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Sample records for mcnp nova aproximacao

  1. Features of MCNP6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goorley, T.; James, M.; Booth, T.; Brown, F.; Bull, J.; Cox, L. J.; Durkee, J.; Elson, J.; Fensin, M.; Forster, R. A.; Hendricks, J.; Hughes, H. G.; Johns, R.; Kiedrowski, B.; Martz, R.; Mashnik, S.; McKinney, G.; Pelowitz, D.; Prael, R.; Sweezy, J.; Waters, L.; Wilcox, T.; Zukaitis, T.

    2014-06-01

    MCNP6 is simply and accurately described as the merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX capabilities, but it is much more than the sum of these two computer codes. MCNP6 is the result of six years of effort by the MCNP5 and MCNPX code development teams. These groups of people, residing in Los Alamos National Laboratory's X Computational Physics Division, Monte Carlo Codes Group (XCP-3) and Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, Radiation Transport Modeling Team (NEN-5) respectively, have combined their code development efforts to produce the next evolution of MCNP. While maintenance and major bug fixes will continue for MCNP5 1.60 and MCNPX 2.7.0 for upcoming years, new code development capabilities only will be developed and released in MCNP6. In fact, the initial release of MCNP6 contains numerous new features not previously found in either code. These new features are summarized in this document. Packaged with MCNP6 is also the new production release of the ENDF/B-VII.1 nuclear data files usable by MCNP. The high quality of the overall merged code, usefulness of these new features, along with the desire in the user community to start using the merged code, have led us to make the first MCNP6 production release: MCNP6 version 1. High confidence in the MCNP6 code is based on its performance with the verification and validation test suites, comparisons to its predecessor codes, our automated nightly software debugger tests, the underlying high quality nuclear and atomic databases, and significant testing by many beta testers.

  2. MCNP Progress & Performance Improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Forrest B.; Bull, Jeffrey S.; Rising, Michael Evan

    2015-04-14

    Twenty-eight slides give information about the work of the US DOE/NNSA Nuclear Criticality Safety Program on MCNP6 under the following headings: MCNP6.1.1 Release, with ENDF/B-VII.1; Verification/Validation; User Support & Training; Performance Improvements; and Work in Progress. Whisper methodology will be incorporated into the code, and run speed should be increased.

  3. MCNP: Photon benchmark problems

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, D.J.; Hollowell, D.E.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1991-09-01

    The recent widespread, markedly increased use of radiation transport codes has produced greater user and institutional demand for assurance that such codes give correct results. Responding to these pressing requirements for code validation, the general purpose Monte Carlo transport code MCNP has been tested on six different photon problem families. MCNP was used to simulate these six sets numerically. Results for each were compared to the set's analytical or experimental data. MCNP successfully predicted the analytical or experimental results of all six families within the statistical uncertainty inherent in the Monte Carlo method. From this we conclude that MCNP can accurately model a broad spectrum of photon transport problems. 8 refs., 30 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Recurrent novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hack, Margherita; Selvelli, Pierluigi

    1993-01-01

    Recurrent novae seem to be a rather inhomogeneous group: T CrB is a binary with a M III companion; U Sco probably has a late dwarf as companion. Three are fast novae; two are slow novae. Some of them appear to have normal chemical composition; others may present He and CNO excess. Some present a mass-loss that is lower by two orders of magnitude than classical novae. However, our sample is too small for saying whether there are several classes of recurrent novae, which may be related to the various classes of classical novae, or whether the low mass-loss is a general property of the class or just a peculiarity of one member of the larger class of classical novae and recurrent novae.

  5. Recent MCNP developments

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, J.S.; Briesmeister, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    MCNP is a widely used and actively developed Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Many important features have recently been added and more are under development. Benchmark studies not only indicate that MCNP is accurate but also that modern computer codes can give answers basically as accurate as the physics data that goes in them. Even deep penetration problems can be correct to within a factor of two after 10 to 25 mean free paths of penetration. And finally, Monte Carlo calculations, once thought to be too expensive to run routinely, can now be run effectively on desktop computers which compete with the supercomputers of yesteryear. 21 refs., 3 tabs.

  6. MCNP6 Status

    SciTech Connect

    Goorley, John T.

    2012-06-25

    We, the development teams for MCNP, NJOY, and parts of ENDF, would like to invite you to a proposed 3 day workshop October 30, 31 and November 1 2012, to be held at Los Alamos National Laboratory. At this workshop, we will review new and developing missions that MCNP6 and the underlying nuclear data are being asked to address. LANL will also present its internal plans to address these missions and recent advances in these three capabilities and we will be interested to hear your input on these topics. Additionally we are interested in hearing from you additional technical advances, missions, concerns, and other issues that we should be considering for both short term (1-3 years) and long term (4-6 years)? What are the additional existing capabilities and methods that we should be investigating? The goal of the workshop is to refine priorities for mcnp6 transport methods, algorithms, physics, data and processing as they relate to the intersection of MCNP, NJOY and ENDF.

  7. Recurrent novae, classical novae, symbiotic novae, and population II novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, M.

    2002-01-01

    Light curve analyses of the decay phase of nova outbursts are summarized. The nova duration is determined by the strong wind mass-loss which depends only on the white dwarf mass. Fast novae correspond to very massive white dwarfs and very slow novae correspond almost to the lower mass limit of white dwarfs. This relation is shown in both classical novae and recurrent novae. Light curves are theoretically reproduced for recurrent novae, U Sco, V394 CrA, CI Aql, V2487 Oph, RS Oph, T CrB, V745 Sco and V3890 Sgr, using a binary model composed of a white dwarf, an irradiated accretion disk, and a partly irradiated companion which is shadowed by the accretion disk. From the light curve fitting, we conclude that most of these objects contain a very massive white dwarf close to the Chandrasekhar mass limit (1.37 Modot for U Sco, V394 CrA T CrB and RS Oph, 1.35 Modot for V2487 Oph, V3890 Sgr and V745 Sco). They are strong candidates of type Ia SN progenitors. Population II novae have trends of slow evolution and small expanding velocity compared with disk novae.

  8. Validation suite for MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Mosteller, R. D.

    2002-01-01

    Two validation suites, one for criticality and another for radiation shielding, have been defined and tested for the MCNP Monte Carlo code. All of the cases in the validation suites are based on experiments so that calculated and measured results can be compared in a meaningful way. The cases in the validation suites are described, and results from those cases are discussed. For several years, the distribution package for the MCNP Monte Carlo code1 has included an installation test suite to verify that MCNP has been installed correctly. However, the cases in that suite have been constructed primarily to test options within the code and to execute quickly. Consequently, they do not produce well-converged answers, and many of them are physically unrealistic. To remedy these deficiencies, sets of validation suites are being defined and tested for specific types of applications. All of the cases in the validation suites are based on benchmark experiments. Consequently, the results from the measurements are reliable and quantifiable, and calculated results can be compared with them in a meaningful way. Currently, validation suites exist for criticality and radiation-shielding applications.

  9. MCNP: Multigroup/adjoint capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.; Redmond, E.L. II; Palmtag, S.P.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1994-04-01

    This report discusses various aspects related to the use and validity of the general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP for multigroup/adjoint calculations. The increased desire to perform comparisons between Monte Carlo and deterministic codes, along with the ever-present desire to increase the efficiency of large MCNP calculations has produced a greater user demand for the multigroup/adjoint capabilities. To more fully utilize these capabilities, we review the applications of the Monte Carlo multigroup/adjoint method, describe how to generate multigroup cross sections for MCNP with the auxiliary CRSRD code, describe how to use the multigroup/adjoint capability in MCNP, and provide examples and results indicating the effectiveness and validity of the MCNP multigroup/adjoint treatment. This information should assist users in taking advantage of the MCNP multigroup/adjoint capabilities.

  10. Dwarf novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladous, Constanze

    1993-01-01

    Dwarf novae are defined on grounds of their semi-regular brightness variations of some two to five magnitudes on time scales of typically 10 to 100 days. Historically several different classification schemes have been used. Today, dwarf novae are divided into three sub-classes: the U Geminorum stars, the SU Ursae Majoris stars, and the Z Camelopardalis stars. Outbursts of dwarf novae occur at semi-periodic intervals of time, typically every 10 to 100 days; amplitudes range from typically 2 to 5 mag. Within certain limits values are characteristic for each object. Relations between the outburst amplitude, or the total energy released during outburst, and the recurrence time have been found, as well as relations between the orbital period and the outburst decay time, the absolute magnitude during outburst maximum, and the widths of long and short outbursts, respectively. Some dwarf novae are known to have suspended their normal outburst activity altogether for a while. They later resumed it without having undergone any observable changes. The optical colors of dwarf novae all are quite similar during outburst, considerably bluer than during the quiescent state. During the outburst cycle, characteristic loops in the two color diagram are performed. At a time resolution on the order of minutes, strictly periodic photometric changes due to orbital motion become visible in the light curves of dwarf novae. These are characteristic for each system. Remarkably little is known about orbital variations during the course of an outburst. On time-scales of minutes and seconds, further more or less periodic types of variability are seen in dwarf novae. Appreciable flux is emitted by dwarf novae at all wavelengths from the X-rays to the longest IR wavelengths, and in some cases even in the radio. Most dwarf novae exhibit strong emission line spectra in the optical and UV during quiescence, although some have only very weak emissions in the optical and/or weak absorptions at UV

  11. The REBUS-MCNP linkage.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, J. G.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-04-24

    The Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program uses the REBUS-PC computer code to provide reactor physics and core design information such as neutron flux distributions in space, energy, and time, and to track isotopic changes in fuel and neutron absorbers with burnup. REBUS-PC models the complete fuel cycle including shuffling capability. REBUS-PC evolved using the neutronic capabilities of multi-group diffusion theory code DIF3D 9.0, but was extended to apply the continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP for one-group fluxes and cross-sections. The linkage between REBUS-PC and MCNP has recently been modernized and extended, as described in this manual. REBUS-PC now calls MCNP via a system call so that the user can apply any valid MCNP executable. The interface between REBUS-PC and MCNP requires minimal changes to an existing MCNP model, and little additional input. The REBUS-MCNP interface can also be used in conjunction with DIF3D neutronics to update an MCNP model with fuel compositions predicted using a DIF3D based depletion.

  12. MCNP LWR Core Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Noah A.

    2012-08-14

    The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

  13. MCNP-DSP users manual

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.

    1997-01-01

    The Monte Carlo code MCNP-DSP was developed from the Los Alamos MCNP4a code to calculate the time and frequency response statistics obtained from the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven frequency analysis measurements. This code can be used to validate calculational methods and cross section data sets from subcritical experiments. This code provides a more general model for interpretation and planning of experiments for nuclear criticality safety, nuclear safeguards, and nuclear weapons identification and replaces the use of point kinetics models for interpreting the measurements. The use of MCNP-DSP extends the usefulness of this measurement method to systems with much lower neutron multiplication factors.

  14. A new MCNP{trademark} test set

    SciTech Connect

    Brockhoff, R.C.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1994-09-01

    The MCNP test set is used to test the MCNP code after installation on various computer platforms. For MCNP4 and MCNP4A this test set included 25 test problems designed to test as many features of the MCNP code as possible. A new and better test set has been devised to increase coverage of the code from 85% to 97% with 28 problems. The new test set is as fast as and shorter than the MCNP4A test set. The authors describe the methodology for devising the new test set, the features that were not covered in the MCNP4A test set, and the changes in the MCNP4A test set that have been made for MCNP4B and its developmental versions. Finally, new bugs uncovered by the new test set and a compilation of all known MCNP4A bugs are presented.

  15. Potential MCNP enhancements for NCT

    SciTech Connect

    Estes, G.P.; Taylor, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    MCNP a Monte Carlo radiation transport code, is currently widely used in the medical community for a variety of purposes including treatment planning, diagnostics, beam design, tomographic studies, and radiation protection. This is particularly true in the Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) community. The current widespread medical use of MCNP after its general public distribution in about 1980 attests to the code's general versatility and usefulness, particularly since its development to date has not been influenced by medical applications. This paper discusses enhancements to MCNP that could be implemented at Los Alamos for the benefit of the NCT community. These enhancements generally fall into two categories, namely those that have already been developed to some extent but are not yet publicly available, and those that seem both needed based on our current understanding of NCT goals, and achievable based on our working knowledge of the MCNP code. MCNP is a general, coupled neutron/photon/electron Monte Carlo code developed and maintained by the Radiation Transport Group at Los Alamos. It has been used extensively for radiation shielding studies, reactor analysis, detector design, physics experiment interpretation, oil and gas well logging, radiation protection studies, accelerator design, etc. over the years. MCNP is a three-dimensional geometry, continuous energy physics code capable of modeling complex geometries, specifying material regions such as organs by the intersections of analytical surfaces.

  16. Potential MCNP enhancements for NCT

    SciTech Connect

    Estes, G.P.; Taylor, W.M.

    1992-12-01

    MCNP a Monte Carlo radiation transport code, is currently widely used in the medical community for a variety of purposes including treatment planning, diagnostics, beam design, tomographic studies, and radiation protection. This is particularly true in the Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) community. The current widespread medical use of MCNP after its general public distribution in about 1980 attests to the code`s general versatility and usefulness, particularly since its development to date has not been influenced by medical applications. This paper discusses enhancements to MCNP that could be implemented at Los Alamos for the benefit of the NCT community. These enhancements generally fall into two categories, namely those that have already been developed to some extent but are not yet publicly available, and those that seem both needed based on our current understanding of NCT goals, and achievable based on our working knowledge of the MCNP code. MCNP is a general, coupled neutron/photon/electron Monte Carlo code developed and maintained by the Radiation Transport Group at Los Alamos. It has been used extensively for radiation shielding studies, reactor analysis, detector design, physics experiment interpretation, oil and gas well logging, radiation protection studies, accelerator design, etc. over the years. MCNP is a three-dimensional geometry, continuous energy physics code capable of modeling complex geometries, specifying material regions such as organs by the intersections of analytical surfaces.

  17. Nova Scotia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmons, Vianne; Power, Anne

    2003-01-01

    This article profiles the educational system of Nova Scotia and discusses initiatives for students who are at-risk. It describes programs and services for students who are at-risk, relevant educational legislation, areas of strength, challenges that need to be overcome, and areas of action. (Contains references.) (CR)

  18. MCNP(TM) Version 5.

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, L. J.; Barrett, R. F.; Booth, Thomas Edward; Briesmeister, Judith F.; Brown, F. B.; Bull, J. S.; Giesler, G. C.; Goorley, J. T.; Mosteller, R. D.; Forster, R. A.; Post, S. E.; Prael, R. E.; Selcow, Elizabeth Carol,; Sood, A.

    2002-01-01

    The Monte Carlo transport workhorse, MCNP, is undergoing a massive renovation at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in support of the Eolus Project of the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASCI) Program. MCNP Version 5 (V5) (expected to be released to RSICC in Spring, 2002) will consist of a major restructuring from FORTRAN-77 (with extensions) to ANSI-standard FORTRAN-90 with support for all of the features available in the present release (MCNP-4C2/4C3). To most users, the look-and-feel of MCNP will not change much except for the improvements (improved graphics, easier installation, better online documentation). For example, even with the major format change, full support for incremental patching will still be provided. In addition to the language and style updates, MCNP V5 will have various new user features. These include improved photon physics, neutral particle radiography, enhancements and additions to variance reduction methods, new source options, and improved parallelism support (PVM, MPI, OpenMP).

  19. Magnetic novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemko, Polina; Orio, Marina

    2016-07-01

    We present the results of optical and X-ray observations of two quiescent novae, V2491 Cyg and V4743 Sgr. Our observations suggest the intriguing possibility of localization of hydrogen burning in magnetic novae, in which accretion is streamed to the polar caps. V2491 Cyg was observed with Suzaku more than 2 years after the outburst and V4743 Sgr was observed with XMM Newton 2 and 3.5 years after maximum. In the framework of a monitoring program of novae previously observed as super soft X-ray sources we also obtained optical spectra of V4743 Sgr with the SALT telescope 11.5 years after the eruption and of V2491 Cyg with the 6m Big Azimutal Telescope 4 and 7 years post-outburst. In order to confirm the possible white dwarf spin period of V2491 Cyg measured in the Suzaku observations we obtained photometric data using the 90cm WIYN telescope at Kitt Peak and the 1.2 m telescope in Crimea. We found that V4743 Sgr is an intermediate polar (IP) and V2491 Cyg is a strong IP candidate. Both novae show modulation of their X-ray light curves and have X-ray spectra typical of IPs. The Suzaku and XMM Newton exposures revealed that the spectra of both novae have a very soft blackbody-like component with a temperature close to that of the hydrogen burning white dwarfs in their SSS phases, but with flux by at least two orders of magnitude lower, implying a possible shrinking of emitting regions in the thin atmosphere that is heated by nuclear burning underneath it. In quiescent IPs, independently of the burning, an ultrasoft X-ray flux component originates at times in the polar regions irradiated by the accretion column, but the soft component of V4743 Sgr disappeared in 2006, indicating that the origin may be different from accretion. We suggest it may have been due to an atmospheric temperature gradient on the white dwarf surface, or to continuing localized thermonuclear burning at the bottom of the envelope, before complete turn-off. The optical spectra of V2491 Cyg and V

  20. SUPERIMPOSED MESH PLOTTING IN MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    J. HENDRICKS

    2001-02-01

    The capability to plot superimposed meshes has been added to MCNP{trademark}. MCNP4C featured a superimposed mesh weight window generator which enabled users to set up geometries without having to subdivide geometric cells for variance reduction. The variance reduction was performed with weight windows on a rectangular or cylindrical mesh superimposed over the physical geometry. Experience with the new capability was favorable but also indicated that a number of enhancements would be very beneficial, particularly a means of visualizing the mesh and its values. The mathematics for plotting the mesh and its values is described here along with a description of other upgrades.

  1. MCNP-DSP USERS MANUAL

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.

    2001-01-19

    The Monte Carlo code MCNP-DSP was developed from the Los Alamos MCNP4a code to calculate the time and frequency response statistics obtained from subcritical measurements. The code can be used to simulate a variety of subcritical measurements including source-driven noise analysis, Rossi-{alpha}, pulsed source, passive frequency analysis, multiplicity, and Feynman variance measurements. This code can be used to validate Monte Carlo methods and cross section data sets with subcritical measurements and replaces the use of point kinetics models for interpreting subcritical measurements.

  2. Verification of MCNP5-1.60 and MCNP6-Beta-2 for Criticality Safety Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Forrest B.; Kiedrowski, Brian C.; Bull, Jeffrey S.

    2012-05-01

    To verify that both MCNP5-1.60 and MCNP6-Beta-2 are performing correctly for criticality safety applications, several suites of verification/validation benchmark problems were run in early 2012. Results from these benchmark suites were compared with results from previously verified versions of MCNP5. The goals of this verification testing were: (1) Verify that MCNP5-1.60 works correctly for nuclear criticality safety applications, producing the same results as for the previous verification performed in 2010; (2) Determine the sensitivity to computer roundoff using different Fortran-90 compilers for building MCNP5 and MCNP6, to support moving to current versions of the compilers; and (3) Verify that MCNP6-Beta-2 works correctly for nuclear criticality safety applications, producing the same results as for MCNP5-1.60. This provides support for eventual migration of users and applications to MCNP6. The current production version of MCNP5 included in the RSICC release package is MCNP5-1.60. This version was first distributed by RSICC in October 2010. While there were subsequent RSICC distributions of the MCNP package in July 2011 and February 2012, no changes were made to MCNP5-1.60. The RSICC release package in February 2012 included both MCNP5-1.60 and the current beta version of MCNP6, MCNP6-Beta-2. MCNP6 is the merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX capabilities. The current release of MCNP6 available from RSICC as of February 2012 is MCNP6-Beta-2. This version includes all of the features for criticality safety calculations that are available in MCNP5-1.60, and many new features largely unrelated to nuclear criticality safety calculations. This release is a 'beta' release to allow intermediate and advanced users to begin testing the merged code in their field of expertise. It should not be used for production calculations.

  3. MCNP6 Cosmic-Source Option

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, Gregg W; Armstrong, Hirotatsu; James, Michael R; Clem, John; Goldhagen, Paul

    2012-06-19

    MCNP is a Monte Carlo radiation transport code that has been under development for over half a century. Over the last decade, the development team of a high-energy offshoot of MCNP, called MCNPX, has implemented several physics and algorithm improvements important for modeling galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) interactions with matter. In this presentation, we discuss the latest of these improvements, a new Cosmic-Source option, that has been implemented in MCNP6.

  4. MCNP6 Fission Multiplicity with FMULT Card

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, Trevor; Fensin, Michael Lorne; Hendricks, John S.; James, Michael R.; McKinney, Gregg W.

    2012-06-18

    With the merger of MCNPX and MCNP5 into MCNP6, MCNP6 now provides all the capabilities of both codes allowing the user to access all the fission multiplicity data sets. Detailed in this paper is: (1) the new FMULT card capabilities for accessing these different data sets; (2) benchmark calculations, as compared to experiment, detailing the results of selecting these separate data sets for thermal neutron induced fission on U-235.

  5. Classical novae and recurrent novae: General properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hack, Margherita; Selvelli, Pierluigi; Duerbeck, Hilmar W.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the observable characteristics of classical novae and recurrent novae obtained by different techniques (photometry, spectroscopy, and imaging) in all the available spectral ranges. We consider the three stages in the life of a nova: quiescence (pre- and post-outburst), outburst, final decline and nebular phase. We describe the photometric properties during the quiescent phase. We describe the photometric properties during outburst, the classification according the rate of decline (magnitudes per day), which permits us to define very fast, fast, intermediate, slow, and very slow novae and the correlation between luminosity and speed class. We report the scanty data on the spectra of the few known prenovae and those on the spectra of old novae and those of dwarf novae and nova-like, which, however, are almost undistinguishable. We describe the typical spectra appearing from the beginning of the outburst, just before maximum, up to the nebular phase and the correlation between spectral type at maximum, expansional velocity, and speed class of the nova. We report the existing infrared observations, which permit us to explain some of the characteristics of the outburst light curve, and give evidence of the formation of a dust shell in slow and intermediate novae (with the important exception of the very slow nova HR Del 1967) and its absence or quasi-absence in fast novae. The ultraviolet and X-ray observations are described. The X ray observations of novae, mainly from the two satellites EINSTEIN and EXOSAT, are reported. Observations of the final decline and of the envelopes appearing several months after outburst are also reported.

  6. Typical examples of classical novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hack, Margherita; Selvelli, Pierluigi; Bianchini, Antonio; Duerbeck, Hilmar W.

    1993-01-01

    Because of the very complicated individualistic behavior of each nova, we think it necessary to review the observations of a few well-observed individuals. We have selected a few objects of different speed classes, which have been extensively observed. They are: V1500 Cygni 1975, a very fast nova; V603 Aql 1918, fast nova; CP Pup 1942, fast nova; GK Per 1901, fast nova; V 1668 Cyg 1979, moderately fast nova; FH Ser 1970, slow nova; DQ Her 1934, slow nova; T Aur 1891, slow nova; RR Pic 1925, slow nova; and HR Del 1967, very slow nova.

  7. Fermi Sees a Nova

    NASA Video Gallery

    Watch V407 Cyg go nova! A nova is a sudden, short-lived brightening of an otherwise inconspicuous star. The outburst occurs when a white dwarf in a binary system erupts in an enormous thermonuclear...

  8. The New MCNP6 Depletion Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, Michael Lorne; James, Michael R.; Hendricks, John S.; Goorley, John T.

    2012-06-19

    The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology.

  9. The new MCNP6 depletion capability

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, M. L.; James, M. R.; Hendricks, J. S.; Goorley, J. T.

    2012-07-01

    The first MCNP based in-line Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology. (authors)

  10. MCNP4A: Features and philosophy

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, J.S.

    1993-05-01

    This paper describes MCNP, states its philosophy, introduces a number of new features becoming available with version MCNP4A, and answers a number of questions asked by participants in the workshop. MCNP is a general-purpose three-dimensional neutron, photon and electron transport code. Its philosophy is ``Quality, Value and New Features.`` Quality is exemplified by new software quality assurance practices and a program of benchmarking against experiments. Value includes a strong emphasis on documentation and code portability. New features are the third priority. MCNP4A is now available at Los Alamos. New features in MCNP4A include enhanced statistical analysis, distributed processor multitasking, new photon libraries, ENDF/B-VI capabilities, X-Windows graphics, dynamic memory allocation, expanded criticality output, periodic boundaries, plotting of particle tracks via SABRINA, and many other improvements. 23 refs.

  11. NOVA 201 ultrasonic thickness gage (NOVA Gage)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garecht, Diane

    1990-01-01

    The measurement integrity of the NOVA 201 digital ultrasonic thickness gage (NOVA gage) was demonstrated by comparing the NOVA gage measurements to the thickness gage measurements, and determining the bias and uncertainty of the NOVA gage when measuring redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) hardware per engineering test plans (ETP). The NOVA gage was tested by three different operators on steel and aluminum RSRM hardware for wall thickness. The results show that the measurement bias is not consistent. The uncertainty of the bias is caused by the heterogeneous material properties of the RSRM components that influence the time of flight of ultrasonic waves. The measurement uncertainty inherent to the design and operation of the NOVA gage is less in comparison to the uncertainty of the bias. The total measurement uncertainty cannot be substantially reduced by taking more than one measurement. There is no correlation between bias and the surface finish range of this test unless 3-in-One oil is used as a couplant, in which case there appears to be a slight trend. There is no correlation between uncertainty and the surface finish range. The measurement uncertainty of the NOVA gage can be reduced using 3-in-One oil as a couplant.

  12. Novae as distance indicators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Holland C.; Ciardullo, Robin

    1988-01-01

    Nova shells are characteristically prolate with equatorial bands and polar caps. Failure to account for the geometry can lead to large errors in expansion parallaxes for individual novae. When simple prescriptions are used for deriving expansion parallaxes from an ensemble of randomly oriented prolate spheroids, the average distance will be too small by factors of 10 to 15 percent. The absolute magnitudes of the novae will be underestimated and the resulting distance scale will be too small by the same factors. If observations of partially resolved nova shells select for large inclinations, the systematic error in the resulting distance scale could easily be 20 to 30 percent. Extinction by dust in the bulge of M31 may broaden and shift the intrinsic distribution of maximum nova magnitudes versus decay rates. We investigated this possibility by projecting Arp's and Rosino's novae onto a composite B - 6200A color map of M31's bulge. Thirty two of the 86 novae projected onto a smooth background with no underlying structure due to the presence of a dust cloud along the line of sight. The distribution of maximum magnitudes versus fade rates for these unreddened novae is indistinguishable from the distribution for the entire set of novae. It is concluded that novae suffer very little extinction from the filamentary and patchy distribution of dust seen in the bulge of M31. Time average B and H alpha nova luminosity functions are potentially powerful new ways to use novae as standard candles. Modern CCD observations and the photographic light curves of M31 novae found during the last 60 years were analyzed to show that these functions are power laws. Consequently, unless the eruption times for novae are known, the data cannot be used to obtain distances.

  13. MCNP Perturbation Capability for Monte Carlo Criticality Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, J.S.; Carter, L.L.; McKinney, G.W.

    1999-09-20

    The differential operator perturbation capability in MCNP4B has been extended to automatically calculate perturbation estimates for the track length estimate of k{sub eff} in MCNP4B. The additional corrections required in certain cases for MCNP4B are no longer needed. Calculating the effect of small design changes on the criticality of nuclear systems with MCNP is now straightforward.

  14. MatMCNP: A Code for Producing Material Cards for MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    DePriest, Kendall Russell; Saavedra, Karen C.

    2014-09-01

    A code for generating MCNP material cards (MatMCNP) has been written and verified for naturally occurring, stable isotopes. The program allows for material specification as either atomic or weight percent (fractions). MatMCNP also permits the specification of enriched lithium, boron, and/or uranium. In addition to producing the material cards for MCNP, the code calculates the atomic (or number) density in atoms/barn-cm as well as the multiplier that should be used to convert neutron and gamma fluences into dose in the material specified.

  15. MCNP APPLICATIONS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

    SciTech Connect

    G. MCKINNEY; T. BOOTH; ET AL

    2000-10-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code, MCNP, has become an international standard for a wide spectrum of neutron, photon, and electron radiation transport applications. The latest version of the code, MCNP 4C, was released to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) in February 2000. This paper describes the code development philosophy, new features and capabilities, applicability to various problems, and future directions.

  16. MCNP application for the 21 century

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, M.C.

    2000-08-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code, MCNP, has become an international standard for a wide spectrum of neutron, photon, and electron radiation transport applications. The latest version of the code, MCNP 4C, was released to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) in February 2000. This paper describes the code development philosophy, new features and capabilities, applicability to various problems, and future directions.

  17. Nova-like variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladous, Constanze

    1993-01-01

    On grounds of different observable characteristics five classes of nova-like objects are distinguished: the UX Ursae Majoris stars, the antidwarf novae, the DQ Herculis stars, the AM Herculis stars, and the AM Canum Venaticorum stars. Some objects have not been classified specifically. Nova-like stars share most observable features with dwarf novae, except for the outburst behavior. The understanding is that dwarf novae, UX Ursae Majoris stars, and anti-dwarf novae are basically the same sort of objects. The difference between them is that in UX Ursae Majoris stars the mass transfer through the accretion disc always is high so the disc is stationary all the time; in anti-dwarf novae for some reason the mass transfer occasionally drops considerably for some time, and in dwarf novae it is low enough for the disc to undergo semiperiodic changes between high and low accretion events. DQ Herculis stars are believed to possess weakly magnetic white dwarfs which disrupt the inner disc at some distance from the central star; the rotation of the white dwarf can be seen as an additional photometric period. In AM Herculis stars, a strongly magnetic white dwarf entirely prevents the formation of an accretion disk and at the same time locks the rotation of the white dwarf to the binary orbit. Finally, AM Canum Venaticorum stars are believed to be cataclysmic variables that consist of two white dwarf components.

  18. Novae in globular clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Mariko; Hachisu, Izumi; Henze, Martin

    2013-12-10

    We present the first light-curve analysis of Population II novae that appeared in M31 globular clusters. Our light-curve models, based on the optically thick wind theory, reproduce well both the X-ray turn-on and turnoff times with the white dwarf (WD) mass of about 1.2 M {sub ☉} for M31N 2007-06b in Bol 111 and about 1.37 M {sub ☉} for M31N 2010-10f in Bol 126. The transient supersoft X-ray source CXO J004345 in Bol 194 is highly likely a nova remnant of 1.2-1.3 M {sub ☉} WD. These WD masses are quite consistent with the temperatures deduced from X-ray spectra. We also present the dependence of nova light curves on the metallicity in the range from [Fe/H] = 0.4 to –2.7. Whereas strong optically thick winds are accelerated in Galactic disk novae owing to a large Fe opacity peak, only weak winds occur in Population II novae with low Fe abundance. Thus, nova light curves are systematically slow in low Fe environment. For an extremely low Fe abundance normal nova outbursts may not occur unless the WD is very massive. We encourage V or y filter observation rather than R as well as high cadence X-ray monitorings to open quantitative studies of extragalactic novae.

  19. Nova AQL 1918 - A nude old nova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvelli, P. L.; Cassatella, A.

    IUE observations at high and low resolution of Nova Aql 1918 are studied. No evidence of outflow or nebular lines is found, which indicates that the shell ejected at the time of the outburst and surrounding the system for many years has disappeared. The ejection of the shell is shown to be a transient phenomenon during the life of the nova, and due to expansion at a rate of about 2 arcsec/yr, the density of the nebula has probably decreased so much that the nebula can now be considered to have vanished.

  20. MCNP capabilities for nuclear well logging calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, R.A.; Little, R.C.; Briesmeister, J.F.; Hendricks, J.S. . Applied Theoretical Physics Div.)

    1990-06-01

    The Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) consists of state-of-the-art Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates transport codes and data libraries. This paper discusses how the general-purpose continuous-energy Monte Carlo code MCNP ({und M}onte {und C}arlo {und n}eutron {und p}hoton), part of the LARTCS, provides a computational predictive capability for many applications of interest to the nuclear well logging community. The generalized three-dimensional geometry of MCNP is well suited for borehole-tool models. SABRINA, another component of the LARTCS, is a graphics code that can be used to interactively create a complex MCNP geometry. Users can define many source and tally characteristics with standard MCNP features. The time-dependent capability of the code is essential when modeling pulsed sources. Problems with neutrons, photons, and electrons as either single particle or coupled particles can be calculated with MCNP. The physics of neutron and photon transport and interactions is modeled in detail using the latest available cross-section data.

  1. MCNP-ORIGEN2 Coupling Utility Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1997-07-30

    The MOCUP code system is a series of pre- and post-processor modules to connect the MCNP Monte Carlo transport code and the ORIGEN2.1 depletion and isotopics code into a generalized transport/depletion package for use on non-lattice or non-uniform lattice reactor calculations. No modifications were made to either MCNP or ORIGEN2.1, permitting standard versions of each code to be used. MOCUP contains a simple graphical user interface to allow the user to easily execute the modulesmore » governing MCNP and ORIGEN2.1 input assembly, output processing, and execution, and to perform various file housekeeping tass. Flux and reaction rate calculations are performed in MCNP, with the results extracted by the menpPRO module and passed to the ORIGEN2.1 code by the origenPRO module for deletion. The resulting new isotopic inventories are used to modify the MCNP input in the compPRO module for use in the next timestep. MOCUP permits an arbitary number of depletable cells, different depletable cell types (fuel, targets, etc.) and isotopes that may be tracked. anticipated applications are to test and research reactor physics analyses; isotope production; fuel, target, filter, control, and/or burnable absorber depletion; structural material transmutation; and verification of lattice code calculations.« less

  2. MCNP analyses of criticality calculation results

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, R.A.; Booth, T.E.

    1995-05-01

    Careful assessment of the results of a calculation by the code itself can reduce mistakes in the problem setup and execution. MCNP has over four hundred error messages that inform the user of FATAL or WARNING errors that have been discovered during the processing of just the input file. The latest version, MCNP4A, now performs a self assessment of the calculated results to aid the user in determining the quality of the Monte Carlo results. MCNP4A, which was released to RSIC in October 1993, contains new analyses of the MCNP Monte Carlo calculation that provide simple user WARNINGs for both criticality and fixed source calculations. The goal of the new analyses is to provide the MCNP criticality practitioner with enough information in the output to assess the validity of the k{sub eff} calculation and any associated tallies. The results of these checks are presented in the k{sub eff} results summary page, several k{sub eff} tables and graphs, and tally tables and graphs. Plots of k{sub eff} at the workstation are also available as the problem is running or in a postprocessing mode to assess problem performance and results.

  3. Novae as Thermonuclear Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, D. D.

    2003-07-01

    Fred Hoyle undertook a study of observational consequences of the thermonuclear paradigm for the nova event in the years following his 1972 resignation from Cambridge University. The most fruitful of these have been in the areas of gamma-ray astronomy, by which one attempts to measure the level of radioactivity in the nova envelope, and of presolar grain studies in laboratories, by which one measures anomalous isotopic ratios that fingerprint condensation in the thermonuclear event. This work summarizes progress with these two astronomical measures of the novae.

  4. SABRINA - an interactive geometry modeler for MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    West, J.T.; Murphy, J. )

    1988-01-01

    One of the most difficult tasks when analyzing a complex three-dimensional system with Monte Carlo is geometry model development. SABRINA attempts to make the modeling process more user-friendly and less of an obstacle. It accepts both combinatorial solid bodies and MCNP surfaces and produces MCNP cells. The model development process in SABRINA is highly interactive and gives the user immediate feedback on errors. Users can view their geometry from arbitrary perspectives while the model is under development and interactively find and correct modeling errors. An example of a SABRINA display is shown. It represents a complex three-dimensional shape.

  5. Adjoint-Based Uncertainty Quantification with MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Seifried, Jeffrey E.

    2011-09-01

    This work serves to quantify the instantaneous uncertainties in neutron transport simulations born from nuclear data and statistical counting uncertainties. Perturbation and adjoint theories are used to derive implicit sensitivity expressions. These expressions are transformed into forms that are convenient for construction with MCNP6, creating the ability to perform adjoint-based uncertainty quantification with MCNP6. These new tools are exercised on the depleted-uranium hybrid LIFE blanket, quantifying its sensitivities and uncertainties to important figures of merit. Overall, these uncertainty estimates are small (< 2%). Having quantified the sensitivities and uncertainties, physical understanding of the system is gained and some confidence in the simulation is acquired.

  6. Application of MCNP{trademark} to computed tomography in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Brockhoff, R.C.; Estes, G.P.; Hills, C.R.; Demarco, J.J.; Solberg, T.D.

    1996-03-01

    The MCNP{trademark} code has been used to simulate CT scans of the MIRD human phantom. In addition. an actual CT scan of a patient was used to create an MCNP geometry, and this geometry was computationally ``CT scanned`` using MCNP to reconstruct CT images. The results show that MCNP can be used to model the human body based on data obtained from CT scans and to simulate CT scans that are based on these or other models.

  7. New methods for neutron response calculations with MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, J.S.

    1997-05-01

    MCNP4B was released for international distribution in February, 1997. The author summarized the new MCNP4B features since the release of MCNP4A over three years earlier and compare some results. Then he describes new methods being developed for future code releases. The focus is methods and applications of ex-core neutron response calculations.

  8. Light echoes - Novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1988-01-01

    The sudden brilliance of a nova eruption will be reflected on surrounding dust grains to create a phantom nebula. Previous searches for these light echoes have used relatively short exposures with photograhic detectors. This paper reports on a search around eight recent novae with long exposures using a CCD camera. Despite an increase of sensitivity by over an order of magnitude, no light echoes were detected. It is found that the average grain density must be less than about 10 to the -9th per cu cm for distances from 0.1 pc to 1000 pc from the novae. The light echo around Nova Persei 1901 was caused by reflection off clouds with grain densities of several times 10 to the -9th per cu cm which are at distances between 0.1 pc and 10 pc. Echoes from dust in a circumstellar shell or ejected during a previous eruption will be effectively unobservable.

  9. Evaluation of Geometric Progression (GP) Buildup Factors using MCNP Codes (MCNP6.1 and MCNP5-1.60)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung-O.; Roh, Gyuhong; Lee, Byungchul

    2016-02-01

    The gamma-ray buildup factors of three-dimensional point kernel code (QAD-CGGP) are re-evaluated by using MCNP codes (MCNP6.1 and MCNPX5-1.60) and ENDF/B-VI.8 photoatomic data, which cover an energy range of 0.015-15 MeV and an iron thickness of 0.5-40 Mean Free Path (MFP). These new data are fitted to the Geometric Progression (GP) fitting function and are then compared with ANS standard data equipped with QAD-CGGP. In addition, a simple benchmark calculation was performed to compare the QAD-CGGP results applied with new and existing buildup factors based on the MCNP codes. In the case of the buildup factors of low-energy gamma-rays, new data are evaluated to be about 5% higher than the existing data. In other cases, these new data present a similar trend based on the specific penetration depth, while existing data continuously increase beyond that depth. In a simple benchmark, the calculations using the existing data were slightly underestimated compared to the reference data at a deep penetration depth. On the other hand, the calculations with new data were stabilized with an increasing penetration depth, despite a slight overestimation at a shallow penetration depth.

  10. Observations of Novae From ROAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambsch, F.-J.

    2014-12-01

    The author discusses observations of galactic novae and some extragalactic supernovae from his remote observatory ROAD (Remote Observatory Atacama Desert) he commenced in August 2011 with Nova Lupi 2011 (PR Lup). The observed novae are mainly chosen according to AAVSO Alert Notices and AAVSO Special Notices as published on their website. Examples of dense observations of different novae are presented. The focus goes to the different behaviors of their light curves. It also demonstrates the capability of the remote observatory ROAD.

  11. Observations of Novae from ROAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambsch, Franz-Josef

    2014-05-01

    The author discusses observations of galactic novae and some extragalactic supernovae from his remote observatory ROAD (Remote Observatory Atacama Desert) he commenced in August 2011 with Nova Lupi 2011 (PR Lup). The observed novae are mainly chosen according to alert notices and special notices of the AAVSO as published on their website. Examples of dense observations of different novae are presented. The focus goes to the different behaviors of their light curves. It also demonstrates the capability of the remote observatory ROAD.

  12. The MCNP5 Random number generator

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, F. B.; Nagaya, Y.

    2002-01-01

    MCNP and other Monte Carlo particle transport codes use random number generators to produce random variates from a uniform distribution on the interval. These random variates are then used in subsequent sampling from probability distributions to simulate the physical behavior of particles during the transport process. This paper describes the new random number generator developed for MCNP Version 5. The new generator will optionally preserve the exact random sequence of previous versions and is entirely conformant to the Fortran-90 standard, hence completely portable. In addition, skip-ahead algorithms have been implemented to efficiently initialize the generator for new histories, a capability that greatly simplifies parallel algorithms. Further, the precision of the generator has been increased, extending the period by a factor of 10{sup 5}. Finally, the new generator has been subjected to 3 different sets of rigorous and extensive statistical tests to verify that it produces a sufficiently random sequence.

  13. Precision Nova operations

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, R.B.; Miller, J.L.; Saunders, R.L.; Thompson, C.E.; Weiland, T.L.; Laumann, C.W.

    1995-09-01

    To improve the symmetry of x-ray drive on indirectly driven ICF capsules, we have increased the accuracy of operating procedures and diagnostics on the Nova laser. Precision Nova operations includes routine precision power balance to within 10% rms in the ``foot`` and 5% nns in the peak of shaped pulses, beam synchronization to within 10 ps rms, and pointing of the beams onto targets to within 35 {mu}m rms. We have also added a ``fail-safe chirp`` system to avoid Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) in optical components during high energy shots.

  14. Precision Nova operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, Robert B.; Miller, John L.; Saunders, Rodney L.; Thompson, Calvin E.; Weiland, Timothy L.; Laumann, Curt W.

    1995-12-01

    To improve the symmetry of x-ray drive on indirectly driven ICF capsules, we have increased the accuracy of operating procedures and diagnostics on the Nova laser. Precision Nova operations include routine precision power balance to within 10% rms in the 'foot' and 5% rms in the peak of shaped pulses, beam synchronization to within 10 ps rms, and pointing of the beams onto targets to within 35 micrometer rms. We have also added a 'fail-safe chirp' system to avoid stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in optical components during high energy shots.

  15. Present and future capabilities of MCNP

    PubMed

    Hendricks; Adam; Booth; Briesmeister; Carter; Cox; Favorite; Forster; McKinney; Prael

    2000-10-01

    Several new capabilities have been added to MCNP4C including: (1) macrobody surfaces; (2) the superimposed mesh importance functions, so that it is no longer necessary to subdivide geometries for variance reduction; and (3) Xlib graphics and DVF Fortran 90 for PCs. There are also improvements in neutron physics, electron physics, perturbations, and parallelization. In the more distant future we are working on adaptive Monte Carlo code modernization, more parallelization, visualization, and charged particles. PMID:11003531

  16. NOVA HIGH SCHOOL--INTRODUCTION

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    COGSWELL, JOHN F.

    AN OVERVIEW WAS PRESENTED OF THE ORGANIZATION AND OPERATION OF A NUMBER OF INNOVATIVE ASPECTS OF THE NOVA HIGH SCHOOL IN FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA. NOVA IS PART OF A COMPLEX PLANNED TO INCLUDE GRADES K THROUGH 12. STUDENTS MUST APPLY TO ATTEND NOVA AND ARE SELECTED PRIMARILY ON THE RELATION OF STUDENT PERFORMANCE TO MEASURES OF APTITIDE. VOCATIONAL…

  17. SCIENCE AT NOVA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broward County Schools, Fort Lauderdale, FL.

    THE SCIENCE PROGRAM AT NOVA HIGH SCHOOL IS STRUCTURED TO MEET THE NEEDS OF A SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY. THE JUNIOR HIGH PROGRAM EMPHASIZES THE ACCUMLATION, TABULATION, AND ANALYSIS OF DATA. THE SENIOR HIGH PROGRAM MAKES USE OF THESE PROCESSES IN THE INVESTIGATION OF VARIOUS SUBJECT AREAS. THE UNITS COMPOSING THE HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULUM ARE DESCRIBED. UNIT…

  18. Gamma Rays from Classical Novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    NASA at the University of Chicago, provided support for a program of theoretical research into the nature of the thermonuclear outbursts of the classical novae and their implications for gamma ray astronomy. In particular, problems which have been addressed include the role of convection in the earliest stages of nova runaway, the influence of opacity on the characteristics of novae, and the nucleosynthesis expected to accompany nova outbursts on massive Oxygen-Neon-Magnesium (ONeMg) white dwarfs. In the following report, I will identify several critical projects on which considerable progress has been achieved and provide brief summaries of the results obtained:(1) two dimensional simulation of nova runaway; (2) nucleosynthesis of nova modeling; and (3) a quasi-analytic study of nucleosynthesis in ONeMg novae.

  19. MCNP4B{sup {trademark}} verification and validation

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, J.S.; Court, J.D.

    1996-08-01

    Several new features and bug fixes have been incorporated into the new release of MCNP. As required by the MCNP Software Quality Assurance Plan, these changes to the code and the test set are documented here for user reference. This document summarizes the new MCNP4B features and corrections, separated into major and minor groupings. Also included are a code cleanup section and a section delineating problems identified in LA-12839 which have not been corrected. Finally, we document the MCNP4B test set modifications and explain how test set coverage has been improved.

  20. MCNP Output Data Analysis with ROOT (MODAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carasco, C.

    2010-06-01

    MCNP Output Data Analysis with ROOT (MODAR) is a tool based on CERN's ROOT software. MODAR has been designed to handle time-energy data issued by MCNP simulations of neutron inspection devices using the associated particle technique. MODAR exploits ROOT's Graphical User Interface and functionalities to visualize and process MCNP simulation results in a fast and user-friendly way. MODAR allows to take into account the detection system time resolution (which is not possible with MCNP) as well as detectors energy response function and counting statistics in a straightforward way. Program summaryProgram title: MODAR Catalogue identifier: AEGA_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGA_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 155 373 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 14 815 461 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: Most Unix workstations and PC Operating system: Most Unix systems, Linux and windows, provided the ROOT package has been installed. Examples where tested under Suse Linux and Windows XP. RAM: Depends on the size of the MCNP output file. The example presented in the article, which involves three two-dimensional 139×740 bins histograms, allocates about 60 MB. These data are running under ROOT and include consumption by ROOT itself. Classification: 17.6 External routines: ROOT version 5.24.00 ( http://root.cern.ch/drupal/) Nature of problem: The output of an MCNP simulation is an ASCII file. The data processing is usually performed by copying and pasting the relevant parts of the ASCII file into Microsoft Excel. Such an approach is satisfactory when the quantity of data is small but is not efficient when the size of the simulated data is large, for example when time

  1. MCNP output data analysis with ROOT (MODAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carasco, C.

    2010-12-01

    MCNP Output Data Analysis with ROOT (MODAR) is a tool based on CERN's ROOT software. MODAR has been designed to handle time-energy data issued by MCNP simulations of neutron inspection devices using the associated particle technique. MODAR exploits ROOT's Graphical User Interface and functionalities to visualize and process MCNP simulation results in a fast and user-friendly way. MODAR allows to take into account the detection system time resolution (which is not possible with MCNP) as well as detectors energy response function and counting statistics in a straightforward way. New version program summaryProgram title: MODAR Catalogue identifier: AEGA_v1_1 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGA_v1_1.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 150 927 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4 981 633 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: Most Unix workstations and PCs Operating system: Most Unix systems, Linux and windows, provided the ROOT package has been installed. Examples where tested under Suse Linux and Windows XP. RAM: Depends on the size of the MCNP output file. The example presented in the article, which involves three two dimensional 139×740 bins histograms, allocates about 60 MB. These data are running under ROOT and include consumption by ROOT itself. Classification: 17.6 Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEGA_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 181 (2010) 1161 External routines: ROOT version 5.24.00 ( http://root.cern.ch/drupal/) Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: The output of a MCNP simulation is an ascii file. The data processing is usually performed by copying and pasting the relevant parts of the ascii

  2. New Nova Candidates from the RSBE M31 Nova Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauber, Stephanie; Rector, Travis A.; Shafter, Allen W.

    2015-01-01

    Since 1995 the Kitt Peak National Observatory WIYN 0.9-m telescope has been used to monitor M31 for novae as part of the Research-Based Science Education Project (RBSE). The resulting images, which typically cover approximately the inner 20 arc min of M31, are taken through a broad-band H-alpha filter to isolate the strong H-alpha emission lines characteristic of novae shortly after eruption.We are in the process of reanalyzing the entire RBSE data set covering the period between September 1995 and August 2014 in order to produce an up-to-date list of novae from this survey. Here, we present coordinates and H-alpha magnitudes for 4 new nova discoveries not previous reported. Among the new nova discoveries, one system appears spatially coincident with M31N 1988-09a, and is thus a recurrent nova candidate.

  3. MCNP simulations of material exposure experiments (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Temple, Brian A

    2010-12-08

    Simulations of proposed material exposure experiments were performed using MCNP6. The experiments will expose ampules containing different materials of interest with radiation to observe the chemical breakdown of the materials. Simulations were performed to map out dose in materials as a function of distance from the source, dose variation between materials, dose variation due to ampule orientation, and dose variation due to different source energy. This write up is an overview of the simulations and will provide guidance on how to use the data in the spreadsheet.

  4. Nova Lupi 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2011-08-01

    Announcement of discovery of Nova Lupi 2011 = PNV J14542000-5505030. Discovered by Nicholas Brown (Quinns Rocks, Western Australia) on 2011 Aug. 4.73 UT at unfiltered mag=10.2 (tmax 400 film). Posted on the IAU Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams Transient Object Confirmation Page (TOCP) as PNV J14542000-5505030. Spectra obtained by Fred Walter (SUNY Stony Brook) 2011 August 9.0132 UT with the SMARTS 1.5m RC spectrograph at Cerro Tololo and reported in ATEL #3536 confirms that the object is an Fe II nova near maximum. Initially announced in [vsnet-alert 13560] (Nicholas Brown) and in AAVSO Special Notice #247 (Arne Henden). Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations.

  5. Nova in Puppis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, Matthew R.

    2007-11-01

    Nova Puppis 2007 was discovered visually by Alfredo Jose Serra Pereira, Carnaxide, Portugal, on November 14.23 UT at visual magnitude 7.0. The discovery was announced in IAU Circular No. 8895 (Daniel W. E. Green, Ed.). The nova is located at 08:16:17.99 -34:15:25.0 (J2000, J. Young and H. Rhoades, Table Mountain Observatory, near Wrightwood, CA). Nothing was visible down to magnitude 8 on November 6.23, 7.22, 8.23, 10.23, and 11.22 UT. Young reports that a red image of the field from the Digitized Sky Survey contains a point source at an approximate magnitude of 20. No spectra have yet been published. Please report observations to the AAVSO International Database as N PUP 2007.

  6. MCNP6 Cosmic & Terrestrial Background Particle Fluxes -- Release 4

    SciTech Connect

    McMath, Garrett E.; McKinney, Gregg W.; Wilcox, Trevor

    2015-01-23

    Essentially a set of slides, the presentation begins with the MCNP6 cosmic-source option, then continues with the MCNP6 transport model (atmospheric, terrestrial) and elevation scaling. It concludes with a few slides on results, conclusions, and suggestions for future work.

  7. Hot Cell Window Shielding Analysis Using MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Chad L. Pope; Wade W. Scates; J. Todd Taylor

    2009-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex nuclear facilities are undergoing a documented safety analysis upgrade. In conjunction with the upgrade effort, shielding analysis of the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) hot cell windows has been conducted. This paper describes the shielding analysis methodology. Each 4-ft thick window uses nine glass slabs, an oil film between the slabs, numerous steel plates, and packed lead wool. Operations in the hot cell center on used nuclear fuel (UNF) processing. Prior to the shielding analysis, shield testing with a gamma ray source was conducted, and the windows were found to be very effective gamma shields. Despite these results, because the glass contained significant amounts of lead and little neutron absorbing material, some doubt lingered regarding the effectiveness of the windows in neutron shielding situations, such as during an accidental criticality. MCNP was selected as an analysis tool because it could model complicated geometry, and it could track gamma and neutron radiation. A bounding criticality source was developed based on the composition of the UNF. Additionally, a bounding gamma source was developed based on the fission product content of the UNF. Modeling the windows required field inspections and detailed examination of drawings and material specifications. Consistent with the shield testing results, MCNP results demonstrated that the shielding was very effective with respect to gamma radiation, and in addition, the analysis demonstrated that the shielding was also very effective during an accidental criticality.

  8. Benchmarking MCNP and TRIPOLI with PGNAA measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carasco, C.; Perot, B.; Sikora, A.; Mauerhofer, E.; Havenith, A.; Payan, E.; Kettler, J.; Kring, T.; Ma, J. L.

    2014-06-01

    The French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA Cadarache), the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH (FZJ), and the RWTH Aachen University (RWTH) are involved in a cooperation aiming at characterizing toxic and reactive elements in radioactive waste packages by means of Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA). The design of an optimized measurement system and the assessment of its performances for realistic scenarios can be conveniently studied by numerical Monte Carlo simulation, provided the model and nuclear data offer a sufficient precision. Previous studies performed with MCNP have shown that when the nuclear data libraries lack of precision, relevant results can still be obtained by performing calculations in multiple steps (by first determining the radiative capture rate, and transporting the induced gamma toward the detector) and by injecting valid gamma-ray production data in-between [1]. In such cases, it is interesting to compare the results obtained with different codes. In the present paper, we propose to compare the MCNP and TRIPOLI codes with measurements obtained in MEDINA (Multi Element Detection based on Instrumental Neutron Activation), which is the new FZJ PGNAA facility [2]. The aim of the measurement campaign is to assess capture gamma rays of toxic elements that can be found in 200 L waste drums which are expected for geological repository.

  9. An assessment of the MCNP4C weight window

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher N. Culbertson; John S. Hendricks

    1999-12-01

    A new, enhanced weight window generator suite has been developed for MCNP version 4C. The new generator correctly estimates importances in either a user-specified, geometry-independent, orthogonal grid or in MCNP geometric cells. The geometry-independent option alleviates the need to subdivide the MCNP cell geometry for variance reduction purposes. In addition, the new suite corrects several pathologies in the existing MCNP weight window generator. The new generator is applied in a set of five variance reduction problems. The improved generator is compared with the weight window generator applied in MCNP4B. The benefits of the new methodology are highlighted, along with a description of its limitations. The authors also provide recommendations for utilization of the weight window generator.

  10. Analyses of the LMC Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanlandingham, K. M.; Schwarz, G. J.; Starrfield, S.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Shore, S. N.; Sonneborn, G.

    In the past 10 years, 6 classical novae have been observed in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We have begun a study of these objects using ultraviolet spectra obtained by IUE and optical spectra from nova surveys. We are using the results of this study to further our understanding of novae and stellar evolution. Our study includes analysis of both the early, optically thick spectra using model atmospheres, and the later nebular spectra using optimization of photoionization codes. By analysing of all the LMC novae in a consistent manner, we can compare their individual results and use their combined properties to calibrate Galactic novae. In addition, our studies can be used to determine the elemental abundances of the nova ejecta, the amount of mass ejected, and the contribution of novae to the ISM abundances. To date we have analyzed Nova LMC 1988#1 and Nova LMC 1990#1, and have obtained preliminary results for Nova LMC 1991. The results of this work are presented in this poster. The metal content of the LMC is known to be sub-solar and varies as a function of location within the cloud. A detailed abundance analysis of the ejecta of the LMC novae provides important information concerning the effect of initial metal abundances on energetics of the nova outburst. Since the distance to the LMC is well known, many important parameters of the outburst, such as the luminosity, can be absolutely determined. Both galactic and extragalactic novae have been proposed as potential standard candles. Recent work by Della Valle & Livio (1995) has improved on the standard relations (e.g., Schmidt 1957; Pfau 1976; Cohen 1985; Livio 1992) by including novae from the LMC and M31. Unfortunately, the dependence of the nova outburst on metallicity has not been well-studied. Recent theoretical work by Starrfield et al. (1998) indicates that the luminosity of the outburst increases with decreasing metal abundances. If there is a dependence of luminosity on metallicity, it will have to

  11. Modelling nova populations in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hai-Liang; Woods, T. E.; Yungelson, L. R.; Gilfanov, M.; Han, Zhanwen

    2016-05-01

    Theoretical modelling of the evolution of classical and recurrent novae plays an important role in studies of binary evolution, nucleosynthesis and accretion physics. However, from a theoretical perspective the observed statistical properties of novae remain poorly understood. In this paper, we have produced model populations of novae using a hybrid binary population synthesis approach for differing star formation histories (SFHs): a starburst case (elliptical-like galaxies), a constant star formation rate case (spiral-like galaxies) and a composite case (in line with the inferred SFH for M31). We found that the nova rate at 10 Gyr in an elliptical-like galaxy is ˜10-20 times smaller than a spiral-like galaxy with the same mass. The majority of novae in elliptical-like galaxies at the present epoch are characterized by low-mass white dwarfs (WDs), long decay times, relatively faint absolute magnitudes and long recurrence periods. In contrast, the majority of novae in spiral-like galaxies at 10 Gyr have massive WDs, short decay times, are relatively bright and have short recurrence periods. The mass-loss time distribution for novae in our M31-like galaxy is in agreement with observational data for Andromeda. However, it is possible that we underestimate the number of bright novae in our model. This may arise in part due to the present uncertainties in the appropriate bolometric correction for novae.

  12. Performance of MCNP4A on seven computing platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, J.S.; Brockhoff, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    The performance of seven computer platforms has been evaluated with the MCNP4A Monte Carlo radiation transport code. For the first time we report timing results using MCNP4A and its new test set and libraries. Comparisons are made on platforms not available to us in previous MCNP timing studies. By using MCNP4A and its 325-problem test set, a widely-used and readily-available physics production code is used; the timing comparison is not limited to a single ``typical`` problem, demonstrating the problem dependence of timing results; the results are reproducible at the more than 100 installations around the world using MCNP; comparison of performance of other computer platforms to the ones tested in this study is possible because we present raw data rather than normalized results; and a measure of the increase in performance of computer hardware and software over the past two years is possible. The computer platforms reported are the Cray-YMP 8/64, IBM RS/6000-560, Sun Sparc10, Sun Sparc2, HP/9000-735, 4 processor 100 MHz Silicon Graphics ONYX, and Gateway 2000 model 4DX2-66V PC. In 1991 a timing study of MCNP4, the predecessor to MCNP4A, was conducted using ENDF/B-V cross-section libraries, which are export protected. The new study is based upon the new MCNP 25-problem test set which utilizes internationally available data. MCNP4A, its test problems and the test data library are available from the Radiation Shielding and Information Center in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, or from the NEA Data Bank in Saclay, France. Anyone with the same workstation and compiler can get the same test problem sets, the same library files, and the same MCNP4A code from RSIC or NEA and replicate our results. And, because we report raw data, comparison of the performance of other compute platforms and compilers can be made.

  13. HET Spectroscopy of Extragalactic Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafter, Allen W.; Coelho, E. A.; Misselt, K. A.; Bode, M. F.; Darnley, M. J.

    2006-12-01

    We are currently involved in a multifaceted campaign to study extragalactic novae in the optical and IR using a variety of instruments: The Mount Laguna 1m, the Steward 2.3m, and the Liverpool 2m telescopes for optical imaging, the Hobbey-Eberly Telescope (HET) for optical spectroscopy, and the Spitzer Space Telescope for IR photometry and spectroscopy. Here, we report the initial results from our program of spectroscopic observations obtained with the LRS on the HET. Thus far, we have obtained spectra of three novae: Nova M31-2006#9 (ATEL 887), Nova M32-2006#1 (CBET 591), and Nova M33-2006#1 (CBET 655), which were taken on 24-Sep-2006 UT, 30-Sep-2006 UT, and 02-Oct-2006 UT, approximately 6, 65, and 4 days post discovery, for the three novae respectively. The spectra of Nova M31-2006#9 and Nova M33-2006#1 revealed prominent Balmer (FWHM 1600 km/s) and Fe II emission lines typical of the "Fe II" class in the classification system of Williams (1992 AJ, 104, 725). The spectrum of Nova M32-2006#1, which was obtained much longer after eruption, showed strong H-alpha (FWHM 1300 km/s), along with weaker H-beta, Fe II, and [N II] 5755, indicating that this nova is also a member of the Fe II class, and that it had entered the nebular phase at the time of our observations. In addition to these three novae, we also attempted to obtain a spectrum of Nova M31-2006#7 (CBET 615) on 23-Sep-2006 UT, approximately three weeks after discovery. However, by the time of our observations, the nova had faded to invisibility. An 1800s integration at the reported position reveled no trace of the nova. It is likely that this optical transient was an unusually fast nova, possibly of the "He/N" class. This work is being supported in part by NSF grant AST-0607682.

  14. MCNP modelling of the PBMR equilibrium core

    SciTech Connect

    Albornoz, F.; Korochinsky, S.

    2006-07-01

    A complete MCNP model of the PBMR equilibrium core is presented, which accounts for the same fuel regions defined in the PBMR core management code, as well as for complete fuel and reflector temperature distributions. This comprehensive 3D model is the means to calculate and characterize the neutron and photon boundary sources of the equilibrium core, and is also used to support some specific core neutronic studies needing detailed geometry modelling. Due to the geometrical modelling approach followed, an unrealistic partial cutting of fuel kernels and pebbles is introduced in the model. The variations introduced by this partial cutting both on the packing fraction and on the uranium load of the modelled core and its corresponding effect on core reactivity and flux levels, have been investigated and quantified. A complete set of high-temperature cross-section data was applied to the calculation of the PBMR equilibrium core, and its effect on the calculated core reactivity is also reported. (authors)

  15. Enhancements to the MCNP6 background source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McMath, Garrett E.; McKinney, Gregg W.

    2015-10-19

    The particle transport code MCNP has been used to produce a background radiation data file on a worldwide grid that can easily be sampled as a source in the code. Location-dependent cosmic showers were modeled by Monte Carlo methods to produce the resulting neutron and photon background flux at 2054 locations around Earth. An improved galactic-cosmic-ray feature was used to model the source term as well as data from multiple sources to model the transport environment through atmosphere, soil, and seawater. A new elevation scaling feature was also added to the code to increase the accuracy of the cosmic neutronmore » background for user locations with off-grid elevations. Furthermore, benchmarking has shown the neutron integral flux values to be within experimental error.« less

  16. Enhancements to the MCNP6 background source

    SciTech Connect

    McMath, Garrett E.; McKinney, Gregg W.

    2015-10-19

    The particle transport code MCNP has been used to produce a background radiation data file on a worldwide grid that can easily be sampled as a source in the code. Location-dependent cosmic showers were modeled by Monte Carlo methods to produce the resulting neutron and photon background flux at 2054 locations around Earth. An improved galactic-cosmic-ray feature was used to model the source term as well as data from multiple sources to model the transport environment through atmosphere, soil, and seawater. A new elevation scaling feature was also added to the code to increase the accuracy of the cosmic neutron background for user locations with off-grid elevations. Furthermore, benchmarking has shown the neutron integral flux values to be within experimental error.

  17. NOVA Fall 2002 Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ransick, Kristina; Rosene, Dale; Sammons, James; Turck, Mary

    This NOVA teacher's guide presents activities, information, and teaching ideas from the Public Broadcasting System's (PBS) NOVA television program series. Episodes include: (1) "Mysterious Life of Caves" which investigates the role microbes play in the creation of some limestone caves; (2) "Lost Roman Treasure" which follows archaeologists working…

  18. Nova Delphini 2013: Backyard Analysis of a Classical Nova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Piper

    2014-01-01

    On August 14, 2013, Nova Delphini was discovered by Koichi Itagaki. This nova erupted to a maximum brightness of magnitude 4.4 by August 16, 2013. The extraordinary brightness of this event has allowed many amateur astronomers to have the chance to study it. More than 750 amateur astronomers have contributed to the AAVSO photometry database of Nova Delphini.1 The amount and quality of spectroscopic data gathered is unprecedented as well, as over 700 individual spectra have been collected so far in the ARAS database.2 A nova is a class of variable star that undergoes a cataclysmic eruption, which can be observed through a sudden increase in brightness that declines over a series of months or years. At the center of a nova is an accreting white dwarf star which is collecting hydrogen from its surroundings. The accreting mass causes a nuclear reaction on the surface of the white dwarf and as the pressure increases the reaction becomes super-critical and a thermonuclear runaway is ignited causing the brightness increase as well as triggering the ejection of a shell of material form the star. The stages of a classical nova outburst are outlined along with techniques available to amateur astronomers for study of these phenomena. The author’s equipment and software setup are detailed. Results obtained using a low resolution grating, Schmidt-cassegrain telescope and CCD camera that were acquired while Nova Delphini was in the “fireball stage” 3 and subsequent “iron curtain phase”3 are compared and discussed. Results obtained using a high resolution spectroscope, Schmidt-cassegrain telescope and CCD camera that were acquired during the “lifting of the iron curtain phase”3 are also presented. References 1. Turner, Rebecca. “AAVSO - Nova Del 2013” 20 Aug 2013 Web. 8 Sep 2013 nova-del-2013> 2. Tessier, Francois. “ARAS Spectral Database - Nova-Del-2013” 22 Sep 2013 Web. 22 Sep 2013 Novae/Nova

  19. Fritz Zwicky: Novae Become Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, T.

    2005-12-01

    The Swiss physicist Fritz Zwicky (1898-1974) dabbled in a plethora of disciplines, including astronomy and astrophysics. His dabblings were with vested interest and he has left quite an impact. His first great success was his nova research. In the early 1930s, while supermarkets and Superman were flying, he labelled the distinctly brighter nova Supernova. It had been believed that novae were the collision of two stars, but Zwicky came to recognize supernovae as a phenomenon quite distinct from novae. He and Walter Baade explained supernova by melding astronomy and physics and in this aim they created neutron stars, explained the origin of cosmic rays, initiated the first sky survey, and confirmed that a number of historical novae were indeed supernovae. This was truly an important work in the history of astrophysics.

  20. The Hunt for Old Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappert, C.; Vogt, N.; Schmidtobreick, L.; Ederoclite, A.

    2014-12-01

    We inform on the progress of our on-going project to identify and classify old classical novae, using deep UBVR photometry and subsequent spectroscopy for a proper candidate confirmation, and time-resolved observations in order to find the orbital period and other physical properties of the identified old novae. This way, we have already increased the number of confirmed southern and equatorial post-novae from 33 to 50, and determined new orbital periods of eight objects. As an example, we sumarize the results on V728 Sco (Nova Sco 1862) which we found to be an eclipsing system with a 3.32 h orbital period, displaying high and low states similar to dwarf-nova outbursts. Analysis of the low-state eclipse indicates the presence of a small hot inner disk around the white dwarf component.

  1. Nova Mus 2008 = QY Mus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, Matthew R.

    2008-10-01

    Nova Mus 2008 = QY Mus was discovered by William Liller, Vina del Mar, Chile, on 2008 September 28.998 UT at magnitude 8.6 (Tech Pan film + orange filter). The position is RA = 13h 16m 36.44s , Dec = -67d 36m 47.8s (from P. Nelson). This object was announced as a nova in IAU Circular 8990 (Daniel W.E. Green, editor). The nova classification was determined using low-resolution spectra by W. Liller indicating the presence of broad H-alpha lines at least 2300 angstroms wide. Several observers confirmed the nova and provided photometry. The position above was provided by Peter Nelson (Ellinbank, Vic., Aus.), and is averaged from four separate exposures (rms error approx. 0.4 arcseconds). The GCVS team have formally designated Nova Mus 2008 as QY MUS. Observations should be reported to the AAVSO International Database as QY MUS.

  2. MCNP (trademark) ENDF/B-VI iron benchmark calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Court, J. D.; Hendricks, J. S.

    Four iron shielding benchmarks have been calculated for, we believe the first time, with MCNP4A and its new ENDF/B-VI library. These calculations are part of the Hiroshima/Nagasaki dose re-evaluation for the National Academy of Sciences and the Defense Nuclear Agency. We believe these calculations are significant because they validate MCNP and the new ENDF/B-VI libraries. These calculations are compared to ENDF/B-V, experiment, and in some cases the recommended MCNP data library (a T-2 evaluation) and ENDF/IV.

  3. Computational radiology and imaging with the MCNP Monte Carlo code

    SciTech Connect

    Estes, G.P.; Taylor, W.M.

    1995-05-01

    MCNP, a 3D coupled neutron/photon/electron Monte Carlo radiation transport code, is currently used in medical applications such as cancer radiation treatment planning, interpretation of diagnostic radiation images, and treatment beam optimization. This paper will discuss MCNP`s current uses and capabilities, as well as envisioned improvements that would further enhance MCNP role in computational medicine. It will be demonstrated that the methodology exists to simulate medical images (e.g. SPECT). Techniques will be discussed that would enable the construction of 3D computational geometry models of individual patients for use in patient-specific studies that would improve the quality of care for patients.

  4. RECURRENT NOVAE IN M31

    SciTech Connect

    Shafter, A. W.; Henze, M.; Rector, T. A.; Schweizer, F.; Hornoch, K.; Orio, M.; Pietsch, W.; Darnley, M. J.; Williams, S. C.; Bode, M. F.; Bryan, J.

    2015-02-01

    The reported positions of 964 suspected nova eruptions in M31 recorded through the end of calendar year 2013 have been compared in order to identify recurrent nova (RN) candidates. To pass the initial screen and qualify as a RN candidate, two or more eruptions were required to be coincident within 0.′1, although this criterion was relaxed to 0.′15 for novae discovered on early photographic patrols. A total of 118 eruptions from 51 potential RN systems satisfied the screening criterion. To determine what fraction of these novae are indeed recurrent, the original plates and published images of the relevant eruptions have been carefully compared. This procedure has resulted in the elimination of 27 of the 51 progenitor candidates (61 eruptions) from further consideration as RNe, with another 8 systems (17 eruptions) deemed unlikely to be recurrent. Of the remaining 16 systems, 12 candidates (32 eruptions) were judged to be RNe, with an additional 4 systems (8 eruptions) being possibly recurrent. It is estimated that ∼4% of the nova eruptions seen in M31 over the past century are associated with RNe. A Monte Carlo analysis shows that the discovery efficiency for RNe may be as low as 10% that for novae in general, suggesting that as many as one in three nova eruptions observed in M31 arise from progenitor systems having recurrence times ≲100 yr. For plausible system parameters, it appears unlikely that RNe can provide a significant channel for the production of Type Ia supernovae.

  5. Recurrent Novae in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafter, A. W.; Henze, M.; Rector, T. A.; Schweizer, F.; Hornoch, K.; Orio, M.; Pietsch, W.; Darnley, M. J.; Williams, S. C.; Bode, M. F.; Bryan, J.

    2015-02-01

    The reported positions of 964 suspected nova eruptions in M31 recorded through the end of calendar year 2013 have been compared in order to identify recurrent nova (RN) candidates. To pass the initial screen and qualify as a RN candidate, two or more eruptions were required to be coincident within 0.‧1, although this criterion was relaxed to 0.‧15 for novae discovered on early photographic patrols. A total of 118 eruptions from 51 potential RN systems satisfied the screening criterion. To determine what fraction of these novae are indeed recurrent, the original plates and published images of the relevant eruptions have been carefully compared. This procedure has resulted in the elimination of 27 of the 51 progenitor candidates (61 eruptions) from further consideration as RNe, with another 8 systems (17 eruptions) deemed unlikely to be recurrent. Of the remaining 16 systems, 12 candidates (32 eruptions) were judged to be RNe, with an additional 4 systems (8 eruptions) being possibly recurrent. It is estimated that ∼4% of the nova eruptions seen in M31 over the past century are associated with RNe. A Monte Carlo analysis shows that the discovery efficiency for RNe may be as low as 10% that for novae in general, suggesting that as many as one in three nova eruptions observed in M31 arise from progenitor systems having recurrence times ≲ 100 yr. For plausible system parameters, it appears unlikely that RNe can provide a significant channel for the production of Type Ia supernovae.

  6. MCNP-model for the OAEP Thai Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmeier, F.X.; Tang, J.S.; Primm, R.T. III

    1998-06-01

    An MCNP input was prepared for the Thai Research Reactor, making extensive use of the MCNP geometry`s lattice feature that allows a flexible and easy rearrangement of the core components and the adjustment of the control elements. The geometry was checked for overdefined or undefined zones by two-dimensional plots of cuts through the core configuration with the MCNP geometry plotting capabilities, and by a three-dimensional view of the core configuration with the SABRINA code. Cross sections were defined for a hypothetical core of 67 standard fuel elements and 38 low-enriched uranium fuel elements--all filled with fresh fuel. Three test calculations were performed with the MCNP4B-code to obtain the multiplication factor for the cases with control elements fully inserted, fully withdrawn, and at a working position.

  7. Criticality calculations with MCNP{trademark}: A primer

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, C.D. II; Busch, R.D.; Briesmeister, J.F.; Forster, R.A.

    1994-06-06

    With the closure of many experimental facilities, the nuclear criticality safety analyst increasingly is required to rely on computer calculations to identify safe limits for the handling and storage of fissile materials. However, in many cases, the analyst has little experience with the specific codes available at his/her facility. This primer will help you, the analyst, understand and use the MCNP Monte Carlo code for nuclear criticality safety analyses. It assumes that you have a college education in a technical field. There is no assumption of familiarity with Monte Carlo codes in general or with MCNP in particular. Appendix A gives an introduction to Monte Carlo techniques. The primer is designed to teach by example, with each example illustrating two or three features of MCNP that are useful in criticality analyses. Beginning with a Quickstart chapter, the primer gives an overview of the basic requirements for MCNP input and allows you to run a simple criticality problem with MCNP. This chapter is not designed to explain either the input or the MCNP options in detail; but rather it introduces basic concepts that are further explained in following chapters. Each chapter begins with a list of basic objectives that identify the goal of the chapter, and a list of the individual MCNP features that are covered in detail in the unique chapter example problems. It is expected that on completion of the primer you will be comfortable using MCNP in criticality calculations and will be capable of handling 80 to 90 percent of the situations that normally arise in a facility. The primer provides a set of basic input files that you can selectively modify to fit the particular problem at hand.

  8. Nova Survey participation requested

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-03-01

    The AAVSO solicits participation in an online nova survey from our member and observer communities. The survey is being conducted in advance of an upcoming long-term observing campaign that will be launched in mid-April 2013. We are seeking participation in this survey from as broad a sample of the AAVSO community as possible, and your responses will help us gauge the effectiveness of the campaign and serve the observer community better. The survey may be completed anonymously, but you will have the option of providing us with your name and AAVSO observer code if you choose. Please visit the following website to complete the survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ZQHDYWB. The survey should take no more than five minutes to complete. We ask that you complete the survey by Monday, April 15, 2013.

  9. Olivier Chesneau's Work on Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millour, F.; Lagadec, E.

    2015-12-01

    Olivier Chesneau founded a brand new field of observational astrophysics with his attempts to resolve the novae expanding fireball from the very first days of the explosion. With the images he could get, he showed that novae do indeed explode in an aspherical way, leading to a change of paradigm for the physics of these yet-poorly understood catastrophic systems. He also set the stage for a new way of estimating novae distances, by directly measuring the sky-size of the fireball and comparing it with spectroscopic scales, taking into account the tremendous effects of the fireball geometry.

  10. MCWO - Linking MCNP And ORIGEN2 For Fuel Burnup Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gray S Chang

    2005-04-01

    The UNIX BASH (Bourne Again Shell) script MCWO has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environment Laboratory (INEEL) to couple the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the depletion and buildup code ORIGEN2. MCWO is a fully automated tool that links the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the radioactive decay and burnup code ORIGEN2. MCWO can handle a large number of fuel burnup and material loading specifications, Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) powers, and irradiation time intervals. The program processes input from the user that specifies the system geometry, initial material compositions, feed/removal specifications, and other code-specific parameters. Calculated results from MCNP, ORIGEN2, and data process module calculations are then output successively as the code runs. The principal function of MCWO is to transfer one-group cross-section and flux values from MCNP to ORIGEN2, and then transfer the resulting material compositions (after irradiation and/or decay) from ORIGEN2 back to MCNP in a repeated, cyclic fashion. The basic requirement of the code is that the user have a working MCNP input file and other input parameters; all interaction with ORIGEN2 and other calculations are performed by UNIX BASH script MCWO. This paper presents the MCWO-calculated results of the RERTR-1 and -2 , and the Weapons-Grade Mixed Oxiide fuel (Wg-MOX) fuel experiments in ATR and compares the MCWO-calculated results with the measured data.

  11. Spectral measurements in critical assemblies: MCNP specifications and calculated results

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanie C. Frankle; Judith F. Briesmeister

    1999-12-01

    Recently, a suite of 86 criticality benchmarks for the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code was developed, and the results of testing the ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI data (through Release 2) were published. In addition to the standard k{sub eff} measurements, other experimental measurements were performed on a number of these benchmark assemblies. In particular, the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) specifications contain experimental data for neutron leakage and central-flux measurements, central-fission ratio measurements, and activation ratio measurements. Additionally, there exists another set of fission reaction-rate measurements performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) utilizing a {sup 252}Cf source. This report will describe the leakage and central-flux measurements and show a comparison of experimental data to MCNP simulations performed using the ENDF/B-V and B-VI (Release 2) data libraries. Central-fission and activation reaction-rate measurements will be described, and the comparison of experimental data to MCNP simulations using available data libraries for each reaction of interest will be presented. Finally, the NIST fission reaction-rate measurements will be described. A comparison of MCNP results published previously with the current MCNP simulations will be presented for the NIST measurements, and a comparison of the current MCNP simulations to the experimental measurements will be presented.

  12. Release of MCNP5_RSICC_1.30.

    SciTech Connect

    Goorley, T.; Bull, J. S.; Brown, F. B.; Booth, Thomas Edward; Hughes, H. G.; Mosteller, R. D.; Forster, R. A.; Post, S. E.; Prael, R. E.; Selcow, Elizabeth Carol,; Sood, A.; Sweezy, J. E.

    2004-01-01

    In July of 2004, an updated version of MCNP5{trademark} (MCNP5-RSICC-1.30) was released to the Radiation Shielding Information Computational Center. This updated version has three new features, thirteen bug fixes and several minor coding improvements. The new features are: support for 8 byte integers, specialized tally treatment of large lattices, and mesh tally enhancements. Of the thirteen bug fixes, only four resulted in incorrect answers in specific circumstances. In addition to the standard RSICC distribution of the MCNP5 source, executables and patches, the patch file (only) is available on the MCNP website: http://www-xdiv.lanl.gov/x5/MCNP/theresources.html. The three new MCNP5 features are discussed. Several new improvements have also been made to the manual and development environment. All of the features, bug fixes, coding improvement issues and related documentation are now maintained in Sourceforge. Fortran and C source code and regression test problems are now under version control with CVS.

  13. HET Spectra of Three Recent Extragalactic Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafter, A. W.; Coelho, E. A.; Misselt, K. A.; Bode, M. F.; Darnley, M. J.; Quimby, R.

    2006-10-01

    We report optical spectroscopic observations (4280Å - 7280Å) obtained with the HET of three extragalactic novae: Nova M31 2006 No. 9 (ATEL #887), Nova M32 2006 No. 1 (CBET #591), and Nova M33 2006 No. 1 (CBET #655). The spectra were obtained on 24 Sep 2006 UT, 30 Sep 2006 UT, and 02 Oct 2006 UT, corresponding to approximately 6, 65, and 4 days post discovery, for the three novae respectively.

  14. Argonne's Vilas Pol on NOVA!

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Can innovations in materials science help clean up our world? Argonne's material scientist Vilas Pol guest starred on NOVA's "Making Stuff: Cleaner," where David Pogue explored the rapidly-developing science and business of clean energy.

  15. Argonne's Vilas Pol on NOVA!

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-04-19

    Can innovations in materials science help clean up our world? Argonne's material scientist Vilas Pol guest starred on NOVA's "Making Stuff: Cleaner," where David Pogue explored the rapidly-developing science and business of clean energy.

  16. Nova reaction rates and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, S.; Herlitzius, C.; Fiehl, J.

    2011-04-01

    Oxygen-neon novae form a subset of classical novae events known to freshly synthesize nuclei up to mass number A≲40. Because several gamma-ray emitters lie in this mass range, these novae are also interesting candidates for gamma-ray astronomy. The properties of excited states within those nuclei in this mass region play a critical role in determining the resonant (p,γ) reaction rates, themselves, largely unknown for the unstable nuclei. We describe herein a new Doppler shift lifetime facility at the Maier-Leibnitz tandem laboratory, Technische Universität München, with which we will map out important resonant (p,γ) nova reaction rates.

  17. Novae in γ-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernanz, M.

    2012-09-01

    Classical novae produce radioactive nuclei which are emitters of γ-rays in the MeV range. Some examples are the lines at 478 and 1275 keV (from ^7Be and ^{22}Na) and the positron-electron annihilation emission (511 keV line and a continuum below this energy, with a cut-off at 20-30 keV). The analysis of γ-ray spectra and light curves is potentially a unique and powerful tool both to trace the corresponding isotopes and to give insights on the properties of the expanding envelope determining its transparency. Another possible origin of γ-rays is the acceleration of particles up to very high energies, so that either neutral pions or inverse Compton processes produce γ-rays of energies larger than 100 MeV. MeV photons during nova explosions have not been detected yet, although several attempts have been made in the last decades; on the other hand, GeV photons from novae have been detected in some particular novae, in symbiotic binaries, where the companion is a red giant with a wind, instead of a main sequence star as in the cataclysmic variables hosting classical novae. Both mechanisms of γ-ray production in novae are reviewed, with more emphasis on the one related to radioactivities.

  18. Characterization of the NPOD3 Detectors in MCNP5 and MCNP6

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Kimberly L.; Hutchinson, Jesson D.; Sood, Avneet

    2014-01-21

    Researchers performed a series of measurements in May 2012 to characterize the NPOD3 detector systems. The detectors were placed in varying states of disassembly to determine the effect of individual components on detection efficiency. A 4.5 kg α-phase Pu sphere known as the Los Alamos BeRP Ball was used as the SNM source in both a bare configuration and reflected by varying thicknesses of polyethylene. A set of simulations matching the experimental setups were run and the data were compared to the measured data. The total and leakage multiplication and the inferred k values were determined for both the simulations and the measurements. Table 3 shows a comparison of the results from MCNP6 and MCNP5 with the list-mode patch to the measured results. The count rates for the calculated results were obtained by dividing the total line count in the list-mode file (equivalent to the total number of absorptions in the NPOD detectors) by the total run time. The count rates are identical for both codes, and they both produce the same multiplicity and inferred k values regardless of measurement time as expected.

  19. Performance of scientific computing platforms running MCNP4B

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, H.E.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1997-11-01

    A performance study has been made for the MCNP4B Monte Carlo radiation transport code on a wide variety of scientific computing platforms ranging from personal computers to Cray mainframes. We present the timing study results using MCNP4B and its new test set and libraries. This timing study is unlike other timing studies because of its widespread reproducibility, its direct comparability to the predecessor study in 1993, and its focus upon a nuclear engineering code. Our results, derived from using the new 29-problem test set for MCNP4B, (1) use a highly versatile and readily available physics code; (2) show that timing studies are very problem dependent; (3) present the results as raw data allowing comparisons of performance to other computing platforms not included in this study to those platforms that were included; (4) are reproducible; and (5) provide a measure of improvement in performance with the MCNP code due to advancements in software and hardware over the past 4 years. In the 1993 predecessor study using MCNP4A, the performances were based on a 25 problem test set. We present our data based on MCNP4B`s new 29 problem test set which cover 97% of all the FORTRAN physics code lines in MCNP4B. Like the previous study the new test problems and the test data library are available from the Radiation Shielding and Information Computational Center (RSICC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Our results are reproducible because anyone with the same workstation, compiler, and operating system can duplicate the results presented here. The computing platforms included in this study are the Sun Sparc2, Sun Sparc5, Cray YMP 8/128, HP C180,SGI origin 2000, DBC 3000/600, DBC AiphaStation 500(300 MHz), IBM RS/6000-590, HP /9000-735, Micron Milienia Pro 200 MHz PC, and the Cray T94/128.

  20. Verification of the MCNP (TM) Perturbation Correction Feature for Cross-Section Dependent Tallies

    SciTech Connect

    A. K. Hess; G. W. McKinney; J. S. Hendricks; L. L. Carter

    1998-10-01

    The Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code MCNP version 4B perturbation capability has been extended to cross-section dependent tallies and to the track-length estimate of Iqff in criticality problems. We present the complete theory of the MCNP perturbation capability including the correction to MCNP4B which enables cross-section dependent perturbation tallies. We also present the MCNP interface as an upgrade to the MCNP4B manual. Finally, we present test results demonstrating the validity of the perturbation capability in MCNP, particularly cross-section dependent problems.

  1. Standard Neutron, Photon, and Electron Data Libraries for MCNP4C.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-02-16

    Version 03 US DOE 10CFR810 Jurisdiction. DLC-200/MCNPDATA is for use with Versions 4C and and 4C2 of the MCNP transport code. This data library provides a comprehensive set of cross sections for a wide range of radiation transport applications using the Monte Carlo code package CCC-700/MCNP4C. See Appendix G of the MCNP report LA-13709-M for information on the libraries and how to select specific nuclides for use in MCNP. Newer MCNP cross sections from LANLmore » are included in CCC-710/MCNP5.« less

  2. Classical and Recurrent Nova Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José, Jordi; Casanova, Jordi; García-Berro, Enrique; Hernanz, Margarita; Shore, Steven N.; Calder, Alan C.

    2013-01-01

    Remarkable progress in the understanding of nova outbursts has been achieved through combined efforts in photometry, spectroscopy and numerical simulations. According to the thermonuclear runaway model, novae are powered by thermonuclear explosions in the hydrogen-rich envelopes transferred from a low-mass stellar companion onto a close white dwarf star. Extensive numerical simulations in 1-D have shown that the accreted envelopes attain peak temperatures ranging between 108 and 4 × 108 K, for about several hundred seconds, hence allowing extensive nuclear processing which eventually shows up in the form of nucleosynthetic fingerprints in the ejecta. Indeed, it has been claimed that novae can play a certain role in the enrichment of the interstellar medium through a number of intermediate-mass elements. This includes 17O, 15N, and 13C, systematically overproduced with respect to solar abundances, plus a lower contribution in a number of other species (A < 40), such as 7Li, 19F, or 26Al. At the turn of the XXI Century, classical novae have entered the era of multidimensional models, which provide a new insight into the physical mechanisms that drive mixing at the core-envelope interface. In this review, we will present hydrodynamic models of classical novae, from the onset of accretion up to the explosion and ejection stages, both for classical and recurrent novae, with special emphasis on their gross observational properties and their associated nucleosynthesis. The impact of nuclear uncertainties on the final yields will be discussed. Recent results from 2-D models of mixing during classical nova outbursts will also be presented.

  3. Depletion analysis of the UMLRR reactor core using MCNP6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odera, Dim Udochukwu

    Accurate knowledge of the neutron flux and temporal nuclide inventory in reactor physics calculations is necessary for a variety of application in nuclear engineering such as criticality safety, safeguards, and spent fuel storage. The Monte Carlo N- Particle (MCNP6) code with integrated buildup depletion code (CINDER90) provides a high-fidelity tool that can be used to perform 3D, full core simulation to evaluate fissile material utilization, and nuclide inventory calculations as a function of burnup. The University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Reactor (UMLRR) reactor has been modeled with the deterministic based code, VENTURE and with an older version of MCNP (MCNP5). The MIT developed MCODE (MCNP ORIGEN DEPLETION CODE) was used previously to perform some limited depletion calculations. This work chronicles the use of MCNP6, released in June 2013, to perform coupled neutronics and depletion calculation. The results are compared to previously benchmarked results. Furthermore, the code is used to determine the ratio of fission products 134Cs and 137Cs (burnup indicators), and the resultant ratio is compared to the burnup of the UMLRR.

  4. Visualization and analyses of MCNP criticality calculation results

    SciTech Connect

    Urbatsch, T.J.; Forster, R.A.; Booth, T.E.; Van Riper, K.A.; Waters, L.S.

    1995-07-01

    Careful assessment of the results of a calculation by the code itself can detect mistakes in the problem setup and execution. MCNP has over four hundred error messages that inform the user of FATAL or WARNING errors that have been discovered during processing of just the input file. MCNP4A performs a self assessment of the calculated results to aid the user in determining the quality of the Monte Carlo results. MCNP4A contains new built-in sensitivity analyses of the Monte Carlo calculation that provide the user with simple WARNING messages for both criticality and fixed source calculations. The goal of the new analyses described in this paper is to provide the MCNP criticality practitioner with enough information in the output to assess the validity of the k{sub eff} calculation and any associated tallies. The results of these checks are presented in the k{sub eff} results summary, several k{sub eff} tables and graphs, and tally tables and graphs. Plots of k{sub eff} at the workstation are also available as the problem is running or in a postprocessing mode to assess problem performance and results. Plots of the fission source by cycle supply valuable visual information, although they are not yet available in the production version of MCNP.

  5. Criticality calculations with MCNP{sup TM}: A primer

    SciTech Connect

    Mendius, P.W.; Harmon, C.D. II; Busch, R.D.; Briesmeister, J.F.; Forster, R.A.

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this Primer is to assist the nuclear criticality safety analyst to perform computer calculations using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. Because of the closure of many experimental facilities, reliance on computer simulation is increasing. Often the analyst has little experience with specific codes available at his/her facility. This Primer helps the analyst understand and use the MCNP Monte Carlo code for nuclear criticality analyses. It assumes no knowledge of or particular experience with Monte Carlo codes in general or with MCNP in particular. The document begins with a Quickstart chapter that introduces the basic concepts of using MCNP. The following chapters expand on those ideas, presenting a range of problems from simple cylinders to 3-dimensional lattices for calculating keff confidence intervals. Input files and results for all problems are included. The Primer can be used alone, but its best use is in conjunction with the MCNP4A manual. After completing the Primer, a criticality analyst should be capable of performing and understanding a majority of the calculations that will arise in the field of nuclear criticality safety.

  6. Recent Developments in the MCNP-POLIMI Postprocessing Code

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, S.A.

    2004-12-17

    The design and analysis of measurements performed with organic scintillators rely on the use of Monte Carlo codes to simulate the interaction of neutrons and photons, originating from fission and other reactions, with the materials present in the system and the radiation detectors. MCNP-PoliMi is a modification of the MCNP-4c code that models the physics of secondary particle emission from fission and other processes realistically. This characteristic allows for the simulation of the higher moments of the distribution of the number of neutrons and photons in a multiplying system. The present report describes the recent additions to the MCNP-PoliMi post-processing code. These include the simulation of detector dead time, multiplicity, and third order statistics.

  7. MCNP load balancing and fault tolerance with PVM

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, G.W.

    1995-07-01

    Version 4A of the Monte Carlo neutron, photon, and electron transport code MCNP, developed by LANL (Los Alamos National Laboratory), supports distributed-memory multiprocessing through the software package PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine, version 3.1.4). Using PVM for interprocessor communication, MCNP can simultaneously execute a single problem on a cluster of UNIX-based workstations. This capability provided system efficiencies that exceeded 80% on dedicated workstation clusters, however, on heterogeneous or multiuser systems, the performance was limited by the slowest processor (i.e., equal work was assigned to each processor). The next public release of MCNP will provide multiprocessing enhancements that include load balancing and fault tolerance which are shown to dramatically increase multiuser system efficiency and reliability.

  8. Features of MCNP6 Relevant to Medical Radiation Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, H. Grady III; Goorley, John T.

    2012-08-29

    MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) is a general-purpose Monte Carlo code for simulating the transport of neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and more recently other fundamental particles and heavy ions. Over many years MCNP has found a wide range of applications in many different fields, including medical radiation physics. In this presentation we will describe and illustrate a number of significant recently-developed features in the current version of the code, MCNP6, having particular utility for medical physics. Among these are major extensions of the ability to simulate large, complex geometries, improvement in memory requirements and speed for large lattices, introduction of mesh-based isotopic reaction tallies, advances in radiography simulation, expanded variance-reduction capabilities, especially for pulse-height tallies, and a large number of enhancements in photon/electron transport.

  9. MCNP Analysis of a Phoswich Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Childress; William H. Miller

    2002-06-12

    A series of triple crystal phosphor sandwich detectors have been developed and constructed for testing at the University of Missouri-Columbia [1-7]. These detectors can simultaneously measure alpha, beta, and gamma radiation and utilize digital pulse shape discrimination to identify and separate radiation events coming from each of the separate phosphors. The research reported here uses Monte Carlo [8] software analysis to determine operating parameters for this detector system and optimizes its design for measuring trace amounts of alpha, beta and gamma-ray activity in effluent streams from nuclear waste cleanup processes. The previously designed, fabricated and tested phoswich detector [5] consisted of three scintillators placed on top of each other with a common diameter of 5.08 cm and viewed with a single photomultiplier tube. The scintillators (ZnS-0.00376 cm, CaF{sub 2}-0.254 cm and NaI-2.54 cm) interact preferentially with alpha, beta and gamma-ray radiation, respectively. This design allows preferential, but not exclusive, interaction of various radiations with specific layers. Taking into account and correcting for events that can occur in the ''wrong'' phosphor, this system was experimentally shown to have a 99% accuracy for properly identifying radiation coming from a mixed alpha/beta/gamma-ray source. In an attempt to better understand this system and provide design guidance for a detector system to be used in monitoring effluents from nuclear waste treatment facilities, this detector was modeled using MCNP [8]. This analysis [9] indicated that the thin ZnS layer adequately stops alpha particle energy, but greatly reduces beta detection efficiency to essentially zero at beta E{sub max} energies below 300 keV. The CaF{sub 2} layer, designed to keep any beta particle energy from entering the NaI detector results in an incorrect gamma-ray response that is approximately 23% of the NaI's response and is variable with energy. High energy beta events in the Ca

  10. MCNP speed advances for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Goorley, J.T.; McKinney, G.; Adams, K.; Estes, G.

    1998-04-01

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) treatment planning process of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center-M.I.T team relies on MCNP to determine dose rates in the subject`s head for various beam orientations. In this time consuming computational process, four or five potential beams are investigated. Of these, one or two final beams are selected and thoroughly evaluated. Recent advances greatly decreased the time needed to do these MCNP calculations. Two modifications to the new MCNP4B source code, lattice tally and tracking enhancements, reduced the wall-clock run times of a typical one million source neutrons run to one hour twenty five minutes on a 200 MHz Pentium Pro computer running Linux and using the GNU FORTRAN compiler. Previously these jobs used a special version of MCNP4AB created by Everett Redmond, which completed in two hours two minutes. In addition to this 30% speedup, the MCNP4B version was adapted for use with Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) on personal computers running the Linux operating system. MCNP, using PVM, can be run on multiple computers simultaneously, offering a factor of speedup roughly the same as the number of computers used. With two 200 MHz Pentium Pro machines, the run time was reduced to forty five minutes, a 1.9 factor of improvement over the single Linux computer. While the time of a single run was greatly reduced, the advantages associated with PVM derive from using computational power not already used. Four possible beams, currently requiring four separate runs, could be run faster when each is individually run on a single machine under Windows NT, rather than using Linux and PVM to run one after another with each multiprocessed across four computers. It would be advantageous, however, to use PVM to distribute the final two beam orientations over four computers.

  11. Spitzer observations of adolescent novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Aneurin; Gehrz, Robert; Helton, Andrew; Krautter, Joachim; Lyke, James; Polomsky, Elisha; Rushton, Mark; Salama, Alberto; Shore, Steven; Starrfield, Sumner; Truran, James; Wagner, R. Mark; Woodward, Charles

    2006-05-01

    Classical novae (CNe) offer the best opportunity to observe many astrophysical processes (such as dust formation and processing, shaping of nebulae, gas cooling by IR fine structure lines) in `fast forward'. The CN eruption arises following a thermonuclear runaway on the surface of a white dwarf in a semi-detached binary system, following which some 10^-4 Msun of material, enriched in metals, is explosively ejected at ~1000km/s. Following the eruption, CNe vary rapidly, on a timescale ~months, and this necessitates continuous monitoring. Several novae were observed in GO1 as targets-of-opportunity (ToO). We propose to use the Spitzer IRS to observe a sample of novae, including GO1 ToO and several recent (<20years) CNe, to provide us with a well-populated CN parameter space. We aim to determine (i) the ejecta masses, (ii) abundances in the ejected material, (iii) evolution and processing of the CN dust.

  12. Accelerating Pseudo-Random Number Generator for MCNP on GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Chunye; Liu, Jie; Chi, Lihua; Hu, Qingfeng; Deng, Li; Gong, Zhenghu

    2010-09-01

    Pseudo-random number generators (PRNG) are intensively used in many stochastic algorithms in particle simulations, artificial neural networks and other scientific computation. The PRNG in Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) requires long period, high quality, flexible jump and fast enough. In this paper, we implement such a PRNG for MCNP on NVIDIA's GTX200 Graphics Processor Units (GPU) using CUDA programming model. Results shows that 3.80 to 8.10 times speedup are achieved compared with 4 to 6 cores CPUs and more than 679.18 million double precision random numbers can be generated per second on GPU.

  13. Geometry creation for MCNP by Sabrina and XSM

    SciTech Connect

    Van Riper, K.A.

    1994-02-01

    The Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code MCNP is based on a surface description of 3-dimensional geometry. Cells are defined in terms of boolean operations on signed quadratic surfaces. MCNP geometry is entered as a card image file containing coefficients of the surface equations and a list of surfaces and operators describing cells. Several programs are available to assist in creation of the geometry specification, among them Sabrina and the new ``Smart Editor`` code XSM. We briefly describe geometry creation in Sabrina and then discuss XSM in detail. XSM is under development; our discussion is based on the state of XSM as of January 1, 1994.

  14. Cold neutron gain calculations for the NBSR using MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.; Rowe, J.M. ); Blau, M. )

    1993-01-01

    The existing D[sub 2]O-ice cold neutron source in the 20-MW National Bureau of Standards reactor (NBSR) will be replaced in 1994 with a liquid-hydrogen (LH2) source, to increase the yield of cold neutrons (X > 0.4 nm). Two series of Monte Carlo calculations using MCNP were performed to determine the optimum cold moderator geometry and to verify its performance. Only the region near the cryostat was modeled for the first series of calculations, leading to the choice of a spherical annulus for the LH[sub 2] source. A complete MCNP model of the core was subsequently developed.

  15. Calculation of cell volumes and surface areas in MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    MCNP is a general Monte Carlo neutron-photon particle transport code which treats an arbitrary three-dimensional configuration of materials in geometric cells bounded by first- and second-degree surfaces, and some special fourth-degree surfaces. It is necessary to calculate cell volumes and surface areas so that cell masses, fluxes, and other important information can be determined. The volume/area calculation in MCNP computes cell volumes and surface areas for cells and surfaces rotationally symmetric about any arbitrary axis. 5 figures, 1 table.

  16. Reactor physics verification of the MCNP6 unstructured mesh capability

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, T. P.; Kiedrowski, B. C.; Martz, R. L.; Martin, W. R.

    2013-07-01

    The Monte Carlo software package MCNP6 has the ability to transport particles on unstructured meshes generated from the Computed-Aided Engineering software Abaqus. Verification is performed using benchmarks with features relevant to reactor physics - Big Ten and the C5G7 computational benchmark. Various meshing strategies are tested and results are compared to reference solutions. Computational performance results are also given. The conclusions show MCNP6 is capable of producing accurate calculations for reactor physics geometries and the computational requirements for small lattice benchmarks are reasonable on modern computing platforms. (authors)

  17. An Electron/Photon/Relaxation Data Library for MCNP6

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, III, H. Grady

    2015-08-07

    The capabilities of the MCNP6 Monte Carlo code in simulation of electron transport, photon transport, and atomic relaxation have recently been significantly expanded. The enhancements include not only the extension of existing data and methods to lower energies, but also the introduction of new categories of data and methods. Support of these new capabilities has required major additions to and redesign of the associated data tables. In this paper we present the first complete documentation of the contents and format of the new electron-photon-relaxation data library now available with the initial production release of MCNP6.

  18. Transient classification and novae ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Robert

    2016-07-01

    A third parameter, in addition to luminosity and rate of brightness decline, derived from the spectra of transients is suggested as a means of more accurately classifying objects in outburst. Principal component analysis of the spectra of transients is suggested as the best way to determine the third parameter. A model is suggested for novae ejecta that is based on the ballistic ejection of an ensemble of clouds having a wide range of sizes. Short term brightness fluctuations of novae, the formation of dust, and the production of X-ray emission follow naturally from such a picture of the evolving clouds.

  19. Observations of classical novae in outburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Stryker, L. L.; Sonneborn, G.; Sparks, Warren M.; Ferland, Gary; Wagner, R. M.; Williams, R. E.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Ney, Edward P.; Kenyon, Scott

    1988-01-01

    The IUE obtained ultraviolet data on novae in outburst. The characteristics of every one of the outbursts are different. Optical and infrared data on many of the same novae were also obtained. Three members of the carbon-oxygen class of novae are presented.

  20. Monte Carlo N–Particle Transport Code System Including MCNP6.1.1BETA, MCNP6.1, MCNP5-1.60, MCNPX-2.7.0 and Data Libraries.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-09-01

    Version 01 MCNP6™ is a general-purpose, continuous-energy, generalized-geometry, time-dependent, Monte Carlo radiation-transport code designed to track many particle types over broad ranges of energies. This MCNP6.1.1Beta is a follow-on to the MCNP6.1 production version which itself was the culmination of a multi-year effort to merge the MCNP5™ [X-503] and MCNPX™ [PEL11] codes into a single product. This MCNP6.1.1 beta has been released in order to provide the radiation transport community with the latest feature developmentsmore » and bug fixes in the code. MCNP6.1.1 has taken input from a group of people, residing in the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) X Computational Physics Division, Radiation Transport Group (XCP-3), and Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, Systems Design and Analysis Group (NEN-5). They have combined their code development efforts to produce this next evolution of MCNP. For those familiar with previous versions of MCNP, you will discover the code has been expanded to handle a multitude of particles and to include model physics options for energies above the cross-section table range, a material burnup feature, and delayed particle production. Expanded and/or new tally, source, and variance-reduction options are available to the user as well as an improved plotting capability. The capability to calculate keff eigenvalues for fissile systems remains a standard feature. Although MCNP6 is simply and accurately described as the merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX capabilities, the result is much more than the sum of these two computer codes. MCNP6 is the result of five years of effort by the MCNP5 and MCNPX code development teams.« less

  1. Monte Carlo N–Particle Transport Code System Including MCNP6.1.1BETA, MCNP6.1, MCNP5-1.60, MCNPX-2.7.0 and Data Libraries.

    SciTech Connect

    2014-09-01

    Version 01 MCNP6™ is a general-purpose, continuous-energy, generalized-geometry, time-dependent, Monte Carlo radiation-transport code designed to track many particle types over broad ranges of energies. This MCNP6.1.1Beta is a follow-on to the MCNP6.1 production version which itself was the culmination of a multi-year effort to merge the MCNP5™ [X-503] and MCNPX™ [PEL11] codes into a single product. This MCNP6.1.1 beta has been released in order to provide the radiation transport community with the latest feature developments and bug fixes in the code. MCNP6.1.1 has taken input from a group of people, residing in the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) X Computational Physics Division, Radiation Transport Group (XCP-3), and Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, Systems Design and Analysis Group (NEN-5). They have combined their code development efforts to produce this next evolution of MCNP. For those familiar with previous versions of MCNP, you will discover the code has been expanded to handle a multitude of particles and to include model physics options for energies above the cross-section table range, a material burnup feature, and delayed particle production. Expanded and/or new tally, source, and variance-reduction options are available to the user as well as an improved plotting capability. The capability to calculate keff eigenvalues for fissile systems remains a standard feature. Although MCNP6 is simply and accurately described as the merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX capabilities, the result is much more than the sum of these two computer codes. MCNP6 is the result of five years of effort by the MCNP5 and MCNPX code development teams.

  2. Nova LMC 1990 no. 1: The first extragalactic neon nova

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George; Shore, Steven N.; Starrfield, Sumner G.

    1990-01-01

    International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observations of nova LMC (Large Magellanic Cloud) 1990 No. 1, the first neon (or ONeMg) nova observed outside the Galaxy are presented. The observations were obtained from 17 Jan. to Mar. 1990, with especially dense coverage during the first 25 days of the outburst. (The neon nova categorization is based on the detection of forbidden Ne 3-4 lines in optical spectra; the ultraviolet neon lines were not detected.) During the first 30 days of the outburst, the radiative losses were dominated by the N 5 delta 1240 and C 4 delta 1550 lines. The maximum ejection velocity was approximately 8000 km/s, based on the blue absorption edge of the C 4 P-Cygni profile. Early in the outburst of Nova LMC 1990 No. 1 the UV luminosity alone was approximately 3 times 10 to the 38th power erg/sec, implying that the bolometric luminosity was well in excess of the Eddington luminosity for a one solar mass object.

  3. Impact of MCNP unresolved resonance probability-table treatment on uranium and plutonium benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Mosteller, R.D.; Little, R.C.

    1998-12-31

    Versions of MCNP up through and including 4B have not accurately modeled neutron self-shielding effects in the unresolved resonance energy region. Recently, a probability-table treatment has been incorporated into a developmental version of MCNP. This paper presents MCNP results for a variety of uranium and plutonium critical benchmarks, calculated with and without the probability-table treatment.

  4. Fission Matrix Capability for MCNP Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, Sean E.; Brown, Forrest B.; Kiedrowski, Brian C.; Martin, William R.

    2012-09-05

    In a Monte Carlo criticality calculation, before the tallying of quantities can begin, a converged fission source (the fundamental eigenvector of the fission kernel) is required. Tallies of interest may include powers, absorption rates, leakage rates, or the multiplication factor (the fundamental eigenvalue of the fission kernel, k{sub eff}). Just as in the power iteration method of linear algebra, if the dominance ratio (the ratio of the first and zeroth eigenvalues) is high, many iterations of neutron history simulations are required to isolate the fundamental mode of the problem. Optically large systems have large dominance ratios, and systems containing poor neutron communication between regions are also slow to converge. The fission matrix method, implemented into MCNP[1], addresses these problems. When Monte Carlo random walk from a source is executed, the fission kernel is stochastically applied to the source. Random numbers are used for: distances to collision, reaction types, scattering physics, fission reactions, etc. This method is used because the fission kernel is a complex, 7-dimensional operator that is not explicitly known. Deterministic methods use approximations/discretization in energy, space, and direction to the kernel. Consequently, they are faster. Monte Carlo directly simulates the physics, which necessitates the use of random sampling. Because of this statistical noise, common convergence acceleration methods used in deterministic methods do not work. In the fission matrix method, we are using the random walk information not only to build the next-iteration fission source, but also a spatially-averaged fission kernel. Just like in deterministic methods, this involves approximation and discretization. The approximation is the tallying of the spatially-discretized fission kernel with an incorrect fission source. We address this by making the spatial mesh fine enough that this error is negligible. As a consequence of discretization we get a

  5. Certification of MCNP version 4A for WHC computer platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, L.L., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-07

    MCNP is a general-purpose Monte Carlo code that can be used for neutron, photon, or coupled neutron/photon transport, including the capability to calculate eigenvalues for critical systems. The code treats an arbitrary three-dimensional configuration of materials in geometric cells bounded by first- and second-degree surfaces, and some special fourth-degree surfaces (elliptical tori).

  6. MCNP6. Simulating Correlated Data in Fission Events

    SciTech Connect

    Rising, Michael Evan; Sood, Avneet

    2015-12-03

    This report is a series of slides discussing the MCNP6 code and its status in simulating fission. Applications of interest include global security and nuclear nonproliferation, detection of special nuclear material (SNM), passive and active interrogation techniques, and coincident neutron and photon leakage.

  7. MCNP6 enhancements of delayed-particle production

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, G. W.

    2012-07-01

    Over the last decade, there has been an increased interest in the production of delayed-particle signatures from neutron and photon interactions with matter. To address this interest, various radiation transport codes have developed a wide range of delayed-particle physics packages. With the recent merger of the Monte Carlo transport codes MCNP5 and MCNPX, MCNP6 inherited the comprehensive model-based delayed-particle production capabilities developed in MCNPX over the last few years. An integral part of this capability consists of the depletion code CINDER90 which was incorporated into MCNPX in 2004. During this last year, significant improvements have been made to the MCNP6 physics and algorithms associated with delayed-particle production, including the development of a delayed-beta capability, an algorithm enhancement for the delayed-neutron treatment, and a database enhancement for delayed-gamma emission. The delayed-beta feature represents an important component in modeling background signals produced by active interrogation sources. Combined, these improvements provide MCNP6 with a flexible state-of-the-art physics package for generating high-fidelity signatures from fission and activation. This paper provides details of these enhancements and presents results for a variety of fission and activation examples. (authors)

  8. Preliminary Benchmarking and MCNP Simulation Results for Homeland Security

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Hayes

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to create Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) input stacks for benchmarked measurements sufficient for future perturbation studies and analysis. The approach was to utilize historical experimental measurements to recreate the empirical spectral results in MCNP, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Results demonstrate that perturbation analysis of benchmarked MCNP spectra can be used to obtain a better understanding of field measurement results which may be of national interest. If one or more spectral radiation measurements are made in the field and deemed of national interest, the potential source distribution, naturally occurring radioactive material shielding, and interstitial materials can only be estimated in many circumstances. The effects from these factors on the resultant spectral radiation measurements can be very confusing. If benchmarks exist which are sufficiently similar to the suspected configuration, these benchmarks can then be compared to the suspect measurements. Having these benchmarks with validated MCNP input stacks can substantially improve the predictive capability of experts supporting these efforts.

  9. NOVA Fall 1998 Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colombo, Luann

    This teacher's guide is designed to accompany the PBS television program "NOVA." Six science activities correspond to: (1) "Lost at Sea: The Search for Longitude,, which researches and charts the shortest course to circumnavigate the globe; (2) "Chasing El Nino," which formulates a question and designs an experiment to evaluate the accuracy of…

  10. THE NOVA RATE IN NGC 2403

    SciTech Connect

    Franck, J. R.; Shafter, A. W.; Hornoch, K.; Misselt, K. A.

    2012-11-20

    A multi-epoch H{alpha} survey of the late-type spiral galaxy NGC 2403 has been completed in order to determine its nova rate. A total of nine nova candidates were discovered in 48 nights of observation with two different telescopes over the period from 2001 February to 2012 April. After making corrections for temporal coverage and spatial completeness, a nova rate of 2.0{sup +0.5} {sub -0.3} yr{sup -1} was determined. This rate corresponds to a luminosity-specific nova rate of 2.5 {+-} 0.7 novae per year per 10{sup 10} L {sub Sun ,K}. This value is consistent with that of the similar Hubble-type galaxy, M33, and is typical of those of other galaxies with measured nova rates, which range from 1 to 3 novae per year per 10{sup 10} L {sub Sun ,K}.

  11. An observational case against nova hibernation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naylor, T.; Charles, P. A.; Mukai, K.; Evans, A.

    1992-01-01

    We use WHT spectroscopy and imaging to show that nova Vul 1670 (= CK Vul) has been incorrectly identified, and thus its luminosity cannot be used as evidence that novae fade into a 'hibernation' phase within 300 yr of their outbursts. INT spectroscopy is used to correct the magnitude of nova Sge 1783 (= WY Sge) for inclination, this result also implying that novae do not fade significantly. We therefore suggest that, while novae decline in the first 60 yr after outburst, thereafter their luminosity remains constant, and they never undergo a 'hibernation' phase. We show that this idea is consistent with the space density of novae and novalike variables, the outburst interval of SS Cyg and the current luminosities of old novae.

  12. Implementation of on-the-fly doppler broadening in MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, W. R.; Wilderman, S.; Brown, F. B.; Yesilyurt, G.

    2013-07-01

    A new method to obtain Doppler broadened cross sections has been implemented into MCNP, removing the need to generate cross sections for isotopes at problem temperatures. When a neutron of energy E enters a material region that is at some temperature T, the cross sections for that material at temperature T are immediately obtained 'on-the-fly' (OTF) by interpolation using a high order functional expansion for the temperature dependence of the Doppler-broadened cross section for that isotope at the neutron energy E. The OTF cross sections agree with the NJOY-based cross sections for all neutron energies and all temperatures in the range specified by the user, e.g., 250 K - 3200 K. The OTF methodology has been successfully implemented into the MCNP Monte Carlo code and has been tested on several test problems by comparing MCNP with conventional ACE cross sections versus MCNP with OTF cross sections. The test problems include the Doppler defect reactivity benchmark suite and two full-core VHTR configurations, including one with multiphysics coupling using RELAP5-3D/ATHENA for the thermal-hydraulic analysis. The comparison has been excellent, verifying that the OTF libraries can be used in place of the conventional ACE libraries generated at problem temperatures. In addition, it has been found that the OTF methodology greatly reduces the complexity of the input for MCNP, resulting in an order of magnitude decrease in the number of input lines for full-core configurations. Finally, for full-core problems with multiphysics feedback, the memory required to store the cross section data is considerably reduced with OTF cross sections and the additional computational effort with OTF is modest, on the order of 10-15%. (authors)

  13. MCNP{sup TM} criticality primer and training experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Briesmeister, J.; Forster, R.A.; Busch, R.

    1995-09-01

    With the closure of many experimental facilities, the nuclear criticality safety analyst is increasingly required to rely on computer calculations to identify safe limits for the handling and storage of fissile materials. However, the analyst may have little experience with the specific codes available at his or her facility. Usually, the codes are quite complex, black boxes capable of analyzing numerous problems with a myriad of input options. Documentation for these codes is designed to cover all the possible configurations and types of analyses but does not give much detail on any particular type of analysis. For criticality calculations, the user of a code is primarily interested in the value of the effective multiplication factor for a system (k{sub eff}). Most codes will provide this, and truckloads of other information that may be less pertinent to criticality calculations. Based on discussions with code users in the nuclear criticality safety community, it was decided that a simple document discussing the ins and outs of criticality calculations with specific codes would be quite useful. The Transport Methods Group, XTM, at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) decided to develop a primer for criticality calculations with their Monte Carlo code, MCNP. This was a joint task between LANL with a knowledge and understanding of the nuances and capabilities of MCNP and the University of New Mexico with a knowledge and understanding of nuclear criticality safety calculations and educating first time users of neutronics calculations. The initial problem was that the MCNP manual just contained too much information. Almost everything one needs to know about MCNP can be found in the manual; the problem is that there is more information than a user requires to do a simple k{sub eff} calculation. The basic concept of the primer was to distill the manual to create a document whose only focus was criticality calculations using MCNP.

  14. AT Cnc: A Second Dwarf Nova with a Classical Nova Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shara, Michael M.; Mizusawa, Trisha; Wehinger, Peter; Zurek, David; Martin, Christopher D.; Neill, James D.; Forster, Karl; Seibert, Mark

    2012-10-01

    We are systematically surveying all known and suspected Z Cam-type dwarf novae for classical nova shells. This survey is motivated by the discovery of the largest known classical nova shell, which surrounds the archetypal dwarf nova Z Camelopardalis. The Z Cam shell demonstrates that at least some dwarf novae must have undergone classical nova eruptions in the past, and that at least some classical novae become dwarf novae long after their nova thermonuclear outbursts, in accord with the hibernation scenario of cataclysmic binaries. Here we report the detection of a fragmented "shell," 3 arcmin in diameter, surrounding the dwarf nova AT Cancri. This second discovery demonstrates that nova shells surrounding Z Cam-type dwarf novae cannot be very rare. The shell geometry is suggestive of bipolar, conical ejection seen nearly pole-on. A spectrum of the brightest AT Cnc shell knot is similar to that of the ejecta of the classical nova GK Per, and of Z Cam, dominated by [N II] emission. Galaxy Evolution Explorer FUV imagery reveals a similar-sized, FUV-emitting shell. We determine a distance of 460 pc to AT Cnc, and an upper limit to its ejecta mass of ~5 × 10-5 M ⊙, typical of classical novae.

  15. AT Cnc: A SECOND DWARF NOVA WITH A CLASSICAL NOVA SHELL

    SciTech Connect

    Shara, Michael M.; Mizusawa, Trisha; Zurek, David; Wehinger, Peter; Martin, Christopher D.; Neill, James D.; Forster, Karl; Seibert, Mark

    2012-10-20

    We are systematically surveying all known and suspected Z Cam-type dwarf novae for classical nova shells. This survey is motivated by the discovery of the largest known classical nova shell, which surrounds the archetypal dwarf nova Z Camelopardalis. The Z Cam shell demonstrates that at least some dwarf novae must have undergone classical nova eruptions in the past, and that at least some classical novae become dwarf novae long after their nova thermonuclear outbursts, in accord with the hibernation scenario of cataclysmic binaries. Here we report the detection of a fragmented 'shell', 3 arcmin in diameter, surrounding the dwarf nova AT Cancri. This second discovery demonstrates that nova shells surrounding Z Cam-type dwarf novae cannot be very rare. The shell geometry is suggestive of bipolar, conical ejection seen nearly pole-on. A spectrum of the brightest AT Cnc shell knot is similar to that of the ejecta of the classical nova GK Per, and of Z Cam, dominated by [N II] emission. Galaxy Evolution Explorer FUV imagery reveals a similar-sized, FUV-emitting shell. We determine a distance of 460 pc to AT Cnc, and an upper limit to its ejecta mass of {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M {sub Sun }, typical of classical novae.

  16. Possible Improvements to MCNP6 and its CEM/LAQGSM Event-Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Mashnik, Stepan Georgievich

    2015-08-04

    This report is intended to the MCNP6 developers and sponsors of MCNP6. It presents a set of suggested possible future improvements to MCNP6 and to its CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 event-generators. A few suggested modifications of MCNP6 are quite simple, aimed at avoiding possible problems with running MCNP6 on various computers, i.e., these changes are not expected to change or improve any results, but should make the use of MCNP6 easier; such changes are expected to require limited man-power resources. On the other hand, several other suggested improvements require a serious further development of nuclear reaction models, are expected to improve significantly the predictive power of MCNP6 for a number of nuclear reactions; but, such developments require several years of work by real experts on nuclear reactions.

  17. Conversion of Input Data between KENO V.a and MCNP File Formats, Version 5L.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-10-31

    Version 00 The KENO2MCNP program was written to convert KENO V.a input files to MCNP Format. This program currently only works with KENO Va geometries and will not work with geometries that contain more than a single array. A C++ graphical user interface was created that was linked to Fortran routines from KENO V.a that read the material library and Fortran routines from the MCNP Visual Editor that generate the MCNP input file. Either SCALEmore » 5.0 or SCALE 5.1 cross section files will work with this release. This version of KENO2MCNP was tested with CCC-730/MCNP5 1.40 and with CCC-725/SCALE5.0 and CCC-732/SCALE 5.1. Note that this distribution does not include either MCNP or SCALE, which are available separately through either RSICC or the NEA Data Bank.« less

  18. Identifying and quantifying recurrent novae masquerading as classical novae

    SciTech Connect

    Pagnotta, Ashley; Schaefer, Bradley E.

    2014-06-20

    Recurrent novae (RNe) are cataclysmic variables with two or more nova eruptions within a century. Classical novae (CNe) are similar systems with only one such eruption. Many of the so-called CNe are actually RNe for which only one eruption has been discovered. Since RNe are candidate Type Ia supernova progenitors, it is important to know whether there are enough in our Galaxy to provide the supernova rate, and therefore to know how many RNe are masquerading as CNe. To quantify this, we collected all available information on the light curves and spectra of a Galactic, time-limited sample of 237 CNe and the 10 known RNe, as well as exhaustive discovery efficiency records. We recognize RNe as having (1) outburst amplitude smaller than 14.5 – 4.5 × log (t {sub 3}), (2) orbital period >0.6 days, (3) infrared colors of J – H > 0.7 mag and H – K > 0.1 mag, (4) FWHM of Hα > 2000 km s{sup –1}, (5) high excitation lines, such as Fe X or He II near peak, (6) eruption light curves with a plateau, and (7) white dwarf mass greater than 1.2 M {sub ☉}. Using these criteria, we identify V1721 Aql, DE Cir, CP Cru, KT Eri, V838 Her, V2672 Oph, V4160 Sgr, V4643 Sgr, V4739 Sgr, and V477 Sct as strong RN candidates. We evaluate the RN fraction among the known CNe using three methods to get 24% ± 4%, 12% ± 3%, and 35% ± 3%. With roughly a quarter of the 394 known Galactic novae actually being RNe, there should be approximately a hundred such systems masquerading as CNe.

  19. Possible Nova in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burwitz, V.; Pietsch, W.; Updike, A.; Hartmann, D.; Milne, P.; Williams, G.

    2007-10-01

    We report the discovery of an optical nova candidate in M 31 on two 4*60sec stacked R filter CCD images obtained with the robotic 60cm telescope with an E2V CCD (2kx2k) Livermore Optical Transient Imaging System (Super- LOTIS, located at Steward Observatory, Kitt Peak, Arizona, USA) on 2007 Oct 13.255, 13.259 with respective magnitudes of 18.0, 17.8. The position for the nova candidate is RA = 00h43m29.48s, Dec(2000) = +41d17'13.5" (J2000, accuracy of 0.2"), which is 8' 29" east and 1' 5" north of the core of M 31.

  20. Hydrodynamic simulations of recurrent novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starrfield, S.; Sparks, W. M.; Truran, J. W.; Sion, E. M.

    1984-12-01

    Simulations of the 1979 outburst of the recurrent nova U Scorpii using a Lagrangian, hydrodynamic computer code which incorporates accretion in the evolution to the outburst are discussed. Three evolutionary sequences were computed in an attempt to understand the very rapid outburst and short recurrence time of this most unusual nova. It is now possible to reproduce the CNO composition of the ejected material, the light curve, the amount of ejected material, and the kinetic energy of the ejecta. The best sequence studied involved accretion of solar rich material onto a 1.38 solar magnatude white dwarf at a rate of 1.6 x 10 to the minus 8 solar magnatude per year.

  1. The NOvA experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Ronald E.

    2008-01-01

    The NOvA Project will construct a 15 kt Far Detector 835 km from Fermilab at Ash River Minnesota, a 220 ton Near Detector on the Fermilab site and upgrade the existing NuMI beamline from 400 kW to 700 kW. The detector technology is liquid scintillator captured in reflective rigid PVC cells. The light is captured using WLS fibre and routed to avalanche photo diodes. NO?A is designed to observe the appearance of electron neutrinos, determine the value of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) and begin the study of CP violation in the neutrino sector. NO?A is the only currently approved experiment with the ability to determine the neutrino mass ordering. The NOvA physics program and projected sensitivities are described in this report.

  2. Nucleosynthesis and the nova outburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Truran, J.W.; Wiescher, M.; Sparks, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    A nova outburst is the consequence of the accretion of hydrogen rich material onto a white dwarf and it can be considered as the largest hydrogen bomb in the Universe. The fuel is supplied by a secondary star in a close binary system while the strong degeneracy of the massive white dwarf acts to contain the gas during the early stages of the explosion. The containment allows the temperature in the nuclear burning region to exceed 10(sup 8)K under all circumstances. As a result a major fraction of CNO nuclei in the envelope are transformed into (beta)(sup +)-unstable nuclei. We discuss the effects of these nuclei on the evolution. Recent observational studies have shown that there are two compositional classes of novae; one which occurs on carbon-oxygen white dwarfs, and a second class that occurs on oxygen-neon-magnesium white dwarfs. In this review we will concentrate on the latter explosions since they produce the most interesting nucleosynthesis. We report both on the results of new observational determinations of nova abundances and, in addition, new hydrodynamic calculations that examine the consequences of the accretion process on 1.0M(sub (circle dot)), 1.25M(sub (circle dot)), and 1.35M(sub (circle dot)) white dwarfs. Our results show that novae can produce (sup 22)Na, (sup 26)Al, and other intermediate mass nuclei in interesting amounts. We will present the results of new calculations, done with updated nuclear reaction rates and opacities, which exhibit quantitative differences with respect to published work.

  3. Nucleosynthesis and the nova outburst

    SciTech Connect

    Starrfield, S.; Truran, J.W.; Wiescher, M.; Sparks, W.M.

    1995-12-31

    A nova outburst is the consequence of the accretion of hydrogen rich material onto a white dwarf and it can be considered as the largest hydrogen bomb in the Universe. The fuel is supplied by a secondary star in a close binary system while the strong degeneracy of the massive white dwarf acts to contain the gas during the early stages of the explosion. The containment allows the temperature in the nuclear burning region to exceed 10{sup 8}K under all circumstances. As a result a major fraction of CNO nuclei in the envelope are transformed into {beta}{sup +}-unstable nuclei. We discuss the effects of these nuclei on the evolution. Recent observational studies have shown that there are two compositional classes of novae; one which occurs on carbon-oxygen white dwarfs, and a second class that occurs on oxygen-neon-magnesium white dwarfs. In this review we will concentrate on the latter explosions since they produce the most interesting nucleosynthesis. We report both on the results of new observational determinations of nova abundances and, in addition, new hydrodynamic calculations that examine the consequences of the accretion process on 1.0M{sub {circle_dot}}, 1.25M{sub {circle_dot}}, and 1.35M{sub {circle_dot}} white dwarfs. Our results show that novae can produce {sup 22}Na, {sup 26}Al, and other intermediate mass nuclei in interesting amounts. We will present the results of new calculations, done with updated nuclear reaction rates and opacities, which exhibit quantitative differences with respect to published work.

  4. AST3: dwarf nova outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Bin; Hu, Yi; Shang, Zhaohui; Wang, Lifan

    2016-05-01

    AST3#2 OT J024453.11-580940.1 discovery - new dwarf nova outburst with ampl > 5.8 The 2nd Antarctic Survey Telescope (AST3#2) discovered OT source at (RA, Dec) = 02:44:53.11 -58:09:40.1 on 2016-05-06.071 UT with Sloan-g magnitude of 15.5m (limit 18.6m).

  5. Nova chain design and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, W.W.; Glaze, J.A.; Trenholme, J.B.; Hagen, W.F.

    1980-09-04

    During the past year design of the Nova laser has undergone significant change as a result of developments in our laser glass and optical coating evaluation programs. Two notable aspects of the glass development program deserve emphasis. First, vendor qualification for production of fluorophosphate laser glass is progressing satisfactorily. There is a reasonable expectation that vendors can meet fluorophosphate glass specifications within Nova schedule constraints. Secondly, recent gain saturation measurements have shown that the saturation fluence of the fluorophosphate glass is larger than previously supposed (approx. 5.5 J/cm/sup 2/) and in fact is somewhat larger than Shiva silicate glasses. Hence, performance of Nova for pulses in the 3 ns and longer range should be satisfactory. For pulses in the 1 ns regime, of course, the fluorophosphate chain will have superior performance to that of silicate because of its low nonlinear index of refraction (approx. 30% that of silicate). These and other considerations have led us to choose a chain design based upon the use of fluorophosphate glass in our amplifiers.

  6. Positron annihilation gamma rays from novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leising, Mark D.; Clayton, Donald D.

    1987-01-01

    The potential for observing annihilation gamma rays from novae is investigated. These gamma rays, a unique signature of the thermonuclear runaway models of novae, would result from the annihilation of positrons emitted by beta(+)-unstable nuclei produced near the peak of the runaway and carried by rapid convection to the surface of the nova envelope. Simple models, which are extensions of detailed published models, of the expansion of the nova atmospheres are evolved. These models serve as input into investigations of the fate of nearby Galactic fast novae could yield detectable fluxes of electron-positron annihilation gamma rays produced by the decay of N-13 and F-18. Although nuclear gamma-ray lines are produced by other nuclei, it is unlikely that the fluxes at typical nova distances would be detectable to present and near-future instruments.

  7. A Verification of MCNP6 FMESH Tally Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, Alicia L.; McKigney, Edward A.; Schirato, Richard C.; Robinson, Alex Philip; Temple, Brian Allen

    2015-02-10

    This work serves to verify the MCNP6 FMESH capability through comparison to two types of data. FMESH tallies, binned in time, were generated on an ideal detector face for neutrons undergoing a single scatter in a graphite target. For verification, FMESH results were compared to analytic calculations of the nonrelativistic TOF for elastic and inelastic single neutron scatters (TOF for the purposes of this paper is the time for a neutron to travel from its scatter location in the graphite target to the detector face). FMESH tally results were also compared to F4 tally results, an MNCP tally that calculates fluence in the same way as the FMESH tally. The FMESH tally results agree well with the analytic results and the F4 tally; hence, it is believed that, for simple geometries, MCNP6 FMESH tallies represent the physics of neutron scattering very well.

  8. The MCNP{trademark}/LCS{trademark} merger project

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, H.G.; Adams, K.J.; Chadwick, M.B.

    1997-10-01

    The MCNP code is written and maintained by Group X-TM at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In response to a variety of needs, and particularly in support of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program, the authors have recently undertaken a major effort to expand the capabilities of MCNP to increase the set of transportable particles; to make use of newly evaluated high energy nuclear data tables for neutrons, protons, and potentially other particles; and to incorporate physics models for use where tabular data are unavailable. A preliminary version of the expanded code, called MCNPX, has now been issued for testing. The new code includes all existing LAHET physics modules, and has the ability to utilize the 150 MeV data libraries that have recently been released by LANL Group T-2.

  9. MCNP/X TRANSPORT IN THE TABULAR REGIME

    SciTech Connect

    HUGHES, H. GRADY

    2007-01-08

    The authors review the transport capabilities of the MCNP and MCNPX Monte Carlo codes in the energy regimes in which tabular transport data are available. Giving special attention to neutron tables, they emphasize the measures taken to improve the treatment of a variety of difficult aspects of the transport problem, including unresolved resonances, thermal issues, and the availability of suitable cross sections sets. They also briefly touch on the current situation in regard to photon, electron, and proton transport tables.

  10. Searching for nova shells around cataclysmic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahman, D. I.; Dhillon, V. S.; Knigge, C.; Marsh, T. R.

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of a search for nova shells around 101 cataclysmic variables (CVs), using H α images taken with the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) and the 2.5-m Isaac Newton Telescope Photometric H α Survey of the Northern Galactic Plane (IPHAS). Both telescopes are located on La Palma. We concentrated our WHT search on nova-like variables, whilst our IPHAS search covered all CVs in the IPHAS footprint. We found one shell out of the 24 nova-like variables we examined. The newly discovered shell is around V1315 Aql and has a radius of ˜2.5 arcmin, indicative of a nova eruption approximately 120 yr ago. This result is consistent with the idea that the high mass-transfer rate exhibited by nova-like variables is due to enhanced irradiation of the secondary by the hot white dwarf following a recent nova eruption. The implications of our observations for the lifetime of the nova-like variable phase are discussed. We also examined four asynchronous polars, but found no new shells around any of them, so we are unable to confirm that a recent nova eruption is the cause of the asynchronicity in the white dwarf spin. We find tentative evidence of a faint shell around the dwarf nova V1363 Cyg. In addition, we find evidence for a light echo around the nova V2275 Cyg, which erupted in 2001, indicative of an earlier nova eruption ˜300 yr ago, making V2275 Cyg a possible recurrent nova.

  11. NUCLEAR THERMOMETERS FOR CLASSICAL NOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Downen, Lori N.; Iliadis, Christian; Jose, Jordi; Starrfield, Sumner

    2013-01-10

    Classical novae are stellar explosions occurring in binary systems, consisting of a white dwarf and a main-sequence companion. Thermonuclear runaways on the surface of massive white dwarfs, consisting of oxygen and neon, are believed to reach peak temperatures of several hundred million kelvin. These temperatures are strongly correlated with the underlying white dwarf mass. The observational counterparts of such models are likely associated with outbursts that show strong spectral lines of neon in their shells (neon novae). The goals of this work are to investigate how useful elemental abundances are for constraining the peak temperatures achieved during these outbursts and determine how robust 'nova thermometers' are with respect to uncertain nuclear physics input. We present updated observed abundances in neon novae and perform a series of hydrodynamic simulations for several white dwarf masses. We find that the most useful thermometers, N/O, N/Al, O/S, S/Al, O/Na, Na/Al, O/P, and P/Al, are those with the steepest monotonic dependence on peak temperature. The sensitivity of these thermometers to thermonuclear reaction rate variations is explored using post-processing nucleosynthesis simulations. The ratios N/O, N/Al, O/Na, and Na/Al are robust, meaning they are minimally affected by uncertain rates. However, their dependence on peak temperature is relatively weak. The ratios O/S, S/Al, O/P, and P/Al reveal strong dependences on temperature and the poorly known {sup 30}P(p, {gamma}){sup 31}S rate. We compare our model predictions to neon nova observations and obtain the following estimates for the underlying white dwarf masses: 1.34-1.35 M {sub Sun} (V838 Her), 1.18-1.21 M {sub Sun} (V382 Vel), {<=}1.3 M {sub Sun} (V693 CrA), {<=}1.2 M {sub Sun} (LMC 1990 no. 1), and {<=}1.2 M {sub Sun} (QU Vul).

  12. Element abundances of classical novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrea, J.; Drechsel, H.; Starrfield, S.

    1994-11-01

    Physical conditions and element abundances in the optically thin shells of 11 classical novae with outbursts between 1978 and 1989 were determined from an analysis of UV and optical spectra obtained during the nebular stage. Eight novae were studied on the basis of new optical and UV spectra. The accuracy of the element abundances depends on whether or not simultaneous UV spectra were available to determine individual ionization stage dependent gas temperatures. Generally, slightly higher than solar abundances of helium and pronounced overabundances of the heavier elements were found. QU Vul turned out to be an ONeMg nova, while the other objects belong to the class of CO novae. The nature of V2214 Oph could not be completely clarified. The novae V1668 Cyg (1978), V693 CrA (1981), and V1370 Aql (1982), for which published element abundances exist, were reanalyzed to check the consistency of our spectral analysis approach. Satisfactory agreement of the results was found. Photoionization calculations were carried out for PW Vul using the code of Aldrovandi, Pequignot, and Stasinska. A synthetic spectrum was generated for the parameters derived from the analysis of the UV and optical spectra, which is in very good agreement with the observations. The spectral analysis technique was then applied to the model spectrum and reproduced the model parameters well. Electron temperatures for the C(2+) and C(3+) ions between 7 500 and 12,000 K and for N(4+) betwen 12,000 and 16,000 K were derived. For PW Vul these temperatures remained relatively constant over several months. The decline in density of the ejected shells with time could be investigated for V842 Cen, QV Vul, V977 Sco, and V443 Sct, and was found to deviate from the relation Ne proportional to t-2 for free expansion of a shell in a different way for each object. A possible explanation may be the complex density structure of the shells. This suspicion is supported by high resolution spectra (ESO 3.6m telescope

  13. Characteristics of multiprocessing MCNP5 on small personal computer clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Sean M.; McConn, Ronald J.; Pagh, Richard T.; Schweppe, John E.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2006-06-05

    The feasibility and efficiency of performing MCNP5 calculations with a small, heterogeneous computing cluster built from Microsoft® Windows™ Personal Computers (PCs) are explored. The performance increases that may be expected with such clusters are estimated. Our results show that the speed increase from additional slave PCs is nearly linear up to 10 processors. Guidance is given as to the specific advantages of changing various parameters present in the system. Implementing load balancing, and reducing the overhead from the MCNP rendezvous mechanism add to heterogeneous cluster efficiency. Hyper-threading technology and matching the total number of slave processes to the total number of logical processors also yield modest speed increases in the range below 7 processors. Because of the ease of acquisition of heterogeneous desktop computers, and the peak in efficiency at the level of a few physical processors, a strong case is made for the use of small clusters as a tool for producing MCNP5 calculations rapidly, and detailed instructions for constructing such clusters are provided.

  14. MCNP6 fragmentation of light nuclei at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashnik, Stepan G.; Kerby, Leslie M.

    2014-11-01

    Fragmentation reactions induced on light target nuclei by protons and light nuclei of energies around 1 GeV/nucleon and below are studied with the latest Los Alamos Monte Carlo transport code MCNP6 and with its cascade-exciton model (CEM) and Los Alamos version of the quark-gluon string model (LAQGSM) event generators, version 03.03, used as stand-alone codes. Such reactions are involved in different applications, like cosmic-ray-induced single event upsets (SEU's), radiation protection, and cancer therapy with proton and ion beams, among others; therefore, it is important that MCNP6 simulates them as well as possible. CEM and LAQGSM assume that intermediate-energy fragmentation reactions on light nuclei occur generally in two stages. The first stage is the intranuclear cascade (INC), followed by the second, Fermi breakup disintegration of light excited residual nuclei produced after the INC. Both CEM and LAQGSM account also for coalescence of light fragments (complex particles) up to 4He from energetic nucleons emitted during INC. We investigate the validity and performance of MCNP6, CEM, and LAQGSM in simulating fragmentation reactions at intermediate energies and discuss possible ways of further improving these codes.

  15. Yankee Rowe isotopics benchmark using MCNP-XT

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.; Whitmer, C.

    2013-07-01

    The Yankee Rowe spent fuel isotopic data provides a valuable source to benchmark the burnup calculations as part of verification and validation (V and V) efforts for the TerraPower's Monte Carlo depletion code, MCNP-XT. A total of 71 fuel rods were selected in the Yankee Rowe isotopic measurements covering a burnup range up to 44 MWd/kg ({approx}4.4%) under both the asymptotic spectrum and the non-asymptotic spectrum. The MCNP-XT pin cell depletion provides a comparison against the asymptotic spectrum measurement; and full assembly depletion with 322 depletion materials provides comparisons against various non-asymptotic depletion conditions. All calculations are performed based on the recent ENDF/B-VII.O data. Furthermore, the Monte Carlo depletion uncertainties and biases were examined showing their effect as insignificant. The set of burnup calculations cover the scattered experimental measurements demonstrating excellent agreement with the measured values. This benchmark exercise demonstrates the depletion analysis capability of the MCNP-XT code and validates the low burnup range. (authors)

  16. Code System for Generation of Input Data for MCNP.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-07-16

    Version 00 The MSM-SOURCE code was designed for quick and easy estimations of basic stopping characteristics of proton transmission, for generation of the source definition (SDEF) portion of the input data for MCNP (for 3b- and 4- versions) [2], simulating the set of single neutron sources, produced in the sample during the proton transmission. It does not generate the ful MCNP input file. The results of calculations well reproduce the experimental data [3]. It permitsmore » one to extend the possibilities of the MCNP code for consideration of secondary neutrons from the proton interaction with nuclei of the sample substance. The MSM-SOURCE code is applicable for calculations of the proton transport for the incident energies from 0.1 to 1 GeV and various targets 12 < A < 238. This code is based of the Moving Source Model (MSM) (using the original parametrization [3],[4]) and Bethe stopping theory with the relativistic corrections for protons. It allows the estimations of the proton range, the changes of the proton current and the neutron production versus the depth. The double differential spectra and the multiplicities of nucleons, produced in the primary proton-induced reactions, are obtained. For the evaluation of inelastic cross section the original parametrization is used [4].« less

  17. Technical Note: Improved implementation of doppler broadening in MCNP5

    SciTech Connect

    Bartol, Laura J.; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: Incoherent scattering has a substantial effect on spectroscopic measurements and simulations. Many general-purpose Monte Carlo codes include models that account for the effects of bound electrons on incoherent scattering, including Doppler broadening (DB). This work investigates the DB model used in the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP5). Methods: Simulations were run with three versions of MCNP5: v1.51, v1.60, and a modified form of v1.60 (v1.60m). All simulations used the MCPLIB04 photon data library, which presents the electron subshell data for incoherent scattering in the form of a probability density function. In v1.60m, the source code was altered to sample the electron subshell from a cumulative density function instead. Each version of the code was tested using an identical set of simulations that investigated DB in a slab of silicon at scattering angles of 15 Degree-Sign , 30 Degree-Sign , and 45 Degree-Sign . For each angle, simulations were run for multiple energies between 200 keV and 800 keV. The spectrum of singly-scattered photons at the exit of the slab was scored. Spectra were analytically calculated for comparison. Results: In v1.51, DB was modeled for incident photon energies below 760 keV, 384 keV, and 260 keV at scattering angles of 15 Degree-Sign , 30 Degree-Sign , and 45 Degree-Sign , respectively. Above these energy thresholds, v1.51 did not model DB. The spectra calculated using v1.60 and v1.60m exhibited DB for all energy-angle combinations; however, v1.60m, exhibited more energy broadening than did v1.60. The spectra calculated with v1.60m agreed with the analytical calculations. Conclusions: MCNP5 v1.51 and v1.60 model partial broadening when used with the MCPLIB04 data library. MCNP5 v1.60m models DB more accurately due to the form of the electron subshell data. In response to these results, Los Alamos National Laboratory has released a new photon data library, MCPLIB84, that presents the electron subshell data in

  18. Identification of Recurrent Novae in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafter, Allen W.; Rector, T. A.; Schweizer, F.; Bryan, J.

    2014-01-01

    Over roughly the past century a total of more than 900 optical transient events have been recorded in M31, the vast majority of which are believed to represent eruptions of classical novae. The impressive dataset of nova positions put together by Pietsch (http://www.mpe.mpg.de m31novae/opt/m31/) provides the opportunity to search for multiple nova outbursts from the same progenitor system, and thus to characterize the population of recurrent novae (RNe) in M31. In order to identify RNe candidates, we have searched for spatial near coincidences among the 945 recorded novae given in the Pietsch catalog through the end of August 2013. Given that the positions of many of the early novae are quite uncertain, we have set our initial screen to include nova pairs with nominal separations less than or equal to 6 arcsec. We have identified a total of 102 novae that pass this coarse screen. Of these, 78 novae form 39 pairs, 15 form five triples, four novae are part of a quad, and five novae form a quint. As demonstrated by Shafter, Rice and Daub (2009, presented at the "Wild Stars in the Old West II" conference, mintaka.sdsu.edu/faculty/shafter/extragalactic_novae/RNePoster4.pdf), the majority of the 102 novae surviving our initial screen are expected to be associated with chance positional near coincidences (especially near the nucleus), and are not RNe. To decide which candidates are indeed RNe, we have undertaken a study to locate the original discovery plates, CCD images or published finding charts, and to perform the necessary astrometry to identify which of our candidate RNe are chance positional coincidences, and which are RNe. For each candidate, we estimate the probability that the object is a chance positional coincidence as in Shafter et al. (2009). To date, we have been successful in identifying finding charts or original images for most of the candidates, and have found a total of 23 nova outbursts in M31 associated with 10 systems that are almost certainly RNe.

  19. Nova pulse power design and operational experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitham, K.; Larson, D.; Merritt, B.; Christie, D.

    1987-01-01

    Nova is a 100 TW Nd++ solid state laser designed for experiments with laser fusion at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The pulsed power for Nova includes a 58 MJ capacitor bank driving 5336 flashlamps with millisecond pulses and subnanosecond high voltages for electro optics. This paper summarizes the pulsed power designs and the operational experience to date.

  20. On the Progenitors of Local Group Novae. II. The Red Giant Nova Rate of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, S. C.; Darnley, M. J.; Bode, M. F.; Shafter, A. W.

    2016-02-01

    In our preceding paper, Liverpool Telescope data of M31 novae in eruption were used to facilitate a search for their progenitor systems within archival Hubble Space Telescope data, with the aim of detecting systems with red giant secondaries (RG-novae) or luminous accretion disks. From an input catalog of 38 spectroscopically confirmed novae with archival quiescent observations, likely progenitors were recovered for 11 systems. Here we present the results of the subsequent statistical analysis of the original survey, including possible biases associated with the survey and the M31 nova population in general. As part of this analysis, we examine the distribution of optical decline times (t2) of M31 novae, how the likely bulge and disk nova distributions compare, and how the M31 t2 distribution compares to that of the Milky Way. Using a detailed Monte Carlo simulation, we determine that {30}-10+13% of all M31 nova eruptions can be attributed to RG-nova systems, and at the 99% confidence level, \\gt 10% of all M31 novae are RG-novae. This is the first estimate of a RG-nova rate of an entire galaxy. Our results also imply that RG-novae in M31 are more likely to be associated with the M31 disk population than the bulge; indeed, the results are consistent with all RG-novae residing in the disk. If this result is confirmed in other galaxies, it suggests that any Type Ia supernovae that originate from RG-nova systems are more likely to be associated with younger populations and may be rare in old stellar populations, such as early-type galaxies.

  1. BVRJK observations of Northern Hemisphere old novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szkody, Paula

    1994-01-01

    BVR photometry has been accomplished for 65 objects in the Duerbeck atlas along with J photometry of 52 and K of 30 objects. The (B - V), (V - R), and (V - J) colors are compiled with those available in the literature to assess the color change of novae as a function of time since outburst. Using available reddening values results in a list of 42 (B - V), 28 (V - R), and 38 (V - J) dereddened colors for novae that are from 1 to 319 years past outburst. The results indicate all the colors cluster about zero, with no obvious transition to red values as would be expected for novae undergoing a hibernation scenario. This indicates the accretion disk is sustained for at least 200 years after outburst. It is also apparent that red novae with giant secondaries and/or unusual properties readily stand out from the normal novae in color.

  2. Nova shell observation of V2275 Cyg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esenoglu, Hasan H.; Balman, Solen; Saygac, A. Talat

    2016-07-01

    We present a recent search for nova shell of V2275 Cyg after its eruption of 9 years, using narrow bands of H-alpha, OIII and H-alpha-continuum images taken with RTT150 telescope at TUG. They were taken in November 2nd, 2010 with exposures of 600sec. There is uncertain in the literature whether the nova shell is visible in H-alpha. In this work the nova disappears on frame of OIII (wavelengt of 500.7nm with band width of 5nm) when it is faint apparent on the frames of both H-alpha and H-alpha continuum. We will calculate a new angular diameter of the nova shell by using the nebular expantion method if the data allow to measure seeing values of the nova and neighbor stars.

  3. The origin of presolar nova grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José, Jordi; Hernanz, Margarita

    2007-08-01

    Infrared observations reveal that classical novae often form dust in their expanding shells ejected into the interstellar medium as a consequence of violent outbursts. Recent experimental efforts have led to the identification of presolar nova candidate grains from the Acfer 094 and Murchison meteorites. Recently, however, concerns have been raised about the stellar paternity of these grains by new measurements on another sample of SiC grains: these grains are characterized by 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios similar to the ones reported for the nova grains, but a number of different imprints suggest that a possible supernova origin cannot be excluded. Here we review the predicted nucleosynthetic imprints accompanying nova explosions and discuss the chances to synthesize heavier species, such as titanium, in nova-like events.

  4. Nova laser assurance-management system

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, A.J.

    1983-07-18

    In a well managed project, Quality Assurance is an integral part of the management activities performed on a daily basis. Management assures successful performance within budget and on schedule by using all the good business, scientific, engineering, quality assurance, and safety practices available. Quality assurance and safety practices employed on Nova are put in perspective by integrating them into the overall function of good project management. The Nova assurance management system was developed using the quality assurance (QA) approach first implemented at LLNL in early 1978. The LLNL QA program is described as an introduction to the Nova assurance management system. The Nova system is described pictorially through the Nova configuration, subsystems and major components, interjecting the QA techniques which are being pragmatically used to assure the successful completion of the project.

  5. ON THE PROGENITORS OF GALACTIC NOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Darnley, M. J.; Bode, M. F.; Hounsell, R. A.; Ribeiro, V. A. R. M.; Williams, R. P.

    2012-02-10

    Of the approximately 400 known Galactic classical novae, only 10 of them, the recurrent novae, have been seen to erupt more than once. At least eight of these recurrents are known to harbor evolved secondary stars, rather than the main-sequence secondaries typical in classical novae. In this paper, we propose a new nova classification system, based solely on the evolutionary state of the secondary and not (like the current schemes) based on the properties of the outbursts. Using archival optical and near-infrared photometric observations of a sample of 38 quiescent Galactic novae we show that the evolutionary state of the secondary star in a quiescent system can be predicted and several objects are identified for follow-up observations: CI Aql, V2487 Oph, DI Lac, and EU Sct.

  6. Terra Nova Bay Polynya, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In Terra Nova Bay, off the Scott Coast of Victoria Land, Antarctica, a large pocket of open water persists throughout most of the Southern Hemisphere winter, even while most of the rest of the Antarctic coastline is firmly embraced by the frozen Southern Ocean. This pocket of open water--a polynya--results from exceptionally strong winds that blow downslope from the Trans-Antarctic Mountains. These fierce katabatic winds drive the sea ice eastward. Since the dominant ice drift pattern in the area is northward, the Drygalski Ice Tongue prevents the bay from being re-populated with sea ice. This image of the Terra Nova Bay polynya was captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite on October 16, 2007. Sea ice sits over the Ross Sea like a cracked and crumbling windshield. Blue-tinged glaciers flow down from the Trans-Antarctic Mountains. Although glaciers can appear blue because of melt water, they can also get that tint when the wind scours and polishes the ice surface. Given the strength of the katabatic winds along this part of the Antarctic coast, it is likely that the blue color of these glaciers is a result of their having been swept clean of snow. The large image has a spatial resolution (level of detail) of 250 meters per pixel.

  7. Monte Carlo N–Particle Transport Code System Including MCNP6.1, MCNP5-1.60, MCNPX-2.7.0 and Data Libraries.

    SciTech Connect

    GOORLEY, TIM

    2013-07-16

    Version 00 US DOE 10CFR810 Jurisdiction. MCNP6™ is a general-purpose, continuous-energy, generalized-geometry, time-dependent, Monte Carlo radiation-transport code designed to track many particle types over broad ranges of energies. MCNP6 represents the culmination of a multi-year effort to merge the MCNP5™ [X-503] and MCNPX™ [PEL11] codes into a single product comprising all features of both. For those familiar with previous versions of MCNP, you will discover the code has been expanded to handle a multitude of particles and to include model physics options for energies above the cross-section table range, a material burnup feature, and delayed particle production. Expanded and/or new tally, source, and variance-reduction options are available to the user as well as an improved plotting capability. The capability to calculate keff eigenvalues for fissile systems remains a standard feature. Although MCNP6 is simply and accurately described as the merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX capabilities, the result is much more than the sum of these two computer codes. MCNP6 is the result of five years of effort by the MCNP5 and MCNPX code development teams. These groups of people, residing in the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) X Computational Physics Division, Monte Carlo Codes Group (XCP-3), and Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, Systems Design and Analysis Group (NEN-5, formerly D-5), have combined their code development efforts to produce the next evolution of MCNP. While maintenance and bug fixes will continue for MCNP5 v.1.60 and MCNPX v.2.7.0 for upcoming years, new code development capabilities will be developed and released only in MCNP6. In fact, this initial production release of MCNP6 (v. 1.0) contains 16 new features not previously found in either code. These new features include (among others) the abilities to import unstructured mesh geometries from the finite element code Abaqus, to transport photons down to 1.0 eV, to model complete atomic

  8. Monte Carlo N–Particle Transport Code System Including MCNP6.1, MCNP5-1.60, MCNPX-2.7.0 and Data Libraries.

    SciTech Connect

    GOORLEY, TIM

    2013-07-16

    Version 01 US DOE 10CFR810 Jurisdiction. MCNP6™ is a general-purpose, continuous-energy, generalized-geometry, time-dependent, Monte Carlo radiation-transport code designed to track many particle types over broad ranges of energies. MCNP6 represents the culmination of a multi-year effort to merge the MCNP5™ [X-503] and MCNPX™ [PEL11] codes into a single product comprising all features of both. For those familiar with previous versions of MCNP, you will discover the code has been expanded to handle a multitude of particles and to include model physics options for energies above the cross-section table range, a material burnup feature, and delayed particle production. Expanded and/or new tally, source, and variance-reduction options are available to the user as well as an improved plotting capability. The capability to calculate keff eigenvalues for fissile systems remains a standard feature. Although MCNP6 is simply and accurately described as the merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX capabilities, the result is much more than the sum of these two computer codes. MCNP6 is the result of five years of effort by the MCNP5 and MCNPX code development teams. These groups of people, residing in the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) X Computational Physics Division, Monte Carlo Codes Group (XCP-3), and Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, Systems Design and Analysis Group (NEN-5, formerly D-5), have combined their code development efforts to produce the next evolution of MCNP. While maintenance and bug fixes will continue for MCNP5 v.1.60 and MCNPX v.2.7.0 for upcoming years, new code development capabilities will be developed and released only in MCNP6. In fact, this initial production release of MCNP6 (v. 1.0) contains 16 new features not previously found in either code. These new features include (among others) the abilities to import unstructured mesh geometries from the finite element code Abaqus, to transport photons down to 1.0 eV, to model complete atomic

  9. Monte Carlo N–Particle Transport Code System Including MCNP6.1, MCNP5-1.60, MCNPX-2.7.0 and Data Libraries.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-07-16

    Version 01 US DOE 10CFR810 Jurisdiction. MCNP6™ is a general-purpose, continuous-energy, generalized-geometry, time-dependent, Monte Carlo radiation-transport code designed to track many particle types over broad ranges of energies. MCNP6 represents the culmination of a multi-year effort to merge the MCNP5™ [X-503] and MCNPX™ [PEL11] codes into a single product comprising all features of both. For those familiar with previous versions of MCNP, you will discover the code has been expanded to handle a multitude ofmore » particles and to include model physics options for energies above the cross-section table range, a material burnup feature, and delayed particle production. Expanded and/or new tally, source, and variance-reduction options are available to the user as well as an improved plotting capability. The capability to calculate keff eigenvalues for fissile systems remains a standard feature. Although MCNP6 is simply and accurately described as the merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX capabilities, the result is much more than the sum of these two computer codes. MCNP6 is the result of five years of effort by the MCNP5 and MCNPX code development teams. These groups of people, residing in the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) X Computational Physics Division, Monte Carlo Codes Group (XCP-3), and Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, Systems Design and Analysis Group (NEN-5, formerly D-5), have combined their code development efforts to produce the next evolution of MCNP. While maintenance and bug fixes will continue for MCNP5 v.1.60 and MCNPX v.2.7.0 for upcoming years, new code development capabilities will be developed and released only in MCNP6. In fact, this initial production release of MCNP6 (v. 1.0) contains 16 new features not previously found in either code. These new features include (among others) the abilities to import unstructured mesh geometries from the finite element code Abaqus, to transport photons down to 1.0 eV, to model

  10. Monte Carlo N–Particle Transport Code System Including MCNP6.1, MCNP5-1.60, MCNPX-2.7.0 and Data Libraries.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-07-16

    Version 00 US DOE 10CFR810 Jurisdiction. MCNP6™ is a general-purpose, continuous-energy, generalized-geometry, time-dependent, Monte Carlo radiation-transport code designed to track many particle types over broad ranges of energies. MCNP6 represents the culmination of a multi-year effort to merge the MCNP5™ [X-503] and MCNPX™ [PEL11] codes into a single product comprising all features of both. For those familiar with previous versions of MCNP, you will discover the code has been expanded to handle a multitude ofmore » particles and to include model physics options for energies above the cross-section table range, a material burnup feature, and delayed particle production. Expanded and/or new tally, source, and variance-reduction options are available to the user as well as an improved plotting capability. The capability to calculate keff eigenvalues for fissile systems remains a standard feature. Although MCNP6 is simply and accurately described as the merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX capabilities, the result is much more than the sum of these two computer codes. MCNP6 is the result of five years of effort by the MCNP5 and MCNPX code development teams. These groups of people, residing in the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) X Computational Physics Division, Monte Carlo Codes Group (XCP-3), and Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, Systems Design and Analysis Group (NEN-5, formerly D-5), have combined their code development efforts to produce the next evolution of MCNP. While maintenance and bug fixes will continue for MCNP5 v.1.60 and MCNPX v.2.7.0 for upcoming years, new code development capabilities will be developed and released only in MCNP6. In fact, this initial production release of MCNP6 (v. 1.0) contains 16 new features not previously found in either code. These new features include (among others) the abilities to import unstructured mesh geometries from the finite element code Abaqus, to transport photons down to 1.0 eV, to model

  11. Radiation calculations using LAHET/MCNP/CINDER90

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, L.

    1994-10-01

    The LAHET monte carlo code system has recently been expanded to include high energy hadronic interactions via the FLUKA code, while retaining the original Los Alamos versions of HETC and ISABEL at lower energies. Electrons and photons are transported with EGS4 or ITS, while the MCNP coupled neutron/photon monte carlo code provides analysis of neutrons with kinetic energies less than 20 MeV. An interface with the CINDER activation code is now in common use. Various other changes have been made to facilitate analysis of high energy accelerator radiation environments and experimental physics apparatus, such as those found at SSC and RHIC. Current code developments and applications are reviewed.

  12. Radiation calculations using LAHET/MCNP/CINDER90

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, L.S.

    1993-08-01

    The LAHET Monte Carlo code system has recently been expanded to include high energy hadronic interactions via the FLUKA code, while retaining the original Los Alamos versions of HETC and ISABEL at lower energies. Electrons and photons are transported with EGS4 or ITS, while the MCNP coupled neutron/photon Monte Carlo code provides analysis of neutrons with kinetic energies less than 20 MeV. An interface with the CINDER activation code is now in common use. Various other changes have been made to facilitate analysis of high energy accelerator radiation environments and experimental physics apparatus, such as those found at SSC and RHIC. Current code developments and applications are reviewed.

  13. Modelling of dynamic experiments in MCNP5 environment.

    PubMed

    Mosorov, Volodymyr; Zych, Marcin; Hanus, Robert; Petryka, Leszek

    2016-06-01

    The design of radiation measurement systems includes a modelling phase which ascertains the best 3D geometry for a projected gauge. To simulate measured counts by a detector, the widely-used rigorous phenomenological model is used. However, this model does not consider possible source or/and detector movement during a measurement interval. Therefore, the phenomenological model has been successfully modified in order to consider such a displacement during the time sampling interval in dynamic experiments. To validate the proposed model, a simple radiation system was accurately implemented in the MCNP5 code. The experiments confirmed the accuracy of the proposed model. PMID:27058321

  14. Heart simulation with surface equations for using on MCNP code

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaei-Ochbelagh, D.; Salman-Nezhad, S.; Asadi, A.; Rahimi, A.

    2011-12-26

    External photon beam radiotherapy is carried out in a way to achieve an 'as low as possible' a dose in healthy tissues surrounding the target. One of these surroundings can be heart as a vital organ of body. As it is impossible to directly determine the absorbed dose by heart, using phantoms is one way to acquire information around it. The other way is Monte Carlo method. In this work we have presented a simulation of heart geometry by introducing of different surfaces in MCNP code. We used 14 surface equations in order to determine human heart modeling. Those surfaces are borders of heart walls and contents.

  15. Visualizing MCNP Tally Segment Geometry and Coupling Results with ABAQUS

    SciTech Connect

    J. R. Parry; J. A. Galbraith

    2007-11-01

    The Advanced Graphite Creep test, AGC-1, is planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in support of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant program. The experiment requires very detailed neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses to show compliance with programmatic and ATR safety requirements. The MCNP model used for the neutronics analysis required hundreds of tally regions to provide the desired detail. A method for visualizing the hundreds of tally region geometries and the tally region results in 3 dimensions has been created to support the AGC-1 irradiation. Additionally, a method was created which would allow ABAQUS to access the results directly for the thermal analysis of the AGC-1 experiment.

  16. Heart simulation with surface equations for using on MCNP code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei-Ochbelagh, D.; Salman-Nezhad, S.; Asadi, A.; Rahimi, A.

    2011-12-01

    External photon beam radiotherapy is carried out in a way to achieve an "as low as possible" a dose in healthy tissues surrounding the target. One of these surroundings can be heart as a vital organ of body. As it is impossible to directly determine the absorbed dose by heart, using phantoms is one way to acquire information around it. The other way is Monte Carlo method. In this work we have presented a simulation of heart geometry by introducing of different surfaces in MCNP code. We used 14 surface equations in order to determine human heart modeling. Those surfaces are borders of heart walls and contents.

  17. MCNP5 CALCULATIONS REPLICATING ARH-600 NITRATE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    FINFROCK SH

    2011-10-25

    This report serves to extend the previous document: 'MCNP Calculations Replicating ARH-600 Data' by replicating the nitrate curves found in ARH-600. This report includes the MCNP models used, the calculated critical dimension for each analyzed parameter set, and the resulting data libraries for use with the CritView code. As with the ARH-600 data, this report is not meant to replace the analysis of the fissile systems by qualified criticality personnel. The M CNP data is presented without accounting for the statistical uncertainty (although this is typically less than 0.001) or bias and, as such, the application of a reasonable safety margin is required. The data that follows pertains to the uranyl nitrate and plutonium nitrate spheres, infinite cylinders, and infinite slabs of varying isotopic composition, reflector thickness, and molarity. Each of the cases was modeled in MCNP (version 5.1.40), using the ENDF/B-VI cross section set. Given a molarity, isotopic composition, and reflector thickness, the fissile concentration and diameter (or thicknesses in the case of the slab geometries) were varied. The diameter for which k-effective equals 1.00 for a given concentration could then be calculated and graphed. These graphs are included in this report. The pages that follow describe the regions modeled, formulas for calculating the various parameters, a list of cross-sections used in the calculations, a description of the automation routine and data, and finally the data output. The data of most interest are the critical dimensions of the various systems analyzed. This is presented graphically, and in table format, in Appendix B. Appendix C provides a text listing of the same data in a format that is compatible with the CritView code. Appendices D and E provide listing of example Template files and MCNP input files (these are discussed further in Section 4). Appendix F is a complete listing of all of the output data (i.e., all of the analyzed dimensions and the

  18. Automated Searches for Extragalactic Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnley, M. J.

    2005-06-01

    Classical novae (CNe) are interacting binary systems in which the white dwarf undergoes unpredictable explosive outbursts. The energy of a nova outburst is only surpassed by that of gamma-ray bursts, supernovae and a small number of luminous blue variables. However, the outbursts of CNe are far more common than any of these other stars. Due to their brightness and occurrence in both Population I and Population II systems, novae are potentially important as extragalactic distance indicators and tools in the exploration of binary star evolution in galaxies. The POINT-AGAPE survey is an optical search for gravitational micro-lensing events towards the Andromeda galaxy (M31). As well as micro-lensing, the survey is sensitive to many different classes of variable stars and transients, including CNe. In this work we describe the automated detection and selection pipeline used to identify M31 CNe and we present the resulting catalogue of 20 strong CN candidates observed over three seasons. The CNe we discover are observed both in the M31 bulge region as well as over a wide area of the M31 disc. Nine of the CNe are caught during the final rise phase (which is often missed in Galactic novae) and all are well sampled in at least two colours. The excellent light-curve coverage has allowed us to detect and classify CNe over a wide range of speed classes, from very fast to very slow. Among the light curves is, for example, a moderately fast CN exhibiting entry into a deep transition minimum, followed by its final decline. We have also observed in detail a very slow CN which faded by only 0.01 mag day^{-1} over a 150 day period. The CN catalogue constitutes a uniquely well-sampled and objectively-selected data set with which to study the statistical properties of CNe in M31. As a by-product, we have detected other interesting variable objects, including one of the longest period and most luminous Mira variables. An analysis of the MMRD relationship in M31 was performed using the

  19. The NOvA Technical Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres, D.S.; Drake, G.R.; Goodman, M.C.; Grudzinski, J.J.; Guarino, V.J.; Talaga, R.L.; Zhao, A.; Stamoulis, P.; Stiliaris, E.; Tzanakos, G.; Zois, M.; /Athens U. /Caltech /UCLA /Fermilab /College de France /Harvard U. /Indiana U. /Lebedev Inst. /Michigan State U. /Minnesota U., Duluth /Minnesota U.

    2007-10-08

    Technical Design Report (TDR) describes the preliminary design of the NOvA accelerator upgrades, NOvA detectors, detector halls and detector sites. Compared to the March 2006 and November 2006 NOvA Conceptual Design Reports (CDR), critical value engineering studies have been completed and the alternatives still active in the CDR have been narrowed to achieve a preliminary technical design ready for a Critical Decision 2 review. Many aspects of NOvA described this TDR are complete to a level far beyond a preliminary design. In particular, the access road to the NOvA Far Detector site in Minnesota has an advanced technical design at a level appropriate for a Critical Decision 3a review. Several components of the accelerator upgrade and new neutrino detectors also have advanced technical designs appropriate for a Critical Decision 3a review. Chapter 1 is an Executive Summary with a short description of the NOvA project. Chapter 2 describes how the Fermilab NuMI beam will provide a narrow band beam of neutrinos for NOvA. Chapter 3 gives an updated overview of the scientific basis for the NOvA experiment, focusing on the primary goal to extend the search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations and measure the sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) parameter. This parameter has not been measured in any previous experiment and NOvA would extend the search by about an order of magnitude beyond the current limit. A secondary goal is to measure the dominant mode oscillation parameters, sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 23}) and {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} to a more precise level than previous experiments. Additional physics goals for NOvA are also discussed. Chapter 4 describes the Scientific Design Criteria which the Fermilab accelerator complex, NOvA detectors and NOvA detector sites must satisfy to meet the physics goals discussed in Chapter 3. Chapter 5 is an overview of the NOvA project. The changes in the design relative to the NOvA CDR are discussed. Chapter 6 summarizes the NOvA

  20. Shortest Recurrence Periods of Forced Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, Izumi; Saio, Hideyuki; Kato, Mariko

    2016-06-01

    We revisit hydrogen shell burning on white dwarfs (WDs) with higher mass accretion rates than the stability limit, {\\dot{M}}{{stable}}, above which hydrogen burning is stable. Novae occur with mass accretion rates below the limit. For an accretion rate >{\\dot{M}}{{stable}}, a first hydrogen shell flash occurs followed by steady nuclear burning, so the shell burning will not be quenched as long as the WD continuously accretes matter. On the basis of this picture, some persistent supersoft X-ray sources can be explained by binary models with high accretion rates. In some recent studies, however, the claim has been made that no steady hydrogen shell burning exists even for accretion rates >{\\dot{M}}{{stable}}. We demonstrate that, in such cases, repetitive flashes occurred because mass accretion was artificially controlled. If we stop mass accretion during the outburst, no new nuclear fuel is supplied, so the shell burning will eventually stop. If we resume mass accretion after some time, the next outburst eventually occurs. In this way, we can design the duration of outburst and interpulse time with manipulated mass accretion. We call such a controlled nova a “forced nova.” These forced novae, if they exist, could have much shorter recurrence periods than “natural novae.” We have obtained the shortest recurrence periods for forced novae for various WD masses. Based on the results, we revisit WD masses of some recurrent novae, including T Pyx.

  1. MCNP: a general Monte Carlo code for neutron and photon transport

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, R.A.; Godfrey, T.N.K.

    1985-01-01

    MCNP is a very general Monte Carlo neutron photon transport code system with approximately 250 person years of Group X-6 code development invested. It is extremely portable, user-oriented, and a true production code as it is used about 60 Cray hours per month by about 150 Los Alamos users. It has as its data base the best cross-section evaluations available. MCNP contains state-of-the-art traditional and adaptive Monte Carlo techniques to be applied to the solution of an ever-increasing number of problems. Excellent user-oriented documentation is available for all facets of the MCNP code system. Many useful and important variants of MCNP exist for special applications. The Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee is the contact point for worldwide MCNP code and documentation distribution. A much improved MCNP Version 3A will be available in the fall of 1985, along with new and improved documentation. Future directions in MCNP development will change the meaning of MCNP to Monte Carlo N Particle where N particle varieties will be transported.

  2. Standard Neutron, Photon, and Electron Data Libraries for MCNP4B.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1997-04-01

    Version 00 US DOE 10CFR810 Jurisdiction. DLC-189/MCNPXS is for use with Version 4B and later of the MCNP transport code. This data library provides a comprehensive set of cross sections for a wide range of radiation transport applications using the Monte Carlo code package CCC-660/MCNP4B.

  3. Application of MCNP{trademark} to storage facility dose rate assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, W.T.; Roberts, R.R.; Estes, G.P.; Taylor, W.M.

    1996-12-31

    The MCNP code is widely used in the determination of neutral particle dose rate analyses. In this paper we examine the application of MCNP to several storage facilities containing special nuclear material, SNM, wherein the neutron dose rate is the primary quantity of interest. In particular, we describe the special geometry, modeling assumptions, and physics considerations encountered in each of three applications.

  4. The MCNP-DSP code for calculations of time and frequency analysis parameters for subcritical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a modified version of the MCNP code, the MCNP-DSP. Variance reduction features were disabled to have strictly analog particle tracking in order to follow fluctuating processes more accurately. Some of the neutron and photon physics routines were modified to better represent the production of particles. Other modifications are discussed.

  5. Electron photon verification calculations using MCNP4B

    SciTech Connect

    Gierga, D.P.; Adams, K.J.

    1998-07-01

    MCNP4B was released in February 1997 with significant enhancements to electron/photon transport methods. These enhancements have been verified against a wide range of published electron/photon experiments, spanning high energy bremsstrahlung production to electron transmission and reflection. Three sets of bremsstrahlung experiments were simulated. The first verification calculations for bremsstrahlung production used the experimental results in Faddegon for 15 MeV electrons incident on lead, aluminum, and beryllium targets. The calculated integrated bremsstrahlung yields, the bremsstrahlung energy spectra, and the mean energy of the bremsstrahlung beam were compared with experiment. The impact of several MCNP tally options and physics parameters was explored in detail. The second was the experiment of O`Dell which measured the bremsstrahlung spectra from 10 and 20.9 MeV electrons incident on a gold/tungsten target. The final set was a comparison of relative experimental spectra with calculated results for 9.66 MeV electrons incident on tungsten based on the experiment of Starfelt and Koch. The transmission experiments of Ebert were also studied, including comparisons of transmission coefficients for 10.2 MeV electrons incident on carbon, silver, and uranium foils. The agreement between experiment and simulation was usually within two standard deviations of the experimental and calculational errors.

  6. MCNP/MCNPX model of the annular core research reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    DePriest, Kendall Russell; Cooper, Philip J.; Parma, Edward J., Jr.

    2006-10-01

    Many experimenters at the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) have a need to predict the neutron/gamma environment prior to testing. In some cases, the neutron/gamma environment is needed to understand the test results after the completion of an experiment. In an effort to satisfy the needs of experimenters, a model of the ACRR was developed for use with the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport codes MCNP [Br03] and MCNPX [Wa02]. The model contains adjustable safety, transient, and control rods, several of the available spectrum-modifying cavity inserts, and placeholders for experiment packages. The ACRR model was constructed such that experiment package models can be easily placed in the reactor after being developed as stand-alone units. An addition to the 'standard' model allows the FREC-II cavity to be included in the calculations. This report presents the MCNP/MCNPX model of the ACRR. Comparisons are made between the model and the reactor for various configurations. Reactivity worth curves for the various reactor configurations are presented. Examples of reactivity worth calculations for a few experiment packages are presented along with the measured reactivity worth from the reactor test of the experiment packages. Finally, calculated neutron/gamma spectra are presented.

  7. Possible Nova in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietsch, W.; Burwitz, V.; Stoss, R.; Updike, A.; Hartmann, D.; Milne, P.; Williams, G.

    2007-10-01

    We report the discovery of an optical nova candidate in M 31 on 5 stacked white light images (each with 60 sec exposure) on 2007 Oct 6.104 with a magnitude of 17.1. The images were obtained with the REMO2 telescope of the Observatori Astronomic de Mallorca OAM (620), Costitx, Spain (30cm f/9 Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope with an SBIG STL-1001E CCD camera). The object is confirmed on R filter CCD images with the robotic 60cm telescope with an E2V CCD (2kx2k) Livermore Optical Transient Imaging System (Super-LOTIS, located at Steward Observatory, Kitt Peak, Arizona, USA) on (two 8*60 s stacked, 17.1 and 17.2 mag) on 2007 Oct 6.336 and 6.429, respectively.

  8. Circumstellar Dust in Symbiotic Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkic, T.; Kotnik-Karuza, D.

    2015-12-01

    We present a model of inner dust regions around the cool Mira component of the two symbiotic novae, RR Tel and HM Sge, based on the near-IR photometry, ISO spectra and mid-IR interferometry. The dust properties were determined using the DUSTY code. A compact circumstellar silicate dust shell with inner dust shell temperatures between 900 K and 1300 K and of moderate optical depth can explain all the observations. RR Tel shows the presence of an equatorially enhanced dust density during minimum obscuration. Obscuration events are explained by an increase in optical depth caused by the newly condensed dust. The mass loss rates are significantly higher than in intermediate-period single Miras but in agreement with longer-period O-rich AGB stars.

  9. Similarities between Stunted Outbursts in Nova-like Cataclysmic Variables and Outbursts in Ordinary Dwarf Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeycutt, R. K.

    2001-04-01

    Stunted outbursts have been reported in old novae and nova-like cataclysmic variables by Honeycutt, Robertson, and Turner. These 0.4-1 mag outbursts were concluded to be either mass transfer events or disk outbursts similar to dwarf nova eruptions, but seen under unusual conditions. Honeycutt, Robertson, and Turner did not have enough evidence to favor either of these possibilities. This paper uses additional long-term photometry and analysis to argue that the similarities of these stunted outbursts to dwarf nova eruptions are now so numerous that the dwarf nova outburst choice is strongly favored. The similarities discussed here include the range of outburst spacings, the coherence and stability of the outbursts, and the presence of isolated outburst/dip pairs. As part of this discussion we note the presence of unexpectedly stable clocks over 9 years for the repetition interval of dwarf nova outbursts in SY Cnc and of stunted outbursts in FY Per.

  10. Testing the Delayed Gamma Capability in MCNP6

    SciTech Connect

    Weldon, Robert A.; Fensin, Michael L.; McKinney, Gregg W.

    2015-10-28

    . We examine five different decay chains (two-stage decay to stable) and show the predictability of the MCNP6 delayed gamma feature. Results do show that while the default delayed gamma calculations available in the MCNP6 1.0 release can give accurate results for some isotopes (e.g., 137Ba), the percent differences between the closed form analytic solutions and the MCNP6 calculations were often >40% (28Mg, 28Al, 42K, 47Ca, 47Sc, 60Co). With the MCNP6 1.1 Beta release, the tenth entry on the DBCN card allows improved calculation within <5% as compared to the closed form analytic solutions for immediate parent emissions and transient equilibrium systems. While the tenth entry on the DBCN card for MCNP6 1.1 gives much better results for transient equilibrium systems and parent emissions in general, it does little to improve daughter emissions of secular equilibrium systems. Finally, hypotheses were presented as to why daughter emissions of secular equilibrium systems might be mispredicted in some cases and not in others.

  11. Multiwavelength Modeling of Nova Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauschildt, P. H.; Starrfield, S.

    1997-01-01

    We have analyzed the early optically thick ultraviolet spectra of Nova OS And 1986 using a grid of spherically symmetric, non-LTE, line-blanketed, expanding model atmospheres and synthetic spectra with the following set of parameters: 5,000 less than or equal to T(sub model) less than or equal to 60,000K, solar abundances, (rho)(alpha) r(sup -3), v(sub max) = 2000 km/s, L = 6 x 10(exp 4) solar luminosity, and a statistical or microturbulent velocity of 50 km/s. We used the synthetic spectra to estimate the model parameters corresponding to the observed IUE spectra. The fits to the observations were then iteratively improved by changing the parameters of the model atmospheres, in particular T(sub model) and the abundances, to arrive at the best fits to the optically thick pseudo-continuum and the features found in the IUE spectra. The IUE spectra show two different optically thick subphases. The earliest spectra, taken a few days after maximum optical light, show a pseudo-continuum created by overlapping absorption lines. The later observations, taken approximately 3 weeks after maximum light, show the simultaneous presence of allowed, semi-forbidden, and forbidden lines in the observed spectra. Analysis of these phases indicate that OS And 86 had solar metallicities except for Mg which showed evidence of being underabundant by as much as a factor of 10. We determine a distance of 5.1 kpc to OS And 86 and derive a peak bolometric luminosity of approximately 5 x 10(exp 4) solar luminosity. The computed nova parameters provide insights into the physics of the early outburst and explain the spectra seen by IUE. Lastly, we find evidence in the later observations for large non-LTE effects of Fe II which, when included, lead to much better agreement with the observations.

  12. Recent progress in understanding the eruptions of classical novae

    SciTech Connect

    Shara, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    The physical processes generating nova eruptions are reviewed, along with the effects on nova eruptions of binary-system parameters such as the chemical composition or mass of the white dwarf and the mass accretion rate. Also considered are the possible metamorphosis from dwarf to classical novae and back again, X-ray and gamma-ray emission from novae, and the characteristics and distributions of novae in globular clusters and extragalactic systems. Limitations of the thermonuclear runaway model are discussed. 159 references.

  13. Validation of the MCNP-DSP Monte Carlo code for calculating source-driven noise parameters of subcritical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes calculations performed to validate the modified version of the MCNP code, the MCNP-DSP, used for: the neutron and photon spectra of the spontaneous fission of californium 252; the representation of the detection processes for scattering detectors; the timing of the detection process; and the calculation of the frequency analysis parameters for the MCNP-DSP code.

  14. Photometric Periods of Recent Southern Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Frederick M.; Pagnotta, Ashley; Kafka, Stella

    2013-02-01

    We initiated a program to follow the temporal evolution of novae using the SMARTS facilities in 2003. Since then we have followed the evolution of the 68 galactic novae, resulting in the ``Stony Brook/SMARTS Atlas of mostly Southern Novae", a spectroscopic and photometric database. The next step is to undertake a systematic search for orbital periods. We propose here for a week of classical time on the 0.9m to search for photometric periods in the range of a few hours to a few days; we have identified two systems with periods of 1.1 and 5.2 hours. Our targets are recent novae visible in the A semester, mostly in the galactic center region. This complements our continuing longer-term SMARTS monitoring of these systems as they approach quiescence.

  15. Copernicus observations of Nova Cygni 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, E. B.; Snow, T. P.; Upson, W. L.; Anderson, R.; Starrfield, S. G.; Gallagher, J. S.; Friedjung, M.; Linsky, J. L.; Henry, R. C.; Moos, H. W.

    1977-01-01

    Near-ultraviolet radiation from Nova Cygni 1975 was detected by the Copernicus satellite on five occasions from 1975 September 1 to 1975 September 9. The nova was not seen in the UV after this date. The principal result was the observation of a broad emission feature from the Mg II doublet at 2800 A. The absence of strong UV radiation at shorter wavelengths suggests that these lines are produced by collisional excitation in the outer layers of an expanding shell with electron temperature of approximately 4000 K. The absence of observed emission lines from highly ionized species indicates that the amount of material with log T between 4.4 and 5.7 is less than 0.001 times that which produces the Mg II emission. The continuum flux in the near-UV decreased as the nova evolved, showing that the total luminosity decreased as the nova faded in the visible.

  16. CCD observations of old nova fields

    SciTech Connect

    Downes, R.A.; Szkody, P.; Washington Uni., Seattle )

    1989-06-01

    The discovery of CK Vulpeculae (Nova 1670) has prompted a major review of ideas concerning the long-term development of novae. Unfortunately, there are very few recovered novae old enough to provide confirmation (or rejection) of the new hibernation scenario. CCD images of seven old nova fields, and R band photometry for four fields, have been obtained in an attempt to recover these objects in quiescence. A strong candidate for U Leonis, and a possible counterpart for T Bootis, are found. For three other fields, weak candidates have been found. Finding charts and colors are presented for the seven fields observed. The R light curves of U Leo, indicating an orbital period of 192.5 or 385.0 min, are shown. 14 refs.

  17. CCD observations of old nova fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downes, Ronald A.; Szkody, Paula

    1989-01-01

    The discovery of CK Vulpeculae (Nova 1670) has prompted a major review of ideas concerning the long-term development of novae. Unfortunately, there are very few recovered novae old enough to provide confirmation (or rejection) of the new 'hibernation' scenario. CCD images of seven old nova fields, and R band photometry for four fields, have been obtained in an attempt to recover these objects in quiescence. A strong candidate for U Leonis, and a possible counterpart for T Bootis, are found. For three other fields, weak candidates have been found. Finding charts and colors are presented for the seven fields observed. The R light curves of U Leo, indicating an orbital period of 192.5 or 385.0 min, are shown.

  18. Old Novae and the SW Sextantis Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidtobreick, L.; Tappert, C.

    2014-12-01

    From a large observing campaign, we found that nearly all non- or weakly magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs) in the orbital period range between 2.8 and 4 hours are of SW Sex type and as such experience very high mass transfer rates. The exceptions seem to be some old novae that have periods around 3.5 h. Their spectra do not show the typical SW Sex characteristics but rather resemble those of dwarf novae with low mass transfer rates. The presence of old novae in this period range of SW Sex stars that do not follow the trend but show instead rather low mass transfer rates is interpreted as evidence for an effect of the nova eruption on the mass transfer rate of the underlying CV similar to the hibernation scenario.

  19. Planets orbiting Quark Nova compact remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keränen, P.; Ouyed, R.

    2003-08-01

    We explore planet formation in the Quark Nova scenario. If a millisecond pulsar explodes as a Quark Nova, a protoplanetary disk can be formed out of the metal rich fall-back material. The propeller mechanism transfers angular momentum from the born quark star to the disk that will go through viscous evolution with later plausible grain condensation and planet formation. As a result, earth-size planets on circular orbits may form within short radii from the central quark star. The planets in the PSR 1257+12 system can be explained by our model if the Quark Nova compact remnant is born with a period of ~ 0.5 ms following the explosion. We suggest that a good portion of the Quark Nova remnants may harbour planetary systems.

  20. Pulse shaping on the Nova laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, J.K.; Speck, D.R.; Bibeau, C.; Weiland, T.L.

    1989-02-06

    Inertial confinement fusion requires temporally shaped pulses to achieve high gain efficiency. Recently, we demonstrated the ability to produce complex temporal pulse shapes at high power at 0.35 microns on the Nova laser system. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  1. CNO nucleosynthesis and the nova outburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Truran, J.; Sparks, W.

    1977-01-01

    Predictions for CNO nucleosynthesis by the classical nova outburst are presented. Properties of the nova phenomenon pertinent to the production of CNO isotopes are discussed, the effect of beta(+) unstable nuclei on outburst evolution is examined, and the need for enhanced CNO nuclei in the envelope is described. Possible mechanisms for producing such enhancement are considered, and recent observations of enhanced CNO nuclei in nova ejecta are reviewed. Results of model evolutionary calculations are outlined which show that a thermonuclear runaway in the hydrogen envelope of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf can reproduce the gross features of the classical nova outburst, that the behavior of the outburst depends at least on the hydrogen-envelope mass and the degree of CNO enhancement, and that all degrees of isotopic enhancement result in an outburst that may be compared with observed events. Two enhancement mechanisms are identified, both of which involve mixing in the envelope.

  2. Rate of nova production in the Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Liller, W.; Mayer, B.

    1987-07-01

    The ongoing PROBLICOM program in the Southern Hemisphere now makes it possible to derive a reliable value for the overall production rate of Galactic novae. The results, 73 + or - 24/y, indicates that the Galaxy outproduces M 31 by a factor of two or three. It is estimated that the rate of supernova ejecta is one and a half orders of magnitude greater than that of novae in the Galaxy. 15 references.

  3. Addressing Fission Product Validation in MCNP Burnup Credit Criticality Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Don; Bowen, Douglas G; Marshall, William BJ J

    2015-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation issued Interim Staff Guidance (ISG) 8, Revision 3 in September 2012. This ISG provides guidance for NRC staff members’ review of burnup credit (BUC) analyses supporting transport and dry storage of pressurized water reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in casks. The ISG includes guidance for addressing validation of criticality (keff) calculations crediting the presence of a limited set of fission products and minor actinides (FP&MAs). Based on previous work documented in NRC Regulatory Guide (NUREG) Contractor Report (CR)-7109, the ISG recommends that NRC staff members accept the use of either 1.5 or 3% of the FP&MA worth—in addition to bias and bias uncertainty resulting from validation of keff calculations for the major actinides in SNF—to conservatively account for the bias and bias uncertainty associated with the specified unvalidated FP&MAs. The ISG recommends (1) use of 1.5% of the FP&MA worth if a modern version of SCALE and its nuclear data are used and (2) 3% of the FP&MA worth for well qualified, industry standard code systems other than SCALE with the Evaluated Nuclear Data Files, Part B (ENDF/B),-V, ENDF/B-VI, or ENDF/B-VII cross sections libraries. The work presented in this paper provides a basis for extending the use of the 1.5% of the FP&MA worth bias to BUC criticality calculations performed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code. The extended use of the 1.5% FP&MA worth bias is shown to be acceptable by comparison of FP&MA worths calculated using SCALE and MCNP with ENDF/B-V, -VI, and -VII–based nuclear data. The comparison supports use of the 1.5% FP&MA worth bias when the MCNP code is used for criticality calculations, provided that the cask design is similar to the hypothetical generic BUC-32 cask model and that the credited FP&MA worth is no more than 0.1 Δkeff (ISG-8, Rev. 3, Recommendation 4).

  4. Circumstellar dust in symbiotic novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkic, Tomislav; Kotnik-Karuza, Dubravka

    2015-08-01

    Physical properties of the circumstellar dust and associated physical mechanisms play an important role in understanding evolution of symbiotic binaries. We present a model of inner dust regions around the cool Mira component of the two symbiotic novae, RR Tel and HM Sge, based on the long-term near-IR photometry, infrared ISO spectra and mid-IR interferometry. Pulsation properties and long-term variabilities were found from the near-IR light curves. The dust properties were determined using the DUSTY code which solves the radiative transfer. No changes in pulsational parameters were found, but a long-term variations with periods of 20-25 years have been detected which cannot be attributed to orbital motion.Circumstellar silicate dust shell with inner dust shell temperatures between 900 K and 1300 K and of moderate optical depth can explain all the observations. RR Tel showed the presence of an optically thin CS dust envelope and an optically thick dust region outside the line of sight, which was further supported by the detailed modelling using the 2D LELUYA code. Obscuration events in RR Tel were explained by an increase in optical depth caused by the newly condensed dust leading to the formation of a compact dust shell. HM Sge showed permanent obscuration and a presence of a compact dust shell with a variable optical depth. Scattering of the near-IR colours can be understood by a change in sublimation temperature caused by the Mira variability. Presence of large dust grains (up to 4 µm) suggests an increased grain growth in conditions of increased mass loss. The mass loss rates of up to 17·10-6 MSun/yr were significantly higher than in intermediate-period single Miras and in agreement with longer-period O-rich AGB stars.Despite the nova outburst, HM Sge remained enshrouded in dust with no significant dust destruction. The existence of unperturbed dust shell suggests a small influence of the hot component and strong dust shielding from the UV flux. By the use

  5. MCNP simulation of a Theratron 780 radiotherapy unit.

    PubMed

    Miró, R; Soler, J; Gallardo, S; Campayo, J M; Díez, S; Verdú, G

    2005-01-01

    A Theratron 780 (MDS Nordion) 60Co radiotherapy unit has been simulated with the Monte Carlo code MCNP. The unit has been realistically modelled: the cylindrical source capsule and its housing, the rectangular collimator system, both the primary and secondary jaws and the air gaps between the components. Different collimator openings, ranging from 5 x 5 cm2 to 20 x 20 cm2 (narrow and broad beams) at a source-surface distance equal to 80 cm have been used during the study. In the present work, we have calculated spectra as a function of field size. A study of the variation of the electron contamination of the 60Co beam has also been performed. PMID:16604598

  6. Fuel Element Transfer Cask Modelling Using MCNP Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darmawan, Rosli; Topah, Budiman Naim

    2010-01-01

    After operating for more than 25 years, some of the Reaktor TRIGA Puspati (RTP) fuel elements would have been depleted. A few addition and fuel reconfiguration exercises have to be conducted in order to maintain RTP capacity. Presently, RTP spent fuels are stored at the storage area inside RTP tank. The need to transfer the fuel element outside of RTP tank may be prevalence in the near future. The preparation shall be started from now. A fuel element transfer cask has been designed according to the recommendation by the fuel manufacturer and experience of other countries. A modelling using MCNP code has been conducted to analyse the design. The result shows that the design of transfer cask fuel element is safe for handling outside the RTP tank according to recent regulatory requirement.

  7. Experimental validation of lead cross sections for scale and MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Henrikson, D.J.

    1995-12-01

    Moving spent nuclear fuel between facilities often requires the use of lead-shielded casks. Criticality safety that is based upon calculations requires experimental validation of the fuel matrix and lead cross section libraries. A series of critical experiments using a high-enriched uranium-aluminum fuel element with a variety of reflectors, including lead, has been identified. Twenty-one configurations were evaluated in this study. The fuel element was modelled for KENO V.a and MCNP 4a using various cross section sets. The experiments addressed in this report can be used to validate lead-reflected calculations. Factors influencing calculated k{sub eff} which require further study include diameters of styrofoam inserts and homogenization.

  8. Fuel Element Transfer Cask Modelling Using MCNP Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Darmawan, Rosli; Topah, Budiman Naim

    2010-01-05

    After operating for more than 25 years, some of the Reaktor TRIGA Puspati (RTP) fuel elements would have been depleted. A few addition and fuel reconfiguration exercises have to be conducted in order to maintain RTP capacity. Presently, RTP spent fuels are stored at the storage area inside RTP tank. The need to transfer the fuel element outside of RTP tank may be prevalence in the near future. The preparation shall be started from now. A fuel element transfer cask has been designed according to the recommendation by the fuel manufacturer and experience of other countries. A modelling using MCNP code has been conducted to analyse the design. The result shows that the design of transfer cask fuel element is safe for handling outside the RTP tank according to recent regulatory requirement.

  9. Treating electron transport in MCNP{sup trademark}

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, H.G.

    1996-12-31

    The transport of electrons and other charged particles is fundamentally different from that of neutrons and photons. A neutron, in aluminum slowing down from 0.5 MeV to 0.0625 MeV will have about 30 collisions; a photon will have fewer than ten. An electron with the same energy loss will undergo 10{sup 5} individual interactions. This great increase in computational complexity makes a single- collision Monte Carlo approach to electron transport unfeasible for many situations of practical interest. Considerable theoretical work has been done to develop a variety of analytic and semi-analytic multiple-scattering theories for the transport of charged particles. The theories used in the algorithms in MCNP are the Goudsmit-Saunderson theory for angular deflections, the Landau an theory of energy-loss fluctuations, and the Blunck-Leisegang enhancements of the Landau theory. In order to follow an electron through a significant energy loss, it is necessary to break the electron`s path into many steps. These steps are chosen to be long enough to encompass many collisions (so that multiple-scattering theories are valid) but short enough that the mean energy loss in any one step is small (for the approximations in the multiple-scattering theories). The energy loss and angular deflection of the electron during each step can then be sampled from probability distributions based on the appropriate multiple- scattering theories. This subsumption of the effects of many individual collisions into single steps that are sampled probabilistically constitutes the ``condensed history`` Monte Carlo method. This method is exemplified in the ETRAN series of electron/photon transport codes. The ETRAN codes are also the basis for the Integrated TIGER Series, a system of general-purpose, application-oriented electron/photon transport codes. The electron physics in MCNP is similar to that of the Integrated TIGER Series.

  10. Performance upgrades to the MCNP6 burnup capability for large scale depletion calculations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fensin, M. L.; Galloway, J. D.; James, M. R.

    2015-04-11

    The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. With the merger of MCNPX and MCNP5, MCNP6 combined the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. The new MCNP6 depletion capability was first showcased at the International Congress for Advancements in Nuclear Power Plants (ICAPP) meeting in 2012. At that conference the new capabilities addressed included the combined distributive and shared memory parallel architecture for the burnup capability, improved memory management, physics enhancements, and newmore » predictability as compared to the H.B Robinson Benchmark. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, a special purpose cluster named “tebow,” was constructed such to maximize available RAM per CPU, as well as leveraging swap space with solid state hard drives, to allow larger scale depletion calculations (allowing for significantly more burnable regions than previously examined). As the MCNP6 burnup capability was scaled to larger numbers of burnable regions, a noticeable slowdown was realized.This paper details two specific computational performance strategies for improving calculation speedup: (1) retrieving cross sections during transport; and (2) tallying mechanisms specific to burnup in MCNP. To combat this slowdown new performance upgrades were developed and integrated into MCNP6 1.2.« less

  11. Performance upgrades to the MCNP6 burnup capability for large scale depletion calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, M. L.; Galloway, J. D.; James, M. R.

    2015-04-11

    The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. With the merger of MCNPX and MCNP5, MCNP6 combined the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. The new MCNP6 depletion capability was first showcased at the International Congress for Advancements in Nuclear Power Plants (ICAPP) meeting in 2012. At that conference the new capabilities addressed included the combined distributive and shared memory parallel architecture for the burnup capability, improved memory management, physics enhancements, and new predictability as compared to the H.B Robinson Benchmark. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, a special purpose cluster named “tebow,” was constructed such to maximize available RAM per CPU, as well as leveraging swap space with solid state hard drives, to allow larger scale depletion calculations (allowing for significantly more burnable regions than previously examined). As the MCNP6 burnup capability was scaled to larger numbers of burnable regions, a noticeable slowdown was realized.This paper details two specific computational performance strategies for improving calculation speedup: (1) retrieving cross sections during transport; and (2) tallying mechanisms specific to burnup in MCNP. To combat this slowdown new performance upgrades were developed and integrated into MCNP6 1.2.

  12. Comparisons between MCNP, EGS4 and experiment for clinical electron beams.

    PubMed

    Jeraj, R; Keall, P J; Ostwald, P M

    1999-03-01

    Understanding the limitations of Monte Carlo codes is essential in order to avoid systematic errors in simulations, and to suggest further improvement of the codes. MCNP and EGS4, Monte Carlo codes commonly used in medical physics, were compared and evaluated against electron depth dose data and experimental backscatter results obtained using clinical radiotherapy beams. Different physical models and algorithms used in the codes give significantly different depth dose curves and electron backscattering factors. The default version of MCNP calculates electron depth dose curves which are too penetrating. The MCNP results agree better with experiment if the ITS-style energy-indexing algorithm is used. EGS4 underpredicts electron backscattering for high-Z materials. The results slightly improve if optimal PRESTA-I parameters are used. MCNP simulates backscattering well even for high-Z materials. To conclude the comparison, a timing study was performed. EGS4 is generally faster than MCNP and use of a large number of scoring voxels dramatically slows down the MCNP calculation. However, use of a large number of geometry voxels in MCNP only slightly affects the speed of the calculation. PMID:10211804

  13. An enhanced geometry-independent mesh weight window generator for MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T.M.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1997-12-31

    A new, enhanced, weight window generator suite has been developed for MCNP{trademark}. The new generator correctly estimates importances in either an user-specified, geometry-independent orthogonal grid or in MCNP geometric cells. The geometry-independent option alleviates the need to subdivide the MCNP cell geometry for variance reduction purposes. In addition, the new suite corrects several pathologies in the existing MCNP weight window generator. To verify the correctness of the new implementation, comparisons are performed with the analytical solution for the cell importance. Using the new generator, differences between Monte Carlo generated and analytical importances are less than 0.1%. Also, assumptions implicit in the original MCNP generator are shown to be poor in problems with high scattering media. The new generator is fully compatible with MCNP`s AVATAR{trademark} automatic variance reduction method. The new generator applications, together with AVATAR, gives MCNP an enhanced suite of variance reduction methods. The flexibility and efficacy of this suite is demonstrated in a neutron porosity tool well-logging problem.

  14. Shortest recurrence periods of novae

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Mariko; Saio, Hideyuki; Hachisu, Izumi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2014-10-01

    Stimulated by the recent discovery of the 1 yr recurrence period nova M31N 2008-12a, we examined the shortest recurrence periods of hydrogen shell flashes on mass-accreting white dwarfs (WDs). We discuss the mechanism that yields a finite minimum recurrence period for a given WD mass. Calculating the unstable flashes for various WD masses and mass accretion rates, we identified a shortest recurrence period of about two months for a non-rotating 1.38 M {sub ☉} WD with a mass accretion rate of 3.6 × 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. A 1 yr recurrence period is realized for very massive (≳ 1.3 M {sub ☉}) WDs with very high accretion rates (≳ 1.5 × 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}). We revised our stability limit of hydrogen shell burning, which will be useful for binary evolution calculations toward Type Ia supernovae.

  15. Models for various aspects of dwarf novae and nova-like stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladous, Constanze

    1993-01-01

    The first attempts to explain the nature of dwarf novae were based on the assumption of single-star phenomena, in which emission lines were assumed to be caused by circumstellar gas shells. The outburst behavior was tentatively ascribed to the kind of (also not understood) mechanism leading to nova outbursts. The realization that some, and possibly all, dwarf novae and nova-like stars (and novae) are binaries eventually led to models which bore more and more similarities to the modern interpretation on the basis of the Roche model. Not all cataclysmic variables are known binaries. In fact, with respect to the entire number of known objects, the proven binaries are still the minority, but all the brightest variables are in fact known to binaries. Not a single system is known which exhibits the usual characteristics of a cataclysmic variable and at the same time can be declared with certainty to be a single star. Two systems are known, the dwarf nova EY Cyg and the recurrent nova V1017 Sgr, in which, in spite of intensive search, no radial velocity variations have been found; but they still exhibit composite spectra consisting of a bright continuum, an emission spectrum, and a cool absorption spectrum. If the Roche model is correct, it is to be expected that a small percentage of objects is viewed pole-on, so orbital motions do not make themselves felt as Doppler shifts of spectral lines. So even these two systems support the hypothesis that all cataclysmic variables (with the possible exception of symbiotic stars) are binaries. In cataclysmic variables, it seems that the brightness changes observed in dwarf novae and nova-like stars in the optical and the UV are due directly to changes in the accretion disks. The study and understanding of accretion disks in these systems can bear potentially valuable consequences for many other fields in astronomy. The observed spectra of dwarf novae and nova-like stars comprise a fairly large range: pure emission spectra, pure

  16. MCNP(TM) Release 6.1.1 beta: Creating and Testing the Code Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Lawrence J.; Casswell, Laura

    2014-06-12

    This report documents the preparations for and testing of the production release of MCNP6™1.1 beta through RSICC at ORNL. It addresses tests on supported operating systems (Linux, MacOSX, Windows) with the supported compilers (Intel, Portland Group and gfortran). Verification and Validation test results are documented elsewhere. This report does not address in detail the overall packaging of the distribution. Specifically, it does not address the nuclear and atomic data collection, the other included software packages (MCNP5, MCNPX and MCNP6) and the collection of reference documents.

  17. Impact of MCNP unresolved resonance probability-table treatment on {sup 233}U benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Mosteller, R.D.

    1999-06-01

    Previous versions of the MCNP Monte Carlo code, up through and including MCNP4B, have not accurately modeled neutron self-shielding effects in the unresolved resonance energy region. Recently, a probability-table treatment has been incorporated into an intermediate version called MCNP4XS, and compatible continuous-energy cross-section libraries have been developed for 27 different isotopes. Preliminary results for a variety of uranium and plutonium benchmarks have been presented previously, and this paper extends those results to include several {sup 233}U benchmarks. The objective of the current study is to assess the reactivity impact of the probability-table treatment on {sup 233}U systems.

  18. Impact of MCNP Unresolved Resonance Probability-Table Treatment on Uranium and Plutonium Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Mosteller, R.D.; Little, R.C.

    1999-09-20

    A probability-table treatment recently has been incorporated into an intermediate version of the MCNP Monte Carlo code named MCNP4XS. This paper presents MCNP4XS results for a variety of uranium and plutonium criticality benchmarks, calculated with and without the probability-table treatment. It is shown that the probability-table treatment can produce small but significant reactivity changes for plutonium and {sup 233}U systems with intermediate spectra. More importantly, it can produce substantial reactivity increases for systems with large amounts of {sup 238}U and intermediate spectra.

  19. Nova Discovery Efficiency 1890-2014; Only 43%±6% of the Brightest Nova Are Discovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    2014-06-01

    Galactic nova discovery has always been the domain of the best amateur astronomers, with the only substantial exception being the use of the Harvard plates from 1890-1947. (Modern CCD surveys have not produced any significant nova discoveries.) From 1890-1946, novae were discovered by gentlemen who deeply knew the stars in the sky and who checked for new stars on every clear night. This all changed when war surplus binoculars became commonly available, so the various organizations (e.g., AAVSO, BAA) instructed their hunters to use binoculars to regularly search small areas of the Milky Way. In the 1970s the hunters largely switched to blinking photographs, while they switched to CCD images in the 1990s, all exclusively in Milky Way regions. Currently, most hunters use 'go-to' scopes to look deeply only in the Milky Way, use weekly or monthly cadences, never go outside to look up at the light-polluted skies, and do not have the stars memorized at all. This situation is good for catching many faint novae, but is inefficient for catching the more isotropic and systematically-fast bright novae.I have made an exhaustive analysis of all known novae to isolate the effects on the relative discovery efficiency as a function of decade, the elongation from the Sun, the Moon's phase, the declination, the peak magnitude, and the duration of the peak. For example, the relative efficiency for novae south of declination -33° is 0.5 before 1953, 0.2 from 1953-1990, and 0.8 after 1990. My analysis gives the overall discovery efficiency to be 43%±6%, 30%, 22%, 12%, and 6% for novae peaking brighter than 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 mag. Thus, the majority of first magnitude novae are being missed. The bright novae are lost because they are too close to the Sun, in the far south, and/or very fast. This is illustrated by the discovery rate for Vpeak<2 novae being once every five years before 1946, yet only one such nova (V1500 Cyg) has been seen in the last 68 years. A critical consequence of

  20. Current status of MCNP6 as a simulation tool useful for space and accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mashnik, Stepan G; Bull, Jeffrey S; Hughes, H. Grady; Prael, Richard E; Sierk, Arnold J

    2012-07-20

    For the past several years, a major effort has been undertaken at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to develop the transport code MCNP6, the latest LANL Monte-Carlo transport code representing a merger and improvement of MCNP5 and MCNPX. We emphasize a description of the latest developments of MCNP6 at higher energies to improve its reliability in calculating rare-isotope production, high-energy cumulative particle production, and a gamut of reactions important for space-radiation shielding, cosmic-ray propagation, and accelerator applications. We present several examples of validation and verification of MCNP6 compared to a wide variety of intermediate- and high-energy experimental data on reactions induced by photons, mesons, nucleons, and nuclei at energies from tens of MeV to about 1 TeV/nucleon, and compare to results from other modern simulation tools.

  1. A Patch to MCNP5 for Multiplication Inference: Description and User Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, Jr., Clell J.

    2014-05-05

    A patch to MCNP5 has been written to allow generation of multiple neutrons from a spontaneous-fission event and generate list-mode output. This report documents the implementation and usage of this patch.

  2. Comparisons of TORT and MCNP dose calculations for BNCT treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersol, D.T.; Slater, C.O.; Williams, L.R.; Redmond, E.L., II; Zamenhof, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    The relative merit of using a deterministic code to calculate dose distributions for BNCT applications were examined. The TORT discrete deterministic ordinated code was used in comparison to MCNP4A to calculate dose distributions for BNCT applications

  3. Seven Galactic classical novae from the OGLE-IV Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, P.; Udalski, A.

    2016-07-01

    We report the discovery of seven classical novae located in the Galactic bulge and disk fields. Novae were found during a search for bright transients in data from the OGLE-IV sky survey from observing seasons 2014-2016.

  4. Analysis of JSI TRIGA MARK II reactor physical parameters calculated with TRIPOLI and MCNP.

    PubMed

    Henry, R; Tiselj, I; Snoj, L

    2015-03-01

    New computational model of the JSI TRIGA Mark II research reactor was built for TRIPOLI computer code and compared with existing MCNP code model. The same modelling assumptions were used in order to check the differences of the mathematical models of both Monte Carlo codes. Differences between the TRIPOLI and MCNP predictions of keff were up to 100pcm. Further validation was performed with analyses of the normalized reaction rates and computations of kinetic parameters for various core configurations. PMID:25576735

  5. Methodology, verification, and performance of the continuous-energy nuclear data sensitivity capability in MCNP6

    SciTech Connect

    Kiedrowski, B. C.; Brown, F. B.

    2013-07-01

    A continuous-energy sensitivity coefficient capability has been introduced into MCNP6. The methods for generating energy-resolved and energy-integrated sensitivity profiles are discussed. Results from the verification exercises that were performed are given, and these show that MCNP6 compares favorably with analytic solutions, direct density perturbations, and comparisons to TSUNAMI-3D and MONK. Run-time and memory requirements are assessed for typical applications, and these are shown to be reasonable with modern computing resources. (authors)

  6. The distances of the Galactic Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdonmez, Aykut; Guver, Tolga; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio; Ak, Tansel

    2016-07-01

    Using location of the RC stars on the CMDs obtained from the UKIDSS, VISTA and 2MASS photometry, we have derived the reddening-distance relations towards each Galactic nova for which at least one independent reddening measurement exists. We were able to determine the distances of 72 Galactic novae and set lower limits on the distances of 45 systems. The reddening curves of the systems are presented. These curves can be also used to estimate reddening or the distance of any source, whose location is close to the position of the nova in our sample. The distance measurement method in our study can be easily applicable to any source, especially for ones that concentrated along the Galactic plane.

  7. The Distances of the Galactic Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdönmez, Aykut; Güver, Tolga; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio; Ak, Tansel

    2016-06-01

    Utilising the unique location of red clump giants on colour-magnitude diagrams obtained from various near-IR surveys, we derived specific reddening-distance relations towards 119 Galactic novae for which independent reddening measurements are available. Using the derived distance-extinction relation and the independent measurements of reddening we calculated the most likely distances for each system. We present the details of our distance measurement technique and the results of this analysis, which yielded the distances of 73 Galactic novae and allowed us to set lower limits on the distances of 46 systems. We also present the data of reddening-distance relations derived for each nova, which may be useful to analyze the different Galactic components present in the line of sight.

  8. The distances of the Galactic novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdönmez, Aykut; Güver, Tolga; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio; Ak, Tansel

    2016-09-01

    Utilizing the unique location of red clump giants on colour-magnitude diagrams obtained from various near-infrared surveys, we derived specific reddening-distance relations towards 119 Galactic novae for which independent reddening measurements are available. Using the derived distance-extinction relation and the independent measurements of reddening we calculated the most likely distances for each system. We present the details of our distance measurement technique and the results of this analysis, which yielded the distances of 73 Galactic novae and allowed us to set lower limits on the distances of 46 systems. We also present the reddening-distance relations derived for each nova, which may be useful to analyse the different Galactic components present in the line of sight.

  9. NOVA laser facility for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, W.W.

    1983-11-30

    The NOVA laser consists of ten beams, capable of concentrating 100 to 150 kJ of energy (in 3 ns) and 100 to 150 TW of power (in 100 ps) on experimental targets by 1985. NOVA will also be capable of frequency converting the fundamental laser wavelength (1.05 ..mu..m) to its second (0.525 ..mu..m) or third (0.35 ..mu..m) harmonic. This additional capability (80 to 120 kJ at 0.525 ..mu..m, 40 to 70 kJ at 0.35 ..mu..m) was approved by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in April 1982. These shorter wavelengths are much more favorable for ICF target physics. Current construction status of the NOVA facility, intended for completion in the autumn of 1984, will be presented.

  10. Validating MCNP for LEU Fuel Design via Power Distribution Comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Primm, Trent; Maldonado, G Ivan; Chandler, David

    2008-11-01

    The mission of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program is to minimize and, to the extent possible, eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in civilian nuclear applications by working to convert research and test reactors, as well as radioisotope production processes, to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel and targets. Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is reviewing the design bases and key operating criteria including fuel operating parameters, enrichment-related safety analyses, fuel performance, and fuel fabrication in regard to converting the fuel of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from HEU to LEU. The purpose of this study is to validate Monte Carlo methods currently in use for conversion analyses. The methods have been validated for the prediction of flux values in the reactor target, reflector, and beam tubes, but this study focuses on the prediction of the power density profile in the core. A current 3-D Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) model was modified to replicate the HFIR Critical Experiment 3 (HFIRCE-3) core of 1965. In this experiment, the power profile was determined by counting the gamma activity at selected locations in the core. Foils (chunks of fuel meat and clad) were punched out of the fuel elements in HFIRCE-3 following irradiation and experimental relative power densities were obtained by measuring the activity of these foils and comparing each foil s activity to the activity of a normalizing foil. The current work consisted of calculating corresponding activities by inserting volume tallies into the modified MCNP model to represent the punchings. The average fission density was calculated for each foil location and then normalized to the normalizing foil. Power distributions were obtained for the clean core (no poison in moderator and symmetrical rod position at 17.5 inches) and fully poisoned-moderator (1.35 g B/liter in moderator and rods fully withdrawn) conditions. The observed deviations between the

  11. MCNP-based computational model for the Leksell Gamma Knife

    SciTech Connect

    Trnka, Jiri; Novotny, Josef Jr.; Kluson, Jaroslav

    2007-01-15

    We have focused on the usage of MCNP code for calculation of Gamma Knife radiation field parameters with a homogenous polystyrene phantom. We have investigated several parameters of the Leksell Gamma Knife radiation field and compared the results with other studies based on EGS4 and PENELOPE code as well as the Leksell Gamma Knife treatment planning system Leksell GammaPlan (LGP). The current model describes all 201 radiation beams together and simulates all the sources in the same time. Within each beam, it considers the technical construction of the source, the source holder, collimator system, the spherical phantom, and surrounding material. We have calculated output factors for various sizes of scoring volumes, relative dose distributions along basic planes including linear dose profiles, integral doses in various volumes, and differential dose volume histograms. All the parameters have been calculated for each collimator size and for the isocentric configuration of the phantom. We have found the calculated output factors to be in agreement with other authors' works except the case of 4 mm collimator size, where averaging over the scoring volume and statistical uncertainties strongly influences the calculated results. In general, all the results are dependent on the choice of the scoring volume. The calculated linear dose profiles and relative dose distributions also match independent studies and the Leksell GammaPlan, but care must be taken about the fluctuations within the plateau, which can influence the normalization, and accuracy in determining the isocenter position, which is important for comparing different dose profiles. The calculated differential dose volume histograms and integral doses have been compared with data provided by the Leksell GammaPlan. The dose volume histograms are in good agreement as well as integral doses calculated in small calculation matrix volumes. However, deviations in integral doses up to 50% can be observed for large

  12. MCNP-based computational model for the Leksell gamma knife.

    PubMed

    Trnka, Jiri; Novotny, Josef; Kluson, Jaroslav

    2007-01-01

    We have focused on the usage of MCNP code for calculation of Gamma Knife radiation field parameters with a homogenous polystyrene phantom. We have investigated several parameters of the Leksell Gamma Knife radiation field and compared the results with other studies based on EGS4 and PENELOPE code as well as the Leksell Gamma Knife treatment planning system Leksell GammaPlan (LGP). The current model describes all 201 radiation beams together and simulates all the sources in the same time. Within each beam, it considers the technical construction of the source, the source holder, collimator system, the spherical phantom, and surrounding material. We have calculated output factors for various sizes of scoring volumes, relative dose distributions along basic planes including linear dose profiles, integral doses in various volumes, and differential dose volume histograms. All the parameters have been calculated for each collimator size and for the isocentric configuration of the phantom. We have found the calculated output factors to be in agreement with other authors' works except the case of 4 mm collimator size, where averaging over the scoring volume and statistical uncertainties strongly influences the calculated results. In general, all the results are dependent on the choice of the scoring volume. The calculated linear dose profiles and relative dose distributions also match independent studies and the Leksell GammaPlan, but care must be taken about the fluctuations within the plateau, which can influence the normalization, and accuracy in determining the isocenter position, which is important for comparing different dose profiles. The calculated differential dose volume histograms and integral doses have been compared with data provided by the Leksell GammaPlan. The dose volume histograms are in good agreement as well as integral doses calculated in small calculation matrix volumes. However, deviations in integral doses up to 50% can be observed for large

  13. AN EXTENDED GRID OF NOVA MODELS. III. VERY LUMINOUS, RED NOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Shara, Michael M.; Zurek, David; Yaron, Ofer; Prialnik, Dina; Kovetz, Attay

    2010-12-10

    Extremely luminous, red eruptive variables like RV in M31 are being suggested as exemplars of a new class of astrophysical objects. Our greatly extended series of nova simulations shows that classical nova models can produce very red, luminous eruptions. In a poorly studied corner of three-dimensional nova parameter space (very cold, low-mass white dwarfs, accreting at very low rates) we find bona fide classical novae that are very luminous and red because they eject very slowly moving, massive envelopes. A crucial prediction of these nova models-in contrast to the predictions of merging star ('mergeburst') models-is that a hot remnant, the underlying white dwarf, will emerge after the massive ejected envelope has expanded enough to become optically thin. This blue remnant must fade on a timescale of decades-much faster than a 'mergeburst', which must fade on timescales of millennia or longer. Furthermore, the cooling nova white dwarf and its expanding ejecta must become redder in the years after eruption, while a contracting mergeburst must become hotter and bluer. We predict that red novae will always brighten to L {approx} 1000 L{sub sun} for about one year before rising to the maximum luminosity at L {approx} 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} L{sub sun}. The maximum luminosity attainable by a nova is likely to be L {approx} 10{sup 7} L{sub sun}, corresponding to M {approx} -12. In an accompanying paper, we describe a fading, luminous blue candidate for the remnant of M31-RV; it is observed with the Hubble Space Telescope to be compatible only with the nova model.

  14. NUCLEAR MIXING METERS FOR CLASSICAL NOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Keegan J.; Iliadis, Christian; Downen, Lori; Champagne, Art; José, Jordi

    2013-11-10

    Classical novae are caused by mass transfer episodes from a main-sequence star onto a white dwarf via Roche lobe overflow. This material possesses angular momentum and forms an accretion disk around the white dwarf. Ultimately, a fraction of this material spirals in and piles up on the white dwarf surface under electron-degenerate conditions. The subsequently occurring thermonuclear runaway reaches hundreds of megakelvin and explosively ejects matter into the interstellar medium. The exact peak temperature strongly depends on the underlying white dwarf mass, the accreted mass and metallicity, and the initial white dwarf luminosity. Observations of elemental abundance enrichments in these classical nova events imply that the ejected matter consists not only of processed solar material from the main-sequence partner but also of material from the outer layers of the underlying white dwarf. This indicates that white dwarf and accreted matter mix prior to the thermonuclear runaway. The processes by which this mixing occurs require further investigation to be understood. In this work, we analyze elemental abundances ejected from hydrodynamic nova models in search of elemental abundance ratios that are useful indicators of the total amount of mixing. We identify the abundance ratios ΣCNO/H, Ne/H, Mg/H, Al/H, and Si/H as useful mixing meters in ONe novae. The impact of thermonuclear reaction rate uncertainties on the mixing meters is investigated using Monte Carlo post-processing network calculations with temperature-density evolutions of all mass zones computed by the hydrodynamic models. We find that the current uncertainties in the {sup 30}P(p, γ){sup 31}S rate influence the Si/H abundance ratio, but overall the mixing meters found here are robust against nuclear physics uncertainties. A comparison of our results with observations of ONe novae provides strong constraints for classical nova models.

  15. Validation and verification of MCNP6 as a new simulation tool useful for medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mashnik, Stepan G

    2011-01-06

    MCNP6, the latest and most advanced LANL transport code, representing a merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX has been Validated and Verified (V&V) against different experimental data and results by other codes relevant to medical applications. In the present work, we V&V MCNP6 using mainly the latest modifications of the Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM) and of the Los Alamos version of the Quark-Gluon String Model (LAQGSM) event generators CEM03.02 and LAQGSM03.03. We found that MCNP6 describes well data of interest for medical applications measured on both thin and thick targets and agrees very well with similar results obtained with other codes; MCNP6 may be a very useful tool for medical applications We plan to make MCNP6 available to the public via RSICC at Oak Ridge in the middle of 2011 but we are allowed to provide it to friendly US Beta-users outside LANL already now.

  16. Verification of Unstructured Mesh Capabilities in MCNP6 for Reactor Physics Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Timothy P.; Martz, Roger L.; Kiedrowski, Brian C.; Martin, William R.

    2012-08-22

    New unstructured mesh capabilities in MCNP6 (developmental version during summer 2012) show potential for conducting multi-physics analyses by coupling MCNP to a finite element solver such as Abaqus/CAE[2]. Before these new capabilities can be utilized, the ability of MCNP to accurately estimate eigenvalues and pin powers using an unstructured mesh must first be verified. Previous work to verify the unstructured mesh capabilities in MCNP was accomplished using the Godiva sphere [1], and this work attempts to build on that. To accomplish this, a criticality benchmark and a fuel assembly benchmark were used for calculations in MCNP using both the Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) native to MCNP and the unstructured mesh geometry generated using Abaqus/CAE. The Big Ten criticality benchmark [3] was modeled due to its geometry being similar to that of a reactor fuel pin. The C5G7 3-D Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Assembly Benchmark [4] was modeled to test the unstructured mesh capabilities on a reactor-type problem.

  17. MCNP6 Simulation of Light and Medium Nuclei Fragmentation at Intermediate Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mashnik, Stepan Georgievich; Kerby, Leslie Marie

    2015-05-22

    MCNP6, the latest and most advanced LANL Monte Carlo transport code, representing a merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX, is actually much more than the sum of those two computer codes; MCNP6 is available to the public via RSICC at Oak Ridge, TN, USA. In the present work, MCNP6 was validated and verified (V&V) against different experimental data on intermediate-energy fragmentation reactions, and results by several other codes, using mainly the latest modifications of the Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM) and of the Los Alamos version of the Quark-Gluon String Model (LAQGSM) event generators CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03. It was found that MCNP6 using CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 describes well fragmentation reactions induced on light and medium target nuclei by protons and light nuclei of energies around 1 GeV/nucleon and below, and can serve as a reliable simulation tool for different applications, like cosmic-ray-induced single event upsets (SEU’s), radiation protection, and cancer therapy with proton and ion beams, to name just a few. Future improvements of the predicting capabilities of MCNP6 for such reactions are possible, and are discussed in this work.

  18. Dust formation in Nova Cephei 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninan, J. P.; Ojha, D. K.; Ghosh, S. K.; Anupama, G. C.; Prabhu, T. P.; Bhatt, B. C.

    2013-08-01

    We report near-infrared K band photometry and spectroscopy of Nova Cephei 2013, discovered by K. Nishiyama and F. Kabashima on 2013 Feb 2.4 UT (cf. CBET #3397, ATel #4950, #4893, #5026). The observations were made using the 2-m Himalayan Chandra telescope (+TIFR Near Infrared Imager and Spectrometer, TIRSPEC) at the Indian Astronomical Observatory (IAO), Hanle (Ladakh). The estimated K band magnitudes of nova were: 2013 June 23 UT, 7.40 +/-0.02 and 2013 July 8 UT 7.84 +/- 0.02; the source brightness has therefore dimmed by 0.44 mag in K band during 16 days.

  19. Mix experiments with the NOVA laser

    SciTech Connect

    Rupert, V.C.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Skokowski, P.G.

    1988-10-01

    The NOVA mix experiments are designed to study mix between two dissimilar materials subjected to strong (M/approximately/50) shocks and variable accelerations in a direction normal to their common boundary. The main purpose of the experiments is to provide a data base with which predictive models can be compared and normalized. Together with shock tube experiments, which explore a different regime, the current NOVA tests investigate the shock induced source terms in our model and the evolution of both Rayleigh-Taylor stable and unstable interfaces. 3 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Dynamic testing of NOVA laser switchyard tower

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, H.J.; Pastrnak, J.W.; Fields, D.E.

    1984-06-01

    NOVA is the latest in a series of powerful laser systems designed to study the feasibility of initiating a controlled fusion reaction by concentrating several laser beams on a small fuel target. The laser components, turning mirrors and target chamber are all mounted on large steel frame structures. These structures were first analyzed via finite element models to access their seismic integrity as well as their overall vibrational stability. When construction was completed, a modal analysis was performed on the structures to verify and improve the finite element models. This report discusses the linking of the analytical and experimental studies for the NOVA switchyard tower structure.

  1. Infrared observations of nova V5588 Sagittarii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, D. P. K.; Ashok, N. M.

    2011-05-01

    We report near-IR 1.08 to 2.3 micron spectroscopy of the nova V5588 Sgr using the NICMOS3 imager/spectrograph and the 1.2m Mount Abu telescope of the Physical Research Laboratory. The spectra were taken on 26 April and 4 May 2011, after the large second rebrightening of the nova reported on 25.11 April (Munari et al., CBET 2707) when it reached V = 11.7, a brightness level comparable to that of the primary maximum of V = 11.2 reached on 7 April 2011.

  2. Ultraviolet observations of LMC nova 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Stryker, L. L.; Sonneborn, G.; Sparks, Warren M.; Sion, E. M.; Wagner, R. M.; Ferland, Gary; Gallagher, J. S.; Wade, R.; Williams, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    The IUE obtained ultraviolet spectra of a nova in an external galaxy. The spectral features do not seem unusual for a nova at maximum but it is hoped to be able to follow it for a long enough time to be able to study the high ionization lines that appear when the density drops to lower values (the nebular stage). A high dispersion spectrum was also obtained to assist in the line identification and to study the line of sight to the LMC 1 deg of arc away from SN 1987A.

  3. New optical nova candidate in M 31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burwitz, V.; Pietsch, W.; Henze, M.; Rodriguez, J.; Haswell, C. A.; Holmes, S.; Kolb, U.; Lucas, R.

    2010-06-01

    We report the discovery of a possible nova in M 31 on a 5x120s stacked unfiltered CCD image obtained with the 0.35-m f/11 OU/OAM PIRATE Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope (+ SBIG STL-1001E CCD camera) at Costitx, Mallorca, Spain on 2010 June 26.084 UT with a corresponding R magnitude of 17.8. The position for the nova candidate is RA = 00h44m04.48s, Dec = +41d28'34.2" (J2000, accuracy of 0.3"), which is 902" east and 746" north of the core of M 31.

  4. SN 2010U: A LUMINOUS NOVA IN NGC 4214

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, Roberta M.; Helton, L. Andrew; Prieto, Jose L.; Rosenfield, Philip; Williams, Benjamin; Murphy, Jeremiah; Dalcanton, Julianne; Gilbert, Karoline; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Khan, Rubab; Szczygiel, Dorota; Mogren, Karen; Fesen, Robert A.; Milisavljevic, Dan

    2010-07-20

    The luminosity, light curve, post-maximum spectrum, and lack of a progenitor on deep pre-outburst images suggest that SN 2010U was a luminous, fast nova. Its outburst magnitude is consistent with that for a fast nova using the maximum magnitude-rate of decline relationship for classical novae.

  5. NovaNET User Manual for "Crouter" Instructors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortner, Monica B.; Davis, Dennis M.

    Intended to teach instructors how to use the NovaNET computer system or the PLATO system to deliver instruction, this manual provides instructions for using both NovaNET, which supercedes PLATO, and the crouter software package, which is a general purpose tool for managing instruction on the NovaNET computer. This self-instructional manual is…

  6. The benefit of amateur observations for research in dwarf novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    La Dous, Constanze

    1992-01-01

    Contributions of amateur astronomers to research on dwarf novae, which are based on carefully monitoring the outburst behavior of these objects, are reviewed. These contributions range from scheduling of observations to the observational basis for research on the dwarf nova outburst mechanism. It is suggested, that, with better equipment, observations of orbital light variations in dwarf novae might be performed by amateur astronomers.

  7. IER-163 Post-Experiment MCNP Calculations (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2012-06-04

    IER-163 has been modeled with high fidelity in MCNP6. The model k{sub eff} was high, as in other similar calculations. The fission ratio {sup 238}U(n,f)/{sup 235}U(n,f) was 12.6% too small compared with measurements; the ratio {sup 239}Pu(n,f)/{sup 235}U(n,f) was 11.5% too small compared with measurements; the iridium ratio {sup 193}Ir(n,n{prime})/{sup 191}Ir(n,{gamma}) was 16.4% too large; and the gold ratios {sup 197}Au(n,2n)/{sup 197}Au(n,{gamma}), {sup 197}Au(n,2n)/{sup 235}U(n,f), and {sup 197}Au(n,{gamma})/{sup 235}U(n,f) were within one standard deviation of the measured values. It is suggested that the calculated {sup 235}U fission rate is too large and the calculated {sup 238}U fission rate is too small.

  8. Automated variance reduction for Monte Carlo shielding analyses with MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulescu, Georgeta

    Variance reduction techniques are employed in Monte Carlo analyses to increase the number of particles in the space phase of interest and thereby lower the variance of statistical estimation. Variance reduction parameters are required to perform Monte Carlo calculations. It is well known that adjoint solutions, even approximate ones, are excellent biasing functions that can significantly increase the efficiency of a Monte Carlo calculation. In this study, an automated method of generating Monte Carlo variance reduction parameters, and of implementing the source energy biasing and the weight window technique in MCNP shielding calculations has been developed. The method is based on the approach used in the SAS4 module of the SCALE code system, which derives the biasing parameters from an adjoint one-dimensional Discrete Ordinates calculation. Unlike SAS4 that determines the radial and axial dose rates of a spent fuel cask in separate calculations, the present method provides energy and spatial biasing parameters for the entire system that optimize the simulation of particle transport towards all external surfaces of a spent fuel cask. The energy and spatial biasing parameters are synthesized from the adjoint fluxes of three one-dimensional Discrete Ordinates adjoint calculations. Additionally, the present method accommodates multiple source regions, such as the photon sources in light-water reactor spent nuclear fuel assemblies, in one calculation. With this automated method, detailed and accurate dose rate maps for photons, neutrons, and secondary photons outside spent fuel casks or other containers can be efficiently determined with minimal efforts.

  9. Fission matrix capability for MCNP, Part I - Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, F. B.; Carney, S. E.; Kiedrowski, B. C.; Martin, W. R.

    2013-07-01

    The theory underlying the fission matrix method is derived using a rigorous Green's function approach. The method is then used to investigate fundamental properties of the transport equation for a continuous-energy physics treatment. We provide evidence that an infinite set of discrete, real eigenvalues and eigenfunctions exist for the continuous-energy problem, and that the eigenvalue spectrum converges smoothly as the spatial mesh for the fission matrix is refined. We also derive equations for the adjoint solution. We show that if the mesh is sufficiently refined so that both forward and adjoint solutions are valid, then the adjoint fission matrix is identical to the transpose of the forward matrix. While the energy-dependent transport equation is strictly bi-orthogonal, we provide surprising results that the forward modes are very nearly self-adjoint for a variety of continuous-energy problems. A companion paper (Part II - Applications) describes the initial experience and results from implementing this fission matrix capability into the MCNP Monte Carlo code. (authors)

  10. First optical candidate for a recovered classical nova in a globular cluster - Nova 1938 in M14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shara, Michael M.; Potter, Michael; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Hogg, Helen S.; Wehlau, Amelia

    1986-01-01

    U, B, V, R, and H-alpha CCD frames of the field of the nova which appeared in the globular cluster M14 in 1938 have been compared with the nova discovery images. On the basis of positional coincidence, brightness, and blue color, a candidate nova was identified and its right ascension and declination to within 1 arcsec each. Confirmation of the candidate and detailed study of the quiescent nova will probably require Hubble Space Telescope observations.