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Sample records for mcg oral misoprostol

  1. Early termination of pregnancy with mifepristone (RU 486) and the orally active prostaglandin misoprostol.

    PubMed

    Peyron, R; Aubény, E; Targosz, V; Silvestre, L; Renault, M; Elkik, F; Leclerc, P; Ulmann, A; Baulieu, E E

    1993-05-27

    Between June and October 1991 health workers administered 1 dose of 600 mg mifepristone (RU-486) and a single oral dose of 400 mcg misoprostol on day 3 to at least 488 women at 25 centers in France to terminate pregnancy of less than 50 days duration. Pregnancy termination occurred within 48 hours in 2.9% of all women. They had only received RU-486. 1% vomited after taking the first dose of misoprostol, necessitating a second dose. The overall success rate for this regimen was 96.9%. 12 hours was the mean time between taking misoprostol and expulsion of the conceptus. The median time was 3 hours. The types of failure were incomplete expulsion of the conceptus (1.8%), ongoing pregnancy (0.8%), and prolonged bleeding (0.4%). Mean duration of bleeding following the regimen was 9 days. A second study occurred between March 1991 and March 1992 among at least 385 women at 1 center in France. They received RU-486 and misoprostol in the same manner as the women in study 1, but those who did not experience pregnancy termination within 4 hours after the initial dose received another 200 mcg dose of misoprostol. 5/5% experienced pregnancy termination before administration of misoprostol. 69.1% experienced termination within 4 hours. Pregnancy termination occurred within the first 3 hours in almost 90% of them. 27 women who did not abort within 4 hours did not take the additional dose and 26 of them aborted completely. The sole woman with a continued pregnancy underwent vacuum aspiration. 67 of the 71 women who took the second dose completely expelled the conceptus within 48 hours. Thus, 79.2% of all women aborted while being monitored at the center. The overall success rate was 98.7% . The leading side effects in both studies in order of frequency were uterine cramps and nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. These results showed that oral administration of misoprostol is as effective and well tolerated as other prostaglandins administered parenterally or vaginally. PMID:8479487

  2. Misoprostol

    MedlinePlus

    Misoprostol is used to prevent ulcers in people who take certain arthritis or pain medicines, including aspirin, ... Misoprostol comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken 4 times a day, ...

  3. A prospective study of a monophasic oral contraceptive containing 30 mcg ethinyl oestradiol and 150 mcg desogestrel (Marvelon).

    PubMed

    Ismail, M T

    1994-06-01

    Marvelon, a monophasic oral contraceptive (OC) containing 30 mcg of ethinyl estradiol and 150 mcg of desogestrel, has been available to Malaysian women through the national family planning program since 1982. To assess the safety, effectiveness, and side effects associated with this OC, 247 women who requested the pill were enrolled in a multicenter prospective study that included follow-up after the first, third, and sixth cycles of use. 81% of participants had never used any form of contraception before Marvelon. 194 women (79%) completed the 6-month study. There were no pregnancies recorded. Although women reported a slightly increased incidence of nausea, breast tenderness, and headache in the first treatment cycle, these side effects had abated by the end of the third cycle. After six cycles, mean body weight had decreased by an average of 0.4 kg. Both systolic and diastolic blood pressure were unaffected. An unexpected finding was a decrease in the severity of acne with continuous use of Marvelon. Although both spotting and breakthrough bleeding increased slightly in the first two cycles, irregular bleeding returned to pretreatment levels by the third cycle. The length of the withdrawal bleed in the pill-free week was reduced. The incidence of irregular bleeding and other side effects was substantially lower in this sample of Malaysian women than in Asian and Caucasian Marvelon users surveyed in other studies. PMID:12320338

  4. Comparison of Vaginal and Oral Doses of Misoprostol for Labour Induction in Post-Term Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Rezaie, Masomeh; Farhadifar, Fariba; Nayebi, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Considering maternal complications, it is preferred to induce labour after 40 weeks. Labour induction is a procedure used to stimulate uterine contractions during pregnancy before the beginning of the labour. Aim The aim of this study was to compare oral misoprostol with vaginal misoprostol for induction of labour in post-term pregnancies. Materials and Methods This double blind clinical-trial study was performed on 180 post-term pregnant women who were admitted to the labour ward of Besat Hospital Sanandaj, Iran in 2013-2014. Participants were equally divided into three groups using block randomization method. The induction was performed for the first group with 100 μg of oral misoprostol, for the second group with 50 μg of oral misoprostol, and for the third group with 25 μg of vaginal misoprostol. Vaginal examination and FHR was done before repeating each dose to determine Bishop Score. Induction time with misoprostol to the start of uterine contractions, induction time to delivery, and mode of delivery, systolic tachycardia, hyper stimulation and fetal outcomes were studied as well. Results First minute Apgar scores and medication dosage of the study groups were significantly different (p=0.0001). But labour induction, induction frequency, mode of delivery, complications, and 5 minutes Apgar score in the groups had no significant difference (p>0.05). The risk of fetal distress and neonatal hospitalization of the groups were statistically significant (p=0. 02). There was no significant difference between the three groups in terms of mean time interval from the administration of misoprostol to the start of uterine contractions (labour induction), the time interval from the start of uterine contractions to delivery and taking misoprostol to delivery. From the administration of misoprostol to start of the uterine contractions the mean difference between time intervals in the three groups were not statistically significant. Conclusion Based on our findings it can be concluded that prescribing 100μg oral misoprostol is effective than 50 μg oral or 25 μg vaginal misoprostol in terms of induction time, maternal and neonatal outcomes in post- term pregnancy. However, the best dose and route should be decided according to evidence based information. PMID:27134946

  5. Induction of labour with a Foley catheter or oral misoprostol at term: the PROBAAT-II study, a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Induction of labour is a common obstetric procedure. At present, different methods are used for induction of labour in women with an unfavourable cervix. Recently, we showed that in term women with an unfavorable cervix the use of a Foley catheter in comparison with vaginal Prostaglandin E2 gel, results in a comparable vaginal delivery rate. A meta-analysis on the subject indicated lower rates of hyperstimulation, and probably as a sequel fewer cases of postpartum haemorrhage. Misoprostol (PgE1) is another type of prostaglandin frequently used for labour induction, recommended by the international federation of gynaecology and obstetrics (FIGO). Misoprostol can be administered by vaginal, rectal and oral route. There is evidence that oral administration results in less asphyxia and hyperstimulation than vaginal administration. At present, valid comparisons between oral misoprostol and Foley catheter are lacking. Therefore, we propose a randomised controlled trial comparing Foley catheter to oral misoprostol in order to assess safety and cost-effectiveness. Methods/Design We plan a multicentre, randomised, controlled, open-label clinical trial among term pregnant women with a vital singleton in cephalic presentation, unfavorable cervix, intact membranes and an indication for induction of labour. After informed consent, women will be randomly allocated by a webbased randomisation system to transcervical Foley catheter or oral misoprostol (50 mcg every 4 hours). The primary outcome will be a composite of complications of uterine hyperstimulation, i.e. post partum haemorrhage and asphyxia. Secondary outcomes are mode of delivery, maternal and neonatal morbidity, costs and women’s preference. Serious adverse events such as severe maternal or neonatal morbitity or mortality will be monitored and reported to an independent data safety monitory board. With a sample size of 1860 women we will be able to demonstrate a 5% non-inferiority of the Foley catheter as compared to misoprostol for the composite outcome. Discussion Worldwide, various methods are being used for labour induction. Results of the proposed trial will contribute to the answer which method of induction of labour is most safe, cost-effective, and patient friendly and will help to construct evidence based guidelines. Trial registration The Netherlands Trial Register NTR3466 PMID:23506128

  6. Comparison of two doses of oral misoprostol with one, after mifepristone in early abortion.

    PubMed

    Jha, Tulika; Das, Anindya; Bhattacharya, Ajit Ranjan; Ganguly, Rajendra Prasad; Patra, Kajal Kumar; Das, Bibekananda

    2013-12-01

    A prospective randomised controlled study was conducted at RG Kar Medical College and hospital to compare the efficacy and side-effects of two doses of oral misoprostol, with one dose following mifepristone in early abortion. Two randomly allocated groups of seventy-five women each were formed, which were comparable in all respects and also conformed to the inclusion and exclusion criteria laid down in this study. Both groups received 200 mg of mifepristone on day one. After 48 hours, both groups received 400 microg of misoprostol and 3 hours later one group received 3 tablets of 200 microg misoprostol and the other group received 3 tablets of placebo. The women were then followed up to note the time of expulsion, completeness of the process, amount of bleeding encountered, side-effects if any or any other observation. The most important parameter ie, the completeness of the expulsion when compared showed no statistically significant difference between the two groups (p-value = 0.1025). PMID:25154152

  7. Randomized Trial of Oral Misoprostol Treatment for Cervical Ripening Before Tandem Application in Cervix Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cepni, Kimia; Gul, Sule; Cepni, Ismail; Gueralp, Onur; Sal, Veysel; Mayadagli, Alpaslan

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of oral misoprostol administered to facilitate tandem application to the cervix as a part of brachytherapy in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Eighty patients with cervical cancer who had been planned to undergo brachytherapy at Dr. Luetfi Kirdar Kartal Training and Research Hospital were evaluated in a double-blind, prospective, randomized trial. Patients were divided randomly into two groups of 40 patients. The first and second groups received 400 {mu}g of misoprostol orally and placebo, respectively, 3 h before tandem application. The two groups were compared in terms of age, diameter of tumor, parity, age at first intercourse, amount of bleeding and pain at first tandem application, length of endometrial cavity measured by hysterometer, and size of Hegar dilators used for cervical dilatation. Results: Of all cases, 63.6%, 16.3%, 10%, 6.3%, 2.5%, and 1.3% were Stage IIB, IIIB, IIIA, IVA, IIA and IIC, respectively. Mean ({+-}SD) age (range) was 49.3 {+-} 13.1 (25-83) years and 56.6 {+-} 13.2 (30-78) years in the study and control groups, respectively (p = 0.015). Age at first intercourse, diameter of tumor, parity, amount of bleeding at first tandem application, and length of endometrial cavity measured by hysterometer were not significantly different between the two groups. Pain score was significantly higher in the control group (p < 0.001). Application was significantly easier in the study group compared with controls (p < 0.001). Average size of initial Hegar dilators used for cervical dilatation was significantly higher in the study group compared with controls (p = 0.017). Conclusion: Administration of misoprostol 400 {mu}g orally for cervical ripening before tandem application facilitates the procedure, increases patient tolerability and comfort, and may decrease complication rates.

  8. Evaluating misoprostol content in pregnant women with hourly oral administration during labor induction by microElution solid phase extraction combined with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hung, Cheng-Han; Cheng, Shi-Yann; Chan, Tzu-Min; Lee, Maw-Rong

    2015-09-01

    Misoprostol is a widely used alternative of prostaglandin for labor induction. Based on previous studies, we envision that small and frequent oral dosage of misoprostol is an effective method for labor induction. To monitor the misoprostol content during labor induction, a rapid, sensitive, and selective microElution solid phase extraction (μElution SPE) combined with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed. Using μElution SPE could minimize the sample consumption and elution volume in order to maximize the sample enrichment and throughput. The misoprostol acid, a metabolite of misoprostol, was gradient separated in a Bidentate C18 column, then quantified by highly-selective reaction monitoring (H-SRM) in a total run time of 6min. The developed method was optimized and validated in human plasma, and showed linear range of 0.01-10ng/mL. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.001ng/mL. The recovery ranged from 89.0 to 96.0%, and no significant matrix effect or carryover was observed. The precision, accuracy and stability were met with the criteria of U.S. FDA guidance. The developed method was successfully applied to evaluate misoprostol concentration during labor induction in pregnant women. The concentration-time profiles approves that hourly oral administration of misoprostol is a safe and effective method without drug accumulation for labor induction. PMID:26245361

  9. Effectiveness of a single dose of oral misoprostol 600 μg for treatment in early pregnancy failure.

    PubMed

    Benchamanon, R; Phupong, V

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness, side-effects and acceptability of a single dose of oral misoprostol 600 μg for treatment of 1st trimester pregnancy failure. A prospective descriptive study was conducted on pregnant women of < 13 weeks' gestation, diagnosed as 1st trimester pregnancy failure. Patients were assigned to receive a single dose of misoprostol 600 μg orally and then evaluated 48 h after drug administration for complete abortion. A total of 55 women were recruited to the study. The complete abortion rate was 65.5%. Pain and diarrhoea were the most common side-effects. Acceptability and satisfactory rates were 70.9% and 70.9%, respectively. In conclusion, a single dose of oral misoprostol 600 μg is a fair method for the management of 1st trimester pregnancy failure. Side-effects are tolerable and satisfaction is high. Thus, this method may be used as an alternative treatment. PMID:24988526

  10. Vaginal misoprostol for pre-abortion cervical priming: is there an optimal evacuation time interval?

    PubMed

    Singh, K; Fong, Y F; Prasad, R N; Dong, F

    1999-03-01

    The optimal evacuation time interval for vaginal misoprostol administration for cervical priming before first-trimester pregnancy termination was investigated in a prospective study conducted at the National University of Singapore Medical Institute. 60 healthy nulliparous women requesting pregnancy termination at 6-11 weeks of gestation were randomly assigned to receive either 400 mcg or 600 mcg of misoprostol. Vacuum aspiration was performed after 3 hours in the 400 mcg group and after 2 hours in the 600 mcg group. The degree of cervical dilatation before the procedure was measured through use of a Hegar's dilator. Only 5 women (16.7%) in the 600 mcg group, compared with 28 women (93.3%) in the 400 mcg group, achieved a cervical dilatation of 8 mm or more. When the 400 mcg group was used as a baseline, the odds ratio for successful dilatation (8 mm or above) was 0.014 (95% confidence interval, 0.003-0.080) for 600 mcg of misoprostol. Mean cervical dilatation was 8.1 mm for 400 mcg and 6.6 mm for 600 mcg (p 0.001). Despite the shorter evacuation time interval, the 600 mcg misoprostol dose was associated with an increase in side effects such as vaginal bleeding, abdominal pain, and fever above 38 C. These findings indicate that 400 mcg of misoprostol with a minimal evacuation time interval of 3 hours is most effective. However, a further evaluation with a larger sample size with adequate power to evaluate side effects is recommended. PMID:10426647

  11. Intravaginal misoprostol for termination of midtrimester pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lim, J M; Soh, E B; Raman, S

    1995-02-01

    Misoprostol seems to be a drug with many potential uses apart from the treatment of gastric and duodenal ulcers. The oral tablet appears to be effective for termination of midtrimester pregnancy when administered intravaginally. Further research should be carried out to determine its full range of action in order that the drug can be utilized to its maximum potential. PMID:7772001

  12. Comparison of different regimes of misoprostol for the termination of early pregnancy failure

    PubMed Central

    Seervi, Nandaram; Hooja, Nupur; Rajoria, Lata; Verma, Asha; Malviya, Kusum; Mehta, Neha

    2014-01-01

    Background Nearly 20% of all confirmed pregnancies end in spontaneous abortion. Misoprostol's use in early pregnancy failure is varied and dose and route are not well established. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and the side effects of different regimes of misoprostol in causing expulsion of products of conception in early pregnancy failure. Method Women patients with an ultrasound diagnosis of early pregnancy failure, less than 12 weeks gestation were divided into two, Group-A: tab. Misoprostol 800 mcg 6 hourly vaginally, upto 3 doses. Group-B tablet misoprostol 600 mcg 6 hourly, sublingually for 3 doses. All observations were noted and statistical analyzed. Results Mean gestational age was 7.93 weeks. Mean induction abortion interval 18.183 h. Women patients with less than six weeks gestational age had least mean induction-abortion interval time, 15.75 ± 2.82 h in vaginal group but was highest in sublingual group 22 ± 2 h and 18.43 h in overall (P = 0.02). Though after 8 weeks, both routes were equally effective. Mean dose required in group-A was 20044 mcg and in group-B was 1564 mcg (P < 0.001). Efficacy of protocol was 88.89% in group-A and 92.85% in group-B. Conclusion Both regimes had comparable efficacy, acceptability (90%) and side effects. In women patients less than six weeks period of gestation, the vaginal (800 mcg) route was distinctly superior, in women patients with 6–8 weeks the sublingual (600 mcg) route was more advantageous. The correct dose must be used for the route chosen. The route of administration should be decided in accordance with the preference of the patient and the clinical situation. PMID:25382911

  13. Misoprostol for Labour Induction after Previous Caesarean Section – Forever a “No Go”?

    PubMed Central

    Rath, W.; Tsikouras, P.

    2015-01-01

    Misoprostol in oral or vaginal form is an established method of labour induction worldwide. Its use after previous caesarean section is associated with a high rate of uterine rupture; according to international guidelines it is therefore contraindicated in this setting. However the evidence base for this recommendation comprises case reports, one randomised trial that was discontinued prematurely, and numerous low quality retrospective data analyses published between 1997 and 2004. New insights into e.g. resorption kinetics, dosage and application intervals, dose dependant uterine hyperstimulation rates, as well as increasing clinical experience with misoprostol have lead to a critical reappraisal of these “historical” studies. Accordingly the evidence supporting a ban on vaginal and particularly oral misoprostol for labour induction in the context of a scarred uterus is currently insufficient for a convincing guideline recommendation. In view of the clear advantages of misoprostol over prostaglandin E2 (cheaper, more effective) a retrospective review of registry data should be conducted to determine the incidence of uterine rupture following misoprostol and the circumstances in which it occurs. A prospective, randomised trial could then be conducted on the basis of these findings (e.g. oral misoprostol vs. vaginal prostaglandin E2); known risk factors for uterine rupture including the type of uterine scar would need to be taken into account when selecting patients for vaginal delivery. Until new data from well-designed studies are available, misoprostol will continue to be contraindicated in clinical guidelines for use in labour induction after previous caesarean section. PMID:26719597

  14. 75 FR 16211 - MCG Capital Corporation; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... COMMISSION MCG Capital Corporation; Notice of Application March 25, 2010. AGENCY: Securities and Exchange... of the Application: MCG Capital Corporation (the ``Applicant''), requests an order to amend a prior...'') pursuant to the MCG Capital Corporation 2006 Employee Restricted Stock Plan and the MCG Capital...

  15. Misoprostol for induction of labor.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Megan L; Wing, Deborah A

    2015-10-01

    Labor-induction rates have increased considerably in the United States as well as around the world. With up to half of all induced labors requiring cervical ripening, prostaglandins have been utilized to increase induction success and achieve vaginal delivery. Misoprostol, a synthetic prostaglandin E1 analog has the ability to mimic the changes of spontaneous labor and has been used off label for over 30 years as a labor-induction agent. In the following article, cervical ripening and induction of labor with misoprostol will be discussed. The risks and benefits of misoprostol for ripening and induction and routes of administration will be reviewed, as well as future directions and new developments for its use. PMID:26601733

  16. Reduction of aspirin-induced fecal blood loss with low-dose misoprostol tablets in man

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.M.; Clark, L.; Armstrong, L.; D'Souza, J.

    1985-07-01

    Misoprostol (SC-29333), a synthetic prostaglandin E1 methyl ester analog, was given simultaneously with acetylsalicylic acid in a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized prospective study of 32 healthy human male subjects. Fecal blood loss was measured for eight days using the /sup 51/Cr-labeled red blood cell technique. Aspirin (650 mg qid) and misoprostol (25 micrograms qid) or placebo were given during days 3, 4, and 5. There was a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in median blood loss (modified Friedman test) from 0.81 to 6.05 ml/day in the aspirin with placebo group (N = 16). Median blood loss was increased (from 0.75 to 3.75 ml/day) in the aspirin with misoprostol group (N = 16), but this was significantly less (Mann-Whitney U test, P less than 0.01) than the placebo group. Mean serum salicylate concentrations in the placebo and misoprostol groups were similar (7.8 and 6.8 micrograms/ml, respectively). There were no significant changes in laboratory values in any of the subjects studied, nor were any major side-effects encountered. This study demonstrates that oral misoprostol reduces aspirin-induced gastrointestinal bleeding even when administered simultaneously and at a dose level below its threshold for significant acid inhibition. This indicates a potential role for misoprostol in the prevention of gastric mucosal damage in selected patients.

  17. Differential effects of misoprostol and ranitidine on the pharmacokinetics of diclofenac and gastrointestinal symptoms.

    PubMed Central

    Dammann, H G; Simon-Schultz, J; Steinhoff, I; Damaschke, A; Schmoldt, A; Sallowsky, E

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of oral misoprostol (800 microg day(-1)) and ranitidine (300 mg day(-1)) on the pharmacokinetics of diclofenac (100 mg) were assessed in a three-way randomized crossover study in 18 healthy male subjects. 2. Subjects were studied over three 8 day periods, during which they received twice-daily placebo, misoprostol, or ranitidine. A single dose of diclofenac was given orally on days 1 and 8, and plasma diclofenac concentrations were measured by h.p.l.c. over 24 h. 3. Misoprostol caused a non-significant 19% increase in the mean Cmax value of diclofenac on both days 1 and 8. After 8 days of dosing with misoprostol there was a significant (P = 0.04) 20% decrease in the AUC of diclofenac. 4. Ranitidine had no statistically significant effects on the pharmacokinetics of diclofenac. 5. Co-administration of misoprostol and diclofenac was associated with a higher frequency and severity of gastrointestinal symptoms and frequency of bowel opening, and a decrease in faecal consistency when compared with either placebo or ranitidine plus diclofenac (P < 0.01). PMID:12959313

  18. Misoprostol: serious cardiovascular events, even after a single dose.

    PubMed

    2015-07-01

    A French Regional Pharmacovigilance Centre identified serious cardiovascular adverse effects linked to misoprostol and reported worldwide up to the end of 2012. Dozens of cases of myocardial infarction, angina and stroke had been reported, including after a single dose in gynaecology and obstetrics, for instance in elective abortion. This risk appears higher in smokers, women aged over 35 years, obese women, and after high-dose vaginal administration. The incidence is unknown. The bioavailability of misoprostol is higher with the vaginal than the oral route, especially when water is added to the tablet before vaginal administration. In practice, this risk must be taken into account, especially in women with risk factors for cardiovascular disease, or when using high doses or the vaginal route. When a high cardiovascular risk is identified, it is best to warn patients of the cardiac effects of this drug and advise them to consult a doctor if they experience chest tightness, or to propose an alternative method. Whenever possible, these women should not be alone when they take misoprostol. PMID:26240884

  19. Sublingual versus Vaginal Misoprostol for the Induction of Labor at Term: A Randomized, Triple-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jahromi, Bahia Namavar; Poorgholam, Foroogh; Yousefi, Gholamhossein; Salarian, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Background: We sought to compare the effectiveness and safety of sublingual versus vaginal misoprostol for the termination of pregnancy with a live full-term fetus. Methods: This randomized, triple-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed on 200 primiparous women with normal, singleton, full-term pregnancies candidated for the induction of labor. Sublingual and vaginal tablets containing misoprostol (25 mcg) or placebo in similar shapes were administered every 4 hours until the Bishop score reached above 8. Maternal and neonatal complications and outcomes were compared. Results: There were 100 parturient women in each group. The mean maternal age, gestational age, and Bishop score at the commencement of misoprostol had no statistical differences between the sublingual and vaginal groups. The mean time interval between misoprostol commencement and delivery was 497.10±291.49 and 511.67±08.46 minutes for the sublingual and vaginal groups, correspondingly. Twenty-two women had Cesarean deliveries in the sublingual group versus 14 in the vaginal group. Meconium-stained amniotic fluid was seen in 12 women in the sublingual group and 4 in the vaginal group (P=0.03). Late fetal heart rate deceleration was observed in 8 women in the sublingual group and 4 in the vaginal group (P=0.22). The mean neonatal birth weight, blood gas value at birth, Apgar score, and length of admission time in the neonatal intensive care unit were not different between the 2 groups. Conclusion: Sublingual and vaginal misoprostol had similar effectiveness; however, meconium-stained liquor was observed considerably more frequently with sublingual misoprostol than with vaginal misoprostol. Trial Registration Number: IRCT201402096541N3 PMID:26989277

  20. Misoprostol for postpartum hemorrhage prevention at home birth: an integrative review of global implementation experience to date

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hemorrhage continues to be a leading cause of maternal death in developing countries. The 2012 World Health Organization guidelines for the prevention and management of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) recommend oral administration of misoprostol by community health workers (CHWs). However, there are several outstanding questions about distribution of misoprostol for PPH prevention at home births. Methods We conducted an integrative review of published research studies and evaluation reports from programs that distributed misoprostol at the community level for prevention of PPH at home births. We reviewed methods and cadres involved in education of end-users, drug administration, distribution, and coverage, correct and incorrect usage, and serious adverse events. Results Eighteen programs were identified; only seven reported all data of interest. Programs utilized a range of strategies and timings for distributing misoprostol. Distribution rates were higher when misoprostol was distributed at a home visit during late pregnancy (54.5-96.9%) or at birth (22.5-83.6%), compared to antenatal care (ANC) distribution at any ANC visit (22.5-49.1%) or late ANC visit (21.0-26.7%). Coverage rates were highest when CHWs and traditional birth attendants distributed misoprostol and lower when health workers/ANC providers distributed the medication. The highest distribution and coverage rates were achieved by programs that allowed self-administration. Seven women took misoprostol prior to delivery out of more than 12,000 women who were followed-up. Facility birth rates increased in the three programs for which this information was available. Fifty-one (51) maternal deaths were reported among 86,732 women taking misoprostol: 24 were attributed to perceived PPH; none were directly attributed to use of misoprostol. Even if all deaths were attributable to PPH, the equivalent ratio (59 maternal deaths/100,000 live births) is substantially lower than the reported maternal mortality ratio in any of these countries. Conclusions Community-based programs for prevention of PPH at home birth using misoprostol can achieve high distribution and use of the medication, using diverse program strategies. Coverage was greatest when misoprostol was distributed by community health agents at home visits. Programs appear to be safe, with an extremely low rate of ante- or intrapartum administration of the medication. PMID:23421792

  1. Misoprostol: discovery, development, and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Collins, P W

    1990-01-01

    Misoprostol is a synthetic 15-deoxy-16-hydroxy-16-methyl analog of PGE1, and the first prostaglandin to be registered for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease. Misoprostol is a safe and well-tolerated drug that exerts potent gastric antisecretory effects and mucosal protective actions on the gastric and duodenal mucosa. In a dosage of 800 micrograms daily in two or four divided doses, misoprostol produced rates of complete ulcer healing in both gastric and duodenal ulcer patients significantly superior to placebo and comparable to H2 receptor antagonists. The major adverse effect is diarrhea in about 10% of patients, but this is usually mild and self-limiting. Misoprostol possesses uterotonic activity and should not be used in pregnant women or those who wish to become pregnant. Misoprostol effectively heals and prevents NSAID-induced gastropathy, a therapeutic need previously unserved. Due to its mucosal protective properties, misoprostol may have advantages over antisecretory drugs in the compromised patient who is a chronic smoker or alcohol user, in refractory duodenal ulcer patients, in recurrent ulcer, and in emergency use for acute upper GI bleeding. Misoprostol's tissue-protective effects may also extend to other therapeutic areas. PMID:2109814

  2. Stakeholder perceptions of misoprostol: a qualitative investigation

    PubMed Central

    Bazzano, Alessandra N; Jones, Lea; Ngo, Thoai D

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to explore perceptions of stakeholders regarding misoprostol use in Cambodia, a setting with high maternal mortality. Semi-structured expert interviews were conducted with 21 participants in the capital, Phnom Penh. The sample included participants involved in providing reproductive health services through international and local health agencies and the pharmaceutical industry. A theme of controversy over the role of misoprostol in the context of reproductive health services emerged, along with a need to reconcile legitimate viewpoints in order to understand the place of misoprostol in the Cambodian reproductive health setting. Understanding stakeholder perspectives on misoprostol can shed light on the drug’s role in reproductive health programming where maternal mortality is high and health facilities are still improving. PMID:24748820

  3. Stakeholder perceptions of misoprostol: a qualitative investigation.

    PubMed

    Bazzano, Alessandra N; Jones, Lea; Ngo, Thoai D

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to explore perceptions of stakeholders regarding misoprostol use in Cambodia, a setting with high maternal mortality. Semi-structured expert interviews were conducted with 21 participants in the capital, Phnom Penh. The sample included participants involved in providing reproductive health services through international and local health agencies and the pharmaceutical industry. A theme of controversy over the role of misoprostol in the context of reproductive health services emerged, along with a need to reconcile legitimate viewpoints in order to understand the place of misoprostol in the Cambodian reproductive health setting. Understanding stakeholder perspectives on misoprostol can shed light on the drug's role in reproductive health programming where maternal mortality is high and health facilities are still improving. PMID:24748820

  4. Introduction of misoprostol for the treatment of incomplete abortion beyond 12 weeks of pregnancy in Benin.

    PubMed

    Adisso, Sosthène; Hounkpatin, Benjamin I B; Komongui, Gounnou D; Sambieni, Olivier; Perrin, René X

    2014-07-01

    Improving the care of women who have undergone a spontaneous or induced abortion is an important step in reducing abortion-related morbidity and mortality. Both the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) and the World Health Organization recommend the use of manual vacuum aspiration (MVA) and misoprostol rather than sharp curettage to treat incomplete abortion. MVA was introduced into the public healthcare service in Benin in 2006 and since 2008 misoprostol has been available in 3 large maternity hospitals. The present study opted to use an oral dose of 800 μg and not to limit to pregnancies of up to 12 weeks, but to include women with second trimester abortions. After 5 years, results show that around three-quarters of the women treated with misoprostol at 13-18 weeks of pregnancy required MVA to complete uterine evacuation and approximately one-quarter had severe bleeding, confirming that the indication of misoprostol for incomplete abortion should be limited to pregnancies of up to 12 weeks. PMID:24800660

  5. Programmes for advance distribution of misoprostol to prevent post-partum haemorrhage: a rapid literature review of factors affecting implementation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Helen J; Colvin, Christopher J; Richards, Esther; Roberson, Jeffrey; Sharma, Geeta; Thapa, Kusum; Gülmezoglu, A Metin

    2016-02-01

    Recent efforts to prevent post-partum haemorrhage (PPH) in low-income countries have focused on providing women with access to oral misoprostol during home birth. The WHO recommends using lay health workers (LHWs) to administer misoprostol in settings where skilled birth attendants are not available. This review synthesizes current knowledge about the barriers and facilitators affecting implementation of advance community distribution of misoprostol to prevent PPH, where misoprostol may be self-administered or administered by an LHW.We searched for and summarized available empirical evidence, and collected primary data from programme stakeholders about their experiences of programme implementation.We present key outcomes and features of advanced distribution programmes that are in operation or have been piloted globally. We categorized factors influencing implementation into those that operate at the health system level, factors related to the community and policy context and those factors more closely connected to the end user.Debates around advance distribution have centred on the potential risks and benefits of making misoprostol available to pregnant women and community members during pregnancy for administration in the home. However, the risks of advance distribution appear manageable and the benefits of self-administration, especially for women who have little chance of expert care for PPH, are considerable. PMID:25797470

  6. Ethynilestradiol 20 mcg plus Levonorgestrel 100 mcg: Clinical Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Estroprogestins (EPs) are combinations of estrogen and progestin with several actions on women's health. The different pharmacological composition of EPs is responsible for different clinical effects. One of the most used low-dose EP associations is ethinylestradiol 20 mcg plus levonorgestrel 100 mcg in monophasic regimen (EE20/LNG100). This review summarizes clinical pharmacology, cycle control, and effects on lipid and glucose metabolism, coagulation, body weight/body composition, acne, and sexuality of EE20/LNG100. Overall, EE20/LNG100 combination is safe and well tolerated, and in several studies the incidence of adverse events in the treated group was comparable to that of the placebo group. Cycle control was effective and body weight/body composition did not vary among treated and untreated groups in most studies. The EE20/LNG100 combination shows mild or no effect on lipid and glucose metabolism. Lastly, EE20/LNG100 is associated with a low risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). In conclusion, in the process of decision making for the individualization of EPs choice, EE20/LNG100 should be considered for its favorable clinical profile. PMID:25477960

  7. [Developmental toxicity of misoprostol: an update].

    PubMed

    Cavieres, María Fernanda

    2011-04-01

    Misoprostol, a synthetic analog of prostaglandin E1, is currently used in Chile and other countries as an antiulcer medication, mainly for the prevention of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory-induced gastric ulcers. Due to its uterotonic properties, it is also indicated in obstetrics for induction of labor and termination of pregnancy. In this last case, misoprostol is either used alone or in combination with other oxytocic drugs such as methotrexate or mifepristone. The use of misoprostol as an abortifacient agent is considered to be safe since it rarely causes serious side effects. However up to 15 % of misoprostol-induced-abortions may not be successful, even under medical supervision, leading to in utero exposure to the drug and to the induction of a series of birth defects including limb and joints defects and Moebius syndrome. Reports from the nineties failed to show a strong epidemiological association between in utero drug exposure and induction of defects, a situation that has changed now that the number of cases reported has increased. Since the practice of abortion is illegal in Chile, many women turn to off-medical procedures to interrupt their pregnancy and use misoprostol as an easy and cheap alternative, readily available in the INTERNET. The lack of medical supervision in these cases may lead to situations that favor the induction of congenital defects. Here, we present an updated review of scientific data, to evaluate the risk of birth defects in babies exposed to the drug during pregnancy termination failed attempts. PMID:21879192

  8. Randomized double masked trial of Zhi Byed 11, a Tibetan traditional medicine, versus misoprostol to prevent postpartum hemorrhage in Lhasa, Tibet.

    PubMed

    Miller, Suellen; Tudor, Carrie; Thorsten, Vanessa; Nyima; Kalyang; Sonam; Lhakpen; Droyoung; Quzong, Karma; Dekyi, Tsering; Hartwell, Ty; Wright, Linda L; Varner, Michael W

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare a Tibetan traditional medicine (the uterotonic Zhi Byed 11 [ZB11]) to oral misoprostol for prophylaxis of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). We conducted a double-blind randomized controlled trial at three hospitals in Lhasa, Tibet, People's Republic of China. Women (N = 967) were randomized to either ZB11 or misoprostol groups. Postpartum blood loss was measured in a calibrated blood collection drape. The primary combined outcome was incidence of PPH, defined as measured blood loss (MBL) > or = 500 mL, administration of open label uterotonics, or maternal death. We found that the rate of the combined outcome was lower among the misoprostol group (16.1% versus 21.8% for ZB11; P = .02). Frequency of PPH was lower with misoprostol (12.4% versus 17.4%; P = .02). There were no significant differences in MBL > 1000 mL or mean or median MBL. Fever was significantly more common in the misoprostol group (P = .03). The rate of combined outcome was significantly lower among women receiving misoprostol. However, other indices of obstetric hemorrhage were not significantly different. PMID:19249659

  9. Randomized Double Masked Trial of Zhi Byed 11, a Tibetan Traditional Medicine, Versus Misoprostol to Prevent Postpartum Hemorrhage in Lhasa, Tibet

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Suellen; Tudor, Carrie; Thorsten, Vanessa; Nyima; Kalyang; Sonam; Lhakpen; Droyoung; Quzong, Karma; Dekyi, Tsering; Hartwell, Ty; Wright, Linda L.; Varner, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare a Tibetan traditional medicine (the uterotonic Zhi Byed 11 [ZB11]) to oral misoprostol for prophylaxis of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). We conducted a double-blind randomized controlled trial at three hospitals in Lhasa, Tibet, People’s Republic of China. Women (N = 967) were randomized to either ZB11 or misoprostol groups. Postpartum blood loss was measured in a calibrated blood collection drape. The primary combined outcome was incidence of PPH, defined as measured blood loss (MBL) ≥ 500 mL, administration of open label uterotonics, or maternal death. We found that the rate of the combined outcome was lower among the misoprostol group (16.1% versus 21.8% for ZB11; P = .02). Frequency of PPH was lower with misoprostol (12.4% versus 17.4%; P = .02). There were no significant differences in MBL > 1000 mL or mean or median MBL. Fever was significantly more common in the misoprostol group (P = .03). The rate of combined outcome was significantly lower among women receiving misoprostol. However, other indices of obstetric hemorrhage were not significantly different. PMID:19249659

  10. Overview and expert assessment of off-label use of misoprostol in obstetrics and gynaecology: review and report by the Collège national des gynécologues obstétriciens français.

    PubMed

    Marret, H; Simon, E; Beucher, G; Dreyfus, M; Gaudineau, A; Vayssière, C; Lesavre, M; Pluchon, M; Winer, N; Fernandez, H; Aubert, J; Bejan-Angoulvant, T; Jonville-Bera, A P; Clouqueur, E; Houfflin-Debarge, V; Garrigue, A; Pierre, F

    2015-04-01

    The literature suggests that misoprostol can be offered to patients for off-label use as it has reasonable efficacy, risk/benefit ratio, tolerance and patient satisfaction, according to the criteria for evidence-based medicine. Both the vaginal and sublingual routes are more effective than the oral route for first-trimester cervical dilatation. Vaginal misoprostol 800μg, repeated if necessary after 24 or 48h, is a possible alternative for management after early pregnancy failure. However, misoprostol has not been demonstrated to be useful for the evacuation of an incomplete miscarriage, except for cervical dilatation before vacuum aspiration. Oral mifepristone 200mg, followed 24-48h later by vaginal, sublingual or buccal misoprostol 800μg (followed 3-4h later, if necessary, by misoprostol 400μg) is a less efficacious but less aggressive alternative to vacuum aspiration for elective or medically-indicated first-trimester terminations; this alternative becomes increasingly less effective as gestational age increases. In the second trimester, vaginal misoprostol 800-2400μg in 24h, 24-48h after at least 200mg of mifepristone, is an alternative to surgery, sulprostone and gemeprost. Data for the third trimester are sparse. For women with an unripe cervix and an unscarred uterus, vaginal misoprostol 25μg every 3-6h is an alternative to prostaglandin E2 for cervical ripening at term for a live fetus. When oxytocin is unavailable, misoprostol can be used after delivery for prevention (sublingual misoprostol 600μg) and treatment (sublingual misoprostol 800μg) of postpartum haemorrhage. The use of misoprostol to promote cervical dilatation before diagnostic hysteroscopy or surgical procedures is beneficial for premenopausal women but not for postmenopausal women. Nonetheless, in view of the side effects of misoprostol, its use as a first-line treatment is not indicated, and it should be reserved for difficult cases. Misoprostol is not useful for placing or removing the types of intra-uterine devices used in Europe, regardless of parity. PMID:25701235

  11. Effectiveness and Safety of Lower Doses of Mifepristone Combined With Misoprostol for the Termination of Ultra-Early Pregnancy: A Dose-Ranging Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Li, Cui-Lan; Chen, Dun-Jin; Song, Li-Ping; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Zhong-Fang; Liu, Ming-Xing; Chen, Wei-Ling

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness and safety of lower doses of mifepristone combined with misoprostol for the termination of ultra-early pregnancy. A total of 2500 women with ultra-early pregnancy (amenorrhea ≤ 35 days) were randomly divided into 5 groups with gradually decreased dose of oral mifepristone from 150 to 50 mg followed by 200 µg of oral misoprostol 24 hours later. The primary end point was complete abortion without surgical intervention. Secondary end points were vaginal bleeding, return of menses, and side effects. Rates of complete abortion were high in all groups. Moreover, the lower doses of mifepristone led to shorter vaginal bleeding period, the return of menses on the expected date, and fewer side effects. Lower doses of mifepristone combined with 200 µg of misoprostol are as effective and safe as higher doses of this combination for the termination of ultra-early pregnancy with lower possibility of vaginal bleeding and side effects. PMID:25394644

  12. Abortion induced with methotrexate and misoprostol.

    PubMed Central

    Wiebe, E R

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the outcome and side effects of a new drug protocol to induce abortion. DESIGN: Case series. SETTING: An urban primary care practice. PATIENTS: One hundred consecutive patients who requested elective termination of pregnancies of less than 8 weeks' gestation. INTERVENTION: Subjects received methotrexate (50 mg/m2 body surface area, administered intramuscularly) and, 3 days afterward, misoprostol (800 micrograms, given vaginally). OUTCOME MEASURES: Number of abortions induced within 24 hours and within 10 days of misoprostol administration, number of surgical aspirations conducted because of incomplete abortion, mean amount of bleeding and pain and the number of women who, if faced with the same situation, said they would again choose a drug-induced abortion over a surgical one. RESULTS: Abortion occurred within 24 hours of misoprostol administration among 48 women and within 10 days among 69 women. In total, 89 women had an abortion without surgical aspiration. Of these women, 71 said they would choose a drug-induced abortion if faced with the choice again. CONCLUSION: Abortion induced with methotrexate and misoprostol appears to be a feasible alternative to surgical abortion and deserves further study. PMID:8548705

  13. [Misoprostol in case of termination of pregnancy in the second and third trimesters. Trials].

    PubMed

    Pluchon, M; Winer, N

    2014-02-01

    Termination of pregnancies (TOP), in the second and third trimesters, require feasibility to induce labour with unfavorable cervix. Combination therapy is then usually necessary. Misoprostol use is out of marketing authorization in obstetrics but is widely used for many years in TOP in the 2nd and 3rd trimesters of pregnancy. Most randomized trials comparing misoprostol to other molecules available for TOP (gemeprost, dinoprostone, sulprostone) show that misoprostol is at least as effective with fewer side effects often especially if using adapted doses and routes of administration. Sometimes, products with a marketing authorization have been used with caution due to adverse effects more or less reported with misoprostol. There is, however, no conclusive evidence in the literature showing the superiority of a dose or route of administration of misoprostol compared to another. However, sublingual and oral seem to be preferred by patients than the vaginal route which remains the most evaluated and effective route. In summary, the use of vaginal misoprostol is the first-line treatment in medical abortion in the 2nd and third trimester, in combination with at least 200mg of mifepristone 36 to 48 hours before, at a dose of 400 μg every 4 to 6 hours. However, its use must be given with caution in cases of uterine scar, but cannot be forbidden for the sole justification of not having a marketing authorization. It will nevertheless warrant information to patients and allow a reduction at least half doses. The multi-scarred uterus still justifies a lower starting dose in the minimum effective doses (100 μg or less) as a corollary, increased induction-expulsion delay. The risk-benefit balance must be discussed with the patient. The agent without any pharmacological action solely or in combination (laminar dilapans, Foley catheter or double balloon) is particularly interesting in the case of uterine scar or maternal vascular risk but requires further evaluation by other research with adequate power and methodology before recommending for systematic routine use. PMID:24440001

  14. The effectiveness of using misoprostol with and without letrozole for successful medical abortion: A randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Naghshineh, Elham; Allame, Zahra; Farhat, Faezah

    2015-01-01

    Background: In developing countries it is important to the exploration of available and safe regimens for medical abortion. The present study was designed to assess the effect of letrozole compared to placebo pretreatment followed by sublingual misoprostol for therapeutic abortion in eligible women with gestational age less than 17 weeks. Materials and Methods: In this randomized control trail, 130 women eligible for legal abortions were randomly divided into two groups of case and controls. Cases received daily oral dose of 10 mg letrozole 10 mg letrozole for three days followed by sublingual misoprostol. Controls received daily oral dose of placebo followed by sublingual misoprostol. The dose of misoprostol was administrated according to ACOG guidelines based on patients’ gestational age. The rate of complete abortion, induction-of-abortion time, and side-effects were assessed as main outcomes. Results: Complete abortion was observed in 46 (76.7%) letrozole group and 26 (42.6%) controls (P < 0.0001). Also, in 14 subjects of letrozole group and 35 subjects in placebo group, the placenta was not delivered during follow-up and curettage was performed. The mean interval induction-to-abortion was 5.1 h in letrozole group and 8.9 h in control (P < 0.0001). The cumulative rates of the induction-of-abortion time were a significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.0001). The incidence and severity of side-effects was comparable for the two groups (P = 0.9). Conclusion: Letrozole could be a quite beneficial adjuvant to misoprostol for induction of complete abortion in those who are candidates for legal medical abortion. PMID:26600834

  15. Effectiveness of Misoprostol for Induction of First-Trimester Miscarriages

    PubMed Central

    Ambusaidi, Qamariya; Zutshi, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Non-invasive methods of inducing a miscarriage are now considered an effective alternative to surgical evacuation (dilatation and curettage). This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of misoprostol in the termination of first-trimester miscarriages. Methods: This prospective study was conducted between October 2009 and September 2010 and assessed all patients admitted to the Royal Hospital in Muscat, Oman, for the termination of first-trimester miscarriages during the study period. All patients received misoprostol and the rates of successful termination were measured. Patient satisfaction was assessed using a short questionnaire. Results: A total of 290 women were included in the study. Termination with misoprostol was successful in 61.38% of the subjects. Of the remaining subjects requiring additional surgical evacuation (n = 112), 58.93% required evacuation due to failed termination with misoprostol and 65.18% underwent early evacuation (≤24 hours since their last misoprostol dose). The majority of patients experienced no side-effects due to misoprostol (89.66%). Pain was controlled with simple analgesics in 70.00% of the subjects. A high satisfaction rate (94.83%) with the misoprostol treatment was reported. Conclusion: Misoprostol was a well-tolerated drug which reduced the rate of surgical evacuation among the study subjects. This medication can therefore be used safely in the management of incomplete miscarriages. PMID:26629383

  16. Termination of early pregnancy (up to 63 days of amenorrhea) with mifepristone and increasing doses of misoprostol [corrected].

    PubMed

    Aubény, E; Peyron, R; Turpin, C L; Renault, M; Targosz, V; Silvestre, L; Ulmann, A; Baulieu, E E

    1995-01-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of mifepristone in combination with misoprostol for termination of early pregnancy (up to 49 days of amenorrhea) are established. We studied the efficacy and tolerability of this combination therapy for termination of pregnancy in women up to 63 days of amenorrhea. We also examined the effect of an additional dose of misoprostol in cases of nonexpulsion within 3 hours after the first dose. The multicenter trial included 1,108 women, mean age 27.9 +/- 6.2 years. The mean duration of pregnancy was 51.7 +/- 9.2 days. On day 1, the women received an oral dose of mifepristone, 600 mg. On day 3, they received an oral dose of misoprostol, 400 micrograms, and were monitored for up to 3 hours. If they did not expel the conceptus within 3 hours, an additional dose of 200 micrograms of misoprostol was given and they were monitored for 2 more hours. From days 10 to 18, the women were followed up with clinical examination, human chorionic gonadotropin measurement, or ultrasound examination. Overall, the procedure was successful in 92.9% of women. Efficacy decreased with the duration of pregnancy, especially after 56 days of amenorrhea. Up to 42 days of amenorrhea, the success rate was 97.6%; between days 42 and 49, 94.8%; between days 50 and 56, 93.4%; between days 57 and 63, 86.8%; and after day 63, 83.3%. The most common side effects were moderate uterine cramps (80.5%) and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms (34.9%), especially vomiting (18.3%) and diarrhea (10.5%). GI symptoms were generally mild. A second dose of misoprostol was given to 61.6% of the women. In a subgroup analysis, we assessed the efficacy of 600 mg of mifepristone plus 400 or 600 micrograms of misoprostol (one or two doses) in women with up to 49 days of amenorrhea and compared it with the efficacy in women who received mifepristone plus only 400 micrograms (one dose) of misoprostol in a previous study. The overall rate of success (termination of pregnancy) was 95.5% in the current study compared with 95.4% in the previous study. The additional dose of misoprostol did not significantly increase the overall rate of success, but did increase the rate of termination within the monitoring period (69.7% versus 64.9% (and within 72 hours after administration of mifepristone (92.7% versus 90.4%). We have confirmed that the combination of mifepristone and misoprostol was effective, safe, and well tolerated for termination of pregnancies at 49 or fewer days of amenorrhea. The efficacy decreased slightly between 49 and 56 days, and then decreased significantly between 56 and 63 days. For maximal safety and tolerability, we recommend this method only for women with 49 or fewer days of amenorrhea. A second dose of misoprostol did not improve overall efficacy, but did increase the rate of early termination. PMID:8574255

  17. Visualization of results of mathematical simulations: The contribution of MCG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An abstract on the contribution of MCG to the visualization of results of mathematical simulations is presented. MCG, which is a Belgian company dealing with synthesis three dimensional animation, became aware of a need which was the result of the increasing power of the hardware and software tools used by the engineers today: the visualization of the results of mathematical simulations. The design of a program including various visualization tools adapted to software like SAMCEF in the field of system dynamics and ECRIN Principia and SDRC in the field of fluid dynamics was undertaken by MCG. In fluid dynamics, the program which associates color with the relative values of variables in scalar fields, enables the calculation of iso-value surfaces, cuts in the mesh, and in the case of vector fields, offers colored arrow representation and animated particle paths in the velocity field. The system dynamics program reads the files generated by SAMCEF and allows complex periodic or transient movements on a reactor blade. simulated opening of a structure in space to be represented.

  18. Probing MCG-6-30-15 with the Chandra HETGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. C.; Canizares, C. R.; Fang, T.; Morales, R.; Fabian, A. C.; Marshall, H. L.; Schulz, N. S.

    The Chandra HETGS spectra of the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15 show numerous narrow, unresolved (FWHM ≈ < 200 m s-1) absorption lines from a wide range of ionization states of N, O, Mg, Ne, Si, S, Ar, and Fe. The initial analysis of these data, presented in Lee et al. (2001), shows that a dusty warm absorber is reasonable for explaining the soft X-ray spectral features ≈> 0.48 keV (≈< 26 Å ). The implied Hydrogen column density needed to explain the Fe I L edge feature at ~0.707 keV agrees with that obtained from earlier reddening studies. Both results point to dust embedded in the ionized absorber of MCG-6-30-15 (given the relatively lower observed X-ray absorption by cold gas). This conclusion is contrary to the results reported from XMM which call for relativistically broadened soft X-ray emission line. We also report on preliminary results from Lee et al. (in preparation) based on a full treatment of the warm absorber in MCG-6-30-15 in the Chandra spectral bandpass, which shows a distribution of v and NH which depend on ξ and may point to an outflow in the warm absorber of MCG-6-30-15. The results of the in-depth analysis are consistent with those previously published. This proceeding is intended as a review of the findings for the soft 0.5-1 keV X-ray spectrum of MCG-6-30-15 presented by Lee et al. (2001a,b) for the ~67 ks subset of the Chandra HETGS (Lee et al. 2001a,b) AO1 observation corresponding to the period with high continuum flux. Preliminary results (as presented during this meeting) for the full length of the 120 ks integration are reported as highlights from Lee et al., in preparation. Details from the initial papers can be found in Lee et al., 2001, ApJ., 554, L13, and the conference proceeding from ``X-ray emission from Accretion onto Black Holes''

  19. Genetic and functional properties of uncultivated MCG archaea assessed by metagenome and gene expression analyses

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jun; Xu, Jun; Qin, Dan; He, Ying; Xiao, Xiang; Wang, Fengping

    2014-01-01

    The Miscellaneous Crenarchaeota group (MCG) Archaea is one of the predominant archaeal groups in anoxic environments and may have significant roles in the global biogeochemical cycles. However, no isolate of MCG has been cultivated or characterized to date. In this study, we investigated the genetic organization, ecophysiological properties and evolutionary relationships of MCG archaea with other archaeal members using metagenome information and the result of gene expression experiments. A comparison of the gene organizations and similarities around the 16S rRNA genes from all available MCG fosmid and cosmid clones revealed no significant synteny among genomic fragments, demonstrating that there are large genetic variations within members of the MCG. Phylogenetic analyses of large-subunit+small-subunit rRNA, concatenated ribosomal protein genes and topoisomerases IB gene (TopoIB) all demonstrate that MCG constituted a sister lineage to the newly proposed archaeal phylum Aigarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota. Genes involved in protocatechuate degradation and chemotaxis were found in a MCG fosmid 75G8 genome fragment, suggesting that this MCG member may have a role in the degradation of aromatic compounds. Moreover, the expression of a putative 4-carboxymuconolactone decarboxylase was observed when the sediment was supplemented with protocatechuate, further supporting the hypothesis that this MCG member degrades aromatic compounds. PMID:24108328

  20. [Abortion and misoprostol: health practices and scientific controversy].

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Marilena Cordeiro Dias Villela; Mastrella, Miryam

    2012-07-01

    This article puts into perspective the controversy between the association of the use of misoprostol for abortion and teratogenicity studies of the type found in a case report. The use of herbal medicinal drugs and the medical-obstetric and national and international norms governing the registration and circulation of pharmaceutical products were examined. Official documents of ANVISA, the Ministry of Health and the World Health Organization on the use of misoprostol, as well as 68 articles such as case reports published in national journals, linking abortion, misoprostol and teratogenicity were reviewed, systematically filed and analyzed using the monographic method. The legal prohibition of abortion prevents the proper prescription and use of a drug such as misoprostol that is both safe and effective. Thus, the danger for the health of women is linked not to the intrinsic characteristics of the drug, but to the moral arguments that constitute negligence and disregard for the fundamental rights of women. PMID:22872339

  1. Focus on misoprostol: review of worldwide safety data.

    PubMed

    Wildeman, R A

    1987-05-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms have been the most frequently reported adverse experiences in the misoprostol (Cytotec) studies of both patients with peptic ulcer disease, and healthy subjects. There have been relatively few cardiovascular, genito-urinary, or other adverse effects. This is similar to the results of animal studies in which misoprostol had little, if any, effects on cardiovascular, central nervous, and endocrine systems. The predominant activity of misoprostol in the gastrointestinal tract, essential to its ulcer-healing activity, may also account in part for the association of misoprostol with gastrointestinal adverse experiences. Abnormal bowel movements were the most common complaint (9-13%) of patients in pivotal controlled studies. In patients taking misoprostol 200 micrograms four times daily, 7.1% had diarrhea, with less than 1% stopping therapy because of diarrhea. Abdominal pain in these patients was reported in an incidence of 12.8%, was mild, and only rarely resulted in stopping therapy. Other adverse reactions reported in these patients were nausea, headache, and dizziness. In pregnant women, undergoing a legal termination of pregnancy, it has been shown that misoprostol has a greater incidence of uterine bleeding, and partial or complete expulsion of uterine contents, than placebo. Misoprostol (Cytotec) has received government approval for marketing in 12 countries, since the first gave its approval in June, 1984. It has been launched in 6 of those markets to date, with an estimated 100,000 patients having taken the drug. No serious adverse experiences attributed to misoprostol have been reported, but mild adverse experiences have occurred. Those most frequently reported were gastrointestinal in nature, and included diarrhea, abdominal pain, and nausea.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3113801

  2. Foley Catheter versus Vaginal Misoprostol for Labour Induction

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Nasreen; Ansari, Mehkat; Ali, S. Manazir; Parveen, Shazia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the efficacy and safety of intravaginal misoprostol with transcervical Foley catheter for labour induction. Material and Methods. One hundred and four women with term gestation, with Bishop score < 4, and with various indications for labour induction were randomly divided into two groups. In Group I, 25 μg of misoprostol tablet was placed intravaginally, 4 hourly up to maximum 6 doses. In Group II, Foley catheter 16F was placed through the internal os of the cervix under aseptic condition and then inflated with 50 cc of sterile saline. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS software. Results. The induction to delivery interval was 14.03 ± 7.61 hours versus 18.40 ± 8.02 hours (p < 0.01). The rate of vaginal delivery was 76.7% versus 56.8% in misoprostol and transcervical Foley catheter group, respectively. Uterine hyperstimulation was more common with misoprostol. Neonatal outcome was similar in both the groups. Conclusion. Intravaginal misoprostol is associated with a shorter induction to delivery interval as compared to Foley's catheter and it increases the rate of vaginal delivery in cases of unripe cervix at term. Transcervical Foley catheter is associated with a lower incidence of uterine hyperstimulation during labour. PMID:26557725

  3. Effect of misoprostol and cimetidine on gastric cell labeling index

    SciTech Connect

    Fich, A.; Arber, N.; Sestieri, M.; Zajicek, G.; Rachmilewitz, D.

    1985-07-01

    The effect of misoprostol and cimetidine on gastric cell turnover was studied. Endoscopic biopsy specimens of fundic and antral mucosa were obtained from duodenal ulcer patients before and after 4 wk of therapy with cimetidine 1.2 g/day or misoprostol 800 micrograms/day. Biopsy specimens were incubated with (/sup 3/H)thymidine. Glandular column length and number of labeled cells were determined after autoradiography. There was no significant difference in column length of antral or fundic glands before or after therapy with cimetidine and misoprostol. The number of antral and fundic labeled cells was significantly decreased after misoprostol treatment (3.6 +/- 0.3 and 4.6 +/- 0.4, mean +/- SE), as opposed to their respective number before therapy (6.9 +/- 0.5 and 8.3 +/- 0.8) (p less than 0.01). On the other hand, after treatment with cimetidine, the number of antral and fundic labeled cells was significantly higher (11.8 +/- 0.9 and 7.5 +/- 1.0, respectively) as compared with their number before therapy (5.7 +/- 0.5 and 5.6 +/- 0.6, respectively). The decreased gastric cell turnover induced by misoprostol indicates that the trophic effect of prostanoids on gastric mucosa is not due to an increase in cellular kinetics. The increased gastric cell turnover induced by cimetidine may contribute to its therapeutic effect in peptic ulcer disease.

  4. Rethinking WHO guidance: review of evidence for misoprostol use in the prevention of postpartum haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Christina S; Brhlikova, Petra; Pollock, Allyson M

    2012-01-01

    This article describes and critically appraises clinical trials assessing misoprostol effectiveness in preventing primary postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) in home and community settings in low- and middle-income countries. Of 172 identified studies of misoprostol use in labour only six fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All trials used 600μg misoprostol in the intervention arm; three assessed misoprostol alongside components of active management of the third-stage labour (AMTSL), two used expectant management of labour and one allowed birth attendants to choose management practice. The three AMTSL studies showed no significant differences in PPH incidence or referral to higher centres and only one study showed significant decrease in severe PPH using misoprostol. One expectant management study and the choice of management by birth attendants study found significant decreases in PPH incidence with misoprostol. All studies showed significantly increased risk of shivering with misoprostol. Studies were biased by use of alternative uterotonics in the control arm, confounding management practices, and subjective assessment and, with one exception, exclusion of high-risk women. PPH incidence fell in both the control and intervention groups in both the landmark papers that informed the World Health Organization (WHO) decision to admit misoprostol to the Essential Medicines List. This suggests factors other than misoprostol use are crucial. Current evidence does not support misoprostol use in home and community settings in low- and middle-income countries for PPH prevention. WHO should rethink its recent decision to include misoprostol on the Essential Medicines List. PMID:22907551

  5. The therapeutic efficacy of misoprostol in peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Watkinson, G; Hopkins, A; Akbar, F A

    1988-01-01

    Misoprostol, a synthetic methyl ester analogue of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) is both a powerful inhibitor of gastric secretion and is able to protect the gastroduodenal mucosa from damage produced by alcohol, aspirin, naproxen and tolmetin. The results of 12 double-blind, randomized, placebo- and cimetidine-controlled trials involving 4000 patients have been reviewed here and show that misoprostol, given in a dosage of 800 micrograms daily in two or four divided doses, is able to produce rates of complete ulcer healing and pain relief in both gastric and duodenal ulcer which are significantly superior to placebo therapy and comparable to those achieved with high or conventional doses of cimetidine. One further large trial has shown that misoprostol is able to heal a significant proportion of duodenal ulcers refractory to treatment with H2 receptor antagonists. In the compromised patient, two trials have suggested that misoprostol is able to abolish the adverse effects of smoking on duodenal ulcer, although this effect was not apparent in the gastric ulcer trials or in other duodenal ulcer trials. Similarly, while in volunteers pretreatment with misoprostol is able to protect the gastric mucosa from alcohol damage, there is little clinical evidence to support improved ulcer healing in the patient who abuses alcohol. Further studies in these areas should be conducted. Misoprostol could well have an important role to play in the protection of the gastroduodenal mucosa from damage produced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in arthritic patients compelled to take these drugs for long periods. A series of double-blind placebo-controlled trials in healthy volunteers have shown that pretreatment with, or simultaneous administration of, 800 micrograms daily of misoprostol, reduces significantly mucosal damage produced by aspirin, tolmetin and naproxen. Two controlled clinical trials in a large number of arthritic patients have shown firstly, that misoprostol 800 micrograms daily is able to reduce significantly aspirin-induced mucosal bleeding as compared with placebo and secondly, in an endoscopically, placebo-controlled trial that it reduced significantly the frequency and severity of aspirin-induced mucosal lesions, accelerated the healing of erosions and ulcers and in other patients was able to protect the undamaged mucosa from injury. Misoprostol is well tolerated--a dose related, usually self limiting, diarrhoea occurred in a small proportion of patients but only rarely enforced withdrawal. Because of its uterotropic effects misoprostol should not be given to women of child bearing age unless they are taking adequate contraceptive measures. It has no other systemic effects and no clinically significant adverse haematology or biochemical abnormalities, or drug interactions have been reported. It does not seem to induce hypergastrinaemia. Misoprostol is, therefore, a safe and effective drug in the treatment of chronic peptic ulcer and could have a beneficial action in duodenal ulcers refractory to treatment with H2-receptor antagonists. It could benefit compromised groups of ulcer patients who are smokers or alcohol users amd certainly has been shown to protect the gastroduodenal mucosa against damage induced by NSAIDs in healthy volunteers and arthritic patients. PMID:3138682

  6. Factors Related to Successful Misoprostol Treatment for Early Pregnancy Failure

    PubMed Central

    Creinin, Mitchell D.; Huang, Xiangke; Westhoff, Carolyn; Barnhart, Kurt; Gilles, Jerry M.; Zhang, Jun

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify potential predictors for treatment success in medical management with misoprostol for early pregnancy failure. METHODS We conducted a planned secondary analysis of data from a multicenter trial that compared medical and surgical management of early pregnancy failure. Medical management consisted of misoprostol 800 ?g vaginally on study day 1, with a repeat dose if indicated on day 3. Women returned on days 3 and 15, and a telephone interview was conducted on day 30. Failure was defined as suction aspiration for any reason within 30 days. Demographic, historical, and outcome variables were included in univariable analyses of success. Multivariable analyses were conducted using clinical site, gestational age, and variables for which the univariable analysis resulted in a P < .1 to determine predictors of overall treatment success and first-dose success. RESULTS Of the 491 women who received misoprostol, 485 met the criteria for this secondary analysis. Lower abdominal pain or vaginal bleeding within the last 24 hours, Rh-negative blood type, and nulliparity were predictive of overall success. However, only vaginal bleeding within the last 24 hours and parity of 0 or 1 were predictive of first-dose success. Overall success exceeds 92% in women who have localized abdominal pain within the last 24 hours, Rh-negative blood type, or the combination of vaginal bleeding in the past 24 hours and nulliparity. CONCLUSION Misoprostol treatment for early pregnancy failure is highly successful in select women, primarily those with active bleeding and nulliparity. Clinicians and patients should be aware of these differences when considering misoprostol treatment. PMID:16582130

  7. Recommendations for scale-up of community-based misoprostol distribution programs.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Nuriya; Kapungu, Chisina; Carnahan, Leslie; Geller, Stacie

    2014-06-01

    Community-based distribution of misoprostol for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) in resource-poor settings has been shown to be safe and effective. However, global recommendations for prenatal distribution and monitoring within a community setting are not yet available. In order to successfully translate misoprostol and PPH research into policy and practice, several critical points must be considered. A focus on engaging the community, emphasizing the safe nature of community-based misoprostol distribution, supply chain management, effective distribution, coverage, and monitoring plans are essential elements to community-based misoprostol program introduction, expansion, or scale-up. PMID:24680582

  8. Misoprostol Impairs Female Reproductive Tract Innate Immunity against Clostridium sordellii1

    PubMed Central

    Aronoff, David M.; Hao, Yibai; Chung, Jooho; Coleman, Nicole; Lewis, Casey; Peres, Camila M.; Serezani, Carlos H.; Chen, Gwo-Hsiao; Flamand, Nicolas; Brock, Thomas G.; Peters-Golden, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Fatal cases of acute shock complicating Clostridium sordellii endometritis following medical abortion with mifepristone (also known as RU-486) used with misoprostol were reported. The pathogenesis of this unexpected complication remains enigmatic. Misoprostol is a pharmacomimetic of PGE2, an endogenous suppressor of innate immunity. Clinical C. sordellii infections were associated with intravaginal misoprostol administration, suggesting that high misoprostol concentrations within the uterus impair immune responses against C. sordellii. We modeled C. sordellii endometritis in rats to test this hypothesis. The intrauterine but not the intragastric delivery of misoprostol significantly worsened mortality from C. sordellii uterine infection, and impaired bacterial clearance in vivo. Misoprostol also reduced TNF-α production within the uterus during infection. The intrauterine injection of misoprostol did not enhance mortality from infection by the vaginal commensal bacterium Lactobacillus crispatus. In vitro, misoprostol suppressed macrophage TNF-α and chemokine generation following C. sordellii or peptidoglycan challenge, impaired leukocyte phagocytosis of C. sordellii, and inhibited uterine epithelial cell human β-defensin expression. These immunosuppressive effects of misoprostol, which were not shared by mifepristone, correlated with the activation of the Gs protein-coupled E prostanoid (EP) receptors EP2 and EP4 (macrophages) or EP4 alone (uterine epithelial cells). Our data provide a novel explanation for postabortion sepsis leading to death and also suggest that PGE2, in which production is exaggerated within the reproductive tract during pregnancy, might be an important causal determinant in the pathogenesis of more common infections of the gravid uterus. PMID:18523288

  9. Misoprostol and the politics of abortion in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ramya

    2012-12-01

    Misoprostol, a WHO essential medicine indicated for labour induction, management of miscarriage and post-partum haemorrhage, as well as for induced abortion and treatment of post-abortion complications, came up for registration in Sri Lanka in December 2010. The decision on registration was postponed, indefinitely. This has wide-ranging implications, as misoprostol is widely available and used, including by health professionals in Sri Lanka, without guidance or training in its use. This paper attempts to situate the failure to register misoprostol within the broader context of unsafe abortion, drawing on data from interviews with physicians and health policymakers in Sri Lanka. It demonstrates how personal opposition to abortion infiltrates policy decisions and prevents the issue of unsafe abortion being resolved. Any move to reform abortion law and policy in Sri Lanka will require a concerted effort, spearheaded by civil society. Women and communities affected by the consequences of unsafe abortion need to be involved in these efforts. Regardless of the law, women will access abortion services if they need them, and providers will provide them. Decriminalizing abortion and registering abortion medications will make provision of abortion services safer, less expensive and more equitable. PMID:23245422

  10. A randomized trial of saline solutionmoistened misoprostol versus dry misoprostol for first-trimester pregnancy failure

    PubMed Central

    Gilles, Jerry M.; Creinin, Mitchell D.; Barnhart, Kurt; Westhoff, Carolyn; Frederick, Margaret M.; Zhang, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to estimate whether the efficacy of treatment with intravaginal misoprostol for first-trimester pregnancy failure is enhanced by the addition of saline solution. Study design Eighty women with embryonic/fetal death or anembryonic pregnancy were assigned randomly to receive either 800 ?g of misoprostol with saline solution (group I, 41 women) or without (group II, 39 women). Treatment was repeated on day 3 if the gestational sac remained. Curettage was performed if the gestational sac remained on day 8 or as necessary during at least 30 days of follow-up. Data were analyzed with the Student t test and the ?2 or Fisher exact test. Results By the first follow-up visit, 73% (group I) and 64% (group II) of women passed the gestational sac (P = .38). By the second follow-up visit, expulsion rates were 83% and 87%, respectively (P = .59). Five subjects in each group underwent curettage. Conclusion Misoprostol is effective for the treatment of failed first-trimester pregnancy. The expulsion rate is not improved by adding saline solution. PMID:14981379

  11. Misoprostol modulates cytokine expression through a cAMP pathway: Potential therapeutic implication for liver disease.

    PubMed

    Gobejishvili, Leila; Ghare, Smita; Khan, Rehan; Cambon, Alexander; Barker, David F; Barve, Shirish; McClain, Craig; Hill, Daniell

    2015-12-01

    Dysregulated cytokine metabolism plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of many forms of liver disease, including alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver disease. In this study we examined the efficacy of Misoprostol in modulating LPS-inducible TNFα and IL-10 expression in healthy human subjects and evaluated molecular mechanisms for Misoprostol modulation of cytokines in vitro. Healthy subjects were given 14day courses of Misoprostol at doses of 100, 200, and 300μg four times a day, in random order. Baseline and LPS-inducible cytokine levels were examined ex vivo in whole blood at the beginning and the end of the study. Additionally, in vitro studies were performed using primary human PBMCs and the murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, to investigate underlying mechanisms of misoprostol on cytokine production. Administration of Misoprostol reduced LPS inducible TNF production by 29%, while increasing IL-10 production by 79% in human subjects with no significant dose effect on ex vivo cytokine activity; In vitro, the effect of Misoprostol was largely mediated by increased cAMP levels and consequent changes in CRE and NFκB activity, which are critical for regulating IL-10 and TNF expression. Additionally, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) studies demonstrated that Misoprostol treatment led to changes in transcription factor and RNA Polymerase II binding, resulting in changes in mRNA levels. In summary, Misoprostol was effective at beneficially modulating TNF and IL-10 levels both in vivo and in vitro; these studies suggest a potential rationale for Misoprostol use in ALD, NASH and other liver diseases where inflammation plays an etiologic role. PMID:26408955

  12. Overcoming entrenched disagreements: the case of misoprostol for post-partum haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ghinea, Narcyz; Lipworth, Wendy; Little, Miles; Kerridge, Ian; Day, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The debate about whether misoprostol should be distributed to low resource communities to prevent post-partum haemorrhage (PPH), recognized as a major cause of maternal mortality, is deeply polarised. This is in spite of stakeholders having access to the same evidence about the risks and benefits of misoprostol. To understand the disagreement, we conducted a qualitative analysis of the values underpinning debates surrounding community distribution of misoprostol. We found that different moral priorities, epistemic values, and attitudes towards uncertainty were the main factors sustaining the debate. With this understanding, we present a model for ethical discourse that might overcome the current impasse. PMID:25897445

  13. Relativistic ionized accretion disc models of MCG-6-30-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, D. R.; Fabian, A. C.

    2001-12-01

    We present results from fitting of ionized accretion disc models to three long ASCA observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15. All three data sets can be fitted by a model consisting of ionized reflection from the inner region of the accretion disc (with twice solar Fe abundance) and a separate disc-line component from farther out on the disc. The disc-line is required to fit the height of the observed Fe Kα line profile. However, we show that a much simpler model of reflection from a very weakly ionized constant-density disc also fits the data. In this case only a single cold Fe Kα line at 6.4keV is required to fit the observed line. The ionized disc models predict that OVIII Kα, CVI Kα, FeXVII Lα and FeXVIII Lα lines will appear in the soft X-ray region of the reflection spectrum, but are greatly blurred as a result of Compton scattering. The equivalent width (EW) of OVIII Kα is estimated to be about 10eV and seems to be as strong as the blend of the Fe L lines. This result creates difficulty for the claim of a strong relativistic OVIII line in the XMM-Newton grating spectrum of MCG-6-30-15, although we cannot strictly rule it out since MCG-6-30-15 was in an anomalously low state during that observation. We find that increasing the O abundance or breaking the continuum below 2keV will not significantly strengthen the line. The second Fe Kα line component in the ionized disc model may arise from neutral reflection from a flared disc, or from a second illumination event. The data cannot distinguish between the two cases, and we conclude that single-zone ionized disc models have difficulty fitting these hard X-ray data of MCG-6-30-15.

  14. NOTE: Entropy-based automated classification of independent components separated from fMCG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comani, S.; Srinivasan, V.; Alleva, G.; Romani, G. L.

    2007-03-01

    Fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) is a noninvasive technique suitable for the prenatal diagnosis of the fetal heart function. Reliable fetal cardiac signals can be reconstructed from multi-channel fMCG recordings by means of independent component analysis (ICA). However, the identification of the separated components is usually accomplished by visual inspection. This paper discusses a novel automated system based on entropy estimators, namely approximate entropy (ApEn) and sample entropy (SampEn), for the classification of independent components (ICs). The system was validated on 40 fMCG datasets of normal fetuses with the gestational age ranging from 22 to 37 weeks. Both ApEn and SampEn were able to measure the stability and predictability of the physiological signals separated with ICA, and the entropy values of the three categories were significantly different at p <0.01. The system performances were compared with those of a method based on the analysis of the time and frequency content of the components. The outcomes of this study showed a superior performance of the entropy-based system, in particular for early gestation, with an overall ICs detection rate of 98.75% and 97.92% for ApEn and SampEn respectively, as against a value of 94.50% obtained with the time-frequency-based system.

  15. Does an acidic medium enhance the efficacy of vaginal misoprostol for pre-abortion cervical priming?

    PubMed

    Singh, K; Fong, Y F; Prasad, R N; Dong, F

    1999-06-01

    Absorption pharmacokinetics reveal a relationship between plasma concentrations of misoprostol and its therapeutic effect. To achieve a constant plasma profile and optimal efficacy, it is important to develop a medium that ensures complete dissolution of vaginal misoprostol tablets. Vaginal misoprostol is said to liquefy better in an acidic medium; thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether a 200 microg misoprostol tablet dissolved in acetic acid would be more efficacious than 200 microg misoprostol dissolved in water for pre-abortion cervical priming. A total of 120 healthy nulliparous women requesting legal termination of pregnancy between 6-12 weeks gestation were allocated randomly to either of the study groups. Vacuum aspiration was performed 3-4 h after insertion of the misoprostol tablet. Using Hegar's dilator, the degree of cervical dilatation before operation was measured. Of 60 women, 14 (23%) achieved a cervical dilatation of >/=8 mm when the misoprostol dose was dissolved in acetic acid; 12 (20%) achieved a similar cervical dilatation when the dose was dissolved in water. The mean cervical dilatation for the acid and water media used was 6.3 mm and 6.2 mm respectively; these differences were not statistically significant, neither were pre-operative and intra-operative blood losses statistically different between the two groups. Twenty-four (40%) and four (7%) respectively of women in whom a water medium was used experienced vaginal bleeding and abdominal pain; 20 (33%) and 0 women respectively among those in whom an acetic acid medium was used experienced vaginal bleeding and abdominal pain. These differences in side effects were not statistically significant. Our study shows that the use of acetic acid to dissolve vaginal misoprostol does not improve the efficacy in achieving successful cervical dilatation for pre-abortion cervical priming. PMID:10357990

  16. Comparative study of intravaginal misoprostol with gemeprost as an abortifacient in second trimester missed abortion.

    PubMed

    Eng, N S; Guan, A C

    1997-08-01

    This prospective, randomized study compared the efficacy of intravaginal misoprostol (Cytotec) and gemeprost (Cervagem) as an abortifacient for intrauterine deaths in second trimester pregnancy. Side-effects, complications and the cost-effectiveness associated with each drug were assessed. 21 out of 25 patients (84%) in the misoprostol group aborted whereas only 17 out of 25 patients (68%) in the gemeprost group aborted within 24 hours after the initiation of therapy. In the misoprostol group, the abortion rate was influenced by the gestational age with 100% abortion rate for those > 17 weeks' gestation compared to 67% for those with a gestational age of 13-16 weeks. Side-effects were rare in either group and no major complications were reported in either group. Misoprostol was definitely more cost-effective compared to gemeprost as the mean cost of inducing an abortion using misoprostol was RM 1.08 whereas that of gemeprost was RM 105. We thus concluded that misoprostol was at least as effective as gemeprost as an abortifacient for intrauterine death in second trimester pregnancy. Moreover, it was less costly, with very few side-effects. PMID:9325520

  17. Instability of Misoprostol Tablets Stored Outside the Blister: A Potential Serious Concern for Clinical Outcome in Medical Abortion

    PubMed Central

    Berard, Veronique; Fiala, Christian; Cameron, Sharon; Bombas, Teresa; Parachini, Mirella; Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Misoprostol (Cytotec) is recognised to be effective for many gynaecological indications including termination of pregnancy, management of miscarriage and postpartum haemorrhage. Although not licensed for such indications, it has been used for these purposes by millions of women throughout the world. Misoprostol tablets are most often packaged as multiple tablets within an aluminium strip, each within an individual alveolus. When an alveolus is opened, tablets will be exposed to atmospheric conditions. Objective To compare the pharmaco technical characteristics (weight, friability), water content, misoprostol content and decomposition product content (type A misoprostol, type B misoprostol and 8-epi misoprostol) of misoprostol tablets Cytotec (Pfizer) exposed to air for periods of 1 hour to 720 hours (30 days), to those of identical non exposed tablets. Methods Four hundred and twenty (420) tablets of Cytotec (Pfizer) were removed from their alveoli blister and stored at 25°C/60% relative humidity. Water content, and misoprostol degradation products were assayed in tablets exposed from 1 to 720 hours (30 days). Comparison was made with control tablets (N = 60) from the same batch stored in non-damaged blisters. Statistical analyses were carried out using Fisher’s exact test for small sample sizes. Results By 48 hours, exposed tablets demonstrated increased weight (+4.5%), friability (+1 300%), and water content (+80%) compared to controls. Exposed tablets also exhibited a decrease in Cytotec active ingredient dosage (−5.1% after 48 hours) and an increase in the inactive degradation products (+25% for type B, +50% for type A and +11% for 8-epi misoprostol after 48 hours) compared to controls. Conclusion Exposure of Cytotec tablets to ‘typical’ European levels of air and humidity results in significant time-dependent changes in physical and biological composition that could impact adversely upon clinical efficacy. Health professionals should be made aware of the degradation of misoprostol with inappropriate storage of misoprostol tablets. PMID:25502819

  18. Human MCG measurements with a high-sensitivity potassium atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Kamada, K; Ito, Y; Kobayashi, T

    2012-06-01

    Measuring biomagnetic fields, such as magnetocardiograms (MCGs), is important for investigating biological functions. To address to this need, we developed an optically pumped atomic magnetometer. In this study, human MCGs were acquired using a potassium atomic magnetometer without any modulating systems. The sensitivity of the magnetometer is comparable to that of high-T(c) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) and is sufficient for acquiring human MCGs. The activity of a human heart estimated from the MCG maps agrees well with that measured with SQUID magnetometers. Thus, our magnetometer produces reliable results, which demonstrate the potential of our atomic magnetometer for biomagnetic measurements. PMID:22621881

  19. Cellulase production in continuous and fed-batch culture by Trichoderma reesei MCG80

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, A.L.; Andreotti, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Continuous culture of Natick's strain MCG80 of Trichoderma reesei at a dilution rate of 0.028 h/sup -1/ has yielded a cellulase titer of over 61 U/mL using 5% lactose as the sole carbon source. Enzyme productivity at this dilution rate is 168 IU/L/h. Repeated fed-batch cultures using this strain on lactose as the carbon source have titers of 10 IU/mL with productivities in excess of 100 IU/L/h. 5 figures, 1 table.

  20. Clinical evaluation of different applications of misoprostol and aglepristone for induction of abortion in bitches.

    PubMed

    Agaoglu, A R; Aslan, S; Emre, B; Korkmaz, O; Ozdemir Salci, E S; Kocamuftuoglu, M; Seyrek-Intas, K; Schäfer-Somi, S

    2014-04-15

    The aim of the present study was to compare the clinical and endocrinological effects of different applications of misoprostol (MIS) and aglepristone (AGL) for the induction of abortion in bitches. For this purpose, 28 healthy pregnant bitches from different breeds, ages, body weights (Body weigt, BWs, 10-40 kg), and between Days 25 to 35 of gestation were used. Bitches were randomly assigned to four groups. In group 1 (GI, n = 7), AGL (10 mg/kg BW, s.c. on 2 consecutive days); in group 2 (GII, n = 7), AGL (as in GI), intravaginal MIS (IVag, 200 μg for bitches with ≤20 kg BW, 400 μg for bitches with >20 kg BW, daily intravaginally until completion of abortion); in group 3 (GIII, n = 7), AGL (as in GI), ICVag (as in GII), per os MIS (400 μg for bitches with ≤20 kg BW, 800 μg for bitches with >20 kg BW, daily orally, until completion of abortion); in group 4 (GIV, n = 7), AGL (as in GI), per os MIS (as GIII) were used. Clinical, vaginal, and ultrasonographic examinations were performed daily until abortion was completed. For measurement of serum progesterone, blood samples were collected in all groups immediately after the first AGL administration and every other day until completion of abortion. No statistical differences were found between groups concerning the duration until completion of abortion after treatment (nonsignificant); however, in GII, one bitch completed abortion 2 days after the start of treatment. PMID:24576713

  1. Medical management of missed abortion and anembryonic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    el-Refaey, H; Hinshaw, K; Henshaw, R; Smith, N; Templeton, A

    1992-12-01

    Mifepristone (an antiprogesterone) and misoprostol (a synthetic analogue of prostaglandin E1) were administered to 60 women diagnosed with missed abortion or anembryonic pregnancy (gestation sac present but no developing embryo) equivalent to 13 weeks' gestation or less who were recruited after counselling. The median age was 227 (range 15-44), and the median duration of amenorrhoea was 71 (42-110) days. 25 of the women had been referred for ultrasound scanning because of bleeding in early pregnancy, while the rest were diagnosed by routine scanning. 29 patients had anembryonic pregnancies, and 31 had a missed abortion. Each patient received a 600 mg single oral dose of mifepristone, and 36-48 hours later misoprostol 600 mcg was given orally (400 mcg and, 2 hours later, 200 mcg). If the products of conception were not expelled within 4 hours, vaginal ultrasonography was performed. 8 patients aborted with mifepristone alone, 43 aborted after taking 600 mcg of misoprostol, and 5 more aborted after receiving a 2nd divided dose of 600 mcg misoprostol. In 3 patients the treatment failed, and they underwent evacuation of the uterus under general anaesthesia. Exploratory curettage was performed in 2 other patients at 14 and 22 days after treatment with misoprostol, but no products of conception were obtained. The median time from administration of misoprostol to abortion was 4 (1-11) hours. The median duration of bleeding after abortion was 10 (2-22) days. Side effects included nausea, vomiting (5 patients received antiemetic drugs), and diarrhoea (7 patients) from misoprostol treatment. 39 women did not want any pain relief, 13 asked for oral analgesia, and 7 obtained parenteral analgesia. PMID:1486304

  2. Comparison of misoprostol and ranitidine in the treatment of duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Goldin, E; Fich, A; Eliakim, R; Zimmerman, J; Ligumsky, M; Rachmilewitz, D

    1988-06-01

    The efficacy of misoprostol (a synthetic analogue of prostaglandin E1) and ranitidine in the treatment of duodenal ulcer was evaluated. Seventy-one patients with endoscopically proven duodenal ulcer were randomized in a double-blind manner in one of two groups that received two daily doses of 400 micrograms misoprostol or 150 mg ranitidine. Ulcer healing was assessed endoscopically after 4 weeks of treatment; in subjects who had not healed treatment was continued and endoscopy was repeated after another 4 weeks. The mean age, sex distribution and tobacco, alcohol and caffein consumption were similar in both groups. In the misoprostol-treated group, healing of the ulcer was observed in 74.8% of patients at 4 weeks and in 86.5% at 8 weeks; in the ranitidine group (n = 34), the healing rate was 91.2 and 100%, respectively. The differences between healing rates in the two groups were not statistically significant. In the misoprostol group (n = 37), 27% of patients experienced diarrhea; of these, two were withdrawn from the trial due to this side effect. These results, which are part of a multicenter international study, suggest that misoprostol at a daily dose of 800 micrograms is as effective as 300 mg/day ranitidine in the treatment of duodenal ulcer. PMID:3136094

  3. Perceptions of misoprostol among providers and women seeking post-abortion care in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Maternowska, M Catherine; Mashu, Alexio; Moyo, Precious; Withers, Mellissa; Chipato, Tsungai

    2015-02-01

    In Zimbabwe, abortions are legally restricted and complications from unsafe abortions are a major public health concern. This study in 2012 explored women's and providers' perspectives in Zimbabwe on the acceptability of the use of misoprostol as a form of treatment for complications of abortion in post-abortion care. In-depth interviews were conducted with 115 participants at seven post-abortion care facilities. Participants included 73 women of reproductive age who received services for incomplete abortion and 42 providers, including physicians, nurses, midwives, general practitioners and casualty staff. Only 29 providers had previously used misoprostol with their own patients, and only 21 had received any formal training in its use. Nearly all women and providers preferred misoprostol to surgical abortion methods because it was perceived as less invasive, safer and more affordable. Women also generally preferred the non-surgical method, when given the option, as fears around surgery and risk were high. Most providers favoured removing legal restrictions on abortion, particularly medical abortion. Approving use of misoprostol for post-abortion care in Zimbabwe is important in order to reduce unsafe abortion and its related sequelae. Legal, policy and practice reforms must be accompanied by effective reproductive health curricula updates in medical, nursing and midwifery schools, as well as through updated training for current and potential providers of post-abortion care services nationwide. Our findings support the use of misoprostol in national post-abortion care programmes, as it is an acceptable and potentially life-saving treatment option. PMID:25702065

  4. Advance distribution of misoprostol for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) at home births in two districts of Liberia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A postpartum hemorrhage prevention program to increase uterotonic coverage for home and facility births was introduced in two districts of Liberia. Advance distribution of misoprostol was offered during antenatal care (ANC) and home visits. Feasibility, acceptability, effectiveness of distribution mechanisms and uterotonic coverage were evaluated. Methods Eight facilities were strengthened to provide PPH prevention with oxytocin, PPH management and advance distribution of misoprostol during ANC. Trained traditional midwives (TTMs) as volunteer community health workers (CHWs) provided education to pregnant women, and district reproductive health supervisors (DRHSs) distributed misoprostol during home visits. Data were collected through facility and DRHS registers. Postpartum interviews were conducted with a sample of 550 women who received advance distribution of misoprostol on place of delivery, knowledge, misoprostol use, and satisfaction. Results There were 1826 estimated deliveries during the seven-month implementation period. A total of 980 women (53.7%) were enrolled and provided misoprostol, primarily through ANC (78.2%). Uterotonic coverage rate of all deliveries was 53.5%, based on 97.7% oxytocin use at recorded facility vaginal births and 24.9% misoprostol use at home births. Among 550 women interviewed postpartum, 87.7% of those who received misoprostol and had a home birth took the drug. Sixty-three percent (63.0%) took it at the correct time, and 54.0% experienced at least one minor side effect. No serious adverse events reported among enrolled women. Facility-based deliveries appeared to increase during the program. Conclusions The program was moderately effective at achieving high uterotonic coverage of all births. Coverage of home births was low despite the use of two channels of advance distribution of misoprostol. Although ANC reached a greater proportion of women in late pregnancy than home visits, 46.3% of expected deliveries did not receive education or advance distribution of misoprostol. A revised community-based strategy is needed to increase advance distribution rates and misoprostol coverage rates for home births. Misoprostol for PPH prevention appears acceptable to women in Liberia. Correct timing of misoprostol self-administration needs improved emphasis during counseling and education. PMID:24894566

  5. Effects on bowel motility of misoprostol administered before and after meals.

    PubMed

    Rutgeerts, P; Vantrappen, G; Hiele, M; Ghoos, Y; Onkelinx, C

    1991-10-01

    Prostaglandin analogues, used in the treatment of duodenal and benign gastric ulcer and in the prevention of gastric ulceration caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, are frequently associated with gastrointestinal side effects, particularly diarrhoea and abdominal cramps. We investigated the effects of misoprostol, a prostaglandin E1 derivative, on bowel motility and faecal loss of fat, water and bile acids in relation to its postprandial vs. preprandial administration. Twelve healthy subjects participated in a double-blind crossover study comparing three 5-day courses of therapy with a washout period of 1-2 weeks between courses. Following a Latin Square design, the dosing regimens were (a) 400 micrograms misoprostol b.d. after meals and placebo b.d. before meals; (b) 400 micrograms misoprostol b.d. before meals and placebo b.d. after meals; (c) placebo before and after meals. Orocaecal transit time measured by H2 breath tests following lactulose administration, was shortest during pre-prandial dosing but was also significantly decreased during post-prandial dosing. The overall treatment difference was highly significant (P less than 0.001), and the difference between each pair of treatments was also statistically significant. Whole bowel transit time studied by means of 3H-PEG 4000 determination in stools, was shorter for the two misoprostol regimens but statistical significance was borderline. The number of stools passed per day was similar in the three groups. During both misoprostol dosing periods, stools were less formed and their content of water, fat and bile acids was higher. There was also more urgency, flatulence, abdominal pain and nausea. It is concluded that the gastrointestinal side effects caused by misoprostol are mainly based on an increased orocaecal transit time. The effects are more important when the drug is administered before meals than after meals. PMID:1793784

  6. Cervical Priming by Misoprostol before Diagnostic Dilatation and Curettage: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadian, Shima; Tavana, Anahita; Tavana, Shahrzad; Mohammadian, Aida; Fallahian, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Difficulty in cervical dilatation is a hard situation during the procedure of diagnostic dilatation and curettage in some cases. This study was performed to evaluate the effect of vaginal misoprostol for cervical priming before diagnostic dilatation and curettage. Methods: In this study 56 women were selected as the candidates for dilatation and curettage. The study was double blind and was performed for two parallel groups. One misoprostol tablet (200 ?g) was administered in posterior fornix of vagina 24 hr before operation in 28 patients whereas in other 28 patients, placebo (VitB6) was used. Then, the two groups were compared according to the patency of the cervix measured by No. 5 Hegar dilators and the duration of dilatation and curettage procedure as well. Chi-square test, t-test, and Mann-Whitney U test were used for comparing two groups, and a p-value less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: Before the procedure of dilatation and curettage, the patency of the cervix was measured by passing Hegar dilator number 5 through the cervical canal in fifteen (53.6%) patients in the misoprostol group and 8 patients (28.6%) in the placebo group (p=0.05) which their difference was statistically significant. The effect of misoprostol was not significant in nulliparous women and postmenopausal period either. Conclusion: Vaginal misoprostol is a useful drug for ripening and dilating the cervix. It also facilitates the procedure of dilatation and curettage in premenopausal and multiparous women. Misoprostol was less effective in nulliparous women and in postmenopausal period. PMID:26913235

  7. Serum biomarkers may help predict successful misoprostol management of early pregnancy failure.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Courtney A; Ratcliffe, Sarah J; Quinley, Kelly E; Miller, Carrie; Sammel, Mary D

    2015-06-01

    In order to simplify management of early pregnancy loss, our goal was to elucidate predictors of successful medical management of miscarriage with a single dose of misoprostol. In this secondary analysis of data from a multicenter randomized controlled trial, candidate biomarkers were compared between 49 women with missed abortion who succeeded in passing their pregnancy with a single dose of misoprostol and 46 women who did not pass their pregnancy with a misoprostol single dose. We computed the precision of trophoblastic protein and hormone concentrations to discriminate between women who succeed or fail single dose misoprostol management. We also included demographic factors in our analyses. We found overlap in the concentrations of the individual markers between women who succeeded and failed single-dose misoprostol. However, hCG levels ≥ 4000 mIU/mL and ADAM-12 levels ≥ 2500 pg/mL were independently associated with complete uterine expulsion after one dose of misoprostol in our population. A multivariable logistic model for success included non-Hispanic ethnicity and parity <2 in addition to hCG ≥ 4000 mIU/mL and ADAM-12 ≥ 2500 pg/mL and had an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) of 0.81 (95% confidence interval: 72-90%). Categorizing women with a predicted probability of ≥ 0.65 resulted in a sensitivity of 75.0%, specificity 77.1% and positive predictive value of 81.8%. While preliminary, our data suggest that serum biomarkers, especially when combined with demographic characteristics, may be helpful in guiding patient decision-making regarding the management of early pregnancy failure (EPF). Further study is warranted. PMID:26051455

  8. A Variable Partial Covering Model for the Seyfert 1 Galaxy MCG -6-30-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Takehiro; Ebisawa, Ken; Inoue, Hajime

    2012-12-01

    We propose a simple spectral model for the Seyfert 1 Galaxy MCG -6-30-15 that can explain most of the 1-40 keV spectral variation by a change of the partial covering fraction, similar to that proposed by Miller, Turner, and Reeves (2008, A&A, 483, 437). Our spectral model is composed of three continuum components: (1) a direct power-law component, (2) a heavily absorbed power-law component by mildly ionized intervening matter, and (3) a cold-disk reflection component far from the black hole with a moderate solid-angle (Ω/2π ≃ 0.3) accompanying a narrow fluorescent iron line. The first two components are affected by the surrounding thin highly ionized absorber with NH ≃ 1023.4 cm-2 and log ξ ≃ 3.4. The heavy absorber in the second component is fragmented into many clouds, each of which is composed of radial zones with different ionization states and different column densities, a main body (NH ≃1024.2 cm-2, log ξ ≃ 1.6), an envelope (NH ≃ 1022.1 cm-2, log ξ ≃ 1.9), and presumably a completely opaque core. Not only the intrinsic spectral shape of the X-ray source but also these parameters of the ionized absorbers are unchanged at all. The central X-ray source extends moderately, and its luminosity is not significantly variable. The observed flux and spectral variations are mostly explained by the variation of the geometrical partial covering fraction of the central source ranging from 0 (uncovered) to ˜0.63 by the intervening ionized clouds in the line of sight. The ionized iron K-edge of the heavily absorbed component explains most of the seemingly broad line-like features, a well-known spectral characteristic of MCG -6-30-15. The direct component and the absorbed one are negatively correlated, and their variations cancel out each other, so that the fractional spectral variation becomes the minimum at the iron-energy band; thus, another observational characteristic of MCG -6-30-15 is explained.

  9. A Chandra-HETG view of MCG +8-11-11

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, K. D.; Nowak, M. A.

    2014-12-10

    We present a spectral analysis of the 118 ks Chandra High Energy Transmission Gratings (HETG) observation of the X-ray bright Seyfert 1.5 galaxy MCG +8-11-11, in conjunction with 100 ks of archival Suzaku data, aimed at investigating the signatures of warm absorption and Compton reflection reported from previous Suzaku and XMM-Newton studies of the source. Contrary to previous results, we find that warm absorption is not required by the data. Instead, we report upper limits on absorption lines that are below previous (marginal) detections. Fe Kα line emission is clearly detected and is likely resolved with σ ∼ 0.02 keV with the HETG data. We applied self-consistent, broadband spectral-fitting models to the Chandra and Suzaku data to investigate this and other signatures of distant absorption and reflection. Utilizing in particular the MYTorus model, we find that the data are consistent with reprocessing by a distant, neutral torus that is marginally Compton-thick ( N {sub H} ∼10{sup 24}cm{sup –2}) and out of the line of sight. However, we do not find compelling evidence of a relativistically broadened Fe K emission line, which is often expected from type 1 active galactic nuclei. This is consistent with some, although not all, previous studies of MCG +8-11-11. A well-measured edge is identified by the HETG near 0.5 keV, indicating neutral absorption in the line of sight that is consistent with galactic absorption; however, the absorption may be partially intrinsic to the source. The HETG data are consistent with the presence of a soft excess, a feature that may be missed by considering the Suzaku data alone.

  10. Reconstructing Merger Timelines Using Star Cluster Age Distributions: The Case of MCG+08-11-002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Rebecca L.; Medling, Anne M.; U, Vivian; Max, Claire E.; Sanders, David; Kewley, Lisa. J.

    2016-02-01

    We present near infrared imaging and integral field spectroscopy of the centre of the dusty luminous infrared galaxy merger MCG+08-11-002, taken using the Near InfraRed Camera 2 (NIRC2) and the OH-Suppressing InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (OSIRIS) on Keck II. We achieve a spatial resolution of 25 pc in the K band, allowing us to resolve 41 star clusters in the NIRC2 images. We calculate the ages of 22/25 star clusters within the OSIRIS field using the equivalent widths of the CO 2.3?m absorption feature and the Br? nebular emission line. The star cluster age distribution has a clear peak at ages ? 20 Myr, indicative of current starburst activity associated with the final coalescence of the progenitor galaxies. There is a possible second peak at 65 Myr which may be a product of the previous close passage of the galaxy nuclei. We fit single and double starburst models to the star cluster age distribution and use Monte Carlo sampling combined with two-sided K-S tests to calculate the probability that the observed data are drawn from each of the best fit distributions. There is a >90 per cent chance that the data are drawn from either a single or double starburst star formation history, but stochastic sampling prevents us from distinguishing between the two scenarios. Our analysis of MCG+08-11-002 indicates that star cluster age distributions provide valuable insights into the timelines of galaxy interactions and may therefore play an important role in the future development of precise merger stage classification systems.

  11. Reconstructing merger timelines using star cluster age distributions: the case of MCG+08-11-002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Rebecca L.; Medling, Anne M.; U, Vivian; Max, Claire E.; Sanders, David; Kewley, Lisa J.

    2016-05-01

    We present near-infrared imaging and integral field spectroscopy of the centre of the dusty luminous infrared galaxy merger MCG+08-11-002, taken using the Near InfraRed Camera 2 (NIRC2) and the OH-Suppressing InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (OSIRIS) on Keck II. We achieve a spatial resolution of ˜25 pc in the K band, allowing us to resolve 41 star clusters in the NIRC2 images. We calculate the ages of 22/25 star clusters within the OSIRIS field using the equivalent widths of the CO 2.3 μm absorption feature and the Br γ nebular emission line. The star cluster age distribution has a clear peak at ages ≲ 20 Myr, indicative of current starburst activity associated with the final coalescence of the progenitor galaxies. There is a possible second peak at ˜65 Myr which may be a product of the previous close passage of the galaxy nuclei. We fit single and double starburst models to the star cluster age distribution and use Monte Carlo sampling combined with two-sided Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests to calculate the probability that the observed data are drawn from each of the best-fitting distributions. There is a >90 per cent chance that the data are drawn from either a single or double starburst star formation history, but stochastic sampling prevents us from distinguishing between the two scenarios. Our analysis of MCG+08-11-002 indicates that star cluster age distributions provide valuable insights into the timelines of galaxy interactions and may therefore play an important role in the future development of precise merger stage classification systems.

  12. Principal component analysis of MCG-06-30-15 with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, M. L.; Marinucci, A.; Brenneman, L.; Fabian, A. C.; Kara, E.; Matt, G.; Walton, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    We analyse the spectral variability of MCG-06-30-15 with 600 k s of XMM-Newton data, including 300 k s of new data from the joint XMM-Newton and NuSTAR 2013 observational campaign. We use principal component analysis to find high-resolution, model-independent spectra of the different variable components of the spectrum. We find that over 99 per cent of the variability can be described by just three components, which are consistent with variations in the normalization of the power-law continuum (˜97 per cent), the photon index (˜2 per cent) and the normalization of a relativistically blurred reflection spectrum (˜0.5 per cent). We also find a fourth significant component but this is heavily diluted by noise, and we can attribute all the remaining spectral variability to noise. All three components are found to be variable on time-scales from 20 down to 1 k s, which corresponds to a distance from the central black hole of less than 70 gravitational radii. We compare these results with those derived from spectral fitting, and find them to be in very good agreement with our interpretation of the principal components. We conclude that the observed relatively weak variability in the reflected component of the spectrum of MCG-06-30-15 is due to the effects of light-bending close to the event horizon of the black hole, and demonstrate that principal component analysis is an effective tool for analysing spectral variability in this regime.

  13. Performance comparison of independent component analysis algorithms for fetal cardiac signal reconstruction: a study on synthetic fMCG data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantini, D.; Hild, K. E., II; Alleva, G.; Comani, S.

    2006-02-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) algorithms have been successfully used for signal extraction tasks in the field of biomedical signal processing. We studied the performances of six algorithms (FastICA, CubICA, JADE, Infomax, TDSEP and MRMI-SIG) for fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG). Synthetic datasets were used to check the quality of the separated components against the original traces. Real fMCG recordings were simulated with linear combinations of typical fMCG source signals: maternal and fetal cardiac activity, ambient noise, maternal respiration, sensor spikes and thermal noise. Clusters of different dimensions (19, 36 and 55 sensors) were prepared to represent different MCG systems. Two types of signal-to-interference ratios (SIR) were measured. The first involves averaging over all estimated components and the second is based solely on the fetal trace. The computation time to reach a minimum of 20 dB SIR was measured for all six algorithms. No significant dependency on gestational age or cluster dimension was observed. Infomax performed poorly when a sub-Gaussian source was included; TDSEP and MRMI-SIG were sensitive to additive noise, whereas FastICA, CubICA and JADE showed the best performances. Of all six methods considered, FastICA had the best overall performance in terms of both separation quality and computation times.

  14. Different Doses of Sublingual Misoprostol versus Methylergometrine for the Prevention of Atonic Postpartum Haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Soltan, M.H.; El-Gendi, E.; Imam, H. H.; Fathi, O

    2007-01-01

    Objective: In the poor underdeveloped countries, anaemia is very common in pregnant women. Maternal mortality is four times higher in severely anaemic women than non-anaemic ones and postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is the most common cause of death. Its main cause is uterine atony, which accounts for more than 70%. The objective of this study is to evaluate the use of sublingual misoprostol in different doses of 600, 800 and1000μg in management of the third stage of labor, with regards to blood loss and incidence of atonic postpartum haemorrhag (APPH). Study Design: Double blind randomized controlled study Methods : One thousand and two hundred parturient were studied in a control and three study groups, each composed of 300 women. Methylergometrine 0.2 mg IM injection and sublingual misoprostol 600, 800 and 1000 μg tablets were given to women in control and the three study groups respectively, immediately after delivery. Outcome Measures: Duration of the third stage of labour, Blood loss in the third stage of labour, Outcomes in anaemic compared to non-anaemic women, Incidance of atonic postpartum haemorrhage in different groups, Haemoglobin deficit after 24 hrs of delivery, Changes in the women’s blood pressure during the study, Side effects of the drug, and, Women’s acceptability of sublingual misoprostol administration. Results : Only significant reduction in blood loss and haemoglobin deficits were seen in the third stage of labour and after delivery in women used misoprostol doses of 800 μg and 1000 μg. The incidences of PPH in studied women and controls were almost similar, ranging between 2 and 3%. Similar results were seen in anaemic and non-anaemic women with a higher incidence of APPH in the non-misoprostol user anaemic women. Side effects of the drug were dose related. Conclusion : Misoprostol in high dose may be used for managing third stage of labour to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality due to APPH particularly, in the poor underdeveloped countries where, facilities to deliver in health centers, purchase and store the oxytocic ampoules or medically trained persons are not readily available in all places. Benefits of large dose misoprostol outweigh its side effects. PMID:21475433

  15. Potential Cost-Effectiveness of Prenatal Distribution of Misoprostol for Prevention of Postpartum Hemorrhage in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Lubinga, Solomon J.; Atukunda, Esther C.; Wasswa-Ssalongo, George; Babigumira, Joseph B.

    2015-01-01

    Background In settings where home birth rates are high, prenatal distribution of misoprostol has been advocated as a strategy to increase access to uterotonics during the third stage of labor to prevent postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). Our objective was to project the potential cost-effectiveness of this strategy in Uganda from both governmental (the relevant payer) and modified societal perspectives. Methods and Findings To compare prenatal misoprostol distribution to status quo (no misoprostol distribution), we developed a decision analytic model that tracked the delivery pathways of a cohort of pregnant women from the prenatal period, labor to delivery without complications or delivery with PPH, and successful treatment or death. Delivery pathway parameters were derived from the Uganda Demographic and Health Survey. Incidence of PPH, treatment efficacy, adverse event and case fatality rates, access to misoprostol, and health resource use and cost data were obtained from published literature and supplemented with expert opinion where necessary. We computed the expected incidence of PPH, mortality, disability adjusted life years (DALYs), costs and incremental cost effectiveness ratios (ICERs). We conducted univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses to examine robustness of our results. In the base-case analysis, misoprostol distribution lowered the expected incidence of PPH by 1.0% (95% credibility interval (CrI): 0.55%, 1.95%), mortality by 0.08% (95% CrI: 0.04%, 0.13%) and DALYs by 0.02 (95% CrI: 0.01, 0.03). Mean costs were higher with prenatal misoprostol distribution from governmental by US$3.3 (95% CrI: 2.1, 4.2) and modified societal (by US$1.3; 95% CrI: -1.6, 2.8) perspectives. ICERs were US$191 (95% CrI: 82, 443) per DALY averted from a governmental perspective, and US$73 (95% CI: -86, 256) per DALY averted from a modified societal perspective. Conclusions Prenatal distribution of misoprostol is potentially cost-effective in Uganda and should be considered for national-level scale up for prevention of PPH. PMID:26560140

  16. Effect of longterm misoprostol coadministration with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: a histological study.

    PubMed Central

    Shah, K; Price, A B; Talbot, I C; Bardhan, K D; Fenn, C G; Bjarnason, I

    1995-01-01

    Prostaglandins are widely used in the prevention and healing of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) induced gastric and duodenal ulcers, but their longterm effect on the human gastric mucosa is unknown. This study assessed the effect of coadministration of prostaglandins with NSAIDs on the histology of the gastroduodenal mucosa. Histological appearances (using the Sydney system) of gastric biopsy specimens from 180 patients receiving longterm NSAID treatment of whom 90 had been receiving misoprostol (400-800 micrograms/day) for one to two years were studied. Both groups of patients were comparable with regard to clinical and demographic details. There was no significant difference (p > 0.1) in the prevalence of chronic gastritis (total, corpus or antrum only) between patients receiving (36 of 90 (40%)) or not receiving misoprostol (35 of 90 (39%)). Chronic gastritis was equally associated with the presence of Helicobacter pylori, 86% and 73% (p > 0.1), respectively, in the two groups. Significantly fewer patients receiving misoprostol had reactive gastritis than those receiving only NSAIDs (8 (9%) versus 27 (30%), p < 0.01). Reactive gastritis was not associated with H pylori. Thirty nine (43%) of the misoprostol treated patients had normal histology compared with 16 (18%) receiving only NSAIDs (p < 0.01). These results show two different patterns of gastric damage in patients receiving NSAIDs, namely chronic and reactive gastritis. Misoprostol treatment was associated with a significantly reduced prevalence of reactive gastritis and it is suggested that this, along with its antisecretory action, may explain the reduced prevalence of gastroduodenal lesions when coadministered with NSAIDs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7557567

  17. Civil Society Organizations and medicines policy change: a case study of registration, procurement, distribution and use of misoprostol in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Atukunda, Esther Cathyln; Brhlikova, Petra; Agaba, Amon Ganafa; Pollock, Allyson M

    2015-04-01

    Misoprostol use for postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) has been promoted by Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) since the early 2000s. Yet, CSOs' role in improving access to misoprostol and shaping health policy at global and national levels is not well understood. We document the introduction of misoprostol in Uganda in 2008 from its registration, addition to treatment guidelines and national Essential Medicines List (EML), to its distribution and use. We then analyse the contribution of CSOs to this health policy change and service provision. Policy documents, procurement data and 82 key informant interviews with government officials, healthcare providers, and CSOs in four Ugandan districts of Kampala, Mbarara, Apac, Bundibugyo were collected between 2010 and 2013. Five key CSOs promoted and accelerated the rollout of misoprostol in Uganda. They supported the registration of misoprostol with the National Drug Authority, the development of clinical guidelines, and the piloting and training of health care providers. CSOs and National Medical Stores were procuring and distributing misoprostol country-wide to health centres two years before it was added to the clinical guidelines and EML of Uganda and in the absence of good evidence. The evidence suggests an increasing trend of misoprostol procurement and availability over the medicine of choice, oxytocin. This shift in national priorities has serious ramifications for maternal health care that need urgent evaluation. The absence of clinical guidelines in health centres and the lack of training preclude rational use of misoprostol. CSOs shifted their focus from the public to the private sector, where some of them continue to promote its use for off-label indications including induction of labour and abortion. There is an urgent need to build capacity to improve the robustness of the national and local institutions in assessing the safety and effectiveness of all medicines and their indications in Uganda. PMID:25728484

  18. Supernova 2011at = PSN J09285756-1448206 in MCG -02-24-27

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2011-03-01

    Announces the discovery of SN 2011at = PSN J09285756-1448206 in MCG -02-24-27 by Lou Cox, Jack Newton, and Tim Puckett (Ellijay, GA, in the course of the Puckett Observatory Supernova Search) on 2011 March 10.214 UT at unfiltered CCD magnitude 14.5. Spectra obtained March 11.81 UT with the Swift satellite (+UVOT) by F. Bufano (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica (INAF), Osservatorio Astronomico di Catania), S. Benetti (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova), and A. Pastorello (Queen's University, Belfast, et al.); and on March 12 UT with the F. L. Whipple Observatory 1.5-m telescope (+FAST) by M. Calkins (reported by G. H. Marion, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), on behalf of the CfA Supernova Group) show SN 2011at to be a type-Ia supernova a few days before/around maximum. The object was designated PSN J09285756-1448206 when posted on the Central Bureau's Transient Objects Confirmation Page (TOCP) webpage. Initially announced in CBET 2676 (Daniel W. ! E. Green, ed.). Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details.

  19. On the origin of the broad, relativistic iron line of MCG-6-30-15 observed by XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martocchia, A.; Matt, G.; Karas, V.

    2002-03-01

    The relativistic iron line profile recently observed by XMM-Newton in the spectrum of the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15 (Wilms et al. \\cite{Wilms01}) is discussed in the framework of the lamp-post model. It is shown that the steep disc emissivity, the large line equivalent width and the amount of Compton reflection can be self-consistently reproduced in this scenario.

  20. Performance comparison of six independent components analysis algorithms for fetal signal extraction from real fMCG data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hild, Kenneth E.; Alleva, Giovanna; Nagarajan, Srikantan; Comani, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    In this study we compare the performance of six independent components analysis (ICA) algorithms on 16 real fetal magnetocardiographic (fMCG) datasets for the application of extracting the fetal cardiac signal. We also compare the extraction results for real data with the results previously obtained for synthetic data. The six ICA algorithms are FastICA, CubICA, JADE, Infomax, MRMI-SIG and TDSEP. The results obtained using real fMCG data indicate that the FastICA method consistently outperforms the others in regard to separation quality and that the performance of an ICA method that uses temporal information suffers in the presence of noise. These two results confirm the previous results obtained using synthetic fMCG data. There were also two notable differences between the studies based on real and synthetic data. The differences are that all six ICA algorithms are independent of gestational age and sensor dimensionality for synthetic data, but depend on gestational age and sensor dimensionality for real data. It is possible to explain these differences by assuming that the number of point sources needed to completely explain the data is larger than the dimensionality used in the ICA extraction.

  1. A SUZAKU OBSERVATION OF MCG -2-58-22: CONSTRAINING THE GEOMETRY OF THE CIRCUMNUCLEAR MATERIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Rivers, Elizabeth; Markowitz, Alex; Rothschild, Richard

    2011-05-01

    We have analyzed a long-look Suzaku observation of the active galactic nucleus MCG -2-58-22, a type 1.5 Seyfert with very little X-ray absorption in the line of sight and prominent features arising from reflection off circumnuclear material: the Fe line and Compton reflection hump. We place tight constraints on the power-law photon index ({Gamma} = 1.80 {+-} 0.02), the Compton reflection strength (R = 0.69 {+-} 0.05), and the Fe K emission line energy centroid and width (E = 6.40 {+-} 0.02 keV, v{sub FWHM} < 7100 km s{sup -1}). We find no significant evidence either for emission from strongly ionized Fe, or for a strong, relativistically broadened Fe line, indicating that perhaps there is no radiatively efficient accretion disk very close in to the central black hole. In addition, we test a new self-consistent physical model from Murphy and Yaqoob, the 'MYTORUS' model, consisting of a donut-shaped torus of material surrounding the central illuminating source and producing both the Compton hump and the Fe K line emission. From the application of this model we find that the observed spectrum is consistent with a Compton-thick torus of material (column density N{sub H} = 3.6{sup +1.3}{sub -0.8} x 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}) lying outside of the line of sight to the nucleus, leaving it bare of X-ray absorption in excess of the Galactic column. We calculate that this material is sufficient to produce all of the Fe line flux without the need for any flux contribution from additional Compton-thin circumnuclear material.

  2. A Suzaku Observation of MCG -2-58-22: Constraining the Geometry of the Circumnuclear Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, Elizabeth; Markowitz, Alex; Rothschild, Richard

    2011-05-01

    We have analyzed a long-look Suzaku observation of the active galactic nucleus MCG -2-58-22, a type 1.5 Seyfert with very little X-ray absorption in the line of sight and prominent features arising from reflection off circumnuclear material: the Fe line and Compton reflection hump. We place tight constraints on the power-law photon index (Γ = 1.80 ± 0.02), the Compton reflection strength (R = 0.69 ± 0.05), and the Fe K emission line energy centroid and width (E = 6.40 ± 0.02 keV, v FWHM < 7100 km s-1). We find no significant evidence either for emission from strongly ionized Fe, or for a strong, relativistically broadened Fe line, indicating that perhaps there is no radiatively efficient accretion disk very close in to the central black hole. In addition, we test a new self-consistent physical model from Murphy and Yaqoob, the "MYTORUS" model, consisting of a donut-shaped torus of material surrounding the central illuminating source and producing both the Compton hump and the Fe K line emission. From the application of this model we find that the observed spectrum is consistent with a Compton-thick torus of material (column density N H = 3.6+1.3 - 0.8 × 1024 cm-2) lying outside of the line of sight to the nucleus, leaving it bare of X-ray absorption in excess of the Galactic column. We calculate that this material is sufficient to produce all of the Fe line flux without the need for any flux contribution from additional Compton-thin circumnuclear material.

  3. The biomedicalisation of illegal abortion: the double life of misoprostol in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Zordo, Silvia De

    2016-03-01

    This paper examines the double life of misoprostol in Brazil, where it is illegally used by women as an abortifacient and legally used in obstetric hospital wards. Based on my doctoral and post-doctoral anthropological research on contraception and abortion in Salvador, Bahia, this paper initially traces the "conversion" of misoprostol from a drug to treat ulcers to a self-administered abortifacient in Latin America, and its later conversion to aneclectic global obstetric tool. It then shows how, while reducing maternal mortality, its use as an illegal abortifacient has reinforced the double reproductive citizenship regime existing in countries with restrictive abortion laws and poor post-abortion care services, where poor women using it illegally are stigmatised, discriminated against and exposed to potentially severe health risks. PMID:27008072

  4. Attenuation of Ischemic Liver Injury by Prostaglandin E1 Analogue, Misoprostol, and Prostaglandin I2 Analogue, OP-41483

    PubMed Central

    Totsuka, Eishi; Todo, Satoru; Zhu, Yue; Ishizaki, Naoki; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Jin, Maeng Bong; Urakami, Atsushi; Shimamura, Tsuyoshi; Starzl, Thomas E

    2010-01-01

    Background Prostaglandin has been reported to have protective effects against liver injury. Use of this agent in clinical settings, however, is limited because of drug-related side effects. This study investigated whether misoprostol, prostaglandin E1 analogue, and OP-41483, prostaglandin I2 analogue, which have fewer adverse effects with a longer half-life, attenuate ischemic liver damage. Study Design Thirty beagle dogs underwent 2 hours of hepatic vascular exclusion using venovenous bypass. Misoprostol was administered intravenously for 30 minutes before ischemia and for 3 hours after reperfusion. OP-41483 was administered intraportally for 30 minutes before ischemia (2 μg/kg/min) and for 3 hours after reperfusion (0.5 μg/kg/min). Animals were divided into five groups: untreated control group (n = 10); high-dose misoprostol (total 100 μg/kg) group (MP-H, n = 5); middle-dose misoprostol (50 μg/kg) group (MP-M, n = 5); low-dose misoprostol (25 μg/kg) group (MP-L, n = 5); and OP-41483 group (OP, n = 5). Animal survival, hepatic tissue blood flow (HTBF), liver function, and histology were analyzed. Results Two-week animal survival rates were 30% in control, 60% in MP-H, 100% in MP-M, 80% in MP-L, and 100% in OP. The treatments with prostaglandin analogues improved HTBF, and attenuated liver enzyme release, adenine nucleotrides degradation, and histologic abnormalities. In contrast to the MP-H animals that exhibited unstable cardiovascular systems, the MP-M, MP-L, and OP animals experienced only transient hypotension. Conclusions These results indicate that misoprostol and OP-41483 prevent ischemic liver damage, although careful dose adjustment of misoprostol is required to obtain the best protection with minimal side effects. PMID:9740185

  5. Coagulation profile in women on low-dose oral contraceptive pills.

    PubMed

    Roshidah, I; Khalid, H; Baharum, Y

    1990-12-01

    The effect of low dose combined oral contraceptives containing 30 mcg ethinyl estradiol and either 150 mcg levonorgestrel or 150 mcg desogestrel on coagulation indices in Malaysian women was examined. 50 women who had been using the pills for 1 year or more, were compared to 75 non-users. All were attending the Maternity Clinic of the General Hospital, Kuala Lumpur. Pill users registered shorter prothrombin time, 11.5 vs. 11.1 seconds (p=0.016), and partial thromboplastin time, 40.1 vs 35.1 seconds (p=0.000). Since there were no significant differences in Factors II, V, VII, or VIII, the overall effects of low-dose pills on coagulation is probably not clinically significant. PMID:12343152

  6. Development and validation of LC methods for the separation of misoprostol related substances and diastereoisomers.

    PubMed

    Kahsay, Getu; Song, Huiying; Eerdekens, Fran; Tie, Yaxin; Hendriks, Danny; Van Schepdael, Ann; Cabooter, Deirdre; Adams, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Misoprostol is a synthetic prostaglandin E1 analogue which is mainly used for prevention and treatment of gastric ulcers, but also for abortion due to its labour inducing effect. Misoprostol exists as a mixture of diastereoisomers (1:1) and has several related impurities owing to its instability at higher temperatures and moisture. A simple and robust reversed phase liquid chromatographic (RPLC) method is described for the separation of the related substances and a normal phase (NP) LC method for the separation of misoprostol diastereoisomers. The RPLC method was performed using an Ascentis Express C18 (150 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) column kept at 35 °C. The mobile phase was a gradient mixture of mobile phase A (ACN-H2O-MeOH, 28:69:3 v/v/v) and mobile phase B (ACN-H2O-MeOH, 47:50:3 v/v/v) eluted at a flow rate of 1.5 mL/min. UV detection was performed at 200 nm. The NPLC method was undertaken by using an XBridge bare silica (150 mm × 2.1 mm, 3.5 μm) column at 35 °C. The mobile phase contained 1-propanol-heptane-TFA (4:96:0.1%, v/v/v), pumped at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. UV detection was performed at 205 nm. This LC method can properly separate the two diastereoisomers (Rs > 2) within an analysis time of less than 20 min. Both methods were validated according to the ICH guidelines. Furthermore, these new LC methods have been successfully applied for purity control and diastereoisomers ratio determination of misoprostol bulk drug, tablets and dispersion. PMID:25880239

  7. A critical appraisal of the misoprostol removable, controlled-release vaginal delivery system of labor induction

    PubMed Central

    Patte, Charlotte; Deruelle, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Background Induction of labor is a major issue in pregnancy management. Finding strategies to increase rate and decrease time to vaginal delivery is an important goal, but maternal or neonatal safety must remain the primary objective. Misoprostol is a synthetic analogue of prostaglandin used off label to ripen the cervix and induce labor. The misoprostol vaginal insert (MVI) was designed to allow a controlled-release delivery of misoprostol (from 50 to 200 μg) with a removal tape. The objective of this review was to make a critical appraisal of this device referring to the literature. Methods A literature search was performed in the PubMed and Cochrane databases using the keywords “vaginal misoprostol insert”. Results Several studies compared different doses of MVI (50, 100, 150, and 200 μg) with the 10 mg dinoprostone insert. The 100 μg MVI compared with the dinoprostone vaginal insert (DVI) showed similar efficacy and no significant differences in cesarean delivery rate. MVI 200 μg compared with DVI showed a reduced time to vaginal delivery and oxytocin need but had an increased risk of uterine hyperstimulation. The rate of hyperstimulation syndrome was two to three times more frequent with the 200 μg MVI than the 100 μg. Conclusion Current data suggest that the 100 μg MVI would provide the best balance between efficacy and safety. Further studies should be performed to evaluate this dose, especially in high-risk situations needing induction of labor. PMID:26648758

  8. Feasibility, Acceptability, and Programme Effectiveness of Misoprostol for Prevention of Postpartum Haemorrhage in Rural Bangladesh: A Quasiexperimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Quaiyum, Abdul; Gazi, Rukhsana; Hossain, Shahed; Wirtz, Andrea; Saha, Nirod Chandra

    2014-01-01

    We explored the feasibility of distributing misoprostol tablets using two strategies in prevention of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) among women residing in the Abhoynagar subdistrict of Bangladesh. We conducted a quasiexperimental study with a posttest design and nonequivalent comparison and intervention groups. Paramedics distributed three misoprostol tablets, one delivery mat (Quaiyum's delivery mat), a packet of five standardized sanitary pads, and one lidded plastic container with detailed counseling on their use. All materials except misoprostol were also provided with counseling sessions to the control group participants. Postpartum blood loss was measured by paramedics using standardized method. This study has demonstrated community acceptability to misoprostol tablets for the prevention of PPH that reduced overall volume of blood loss after childbirth. Likewise, the delivery mat and pad were found to be useful to mothers as tools for assessing the amount of blood loss after delivery and informing care-seeking decisions. Further studies should be undertaken to explore whether government outreach health workers can be trained to effectively distribute misoprostol tablets among rural women of Bangladesh. Such a study should explore and identify the programmatic requirements to integrate this within the existing reproductive health program of the Government of Bangladesh. PMID:25763402

  9. Misoprostol-induced radioprotection of Syrian hamster embryo cells in utero from cell death and oncogenic transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.C.; LaNasa, P.; Hanson, W.R.

    1994-07-01

    Misoprostol, a PGE analog, is an effective radioprotector of murine intestine and hematopoietic and hair cell renewal systems. The radioprotective nature of misoprostol was extended to examine its ability to influence clonogenic cell survival and induction of oncogenic transformation in Syrian hamster embryo cells exposed to X rays in utero and assayed in vitro. Hamsters in their 12th day of pregnancy were injected subcutaneously with misoprostal, and 2 h later the pregnant hamsters were exposed to graded doses of X rays. Immediately after irradiation, hamsters were euthanized and embryonic tissue was explanted into culture dishes containing complete growth medium. After a 2-week incubation period, clongenic cell survival and morphologically transformed foci were determined. Survival of misoprostol-treated SHE cells was increased and yielded a dose reduction factor of 1.5 compared to SHE cells treated with X rays alone. In contrast, radiation-induced oncogenic transformation of misoprostol-treated cells was reduced by a factor of 20 compared to cells treated with X rays alone. These studies suggest that misoprostol not only protects normal tissues in vivo from acute radiation injury, but also protects cells, to a large extent, from injury leading to transforming events. 26 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Analysis of misoprostol and chlorhexidine policy gains in Pakistan: the advocacy experience of Mercy Corps Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, Zahida; Cutherell, Andrea; Noor, Arif; Naureen, Farah; Norman, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    While Pakistan has made progress toward achieving Millennium Development Goal 5 for maternal health, it is unlikely to achieve the target; further, it is also not on track for Millennium Development Goal 4 regarding child health. Two low-cost, temperature stable and life-saving drugs, misoprostol and chlorhexidine, can respectively avert maternal and newborn deaths, and are particularly pertinent for poor and marginalized areas which bear the brunt of maternal and newborn deaths in Pakistan. In response, Mercy Corps led focused advocacy efforts to promote changes in policies, protocols, and regulatory environments for misoprostol (2012-2014) and for chlorhexidine (2014). These short-duration advocacy projects facilitated significant policy gains, such as inclusion of misoprostol and chlorhexidine into province-specific essential drug lists, development and endorsement of clinical protocols for the two drugs by provincial health departments, inclusion of misoprostol into pre-service training curriculum for several health cadres, and application for registration of chlorhexidine (at the concentration required for newborn care) by two pharmaceutical companies. These results were achieved by a consultative and evidence-based process which generated feedback from community members, program implementers, and policymakers, and ultimately put the government in the driver's seat to facilitate change. Community Action Dialogue forums were linked with provincial-level Technical Working Groups and Provincial Steering Committees, who passed on endorsed recommendations to the Health Secretary. The key factors which facilitated change were the identification of champions within the provincial health departments, prioritization of relationship building and follow-up, focus on concrete advocacy aims rather than broad objectives, and the use of multi-stakeholder forums to secure an enabling environment for the policy changes to take root. While these advocacy initiatives resulted in significant policy changes in Pakistan's devolved health system, to ensure these policy changes have an impact on health outcomes, Pakistan should focus on the scale-up of appropriate use of chlorhexidine and misoprostol. Further, future policy initiatives in Pakistan should make use of similar multi-stakeholder policy forums, while ensuring a third party to facilitate the process so that civil society and community voices are not lost in the policy development discussion. PMID:26792198

  11. Soft X-Ray Emission Lines from a Relativistic Accretion Disk in MCG -6-30-15 and Mrk 766

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Sako, M.; Kahn, S. M.; Brinkman, A. C.; Kaastra, J. S.; Page, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) spectra of the Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies MCG -6-30-15 and Mrk 766 are physically and spectroscopically inconsistent with standard models comprising a power-law continuum absorbed by either cold or ionized matter. We propose that the remarkably similar features detected in both objects in the 5 - 35 A band are H-like oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon emission lines, gravitation- ally redshifted and broadened by relativistic effects in the vicinity of a Kerr black hole. We discuss the implications of our interpretation, and demonstrate that the derived parameters can be physically self-consistent.

  12. Intravaginal Misoprostol for Cervical Ripening and Labor Induction in Nulliparous Women: A Double-blinded, Prospective Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Hao-Ping; Fan, Jian-Xia; Yu, Hong; Sun, Li-Zhou; Chen, Lian; Chang, Qing; Zhao, Nai-Qing; Di, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Background: In China, no multicenter double-blinded prospective randomized controlled study on labor induction has been conducted till now. This study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravaginal accurate 25-μg misoprostol tablets for cervical ripening and labor induction in term pregnancy in nulliparous women. Methods: This was a double-blinded, prospective randomized controlled study including nulliparous women from 6 university hospitals across China. Subjects were randomized into misoprostol or placebo group with the sample size ratio set to 7:2. Intravaginal 25-μg misoprostol or placebo was applied at an interval of 4 h (repeated up to 3 times) for labor induction. Primary outcome measures were the incidence of cumulative Bishop score increases ≥3 within 12 h or vaginal delivery within 24 h. Safety assessments included the incidences of maternal morbidity and adverse fetal/neonatal outcomes. Results: A total of 173 women for misoprostol group and 49 women for placebo were analyzed. The incidence of cumulative Bishop score increases ≥3 within 12 h or vaginal delivery within 24 h was higher in the misoprostol group than in the placebo (64.2% vs. 22.5%, relative risk [RR]: 2.9, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4–6.0). The incidence of onset of labor within 24 h was significantly higher in the misoprostol group than in the placebo group (48.0% vs. 18.4%, RR: 2.6, 95% CI: 1.2–5.7); and the induction-onset of labor interval was significantly shorter in the misoprostol group (P = 0.0003). However, there were no significant differences in the median process time of vaginal labor (6.4 vs. 6.8 h; P = 0.695), incidence (39.3% vs. 49.0%, RR: 0.8, 95% CI: 0.4–1.5) and indications (P = 0.683) of cesarean section deliveries, and frequencies of maternal, fetal/neonatal adverse events between the groups. Conclusion: Intravaginal misoprostol 25 μg every 4 h is efficacious and safe in labor induction and cervical ripening. PMID:26481739

  13. Another Interpretation of the Disk-Line Profile for the Seyfert 1 Galaxy MCG-6-30-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Hajime; Matsumoto, Chiho

    2003-06-01

    The Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15 is a representative object possessing a ``disk-line'' (a broad and skewed feature around 5-7keV in an X-ray spectrum). Using the longest MCG-6-30-15 observation with ASCA, Matsumoto et al. (2003, PASJ, 55, 615) found an interesting time-variability: the RMS variability as a function of a time-bin-width decreases more rapidly in the disk-line energy band (5.0-6.6keV) than those in the other energy bands, as the time-bin-width increases from ˜ 104s, to ˜ 105s. In this paper, we argue that this energy-dependent change in the RMS variability as a function of the time-bin-width is difficult to be reproduced by simply considering the variability of a ``disk-line'', but that the RMS variability of the continuum component should have an energy-dependent evolution associated with the time-bin-width change. Such an energy-dependent variability of the continuum component can be realized by introducing absorption components with the typical variation time scale longer than that of the continuum. In this interpretation, a significant part of the broad excess feature in 5-7keV is considered to be the result of a transparent spectral window of the warm absorbers.

  14. Defense Mapping Agency (DMA) Overview Of Mapping, Charting, And Geodesy (MC&G) Applications Of Digital Image Pattern Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, William C.

    1981-11-01

    In the world of mapping, charting and geodesy (MC&G) image processing, the amount of knowledge a person must bring to bear is one of the deepest intellectual questions today. The human being looks for meaning wherever possible and develops ways to organize things perceptively even if he has to invent ways of doing it. This process leads him into a wide range of information processing activities and technologies to assist him in achieving image exploitation goals in the most effective and efficient manner. Within a given area of MC&G interest, any set of procedures developed must give him the capability to process all required information within a scene regardless of its diversity. This makes it mandatory that his range of image processing cannot be limited to just techniques of image manipulation, but must involve a total system concept starting from the particular attributes and capabilities of the human mind, i.e., the processes and paradigms used by that mind in the accomplishment of its tasks, the equipment and methods by which that mind interacts with source image materials and the computer processes used to extract information. All of this must be accomplished at rates commensurate with mapping large regions of the world, within relatively fixed periods of time, at a variety of scales and detail densities using input photography also varying over a wide range of scales and ground resolutions.

  15. RXTE and BeppoSAX Observations of MCG-5-23-16: Reflection From Distant Cold Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattson, B. J.; Weaver, K. A.

    2003-01-01

    We examine the spectral variability of the Seyfert 1.9 galaxy MCG-5-23-16 using RXTE and BeppoSAX observations spanning 2 years from April 1996 to April 1998. During the first year the X-ray source brightens by a factor of approximately 25% on timescales of days to months. During this time, the reprocessed continuum emission seen with RXTE does not respond measurably to the continuum increase. However, by the end of the second year during the BeppoSAX epoch the X-ray source has faded again. This time, the reprocessed emission has also faded, indicating that the reprocessed flux has responded to the continuum. If these effects are caused by time delays due to the distance between the X-ray source and the reprocessing region, we derive a light crossing time of between approximately 1 light day and approximately 1.5 light years. This corresponds to a distance of 0.001 pc to 0.55 pc, which implies that the reprocessed emission originates between 3 x 10(exp 15) cm and 1.6 x 10(exp l8) cm from the X-ray source. In other words, the reprocessing in MCG-5-23-16 is not dominated by the inner regions of a standard accretion disk.

  16. Comparison of Prevention of NSAID-Induced Gastrointestinal Complications by Rebamipide and Misoprostol: A Randomized, Multicenter, Controlled Trial—STORM STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soo-Heon; Cho, Chul-Soo; Lee, Oh-Young; Jun, Jae-Bum; Lin, San-Ren; Zhou, Li-Ya; Yuan, Yao-Zong; Li, Zhao-Shen; Hou, Xiao-Hua; Zhao, Hong-Chuan; Kachintorn, Udom; Kositchaiwat, Chomsri; Lertkupinit, Comson

    2007-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have gastrointestinal side effects such as dyspepsia, peptic ulcer, hemorrhage, and perforation. Misoprostol and PPIs have been used to prevent NSAID-induced gastroduodenal injury. Rebamipide increases gastric mucus and stimulates the production of endogenous prostaglandins. The prophylactic effect of rebamipide on NSAID-induced gastrointestinal complications is unknown. The aim of this study was to compare NSAID-induced gastrointestinal complications in rebamipide- and misoprostol-treated groups. Patients were randomized to two groups and took a conventional NSAID plus rebamipide or misoprostol for 12 weeks. Gastric mucosal damage was evaluated by endoscopy at screening and the end of the study. The prevalences of active gastric ulcer were 7/176 (3.9%) in the rebamipide group and 3/156 (1.9%) in the misoprostol group. The prevalences of peptic ulcer were 8/176 (4.5%) in the rebamipide group and 7/156 (4.4%) in the misoprostol group. The cumulative incidences of peptic ulcer in the high-risk subgroup were 6/151 (4.0%) for rebamipide and 6/154 (3.9%) for misoprostol. In conclusion, rebamipide prevented NSAID-induced peptic ulcer as effectively as misoprostol in patients on long-term NSAID therapy. Rebamipide may be a useful therapeutic option for the prevention of NSAID-induced gastrointestinal ulcer because of its therapeutic effect and safety. PMID:18188417

  17. Implementation of misoprostol for postabortion care in Kenya and Uganda: a qualitative evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Osur, Joachim; Baird, Traci L.; Levandowski, Brooke A.; Jackson, Emily; Murokora, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evaluate implementation of misoprostol for postabortion care (MPAC) in two African countries. Design Qualitative, program evaluation. Setting Twenty-five public and private health facilities in Rift Valley Province, Kenya, and Kampala Province, Uganda. Sample Forty-five MPAC providers, health facility managers, Ministry of Health officials, and non-governmental (NGO) staff involved in program implementation. Methods and main outcome measures In both countries, the Ministry of Health, local health centers and hospitals, and NGO staff developed evidence-based service delivery protocols to introduce MPAC in selected facilities; implementation extended from January 2009 to October 2010. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews evaluated the implementation process, identified supportive and inhibitive policies for implementation, elicited lessons learned during the process, and assessed provider satisfaction and providers impressions of client satisfaction with MPAC. Project reports were also reviewed. Results In both countries, MPAC was easy to use, and freed up provider time and health facility resources traditionally necessary for provision of PAC with uterine aspiration. On-going support of providers following training ensured high quality of care. Providers perceived that many women preferred MPAC, as they avoided instrumentation of the uterus, hospital admission, cost, and stigma associated with abortion. Appropriate registration of misoprostol for use in the pilot, and maintaining supplies of misoprostol, were significant challenges to service provision. Support from the Ministry of Health was necessary for successful implementation; lack of country-based standards and guidelines for MPAC created challenges. Conclusions MPAC is simple, cost-effective and can be readily implemented in settings with high rates of abortion-related mortality. PMID:23618341

  18. Herpes - oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... HSV-2 is spread to the mouth during oral sex, causing oral herpes. Herpes viruses spread most easily ... if someone has oral herpes. Do not have oral sex if you have oral herpes, especially if you ...

  19. ASCA observations of the warm absorber in MCG-6-30-15: The discovery of a change in column density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabian, Andrew C.; Kunieda, Hideyo; Inoue, Shigeru; Matsuoka, Masaru; Mihara, Tatehiro; Miyamoto, Sigenori; Otani, Chiko; Ricker, George; Tanaka, Yasuo; Yamauchi, Makoto

    1994-01-01

    We report the first X-ray observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15 obtained at medium spectral resolution. The partially-ionized, 'warm' absorber is resolved and shown to be due to O VII and O VIII. The main absorption edge agrees with that of O VII at the redshift of the galaxy to within 1%. The column density of the absorbing material is greater by a factor of 2 in the first of our two obsevations, which were 3 weeks apart, while the mean flux is slightly lower and the ionization parameter slightly higher. We also discuss the flourescent iron emssion line seen in the source, which is at 6.40 keV. The line is significantly broadened, with a Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of about 0.4 keV.

  20. X-ray observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxies AKN120 and MCG8-11-11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R.; Marshall, F. E.

    1980-01-01

    A new X-ray source, H0523-00, with the optically variable Seyfert 1 galaxy AKN 120 is identified. The source has a 2-10 keV X-ray flux of 2 x 10 to the -11th ergs/sq cm s which corresponds to a 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity of 10 to the 44th ergs/s. X-ray observations over a 1.5 year time span combined with contemporaneous optical photometry show a decrease in the optical with no corresponding decrease in the X-ray. In contrast, similar observations of MCG 8-11-11 show a contemporaneous decrease in optical and X-ray fluxes. It is noted that the infrared and X-ray spectral slopes for these two objects are similar, with the optical being steeper by roughly one unit.

  1. Social networks and health policy: the case of misoprostol and the WHO model essential medicine list.

    PubMed

    Millard, Colin; Brhlikova, Petra; Pollock, Allyson

    2015-05-01

    The WHO Essential Medicines List (EML) was established to help countries prioritise medicines according to their health care needs. Selection for the List is based on rigorous scrutiny of public health relevance, evidence on efficacy and safety, and comparative cost effectiveness. The WHO ideal is that a medicine and its efficacy are based on science, but in reality a medicine has a social life and the acceptance of a pharmaceutical intervention involves the interaction of a wide array of governmental and civil society organisations, and industry. Misoprostol is a medicine widely used for both abortion and prevention of postpartum haemorrhage in low income countries. Although the evidence for the latter is highly contested it was nevertheless added to the WHO EML in 2011. We use social network analysis to examine the social, political and economic field surrounding the WHO EML applications and health policy. We describe a chronology of the drug's use and of the applications to the WHO EML and carry out a social network analysis of the organisations and individuals involved in the applications, research and dissemination. The research identified a network of 238 organisations and individuals involved in the promotion of misoprostol for postpartum haemorrhage and present at the time of the WHO EML applications. There is a strong interdependency between the funding bodies, civil society organisations, researchers and clinician organisations. The research was part of an EU FP7 funded project on Accessing Medicines in Africa and South Asia (2010-2013). PMID:25818380

  2. Receptor binding characteristics of tritiated misoprostol free acid in enriched canine parietal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, B.S.; Kessler, L.K.; Conway, R.G.; Schoenhard, G.; Stolzenbach, J.; Collins, P.; Kramer, S.; Butchko, G.M.; Bauer, R.F.

    1986-03-01

    Misoprostol (MISO) is a synthetic prostaglandin (PG) E/sub 1/ methyl ester with gastric antisecretory and mucosal protective properties. MISO is rapidly de-esterified to misoprostol free acid (MISO-FA) in enriched (65-80%) canine parietal cell preparations. Both forms appear to possess equivalent antisecretory potency and (/sup 3/H) MISO-FA is stable in these preparations. (/sup 3/H) MISO-FA binding was reversible and saturable with a maximal number of binding sites estimated at 8138 +/- 1893 per cell. The scatchard plot was linear, indicating a single, high affinity receptor population with a dissociation constant of 11 +/- 2.6 x 10/sup -9/ M. Unlabeled MISO-FA and MISO were equally potent inhibitors (IC/sub 50/, approx. 10/sup -8/M) of (/sup 3/H) MISO-FA binding. At 10/sup -5/ M, the dinor and tetranor ..beta..-oxidation metabolites of MISO were weak binding inhibitors. Strict stereospecific binding was shown by MISO stereoisomers, and the 11R, 16S isomer was most active. Both PGE/sub 1/ and 16,16 dimethyl PGE/sub 2/ were potent binding inhibitors, but PGF/sub 1/..cap alpha.. (10/sup -6/ M) and Hoe 892 (10/sup -5/ M), a stable PGI/sub 2/ analog, were weak inhibitors. Neither histamine or cimetidine competed for binding sites. These data indicate the presence of stereospecific E-type prostaglandin receptors in enriched canine parietal cell preparations.

  3. Acute intestinal injury induced by acetic acid and casein: prevention by intraluminal misoprostol

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.J.; Zhang, x.J.; Gu, x.A.; Clark, D.A. )

    1991-07-01

    Acute injury was established in anesthetized rabbits by intraluminal administration of acetic acid with and without bovine casein, into loops of distal small intestine. Damage was quantified after 45 minutes by the blood-to-lumen movement of {sup 51}Cr-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-tagged bovine serum albumin as well as luminal fluid histamine levels. The amount of titratable acetic acid used to lower the pH of the treatment solutions to pH 4.0 was increased by the addition of calcium gluconate. Luminal acetic acid caused a 19-fold increase in {sup 51}Cr-EDTA accumulation over saline controls; casein did not modify this effect. In saline controls, loop fluid histamine levels bordered on the limits of detection (1 ng/g) but were elevated 19-fold by acetic acid exposure and markedly increased (118-fold) by the combination of acid and casein. Intraluminal misoprostol (3 or 30 micrograms/mL), administered 30 minutes before acetic acid, significantly attenuated the increase in epithelial permeability (luminal {sup 51}Cr-EDTA, fluorescein isothiocyanate-bovine serum albumin accumulation) and histamine release (P less than 0.05). Diphenhydramine, alone or in combination with cimetidine, and indomethacin (5 mg/kg IV) were not protective. It is concluded that exposure of the epithelium to acetic acid promotes the transepithelial movement of casein leading to enhanced mast cell activation and mucosal injury. Damage to the epithelial barrier can be prevented by misoprostol.

  4. Improvement of fertility in artificially inseminated ewes following vaginal treatment with misoprostol plus terbutaline sulphate.

    PubMed

    Horta, A E M; Barbas, J P; Marques, C C; Baptista, M C; Vasques, M I; Pereira, R M; Mascarenhas, R D; Cavaco-Gonalves, S

    2010-12-01

    The effect of vaginal administration of misoprostol plus terbutaline sulphate 6?h prior to artificial insemination (AI) upon the site of AI (vaginal or cervical) and fertility was studied using a total of 87 estrous synchronized Serra da Estrela ewes (control n?=?42 and treated n?=?45). Artificial insemination was performed using refrigerated semen at 54-55?h after sponge removal. Lambing rate (fertility) and prolificacy were compared between control and treated ewes. The effect of the site of semen deposition on fertility was also evaluated. Prolificacy rate was not different between control (1.5) and treated (1.59) ewes. The proportion of cervical AI achieved in control (45.2%) and treated (37.8%) ewes was not significantly different. Overall, fertility was significantly lower in control than in treated ewes (42.9% vs 64.4%; p?misoprostol plus terbutaline sulphate 6?h prior to artificial insemination did not affect the proportion of cervical inseminations but significantly improved the fertility of treated ewes. Although needing confirmation, it was hypothesized that drugs might have induced local secretory modifications leading to an increase of cervical ability to retain more viable spermatozoa for fertilization. PMID:20210884

  5. Thalidomide and misoprostol: Ophthalmologic manifestations and associations both expected and unexpected.

    PubMed

    Miller, Marilyn T; Ventura, Liana; Strömland, Kerstin

    2009-08-01

    Thalidomide is a very potent teratogen capable of causing severe systemic malformations if the fetus is exposed during the sensitive period. Although structural anomalies of the eye can occur from thalidomide exposure, the most frequent eye complication is secondary to damage to the cranial nuclei in the brain stem, resulting in aberrant neurologic connections causing a condition of abnormal ocular movement, Duane syndrome. A less frequent anomalous neurologic complication is tearing when eating (paradoxical gustolacrimal tearing or "crocodile tears") or lack of emotional tearing. The involvement of the 6th and 7th cranial nerves, often seen together in the thalidomide-affected individual, is also characteristic of Möbius syndrome/sequence. This syndrome usually occurs sporadically, but characteristic findings of this condition have also been observed in South American children who were born after an unsuccessful attempt to induce abortion with the prostaglandin drug misoprostol (Cytotec). Aberrant tearing also occurs in some individuals with Möbius syndrome. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD), an unexpected associated finding in a Swedish thalidomide study, is now also noted in Möbius studies, in patients both with and without exposure to misoprostol. PMID:19639653

  6. Relativistic Iron K Emission and Absorption in the Seyfert 1.9 Galaxy MCG-05-23-16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braito, V.; Reeves, J. N.; Dewangan, G. C.; George, I.; Griffiths, R.; Markowitz, A.; Nandra, K.; Porquet, D.; Ptak, A.; Turner, T. J.; Yaqoob, T.; Weaver, K.

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of the simultaneous deep XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the bright Seyfert 1.9 galaxy MCG-5-23-16, which is thought to have one of the best known examples of a relativistically broadened iron Kalpha line. We detected a narrow sporadic absorption line at 7.7 keV which appears to be variable on a time-scale of 20 ksec. If associated with FeXXVI this absorption is indicative of a possible variable high ionization, high velocity outflow. The time averaged spectral analysis shows that the iron K-shell complex is best modeled with an unresolved narrow emission component (FWHM less than 5000 kilometers per second, EW approx. 60 eV) plus a broad component. This latter component has FWHM approx. 44000 kilometers per second, an EW approx. 50 eV and its profile is well described with an emission line originating from the accretion disk viewed with an inclination angle approx. 40 deg. and with the emission arising from within a few tens of gravitational radii of the central black hole. The time-resolved spectral analysis of the XMM-Newton EPIC-pn spectrum shows that both the narrow and broad components of the Fe K emission line appear to be constant within the errors. The analysis of the XMM-Newton/RGS spectrum reveals that the soft X-ray emission of MCG-5-23-16 is likely dominated by several emission lines superimposed on an unabsorbed scattered power-law continuum. The lack of strong Fe L shell emission together with the detection of a strong forbidden line in the O VII triplet supports a scenario where the soft X ray emission lines are produced in a plasma photoionized by the nuclear emission.

  7. Small-angle neutron scattering study of Bence-Jones protein Mcg: comparison of structures in solution and in crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, M.; Stevens, F.J.; Westholm, F.A.; Kim, S.S.; Carlson, R.D.

    1982-06-08

    Small-angle neutron scattering measurements in dilute solution were performed on the Mcg Bence-Jones protein dimer, for which accurate atomic coordinates have been determined by crystallographic methods. The measured radius of gyration (R/sub g/) in H/sub 2/O buffer is 24.0 +/- 0.4 angstrom and in D/sub 2/O buffer is 23.3 +/- O.1 angstrom; the calculated value of R/sub v/ (R/sub g/ in vacuo) is 24.0 angstrom. On the basis of a match point of 44.2% D/sub 2/O concentration, the experimental partial specific volume is 0.74 cm/sup 3//g. The experimentally derived molecular weight of 47 000 is in very good agreement with that (45 500) calculated from the amino acid composition. For comparisons with different Fab's (antigen binding fragments) exhibiting various ''elbow bends'' due to the flexibility of the switch peptide between variable and constant domains of the immunoglobulin chains, calculation of the R/sub g/ value of the Mcg dimer was performed as a function of the elbow bend. The R/sub g/ varied from 22.8 to 26.0 angstrom as the elbow bend was opened from 100/sup 0/ to 180/sup 0/; the maximum radius of gyration of the particle was 26.5 angstrom with the switch peptide stretched by separating the variable and constant domains by an additional 1.5 angstrom at an elbow bend of 180/sup 0/.

  8. Role of vaginal estradiol pretreatment combined with vaginal misoprostol for cervical ripening before operative hysteroscopy in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Piccolo, Eleonora; Manicuti, Claudia; Cardinale, Silvia; Collamarini, Matteo; Piccione, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy and safety of vaginal misoprostol after a pretreatment with vaginal estradiol to facilitate the hysteroscopic surgery in postmenopausal women. Methods In this observational comparative study, 35 control women (group A) did not receive any pharmacological treatment,26 women (group B) received 25 µg of vaginal estradiol daily for 14 days and 400 µg of vaginal misoprostol 12 hours before hysteroscopic surgery, 32 women (group C) received 400 µg of vaginal misoprostol 12 hours before surgery. Results Demographic data were well balanced and all variables were not significantly different among the three groups. The study showed a significant difference in the preoperative cervical dilatation among the group B (7.09±1.87 mm), the group A (5.82±1.85 mm; B vs. A, P=0.040) and the group C (5.46±2.07 mm; B vs. C, P=0.007). The dilatation was very easy in 73% of women in group B. The pain scoring post surgery was lower in the group B (B vs. A, P=0.001; B vs. C, P=0.077). In a small subgroup of women with suspected cervical stenosis, there were no statistically significant differences among the three groups considered. No complications during and post hysteroscopy were observed. Conclusion In postmenopausal women the pretreatment with oestrogen appears to have a crucial role in allowing the effect of misoprostol on cervical ripening. The combination of vaginal estradiol and vaginal misoprostol presents minor side effects and has proved to be effective in obtaining satisfying cervical dilatation thus significantly reducing discomfort for the patient. PMID:27200313

  9. ASASSN-16az and ASASSN-16ba: Discovery of Two Probable Supernovae in 2MASX J11303364-4233359 and MCG -03-25-015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Godoy-Rivera, D.; Basu, U.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Chen, Ping; Brimacombe, J.

    2016-01-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered two new transient sources, most likely supernovae, in the galaxies 2MASX J11303364-4233359 and MCG -03-25-015.

  10. USDA DATABASE OF VITAMIN A (MCG RAE) AND VITAMIN E (MG AT) FOR NATIONAL HEALTH AND NUTRITION EXAMINATION SURVEY 1999-2000

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current dietary reference intakes (DRI) for recommended intakes for individuals for vitamin A are expressed as micrograms of retinol activity equivalents (mcg RAE), and for vitamin E as milligrams of alpha-tocopherol (mg AT). Previously, recommendations were expressed as micrograms of retinol equi...

  11. A phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study of misoprostol rectal suppositories to prevent acute radiation proctitis in patients with prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hille, Andrea . E-mail: ahille@med.uni-goettingen.de; Schmidberger, Heinz; Hermann, Robert M.; Christiansen, Hans; Saile, Bernhard; Pradier, Olivier; Hess, Clemens F.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: Acute radiation proctitis is the most relevant complication of pelvic radiation and is still mainly treated supportively. Considering the negative impact of acute proctitis symptoms on patients' daily activities and the potential relationship between the severity of acute radiation injury and late damage, misoprostol was tested in the prevention of acute radiation-induced proctitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 100 patients who underwent radiotherapy for prostate cancer were entered into this phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study with misoprostol or placebo suppositories. Radiation-induced toxicity was evaluated weekly during radiotherapy using the Common Toxicity Criteria. Results: Between the placebo and the misoprostol groups, no significant differences in proctitis symptoms occurred: 76% of patients in each group had Grade 1 toxicity, and 26% in the placebo group and 36% in the misoprostol group had Grade 2 toxicity. No differences were found in onset or symptom duration. Comparing the peak incidence of patients' toxicity symptoms, significantly more patients experienced rectal bleeding in the misoprostol group (p = 0.03). Conclusion: Misoprostol given as a once-daily suppository did not decrease the incidence and severity of radiation-induced acute proctitis and may increase the incidence of acute bleeding.

  12. Oral Herpes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Text size: Website Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum Disease TMJ Disorders Oral Cancer Dry Mouth Burning Mouth Tooth Decay See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer ... Herpes Main Content Title: Oral ...

  13. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Oral Cancer Basic description Cancer can affect any part of the oral cavity, including the lips, tongue, mouth, and throat. There are 2 kinds of oral cancer: oral cavity cancer and oropharyngeal cancer. The most ...

  14. MCG+08-22-082: A Double Core and Boxy Appearance Dwarf Lenticular Galaxy Suspected to be a Merger Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Mina; Paudel, Sanjaya; Lee, Youngdae; Kim, Sang Chul

    2016-06-01

    We present a study on the dwarf lenticular galaxy MCG+08-22-082 (U141), located in the Ursa Major cluster, blue-centered, double-cored, and having a boxy appearance. Using publicly available data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we perform an analysis of the structural and stellar population properties of the galaxy and the cores. We find that the light profile of U141 follows an exponential law. U141 has a brightness of {M}r=-16.01 mag, and an effective radius of {R}e=1.7 {{kpc}}. The boxiness parameter {a}4/a is mostly between 0 and ‑0.05 in the inner parts, reaching an extreme of about ‑0.1. Double cores are seen at the center of U141; each of these cores has a stellar mass of ∼106 M⊙ and the separation between them is ∼300 pc. Optical spectroscopy of these cores shows prominent emission in Hα, suggesting ongoing star-forming activities. We interpret these morphological properties and speculate that U141 is a merger remnant of two disk galaxies. Thus, we might have discovered an intermediate stage of merging, providing possible evidence of double cores in the center of the galaxy.

  15. The Broadband Spectral Variability of MCG-6-30-15 Observed by Nustar and XMM-NEWTON

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marinucci, A.; Matt, G.; Miniutti, G.; Guainazzi, M.; Parker, M. L.; Brenneman, L.; Fabian, A. C.; Kara, E.; Arevalo, P.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Boggs, S. E.; Cappi, M.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Elvis, M.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Reynolds, C. S.; Risaliti, G.; Stern, D. K; Walton, D. J.; Zhang, W.

    2014-01-01

    MCG-6-30-15, at a distance of 37 Mpc (z = 0.008), is the archetypical Seyfert 1 galaxy showing very broad Fe K(alpha) emission. We present results from a joint NuSTAR and XMM-Newton observational campaign that, for the first time, allows a sensitive, time-resolved spectral analysis from 0.35 keV up to 80 keV. The strong variability of the source is best explained in terms of intrinsic X-ray flux variations and in the context of the light-bending model: the primary, variable emission is reprocessed by the accretion disk, which produces secondary, less variable, reflected emission. The broad Fe K(alpha) profile is, as usual for this source, well explained by relativistic effects occurring in the innermost regions of the accretion disk around a rapidly rotating black hole. We also discuss the alternative model in which the broadening of the Fe K(alpha) is due to the complex nature of the circumnuclear absorbing structure. Even if this model cannot be ruled out, it is disfavored on statistical grounds.We also detected an occultation event likely caused by broad-line region clouds crossing the line of sight.

  16. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Text size: Website Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum Disease TMJ Disorders Oral Cancer Dry Mouth Burning Mouth Tooth Decay See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer ... This Page Facebook External link – please review ...

  17. Oral Myiasis

    PubMed Central

    Saravanan, Thalaimalai; Mohan, Mathan A; Thinakaran, Meera; Ahammed, Saneem

    2015-01-01

    Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy. PMID:25709196

  18. Surgical versus expectant management in women with an incomplete evacuation of the uterus after treatment with misoprostol for miscarriage: the MisoREST trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medical treatment with misoprostol is a non-invasive and inexpensive treatment option in first trimester miscarriage. However, about 30% of women treated with misoprostol have incomplete evacuation of the uterus. Despite being relatively asymptomatic in most cases, this finding often leads to additional surgical treatment (curettage). A comparison of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of surgical management versus expectant management is lacking in women with incomplete miscarriage after misoprostol. Methods/Design The proposed study is a multicentre randomized controlled trial that assesses the costs and effects of curettage versus expectant management in women with incomplete evacuation of the uterus after misoprostol treatment for first trimester miscarriage. Eligible women will be randomized, after informed consent, within 24 hours after identification of incomplete evacuation of the uterus by ultrasound scanning. Women are randomly allocated to surgical or expectant management. Curettage is performed within three days after randomization. Primary outcome is the sonographic finding of an empty uterus (maximal diameter of any contents of the uterine cavity < 10 millimeters) six weeks after study entry. Secondary outcomes are patients’ quality of life, surgical outcome parameters, the type and number of re-interventions during the first three months and pregnancy rates and outcome 12 months after study entry. Discussion This trial will provide evidence for the (cost) effectiveness of surgical versus expectant management in women with incomplete evacuation of the uterus after misoprostol treatment for first trimester miscarriage. Trial registration Dutch Trial Register: NTR3110 PMID:23638956

  19. Effects of a single rectal dose of Misoprostol prior to abdominal hysterectomy in women with symptomatic leiomyoma: a randomized double blind clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabai, Afsarosadat; Karimi-Zarchi, Mojgan; Meibodi, Bahare; Vaghefi, Marzie; Yazdian, Pouria; Zeidabadi, Mahbube; Dehghani, Atefe; Teimoori, Soraya; Jamali, Azadeh; Akhondi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background Fibroma, the most common benign pelvic tumor in women, affects 25 to 30% of women of reproductive age. Primary treatment for patients with symptomatic or large fibroma is surgery. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a single rectal dose of Misoprostol on bleeding during abdominal hysterectomy. Methods This double blind randomized clinical trial was conducted with 80 candidates for abdominal hysterectomy, due to uterine myoma, in the Shahid Sadoughi hospital of Yazd in 2012. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of single rectal dose of Misoprostol on peri-operational abdominal hysterectomy bleeding. Following administration of 400 micrograms of Misoprostol in the case group (n=40), predetermined criteria were compared with control group (n=40). Results Volume of bleeding during the operation was significantly lower in cases where Misoprostol was used. (268.71 ± 156.85 vs. 350.38 ± 152.61 cc in the case and control groups, respectively). Our findings also showed that Hemoglobin (Hb) levels before, 8, and 30 hours following the operation differed significantly (p=0.001), but these changes were similar in both groups. Pre-operative Hb levels were 11.90 ± 1.7 and 11.90 ± 2.0 in the case and control groups, respectively. Conclusion A single rectal dose of Misoprostol has positive effect on reducing peri-operational bleeding in women undergoing abdominal hysterectomy due to symptomatic leiomyoma. PMID:26516444

  20. Morphological Findings in Trophozoites during Amoebic Abscess Development in Misoprostol-Treated BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aceves-Cano, Andrés; Gaytán-Ochoa, Rocío; Ramos-Martínez, Ernesto; Erosa de la Vega, Gilberto; González-Horta, Carmen; Talamás-Rohana, Patricia; Sánchez-Ramírez, Blanca

    2015-01-01

    During amoebic liver abscess (ALA) formation in susceptible animals, immune response is regulated by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) dependent mechanisms. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of misoprostol (MPL), a PGE1 analogue, on ALA formation in BALB/c mice. Male mice from BALB/c strain were intrahepatically infected with 7.5 × 105 trophozoites of E. histolytica strain HM1:IMSS and treated with 10−4 M of MPL daily until sacrifice at 2, 4, and 7 days postinfection (p.i.). ALA formation was evaluated at 2, 4, and 7 days postinfection; trophozoite morphology was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and image analysis. Results showed an increase in frequency of ALA formation in infected and MPL-treated mice only at 2 days p.i. (P = 0.03). A significant diminution in the size of trophozoites was detected in abscesses from mice independently of MPL treatment (from 5.8 ± 1.1 µm at 2 days p.i. to 2.7 ± 1.9 µm at 7 days p.i.) compared with trophozoites dimensions observed in susceptible hamsters (9.6 ± 2.7 µm) (P < 0.01). These results suggest that MPL treatment may modify the adequate control of inflammatory process to allow the persistence of trophozoites in the liver; however, natural resistance mechanisms cannot be discarded. PMID:26090455

  1. Fibrinolytic response in women on low-dose oral contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Ishak, R; Ahmad, R; Gudum, H R; Hassan, K; Ang, E S

    1992-06-01

    Long term use of low doses of combination oral contraceptives appears to increase plasminogen level, thereby increasing fibrinolytic activity and reducing the risk of thromboembolism. Blood levels of plasminogen, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI), were measured before and after stress (5 minutes of stair climbing) in a group of 30 women, 23-40 years old, who had taken 30 mcg of ethinyl estradiol with 150 mcg of desogestrel or levonorgestrel for at least 1 year. Similar measurements were taken from a control group of 30 women matched for age, height, and weight. Plasminogen and tPA levels in both groups increased significantly after exercise. The level of PAI did not change significantly with stress in either group. The level of plasminogen was significantly higher in the group taking contraceptives, whether before or after exercise, when compared to the control group. Levels of tPA and PAI, although slightly increased in the oral contraceptive group, were not significantly different between the two groups. The increase in plasminogen may be due to the estrogen component of the contraceptives. Stress seems to increase fibrinolytic response. PMID:12345026

  2. KAIT Discovery and Robotic Follow-up of a Possible Young SN Candidate in MCG-01-10-039: PSN J03490564-0303283

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, W.; Li, W.; Filippenko, A. V.; Cenko, S. B.

    2013-11-01

    We report the discovery, with the 0.76-m Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT) at Lick Observatory, of a possible new supernova in the nearby galaxy MCG-01-10-039 (z=0.013504 ). The new object, dubbed PSN J03490564-0303283 (by the IAU), is located at (J2000.0) coordinates RA = 03:49:05.64, Dec = -03:03:28.3. Following discovery in an unfiltered image obtained at 08:27 UT on 2013 Nov. 09, KAIT autonomously began a sequence of triggered follow-up observations in the U, B, V, R, I, and clear (roughly R) filters beginning only 5 minutes later.

  3. Oral Mucocele

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Oral Mucocele Information for adults A A A This image displays a mucocele inside the lip. Overview An oral mucocele is a harmless, fluid-containing (cyst-like) swelling ...

  4. Oral electricity.

    PubMed

    Certosimo, A J; O'Connor, R P

    1996-01-01

    "Oral electricity," "electrogalvanism," or "galvanic currents" has long been recognized as a potential source of oral pain and discomfort. This phenomenon of oral galvanism results from the difference in electrical potential between dissimilar restorative metals located in the mouth. In this case report, the literature is reviewed, and an interesting case study'is presented. The patient's clinical presentation, and the duration and constancy of the oral symptoms, pose diagnostic challenges. A simple, yet effective treatment regimen is proposed. PMID:8957826

  5. Oral Insulin

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Oral insulin is an exciting area of research and development in the field of diabetology. This brief review covers the various approaches used in the development of oral insulin, and highlights some of the recent data related to novel oral insulin preparation. PMID:21059246

  6. Cycle-Related Changes in Mood, Sexual Desire, and Sexual Activity in Oral Contraception-Using and Nonhormonal-Contraception-Using Couples.

    PubMed

    Elaut, Els; Buysse, Ann; De Sutter, Petra; Gerris, Jan; De Cuypere, Griet; T'Sjoen, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Findings on women's sexuality across the menstrual cycle are inconsistent. One relatively consistent finding is a midcycle and premenstrual peak in sexual desire in freely cycling women. Results on the cycle-related effects on sexual behavior are less clear. Large proportions of reproductive-aged women use combined oral contraception (COC), but studies on potential cycle-related shifts in sexual desire and behavior are sparse. A prospective diary study assessed sexual desire, sexual behavior, and mood in 89 heterosexual couples. Women were using one of four contraceptive methods: (1) nonhormonal contraception, (2) low-dose COC containing 20 mcg ethinylestradiol and 75 mcg gestoden or desogestrel, (3) COC containing 35 mcg ethinylestradiol and 2 mg cyproteronacetate, and (4) COC containing 30 mcg ethinylestradiol and 3 mg drospirenone. No cycle effects of sexual desire were established in the COC group, but frequency of sexual intercourse declined in the last days of active pill taking. These results were similar in both female and male partners. Negative affect did not covary with sexual desire. PMID:25420716

  7. [The illegal market for gender-related drugs as portrayed in the Brazilian news media: the case of misoprostol and women].

    PubMed

    Diniz, Debora; Castro, Rosana

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes how the Brazilian news media covers the illegal market for misoprostol, the main drug used to induce abortion. A total of 1,429 news stories were retrieved from 220 print and electronic media channels from 2004 to 2009. The analysis included 524 stories from 62 regional and national newspapers. Misoprostol appeared repeatedly in the news, but was usually approached from a criminal perspective, unlike abortion as a whole, which the Brazilian media routinely covers as a religious, political, and public health issue. Misoprostol is part of the illegal gender-related drug market, along with drugs for weight loss and erectile dysfunction and anabolic steroids. Sixty-four (12%) of the news stories told life histories of women who had aborted with misoprostol. The women's ages ranged from 13 to 46 years, and socioeconomic status was associated with different experiences with abortion. Three characters appeared in the women's abortion itineraries: girlfriends (confidantes), go-betweens, and physicians. Stories of late-stage abortion are confused with the criminal characterization of infanticide and provide the extreme cases in the media's narrative on abortion. PMID:21340108

  8. Factors in the choice of oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate dose for adult burns dressings.

    PubMed

    Shah, H; Smythe, J; Hanafiah, Z; Williams, G J P; Holdcroft, A

    2009-09-01

    Factors that influenced the choice of dose of oral transmucosal fentanyl at the time of burns dressing change were investigated in a prospective study. After Ethics committee approval, data was analysed from 29 consecutive patients who had been recruited and consented for a study of pain associated with burns dressings. Patients had completed an 11-point verbal pain intensity score (VRS) prior to and after the dressing change. Analgesic use during for this period was documented. Doses of 600 to 1200 mcg of transmucosal fentanyl (Actiq) were given based on individual assessment. The pre-dressing VRS (median [range]) in the 15 patients who received 600 mcg was 8 [3-10] and was higher than the VRS of 6 [2-9] in the 800-1200 mcg group. The time since the burn was longer in the low dose group at 7 [1-22] days compared with 5 [0-50] days in the higher dose group. In addition 73% of the low dose group was prescribed opioids regularly prior to the dressing compared with 57% of the high dose group. The choice of a lower transmucosal fentanyl dose was based on prior use of opioids and the age of the burn rather than on the patient's pain intensity. PMID:19167829

  9. Abortion after deliberate Arthrotec® addition to food. Mass spectrometric detection of diclofenac, misoprostol acid, and their urinary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Watzer, Bernhard; Lusthof, Klaas J; Schweer, Horst

    2015-07-01

    Arthrotec(®) (AT) is a combination of diclofenac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and misoprostol (MP), a synthetic analogue of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1). MP is a lipophilic methyl ester prodrug. It is readily metabolized to the biologically active misoprostol acid (MPA). During the last few years, medical studies exhibited MP to be an excellent abortive. In this paper, we describe a rare criminal case of MP abortion, initiated by the expectant father. After the abortion, samples of vomit and urine were collected. Systemic exposure to MP is difficult to prove, because both MP and the active metabolite MPA are hardly excreted in urine. Therefore, in addition to routine toxicological analysis, we used slightly modified, well-established liquid and gas chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS and GC/MS/MS) methods, for the direct and the indirect detection of MPA and its metabolites. In this case, we were able to demonstrate the presence of the major MP metabolites 2,3-dinor-MPA and 2,3,4,5-tetranor-MPA in the urine of the victim. We also detected paracetamol, 3-methoxyparacetamol and diclofenac-glucuronide in the urine. In the vomit of the victim, we detected diclofenac and MPA. These results, combined with the criminal investigations, showed that the accused had mixed MP into the food of his pregnant girlfriend. Finally, these investigations contributed to a confession of the accused. PMID:25524762

  10. Effects on acne of two oral contraceptives containing desogestrel and cyproterone acetate.

    PubMed

    Charoenvisal, C; Thaipisuttikul, Y; Pinjaroen, S; Krisanapan, O; Benjawang, W; Koster, A; Doesburg, W

    1996-01-01

    In Thailand, at the Prince of Sonkhla University in Sonkhla (Center A) and Rajvithi Hospital in Bangkok (Center B), researchers compared data on 32 women using a low-dose combined oral contraceptive (OC) containing 150 mcg desogestrel plus 30 mcg ethinyl estradiol (Marvelon) with data on 34 women using an OC containing 2000 mcg cyproterone acetate plus 50 mcg ethinyl estradiol (Diane) to examine their efficacy in acne treatment. All the women presented with acne and were between 16 and 30 years old. The study consisted of a baseline cycle and 6 successive treatment cycles. The mean objective acne score decreased with both OCs in Center A. This decrease was significant with Diane after 3 and 6 treatment cycles (p 0.05). At cycle 6, the mean objective score for Diane was much lower than that for Marvelon (p 0.05). At Center B, the mean objective score consistently and significantly decreased with Marvelon after 3 and 6 treatment cycles (p 0.05 and p 0.01, respectively) and with Diane after 6 treatment cycles (p 0.001). No significant between-group differences existed for Center B. The percentage of women with moderate/severe acne decreased significantly with Marvelon at Center B (p = 0.002) and with Diane in Centers A (p = 0.014) and B (p = 0.004). Both Diane and Marvelon significantly increased plasma levels of sex hormone binding globulin at 3 and 6 treatment cycles (p 0.01). They tended to reduce plasma levels of total and free testosterone. This decrease only reached significance with Marvelon, however (p 0.05). There were no significant associations between acne severity and biochemical variables. These findings suggest that both OCs cause significant improvement in acne in most Asian women who also may need a reliable contraceptive. There were no significant differences between the two OCs. PMID:8894800

  11. Effect of combined low-dose oral contraceptives on blood viscosity and haematocrit.

    PubMed

    Ishak, R; Loh Chooi Khim

    1991-06-01

    Researchers compared the results of hematocrit and blood viscosity tests of 16 women using a combined oral contraceptive (COC) with 30 mcg ethinyl estradiol/150 mcg desogestrel (group 1), 11 women using a COC with 30 mcg ethinyl estradiol/150 mcg levonorgestrel (group 2), and 16 women who did not use any OCs (control group), all who attended the National Population and Family Development Clinic at the General Hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. They wanted to examine the effects of COCs on blood viscosity, which is inversely related to blood flow, and hematocrit. The women were matched for age. The hematocrit level of women who took the ethinyl estradiol/desogestrel COC was significantly higher than that of the control group (41.5% vs. 37.4%; p.001). On the other hand, the hematocrit level of women who took the ethinyl estradiol/levonorgestrel COC was close to that of the control group (38.5% vs. 37.4%). Even though the mean whole blood viscosity for group 2 was higher than that of group 1 and the control group (6.6 cps vs. 5.5 cps), the difference was insignificant. Yet whole blood viscosity of group 2 at the higher shear rates (46, 115, and 230 per second) was significantly higher than the control group (p.05). The whole blood viscosities of group 1 and the control group did not differ considerably. This supported the theory that hematocrit contributes to blood viscosity. Further these results agreed with those of another study which also showed increased blood viscosity and hematocrit in healthy women taking OCs. Thus thromboembolic events in women taking OCs could be a result of a drop in rate of blood flow which at the lower shear rates could increase red cell aggregation and clotting. In conclusion, health providers could use these indicators to monitor women who have used OCs over a considerable period for thrombotic risks to determine if OC use should continue. PMID:12317443

  12. MCG101-induced cancer anorexia-cachexia features altered expression of hypothalamic Nucb2 and Cartpt and increased plasma levels of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptides.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Jonathan R; Iresjö, Britt-Marie; Smedh, Ulrika

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore central and peripheral host responses to an anorexia-cachexia producing tumor. We focused on neuroendocrine anorexigenic signals in the hypothalamus, brainstem, pituitary and from the tumor per se. Expression of mRNA for corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), nesfatin-1, thyrotropin (TSH) and the TSH receptor were explored. In addition, we examined changes in plasma TSH, CART peptides (CARTp) and serum amyloid P component (SAP). C57BL/6 mice were implanted with MCG101 tumors or sham-treated. A sham-implanted, pair‑fed (PF) group was included to delineate between primary tumor and secondary effects from reduced feeding. Food intake and body weight were measured daily. mRNA levels from microdissected mouse brain samples were assayed using qPCR, and plasma levels were determined using ELISA. MCG101 tumors expectedly induced anorexia and loss of body weight. Tumor-bearing (TB) mice exhibited an increase in nesfatin-1 mRNA as well as a decrease in CART mRNA in the paraventricular area (PVN). The CART mRNA response was secondary to reduced caloric intake whereas nesfatin-1 mRNA appeared to be tumor-specifically induced. In the pituitary, CART and TSH mRNA were upregulated in the TB and PF animals compared to the freely fed controls. Plasma levels for CARTp were significantly elevated in TB but not PF mice whereas levels of TSH were unaffected. The plasma CARTp response was correlated to the degree of inflammation represented by SAP. The increase in nesfatin-1 mRNA in the PVN highlights nesfatin-1 as a plausible candidate for causing tumor-induced anorexia. CART mRNA expression in the PVN is likely an adaptation to reduced caloric intake secondary to a cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome (CACS)‑inducing tumor. The MCG101 tumor did not express CART mRNA, thus the elevation of plasma CARTp is host derived and likely driven by inflammation. PMID:26780979

  13. Sublingual Misoprostol versus Intramuscular Oxytocin for Prevention of Postpartum Hemorrhage in Uganda: A Double-Blind Randomized Non-Inferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    Atukunda, Esther C.; Siedner, Mark J.; Obua, Celestino; Mugyenyi, Godfrey R.; Twagirumukiza, Marc; Agaba, Amon G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a leading cause of maternal death in sub-Saharan Africa. Although the World Health Organization recommends use of oxytocin for prevention of PPH, misoprostol use is increasingly common owing to advantages in shelf life and potential for sublingual administration. There is a lack of data about the comparative efficacy of oxytocin and sublingual misoprostol, particularly at the recommended dose of 600 µg, for prevention of PPH during active management of labor. Methods and Findings We performed a double-blind, double-dummy randomized controlled non-inferiority trial between 23 September 2012 and 9 September 2013 at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital in Uganda. We randomized 1,140 women to receive 600 µg of misoprostol sublingually or 10 IU of oxytocin intramuscularly, along with matching placebos for the treatment they did not receive. Our primary outcome of interest was PPH, defined as measured blood loss ≥500 ml within 24 h of delivery. Secondary outcomes included measured blood loss ≥1,000 ml; mean measured blood loss at 1, 2, and 24 h after delivery; death; requirement for blood transfusion; hemoglobin changes; and use of additional uterotonics. At 24 h postpartum, primary PPH occurred in 163 (28.6%) participants in the misoprostol group and 99 (17.4%) participants in the oxytocin group (relative risk [RR] 1.64, 95% CI 1.32 to 2.05, p<0.001; absolute risk difference 11.2%, 95% CI 6.44 to 16.1). Severe PPH occurred in 20 (3.6%) and 15 (2.7%) participants in the misoprostol and oxytocin groups, respectively (RR 1.33, 95% CI 0.69 to 2.58, p = 0.391; absolute risk difference 0.9%, 95% CI −1.12 to 2.88). Mean measured blood loss was 341.5 ml (standard deviation [SD] 206.2) and 304.2 ml (SD 190.8, p = 0.002) at 2 h and 484.7 ml (SD 213.3) and 432.8 ml (SD 203.5, p<0.001) at 24 h in the misoprostol and oxytocin groups, respectively. There were no significant differences between the two groups in any other secondary outcomes. Women in the misoprostol group more commonly experienced shivering (RR 1.91, 95% CI 1.65 to 2.21, p<0.001) and fevers (RR 5.20, 95% CI 3.15 to 7.21, p = 0.005). This study was conducted at a regional referral hospital with capacity for emergency surgery and blood transfusion. High-risk women were excluded from participation. Conclusions Misoprostol 600 µg is inferior to oxytocin 10 IU for prevention of primary PPH in active management of labor. These data support use of oxytocin in settings where it is available. While not powered to do so, the study found no significant differences in rate of severe PPH, need for blood transfusion, postpartum hemoglobin, change in hemoglobin, or use of additional uterotonics between study groups. Further research should focus on clarifying whether and in which sub-populations use of oxytocin would be preferred over sublingual misoprostol. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01866241 Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:25369200

  14. Observations of MCG-5-23-16 with Suzaku, XMM-Newton and NuSTAR: Disk tomography and compton hump reverberation

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, A.; Reynolds, C.; Lohfink, A.; Cackett, E. M.; Kara, E.; Fabian, A. C.; Harrison, F. A.; Balokovic, M.; Matt, G.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W.; Christensen, F. E.; Hailey, C. J.; Stern, D.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-07-01

    MCG-5-23-16 is one of the first active galactic nuclei (AGNs) where relativistic reverberation in the iron K line originating in the vicinity of the supermassive black hole was found, based on a short XMM-Newton observation. In this work, we present the results from long X-ray observations using Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and NuSTAR designed to map the emission region using X-ray reverberation. A relativistic iron line is detected in the lag spectra on three different timescales, allowing the emission from different regions around the black hole to be separated. Using NuSTAR coverage of energies above 10 keV reveals a lag between these energies and the primary continuum, which is detected for the first time in an AGN. This lag is a result of the Compton reflection hump responding to changes in the primary source in a manner similar to the response of the relativistic iron K line.

  15. Observations of MCG-5-23-16 with Suzaku, XMM-Newton and NuSTAR: Disk Tomography and Compton Hump Reverberation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoghbi, A.; Cackett, E. M.; Reynolds, C.; Kara, E.; Harrison, F. A.; Fabian, A. C.; Lohfink, A.; Matt, G.; Stern, D.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-01-01

    MCG-5-23-16 is one of the first active galactic nuclei (AGNs) where relativistic reverberation in the iron K line originating in the vicinity of the supermassive black hole was found, based on a short XMM-Newton observation. In this work, we present the results from long X-ray observations using Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and NuSTAR designed to map the emission region using X-ray reverberation. A relativistic iron line is detected in the lag spectra on three different timescales, allowing the emission from different regions around the black hole to be separated. Using NuSTAR coverage of energies above 10 keV reveals a lag between these energies and the primary continuum, which is detected for the first time in an AGN. This lag is a result of the Compton reflection hump responding to changes in the primary source in a manner similar to the response of the relativistic iron K line.

  16. XMM-EPIC observation of MCG-6-30-15: direct evidence for the extraction of energy from a spinning black hole?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilms, Jörn; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Reeves, James; Molendi, Silvano; Staubert, Rüdiger; Kendziorra, Eckhard

    2001-12-01

    We present XMM-Newton European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) observations of the bright Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15, focusing on the broad Fe Kα line at ~6keV and the associated reflection continuum, which is believed to originate from the inner accretion disc. We find these reflection features to be extremely broad and redshifted, indicating an origin in the very central regions of the accretion disc. It seems likely that we have caught this source in the `deep minimum' state first observed by Iwasawa et al. The implied central concentration of X-ray illumination is difficult to understand in any pure accretion disc model. We suggest that we are witnessing the extraction and dissipation of rotational energy from a spinning black hole by magnetic fields connecting the black hole or plunging region to the disc.

  17. Oral cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Chunduri, Nagendra S; Goteki, Venkateswarulu; Gelli, Vamsi; Madasu, Krishnaveni

    2013-03-01

    Cysticercosis is a common disease in developing countries, but oral lesions caused by this parasitic infestation are rare. We report here a rare case of oral cysticercosis in a 17 year old male who sought treatment for an asymptomatic nodule of the lower lip that had previously been diagnosed as a mucocele. PMID:23691623

  18. Ferritin above 100 mcg/L could rule out colon cancer, but not gastric or rectal cancer in patients with involuntary weight loss

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A tenth of patients with involuntary weight loss (IWL) have gastrointestinal cancer. Ferritin is the first parameter to be modified during the process leading to iron deficiency anaemia, therefore it should be the most sensitive. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of ferritin to rule out gastrointestinal cancer in patients with involuntary weight loss. Methods All consecutive patients with IWL admitted in a secondary care university hospital were prospectively studied. Ferritin, haemoglobin with erythrocyte indices and serum iron were recorded for all patients. The reference standard was bidirectional endoscopy and/or 6 months follow-up. Results 290 patients were included, a quarter had cancer, of which 22 (7.6%) had gastrointestinal cancer (8 gastric cancer, 1 ileum cancer, 13 colorectal cancer). Ferritin had the best area under the curve (AUC), both for gastrointestinal cancer (0.746, CI: 0.691-0.794), and colorectal cancer (0.765, CI: 0.713-0.813), compared to the other parameters of iron deficiency. In the diagnosis of colorectal cancer, ferritin with a cut-off value of 100 mcg/L had a sensitivity of 93% (CI: 69-100%), and negative likelihood ratio of 0.13, with a negative predictive value of 99% (96-100%), while for gastrointestinal cancer, the sensitivity was lower (89%, CI: 67-95%), with a negative likelihood ratio of 0.24. There were three false negative patients, two with gastric cancer, and one with rectal cancer. Conclusion In patients with involuntary weight loss, a ferritin above 100mcg/L could rule out colon cancer, but not gastric or rectal cancer. PMID:22776590

  19. DNA METHYLTRANSFERASE 1 is involved in (m)CG and (m)CCG DNA methylation and is essential for sporophyte development in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Yaari, Rafael; Noy-Malka, Chen; Wiedemann, Gertrud; Auerbach Gershovitz, Nitzan; Reski, Ralf; Katz, Aviva; Ohad, Nir

    2015-07-01

    DNA methylation has a crucial role in plant development regulating gene expression and silencing of transposable elements. Maintenance DNA methylation in plants occurs at symmetrical (m)CG and (m)CHG contexts ((m) = methylated) and is maintained by DNA METHYLTRANSFERASE 1 (MET1) and CHROMOMETHYLASE (CMT) DNA methyltransferase protein families, respectively. While angiosperm genomes encode for several members of MET1 and CMT families, the moss Physcomitrella patens, serving as a model for early divergent land plants, carries a single member of each family. To determine the function of P. patens PpMET we generated ΔPpmet deletion mutant which lost (m)CG and unexpectedly (m)CCG methylation at loci tested. In order to evaluate the extent of (m)CCG methylation by MET1, we reexamined the Arabidopsis thaliana Atmet1 mutant methylome and found a similar pattern of methylation loss, suggesting that maintenance of DNA methylation by MET1 is conserved through land plant evolution. While ΔPpmet displayed no phenotypic alterations during its gametophytic phase, it failed to develop sporophytes, indicating that PpMET plays a role in gametogenesis or early sporophyte development. Expression array analysis revealed that the deletion of PpMET resulted in upregulation of two genes and multiple repetitive sequences. In parallel, expression analysis of the previously reported ΔPpcmt mutant showed that lack of PpCMT triggers overexpression of genes. This overexpression combined with loss of (m)CHG and its pleiotropic phenotype, implies that PpCMT has an essential evolutionary conserved role in the epigenetic control of gene expression. Collectively, our results suggest functional conservation of MET1 and CMT families during land plant evolution. A model describing the relationship between MET1 and CMT in CCG methylation is presented. PMID:25944663

  20. Oral vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qing; Berzofsky, Jay A.

    2013-01-01

    Oral vaccines are safe and easy to administer and convenient for all ages. They have been successfully developed to protect from many infectious diseases acquired through oral transmission. We recently found in animal models that formulation of oral vaccines in a nanoparticle-releasing microparticle delivery system is a viable approach for selectively inducing large intestinal protective immunity against infections at rectal and genital mucosae. These large-intestine targeted oral vaccines are a potential substitute for the intracolorectal immunization, which has been found to be effective against rectogenital infections but is not feasible for mass vaccination. Moreover, the newly developed delivery system can be modified to selectively target either the small or large intestine for immunization and accordingly revealed a regionalized immune system in the gut. Future applications and research endeavors suggested by the findings are discussed. PMID:23493163

  1. Oral Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Periodontists: Dentists who treat gum disease and place dental implants. Oral surgeons: Dentists who operate on your mouth and supporting tissues. Orthodontists: Dentists who straighten teeth and align jaws. Endodontists: Dentists who perform root ...

  2. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... possible signs of cancer. Some parts of the pharynx are not visible during an oral cancer exam. ... dentist about whether a specialist should check your pharynx. This pamphlet was developed by the National Institute ...

  3. Oral calcitonin.

    PubMed

    Maricic, Michael J

    2012-03-01

    Both injectable and nasal spray calcitonins have been utilized in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis for over 25years. More widespread use of calcitonin in the treatment of osteoporosis has been hampered in part due to poor patient acceptability and compliance and the inability of patients to take this medication as an oral pill. In recent years, an oral preparation of calcitonin has been developed that combines the active peptide hormone with a caprylic acid derivative to enhance bioavailability. Clinical trials with oral calcitonin in patients with osteoarthritis are currently being conducted. A recent phase 3 study failed to demonstrate significant vertebral fracture reduction, and as a result the clinical program for oral calcitonin in osteoporosis is under review for further consideration. PMID:22281725

  4. If we can do it for misoprostol, why not for mifepristone? The case for taking mifepristone out of the office in medical abortion.

    PubMed

    Gold, Marji; Chong, Erica

    2015-09-01

    Given the highly political nature of abortion in the United States, the provision of medical abortion with mifepristone (Mifeprex) and misoprostol has always occurred under a unique set of circumstances. The Food and Drug Administration-approved regimen requires clinicians to administer the mifepristone in the office and also requires women to return to the office for the misoprostol. In the US, where off-label drug use is an accepted practice when supportive evidence exists, most clinicians give women the misoprostol at the initial visit for her to take at home, eliminating an unnecessary visit to the office. This commentary suggests that, based on current studies, there is also enough evidence to offer women the option to self-administer mifepristone out of the office and that this is just another feature of off-label use. Six studies, enrolling over 1800 women, found that the option of taking mifepristone out of the office was popular and acceptable among women and providers. Given that it is safe, highly acceptable and not burdensome on providers, outside-office-use of mifepristone should be offered to all women as part of routine medical abortion services. PMID:26093187

  5. Pharmacy workers in Nepal can provide the correct information about using mifepristone and misoprostol to women seeking medication to induce abortion.

    PubMed

    Tamang, Anand; Puri, Mahesh; Lama, Kalyan; Shrestha, Prabhakar

    2015-02-01

    In Nepal, despite policy restrictions, both registered and unregistered brands of mifepristone and misoprostol can easily be obtained at pharmacies. Since many women visit pharmacies for abortion information, ensuring that they receive effective care from pharmacy workers remains an important challenge. We conducted an operations research study to examine whether trained pharmacy workers can correctly provide information on safe use of mifepristone and misoprostol for early first trimester medical abortion. Pharmacy workers in one district were given orientation and training using a harm-reduction approach, and compared with a non-equivalent comparison group in the second district. Overall, trained pharmacy workers' knowledge increased substantially, but no increase was found in the comparison group. Compared to the baseline (65%), 97% of trained pharmacy workers knew up to what stage of pregnancy and how women should use mifepristone and misoprostol. A higher percentage of pharmacy workers in the intervention group (77%) compared to the comparison group (49%) were knowledgeable at follow-up about determining whether an abortion was successful, implying a need for improving this aspect of training. As many mid-level health providers run their own pharmacies and offer medical abortion pills, it is important for the government to consider training these providers and registering their pharmacies as safe medical abortion service outlets. PMID:25702074

  6. Anti-inflammatory effects of salmeterol/fluticasone propionate 50/250 mcg combination therapy in Japanese patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Kazuhisa; Kobayashi, Akihiro; Makihara, Yukio; Johnson, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Using sputum neutrophils as the primary measure, and other inflammation biomarkers, this study evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of the combination salmeterol 50 mcg and fluticasone propionate 250 mcg (SFC 250) in Japanese patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Patients and methods Patients were treated in a randomized, double-blind, parallel group, placebo-controlled trial with SFC 250 twice daily (n=26) or placebo (n=26) for 12 weeks. At the start and end of treatment, inflammation biomarkers (sputum and serum), lung function, and health status (COPD Assessment Test [CAT] questionnaire) were measured. Results Although a numerical decrease in differential neutrophil count was observed from baseline, SFC 250 did not significantly reduce sputum neutrophils compared with placebo, nor were there significant changes from baseline in the other biomarkers (sputum or serum), lung function, or CAT, versus placebo. Squamous epithelial cell contamination in some sputum samples rendered them unacceptable for analysis, which reduced the sample size to n=19 (SFC 250) and n=10 (placebo). However, inclusion of contaminated samples did not affect the overall trend of the outcome. Ad hoc bootstrap statistical analysis showed a 27.9% (SFC 250) and 1.3% (placebo) decrease in sputum neutrophils. Sputum IL-8 decreased by 43.2% after SFC 250 but increased by 48.3% with placebo. Responder analyses showed 42% of patients had ≥20% decrease in neutrophils from baseline; and 47% of patients had a ≥200 pg/mL change in sputum IL-8 following SFC 250 versus 20% after placebo; both changes are considered clinically relevant. Conclusion This study provides additional information about inflammation in Japanese COPD patients and is the first to study the anti-inflammatory effects of SFC 250 in this context and population. In the primary analysis, SFC 250 did not produce significant changes from baseline in sputum neutrophil levels or other sputum or serum inflammatory markers compared with placebo. Secondary ad hoc statistical analysis showed that SFC 250 reduced the number of sputum neutrophils and IL-8 compared with placebo. PMID:25945045

  7. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... notice signs of oral cancer during regular checkups. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) also make note of unusual or abnormal ... 186,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists; speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech- ...

  8. Prescribing rationale and budgetary outcomes associated with the introduction of a combined formulation of diclofenac sodium and misoprostol in Canada.

    PubMed

    Sclar, D A; Robison, L M; Maheu, A; Skaer, T L

    1995-01-01

    The budgetary impact of prescribing a combined formulation of diclofenac sodium and misoprostol to patients previously using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs), cytoprotective agents, or a combination of agents from both therapeutic categories is assessed, as is the clinical rationale for prescribing the combined formulation. Analysis of data for Canada on claims paid by third parties showed that the use of the combined formulation in Canada had resulted in significant initial overall savings and that the greatest cost savings were made for those who had previously used both an NSAID and a cytoprotective concomitantly. The inclusion of shadow costs (secondary costs) indicates that the use of the combined formulation over a 6-month period involves very low shadow costs (medical expenses related to ulcer treatment) compared with other NSAIDs: the shadow cost multiplication factor was 1.03 for the combined formulation compared with 1.22 to 3.47 for other NSAIDs. Pharmaceutical costs alone are insufficient for evaluating total budgetary impacts. PMID:8746611

  9. Constraining Properties of AGN Coronae with NuSTAR: the Case of the Obscured Seyfert 1.9 Nucleus MCG -05-23-016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balokovic, Mislav; Harrison, Fiona

    2016-04-01

    Robust measurements of the high-energy cut-off in the coronal continuum of AGN have long been limited to a small set of the brightest examples and almost exclusively to unobscured nuclei. We report on a direct measurement of the cut-off energy in the nuclear continuum of the obscured Seyfert 1.9 nucleus MCG-05-23-016 with unprecedented precision. The high sensitivity of NuSTAR in the hard X-ray band allows us to clearly disentangle the spectral curvature of the primary continuum from that of the reprocessed component. Using a simple phenomenological spectral model, we measured the cut-off energy to be 116+/-6 keV, while more complex Comptonization models provided independent constraints on the kinetic temperature of the electrons in the corona and its optical depth. Similar to a number of such measurements perfomed with NuSTAR in the past few years, and consistent with analyses of relatively large samples of hard X-ray spectra from the NuSTAR survey of nearby AGN, the optical depth was found to be of order unity for a range of assumed simple geometries. This means that the data are pushing the currently available models to the limits of their validity. In combination with the observations of spectral signatures from the innermost region of the accretion disk, and the observed variability of the high-energy cut-off, these results allow us to constrain the spatial extent of the AGN corona, its inhomogeneity and physical conditions needed to maintain its structure.

  10. Women's Acceptability of Misoprostol Treatment for Incomplete Abortion by Midwives and Physicians - Secondary Outcome Analysis from a Randomized Controlled Equivalence Trial at District Level in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Cleeve, Amanda; Byamugisha, Josaphat; Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina; Mbona Tumwesigye, Nazarius; Atuhairwe, Susan; Faxelid, Elisabeth; Klingberg-Allvin, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess women´s acceptability of diagnosis and treatment of incomplete abortion with misoprostol by midwives, compared with physicians. Methods This was an analysis of secondary outcomes from a multi-centre randomized controlled equivalence trial at district level in Uganda. Women with first trimester incomplete abortion were randomly allocated to clinical assessment and treatment with misoprostol by a physician or a midwife. The randomisation (1:1) was done in blocks of 12 and stratified for health care facility. Acceptability was measured in expectations and satisfaction at a follow up visit 14–28 days following treatment. Analysis of women’s overall acceptability was done using a generalized linear mixed-effects model with an equivalence range of -4% to 4%. The study was not masked. The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.org, NCT 01844024. Results From April 2013 to June 2014, 1108 women were assessed for eligibility of which 1010 were randomized (506 to midwife and 504 to physician). 953 women were successfully followed up and included in the acceptability analysis. 95% (904) of the participants found the treatment satisfactory and overall acceptability was found to be equivalent between the two study groups. Treatment failure, not feeling calm and safe following treatment, experiencing severe abdominal pain or heavy bleeding following treatment, were significantly associated with non-satisfaction. No serious adverse events were recorded. Conclusions Treatment of incomplete abortion with misoprostol by midwives and physician was highly, and equally, acceptable to women. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01844024 PMID:26872219

  11. Safety, efficacy and acceptability of outpatient mifepristone-misoprostol medical abortion through 70 days since last menstrual period in public sector facilities in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Sanhueza Smith, Patricio; Peña, Melanie; Dzuba, Ilana G; García Martinez, María Laura; Aranguré Peraza, Ana Gabriela; Bousiéguez, Manuel; Shochet, Tara; Winikoff, Beverly

    2015-02-01

    Extensive evidence exists regarding the efficacy and acceptability of medical abortion through 63 days since last menstrual period (LMP). In Mexico City's Secretariat of Health (SSDF) outpatient facilities, mifepristone-misoprostol medical abortion is the first-line approach for abortion care in this pregnancy range. Recent research demonstrates continued high rates of complete abortion through 70 days LMP. To expand access to legal abortion services in Mexico City (where abortion is legal through 12 weeks LMP), this study sought to assess the efficacy and acceptability of the standard outpatient approach through 70 days in two SSDF points of service. One thousand and one women seeking pregnancy termination were enrolled and given 200 mg mifepristone followed by 800 μg misoprostol 24-48 hours later. Women were asked to return to the clinic one week later for evaluation. The great majority of women (93.3%; 95% CI: 91.6-94.8) had complete abortions. Women with pregnancies ≤ 8 weeks LMP had significantly higher success rates than women in the 9th or 10th weeks (94.9% vs. 90.5%; p = 0.01). The difference in success rates between the 9th and 10th weeks was not significant (90.0% vs. 91.2%; p = 0.71). The majority of women found the side effects (82.9%) and the use of misoprostol (84.4%) to be very acceptable or acceptable. This study provides additional evidence supporting an extended outpatient medical abortion regimen through 10 weeks LMP. PMID:25702071

  12. Première expérience de l'utilisation du Misoprostol comme soin après avortement (SAA) à Libreville, Gabon

    PubMed Central

    Mayi-Tsonga, Sosthène; Minkobame, Ulysse; Mbila, Arielle; Assoumou, Pamphile; Diop, Ayisha; Winikoff, Beverly

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Une étude a été menée afin de déterminer le taux d'acceptabilité de 400µg de misoprostol par voie sublinguale comme traitement de première intention de l'avortement incomplet et de préciser le taux d'avortement complet ou vacuité utérine. Méthodes Les femmes éligibles avaient un diagnostic clinique d'avortement incomplet avec une taille utérine inférieure à celle d'un utérus de 12 semaines d'aménorrhées (SA). Chacune a reçu 400µg de misoprostol par voie sublinguale. Les femmes ont été revues après une semaine. A J7, celles qui n'avaient pas complètement expulsé ont eu le choix entre une nouvelle consultation de suivi à J14 et la pratique d'une évacuation chirurgicale immédiate. Résultats 145 patientes ont été éligibles et ont toutes accepté la méthode (100%). L’âge moyen était de 25,9 ± 6 ans. A J7, 120 patientes étaient guéries (85,7%). A J14, le taux de réussitea été de 95,7% soit 134 patientes guéries. Les patientes guéries ont déclaré être très satisfaites (57,5%), satisfaites (41,8%) et insatisfaite (0,7%). Au total,128 femmes (95,5%) ont dit être prêtes à utiliser de nouveau le misoprostol comme méthode d’évacuation utérine en cas d'avortement incomplet. Conclusion L’étude démontre que le 400µg misoprostol par voie sublinguale nous permet de prendre en charge d'une manière adéquate l'avortement incomplet surtout dans les pays à faible ressource et notamment dans les structures sanitaires de première ligne ou éloignées. PMID:25469194

  13. Oral contraceptives did not affect biochemical folate indexes and homocysteine concentrations in adolescent females.

    PubMed

    Green, T J; Houghton, L A; Donovan, U; Gibson, R S; O'Connor, D L

    1998-01-01

    The impact of oral contraceptive (OC) use, smoking, and alcohol drinking on biochemical indexes of folate and vitamin B-12 was investigated in 229 adolescents 14-20 years old recruited from advertisements in Ontario, Canada. Subjects completed a life-style questionnaire and a 3-day, weighed food record, followed by overnight fasting and the collection of blood samples. Of the 48 participants (21%) who were OC users, 30 had used the pill for more than 12 months. Only 37 adolescents (16%) smoked, but 94 (60%) had consumed alcohol in the month preceding the study. Median daily intake of folate and vitamin B-12 (including intake from supplements) was 215 mcg and 1.9 mcg, respectively. OC use, smoking, and alcohol consumption were not significantly associated with lower serum or red blood cell folate levels, after controlling for folate intake. Serum homocysteine levels were not correlated with smoking or OC use, but were 13% higher among alcohol drinkers than nondrinkers. Finally, although smoking and alcohol use were not associated with serum B-12 levels, OC use was linked with an estimated 33% lower serum B-12 level than was nonuse. These findings fail to validate concerns that OC use has a negative impact on the folate status of adolescent females, but suggest a need to improve the dietary folate intake of young women who smoke. PMID:9434651

  14. Oral sex, oral health and orogenital infections.

    PubMed

    Saini, Rajiv; Saini, Santosh; Sharma, Sugandha

    2010-01-01

    Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active male-female and same-gender couples of various ages, including adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus and analingus. Oral sex is infrequently examined in research on adolescents; oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital pathogens. Oral health has a direct impact on the transmission of infection; a cut in your mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of infection. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection and safer sex precautions. There are various methods of preventing infection during oral sex such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues and oral hygiene and dental issues. The lesions or unhealthy periodontal status of oral cavity accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex. PMID:20300419

  15. The risks of oral contraceptives and estrogen replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Coe, F L; Parks, J H

    1989-01-01

    The benefits and risks of both oral contraceptives and estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) are evaluated by summarizing briefly the results of the most evidential studies on breast, ovarian, endometrial, and hepatobiliary cancer, heart attack, stroke and venous thromboembolism. The methods used to estimate risk ratios, prospective random-allocation, double-blind trials, and retrospective case- controlled studies, are explained briefly. The ERT used today resemble sequential oral contraceptives, except that only 10-20 mcg ethinyl estradiol is taken for 25 days, and progestins are used on the last 10 days. Breast cancer risk is not different in pill users from nonusers, based on the U.K. General PRactitioner, Oxford Family Planning, Harvard nurses or U.S. SEER National Cancer Institute studies. Studies on ERT and breast cancer are mixed, but only injected estrogens raised the risks. Ovarian cancer is prevented by pill use in proportion to length of use. No studies were reported for ERT. The risk of hepatic cancer is 3.8 to 7.8 higher in pill users, but the number of cases is so rare that this should not affect prescriptions. Neither pill nor ERT raise the risk of myocardial infarction, and after premature surgical menopause, ERT lowers the risk. Based on studies done in the 1970s, oral contraceptives raise the risk of thrombotic stroke while women are taking them, from 10-13/100,000 to 41/100,000. ERT has no clear association with stroke. Similarly, orals increase the risk of venous thromboembolism, 8-fold in the Oxford Family Planning study published in 1986, although the absolute numbers are very small. ERT had no effects no risk of thromboembolism according to the lipid Research, Framingham and Nachtigall studies. PMID:2689999

  16. [Prevention of oral cancer].

    PubMed

    Roodenburg, J L; Vermey, A; Nauta, J M

    1994-05-01

    Etiology control is the most important primary prevention of oral cancer. The use of tobacco and alcohol increases the risk of a squamous cell carcinoma of the oral mucosa. The dentist can play an important role in the secondary prevention or screening for premalignant lesions, asymptomatic malignancies and second primary tumours of the oral cavity. Because of their age, edentulous patients run a high risk of oral cancer. Therefore, a regular oral check-up of these patients should be recommended. PMID:11830977

  17. Training Traditional Birth Attendants on the Use of Misoprostol and a Blood Measurement Tool to Prevent Postpartum Haemorrhage: Lessons Learnt from Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Passano, Paige; Bohl, Daniel D.; Islam, Arshadul; Prata, Ndola

    2014-01-01

    A consensus emerged in the late 1990s among leaders in global maternal health that traditional birth attendants (TBAs) should no longer be trained in delivery skills and should instead be trained as promoters of facility-based care. Many TBAs continue to be trained in places where home deliveries are the norm and the potential impacts of this training are important to understand. The primary objective of this study was to gain a more nuanced understanding of the full impact of training TBAs to use misoprostol and a blood measurement tool (mat) for the prevention of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) at home deliveries through the perspective of those involved in the project. This qualitative study, conducted between July 2009 and July 2010 in Bangladesh, was nested within larger operations research, testing the feasibility and acceptability of scaling up community-based provision of misoprostol and a blood measurement tool for prevention of PPH. A total of 87 in-depth interviews (IDIs) were conducted with TBAs, community health workers (CHWs), managers, and government-employed family welfare visitors (FWVs) at three time points during the study. Computer-assisted thematic data analysis was conducted using ATLAS.ti (version 5.2). Four primary themes emerged during the data analysis, which all highlight changes that occurred following the training. The first theme describes the perceived direct changes linked to the two new interventions. The following three themes describe the indirect changes that interviewees perceived: strengthened linkages between TBAs and the formal healthcare system; strengthened linkages between TBAs and the communities they serve; and improved quality of services/service utilization. The data indicate that training TBAs and CHW supervisors resulted in perceived broader and more nuanced changes than simply improvements in TBAs’ knowledge, attitudes, and practices. Acknowledgeing TBAs’ important role in the community and in home deliveries and integrating them into the formal healthcare system has the potential to result in changes similar to those seen in this study. PMID:24847601

  18. Effect of the oral contraceptive pill on protein S and antithrombin-III levels in Malaysian women.

    PubMed

    Wong, K K; Ng, S C; Koong, P L

    Studies focusing on the relationship between oral contraceptive (OC) usage and occurrence of thromboembolism have been conducted for over 3 decades. Those studies centered on the effects OC use has on blood proteins and on measurable physiological changes that occurred in women with venous thrombosis. This article reports the findings of a study that investigated the effects of OC use on the levels of the anticoagulants antithrombin-III (AT-III), protein C (PC), and protein S (PS) in a group of Asian women. Previous studies had mostly been based on Caucasian women. Of the 21 women studied, 16 were Malaysian, 3 were Chinese, and 2 were Indian. Low-dose OCs containing 30 mcg of ethinyl estradiol and 150 mcg of either desogestrel or levonorgestrel were used. Blood was tested before OC use and 3 and 6 months after starting OC use. Levels of AT-III and PS were measured using the Laurell rocket immunoelectrophoresis technique. Statistical analysis was performed using the paired Student's t-test and an analysis of variance test. No statistically significant differences were found for the mean levels of AT-III and total PS when comparing the pre-OC with the 3- and 6-month post-OC values. Earlier studies based mostly on Caucasian women have reported lower levels of both total PS and free PS in OC users. PMID:12288974

  19. Oral Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... OCF Funded Research Partners OCF funded Peer Reviewed Science Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical Trial ... The Oral Cancer Foundation The Oral Cancer Foundation is a national public service, non-profit entity designed to reduce ...

  20. Oral Steroids for Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Andrew D; Clarke, Jesse; Williams, Timothy K

    2015-01-01

    Contact/allergic dermatitis is frequently treated inappropriately with lower-than-recommended doses or inadequate duration of treatment with oral and intramuscular glucocorticoids. This article highlights a case of dermatitis in a Ranger Assessment and Selection Program student who was improperly treated over 2 weeks with oral steroids after being bit by Cimex lectularius, commonly known as bed bugs. The article also highlights the pitfalls of improper oral steroid dosing and provides reasoning for longer-duration oral steroid treatment. PMID:26125159

  1. Long-term monitoring of the archetype Seyfert galaxy MCG-6-30-15: X-ray, optical and near-IR variability of the corona, disc and torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lira, P.; Arévalo, P.; Uttley, P.; McHardy, I. M. M.; Videla, L.

    2015-11-01

    We present long-term monitoring of MCG-6-30-15 in X-rays, optical and near-IR wavelengths, collected over 5 yr of monitoring. We determine the power spectrum density of all the observed bands and show that after taking into account the host contamination similar power is observed in the optical and near-IR bands. There is evidence for a correlation between the light curves of the X-ray photon flux and the optical B band, but it is not possible to determine a lag with certainty, with the most likely value being around 0 d. Strong correlation is seen between the optical and near-IR bands. Cross-correlation analysis shows some complex probability distributions and lags that range from 10 to 20 d, with the near-IR following the optical variations. Filtering the light curves in frequency space shows that the strongest correlations are those corresponding to the shortest time-scales. We discuss the nature of the X-ray variability and conclude that this is intrinsic and cannot be accounted for by absorption episodes due to material intervening in the line of sight. It is also found that the lags agree with the relation τ ∝ λ4/3, as expected for an optically thick geometrically thin accretion disc, although for a larger disc than that predicted by the estimated black hole mass and accretion rate in MCG-6-30-15. The cross-correlation analysis suggests that the torus is located at ˜20 light-days from the central source and at most at ˜50 light-days from the central region. This implies an active galactic nucleus bolometric luminosity of ˜3 × 1043 erg s-1 cm-2.

  2. Effect of oral glucose on serum zinc in the elderly

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.L.; Kohrs, M.B.; Horwitz, D.L.; Cyborski, C.K.; Czajka-Narins, D.M.; Kamath, S.

    1986-03-05

    To determine the effect of glucose loading on serum zinc concentrations, 34 elderly subjects aged 60-86 y were studied. Anthropometric data, medical and dietary histories were obtained. Serum zinc and glucose concentrations were obtained fasting and 1/2, 1, 1 1/2, 2 and 3 h after 75 g oral glucose load; glycohemoglobin and fasting serum lipids were also determined. For comparison, the subjects were categorized as: normal or low serum zinc concentrations; normal or high body mass index BMI; normal or high sum of skinfolds and normal or high serum cholesterol. Results showed that low serum zinc concentrations increased significantly over baseline values after the glucose load and did not return to fasting levels. On the other hand, mean serum zinc concentrations significantly declined without recovery for those with normal zinc values. For the total group, no significant differences were noted between fasting values and subsequent time periods. No correlations were noted between fasting serum zinc and area under the curve for zinc except in the high BMI group (positive correlation observed). For the high BMI group, fasting serum zinc differed significantly from the succeeding measurements except for 30 min. For the group as a whole, mean serum zinc concentration was within normal limits (76.9 +/- 2.8 mcg/ml): mean zinc intake was less than 2/3rds the RDA. They conclude that glucose ingestion may alter serum zinc and should be considered in interpreting these levels.

  3. Understanding Oral Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, W. Jay

    2012-01-01

    A five-year research project of seminary students from various cultural backgrounds revealed that the slight majority of contemporary seminary students studied are oral learners. Oral learners learn best and have their lives most transformed when professors utilize oral teaching and assessment methods. After explaining several preferences of oral…

  4. Women's oral health issues.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, B J

    2000-09-01

    Hormonal fluctuations affect more than a woman's reproductive system. They have a surprisingly strong influence on the oral cavity. Puberty, menses, pregnancy, and menopause all influence women's oral health and the way in which a dentist should approach their treatment. This paper will review aspects of a woman's life when hormonal fluctuations may affect oral tissues. PMID:11324047

  5. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... find out more. Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 42,000 Americans ... find out more. Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 42,000 Americans ...

  6. The effects of rifampin and rifabutin on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a combination oral contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Barditch-Crovo, P; Trapnell, C B; Ette, E; Zacur, H A; Coresh, J; Rocco, L E; Hendrix, C W; Flexner, C

    1999-04-01

    The relative effects of rifampin and rifabutin (a related rifamycin) on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ethinyl estradiol (EE) and norethindrone were evaluated in a prospective, randomized, double-blinded crossover study in 12 premenopausal women who were on a stable oral contraceptive regimen that contained 35 mcg EE and 1 mg norethindrone. Subjects were randomized to receive 14 days of rifampin or rifabutin from days 7 through 21 of their menstrual cycle. After a 1-month washout period (only the oral contraceptives were taken), subjects were crossed over to the other rifamycin. Findings showed that rifampin significantly decreased the mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to 24 hours [AUC (0-24)] of EE and the mean AUC (0-24) of norethindrone. Rifabutin significantly decreased the mean AUC (0-24) of EE and the mean AUC (0-24) of norethindrone. The effect of rifampin was significantly greater than rifabutin on each AUC (0-24). Despite these changes, subjects did not ovulate (as determined by progesterone concentrations) during the cycle in which either rifamycin was administered. Levels of mean follicle-stimulating hormone increased 69% after rifampin. This study suggests that rifampin (600 mg daily) was a more important inducer of EE and norethindrone clearance than rifabutin, but none of these agents were able to reverse the suppression of ovulation done by oral contraceptives. PMID:10223781

  7. Essentials of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators. PMID:26617944

  8. Diclofenac and Misoprostol

    MedlinePlus

    ... patients who have a high risk of developing stomach ulcers. Diclofenac is in a class of medications ... prevents ulcers caused by diclofenac by protecting the stomach lining and decreasing stomach acid production.

  9. Use of Simulated Patients to Evaluate Combined Oral Contraceptive Dispensing Practices of Community Pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Obreli-Neto, Paulo Roque; Pereira, Leonardo Régis Leira; Guidoni, Camilo Molino; Baldoni, André de Oliveira; Marusic, Srecko; de Lyra-Júnior, Divaldo Pereira; de Almeida, Kelsen Luis; Pazete, Ana Claudia Montolezi; do Nascimento, Janaina Dutra; Kos, Mitja; Girotto, Edmarlon; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2013-01-01

    Background Combined oral contraceptive (COC) use is the most commonly used reversible method of birth control. The incorrect use of COCs is frequent and one of the most common causes of unintended pregnancies. Community pharmacists (CPs) are in a strategic position to improve COC use because they are the last health professional to interact with patients before drug use. Objective To evaluate the COC dispensing practices of CPs in a developing country. Method A cross-sectional study was conducted in community pharmacies of Assis and Ourinhos microregions, Brazil, between June 1, 2012, and October 30, 2012. Four simulated patients (SPs) (with counseled audio recording) visited community pharmacies with a prescription for Ciclo 21® (a COC containing ethinyl estradiol 30 mcg + levonorgestrel 15 mcg). The audio recording of every SP visit was listened to independently by 3 researchers to evaluate the COC dispensing practice. The percentage of CPs who performed a screening for safe use of COCs (i.e., taking of patients’ medical and family history, and measuring of blood pressure) and provided counseling, as well as the quality of the screening and counseling, were evaluated. Results Of the 185 CPs contacted, 41 (22.2%) agreed to participate in the study and finished the study protocol. Only 3 CPs asked the SP a question (1 question asked by each professional), and all of the questions were closed-ended, viz., “do you smoke?” (n = 2) and “what is your age?” (n = 1). None of the CPs measured the patient’s blood pressure. Six CPs provided counseling when dispensing COCs (drug dosing, 5 CPs; possible adverse effects, 2 CPs), and one CP provided counseling regarding both aspects. Conclusion The CPs evaluated did not dispense COC appropriately and could influence in the occurrence of negatives therapeutic outcomes such as adverse effects and treatment failure. PMID:24324584

  10. Radiation Induced Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    PS, Satheesh Kumar; Balan, Anita; Sankar, Arun; Bose, Tinky

    2009-01-01

    Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i) With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii) who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii) who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv) who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene PMID:20668585

  11. [Oral precancer and cancer].

    PubMed

    López-López, José; Omaña-Cepeda, Carlos; Jané-Salas, Enric

    2015-11-01

    We reviewed the concept of oral precancerous lesions, oral cancer, and the possibility of early diagnosis. With the keywords: premalignant oral lesions prevention, a search was performed over the past 10 years. Also clinical trials are searched from January 2011 until today with the keywords: oral cancer prevention AND dentistry. It is emphasized that there can be no significant changes related to the concept of precancerous lesions and cancer, and those relating to the early diagnosis. Despite the numerous described methods of screening, biopsy remains the most useful test, and therefore it is essential, mainly if we consider the new possibilities of molecular studies. PMID:25638423

  12. Chrysomya bezziana oral myiasis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gs Vijay; Sowmya, Gs; Shivananda, S

    2011-10-01

    Myiasis is an opportunistic infestation of human and vertebrate animals with dipterous larvae. Oral myiasis is a rare condition associated with poor oral hygiene, mental disability, halitosis and other conditions. We present a case report of an adult mentally challenged woman with extensive necrotic oral lesion burrowing into the hard palate through which three live maggots (larvae) were seen emerging out. The larvae were removed using forceps and the patient was treated with oral ivermectin. The maggots were identified as larvae of the Chrysomya bezziana fly. PMID:22224006

  13. The Oral History Review, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Samuel B., Ed.

    The contents of this issue of the "Oral History Review" include eight articles, Oral History Council reports, and lists of the sites of future oral history colloquiums, of Oral History Association publications in print and in microform, and of contributors. Titles of articles and authors are as follows: "Oral History Comes of Age" by Samuel…

  14. Migraine and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Mousa, G Y

    1982-10-01

    Migraine is a common complaint in optometric practice. Three cases of migrainous patients taking oral contraceptives are presented in this report. The role of oral contraceptives in triggering a migraine attack and possibly elevating the risk of a stroke in a patient with migraine is discussed. The counseling an optometrist can provide in such cases in discussed. PMID:7148975

  15. Oral amelanotic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Adisa, A O; Olawole, W O; Sigbeku, O F

    2012-06-01

    Malignant melanomas of the mucosal regions of the head and neck are extremely rare neoplasms accounting for less than 1% of all melanomas. Approximately half of all head and neck melanomas occur in the oral cavity. Less than 2% of all melanomas lack pigmentation, in the oral mucosa however, up to 75% of cases are amelanotic. No etiologic factors or risk factors have been recognized for oral melanomas. Some authors have suggested that oral habits and selfmedication may be of etiological significance. Oral melanoma is rare but it is relatively frequent in countries like Japan, Uganda, and India. It is rarely identified under the age of 20 years. In Australia where cutaneous melanomas are relatively common primary melanoma of the oral mucosa is rare. The surface architecture of oral melanomas ranges from macular to ulcerated and nodular. The lesion is said to be asymptomatic in the early stages but may become ulcerated and painful in advanced lesions. The diagnosis of amelanotic melanoma is more difficult than that of pigmented lesions. The neoplasm consists of spindle-shaped cells with many mitotic figures and no cytoplasmic melanin pigmentation. Immunohistochemistry using S-100, HMB-45, Melan-A and MART-1 will help in establishing the correct diagnosis. Radical surgery with ample margins and adjuvant chemotherapy are appropriate management protocol for malignant melanoma. Oral melanoma is associated with poor prognosis but its amelanotic variant has even worse prognosis because it exhibits a more aggressive biology and because of difficulty in diagnosis which leads to delayed treatment. PMID:25161399

  16. Oral Transliterating. PEPNet Tipsheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troiano, Claire A.

    2010-01-01

    An oral transliterator provides communication access to a person who is deaf or hard of hearing and who uses speechreading and speaking as a means of communicating. The oral transliterator, positioned in front of the speechreader, inaudibly repeats the spoken message, making it as speechreadable as possible. This is called Expressive Oral…

  17. Oral manifestations of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Leão, Jair Carneiro; Gueiros, Luiz Alcino; Porter, Stephen R

    2006-04-01

    The past decade has shown a significant rise in the prevalence of infective syphilis in the developed world, and striking increases in its frequency have occurred in Eastern Europe, particularly the UK, and in the US. Although oral manifestations of syphilis are most likely to be observed during secondary disease, all stages of the disease can give rise to oral lesions. Significant oral lesions such as gumma-associated bony destruction and a possible predisposition to oral squamous cell carcinoma are associated with tertiary disease. Since the prevalence of infective syphilis in heterosexuals has been increasing, there has now been a gradual rise in the number of children born with congenital syphilis. Consequently, the congenital disease gives rise to dental anomalies as well as bone, skin, and neurological anomalies of the face. The aim of this report is to review syphilis-related oral lesions, as well as to summarize the relations between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and syphilis. PMID:16680334

  18. Thrush (Oral Candidiasis) in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A A In oral candidiasis, normal mouth yeast overgrows, causing white, slightly elevated lesions. Overview Thrush ( ... candidiasis), also known as oral moniliasis, is a yeast infection of the mouth or throat (the oral ...

  19. Oral Contraceptive Pill and PCOS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health PCOS: The Oral Contraceptive Pill Posted under Health Guides . ... of oral contraceptive pills for young women with PCOS? Regular and Lighter Periods: Oral contraceptive pills can ...

  20. American Academy of Oral Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Orlando, FL AAOM: Representing the Discipline of Oral Medicine Oral Medicine is the discipline of dentistry concerned with the ... offers credentialing, resources and professional community for oral medicine practitioners. Our membership provides care to thousands We ...

  1. Curricular Guidelines for Oral Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for oral biology curriculum cover its scope, primary educational goals, prerequisites, sequencing, faculty, course content in each subarea (oral tissues and systems and oral diagnostic methodology), and specific behavioral objectives. (MSE)

  2. Literatura Oral Hispanica (Hispanic Oral Literature).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlpine, Dave

    As part of a class in Hispanic Oral Literature, students collected pieces of folklore from various Hispanic residents in the region known as "Siouxland" in Iowa. Consisting of some of the folklore recorded from the residents, this paper includes 18 "cuentos y leyendas" (tales and legends), 48 "refranes" (proverbs), 17 "chistes" (jokes), 1…

  3. The oral microbiome and oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Laura; Ganly, Ian

    2014-12-01

    The role that bacteria play in the etiology and predisposition to cancer is of increasing interest, particularly since the development of high-throughput genetic-based assays. With this technology, it has become possible to comprehensively examine entire microbiomes as a functional entity. This article focuses on the understanding of bacteria and its association with oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:25439271

  4. Examining the association between oral health and oral HPV infection.

    PubMed

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Markham, Christine M; Ross, Michael Wallis; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2013-09-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the cause of 40% to 80% of oropharyngeal cancers; yet, no published study has examined the role of oral health in oral HPV infection, either independently or in conjunction with other risk factors. This study examined the relation between oral health and oral HPV infection and the interactive effects of oral health, smoking, and oral sex on oral HPV infection. Our analyses comprised 3,439 participants ages 30 to 69 years for whom data on oral HPV and oral health were available from the nationally representative 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results showed that higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was associated with four measures of oral health, including self-rated oral health as poor-to-fair [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-1.95], indicated the possibility of gum disease (PR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.13-2.01), reported use of mouthwash to treat dental problems in the past week (PR = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.07-1.52), and higher number of teeth lost (Ptrend = 0.035). In multivariable logistic regression models, oral HPV infection had a statistically significant association with self-rated overall oral health (OR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.15-2.09), independent of smoking and oral sex. In conclusion, poor oral health was an independent risk factor of oral HPV infection, irrespective of smoking and oral sex practices. Public health interventions may aim to promote oral hygiene and oral health as an additional measure to prevent HPV-related oral cancers. PMID:23966202

  5. Oral sex and oral health: An enigma in itself.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Tarun; Puri, Gagan; Aravinda, Konidena; Arora, Neha; Patil, Deepa; Gupta, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active couples of various age groups, including male-female and same-gender adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus, and analingus. Oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital infections from one site in body to the other. Oral health has a direct correlation on the transmission of infection; a cut in the mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of life-threatening infections. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues, and oral hygiene and dental issues. The ulcerations or unhealthy periodontium in mouth accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus, consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex. PMID:26692602

  6. Oral sex and oral health: An enigma in itself

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Tarun; Puri, Gagan; Aravinda, Konidena; Arora, Neha; Patil, Deepa; Gupta, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active couples of various age groups, including male-female and same-gender adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus, and analingus. Oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital infections from one site in body to the other. Oral health has a direct correlation on the transmission of infection; a cut in the mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of life-threatening infections. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues, and oral hygiene and dental issues. The ulcerations or unhealthy periodontium in mouth accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus, consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex. PMID:26692602

  7. [Off-label drug use of the misoprostol in gynecology & obstetrics: From a medico-economics benefit to a potential legal risk].

    PubMed

    Decamps-Mini, D; Pelofi, J; Treisser, A

    2015-06-01

    The scandal of the Mediator® case led the legislature to take measures in order to regulate off-label drugs prescriptions. Indeed the law issued in December 29th, 2011 on strengthening the safety of drugs and all derivative health products came to pave the way for an "over-cautious" practice of medicine in line with the precautionary principle erected as a constitutional principle. The supervision of off-label prescribing has had a direct impact on the exercise of the medical profession and has resurrected the issues related to the freedom of prescription, the obligation to provide information to patients and in general their whole responsibility. It is important to mention that the prescribing act is part of the freedom and the strict prerogative of those skilled in the art: the physician in this case. The off-label prescription is commonly accepted in certain specialties, such as anesthesia and intensive care, oncology or pediatrics where it is even subject of a memorandum of use because of concerns regarding the availability of forms adapted to children. However, the physician must ensure that no appropriate therapeutic alternative is available and inform the patient, fundamental principle of the right to respect for the will of the person. Off-label use of the prostaglandin-E1 analogue misoprostol in obstetrics and gynecology is a good example. In fact, this drug obtained a marketing authorization for the treatment or prevention of peptic ulcers and other stomach disorders, is commonly used off-label when inducing labour or intrauterine device insertion. These are the issues that need to be clarify and carefully assessed in order to help physicians to understand the impact of the law and the state of the jurisprudence on the exercise of their profession. PMID:26032707

  8. Absorption, retention and urinary excretion of chromium-51 in rats pretreated with indomethacin and dosed with dimethylprostaglandin E2, misoprostol or prostacyclin.

    PubMed

    Kamath, S M; Stoecker, B J; Davis-Whitenack, M L; Smith, M M; Adeleye, B O; Sangiah, S

    1997-03-01

    Drug-nutrient interactions affecting chromium were investigated in this study. Rats were injected with indomethacin to reduce endogenous prostaglandin synthesis and dosed with prostaglandin analogues or prostacyclin. Effects on absorption, tissue distribution and urinary excretion of 51Cr from 51CrCl3 were evaluated using a 2 x 4 factorial experimental design. Forty-eight adult male rats were food deprived for 12 h and then injected intraperitoneally with indomethacin (5 mg/kg body wt) or placebo. Thirty minutes later, rats were intubated and dosed with one of four treatments: a prostaglandin E1 analogue (misoprostol) at 50 microg/kg body wt; a prostaglandin E2 analogue (16,16-dimethylprostaglandin E2) at 7.5 microg/kg body wt; prostacyclin at 20 microg/kg body wt; or control (7.64 mmol/L Tween-80 suspended in 0.15 mol/L NaCl containing 0.48 mol/L ethanol). Immediately after intubation, rats were dosed with 3.7 mBq of 51CrCl3 by micropipette. Blood was collected from the tail at intervals after 51Cr dosing. Six hours after dosing, 51Cr rats were exsanguinated by cardiac puncture. Indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis, significantly increased (P < 0.05) 51Cr in blood at all time periods tested except at 15 min. In tissues, indomethacin significantly increased 51Cr retention. Urinary 51Cr excretion at 6 h was higher (P < 0.05) in indomethacin-pretreated rats than in control rats. Administration of indomethacin, which blocks prostaglandin synthesis, enhanced 51Cr absorption, whereas dosing with 16,16-dimethylprostaglandin E2 decreased 51Cr absorption. PMID:9082033

  9. Oral Melanotic Macule

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oral melanotic macule is a non-cancerous (benign), dark spot found on the lips or inside the ... are more common in middle-aged people, in dark-skinned people, and in females. Signs and Symptoms ...

  10. Flunisolide Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    Flunisolide oral inhalation is used to prevent difficulty breathing, chest tightness, wheezing, and coughing caused by asthma in adults and children 6 years of age and older. It is in a class of medications called corticosteroids. Flunisolide works ...

  11. Ciclesonide Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    Ciclesonide oral inhalation is used to prevent difficulty breathing, chest tightness, wheezing, and coughing caused by asthma in adults and children 12 years of age and older. Ciclesonide is in a class of medications called corticosteroids. It works ...

  12. Oral health and HIV.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, David I

    2004-01-01

    Most oral health problems can be found in people who are either HIV positive or negative. Yet there are some important differences. A few conditions are seen almost exclusively in people with HIV, while some that are found in both populations are more problematic for people with HIV, especially those with advanced disease. A diminished immune system can alter the course of oral disease and require more aggressive treatment to prevent minor troubles from escalating into major health problems. Over 30 different oral manifestations of HIV disease have been reported since the beginning of the AIDS epidemic. This article will address several of the most common of these oral health issues. As with any health condition faced by HIV positive people, early identification and treatment should be emphasized. In many cases, referral to a dentist should be made as soon as possible. PMID:15104067

  13. Albuterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    Albuterol is used to prevent and treat difficulty breathing, wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing, and chest tightness ... of diseases that affect the lungs and airways). Albuterol inhalation aerosol and powder for oral inhalation is ...

  14. Pain in oral galvanism.

    PubMed

    Hampf, G; Ekholm, A; Salo, T; Ylipaavalniemi, P; Aalberg, V; Tuominen, S; Alfthan, G

    1987-06-01

    The present study reports on a controlled investigation of 38 patients with signs and symptoms of presumed oral galvanism, referred to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of the University of Helsinki for examination and treatment. A significant difference in mental health and in intraoral sensitivity threshold was found between patients and controls: patients with oral galvanism were mentally more disturbed and had a lower sensibility threshold than those in the control group. There was no statistical difference in electrical currents, potential or energy capacity in the dental metallic restorations between patients and controls. The frequency of allergies and oral candida infection was similar to that of a normal population. The possibility of exposure to mercury was excluded through a head hair analysis. The psychic background of complaints and findings is emphasized and a hypothesis for the mechanism giving rise to discomfort is presented. PMID:3614966

  15. Oral galvanism in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Molin, C

    1990-08-01

    Although a questionnaire response showed that many Swedes are concerned about oral galvanism, it seems that the symptoms changed as each theory was challenged. The symptoms changed with additional knowledge of the patient and the environment. PMID:2205644

  16. Maintaining women's oral health.

    PubMed

    McCann, A L; Bonci, L

    2001-07-01

    Women must adopt health-promoting strategies for both general health and the oral cavity, because the health of a woman's body and oral cavity are bidirectional. For general health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should actively advise women to minimize alcohol use, abstain from or cease smoking, stay physically active, and choose the right foods to nourish both the body and mind. For oral health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should advise women on how to prevent or control oral infections, particularly dental caries and periodontal diseases. Specifically, women need to know how to remove plaque from the teeth mechanically, use appropriate chemotherapeutic agents and dentifrices, use oral irrigation, and control halitosis. Dental practitioners also need to stress the importance of regular maintenance visits for disease prevention. Adolescent women are more prone to gingivitis and aphthous ulcers when they begin their menstrual cycles and need advice about cessation of tobacco use, mouth protection during athletic activities, cleaning orthodontic appliances, developing good dietary habits, and avoiding eating disorders. Women in early to middle adulthood may be pregnant or using oral contraceptives with concomitant changes in oral tissues. Dental practitioners need to advise them how to take care of the oral cavity during these changes and how to promote the health of their infants, including good nutrition. Older women experience the onset of menopause and increased vulnerability to osteoporosis. They may also experience xerostomia and burning mouth syndrome. Dental practitioners need to help women alleviate these symptoms and encourage them to continue good infection control and diet practices. PMID:11486666

  17. Oral Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Padmavathi, Bn; Sharma, Smriti; Astekar, Madhusudan; Rajan, Y; Sowmya, Gv

    2014-09-01

    'Crohn's disease' is an inflammatory granulomatous disease of the gastrointestinal tract with extra-intestinal manifestations. Oral lesions may precede the intestinal disease and serve as a source for histological diagnosis. We present a case of orofacial Crohn's disease where orofacial symptoms were present for about 13 years and occasional constipation was present, since 6 months. Oral examination plays an important role in early diagnosis of Crohn's disease. PMID:25364165

  18. Oral vs. salivary diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Joana; Corby, Patricia M.; Barber, Cheryl A.; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    The field of "salivary diagnostics" includes studies utilizing samples obtained from a variety of sources within the oral cavity. These samples include; whole unstimulated saliva, stimulated whole saliva, duct saliva collected directly from the parotid, submandibular/sublingual glands or minor salivary glands, swabs of the buccal mucosa, tongue or tonsils, and gingival crevicular fluid. Many publications state "we collected saliva from subjects" without fully describing the process or source of the oral fluid. Factors that need to be documented in any study include the time of day of the collection, the method used to stimulate and collect the fluid, and how much fluid is being collected and for how long. The handling of the oral fluid during and post-collection is also critical and may include addition of protease or nuclease inhibitors, centrifugation, and cold or frozen storage prior to assay. In an effort to create a standard protocol for determining a biomarker's origin we carried out a pilot study collecting oral fluid from 5 different sites in the mouth and monitoring the concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines detected using MesoScaleDiscovery (MSD) electrochemiluminesence assays. Our data suggested that 3 of the cytokines are primarily derived from the submandibular gland, while 7 of the cytokines come from a source other than the major salivary glands such as the minor salivary glands or cells in the oral mucosae. Here we review the literature on monitoring biomarkers in oral samples and stress the need for determining the blood/saliva ratio when a quantitative determination is needed and suggest that the term oral diagnostic be used if the source of an analyte in the oral cavity is unknown.

  19. Oral pigmentation: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sreeja, C.; Ramakrishnan, K.; Vijayalakshmi, D.; Devi, M.; Aesha, I.; Vijayabanu, B.

    2015-01-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations. PMID:26538887

  20. Oral Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Padmavathi, BN; Sharma, Smriti; Astekar, Madhusudan; Rajan, Y; Sowmya, GV

    2014-01-01

    ’Crohn's disease’ is an inflammatory granulomatous disease of the gastrointestinal tract with extra-intestinal manifestations. Oral lesions may precede the intestinal disease and serve as a source for histological diagnosis. We present a case of orofacial Crohn's disease where orofacial symptoms were present for about 13 years and occasional constipation was present, since 6 months. Oral examination plays an important role in early diagnosis of Crohn's disease. PMID:25364165

  1. Oral and systemic photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Andrew C; Damian, Diona L; Halliday, Gary M

    2014-01-01

    Photoprotection can be provided not only by ultraviolet (UV) blockers but also by oral substances. Epidemiologically identified associations between foods and skin cancer and interventional experiments have discovered mechanisms of UV skin damage. These approaches have identified oral substances that are photoprotective in humans. UV inhibits adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production causing an energy crisis, which prevents optimal skin immunity and DNA repair. Enhancing ATP production with oral nicotinamide protects from UV immunosuppression, enhances DNA repair and reduces skin cancer in humans. Reactive oxygen species also contribute to photodamage. Nontoxic substances consumed in the diet, or available as oral supplements, can protect the skin by multiple potential mechanisms. These substances include polyphenols in fruit, vegetables, wine, tea and caffeine-containing foods. UV-induced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) contributes to photodamage. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and food substances reduce production of this lipid mediator. Fish oils are photoprotective, at least partially by reducing PGE2 . Orally consumed substances, either in the diet or as supplements, can influence cutaneous responses to UV. A current research goal is to develop an oral supplement that could be used in conjunction with other sun protective strategies in order to provide improved protection from sunlight. PMID:24313740

  2. Aerodigestive cancers: oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Haws, Luke; Haws, Bryn Taylor

    2014-09-01

    Worldwide, approximately 260,000 new cases of oral cancer occur, and more than 125,000 mortalities are attributed to oral cancers each year. Oral cancers most commonly arise in the tongue, followed by the floor of the mouth and the lower gum. Tobacco and alcohol use are the major risk factors, although human papillomavirus has been identified as an etiology in a small percentage of oral squamous cell cancers. Although the evidence to support routine annual screening for oral cancers is inconclusive, family physicians and dental practitioners should be attentive to precursor lesions, such as leukoplakia and erythroplakia, and strongly consider obtaining or referring for biopsy patients with suspicious lesions. Depending on stage, management of oral cancers often involves surgery, with or without postoperative radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Patients who have been treated for these cancers should undergo close surveillance by otolaryngology subspecialists, but their family physicians primarily will be responsible for their long-term care. Complications relating to management, including difficulties with speech, swallowing, and chewing, will need to be addressed. For patients with advanced-stage disease, family physicians also may be responsible for palliative and end-of-life care. PMID:25198382

  3. Menopause and oral health

    PubMed Central

    Suri, Vanita; Suri, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Different phases of a woman's life: Puberty, menses, pregnancy, and menopause have varied influence on her oral health. During the menopause, women go through biological and endocrine changes, particularly in their sex steroid hormone production, affecting their health. Because the oral mucosa contains estrogen receptors, variations in hormone levels directly affect the oral cavity. A few oral conditions and or diseases are seen more frequently during post menopausal years. Role of hormones affecting the health of oro-dental tissues, as well as treatment by HRT in ameliorating these conditions is not clear. There is paucity of randomized controlled trials in this field and more data is needed, before the recommendations for oral health care in post menopausal women can be made. A gynecologist sitting in menopausal clinic should be aware of oral changes happening during this period, and dental needs of these women and should refer them to the dental specialists accordingly. On the other hand, a dentist should also be sensitized about the menopausal status of the woman, her HRT status and special preventive and treatment needs. PMID:25316996

  4. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Murat ?nan; Cengiz, Seda; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers. PMID:22792106

  5. The Canine Oral Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Klein, Erin A.; Thompson, Emily C.; Blanton, Jessica M.; Chen, Tsute; Milella, Lisa; Buckley, Catherine M. F.; Davis, Ian J.; Bennett, Marie-Lousie; Marshall-Jones, Zoe V.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the bacterial composition of the canine oral microbiome is of interest for two primary reasons. First, while the human oral microbiome has been well studied using molecular techniques, the oral microbiomes of other mammals have not been studied in equal depth using culture independent methods. This study allows a comparison of the number of bacterial taxa, based on 16S rRNA-gene sequence comparison, shared between humans and dogs, two divergent mammalian species. Second, canine oral bacteria are of interest to veterinary and human medical communities for understanding their roles in health and infectious diseases. The bacteria involved are mostly unnamed and not linked by 16S rRNA-gene sequence identity to a taxonomic scheme. This manuscript describes the analysis of 5,958 16S rRNA-gene sequences from 65 clone libraries. Full length 16S rRNA reference sequences have been obtained for 353 canine bacterial taxa, which were placed in 14 bacterial phyla, 23 classes, 37 orders, 66 families, and 148 genera. Eighty percent of the taxa are currently unnamed. The bacterial taxa identified in dogs are markedly different from those of humans with only 16.4% of oral taxa are shared between dogs and humans based on a 98.5% 16S rRNA sequence similarity cutoff. This indicates that there is a large divergence in the bacteria comprising the oral microbiomes of divergent mammalian species. The historic practice of identifying animal associated bacteria based on phenotypic similarities to human bacteria is generally invalid. This report describes the diversity of the canine oral microbiome and provides a provisional 16S rRNA based taxonomic scheme for naming and identifying unnamed canine bacterial taxa. PMID:22558330

  6. Oral Insulin Reloaded

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz; Plum-Mörschel, Leona

    2014-01-01

    Optimal coverage of insulin needs is the paramount aim of insulin replacement therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. To apply insulin without breaking the skin barrier by a needle and/or to allow a more physiological provision of insulin are the main reasons triggering the continuous search for alternative routes of insulin administration. Despite numerous attempts over the past 9 decades to develop an insulin pill, no insulin for oral dosing is commercially available. By way of a structured approach, we aim to provide a systematic update on the most recent developments toward an orally available insulin formulation with a clear focus on data from clinical-experimental and clinical studies. Thirteen companies that claim to be working on oral insulin formulations were identified. However, only 6 of these companies published new clinical trial results within the past 5 years. Interestingly, these clinical data reports make up a mere 4% of the considerably high total number of publications on the development of oral insulin formulations within this time period. While this picture clearly reflects the rising research interest in orally bioavailable insulin formulations, it also highlights the fact that the lion’s share of research efforts is still allocated to the preclinical stages. PMID:24876606

  7. Communication among oral bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kolenbrander, Paul E; Andersen, Roxanna N; Blehert, David S; Egland, Paul G; Foster, Jamie S; Palmer, Robert J

    2002-09-01

    Human oral bacteria interact with their environment by attaching to surfaces and establishing mixed-species communities. As each bacterial cell attaches, it forms a new surface to which other cells can adhere. Adherence and community development are spatiotemporal; such order requires communication. The discovery of soluble signals, such as autoinducer-2, that may be exchanged within multispecies communities to convey information between organisms has emerged as a new research direction. Direct-contact signals, such as adhesins and receptors, that elicit changes in gene expression after cell-cell contact and biofilm growth are also an active research area. Considering that the majority of oral bacteria are organized in dense three-dimensional biofilms on teeth, confocal microscopy and fluorescently labeled probes provide valuable approaches for investigating the architecture of these organized communities in situ. Oral biofilms are readily accessible to microbiologists and are excellent model systems for studies of microbial communication. One attractive model system is a saliva-coated flowcell with oral bacterial biofilms growing on saliva as the sole nutrient source; an intergeneric mutualism is discussed. Several oral bacterial species are amenable to genetic manipulation for molecular characterization of communication both among bacteria and between bacteria and the host. A successful search for genes critical for mixed-species community organization will be accomplished only when it is conducted with mixed-species communities. PMID:12209001

  8. Communication among Oral Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kolenbrander, Paul E.; Andersen, Roxanna N.; Blehert, David S.; Egland, Paul G.; Foster, Jamie S.; Palmer, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Human oral bacteria interact with their environment by attaching to surfaces and establishing mixed-species communities. As each bacterial cell attaches, it forms a new surface to which other cells can adhere. Adherence and community development are spatiotemporal; such order requires communication. The discovery of soluble signals, such as autoinducer-2, that may be exchanged within multispecies communities to convey information between organisms has emerged as a new research direction. Direct-contact signals, such as adhesins and receptors, that elicit changes in gene expression after cell-cell contact and biofilm growth are also an active research area. Considering that the majority of oral bacteria are organized in dense three-dimensional biofilms on teeth, confocal microscopy and fluorescently labeled probes provide valuable approaches for investigating the architecture of these organized communities in situ. Oral biofilms are readily accessible to microbiologists and are excellent model systems for studies of microbial communication. One attractive model system is a saliva-coated flowcell with oral bacterial biofilms growing on saliva as the sole nutrient source; an intergeneric mutualism is discussed. Several oral bacterial species are amenable to genetic manipulation for molecular characterization of communication both among bacteria and between bacteria and the host. A successful search for genes critical for mixed-species community organization will be accomplished only when it is conducted with mixed-species communities. PMID:12209001

  9. [Oral problems in divers].

    PubMed

    Scheper, W A; Lobbezoo, F; Eijkman, M A J

    2005-05-01

    Divers can have several oral problems. Firstly, problems caused by pressure changes. These are barodontalgia and odontocrexis. Barodontalgia is toothache by barotrauma. Odontocrexis is restorations coming lose or breaking or tooth fractures by expansion of air beneath restorations. Other problems can occur by cements used to fix casted restorations, by inflammations in the orofacial region, and by not yet fully healed oral wounds. Secondly, there are problems related to the diver's mouthpiece. To keep the mouthpiece in place, the mandible has to be forced in a forward position. Holding this position often and for long periods of time, may develop or aggravate temporomandibular dysfunction. Insufficient fit of the mouthpiece may induce oral mucosal lesions. Therefore, it is recommended to produce individual diver mouthpieces. It is also recommended to produce individual diver mouthpieces for complete dentures wearing divers and for divers with fixed orthodontic appliances. PMID:15932043

  10. Oral inflammation in small animals.

    PubMed

    Lommer, Milinda J

    2013-05-01

    The oral cavity can be affected by a wide variety of disorders characterized by inflammation of the gingiva and/or oral mucosa. In dogs and cats, differential diagnoses for generalized oral inflammatory disorders include plaque-reactive mucositis, chronic gingivostomatitis, eosinophilic granuloma complex, pemphigus and pemphigoid disorders, erythema multiforme, and systemic lupus erythematosus. In addition, endodontic or periodontal abscesses, infectious conditions, reactive lesions, and neoplastic conditions may initially present with localized or generalized inflammation of the oral mucosa. Determination of the underlying cause of an oral inflammatory condition relies on a thorough history, complete physical and oral examination, and incisional biopsy and histopathologic examination of lesions. PMID:23643021

  11. Misoprostol for pre-term labor induction in the second trimester: Role of medical history and clinical parameters for prediction of time to delivery

    PubMed Central

    di Liberto, Alexander; Endrikat, Jan; Frohn, Sandra; Solomayer, Erich; Ertan, Kubilay

    2014-01-01

    Objective Serious fetal malformations and/or chromosome aberrations detected by modern diagnostic tools in early pregnancy require discussions on induced abortion with pregnant women. Competent counseling includes prediction of the time needed for the whole abortion process. In an attempt to refine our predictions, we evaluated the impact of 11 medical history and clinical variables on time to delivery. Material and Methods We performed a retrospective chart analysis on 79 women submitted for pre-term abortion because of fetal anomalies. Abortion was induced by vaginal application of misoprostol (prostaglandine E1, Cytotec™, Pfizer, New York, USA). We investigated 11 medical history and clinical variables for their impact on the percentage of women delivering within 24 hours (primary endpoint) and on the mean induction-delivery time interval (secondary endpoint). Results Fifty-three percent (42/79) of women delivered within 24 hours; 83.6% (66/79) delivered within 48 hours. A total of 83.3% of women with a history of late abortion delivered within 24 hours, whereas 50.7% without this history did. Mean induction-delivery time interval was 12.3 hours versus 35.5 hours, respectively. For history of early abortion, the figures were 65.2% versus 48.2% for delivery within 24 hours and 15.6 hours versus 32.5 hours for mean induction-delivery time interval. Current weight of fetus >500 g, weight of last previous newborn of ≤3500 g, previous pregnancies, premature rupture of membranes, and an elevated CRP of >0.5 mg/dL also cut time to delivery. Surprisingly, maternal and gestational age had no remarkable or consistent impact on the mean induction-delivery time interval. None of the differences reached statistical significance. Eighty-three percent of women needed 1000 μg or less for successful delivery. Conclusion Neither variables of medical history nor specific clinical variables allow for precise prediction of time to delivery in the second trimester. Certain parameters, however, show a trend to reduce the induction-delivery time interval. Our results might serve as initial guidance for patient counseling. PMID:25317038

  12. Curriculum Guidelines for Predoctoral Oral Diagnosis/Oral Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Oral diagnosis is the area of dental practice that deals with gathering, recording, and evaluating information contributing to the identification of abnormalities of the head and neck region. A statement of general curricular goals in oral diagnosis/oral medicine is presented. (MLW)

  13. Lakota Oral Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    One Feather, Vivian

    Course objectives for the three credit hour Lakota Oral Literature (college level English) course presented in this publication are to: perceive through the reading and hearing of Lakota legends a better understanding of the known world of the Lakota people which existed prior to white contact; understand the origin of the laws which the Lakota

  14. Imaging in oral cancers

    PubMed Central

    Arya, Supreeta; Chaukar, Devendra; Pai, Prathamesh

    2012-01-01

    Oral cavity squamous cell cancers form a significant percentage of the cancers seen in India. While clinical examination allows direct visualization, it cannot evaluate deep extension of disease. Cross-sectional imaging has become the cornerstone in the pretreatment evaluation of these cancers and provides accurate information about the extent and depth of disease that can help decide the appropriate management strategy and indicate prognosis. Early cancers are treated with a single modality, either surgery or radiotherapy while advanced cancers are offered a combination of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Imaging can decide resectability, help plan the precise extent of resection, and indicate whether organ conservation therapy should be offered. Quality of life issues necessitate preservation of form and function and pretreatment imaging helps plan appropriate reconstruction and counsel patients regarding lifestyle changes. Oral cavity has several subsites and the focus of the review is squamous cancers of the gingivobuccal region, oral tongue and retromolar trigone as these are most frequently encountered in the subcontinent. References for this review were identified by searching Medline and PubMed databases. Only articles published in English language literature were selected. This review aims to familiarize the radiologist with the relevant anatomy of the oral cavity, discuss the specific issues that influence prognosis and management at the above subsites, the optimal imaging methods, the role of imaging in accurately staging these cancers and in influencing management. A checklist for reporting will emphasize the information to be conveyed by the radiologist. PMID:23599568

  15. Oral Communication in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Noting that oral communication skills need continuous refinement, this document outlines various methods of practicing these skills, such as literature circles in reading; a reader's theater; presentations of book reports; story telling; a poetry reading club; and choral reading. The document describes literature circles as small groups of readers…

  16. AAS Oral History Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Holbrook, Jarita; AAS Oral History Team

    2016-06-01

    Now in its fourth year, the AAS Oral History Project has interviewed over 80 astronomers from all over the world. Led by the AAS Historical Astronomy Division (HAD) and partially funded by the American Institute of Physics Niels Bohr Library and ongoing support from the AAS, volunteers have collected oral histories from astronomers at professional meetings starting in 2015, including AAS, DPS, and the IAU general assembly. Each interview lasts one and a half to two hours and focuses on interviewees’ personal and professional lives. Questions include those about one’s family, childhood, strong influences on one’s scientific career, career path, successes and challenges, perspectives on how astronomy is changing as a field, and advice to the next generation. Each interview is audio recorded and transcribed, the content of which is checked with each interviewee. Once complete, interview transcripts are posted online as part of a larger oral history library at https://www.aip.org/history-programs/niels-bohr-library/oral-histories. Future analysis will reveal a rich story of astronomers and will help the community address issues of diversity, controversies, and the changing landscape of science. We are still recruiting individuals to be interviewed from all stages of career from undergraduate students to retired and emeritus astronomers. Contact Jarita Holbrook to schedule an interview or to find out more information about the project (astroholbrook@gmail.com). Also, contact Jarita Holbrook if you would like to become an interviewer for the project.

  17. History of oral contraception.

    PubMed

    Dhont, Marc

    2010-12-01

    On the 50th birthday of the pill, it is appropriate to recall the milestones which have led to its development and evolution during the last five decades. The main contraceptive effect of the pill being inhibition of ovulation, it may be called a small miracle that this drug was developed long before the complex regulation of ovulation and the menstrual cycle was elucidated. Another stumbling block on its way was the hostile climate with regard to contraception that prevailed at the time. Animal experiments on the effect of sex steroids on ovulation, and the synthesis of sex steroids and orally active analogues were the necessary preliminaries. We owe the development of oral contraceptives to a handful of persons: two determined feminists, Margaret Sanger and Katherine McCormick; a biologist, Gregory Pincus; and a gynaecologist, John Rock. Soon after the introduction of the first pills, some nasty and life-threatening side effects emerged, which were due to the high doses of sex steroids. This led to the development of new preparations with reduced oestrogen content, progestins with more specific action, and alternative administration routes. Almost every decade we have witnessed a breakthrough in oral contraception. Social and moral objections to birth control have gradually disappeared and, notwithstanding some pill scares, oral contraceptives are now one of the most used methods of contraception. Finally, all's well that ends well: recent reports have substantiated the multiple noncontraceptive health benefits paving the way for a bright future for this 50-year-old product. PMID:21091163

  18. Oral Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gallus, Alexander S.; Wittkowsky, Ann; Crowther, Mark; Hylek, Elaine M.; Palareti, Gualtiero

    2012-01-01

    Background: The objective of this article is to summarize the published literature concerning the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral anticoagulant drugs that are currently available for clinical use and other aspects related to their management. Methods: We carried out a standard review of published articles focusing on the laboratory and clinical characteristics of the vitamin K antagonists; the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate; and the direct factor Xa inhibitor, rivaroxaban Results: The antithrombotic effect of each oral anticoagulant drug, the interactions, and the monitoring of anticoagulation intensity are described in detail and discussed without providing specific recommendations. Moreover, we describe and discuss the clinical applications and optimal dosages of oral anticoagulant therapies, practical issues related to their initiation and monitoring, adverse events such as bleeding and other potential side effects, and available strategies for reversal. Conclusions: There is a large amount of evidence on laboratory and clinical characteristics of vitamin K antagonists. A growing body of evidence is becoming available on the first new oral anticoagulant drugs available for clinical use, dabigatran and rivaroxaban. PMID:22315269

  19. Oral Communication in Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binnion, John E.; Thomas, Edward G.

    Helping young executives develop oral communication skills is an important task of business schools. A course that requires informal, timed, extemporaneous talks as well as extended formal presentations allows students the opportunity to be evaluated by their peers and by faculty members as they grow in their ability to communicate. Formal

  20. Oral Communication in Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, J. Daryll

    1976-01-01

    Investigated was the kind of communication that takes place in oral teaching. Analysis of tape-recorded transcripts of fifteen half-hour biology lessons delivered to high school and college students revealed a high degree of teacher-dominance and infrequency of discussion involving several pupils. (CS)

  1. WRITING ORAL DRILLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NEY, JAMES W.

    ALL ORAL LANGUAGE DRILLS MAY BE SEPARATED INTO TWO TYPES--(1) MIM-MEM OR MIMICRY MEMORIZATION DRILLS OR (2) PATTERN PRACTICE DRILLS. THESE TWO LARGER CATEGORIES CAN BE SUB-DIVIDED INTO A NUMBER OF OTHER TYPES, SUCH AS TRANSFORMATION AND SUBSTITUTION DRILLS. THE USE OF ANY PARTICULAR TYPE DEPENDS ON THE PURPOSE TO WHICH THE DRILL IS PUT. IN ANY…

  2. Estrogen and Progestin (Oral Contraceptives)

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur before the menstrual period each month) in women who have chosen to use an oral contraceptive ... taking oral contraceptives. If you have had an abortion or miscarriage, talk to your doctor about when ...

  3. Probiotics and oral health.

    PubMed

    Bizzini, Bernard; Pizzo, Giuseppe; Scapagnini, Giovanni; Nuzzo, Domenico; Vasto, Sonya

    2012-01-01

    Probiotics are living microorganisms (e.g., bacteria) that are either the same as or similar to organisms found naturally in the human body and may be beneficial to health. Current researches have shown that the balance between beneficial and pathogenic bacteria is essential in order to maintain the oral health. Therefore, oral cavity has recently been suggested as a relevant target for probiotic applications. Dental caries can be seen as a microbial imbalance where the oral microbiota shift towards community dominance which produces acidogenic and acid-tolerant gram positive bacteria. Similarly, the accumulation of bacteria within the biofilm, facilitated by poor oral hygiene, predisposes to allogenic shifts in the microbial community, leading to the onset of periodontal inflammation. Probiotic bacteria belonging to the genus of Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and Streptococcus have been proven effective for preventing caries by reducing the number of cariogenic bacteria in saliva after a short period of consuming the probiotic. In contrast, the effect of probiotics on improving gingivitis and periodontitis has been less investigated. The currently available studies on the effect of probiotics on periodontal pathogens and clinical periodontal parameters showed differing results depending on the strains used and the endpoints analyzed. Many of the clinical studies are pilot in nature and with low quality, therefore, properly conducted clinical trials, using probiotic strains with in vitro proven periodontal probiotic effects, are needed. The putative beneficial effects of probiotics on oral malodour have also been evaluated, but further evidence is needed to fully explore the potential of probiotics for preventing malodour. PMID:22632388

  4. Oral Lichen Planus in Children

    PubMed Central

    Mohan Das, Usha; JP, Beena

    2009-01-01

    Oral lichen planus which is one of the most common oral mucosal diseases in adults, it has been rarely described in children. There are very reports in the literature regarding oral lichen planus in children, here we report a case of intraoral lesions of lichen planus. Lichen planus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hyperkeratotic or erosive lesions of the oral mucosa in children. PMID:25206101

  5. [Oral manifestations of systemic diseases].

    PubMed

    Fistarol, S K; Itin, P H

    2009-11-01

    Many systemic diseases may present with oral manifestations and the oral mucosa may act as a mirror of internal involvement. We discuss the most common, specific and unspecific, as the most peculiar oral mucosal manifestations of systemic disease in the different organ systems. The most prevalent conditions of the oral mucosa in the course of HIV infection and marker lesions of multisystemic genodermatoses are elucidated. PMID:19855944

  6. Oral and Perioral Piercing Complications

    PubMed Central

    Escudero-Castaño, N; Perea-García, M.A; Campo-Trapero, J; Cano-Sánchez; Bascones-Martínez, A

    2008-01-01

    Background. The oral an perioral piercing has a long history as part of religious, tribal,cultural or sexual symbolism and nowdays there is a high incidence of oral and perioral piercing in the adolescent population. This practice has a long history as part of religious, tribal, cultural or sexual symbolism. This article reviews current knowledge on injuries or diseases that might be produced by piercing in the oral cavity. We propose a classification to diagnosed the pathologies related to oral an perioral piercing Methods. A search was conducted of articles in PubMed, Scielo published between 1997 and 2007, using the key words ``oral and perioral, piercing ´´, ``oral, piercing and disease”, ``recessions and oral piercing´´. It has reviewed about twentythree articles 17 were narrative reviews and 6 case series Results. A review was carried out on the origins of oral and perioral body piercing and its local implications, classifying the different alterations like recessions, systemic implications that it can produce in the oral and perioral cavity. Conclusion. Patients with oral and perioral piercing should be regularly followed up because of the possible development of different types of adverse effects. Clinical implications. Adverse effects of oral and perioral piercing can be systemic, with transmission of infectious diseases such as hepatitis B or C, or can be local, with alteration of oral mucosae or even of dental structures. PMID:19444317

  7. A History of Oral Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahn, Eugene; Bahn, Margaret L.

    This historical account of the oral interpretation of literature establishes a chain of events comprehending 25 centuries of verbal tradition from the Homeric Age through 20th Century America. It deals in each era with the viewpoints and contributions of major historical figures to oral interpretation, as well as with oral interpretation's…

  8. Oral History and Active Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Alan J.

    1994-01-01

    Contends that oral history is a way to involve students in thinking about and understanding history and the contemporary world. Includes a family history chart, recommendations for creating an oral history questionnaire, sample interview questions, and four student oral history writing models. (CFR)

  9. Proinflammatory cytokine levels in oral lichen planus, oral leukoplakia, and oral submucous fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to identify salivary and serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-8, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in patients with oral lichen planus, oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, and healthy controls. Materials and Methods Patients selected included 54 oral lichen planus (41 to 65 years), 50 oral leukoplakia (42 to 65 years), 51 oral submucous fibrosis (41 to 65 years), and 50 healthy controls (42 to 65 years). Oral lichen planus, oral leukoplakia, and oral submucous fibrosis cases were diagnosed using histopathological analysis. Salivary and serum cytokine concentrations were measured using enzyme-linked immunoassay kits in all subjects. Results The levels of serum and salivary TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 were statistically significantly increased in oral leukoplakia, submucous fibrosis, and lichen planus in contrast to normal healthy subjects (P<0.05). Serum and salivary correlation analysis revealed strong and highly significant correlations for TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 in all groups (r=0.72-0.82, P<0.05). Conclusion Salivary and serum cytokines were also elevated when analyzed in oral precancerous lesions. Thus, salivary and serum IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-α levels might act as diagnostic markers for detection of oral precancer. PMID:26339574

  10. Raisins and oral health.

    PubMed

    Wong, Allen; Young, Douglas A; Emmanouil, Dimitris E; Wong, Lynne M; Waters, Ashley R; Booth, Mark T

    2013-06-01

    Traditionally, raisins have been thought to promote dental caries due to their suspected "stickiness" and sugar content. Current research identifies some evidence contrary to traditional thought, suggesting that raisins may not contribute to dental caries. This article reviews new findings with regards to raisins and the 3 conditions that are thought to contribute to the formation of dental caries; low oral pH, adherence of food to teeth, and biofilm (bacterial) behavior. The studies reviewed concluded that raisin: consumption alone does not drop oral pH below the threshold that contributes to enamel dissolution, do not remain on the teeth longer than other foods, and contain a variety of antioxidants that inhibit Streptococcus Mutans, bacteria that is a primary cause of dental caries. Further research in this area should be considered. PMID:23789933

  11. Immunologically mediated oral diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jimson, Sudha; Balachader, N.; Anita, N.; Babu, R.

    2015-01-01

    Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect immunoflouresence, immune precipitation and immunoblotting. Therapeutic agents should be selected after thorough evaluation of immune status through a variety of tests and after determining any aggravating or provoking factors. Early and appropriate diagnosis is important for proper treatment planning contributing to better prognosis and better quality of life of patient. PMID:26015713

  12. Damaging oral habits.

    PubMed

    Kamdar, Rajesh J; Al-Shahrani, Ibrahim

    2015-04-01

    Oral habits, if persist beyond certain developmental age, can pose great harm to the developing teeth, occlusion, and surrounding oral tissues. In the formative years, almost all children engage in some non-nutritive sucking habits. Clinicians, by proper differential diagnosis and thorough understanding of natural growth and developmental processes, should take a decision for intervening. This article describes case series reports of thumb sucking, finger sucking, and tongue thrusting habits, which have been successfully treated by both removable and fixed orthodontic appliances. The cases shown are ranging from the age group of 9-19 years presenting combination of both mixed and permanent dentition development. All cases show satisfactory correction of habits and stable results. PMID:25954079

  13. Management of oral cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, A. E.; Langdon, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    Oral cancer is a serious disease that is on the increase. The most pressing need is early recognition and referral for specialist treatment. Too many cases present with advanced tumours. Radiotherapy and surgery remain the primary modalities of curative treatment, but understanding of tumour pathology and developments in surgical and radiotherapeutic technique have combined to produce a rational approach to management. In many instances 'radical' methods of surgical access can be combined with a more 'conservative' resection of the mandible or cervical lymph nodes. One-stage reconstructive procedures, often incorporating osteotomy techniques, miniature bone plating and free tissue transfer, have minimised the morbidity and functional deficit so often seen after earlier operations. All surgeons involved in the modern management of oral cancer should have expertise in these techniques or be part of a team which can provide them. PMID:8540656

  14. Oral hypoglycemic agent update.

    PubMed

    Krall, L P; Chabot, V A

    1978-07-01

    The treatment of diabetes is still a problem more than a half-century after the discovery of insulin. Patients are now living significantly longer but until the development of oral hypoglycemic agents, the only direct treatment modalities were exercise, diet, and insulin. Before evaluating the effectiveness of treatment, a therapeutic goal must be determined. While there are no absolutely "hard" facts proving that "good control" is beneficial in preventing chronic complications of diabetes, increasing accumulation of "soft" data strongly suggests that normal blood glucose levels are most desirable, when possible, but not at the cost of severe or disabling hypoglycemic reactions. The development of the oral agents was a great public health advance in that many persons with early diabetes, but fearful of insulin injections, had less dread of "the pills" and sought treatment. The oral agents simplified care but this very simplification process often undermined the need for proper diet and good fundamental care. This often led to mediocre diabetes care. While useful, the oral agents have marked limitations and in some are effective only temporarily. The presently available oral agents are sulfonylureas and require a viable beta-cell system for success. This limits the number of diabetics responsive to such treatment. The general indications for tolbutamide, chlorpropamide, acetohexamide and tolazamide are in maturity-onset diabetics, generally beyond the age of 40 with diabetes of less than 10 years. They are contraindicated in juvenile-onset diabetics, in pregnant women, and usually in patients undergoing major surgery, and can become ineffective during periods of extreme stress or during severe infection. They can lower blood glucose levels if used in proper doses in properly selected patients. Contrary to several decades of documentation, it has become popular to suggest that the oral agents are not effective. They can be effective but for many reasons apparently were not in their use by the U.G.D.P. researchers. This might not be the fault of the oral agent used. If ineffective, they should be discontinued. Many, but not all, patients may respond to diet therapy, which is then the treatment of choice. Obviously insulin, though difficult to use for many persons and in itself able to induce several severe reactions if not used properly, is the only treatment (with diet) for the severe diabetic. There is a large spectrum of patients inbetween in whom the oral agents may be useful. The use of phenformin (phenethyl-biguanide) has been effectively curtailed because of many reported cases of lactic acidosis, and while it is doubtful that phenformin alone, in the absence of complicating factors, is the causative factor, it is capable of being an augmenting influence when other conditions, such as decreased kidney function, prevail... PMID:98675

  15. Studies in oral leukoplakias

    PubMed Central

    Pindborg, J. J.; Kiær, Joyce; Gupta, P. C.; Chawla, T. N.

    1967-01-01

    Oral carcinoma has been shown to be correlated with the use of tobacco in various parts of India. In a large-scale dental survey conducted in Lucknow, Bombay and Bangalore various precancerous conditions were investigated and studied for their possible relation to smoking and chewing habits. This paper reports the prevalence of oral leukoplakia among 10 000 dental-clinic patients in Lucknow and the correlation of the condition with the use of tobacco and betel nut in the study population. The results show that leukoplakia is far more prevalent among users of tobacco, betel nut or both than among non-users. A strikingly high frequency was found among smokers of the local cigarette, the bidi. PMID:5300044

  16. Damaging Oral Habits

    PubMed Central

    Kamdar, Rajesh J; Al-Shahrani, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Oral habits, if persist beyond certain developmental age, can pose great harm to the developing teeth, occlusion, and surrounding oral tissues. In the formative years, almost all children engage in some non-nutritive sucking habits. Clinicians, by proper differential diagnosis and thorough understanding of natural growth and developmental processes, should take a decision for intervening. This article describes case series reports of thumb sucking, finger sucking, and tongue thrusting habits, which have been successfully treated by both removable and fixed orthodontic appliances. The cases shown are ranging from the age group of 9-19 years presenting combination of both mixed and permanent dentition development. All cases show satisfactory correction of habits and stable results. PMID:25954079

  17. The new oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Garcia, David; Libby, Edward; Crowther, Mark A

    2010-01-01

    Although their first application in clinical practice occurred in the 1940s, vitamin K antagonists remain the only form of oral anticoagulant medication approved for long-term use. Although the available vitamin K antagonists are highly effective for the prevention and/or treatment of most thrombotic disease, the significant interpatient and intrapatient variability in dose-response, the narrow therapeutic index, and the numerous drug and dietary interactions associated with these agents have led clinicians, patients, and investigators to search for alternative agents. Three new orally administered anticoagulants (apixaban, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban) are in the late stages of development and several others are just entering (or moving through) earlier phases of investigation. These novel anticoagulant medications are being studied for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism, the treatment of acute coronary syndromes and the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. This review summarizes published clinical trial data pertinent to apixaban, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban. PMID:19880491

  18. Oral health & HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Gennaro, Susan; Naidoo, Sudeshi; Berthold, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Oral lesions are common in women and children with HIV/AIDS and may decrease the overall quality of life in these patients because of pain, dry mouth, and difficulty in eating. An oral cavity screening is an easy, noninvasive, quick, and inexpensive procedure that provides nurses with invaluable information about the need for referral, treatment, and health education. Nurses can use the information obtained from a careful oral screening to decrease the symptoms experienced with oral lesions and optimize a patient's ability to chew and enjoy food. Common oral manifestations of HIV infection include fungal, viral, and bacterial infections, although neoplasms, periodontal disease, salivary gland disease, and lesions of uncertain origin are also seen. Oral lesions such as candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia, herpetic ulcers, and Kaposi's sarcoma are often among the first symptoms of HIV infection. PMID:18158528

  19. Skylab oral health studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, L. R.; Frome, W. J.; Handler, S.; Wheatcroft, M. G.; Rider, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Evaluation of Skylab crewmembers for mission related effects on oral health in relation to possible dental injuries provided the following distinctive changes: (1) increased counts of specific anaerobic and streptococcal components; (2) elevations in levels of secretory IgA concurrent with diminutions of salivary lysozyme; and (3) increases in dental calculus and gingival inflammations. The clinical changes are considered to be more influenced by the preexisting state of dental health than by any mission related effects.

  20. [Amalgam. XIV. Oral galvanism].

    PubMed

    Schuurs, A H; Boere, G

    1994-04-01

    Although 'oral galvanism' is associated with corrosion, it seems to be an irrelevant phenomenon. It is very difficult to measure correctly electric currents in the mouth, if possible at all, and the value and significance of the results are questionable. Occasionally a patient may perceive an electric current, i.e. pain or taste sensation, due to intermittent contacts between restorations of amalgam and gold. A damaging effect, however, has never been proven. PMID:11830961

  1. Oral manifestations in transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Nappalli, Deepika; Lingappa, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Organ transplantation is a widely undertaken procedure and has become an important alternative for the treatment of different end-stage organ diseases that previously had a poor prognosis. The field of organ transplant and hematopoietic stem cell transplant is developing rapidly. The increase in the number of transplant recipients also has an impact on oral and dental services. Most of the oral problems develop as a direct consequence of drug-induced immunosuppression or the procedure itself. These patients may present with oral complaints due to infections or mucosal lesions. Such lesions should be identified, diagnosed, and treated. New treatment strategies permit continuous adaptation of oral care regimens to the changing scope of oral complications. The aim of this review is to analyze those oral manifestations and to discuss the related literature. PMID:26005458

  2. Oral Lesions and Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Castellarin, P.; Pozzato, G.; Tirelli, G.; Di Lenarda, R.; Biasotto, M.

    2010-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative disorders are heterogeneous malignancy characterized by the expansion of a lymphoid clone more or less differentiated. At the level of the oral cavity, the lymphoproliferative disorder can occur in various ways, most commonly as lymphoid lesions with extranodal externalization, but sometimes, oral lesions may represent a localization of a disease spread. With regard to the primary localizations of lymphoproliferative disorders, a careful examination of the head and neck, oral, and oropharyngeal area is necessary in order to identify suspicious lesions, and their early detection results in a better prognosis for the patient. Numerous complications have been described and frequently found at oral level, due to pathology or different therapeutic strategies. These complications require precise diagnosis and measures to oral health care. In all this, oral pathologists, as well as dental practitioners, have a central role in the treatment and long-term monitoring of these patients. PMID:20871659

  3. Oral epithelioid hemangioendothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Preeti Tomar; Guledgud, Mahima V.; Patil, Karthikeya

    2015-01-01

    Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (HE) is an intermediate malignant potential vascular neoplasm with uncertain clinical behavior, wide variations in microscopic findings, and prognosis. According to the World Health Organization (2002) classification, epithelioid HE has been considered under malignant tumors which rarely metastasize. The epithelioid variant, the most aggressive one, has similar gender predilection and sporadic occurrence in children. The patients usually present with an asymptomatic oral mass whereas few cases may report with the painful bleeding lesion. We attempt to present a case in an adolescent male with previously never described biological behavior, diverse histopathological features, and immunohistochemistry findings. PMID:26681871

  4. [New oral anticoagulant drugs].

    PubMed

    Berkovits, Alejandro; Aizman, Andrés; Zúñiga, Pamela; Pereira, Jaime; Mezzano, Diego

    2011-10-01

    Thromboembolic disease (TED) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The hallmark of oral long-term anticoagulant therapy has been the use of vitamin K antagonists, whose anticoagulant effect is exerted inhibiting vitamin K epoxide reductase. Warfarin and acenocoumarol are the most commonly used. In the last five years several new drugs for long term anticoagulation have been developed, which can inhibit single clotting factors with the purpose of improving drug therapeutic range and, ideally, minimizing bleeding risks. This review addresses the state of the art on the clinical use of inhibitors of activated factor X and thrombin. PMID:22286737

  5. Oral complications in cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  6. Oral periopathogens and systemic effects.

    PubMed

    Costerton, John; Keller, Duane

    2007-01-01

    Management of oral biofilms allows dentists to help control the pathogens responsible for periodontal disease and decay. Increasing evidence indicates that the oral system is a portal for pathogenic microorganisms. This is a cumulative situation with systemic effects that can overcome an individual's resistance threshold, culminating in systemic sequela. New evidence indicates that controlling these oral pathogens has systemic benefits, as oral pathology is related to cardiovascular and respiratory disease, diabetes, and systemic inflammatory responses, as well as low birth weight and pre-term deliveries. Some insurance companies now cover periodontal scaling for gingivitis and periodontal disease for pregnant women and patients at risk for pregnancy. PMID:17511362

  7. Halitosis. A common oral problem.

    PubMed

    Spielman, A I; Bivona, P; Rifkin, B R

    1996-12-01

    Halitosis is caused primarily by bacterial putrefaction and the generation of volatile sulfur compounds. Ninety percent of patients suffering from halitosis have oral causes, such as poor oral hygiene, periodontal disease, tongue coat, food impaction, unclean dentures, faulty restorations, oral carcinomas, and throat infections. The remaining 10 percent of halitosis sufferers have systemic causes that include renal or hepatic failure, carcinomas, diabetes or trimethylaminuria. Modern analytical and microbiological techniques permit diagnosis of bad breath. Management of halitosis involves maintaining proper oral hygiene, and periodontal treatment, including tongue brushing. PMID:9002736

  8. Disseminated histoplasmosis with oral manifestation.

    PubMed

    Epifanio, Rodolfo N; Brannon, Robert B; Muzyka, Brian C

    2007-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a fungal disease that affects humans and is caused by Histoplasma capsulatum. The presentation of the infection may be acute, chronic, or disseminated. The disseminated form has extrapulmonary manifestations which may include oral manifestations. A patient with AIDS sought treatment and he had disseminated histoplasmosis with oral manifestations. The purpose of this case report and literature review is to emphasize the role the dental team has in the diagnosis of disseminated disease when a patient presents with oral manifestations associated with the disease. This case report is clinically relevant because it is not uncommon for oral manifestations to be one of the first signs of systemic disease. PMID:18683806

  9. Oral manifestations of HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Reznik, David A

    HIV-related oral conditions occur in a large proportion of patients, and frequently are misdiagnosed or inadequately treated. Dental expertise is necessary for appropriate management of oral manifestations of HIV infection or AIDS, but many patients do not receive adequate dental care. Common or notable HIV-related oral conditions include xerostomia, candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia, periodontal diseases such as linear gingival erythema and necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis, Kaposi's sarcoma, human papilloma virus-associated warts, and ulcerative conditions including herpes simplex virus lesions, recurrent aphthous ulcers, and neutropenic ulcers. PMID:16377852

  10. [Oral manifestations in HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Steinsvoll, Svein; Herlofson, Bente Brokstad

    2006-04-27

    In this review article, oral lesions in relation to HIV infection are presented and discussed. Lesions such as oral candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia and necrotising gingivitis or periodontitis may be the first sign of an HIV infection or of its progression. Almost all HIV-infected patients will contract oral diseases. Dentists and physicians play an essential role in early recognition of signs and symptoms of HIV disease or of its progression. Only through such recognition can appropriate definitive diagnostic testing be conducted and appropriate therapeutic intervention for the condition be considered. It is pivotal that both dentists and physicians are familiar with the most frequently occurring oral symptoms of HIV infection. PMID:16670745

  11. Micronutrients and Oral Clefts

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, C.M.; Chowchuen, B.; Pitiphat, W.; DeRouen, T.; Pisek, A.; Godfrey, K.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about oral clefts in developing countries. We aimed to identify micronutrient-related and environmental risk factors for oral clefts in Thailand. We tested hypotheses that maternal exposure during the periconceptional period to multivitamins or liver consumption would decrease cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL ± P) risk and that menstrual regulation supplements would increase CL ± P risk. We conducted a multisite hospital-based case-control study in Thailand. We enrolled cases with CL ± P and 2 live births as controls at birth from the same hospital. Mothers completed a questionnaire. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Eighty-six cases and 172 controls were enrolled. Mothers who took a vitamin (adjusted OR, 0.39; 95% CI: 0.16, 0.94) or ate liver (adjusted OR, 0.26; 95% CI: 0.12, 0.57) were less likely than those who did not to have an affected child. Mothers who took a menstrual regulation supplement were more likely than mothers who did not to have an affected child. Findings did not differ for infants with a family history of other anomalies or with isolated CL ± P. If replicated, our finding that liver decreases CL ± P risk could offer a low-cost primary prevention strategy. PMID:24097855

  12. [Oral jewelry: a review].

    PubMed

    Jeger, Franziska; Lussi, Adrian; Zimmerli, Brigitte

    2009-01-01

    Oral jewelry is popular. One of the most widely spread types are so-called tooth diamonds made of composite materials which are applied to the teeth with an adhesive. Note that parents are required to sign a release form for under-aged patients in Switzerland. Tooth cap grills and gold teeth are considered status symbols within the Hip-Hop fashion scene. However, tooth ornaments favour the accumulation of plaque and can diminish the ability to articulate. With respect to jewelry in oral soft tissue especially tongue and lip piercings are of significance to dentists. Besides the systemic complications, which are mostly caused by a lack of hygiene or the failure of noting medical contraindications by the piercer, local complications occur frequently. After surgery, pain, swelling, infections as well as hemorrhages or hematomas can be observed. Long-term effects can be problematic: gingival recession can be discernes mainly in the case of lip piercings the loss of hard tooth substance in the case of tongue piercings. Because of that, conservation therapies can become indespensable. Patients wearing dental jewelry have to be aware of risks of tooth damage, and they regularly have to undergo dental check-ups. Information campaigns--for dentists as well as patients--are necessary. PMID:20112640

  13. Apixaban and oral implications

    PubMed Central

    Bagán, Jose V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Thrombotic disorders remain a leading cause of death in the Western world, and in this regard a number of anticoagulation treatment have been used, including heparins, fondaparinux, vitamin K antagonists (warfarin, acenocoumarol), and new oral anticoagulants such as apixaban. For years there has been great controversy regarding the use of anticoagulants in planning dental treatments that imply bleeding. The main concerns about using new oral anticoagulants in invasive dental procedures are bleeding due to the lack of an antidote, and the thrombotic risk of the disease for which anticoagulation was indicated in the first place. Material and Methods A literature search was conducted through May 2014 using the keyword “apixaban” for publications in the ISI Web of Knowledge. The search was extended to other databases (PubMed, Scopus and the Cochrane Library). Results Based on the results of the different studies, apixaban seems to be a good alternative to conventional anticoagulation and a reasonable treatment option, though its main and most common adverse effect is bleeding. Dose adjustment is needed in some patients, though regular laboratory monitoring is not required. The use of the drug in different patient populations will define its final indications and doses. Conclusions Regarding the use of apixaban in the dental setting, there is a compelling need for further clinical studies in order to establish more evidence-based guidelines for patients requiring antithrombotic treatment. Key words:Apixaban, dental treatment, dental implications. PMID:26535102

  14. Global oral health inequalities: oral infections-challenges and approaches.

    PubMed

    Challacombe, S; Chidzonga, M; Glick, M; Hodgson, T; Magalhães, M; Shiboski, C; Owotade, F; Ranganathan, R; Naidoo, S

    2011-05-01

    Four oral mucosal infections were identified as Global Oral Health Priorities: (a) HIV and associated viral, bacterial, and fungal infections; (b) tuberculosis; (c) NOMA; and (d) sexually transmitted diseases. Huge global inequalities exist in all four. HIV-associated infections constitute the major challenge. Oral manifestations of AIDS can be specifically diagnostic, indicating a significant role for dentists within health teams. The World Workshops in Oral Health & Disease in AIDS have identified a research program, elements of which are being implemented. Data on oral mucosal involvement in tuberculosis, syphilis, and gonorrhea are incomplete in developed countries and virtually non-existent in low- and middle-income countries, indicating the need for further epidemiological studies. Oral manifestations of tuberculosis and sexually transmitted diseases are largely associated with general health, so action programs should be integrated with agencies treating the systemic diseases. NOMA is very much in the oral health domain. It is a preventable disease associated with malnutrition and unidentified bacterial factors. Prevalence is probably grossly overestimated at present; but nevertheless it constitutes a challenge to the profession, especially in the NOMA belt. Current treatment is surgical, but plans for its eradication should be achievable. The global oral health community, especially the IADR, has a major role to play. PMID:21490235

  15. Oral Mucosal Lesions: Oral Cavity Biology-Part I.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Syed, Nazim Hussain; Aggarwal, Ashok; Sehgal, Shruti

    2015-01-01

    It is important to evaluate the background of oral cavity biology to define morphologic abrasions in oral mucosa following a host of local and/ or systemic disorders. The oral cavity is not only the beginning of the digestive system, but it also plays a significant role in communication; the voice (although the voice is produced in the throat), tongue, lips, and jaw are its essential components to produce the range of sounds. The vestibule and the oral cavity are its major parts, and are usually moist. The lips and the teeth are in approximation, marking its start up. The anatomy of the oral cavity in brief has been reviewed in right prospective for disease related changed morphology, thus facilitating interpretation. PMID:26861428

  16. Compounded oral ketamine.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Jack P; Hahn, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    The nonnarcotic nonaddictive neuropathic pain reliever ketamine, which was synthesized in the early 1960s by Parke-Davis, was first administered to human patients in 1965. Used by the U. S. military as a field anesthetic during the Vietnam War, it slowly became popular as both an induction and maintenance agent for the general anesthesia required during brief surgical procedures. The use of ketamine in the past has been limited primarily to intravenous administration in hospitalized patients. Very recently, several published reports have described the use of low-dose ketamine for the relief of pain, refractory depression, and anxiety in patients with or without cancer. Because chronic pain, depression, and anxiety often occur in hospice patients with or without cancer and in palliative care patients who are not eligible for hospice, the discovery of new and effective uses for an established drug to treat those conditions has excited interest in the palliative care community. We support that interest with this case report, which describes our experience in treating a 44-year-old male hospice patient with severe constant anxiety, fear, and depression in addition to multiple near-terminal comorbid physical conditions that produce chronic pain. Prior treatments prescribed to resolve this patient's pain, anxiety, and depression had proven ineffective. However, a single low-dose (0.5 mg/kg) subcutaneous test injection of ketamine provided dramatic relief from those symptoms for 80 hours, although the anesthetic effects of that drug are not of long duration. This good outcome has been sustained to date by daily treatment with a compounded flavored oral ketamine solution (40 mg/5 mL) that is not commercially available. Flavoring the solution masks the bitter taste of ketamine and renders the treatment palatable. We found ketamine to be a well-tolerated and effective treatment for the triad of severe anxiety, chronic pain, and severe depression in a hospice patient with multiple comorbid conditions. To our knowledge, this report chronicles the first use of compounded oral ketamine for home-based palliative or hospice care in Louisiana. A formulation for a flavored oral ketamine solution is provided for easy reference. PMID:23072195

  17. Embracing Plurality through Oral Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Bich; Oliver, Rhonda; Rochecouste, Judith

    2015-01-01

    The transmission and dissemination of knowledge in Aboriginal societies for the most part occurs orally in an Aboriginal language or in Aboriginal English. However, whilst support is given to speaking skills in Indigenous communities, in our education system less emphasis is given to developing equivalent oral communicative competence in Standard…

  18. Tobacco Use and Oral Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seffrin, John R.; Randall, B. Grove

    1982-01-01

    Oral disease risks regarding the use of tobacco arise not only from smoking but also from the oral use of tobacco in the form of snuff. Such diseases range from simple tooth decay to various forms of cancer. A fact list is suggested for presenting the risks to school-age youth. (JN)

  19. Pediatric soft tissue oral lesions.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Andres; Haberland, Christel M; Baker, Suher

    2014-04-01

    This article provides an overview of common color changes and soft tissue oral nodular abnormalities in children and adolescents. The clinical presentation and treatment options to address these conditions are presented in a concise approach, highlighting key features relevant to the oral health care professional. PMID:24655531

  20. Oral History in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotchkiss, Ron

    1979-01-01

    Defines oral history as the act of talking to another person about the past. By obtaining the common man's view, a more complete interpretation of the past results. Outlines an oral history unit on the depression. Activities include tape recorded interviews and use of letters, pictures, diaries, newspapers, films, music, and books. (KC)

  1. [Oral ecosystem in elderly people].

    PubMed

    Lacoste-Ferré, Marie-Hélène; Hermabessière, Sophie; Jézéquel, Fabienne; Rolland, Yves

    2013-06-01

    The mouth is a complex natural cavity which constitutes the initial segment of the digestive tract. It is an essential actor of the vital functions as nutrition, language, communication. The whole mouth (teeth, periodontium, mucous membranes, tongue) is constantly hydrated and lubricated by the saliva. At any age, a balance becomes established between the bacterial proliferations, the salivary flow, the adapted tissular answer: it is the oral ecosystem. The regulation of this ecosystem participates in the protection of the oral complex against current inflammatory and infectious pathologies (caries, gingivitis, periodontitis, candidiasis). In elderly, the modification of the salivary flow, the appearance of specific pathologies (root caries, edentulism, periodontitis), the local conditions (removable dentures), the development of general pathologies, the development of general pathologies (diabetes, hypertension, immunosuppression, the insufficient oral care are so many elements which are going to destabilize the oral ecosystem, to favor the formation of the dental plaque and to weaken oral tissues. The preservation of this ecosystem is essential for elderly: it allows to eat in good conditions and so to prevent the risks of undernutrition. The authors describe the oral physiopathology (oral microflora, salivary secretion) and the strategies to be adopted to protect the balance of the oral ecosystem in geriatric population. PMID:23803630

  2. Teaching Vocabulary by Oral Translation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heltai, Pal

    1989-01-01

    Examines the conditions under which oral translation from a first language to a second language can be used as an exercise to build vocabulary. Depending upon the teaching situation, oral translation can be made both interesting and useful while being compatible with communicative approaches to language teaching. (Author/CB)

  3. Oral History in Louisiana Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Joel, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Theme issue shares experiences of librarians who have done oral history projects in school, parish, and university libraries throughout Louisiana. Articles cover the roles of the library and of oral history, how to begin projects, and how to involve students in the production of tapes and their organization for retrieval. (CDD)

  4. Oral myiasis in two children.

    PubMed

    Daltoé, Felipe P; Nosé, André Ricardo; Nosé, Fábio Roberto; Vanti, Luiz Augusto; Mosca, Rodrigo C; Mantesso, Andrea

    2013-05-01

    The term myiasis refers to growth of parasitic diptera in the living or dead tissue of vertebrate animal. Most cases of myiasis in humans are mild and rarely present in the mouth. We describe 2 children with severe oral myiasis that evolved to oral and maxillofacial mutilations. We discuss preventive measures. PMID:23271445

  5. Oral infections and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Kholy, Karim El; Genco, Robert J; Van Dyke, Thomas E

    2015-06-01

    Oral infections are the most common diseases of mankind. Numerous reports have implicated oral infections, particularly periodontitis, as a risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). In this review we examine the epidemiology and biologic plausibility of this association with an emphasis on oral bacteria and inflammation. Longitudinal studies of incident cardiovascular events clearly show excess risk for CVD in individuals with periodontitis. It is likely that systemic exposure to oral bacteria impacts upon the initiation and progression of CVD through triggering of inflammatory processes. Given the high prevalence of periodontitis, any risk attributable to future CVD is important to public health. Unraveling the role of the oral microbiome in CVD will lead to new preventive and treatment approaches. PMID:25892452

  6. Oral lichen planus: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Krupaa, R. Jayasri; Sankari, S. Leena; Masthan, K. M. K.; Rajesh, E.

    2015-01-01

    Lichen planus is an immunologically mediated mucocutaneous disease that is triggered by varied etiological agents. The oral lichenoid reaction is considered a variant of the disease that needs to be clearly diagnosed as a separate entity from oral lichen planus and treated. They follow a strict cause-effector relationship, protocols that suggest the differentiation. Lichen planus has varied clinical forms in the oral mucosa and cutaneously that has different prognosis. This condition also arises in association with various other systemic conditions such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus. There have been cases reported in the esophagus, larynx, scalp, nail, cutaneous areas, especially arms and wrists, trunk. There is reported malignant transformation that essentiates careful examination, treatment protocol and regular follow-up sessions. This article throws light on the disease condition of oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid reaction that is essential for the differentiation and treatment. PMID:26015696

  7. Oral reconstruction with submental flap

    PubMed Central

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Submental flap is a useful technique for reconstruction of medium to large oral cavity defects. Hair bearing nature of this flap in men makes it less appropriate. Therefore, deepithelialized variant is introduced to overcome the problem of hair with this flap. Recently, application of this flap has been introduced in maxillofacial trauma patients. Materials and Methods: Deepithelialized orthograde submental flap is used for the reconstruction of oral cavity mucosal defects. Results: Four cases including two trauma patients and two squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of oral cavity were treated using deepithelialized orthograde submental flap. There were no complications in all four patients and secondary epithelialization occurred in raw surface of the flap which was exposed to oral cavity. Conclusion: Deepithelialized orthograde submental flap is very effective in reconstruction of oral cavity in men. The problem of hair is readily solved using this technique without jeopardizing flap blood supply. PMID:24205473

  8. Oral and sublingual immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Wesley

    2014-01-01

    Allergic diseases have continued to increase throughout the developed world. Subcutaneous immunotherapy has been a mainstay of treatment for allergic rhinitis and asthma, however, some patients are precluded from treatment. On the other hand, in the case of food allergy, treatments simply do not exist. Oral and sublingual immunotherapy, with its superior safety and ease of administration, offers an alternative for patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma and has also been promising as a potential treatment for food allergy. The review summarizes significant advances from the past year including further data on the effectiveness of existing treatments, preliminary data on novel treatments, and further understanding of the mechanisms of these new therapies. PMID:25133094

  9. Biomechanics of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of prosthodontic treatment has been well recognized, and the need is continuously increasing with the ageing population. While the oral mucosa plays a critical role in the treatment outcome, the associated biomechanics is not yet fully understood. Using the literature available, this paper provides a critical review on four aspects of mucosal biomechanics, including static, dynamic, volumetric and interactive responses, which are interpreted by its elasticity, viscosity/permeability, apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient, respectively. Both empirical studies and numerical models are analysed and compared to gain anatomical and physiological insights. Furthermore, the clinical applications of such biomechanical knowledge on the mucosa are explored to address some critical concerns, including stimuli for tissue remodelling (interstitial hydrostatic pressure), pressure–pain thresholds, tissue displaceability and residual bone resorption. Through this review, the state of the art in mucosal biomechanics and their clinical implications are discussed for future research interests, including clinical applications, computational modelling, design optimization and prosthetic fabrication. PMID:26224566

  10. Biomechanics of oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of prosthodontic treatment has been well recognized, and the need is continuously increasing with the ageing population. While the oral mucosa plays a critical role in the treatment outcome, the associated biomechanics is not yet fully understood. Using the literature available, this paper provides a critical review on four aspects of mucosal biomechanics, including static, dynamic, volumetric and interactive responses, which are interpreted by its elasticity, viscosity/permeability, apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient, respectively. Both empirical studies and numerical models are analysed and compared to gain anatomical and physiological insights. Furthermore, the clinical applications of such biomechanical knowledge on the mucosa are explored to address some critical concerns, including stimuli for tissue remodelling (interstitial hydrostatic pressure), pressure-pain thresholds, tissue displaceability and residual bone resorption. Through this review, the state of the art in mucosal biomechanics and their clinical implications are discussed for future research interests, including clinical applications, computational modelling, design optimization and prosthetic fabrication. PMID:26224566

  11. Pregnancy Cravings Can Harm Your Oral Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Overal Health Oral Warning Signs Can Indicate Serious Medical Conditions Serious diseases, including diabetes, cancer, and ... Affect My Oral Health? Periodontal Disease and Pregnancy games Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral ...

  12. The Fungal Biome of the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Jyotsna; Retuerto, Mauricio; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Ghannoum, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Organisms residing in the oral cavity (oral microbiota) contribute to health and disease, and influence diseases like gingivitis, periodontitis, and oral candidiasis (the most common oral complication of HIV-infection). These organisms are also associated with cancer and other systemic diseases including upper respiratory infections. There is limited knowledge regarding how oral microbes interact together and influence the host immune system. Characterizing the oral microbial community (oral microbiota) in health and disease represents a critical step in gaining insight into various members of this community. While most of the studies characterizing oral microbiota have focused on bacterial community, there are few encouraging studies characterizing the oral mycobiome (the fungal component of the oral microbiota). Our group recently characterized the oral mycobiome in health and disease focusing on HIV. In this chapter we will describe the methods used by our group for characterization of the oral mycobiome. PMID:26519069

  13. Nonspeech Oral Movements and Oral Motor Disorders: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Speech and other oral functions such as swallowing have been compared and contrasted with oral behaviors variously labeled quasispeech, paraspeech, speechlike, and nonspeech, all of which overlap to some degree in neural control, muscles deployed, and movements performed. Efforts to understand the relationships among these behaviors are hindered by the lack of explicit and widely accepted definitions. This review article offers definitions and taxonomies for nonspeech oral movements and for diverse speaking tasks, both overt and covert. Method Review of the literature included searches of Medline, Google Scholar, HighWire Press, and various online sources. Search terms pertained to speech, quasispeech, paraspeech, speechlike, and nonspeech oral movements. Searches also were carried out for associated terms in oral biology, craniofacial physiology, and motor control. Results and Conclusions Nonspeech movements have a broad spectrum of clinical applications, including developmental speech and language disorders, motor speech disorders, feeding and swallowing difficulties, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, trismus, and tardive stereotypies. The role and benefit of nonspeech oral movements are controversial in many oral motor disorders. It is argued that the clinical value of these movements can be elucidated through careful definitions and task descriptions such as those proposed in this review article. PMID:26126128

  14. Quantitative Immunoexpression of EGFR in Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders: Oral Leukoplakia and Oral Submucous Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jyothi Meka, Naga; Ugrappa, Sridevi; Velpula, Nagalaxmi; Kumar, Sravan; Naik Maloth, Kotya; Kodangal, Srikanth; Ch, Lalitha; Goyal, Stuti

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Many oral squamous cell carcinomas develop from potentially malignant disorders (PMDs)which include a variety of lesions and conditions characterized by an increased risk for malignant transformation. Thisstudy evaluated the quantitative expression of EGFR in normal oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia and oral submucous fibrosis to predict the malignant risk in compliance with the intensity of staining with EGFR. Materials and methods. Thirty subjects were included in the study, consisting of 10 oral leukoplakia (OL), 10 oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) and 10 normal oral mucosa (NOM) as the control group. Owing to the histopathological confirmation of precancerous state of tissue, 4-?m-thick sections of tissue were taken from paraffin-embedded wax blocks for immunohistochemical staining for EGFR. Results. All the control cases showed positive expression for EGFR, while 20% of oral leukoplakia and 40% of OSMF cases showed strong expression (3+), 40% of OL and 30% of OSMF cases showed weak expression (2+), and 40% of OLand 30% of OSMF cases showed poor expression (1+) compared to controls (P=0.012). Conclusion. EGFR expression levels in the premalignant lesion appear to be a sensitive factor in predicting the neoplastic potential. This suggests that EGFR may serve as a biological marker to identify high-risk subgroups and guide prophylactic therapy with chemopreventive drugs or surgical intervention to prevent progression to carcinoma. Hence, further investigations in the direction of chemopreventive trials with a larger sample size are suggested to determine its role in the head and neck tumorigenesis. PMID:26697149

  15. Oral lichen planus to oral lichenoid lesions: Evolution or revolution

    PubMed Central

    Dudhia, Bhavin B; Dudhia, Sonal B; Patel, Purv S; Jani, Yesha V

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis between different diseases may be impaired by clinical and histopathologic similarities, as observed in the oral lichen planus (OLP) and oral lichenoid lesion (OLL). Inspite of similar clinicopathological features; etiology, diagnosis and prognosis differ which mandates separation of OLL from OLP. Hence, it is essential for the oral physician and oral pathologist to be familiarized with the individual variations among clinicopathological features of OLP and OLL as well as to obtain a thorough history and perform a complete mucocutaneous examination in addition to specific diagnostic testing. The difficulties faced to establish the diagnosis between these two pathologies are widely investigated in the literature with a lack of definite conclusion. This review is an attempt to throw some light on these clinicopathologic entities with the aim to resolve the diagnostic dilemma. PMID:26980966

  16. Oral cysticercosis: a clinical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Wanjari, Sangeeta Panjab; Patidar, Kalpana A; Parwani, Rajkumar N; Tekade, Satyajitraje A

    2013-01-01

    Cysticercosis is a potentially fatal parasitic disease caused by cysticercus cellulosae, the larval stage of Taenia solium. Oral cysticercosis is a rare entity and represents difficulty in clinical diagnosis. This article reports two cases of oral cysticercosis involving buccal and labial mucosa. Both the cases presented with solitary, nodular swelling that had been clinically diagnosed as a mucocele. Histopathology of excisional biopsy revealed it to be cysticercosis. Single, cystic nodular swelling of oral cavity may be the only evidence of cysticercosis and may present first to dentist. These cases emphasise the role of dentist and thorough histopathological examination in the early diagnosis of disease that can prevent potential systemic complication. PMID:23580668

  17. Management of oral melanin pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Karydis, Anastasios; Bland, Paul; Shiloah, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Melanin is an endogenous pigment responsible for human tissue coloration of the skin, mucosa, hair, eyes and parts of the brain. In the skin, its function is protection from the harmful effects of UV radiation. Its purpose in oral tissues has not yet been determined. Oral pigmentation could be an esthetic issue for some patients, particularly when it is located on the anterior labial gingiva in individuals with a high smile line. This article presents and describes several different approaches for the management of oral melanin pigmentation. PMID:23420974

  18. Oral cysticercosis: a clinical dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Wanjari, Sangeeta Panjab; Patidar, Kalpana A; Parwani, Rajkumar N; Tekade, Satyajitraje A

    2013-01-01

    Cysticercosis is a potentially fatal parasitic disease caused by cysticercus cellulosae, the larval stage of Taenia solium. Oral cysticercosis is a rare entity and represents difficulty in clinical diagnosis. This article reports two cases of oral cysticercosis involving buccal and labial mucosa. Both the cases presented with solitary, nodular swelling that had been clinically diagnosed as a mucocele. Histopathology of excisional biopsy revealed it to be cysticercosis. Single, cystic nodular swelling of oral cavity may be the only evidence of cysticercosis and may present first to dentist. These cases emphasise the role of dentist and thorough histopathological examination in the early diagnosis of disease that can prevent potential systemic complication. PMID:23580668

  19. Pharmacology of oral chemotherapy agents.

    PubMed

    Birner, Ann

    2003-01-01

    The abundance of orally formulated chemotherapy agents reflects the expanding role of oral chemotherapy in the care of patients with cancer. Many oral chemotherapy agents have been used for a number of years, and several have been developed recently. Newer agents include the prodrugs capecitabine and temozolomide, the retinoid bexarotene, the immunomodulatory agent thalidomide, the protein kinase inhibitor imatinib, and the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors gefitinib and erlotinib. Each agent has unique pharmacologic properties, dosing, and side-effect profiles. This article reviews these agents from a pharmacology perspective. PMID:14705495

  20. Diabetes mellitus and oral health.

    PubMed

    Kudiyirickal, Marina George; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2015-05-01

    The oral health is influenced by systemic health, and one of the most common chronic diseases encountered in dental practice is diabetes mellitus. Diabetes can worsen oral infections and vice versa. In the literature, periodontitis and diabetes in the young to middle-aged adults have been the most widely researched area. Understanding the patho-physiology, clinical manifestations and management of different types of orofacial diseases in diabetic patients are important to the diabetologist and the dentist for the optimal care of patients with these diseases. This review explores the inter-link between diabetes and oral health. PMID:25487035

  1. Melanin: the biophysiology of oral melanocytes and physiological oral pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The presence of melanocytes in the oral epithelium is a well-established fact, but their physiological functions are not well defined. Melanin provides protection from environmental stressors such as ultraviolet radiation and reactive oxygen species; and melanocytes function as stress-sensors having the capacity both to react to and to produce a variety of microenvironmental cytokines and growth factors, modulating immune, inflammatory and antibacterial responses. Melanocytes also act as neuroendocrine cells producing local neurotransmitters including acetylcholine, catecholamines and opioids, and hormones of the melanocortin system such as proopiomelanocortin, adrenocorticotropic hormone and α-melanocyte stimulating hormone, that participate in intracellular and in intercellular signalling pathways, thus contributing to tissue homeostasis. There is a wide range of normal variation in melanin pigmentation of the oral mucosa. In general, darker skinned persons more frequently have oral melanin pigmentation than light-skinned persons. Variations in oral physiological pigmentation are genetically determined unless associated with some underlying disease. In this article, we discuss some aspects of the biophysiology of oral melanocytes, of the functions of melanin, and of physiological oral pigmentation. PMID:24661309

  2. Oral physiology and mastication.

    PubMed

    van der Bilt, A; Engelen, L; Pereira, L J; van der Glas, H W; Abbink, J H

    2006-08-30

    Mastication is a sensory-motor activity aimed at the preparation of food for swallowing. It is a complex process involving activities of the facial, the elevator and suprahyoidal muscles, and the tongue. These activities result in patterns of rhythmic mandibular movements, food manipulation and the crushing of food between the teeth. Saliva facilitates mastication, moistens the food particles, makes a bolus, and assists swallowing. The movement of the jaw, and thus the neuromuscular control of chewing, plays an important role in the comminution of the food. Characteristics of the food, e.g. water and fat percentage and hardness, are known to influence the masticatory process. Food hardness is sensed during mastication and affects masticatory force, jaw muscle activity, and mandibular jaw movements. When we chew for instance a crispy food, the jaw decelerates and accelerates as a result of resistance and breakage of food particles. The characteristic breakage behaviour of food is essential for the sensory sensation. This study presents a short review of the influence of oral physiology characteristics and food characteristics on the masticatory process. PMID:16564557

  3. Nutrition and oral health.

    PubMed

    Budtz-Jørgensen, E; Chung, J P; Rapin, C H

    2001-12-01

    Reduced chewing function in community-dwelling older people with adequate general health is linked to having fewer than 20 teeth present or to wearing removable dentures. By chewing for longer periods of time or swallowing larger food particles they are normally able to compensate for the impaired function. The masticatory function can be restored by adequate prosthetic therapy, which results in increased activity of the masticatory muscles during chewing and reduces the chewing time and the number of chewing strokes until swallowing. In frail or dependent elderly people undernutrition is prevalent because of health problems, reduced appetite and poor quality of life. Poor oral health and xerostomia are often associated with a reduced body mass index and serum albumin level and the avoidance of difficult-to-chew foods. Maintenance or re-establishment of masticatory function is an integral part of the medical health care of these patients, with the aim of improving their nutritional status and quality of life. PMID:11866483

  4. As-yet-uncultivated oral bacteria: breadth and association with oral and extra-oral diseases

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, José F.; Rôças, Isabela N.

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown that 40–60% of the bacteria found in different healthy and diseased oral sites still remain to be grown in vitro, phenotypically characterized, and formally named as species. The possibility exists that these as-yet-uncultivated bacteria play important ecological roles in oral bacterial communities and may participate in the pathogenesis of several oral infectious diseases. There is also a potential for these as-yet-uncultivated oral bacteria to take part in extra-oral infections. For a comprehensive characterization of physiological and pathogenic properties as well as antimicrobial susceptibility of individual bacterial species, strains need to be grown in pure culture. Advances in culturing techniques have allowed the cultivation of several oral bacterial taxa only previously known by a 16S rRNA gene sequence signature, and novel species have been proposed. There is a growing need for developing improved methods to cultivate and characterize the as-yet-uncultivated portion of the oral microbiome so as to unravel its role in health and disease. PMID:23717756

  5. Oral agents in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lorefice, L; Fenu, G; Frau, J; Coghe, G C; Marrosu, M G; Cocco, E

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. Disease-modifying drugs licensed for MS treatment have been developed to reduce relapse rates and halt disease progression. The majority of current MS drugs involve regular, parenteral administration, affecting long-term adherence and thus reducing treatment efficacy. Over the last two decades great progress has been made towards developing new MS therapies with different modes of action and biologic effects. In particular, oral drugs have generated much interest because of their convenience and positive impact on medication adherence. Fingolimod was the first launched oral treatment for relapsing-remitting MS; recently, Teriflunomide and Dimethyl fumarate have also been approved as oral disease-modifying agents. In this review, we summarize and discuss the history, pharmacodynamics, efficacy, and safety of oral agents that have been approved or are under development for the selective treatment of MS. PMID:25924620

  6. Multicultural Issues in Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Raul I.; Cadoret, Cindy; Henshaw, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Demographic changes over the coming decades will heighten the challenges to the dental profession and to the nation. The expected growth in the numbers of racial and ethnic minorities, and the concomitant growth of immigrant populations are likely to lead to worsening of oral health disparities. Their consequences are becoming increasingly evident as the profession strives to improve the oral health of all Americans. The increasing diversity of the population, together with the importance of cultural beliefs and behaviors that affect health outcomes, will require ways to enhance provider-patient communications and oral health literacy. We discuss the nature and challenges presented by multicultural patient populations. One important means by which to promote oral health in diverse populations is to develop a dental workforce that is both culturally and linguistically competent, as well as one that is as culturally diverse as the American population. PMID:18329446

  7. Progestin-Only Oral Contraceptives

    MedlinePlus

    ... If you have had a miscarriage or an abortion, you can start taking progestin-only oral contraceptives ... medication may interfere with some laboratory tests.Rarely, women can become pregnant even if they are taking ...

  8. Oral Health and Bone Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... browser. Home Bone Basics Lifestyle Oral Health and Bone Disease Publication available in: PDF (58 KB) Related Resources ... information on osteoporosis, visit: NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center Website: http://www.bones.nih. ...

  9. Oral tuberculosis involving maxillary gingiva

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Rohit; Singh, Anil; Badni, Manjunath; Singh, Priyanka

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a communicable disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which is transmitted by aerosolized saliva droplets among individuals in close contact with expelled sputum of a diseased patient. However, TB lesions of the oral cavity are often overlooked in the differential diagnosis. We report here a case of tuberculosis of oral cavity affecting the gingiva of a 24-year-old male. PMID:22639508

  10. Menopause and the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Mutneja, Puneet; Dhawan, Pankaj; Raina, Anudeep; Sharma, Gaurav

    2012-01-01

    Menopause is associated with a large number of symptoms ranging from physical to psychological. These symptoms may unfavorably affect oral health and treatment needs requiring dentists to be aware of the symptoms and health care needs of peri-menopausal/menopausal/postmenopausal women. This article attempts to provide an insight into the multifarious oral manifestations at menopause along with the relevant prosthodontic implications. PMID:22837914

  11. Developing Oral History in Chinese Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Songhui, Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Compared with oral history in most Western countries, oral history theory and practice in Mainland China lag behind in both study and practice. This paper outlines the experience of oral history work in the Shantou university library, and the types and features of the oral history collected by the library. It examines problems in the development

  12. 20 CFR 501.5 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oral argument. 501.5 Section 501.5 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION APPEALS BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR RULES OF PROCEDURE § 501.5 Oral argument. (a) Oral argument. Oral argument may be held in the discretion of the Board, on its...

  13. Smart Talk: Improving Children's Oral Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haywood, Janie F.; Perkins, J. Helen

    2003-01-01

    Encourages caregivers to engage children in oral language activities that will help children develop skills necessary for reading and writing. Examines: (1) oral language as a predecessor to reading; (2) talking leading to learning; and (3) rich oral environment as a scaffold. Concludes with examples of oral-language activities for infants,…

  14. Developing Oral History in Chinese Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Songhui, Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Compared with oral history in most Western countries, oral history theory and practice in Mainland China lag behind in both study and practice. This paper outlines the experience of oral history work in the Shantou university library, and the types and features of the oral history collected by the library. It examines problems in the development…

  15. 12 CFR 1102.36 - Oral presentations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oral presentations. 1102.36 Section 1102.36... Practice for Proceedings § 1102.36 Oral presentations. (a) In general. A party does not have a right to an oral presentation. Under this section, a party's request to make an oral presentation may be denied...

  16. Oral contraceptives and cervical neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Brinton, L A

    1991-06-01

    Although initial studies examining the relationship of oral contraceptives to risk of cervical neoplasia were reassuring, more recent studies provide some evidence of a positive relationship, particularly for long-term usage. Results, however, are difficult to interpret, because of a variety of methodologic complexities, including potential sources of confounding and bias. Sexual behavior and Pap smear screening have been identified as important confounders, but in several well-controlled studies residual excess risks of nearly 2-fold persist for users of 5 or more years. A possible promotional effect of oral contraceptives is suggested by higher risks associated with recent usage. There also is some suggestion of a stronger effect for adenocarcinomas than for squamous cell tumors. A relationship is biologically possible, given findings of hormone receptors in cervical tissue and the fact that oral contraceptives have been found to induce cervical hyperplasia. In addition, oral contraceptives may induce proliferation of the human papillomaviruses, the leading suspect agent for cervical cancer. Although a number of lines of evidence support a relationship of oral contraceptives to cervical cancer risk, firm conclusions await the results of additional studies that specifically address some of the methodologic shortcomings of previous investigations. In particular, additional follow-up studies are needed to define the effect of oral contraceptives on the natural history of cervical lesions. PMID:1868734

  17. Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Yardimci, Gurkan; Kutlubay, Zekayi; Engin, Burhan; Tuzun, Yalcin

    2014-01-01

    Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa, known as potentially malignant disorders in recent years, are consists of a group of diseases, which should be diagnosed in the early stage. Oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, and oral erythroplakia are the most common oral mucosal diseases that have a very high malignant transformation rate. Oral lichen planus is one of the potentially malignant disorders that may be seen in six different subtypes including papular, reticular, plaque-like, atrophic, erosive, and bullous type, clinically. Atrophic and erosive subtypes have the greater increased malignant transformation risk compared to another subtypes. Although there are various etiological studies, the etiology of almost all these diseases is not fully understood. Geographically, etiologic factors may vary. The most frequently reported possible factors are tobacco use, alcohol drinking, chewing of betel quid containing areca nut, and solar rays. Early diagnosis is very important and can be lifesaving, because in late stages, they may be progressed to severe dysplasia and even carcinoma in situ and/or squamous cell carcinoma. For most diseases, treatment results are not satisfactory in spite of miscellaneous therapies. While at the forefront of surgical intervention, topical and systemic treatment alternatives such as corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and retinoids are widely used. PMID:25516862

  18. Oral manifestations associated with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Nokta, Mostafa

    2008-02-01

    Oral lesions are among the early signs of HIV infection and can predict progression to AIDS. The lesions commonly associated with the infection include oral candidiasis, herpes simplex infection, oral Kaposi's sarcoma, oral hairy leukoplakia, parotid gland enlargement, gingival diseases, xerostomia, and recurrent oral ulcerations. The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy has changed the epidemiology of some of the oral diseases associated with HIV infection. This review discusses the oral manifestations associated with HIV disease, the change in the pattern of the disease, and some research questions that need more emphasis from the research community. PMID:18417029

  19. [Interaction of human oral microbial community].

    PubMed

    Shi, Wen-Yuan; Zhou, Xue-Dong

    2010-02-01

    Human body is inhabited by large number of microbial organisms that form complex ecosystems. Oral cavity is one of the major sites for microbial colonization. Oral microbial diversity is huge as the compositions vary among different oral cavities, different locations within the same oral cavity, or same location at different time points. The differences in compositions and varieties determine the balance of human oral microbial ecosystem, which is directly associated with oral disease or health. This review focuses on the history and new progress of the studies on human oral microbial communities. PMID:20337063

  20. Acute oral toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Walum, E

    1998-01-01

    The purposes of acute toxicity testing are to obtain information on the biologic activity of a chemical and gain insight into its mechanism of action. The information on acute systemic toxicity generated by the test is used in hazard identification and risk management in the context of production, handling, and use of chemicals. The LD50 value, defined as the statistically derived dose that, when administered in an acute toxicity test, is expected to cause death in 50% of the treated animals in a given period, is currently the basis for toxicologic classification of chemicals. For a classical LD50 study, laboratory mice and rats are the species typically selected. Often both sexes must be used for regulatory purposes. When oral administration is combined with parenteral, information on the bioavailability of the tested compound is obtained. The result of the extensive discussions on the significance of the LD50 value and the concomitant development of alternative procedures is that authorities today do not usually demand classical LD50 tests involving a large number of animals. The limit test, the fixed-dose procedure, the toxic class method, and the up-and-down methods all represent simplified alternatives using only a few animals. Efforts have also been made to develop in vitro systems; e.g., it has been suggested that acute systemic toxicity can be broken down into a number of biokinetic, cellular, and molecular elements, each of which can be identified and quantified in appropriate models. The various elements may then be used in different combinations to model large numbers of toxic events to predict hazard and classify compounds. PMID:9599698

  1. [Aphthous ulcers and oral ulcerations].

    PubMed

    Vaillant, Loïc; Samimi, Mahtab

    2016-02-01

    Aphthous ulcers are painful ulcerations located on the mucous membrane, generally in the mouth, less often in the genital area. Three clinical forms of aphthous ulcers have been described: minor aphthous ulcers, herpetiform aphthous ulcers and major aphthous ulcers. Many other conditions presenting with oral bullous or vesiculous lesions orulcerations and erosions can be mistaken for aphthous ulcers. Currently, treatment of aphthous ulcers is palliative and symptomatic. Topical treatments (topical anesthetics, topical steroids and sucralfate) are the first line therapy. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is defined by the recurrence of oral aphthous ulcers at least 4 times per year. RAS is often idiopathic but can be associated with gastro-intestinal diseases (i.e. celiac disease, inflammatory bowel diseases), nutritional deficiencies (iron, folates…), immune disorders (HIV infection, neutropenia) and rare syndromes. Behçet's disease is a chronic, inflammatory, disease whose main clinical feature is recurrent bipolar aphthosis. Colchicine associated with topical treatments constitutes a suitable treatment of most RAS. Thalidomide is the most effective treatment of RAS but its use is limited by frequent adverse effects. Oral ulcers can be related to a wide range of conditions that constitute the differential diagnoses of aphthous ulcers. Oral ulcers are classified into three main groups: acute ulcers with abrupt onset and short duration, recurrent ulcers (mainly due to postherpetic erythema multiforme) and chronic ulcers (with slow onset and insidious progression). Acute oral ulcers are due to trauma, bacterial infections (including acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis), deep fungal infection, gastro-intestinal (namely inflammatory bowel disease) or systemic diseases. Chronic oral ulcers may be drug-induced, or due to benign or malignant tumors. Every oral solitary chronic ulcer should be biopsied to rule out squamous cell carcinoma. A solitary palatal ulcer can be related with necrotizing sialometaplasia. PMID:26880080

  2. Oral contraceptives: Pt. 2.

    PubMed

    1978-01-01

    This discussion of oral contraceptives (OCs) presents information on the following: types of steroidal contraception OCs, injectable contraceptive agents, implants, intravaginal rings, IUD bearing steroids, male pills, intracervical devices, contraceptive bracelets, and intranasal administration of hormones); guidelines for adolescent usage (why adolescents use OCs, common medical concerns, assessment, prescribing, educating for user effectiveness, and the length of time that the adolescent can use OCs); the marketing of OCs; attitudes toward OCs; the effect of OCs on insulin requirements in diabetes; mortality among OC users; assessing new knowledge of mortality trends and OCs; beneficial and adverse effects; sexual and psychological response to OCs; chromosomal abnormalities and OCs; ectopic pregnancies and the progestogen only pill; liver tumors and OCs; cancer and OCs; eye conditions and OCs; and postpill amenorrhea and infertility. Most adolescents choose OCs as their initial contraceptive method because it is probably the only method of which they have much knowledge. Most adolescents lack the needed level of sexual maturity and sexual sophistication to pause to insert a diaphrage or to use a condom. Another attraction of OCs is reliability. At this time 12 major companies based in 8 countries (excluding China) produce and market OCs. Basically either of 2 estrogens, ethinyl estradiol and mestranol, are used in combination with about 6 different progestogens. Attitudes vary greatly and range from total acceptance to total rejection. Despite some negative views about OC, 32.2% of Australian women in childbearing years are using OCs indicating a high degree of acceptance. The new data available indicate strongly that the hazards of using OCs are somewhat greater than previously suspected. In 1977 the Royal College of General Practitioners reported a death rate from circulatory disease which was in OC users 4.7 times that of women who had never used OCs. The deaths were concentrated among the older women, among cigarette smokers, and those with a long duration of OC use, i.e., over 5 years. Available evidence suggests that OCs do affect a number of transmitter amines in the brain and this might be responsible for the depressed mood in some patients. Critical review of the literature leaves one skeptical concerning claims of either positive or negative influences on the libido. PMID:12338652

  3. Adolescents and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Sanfilippo, J S

    1991-01-01

    Oral contraceptive (OC) options for adolescents are provides. Clarification for those desiring a birth control method is necessary and the benefits of decreased acne and dysmenorrhea with low dose OCs should be stressed along with the importance of compliance. A community effort is suggested to communicate the sexual and contraceptive alternatives, including abstinence and outercourse (sexual stimulation to orgasm without intercourse). Attention is given to concerns associated with teenage sexual activity, prevention of adolescent pregnancy, contraceptive options for the adolescent patient, adolescent attitudes toward birth control OCs, management of the adolescent OC user, manipulation of steroid components of OCs to respond to adolescent concerns, and other hormonal contraceptive options such as minipills or abstinence. The text is supplemented with tables: the % of US women by single years of age for 1971, 1976, 1979, and 1982; comparative pregnancy and abortion rates for the US and 5 other countries; federal cost for teen childbearing; adolescent nonhormonal contraceptive methods (advantages, disadvantages, and retail cost); checklist to identify those at risk for noncompliance with OCs; hormonal side effects of OCs; risks from OCs to adolescents; and benefits of OCs. Concern about adolescent pregnancy dates back to Aristotle. A modern profile shows girls form single-parent families are sexually active at an earlier age, adolescent mothers produce offspring who repeat the cycle, victims of sexual abuse are more likely to be sexually active, and teenagers in foster care are 4 times more likely to be sexually active and 8 times more likely to become pregnant. Prevention involves a multifaceted approach. OCs are the most appropriate contraceptive choice for adolescents. Frequency of intercourse is closely associated with OC use after approximately 15 months of unprotected sexual activity. At risk for noncompliance variables are scales of personality development (autonomy, self-esteem, locus of control), life expectations (marriage, college, career), dating behavior, age at 1st intercourse, perceived risk for becoming pregnant, personal attributes (sex, birth control, acquisition of birth control, pregnancy, parents' and peers' feelings toward sex and birth control), and previous experiences with birth control. PMID:1679420

  4. Drug Testing in Oral Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Drummer, Olaf H

    2006-01-01

    Over the last decade there have been considerable developments in the use of oral fluid (saliva) for drug testing. Oral fluid can provide a quick and non-invasive specimen for drug testing. However, its collection may be thwarted by lack of available fluid due to a range of physiological factors, including drug use itself. Food and techniques designed to stimulate production of oral fluid can also affect the concentration of drugs. Current applications are mainly focused on drugs of abuse testing in employees at workplaces where drug use has safety implications, in drivers of vehicles at the roadside and in other situations where drug impairment is suspected. Testing has included alcohol (ethanol) and a range of clinical tests eg antibodies to HIV, therapeutic drugs and steroids. Its main application has been for testing for drugs of abuse such as the amphetamines, cocaine and metabolites, opioids such as morphine, methadone and heroin, and for cannabis. Oral fluid concentrations of basic drugs such as the amphetamines, cocaine and some opioids are similar or higher than those in plasma. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major species present from cannabis use, displays similar concentrations in oral fluid compared to blood in the elimination phase. However, there is significant local absorption of the drug in the oral cavity which increases the concentrations for a period after use of drug. Depot effects occur for other drugs introduced into the body that allow local absorption, such as smoking of tobacco (nicotine), cocaine, amphetamines, or use of sub-lingual buprenorphine. Screening techniques are usually an adaptation of those used in other specimens, with an emphasis on the parent drug since this is usually the dominant species present in oral fluid. Confirmatory techniques are largely based on mass spectrometry (MS) with an emphasis on Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS), due to low sample volumes and the low detection limits required. Drug testing outside laboratory environments has become widespread and provides presumptive results within minutes of collection of specimens. This review focuses on the developments, particularly over the last 10 years, and outlines the roles and applications of testing for drugs in oral fluid, describes the difficulties associated with this form of testing and illustrates applications of oral fluid testing for specific drugs. PMID:17268583

  5. Oral immunotherapy for allergic conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Waka; Fukuda, Ken; Harada, Yosuke; Yagita, Hideo; Fukushima, Atsuki

    2014-11-01

    Antigen-specific immunotherapy is expected to be a desirable treatment for allergic diseases. Currently, antigen-specific immunotherapy is performed by administering disease-causing antigens subcutaneously or sublingually. These approaches induce long-term remission in patients with allergic rhinitis or asthma. The oral route is an alternative to subcutaneous and sublingual routes, and can also induce long-term remission, a phenomenon known as "oral tolerance." The effectiveness of oral tolerance has been reported in the context of autoimmune diseases, food allergies, asthma, atopic dermatitis, and allergic rhinitis in both human patients and animal models. However, few studies have examined its efficacy in animal models of allergic conjunctivitis. Previously, we showed that ovalbumin feeding suppressed ovalbumin-induced experimental allergic conjunctivitis, indicating the induction of oral tolerance is effective in treating experimental allergic conjunctivitis. In recent years, transgenic rice has been developed that can induce oral tolerance and reduce the severity of anaphylaxis. The major Japanese cedar pollen antigens in transgenic rice, Cryptomeria japonica 1 and C. japonica 2, were deconstructed by molecular shuffling, fragmentation, and changes in the oligomeric structure. Thus, transgenic rice may be an effective treatment for allergic conjunctivitis. PMID:25289722

  6. Graphite oral tattoo: case report.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Renata Mendonça; Gouvêa Lima, Gabriela de Morais; Guilhermino, Marinaldo; Vieira, Mayana Soares; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Anbinder, Ana Lia

    2015-10-01

    Pigmented oral lesions compose a large number of pathological entities, including exogenous pigmentat oral tattoos, such as amalgam and graphite tattoos. We report a rare case of a graphite tattoo on the palate of a 62-year-old patient with a history of pencil injury, compare it with amalgam tattoos, and determine the prevalence of oral tattoos in our Oral Pathology Service. We also compare the clinical and histological findings of grafite and amalgam tattoos. Oral tattoos affect women more frequently in the region of the alveolar ridge. Graphite tattoos occur in younger patients when compared with the amalgam type. Histologically, amalgam lesions represent impregnation of the reticular fibers of vessels and nerves with silver, whereas in cases of graphite tattoos, this impregnation is not observed, but it is common to observe a granulomatous inflammatory response, less evident in cases of amalgam tattoos. Both types of lesions require no treatment, but in some cases a biopsy may be done to rule out melanocytic lesions. PMID:26632800

  7. Oral health and older adults.

    PubMed

    DeBiase, Christina B; Austin, Shari L

    2003-01-01

    The population of individuals aged 65 and older is growing dramatically and is expected to increase 126% by 2011, compared to only a 42% rise in the population of the United States as a whole. The fastest growing segment of the older adult population is persons aged 85 and older (Figure 1). Although many members of this generation lead healthy independent lives, the challenge faced by oral health care professionals is providing care to the chronically ill and/or homebound or institutionalized older adult, particularly the oldest old and those with limited finances. Effective communication skills are essential when dealing with older adults and their families. Collaboration between medical/allied health professionals and oral health care professionals is also critical in order to accurately assess and manage the oral health needs of the aging patient. A preventive approach to oral health with sensitivity to the physical, mental, and social status of the patient is the focus of this course. Marketing strategies to alleviate common barriers to seeking oral health care among this age group are provided. PMID:12861793

  8. Head Start Oral Health Assessment.

    PubMed

    Reed, Rebecca; York, Jill; Dady, Nadege; Chaviano-Moran, Rosa; Jiang, Shuying; Holtzman, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    Purpose A Head Start program located in Paterson, New Jersey considered establishing a school-based dental clinic to address unmet oral health needs such as access to care and the need for restorative treatment. The purpose of this study was to establish the oral health status of Head Start children, their treatment needs, and parents' interest and willingness to utilize a school-based dental clinic. Description School-based dental care has been used to address access to care issues, particularly among children who live in underserved areas. A 21 item survey was used to correlate the results of an oral exam performed on the Head Start children and the parents' preferences, beliefs and access patterns. Fisher's exact test and Chi squared test were used to study the association among variable with significance levels set at 0.05. Assessment The oral exam revealed a high caries rate amongst all of the children. Parental responses indicated strong support for the establishment of a school-based clinic and identified the need for further parental education. Having a regular source of care was found to be unrelated to treatment needs. Conclusion Further education of the parents regarding the child's oral health is critical to the success and viability of this school-based clinic. PMID:27017227

  9. A phase I and pharmacokinetics study of intravenous calcitriol in combination with oral dexamethasone and gefitinib in patients with advanced solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Muindi, Josephia R.; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.; Christy, Renee; Engler, Kristie L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The primary objective of this study was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of intravenously (i.v.) calcitriol administered in combination with a fixed oral dose of dexamethasone and gefitinib in patients with refractory solid tumors. Methods A fixed oral dose of dexamethasone of 4 mg/day was given every 12 h × 3 doses starting 12 h prior to i.v. calcitriol administration. Calcitriol was administered i.v. over 1 h on weeks 1, 3, and weekly thereafter. The starting calcitriol dose level was 57 μg and escalation occurred in cohorts of three patients until the MTD was defined. Gefitinib was given at a fixed oral daily dose of 250 mg starting at week 2 (day 8). Serum calcitriol PK studies were performed on day 1 (calcitriol + dexamethasone) and on day 15 (calcitriol + dexamethasone + gefitinib). Results A total of 20 patients were treated. Dose-limiting hypercalcemia was observed in two out of the four patients receiving 163 mcg/week of calcitriol. Mean (±SE) peak serum calcitriol concentration (Cmax) at the MTD (125 μg/week calcitriol) was 11.17 ± 2.62 ng/ml and the systemic exposure (AUC0–72 h) of 53.30 ± 10.49 ng h/ml. The relationship between calcitriol dose and either Cmax or AUC was linear over the 57–163 μg dose range. Conclusions The addition of a low dose of dexamethasone allowed the safe escalation of calcitriol to the MTD of 125 μg/week. This dose level resulted in serum calcitriol concentrations that are associated with pre-clinical antitumor activity. However, no antitumor activity was noted clinically in patients with solid tumors. PMID:19396601

  10. The oral cavity in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Pittock, S; Drumm, B; Fleming, P; McDermott, M; Imrie, C; Flint, S; Bourke, B

    2001-05-01

    We assessed the utility of expert oral examination as a part of the diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected Crohn's disease. Of 45 patients with newly diagnosed CD, 25 had been examined by a dentist. Twelve (48%) of these had oral CD lesions. Mucosal tags constituted the most frequent form of oral lesion (8/12). Of 8 oral biopsy specimens, 6 (75%) contained non-caseating granulomas. Patients with oral CD had more oral symptoms, presented for diagnosis sooner, and were more likely to have other upper gastrointestinal inflammation than those without oral lesions. Oral manifestations of CD are common in children; therefore, expert oral examination may be useful during diagnostic evaluation of children with suspected inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:11343060

  11. [Oral candidiasis: clinical features and control].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2010-10-01

    Candidiasis is the most commonly encountered fungal infection, and oral candidiasis is often observed as a local opportunistic infection. Oral candidiasis is clinically divided into three types: acute forms, chronic forms, and Candida-associated lesions. Candida adhesion and multiplication are largely regulated by the local and systemic factors of the host. The local factors include impairment of the oral mucosal integrity, which is usually impaired by hyposalivation, anticancer drugs/radiation for head and neck cancers, denture wearing, a decrease in the oral bacterial population, and poor oral hygiene. Among Candida species, oral candidiasis is mostly caused by Candida albicans (C. albicans), C. glabrata, or C. tropicalis. Oral Candida induces a variety of symptoms, such as oral mucosal inflammation manifesting as an uncomfortable feeling, pain, erythema, erosion, taste abnormalities, and hyperplasia of the oral mucosa. Candida overgrowth in the oral cavity may disseminate to distant organs. Therefore, in order to avoid the sequelae of systemic candidiasis, oral candidiasis should be rapidly controlled. Oral candidiasis is usually treated by the local application of antifungal drugs. However, oral candidiasis occasionally escapes the control of such local treatment due to the development of multi-drug resistant Candida strains and species or due to the suppression of salivation or cellular immune activity. When drug-resistant strains are suspected as the pathogens and when the host is generally compromised, the oral administration of combinations of antifungal drugs, enhancement of cellular immune activity, and improvement of the nutritional condition are recommended. PMID:21077293

  12. [Oral manifestations of HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Bascones, Antonio; Serrano, Carlos; Campo, Julián

    2003-03-29

    Oral manifestations of HIV infection are sometimes the first sign of the disease and often indicate its progression to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), thus it is important for health professionals (physicians and dentist) to possess adequate knowledge of these lesions. Improvements in antiretroviral treatments, especially with the incorporation of HAART therapy, have produced a gradual reduction in the prevalence of HIV-associated oral lesions. On the other hand, the increased life expectancy of HIV-positive patients has led to their greater presence at our clinics, implying the need for continuous updating in the diagnosis and treatment of these processes. Using the consensus classification (EEC-Clearinghouse, 1993) we reviewed the diagnostic criteria and current treatment protocols for the different HIV infection related oral lesions in both adults and children. PMID:12681223

  13. Oral Leukoplakia – an Update

    PubMed Central

    PARLATESCU, Ioanina; GHEORGHE, Carmen; COCULESCU, Elena; TOVARU, Serban

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper was to assess the current state of science on oral leukoplakia. Although it is considered a potentially malignant disorder the overall malignant progression of oral leukoplakia is of the order of 5% and even more. Nowadays there are no currently accepted markers to distinguish those that may progress to cancer from those that may not. The current golden standard is considered the presence of epithelial dysplasia on the tissue biopsy of the lesion. Proliferative verrucous leukoplakia is a rare form of OL which has multiple recurrences, is refractory to treatment and has malignant transformation in a short period. It is considered a true premalignant lesion. The management of oral leukoplakia varies from a "wait and see" attitude and topical chemopreventive agents to complete surgical removal. PMID:25553134

  14. Child, neglect and oral health

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite advancements in oral health policies, dental caries still a problem. The lack of parents/caregiver’s care regarding child’s oral health, which characterizes neglect, may lead to a high prevalence of caries. Therefore, the objective of this study was to analyze the relation between dental caries and neglect in five year-old children. Methods Quantitative study performed in two different moments. First, the children underwent oral examinations and physical inspection. Then, a semi-structured interview was performed with parents of children with high and low caries rate. Results In all, 149 physical inspections and oral exams were performed. The number of decayed, missing and filled teeth – dmf-t was 2.75 (SD 2.83); 16 children had extremely high values (dmf-t ≥7), 85 intermediate values (1 ≤ dmf-t ≥ 6) and 48 extremely low (dmf-t = 0). Nearly all caregivers were female (96.7%; n = 29), mostly mothers (93.3%; n = 28). Associations were found between caries experience and reason of the last consultation (p = 0.011), decayed teeth and child’s oral health perception (p = 0.001). There was a trend towards a significant association between general health and decayed teeth (p = 0.079), general hygiene and caries experience (p = 0.083), and caries experience and number of times the child brushes the teeth (p = 0.086). Conclusion There’s a relation between caries experience and children’s oral health perception by caregivers, as well as between caries experience and children’s access to dental care. There is a trend towards association between caries experience and risk factors suggestive of neglect. PMID:24238222

  15. Modified oral metronidazole desensitization protocol

    PubMed Central

    Pien, Lily C.; Gutta, Ravi C.; Abouhassan, Susan R.

    2014-01-01

    The Center for Disease Control guidelines recommend desensitization to metronidazole in patients with trichomoniasis and hypersensitivity to metronidazole. There is only one published oral metronidazole desensitization protocol. The purpose of this study was to design a new, more gradual oral desensitization protocol to decrease systemic reactions that may occur when using the previously published protocol. We present two patients with presumed IgE-mediated allergy to metronidazole who underwent oral desensitization using our modified protocol. Case 1 was a 65-year-old woman with trichomoniasis who presented for metronidazole desensitization with a history of intraoperative anaphylaxis and positive skin tests to metronidazole. The patient tolerated six doses of the modified desensitization but developed systemic symptoms of nasal congestion and diffuse pruritus after the 25- and 100-mg doses. Both reactions were treated with intravenous (i.v.) antihistamines. Because of gastrointestinal irritation, the desensitization was completed at a dose of 250 mg orally every 6 hours. Case 2 was a 42-year-old woman with trichomoniasis and a history of hives immediately after administration of i.v. metronidazole who presented for desensitization. The patient had negative skin-prick and intradermal testing to metronidazole. She developed lip tingling and pruritus on her arms 15 minutes after the 10-mg dose. Fexofenadine at 180 mg was given orally and symptoms resolved. She tolerated the rest of the protocol without reaction and received a total dose of 2 g of metronidazole. Our oral metronidazole desensitization for presumed IgE-mediated reactions offers a second option for physicians wishing to use a more gradual escalation in dose. PMID:24612959

  16. Oral Cysticercosis- A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Palakurthy, Pavan; Muddana, Keerthi; Nandan, Rateesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Cysticercosis, a helminthic disease commonly seen in India, Latin America, Eastern Europe and Southern Africa, results from extraintestinal encystation of the larval form of Taenia solium. It is a condition in which man acts as intermediate host instead of definitive host. The most frequent sites of cysticercosis are subcutaneous layers, brain, muscles, heart, liver, lungs, and peritoneum. Oral cysticercosis is considered rare and cause cystic swellings or nodules in the mouth and a precise clinical diagnosis is not usually established. Here, we report a case of oral cysticercosis in a 32-year-old female occurring in the mentalis muscle presenting as asymptomatic nodule. PMID:26266222

  17. Oral Complications of HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leao, Jair C.; Ribeiro, Camila M. B.; Carvalho, Alessandra A. T.; Frezzini, Cristina; Porter, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Oral lesions are among the early signs of HIV infection and can predict its progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A better understanding of the oral manifestations of AIDS in both adults and children has implications for all health care professionals. The knowledge of such alterations would allow for early recognition of HIV-infected patients. The present paper reviews epidemiology, relevant aspects of HIV infection related to the mouth in both adults and children, as well as current trends in antiretroviral therapy and its connection with orofacial manifestations related to AIDS. PMID:19488613

  18. Oral complications of HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Leao, Jair C; Ribeiro, Camila M B; Carvalho, Alessandra A T; Frezzini, Cristina; Porter, Stephen

    2009-05-01

    Oral lesions are among the early signs of HIV infection and can predict its progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A better understanding of the oral manifestations of AIDS in both adults and children has implications for all health care professionals. The knowledge of such alterations would allow for early recognition of HIV-infected patients. The present paper reviews epidemiology, relevant aspects of HIV infection related to the mouth in both adults and children, as well as current trends in antiretroviral therapy and its connection with orofacial manifestations related to AIDS. PMID:19488613

  19. Authentic Progress Assessment of Oral Language: Oral Portfolios.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshida, Yuichi

    Student testing in Japan is not effectively used. In many cases test results are used only for ranking and sorting students into whatever the designated purposes of the tests are. They are not focused on monitoring individual student progress. This is an especially inadequate approach for teaching oral communications courses. This paper proposes a…

  20. Oral Motor Intervention Improved the Oral Feeding in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xu; Yi, Li-Juan; Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Jian-Guo; Ma, Li; Ou, Yang-Xiang; Shuai, Ting; Zeng, Zi; Song, Guo-Min

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Oral feeding for preterm infants has been a thorny problem worldwide. To improve the efficacy of oral feeding in preterm infants, oral motor intervention (OMI), which consists of nonnutritive sucking, oral stimulation, and oral support, was developed. Published studies demonstrated that OMI may be as an alternative treatment to solve this problem; however, these results remain controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis (TSA) to objectively evaluate the potential of OMI for improving the current status of oral feeding in preterm infants. A search of PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure was performed to capture relevant citations until at the end of October, 2014. Lists of references of eligible studies and reviews were also hand-checked to include any latent studies. Two independent investigators screened literature, extracted data, and assessed the methodology, and then a meta-analysis and TSA was performed by using Reviewer Manager (RevMan) 5.3 and TSA 0.9 beta, respectively. A total of 11 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), which included 855 participants, were incorporated into our meta-analysis. The meta-analyses suggested that OMI is associated with the reduced transition time (ie, the time needed from tube feeding to totally oral feeding) (mean difference [MD], −4.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], −5.22 to −2.84), shorten hospital stays (MD, −3.64; 95% CI, −5.57 to −1.71), increased feeding efficiency (MD, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.36–1.27), and intake of milk (MD, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.06–0.21) rather than weight gain. Results of TSA for each outcomes of interest confirmed these pooled results. With present evidences, OMI can be as an alternative to improve the condition of transition time, length of hospital stays, feeding efficiency, and intake of milk in preterm infants. However, the pooled results may be impaired due to low quality included, and thus, well-designed and large RCTs were needed to further established effects. PMID:26252313

  1. Oral health information systems--towards measuring progress in oral health promotion and disease prevention.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Bratthall, Douglas; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the essential components of oral health information systems for the analysis of trends in oral disease and the evaluation of oral health programmes at the country, regional and global levels. Standard methodology for the collection of epidemiological data on oral health has been designed by WHO and used by countries worldwide for the surveillance of oral disease and health. Global, regional and national oral health databanks have highlighted the changing patterns of oral disease which primarily reflect changing risk profiles and the implementation of oral health programmes oriented towards disease prevention and health promotion. The WHO Oral Health Country/Area Profile Programme (CAPP) provides data on oral health from countries, as well as programme experiences and ideas targeted to oral health professionals, policy-makers, health planners, researchers and the general public. WHO has developed global and regional oral health databanks for surveillance, and international projects have designed oral health indicators for use in oral health information systems for assessing the quality of oral health care and surveillance systems. Modern oral health information systems are being developed within the framework of the WHO STEPwise approach to surveillance of noncommunicable, chronic disease, and data stored in the WHO Global InfoBase may allow advanced health systems research. Sound knowledge about progress made in prevention of oral and chronic disease and in health promotion may assist countries to implement effective public health programmes to the benefit of the poor and disadvantaged population groups worldwide. PMID:16211160

  2. Correlations between Perceived Oral Malodor Levels and Self-Reported Oral Complaints

    PubMed Central

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Ishii, Kurumi; Tomita, Sachiyo; Tatsuta, Chihiro; Sugiyama, Toshiko; Ishizuka, Yoichi; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Tsunoda, Masatake

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Even though objective data indicating the absence of oral malodor are presented to patients, they may be skeptical about the results, possibly due to the presence of some discomfort in the oral cavity. The objective of this study was to investigate whether there is an association among self-perceptions of oral malodor, oral complaints, and the actual oral malodor test result. Materials and Methods. Questions concerning self-perceptions of oral malodor and subjective intraoral symptoms were extracted from a questionnaire on oral malodor completed by 363 subjects who visited the clinic for oral malodor of Tokyo Dental College Chiba Hospital and gave consent to this study. In addition, the association of self-perception of oral malodor with values obtained after organoleptic and OralChroma measurement was analyzed. Results. No correlation between 195 subjects (54%) who were judged “with oral malodor” (organoleptic score of ≥1) and 294 subjects (81.6%) who had a self-perceptions of oral malodor was observed. Self-perception of oral malodor was significantly correlated with tongue coating (p = 0.002) and a strange intraoral taste (p = 0.016). Conclusions. Subjects with a self-perception of oral malodor were not necessarily consistent with those actually having an oral malodor. In addition, it was suggested that patients became aware of oral malodor when they felt oral complaints. PMID:26273303

  3. [Effect of a combined oral contraceptive on lactation and growth of the infant].

    PubMed

    Peralta, O; Díaz, S; Juez, G; Herreros, C; Casado, M E; Salvatierra, A M; Miranda, P; Croxatto, H

    1983-01-01

    This work describes a study conducted in a University of Chile hospital to determine the influence of a combined oral contraceptive (OC) containing 30 mcg of ethinyl estradiol and 150 mcg of norgestrel on lactation and infant growth. 103 women exclusively breastfeeding began using the OC on day 30-35 postpartum, 59 women exclusively breastfeeding whose infants gained at least 20 gm daily during the 3rd month of life began using the OC on day 90 postpartum, and 109 women exclusively breastfeeding received an injectable placebo on day 30 postpartum and an IUD or spermicides on day 90 if desired. A subgroup of 82 women from the 30-day control group who continued breastfeeding exclusively at day 90 postpartum and whose infants gained at least 20 gm daily during the 3rd month were a control group for the women beginning OCs on day 90. Follow-up visits were arranged every 10 days through the 3rd month and every 30 days subsequently through 1 year. At the beginning of the study, treatment and control groups were similar in age, parity, weight, maternal hemoglobin, and sex and weight of infants. 63 women were excluded from the study while still breastfeeding for a variety of reasons including loss to follow-up. The main reason for exclusion of OC users was termination of OC use or change of method. 11 pregnancies occurred in controls using spermicides or no contraception. Among women using OCs starting at day 30 postpartum, the percentage exclusively breastfeeding was significantly lower than among controls beginning in the 4th month, and a higher percentage of cases gave supplementary feedings on the advice of their physicians or their own decision. At 6 months, 61% of controls and 40% beginning OC use at 30 days were still breastfeeding exclusively. Fewer women beginning OC use at 90 days than controls were exclusively breastfeeding at 6 months, and a higher proportion were giving supplementary feedings on medical advice. The 2 treatment groups had smaller weight gains than their control groups in the 1st month of treatment. Total weight gain to the 6th month was significantly different for babies whose mothers began OC use at 30 days but not for those beginning use at 90 days. The average absolute weight of infants in the groups beginning treatment at 30 days was significantly lower at several ages but the differences were small. Growth of infants was good in most cases. Only 6 presented significant intercurrent illnesses. There were no deaths. No pregnancies occurred in women using OCs and tolerance was good. 1 woman discontinued use for metrorrhagia. It was concluded that the OC tested moderately inhibits lactation, especially when use is begun at the beginning of the 2nd postpartum month. PMID:6681210

  4. 75 FR 62591 - Oral Argument

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... invited amicus curiae to submit briefs in these matters, see 75 FR 20007, Apr. 16, 2010; 75 FR 29366, May... given of the scheduling of oral argument in the matters of: Hyginus U. Aguzie v. Office of Personnel Management, MSPB Docket Number DC-0731-09-0261-R-1; Jenee Ella Hunt-O'Neal v. Office of Personnel...

  5. 75 FR 56146 - Oral Argument

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... amicus curiae to submit briefs. See 75 FR 6728, Feb. 10, 2010. The parties, OPM, and the amici curiae... given of the scheduling of oral argument in the matters of Rhonda K. Conyers v. Department of Defense, MSPB Docket No. CH-0752-09-0925-I-1, and Devon H. Northover v. Department of Defense, MSPB Docket...

  6. War, Journalism, and Oral History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Gary

    2000-01-01

    Describes a project where students conducted oral history with either a war correspondent or a U.S. combat veteran for the course "War and the News Media: From Vietnam through Desert Storm and Beyond." Discusses how the students prepared for the interviews and the evaluation of their projects. (CMK)

  7. Oral Communication across the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    2011-01-01

    Proficiency in oral communication is necessary in school and in society. To do well in the different curriculum areas, pupils must speak with clarity and understanding. For example, in a discussion group in the social studies involving the topic "the pros and cons of raising taxes," pupils need to express knowledgeable ideas with appropriate voice…

  8. The Oral Accentuation of Greek.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, W. Sidney

    1967-01-01

    A brief review of theory and traditional approaches to the problem of oral reading of Greek dating from the fall of Constantinople (1453) focuses on the importance of two major linguistic features of Byzantine pronunciation. The first examines the nature of the dynamic (stress) accent and the second is concerned with differences in vowel lengths…

  9. Orality, Literacy, and Star Wars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havelock, Eric A.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that the educational system should encourage "down to earth" language by including oral recitation in the curricula, particularly recitation of popular poetry with accompaniment. Using the shuttle disaster as a striking example, claims that the modern media overuses conceptual language to disguise the hard meaning of what is being…

  10. Oral Hygiene. Learning Activity Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hime, Kirsten

    This learning activity package on oral hygiene is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, a list of definitions, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics…

  11. ORAL NEMATODE INFECTION OF TARANTULAS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oral nematode infection of Theraphosidae spiders, known as tarantulas, has been recently identified from several collections in the UK and mainland Europe. The disease has also been seen in captive and wild spiders from the Americas, Asia and Africa. Spider symptoms are described from anorexia until...

  12. Oral Examinations. Pamphlet No. 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodson, C. J.

    This pamphlet reports on an investigation into the problem of standardizing the marking of oral examinations at the Ordinary Level of the General Certificate of Education. Investigations were made into two languages - German and Welsh. Language teachers received a list of 63 questions, of which 20 were to be presented to the examination candidate,…

  13. Gaelic Singing and Oral Tradition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, Mark; MacDonald, Iona; Byrne, Charles G.

    2011-01-01

    A recent report by UNESCO placed Scots Gaelic on a list of 2500 endangered languages highlighting the perilous state of a key cornerstone of Scottish culture. Scottish Gaelic song, poems and stories have been carried through oral transmission for many centuries reflecting the power of indigenous peoples to preserve cultural heritage from…

  14. Raman spectroscopy of oral bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Andrew J.; Zhu, Qingyuan; Quivey, Robert G.

    2003-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been employed to measure the varying concentrations of two oral bacteria in simple mixtures. Evaporated droplets of centrifuged mixtures of Streptococcus sanguis and Streptococcus mutans were analyzed via Raman microspectroscopy. The concentration of s. sanguis was determined based upon the measured Raman spectrum, using partial least squares cross-validation, with an r2 value of 0.98.

  15. Pollen grains for oral vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Atwe, Shashwati U.; Ma, Yunzhe; Gill, Harvinder Singh

    2015-01-01

    Oral vaccination can offer a painless and convenient method of vaccination. Furthermore, in addition to systemic immunity it has potential to stimulate mucosal immunity through antigen-processing by the gut-associated lymphoid tissues. In this study we propose the concept that pollen grains can be engineered for use as a simple modular system for oral vaccination. We demonstrate feasibility of this concept by using spores of Lycopodium clavatum (clubmoss) (LSs). We show that LSs can be chemically cleaned to remove native proteins to create intact clean hollow LS shells. Empty pollen shells were successfully filled with molecules of different sizes demonstrating their potential to be broadly applicable as a vaccination system. Using ovalbumin (OVA) as a model antigen, LSs formulated with OVA were orally fed to mice. LSs stimulated significantly higher anti-OVA serum IgG and fecal IgA antibodies compared to those induced by use of cholera toxin as a positive-control adjuvant. The antibody response was not affected by pre-neutralization of the stomach acid, and persisted for up to seven months. Confocal microscopy revealed that LSs can translocate in to mouse intestinal wall. Overall, this study lays the foundation of using LSs as a novel approach for oral vaccination. PMID:25151980

  16. Oral sensory changes in aging.

    PubMed

    Weiffenbach, J M; Tylenda, C A; Baum, B J

    1990-07-01

    Perception of oral sensory intensity was assessed in healthy, community-dwelling men (n = 46) and women (n = 41) between 25 and 93 years of age. Cross-modal matches of distance to perceived intensity were obtained for five types of oral stimuli (sugar water, salt water, heated or chilled water, water thickened with methylcellulose, and local pressure on the dorsal tongue). Differences among stimulus types were observed for measures of response size (mean, median, maximum, and range of response distance and rate of increase with stimulus strength), but not measures of judgment quality, repeatability (ICC), and conformity to a linear rise with stimulus strength (r2). Age had no significant effect on any of the response measures for any stimulus type except pressure. All measures of response to lingual pressure except median size declined significantly with age. We conclude that (a) the various oral stimulus types elicit perceptions that differ in intensity but were judged with similar accuracy, and that (b) aging brings a specific decline in the perception of localized lingual pressure while both size and accuracy of intensity judgments are maintained for the other oral sensitivities tested. PMID:2365963

  17. New issues in oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Francis, Charles W

    2008-01-01

    Polymorphisms in CYP2C9, a critical cytochrome P-450 enzyme in the metabolism of warfarin, alters its clearance and affects dosing. CYP*1 has higher activity than either the *2 or *3 variants, and patients with the *2 or *3 variants require a lower dose. VKORC1 is the enzyme inhibited by warfarin, and its levels are affected by several polymorphisms that can be divided into high or low level haplotypes, and patients with high level haplotypes require higher warfarin doses. The use of algorithms for dosing that incorporate pharmacogenomic information perform better than those using clinical data alone. Considerable effort is ongoing to develop new oral anticoagulants as alternatives to warfarin, and three agents are in advanced development. Dabigatran is an oral direct thrombin inhibitor that has been compared with enoxaparin for prevention of VTE following hip or knee replacement. Based on non-inferiority results in European trials, it has now been approved for marketing in Europe. Phase III trials with a new oral Xa inhibitor, rivaroxaban, have been completed in hip or knee replacement, and rivaroxaban was superior to enoxaparin in prevention of VTE with no increase in bleeding complications. Phase III studies with apixaban, another oral Xa inhibitor, are in progress. These agents are also being evaluated in large studies for prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation and for VTE treatment. PMID:19074093

  18. Why Is Oral Health Important for Women?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Overal Health Oral Warning Signs Can Indicate Serious Medical Conditions Serious diseases, including diabetes, cancer, and ... Test May Help Dentists Check for Breast Cancer games Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral ...

  19. Why Is Oral Health Important for Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Overal Health Oral Warning Signs Can Indicate Serious Medical Conditions Serious diseases, including diabetes, cancer, and ... Energy Drinks Responsible for Irreversible Damage to Teeth games Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral ...

  20. ABCs of Oral Health: Nutrition - Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oral Warning Signs Can Indicate Serious Medical Conditions Serious diseases, including diabetes, cancer, and eating disorders, can manifest as signs and symptoms inside of the ... Nutrition - Adults Nutrition - Children games Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral ...

  1. Oral Steroids (Steroid Pills and Syrups)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Medications > Quick-Relief Medications > Oral Steroids Oral Steroids (Steroid Pills and Syrups) How are steroid pills and ... Want to learn more about steroids? How are steroid pills and syrups used? Steroid pills and syrups ...

  2. What Are Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat. The oral cavity (mouth) and oropharynx (throat) The oral cavity includes the lips, the inside ... oropharynx. The oropharynx is the part of the throat just behind the mouth. It begins where the ...

  3. National Oral Health Surveillance System (NOHSS)

    MedlinePlus

     National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Oral Health Resources Oral Health Home | Contact Us ... Health , National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Privacy Policy | Accessibility Home | Glossary | Related Links | Contact ...

  4. Grape products and oral health.

    PubMed

    Wu, Christine D

    2009-09-01

    Oral diseases, including dental caries, periodontal disease, and tooth loss, affect the majority of the population and can affect a person's overall health. Raisins contain polyphenols, flavonoids, and high levels of iron that may benefit human health. However, their oral health benefits are less well understood. We hypothesized that raisins contain antimicrobial phytochemicals capable of suppressing oral pathogens associated with caries or periodontal diseases and thus benefit oral health. Through antimicrobial assay-guided fractionation and purification, compounds identified with growth inhibition against oral pathogens were oleanolic acid, oleanolic aldehyde, linoleic acid, linolenic acid, betulin, betulinic acid, 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furfural, rutin, beta-sitosterol, and beta-sitosterol glucoside. Oleanolic acid suppressed in vitro adherence of cariogenic Streptococcus mutans biofilm. When the effect of raisins and raisin-containing bran cereal on in vivo plaque acidogenicity was examined in 7- to 11-y-old children, it was found that raisins did not reduce the plaque pH decline below pH 6 over the 30-min test period. Compared with commercial bran flakes or raisin bran cereal, a lower plaque pH drop was noted in children who consumed a raisin and bran flake mixture when no sugar was added (P < 0.05). Grape seed extract, high in proanthocyanidins, positively affected the in vitro demineralization and/or remineralization processes of artificial root caries lesions, suggesting its potential as a promising natural agent for noninvasive root caries therapy. Raisins represent a healthy alternative to the commonly consumed sugary snack foods. PMID:19640974

  5. Disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis diagnosis based on oral lesions

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Liana Preto; Martins, Manoela Domingues; de Oliveira, Márcia Gaiger; Munhoz, Etiene Andrade; Carrard, Vinicius Coelho

    2014-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a deep mycosis with primary lung manifestations that may present cutaneous and oral lesions. Oral lesions mimic other infectious diseases or even squamous cell carcinoma, clinically and microscopically. Sometimes, the dentist is the first to detect the disease, because lung lesions are asymptomatic, or even misdiagnosed. An unusual case of PCM with 5 months of evolution presenting pulmonary, oral, and cutaneous lesions that was diagnosed by the dentist based on oral lesions is presented and discussed. PMID:24963249

  6. NATIONAL ORAL HEALTH SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM (NOHSS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    National Oral Health Surveillance System (NOHSS) is a collaborative effort between CDC's Division of Oral Health and The Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors (ASTDD). NOHSS is designed to help public health programs monitor the burden of oral disease, use of the ...

  7. Healthy People 2010: Oral Health Toolkit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isman, Beverly

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this Toolkit is to provide guidance, technical tools, and resources to help states, territories, tribes and communities develop and implement successful oral health components of Healthy People 2010 plans as well as other oral health plans. These plans are useful for: (1) promoting, implementing and tracking oral health objectives;…

  8. 14 CFR 211.16 - Oral hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oral hearing. 211.16 Section 211.16 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS APPLICATIONS FOR PERMITS TO FOREIGN AIR CARRIERS General Requirements § 211.16 Oral hearing. If an oral evidentiary hearing is...

  9. Developing Oral Language in Primary Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkland, Lynn D.; Patterson, Janice

    2005-01-01

    The development of oral language in classrooms has been an incidental occurrence historically. The amount of oral language that children have is an indicator of their success or struggle in school. To meet the needs of these children, teachers can make oral language development a primary focus for instruction. This article examines ways that…

  10. 20 CFR 501.5 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... filing of an appeal. Any appeal in which a request for oral argument is not granted by the Board will..., extend the time allowed. (e) Appearances. An Appellant may appear at oral argument before the Board or... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oral argument. 501.5 Section 501.5...

  11. 29 CFR 2700.77 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oral argument. 2700.77 Section 2700.77 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION PROCEDURAL RULES Review by the Commission § 2700.77 Oral argument. Oral argument may be ordered by the Commission on its...

  12. 29 CFR 2700.77 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oral argument. 2700.77 Section 2700.77 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION PROCEDURAL RULES Review by the Commission § 2700.77 Oral argument. Oral argument may be ordered by the Commission on its...

  13. 29 CFR 2700.77 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Oral argument. 2700.77 Section 2700.77 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION PROCEDURAL RULES Review by the Commission § 2700.77 Oral argument. Oral argument may be ordered by the Commission on its...

  14. Spoken Oral Language and Adult Struggling Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiari, Dariush; Greenberg, Daphne; Patton-Terry, Nicole; Nightingale, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Oral language is a critical component to the development of reading acquisition. Much of the research concerning the relationship between oral language and reading ability is focused on children, while there is a paucity of research focusing on this relationship for adults who struggle with their reading. Oral language as defined in this paper…

  15. Librarianship and Oral Tradition in Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwuji, H. O. M.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the oral tradition of Africa as history, as literature, and as an ongoing characteristic of African culture. It is argued that libraries should accommodate this tradition by actively gathering oral history and by providing community services based on oral, rather than written, materials. (Nine references) (CLB)

  16. Implementing Oral Communication Across the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin, Michael W.; Grice, George L.

    The Oral Communication Across the Curriculum (OCXC) program is a university-wide program using oral communication activities to enhance learning of course content and to improve oral communication skills of participating students. Implementing OCXC programs in postsecondary institutions involves planning, publicizing, gearing up, conducting,…

  17. Current Aspects on Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Markopoulos, Anastasios K

    2012-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common malignant epithelial neoplasm affecting the oral cavity. This article overviews the essential points of oral squamous cell carcinoma, highlighting its risk and genomic factors, the potential malignant disorders and the therapeutic approaches. It also emphasizes the importance of the early diagnosis. PMID:22930665

  18. 43 CFR 4.1608 - Oral presentations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oral presentations. 4.1608 Section 4.1608... presentations. (a) Upon request of the appellant, an opportunity for an oral presentation to the appeals official shall be granted. The purpose of an oral presentation shall be to permit the appellant to...

  19. 48 CFR 15.102 - Oral presentations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oral presentations. 15.102... presentations. (a) Oral presentations by offerors as requested by the Government may substitute for, or augment, written information. Use of oral presentations as a substitute for portions of a proposal can be...

  20. 48 CFR 570.107 - Oral presentations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oral presentations. 570... CONTRACTING PROGRAMS ACQUIRING LEASEHOLD INTERESTS IN REAL PROPERTY General 570.107 Oral presentations. You may use oral presentations for acquisitions of leasehold interests in real property. Follow...

  1. 36 CFR 251.97 - Oral presentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oral presentation. 251.97... presentation. (a) Purpose. An oral presentation provides an additional opportunity for an appellant, and other..., emphasize, and/or clarify information related to an appeal. Oral presentations are to be conducted in...

  2. [Efficacy determination of Splat Oral Care Foam 2 in 1].

    PubMed

    Makeeva, I M; Turkina, A Iu; Akimova, M Iu; Agaptsova, M A

    2010-01-01

    The new oral hygienic foam Splat Oral Care Foam 2 in 1 was clinically tested. Oral hygiene improvement by regular using of oral foam was defined. Saliva pH normalization by using of oral foam after meal was detected. Oral Care Foam 2 in 1 improves efficiency of gingivitis treatment and reduces terms of adaptation to fixed and removable dentures. PMID:21191332

  3. Manifestation of psoriasis in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Despite the common prevalence of cutaneous psoriasis, the existence of manifestations in the oral cavity is subject to controversy. In this article, dermatologic psoriasis is reviewed, and a patient with generalized, symptomatic oral mucosal erythema resembling atrophic candidiasis synchronous with flare of chronic skin psoriasis is described. Diagnostic work up and therapeutic response supported that these mucosal findings were the oral counterpart of cutaneous disease. Dental providers should be familiar with the signs and symptoms of oral psoriasis, institute appropriate preventive measures, and provide palliation directed at symptomatic oral changes of psoriasis. PMID:26665263

  4. Shortening the induction delivery interval with prostaglandins: a randomized controlled trial of solo or in combination

    PubMed Central

    Mahendru, Rajiv; Yadav, Shweta

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of misoprostol alone with dinoprostone followed by misoprostol, all inserted intravaginally in induction of labor at term and the obstetrical outcome. Material and Methods A pilot study comprising 111 primigravidae, >37 gestational weeks with singleton pregnancy in cephalic presentation having an unfavorable Bishop score admitted for labor induction, were considered and randomly allocated into two groups. In group I (n=55) with intravaginal 25mcg misoprostol 4 hourly (six doses at the most) and and group II (n=56), with dinoprostone 0.5mg followed eight hours later by 25mcg misoprostol induction to vaginal delivery time was found to be significantly different, being 14.8 h in group-I and shorter in group-II with a mean of 11.6 h. Vaginal delivery rates within 12 h (groups-I and −II: 47.2%, as compared to 60.7%, respectively) were found to be higher with dinoprostone-misoprostol induction, as well as vaginal delivery rates in 24 h, 80.0% and 91.1%. The need for oxytocin augmentation was more frequent in the misoprostol than in the dinoprostone-misoprostol group, (61.8%, and 39.3%), and all these observations were statistically significant. Abnormal foetal heart rate pattern occurred more frequently (18.2%) in group-I in contrast to 5.3% in group-II, as was the incidence rate of (18.2%) who had passage of meconium in group-I, this rate being significantly different from group-II having meconium passage in 3 cases, a rate of 5.3%. Conclusion Using dinoprostone followed by vaginal misoprostol is safe and effective for induction of labor with less need for oxytocin augmentation and shorter induction delivery interval. PMID:24591967

  5. Recent trends in prevention of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mangalath, Ummar; Aslam, Sachin Aslam; Abdul Khadar, Abdul Hafiz Kooliyat; Francis, Pulikkan George; Mikacha, Muhamed Shaloob Karimbil; Kalathingal, Jubin Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancers often occurs out of long standing potentially malignant lesions and conditions so called premalignant lesions and conditions. Oral precancer is a intermediate state with increased cancer rate which can be recognized and treated obviously with much better prognosis than a full blown malignancy. Oral cancer risk can be lowered or even prevented by simply understanding basic oral hygiene, different bacteria found in the mouth, and how diet influences oral cancers. Currently, research is being done on the relationship between diet and oral cancer. Oral cancer is a very serious disease that can be prevented. Practicing good oral hygiene is key to help keep the oral cavity clean. Limiting the use of tobacco and alcohol products is also important because these are the causes of most oral cancers. Lastly, eating a well balanced diet that has protective affects can reduce the risk of oral cancer. This includes a diet high in fruits, vegetables, and fish and low in high fat and cholesterol meats, rice, and refined grains. PMID:25625069

  6. Oral hobnail hemangioma: case report.

    PubMed

    Vieira Cury, S E; Chain Hartung Habibe, R; Siroteau Corrêa Pontes, F; Rebelo Pontes, H A; Santos De Freitas Silva, B; Dos Santos Pinto, Jr D

    2009-01-01

    Hobnail hemangioma (HH) is a rare benign vascular neoplasm reported as a distinctive small benign, solitary vascular neoplasm of the superficial and mid-dermis occurring on the face, trunk, or extremities of young or middle-aged adults. The oral manifestations are quite uncommon, with only three cases reported in the English language literature. The following case refers to a 38-year-old woman with a small nodule on the hard palatal mucosa. Histological findings showed a biphasic growth pattern of irregularly dilated vascular structures in the superficial mucosa, lined by epithelioid endothelial cells with a hobnail appearance, with neoplastic vessels observed in deeper parts of the lesion. In the oral cavity, the differential diagnosis includes hemangioma, melanoma, and Kaposi's sarcoma, whose clinical and histological features may be confused with those of HH. PMID:20027132

  7. Epithelial Dysplasia in Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Samaneh; Kargahi, Neda; Razavi, Sayed Mohammad; Homayoni, Solmaz

    2014-01-01

    Among oral lesions, we encounter a series of malignant epithelial lesions that go through clinical and histopathologic processes in order to be diagnosed. Identifying these processes along with the etiology knowledge of these lesions is very important in prevention and early treatments. Dysplasia is the step preceding the formation of squamous cell carcinoma in lesions which have the potential to undergo dysplasia. Identification of etiological factors, clinical and histopathologic methods has been the topic of many articles. This article, reviews various articles presenting oral cavity dysplasia, new clinical methods of identifying lesions, and the immunohistochemical research which proposes various markers for providing more precise identification of such lesions. This article also briefly analyzes new treatment methods such as tissue engineering. PMID:25242838

  8. Oral galvanism and mandibular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Haraldson, T

    1985-01-01

    Sixty-two patients were referred to the university dental clinics in Göteborg for examination and treatment of presumed oral galvanism. Thirty of the patients, with an average age of 47 years, were found to suffer from various degrees of mandibular dysfunction. In these 30 patients the most commonly reported symptom was headache, which was present in 67 per cent of the individuals, while mandibular dysfunction was the most common diagnosis. Nineteen patients improved or recovered completely after counselling and/or treatment. Occlusal splints, alone or in combination with other therapeutic methods, were given to 80 per cent of the patients. It is emphasised that patients with putative oral galvanism must be given proper care, including examination of the masticatory system and treatment of diagnosed functional disturbances. PMID:3860994

  9. Reversal of novel oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Abo-Salem, Elsayed; Becker, Richard C

    2016-04-01

    The development of a new generation of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants represents a potential breakthrough in the management of patients with thrombotic diseases, disorders and conditions. While a large and growing body of evidence from large-scale clinical trials and registries supports a favorable safety profile, having a means to rapidly reverse their anticoagulant effects represents an unmet need among practicing clinicians. Several targeted reversal agents are currently in development and the early results are promising. Idarucizumab is a monoclonal antibody that can immediately and specifically reverse dabigatran. Andexanet alfa is a recombinant modified factor Xa that can bind and reverse oral and parenteral factor Xa inhibitors, including rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban, and low molecular weight heparin. Aripazine is a small molecule that can reverse the action of factor Xa inhibitors and possibly dabigatran as well through non-covalent binding and charge-charge interactions. PMID:26939028

  10. Chemoprevention of oral cancer: Green tea experience

    PubMed Central

    Ramshankar, Vijayalakshmi; Krishnamurthy, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancer has a well characterized progression from premalignant oral epithelial changes to invasive cancer, making oral squamous cell carcinoma an optimal disease for chemoprevention interventions prior to malignant transformation. The primary goal of chemoprevention here is to reverse, suppress, or inhibit the progression of premalignant lesions to cancer. Due to the extended duration of oral pathogenesis, its chemoprevention using natural products has been found promising due to their decreased dose and limited toxicity profiles. This review discusses with an emphasis on the clinical trials using green tea extract (GTE) in chemoprevention of oral premalignant lesions along with use of GTE as a chemopreventive agent in various other cancers as well. It is worthwhile to include green tea extract in an oral screening program for evaluating the premalignant lesions comparing the results between the treated and untreated group. Given the wide acceptance of green tea, its benefits may help in effective chemoprevention oral cancer. PMID:24678188

  11. Salivary Markers for Oral Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Markopoulos, Anastasios K.; Michailidou, Evangelia Z.; Tzimagiorgis, Georgios

    2010-01-01

    Oral cancer refers to all malignancies that arise in the oral cavity, lips and pharynx, with 90% of all oral cancers being oral squamous cell carcinoma. Despite the recent treatment advances, oral cancer is reported as having one of the highest mortality ratios amongst other malignancies and this can much be attributed to the late diagnosis of the disease. Saliva has long been tested as a valuable tool for drug monitoring and the diagnosis systemic diseases among which oral cancer. The new emerging technologies in molecular biology have enabled the discovery of new molecular markers (DNA, RNA and protein markers) for oral cancer diagnosis and surveillance which are discussed in the current review. PMID:21673842

  12. Delivery systems and adjuvants for oral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Ed C; O'Hagan, D T

    2006-11-01

    The oral route is the ideal means of delivering prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines, offering significant advantages over systemic delivery. Most notably, oral delivery is associated with simple administration and improved safety. In addition, unlike systemic immunisation, oral delivery can induce mucosal immune responses. However, the oral route of vaccine delivery is the most difficult because of the numerous barriers posed by the gastrointestinal tract. To facilitate effective immunisation with peptide and protein vaccines, antigens must be protected, uptake enhanced and the innate immune response activated. Numerous delivery systems and adjuvants have been evaluated for oral vaccine delivery, including live vectors, inert particles and bacterial toxins. Although developments in oral vaccines have been disappointing so far, in terms of the generation of products, the availability of a range of novel delivery systems offers much greater hope for the future development of improved oral vaccines. PMID:17076597

  13. Methamphetamine Use and Oral Health

    MedlinePlus

    FOR THE DENTAL PATIENT ... Methamphetamine use and oral health M ethamphetamine is an inexpensive, easy-to-make illicit drug. It is known by several street names: “meth,” “speed,” “ice,” “chalk,” “crank,” “fire,” “glass,” “crystal” and “tina.” It is made in tens ...

  14. Hamartomas of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S.; Majumdar, Barnali

    2015-01-01

    The majority of oral diseases present as growths and masses of varied cellular origin. Such masses may include simple hyperplasia, hamartoma, choristoma, teratoma, benign or malignant neoplasms. The distinguishing features of hamartomatous lesions are not certain, and often these non-neoplastic masses are indiscreetly denoted as neoplasms without weighing their pathology or biological behaviour. Essentially, understanding the dynamics of each of these disease processes forms an integral part of the appropriate treatment planning. PMID:26539384

  15. Live oral avirulent Salmonella vaccines.

    PubMed

    Curtiss, R; Kelly, S M; Hassan, J O

    1993-11-01

    Infection of animals and humans with Salmonella is a consequence of oral consumption of food or fluids contaminated with Salmonella. Once in the intestine, Salmonella usually attach to, invade, and proliferate in enterocytes or the cells of the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). The latter route of infection can lead to disease or to an asymptomatic carrier state or stimulate the induction of mucosal, systemic and cellular immune responses. Infection of animals with virulent invasive Salmonella can result in suppression of the immune responses which in turn can facilitate the establishment of a carrier state. It is possible to attenuate Salmonella by introducing mutations that (i) confer auxotrophy, (ii) interfere with sugar metabolism and LPS biosynthesis or (iii) affect some global means of regulating genes needed for the full display of virulence. Oral immunization of animals such as mice and chickens with avirulent Salmonella strains usually is not associated with suppression but rather with stimulation of mucosal, systemic and cellular immune responses. Vaccination by injection of killed vaccines or bacterins does not lead to the induction of either mucosal or cellular immune responses, and humoral immunity may be relatively short lived. Thus, killed vaccines are inferior to orally administered live avirulent Salmonella vaccines which induce a long-lasting protective immunity. In this manuscript we discuss desirable attributes of a safe, efficacious live attenuated Salmonella vaccine, describe attenuated Salmonella mutants so far isolated and their properties and present information on the evaluation of a live attenuated Salmonella oral vaccine for poultry.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8116195

  16. Oral contraceptives in adolescent women.

    PubMed

    Bitzer, Johannes

    2013-02-01

    Taking into account the biological and psychosocial changes during the transition from childhood to adulthood adolescents would need a contraceptive method which ideally would be very effective, independent of compliance, without major health risks during use and no negative impact on the future health of the adolescent, protective against STI, favorable for bone development, with no or only few side effects and having some preventive and therapeutic potential with respect to frequent health problems of adolescent girls. Combined oral contraceptives (COC) used regularly and consistently have a more than 99% efficacy to prevent a pregnancy. COCs have a very low health risk (almost exclusively thromboembolic disease) which seems to differ marginally with respect to dosage and type of the components. Progestogen only oral contraceptives do not have any major negative health impact. The leading side effect is irregular bleeding which in COC users is mainly during the first 3 months and in progestogen only users during the period of use. Other side effects are reported but their frequency is similar to placebo. COC protect against endometrial and ovarian cancer and they may have beneficial effects on a variety of menstrual complaints and acne, which are frequent problems during adolescence. To be effective COCs have to be taken regularly which is frequently not the case. This diminishes considerably their effectiveness depending on the individual compliance. They do not protect against STI and may even have an inhibitory effect on the use of condoms. For most adolescents the risk benefit profile of oral contraceptives is favorable and makes this method valuable. At the same time the prescription of oral contraceptives for adolescents need to be individualized by taking into account the individual risk/benefit profile. Specialized counseling with a high degree of confidentiality adapted to the knowledge and needs of the individual adolescent is desirable. PMID:23384748

  17. Hamartomas of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali

    2015-01-01

    The majority of oral diseases present as growths and masses of varied cellular origin. Such masses may include simple hyperplasia, hamartoma, choristoma, teratoma, benign or malignant neoplasms. The distinguishing features of hamartomatous lesions are not certain, and often these non-neoplastic masses are indiscreetly denoted as neoplasms without weighing their pathology or biological behaviour. Essentially, understanding the dynamics of each of these disease processes forms an integral part of the appropriate treatment planning. PMID:26539384

  18. Oral targeted therapy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carrington, Christine

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Oral targeted therapies are increasingly being used to treat cancer. They work by interfering with specific molecules or pathways involved in tumour growth. It is essential that health professionals managing patients taking these drugs have appropriate training and skills. They should be aware of potential adverse effects and drug interactions, and be able to manage toxicities when they occur. Despite the selectivity of these targeted therapies, they still have serious adverse effects including skin reactions, diarrhoea and altered organ function. PMID:26648656

  19. Nitrous Oxide and Oral Premedication

    PubMed Central

    Giovannitti, Joseph A.

    1984-01-01

    Patients frequently require conscious-sedation to achieve anxiety relief in the dental office. There are specific indications, contraindications, advantages, and disadvantages to each sedation modality. Selection of the appropriate anesthetic technique should be individualized for each patient. This paper reviews two important conscious-sedation modalities: oral premedication and nitrous oxide/oxygen inhalation sedation. Pertinent drugs are reviewed and recommendations are made for their use; current researches are presented and new areas for investigation are suggested. PMID:6597684

  20. 76 FR 73691 - Oral Argument

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... given of the scheduling of oral argument in the matters of: James C. Latham v. U.S. Postal Service, MSPB Docket Number DA-0353-10-0408-I-1; Ruby N. Turner v. U.S. Postal Service, MSPB Docket Number SF-0353-10-0329-I-1; Arleather Reaves v. U.S. Postal Service, MSPB Docket Number CH-0353-10-0823-I-1; Cynthia...

  1. [Oral treatments in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Meca-Lallana, José Eustasio; Hernández-Clares, Rocío; Carreón-Guarnizo, Ester

    2014-12-01

    The development of new disease-modifying drugs (DMD) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), which share the common denominator of oral administration, considerably improves patient expectations in terms of effectiveness, tolerability and treatment adherence compared with currently available drugs. However, the common route of administration of these drugs does not mean that they are equivalent, since the heading of "oral route" encompasses drugs with distinct indications and mechanisms of action, as well as heterogeneous results in terms of efficacy and safety, allowing treatment to be personalized according to the each patient' s characteristics. Currently, four oral DMD are available or in an advanced stage of clinical development: fingolimod, teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate and laquinimod. In pivotal trials versus placebo, these molecules reduced the annualized rate of exacerbations versus placebo by 54%, 31%, 53% and 23%, respectively, the risk of progression of disability by 31%, 30%, 38% and 36%, and the number of active lesions showing contrast uptake on magnetic resonance imaging by 82%, 80%, 90% and 37%, respectively. Based on the risk/benefit ratio, fingolimod is indicated in patients with suboptimal response to initial DMD or in severe rapidly progressing RRMS, while the remaining drugs can be used as first-line options. Clinical experience with these treatments will provide new data on safety and effectiveness, which will be determinant when establishing therapeutic algorithms. PMID:25732946

  2. Oral Chromium Exposure and Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong; Brocato, Jason; Costa, Max

    2015-09-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a known carcinogen when inhaled. However, inhalational exposure to Cr(VI) affects only a small portion of the population, mainly by occupational exposures. In contrast, oral exposure to Cr(VI) is widespread and affects many people throughout the globe. In 2008, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) released a 2-year study demonstrating that ingested Cr(VI) was carcinogenic in rats and mice. The effects of Cr(VI) oral exposure are mitigated by reduction in the gut; however, a portion evades the reductive detoxification and reaches target tissues. Once Cr(VI) enters the cell, it ultimately gets reduced to Cr(III), which mediates its toxicity via induction of oxidative stress during the reduction while Cr intermediates react with protein and DNA. Cr(III) can form adducts with DNA that may lead to mutations. This review will discuss the potential adverse effects of oral exposure to Cr(VI) by presenting up-to-date human and animal studies, examining the underlying mechanisms that mediate Cr(VI) toxicity, as well as highlighting opportunities for future research. PMID:26231506

  3. [Oral medicine 9. Lichen planus and lichenoid lesions of the oral mucosa].

    PubMed

    van der Meij, E H; Schepman, K P; de Visscher, J G A M

    2013-09-01

    The general dentist is sometimes confronted with white lesions of the oral mucosa. Oral lichen planus is the most common oral white lesion. The diagnosis can usually be made on the basis of the clinical aspect, but is sometimes made more difficult by certain abnormalities in the oral mucosa which clinically resemble oral lichen planus or by abnormalities which cannot be distinguished from oral lichen planus but have a different origin. Those lesions are classified as oral lichenoid lesions. Malignant deterioration has been described in allforms of oral lichen planus lesions and oral lichenoid lesions. There is no known method to predict or prevent malignant transformation. Nor are there any studies examining the efficacy of frequent follow-up visits. It seems sensible, in keeping with the tendency in recent literature, to schedule annual check-ups for patients to be on the safe side. These follow-up visits may reasonably be performed in a general dental practice. PMID:24159754

  4. The global burden of oral diseases and risks to oral health.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Estupinan-Day, Saskia; Ndiaye, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    This paper outlines the burden of oral diseases worldwide and describes the influence of major sociobehavioural risk factors in oral health. Despite great improvements in the oral health of populations in several countries, global problems still persist. The burden of oral disease is particularly high for the disadvantaged and poor population groups in both developing and developed countries. Oral diseases such as dental caries, periodontal disease, tooth loss, oral mucosal lesions and oropharyngeal cancers, human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS)-related oral disease and orodental trauma are major public health problems worldwide and poor oral health has a profound effect on general health and quality of life. The diversity in oral disease patterns and development trends across countries and regions reflects distinct risk profiles and the establishment of preventive oral health care programmes. The important role of sociobehavioural and environmental factors in oral health and disease has been shown in a large number of socioepidemiological surveys. In addition to poor living conditions, the major risk factors relate to unhealthy lifestyles (i.e. poor diet, nutrition and oral hygiene and use of tobacco and alcohol), and limited availability and accessibility of oral health services. Several oral diseases are linked to noncommunicable chronic diseases primarily because of common risk factors. Moreover, general diseases often have oral manifestations (e.g. diabetes or HIV/AIDS). Worldwide strengthening of public health programmes through the implementation of effective measures for the prevention of oral disease and promotion of oral health is urgently needed. The challenges of improving oral health are particularly great in developing countries. PMID:16211157

  5. The global burden of oral diseases and risks to oral health.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Estupinan-Day, Saskia; Ndiaye, Charlotte

    2005-09-01

    This paper outlines the burden of oral diseases worldwide and describes the influence of major sociobehavioural risk factors in oral health. Despite great improvements in the oral health of populations in several countries, global problems still persist. The burden of oral disease is particularly high for the disadvantaged and poor population groups in both developing and developed countries. Oral diseases such as dental caries, periodontal disease, tooth loss, oral mucosal lesions and oropharyngeal cancers, human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS)-related oral disease and orodental trauma are major public health problems worldwide and poor oral health has a profound effect on general health and quality of life. The diversity in oral disease patterns and development trends across countries and regions reflects distinct risk profiles and the establishment of preventive oral health care programmes. The important role of sociobehavioural and environmental factors in oral health and disease has been shown in a large number of socioepidemiological surveys. In addition to poor living conditions, the major risk factors relate to unhealthy lifestyles (i.e. poor diet, nutrition and oral hygiene and use of tobacco and alcohol), and limited availability and accessibility of oral health services. Several oral diseases are linked to noncommunicable chronic diseases primarily because of common risk factors. Moreover, general diseases often have oral manifestations (e.g. diabetes or HIV/AIDS). Worldwide strengthening of public health programmes through the implementation of effective measures for the prevention of oral disease and promotion of oral health is urgently needed. The challenges of improving oral health are particularly great in developing countries. PMID:16211157

  6. [Oral microbiota: a promising predictor of human oral and systemic diseases].

    PubMed

    Xin, Xu; Junzhi, He; Xuedong, Zhou

    2015-12-01

    A human oral microbiota is the ecological community of commensal, symbiotic, and pathogenic microorganisms found in human oral cavity. Oral microbiota exists mostly in the form of a biofilm and maintains a dynamic ecological equilibrium with the host body. However, the disturbance of this ecological balance inevitably causes oral infectious diseases, such as dental caries, apical periodontitis, periodontal diseases, pericoronitis, and craniofacial bone osteomyelitis. Oral microbiota is also correlated with many systemic diseases, including cancer, diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular diseases, and preterm birth. Hence, oral microbiota has been considered as a potential biomarker of human diseases. The "Human Microbiome Project" and other metagenomic projects worldwide have advanced our knowledge of the human oral microbiota. The integration of these metadata has been the frontier of oral microbiology to improve clinical translation. By reviewing recent progress on studies involving oral microbiota-related oral and systemic diseases, we aimed to propose the essential role of oral microbiota in the prediction of the onset, progression, and prognosis of oral and systemic diseases. An oral microbiota-based prediction model helps develop a new paradigm of personalized medicine and benefits the human health in the post-metagenomics era. PMID:27051943

  7. Evaluating awareness regarding oral hygiene practices and exploring gender differences among patients attending for oral prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh; Mohanty, Vikrant; Mahajan, Ananya; Oberoi, Avneet

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oral hygiene is intimated in health of all parts of the body including oral cavity. The understanding of actual practices in keeping the oral heath at standard based on patient's perceptions of oral health care is vital. Understanding the effect of gender on oral health would facilitate the development of successful attitude and behavior modification approach towards sustainable oral health. Purpose of Study: To evaluate awareness regarding oral hygiene practices and exploring gender differences among patients attending for oral prophylaxis. Materials and Methods: A survey was conducted among 250 patients attending the department of periodontology, Maulana Azad institute of dental sciences for oral prophylaxis. A structured questionnaire was used to collect information regarding practices and perception about oral hygiene. Results: Majority of the patients (60.4%) felt that oral hygiene is mandatory for overall health of the body. The use of toothpaste and toothbrush (83.6%) was the most preferred cleaning aid among the study population in the present study. The major constraint for avoiding dental examination was no felt need (41.2%) followed by cost of dental treatment (26.8%) and time constraints (24.0%). Conclusions: Professional plaque removal and regular follow-up combined with oral hygiene instructions to the patients can minimize the level of gingival inflammation and swelling. The poor resources for dental care, common malpractices and nonavailability of professional care are the main barriers in seeking optimum oral hygiene. PMID:25024553

  8. ORAL LICHEN PLANUS AND ORAL LICHENOID REACTION--AN UPDATE.

    PubMed

    Rotim, Zeljko; Bolanca, Zeljana; Rogulj, Ana Andabak; Andabak, Matej; Boras, Vanja Vucićević; Vrdoljak, Danko Velimir

    2015-12-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) and oral lichenoid reaction (OLR) are clinically and histopathologically similar diseases. Whereas OLP is a consequence of T cell mediated autoinflammatory process to a still unknown antigen, OLR might be caused by drugs, dental restorative materials and dental plaque. Pubmed was searched and 24 publications published over the last three years regarding etiology, diagnosis and malignant alteration were included in this study. Patients with OLR who have amalgam fillings near lesions should have them replaced, i.e. when possible they should be referred to patch test, as well as when drug-induced OLR are suspected. OLR lesions induced by drugs should disappear when the offending drug has been discontinued. Histology finding in OLR consists of more eosinophils, plasma cells and granulocytes in comparison to OLP lesions. Furthermore, OLP lesions showed more p53, bcl-2 and COX-2 positivity when compared to OLR. OLP is characterized by infiltration, atrophic epithelium, rete pegs and Max Joseph spaces, while deep infiltration into connective tissue and hyperkeratosis were the criteria for making the diagnosis of OLR. The number of degranulated mastocytes in the reticular layer, as well as the number of capillaries was higher in OLR in comparison to OLP. It seems that OLR are more prone to malignant alteration in comparison to OLP. PMID:27017728

  9. Autofluorescence based diagnostic techniques for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramaniam, A. Murali; Sriraman, Rajkumari; Sindhuja, P.; Mohideen, Khadijah; Parameswar, R. Arjun; Muhamed Haris, K. T.

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Despite of various advancements in the treatment modalities, oral cancer mortalities are more, particularly in developing countries like India. This is mainly due to the delay in diagnosis of oral cancer. Delay in diagnosis greatly reduces prognosis of the treatment and also cause increased morbidity and mortality rates. Early diagnosis plays a key role in effective management of oral cancer. A rapid diagnostic technique can greatly aid in the early diagnosis of oral cancer. Now a day's many adjunctive oral cancer screening techniques are available for the early diagnosis of cancer. Among these, autofluorescence based diagnostic techniques are rapidly emerging as a powerful tool. These techniques are broadly discussed in this review. PMID:26538880

  10. Do caterpillars secrete "oral secretions"?

    PubMed

    Peiffer, Michelle; Felton, Gary W

    2009-03-01

    The oral secretions or regurgitant of caterpillars contain potent elicitors of plant induced responses. These elicitors are recognized by host plants to differentiate between simple mechanical injury and the presence of herbivores. In some cases, this level of recognition is highly specific. Despite the in-depth chemical characterization of these elicitors, little is known about the amounts delivered in regurgitant during feeding. In this study, we use a fluorescent dye to label regurgitant in order to visualize caterpillar regurgitation during feeding. The procedure is highly sensitive and allows us to visualize nanoliter amounts of regurgitant. We examined the propensity of larval Helicoverpa zea, Heliothis virescens, Spodoptera exigua, Spodoptera frugiperda, and Manduca sexta to regurgitate on various host plants. These species were selected because they have been among the most intensely studied in terms of elicitors. Our results indicate that most larvae did not regurgitate following a brief feeding bout ( approximately 10 min) during which they ate ca. 0.40 cm(2) of leaf. When larvae did regurgitate, it was typically less than 10 nl. This is several orders of magnitude less than is typically used in most studies on oral secretions. The frequency of regurgitation appears to vary depending upon the host plant. Larval H. zea are less likely to regurgitate when feeding on tomato leaves compared to corn mid-whorl tissue. Our results have importance in understanding the role of oral secretions in plant recognition of herbivory. Because caterpillars did not routinely regurgitate during feeding, it is likely that they avoid the elicitation of some plant defensive responses during most feeding bouts. PMID:19221841

  11. Autofluorescence spectroscopy of oral mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, S. K.; Uppal, A.; Gupta, P. K.

    1998-06-01

    We report the results of an in-vitro study on autofluorescence from pathologically characterized normal and malignant squamous tissues from the oral cavity. The study involved biopsy samples from 47 patients with oral cancer of which 11 patients had cancer of tongue, 17 of buccal mucosa and 19 of alveolus. The results of excitation and emission spectroscopy at several wavelengths (280 nm less than or equal to (lambda) exless than or equal to 460 nm; 340 nm less than or equal to (lambda) em less than or equal to 520 nm) showed that at (lambda) ex equals 337 nm and 400 nm the mean value for the spectrally integrated fluorescence intensity [(Sigma) (lambda ) IF((lambda) )] from the normal tissue sites was about a factor of 2 larger than that from the malignant tissue sites. At other excitation wavelengths the difference in (Sigma) (lambda ) IF((lambda) ) was not statistically significant. Similarly, for (lambda) em equals 390 nm and 460 nm, the intensity of the 340 nm band of the excitation spectra from normal tissues was observed to be a factor of 2 larger than that from malignant tissues. Analysis of these results suggests that NADH concentration is higher in normal oral tissues compared to the malignant. This contrasts with our earlier observation of an reduced NADH concentration in normal sites of breast tissues vis a vis malignant sites. For the 337 nm excited emission spectra a 10-variable MVLR score (using (Sigma) (lambda ) IF((lambda) ) and normalized intensities at nine wavelengths as input parameters) provided a sensitivity and specificity of 95.7% and 93.1% over the sample size investigated.

  12. [Oral therapy of erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Trummer, H

    2000-01-01

    Erectile disfunction (E. D.) is more common in older men but may affect younger men too. Diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease and hypertension are often associated with E. D. The majority of the patients are treated medically for erectile dysfunction and, recently, oral therapy has become most important since Viagra has been approved. New phosphodiesterase blockers are in preclinical evaluation since then. Phentolamine and apomorphine will become available soon for the treatment of E. D. It is important to know about the etiology of E. D. as well as the mechanisms by which drugs may improve erection in order to decide which drug is appropriate for a particular patient. PMID:10746289

  13. Oral erythroplakia--a review.

    PubMed

    Reichart, Peter A; Philipsen, Hans Peter

    2005-07-01

    Oral erythroplakia (OE) is considered a rare potentially malignant lesion of the oral mucosa. Reports entirely devoted to OE are very few, and only two reviews none of which are of recent date have been published. Only the true, velvety, red homogeneous OE has been clearly defined while the terminology for mixed red and white lesions is complex, ill-defined and confusing. A recent case control study of OE from India reported a prevalence of 0.2%. A range of prevalences between 0.02% and 0.83% from different geographical areas has been documented. OE is predominantly seen in the middle aged and elderly. One study from India showed a female:male ratio of 1:1.04. The soft palate, the floor of the mouth and the buccal mucosa is commonly affected. A specific type of OE occurs in chutta smokers in India. Lesions of OE are typically less than 1.5 cm in diameter. The etiology of OE reveals a strong association with tobacco consumption and the use of alcohol. Histopathologically, it has been documented that in OE of the homogenous type, 51% showed invasive carcinoma, 40% carcinoma in situ and 9% mild or moderate dysplasia. Recently, genomic aberrations with DNA aneuploidy has been demonstrated. p53 mutations with different degrees of dysplasia may play a role in some cases of OE. Transformation rates are considered to be the highest among all precancerous oral lesions and conditions. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice. Data on laser excision are not available. Recurrence rates seem to be high, reliable data are, however, missing. More studies on OE are strongly needed to evaluate a number of so far unanswered questions. The natural history of OE is unknown. Do OEs develop de novo or are they developing from oral leukoplakia through several intermediate stages of white/red lesions? The possible role of fungal infection (Candida micro-organisms) is not clear as is the possible role of HPV co-infection in the development of OE. More data on incidence and prevalence, biological behaviour and adequate treatment are urgently needed. PMID:15975518

  14. Oral metastasis of chondroblastic osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Dumpala, Rakesh Kumar; Guttikonda, Venkateswara Rao; Yeluri, Sivaranjani; Madala, Jayakiran

    2012-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant mesenchymal tumor, accounting for approximately 20% of sarcomas, with 5% incidence in the jaws. They present various clinical and histological aspects as well as variable disease prognosis and outcome. About 50% of all osteosarcomas are osteoblastic, 25% fibroblastic, 25% chondroblastic. Metastasis of osteosarcoma in the oral cavity is rare, and very few cases have been described so far in the literature. This article presents a metastatic case of chondroblastic osteosarcoma in the mandibular right-attached gingiva arising from 4th rib. This case report further suggests that chondroblastic osteosarcoma has poor prognosis. PMID:23293503

  15. Oral cleft prevention program (OCPP)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Oral clefts are one of the most common birth defects with significant medical, psychosocial, and economic ramifications. Oral clefts have a complex etiology with genetic and environmental risk factors. There are suggestive results for decreased risks of cleft occurrence and recurrence with folic acid supplements taken at preconception and during pregnancy with a stronger evidence for higher than lower doses in preventing recurrence. Yet previous studies have suffered from considerable design limitations particularly non-randomization into treatment. There is also well-documented effectiveness for folic acid in preventing neural tube defect occurrence at 0.4 mg and recurrence with 4 mg. Given the substantial burden of clefting on the individual and the family and the supportive data for the effectiveness of folic acid supplementation as well as its low cost, a randomized clinical trial of the effectiveness of high versus low dose folic acid for prevention of cleft recurrence is warranted. Methods/design This study will assess the effect of 4 mg and 0.4 mg doses of folic acid, taken on a daily basis during preconception and up to 3 months of pregnancy by women who are at risk of having a child with nonsyndromic cleft lip with/without palate (NSCL/P), on the recurrence of NSCL/P. The total sample will include about 6,000 women (that either have NSCL/P or that have at least one child with NSCL/P) randomly assigned to the 4 mg and the 0.4 mg folic acid study groups. The study will also compare the recurrence rates of NSCL/P in the total sample of subjects, as well as the two study groups (4mg, 0.4 mg) to that of a historical control group. The study has been approved by IRBs (ethics committees) of all involved sites. Results will be disseminated through publications and presentations at scientific meetings. Discussion The costs related to oral clefts are high, including long term psychological and socio-economic effects. This study provides an opportunity for huge savings in not only money but the overall quality of life. This may help establish more specific clinical guidelines for oral cleft prevention so that the intervention can be better tailored for at-risk women. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00397917 PMID:23181832

  16. [Synthetic progestogens versus oral progesterone].

    PubMed

    Alonso-Uriarte, R; Cortés-Gallegos, V

    1991-02-01

    The antecedents of progesterone natural hormone and related structural groups, chemically and biologically, were described. The synthesis and semi-synthesis of these compounds, is reviewed, and molecular changes, which gave more potency for clinical use, is reviewed. The pharmacology of these groups is manifested, particularly, by the identification of a receptor, its physico-quemical characteristics and relative affinity for tissues as endometrium and myometrium. Furthermore, the progestational quality, the antiestrogenic one, antiandrogenic one and its applications, were evaluated. Finally, several biologic indicators which support the use of oral progesterone and that suggest the re-evaluation of tissular dynamics in reproductive tract, were reviewed. PMID:2066005

  17. Oral Immunotherapy for Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Burbank, Allison J; Sood, Puja; Vickery, Brian P; Wood, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Food allergy is a potentially life-threatening condition with no approved therapies, apart from avoidance and injectable epinephrine for acute allergic reactions. Oral immunotherapy (OIT) is an experimental treatment in which food-allergic patients consume gradually increasing quantities of the food to increase their threshold for allergic reaction. This therapy carries significant risk of allergic reactions. The ability of OIT to desensitize patients to particular foods is well-documented, although the ability to induce tolerance has not been established. This review focuses on recent studies for the treatment of food allergies such as cow's milk, hen's egg, and peanut. PMID:26617227

  18. Periodontics and Oral-Systeric Relationships: Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Glascoe, Alison; Brown, Ronald; Robinson, Grace; Hailu, Kassahun

    2016-01-01

    The oral cavity is a part of the body. The health of the oral cavity affects the health of the entire body. This relationship is reciprocal, as the overall health of an individual will also affect the health of that individual's oral cavity. Periodontal disease is a common, chronic inflammatory disease affecting the supporting structures of the teeth. It has been proposed that periodontal disease is a risk factor for systemic diseases such as diabetes. PMID:26897902

  19. Oral myiasis in a captive hippopotamus.

    PubMed

    Rossi Júnior, João Luiz; Guião-Leite, Flaviana L; Gioso, Marco Antonio; Falqueiro, Léslie M Domingues; Fecchio, Roberto Silveira

    2009-01-01

    Causes of dental infections can be related to failed dental eruption, malocclusion, abrasion, fractures with or without exposure of the dental pulp, and periodontal disease. Reports of oral myiasis in megavertebrates in captivity are infrequent, perhaps due to the difficulty in observing the oral cavity in such species. This report describes a case of oral myiasis in an adult male hippopotamus in the gingival area and alveolar mucosa of the left mandibular canine tooth. PMID:19950517

  20. Oral myiasis caused by Chrysomya bezziana.

    PubMed

    Sankari, Leena S; Ramakrishnan, K

    2010-01-01

    Oral myiasis is a rare disease caused by larvae of certain dipteran flies. It is mostly reported in developing countries and in the tropics. Herein, a case of oral myiasis in the maxillary anterior region of a 14-year-old mentally challenged boy is being reported. The myiasis was caused by the larvae of Chrysomya bezziana species. The clinical findings are presented. Etiology and the importance of oral health in special people are also discussed. PMID:21180453

  1. [Vesiculobullous lesions of the oral mucosa].

    PubMed

    Spijkervet, F K; Vissink, A; Raghoebar, G M; van der Waal, I

    2001-06-01

    In general practice, the dentist can be confronted with a vesiculobullous lesion of the oral mucosa. In many cases the lesion can be classified as recurrent herpes labialis, but many other causes can induce a vesiculobullous lesion of the oral mucosa and perioral skin as well. This article gives an overview of the various vesiculous and bullous lesions of the oral mucous membranes. Special attention is given to the possible causes and their treatment. PMID:11441714

  2. Confronting Oral Health Disparities Among American Indian/Alaska Native Children: The Pediatric Oral Health Therapist

    PubMed Central

    Nash, David A.; Nagel, Ron J.

    2005-01-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) children are disproportionately affected by oral disease compared with the general population of American children. Additionally, AIAN children have limited access to professional oral health care. The Indian Health Service (IHS) and AIAN tribal leaders face a significant problem in ensuring care for the oral health of these children. We discuss the development and deployment of a new allied oral health professional, a pediatric oral health therapist. This kind of practitioner can effectively extend the ability of dentists to provide for children not receiving care and help to confront the significant oral health disparities existing in AIAN children. Resolving oral health disparities and ensuring access to oral health care for American Indians and Alaska Natives is a moral issue—one of social justice. PMID:16006412

  3. Aboriginal oral traditions of Australian impact craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Duane W.; Goldsmith, John

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we explore Aboriginal oral traditions that relate to Australian meteorite craters. Using the literature, first-hand ethnographic records and field trip data, we identify oral traditions and artworks associated with four impact sites: Gosses Bluff, Henbury, Liverpool and Wolfe Creek. Oral traditions describe impact origins for Gosses Bluff, Henbury and Wolfe Creek Craters, and non-impact origins for Liverpool Crater, with Henbury and Wolfe Creek stories having both impact and non-impact origins. Three impact sites that are believed to have been formed during human habitation of Australia -- Dalgaranga, Veevers, and Boxhole -- do not have associated oral traditions that are reported in the literature.

  4. Oral Insulin Delivery: How Far Are We?

    PubMed Central

    Fonte, Pedro; Arajo, Francisca; Reis, Salette; Sarmento, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Oral delivery of insulin may significantly improve the quality of life of diabetes patients who routinely receive insulin by the subcutaneous route. In fact, compared with this administration route, oral delivery of insulin in diabetes treatment offers many advantages: higher patient compliance, rapid hepatic insulinization, and avoidance of peripheral hyperinsulinemia and other adverse effects such as possible hypoglycemia and weight gain. However, the oral delivery of insulin remains a challenge because its oral absorption is limited. The main barriers faced by insulin in the gastrointestinal tract are degradation by proteolytic enzymes and lack of transport across the intestinal epithelium. Several strategies to deliver insulin orally have been proposed, but without much clinical or commercial success. Protein encapsulation into nanoparticles is regarded as a promising alternative to administer insulin orally because they have the ability to promote insulin paracellular or transcellular transport across the intestinal mucosa. In this review, different delivery systems intended to increase the oral bioavailability of insulin will be discussed, with a special focus on nanoparticulate carrier systems, as well as the efforts that pharmaceutical companies are making to bring to the market the first oral delivery system of insulin. The toxicological and safety data of delivery systems, the clinical value and progress of oral insulin delivery, and the future prospects in this research field will be also scrutinized. PMID:23567010

  5. Oral insulin delivery: how far are we?

    PubMed

    Fonte, Pedro; Araújo, Francisca; Reis, Salette; Sarmento, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Oral delivery of insulin may significantly improve the quality of life of diabetes patients who routinely receive insulin by the subcutaneous route. In fact, compared with this administration route, oral delivery of insulin in diabetes treatment offers many advantages: higher patient compliance, rapid hepatic insulinization, and avoidance of peripheral hyperinsulinemia and other adverse effects such as possible hypoglycemia and weight gain. However, the oral delivery of insulin remains a challenge because its oral absorption is limited. The mainbarriers faced by insulin in the gastrointestinal tract are degradation by proteolytic enzymes and lack of transport across the intestinal epithelium. Several strategies to deliver insulin orally have been proposed, but without much clinical or commercial success. Protein encapsulation into nanoparticles is regarded as a promising alternative to administer insulin orally because they have the ability to promote insulin paracellular or transcellular transport across the intestinal mucosa. In this review, different delivery systems intended to increase the oral bioavailability of insulin will be discussed, with a special focus on nanoparticulate carrier systems, as well as the efforts that pharmaceutical companies are making to bring to the market the first oral delivery system of insulin. The toxicological and safety data of delivery systems, the clinical value and progress of oral insulin delivery, and the future prospects in this research field will be also scrutinized. PMID:23567010

  6. Primary oral malignant melanoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Bujas, Tatjana; Pavić, Ivana; Prus, Andrej; Marusić, Zlatko; Balicević, Drinko

    2010-03-01

    Primary oral malignant melanoma usually presents as a dark brown or black lesion. It is a rare malignancy, accounting for less than 1% of all melanomas and 1.6% of all head and neck malignancies, thus forming up to 0.5% of all oral malignancies in the world literature. In general, the prognosis of oral melanoma is poor and worse than that of cutaneous melanoma. The preferred treatment is radical surgery alone or in combination with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and immunomodulatory agents. A case is presented of a large malignant melanoma of oral cavity, noticed six months before initial biopsy and by history described as a rapidly growing mass. PMID:20635585

  7. Giant granuloma gravidarium of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Balasubramanian; Arunprasad, Gnanasekaran; Madhan, Balasubramanian

    2014-01-01

    Oral health is affected by hormonal changes during pregnancy but is usually neglected by both the obstetrician and the patient during follow-up visits. Gingival enlargement is one of the most common oral lesions seen during pregnancy. Rarely, gingival enlargement can be very big, significantly affecting maternal nutrition and impairing haemodynamic status. A giant granuloma gravidarium and appropriate management strategies are discussed. Patients must be encouraged to undergo regular dental check-ups during pregnancy. Simple oral hygiene measures are highly effective in mitigating most oral lesions of pregnancy. PMID:24713716

  8. Oral surgery in patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Demian, Nagi M; Shum, Jonathan W; Kessel, Ivan L; Eid, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Oral health care in patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy can be complex. Care delivered by a multidisciplinary approach is timely and streamlines the allocation of resources to provide prompt care and to attain favorable outcomes. A hospital dentist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, and a maxillofacial prosthodontist must be involved early to prevent avoidable oral complications. Prevention and thorough preparation are vital before the start of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Oral complications must be addressed immediately and, even with the best management, can cause delays and interruption in treatment, with serious consequences for the outcome and prognosis. PMID:24794266

  9. Fungal infections of the oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, P Anitha

    2012-01-01

    Fungal infections in humans occur as a result of defects in the immune system. An increasing emergence in oral Candidal and non-Candidal fungal infections is evident in the past decade owing to the rise in the immunodeficient and immunocompromised population globally. Oral Candidal infection usually involves a compromised host and the compromise may be local or systemic. Local compromising factors include decreased salivation, poor oral hygiene, wearing dentures among others while systemic factors include diabetes mellitus, nutritional deficiency, HIV infection/AIDS and others. Oral candidiasis is generally a localized infection and rarely appears as a systemic fungal disease whereas oral non-Candidal fungal infections are usually signs of disseminated disease. Some of the non-Candidal fungi that were once considered exotic and geographically restricted are now seen worldwide, beyond their natural habitat, probably attributed to globalization and travels. Currently infections from these fungi are more prevalent than before and they may present either as primary oral lesions or as oral manifestations of systemic mycoses. This review discusses the various predisposing factors, clinical presentations, clinical differential diagnosis, diagnosis and management of oral candidiasis, as well as briefly highlights upon a few of the more exotic non-Candidal fungi that infect the oral mucosa. PMID:23422613

  10. Treatment of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bagán-Sebastián, José V

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of oral mucositis is a challenge, due to its complex biological nature. Over the last 10 years, different strategies have been developed for the management of oral mucositis caused by chemotherapy in cancer patients. Material and Methods An exhaustive search was made of the PubMed-Medline, Cochrane Library and Scopus databases, crossing the key words “oral mucositis”, “prevention” and “treatment” with the terms “chemotherapy” and “radiotherapy” by means of the boolean operators “AND” and “NOT”. A total of 268 articles were obtained, of which 96 met the inclusion criteria. Results Several interventions for the prevention of oral mucositis, such as oral hygiene protocols, amifostine, benzidamine, calcium phosphate, cryotherapy and iseganan, among others, were found to yield only limited benefits. Other studies have reported a decrease in the appearance and severity of mucositis with the use of cytoprotectors (sucralfate, oral glutamine, hyaluronic acid), growth factors, topical polyvinylpyrrolidone, and low power laser irradiation. Conclusions Very few interventions of confirmed efficacy are available for the management of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy. However, according to the reviewed literature, the use of palifermin, cryotherapy and low power laser offers benefits, reducing the incidence and severity of oral mucositis – though further studies are needed to confirm the results obtained. Key words:Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis Treatment. PMID:27034762

  11. Oral health disparities in older adults: oral bacteria, inflammation, and aspiration pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Scannapieco, Frank A; Shay, Kenneth

    2014-10-01

    Poor oral hygiene has been suggested to be a risk factor for aspiration pneumonia in the institutionalized and disabled elderly. Control of oral biofilm formation in these populations reduces the numbers of potential respiratory pathogens in the oral secretions, which in turn reduces the risk for pneumonia. Together with other preventive measures, improved oral hygiene helps to control lower respiratory infections in frail elderly hospital and nursing home patients. PMID:25201541

  12. Ecology of Human Oral Lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    van Houte, Johannes; Gibbons, Ronald J.; Pulkkinen, Andrea J.

    1972-01-01

    Lactobacilli were found in saliva, on teeth, and on the dorsum of the tongue, the vestibular mucosa, and the hard palate in humans. Their proportions in saliva, expressed as percentage of the anaerobically cultivable flora, were 10- to 100-fold higher than those on the tooth surface, but were comparable to those on the epithelial surfaces. The adherence of Lactobacillus casei and L. fermenti to oral surfaces was compared with that of streptomycin-labeled Streptococcus sanguis and S. salivarius by using in vitro-cultivated cells. The affinity of both Lactobacillus species for the tooth surface was very low compared with that of S. sanguis but was somewhat higher than that of S. salivarius. The lactobacilli and both Streptococcus species adhered to a similar extent to the dorsum of the tongue, whereas the affinity of the lactobacilli and S. salivarius for the vestibular mucosa was about one-half of that of S. sanguis. The results suggest that the affinity of lactobacilli for oral surfaces significantly influences their proportional distribution in the mouth. The relatively low affinity of lactobacilli for the tooth surface suggests that their recognized association with carious lesions and mechanical appliances under certain conditions may be due primarily to mechanical retention rather than unique growth conditions. PMID:4637297

  13. Ageing, dementia and oral health.

    PubMed

    Foltyn, P

    2015-03-01

    Neurocognitive decline and delirium, frailty, incontinence, falls, hearing and vision impairment, medication compliance and pharmacokinetics, skin breakdown, impaired sleep and rest are regarded as geriatric giants by gerontologists, geriatricians and nursing home staff. As these are all interrelated in the elderly, failure to act on one can impact on the others. However, the implications of poor oral health have for too long been ignored and deserve equal status. Mouth pain can be devastating for the elderly, compound psychosocial problems, frustrate carers and nursing home staff and disrupt family dynamics. As appearance, function and comfort suffer, so may a person's self-esteem and confidence. The contributing factors for poor oral health such as rapid dental decay, acute and chronic periodontal infections and compromised systemic health on a background of a dry mouth, coupled with xerostomia-inducing medications, reduced fine motor function, declining cognition and motivation will not only lead to an increase in both morbidity and mortality but also impact on quality of life. PMID:25762045

  14. Autophagy mediates oral submucous fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    LI, JIANG; ZHAO, TING-TING; ZHANG, PENG; XU, CHAO-JIN; RONG, ZHUO-XIANG; YAN, ZI-YI; FANG, CHANG-YUN

    2016-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is a chronic insidious disease of the oral mucosa, well-recognized as a premalignant condition and commonly found in Southern China. It is primarily caused by the habit of areca nut or gutkha chewing. OSF is believed to be a homeostatic disorder of the extracellular matrix and fibroblast proliferation. The present study demonstrated a novel link between autophagy and OSF. Tissue samples from human OSF showed an overexpression of the autophagy marker microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 using immunohistochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. With regard to the crucial role of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in OSF disease, western blot analysis demonstrated that TGF-β signaling was shown to contribute to the activation of autophagy in fibroblasts in vitro; however, a cell apoptosis and MTS assay demonstrated that the suppression of autophagy ameliorated the fibrosis induced by active TGF-β receptor type I signaling, as well as promoted fibroblast apoptosis and suppressed proliferation. Therefore, the present results suggest that autophagy serves a crucial function in OSF. PMID:27168817

  15. Unusual presentation of oral amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Silva, William P P; Wastner, Bruna F; Bohn, Joslei C; Jung, Juliana E; Schussel, Juliana L; Sassi, Laurindo M

    2015-09-01

    Amyloidosis is a rare disease of difficult diagnosis that occurs due accumulation of amyloid substance localized or systemic. The oral cavity is an unusual site and can be related to both localized and systemic forms and for that reason a full investigation is necessary to determine the extent of the disease. This study reports a case of a 58-year-old melanoderm male patient referred to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery with white plaques on the tongue and multiple nodules in the region of the buccal mucosa and labial commissure, with 6 months of evolution and painful symptoms. An incisional biopsy was performed on both sites and histological examination indicated the presence of eosinophilic amorphous material within the connective tissue, positive for crystal violet staining, consistent with amyloidosis. At the present time, there is no consensus on the management of local amyloidosis. Surgical treatment of localized forms is indicated in some cases to reduce the functional prejudice. Moreover, follow-up is mandatory, both to manage recurrences and to monitor the possible evolution of the disease to the systemic form. PMID:26604589

  16. Unusual presentation of oral amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, William P. P.; Wastner, Bruna F.; Bohn, Joslei C.; Jung, Juliana E.; Schussel, Juliana L.; Sassi, Laurindo M.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a rare disease of difficult diagnosis that occurs due accumulation of amyloid substance localized or systemic. The oral cavity is an unusual site and can be related to both localized and systemic forms and for that reason a full investigation is necessary to determine the extent of the disease. This study reports a case of a 58-year-old melanoderm male patient referred to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery with white plaques on the tongue and multiple nodules in the region of the buccal mucosa and labial commissure, with 6 months of evolution and painful symptoms. An incisional biopsy was performed on both sites and histological examination indicated the presence of eosinophilic amorphous material within the connective tissue, positive for crystal violet staining, consistent with amyloidosis. At the present time, there is no consensus on the management of local amyloidosis. Surgical treatment of localized forms is indicated in some cases to reduce the functional prejudice. Moreover, follow-up is mandatory, both to manage recurrences and to monitor the possible evolution of the disease to the systemic form. PMID:26604589

  17. Oral submucous fibrosis: an update

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Verma, Shyam B; Ali, Fareedi Mukram; Patil, Kishor

    2015-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is a premalignant condition caused by betel chewing. It is very common in Southeast Asia but has started to spread to Europe and North America. OSF can lead to squamous cell carcinoma, a risk that is further increased by concomitant tobacco consumption. OSF is a diagnosis based on clinical symptoms and confirmation by histopathology. Hypovascularity leading to blanching of the oral mucosa, staining of teeth and gingiva, and trismus are major symptoms. Major constituents of betel quid are arecoline from betel nuts and copper, which are responsible for fibroblast dysfunction and fibrosis. A variety of extracellular and intracellular signaling pathways might be involved. Treatment of OSF is difficult, as not many large, randomized controlled trials have been conducted. The principal actions of drug therapy include antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxygen radical mechanisms. Potential new drugs are on the horizon. Surgery may be necessary in advanced cases of trismus. Prevention is most important, as no healing can be achieved with available treatments. PMID:25914554

  18. Communication in the Oral History Interview: Investigating Problems of Interpreting Oral Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, E. Culpepper; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Discusses problems often encountered in oral history interviews including absence of rules, authority, and training; little comprehension of the deeper meaning of words; and failure to consider the true meaning and purposes of oral interviews. Information is also presented on definition of oral history, approaches to problems,…

  19. Epidemiology of oral HPV in the oral mucosa in women without signs of oral disease from Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Losa, María Del Refugio; Barrera, Ernesto Soria; Herrera-Pech, Verónica; Conde-Ferráez, Laura; Puerto-Solís, Marylin; Ayora-Talavera, Guadalupe

    2015-03-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) are considered necessary for the development of cervical cancer. Furthermore, there is no doubt that some types of oral squamous cell carcinoma are associated with HR-HPV. The epidemiology of oral HPV infections in healthy subjects remains unclear due to a lack of knowledge. The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of human papillomavirus infections of the oral mucosa without pathology. A cross-sectional study was performed; samples from 390 women seeking prenatal care, Pap smears, family planning or gynecological diseases were studied. Oral cells were collected by direct swab sampling. Information regarding sociodemographic status, sexual behavior, infectious diseases, contraceptive history and tobacco and alcohol consumption were obtained through direct interviews. HPV and genotypes were detected by type-specific polymerase chain reaction. Our results revealed that 14% of the women studied had an oral HPV infection. Women ≤ 20 years of age had the highest HPV prevalence (24.5%). In total, seven genotypes were identified, including the high-risk genotypes 16, 18, 58 and 59 and the low-risk genotypes 6, 81 and 13, the latter of which is a type exclusive to oral mucosa. Sexual behavior was not associated with the presence of genital HPV types in the oral mucosa. Genital HPV types were present in the oral mucosa of women without associated clinical manifestations; however, sexual behavior was not associated with infection, and therefore others routes of transmission should be explored. PMID:26221121

  20. Epidemiology of oral HPV in the oral mucosa in women without signs of oral disease from Yucatan, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Losa, María del Refugio; Barrera, Ernesto Soria; Herrera-Pech, Verónica; Conde-Ferráez, Laura; Puerto-Solís, Marylin; Ayora-Talavera, Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) are considered necessary for the development of cervical cancer. Furthermore, there is no doubt that some types of oral squamous cell carcinoma are associated with HR-HPV. The epidemiology of oral HPV infections in healthy subjects remains unclear due to a lack of knowledge. The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of human papillomavirus infections of the oral mucosa without pathology. A cross-sectional study was performed; samples from 390 women seeking prenatal care, Pap smears, family planning or gynecological diseases were studied. Oral cells were collected by direct swab sampling. Information regarding sociodemographic status, sexual behavior, infectious diseases, contraceptive history and tobacco and alcohol consumption were obtained through direct interviews. HPV and genotypes were detected by type-specific polymerase chain reaction. Our results revealed that 14% of the women studied had an oral HPV infection. Women ≤ 20 years of age had the highest HPV prevalence (24.5%). In total, seven genotypes were identified, including the high-risk genotypes 16, 18, 58 and 59 and the low-risk genotypes 6, 81 and 13, the latter of which is a type exclusive to oral mucosa. Sexual behavior was not associated with the presence of genital HPV types in the oral mucosa. Genital HPV types were present in the oral mucosa of women without associated clinical manifestations; however, sexual behavior was not associated with infection, and therefore others routes of transmission should be explored. PMID:26221121

  1. Auditory-Oral Matching Behavior in Newborns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xin; Striano, Tricia; Rakoczy, Hannes

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-five newborn infants were tested for auditory-oral matching behavior when presented with the consonant sound /m/ and the vowel sound /a/--a precursor behavior to vocal imitation. Auditory-oral matching behavior by the infant was operationally defined as showing the mouth movement appropriate for producing the model sound just heard (mouth…

  2. Validation of Automated Scoring of Oral Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balogh, Jennifer; Bernstein, Jared; Cheng, Jian; Van Moere, Alistair; Townshend, Brent; Suzuki, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    A two-part experiment is presented that validates a new measurement tool for scoring oral reading ability. Data collected by the U.S. government in a large-scale literacy assessment of adults were analyzed by a system called VersaReader that uses automatic speech recognition and speech processing technologies to score oral reading fluency. In the…

  3. Oral Microbiology: Past, Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    He, Xue-song; Shi, Wen-yuan

    2009-01-01

    Since the initial observations of oral bacteria within dental plaque by van Leeuwenhoek using his primitive microscopes in 1680, an event that is generally recognized as the advent of oral microbiological investigation, oral microbiology has gone through phases of “reductionism” and “holism”. From the small beginnings of the Miller and Black period, in which microbiologists followed Koch's postulates, took the reductionist approach to try to study the complex oral microbial community by analyzing individual species; to the modern era when oral researchers embrace “holism” or “system thinking”, adopt new concepts such as interspecies interaction, microbial community, biofilms, poly-microbial diseases, oral microbiological knowledge has burgeoned and our ability to identify the resident organisms in dental plaque and decipher the interactions between key components has rapidly increased, such knowledge has greatly changed our view of the oral microbial flora, provided invaluable insight into the etiology of dental and periodontal diseases, opened the door to new approaches and techniques for developing new therapeutic and preventive tools for combating oral poly-microbial diseases. PMID:20687296

  4. Orality in Northern Cree Indigenous Worlds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber-Pillwax, Cora

    2001-01-01

    Examines the importance and centrality of orality, rather than literacy, in the shared lives of the Cree of northern Alberta. Discusses orality consciousness related to the practice of shared memories and personal and communal healing during the "dance of the ancestors" or "ghost dance." Includes a short history of the Cree people and their…

  5. 10 CFR 2.1113 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oral argument. 2.1113 Section 2.1113 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION RULES OF PRACTICE FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING PROCEEDINGS AND ISSUANCE OF ORDERS Hybrid Hearing Procedures for Expansion of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Capacity at Civilian Nuclear Power Reactors § 2.1113 Oral argument. (a) Twenty-five...

  6. 12 CFR 1102.36 - Oral presentations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Oral presentations. 1102.36 Section 1102.36 Banks and Banking FEDERAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS EXAMINATION COUNCIL APPRAISER REGULATION Rules of Practice for Proceedings § 1102.36 Oral presentations. (a) In general. A party does not have a right to...

  7. 12 CFR 1102.36 - Oral presentations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Oral presentations. 1102.36 Section 1102.36 Banks and Banking FEDERAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS EXAMINATION COUNCIL APPRAISER REGULATION Rules of Practice for Proceedings § 1102.36 Oral presentations. (a) In general. A party does not have a right to...

  8. 12 CFR 1102.36 - Oral presentations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Oral presentations. 1102.36 Section 1102.36 Banks and Banking FEDERAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS EXAMINATION COUNCIL APPRAISER REGULATION Rules of Practice for Proceedings § 1102.36 Oral presentations. (a) In general. A party does not have a right to...

  9. 12 CFR 1102.36 - Oral presentations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Oral presentations. 1102.36 Section 1102.36 Banks and Banking FEDERAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS EXAMINATION COUNCIL APPRAISER REGULATION Rules of Practice for Proceedings § 1102.36 Oral presentations. (a) In general. A party does not have a right to...

  10. Ronald Reagan and the Oral Tradition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Ellen Reid

    1989-01-01

    Uses oral theory to examine the relationship between cognition and orality. Analyzes how the electronic media mimic the kind of interaction between speaker and audience characteristic of preliterate cultures. Argues that Ronald Reagan's effectiveness on television stems from his use of rhetorical structures characteristic of preliterate oral…

  11. Angioneurotic oedema secondary to oral thiamine

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Mugtaba; Casey, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Although allergic side effects due to parenteral thiamine are well-documented, they are extremely rare when thiamine is used orally. We report a case of a 47-year-old woman who developed angioneurotic oedema secondary to oral ingestion of thiamine at a therapeutic dose. The incident occurred twice with a clear temporal relationship to the initiation on thiamine. PMID:24051148

  12. The Oral Speech Mechanism Screening Examination (OSMSE).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Louis, Kenneth O.; Ruscello, Dennis M.

    Although speech-language pathologists are expected to be able to administer and interpret oral examinations, there are currently no screening tests available that provide careful administration instructions and data for intra-examiner and inter-examiner reliability. The Oral Speech Mechanism Screening Examination (OSMSE) is designed primarily for…

  13. 42 CFR 423.2124 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oral argument. 423.2124 Section 423.2124 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM VOLUNTARY MEDICARE PRESCRIPTION DRUG BENEFIT Reopening, ALJ Hearings, MAC review, and Judicial Review § 423.2124 Oral argument....

  14. Application of Laser in Oral Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Asnaashari, Mohammad; Zadsirjan, Saeede

    2014-01-01

    In this review collected from the literature on usage of laser in oral minor surgery based on a Medline search in the time period between the years: 2008 and 2013, the most current evidence on laser-assisted oral minor surgery is going to be surveyed. PMID:25653807

  15. 31 CFR 1010.713 - Oral communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Oral communications. 1010.713 Section 1010.713 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FINANCIAL CRIMES ENFORCEMENT NETWORK, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL PROVISIONS Administrative Rulings § 1010.713 Oral communications. (a) The Director...

  16. Oral Skills Testing: A Rhetorical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazaraton, Anne; Riggenbach, Heidi

    1990-01-01

    The development, implementation, and evaluation of a semidirect test of oral proficiency, the Rhetorical Task Examination (RTE), is reported. The RTE proposes a compromise approach to rating oral skills by having two scales: one for the functional ability for accomplishing rhetorical tasks and one for linguistic competence. (34 references)…

  17. Oral Reading Fluency in Second Language Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeon, Eun Hee

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the role of oral reading fluency in second language reading. Two hundred and fifty-five high school students in South Korea were assessed on three oral reading fluency (ORF) variables and six other reading predictors. The relationship between ORF and other reading predictors was examined through an exploratory factor…

  18. Oral microbial habitat a dynamic entity

    PubMed Central

    Faran Ali, Syed Muhammad; Tanwir, Farzeen

    2012-01-01

    Oral microbial habitat is composed of wide variety of species. These species play a significant role in maintaining the well being of the oral cavity by contributing in various ways. However the proper functioning of these oral microbes can be detrimental for the human oral cavity if the conditions are not suitable such as redox potential (Eh), pH of a site, the activity of the host defenses, and the presence of antimicrobial agents. The oral microbial community represents the best-characterized group associated with the human host. There are strong correlations between the qualitative composition of the oral microbiota and clinically healthy or diseased states. Amongst the bacteria of more than 700 species now identified within the human oral microbiota, it is the streptococci that are numerically predominant. Interactions between mucosal surfaces and microbial microbiota are key to host defense, health, and disease. These surfaces are exposed to high numbers of microbes and must be capable of distinguishing between those that are beneficial or avirulent and those that will invade and cause disease. Our understanding of the mechanisms involved in these discriminatory processes has recently begun to expand as new studies bring to light the importance of epithelial cells and novel immune cell subsets such as T(h)17 T cells in these processes. In this review article we have tried to find out the factors responsible for maintaining oral microbial habitat intact and the reasons which cause changes in its composition. PMID:25737863

  19. 17 CFR 12.312 - Oral hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oral hearing. 12.312 Section 12.312 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION RULES RELATING TO REPARATIONS Rules Applicable to Formal Decisional Proceedings § 12.312 Oral hearing. (a) Notification; prehearing order. If and when the proceeding...

  20. 10 CFR 590.312 - Oral presentations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oral presentations. 590.312 Section 590.312 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES WITH RESPECT TO THE IMPORT AND EXPORT OF NATURAL GAS Procedures § 590.312 Oral presentations. (a)...

  1. 40 CFR 798.2650 - Oral toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Oral toxicity. 798.2650 Section 798.2650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Subchronic Exposure § 798.2650 Oral toxicity. (a) Purpose. In the assessment and evaluation of...

  2. Oral Appliance Therapy for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    MedlinePlus

    ... right provider? Many dentists with specialized training in dental sleep medicine and oral appliance therapy are also members of the American Academy ... dentist search feature on the American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine Web ... oral appliance therapy. This project is a collaboration between the ...

  3. 10 CFR 2.1113 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Oral argument. 2.1113 Section 2.1113 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION AGENCY RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Hybrid Hearing Procedures for Expansion of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Capacity at Civilian Nuclear Power Reactors § 2.1113 Oral argument. (a)...

  4. 10 CFR 2.1113 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Oral argument. 2.1113 Section 2.1113 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION AGENCY RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Hybrid Hearing Procedures for Expansion of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Capacity at Civilian Nuclear Power Reactors § 2.1113 Oral argument. (a)...

  5. Oral and Written Language Scales (OWLS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldblatt, Jennifer; Friedman, Fran

    1999-01-01

    This article describes the Oral and Written Language Scales, an assessment of receptive and expressive language for children and young adults aged 3 to 21. The test assesses overall language skills and specific performance in oral expression, listening comprehension, and written expression. Its administration, standardization, reliability, and…

  6. Oral Assessment in Mathematics: Implementation and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannone, P.; Simpson, A.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we report the planning and implementation of an oral assessment component in a first-year pure mathematics module of a degree course in mathematics. Our aim was to examine potential barriers to using oral assessments, explore the advantages and disadvantages compared to existing common assessment methods and document the outcomes…

  7. Validation of Automated Scoring of Oral Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balogh, Jennifer; Bernstein, Jared; Cheng, Jian; Van Moere, Alistair; Townshend, Brent; Suzuki, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    A two-part experiment is presented that validates a new measurement tool for scoring oral reading ability. Data collected by the U.S. government in a large-scale literacy assessment of adults were analyzed by a system called VersaReader that uses automatic speech recognition and speech processing technologies to score oral reading fluency. In the

  8. Can oral pathogens influence allergic disease?

    PubMed

    Arbes, Samuel J; Matsui, Elizabeth C

    2011-05-01

    The hygiene hypothesis contends that fewer opportunities for infections and microbial exposures have resulted in more widespread asthma and atopic disease. Consistent with that hypothesis, decreases in infectious oral diseases over the past half century have coincided with increases in the prevalence of asthma and other allergic diseases. This observation has led some researchers to speculate that exposures to oral bacteria, including pathogens associated with periodontal diseases, such as gingivitis and periodontitis, might play a protective role in the development of asthma and allergy. Colonization of the oral cavity with bacteria, including some species of periodontal pathogens, begins shortly after birth, and the detection of serum antibodies to oral pathogens in early childhood provides evidence of an early immune response to these bacteria. Current knowledge of the immune response to oral bacteria and the immunologic pathogenesis of periodontal diseases suggests biologically plausible mechanisms by which oral pathogens could influence the risk of allergic disease. However, studies investigating the association between oral pathogen exposures and allergic disease are few in number and limited by cross-sectional or case-control design, exclusion of young children, and use of surrogate measures of oral bacterial colonization. Additional studies, particularly well-designed case-control studies among very young children and prospective birth cohortstudies, are needed. PMID:21531254

  9. Teaching the Past through Oral History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Pattie

    2000-01-01

    Discusses oral history as a means to connect national events with the lives of individual people. Relates the information from student oral term paper interviews, focusing on topics such as the Vietnam War, the Great Depression, civil rights and school integration, and the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. (CMK)

  10. Speak up! Oral Examinations and Political Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buehler, Melissa J.; Schneider, Laura U.

    2009-01-01

    Testing assessments of undergraduate political science students is predictable and stagnant. A missing, yet valuable, testing assessment tool that can contribute to the repertoire of political science is the oral examination. Borrowing this testing tool largely from foreign language departments, oral exams require students to "think on their feet"…

  11. 17 CFR 10.83 - Oral arguments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oral arguments. 10.83 Section 10.83 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION RULES OF PRACTICE Post Hearing Procedures; Initial Decisions § 10.83 Oral arguments. In his discretion the Administrative...

  12. Oral Corrective Feedback in Second Language Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyster, Roy; Saito, Kazuya; Sato, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews research on oral corrective feedback (CF) in second language (L2) classrooms. Various types of oral CF are first identified, and the results of research revealing CF frequency across instructional contexts are presented. Research on CF preferences is then reviewed, revealing a tendency for learners to prefer receiving CF more…

  13. Oral History as a Teaching Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuenschwander, John A.

    The book presents information on the use of oral history as a classroom device. The first chapter discusses the evolution of oral history from a practice intended to preserve information on noted Americans to a way of preserving recollections of older Americans about the past. The second chapter explains why interviewing members of their own…

  14. Classroom Activities: Oral Proficiency in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Sidney; Michaelis, Joyce

    It is important to introduce and facilitate oral activities in the second language classroom with enthusiasm in a climate of mutual support and cooperation. Students should understand that mistakes are inevitable but not fatal, and that each attempt will build greater ease and confidence in using the language for communication. Oral proficiency…

  15. Kaleidoscope 20: Oral History in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Barbara, Ed.; And Others

    This publication discusses oral history, its potential as a teaching tool, and its application in a variety of different classroom situations from the elementary through the post-secondary levels. The purpose is to show the great variety of uses and possibilities for using oral history in the classroom. There are six major sections. The articles…

  16. Oral Rehabilitation and Management of Mentally Retarded

    PubMed Central

    Khetan, Jitendra; Gupta, Sarika; Tomar, Deepak; Singh, Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    High level of periodontal problems of dental caries are frequently observed in mentally handicapped children. This group of patients presents various problems when they face dental treatments. Identification of such population and providing them affordable oral health care is the new concept. A systematic method for identification and screening of persons with mental retardation has been developed and is being followed. Cost and fear are the most commonly cited barriers to dental care. Physical or mental may lead to deterioration in self-care, and oral care state have a low priority. Risk factors are inter-related and are often barriers to oral health. With advancements in today’s world sufficient information and support is available for each and every individual to lead a healthy life which include the access to the oral health care. Factors such as fear, anxiety and dental phobia plays a vital role in acceptance of dental care and also the delaying of dental care. Lack of knowledge of oral and dental disease, awareness or oral need, oral side-effects of medication and organization of dental services are highlighted in the literature. All health personnel should receive training to support the concept of primary oral health care. Training about dealing with such mentally handicapped people should be addressed urgently among the health professionals. PMID:25738098

  17. 10 CFR 590.312 - Oral presentations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Oral presentations. 590.312 Section 590.312 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES WITH RESPECT TO THE IMPORT AND EXPORT OF NATURAL GAS Procedures § 590.312 Oral presentations. (a)...

  18. Midwestern Rural Adolescents' Oral Sex Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dake, Joseph A.; Price, James H.; Ward, Britney L.; Welch, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study examined the prevalence of oral sexual activity in rural Midwestern adolescents. We also examined the correlates of a series of risk behaviors with oral sexual activity. Methods: A questionnaire based on the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System was distributed to 2121 rural middle and high school students in grades 6-12…

  19. Genetic competence and transformation in oral streptococci.

    PubMed

    Cvitkovitch, D G

    2001-01-01

    The oral streptococci are normally non-pathogenic residents of the human microflora. There is substantial evidence that these bacteria can, however, act as "genetic reservoirs" and transfer genetic information to transient bacteria as they make their way through the mouth, the principal entry point for a wide variety of bacteria. Examples that are of particular concern include the transfer of antibiotic resistance from oral streptococci to Streptococcus pneumoniae. The mechanisms that are used by oral streptococci to exchange genetic information are not well-understood, although several species are known to enter a physiological state of genetic competence. This state permits them to become capable of natural genetic transformation, facilitating the acquisition of foreign DNA from the external environment. The oral streptococci share many similarities with two closely related Gram-positive bacteria, S. pneumoniae and Bacillus subtilis. In these bacteria, the mechanisms of quorum-sensing, the development of competence, and DNA uptake and integration are well-characterized. Using this knowledge and the data available in genome databases allowed us to identify putative genes involved in these processes in the oral organism Streptococcus mutans. Models of competence development and genetic transformation in the oral streptococci and strategies to confirm these models are discussed. Future studies of competence in oral biofilms, the natural environment of oral streptococci, will be discussed. PMID:11497374

  20. Oral and Cutaneous Melanoma: Similarities and Differences

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Rafaela Nogueira; Santos, Cassio Roberto Rocha; Lima, Nadia Lages; Verli, Flaviana Dornela; Marinho, Sandra Aparecida

    2010-01-01

    Melanomas are malignant lesions stemming from the disorganized proliferation of melanocytes. This condition is more common on skin, but may also be detected in mucosa, such as in the oral cavity. The aim of the present study was to report similarities and differences between oral and cutaneous melanoma. Keywords Melanoma; Skin; Mouth; Diagnosis PMID:21629531

  1. Underlying skills of oral and silent reading.

    PubMed

    van den Boer, Madelon; van Bergen, Elsje; de Jong, Peter F

    2014-12-01

    Many studies have examined reading and reading development. The majority of these studies, however, focused on oral reading rather than on the more dominant silent reading mode. Similarly, it is common practice to assess oral reading abilities rather than silent reading abilities in schools and in diagnosis of reading impairments. More important, insights gained through examinations of oral reading tend to be generalized to silent reading. In the current study, we examined whether such generalizations are justified. We directly compared oral and silent reading fluency by examining whether these reading modes relate to the same underlying skills. In total, 132 fourth graders read words, sentences, and text orally, and 123 classmates read the same material silently. As underlying skills, we considered phonological awareness, rapid naming, and visual attention span. All skills correlated significantly with both reading modes. Phonological awareness contributed equally to oral and silent reading. Rapid naming, however, correlated more strongly with oral reading than with silent reading. Visual attention span correlated equally strongly with both reading modes but showed a significant unique contribution only to silent reading. In short, we showed that oral and silent reading indeed are fairly similar reading modes, based on the relations with reading-related cognitive skills. However, we also found differences that warrant caution in generalizing findings across reading modes. PMID:25173643

  2. 7 CFR 2901.3 - Oral presentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oral presentation. 2901.3 Section 2901.3 Agriculture... presentation. Any person seeking an adjustment under this part 2901 shall be given an opportunity to make an oral presentation of data, views and arguments in support of the request for an adjustment,...

  3. An effective oral health promoting message?

    PubMed

    Richards, W; Filipponi, T

    2011-12-01

    This paper questions the effectiveness of current oral health promoting activities in reducing social inequalities in oral health. An attempt is made to address the needs of dental professionals and nutritionists in communicating an understanding of biological aspects of the aetiology of caries and erosion. With a clear understanding of the disease process oral health promoters can possibly reduce social inequalities in oral health. A clear common message which satisfies both dental and nutritional professionals is presented. The issues of commonality and ambiguity are fundamental to effective behavioural/teaching practice. Currently the evidence base suggests that dietary messages are inconsistent and ambiguous. Therefore, a clear common and unambiguous dietary message, based on science, could go some way to improving oral health inequalities. PMID:22158167

  4. [Bacteriological study of oral open abscesses].

    PubMed

    Fukui, K; Kato, N; Tanaka, K; Kato, H; Watanabe, K; Tatematsu, N

    1997-12-01

    Although studies of bacteriology of closed oral abscesses have been extensively done, there are few studies on microorganisms involving open oral abscesses. We examined bacteriologically three open abscesses with precaution against bacterial contamination with oral normal flora and saliva, when sampling. The specimens were subjected to aerobic and anaerobic cultures within 2 hours after sampling. All three cases were infected with 5 to 14 species of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria; Streptococcus spp., Prevotella intermedia and other Prevotella spp. were predominant in all three cases. All six Prevotella spp. isolated were beta-lactamase producers, being resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics. These results emphasize the importance of prompt anaerobic culture for the bacteriological study of open oral abscess and the significance of nitrocefin test to detect beta-lactamase produced by oral isolates, especially Prevotella spp. PMID:9483884

  5. Secondary syphilis simulating oral hairy leukoplakia.

    PubMed

    Aquilina, Christian; Viraben, Roland; Denis, Philippe

    2003-10-01

    We describe a case of secondary syphilis of the tongue in which the main clinical presentation of the disease was similar to oral hairy leukoplakia. In a man who was HIV seronegative, the first symptom was a dryness of the throat followed by a feeling of foreign body in the tongue. Lesions were painful without cutaneous manifestations of secondary syphilis. IgM-fluorescent treponemal antibody test and typical serologic parameters promptly led to the diagnosis of secondary syphilis. We initiated an appropriate antibiotic therapy using benzathine penicillin, which induced healing of the tongue lesions. The differential diagnosis of this lesion may include oral squamous carcinoma, leukoplakia, candidosis, lichen planus, and, especially, hairy oral leukoplakia. This case report emphasizes the importance of considering secondary syphilis in the differential diagnosis of hairy oral leukoplakia. Depending on the clinical picture, the possibility of syphilis should not be overlooked in the differential diagnosis of many diseases of the oral mucosa. PMID:14512934

  6. Bacterial and Host Interactions of Oral Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, Justin; Qi, Fengxia

    2009-01-01

    The oral microbial flora comprises one of the most diverse human-associated biofilms. Its development is heavily influenced by oral streptococci, which are considered the main group of early colonizers. Their initial attachment determines the composition of later colonizers in the oral biofilm and impacts the health or disease status of the host. Thus, the role of streptococci in the development of oral diseases is best described in the context of bacterial ecology, which itself is further influenced by interactions with host epithelial cells, the immune system, and salivary components. The tractability of the oral biofilm makes it an excellent model system for studies of complex, biofilm-associated polymicrobial diseases. Using this system, numerous cooperative and antagonistic bacterial interactions have been demonstrated to occur within the community and with the host. In this review, several recent identified interactions are presented. PMID:19435424

  7. Oral glucose decreases hepatic extraction of insulin.

    PubMed Central

    Gibby, O M; Hales, C N

    1983-01-01

    Peripheral venous (plasma) insulin and C-peptide concentrations were measured in eight normal subjects given oral or intravenous glucose sufficient to produce similar plasma glucose concentrations. The expected increased insulin response to oral as compared with intravenous glucose was not matched by a comparable increase in C-peptide concentration. The ratio of insulin to C-peptide concentrations doubled 30 minutes after oral glucose was given; no comparable rise was seen with intravenous glucose (p = 0.01). This finding is interpreted as evidence for decreased hepatic extraction of insulin after administration of oral glucose. Such a decrease could account for at least half of the well known difference in peripheral insulin concentrations after administration of oral as compared with intravenous glucose. PMID:6403135

  8. Moral Violations Reduce Oral Consumption.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cindy; Van Boven, Leaf; Andrade, Eduardo B; Ariely, Dan

    2014-07-01

    Consumers frequently encounter moral violations in everyday life. They watch movies and television shows about crime and deception, hear news reports of corporate fraud and tax evasion, and hear gossip about cheaters and thieves. How does exposure to moral violations influence consumption? Because moral violations arouse disgust and because disgust is an evolutionarily important signal of contamination that should provoke a multi-modal response, we hypothesize that moral violations affect a key behavioral response to disgust: reduced oral consumption. In three experiments, compared with those in control conditions, people drank less water and chocolate milk while (a) watching a film portraying the moral violations of incest, (b) writing about moral violations of cheating or theft, and (c) listening to a report about fraud and manipulation. These findings imply that "moral disgust" influences consumption in ways similar to core disgust, and thus provide evidence for the associations between moral violations, emotions, and consumer behavior. PMID:25125931

  9. Pancake Syndrome (Oral Mite Anaphylaxis)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Oral mite anaphylaxis is a new syndrome characterized by severe allergic manifestations occurring in atopic patients shortly after the intake of foods made with mite-contaminated wheat flour. This clinical entity, observed more frequently in tropical/subtropical environments, is more often triggered by pancakes and for that reason it has been designated "pancake syndrome". Because cooked foods are able to induce the symptoms, it has been proposed that thermoresistant allergens are involved in its production. A novel variety of this syndrome occurs during physical exercise and therefore has been named dust mite ingestion-associated exercise-induced anaphylaxis. To prevent mite proliferation and the production of anaphylaxis, it has been recommended that wheat flour be stored at low temperatures in the refrigerator. PMID:23283016

  10. Moral Violations Reduce Oral Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Cindy; Van Boven, Leaf; Andrade, Eduardo B.; Ariely, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Consumers frequently encounter moral violations in everyday life. They watch movies and television shows about crime and deception, hear news reports of corporate fraud and tax evasion, and hear gossip about cheaters and thieves. How does exposure to moral violations influence consumption? Because moral violations arouse disgust and because disgust is an evolutionarily important signal of contamination that should provoke a multi-modal response, we hypothesize that moral violations affect a key behavioral response to disgust: reduced oral consumption. In three experiments, compared with those in control conditions, people drank less water and chocolate milk while (a) watching a film portraying the moral violations of incest, (b) writing about moral violations of cheating or theft, and (c) listening to a report about fraud and manipulation. These findings imply that “moral disgust” influences consumption in ways similar to core disgust, and thus provide evidence for the associations between moral violations, emotions, and consumer behavior. PMID:25125931

  11. Pathogenesis of oral submucous fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saba; Chatra, Laxmikanth; Prashanth, Shenai K; Veena, K M; Rao, Prasanna Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Data from recent epidemiological studies provide overwhelming evidence that areca nut is the main etiological factor for oral submucous fibrosis (OSF). It is logical to hypothesize that the increased collagen synthesis or reduced collagen degradation is the possible mechanism in the development of the disease. There are numerous biological pathways involved in the above processes and it is likely that the normal regulatory mechanisms are either down regulated or up regulated at different stages of the disease. The copper content of areca nut is high and the possible role of copper as a mediator of fibrosis is supported by the demonstration of the up regulation of lysyl oxidase in OSMF biopsies. The aim of this article is to emphasize that the incorporation of copper into the areca nut is through the Bordeaux mixture, which is sprayed as a fungicide on areca plantations in regions with scheduled monsoons and of which copper sulfate is an important constituent. PMID:22842361

  12. Elucidation of Equivalent Current Dipole from Magnetocardiography (MCG) Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariyappa, N.; Janawadkar, M. P.; Radhakrishnan, T. S.; Sundar, C. S.; Sengottuvel, S.; Gireesan, K.; Parasakthi, C.; Patel, Rajesh

    2011-07-01

    A method is presented for reconstructing the source parameters of an equivalent current dipole assumed to be responsible for the observed magnetic field distribution. We solve the inverse problem using an iterative nonlinear least square optimization technique. Since the inverse problem is ill-posed and its solution is non-unique, the solution may be trapped in a local minimum if the initial values are far from the exact solution. This necessitates an estimate of the source parameters to be available as a prior knowledge for choosing the initial values. Here, we assume a set of pseudorandom numbers as the initial values for the source parameters and reconstruct the solution by imposing appropriate constraints such that the position coordinates of the dipole are within the boundary occupied by the heart. The method is shown to provide the solution with reasonable accuracy even in the presence of about 15% additive random noise in a study involving simulated data. The method is used for the analysis of magnetocardiography data of a human subject recorded using a SQUID based measurement system developed at IGCAR.

  13. Oral health promotion interventions on oral yeast in hospitalised and medically compromised patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lam, Otto L T; Bandara, H M H N; Samaranayake, Lakshman P; McGrath, Colman; Li, Leonard S W

    2012-03-01

    Yeast are major aetiological agents of localised oral mucosal lesions, and are also leading causes of nosocomial bloodstream infections. The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the effectiveness of oral health promotion interventions on the prevalence and incidence of these opportunistic oral pathogens in hospitalised and medically compromised patients. The PubMed, ISI Web of Science and Cochrane Library databases were searched for clinical trials assessing the effect of oral health promotion interventions on oral yeast. Chlorhexidine delivered in a variety of oral hygiene products appeared to have some effect on oral yeast, although some studies found equivocal effects. Although a wide array of other compounds have also been investigated, their clinical effectiveness remains to be substantiated. Likewise, the utility of mechanical oral hygiene interventions and other oral health promotion measures such as topical application of salivary substitute, remains unsettled. Although many chemical agents contained in oral hygiene products have proven in vitro activity against oral yeast, their clinical effectiveness and potential role as adjuncts or alternative therapies to conventional treatment remains to be confirmed by further high-quality randomised controlled trials. This is pertinent, given the recent emergence of yeast resistance to conventional antifungal agents. PMID:21749481

  14. [Cytogenetics of oral solid tumors].

    PubMed

    Manor, E; Bodner, L

    2011-10-01

    The tumorigenesiss of oral solid tumors is still uncertain. The underlying mechanisms of epithelial or connective tissue proliferation are not yet fully understood. Also, the transformation of a benign tumor into malignant is obscure. Cytogenetics is the study of chromosome number and structure using a light microscope. Human chromosome nomenclature is based on An International System for Human Cytogenetic Nomenclature (ISCN). The normal human somatic cells have 46 chromosomes, including 22 pairs of autosomes and two sex chromosomes, XX in female and XY in male. The chromosome abnormalities can be numerical and structural. Both types can occur concurrently. Numerical abnormalities involve the loss and/or gain of a whole chromosome and can include both autosomes and sex chromosomes. Cells which have lost a chromosome are categorized as a monosomy, while those with an extra chromosome are trisomy. Structural abnormalities include translocations, deletions, inversions and insertions. Cancer, in its various forms is a result of genetic changes. This concept comes from the finding of chromosomal abnormalities. These abnormalities may arise as a consequence of random replication errors; exposure to carcinogens; or damaged DNA repair process. In clinical oncology, the study of chromosome abnormalities in solid tumors provides valuable information for the diagnosis, evaluating treatment response of metastatic cancer, marker for prognosis and targeted therapy. In tumors which histologic features overlap, cytogenetics plays an important role for diagnosis. Cytogenetics has also been used to monitor the surgical margins of the resection in head and neck carcinoma, where the histology was not definitive. The present report will focus on the role of cytogenetics in the diagnosis and prognosis of benign and malignant oral solid tumors. PMID:22471156

  15. Bisphosphonate-Mediated Oral Ulcers: A Rare Differential Diagnosis of Erosive Oral Lesions.

    PubMed

    Lengfeld, Julia; Buder-Bakhaya, Kristina; Goebeler, Matthias; Wobser, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Oral bisphosphonates are widely used drugs for the treatment of various indications such as postmenopausal osteoporosis. Ulcerations of the upper gastrointestinal tract, predominantly reported for alendronate, are common side effects. The occurrence of ulcerations within the oral cavity is less well known and probably underreported. Especially in cases of incorrect mode of intake, oral bisphosphonates are prone to induce oral ulcerations by as yet incompletely delineated mechanisms. We herein report on 2 elderly female patients suffering from oral ulcerations, which could be attributed to inadequate ingestion of alendronate. Possible ways to cause damage to the oral mucosa include non-specific toxic and pro-apoptotic effects, partly via bisphosphonate-mediated interference with intracellular signalling such as the mevalonate downstream pathway. Adequate patient advice in terms of correct use of oral bisphosphonates is crucial in order to prevent mucosal damage. Otherwise, prompt treatment cessation or a switch to an intravenously administered bisphosphonate is likely to achieve complete healing. PMID:26458129

  16. Clinical and microbiological diagnosis of oral candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Soriano, Yolanda

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Candidiasis or oral candidiasis is the most frequent mucocutaneous mycosis of the oral cavity. It is produced by the genus Candida, which is found in the oral cavity of 53% of the general population as a common commensal organism. One hundred and fifty species have been isolated in the oral cavity, and 80% of the isolates correspond to Candida albicans, which can colonize the oral cavity alone or in combination with other species. Transformation from commensal organism to pathogen depends on the intervention of different predisposing factors that modify the microenvironment of the oral cavity and favor the appearance of opportunistic infection. The present study offers a literature review on the diagnosis of oral candidiasis, with the purpose of establishing when complementary microbiological techniques for the diagnosis of oral candidiasis should be used, and which techniques are most commonly employed in routine clinical practice in order to establish a definitive diagnosis. Materials and methods: A Medline-PubMed, Scopus and Cochrane search was made covering the last 10 years. Results: The diagnosis of oral candidiasis is fundamentally clinical. Microbiological techniques are used when the clinical diagnosis needs to be confirmed, for establishing a differential diagnosis with other diseases, and in cases characterized by resistance to antifungal drugs. Biopsies in turn are indicated in patients with hyperplastic candidiasis. Staining (10% KOH) and culture (Sabouraud dextrose agar) are the methods most commonly used for diagnosing primary candidiasis. Identification of the individual species of Candida is usually carried out with CHROMagar Candida®. For the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis, and in cases requiring differentiation between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis, use is made of immunological and genetic techniques such as ELISA and PCR. Key words:Clinical, oral candidiasis, microbiology. PMID:24455095

  17. Oral Manifestations in the American Tegumentary Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Daniel Cesar Silva; Palmeiro, Mariana Reuter; Moreira, João Soares; Martins, Ana Cristina da Costa; da Silva, Aline Fagundes; de Fátima Madeira, Maria; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira; Confort, Eliame Mouta; de Oliveira Schubach, Armando; da Conceição Silva, Fátima; Valete-Rosalino, Cláudia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) can affect the skin or mucosa (mucocutaneous leishmaniasis – MCL) including the oral cavity. MCL oral lesions are often confused with other oral diseases, delaying diagnosis and specific treatment, and increasing the likelihood of sequelae. Thus, increasing the knowledge of the evolution of ATL oral lesions can facilitate its early diagnosis improving the prognosis of healing. Objectives Evaluate the frequency of ATL oral lesion and describe its clinical, laboratory and therapeutic peculiarities. Methods A descriptive transversal study was carried out, using data from medical records of 206 patients with MCL examined at the outpatient clinics-IPEC-Fiocruz between 1989 and 2013. Proportions were calculated for the categorical variables and the association among them was assessed by the Pearson's chi-square test. Measures of central tendency and dispersion were used for the continuous variables and their differences were assessed by both parametric (t test) and non parametric (Mann-Whitney) tests. P-values <0.05 were considered as significant. Results The most affected site was the nose, followed by the mouth, pharynx and larynx. Seventy eight (37.9%) have oral lesions and the disease presented a lower median of the evolution time than in other mucous sites as well as an increased time to heal. The presence of oral lesion was associated with: the presence of lesions in the other three mucosal sites; a smaller median of the leishmanin skin test values; a longer healing time of the mucosal lesions; a higher recurrence frequency; and a smaller frequency of treatment finishing and healing. When the oral lesion was isolated, it was associated with an age 20 years lower than when the oral lesion was associated with other mucosal sites. Conclusion Considering the worst therapy results associated with the presence of oral lesions, we suggest that lesions in this location represent a factor of worse prognosis for MCL. PMID:25386857

  18. TWIST and p-Akt immunoexpression in normal oral epithelium oral dysplasia and in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Fernanda-Paula; Corrêa Pontes, Flávia-Sirotheau; Cury, Sérgio-Elias; Fonseca, Felipe-Paiva; Rebelo-Pontes, Hélder; Pinto-Júnior, Décio-dos Santos

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunoexpression of TWIST and p-Akt proteins in oral leukoplakia (OL) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), correlating their expressions with the histological features of the lesions. Study design: Immunohistochemical studies were carried out on 10 normal oral epithelium, 30 OL and 20 OSCC formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples. Immunoperoxidase reactions for TWIST and p-Akt proteins were applied on the specimens and the positivity of the reactions was calculated for 1000 epithelial cells. Results: Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn’s post tests revealed a significant difference in TWIST and p-Akt immunoexpression among normal oral mucosa, OL and OSCC. In addition, a significant positive correlation was found between TWIST and p-Akt expressions according to the Pearson’s correlation test. Conclusions: The results obtained in the current study suggest that TWIST and p-Akt may participate of the multi-step process of oral carcinogenesis since its early stages. Key words: Oral cancer, oral leukoplakia, dysplasia, immunohistochemistry. PMID:21743395

  19. Comparison of a Two-Lead, Computerized, Resting ECG Signal Analysis Device, the MultiFunction-CardioGramsm or MCG (a.k.a. 3DMP), to Quantitative Coronary Angiography for the Detection of Relevant Coronary Artery Stenosis (>70%) - A Meta-Analysis of all Published Trials Performed and Analyzed in the US

    PubMed Central

    Strobeck, John E.; Shen, Joseph T.; Singh, Binoy; Obunai, Kotaro; Miceli, Charles; Sacher, Howard; Ritucci, Franz; Imhoff, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background: Accurate, non-invasive diagnosis of, and screening for, coronary artery disease (CAD) and restenosis after coronary revascularization has been a challenge due to either low sensitivity/specificity or relevant morbidity associated with current diagnostic modalities. Methods: To assess sensitivity and specificity of a new computerized, multiphase, resting electrocardiogram analysis device (MultiFunction-CardioGramsm or MCG a.k.a. 3DMP) for the detection of relevant coronary stenosis (>70%), a meta-analysis of three published prospective trials performed in the US on patient data collected using the US manufactured device and analyzed using the US-based software and New York data analysis center from patients in the US, Germany, and Asia was completed. A total of 1076 patients from the three trials (US - 136; Germany - 751; Asia - 189) (average age 62 ± 11.5, 65 for women, 60 for men) scheduled for coronary angiography, were included in the analysis. Patients enrolled in the trials may or may not have had prior angiography and/or coronary intervention. Angiographic results in all studies were classified for hemodynamically relevant stenosis (> 70%) by two US based angiographers independently. Results: Hemodynamically relevant stenosis was diagnosed in 467 patients (43.4%). The device, after performing a frequency-domain, computational analysis of the resting ECG leads and computer-database comparison, calculated a coronary ischemia “severity” score from 0 to 20 for each patient. The severity score was significantly higher for patients with relevant coronary stenosis (5.4 ± 1.8 vs. 1.7 ± 2.1). The study device (using a cut-off score for relevant stenosis of 4.0) correctly classified 941 of the 1076 patients with or without relevant stenosis (sensitivity-91.2%; specificity-84.6%; NPV 0.942, PPV 0.777). Adjusted positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were 81.9% and 92.6%, respectively (ROC AUC = 0.881 [95% CI: 0.860-0.903]). Subgroup analysis showed no significant influence of sex, age, race/nationality, previous revascularization procedures, resting ECG morphology, or participating center on the device's diagnostic performance. Conclusions: The new computerized, multiphase, resting ECG analysis device (MultiFunction-CardioGramsm) has been shown in this meta-analysis to safely and accurately identify patients with relevant coronary stenosis (>70%) with high sensitivity and specificity and high negative predictive value. Its potential use in the evaluation of symptomatic patients suspected to suffer from coronary disease/ischemia is discussed. PMID:19381351

  20. Systemic Diseases Caused by Oral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaojing; Kolltveit, Kristin M.; Tronstad, Leif; Olsen, Ingar

    2000-01-01

    Recently, it has been recognized that oral infection, especially periodontitis, may affect the course and pathogenesis of a number of systemic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, bacterial pneumonia, diabetes mellitus, and low birth weight. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the current status of oral infections, especially periodontitis, as a causal factor for systemic diseases. Three mechanisms or pathways linking oral infections to secondary systemic effects have been proposed: (i) metastatic spread of infection from the oral cavity as a result of transient bacteremia, (ii) metastatic injury from the effects of circulating oral microbial toxins, and (iii) metastatic inflammation caused by immunological injury induced by oral microorganisms. Periodontitis as a major oral infection may affect the host's susceptibility to systemic disease in three ways: by shared risk factors; subgingival biofilms acting as reservoirs of gram-negative bacteria; and the periodontium acting as a reservoir of inflammatory mediators. Proposed evidence and mechanisms of the above odontogenic systemic diseases are given. PMID:11023956

  1. Antifungal drug resistance of oral fungi.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Masakazu; Firth, Norman A; Cannon, Richard D

    2010-02-01

    Fungi comprise a minor component of the oral microbiota but give rise to oral disease in a significant proportion of the population. The most common form of oral fungal disease is oral candidiasis, which has a number of presentations. The mainstay for the treatment of oral candidiasis is the use of polyenes, such as nystatin and amphotericin B, and azoles including miconazole, fluconazole, and itraconazole. Resistance of fungi to polyenes is rare, but some Candida species, such as Candida glabrata and C. krusei, are innately less susceptible to azoles, and C. albicans can acquire azole resistance. The main mechanism of high-level fungal azole resistance, measured in vitro, is energy-dependent drug efflux. Most fungi in the oral cavity, however, are present in multispecies biofilms that typically demonstrate an antifungal resistance phenotype. This resistance is the result of multiple factors including the expression of efflux pumps in the fungal cell membrane, biofilm matrix permeability, and a stress response in the fungal cell. Removal of dental biofilms, or treatments to prevent biofilm development in combination with antifungal drugs, may enable better treatment and prevention of oral fungal disease. PMID:20155503

  2. Protein and Peptide Drug Delivery: Oral Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Shaji, Jessy; Patole, V.

    2008-01-01

    Till recent, injections remained the most common means for administering therapeutic proteins and peptides because of their poor oral bioavailability. However, oral route would be preferred to any other route because of its high levels of patient acceptance and long term compliance, which increases the therapeutic value of the drug. Designing and formulating a polypeptide drug delivery through the gastro intestinal tract has been a persistent challenge because of their unfavorable physicochemical properties, which includes enzymatic degradation, poor membrane permeability and large molecular size. The main challenge is to improve the oral bioavailability from less than 1% to at least 30-50%. Consequently, efforts have intensified over the past few decades, where every oral dosage form used for the conventional small molecule drugs has been used to explore oral protein and peptide delivery. Various strategies currently under investigation include chemical modification, formulation vehicles and use of enzyme inhibitors, absorption enhancers and mucoadhesive polymers. This review summarizes different pharmaceutical approaches which overcome various physiological barriers that help to improve oral bioavailability that ultimately achieve formulation goals for oral delivery. PMID:20046732

  3. Oral health and elite sport performance.

    PubMed

    Needleman, Ian; Ashley, Paul; Fine, Peter; Haddad, Fares; Loosemore, Mike; de Medici, Akbar; Donos, Nikos; Newton, Tim; van Someren, Ken; Moazzez, Rebecca; Jaques, Rod; Hunter, Glenn; Khan, Karim; Shimmin, Mark; Brewer, John; Meehan, Lyndon; Mills, Steve; Porter, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    While the research base is limited, studies have consistently reported poor oral health in elite athletes since the first report from the 1968 Olympic Games. The finding is consistent both across selected samples attending dental clinics at major competitions and more representative sampling of teams and has led to calls from the International Olympic Committee for more accurate data on oral health. Poor oral health is an important issue directly as it can cause pain, negative effects on appearance and psychosocial effects on confidence and quality of life and may have long-term consequences for treatment burden. Self-reported evidence also suggests an impact on training and performance of athletes. There are many potential challenges to the oral health of athletes including nutritional, oral dehydration, exercise-induced immune suppression, lack of awareness, negative health behaviours and lack of prioritisation. However, in theory, oral diseases are preventable by simple interventions with good evidence of efficacy. The consensus statement aims to raise awareness of the issues of oral health in elite sport and recommends strategies for prevention and health promotion in addition to future research strategies. PMID:25263651

  4. Oral myiasis in a maxillofacial trauma patient.

    PubMed

    Vinit, Grandim Balarama Gupta; Jayavelu, Perumal; Shrutha, Santhebachali Prakasha

    2013-07-01

    Myiasis is a rare disease primarily caused by the invasion of tissue by larvae of certain dipteran flies. Oral myiasis is still more "rare" and "unique" owing to the fact that oral cavity rarely provides the necessary habitat conducive for a larval lifecycle. Common predisposing factors are poor oral hygiene, halitosis, trauma, senility, learning disabilities, physically and mentally challenged conditions. Oral myiasis can lead to rapid tissue destruction and disfigurement and requires immediate treatment. Treatment consists of manual removal of maggots from the oral cavity after application of chemical agents. Good sanitation, personal and environmental hygiene and cleanliness and special care for debilitated persons are the best methods to prevent oral myiasis. This case report describes the presentation of oral myiasis caused by musca nebulo (common house fly) in a 40-year-old male patient, with recent maxillofacial trauma. The patient was treated by manual removal larvae by topical application of turpentine oil, followed by surgical debridement of the wound and open reduction and internal fixation of the fracture. PMID:23956607

  5. Improving Children’s Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    Casamassimo, P.S.; Lee, J.Y.; Marazita, M.L.; Milgrom, P.; Chi, D.L.; Divaris, K.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the concerted efforts of research and professional and advocacy stakeholders, recent evidence suggests that improvements in the oral health of young children in the United States has not followed the prevailing trend of oral health improvement in other age groups. In fact, oral health disparities in the youngest children may be widening, yet efforts to translate advances in science and technology into meaningful improvements in populations’ health have had limited success. Nevertheless, the great strides in genomics, biological, behavioral, social, and health services research in the past decade have strengthened the evidence base available to support initiatives and translational efforts. Concerted actions to accelerate this translation and implementation process are warranted; at the same time, policies that can help tackle the upstream determinants of oral health disparities are imperative. This article summarizes the proceedings from the symposium on the interdisciplinary continuum of pediatric oral health that was held during the 43rd annual meeting of the American Association for Dental Research, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA. This report showcases the latest contributions across the interdisciplinary continuum of pediatric oral health research and provides insights into future research priorities and necessary intersectoral synergies. Issues are discussed as related to the overwhelming dominance of social determinants on oral disease and the difficulty of translating science into action. PMID:25122218

  6. Ethical considerations in community oral health.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Sudeshni

    2015-05-01

    As the public's oral health care needs increase in complexity, there is renewed attention to the ethical dimensions of community oral health decision making and the development of public health ethics in teaching and research in dentistry. Despite their reduction globally, oral diseases persist with a particular distribution pattern that is a reflection of the increasingly widespread inequality in access to community oral health preventive and dental care. This is due to differences in the appropriateness, availability, accessibility, and acceptability of oral health education and the care provided. This article provides an overview of community oral health from an ethical perspective, including the importance of equity, human rights, and social justice in providing oral health care to the underserved. The need for a paradigm shift from highly technical and individualistic dental training curricula is discussed, together with the need to instill a holistic approach to ethical and social responsibility in new dental graduates. It concludes with some possible strategies, using the overarching principles of ethics and bioethics that are applicable to practice among vulnerable populations. PMID:25941240

  7. Oral health and elite sport performance

    PubMed Central

    Needleman, Ian; Ashley, Paul; Fine, Peter; Haddad, Fares; Loosemore, Mike; de Medici, Akbar; Donos, Nikos; Newton, Tim; van Someren, Ken; Moazzez, Rebecca; Jaques, Rod; Hunter, Glenn; Khan, Karim; Shimmin, Mark; Brewer, John; Meehan, Lyndon; Mills, Steve; Porter, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    While the research base is limited, studies have consistently reported poor oral health in elite athletes since the first report from the 1968 Olympic Games. The finding is consistent both across selected samples attending dental clinics at major competitions and more representative sampling of teams and has led to calls from the International Olympic Committee for more accurate data on oral health. Poor oral health is an important issue directly as it can cause pain, negative effects on appearance and psychosocial effects on confidence and quality of life and may have long-term consequences for treatment burden. Self-reported evidence also suggests an impact on training and performance of athletes. There are many potential challenges to the oral health of athletes including nutritional, oral dehydration, exercise-induced immune suppression, lack of awareness, negative health behaviours and lack of prioritisation. However, in theory, oral diseases are preventable by simple interventions with good evidence of efficacy. The consensus statement aims to raise awareness of the issues of oral health in elite sport and recommends strategies for prevention and health promotion in addition to future research strategies. PMID:25263651

  8. School based oral health promotional intervention: Effect on knowledge, practices and clinical oral health related parameters

    PubMed Central

    Gauba, Arjun; Bal, Ikreet Singh; Jain, Ashish; Mittal, Hitesh Chander

    2013-01-01

    Background: No organized school oral health program is existent in India. Aim: The aim of this study is to test the feasibility and efficacy of an economical school oral health promotional intervention with educational and preventive components. Settings and Design: School oral health promotional intervention carried out in one of the randomly selected school and evaluated through short duration prospective model. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 children with an age range of 10-12 years with no previous history of dental intervention were enrolled. Interventions comprised of oral health education (delivered through lecture and demonstrations by an undergraduate dental student) and topical antibacterial therapy (fluoride varnish and povidone iodine). Outcomes consisted of Knowledge and practices (KAP) regarding oral health, clinical oral health related parameters such as plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI) and caries activity as per Modified Snyder's test. These were reported at baseline, 3 weeks and 6 months follow-up examination by a calibrated examiner. Statistical Analysis: McNemar Bowker's test, Student's t-test, Pearson Chi-square tests were used. Results: Highly significant (P < 0.001) improvements in KAP scores, PI scores, GI scores and caries activity were reported at 3 weeks and 6 months follow-up examination. Conclusion: This small economical school oral health program positively influenced oral health related practices and parameters of oral health such as oral cleanliness, gingival health and caries activity. PMID:24403795

  9. Oral Cancer and Oral Precancerous Lesions in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Katsanos, Konstantinos H; Roda, Giulia; Brygo, Alexandre; Delaporte, Emmanuel; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric

    2015-11-01

    Oral cancer is historically linked to well-known behavioural risk factors such as tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption. Other risk factors include age over 40, male sex, several dietary factors, nutritional deficiencies, viruses, sexually transmitted infections, human papillomavirus, chronic irritation, and possibly genetic predisposition. Precancerous lesions in the oral cavity include leukoplakia, erythroplakia, and lichen planus. Histology of oral cancer varies widely but the great majority are squamous cell carcinomas.Epidemiological studies and cancer registries have shown a consistently increased risk of oral malignancies in kidney, bone marrow, heart, or liver transplantation, in graft vs host disease, and in patients with HIV infection. Because of the increasing use of immunosuppressive drugs in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, it is useful to more accurately delineate the consequences of chronic immunosuppression to the oral cavity. Oral cancer and precancerous oral lesions in patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] have been scarcely reported and reviews on the topic are lacking.We conducted a literature search using the terms and variants of all cancerous and precancerous oral manifestations of inflammatory bowel diseases. By retrieving the existing literature, it is evident that patients with IBD belong to the high-risk group of developing these lesions, a phenomenon amplified by the increasing HPV prevalence. Education on modifiable risk behaviours in patients with oral cancer is the cornerstone of prevention.Oral screening should be performed for all IBD patients, especially those who are about to start an immunosuppressant or biological drug. PMID:26163301

  10. Myofibroblasts in oral lesions: A review

    PubMed Central

    Pinisetti, Soujanya; Manyam, Ravikanth; Suresh, Babburi; Aparna, V

    2014-01-01

    Myofibroblasts (MFs) are modified fibroblasts that express features of smooth muscle differentiation and were first observed in granulation tissue during wound healing. These cells play a key role in physiologic and pathologic processes like wound healing and tumorigenesis. The presence of MFs has been reported in normal oral tissues and pathologic conditions like reactive lesions, benign tumors, locally aggressive tumors and malignancies affecting the oral cavity. This article briefly reviews the important hallmarks related to the discovery, characterization and tissue distribution of MFs in oral health and disease. PMID:24959038

  11. Prebiotics and Probiotics and Oral Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurman, J. H.

    The first part of this chapter describes the unique characteristics of the mouth with special emphasis on the oral microbiota. Next, the highly prevalent dental diseases are briefly described together with more rare but still important diseases and symptoms of the mouth. Prevention and treatment of oral and dental diseases are also discussed focusing on aspects considered important with respect to the potential application of prebiotics and probiotics. The second part of the chapter then concentrates on research data on prebiotics and probiotics in the oral health perspective, ending up with conclusions and visions for future research.

  12. Myofibroblasts in oral lesions: A review.

    PubMed

    Pinisetti, Soujanya; Manyam, Ravikanth; Suresh, Babburi; Aparna, V

    2014-01-01

    Myofibroblasts (MFs) are modified fibroblasts that express features of smooth muscle differentiation and were first observed in granulation tissue during wound healing. These cells play a key role in physiologic and pathologic processes like wound healing and tumorigenesis. The presence of MFs has been reported in normal oral tissues and pathologic conditions like reactive lesions, benign tumors, locally aggressive tumors and malignancies affecting the oral cavity. This article briefly reviews the important hallmarks related to the discovery, characterization and tissue distribution of MFs in oral health and disease. PMID:24959038

  13. Dissortativity and duplications in oral cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Pramod; Yadav, Alok; Rai, Aparna; Jalan, Sarika

    2015-08-01

    More than 300 000 new cases worldwide are being diagnosed with oral cancer annually. Complexity of oral cancer renders designing drug targets very difficult. We analyse protein-protein interaction network for the normal and oral cancer tissue and detect crucial changes in the structural properties of the networks in terms of the interactions of the hub proteins and the degree-degree correlations. Further analysis of the spectra of both the networks, while exhibiting universal statistical behaviour, manifest distinction in terms of the zero degeneracy, providing insight to the complexity of the underlying system.

  14. Pathogenesis of postoperative oral surgical pain.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cliff K. S.; Seymour, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    Pain is a major postoperative symptom in many oral surgical procedures. It is a complex and variable phenomenon that can be influenced by many factors. Good management of oral surgical pain requires a detailed understanding of the pathogenesis of surgical pain. This article aims at reviewing postoperative pain from a broad perspective by looking into the nociception, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neuropharmacology of pain. Therapeutic recommendations are made after reviewing the evidence from the literature for maximizing the efficacy of pain management techniques for oral surgical pain. PMID:12722900

  15. Oral manifestations of HIV disease: A review.

    PubMed

    Aškinytė, Daiva; Matulionytė, Raimonda; Rimkevičius, Arūnas

    2015-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS pandemic continues to plague the world. Evaluation of oral health status is important at every stage in the management of HIV disease. Oral health services and professionals can contribute effectively to the control of HIV/AIDS through health education, patient care, infection control and surveillance. Dental professionals have an important task of determining accurate diagnosis of oral manifestations and choosing proper treatment for each case. This review provides information on HIV associated orofacial lesions, their clinical presentation and up to date treatment strategies. PMID:26183854

  16. Evaluation of a suspicious oral mucosal lesion.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Michele; Poh, Catherine F; Hovan, Allan J; Ng, Samson; Rosin, Miriam P

    2008-04-01

    Dentists who encounter a change in the oral mucosa of a patient must decide whether the abnormality requires further investigation. In this paper, we describe a systematic approach to the assessment of oral mucosal conditions that are thought likely to be premalignant or an early cancer. These steps, which include a comprehensive history, step-by-step clinical examination (including use of adjunctive visual tools), diagnostic testing and formulation of diagnosis, are routinely used in clinics affiliated with the British Columbia Oral Cancer Prevention Program (BC OCPP) and are recommended for consideration by dentists for use in daily practice. PMID:18387268

  17. Oral Allergy Syndrome: An Update for Stomatologists

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Roopashri Rajesh; Kashyap, Rajesh Shanker

    2015-01-01

    Oral allergy syndrome (OAS) is an allergic reaction in the oral cavity subsequent to the consumption of food such as fruits, nuts, and vegetables. It occurs mainly due to homology of proteins of pollen to the proteins of fruits and vegetables. In OAS, the immune system produces antibodies that are directed against the proteins of pollen and structurally similar proteins in food, hence, resulting in allergic symptoms limited mainly to the oral cavity. In this review, we have summarized the etiopathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, and management of OAS as an update for stomatologists. PMID:26633978

  18. Hydration and endocrine responses to intravenous fluid and oral glycerol.

    PubMed

    van Rosendal, S P; Strobel, N A; Osborne, M A; Fassett, R G; Coombes, J S

    2015-06-01

    Athletes use intravenous (IV) saline in an attempt to maximize rehydration. The diuresis from IV rehydration may be circumvented through the concomitant use of oral glycerol. We examined the effects of rehydrating with differing regimes of oral and IV fluid, with or without oral glycerol, on hydration, urine, and endocrine indices. Nine endurance-trained men were dehydrated by 4% bodyweight, then rehydrated with 150% of the fluid lost via four protocols: (a) oral = oral fluid only; (b) oral glycerol = oral fluid with added glycerol (1.5 g/kg); (c) IV = 50% IV fluid, 50% oral fluid; and (d) IV with oral glycerol = 50% IV fluid, 50% oral fluid with added glycerol (1.5 g/kg), using a randomized, crossover design. They then completed a cycling performance test. Plasma volume restoration was highest in IV with oral glycerol > IV > oral glycerol  > oral. Urine volume was reduced in both IV trials compared with oral. IV and IV with oral glycerol resulted in lower aldosterone levels during rehydration and performance, and lower cortisol levels during rehydration. IV with oral glycerol resulted in the greatest fluid retention. In summary, the IV conditions resulted in greater fluid retention compared with oral and lower levels of fluid regulatory and stress hormones compared with both oral conditions. PMID:25943662

  19. A Comparative Immunohistochemical Analysis of Langerhans Cells in Oral Mucosa, Oral Lichen Planus and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dorankula, Shyam Prasad Reddy; Pasupula, Ajay Prakash; Thokala, Madhusudan Rao; Muddana, Keerthi; Ramavath, Ravinder

    2015-01-01

    Background Langerhans cells (LCs) are immunocompetent cells resident within oral mucosa which, together with intraepithelial lymphocytes, play a role in mucosal defence. LCs play a role in the pathogenesis of Oral lichen planus (OLP), a chronic mucocutaneous disorder thought to result from cell-mediated immune damage. In oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), LCs are thought to present tumour antigens to the lymphocytes. Aim To assess and compare LCs immuno-histochemically in normal mucosa, oral lichen planus and oral squamous cell carcinoma using anti S100 antibody and to know whether LCs play any role in local immune response to these diseases. Materials and Methods The study was carried out in 65 cases (study group), 30 oral lichen planus and 35 oral squamous cell carcinoma (15 well differentiated, 14 moderately differentiated and 6 poorly differentiated), that were randomly selected from the archives of department of oral pathology and along with control group consisting of 30 normal healthy mucosa. The tissue sections were stained immunohisto-chemically by using anti S100 antibody in each group for detection of LCs. Results There was significant change in mean value of number of LCs in the study groups i.e. OLP and OSCC when compared to that of control group. The results of our study also revealed that there was decrease in the mean value of langerhans cells as the tumour progressed from well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma to poorly differentiated LCs carcinoma. Conclusion A better understanding and clarity of LCs is pivotal for designing novel or improved therapeutic approaches that will allow proper functioning of LC’s in patients with OLP and OSCC, thus significantly reducing the morbidity of OLP and OSCC patients. PMID:26393210

  20. Synthetic cannabinoids in oral fluid.

    PubMed

    Coulter, Cynthia; Garnier, Margaux; Moore, Christine

    2011-09-01

    At the end of 2010, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) used its emergency scheduling authority to temporarily control five chemicals, JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-200, CP-47497, and cannabicyclohexanol (CP-47497 C8), often referred to as "Spice", K2, or "synthetic cannabinoids" because of their reported cannabis-like effects. JWH-250 is commonly encountered, and HU-210 was already controlled, so these were also included in the research. We report the first analytical procedure for the simultaneous determination of these compounds in oral fluid specimens collected with the Quantisal™ device using solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. The method was validated and applied to specimens taken from two individuals who had purchased the synthetic compounds while still legally available in the U.S. After a single session of smoking "Blueberry Posh", the peak concentration of JWH-018 detected was 35 μg/L 20 min after smoking; JWH-018 was still detectable 12 h after a single intake. After a single session of smoking "Black Mamba", JWH-018 was detected with a peak concentration of 5 μg/L after 20 min. In this subject, the compound was not detectable after 12 h. PMID:21871150