Tooth cap grills and gold teeth are considered status symbols within the Hip-Hop fashion scene. However, tooth ornaments favour the accumulation of plaque and can diminish the ability to articulate. With respect to jewelry in oral soft tissue especially tongue and lip piercings are of significance to dentists. Besides the systemic complications, which are mostly caused by a lack of hygiene or the failure of noting medical contraindications by the piercer, local complications occur frequently. After surgery, pain, swelling, infections as well as hemorrhages or hematomas can be observed. Long-term effects can be problematic: gingival recession can be discernes mainly in the case of lip piercings the loss of hard tooth substance in the case of tongue piercings. Because of that, conservation therapies can become indespensable. Patients wearing dental jewelry have to be aware of risks of tooth damage, and they regularly have to undergo dental check-ups. Information campaigns--for dentists as well as patients--are necessary. PMID:20112640

  9. Why Is Oral Health Important for Women?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... Why Is Oral Health Important for Women? Article Chapters Why Is Oral ... Reviewed: January 2012 Previous Next Related Articles: Women's Oral Health Burning Mouth Syndrome in Middle-aged Women Dentists ...

  10. National Oral Health Surveillance System (NOHSS)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Data Sources Related Links Glossary Contact Us National Oral Health Surveillance System Oral Health Indicators Dental Visit . Adults aged 18+ who have ... modified: August 11, 2010 Content Source: Division of Oral Health , National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health ...

  11. 21 CFR 520.1320 - Mebendazole oral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Mebendazole oral. 520.1320 Section 520...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1320 Mebendazole oral. (a) Chemical...

  12. 21 CFR 520.1320 - Mebendazole oral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Mebendazole oral. 520.1320 Section 520...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1320 Mebendazole oral. (a) Chemical...

  13. 21 CFR 520.1320 - Mebendazole oral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Mebendazole oral. 520.1320 Section 520...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1320 Mebendazole oral. (a) Chemical...

  14. 21 CFR 520.1320 - Mebendazole oral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Mebendazole oral. 520.1320 Section 520...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1320 Mebendazole oral. (a) Chemical...

  15. 21 CFR 520.1320 - Mebendazole oral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Mebendazole oral. 520.1320 Section 520...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1320 Mebendazole oral. (a) Chemical...

  16. The Fungal Biome of the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Jyotsna; Retuerto, Mauricio; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Ghannoum, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Organisms residing in the oral cavity (oral microbiota) contribute to health and disease, and influence diseases like gingivitis, periodontitis, and oral candidiasis (the most common oral complication of HIV-infection). These organisms are also associated with cancer and other systemic diseases including upper respiratory infections. There is limited knowledge regarding how oral microbes interact together and influence the host immune system. Characterizing the oral microbial community (oral microbiota) in health and disease represents a critical step in gaining insight into various members of this community. While most of the studies characterizing oral microbiota have focused on bacterial community, there are few encouraging studies characterizing the oral mycobiome (the fungal component of the oral microbiota). Our group recently characterized the oral mycobiome in health and disease focusing on HIV. In this chapter we will describe the methods used by our group for characterization of the oral mycobiome. PMID:26519069

  17. Tobacco Use and Oral Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seffrin, John R.; Randall, B. Grove

    1982-01-01

    Oral disease risks regarding the use of tobacco arise not only from smoking but also from the oral use of tobacco in the form of snuff. Such diseases range from simple tooth decay to various forms of cancer. A fact list is suggested for presenting the risks to school-age youth. (JN)

  18. Recent Trends in Oral Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Chloe

    1974-01-01

    The field of oral interpretation has been influenced by both the analytical approach to literature study, with significant emphasis on understanding the literary text, and the interpersonal approach. While oral reading may utilize various performance arts or media such as dance, music, or film, the most popular movement currently is Readers…

  19. Dyslexia and Oral Reading Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Thomson was the first of very few researchers to have studied oral reading errors as a means of addressing the question: Are dyslexic readers different to other readers? Using the Neale Analysis of Reading Ability and Goodman's taxonomy of oral reading errors, Thomson concluded that dyslexic readers are different, but he found that they do not…

  20. 76 FR 73691 - Oral Argument

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ...given of the scheduling of oral argument in the matters of: James C. Latham v. U.S. Postal Service, MSPB Docket Number DA-0353-10-0408-I-1...or ``Board'') will hear oral argument in the matters of James C. Latham v. U.S. Postal Service, MSPB Docket Number...

  1. Helping Children in Oral Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munkres, Alberta

    An attempt to answer questions surrounding the teaching of oral communication to children is presented. In each section, a pattern is followed. First comes the presentation of an example. Second, there is an explanation of the teaching efforts which led up to this oral product. Third, the author adds comments and raises questions to help the…

  2. Embracing Plurality through Oral Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Bich; Oliver, Rhonda; Rochecouste, Judith

    2015-01-01

    The transmission and dissemination of knowledge in Aboriginal societies for the most part occurs orally in an Aboriginal language or in Aboriginal English. However, whilst support is given to speaking skills in Indigenous communities, in our education system less emphasis is given to developing equivalent oral communicative competence in Standard…

  3. Oral reconstruction with submental flap

    PubMed Central

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Submental flap is a useful technique for reconstruction of medium to large oral cavity defects. Hair bearing nature of this flap in men makes it less appropriate. Therefore, deepithelialized variant is introduced to overcome the problem of hair with this flap. Recently, application of this flap has been introduced in maxillofacial trauma patients. Materials and Methods: Deepithelialized orthograde submental flap is used for the reconstruction of oral cavity mucosal defects. Results: Four cases including two trauma patients and two squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of oral cavity were treated using deepithelialized orthograde submental flap. There were no complications in all four patients and secondary epithelialization occurred in raw surface of the flap which was exposed to oral cavity. Conclusion: Deepithelialized orthograde submental flap is very effective in reconstruction of oral cavity in men. The problem of hair is readily solved using this technique without jeopardizing flap blood supply. PMID:24205473

  4. Oral lichen planus: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Krupaa, R. Jayasri; Sankari, S. Leena; Masthan, K. M. K.; Rajesh, E.

    2015-01-01

    Lichen planus is an immunologically mediated mucocutaneous disease that is triggered by varied etiological agents. The oral lichenoid reaction is considered a variant of the disease that needs to be clearly diagnosed as a separate entity from oral lichen planus and treated. They follow a strict cause-effector relationship, protocols that suggest the differentiation. Lichen planus has varied clinical forms in the oral mucosa and cutaneously that has different prognosis. This condition also arises in association with various other systemic conditions such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus. There have been cases reported in the esophagus, larynx, scalp, nail, cutaneous areas, especially arms and wrists, trunk. There is reported malignant transformation that essentiates careful examination, treatment protocol and regular follow-up sessions. This article throws light on the disease condition of oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid reaction that is essential for the differentiation and treatment. PMID:26015696

  5. Oral Sexual Behaviors Associated with Prevalent Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Gypsyamber; Agrawal, Yuri; Halpern, Jane; Bodison, Sacared; Gillison, Maura L.

    2015-01-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a cause of oropharyngeal cancer. We investigated whether sexual behaviors that elevated the odds of oropharyngeal cancer developing in a case-control study similarly elevated the odds of oral HPV infection developing among control patients. HPV infection was detected in 4.8% of 332 control patients from an outpatient clinic and in 2.9% of 210 college-aged men (age range, 18–23 years). Among control patients, the odds of infection developing independently increased with increases in the lifetime number of oral (P = .007, for trend) or vaginal sex partners (P = .003, for trend). Among college-aged men, the odds of oral HPV infection developing increased with increases in the number of recent oral sex partners (P = .046, for trend) or open-mouthed kissing partners (P = .023, for trend) but not vaginal sex partners. Oral sex and open-mouthed kissing are associated with the development of oral HPV infection. PMID:19320589

  6. Oral food desensitization.

    PubMed

    Green, Todd D; Burks, A Wesley

    2010-11-01

    The immunologic interactions in the gastrointestinal tract are extensive and complex. In most cases, the end result of this activity is one of tolerance, which refers to the inhibition of an immune response. However, in a minority of cases, food allergy develops, and this seems to be increasing in prevalence. We continue to learn about the mechanisms involved in these processes and the factors that may promote tolerance as opposed to allergy. At this point, management of food allergy consists of allergen avoidance and readiness to manage an accidental exposure reaction, but using current knowledge of gastrointestinal immunity, researchers are investigating immunomodulatory approaches that will provide "active" therapy for food allergy and induce tolerance. Oral immunotherapy is one important therapy being studied, and in this article, we review recent results from studies of this potential treatment for food allergy. PMID:20730515

  7. Biomechanics of oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of prosthodontic treatment has been well recognized, and the need is continuously increasing with the ageing population. While the oral mucosa plays a critical role in the treatment outcome, the associated biomechanics is not yet fully understood. Using the literature available, this paper provides a critical review on four aspects of mucosal biomechanics, including static, dynamic, volumetric and interactive responses, which are interpreted by its elasticity, viscosity/permeability, apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient, respectively. Both empirical studies and numerical models are analysed and compared to gain anatomical and physiological insights. Furthermore, the clinical applications of such biomechanical knowledge on the mucosa are explored to address some critical concerns, including stimuli for tissue remodelling (interstitial hydrostatic pressure), pressure-pain thresholds, tissue displaceability and residual bone resorption. Through this review, the state of the art in mucosal biomechanics and their clinical implications are discussed for future research interests, including clinical applications, computational modelling, design optimization and prosthetic fabrication. PMID:26224566

  8. Oral Drug Absorption

    E-print Network

    Yamashita, Shinji

    2006-10-26

    amount of various drugs in the D/P system 0 20 40 60 80 100 0.01 0.1 1.0 10.0 100.0 Permeated amount (% of dose/2 h) Human Abs. ( % of dose) Correlation between in vivo human absorption and in vitro permeated amount in the D/P system Fasted State Fed... (Fasted/Fed) 4.0 0.9 1.6 0.25 1.11 3.09 2.05 28.0 81.2 Cmax (?g/mL) Tmax 2.3 3.8 1.9 2.3 3.0 2.0 (h) 14 0 20 40 60 80 100 0.01 0.1 1.0 10.0 100.0 Estimation of food-effect on oral absorption of albendazole, quazepam and nateglinide from in vitro study in D/P...

  9. Biomechanics of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of prosthodontic treatment has been well recognized, and the need is continuously increasing with the ageing population. While the oral mucosa plays a critical role in the treatment outcome, the associated biomechanics is not yet fully understood. Using the literature available, this paper provides a critical review on four aspects of mucosal biomechanics, including static, dynamic, volumetric and interactive responses, which are interpreted by its elasticity, viscosity/permeability, apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient, respectively. Both empirical studies and numerical models are analysed and compared to gain anatomical and physiological insights. Furthermore, the clinical applications of such biomechanical knowledge on the mucosa are explored to address some critical concerns, including stimuli for tissue remodelling (interstitial hydrostatic pressure), pressure–pain thresholds, tissue displaceability and residual bone resorption. Through this review, the state of the art in mucosal biomechanics and their clinical implications are discussed for future research interests, including clinical applications, computational modelling, design optimization and prosthetic fabrication. PMID:26224566

  10. Quantitative Immunoexpression of EGFR in Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders: Oral Leukoplakia and Oral Submucous Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jyothi Meka, Naga; Ugrappa, Sridevi; Velpula, Nagalaxmi; Kumar, Sravan; Naik Maloth, Kotya; Kodangal, Srikanth; ch, Lalitha; Goyal, Stuti

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Many oral squamous cell carcinomas develop from potentially malignant disorders (PMDs)which include a variety of lesions and conditions characterized by an increased risk for malignant transformation. Thisstudy evaluated the quantitative expression of EGFR in normal oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia and oral submucous fibrosis to predict the malignant risk in compliance with the intensity of staining with EGFR. Materials and methods. Thirty subjects were included in the study, consisting of 10 oral leukoplakia (OL), 10 oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) and 10 normal oral mucosa (NOM) as the control group. Owing to the histopathological confirmation of precancerous state of tissue, 4-?m-thick sections of tissue were taken from paraffin-embedded wax blocks for immunohistochemical staining for EGFR. Results. All the control cases showed positive expression for EGFR, while 20% of oral leukoplakia and 40% of OSMF cases showed strong expression (3+), 40% of OL and 30% of OSMF cases showed weak expression (2+), and 40% of OLand 30% of OSMF cases showed poor expression (1+) compared to controls (P=0.012). Conclusion. EGFR expression levels in the premalignant lesion appear to be a sensitive factor in predicting the neoplastic potential. This suggests that EGFR may serve as a biological marker to identify high-risk subgroups and guide prophylactic therapy with chemopreventive drugs or surgical intervention to prevent progression to carcinoma. Hence, further investigations in the direction of chemopreventive trials with a larger sample size are suggested to determine its role in the head and neck tumorigenesis. PMID:26697149

  11. Diabetes mellitus and oral health.

    PubMed

    Kudiyirickal, Marina George; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2015-05-01

    The oral health is influenced by systemic health, and one of the most common chronic diseases encountered in dental practice is diabetes mellitus. Diabetes can worsen oral infections and vice versa. In the literature, periodontitis and diabetes in the young to middle-aged adults have been the most widely researched area. Understanding the patho-physiology, clinical manifestations and management of different types of orofacial diseases in diabetic patients are important to the diabetologist and the dentist for the optimal care of patients with these diseases. This review explores the inter-link between diabetes and oral health. PMID:25487035

  12. Developing Oral History in Chinese Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Songhui, Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Compared with oral history in most Western countries, oral history theory and practice in Mainland China lag behind in both study and practice. This paper outlines the experience of oral history work in the Shantou university library, and the types and features of the oral history collected by the library. It examines problems in the development…

  13. Multicultural Issues in Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Raul I.; Cadoret, Cindy; Henshaw, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Demographic changes over the coming decades will heighten the challenges to the dental profession and to the nation. The expected growth in the numbers of racial and ethnic minorities, and the concomitant growth of immigrant populations are likely to lead to worsening of oral health disparities. Their consequences are becoming increasingly evident as the profession strives to improve the oral health of all Americans. The increasing diversity of the population, together with the importance of cultural beliefs and behaviors that affect health outcomes, will require ways to enhance provider-patient communications and oral health literacy. We discuss the nature and challenges presented by multicultural patient populations. One important means by which to promote oral health in diverse populations is to develop a dental workforce that is both culturally and linguistically competent, as well as one that is as culturally diverse as the American population. PMID:18329446

  14. The Importance of Oral Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetherington, M. Sue

    1982-01-01

    Offers the results of a survey taken at the College of Charleston in South Carolina indicating that faculty members, recent graduates, and employers all feel that college education in communication should stress training in oral communication skills. (JL)

  15. Robert Keys Jr Oral History

    E-print Network

    Keys, Robert Jr; Nelson, Ben

    2009-12-07

    Oral history interview with Robert Keys, Jr., conducted by Ben Nelson on December 7, 2009. In this interview, Robert Keys, Jr., a member of the Topeka Bible Church congregation, describes his experiences growing up attending ...

  16. Estrogen and Progestin (Oral Contraceptives)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... many different brands. Different brands of oral contraceptives contain slightly different medications or doses, are taken in ... 28-tablet packets have certain color tablets that contain different amounts of estrogen and progestin, but also ...

  17. Dorothy Nickel Friesen Oral History

    E-print Network

    Friesen, Dorothy Nickel; Hobson, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Oral history interview with Dorothy Nickel Friesen conducted by Katie Hobson on July 7, 2015. This interview features the interim pastor at Bethel College Mennonite Church in Newton, Kansas. Questions address Dorothy's experiences as an ordained...

  18. [Novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC)].

    PubMed

    Ieko, Masahiro

    2015-10-01

    Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs), a direct thrombin inhibitor (TDI), and direct factor Xa inhibitors (Xa-INHs) have mainly been used for prevention of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation in place of warfarin. DTI obstructs tenase by inhibiting thrombin generated in the initial phase and feedback to the amplification phase of cell-based coagulation reactions. Xa-INHs inhibit factor Xa activity in the prothrombinase complex of the propagation phase. Since the half-life of NOACs is in the approximate range of 8-14 hours, there are peak and trough periods in the blood concentrations of these agents. During the trough period, a small amount of thrombin is generated and plays a physiological role. The antithrombotic effect of NOACs is exerted during the peak period in combination with the effects of physiological coagulation inhibitors (PCIs) such as antithrombin in the trough period. Endothelial cells are the site for action of PCIs, such that it is important that they remain in a good state for effective anticoagulation by NOACs within the lesions. In a meta-analysis of NOACs vs. warfarin treatment, the former significantly reduced stroke or systemic embolic events by 19% as compared with warfarin, due mainly to a reduction in hemorrhagic stroke, while NOAC administration also significantly reduced intracranial hemorrhage by 52%. PMID:26458452

  19. Performance enhancement and oral appliances.

    PubMed

    Roettger, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The use of some type of oral appliance to enhance human performance, decrease stress or improve strength, has occurred throughout human history, from ancient soldiers to modern athletes. To date, the science describing this phenomenon has been poorly understood, and the research has been limited. The goal of this paper is to review the efforts to improve human performance with oral appliances, and the research exploring the science behind these efforts. PMID:19774772

  20. Oral tuberculosis involving maxillary gingiva

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Rohit; Singh, Anil; Badni, Manjunath; Singh, Priyanka

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a communicable disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which is transmitted by aerosolized saliva droplets among individuals in close contact with expelled sputum of a diseased patient. However, TB lesions of the oral cavity are often overlooked in the differential diagnosis. We report here a case of tuberculosis of oral cavity affecting the gingiva of a 24-year-old male. PMID:22639508

  1. Diseases of the Oral Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, G.

    1988-01-01

    This article provides a clinical approach to the more common oral mucosal lesions. Histologic diagnoses are not included, apart from their use in diagnosis and management. In a small number of oral mucosal lesions, clinical appearance is sufficiently distinctive to permit accurate diagnosis, but a biopsy is usually necessary. Clinical appearance is important in directing further investigations such as culture and serologic testing. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:21253207

  2. Live attenuated oral cholera vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Edward T; Calderwood, Stephen B; Qadri, Firdausi

    2006-08-01

    Live, orally administered, attenuated vaccine strains of Vibrio cholerae have many theoretical advantages over killed vaccines. A single oral inoculation could result in intestinal colonization and rapid immune responses, obviating the need for repetitive dosing. Live V. cholerae organisms can also respond to the intestinal environment and immunological exposure to in vivo expressed bacterial products, which could result in improved immunological protection against wild-type V. cholerae infection. The concern remains that live oral cholera vaccines may be less effective among partially immune individuals in cholera endemic areas as pre-existing antibodies can inhibit live organisms and decrease colonization of the gut. A number of live oral cholera vaccines have been developed to protect against cholera caused by the classical and El Tor serotypes of V. cholerae O1, including CVD 103-HgR, Peru-15 and V. cholerae 638. A number of live oral cholera vaccines have also been similarly developed to protect against cholera caused by V. cholerae O139, including CVD 112 and Bengal-15. Live, orally administered, attenuated cholera vaccines are in various stages of development and evaluation. PMID:16989629

  3. Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Yardimci, Gurkan; Kutlubay, Zekayi; Engin, Burhan; Tuzun, Yalcin

    2014-12-16

    Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa, known as potentially malignant disorders in recent years, are consists of a group of diseases, which should be diagnosed in the early stage. Oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, and oral erythroplakia are the most common oral mucosal diseases that have a very high malignant transformation rate. Oral lichen planus is one of the potentially malignant disorders that may be seen in six different subtypes including papular, reticular, plaque-like, atrophic, erosive, and bullous type, clinically. Atrophic and erosive subtypes have the greater increased malignant transformation risk compared to another subtypes. Although there are various etiological studies, the etiology of almost all these diseases is not fully understood. Geographically, etiologic factors may vary. The most frequently reported possible factors are tobacco use, alcohol drinking, chewing of betel quid containing areca nut, and solar rays. Early diagnosis is very important and can be lifesaving, because in late stages, they may be progressed to severe dysplasia and even carcinoma in situ and/or squamous cell carcinoma. For most diseases, treatment results are not satisfactory in spite of miscellaneous therapies. While at the forefront of surgical intervention, topical and systemic treatment alternatives such as corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and retinoids are widely used. PMID:25516862

  4. Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Yardimci, Gurkan; Kutlubay, Zekayi; Engin, Burhan; Tuzun, Yalcin

    2014-01-01

    Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa, known as potentially malignant disorders in recent years, are consists of a group of diseases, which should be diagnosed in the early stage. Oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, and oral erythroplakia are the most common oral mucosal diseases that have a very high malignant transformation rate. Oral lichen planus is one of the potentially malignant disorders that may be seen in six different subtypes including papular, reticular, plaque-like, atrophic, erosive, and bullous type, clinically. Atrophic and erosive subtypes have the greater increased malignant transformation risk compared to another subtypes. Although there are various etiological studies, the etiology of almost all these diseases is not fully understood. Geographically, etiologic factors may vary. The most frequently reported possible factors are tobacco use, alcohol drinking, chewing of betel quid containing areca nut, and solar rays. Early diagnosis is very important and can be lifesaving, because in late stages, they may be progressed to severe dysplasia and even carcinoma in situ and/or squamous cell carcinoma. For most diseases, treatment results are not satisfactory in spite of miscellaneous therapies. While at the forefront of surgical intervention, topical and systemic treatment alternatives such as corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and retinoids are widely used. PMID:25516862

  5. Oral Presentation Tips UNH Connors Writing Center Support for the Oral Presentations

    E-print Network

    Oral Presentation Tips UNH Connors Writing Center Support for the Oral Presentations Check out the Center's new web page packed with great resources for presenters in Oral Sessions! Presentations are 12

  6. Changes in Abundance of Oral Microbiota Associated with Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Brian L.; Kuczynski, Justin; Bhattacharya, Aditi; Huey, Bing; Corby, Patricia M.; Queiroz, Erica L. S.; Nightingale, Kira; Kerr, A. Ross; DeLacure, Mark D.; Veeramachaneni, Ratna; Olshen, Adam B.; Albertson, Donna G.

    2014-01-01

    Individual bacteria and shifts in the composition of the microbiome have been associated with human diseases including cancer. To investigate changes in the microbiome associated with oral cancers, we profiled cancers and anatomically matched contralateral normal tissue from the same patient by sequencing 16S rDNA hypervariable region amplicons. In cancer samples from both a discovery and a subsequent confirmation cohort, abundance of Firmicutes (especially Streptococcus) and Actinobacteria (especially Rothia) was significantly decreased relative to contralateral normal samples from the same patient. Significant decreases in abundance of these phyla were observed for pre-cancers, but not when comparing samples from contralateral sites (tongue and floor of mouth) from healthy individuals. Weighted UniFrac principal coordinates analysis based on 12 taxa separated most cancers from other samples with greatest separation of node positive cases. These studies begin to develop a framework for exploiting the oral microbiome for monitoring oral cancer development, progression and recurrence. PMID:24887397

  7. Adolescents and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Sanfilippo, J S

    1991-01-01

    Oral contraceptive (OC) options for adolescents are provides. Clarification for those desiring a birth control method is necessary and the benefits of decreased acne and dysmenorrhea with low dose OCs should be stressed along with the importance of compliance. A community effort is suggested to communicate the sexual and contraceptive alternatives, including abstinence and outercourse (sexual stimulation to orgasm without intercourse). Attention is given to concerns associated with teenage sexual activity, prevention of adolescent pregnancy, contraceptive options for the adolescent patient, adolescent attitudes toward birth control OCs, management of the adolescent OC user, manipulation of steroid components of OCs to respond to adolescent concerns, and other hormonal contraceptive options such as minipills or abstinence. The text is supplemented with tables: the % of US women by single years of age for 1971, 1976, 1979, and 1982; comparative pregnancy and abortion rates for the US and 5 other countries; federal cost for teen childbearing; adolescent nonhormonal contraceptive methods (advantages, disadvantages, and retail cost); checklist to identify those at risk for noncompliance with OCs; hormonal side effects of OCs; risks from OCs to adolescents; and benefits of OCs. Concern about adolescent pregnancy dates back to Aristotle. A modern profile shows girls form single-parent families are sexually active at an earlier age, adolescent mothers produce offspring who repeat the cycle, victims of sexual abuse are more likely to be sexually active, and teenagers in foster care are 4 times more likely to be sexually active and 8 times more likely to become pregnant. Prevention involves a multifaceted approach. OCs are the most appropriate contraceptive choice for adolescents. Frequency of intercourse is closely associated with OC use after approximately 15 months of unprotected sexual activity. At risk for noncompliance variables are scales of personality development (autonomy, self-esteem, locus of control), life expectations (marriage, college, career), dating behavior, age at 1st intercourse, perceived risk for becoming pregnant, personal attributes (sex, birth control, acquisition of birth control, pregnancy, parents' and peers' feelings toward sex and birth control), and previous experiences with birth control. PMID:1679420

  8. Oral Contraceptives and Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, M. F.

    1970-01-01

    During 1965-9 22 women aged 41 years or less have been seen with myocardial infarction. Eleven had been taking oral contraceptives. This prevalence of oral contraception (50%) is appreciably greater than that estimated for women of the same age in the general population. Nine of these 11 women had an independent increased risk of developing ischaemic heart disease because of hyperlipidaemia, hypertension, or excessive cigarette smoking. Ten of the 11 not taking an oral contraceptive also had a readily identifiable predisposing factor. None of the 22 showed carbohydrate intolerance. The similarity of the two groups is the striking finding. Details of 15 women of comparable age seen during 1960-4 before oral contraceptives were widely used are also presented, and they had similar characteristics. Oral contraceptives do not appear on their own to increase the risk of developing myocardial infarction, but they may do so in women otherwise prone to ischaemic heart disease. Suggestions are made for the identification of these women. PMID:5443407

  9. Graphite oral tattoo: case report.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Renata Mendonça; Gouvêa Lima, Gabriela De Morais; Guilhermino, Marinaldo; Vieira, Mayana Soares; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Anbinder, Ana Lia

    2015-01-01

    Pigmented oral lesions compose a large number of pathological entities, including exogenous pigmentat oral tattoos, such as amalgam and graphite tattoos. We report a rare case of a graphite tattoo on the palate of a 62-year-old patient with a history of pencil injury, compare it with amalgam tattoos, and determine the prevalence of oral tattoos in our Oral Pathology Service. We also compare the clinical and histological findings of grafite and amalgam tattoos. Oral tattoos affect women more frequently in the region of the alveolar ridge. Graphite tattoos occur in younger patients when compared with the amalgam type. Histologically, amalgam lesions represent impregnation of the reticular fibers of vessels and nerves with silver, whereas in cases of graphite tattoos, this impregnation is not observed, but it is common to observe a granulomatous inflammatory response, less evident in cases of amalgam tattoos. Both types of lesions require no treatment, but in some cases a biopsy may be done to rule out melanocytic lesions. PMID:26632800

  10. Smoking related systemic and oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Vellappally, Sajith; Fiala, Zden?k; Smejkalová, Jindra; Jacob, Vimal; Somanathan, Rakesh

    2007-01-01

    This article reviewed smoking related systemic diseases and oral diseases. Smoking is related to lung cancer, cardiovascular diseases and many other systemic diseases. Cigarette smoke affects the oral cavity first, so it is evident that smoking has many negative influences on oral cavity, for example, staining of teeth and dental restorations, wound healing, reduction of the ability to smell and taste, and development of oral diseases such as oral cancer, periodontitis, smoker's palate, smoker's melanosis, hairy tongue, leukoplakia, oral candidiasis and implant survival rate. The article also discusses the relationship between smoking and dental caries in detail. PMID:18254267

  11. Child, neglect and oral health

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite advancements in oral health policies, dental caries still a problem. The lack of parents/caregiver’s care regarding child’s oral health, which characterizes neglect, may lead to a high prevalence of caries. Therefore, the objective of this study was to analyze the relation between dental caries and neglect in five year-old children. Methods Quantitative study performed in two different moments. First, the children underwent oral examinations and physical inspection. Then, a semi-structured interview was performed with parents of children with high and low caries rate. Results In all, 149 physical inspections and oral exams were performed. The number of decayed, missing and filled teeth – dmf-t was 2.75 (SD 2.83); 16 children had extremely high values (dmf-t ?7), 85 intermediate values (1???dmf-t???6) and 48 extremely low (dmf-t?=?0). Nearly all caregivers were female (96.7%; n?=?29), mostly mothers (93.3%; n?=?28). Associations were found between caries experience and reason of the last consultation (p?=?0.011), decayed teeth and child’s oral health perception (p?=?0.001). There was a trend towards a significant association between general health and decayed teeth (p?=?0.079), general hygiene and caries experience (p?=?0.083), and caries experience and number of times the child brushes the teeth (p?=?0.086). Conclusion There’s a relation between caries experience and children’s oral health perception by caregivers, as well as between caries experience and children’s access to dental care. There is a trend towards association between caries experience and risk factors suggestive of neglect. PMID:24238222

  12. Oral health information systems--towards measuring progress in oral health promotion and disease prevention.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Bratthall, Douglas; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the essential components of oral health information systems for the analysis of trends in oral disease and the evaluation of oral health programmes at the country, regional and global levels. Standard methodology for the collection of epidemiological data on oral health has been designed by WHO and used by countries worldwide for the surveillance of oral disease and health. Global, regional and national oral health databanks have highlighted the changing patterns of oral disease which primarily reflect changing risk profiles and the implementation of oral health programmes oriented towards disease prevention and health promotion. The WHO Oral Health Country/Area Profile Programme (CAPP) provides data on oral health from countries, as well as programme experiences and ideas targeted to oral health professionals, policy-makers, health planners, researchers and the general public. WHO has developed global and regional oral health databanks for surveillance, and international projects have designed oral health indicators for use in oral health information systems for assessing the quality of oral health care and surveillance systems. Modern oral health information systems are being developed within the framework of the WHO STEPwise approach to surveillance of noncommunicable, chronic disease, and data stored in the WHO Global InfoBase may allow advanced health systems research. Sound knowledge about progress made in prevention of oral and chronic disease and in health promotion may assist countries to implement effective public health programmes to the benefit of the poor and disadvantaged population groups worldwide. PMID:16211160

  13. Correlations between Perceived Oral Malodor Levels and Self-Reported Oral Complaints

    PubMed Central

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Ishii, Kurumi; Tomita, Sachiyo; Tatsuta, Chihiro; Sugiyama, Toshiko; Ishizuka, Yoichi; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Tsunoda, Masatake

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Even though objective data indicating the absence of oral malodor are presented to patients, they may be skeptical about the results, possibly due to the presence of some discomfort in the oral cavity. The objective of this study was to investigate whether there is an association among self-perceptions of oral malodor, oral complaints, and the actual oral malodor test result. Materials and Methods. Questions concerning self-perceptions of oral malodor and subjective intraoral symptoms were extracted from a questionnaire on oral malodor completed by 363 subjects who visited the clinic for oral malodor of Tokyo Dental College Chiba Hospital and gave consent to this study. In addition, the association of self-perception of oral malodor with values obtained after organoleptic and OralChroma measurement was analyzed. Results. No correlation between 195 subjects (54%) who were judged “with oral malodor” (organoleptic score of ?1) and 294 subjects (81.6%) who had a self-perceptions of oral malodor was observed. Self-perception of oral malodor was significantly correlated with tongue coating (p = 0.002) and a strange intraoral taste (p = 0.016). Conclusions. Subjects with a self-perception of oral malodor were not necessarily consistent with those actually having an oral malodor. In addition, it was suggested that patients became aware of oral malodor when they felt oral complaints. PMID:26273303

  14. Oral Cysticercosis- A Diagnostic Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Pavan G; Palakurthy, Pavan; Muddana, Keerthi; Nandan, Rateesh Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Cysticercosis, a helminthic disease commonly seen in India, Latin America, Eastern Europe and Southern Africa, results from extraintestinal encystation of the larval form of Taenia solium. It is a condition in which man acts as intermediate host instead of definitive host. The most frequent sites of cysticercosis are subcutaneous layers, brain, muscles, heart, liver, lungs, and peritoneum. Oral cysticercosis is considered rare and cause cystic swellings or nodules in the mouth and a precise clinical diagnosis is not usually established. Here, we report a case of oral cysticercosis in a 32-year-old female occurring in the mentalis muscle presenting as asymptomatic nodule. PMID:26266222

  15. Oral Cysticercosis- A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Palakurthy, Pavan; Muddana, Keerthi; Nandan, Rateesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Cysticercosis, a helminthic disease commonly seen in India, Latin America, Eastern Europe and Southern Africa, results from extraintestinal encystation of the larval form of Taenia solium. It is a condition in which man acts as intermediate host instead of definitive host. The most frequent sites of cysticercosis are subcutaneous layers, brain, muscles, heart, liver, lungs, and peritoneum. Oral cysticercosis is considered rare and cause cystic swellings or nodules in the mouth and a precise clinical diagnosis is not usually established. Here, we report a case of oral cysticercosis in a 32-year-old female occurring in the mentalis muscle presenting as asymptomatic nodule. PMID:26266222

  16. Oral piercing: the hole story.

    PubMed

    Biber, Jay T

    2003-01-01

    Oral and perioral jewelry is increasingly being viewed as an acceptable fashion statement in our society. Accordingly, dental professionals are being presented with questions by their patients as to the risks associated with this form of body piercing. This article reviews recommendations for individuals with, or contemplating, an oral piercing, common locations of piercings, risks associated with the piercing procedure, types of jewelry used, and post-piercing home care instructions. Current trends in the piercing industry will be discussed, and the recommendation made that dental professionals advocate for improved safety standards at body modification studios. PMID:12640773

  17. Curriculum Guidelines for Postdoctoral Oral Diagnosis/Oral Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' Curriculum Guidelines for oral diagnosis and medicine include a definition of the discipline, its interrelationships with other disciplines, a curriculum overview, primary educational goals, prerequisites, a core content outline, specific behavioral objectives, and notes on sequencing, faculty, and…

  18. Oral Motor Intervention Improved the Oral Feeding in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xu; Yi, Li-Juan; Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Jian-Guo; Ma, Li; Ou, Yang-Xiang; Shuai, Ting; Zeng, Zi; Song, Guo-Min

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Oral feeding for preterm infants has been a thorny problem worldwide. To improve the efficacy of oral feeding in preterm infants, oral motor intervention (OMI), which consists of nonnutritive sucking, oral stimulation, and oral support, was developed. Published studies demonstrated that OMI may be as an alternative treatment to solve this problem; however, these results remain controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis (TSA) to objectively evaluate the potential of OMI for improving the current status of oral feeding in preterm infants. A search of PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure was performed to capture relevant citations until at the end of October, 2014. Lists of references of eligible studies and reviews were also hand-checked to include any latent studies. Two independent investigators screened literature, extracted data, and assessed the methodology, and then a meta-analysis and TSA was performed by using Reviewer Manager (RevMan) 5.3 and TSA 0.9 beta, respectively. A total of 11 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), which included 855 participants, were incorporated into our meta-analysis. The meta-analyses suggested that OMI is associated with the reduced transition time (ie, the time needed from tube feeding to totally oral feeding) (mean difference [MD], ?4.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], ?5.22 to ?2.84), shorten hospital stays (MD, ?3.64; 95% CI, ?5.57 to ?1.71), increased feeding efficiency (MD, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.36–1.27), and intake of milk (MD, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.06–0.21) rather than weight gain. Results of TSA for each outcomes of interest confirmed these pooled results. With present evidences, OMI can be as an alternative to improve the condition of transition time, length of hospital stays, feeding efficiency, and intake of milk in preterm infants. However, the pooled results may be impaired due to low quality included, and thus, well-designed and large RCTs were needed to further established effects. PMID:26252313

  19. Understanding Carcinogenesis for Fighting Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takuji; Ishigamori, Rikako

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the major global threats to public health. Oral cancer development is a tobacco-related multistep and multifocal process involving field cancerization and carcinogenesis. The rationale for molecular-targeted prevention of oral cancer is promising. Biomarkers of genomic instability, including aneuploidy and allelic imbalance, are able to measure the cancer risk of oral premalignancies. Understanding of the biology of oral carcinogenesis will give us important advances for detecting high-risk patients, monitoring preventive interventions, assessing cancer risk, and pharmacogenomics. In addition, novel chemopreventive agents based on molecular mechanisms and targets against oral cancers will be derived from research using appropriate animal carcinogenesis models. New approaches, such as interventions with molecular-targeted agents and agent combinations in high-risk oral individuals, are undoubtedly needed to reduce the devastating worldwide consequences of oral malignancy. PMID:21772845

  20. Oral Appliance Therapy for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    MedlinePLUS

    ... improve sleep quality by controlling sleep apnea and snoring. An oral appliance is held in place by ... An oral appliance may be recommended to treat snoring, or as an option for patients with mild ...

  1. ABCs of Oral Health: Nutrition - Children

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to crowns in many situations. More ABCs of Oral Health A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | ... games Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | Newsroom | RSS About AGD | Contact AGD | Site Map | ...

  2. Could Oral Contraceptives Help Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... were using oral contraceptives -- especially those with impaired function -- relied less on steroid treatment than women who hadn't used the pill. The researchers speculated that the beneficial effect of oral contraceptives may be due to ...

  3. 14 CFR 314.15 - Oral proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS EMPLOYEE PROTECTION PROGRAM Determination of Qualifying Dislocation § 314.15 Oral proceedings. The Department will provide for an oral evidentiary hearing, with notice published...

  4. Why Is Oral Health Important for Men?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... chronic pain, loss of function, irreparable facial and oral disfigurement following surgery and even death. More than 8,000 people die each year from oral and pharyngeal diseases. If you use tobacco, it ...

  5. National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center

    MedlinePLUS

    ... oral health care for pregnant women Oral Health Resource Bulletin Oral Health Resource Bulletin: Volume 34 (November 2015) Pocket Guide Bright ... from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration National Maternal and Child Oral ...

  6. Assessing Proofs via Oral Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soto-Johnson, Hortensia; Fuller, Evan

    2012-01-01

    In this qualitative study, we explored how oral interviews can inform instructors about students' understanding of abstract algebra and their ability to construct a proof in this setting. Our findings indicate that some students had a good understanding of the ideas needed for a subgroup proof, but could not write a coherent proof. On the other…

  7. Oral vaccines for cholera control.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, S; Chaturvedi, S

    1997-01-01

    Two oral cholera vaccines-inactivated WC/rBS and live CVD 103 HgR-have recently been marketed in Europe. Though the efficacy of the live vaccine is yet to be supported by field trials, the inactivated oral vaccine has shown encouraging results in field trails on different population groups. Since the role of cholera vaccines-including oral vaccines-as a public health tool in epidemic situations is debatable and cholera immunization for travellers will result in a high cost-benefit ratio, endemic cholera remains the main area of their application. The questions raised in the Bangladesh trial about the protective efficacy of WC/rBS vaccine in people infected with the EI Tor biotype, in 'O' blood group people and in those having no previous immunity to cholera have been reconsidered and explored during the recent field trail in South America, with satisfactory results. However, none of these vaccines provide protection against Vibrio cholerae 0139 Bengal. With their widely demonstrated safety and efficacy, oral cholera vaccines are set to make injectable vaccines obsolete. PMID:9069701

  8. Progestin-Only Oral Contraceptives

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the lining of the uterus. Progestin-only oral contraceptives are a very effective method of birth control, but they do not prevent ... them late and had sex without a backup method of birth control.If you want to become ... Progestin-only contraceptives should not delay your ability ...

  9. ORAL NEMATODE INFECTION OF TARANTULAS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oral nematode infection of Theraphosidae spiders, known as tarantulas, has been recently identified from several collections in the UK and mainland Europe. The disease has also been seen in captive and wild spiders from the Americas, Asia and Africa. Spider symptoms are described from anorexia until...

  10. Divergent routes to oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Keith D; Thurlow, Johanna K; Fleming, Janis; Drake, Paul J H; Vass, J Keith; Kalna, Gabriela; Higham, Des J; Herzyk, Pawel; Macdonald, D Gordon; Parkinson, E Ken; Harrison, Paul R

    2006-08-01

    Most head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients present with late-stage cancers, which are difficult to treat. Therefore, early diagnosis of high-risk premalignant lesions and incipient cancers is important. HNSCC is currently perceived as a single progression mechanism, resulting in immortal invasive cancers. However, we have found that approximately 40% of primary oral SCCs are mortal in culture, and these have a better prognosis. About 60% of oral premalignancies (dysplasias) are also mortal. The mortal and immortal tumors are generated in vivo as judged by p53 mutations and loss of p16(INK4A) expression being found only in the original tumors from which the immortal cultures were derived. To investigate the relationships of dysplasias to SCCs, we did microarray analysis of primary cultures of 4 normal oral mucosa biopsies, 19 dysplasias, and 16 SCCs. Spectral clustering using the singular value decomposition and other bioinformatic techniques showed that development of mortal and immortal SCCs involves distinct transcriptional changes. Both SCC classes share most of the transcriptional changes found in their respective dysplasias but have additional changes. Moreover, high-risk dysplasias that subsequently progress to SCCs more closely resemble SCCs than nonprogressing dysplasias. This indicates for the first time that there are divergent mortal and immortal pathways for oral SCC development via intermediate dysplasias. We believe that this new information may lead to new ways of classifying HNSCC in relation to prognosis. PMID:16885335

  11. Pollen grains for oral vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Atwe, Shashwati U.; Ma, Yunzhe; Gill, Harvinder Singh

    2015-01-01

    Oral vaccination can offer a painless and convenient method of vaccination. Furthermore, in addition to systemic immunity it has potential to stimulate mucosal immunity through antigen-processing by the gut-associated lymphoid tissues. In this study we propose the concept that pollen grains can be engineered for use as a simple modular system for oral vaccination. We demonstrate feasibility of this concept by using spores of Lycopodium clavatum (clubmoss) (LSs). We show that LSs can be chemically cleaned to remove native proteins to create intact clean hollow LS shells. Empty pollen shells were successfully filled with molecules of different sizes demonstrating their potential to be broadly applicable as a vaccination system. Using ovalbumin (OVA) as a model antigen, LSs formulated with OVA were orally fed to mice. LSs stimulated significantly higher anti-OVA serum IgG and fecal IgA antibodies compared to those induced by use of cholera toxin as a positive-control adjuvant. The antibody response was not affected by pre-neutralization of the stomach acid, and persisted for up to seven months. Confocal microscopy revealed that LSs can translocate in to mouse intestinal wall. Overall, this study lays the foundation of using LSs as a novel approach for oral vaccination. PMID:25151980

  12. Orality, Literacy, and Star Wars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havelock, Eric A.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that the educational system should encourage "down to earth" language by including oral recitation in the curricula, particularly recitation of popular poetry with accompaniment. Using the shuttle disaster as a striking example, claims that the modern media overuses conceptual language to disguise the hard meaning of what is being…

  13. 75 FR 62591 - Oral Argument

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... invited amicus curiae to submit briefs in these matters, see 75 FR 20007, Apr. 16, 2010; 75 FR 29366, May... of the scheduling of oral argument in the matters of: Hyginus U. Aguzie v. Office of Personnel Management, MSPB Docket Number DC-0731-09-0261-R-1; Jenee Ella Hunt-O'Neal v. Office of Personnel...

  14. 75 FR 56146 - Oral Argument

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... amicus curiae to submit briefs. See 75 FR 6728, Feb. 10, 2010. The parties, OPM, and the amici curiae... of the scheduling of oral argument in the matters of Rhonda K. Conyers v. Department of Defense, MSPB Docket No. CH-0752-09-0925-I-1, and Devon H. Northover v. Department of Defense, MSPB Docket No....

  15. 76 FR 73691 - Oral Argument

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... to submit briefs. See 76 FR 44373, July 25, 2011. The Board also has invited OPM and the amici curiae... of the scheduling of oral argument in the matters of: James C. Latham v. U.S. Postal Service, MSPB Docket Number DA-0353-10-0408-I-1; Ruby N. Turner v. U.S. Postal Service, MSPB Docket Number...

  16. Gaelic Singing and Oral Tradition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, Mark; MacDonald, Iona; Byrne, Charles G.

    2011-01-01

    A recent report by UNESCO placed Scots Gaelic on a list of 2500 endangered languages highlighting the perilous state of a key cornerstone of Scottish culture. Scottish Gaelic song, poems and stories have been carried through oral transmission for many centuries reflecting the power of indigenous peoples to preserve cultural heritage from…

  17. Westside Family Church Oral History

    E-print Network

    Mann, Brad; Morris, Jason; Stratton, Emily

    2013-06-27

    Oral history interview with Brad Mann and Jason Morris conducted by Emily Stratton in Lenexa, kansas, on June 27, 2013. Brad Mann is the Speedway Campus Pastor and Jason Morris is the Online Campus Pastor for Westside Family Church. Westside Family...

  18. Methamphetamine Use and Oral Health

    MedlinePLUS

    FOR THE DENTAL PATIENT ... Methamphetamine use and oral health M ethamphetamine is an inexpensive, easy-to-make illicit drug. It is known by several street names: “meth,” “speed,” “ice,” “chalk,” “crank,” “fire,” “glass,” “crystal” and “tina.” It is made in tens of ...

  19. A standard picture of healthy oral mucosae by direct oral microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Drogoszewska, Barbara; Michcik, Adam; Polcyn, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Direct oral microscopy constitutes a novel technique of in vivo oral mucosae examination. The basic principles of this method derive from colposcopy and dermoscopy. The main goal of direct oral microscopy is the earliest possible detection of oral precancerous lesions in order to implement their treatment as quickly as possible and prevent malignant transformation. Aim To establish a standard picture of healthy oral mucosae with direct oral microscopy applying standard colposcopic criteria in order to create a reference point for further diagnosis of precancerous lesions. Material and methods Thirty patients of both genders with clinically unaltered oral mucosae were examined. For every individual, clinical examination with the naked eye was performed, followed by direct oral microscopy with colposcopic assessment criteria. Oral mucosae at various sites (lip, cheek, floor of mouth, ventral and lateral sides of the tongue, alveolar ridge and soft palate) were examined. Results Subepithelial blood vessel patterns, mucosal surface, colour tone and transparency were described for healthy oral mucosae. Moreover, cases with clinically unaltered oral mucosae where direct oral microscopy revealed subclinical alterations were described. Conclusions Direct oral microscopy with colposcopic assessment criteria enables establishment of a repeated picture of unaltered oral mucosae. The standard picture of healthy oral mucosae is an essential reference point for application of this technique to early diagnose potentially malignant oral mucosal lesions as well as apply their early treatment. PMID:24278068

  20. 31 CFR 1.10 - Oral information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oral information. 1.10 Section 1.10... Disclosure Provisions § 1.10 Oral information. (a) Officers and employees of the Department may, in response to requests, orally provide information contained in records of the Department that are determined...

  1. 29 CFR 2700.77 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oral argument. 2700.77 Section...Continued) FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION PROCEDURAL RULES...by the Commission § 2700.77 Oral argument. Oral argument may be ordered by...

  2. Healthy People 2010: Oral Health Toolkit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isman, Beverly

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this Toolkit is to provide guidance, technical tools, and resources to help states, territories, tribes and communities develop and implement successful oral health components of Healthy People 2010 plans as well as other oral health plans. These plans are useful for: (1) promoting, implementing and tracking oral health objectives;…

  3. 29 CFR 2700.77 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Oral argument. 2700.77 Section...Continued) FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION PROCEDURAL RULES...by the Commission § 2700.77 Oral argument. Oral argument may be ordered by...

  4. 29 CFR 2700.77 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Oral argument. 2700.77 Section...Continued) FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION PROCEDURAL RULES...by the Commission § 2700.77 Oral argument. Oral argument may be ordered by...

  5. 29 CFR 2700.77 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oral argument. 2700.77 Section...Continued) FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION PROCEDURAL RULES...by the Commission § 2700.77 Oral argument. Oral argument may be ordered by...

  6. 29 CFR 2700.77 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Oral argument. 2700.77 Section...Continued) FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION PROCEDURAL RULES...by the Commission § 2700.77 Oral argument. Oral argument may be ordered by...

  7. On modelling oral tolerance using cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, E.

    1997-02-01

    Oral tolerance is modelled using the Chowdhury et al. model. Two fuzzy generalizations for this model (i.e. models that use fuzzy mathematics) are considered to include autoimmunity. Oral tolerance is studied for these fuzzy models and it is shown that for some cases oral tolerance can be used to treat autoimmunity.

  8. NATIONAL ORAL HEALTH SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM (NOHSS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    National Oral Health Surveillance System (NOHSS) is a collaborative effort between CDC's Division of Oral Health and The Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors (ASTDD). NOHSS is designed to help public health programs monitor the burden of oral disease, use of the ...

  9. Assessing Clinical Judgment Using Standardized Oral Examinations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bashook, Philip

    This paper describes the use of oral examinations to assess the clinical judgment of aspiring physicians. Oral examinations have been used in U.S. medicine since 1917. Currently, 15 member boards of the American Board of Medical Specialties administer 17 different standardized oral examinations to approximately 10,000 physician candidates…

  10. Ronald Reagan and the Oral Tradition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Ellen Reid

    1989-01-01

    Uses oral theory to examine the relationship between cognition and orality. Analyzes how the electronic media mimic the kind of interaction between speaker and audience characteristic of preliterate cultures. Argues that Ronald Reagan's effectiveness on television stems from his use of rhetorical structures characteristic of preliterate oral

  11. An Oral Communication Program: Goals and Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Phillip; And Others

    The Oral Communication Program at Radford University (Virginia) is designed to: (1) provide programming, facilities, and professional expertise to help students and faculty improve oral communication skills; and (2) support and facilitate the incorporation of oral communication into the undergraduate curriculum throughout the university, using the…

  12. Mast cells and oral pathologies: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Reet; Dahiya, Parveen; Goyal, Niti; Kumar, Mukesh; Sharma, Neeta; Saini, Hans Raj

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are resident cells of several types of tissues and contain many granules rich in histamine and heparin. They are distributed preferentially about the micro-vascular endothelial cells in the oral mucosa. These cells play a key role in the inflammatory process and thus their number has been found to be altered in various oral pathological conditions such as oral pyogenic granuloma, oral lichen planus, leukoplakia, oral squamous cell carcinoma, periapical cysts etc. The present review article is aimed to describe the alteration in the number of MCs along with their probable roles in these pathological conditions. PMID:25810632

  13. Oral health care during pregnancy recommendations for oral health professionals.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jayanth; Samelson, Renee

    2009-11-01

    Pregnancy is a unique time in a woman's life and is characterized by complex physiological changes. These changes can adversely affect oral health. Pregnancy is also an opportune time to educate women about preventing dental caries in young children, a common childhood problem. Although multiple studies have shown an association between periodontal infection and adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as premature delivery and low birth weight, recent randomized clinical trials conducted in the United States failed to show that treatment of periodontal disease during pregnancy improved birth outcomes. However, the studies confirmed the safety and effectiveness of providing oral health care during pregnancy. Pregnancy by itself is not a reason to defer routine dental care and necessary treatment for oral health problems. Diagnosis and treatment, including needed dental X-rays, can be undertaken safely during the first trimester of pregnancy. Needed treatment can be provided throughout the remainder of the pregnancy; however, the time period between the 14th and 20th week is considered ideal. PMID:20069785

  14. Recent trends in prevention of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mangalath, Ummar; Aslam, Sachin Aslam; Abdul Khadar, Abdul Hafiz Kooliyat; Francis, Pulikkan George; Mikacha, Muhamed Shaloob Karimbil; Kalathingal, Jubin Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancers often occurs out of long standing potentially malignant lesions and conditions so called premalignant lesions and conditions. Oral precancer is a intermediate state with increased cancer rate which can be recognized and treated obviously with much better prognosis than a full blown malignancy. Oral cancer risk can be lowered or even prevented by simply understanding basic oral hygiene, different bacteria found in the mouth, and how diet influences oral cancers. Currently, research is being done on the relationship between diet and oral cancer. Oral cancer is a very serious disease that can be prevented. Practicing good oral hygiene is key to help keep the oral cavity clean. Limiting the use of tobacco and alcohol products is also important because these are the causes of most oral cancers. Lastly, eating a well balanced diet that has protective affects can reduce the risk of oral cancer. This includes a diet high in fruits, vegetables, and fish and low in high fat and cholesterol meats, rice, and refined grains. PMID:25625069

  15. Oral Cysticercosis: A Diagnostic Difficulty

    PubMed Central

    Sharanesha, Manjunatha Bhari; Jatwa, Rameshwar; Khetrapal, Shaleen

    2014-01-01

    Cysticercosis is a rare disease caused by the ingestion of the parasite Cysticercus cellulosae, a larval stage of Taenia solium. The definitive host is human who harbors the adult worm and may accidentally or incidentally become the host. The larval form of cyst is commonly seen in the brain, meninges and eyes. Cases in the maxillofacial region including oral cavity and cheek muscles are rarely reported. Cysticercosis is not commonly considered in the diagnosis of swellings of the head and neck and a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma for clinicians. Hence, they are of utmost interest to the practitioner and have to be studied. We present an unusual case of cysticercosis presenting as a solitary cystic nodule in the upper left vestibule of the oral cavity in an 18 year male and the diagnosis was made on histopathological examination. PMID:25478466

  16. Epigenetic mechanisms in oral carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gasche, Jacqueline A; Goel, Ajay

    2013-01-01

    Dysregulation of gene expression is a frequent occurrence in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). However, accumulating evidence suggests that in contrast to genetics, epigenetic modifications consisting of aberrant DNA methylation, histone modifications and altered expression of miRNAs induce OSCC tumorigenesis and perhaps play a more central role in the evolution and progression of this disease. The unifying theme among these three epigenetic mechanisms remains the same, which is aberrant regulation of gene expression. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of the impact of epigenetics on oral tumorigenesis with a systematic report on aberrant DNA methylation, histone modifications and miRNA regulation in the pathogenesis of OSCC. We provide insights into recent studies on the prospect of biomarkers for early detection and indication of disease recurrence, and novel treatment modalities. PMID:23148615

  17. Transtracheal ventilation in oral surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Layman, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    The use of transtracheal ventilation as a routine method of ventilation during anaesthesia for 60 patients with gross pathology requiring oral surgery is reported. Theoretical hazards of the technique and protection of the airway are discussed. There were no serious complications in this series. The technique is recommended as a simple and safe alternative to blind nasal intubation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:6614769

  18. Oral targeted therapy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carrington, Christine

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Oral targeted therapies are increasingly being used to treat cancer. They work by interfering with specific molecules or pathways involved in tumour growth. It is essential that health professionals managing patients taking these drugs have appropriate training and skills. They should be aware of potential adverse effects and drug interactions, and be able to manage toxicities when they occur. Despite the selectivity of these targeted therapies, they still have serious adverse effects including skin reactions, diarrhoea and altered organ function. PMID:26648656

  19. Hamartomas of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S.; Majumdar, Barnali

    2015-01-01

    The majority of oral diseases present as growths and masses of varied cellular origin. Such masses may include simple hyperplasia, hamartoma, choristoma, teratoma, benign or malignant neoplasms. The distinguishing features of hamartomatous lesions are not certain, and often these non-neoplastic masses are indiscreetly denoted as neoplasms without weighing their pathology or biological behaviour. Essentially, understanding the dynamics of each of these disease processes forms an integral part of the appropriate treatment planning. PMID:26539384

  20. Antihistamines: topical vs oral administration.

    PubMed

    Davies, R J; Bagnall, A C; McCabe, R N; Calderon, M A; Wang, J H

    1996-05-01

    The pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis is complex, involving not only histamine and mast cell-derived tryptase, but also eosinophil- and neutrophil-derived mediators, cytokines, and intercellular cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1). It is surprising that antihistamines, which block only one component of the process, have proved so effective in the management of allergic rhinitis. Research has therefore focused on whether antihistamines have additional pharmacological activities. In vitro studies have shown that high concentrations of second generation antihistamines can block inflammatory mediator release from basophils and mast cells, and reduce ICAM-1 expression in epithelial cell lines. In vivo studies have also shown an effect on the allergen-induced inflammatory reaction; both oral and intranasal antihistamines cause a reduction in nasal symptoms and inflammatory cell influx. Oral terfenadine and cetirizine and intranasal levocabastine and azelastine have also demonstrated a lowering of ICAM-1 expression on epithelial cells. With regard to clinical efficacy, topical levocabastine (0.5 mg/mL eye drop solution and 0.5 mg/mL nasal spray) was shown to be more effective than oral terfenadine (60 mg twice daily) in relieving ocular itch (P = 0.02) and reducing nasal symptoms in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. In a further study, levocabastine eye drops were as effective and well tolerated as sodium cromoglycate in seasonal allergic rhinitis. Intranasal azelastine (0.28 mg twice daily) showed a trend for superior relief of rhinorrhoea and nasal obstruction compared with oral terfenadine (60 mg twice daily). In addition, intranasal azelastine (0.28 mg twice daily) resulted in significant reductions in sneezing, nasal obstruction, rhinorrhoea and itching in perennial rhinitis, compared with the lower efficacy of beclomethasone dipropionate (0.1 mg twice daily). As well as benefits in efficacy, topical administration is associated with improved safety. Some antihistamines, particularly those metabolized in the liver, are associated with occasional reports of severe side-effects. It is therefore logical to administer antihistamines directly to the target organ. PMID:8735853

  1. Urban legends series: oral leukoplakia.

    PubMed

    Arduino, P G; Bagan, J; El-Naggar, A K; Carrozzo, M

    2013-10-01

    To date, the term oral leukoplakia (OL) should be used to recognize 'predominantly white plaques of questionable risk, having excluded (other) known diseases or disorders that carry no increased risk of cancer'. In this review, we addressed four controversial topics regarding oral leukoplakias (OLs): (i) Do tobacco and alcohol cause OLs?, (ii) What percentage of OLs transform into oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC)?, (iii) Can we distinguish between premalignant and innocent OLs?, and (iv) Is proliferative verrucous leukoplakia (PVL) a specific entity or just a form of multifocal leukoplakia? Results of extensive literature search suggest that (i) no definitive evidence for direct causal relationship between smoked tobacco and alcohol as causative factors of OLs, (ii and iii) the vast majority of OLs follow a benign course and do not progress into a cancer, and no widely accepted and/or validated clinical and/or biological factors can predict malignant transformation, and (iv) the distinction between multifocal/multiple leukoplakias and PVL in their early presentation is impossible; the temporal clinical progression and the high rate of recurrences and development of cancer of PVL are the most reliable features for diagnosis. PMID:23379968

  2. The global burden of oral diseases and risks to oral health.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Estupinan-Day, Saskia; Ndiaye, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    This paper outlines the burden of oral diseases worldwide and describes the influence of major sociobehavioural risk factors in oral health. Despite great improvements in the oral health of populations in several countries, global problems still persist. The burden of oral disease is particularly high for the disadvantaged and poor population groups in both developing and developed countries. Oral diseases such as dental caries, periodontal disease, tooth loss, oral mucosal lesions and oropharyngeal cancers, human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS)-related oral disease and orodental trauma are major public health problems worldwide and poor oral health has a profound effect on general health and quality of life. The diversity in oral disease patterns and development trends across countries and regions reflects distinct risk profiles and the establishment of preventive oral health care programmes. The important role of sociobehavioural and environmental factors in oral health and disease has been shown in a large number of socioepidemiological surveys. In addition to poor living conditions, the major risk factors relate to unhealthy lifestyles (i.e. poor diet, nutrition and oral hygiene and use of tobacco and alcohol), and limited availability and accessibility of oral health services. Several oral diseases are linked to noncommunicable chronic diseases primarily because of common risk factors. Moreover, general diseases often have oral manifestations (e.g. diabetes or HIV/AIDS). Worldwide strengthening of public health programmes through the implementation of effective measures for the prevention of oral disease and promotion of oral health is urgently needed. The challenges of improving oral health are particularly great in developing countries. PMID:16211157

  3. The Bila Muuji oral health promotion partnership.

    PubMed

    Meihubers, Sandra

    2013-12-01

    In western NSW in 2006, a group of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations identified oral health as a priority need in their regions, considering the lack of regular dental services, poor access to oral health information, and high dental disease rates. A regional oral health promotion program was developed and implemented under the guidance of a regional coordinator who supports local staff in oral health promotion activities such as school-based toothbrushing and the provision of oral health information to targeted groups (e.g. young mothers and carers) and staff of chronic disease programs. The program's strength in its planning and continuity is due to many factors, one of the main being the active involvement of local Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation staff in its genesis, planning and implementation. Combined with strong management support, local partnerships and regional coordination, the program continues to provide collaborative approaches to community-based oral health promotion programs. PMID:24360210

  4. Oral myiasis in a captive hippopotamus.

    PubMed

    Rossi Júnior, João Luiz; Guião-Leite, Flaviana L; Gioso, Marco Antonio; Falqueiro, Léslie M Domingues; Fecchio, Roberto Silveira

    2009-01-01

    Causes of dental infections can be related to failed dental eruption, malocclusion, abrasion, fractures with or without exposure of the dental pulp, and periodontal disease. Reports of oral myiasis in megavertebrates in captivity are infrequent, perhaps due to the difficulty in observing the oral cavity in such species. This report describes a case of oral myiasis in an adult male hippopotamus in the gingival area and alveolar mucosa of the left mandibular canine tooth. PMID:19950517

  5. Charles McVey Oral History

    E-print Network

    McVey, Charles; Albin, Tami

    2009-12-17

    Histories of GLBTQ People in Kansas Charles McVey Oral History Part 1 video platform video management video solutionsvideo player Part 2 video platform video management video solutionsvideo player Part 3 video platform video management... Return to Charles McVey's Oral History in KU ScholarWorks Tami Albin, Director for Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of GLBTQ People in Kansas Anschutz Library University of Kansas 1301 Hoch Auditoria Drive Lawrence, KS 66045 Phone: 785-691-5748 All...

  6. Intravenous Voriconazole after Toxic Oral Administration?

    PubMed Central

    Alffenaar, J. W. C.; van Assen, S.; de Monchy, J. G. R.; Uges, D. R. A.; Kosterink, J. G. W.; van der Werf, T. S.

    2010-01-01

    In a male patient with rhinocerebral invasive aspergillosis, prolonged high-dosage oral administration of voriconazole led to hepatotoxicity combined with a severe cutaneous reaction while intravenous administration in the same patient did not. High concentrations in the portal blood precipitate liver enzyme abnormalities, and therefore, oral administration of voriconazole may have a hepatotoxicity profile different from that of intravenous (i.v.) administration. Intravenously administered voriconazole might still be an option after oral-voriconazole-induced toxicity has resolved. PMID:20385853

  7. Promoting oral health through community engagement.

    PubMed

    Glassman, Paul; Harrington, Maureen; Namakian, Maysa

    2014-07-01

    Persistent health disparities still exist in the U.S. despite decades of focus on the importance of prevention. Individual behaviors are the major contributor to oral health. By partnering and linking with community organizations, oral health professionals can expand their reach, overcome the obstacles to delivering effective prevention activities in dental offices and improve the oral health of the most underserved and vulnerable populations, who bear the greatest burden of dental disease. PMID:25076629

  8. Oral perception and oral motor ability in edentulous patients with stroke and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Leung, K C M; Pow, E H N; McMillan, A S; Wong, M C M; Li, L S W; Ho, S-L

    2002-06-01

    Oral perception and oral motor ability were assessed in edentulous patients with stroke, Parkinson's disease, and an age and gender matched control group. Standard stereognosis and oral motor ability tests were performed, with and without complete dentures in situ. Statistical comparisons were made using ANOVA, Levene's test and paired t-tests. Stroke patients had significantly poorer stereognostic measures than Parkinson's disease patients and controls (P < 0.02). Stereognostic measures were better in all groups when dentures were worn. There were no differences in oral motor ability between groups. Oral stereognosis was significantly impaired in stroke patients. Oral stereognostic ability was better in all groups when dentures were worn. The oral motor ability test lacked the sensitivity to detect differences in motor ability between experimental groups. Edentulous patients with stroke should be encouraged to wear dentures during the rehabilitation phase as oral stereognosis is then less impaired. PMID:12071915

  9. Marathon Maternity Oral History Project

    PubMed Central

    Orkin, Aaron; Newbery, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore how birthing and maternity care are understood and valued in a rural community. Design Oral history research. Setting The rural community of Marathon, Ont, with a population of approximately 3500. Participants A purposive selection of mothers, grandmothers, nurses, physicians, and community leaders in the Marathon medical catchment area. Methods Interviews were conducted with a purposive sample, employing an oral history research methodology. Interviews were conducted non-anonymously in order to preserve the identity and personhood of participants. Interview transcripts were edited into short narratives. Oral histories offer perspectives and information not revealed in other quantitative or qualitative research methodologies. Narratives re-personalize and humanize medical research by offering researchers and practitioners the opportunity to bear witness to the personal stories affected through medical decision making. Main findings Eleven stand-alone narratives, published in this issue of Canadian Family Physician, form the project’s findings. Similar to a literary text or short story, they are intended for personal reflection and interpretation by the reader. Presenting the results of these interviews as narratives requires the reader to participate in the research exercise and take part in listening to these women’s voices. The project’s narratives will be accessible to readers from academic and non-academic backgrounds and will interest readers in medicine and allied health professions, medical humanities, community development, gender studies, social anthropology and history, and literature. Conclusion Sharing personal birthing experiences might inspire others to reevaluate and reconsider birthing practices and services in other communities. Where local maternity services are under threat, Marathon’s stories might contribute to understanding the meaning and challenges of local birthing, and the implications of losing maternity services in rural Canada. PMID:24452565

  10. Fungal infections of the oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, P Anitha

    2012-01-01

    Fungal infections in humans occur as a result of defects in the immune system. An increasing emergence in oral Candidal and non-Candidal fungal infections is evident in the past decade owing to the rise in the immunodeficient and immunocompromised population globally. Oral Candidal infection usually involves a compromised host and the compromise may be local or systemic. Local compromising factors include decreased salivation, poor oral hygiene, wearing dentures among others while systemic factors include diabetes mellitus, nutritional deficiency, HIV infection/AIDS and others. Oral candidiasis is generally a localized infection and rarely appears as a systemic fungal disease whereas oral non-Candidal fungal infections are usually signs of disseminated disease. Some of the non-Candidal fungi that were once considered exotic and geographically restricted are now seen worldwide, beyond their natural habitat, probably attributed to globalization and travels. Currently infections from these fungi are more prevalent than before and they may present either as primary oral lesions or as oral manifestations of systemic mycoses. This review discusses the various predisposing factors, clinical presentations, clinical differential diagnosis, diagnosis and management of oral candidiasis, as well as briefly highlights upon a few of the more exotic non-Candidal fungi that infect the oral mucosa. PMID:23422613

  11. Oral and pharyngeal epithelial keratinocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Leelahavanichkul, Kantima; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2013-01-01

    Primary human oral epithelial cells are readily available and have been recently employed for tissue engineering. These cells are currently being widely utilized in multiple research efforts, ranging from the study of oral biology, mucosal immunity, and carcinogenesis to stem cell biology and tissue engineering. This chapter describes step-by-step protocols for the successful isolation and culture of human oral epithelial cells and fibroblasts, and techniques for their use in two-dimensional and three-dimensional culture systems. The described methods will enable to generate reconstituted tissues that resemble epithelial like structures in vitro, which can recapitulate some of the key features of the oral epithelium in vivo. PMID:23097101

  12. Medical Imaging of Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Susan M

    2015-11-01

    Oral cancer is associated with documented risk factors, yet no comprehensive screening program is in place in the United States for early detection of the disease. Oral cancer often is diagnosed in more advanced stages, resulting in a poor prognosis. Dental practitioners and radiographers play an important role in the management of the disease and in helping to improve the quality of life for people who have oral cancer. This article discusses types of oral and oropharyngeal cancer, their diagnosis, treatment options, and the role of dental imaging in patients with these cancers. PMID:26538220

  13. Children's Oral Health Assessment, Prevention, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Okunseri, Christopher; Gonzalez, Cesar; Hodgson, Brian

    2015-10-01

    This article provides a brief introduction to various aspects of oral health care in children, with emphasis on the epidemiology, risk assessment, prevention, and treatment modalities for dental caries. In addition, barriers to dental care and the involvement of pediatricians in advocating for and providing preventive dental care for children are reviewed. Oral health care is one of the most prevalent unmet needs among infants, toddlers, and adolescents in the United States. Routine or preventive dental visits are important for early diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of oral diseases, and for establishing and maintaining good oral health and overall well-being. PMID:26318948

  14. Oral Immunotherapy for Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Burbank, Allison J; Sood, Puja; Vickery, Brian P; Wood, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Food allergy is a potentially life-threatening condition with no approved therapies, apart from avoidance and injectable epinephrine for acute allergic reactions. Oral immunotherapy (OIT) is an experimental treatment in which food-allergic patients consume gradually increasing quantities of the food to increase their threshold for allergic reaction. This therapy carries significant risk of allergic reactions. The ability of OIT to desensitize patients to particular foods is well-documented, although the ability to induce tolerance has not been established. This review focuses on recent studies for the treatment of food allergies such as cow's milk, hen's egg, and peanut. PMID:26617227

  15. Oral cleft prevention program (OCPP)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Oral clefts are one of the most common birth defects with significant medical, psychosocial, and economic ramifications. Oral clefts have a complex etiology with genetic and environmental risk factors. There are suggestive results for decreased risks of cleft occurrence and recurrence with folic acid supplements taken at preconception and during pregnancy with a stronger evidence for higher than lower doses in preventing recurrence. Yet previous studies have suffered from considerable design limitations particularly non-randomization into treatment. There is also well-documented effectiveness for folic acid in preventing neural tube defect occurrence at 0.4 mg and recurrence with 4 mg. Given the substantial burden of clefting on the individual and the family and the supportive data for the effectiveness of folic acid supplementation as well as its low cost, a randomized clinical trial of the effectiveness of high versus low dose folic acid for prevention of cleft recurrence is warranted. Methods/design This study will assess the effect of 4 mg and 0.4 mg doses of folic acid, taken on a daily basis during preconception and up to 3 months of pregnancy by women who are at risk of having a child with nonsyndromic cleft lip with/without palate (NSCL/P), on the recurrence of NSCL/P. The total sample will include about 6,000 women (that either have NSCL/P or that have at least one child with NSCL/P) randomly assigned to the 4 mg and the 0.4 mg folic acid study groups. The study will also compare the recurrence rates of NSCL/P in the total sample of subjects, as well as the two study groups (4mg, 0.4 mg) to that of a historical control group. The study has been approved by IRBs (ethics committees) of all involved sites. Results will be disseminated through publications and presentations at scientific meetings. Discussion The costs related to oral clefts are high, including long term psychological and socio-economic effects. This study provides an opportunity for huge savings in not only money but the overall quality of life. This may help establish more specific clinical guidelines for oral cleft prevention so that the intervention can be better tailored for at-risk women. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00397917 PMID:23181832

  16. J Oral Maxillofac Surg 63:529-535, 2005

    E-print Network

    Lu, Helen H.

    -rich plasma (PRP) as an adjunct to bone grafting procedures in oral and maxillofa- cial surgery has seen *Assistant Professor, Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dental and Oral Surgery, Columbia. ¶Professor and Chair, Hospital Dentistry/Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dental and Oral Surgery

  17. Epidemiology of oral HPV in the oral mucosa in women without signs of oral disease from Yucatan, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Losa, María del Refugio; Barrera, Ernesto Soria; Herrera-Pech, Verónica; Conde-Ferráez, Laura; Puerto-Solís, Marylin; Ayora-Talavera, Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) are considered necessary for the development of cervical cancer. Furthermore, there is no doubt that some types of oral squamous cell carcinoma are associated with HR-HPV. The epidemiology of oral HPV infections in healthy subjects remains unclear due to a lack of knowledge. The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of human papillomavirus infections of the oral mucosa without pathology. A cross-sectional study was performed; samples from 390 women seeking prenatal care, Pap smears, family planning or gynecological diseases were studied. Oral cells were collected by direct swab sampling. Information regarding sociodemographic status, sexual behavior, infectious diseases, contraceptive history and tobacco and alcohol consumption were obtained through direct interviews. HPV and genotypes were detected by type-specific polymerase chain reaction. Our results revealed that 14% of the women studied had an oral HPV infection. Women ? 20 years of age had the highest HPV prevalence (24.5%). In total, seven genotypes were identified, including the high-risk genotypes 16, 18, 58 and 59 and the low-risk genotypes 6, 81 and 13, the latter of which is a type exclusive to oral mucosa. Sexual behavior was not associated with the presence of genital HPV types in the oral mucosa. Genital HPV types were present in the oral mucosa of women without associated clinical manifestations; however, sexual behavior was not associated with infection, and therefore others routes of transmission should be explored. PMID:26221121

  18. [Cerebrovacular accidents and oral contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Gautier, J C; Rosa, A; Lhermitte, F

    1974-01-01

    This review summarizes 169 cerebral vascular accidents in women taking oral contraceptives: 94 arterial (including 13 of the authors' cases), 20 venous, 37 neuroophthalmologic (5 of the authors'), and 18 undetermined diagnoses. The arterial accidents involved the carotid in 56, the vertebrobasilar in 27. Few were fatal; most were considered thromboses; none were due to hemorrhage; few could have been due to emboli or dissecting aneurisms. Aggravation or appearance of migraine was noted in 34 and transient focal cerebral ischemia in 28 cases before arterial accident. No definite time span was obvious, but many occurred 1-6 months or over 2 years after starting pills. Venous accidents were usually fatal, often extended thromboses of the superior longitudinal sinus. Clinically there was severe headache (85%), vomiting, fever without rapid pulse, alteration of consciousness, papillary edema, focal cerebral signs. Ophthalmologic accidents included retinal, arterial, and venous occlusion; paralysis of oculomotor nerve; optic neuritis; and pseudo-tumor-cerebri. The authors recommended caution with oral contraceptives in case of cerebral vascular episodes, migraine, visual disturbances, chorea, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. PMID:4432014

  19. Unusual presentation of oral amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, William P. P.; Wastner, Bruna F.; Bohn, Joslei C.; Jung, Juliana E.; Schussel, Juliana L.; Sassi, Laurindo M.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a rare disease of difficult diagnosis that occurs due accumulation of amyloid substance localized or systemic. The oral cavity is an unusual site and can be related to both localized and systemic forms and for that reason a full investigation is necessary to determine the extent of the disease. This study reports a case of a 58-year-old melanoderm male patient referred to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery with white plaques on the tongue and multiple nodules in the region of the buccal mucosa and labial commissure, with 6 months of evolution and painful symptoms. An incisional biopsy was performed on both sites and histological examination indicated the presence of eosinophilic amorphous material within the connective tissue, positive for crystal violet staining, consistent with amyloidosis. At the present time, there is no consensus on the management of local amyloidosis. Surgical treatment of localized forms is indicated in some cases to reduce the functional prejudice. Moreover, follow-up is mandatory, both to manage recurrences and to monitor the possible evolution of the disease to the systemic form.

  20. Oral submucous fibrosis: an update

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Verma, Shyam B; Ali, Fareedi Mukram; Patil, Kishor

    2015-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is a premalignant condition caused by betel chewing. It is very common in Southeast Asia but has started to spread to Europe and North America. OSF can lead to squamous cell carcinoma, a risk that is further increased by concomitant tobacco consumption. OSF is a diagnosis based on clinical symptoms and confirmation by histopathology. Hypovascularity leading to blanching of the oral mucosa, staining of teeth and gingiva, and trismus are major symptoms. Major constituents of betel quid are arecoline from betel nuts and copper, which are responsible for fibroblast dysfunction and fibrosis. A variety of extracellular and intracellular signaling pathways might be involved. Treatment of OSF is difficult, as not many large, randomized controlled trials have been conducted. The principal actions of drug therapy include antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxygen radical mechanisms. Potential new drugs are on the horizon. Surgery may be necessary in advanced cases of trismus. Prevention is most important, as no healing can be achieved with available treatments. PMID:25914554

  1. Ageing, dementia and oral health.

    PubMed

    Foltyn, P

    2015-03-01

    Neurocognitive decline and delirium, frailty, incontinence, falls, hearing and vision impairment, medication compliance and pharmacokinetics, skin breakdown, impaired sleep and rest are regarded as geriatric giants by gerontologists, geriatricians and nursing home staff. As these are all interrelated in the elderly, failure to act on one can impact on the others. However, the implications of poor oral health have for too long been ignored and deserve equal status. Mouth pain can be devastating for the elderly, compound psychosocial problems, frustrate carers and nursing home staff and disrupt family dynamics. As appearance, function and comfort suffer, so may a person's self-esteem and confidence. The contributing factors for poor oral health such as rapid dental decay, acute and chronic periodontal infections and compromised systemic health on a background of a dry mouth, coupled with xerostomia-inducing medications, reduced fine motor function, declining cognition and motivation will not only lead to an increase in both morbidity and mortality but also impact on quality of life. PMID:25762045

  2. Oral health survey and oral health questionnaire for high school students in Tibet, China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to identify the oral health status as well as oral health practices and access for care of graduating senior high school Tibetan students in Shannan prefecture of Tibet. Methods Based on standards of the 3rd Chinese National Oral Epidemiological Survey and WHO Oral Health Surveys, 1907 graduating students from three senior high schools were examined for caries, periodontitis, dental fluorosis, and oral hygiene status. The questionnaire to the students addressed oral health practices and present access to oral medical services. Results Dental caries prevalence (39.96%) and mean DMFT (0.97) were high in Tibetan students. In community periodontal indexes, the detection rate of gingivitis and dental calculus were 59.50% and 62.64%, respectively. Oral hygiene index-simplified was 0.69, with 0.36 and 0.33 in debris index-simplified and calculus index-simplified, respectively. Community dental fluorosis index was 0.29, with 8.13% in prevalence rate. The questionnaire showed students had poor oral health practices and unawareness for their needs for oral health services. It was also noted that the local area provides inadequate oral medical services. Conclusions Tibetan students had higher prevalence of dental diseases and lower awareness of oral health needs. The main reasons were geographical environment, dietary habit, students’ attitude to oral health, and lack of oral health promotion and education. Oral health education and local dentists training should be strengthened to get effective prevention of dental diseases. PMID:24884668

  3. 21 CFR 20.104 - Summaries of oral discussions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Summaries of oral discussions. 20.104 Section 20.104 Food...Records § 20.104 Summaries of oral discussions. (a) All written summaries of oral discussions, whether in person or by...

  4. 21 CFR 520.2160 - Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms. 520.2160...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage...

  5. 21 CFR 520.88c - Amoxicillin trihydrate oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...false Amoxicillin trihydrate oral suspension. 520.88c Section...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...88c Amoxicillin trihydrate oral suspension. (a)...

  6. 21 CFR 520.390 - Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms. 520.390...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.390 Chloramphenicol oral dosage...

  7. 21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.763 Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage...

  8. 21 CFR 520.2261 - Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...false Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms. 520.2261...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...2261 Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage...

  9. 21 CFR 520.620 - Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... false Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms. 520.620...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.620 Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage...

  10. 21 CFR 520.90 - Ampicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Ampicillin oral dosage forms. 520.90 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.90 Ampicillin oral dosage...

  11. 21 CFR 520.45 - Albendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Albendazole oral dosage forms. 520.45 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.45 Albendazole oral dosage...

  12. 21 CFR 520.2325 - Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms. 520.2325...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2325 Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage...

  13. 21 CFR 520.300 - Cambendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Cambendazole oral dosage forms. 520.300...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.300 Cambendazole oral dosage...

  14. 21 CFR 520.530 - Cythioate oral liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Cythioate oral liquid. 520.530 Section...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.530 Cythioate oral liquid. (a)...

  15. 21 CFR 520.2261 - Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...false Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms. 520.2261...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...2261 Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage...

  16. 21 CFR 520.2345 - Tetracycline oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Tetracycline oral dosage forms. 520.2345...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2345 Tetracycline oral dosage...

  17. 21 CFR 520.2123 - Spectinomycin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Spectinomycin oral dosage forms. 520.2123...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2123 Spectinomycin oral dosage...

  18. 21 CFR 520.903 - Febantel oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Febantel oral dosage forms. 520.903...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.903 Febantel oral dosage...

  19. 21 CFR 520.2160 - Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms. 520.2160...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage...

  20. 21 CFR 520.2325 - Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms. 520.2325...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2325 Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage...

  1. 21 CFR 520.1696 - Penicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Penicillin oral dosage forms. 520.1696...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696 Penicillin oral dosage...

  2. 21 CFR 520.622 - Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms. 520.622...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS... Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage...

  3. 21 CFR 520.622 - Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms. 520.622...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS... Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage...

  4. 21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.763 Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage...

  5. 21 CFR 520.540 - Dexamethasone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Dexamethasone oral dosage forms. 520.540...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.540 Dexamethasone oral dosage...

  6. 21 CFR 520.1450 - Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... false Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms. 520.1450...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1450 Morantel tartrate oral dosage...

  7. 21 CFR 520.2220 - Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms. 520.2220...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2220 Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage...

  8. 21 CFR 520.390 - Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms. 520.390...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.390 Chloramphenicol oral dosage...

  9. 21 CFR 520.1450 - Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... false Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms. 520.1450...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1450 Morantel tartrate oral dosage...

  10. 21 CFR 520.2220 - Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms. 520.2220...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2220 Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage...

  11. 21 CFR 520.903 - Febantel oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Febantel oral dosage forms. 520.903...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.903 Febantel oral dosage...

  12. 21 CFR 520.390 - Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms. 520.390...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.390 Chloramphenicol oral dosage...

  13. 21 CFR 520.90 - Ampicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Ampicillin oral dosage forms. 520.90 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.90 Ampicillin oral dosage...

  14. 21 CFR 520.2220 - Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms. 520.2220...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2220 Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage...

  15. 21 CFR 520.2380 - Thiabendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Thiabendazole oral dosage forms. 520.2380...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2380 Thiabendazole oral dosage...

  16. 21 CFR 520.1120 - Haloxon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Haloxon oral dosage forms. 520.1120...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1120 Haloxon oral dosage...

  17. 21 CFR 520.2158c - Dihydrostreptomycin oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... false Dihydrostreptomycin oral suspension. 520.2158c...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...2158c Dihydrostreptomycin oral suspension. (a)...

  18. 21 CFR 520.905 - Fenbendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Fenbendazole oral dosage forms. 520.905...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.905 Fenbendazole oral dosage...

  19. 21 CFR 520.1448 - Monensin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Monensin oral dosage forms. 520.1448...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1448 Monensin oral dosage forms....

  20. 21 CFR 520.2220c - Sulfadimethoxine oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Sulfadimethoxine oral suspension. 520.2220c...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2220c Sulfadimethoxine oral suspension. (a)...

  1. 21 CFR 520.970 - Flunixin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Flunixin oral dosage forms. 520.970...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.970 Flunixin oral dosage...

  2. 21 CFR 520.154 - Bacitracin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Bacitracin oral dosage forms. 520.154...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.154 Bacitracin oral dosage...

  3. 21 CFR 520.1242 - Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...false Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms. 520.1242...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...1242 Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage...

  4. 21 CFR 520.445 - Chlortetracycline oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... false Chlortetracycline oral dosage forms. 520.445...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.445 Chlortetracycline oral dosage...

  5. 21 CFR 520.90 - Ampicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Ampicillin oral dosage forms. 520.90 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.90 Ampicillin oral dosage...

  6. 21 CFR 520.2473 - Tioxidazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Tioxidazole oral dosage forms. 520.2473...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2473 Tioxidazole oral dosage...

  7. 21 CFR 520.2345 - Tetracycline oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Tetracycline oral dosage forms. 520.2345...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2345 Tetracycline oral dosage...

  8. 21 CFR 520.1450 - Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... false Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms. 520.1450...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1450 Morantel tartrate oral dosage...

  9. 21 CFR 520.530 - Cythioate oral liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Cythioate oral liquid. 520.530 Section...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.530 Cythioate oral liquid. (a)...

  10. 21 CFR 520.88 - Amoxicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Amoxicillin oral dosage forms. 520.88 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.88 Amoxicillin oral dosage...

  11. 21 CFR 520.82 - Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...false Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms. 520.82 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...82 Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage...

  12. 21 CFR 520.2123 - Spectinomycin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Spectinomycin oral dosage forms. 520.2123...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2123 Spectinomycin oral dosage...

  13. 21 CFR 520.1120 - Haloxon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Haloxon oral dosage forms. 520.1120...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1120 Haloxon oral dosage...

  14. 21 CFR 520.2220c - Sulfadimethoxine oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Sulfadimethoxine oral suspension. 520.2220c...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2220c Sulfadimethoxine oral suspension. (a)...

  15. 21 CFR 520.905 - Fenbendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Fenbendazole oral dosage forms. 520.905...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.905 Fenbendazole oral dosage...

  16. 21 CFR 520.1120 - Haloxon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Haloxon oral dosage forms. 520.1120...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1120 Haloxon oral dosage...

  17. 21 CFR 520.2260 - Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms. 520.2260...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2260 Sulfamethazine oral dosage...

  18. 21 CFR 20.104 - Summaries of oral discussions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Summaries of oral discussions. 20.104 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... § 20.104 Summaries of oral discussions. (a) All written summaries of oral discussions,...

  19. 21 CFR 520.903 - Febantel oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Febantel oral dosage forms. 520.903...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.903 Febantel oral dosage...

  20. 21 CFR 520.530 - Cythioate oral liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Cythioate oral liquid. 520.530 Section...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.530 Cythioate oral liquid. (a)...

  1. 21 CFR 520.2520 - Trichlorfon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Trichlorfon oral dosage forms. 520.2520...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520 Trichlorfon oral dosage...

  2. 21 CFR 520.2150 - Stanozolol oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Stanozolol oral dosage forms. 520.2150...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2150 Stanozolol oral dosage...

  3. 21 CFR 20.104 - Summaries of oral discussions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Summaries of oral discussions. 20.104 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... § 20.104 Summaries of oral discussions. (a) All written summaries of oral discussions,...

  4. 21 CFR 520.1450 - Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... false Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms. 520.1450...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1450 Morantel tartrate oral dosage...

  5. 21 CFR 520.1720 - Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms. 520.1720...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1720 Phenylbutazone oral dosage...

  6. 21 CFR 520.2123 - Spectinomycin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Spectinomycin oral dosage forms. 520.2123...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2123 Spectinomycin oral dosage...

  7. 21 CFR 520.2158c - Dihydrostreptomycin oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... false Dihydrostreptomycin oral suspension. 520.2158c...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...2158c Dihydrostreptomycin oral suspension. (a)...

  8. 21 CFR 520.300 - Cambendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Cambendazole oral dosage forms. 520.300...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.300 Cambendazole oral dosage...

  9. 21 CFR 520.88 - Amoxicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Amoxicillin oral dosage forms. 520.88 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.88 Amoxicillin oral dosage...

  10. 21 CFR 520.88c - Amoxicillin trihydrate oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...false Amoxicillin trihydrate oral suspension. 520.88c Section...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...88c Amoxicillin trihydrate oral suspension. (a)...

  11. 21 CFR 872.6510 - Oral irrigation unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 false Oral irrigation unit. 872.6510...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6510 Oral irrigation unit. (a) Identification. An oral irrigation unit is...

  12. 21 CFR 520.2260 - Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms. 520.2260...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2260 Sulfamethazine oral dosage...

  13. 21 CFR 520.905 - Fenbendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Fenbendazole oral dosage forms. 520.905...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.905 Fenbendazole oral dosage...

  14. 21 CFR 520.2520 - Trichlorfon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Trichlorfon oral dosage forms. 520.2520...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520 Trichlorfon oral dosage...

  15. 21 CFR 520.45 - Albendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Albendazole oral dosage forms. 520.45 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.45 Albendazole oral dosage...

  16. 21 CFR 520.1120 - Haloxon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Haloxon oral dosage forms. 520.1120...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1120 Haloxon oral dosage...

  17. 21 CFR 520.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... false Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms. 520.1044...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1044 Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage...

  18. 21 CFR 520.1720 - Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms. 520.1720...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1720 Phenylbutazone oral dosage...

  19. 21 CFR 872.6510 - Oral irrigation unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Oral irrigation unit. 872.6510...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6510 Oral irrigation unit. (a) Identification. An oral irrigation unit is...

  20. 21 CFR 520.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... false Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms. 520.1044...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1044 Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage...

  1. 21 CFR 520.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... false Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms. 520.1044...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1044 Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage...

  2. 21 CFR 520.82 - Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...false Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms. 520.82 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...82 Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage...

  3. 21 CFR 520.622 - Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms. 520.622...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS... Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage...

  4. 21 CFR 520.903 - Febantel oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Febantel oral dosage forms. 520.903...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.903 Febantel oral dosage...

  5. 21 CFR 520.88 - Amoxicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Amoxicillin oral dosage forms. 520.88 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.88 Amoxicillin oral dosage...

  6. 21 CFR 520.2220c - Sulfadimethoxine oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Sulfadimethoxine oral suspension. 520.2220c...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2220c Sulfadimethoxine oral suspension. (a)...

  7. 21 CFR 520.530 - Cythioate oral liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Cythioate oral liquid. 520.530 Section...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.530 Cythioate oral liquid. (a)...

  8. 21 CFR 520.2325 - Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms. 520.2325...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2325 Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage...

  9. 21 CFR 520.2220c - Sulfadimethoxine oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Sulfadimethoxine oral suspension. 520.2220c...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2220c Sulfadimethoxine oral suspension. (a)...

  10. 21 CFR 520.1242 - Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...false Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms. 520.1242...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...1242 Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage...

  11. 21 CFR 520.620 - Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... false Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms. 520.620...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.620 Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage...

  12. 21 CFR 520.2260 - Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms. 520.2260...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2260 Sulfamethazine oral dosage...

  13. 21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.763 Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage...

  14. 21 CFR 520.620 - Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... false Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms. 520.620...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.620 Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage...

  15. 21 CFR 520.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... false Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms. 520.1044...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1044 Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage...

  16. 21 CFR 520.622 - Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms. 520.622...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS... Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage...

  17. 21 CFR 520.38 - Albendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Albendazole oral dosage forms. 520.38 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.38 Albendazole oral dosage...

  18. 21 CFR 520.2325 - Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms. 520.2325...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2325 Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage...

  19. 21 CFR 520.2325 - Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms. 520.2325...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2325 Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage...

  20. 21 CFR 520.2260 - Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms. 520.2260...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2260 Sulfamethazine oral dosage...

  1. 21 CFR 520.2473 - Tioxidazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Tioxidazole oral dosage forms. 520.2473...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2473 Tioxidazole oral dosage...

  2. 21 CFR 520.2345 - Tetracycline oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Tetracycline oral dosage forms. 520.2345...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2345 Tetracycline oral dosage...

  3. 21 CFR 520.2473 - Tioxidazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Tioxidazole oral dosage forms. 520.2473...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2473 Tioxidazole oral dosage...

  4. 21 CFR 520.82 - Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...false Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms. 520.82 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...82 Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage...

  5. 21 CFR 520.2261 - Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...false Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms. 520.2261...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...2261 Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage...

  6. 21 CFR 520.2150 - Stanozolol oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Stanozolol oral dosage forms. 520.2150...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2150 Stanozolol oral dosage...

  7. 21 CFR 520.1696 - Penicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Penicillin oral dosage forms. 520.1696...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696 Penicillin oral dosage...

  8. 21 CFR 872.6510 - Oral irrigation unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 false Oral irrigation unit. 872.6510...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6510 Oral irrigation unit. (a) Identification. An oral irrigation unit is...

  9. 21 CFR 520.1720 - Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms. 520.1720...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1720 Phenylbutazone oral dosage...

  10. 21 CFR 520.2520 - Trichlorfon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Trichlorfon oral dosage forms. 520.2520...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520 Trichlorfon oral dosage...

  11. 21 CFR 520.905 - Fenbendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Fenbendazole oral dosage forms. 520.905...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.905 Fenbendazole oral dosage...

  12. 21 CFR 872.6510 - Oral irrigation unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 false Oral irrigation unit. 872.6510...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6510 Oral irrigation unit. (a) Identification. An oral irrigation unit is...

  13. 21 CFR 520.82 - Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...false Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms. 520.82 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...82 Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage...

  14. 21 CFR 520.2220 - Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms. 520.2220...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2220 Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage...

  15. 21 CFR 520.2158c - Dihydrostreptomycin oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... false Dihydrostreptomycin oral suspension. 520.2158c...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...2158c Dihydrostreptomycin oral suspension. (a)...

  16. 21 CFR 520.2160 - Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms. 520.2160...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage...

  17. 21 CFR 520.2473 - Tioxidazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Tioxidazole oral dosage forms. 520.2473...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2473 Tioxidazole oral dosage...

  18. 21 CFR 520.2220 - Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms. 520.2220...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2220 Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage...

  19. 21 CFR 520.540 - Dexamethasone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Dexamethasone oral dosage forms. 520.540...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.540 Dexamethasone oral dosage...

  20. 21 CFR 520.1242 - Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...false Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms. 520.1242...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...1242 Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage...

  1. 21 CFR 520.82 - Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...false Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms. 520.82 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...82 Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage...

  2. 21 CFR 520.154 - Bacitracin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Bacitracin oral dosage forms. 520.154...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.154 Bacitracin oral dosage...

  3. 21 CFR 520.2380 - Thiabendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Thiabendazole oral dosage forms. 520.2380...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2380 Thiabendazole oral dosage...

  4. 21 CFR 520.2380 - Thiabendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Thiabendazole oral dosage forms. 520.2380...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2380 Thiabendazole oral dosage...

  5. 21 CFR 520.88 - Amoxicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Amoxicillin oral dosage forms. 520.88 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.88 Amoxicillin oral dosage...

  6. 21 CFR 520.620 - Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... false Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms. 520.620...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.620 Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage...

  7. 21 CFR 520.1120 - Haloxon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Haloxon oral dosage forms. 520.1120...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1120 Haloxon oral dosage...

  8. 21 CFR 520.2158c - Dihydrostreptomycin oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... false Dihydrostreptomycin oral suspension. 520.2158c...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...2158c Dihydrostreptomycin oral suspension. (a)...

  9. 21 CFR 872.6510 - Oral irrigation unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 false Oral irrigation unit. 872.6510...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6510 Oral irrigation unit. (a) Identification. An oral irrigation unit is...

  10. 21 CFR 520.445 - Chlortetracycline oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... false Chlortetracycline oral dosage forms. 520.445...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.445 Chlortetracycline oral dosage...

  11. 21 CFR 520.1720 - Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms. 520.1720...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1720 Phenylbutazone oral dosage...

  12. 21 CFR 520.88 - Amoxicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Amoxicillin oral dosage forms. 520.88 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.88 Amoxicillin oral dosage...

  13. 21 CFR 520.2220c - Sulfadimethoxine oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Sulfadimethoxine oral suspension. 520.2220c...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2220c Sulfadimethoxine oral suspension. (a)...

  14. 21 CFR 520.45 - Albendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Albendazole oral dosage forms. 520.45 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.45 Albendazole oral dosage...

  15. 21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.763 Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage...

  16. 21 CFR 520.1720 - Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms. 520.1720...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1720 Phenylbutazone oral dosage...

  17. 21 CFR 520.390 - Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms. 520.390...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.390 Chloramphenicol oral dosage...

  18. 21 CFR 520.2123 - Spectinomycin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Spectinomycin oral dosage forms. 520.2123...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2123 Spectinomycin oral dosage...

  19. 21 CFR 520.300 - Cambendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Cambendazole oral dosage forms. 520.300...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.300 Cambendazole oral dosage...

  20. 21 CFR 520.45 - Albendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Albendazole oral dosage forms. 520.45 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.45 Albendazole oral dosage...

  1. 21 CFR 520.2150 - Stanozolol oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Stanozolol oral dosage forms. 520.2150...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2150 Stanozolol oral dosage...

  2. 21 CFR 520.154 - Bacitracin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Bacitracin oral dosage forms. 520.154...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.154 Bacitracin oral dosage...

  3. 21 CFR 520.2260 - Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms. 520.2260...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2260 Sulfamethazine oral dosage...

  4. 21 CFR 520.540 - Dexamethasone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Dexamethasone oral dosage forms. 520.540...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.540 Dexamethasone oral dosage...

  5. 21 CFR 520.90 - Ampicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Ampicillin oral dosage forms. 520.90 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.90 Ampicillin oral dosage...

  6. 21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.763 Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage...

  7. 21 CFR 520.300 - Cambendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Cambendazole oral dosage forms. 520.300...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.300 Cambendazole oral dosage...

  8. 21 CFR 520.2380 - Thiabendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Thiabendazole oral dosage forms. 520.2380...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2380 Thiabendazole oral dosage...

  9. 21 CFR 520.2473 - Tioxidazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Tioxidazole oral dosage forms. 520.2473...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2473 Tioxidazole oral dosage...

  10. 21 CFR 520.970 - Flunixin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Flunixin oral dosage forms. 520.970...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.970 Flunixin oral dosage...

  11. 21 CFR 520.2261 - Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...false Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms. 520.2261...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...2261 Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage...

  12. 21 CFR 520.1696 - Penicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Penicillin oral dosage forms. 520.1696...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696 Penicillin oral dosage...

  13. 21 CFR 520.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... false Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms. 520.1044...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1044 Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage...

  14. 21 CFR 520.2380 - Thiabendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Thiabendazole oral dosage forms. 520.2380...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2380 Thiabendazole oral dosage...

  15. 21 CFR 520.903 - Febantel oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Febantel oral dosage forms. 520.903...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.903 Febantel oral dosage...

  16. 21 CFR 520.390 - Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms. 520.390...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.390 Chloramphenicol oral dosage...

  17. 21 CFR 520.2158c - Dihydrostreptomycin oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... false Dihydrostreptomycin oral suspension. 520.2158c...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...2158c Dihydrostreptomycin oral suspension. (a)...

  18. 21 CFR 520.1448 - Monensin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Monensin oral dosage forms. 520.1448...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1448 Monensin oral dosage forms....

  19. 21 CFR 520.905 - Fenbendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Fenbendazole oral dosage forms. 520.905...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.905 Fenbendazole oral dosage...

  20. 21 CFR 520.2520 - Trichlorfon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Trichlorfon oral dosage forms. 520.2520...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520 Trichlorfon oral dosage...

  1. 21 CFR 520.2123 - Spectinomycin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Spectinomycin oral dosage forms. 520.2123...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2123 Spectinomycin oral dosage...

  2. 21 CFR 520.300 - Cambendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Cambendazole oral dosage forms. 520.300...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.300 Cambendazole oral dosage...

  3. 21 CFR 520.540 - Dexamethasone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Dexamethasone oral dosage forms. 520.540...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.540 Dexamethasone oral dosage...

  4. 21 CFR 520.530 - Cythioate oral liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Cythioate oral liquid. 520.530 Section...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.530 Cythioate oral liquid. (a)...

  5. 21 CFR 20.104 - Summaries of oral discussions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Summaries of oral discussions. 20.104 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... § 20.104 Summaries of oral discussions. (a) All written summaries of oral discussions,...

  6. 21 CFR 520.2150 - Stanozolol oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Stanozolol oral dosage forms. 520.2150...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2150 Stanozolol oral dosage...

  7. 21 CFR 520.1450 - Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... false Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms. 520.1450...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1450 Morantel tartrate oral dosage...

  8. 21 CFR 520.2160 - Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms. 520.2160...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage...

  9. 21 CFR 520.90 - Ampicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Ampicillin oral dosage forms. 520.90 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.90 Ampicillin oral dosage...

  10. 21 CFR 520.154 - Bacitracin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Bacitracin oral dosage forms. 520.154...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.154 Bacitracin oral dosage...

  11. 21 CFR 520.2520 - Trichlorfon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Trichlorfon oral dosage forms. 520.2520...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520 Trichlorfon oral dosage...

  12. 21 CFR 520.2150 - Stanozolol oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Stanozolol oral dosage forms. 520.2150...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2150 Stanozolol oral dosage...

  13. 21 CFR 520.2261 - Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...false Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms. 520.2261...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...2261 Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage...

  14. 21 CFR 520.622 - Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms. 520.622...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS... Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage...

  15. 21 CFR 20.104 - Summaries of oral discussions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Summaries of oral discussions. 20.104 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... § 20.104 Summaries of oral discussions. (a) All written summaries of oral discussions,...

  16. 21 CFR 520.620 - Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... false Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms. 520.620...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.620 Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage...

  17. 21 CFR 520.88c - Amoxicillin trihydrate oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...false Amoxicillin trihydrate oral suspension. 520.88c Section...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...88c Amoxicillin trihydrate oral suspension. (a)...

  18. 21 CFR 520.2160 - Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms. 520.2160...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage...

  19. 21 CFR 520.154 - Bacitracin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Bacitracin oral dosage forms. 520.154...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.154 Bacitracin oral dosage...

  20. 21 CFR 520.540 - Dexamethasone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Dexamethasone oral dosage forms. 520.540...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.540 Dexamethasone oral dosage...

  1. Tufts University School of Dental Medicine Oral Health Screening Consent

    E-print Network

    Dennett, Daniel

    Tufts University School of Dental Medicine Oral Health Screening Consent that by signing this form I am consenting to receive a basic oral health assessment to establish and maintain oral health. I also understand that receiving this dental

  2. Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation (PDQ)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Research Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation (PDQ®) General Information About Oral Complications Key Points ... bleeding in the mouth. Nerve damage. Complications of radiation therapy Oral complications caused by radiation therapy to ...

  3. Oral Reading Fluency in Second Language Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeon, Eun Hee

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the role of oral reading fluency in second language reading. Two hundred and fifty-five high school students in South Korea were assessed on three oral reading fluency (ORF) variables and six other reading predictors. The relationship between ORF and other reading predictors was examined through an exploratory factor…

  4. Teaching the Past through Oral History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Pattie

    2000-01-01

    Discusses oral history as a means to connect national events with the lives of individual people. Relates the information from student oral term paper interviews, focusing on topics such as the Vietnam War, the Great Depression, civil rights and school integration, and the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. (CMK)

  5. Application of Laser in Oral Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Asnaashari, Mohammad; Zadsirjan, Saeede

    2014-01-01

    In this review collected from the literature on usage of laser in oral minor surgery based on a Medline search in the time period between the years: 2008 and 2013, the most current evidence on laser-assisted oral minor surgery is going to be surveyed. PMID:25653807

  6. 10 CFR 2.1113 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Oral argument. 2.1113 Section 2.1113 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION AGENCY RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Hybrid Hearing Procedures for Expansion of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Capacity at Civilian Nuclear Power Reactors § 2.1113 Oral argument. (a)...

  7. 10 CFR 2.1113 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Oral argument. 2.1113 Section 2.1113 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION AGENCY RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Hybrid Hearing Procedures for Expansion of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Capacity at Civilian Nuclear Power Reactors § 2.1113 Oral argument. (a)...

  8. Oral microbial habitat a dynamic entity

    PubMed Central

    Faran Ali, Syed Muhammad; Tanwir, Farzeen

    2012-01-01

    Oral microbial habitat is composed of wide variety of species. These species play a significant role in maintaining the well being of the oral cavity by contributing in various ways. However the proper functioning of these oral microbes can be detrimental for the human oral cavity if the conditions are not suitable such as redox potential (Eh), pH of a site, the activity of the host defenses, and the presence of antimicrobial agents. The oral microbial community represents the best-characterized group associated with the human host. There are strong correlations between the qualitative composition of the oral microbiota and clinically healthy or diseased states. Amongst the bacteria of more than 700 species now identified within the human oral microbiota, it is the streptococci that are numerically predominant. Interactions between mucosal surfaces and microbial microbiota are key to host defense, health, and disease. These surfaces are exposed to high numbers of microbes and must be capable of distinguishing between those that are beneficial or avirulent and those that will invade and cause disease. Our understanding of the mechanisms involved in these discriminatory processes has recently begun to expand as new studies bring to light the importance of epithelial cells and novel immune cell subsets such as T(h)17 T cells in these processes. In this review article we have tried to find out the factors responsible for maintaining oral microbial habitat intact and the reasons which cause changes in its composition. PMID:25737863

  9. Oral Language and Reading in Bilingual Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jon F.; Heilmann, John; Nockerts, Ann; Iglesias, Aquiles; Fabiano, Leah; Francis, David J.

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the question: Do lexical, syntactic, fluency, and discourse measures of oral language collected under narrative conditions predict reading achievement both within and across languages for bilingual children? More than 1,500 Spanish-English bilingual children attending kindergarten-third grade participated. Oral narratives…

  10. Oral Rehabilitation and Management of Mentally Retarded

    PubMed Central

    Khetan, Jitendra; Gupta, Sarika; Tomar, Deepak; Singh, Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    High level of periodontal problems of dental caries are frequently observed in mentally handicapped children. This group of patients presents various problems when they face dental treatments. Identification of such population and providing them affordable oral health care is the new concept. A systematic method for identification and screening of persons with mental retardation has been developed and is being followed. Cost and fear are the most commonly cited barriers to dental care. Physical or mental may lead to deterioration in self-care, and oral care state have a low priority. Risk factors are inter-related and are often barriers to oral health. With advancements in today’s world sufficient information and support is available for each and every individual to lead a healthy life which include the access to the oral health care. Factors such as fear, anxiety and dental phobia plays a vital role in acceptance of dental care and also the delaying of dental care. Lack of knowledge of oral and dental disease, awareness or oral need, oral side-effects of medication and organization of dental services are highlighted in the literature. All health personnel should receive training to support the concept of primary oral health care. Training about dealing with such mentally handicapped people should be addressed urgently among the health professionals. PMID:25738098

  11. Auditory-Oral Matching Behavior in Newborns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xin; Striano, Tricia; Rakoczy, Hannes

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-five newborn infants were tested for auditory-oral matching behavior when presented with the consonant sound /m/ and the vowel sound /a/--a precursor behavior to vocal imitation. Auditory-oral matching behavior by the infant was operationally defined as showing the mouth movement appropriate for producing the model sound just heard (mouth…

  12. The Oral Speech Mechanism Screening Examination (OSMSE).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Louis, Kenneth O.; Ruscello, Dennis M.

    Although speech-language pathologists are expected to be able to administer and interpret oral examinations, there are currently no screening tests available that provide careful administration instructions and data for intra-examiner and inter-examiner reliability. The Oral Speech Mechanism Screening Examination (OSMSE) is designed primarily for…

  13. 10 CFR 590.312 - Oral presentations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Oral presentations. 590.312 Section 590.312 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES WITH RESPECT TO THE IMPORT AND EXPORT OF NATURAL GAS Procedures § 590.312 Oral presentations. (a)...

  14. 42 CFR 405.1124 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Oral argument. 405.1124...Section 405.1124 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE...MEDICARE PROGRAM FEDERAL HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE AGED...Review § 405.1124 Oral argument. A...

  15. 42 CFR 423.2124 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Oral argument. 423.2124...Section 423.2124 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE...SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...Review § 423.2124 Oral argument. An...

  16. 42 CFR 405.1124 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oral argument. 405.1124...Section 405.1124 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE...MEDICARE PROGRAM FEDERAL HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE AGED...Review § 405.1124 Oral argument. A...

  17. 42 CFR 423.2124 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Oral argument. 423.2124...Section 423.2124 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE...SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...Review § 423.2124 Oral argument. An...

  18. 42 CFR 405.1124 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Oral argument. 405.1124...Section 405.1124 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE...MEDICARE PROGRAM FEDERAL HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE AGED...Review § 405.1124 Oral argument. A...

  19. 42 CFR 423.2124 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Oral argument. 423.2124...Section 423.2124 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE...SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...Review § 423.2124 Oral argument. An...

  20. 42 CFR 405.1124 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Oral argument. 405.1124...Section 405.1124 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE...MEDICARE PROGRAM FEDERAL HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE AGED...Review § 405.1124 Oral argument. A...