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Sample records for mean-square charge radii

  1. Changes in the mean square charge radii and electromagnetic moments of neutron-deficient Bi isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzakh, A. E.; Batist, L. Kh.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Molkanov, P. L.; Moroz, F. V.; Orlov, S. Yu.; Panteleev, V. N.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2015-10-01

    In-source laser spectroscopy experiments for neutron deficient bismuth isotopes at the 306.77 nm atomic transition were carried out at the IRIS (Investigation of Radioactive Isotopes on Synchrocyclotron) facility of Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI). New data on isotope shifts and hyperfine structure for 189-198, 211Bi isotopes and isomers were obtained. The changes in the mean-square charge radii and the magnetic moment values were deduced. Marked deviation from the nearly spherical behavior for ground states of bismuth isotopes at N < 109 is demonstrated, in contrast to the lead and thallium isotopic chains. The big isomer shift between I = 1/2 (intruder) and I = 9/2 (normal) states for odd Bi isotopes (A = 193, 195, 197) was found.

  2. Changes in the mean square charge radii and electromagnetic moments of neutron-deficient Bi isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Barzakh, A. E. Batist, L. Kh.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Molkanov, P. L.; Moroz, F. V.; Orlov, S. Yu.; Panteleev, V. N.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2015-10-15

    In-source laser spectroscopy experiments for neutron deficient bismuth isotopes at the 306.77 nm atomic transition were carried out at the IRIS (Investigation of Radioactive Isotopes on Synchrocyclotron) facility of Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI). New data on isotope shifts and hyperfine structure for {sup 189–198,} {sup 211}Bi isotopes and isomers were obtained. The changes in the mean-square charge radii and the magnetic moment values were deduced. Marked deviation from the nearly spherical behavior for ground states of bismuth isotopes at N < 109 is demonstrated, in contrast to the lead and thallium isotopic chains. The big isomer shift between I = 1/2 (intruder) and I = 9/2 (normal) states for odd Bi isotopes (A = 193, 195, 197) was found.

  3. In-gas-cell laser ionization spectroscopy in the vicinity of 100Sn: Magnetic moments and mean-square charge radii of N=50-54 Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, R.; Bree, N.; Cocolios, T. E.; Darby, I. G.; De Witte, H.; Dexters, W.; Diriken, J.; Elseviers, J.; Franchoo, S.; Huyse, M.; Kesteloot, N.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Pauwels, D.; Radulov, D.; Roger, T.; Savajols, H.; Van Duppen, P.; Venhart, M.

    2014-01-01

    In-gas-cell laser ionization spectroscopy studies on the neutron deficient 97-101Ag isotopes have been performed with the LISOL setup. Magnetic dipole moments and mean-square charge radii have been determined for the first time with the exception of 101Ag, which was found in good agreement with previous experimental values. The reported results allow tentatively assigning the spin of 97,99Ag to 9/2 and confirming the presence of an isomeric state in these two isotopes, whose collapsed hyperfine structure suggests a spin of 1/2 >. The effect of the N=50 shell closure is not only manifested in the magnetic moments but also in the evolution of the mean-square charge radii of the isotopes investigated, in accordance with the spherical droplet model predictions.

  4. Nuclear Charge Radii Systematics

    SciTech Connect

    Marinova, Krassimira

    2015-09-15

    This paper is a brief overview of the existing systematics on nuclear mean square charge radii, obtained by a combined analysis of data from different types of experiment. The various techniques yielding data on nuclear charge radii are summarized. Their specific feature complexities and the accuracy and precision of the obtained information are also discussed.

  5. Electromagnetic charge radii of pseudoscalar mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, B.; Lahiri, A.; Niyogi, S.

    1989-06-01

    The charge radii of the pseudoscalar mesons ..pi../sup +/, /ital K//sup +/, and /ital K//sup 0/ are analyzed in an extended vector-dominance framework and the results are compared with those which follow the nonrelativistic quark model and constituent-quark triangle loop approach. Further, estimates of the root-mean-square relative coordinate parameter are obtained which are in conformity with normal theoretical expectations.

  6. Charge radii in macroscopic-microscopic mass models of reflection asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Iimura, H.; Buchinger, F.

    2008-12-15

    We show that the charge radii of reflection-asymmetric nuclei calculated in the frame of the finite-range droplet model are in better agreement with measured charge radii when reflection asymmetry is taken into account. However discrepancies between experimental and calculated changes in mean square charge radii still remain for some isotopic chains. These discrepancies cannot be removed by empirically including dynamic contributions to the quadrupole deformation.

  7. Nuclear moments and charge radii of neutron-deficient francium isotopes and isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, A.; Buchinger, F.; Cheal, B.; Crawford, J. E.; Dilling, J.; Kortelainen, M.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Leary, A.; Levy, C. D. P.; Mooshammer, F.; Ojeda, M. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Procter, T. J.; Tamimi, W. Al

    2015-04-01

    Collinear laser fluorescence spectroscopy has been performed on the ground and isomeric states of Fr,206204 in order to determine their spins, nuclear moments, and changes in mean-squared charge radii. A new experimental technique has been developed as part of this work which much enhances the data collection rate while maintaining the high resolution. This has permitted the extension of this study to the two isomeric states in each nucleus. The investigation of nuclear g factors and mean-squared charge radii indicates that the neutron-deficient Fr isotopes lie in a transitional region from spherical towards more collective structures.

  8. Charge radii of neon isotopes across the sd neutron shell

    SciTech Connect

    Marinova, K.; Geithner, W.; Kappertz, S.; Kloos, S.; Kotrotsios, G.; Neugart, R.; Wilbert, S.; Kowalska, M.; Keim, M.; Blaum, K.; Lievens, P.; Simon, H.

    2011-09-15

    We report on the changes in mean square charge radii of unstable neon nuclei relative to the stable {sup 20}Ne, based on the measurement of optical isotope shifts. The studies were carried out using collinear laser spectroscopy on a fast beam of neutral neon atoms. High sensitivity on short-lived isotopes was achieved thanks to nonoptical detection based on optical pumping and state-selective collisional ionization, which was complemented by an accurate determination of the beam kinetic energy. The new results provide information on the structural changes in the sequence of neon isotopes all across the neutron sd shell, ranging from the proton drip line nucleus and halo candidate {sup 17}Ne up to the neutron-rich {sup 28}Ne in the vicinity of the ''island of inversion.'' Within this range the charge radius is smallest for {sup 24}Ne with N=14 corresponding to the closure of the neutron d{sub 5/2} shell, while it increases toward both neutron shell closures, N=8 and N=20. The general trend of the charge radii correlates well with the deformation effects which are known to be large for several neon isotopes. In the neutron-deficient isotopes, structural changes arise from the onset of proton-halo formation for {sup 17}Ne, shell closure in {sup 18}Ne, and clustering effects in {sup 20,21}Ne. On the neutron-rich side the transition to the island of inversion plays an important role, with the radii in the upper part of the sd shell confirming the weakening of the N=20 magic number. The results add new information to the radii systematics of light nuclei where data are scarce because of the small contribution of nuclear-size effects to the isotope shifts which are dominated by the finite-mass effect.

  9. Nuclear charge radii of the tin isotopes from muonic atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Piller, C.; Gugler, C.; Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Schaller, L.A.; Schellenberg, L.; Schneuwly, H. ); Fricke, G.; Hennemann, T.; Herberz, J. )

    1990-07-01

    The muonic atom 2{ital p}{sub 1/2}-1{ital s}{sub 1/2} and 2{ital p}{sub 3/2}-1{ital s}{sub 1/2} transition energies were measured with an experimental accuracy of better than 20 ppm for the isotope chain {sup 112,114,116,117,118,119,120,122,124}Sn. Precise values for the Barrett equivalent nuclear radii {ital R}{sub {ital k}{alpha}} and their differences as well as root-mean-square radii were deduced. The {Delta}{ital N}=2 isotope shifts between the even Sn isotopes show a subshell effect at the neutron number {ital N}=64. Otherwise, there is a nearly linear decrease with increasing {ital N}, in accordance with the general systematics of nuclear charge radii. Our muonic atom results are in a good agreement with recent optical data, including odd-even staggering. Hartree-Fock calculations reproduce the general trend but not the subshell effect. Regarding the nuclear polarization corrections, the problem in the 2{ital p} splitting found earlier in {mu}{sup {minus}}-Zr and {mu}{sup {minus}}-Pb seems also to persist in {mu}{sup {minus}}-Sn.

  10. Charge radii of neutron-deficient 36K and 37K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, D. M.; Minamisono, K.; Asberry, H. B.; Bollen, G.; Brown, B. A.; Cooper, K.; Isherwood, B.; Mantica, P. F.; Miller, A.; Morrissey, D. J.; Ringle, R.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Ryder, C. A.; Smith, A.; Strum, R.; Sumithrarachchi, C.

    2015-07-01

    Background: The systematic trend in mean-square charge radii as a function of proton or neutron number exhibits a discontinuity at the nucleon-shell closures. While the established N =28 shell closure is evident in the charge radii of the isotopic chains of K through Mn, a similar signature of the N =20 shell closure is absent in the Ca region. Purpose: The isotope shift between neutron-deficient 36K and 37K was determined to investigate the change of the mean-square charge radii across N =20 in the K isotopic chain. Methods: The D 1 atomic hyperfine spectra of 36K and 37K were measured using an optical pumping and subsequent β -decay asymmetry detection technique. Atomic rate equations were solved to fit the resonant line shape. The result was compared to Skyrme energy-density functional and shell-model calculations. Results: The isotope shift was obtained as δ ν37 ,36=-139 (4 ) (3 ) MHz. Using a re-evaluated isotope shift, δ ν39 ,37=-264 (2 ) (3 ) MHz, the isotope shift relative to 39K was determined to be δ ν39 ,36=-403 (5 ) (4 ) MHz. The differential mean-square charge radius was then deduced as δ 39 ,36=-0.16 (5 ) (8 ) fm2 . The Skyrme energy-density functional and shell-model calculations overpredict the experimental values below N =20 and underpredict them above N =20 , and their agreement is marginal. Conclusions: The absence of the shell-closure signature at N =20 in the K isotopic chain is understood as a balance between the monopole and the quadrupole proton-core polarizations below and above N =20 , respectively.

  11. Cu charge radii reveal a weak sub-shell effect at N =40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bissell, M. L.; Carette, T.; Flanagan, K. T.; Vingerhoets, P.; Billowes, J.; Blaum, K.; Cheal, B.; Fritzsche, S.; Godefroid, M.; Kowalska, M.; Krämer, J.; Neugart, R.; Neyens, G.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Yordanov, D. T.

    2016-06-01

    Collinear laser spectroscopy on Cu-7558 isotopes was performed at the CERN-ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility. In this paper we report on the isotope shifts obtained from these measurements. State-of-the-art atomic physics calculations have been undertaken in order to determine the changes in mean-square charge radii δ A ,A' from the observed isotope shifts. A local minimum is observed in these radii differences at N =40 , providing evidence for a weak N =40 sub-shell effect. However, comparison of δ A ,A' with a droplet model prediction including static deformation deduced from the spectroscopic quadrupole moments, points to the persistence of correlations at N =40 .

  12. Charge radii in macroscopic-microscopic mass models

    SciTech Connect

    Buchinger, F.; Pearson, J.M.

    2005-11-01

    We show that the FRLDM model currently being used in macroscopic-microscopic fission-barrier calculations gives a rather poor agreement with measured charge radii. Considerable improvement in this respect can be made by adjusting the diffuseness parameter b.

  13. Charge radii of odd-A191-211Po isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliverstov, M. D.; Cocolios, T. E.; Dexters, W.; Andreyev, A. N.; Antalic, S.; Barzakh, A. E.; Bastin, B.; Büscher, J.; Darby, I. G.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedoseyev, V. N.; Flanagan, K. T.; Franchoo, S.; Fritzsche, S.; Huber, G.; Huyse, M.; Keupers, M.; Köster, U.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Marsh, B. A.; Molkanov, P. L.; Page, R. D.; Sjødin, A. M.; Stefan, I.; Van de Walle, J.; Van Duppen, P.; Venhart, M.; Zemlyanoy, S. G.

    2013-02-01

    Isotope shifts have been measured for the odd-A polonium isotopes 191-211Po and changes in the nuclear mean square charge radii δ have been deduced. The measurements were performed at CERN-ISOLDE using the in-source resonance-ionization spectroscopy technique. The combined analysis of these data and our recent results for even-A polonium isotopes indicates an onset of deformation already at 197,198Po, when going away from stability. This is significantly earlier than was suggested by previous theoretical and experimental studies of the polonium isotopes. Moreover and in contrast to the mercury isotopes, where a strong odd-even staggering of the charge radii of the ground states was observed by approaching the neutron mid-shell at N = 104, no such effect is present in polonium down to 191Po. Consequently the charge radii of both isomeric and ground states of the odd-A polonium isotopes follow the same trend as the even-A isotopes.

  14. Nuclear charge radii of the Te isotopes from muonic atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Shera, E.B.; Hoehn, M.V.; Fricke, G.; Mallot, G.

    1989-01-01

    The muonic atom energies of the 2p-1s and the 3d-2p transitions were measured with a statistical accuracy of better than +- 70 and +- 40 eV, respectively, for /sup 123,124,125,126,128,130/Te. The values for the Barrett equivalent nuclear radii R/sub k//sub ,//sub ..cap alpha../ and for the root-mean-square radii and their differences were calculated first from muonic data alone and second with the addition of published optical data. The latter data provided the radii of /sup 120/Te and /sup 122/Te isotopes, which were not measured by muonic x rays. A combined analysis of the muonic atom and optical isotope shift data yielded high-precision values of the differences in radii ..delta..R/sub k//sub ,//sub ..cap alpha../ (error < +- 0.5 am) and ..delta../sup 1/2/ (error < +- 0.9 am) between the neighboring isotopes. The optical constants for the Te line lambda = 4049 A were determined (including contributions of higher radial moments) to be F = (509 +- 120) mK/fm/sup 2/ and M = -(104 +- 63) x 10/sup 3/ mK. Systematic behavior of the radius differences in neighboring isotopes and isotones of Ba, Xe, Te, and Sn, together with odd-even staggering of the Te isotopes, are discussed in this paper. The ..delta..N = 2 Te isotope shifts between even-A nuclei decrease nearly linearly with increasing N, which can be explained by a successive decreasing deformation in accordance with the observed systematics.

  15. The 3H-3He Charge Radii Difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, L. S.; Arrington, J. R.; Higinbotham, D. W.

    2016-03-01

    The upcoming E12-14-009 [1] experiment at Jefferson Lab will determine the ratio of the electric form factors for the A=3 mirror nuclei 3He and 3H. The measurement will use a 1.1 GeV electron beam, a special collimator plate to allow for simultaneous optics measurements, and the low-activity tritium target being prepared for Jefferson Lab. By observing the dependence of the form factor ratio as a function of Q2 over 0.05-0.09 GeV2, the dependence of the radii extraction on the shape of the form factors is minimized. As a result, we anticipate the uncertainty of the extracted charge radii difference to be 0.03 fm, a reduction of 70% from the current measurement. Using precise measurements of the 3He charge radius from isotopic shift or μHe measurements [2-4], we can deduce the absolute 3H charge radius. The results will provide a direct comparison to recent calculations of the charge radii.

  16. Nuclear charge radii as signature for structural changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, I.; Marinova, K.

    2016-06-01

    The correlation of nuclear charge radii with other ground and excited state nuclear observables is considered. An empirical approach is used to deal with a large amount of experimental information, which is properly handled to obtain interesting correlations among different observables as one moves away from the line of stability. Especially the appearance of new magic numbers and/or disappearance of traditional ones as well as the onset of deformation in the region of light nuclei (A < 30) are discussed.

  17. Unexpectedly large charge radii of neutron-rich calcium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Bissell, M. L.; Blaum, K.; Ekström, A.; Frömmgen, N.; Hagen, G.; Hammen, M.; Hebeler, K.; Holt, J. D.; Jansen, G. R.; Kowalska, M.; Kreim, K.; Nazarewicz, W.; Neugart, R.; Neyens, G.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Papenbrock, T.; Papuga, J.; Schwenk, A.; Simonis, J.; Wendt, K. A.; Yordanov, D. T.

    2016-06-01

    Despite being a complex many-body system, the atomic nucleus exhibits simple structures for certain `magic’ numbers of protons and neutrons. The calcium chain in particular is both unique and puzzling: evidence of doubly magic features are known in 40,48Ca, and recently suggested in two radioactive isotopes, 52,54Ca. Although many properties of experimentally known calcium isotopes have been successfully described by nuclear theory, it is still a challenge to predict the evolution of their charge radii. Here we present the first measurements of the charge radii of 49,51,52Ca, obtained from laser spectroscopy experiments at ISOLDE, CERN. The experimental results are complemented by state-of-the-art theoretical calculations. The large and unexpected increase of the size of the neutron-rich calcium isotopes beyond N = 28 challenges the doubly magic nature of 52Ca and opens new intriguing questions on the evolution of nuclear sizes away from stability, which are of importance for our understanding of neutron-rich atomic nuclei.

  18. Tentative study of nuclear charge radii for neutron-deficient nuclei around the Z = 82 shell from experimental α decay data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yibin; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2016-01-01

    We tentatively investigate the root-mean-square (rms) nuclear charge radii of odd-A Po and Pb isotopes plus Tl isotopes, particularly concerning these difficultly-detected nuclei along with short lifetimes, via various data on α decay. Within the density-dependent cluster model, the density distributions of studied daughter nuclei are determined by exactly reproducing the corresponding experimental α decay half-lives, which leads the final results of nuclear charge radii. In addition, our recently proposed formula deducing the charge radii is extended to this study for comparison. Whether it concerns the ground or isomeric state of target nuclei, the extracted nuclear charge radii are found to be in good agreement with the measured values. Sequential predictions on the rms charge radii are subsequently made for these neutron-deficient nuclei and especially for the rarely detected Bi isotopic chain, which are expected to be useful for future measurements. Moreover, the variety of α-preformation factors is analyzed in the scheme of valence nucleon number to pursue the further improvement of the model. This may be considered as an effective effort to obtain the charge radii of ground and even low-lying excited states for exotic nuclei near the proton-dripline.

  19. Isotope-shift measurements of stable and short-lived lithium isotopes for nuclear-charge-radii determination

    SciTech Connect

    Noertershaeuser, W.; Sanchez, R.; Ewald, G.; Dax, A.; Goette, S.; Kluge, H.-J.; Kuehl, Th.; Wojtaszek, A.; Behr, J.; Bricault, P.; Dilling, J.; Dombsky, M.; Lassen, J.; Levy, C. D. P.; Pearson, M.; Bushaw, B. A.; Drake, G. W. F.; Pachucki, K.; Puchalski, M.; Yan, Z.-C.

    2011-01-15

    Changes in the mean square nuclear charge radii along the lithium isotopic chain were determined using a combination of precise isotope shift measurements and theoretical atomic structure calculations. Nuclear charge radii of light elements are of high interest due to the appearance of the nuclear halo phenomenon in this region of the nuclear chart. During the past years we have developed a laser spectroscopic approach to determine the charge radii of lithium isotopes which combines high sensitivity, speed, and accuracy to measure the extremely small field shift of an 8-ms-lifetime isotope with production rates on the order of only 10 000 atoms/s. The method was applied to all bound isotopes of lithium including the two-neutron halo isotope {sup 11}Li at the on-line isotope separators at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany, and at TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada. We describe the laser spectroscopic method in detail, present updated and improved values from theory and experiment, and discuss the results.

  20. Scaling of charge-changing interaction cross sections and point-proton radii of neutron-rich carbon isotopes.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, T; Hachiuma, I; Kitagawa, A; Namihira, K; Sato, S; Suzuki, T; Tanihata, I; Fukuda, M

    2011-07-15

    Charge-changing cross sections σ(cc) of stable and unstable nuclei ((9-11)Be, (14-16)C, and (16-18)O) on a carbon target were investigated at 300  MeV/nucleon. A phenomenological analysis based on the Glauber theory indicates an approximate, but universal, scaling of σ(cc) over a wide range of A/Z. This allows the determination of the density distributions of protons tightly bound in the nuclei. An application to (16)C, which is considered to be an anomalously deformed nucleus, indicates a systematic evolution of proton root-mean-square radii and has revealed for the first time a neutron skin effect in carbon isotopes. Being complementary to isotope-shift and electron-scattering experiments, the present method can open up a new approach to explore the structure of exotic nuclei. PMID:21838353

  1. Charge radii in macroscopic-microscopic mass models of axial asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Iimura, H.; Buchinger, F.

    2007-11-15

    We show that the charge radii of axially asymmetric nuclei calculated in the frame of the finite-range droplet model are in better agreement with measured charge radii when axial asymmetry is taken into account. This improvement is mainly the result of a new set of ground-state quadrupole deformations {beta}{sub 2}, generated when masses are calculated including axial asymmetry, and to a much lesser degree due to the inclusion of the axial asymmetry in the calculation of the charge radii itself.

  2. Development of Experiments to Measure D and 4He Charge Radii with Elastic Electron Scattering Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saudi, Sheikh

    Charge radii are one of the important physical characteristics to understand the electromagnetic structure of nuclei. For light nuclei, they are playing a more critical role to better understand the nucleon-nucleon interaction and test the existing models for bound states. Recent measurements of proton radius, done with muonic hydrogen spectroscopy, showed about 7 standard deviation lower than previous experimental results. This discrepancy triggered the so called "Proton Radius Puzzle" in physics world. Several groups are preparing to perform new experiments to extract the proton radius with better precision and model independent methods. It is equally important to perform new experiments for light nuclei, like deuteron (D) and helium-4 (4He), to verify the existing results for their radii. In this thesis work, we have developed an experimental method based on coincidence detection of the scattered electrons and recoiled light nuclei to measure the charge radii of deuteron and helium-4 with high accuracy.

  3. Charge radii and nuclear moments of neutron-deficient potassium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamisono, K.; Barquest, B. R.; Bollen, G.; Hughes, M.; Strum, R.; Tarazona, D.; Asberry, H. B.; Cooper, K.; Hammerton, K.; Klose, A.; Mantica, P. F.; Morrissey, D. J.; Geppert, Ch.; Harris, J.; Ringle, R.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Rossi, D. M.; Ryder, C. A.; Smith, A.; Schwarz, S.; Sumithrarachchi, C.

    2014-09-01

    The monotonic change of charge radii of K isotopes across N = 20 suggests a reduction of the shell gap. A systematic study of the charge radii and ground state magnetic and quadrupole moments of neutron-deficient 35-37K isotopes is underway at the BEam COoling and LAser spectroscopy (BECOLA) facility at NSCL/MSU to investigate the anomalous trend in charge radii. The K isotopes were produced by fragmentation of a 40Ca beam, thermalized in a linear gas cell, extracted at an energy of 30 keV, and transported to BECOLA. The K ion beam was cooled and bunched, and neutralized in a Na vapor cell. Laser-induced fluorescence was detected as a function of the Doppler-tuned laser frequency and time relative to the release of the beam bunch. The beta-NMR technique was used to determine ground-state nuclear moments, where hyperfine splittings are too small to resolve using collinear laser spectroscopy. The monotonic change of charge radii of K isotopes across N = 20 suggests a reduction of the shell gap. A systematic study of the charge radii and ground state magnetic and quadrupole moments of neutron-deficient 35-37K isotopes is underway at the BEam COoling and LAser spectroscopy (BECOLA) facility at NSCL/MSU to investigate the anomalous trend in charge radii. The K isotopes were produced by fragmentation of a 40Ca beam, thermalized in a linear gas cell, extracted at an energy of 30 keV, and transported to BECOLA. The K ion beam was cooled and bunched, and neutralized in a Na vapor cell. Laser-induced fluorescence was detected as a function of the Doppler-tuned laser frequency and time relative to the release of the beam bunch. The beta-NMR technique was used to determine ground-state nuclear moments, where hyperfine splittings are too small to resolve using collinear laser spectroscopy. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant No. PHY-11-02511.

  4. An implicit solvent model for SCC-DFTB with Charge-Dependent Radii

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Guanhua; Zhu, Xiao; Cui, Qiang

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by the need of rapidly exploring the potential energy surface of chemical reactions that involve highly charged species, we have developed an implicit solvent model for the approximate density functional theory, SCC-DFTB. The solvation free energy is calculated using the popular model that employs Poisson-Boltzmann for electrostatics and a surface-area term for non-polar contributions. To balance the treatment of species with different charge distributions, we make the atomic radii that define the dielectric boundary and solute cavity depend on the solute charge distribution. Specifically, the atomic radii are assumed to be linearly dependent on the Mulliken charges and solved self-consistently together with the solute electronic structure. Benchmark calculations indicate that the model leads to solvation free energies of comparable accuracy to the SM6 model (especially for ions), which requires much more expensive DFT calculations. With analytical first derivatives and favorable computational speed, the SCC-DFTB based solvation model can be effectively used, in conjunction with high-level QM calculations, to explore the mechanism of solution reactions. This is illustrated with a brief analysis of the hydrolysis of mono-methyl mono-phosphate ester (MMP) and tri-methyl mono-phosphate ester (TMP). Possible future improvements are also briefly discussed. PMID:20711513

  5. Systematics of nuclear charge radii of the stable molybdenum isotopes from muonic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellenberg, L.; Robert-Tissot, B.; Käser, K.; Schaller, L. A.; Schneuwly, H.; Fricke, G.; Glückert, S.; Mallot, G.; Shera, E. B.

    1980-01-01

    The results of precise measurements of the energies of the 2 p{3}/{2}-1 s{1}/{2}and 2 p{1}/{2}-1 s{1}/{2} muonic X-ray transitions of 92Mo, 94Mo, 95Mo, 96Mo, 97Mo, 98Mo and 100Mo are reported. The data were analyzed in terms of the Barrett moments < rke - αr> of the nuclear charge distributions from which the equivalent nuclear radii Rk and the differences ΔRk between neighboring isotopes were computed. Systematic shell effects have been observed at the neutron numbers N = 50 and N = 56.

  6. Description of Charge Radii in Halo Nuclei within the Gamow Shell Model

    SciTech Connect

    Papadimitriou, G.; Michel, N.; Nazarewicz, W.; Ploszajczak, M.; Rotureau, J.

    2009-05-07

    The charge radius of the halo nucleus {sup 6}He is studied within the framework of the Gamow Shell Model (GSM). The charge radius carries information about the size of the neutron halo, the recoil of the core, and the effective interaction between valence nucleons. The motivation for this work stems from the precise measurements of charge radii in {sup 6,8}He, {sup 11}Li, and {sup 11}Be. For these weakly bound nuclei, the proper treatment of the particle continuum turns out to be crucial. The GSM is a tool that can properly account for the coupling of the continuum space (of both resonant and scattering character) with that of the bound states. We use a GSM Hamiltonian written explicitly in intrinsic coordinates. This guarantees that the core recoil effect is properly described and the spurious center-of-mass motion is removed. According to our calculations for {sup 6}He, the charge radius is very sensitive to (i) the halo extent given by the two-neutron separation energy of the system, and (ii) the p{sub 3/2} occupation. In particular, we show that the two-body wave function of halo neutrons in {sup 6}He should contain {approx}91% of a p{sub 3/2} partial wave to reproduce the charge radius. This observation will help us to construct a GSM effective interaction on the interface of p and sd shells that is needed to describe other halo systems.

  7. Nuclear charge and neutron radii and nuclear matter: Trend analysis in Skyrme density-functional-theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, P.-G.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Radii of charge and neutron distributions are fundamental nuclear properties. They depend on both nuclear interaction parameters related to the equation of state of infinite nuclear matter and on quantal shell effects, which are strongly impacted by the presence of nuclear surface. Purpose: In this work, by studying the correlation of charge and neutron radii, and neutron skin, with nuclear matter parameters, we assess different mechanisms that drive nuclear sizes. Method: We apply nuclear density functional theory using a family of Skyrme functionals obtained by means of optimization protocols, which do not include any radius information. By performing the Monte Carlo sampling of reasonable functionals around the optimal parametrization, we scan all correlations between nuclear matter properties and observables characterizing charge and neutron distributions of spherical closed-shell nuclei 48Ca,208Pb, and 298Fl. Results: By considering the influence of various nuclear matter properties on charge and neutron radii in a multidimensional parameter space of Skyrme functionals, we demonstrate the existence of two strong relationships: (i) between the nuclear charge radii and the saturation density of symmetric nuclear matter ρ0, and (ii) between the neutron skins and the slope of the symmetry energy L . The impact of other nuclear matter properties on nuclear radii is weak or nonexistent. For functionals optimized to experimental binding energies only, proton and neutron radii are found to be weakly correlated due to canceling trends from different nuclear matter characteristics. Conclusion: The existence of only two strong relations connecting nuclear radii with nuclear matter properties has important consequences. First, by requiring that the nuclear functional reproduces the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter practically fixes the charge (or proton) radii, and vice versa. This explains the recent results of ab initio calculations

  8. Few-Nucleon Charge Radii and a Precision Isotope Shift Measurement in Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan Rezaeian, Nima; Shiner, David

    2015-10-01

    Recent improvements in atomic theory and experiment provide a valuable method to precisely determine few nucleon charge radii, complementing the more direct scattering approaches, and providing sensitive tests of few-body nuclear theory. Some puzzles with respect to this method exist, particularly in the muonic and electronic measurements of the proton radius, known as the proton puzzle. Perhaps this puzzle will also exist in nuclear size measurements in helium. Muonic helium measurements are ongoing while our new electronic results will be discussed here. We measured precisely the isotope shift of the 23S - 23P transitions in 3He and 4He. The result is almost an order of magnitude more accurate than previous measured values. To achieve this accuracy, we implemented various experimental techniques. We used a tunable laser frequency discriminator and electro-optic modulation technique to precisely control the frequency and intensity. We select and stabilize the intensity of the required sideband and eliminate unused sidebands. The technique uses a MEMS fiber switch (ts = 10 ms) and several temperature stabilized narrow band (3 GHz) fiber gratings. A beam with both species of helium is achieved using a custom fiber laser for simultaneous optical pumping. A servo-controlled retro-reflected laser beam eliminates Doppler effects. Careful detection design and software are essential for unbiased data collection. Our new results will be compared to previous measurements.

  9. Few-Nucleon Charge Radii and a Precision Isotope Shift Measurement in Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan Rezaeian, Nima; Shiner, David

    2015-05-01

    Precision atomic theory and experiment provide a valuable method to determine few nucleon charge radii, complementing the more direct scattering approaches, and providing sensitive tests of few-body nuclear theory. Some puzzles with respect to this method exist, particularly in the muonic and electronic measurements of the proton radius, and as well with respect to measurements of nuclear size in helium. We perform precision measurements of the isotope shift of the 23S -23P transitions in 3He and 4He. A tunable laser frequency discriminator and electro-optic modulation technique give precise frequency and intensity control. We select (ts <50 ms) and stabilize the intensity of the required sideband and eliminate the unused sidebands (<= 10¬5) . The technique uses a MEMS fiber switch (ts = 10 ms) and several temperature stabilized narrow band (3 GHz) fiber gratings. A fiber based optical circulator and amplifier provide the desired isolation and net gain for the selected frequency. A beam with both species of helium is achieved using a custom fiber laser for simultaneous optical pumping. A servo-controlled retro-reflected laser beam eliminates Doppler effects. Careful detection design and software control allows for unbiased data collection. Current results will be discussed. This work is supported by NSF PHY-1068868 and PHY-1404498.

  10. Dirac form factors and electric charge radii of baryons in the combined chiral and 1 /Nc expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Mendieta, Rubén; Rivera-Ruiz, Mayra Alejandra

    2015-11-01

    The baryon Dirac form factor is computed at one-loop order in large-Nc baryon chiral perturbation theory, where Nc is the number of color charges. Loop graphs with octet and decuplet intermediate states are systematically incorporated into the analysis and the effects of the decuplet-octet mass difference are accounted for. There are large-Nc cancellations between different one-loop graphs as a consequence of the large-Nc spin-flavor symmetry of QCD baryons. As a byproduct, the mean-square charge radius is also computed through a detailed numerical analysis. The predictions of large-Nc baryon chiral perturbation theory are in very good agreement both with the expectations from the 1 /Nc expansion and with the experimental data.

  11. Masses and Charge Radii of {sup 17-22}Ne and the Two-Proton-Halo Candidate {sup 17}Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Geithner, W.; Kappertz, S.; Keim, M.; Neugart, R.; Wilbert, S.; Neff, T.; Feldmeier, H.; Herfurth, F.; Yazidjian, C.; Audi, G.; Guenaut, C.; Lunney, D.; Blaum, K.; George, S.; Delahaye, P.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kowalska, M.; Herlert, A.; Kluge, H.-J.; Lievens, P.

    2008-12-19

    High-precision mass and charge radius measurements on {sup 17-22}Ne, including the proton-halo candidate {sup 17}Ne, have been performed with Penning trap mass spectrometry and collinear laser spectroscopy. The {sup 17}Ne mass uncertainty is improved by factor 50, and the charge radii of {sup 17-19}Ne are determined for the first time. The fermionic molecular dynamics model explains the pronounced changes in the ground-state structure. It attributes the large charge radius of {sup 17}Ne to an extended proton configuration with an s{sup 2} component of about 40%. In {sup 18}Ne the smaller radius is due to a significantly smaller s{sup 2} component. The radii increase again for {sup 19-22}Ne due to cluster admixtures.

  12. Charge Radii and Electromagnetic Moments of Li and Be Isotopes from the Ab Initio No-Core Shell Model

    SciTech Connect

    Forssen, C; Caurier, E; Navratil, P

    2008-12-23

    Recently, charge radii and ground-state electromagnetic moments of Li and Be isotopes were measured precisely. We have performed large-scale ab initio no-core shell model calculations for these isotopes using high-precision nucleon-nucleon potentials. Our computed charge radii, quadrupole and magnetic-dipole moments are in a good agreement with the measurements with the exception of the {sup 11}Li charge radius. The overall trends of all observables are well reproduced. The magnetic moments are in particular well described. Also, we are able to reproduce the small magnitude of the {sup 6}Li quadrupole moment and with the CD-Bonn NN potential also its correct sign.

  13. Charge radii and electromagnetic moments of Li and Be isotopes from the ab initio no-core shell model

    SciTech Connect

    Forssen, C.; Caurier, E.; Navratil, P.

    2009-02-15

    Recently, charge radii and ground-state electromagnetic moments of Li and Be isotopes were measured precisely. We have performed large-scale ab initio no-core shell model calculations for these isotopes using high-precision nucleon-nucleon potentials. The isotopic trends of our computed charge radii and quadrupole and magnetic-dipole moments are in good agreement with experimental results with the exception of the {sup 11}Li charge radius. The magnetic moments are in particular well described, whereas the absolute magnitudes of the quadrupole moments are about 10% too small. The small magnitude of the {sup 6}Li quadrupole moment is reproduced, and with the CD-Bonn NN potential, also its correct sign.

  14. Application of Least Mean Square Algorithms to Spacecraft Vibration Compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard , Stanley E.; Nagchaudhuri, Abhijit

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the Least Mean Square (LMS) algorithm in tandem with the Filtered-X Least Mean Square algorithm for controlling a science instrument's line-of-sight pointing. Pointing error is caused by a periodic disturbance and spacecraft vibration. A least mean square algorithm is used on-orbit to produce the transfer function between the instrument's servo-mechanism and error sensor. The result is a set of adaptive transversal filter weights tuned to the transfer function. The Filtered-X LMS algorithm, which is an extension of the LMS, tunes a set of transversal filter weights to the transfer function between the disturbance source and the servo-mechanism's actuation signal. The servo-mechanism's resulting actuation counters the disturbance response and thus maintains accurate science instrumental pointing. A simulation model of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite is used to demonstrate the algorithms.

  15. Determination of the root-mean-square radius of the deuteron from present-day experimental data on neutron-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Babenko, V. A.; Petrov, N. M.

    2008-10-15

    The correlation between the root-mean-square matter radius of the deuteron, r{sub m}, and its effective radius, {rho}, is investigated. A parabolic relationship between these two quantities makes it possible to determine the root-mean-square radius r{sub m} to within 0.01% if the effective radius {rho} is known. The matter (r{sub m}), structural (r{sub d}), and charge (r{sub ch}) radii of the deuteron are found with the aid of modern experimental results for phase shifts from the SAID nucleon-nucleon database, and their values are fully consistent with their counterparts deduced by using the experimental value of the effective deuteron radius due to Borbely and his coauthors. The charge-radius value of 2.124(6) fm, which was obtained with the aid of the SAID nucleon-nucleon database, and the charge-radius value of 2.126(12) fm, which was obtained with the aid of the experimental value of the effective radius {rho}, are in very good agreement with the present-day chargeradius value of 2.128(11) fm, which was deduced by Sick and Trautmann by processing world-average experimental data on elastic electron scattering by deuterons with allowance for Coulomb distortions.

  16. Proton radii of Be, B, and C isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko

    2015-01-01

    I investigate the neutron number (N ) dependence of root-mean-square radii of point proton distribution (proton radii) of Be, B, and C isotopes with the theoretical method of variation after spin-parity projection in the framework of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). The proton radii in Be and B isotopes changes rapidly as N increases, reflecting the cluster structure change along the isotope chains, whereas those in C isotopes show a weak N dependence because of the stable proton structure in nuclei with Z =6 . In neutron-rich Be and B isotopes, the proton radii are remarkably increased by the enhancement of the two-center cluster structure in the prolately deformed neutron structure. I compare the N dependence of the calculated proton radii with the experimental ones reduced from the charge radii determined by isotope shift and those deduced from the charge changing interaction cross section. It is found that the N dependence of proton radii can be a probe to clarify enhancement and weakening of cluster structures.

  17. Some Results on Mean Square Error for Factor Score Prediction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krijnen, Wim P.

    2006-01-01

    For the confirmatory factor model a series of inequalities is given with respect to the mean square error (MSE) of three main factor score predictors. The eigenvalues of these MSE matrices are a monotonic function of the eigenvalues of the matrix gamma[subscript rho] = theta[superscript 1/2] lambda[subscript rho] 'psi[subscript rho] [superscript…

  18. Least-mean-square spatial filter for IR sensors.

    PubMed

    Takken, E H; Friedman, D; Milton, A F; Nitzberg, R

    1979-12-15

    A new least-mean-square filter is defined for signal-detection problems. The technique is proposed for scanning IR surveillance systems operating in poorly characterized but primarily low-frequency clutter interference. Near-optimal detection of point-source targets is predicted both for continuous-time and sampled-data systems. PMID:20216783

  19. Minimax Mean-Squared Error Location Estimation Using TOA Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chih-Chang; Chang, Ann-Chen

    This letter deals with mobile location estimation based on a minimax mean-squared error (MSE) algorithm using time-of-arrival (TOA) measurements for mitigating the nonline-of-sight (NLOS) effects in cellular systems. Simulation results are provided for illustrating the minimax MSE estimator yields good performance than the other least squares and weighted least squares estimators under relatively low signal-to-noise ratio and moderately NLOS conditions.

  20. Application of linear mean-square estimation in ocean engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-ping; Chen, Bai-yu; Chen, Chao; Chen, Zheng-shou; Liu, Gui-lin

    2016-03-01

    The attempt to obtain long-term observed data around some sea areas we concern is usually very hard or even impossible in practical offshore and ocean engineering situations. In this paper, by means of linear mean-square estimation method, a new way to extend short-term data to long-term ones is developed. The long-term data about concerning sea areas can be constructed via a series of long-term data obtained from neighbor oceanographic stations, through relevance analysis of different data series. It is effective to cover the insufficiency of time series prediction method's overdependence upon the length of data series, as well as the limitation of variable numbers adopted in multiple linear regression model. The storm surge data collected from three oceanographic stations located in Shandong Peninsula are taken as examples to analyze the number-selection effect of reference oceanographic stations (adjacent to the concerning sea area) and the correlation coefficients between sea sites which are selected for reference and for engineering projects construction respectively. By comparing the N-year return-period values which are calculated from observed raw data and processed data which are extended from finite data series by means of the linear mean-square estimation method, one can draw a conclusion that this method can give considerably good estimation in practical ocean engineering, in spite of different extreme value distributions about raw and processed data.

  1. Digital image gathering and minimum mean-square error restoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Stephen K.; Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    1990-01-01

    Most digital image restoration algorithms are inherently incomplete because they are conditioned on a discrete-input, discrete-output model which only accounts for blurring during image gathering and additive noise. For those restoration applications where sampling and reconstruction are important, the restoration algorithm should be based on a more comprehensive end-to-end model which also accounts for the potentially important noiselike effects of aliasing and the low-pass filtering effects of interpolative reconstruction. It is demonstrated that although the mathematics of this more comprehensive model is more complex, the increase in complexity is not so great as to prevent a complete development and analysis of the associated minimum mean-square error (Wiener) restoration filter.

  2. An analysis of reverberation fluctuation by mean square derivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hang; Chen, Yongsen; Yang, Hu; Ni, Yunlu

    2010-07-01

    A method for evaluating the fluctuation of the reverberation envelope is proposed and examined through simulation and real data in this paper. This method is different from the coefficient of variation which is only a function of the first and second order moment of the reverberation statistical model. By using the standard variance of the mean square derivate (MSD) of the reverberation envelope, the paper shows that the reverberation fluctuation is a function of the bandwidth of the emitted signal, and that a large value of the square variance means little fluctuation of the reverberation envelope. Theoretical studies show that the standard variance is proportional to the bandwidth of the emitted signal, so we conclude that less time width or larger bandwidth of the transmitted signal produces less fluctuation. Simulation and real active sonar data processing are used to verify this conclusion.

  3. VR-SCOSMO: A smooth conductor-like screening model with charge-dependent radii for modeling chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuechler, Erich R.; Giese, Timothy J.; York, Darrin M.

    2016-04-01

    To better represent the solvation effects observed along reaction pathways, and of ionic species in general, a charge-dependent variable-radii smooth conductor-like screening model (VR-SCOSMO) is developed. This model is implemented and parameterized with a third order density-functional tight binding quantum model, DFTB3/3OB-OPhyd, a quantum method which was developed for organic and biological compounds, utilizing a specific parameterization for phosphate hydrolysis reactions. Unlike most other applications with the DFTB3/3OB model, an auxiliary set of atomic multipoles is constructed from the underlying DFTB3 density matrix which is used to interact the solute with the solvent response surface. The resulting method is variational, produces smooth energies, and has analytic gradients. As a baseline, a conventional SCOSMO model with fixed radii is also parameterized. The SCOSMO and VR-SCOSMO models shown have comparable accuracy in reproducing neutral-molecule absolute solvation free energies; however, the VR-SCOSMO model is shown to reduce the mean unsigned errors (MUEs) of ionic compounds by half (about 2-3 kcal/mol). The VR-SCOSMO model presents similar accuracy as a charge-dependent Poisson-Boltzmann model introduced by Hou et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 6, 2303 (2010)]. VR-SCOSMO is then used to examine the hydrolysis of trimethylphosphate and seven other phosphoryl transesterification reactions with different leaving groups. Two-dimensional energy landscapes are constructed for these reactions and calculated barriers are compared to those obtained from ab initio polarizable continuum calculations and experiment. Results of the VR-SCOSMO model are in good agreement in both cases, capturing the rate-limiting reaction barrier and the nature of the transition state.

  4. VR-SCOSMO: A smooth conductor-like screening model with charge-dependent radii for modeling chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Kuechler, Erich R; Giese, Timothy J; York, Darrin M

    2016-04-28

    To better represent the solvation effects observed along reaction pathways, and of ionic species in general, a charge-dependent variable-radii smooth conductor-like screening model (VR-SCOSMO) is developed. This model is implemented and parameterized with a third order density-functional tight binding quantum model, DFTB3/3OB-OPhyd, a quantum method which was developed for organic and biological compounds, utilizing a specific parameterization for phosphate hydrolysis reactions. Unlike most other applications with the DFTB3/3OB model, an auxiliary set of atomic multipoles is constructed from the underlying DFTB3 density matrix which is used to interact the solute with the solvent response surface. The resulting method is variational, produces smooth energies, and has analytic gradients. As a baseline, a conventional SCOSMO model with fixed radii is also parameterized. The SCOSMO and VR-SCOSMO models shown have comparable accuracy in reproducing neutral-molecule absolute solvation free energies; however, the VR-SCOSMO model is shown to reduce the mean unsigned errors (MUEs) of ionic compounds by half (about 2-3 kcal/mol). The VR-SCOSMO model presents similar accuracy as a charge-dependent Poisson-Boltzmann model introduced by Hou et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 6, 2303 (2010)]. VR-SCOSMO is then used to examine the hydrolysis of trimethylphosphate and seven other phosphoryl transesterification reactions with different leaving groups. Two-dimensional energy landscapes are constructed for these reactions and calculated barriers are compared to those obtained from ab initio polarizable continuum calculations and experiment. Results of the VR-SCOSMO model are in good agreement in both cases, capturing the rate-limiting reaction barrier and the nature of the transition state. PMID:27131539

  5. Significance of root-mean-square deviation in comparing three-dimensional structures of globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Maiorov, V N; Crippen, G M

    1994-01-14

    In the study of globular protein conformations, one customarily measures the similarity in three-dimensional structure by the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) of the C alpha atomic coordinates after optimal rigid body superposition. Even when the two protein structures each consist of a single chain having the same number of residues so that the matching of C alpha atoms is obvious, it is not clear how to interpret the RMSD. A very large value means they are dissimilar, and zero means they are identical in conformation, but at what intermediate values are they particularly similar or clearly dissimilar? While many workers in the field have chosen arbitrary cutoffs, and others have judged values of RMSD according to the observed distribution of RMSD for random structures, we propose a self-referential, non-statistical standard. We take two conformers to be intrinsically similar if their RMSD is smaller than that when one of them is mirror inverted. Because the structures considered here are not arbitrary configurations of point atoms, but are compact, globular, polypeptide chains, our definition is closely related to similarity in radius of gyration and overall chain folding patterns. Being strongly similar in our sense implies that the radii of gyration must be nearly identical, the root-mean-square deviation in interatomic distances is linearly related to RMSD, and the two chains must have the same general fold. Only when the RMSD exceeds this level can parts of the polypeptide chain undergo nontrivial rearrangements while remaining globular. This enables us to judge when a prediction of a protein's conformation is "correct except for minor perturbations", or when the ensemble of protein structures deduced from NMR experiments are "basically in mutual agreement". PMID:8289285

  6. Computation of the atomic radii through the conjoint action of the effective nuclear charge and the ionization energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Tanmoy; Gazi, Kamarujjaman; Ghosh, Dulal C.

    2010-08-01

    A new ansatz for computing the absolute radii (r) of the atoms based upon the conjoint action of two periodic properties namely, ionization energy (I) and effective nuclear charge (Zeff ) is proposed as r = a(1/I) + b(1/Zeff ) + c, where a, b and c are constants, determined by regression analysis. The ansatz is invoked to calculate sizes of atoms of 103 elements of the periodic table. In the absence of any benchmark to perform a validity test of any set of atomic size, reliance is upon the 'sine qua non' of a set of atomic size. The express periodicity of periods and groups exhibited by the computed size data, d and f block contraction and the manifest relativistic effect in the sizes of lanthanoids and actinoids, etc. speak volumes for the efficacy of the present method. Furthermore, size data have been linked to compute some physical descriptors of the real world, such as equilibrium internuclear distances of a good number of heteronuclear diatomic molecules as validity test. A comparative study of the theoretical vis-à-vis experimental equilibrium inter-nuclear distances reveals that there is close agreement between the theoretical prediction and experimental determination.

  7. Mean-square state and parameter estimation for stochastic linear systems with Gaussian and Poisson noises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basin, M.; Maldonado, J. J.; Zendejo, O.

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes new mean-square filter and parameter estimator design for linear stochastic systems with unknown parameters over linear observations, where unknown parameters are considered as combinations of Gaussian and Poisson white noises. The problem is treated by reducing the original problem to a filtering problem for an extended state vector that includes parameters as additional states, modelled as combinations of independent Gaussian and Poisson processes. The solution to this filtering problem is based on the mean-square filtering equations for incompletely polynomial states confused with Gaussian and Poisson noises over linear observations. The resulting mean-square filter serves as an identifier for the unknown parameters. Finally, a simulation example shows effectiveness of the proposed mean-square filter and parameter estimator.

  8. Energetic charged particle angular distributions near (r less than or equal to 2 Neptune radii) and over the pole of Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, B. H.; Kane, M.; Keath, E. P.; Cheng, A. F.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1990-01-01

    Energetic ion (greater than 28 keV) and electron (greater than 22 keV) pitch angle distributions very close to (r less than or equal to 2 Neptune radii) and over the north planetary pole of Neptune are presented using data from the Low Energy Charged Particle and magnetometer Experiments on the Voyager 2 spacecraft. The particle data are temporally structured and spectrally soft; a similarity with earth-like auroral signatures has previously been noted. However, the pitch angle distributions (showing trapped distributions at high magnetic latitudes) do not support an earth-like auroral interpretation, and alternative explanations for the temporal dynamics must be sought. Between r of about 1.6 and 2.0 Neptune radii and in the vicinity of the magnetic equator, the higher energy ion and electron pitch angle distributions (E greater than or equal to 80 keV) display dramatic 'bite-outs' at 90 deg. This bite-out feature could be caused by interactions with the newly discovered ring 1989N3R.

  9. Proton radii of {sup 4,6,8}He isotopes from high-precision nucleon-nucleon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Caurier, E.; Navratil, P.

    2006-02-15

    Recently, precision laser spectroscopy on {sup 6}He atoms determined accurately the isotope shift between {sup 4}He and {sup 6}He and, consequently, the charge radius of {sup 6}He. A similar experiment for {sup 8}He is under way. We have performed large-scale ab initio calculations for {sup 4,6,8}He isotopes using high-precision nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions within the no-core shell model (NCSM) approach. With the CD-Bonn 2000 NN potential we found point-proton root-mean-square (rms) radii of {sup 4}He and {sup 6}He 1.45(1) fm and 1.89(4), respectively, in agreement with experiment and predict the {sup 8}He point-proton rms radius to be 1.88(6) fm. At the same time, our calculations show that the recently developed nonlocal INOY NN potential gives binding energies closer to experiment, but underestimates the charge radii.

  10. On the Expectations of Mean Squares Based on Nonindependent Variates in Factorials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, John F.

    A study was made of the problem of representing the expectations of mean squares associated with analysis of variance sources of variation for experimental designs. These designs have a factorial structure over repeated measures or, for some other reason, have variates within a factorial design not all of which are mutually independent. A simple…

  11. The Relationship between Mean Square Differences and Standard Error of Measurement: Comment on Barchard (2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Tianshu; Yin, Yue

    2012-01-01

    In the discussion of mean square difference (MSD) and standard error of measurement (SEM), Barchard (2012) concluded that the MSD between 2 sets of test scores is greater than 2(SEM)[superscript 2] and SEM underestimates the score difference between 2 tests when the 2 tests are not parallel. This conclusion has limitations for 2 reasons. First,…

  12. Effect of spin-orbit nuclear charge density corrections due to the anomalous magnetic moment on halonuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, A.; Berengut, J. C.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2010-07-15

    In this paper we consider the contribution of the anomalous magnetic moments of protons and neutrons to the nuclear charge density. We show that the spin-orbit contribution to the mean-square charge radius, which has been neglected in recent nuclear calculations, can be important in light halonuclei. We estimate the size of the effect in helium, lithium, and beryllium nuclei. It is found that the spin-orbit contribution represents a approx2% correction to the charge density at the center of the {sup 7}Be nucleus. We derive a simple expression for the correction to the mean-square charge radius due to the spin-orbit term and find that in light halonuclei it may be larger than the Darwin-Foldy term and comparable to finite size corrections. A comparison of experimental and theoretical mean-square radii including the spin-orbit contribution is presented.

  13. An improved proportionate normalized least-mean-square algorithm for broadband multipath channel estimation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingsong; Hamamura, Masanori

    2014-01-01

    To make use of the sparsity property of broadband multipath wireless communication channels, we mathematically propose an l p -norm-constrained proportionate normalized least-mean-square (LP-PNLMS) sparse channel estimation algorithm. A general l p -norm is weighted by the gain matrix and is incorporated into the cost function of the proportionate normalized least-mean-square (PNLMS) algorithm. This integration is equivalent to adding a zero attractor to the iterations, by which the convergence speed and steady-state performance of the inactive taps are significantly improved. Our simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively improve the estimation performance of the PNLMS-based algorithm for sparse channel estimation applications. PMID:24782663

  14. Crossover behavior of stock returns and mean square displacements of particles governed by the Langevin equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wen-Jong; Wang, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Chi-Ning; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2013-06-01

    It is found that the mean square log-returns calculated from the high-frequency one-day moving average of US and Taiwan stocks with the time internal τ show ballistic behavior \\theta \\tau^{\\alpha_1} with the exponent \\alpha_1 \\approx 2 for small τ and show diffusion-like behavior D \\tau^{\\alpha_2} with the exponent \\alpha_2 \\approx 1 for large τ. Such a crossover behavior can be well described by the mean square displacements of particles governed by the Langevin equation of motion. Thus, θ and D can be considered, respectively, as the temperature-like and diffusivity-like kinetic parameters of the market, and they can be used to characterize the behavior of the market.

  15. An Improved Proportionate Normalized Least-Mean-Square Algorithm for Broadband Multipath Channel Estimation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To make use of the sparsity property of broadband multipath wireless communication channels, we mathematically propose an lp-norm-constrained proportionate normalized least-mean-square (LP-PNLMS) sparse channel estimation algorithm. A general lp-norm is weighted by the gain matrix and is incorporated into the cost function of the proportionate normalized least-mean-square (PNLMS) algorithm. This integration is equivalent to adding a zero attractor to the iterations, by which the convergence speed and steady-state performance of the inactive taps are significantly improved. Our simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively improve the estimation performance of the PNLMS-based algorithm for sparse channel estimation applications. PMID:24782663

  16. States of 13C with abnormal radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demyanova, A. S.; Ogloblin, A. A.; Danilov, A. N.; Goncharov, S. A.; Belyaeva, T. L.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Khlebnikov, S. V.; Burtebaev, N.; Trzaska, W.; Heikkinen, P.; Tyurin, G. P.; Janseitov, D.; Gurov, Yu. B.

    2016-05-01

    Differential cross-sections of the elastic and inelastic 13C + α scattering were measured at E(α) = 90 MeV. The root mean-square radii() of 13C nucleus in the states: 8.86 (1/2-), 3.09 (1/2+) and 9.90 (3/2-) MeV were determined by the Modified diffraction model (MDM). The radii of the first two levels are enhanced compared to that of the ground state of 13C, confirming the suggestion that the 8.86 MeV state is an analogue of the Hoyle state in 12C and the 3.09 MeV state has a neutron halo. Some indications to the abnormally small size of the 9.90 MeV state were obtained.

  17. Analysis of S-box in Image Encryption Using Root Mean Square Error Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Iqtadar; Shah, Tariq; Gondal, Muhammad Asif; Mahmood, Hasan

    2012-07-01

    The use of substitution boxes (S-boxes) in encryption applications has proven to be an effective nonlinear component in creating confusion and randomness. The S-box is evolving and many variants appear in literature, which include advanced encryption standard (AES) S-box, affine power affine (APA) S-box, Skipjack S-box, Gray S-box, Lui J S-box, residue prime number S-box, Xyi S-box, and S8 S-box. These S-boxes have algebraic and statistical properties which distinguish them from each other in terms of encryption strength. In some circumstances, the parameters from algebraic and statistical analysis yield results which do not provide clear evidence in distinguishing an S-box for an application to a particular set of data. In image encryption applications, the use of S-boxes needs special care because the visual analysis and perception of a viewer can sometimes identify artifacts embedded in the image. In addition to existing algebraic and statistical analysis already used for image encryption applications, we propose an application of root mean square error technique, which further elaborates the results and enables the analyst to vividly distinguish between the performances of various S-boxes. While the use of the root mean square error analysis in statistics has proven to be effective in determining the difference in original data and the processed data, its use in image encryption has shown promising results in estimating the strength of the encryption method. In this paper, we show the application of the root mean square error analysis to S-box image encryption. The parameters from this analysis are used in determining the strength of S-boxes

  18. Root mean square roughness of nano porous silicon by scattering spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dariani, R. S.; Ebrahimnasab, S.

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate that surface roughness can be obtained by scattering spectra and is more accurate than mechanical devices such as scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and profilometry techniques such as stylus (contact) profilometry. Due to the probe effect in these techniques, most of the information may be lost. Root mean square ( σ) is obtained experimentally by scattering spectra and theoretically by the Davies-Bennett/Porteus equation. Then, σ is compared with AFM results. Roughness behaviour is studied for four nano porous silicon surfaces, which have been fabricated using the electrochemical method at different etching times. Also, a band gap region can be determined directly from reflection spectrum.

  19. Mean square average-consensus for multi-agent systems with measurement noise and time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fenglan; Guan, Zhi-Hong; Ding, Li; Wang, Yan-Wu

    2013-06-01

    Mean square average consensus for multi-agent systems with measurement noise and time delay under fixed digraph is studied in this article. The time-varying consensus-gain is introduced to attenuate the measurement noise. By combining the tools of algebraic graph theory, matrix theory and stochastic analysis, consensus protocols for multi-agent systems with measurement noise and time delay are elaborately analysed. The example and simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained theoretical results. Moreover, the simulations demonstrate that, the proper consensus-gain function in the consensus protocol is the necessary and sufficient condition for the convergence of the multi-agent systems.

  20. Lower Bound on the Mean Square Displacement of Particles in the Hard Disk Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richthammer, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    The hard disk model is a 2D Gibbsian process of particles interacting via pure hard core repulsion. At high particle density the model is believed to show orientational order, however, it is known not to exhibit positional order. Here we investigate to what extent particle positions may fluctuate. We consider a finite volume version of the model in a box of dimensions 2 n × 2 n with arbitrary boundary configuration, and we show that the mean square displacement of particles near the center of the box is bounded from below by c log n. The result generalizes to a large class of models with fairly arbitrary interaction.

  1. Ab initio molar volumes and Gaussian radii.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Drew F; Ninham, Barry W

    2009-02-12

    Ab initio molar volumes are calculated and used to derive radii for ions and neutral molecules using a spatially diffuse model of the electron distribution with Gaussian spread. The Gaussian radii obtained can be used for computation of nonelectrostatic ion-ion dispersion forces that underlie Hofmeister specific ion effects. Equivalent hard-sphere radii are also derived, and these are in reasonable agreement with crystalline ionic radii. The Born electrostatic self-energy is derived for a Gaussian model of the electronic charge distribution. It is shown that the ionic volumes used in electrostatic calculations of strongly hydrated cosmotropic ions ought best to include the first hydration shell. Ionic volumes for weakly hydrated chaotropic metal cations should exclude electron overlap (in electrostatic calculations). Spherical radii are calculated as well as nonisotropic ellipsoidal radii for nonspherical ions, via their nonisotropic static polarizability tensors. PMID:19140766

  2. Expected distributions of root-mean-square positional deviations in proteins.

    PubMed

    Pitera, Jed W

    2014-06-19

    The atom positional root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) is a standard tool for comparing the similarity of two molecular structures. It is used to characterize the quality of biomolecular simulations, to cluster conformations, and as a reaction coordinate for conformational changes. This work presents an approximate analytic form for the expected distribution of RMSD values for a protein or polymer fluctuating about a stable native structure. The mean and maximum of the expected distribution are independent of chain length for long chains and linearly proportional to the average atom positional root-mean-square fluctuations (RMSF). To approximate the RMSD distribution for random-coil or unfolded ensembles, numerical distributions of RMSD were generated for ensembles of self-avoiding and non-self-avoiding random walks. In both cases, for all reference structures tested for chains more than three monomers long, the distributions have a maximum distant from the origin with a power-law dependence on chain length. The purely entropic nature of this result implies that care must be taken when interpreting stable high-RMSD regions of the free-energy landscape as "intermediates" or well-defined stable states. PMID:24655018

  3. Performance measure of image and video quality assessment algorithms: subjective root-mean-square error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuutinen, Mikko; Virtanen, Toni; Häkkinen, Jukka

    2016-03-01

    Evaluating algorithms used to assess image and video quality requires performance measures. Traditional performance measures (e.g., Pearson's linear correlation coefficient, Spearman's rank-order correlation coefficient, and root mean square error) compare quality predictions of algorithms to subjective mean opinion scores (mean opinion score/differential mean opinion score). We propose a subjective root-mean-square error (SRMSE) performance measure for evaluating the accuracy of algorithms used to assess image and video quality. The SRMSE performance measure takes into account dispersion between observers. The other important property of the SRMSE performance measure is its measurement scale, which is calibrated to units of the number of average observers. The results of the SRMSE performance measure indicate the extent to which the algorithm can replace the subjective experiment (as the number of observers). Furthermore, we have presented the concept of target values, which define the performance level of the ideal algorithm. We have calculated the target values for all sample sets of the CID2013, CVD2014, and LIVE multiply distorted image quality databases.The target values and MATLAB implementation of the SRMSE performance measure are available on the project page of this study.

  4. Optical pattern recognition architecture implementing the mean-square error correlation algorithm

    DOEpatents

    Molley, Perry A.

    1991-01-01

    An optical architecture implementing the mean-square error correlation algorithm, MSE=.SIGMA.[I-R].sup.2 for discriminating the presence of a reference image R in an input image scene I by computing the mean-square-error between a time-varying reference image signal s.sub.1 (t) and a time-varying input image signal s.sub.2 (t) includes a laser diode light source which is temporally modulated by a double-sideband suppressed-carrier source modulation signal I.sub.1 (t) having the form I.sub.1 (t)=A.sub.1 [1+.sqroot.2m.sub.1 s.sub.1 (t)cos (2.pi.f.sub.o t)] and the modulated light output from the laser diode source is diffracted by an acousto-optic deflector. The resultant intensity of the +1 diffracted order from the acousto-optic device is given by: I.sub.2 (t)=A.sub.2 [+2m.sub.2.sup.2 s.sub.2.sup.2 (t)-2.sqroot.2m.sub.2 (t) cos (2.pi.f.sub.o t] The time integration of the two signals I.sub.1 (t) and I.sub.2 (t) on the CCD deflector plane produces the result R(.tau.) of the mean-square error having the form: R(.tau.)=A.sub.1 A.sub.2 {[T]+[2m.sub.2.sup.2.multidot..intg.s.sub.2.sup.2 (t-.tau.)dt]-[2m.sub.1 m.sub.2 cos (2.tau.f.sub.o .tau.).multidot..intg.s.sub.1 (t)s.sub.2 (t-.tau.)dt]} where: s.sub.1 (t) is the signal input to the diode modulation source: s.sub.2 (t) is the signal input to the AOD modulation source; A.sub.1 is the light intensity; A.sub.2 is the diffraction efficiency; m.sub.1 and m.sub.2 are constants that determine the signal-to-bias ratio; f.sub.o is the frequency offset between the oscillator at f.sub.c and the modulation at f.sub.c +f.sub.o ; and a.sub.o and a.sub.1 are constant chosen to bias the diode source and the acousto-optic deflector into their respective linear operating regions so that the diode source exhibits a linear intensity characteristic and the AOD exhibits a linear amplitude characteristic.

  5. Mean square optimal NUFFT approximation for efficient non-Cartesian MRI reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhili; Jacob, Mathews

    2014-01-01

    The fast evaluation of the discrete Fourier transform of an image at non-uniform sampling locations is key to efficient iterative non-Cartesian MRI reconstruction algorithms. Current non-uniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT) approximations rely on the interpolation of oversampled uniform Fourier samples. The main challenge is high memory demand due to oversampling, especially when multi-dimensional datasets are involved. The main focus of this work is to design an NUFFT algorithm with minimal memory demands. Specifically, we introduce an analytical expression for the expected mean square error in the NUFFT approximation based on our earlier work. We then introduce an iterative algorithm to design the interpolator and scale factors.Experimental comparisons show that the proposed optimized NUFFT scheme provides considerably lower approximation errors than our previous scheme that rely on worst case error metrics. The improved approximations are also seen to considerably reduce the errors and artifacts in non-Cartesian MRI reconstruction. PMID:24637054

  6. Response time of mean square slope to wind forcing: An empirical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, David D.; Ruf, Christopher S.; Gleason, Scott T.

    2016-04-01

    We present an empirical study of the response time of surface wave mean square slope to local wind forcing using data collected over 11 years by 46 discus buoys moored at a wide variety of locations. The response time is defined as the time lag at which the time dependence of the waves exhibits the highest correlation with that of the local wind speed. The response time at each location is found to be fairly stable, with the time varying between 0.4 and 1.8 h depending on the location. Examination of long-term statistics reveals response time dependencies on wind speed magnitude, fetch, atmospheric stability, and wavelength. With the increasing reliance on satellite microwave remote sensing as a source of wind data, these results provide useful insights and bounds for their use.

  7. Mean-Square Displacement Relationship in Bioprotectant Systems by Elastic Neutron Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Magazù, S.; Maisano, G.; Migliardo, F.; Mondelli, C.

    2004-01-01

    Neutron intensity elastic scans on trehalose, maltose, and sucrose/H2O mixtures as a function of concentration, temperature, and exchanged wave vector are presented. The experimental findings show a crossover in molecular fluctuations between harmonic and anharmonic dynamical regimes. A new operative definition for the degree of fragility of glass-forming systems is furnished by using explicitly the connection between viscosity and mean-square displacement. The procedure is tested for the investigated mixtures and for a set of glass-forming systems. In this frame, the stronger character of trehalose/H2O mixture indicates a better attitude in respect to maltose and sucrose/H2O mixtures to encapsulate biostructures in a more rigid matrix. PMID:15111437

  8. Guidelines for the Fitting of Anomalous Diffusion Mean Square Displacement Graphs from Single Particle Tracking Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kepten, Eldad; Weron, Aleksander; Sikora, Grzegorz; Burnecki, Krzysztof; Garini, Yuval

    2015-01-01

    Single particle tracking is an essential tool in the study of complex systems and biophysics and it is commonly analyzed by the time-averaged mean square displacement (MSD) of the diffusive trajectories. However, past work has shown that MSDs are susceptible to significant errors and biases, preventing the comparison and assessment of experimental studies. Here, we attempt to extract practical guidelines for the estimation of anomalous time averaged MSDs through the simulation of multiple scenarios with fractional Brownian motion as a representative of a large class of fractional ergodic processes. We extract the precision and accuracy of the fitted MSD for various anomalous exponents and measurement errors with respect to measurement length and maximum time lags. Based on the calculated precision maps, we present guidelines to improve accuracy in single particle studies. Importantly, we find that in some experimental conditions, the time averaged MSD should not be used as an estimator. PMID:25680069

  9. Linear adaptive noise-reduction filters for tomographic imaging: Optimizing for minimum mean square error

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, W Y

    1993-04-01

    This thesis solves the problem of finding the optimal linear noise-reduction filter for linear tomographic image reconstruction. The optimization is data dependent and results in minimizing the mean-square error of the reconstructed image. The error is defined as the difference between the result and the best possible reconstruction. Applications for the optimal filter include reconstructions of positron emission tomographic (PET), X-ray computed tomographic, single-photon emission tomographic, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Using high resolution PET as an example, the optimal filter is derived and presented for the convolution backprojection, Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse, and the natural-pixel basis set reconstruction methods. Simulations and experimental results are presented for the convolution backprojection method.

  10. Mean square stabilisation of complex oscillatory regimes in nonlinear stochastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkirtseva, Irina; Ryashko, Lev

    2016-04-01

    A problem of stabilisation of the randomly forced periodic and quasiperiodic modes for nonlinear dynamic systems is considered. For this problem solution, we propose a new theoretical approach to consider these modes as invariant manifolds of the stochastic differential equations with control. The aim of the control is to provide the exponential mean square (EMS) stability for these manifolds. A general method of the stabilisation based on the algebraic criterion of the EMS-stability is elaborated. A constructive technique for the design of the feedback regulators stabilising various types of oscillatory regimes is proposed. A detailed parametric analysis of the problem of the stabilisation for stochastically forced periodic and quasiperiodic modes is given. An illustrative example of stochastic Hopf system is included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  11. Guidelines for the fitting of anomalous diffusion mean square displacement graphs from single particle tracking experiments.

    PubMed

    Kepten, Eldad; Weron, Aleksander; Sikora, Grzegorz; Burnecki, Krzysztof; Garini, Yuval

    2015-01-01

    Single particle tracking is an essential tool in the study of complex systems and biophysics and it is commonly analyzed by the time-averaged mean square displacement (MSD) of the diffusive trajectories. However, past work has shown that MSDs are susceptible to significant errors and biases, preventing the comparison and assessment of experimental studies. Here, we attempt to extract practical guidelines for the estimation of anomalous time averaged MSDs through the simulation of multiple scenarios with fractional Brownian motion as a representative of a large class of fractional ergodic processes. We extract the precision and accuracy of the fitted MSD for various anomalous exponents and measurement errors with respect to measurement length and maximum time lags. Based on the calculated precision maps, we present guidelines to improve accuracy in single particle studies. Importantly, we find that in some experimental conditions, the time averaged MSD should not be used as an estimator. PMID:25680069

  12. Simultaneous measurement of the root-mean-square roughness and autocorrelation length by optical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dalwoo; Oh, Ki-Jang; Lim, Choong-Soo

    1998-12-01

    We developed an on-line measurement system for the simultaneous measurement of the root-mean-square roughness and autocorrelation length which are the parameters of surface roughness. The measurement is based on the scattering theory of light on the rough surface. Computer simulation shows that the measurement range depends on the wavelength of the light source, and this is verified with the experiment. We installed the measurement system at the finishing line of a cold-rolling steel work, and measured the two parameters in situ. The rms roughness and autocorrelation length are measured and transformed in the average surface roughness and then umber of peaks per inch, respectively. The measured data for both of the parameters are compared with those of stylus method, an the optical method is well coincided with the conventional stylus method.

  13. Normalization of mean squared differences to measure agreement for continuous data.

    PubMed

    Almehrizi, Rashid

    2013-11-01

    Agreement among observations on two variables for reliability or validation purposes is usually assessed by the evaluation of the mean squared differences (MSD). Many transformations of MSD have been proposed to interpret and make statistical inferences about the agreement between the two variables, including the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) and the random marginal agreement coefficient (RMAC). This paper presents a normalization of MSD based on a reference range and uses it to derive CCC and RMAC (or ACC alternatively). The normalization of MSD enables the comparison between these two coefficients. The paper compares thoroughly the differences between these two coefficients and their properties at different agreement levels. Results show that ACC has promising properties over CCC. A Monte Carlo simulations as well as real data applications are performed. ACC for more than two variables are also derived. PMID:24201471

  14. An improved filter-u least mean square vibration control algorithm for aircraft framework.

    PubMed

    Huang, Quanzhen; Luo, Jun; Gao, Zhiyuan; Zhu, Xiaojin; Li, Hengyu

    2014-09-01

    Active vibration control of aerospace vehicle structures is very a hot spot and in which filter-u least mean square (FULMS) algorithm is one of the key methods. But for practical reasons and technical limitations, vibration reference signal extraction is always a difficult problem for FULMS algorithm. To solve the vibration reference signal extraction problem, an improved FULMS vibration control algorithm is proposed in this paper. Reference signal is constructed based on the controller structure and the data in the algorithm process, using a vibration response residual signal extracted directly from the vibration structure. To test the proposed algorithm, an aircraft frame model is built and an experimental platform is constructed. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is more practical with a good vibration suppression performance. PMID:25273765

  15. Measured and predicted root-mean-square errors in square and triangular antenna mesh facets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichter, W. B.

    1989-01-01

    Deflection shapes of square and equilateral triangular facets of two tricot-knit, gold plated molybdenum wire mesh antenna materials were measured and compared, on the basis of root mean square (rms) differences, with deflection shapes predicted by linear membrane theory, for several cases of biaxial mesh tension. The two mesh materials contained approximately 10 and 16 holes per linear inch, measured diagonally with respect to the course and wale directions. The deflection measurement system employed a non-contact eddy current proximity probe and an electromagnetic distance sensing probe in conjunction with a precision optical level. Despite experimental uncertainties, rms differences between measured and predicted deflection shapes suggest the following conclusions: that replacing flat antenna facets with facets conforming to parabolically curved structural members yields smaller rms surface error; that potential accuracy gains are greater for equilateral triangular facets than for square facets; and that linear membrane theory can be a useful tool in the design of tricot knit wire mesh antennas.

  16. Colloquium: Quantum root-mean-square error and measurement uncertainty relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Paul; Lahti, Pekka; Werner, Reinhard F.

    2014-10-01

    Recent years have witnessed a controversy over Heisenberg's famous error-disturbance relation. Here the conflict is resolved by way of an analysis of the possible conceptualizations of measurement error and disturbance in quantum mechanics. Two approaches to adapting the classic notion of root-mean-square error to quantum measurements are discussed. One is based on the concept of a noise operator; its natural operational content is that of a mean deviation of the values of two observables measured jointly, and thus its applicability is limited to cases where such joint measurements are available. The second error measure quantifies the differences between two probability distributions obtained in separate runs of measurements and is of unrestricted applicability. We show that there are no nontrivial unconditional joint-measurement bounds for state-dependent errors in the conceptual framework discussed here, while Heisenberg-type measurement uncertainty relations for state-independent errors have been proven.

  17. Accuracy Analysis of Anisotropic Yield Functions based on the Root-Mean Square Error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Hoon; Lou, Yanshan; Bae, Gihyun; Lee, Changsoo

    2010-06-01

    This paper evaluates the accuracy of popular anisotropic yield functions based on the root-mean square error (RMSE) of the yield stresses and the R-values. The yield functions include Hill48, Yld89, Yld91, Yld96, Yld2000-2d, BBC2000 and Yld2000-18p yield criteria. Two kind steels and five kind aluminum alloys are selected for the accuracy evaluation. The anisotropic coefficients in yield functions are computed from the experimental data. The downhill simplex method is utilized for the parameter evaluation for the yield function except Hill48 and Yld89 yield functions after the error functions are constructed. The yield stresses and the R-values at every 15°from the rolling direction (RD) and the yield stress and R-value at equibiaxial tension conditions are predicted from each yield function. The predicted yield stresses and R-values are then compared with the experimental data. The root-mean square errors (RMSE) are computed to quantitatively evaluate the yield function. The RMSEs are calculated for the yield stresses and the R-values separately because the yield stress difference is much smaller that the difference in the R-values. The RMSEs of different yield functions are compared for each material. The Hill48 and Yld89 yield functions are the worst choices for the anisotropic description of the yield stress anisotropy while Yld91 yield function is the last choice for the modeling of the R-value directionality. Yld2000-2d and BBC2000 yield function have the same accuracy on the modeling of both the yield stress anisotropy and the R-value anisotropy. The best choice is Yld2000-18 yield function to accurately describe the yield tress and R-value directionalities of sheet metals.

  18. Mean-square displacement of particles in slightly interconnected polymer networks.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento-Gomez, Erick; Santamaría-Holek, Iván; Castillo, Rolando

    2014-01-30

    Structural and viscoelastic properties of slightly interconnected polymer networks immersed in a solvent have been studied in two cases: when the polymer network is building up and when the polymer network is shrinking stepwise in a controlled way. To accomplish this goal, the mean square displacement (MSD) of embedded microspheres in the polymer network was measured as a function of time, with diffusive wave spectroscopy. Particle motion was analyzed in terms of a model, based on a Fokker-Planck type equation, developed for describing particles in Brownian motion within a network that constrain their movement. The model reproduces well the experimental features observed in the MSD vs t curves. The variation of the parameters describing the structure of the network can be understood as the polymerization comes about, and also after the successive volume contractions. In addition, from the MSD curves, the complex shear moduli were obtained in a wide range of frequencies when the network is building up, and at the different shrinking states of the network. Our microrheological results give an insight about the dynamics of embedded particles in slightly interconnected networks, which were also compared with similar results for polymers without interconnections and polymer gels. PMID:24423025

  19. Atomic motion from the mean square displacement in a monatomic liquid.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Duane C; De Lorenzi-Venneri, Giulia; Chisolm, Eric D

    2016-05-11

    V-T theory is constructed in the many-body Hamiltonian formulation, and is being developed as a novel approach to liquid dynamics theory. In this theory the liquid atomic motion consists of two contributions, normal mode vibrations in a single representative potential energy valley, and transits, which carry the system across boundaries between valleys. The mean square displacement time correlation function (the MSD) is a direct measure of the atomic motion, and our goal is to determine if the V-T formalism can produce a physically sensible account of this motion. We employ molecular dynamics (MD) data for a system representing liquid Na, and find the motion evolves in three successive time intervals: on the first 'vibrational' interval, the vibrational motion alone gives a highly accurate account of the MD data; on the second 'crossover' interval, the vibrational MSD saturates to a constant while the transit motion builds up from zero; on the third 'random walk' interval, the transit motion produces a purely diffusive random walk of the vibrational equilibrium positions. This motional evolution agrees with, and adds refinement to, the MSD atomic motion as described by current liquid dynamics theories. PMID:27058024

  20. Decomposition of the Mean Squared Error and NSE Performance Criteria: Implications for Improving Hydrological Modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Hoshin V.; Kling, Harald; Yilmaz, Koray K.; Martinez-Baquero, Guillermo F.

    2009-01-01

    The mean squared error (MSE) and the related normalization, the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE), are the two criteria most widely used for calibration and evaluation of hydrological models with observed data. Here, we present a diagnostically interesting decomposition of NSE (and hence MSE), which facilitates analysis of the relative importance of its different components in the context of hydrological modelling, and show how model calibration problems can arise due to interactions among these components. The analysis is illustrated by calibrating a simple conceptual precipitation-runoff model to daily data for a number of Austrian basins having a broad range of hydro-meteorological characteristics. Evaluation of the results clearly demonstrates the problems that can be associated with any calibration based on the NSE (or MSE) criterion. While we propose and test an alternative criterion that can help to reduce model calibration problems, the primary purpose of this study is not to present an improved measure of model performance. Instead, we seek to show that there are systematic problems inherent with any optimization based on formulations related to the MSE. The analysis and results have implications to the manner in which we calibrate and evaluate environmental models; we discuss these and suggest possible ways forward that may move us towards an improved and diagnostically meaningful approach to model performance evaluation and identification.

  1. Estimating Root Mean Square Errors in Remotely Sensed Soil Moisture over Continental Scale Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, Clara S.; Reichle, Rolf; de Jeu, Richard; Naeimi, Vahid; Parinussa, Robert; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Root Mean Square Errors (RMSE) in the soil moisture anomaly time series obtained from the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E; using the Land Parameter Retrieval Model) are estimated over a continental scale domain centered on North America, using two methods: triple colocation (RMSETC ) and error propagation through the soil moisture retrieval models (RMSEEP ). In the absence of an established consensus for the climatology of soil moisture over large domains, presenting a RMSE in soil moisture units requires that it be specified relative to a selected reference data set. To avoid the complications that arise from the use of a reference, the RMSE is presented as a fraction of the time series standard deviation (fRMSE). For both sensors, the fRMSETC and fRMSEEP show similar spatial patterns of relatively highlow errors, and the mean fRMSE for each land cover class is consistent with expectations. Triple colocation is also shown to be surprisingly robust to representativity differences between the soil moisture data sets used, and it is believed to accurately estimate the fRMSE in the remotely sensed soil moisture anomaly time series. Comparing the ASCAT and AMSR-E fRMSETC shows that both data sets have very similar accuracy across a range of land cover classes, although the AMSR-E accuracy is more directly related to vegetation cover. In general, both data sets have good skill up to moderate vegetation conditions.

  2. Calculations of dynamical properties of skutterudites: Thermal conductivity, thermal expansivity, and atomic mean-square displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, N.; Feldman, J. L.; Singh, David J.

    2010-04-05

    While the thermal conductivity of the filled skutterudites has been of great interest it had not been calculated within a microscopic theory. Here a central force, Guggenheim-McGlashen, model with parameters largely extracted from first-principles calculations and from spectroscopic data, specific to LaFe{sub 4} Sb{sub 12} or CoSb{sub 3} , is employed in a Green-Kubo/molecular dynamics calculation of thermal conductivity as a function of temperature. We find that the thermal conductivity of a filled solid is more than a factor of two lower than that of an unfilled solid, assuming the “framework” interatomic force parameters are the same between filled and unfilled solids, and that this decrease is almost entirely due to the cubic anharmonic interaction between filling and framework atoms. In addition, partially as a test of our models, we calculate thermal expansivity and isotropic atomic mean-square displacements using both molecular dynamics and lattice dynamics methods. These quantities are in reasonable agreement with experiment, increasing our confidence in the anharmonic parameters of our models. We also find an anomalously large filling-atom mode Gruneisen parameter that is apparently observed for a filled skutterudite and is observed in a clathrate.

  3. Frequency-shift low-pass filtering and least mean square adaptive filtering for ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shanshan; Li, Chunyu; Ding, Mingyue; Yuchi, Ming

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound image quality enhancement is a problem of considerable interest in medical imaging modality and an ongoing challenge to date. This paper investigates a method based on frequency-shift low-pass filtering (FSLF) and least mean square adaptive filtering (LMSAF) for ultrasound image quality enhancement. FSLF is used for processing the ultrasound signal in the frequency domain, while LMSAPF in the time domain. Firstly, FSLF shifts the center frequency of the focused signal to zero. Then the real and imaginary part of the complex data are filtered respectively by finite impulse response (FIR) low-pass filter. Thus the information around the center frequency are retained while the undesired ones, especially background noises are filtered. Secondly, LMSAF multiplies the signals with an automatically adjusted weight vector to further eliminate the noises and artifacts. Through the combination of the two filters, the ultrasound image is expected to have less noises and artifacts and higher resolution, and contrast. The proposed method was verified with the RF data of the CIRS phantom 055A captured by SonixTouch DAQ system. Experimental results show that the background noises and artifacts can be efficiently restrained, the wire object has a higher resolution and the contrast ratio (CR) can be enhanced for about 12dB to 15dB at different image depth comparing to delay-and-sum (DAS).

  4. Atomic motion from the mean square displacement in a monatomic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Duane C.; De Lorenzi-Venneri, Giulia; Chisolm, Eric D.

    2016-05-01

    V-T theory is constructed in the many-body Hamiltonian formulation, and is being developed as a novel approach to liquid dynamics theory. In this theory the liquid atomic motion consists of two contributions, normal mode vibrations in a single representative potential energy valley, and transits, which carry the system across boundaries between valleys. The mean square displacement time correlation function (the MSD) is a direct measure of the atomic motion, and our goal is to determine if the V-T formalism can produce a physically sensible account of this motion. We employ molecular dynamics (MD) data for a system representing liquid Na, and find the motion evolves in three successive time intervals: on the first ‘vibrational’ interval, the vibrational motion alone gives a highly accurate account of the MD data; on the second ‘crossover’ interval, the vibrational MSD saturates to a constant while the transit motion builds up from zero; on the third ‘random walk’ interval, the transit motion produces a purely diffusive random walk of the vibrational equilibrium positions. This motional evolution agrees with, and adds refinement to, the MSD atomic motion as described by current liquid dynamics theories.

  5. Atomic motion from the mean square displacement in a monatomic liquid

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wallace, Duane C.; De Lorenzi-Venneri, Giulia; Chisolm, Eric D.

    2016-05-11

    V-T theory is constructed in the many-body Hamiltonian formulation, and is being developed as a novel approach to liquid dynamics theory. In this theory the liquid atomic motion consists of two contributions, normal mode vibrations in a single representative potential energy valley, and transits, which carry the system across boundaries between valleys. The mean square displacement time correlation function (the MSD) is a direct measure of the atomic motion, and our goal is to determine if the V-T formalism can produce a physically sensible account of this motion. We employ molecular dynamics (MD) data for a system representing liquid Na,more » and find the motion evolves in three successive time intervals: on the first 'vibrational' interval, the vibrational motion alone gives a highly accurate account of the MD data; on the second 'crossover' interval, the vibrational MSD saturates to a constant while the transit motion builds up from zero; on the third 'random walk' interval, the transit motion produces a purely diffusive random walk of the vibrational equilibrium positions. Furthermore, this motional evolution agrees with, and adds refinement to, the MSD atomic motion as described by current liquid dynamics theories.« less

  6. Detecting Blending End-Point Using Mean Squares Successive Difference Test and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Khorasani, Milad; Amigo, José M; Bertelsen, Poul; Van Den Berg, Frans; Rantanen, Jukka

    2015-08-01

    An algorithm based on mean squares successive difference test applied to near-infrared and principal component analysis scores was developed to monitor and determine the blending profile and to assess the end-point in the statistical stabile phase. Model formulations consisting of an active compound (acetylsalicylic acid), together with microcrystalline cellulose and two grades of calcium carbonate with dramatically different particle shapes, were prepared. The formulation comprising angular-shaped calcium carbonate reached blending end-point slower when compared with the formulation comprising equant-shaped calcium carbonate. Utilizing the ring shear test, this distinction in end-point could be related to the difference in flowability of the formulations. On the basis of the two model formulations, a design of experiments was conducted to characterize the blending process by studying the effect of CaCO3 grades and fill level of the bin on blending end-point. Calcium carbonate grades, fill level, and their interaction were shown to have a significant impact on the blending process. PMID:26094601

  7. Augmented GNSS Differential Corrections Minimum Mean Square Error Estimation Sensitivity to Spatial Correlation Modeling Errors

    PubMed Central

    Kassabian, Nazelie; Presti, Letizia Lo; Rispoli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Railway signaling is a safety system that has evolved over the last couple of centuries towards autonomous functionality. Recently, great effort is being devoted in this field, towards the use and exploitation of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals and GNSS augmentation systems in view of lower railway track equipments and maintenance costs, that is a priority to sustain the investments for modernizing the local and regional lines most of which lack automatic train protection systems and are still manually operated. The objective of this paper is to assess the sensitivity of the Linear Minimum Mean Square Error (LMMSE) algorithm to modeling errors in the spatial correlation function that characterizes true pseudorange Differential Corrections (DCs). This study is inspired by the railway application; however, it applies to all transportation systems, including the road sector, that need to be complemented by an augmentation system in order to deliver accurate and reliable positioning with integrity specifications. A vector of noisy pseudorange DC measurements are simulated, assuming a Gauss-Markov model with a decay rate parameter inversely proportional to the correlation distance that exists between two points of a certain environment. The LMMSE algorithm is applied on this vector to estimate the true DC, and the estimation error is compared to the noise added during simulation. The results show that for large enough correlation distance to Reference Stations (RSs) distance separation ratio values, the LMMSE brings considerable advantage in terms of estimation error accuracy and precision. Conversely, the LMMSE algorithm may deteriorate the quality of the DC measurements whenever the ratio falls below a certain threshold. PMID:24922454

  8. Augmented GNSS differential corrections minimum mean square error estimation sensitivity to spatial correlation modeling errors.

    PubMed

    Kassabian, Nazelie; Lo Presti, Letizia; Rispoli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Railway signaling is a safety system that has evolved over the last couple of centuries towards autonomous functionality. Recently, great effort is being devoted in this field, towards the use and exploitation of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals and GNSS augmentation systems in view of lower railway track equipments and maintenance costs, that is a priority to sustain the investments for modernizing the local and regional lines most of which lack automatic train protection systems and are still manually operated. The objective of this paper is to assess the sensitivity of the Linear Minimum Mean Square Error (LMMSE) algorithm to modeling errors in the spatial correlation function that characterizes true pseudorange Differential Corrections (DCs). This study is inspired by the railway application; however, it applies to all transportation systems, including the road sector, that need to be complemented by an augmentation system in order to deliver accurate and reliable positioning with integrity specifications. A vector of noisy pseudorange DC measurements are simulated, assuming a Gauss-Markov model with a decay rate parameter inversely proportional to the correlation distance that exists between two points of a certain environment. The LMMSE algorithm is applied on this vector to estimate the true DC, and the estimation error is compared to the noise added during simulation. The results show that for large enough correlation distance to Reference Stations (RSs) distance separation ratio values, the LMMSE brings considerable advantage in terms of estimation error accuracy and precision. Conversely, the LMMSE algorithm may deteriorate the quality of the DC measurements whenever the ratio falls below a certain threshold. PMID:24922454

  9. Experimental evaluation of leaky least-mean-square algorithms for active noise reduction in communication headsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartes, David A.; Ray, Laura R.; Collier, Robert D.

    2002-04-01

    An adaptive leaky normalized least-mean-square (NLMS) algorithm has been developed to optimize stability and performance of active noise cancellation systems. The research addresses LMS filter performance issues related to insufficient excitation, nonstationary noise fields, and time-varying signal-to-noise ratio. The adaptive leaky NLMS algorithm is based on a Lyapunov tuning approach in which three candidate algorithms, each of which is a function of the instantaneous measured reference input, measurement noise variance, and filter length, are shown to provide varying degrees of tradeoff between stability and noise reduction performance. Each algorithm is evaluated experimentally for reduction of low frequency noise in communication headsets, and stability and noise reduction performance are compared with that of traditional NLMS and fixed-leakage NLMS algorithms. Acoustic measurements are made in a specially designed acoustic test cell which is based on the original work of Ryan et al. [``Enclosure for low frequency assessment of active noise reducing circumaural headsets and hearing protection,'' Can. Acoust. 21, 19-20 (1993)] and which provides a highly controlled and uniform acoustic environment. The stability and performance of the active noise reduction system, including a prototype communication headset, are investigated for a variety of noise sources ranging from stationary tonal noise to highly nonstationary measured F-16 aircraft noise over a 20 dB dynamic range. Results demonstrate significant improvements in stability of Lyapunov-tuned LMS algorithms over traditional leaky or nonleaky normalized algorithms, while providing noise reduction performance equivalent to that of the NLMS algorithm for idealized noise fields.

  10. Experimental evaluation of leaky least-mean-square algorithms for active noise reduction in communication headsets.

    PubMed

    Cartes, David A; Ray, Laura R; Collier, Robert D

    2002-04-01

    An adaptive leaky normalized least-mean-square (NLMS) algorithm has been developed to optimize stability and performance of active noise cancellation systems. The research addresses LMS filter performance issues related to insufficient excitation, nonstationary noise fields, and time-varying signal-to-noise ratio. The adaptive leaky NLMS algorithm is based on a Lyapunov tuning approach in which three candidate algorithms, each of which is a function of the instantaneous measured reference input, measurement noise variance, and filter length, are shown to provide varying degrees of tradeoff between stability and noise reduction performance. Each algorithm is evaluated experimentally for reduction of low frequency noise in communication headsets, and stability and noise reduction performance are compared with that of traditional NLMS and fixed-leakage NLMS algorithms. Acoustic measurements are made in a specially designed acoustic test cell which is based on the original work of Ryan et al. ["Enclosure for low frequency assessment of active noise reducing circumaural headsets and hearing protection," Can. Acoust. 21, 19-20 (1993)] and which provides a highly controlled and uniform acoustic environment. The stability and performance of the active noise reduction system, including a prototype communication headset, are investigated for a variety of noise sources ranging from stationary tonal noise to highly nonstationary measured F-16 aircraft noise over a 20 dB dynamic range. Results demonstrate significant improvements in stability of Lyapunov-tuned LMS algorithms over traditional leaky or nonleaky normalized algorithms, while providing noise reduction performance equivalent to that of the NLMS algorithm for idealized noise fields. PMID:12002860

  11. Evaluation of the Proton Charge Radius from Electron–Proton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Arrington, John; Sick, Ingo

    2015-09-15

    In light of the proton radius puzzle, the discrepancy between measurements of the proton charge radius from muonic hydrogen and those from electronic hydrogen and electron–proton (e–p) scattering measurements, we re-examine the charge radius extractions from electron scattering measurements. We provide a recommended value for the proton root-mean-square charge radius, r{sub E} = 0.879 ± 0.011 fm, based on a global examination of elastic e–p scattering data. The uncertainties include contributions to account for tension between different data sets and inconsistencies between radii using different extraction procedures.

  12. The Relationship between Root Mean Square Error of Approximation and Model Misspecification in Confirmatory Factor Analysis Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savalei, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    The fit index root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) is extremely popular in structural equation modeling. However, its behavior under different scenarios remains poorly understood. The present study generates continuous curves where possible to capture the full relationship between RMSEA and various "incidental parameters," such as…

  13. Large area aggregation and mean-squared prediction error estimation for LACIE yield and production forecasts. [wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chhikara, R. S.; Feiveson, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    Aggregation formulas are given for production estimation of a crop type for a zone, a region, and a country, and methods for estimating yield prediction errors for the three areas are described. A procedure is included for obtaining a combined yield prediction and its mean-squared error estimate for a mixed wheat pseudozone.

  14. Accuracy in Parameter Estimation for the Root Mean Square Error of Approximation: Sample Size Planning for Narrow Confidence Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Ken; Lai, Keke

    2011-01-01

    The root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) is one of the most widely reported measures of misfit/fit in applications of structural equation modeling. When the RMSEA is of interest, so too should be the accompanying confidence interval. A narrow confidence interval reveals that the plausible parameter values are confined to a relatively…

  15. Charge-Dependent Cavity Radii for an Accurate Dielectric Continuum Model of Solvation with Emphasis on Ions: Aqueous Solutes with Oxo, Hydroxo, Amino, Methyl, Chloro, Bromo and Fluoro Functionalities

    SciTech Connect

    Ginovska, Bojana; Camaioni, Donald M; Dupuis, Michel; Schwerdtfeger, Christine A; Gilcrease, Quinn

    2008-10-23

    Dielectric continuum solvation models are widely used because they are a computationally efficacious way to simulate equilibrium properties of solutes. With advances that allow for molecular-shaped cavities, they have reached a high level of accuracy, in particular for neutral solutes. However, benchmark tests show that existing schemes for defining cavities are unable to consistently predict accurately the effects of solvation on ions, especially anions. This work involves the further development of a protocol put forth earlier for defining the cavities of aqueous solutes, with resulting advances that are most striking for anions. Molecular cavities are defined as interlocked spheres around atoms or groups of atoms in the solute, but the sphere radii are determined by simple empirically-based expressions involving the effective atomic charges of the solute atoms (derived from molecular electrostatic potential) and base radii. Both of these terms are optimized for the different types of atoms or functional groups in a training set of neutral and charged solutes. Parameters in these expressions for radii were fitted by minimizing residuals between calculated and measured standard free energies of solvation (ΔGs*), weighted by the uncertainty in the measured value. The calculations were performed using density functional theory with the B3LYP functional and the 6-311+G** basis set and the COnductor-like Screening MOdel (COSMO). The optimized radii definitions reproduce ΔGs* of neutral solutes and singly-charged ions in the training set to within experimental uncertainty and, more importantly, accurately predict ΔGs* of compounds outside the training set, in particular anions. Inherent to this approach, the cavity definitions reflect the strength of specific solute-water interactions. We surmise that this feature underlies the success of the model, referred to as the CD-COSMO model for Charge-Dependent (also Camaioni-Dupuis) COSMO

  16. A Generalized Subspace Least Mean Square Method for High-resolution Accurate Estimation of Power System Oscillation Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Ning; Abdollahi, Ali

    2013-09-10

    A Generalized Subspace-Least Mean Square (GSLMS) method is presented for accurate and robust estimation of oscillation modes from exponentially damped power system signals. The method is based on orthogonality of signal and noise eigenvectors of the signal autocorrelation matrix. Performance of the proposed method is evaluated using Monte Carlo simulation and compared with Prony method. Test results show that the GSLMS is highly resilient to noise and significantly dominates Prony method in tracking power system modes under noisy environments.

  17. Macrocyclic lanthanide complexes as artificial nucleases and ribonucleases: effects of pH, metal ionic radii, number of coordinated water molecules, charge, and concentrations of the metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Chang, C Allen; Wu, Bo Hong; Kuan, Bu Yuan

    2005-09-19

    We have been interested in the design, synthesis, and characterization of artificial nucleases and ribonucleases by employing macrocyclic lanthanide complexes because their high thermodynamic stability, low kinetic lability, high coordination number, and charge density (Lewis acidity) allow more design flexibility and stability. In this paper, we report the study of the use of the europium(III) complex, EuDO2A+ (DO2A is 1,7-dicarboxymethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane) and other lanthanide complexes (i.e., LaDO2A+, YbDO2A+, EuK21DA+, EuEDDA+, and EuHEDTA where K21DA is 1,7-diaza-4,10,13-trioxacyclopentadecane-N,N'-diacetic acid, EDDA is ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid, and HEDTA is N-hydroxyethyl-ethylenediamine-N,N',N'-triacetic acid), as potential catalysts for the hydrolysis of the phosphodiester bond of BNPP (sodium bis(4-nitrophenyl)-phosphate). For the pH range 7.0-11.0 studied, EuDO2A+ promotes BNPP hydrolysis with the quickest rates among LaDO2A+, EuDO2A+, and YbDO2A+. This indicates that charge density is not the only factor affecting the reaction rates. Among the four complexes, EuDO2A+, EuK21DA+, EuEDDA+, and EuHEDTA, with their respective number of inner-sphere coordinated water molecules three, two, five, and three, EuEDDA+, with the greatest number of inner-sphere coordinated water molecules and a positive charge, promotes BNPP hydrolysis more efficiently at pH below 8.4, and the observed rate trend is EuEDDA+ > EuDO2A+ > EuK21DA+ > EuHEDTA. At pH > 8.4, the EuEDDA+ solution becomes misty and precipitates form. At pH 11.0, the hydrolysis rate of BNPP in the presence of EuDO2A+ is 100 times faster than that of EuHEDTA, presumably because the positively charged EuDO2A+ is more favorable for binding with the negatively charged phosphodiester compounds. The logarithmic hydrolysis constants (pKh) were determined, and are reported in the parentheses, by fitting the kinetic k(obs) data vs pH for EuDO2A+ (8.4), LaDO2A+ (8.4), YbDO2A+ (9.4), EuK21DA+ (7

  18. Mean square displacements with error estimates from non-equidistant time-step kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leetmaa, Mikael; Skorodumova, Natalia V.

    2015-06-01

    We present a method to calculate mean square displacements (MSD) with error estimates from kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations of diffusion processes with non-equidistant time-steps. An analytical solution for estimating the errors is presented for the special case of one moving particle at fixed rate constant. The method is generalized to an efficient computational algorithm that can handle any number of moving particles or different rates in the simulated system. We show with examples that the proposed method gives the correct statistical error when the MSD curve describes pure Brownian motion and can otherwise be used as an upper bound for the true error.

  19. Introducing Charge Hydration Asymmetry into the Generalized Born Model.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Abhishek; Aguilar, Boris H; Tolokh, Igor S; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2014-04-01

    The effect of charge hydration asymmetry (CHA)-non-invariance of solvation free energy upon solute charge inversion-is missing from the standard linear response continuum electrostatics. The proposed charge hydration asymmetric-generalized Born (CHA-GB) approximation introduces this effect into the popular generalized Born (GB) model. The CHA is added to the GB equation via an analytical correction that quantifies the specific propensity of CHA of a given water model; the latter is determined by the charge distribution within the water model. Significant variations in CHA seen in explicit water (TIP3P, TIP4P-Ew, and TIP5P-E) free energy calculations on charge-inverted "molecular bracelets" are closely reproduced by CHA-GB, with the accuracy similar to models such as SEA and 3D-RISM that go beyond the linear response. Compared against reference explicit (TIP3P) electrostatic solvation free energies, CHA-GB shows about a 40% improvement in accuracy over the canonical GB, tested on a diverse set of 248 rigid small neutral molecules (root mean square error, rmse = 0.88 kcal/mol for CHA-GB vs 1.24 kcal/mol for GB) and 48 conformations of amino acid analogs (rmse = 0.81 kcal/mol vs 1.26 kcal/mol). CHA-GB employs a novel definition of the dielectric boundary that does not subsume the CHA effects into the intrinsic atomic radii. The strategy leads to finding a new set of intrinsic atomic radii optimized for CHA-GB; these radii show physically meaningful variation with the atom type, in contrast to the radii set optimized for GB. Compared to several popular radii sets used with the original GB model, the new radii set shows better transferability between different classes of molecules. PMID:24803871

  20. Comparison Study of Airway Reactivity Outcomes due to a Pharmacologic Challenge Test: Impulse Oscillometry versus Least Mean Squared Analysis Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Elena; Bullard, Charrell M.; Armani, Milena H.; Miller, Thomas L.; Shaffer, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    The technique of measuring transpulmonary pressure and respiratory airflow with manometry and pneumotachography using the least mean squared analysis (LMS) has been used broadly in both preclinical and clinical settings for the evaluation of neonatal respiratory function during tidal volume breathing for lung tissue and airway frictional mechanical properties measurements. Whereas the technique of measuring respiratory function using the impulse oscillation technique (IOS) involves the assessment of the relationship between pressure and flow using an impulse signal with a range of frequencies, requires less cooperation and provides more information on total respiratory system resistance (chest wall, lung tissue, and airways). The present study represents a preclinical animal study to determine whether these respiratory function techniques (LMS and IOS) are comparable in detecting changes in respiratory resistance derived from a direct pharmacological challenge. PMID:23691308

  1. Application of least mean square algorithm to suppression of maglev track-induced self-excited vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, D. F.; Li, J.; Hansen, C. H.

    2011-11-01

    Track-induced self-excited vibration is commonly encountered in EMS (electromagnetic suspension) maglev systems, and a solution to this problem is important in enabling the commercial widespread implementation of maglev systems. Here, the coupled model of the steel track and the magnetic levitation system is developed, and its stability is investigated using the Nyquist criterion. The harmonic balance method is employed to investigate the stability and amplitude of the self-excited vibration, which provides an explanation of the phenomenon that track-induced self-excited vibration generally occurs at a specified amplitude and frequency. To eliminate the self-excited vibration, an improved LMS (Least Mean Square) cancellation algorithm with phase correction (C-LMS) is employed. The harmonic balance analysis shows that the C-LMS cancellation algorithm can completely suppress the self-excited vibration. To achieve adaptive cancellation, a frequency estimator similar to the tuner of a TV receiver is employed to provide the C-LMS algorithm with a roughly estimated reference frequency. Numerical simulation and experiments undertaken on the CMS-04 vehicle show that the proposed adaptive C-LMS algorithm can effectively eliminate the self-excited vibration over a wide frequency range, and that the robustness of the algorithm suggests excellent potential for application to EMS maglev systems.

  2. Real-time refinement of subthalamic nucleus targeting using Bayesian decision-making on the root mean square measure.

    PubMed

    Moran, Anan; Bar-Gad, Izhar; Bergman, Hagai; Israel, Zvi

    2006-09-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a major target for treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease patients undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery. Microelectrode recording (MER) is used in many cases to identify the target nucleus. A real-time procedure for identifying the entry and exit points of the STN would improve the outcome of this targeting procedure. We used the normalized root mean square (NRMS) of a short (5 seconds) MER sampled signal and the estimated anatomical distance to target (EDT) as the basis for this procedure. Electrode tip location was defined intraoperatively by an expert neurophysiologist to be before, within, or after the STN. Data from 46 trajectories of 27 patients were used to calculate the Bayesian posterior probability of being in each of these locations, given RMS-EDT pair values. We tested our predictions on each trajectory using a bootstrapping technique, with the rest of the trajectories serving as a training set and found the error in predicting the STN entry to be (mean +/- SD) 0.18 +/- 0.84, and 0.50 +/- 0.59 mm for STN exit point, which yields a 0.30 +/- 0.28 mm deviation from the expert's target center. The simplicity and computational ease of RMS calculation, its spike sorting-independent nature and tolerance to electrode parameters of this Bayesian predictor, can lead directly to the development of a fully automated intraoperative physiological procedure for the refinement of imaging estimates of STN borders. PMID:16763982

  3. Outcome analysis after helmet therapy using 3D photogrammetry in patients with deformational plagiocephaly: the role of root mean square.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Mahsa Bidgoli; Brown, Trevor M; Clausen, April; DaSilva, Trevor; Ho, Emily; Forrest, Christopher R

    2014-02-01

    Deformational plagiocephaly (DP) is a multifactorial non-synostotic cranial deformity with a reported incidence as high as 1 in 7 infants in North America. Treatment options have focused on non-operative interventions including head repositioning and the use of an orthotic helmet device. Previous studies have used linear and two dimensional outcome measures to assess changes in cranial symmetry after helmet therapy. Our objective was to demonstrate improvement in head shape after treatment with a cranial molding helmet by using Root Mean Square (RMS), a measure unique to 3D photogrammetry, which takes into account both changes in volume and shape over time. Three dimensional photographs were obtained before and after molding helmet treatment in 40 infants (4-10 months old) with deformational plagiocephaly. Anatomical reference planes and measurements were recorded using the 3dMD Vultus(®) analysis software. RMS was used to quantify symmetry by superimposing left and right quadrants and calculating the mean value of aggregate distances between surfaces. Over 95% of the patients demonstrated an improvement in symmetry with helmet therapy. Furthermore, when the sample of infants was divided into two treatment subgroups, a statistically significant correlation was found between the age at the beginning of treatment and the change in the RMS value. When helmet therapy was started before 7 months of age a greater improvement in symmetry was seen. This work represents application of the technique of RMS analysis to demonstrate the efficacy of treatment of deformational plagiocephaly with a cranial molding helmet. PMID:24411583

  4. Central depression of nuclear charge density distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Chu Yanyun; Ren Zhongzhou; Wang Zaijun; Dong Tiekuang

    2010-08-15

    The center-depressed nuclear charge distributions are investigated with the parametrized distribution and the relativistic mean-field theory, and their corresponding charge form factors are worked out with the phase shift analysis method. The central depression of nuclear charge distribution of {sup 46}Ar and {sup 44}S is supported by the relativistic mean-field calculation. According to the calculation, the valence protons in {sup 46}Ar and {sup 44}S prefer to occupy the 1d{sub 3/2} state rather than the 2s{sub 1/2} state, which is different from that in the less neutron-rich argon and sulfur isotopes. As a result, the central proton densities of {sup 46}Ar and {sup 44}S are highly depressed, and so are their central charge densities. The charge form factors of some argon and sulfur isotopes are presented, and the minima of the charge form factors shift upward and inward when the central nuclear charge distributions are more depressed. Besides, the effect of the central depression on the charge form factors is studied with a parametrized distribution, when the root-mean-square charge radii remain constant.

  5. Mean-square angle-of-arrival difference between two counter-propagating spherical waves in the presence of atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunyi; Yang, Huamin; Tong, Shoufeng; Lou, Yan

    2015-09-21

    The mean-square angle-of-arrival (AOA) difference between two counter-propagating spherical waves in atmospheric turbulence is theoretically formulated. Closed-form expressions for the path weighting functions are obtained. It is found that the diffraction and refraction effects of turbulent cells make negative and positive contributions to the mean-square AOA difference, respectively, and the turbulent cells located at the midpoint of the propagation path have no contributions to the mean-square AOA difference. If the mean-square AOA difference is separated into the refraction and diffraction parts, the refraction part always dominates the diffraction one, and the ratio of the diffraction part to the refraction one is never larger than 0.5 for any turbulence spectrum. Based on the expressions for the mean-square AOA difference, formulae for the correlation coefficient between the angles of arrival of two counter-propagating spherical waves in atmospheric turbulence are derived. Numerical calculations are carried out by considering that the turbulence spectrum has no path dependence. It is shown that the mean-square AOA difference always approximates to the variance of AOA fluctuations. It is found that the correlation coefficient between the angles of arrival in the x or y direction of two counter-propagating spherical waves ranges from 0.46 to 0.5, implying that the instantaneous angles of arrival of two counter-propagating spherical waves in atmospheric turbulence are far from being perfectly correlated even when the turbulence spectrum does not vary along the path. PMID:26406667

  6. Indirect Determinations of Atomic Radii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Noojin

    1976-01-01

    Describes laboratory activities which relate the mass, volume, density, and radii of atoms through the assumption that the smallest unit of matter is a cubic box containing one atom. From calculations based on macroscopic materials, the author feels that the concept of an atom may be better developed. (CP)

  7. Quantified Choice of Root-Mean-Square Errors of Approximation for Evaluation and Power Analysis of Small Differences between Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Libo; Bentler, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    MacCallum, Browne, and Cai (2006) proposed a new framework for evaluation and power analysis of small differences between nested structural equation models (SEMs). In their framework, the null and alternative hypotheses for testing a small difference in fit and its related power analyses were defined by some chosen root-mean-square error of…

  8. Characterization and assessment of different algorithms for retrieval of mean square slopes from GNSS-R measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarizia, Maria Paola; Ruf, Christopher; Gommenginger, Christine

    2013-04-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) exploits signals of opportunity from navigation constellations (e.g. GPS, GLONASS, Galileo), scattered by the surface of the ocean, to retrieve the surface wind and wave fields. GNSS-R represents a true innovation in remote sensing, and it is receiving a growing interest from the scientific community. Its main advantages lie in the dense space-time sampling capabilities, the ability of L-band signals to penetrate well through rain, and the possibility of simple, low-cost/low-power GNSS receivers. These recognized strengths of GNSS-R recently led to the approval of the NASA EV-2 Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS), a spaceborne mission focused on tropical cyclone (TC) inner core process studies. CYGNSS attempts to resolve the problem of inadequate observations and modeling of the inner core, which represents the principal deficiency with current TC intensity forecasts, and which can be overcome with GNSS-R. The present study focuses on the information content about the sea surface roughness and wind speed, that is contained in spaceborne GNSS-R Delay-Doppler Maps (DDMs). A number of algorithms for the retrieval of Mean Square Slopes (MSS) - representative of the surface roughness - are analyzed. These include existing algorithms based on least-square fitting procedures (e.g. 2D least-square fitting of DDMs, using the Zavorotny-Voronovich DDM theoretical model), or based on direct observables (e.g. DDM volume), as well as "new" algorithms, which make use of waveforms derived from the DDM, which have thusfar been unexploited (e.g. integrated delay and Doppler waveforms). The analysis is carried out using simulated DDMs generated by the mature forward model end-to-end simulator developed for CYGNSS. A comparison of the results obtained for different retrieval algorithms will be presented. In particular, the performance of the algorithms considered is investigated and characterized for the case of

  9. Nuclear radii calculations in various theoretical approaches for nucleus-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Merino, C.; Novikov, I. S.; Shabelski, Yu.

    2009-12-15

    The information about sizes and nuclear density distributions in unstable (radioactive) nuclei is usually extracted from the data on interaction of radioactive nuclear beams with a nuclear target. We show that in the case of nucleus-nucleus collisions the values of the parameters depend somewhat strongly on the considered theoretical approach and on the assumption about the parametrization of the nuclear density distribution. The obtained values of root-mean-square radii (R{sub rms}) for stable nuclei with atomic weights A=12-40 vary by approximately 0.1 fm when calculated in the optical approximation, in the rigid target approximation, and using the exact expression of the Glauber theory. We present several examples of R{sub rms} radii calculations using these three theoretical approaches and compare these results with the data obtained from electron-nucleus scattering.

  10. Proton Radii of B12-17 Define a Thick Neutron Surface in B17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estradé, A.; Kanungo, R.; Horiuchi, W.; Ameil, F.; Atkinson, J.; Ayyad, Y.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Dillmann, I.; Evdokimov, A.; Farinon, F.; Geissel, H.; Guastalla, G.; Janik, R.; Kimura, M.; Knöbel, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Marta, M.; Mostazo, M.; Mukha, I.; Nociforo, C.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Sitar, B.; Strmen, P.; Suzuki, Y.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, J.; Tanihata, I.; Terashima, S.; Vargas, J.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.

    2014-09-01

    The first determination of radii of point proton distribution (proton radii) of B12-17 from charge-changing cross sections (σCC) measurements at the FRS, GSI, Darmstadt is reported. The proton radii are deduced from a finite-range Glauber model analysis of the σCC. The radii show an increase from B13 to B17 and are consistent with predictions from the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics model for the neutron-rich nuclei. The measurements show the existence of a thick neutron surface with neutron-proton radius difference of 0.51(0.11) fm in B17.

  11. DETERMINATION OF STELLAR RADII FROM ASTEROSEISMIC DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Sarbani; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne E-mail: w.j.chaplin@bham.ac.u

    2010-02-20

    The NASA Kepler mission is designed to find planets through transits. Accurate and precise radii of the detected planets depend on knowing the radius of the host star accurately, which is difficult unless the temperature and luminosity of the star are known precisely. Kepler, however, has an asteroseismology program that will provide seismic variables that can characterize stellar radii easily, accurately, and extremely precisely. In this paper, we describe the Yale-Birmingham (YB) method to determine stellar radii using a combination of seismic and conventional variables and analyze the effect of these variables on the result. We find that for main-sequence stars, a knowledge of the parallax is not important to get accurate radii using the YB method: we can get results to an accuracy and precision of better than a few percent if we know the effective temperature and the seismic parameters for these stars. Metallicity does not make much difference either. However, good estimates of the effective temperature and metallicity, along with those of the seismic parameters, are essential to determine radii of subgiants properly. On the other hand, for red giants we find that determining radii properly is not possible without a good estimate of the parallax. We find that the so-called 'surface term' in the seismic data has minimal effect on the inferred radii. Uncertainties in the convective mixing length can matter under some circumstances and can cause a systematic shift in the inferred radii. Blind tests with data simulated to match those expected from the asteroseismic survey phase of Kepler show that it will be possible to infer stellar radii successfully using our method.

  12. Radii and Binding Energies in Oxygen Isotopes: A Challenge for Nuclear Forces.

    PubMed

    Lapoux, V; Somà, V; Barbieri, C; Hergert, H; Holt, J D; Stroberg, S R

    2016-07-29

    We present a systematic study of both nuclear radii and binding energies in (even) oxygen isotopes from the valley of stability to the neutron drip line. Both charge and matter radii are compared to state-of-the-art ab initio calculations along with binding energy systematics. Experimental matter radii are obtained through a complete evaluation of the available elastic proton scattering data of oxygen isotopes. We show that, in spite of a good reproduction of binding energies, ab initio calculations with conventional nuclear interactions derived within chiral effective field theory fail to provide a realistic description of charge and matter radii. A novel version of two- and three-nucleon forces leads to considerable improvement of the simultaneous description of the three observables for stable isotopes but shows deficiencies for the most neutron-rich systems. Thus, crucial challenges related to the development of nuclear interactions remain. PMID:27517768

  13. Radii and Binding Energies in Oxygen Isotopes: A Challenge for Nuclear Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapoux, V.; Somà, V.; Barbieri, C.; Hergert, H.; Holt, J. D.; Stroberg, S. R.

    2016-07-01

    We present a systematic study of both nuclear radii and binding energies in (even) oxygen isotopes from the valley of stability to the neutron drip line. Both charge and matter radii are compared to state-of-the-art ab initio calculations along with binding energy systematics. Experimental matter radii are obtained through a complete evaluation of the available elastic proton scattering data of oxygen isotopes. We show that, in spite of a good reproduction of binding energies, ab initio calculations with conventional nuclear interactions derived within chiral effective field theory fail to provide a realistic description of charge and matter radii. A novel version of two- and three-nucleon forces leads to considerable improvement of the simultaneous description of the three observables for stable isotopes but shows deficiencies for the most neutron-rich systems. Thus, crucial challenges related to the development of nuclear interactions remain.

  14. Fluctuation analysis of time-averaged mean-square displacement for the Langevin equation with time-dependent and fluctuating diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uneyama, Takashi; Miyaguchi, Tomoshige; Akimoto, Takuma

    2015-09-01

    The mean-square displacement (MSD) is widely utilized to study the dynamical properties of stochastic processes. The time-averaged MSD (TAMSD) provides some information on the dynamics which cannot be extracted from the ensemble-averaged MSD. In particular, the relative standard deviation (RSD) of the TAMSD can be utilized to study the long-time relaxation behavior. In this work, we consider a class of Langevin equations which are multiplicatively coupled to time-dependent and fluctuating diffusivities. Various interesting dynamics models such as entangled polymers and supercooled liquids can be interpreted as the Langevin equations with time-dependent and fluctuating diffusivities. We derive a general formula for the RSD of the TAMSD for the Langevin equation with the time-dependent and fluctuating diffusivity. We show that the RSD can be expressed in terms of the correlation function of the diffusivity. The RSD exhibits the crossover at the long time region. The crossover time is related to a weighted average relaxation time for the diffusivity. Thus the crossover time gives some information on the relaxation time of fluctuating diffusivity which cannot be extracted from the ensemble-averaged MSD. We discuss the universality and possible applications of the formula via some simple examples.

  15. Autocorrelation standard deviation and root mean square frequency analysis of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell to monitor for hydrogen and air undersupply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joo Gon; Mukherjee, Santanu; Bates, Alex; Zickel, Benjamin; Park, Sam; Son, Byung Rak; Choi, Jae Sung; Kwon, Osung; Lee, Dong Ha; Chung, Hyun-Youl

    2015-12-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells are a promising energy conversion device which can help to solve urgent environmental and economic problems. Among the various types of fuel cells, the air breathing proton exchange membrane fuel cell, which minimizes the balance of plant, has drawn a lot of attention due to its superior energy density. In this study a compact, air breathing, proton exchange membrane fuel cell based on Nafion and a Pt/C membrane electrode assembly was designed. The fuel cell was tested using a Scribner Associates 850e fuel cell test station. Specifically, the hydrogen fuel and oxygen starvation of the fuel cell were accurately and systematically tested and analyzed using a frequency analysis method which can analyze the input and output frequency. The analysis of the frequency variation under a fuel starvation condition was done using RMSF (root mean square frequency) and ACSD (autocorrelation standard deviation). The study reveals two significant results: first, the fuel starvations show entirely different phenomenon in both RMSF and ACSD and second, the results of the Autocorrelation show clearer results for fuel starvation detection than the results with RMSF.

  16. On the effective ionic radii for ammonium.

    PubMed

    Sidey, Vasyl

    2016-08-01

    A set of effective ionic radii corresponding to different coordination numbers (CNs) and compatible with the radii system by Shannon [Acta Cryst. (1976), A32, 751-767] has been derived for ammonium: 1.40 Å (CN = IV), 1.48 Å (CN = VI), 1.54 Å (CN = VIII) and 1.67 Å (CN = XII). The bond-valence parameters r0 = 2.3433 Å and B = 0.262 Å have been determined for ammonium-fluorine bonds. PMID:27484382

  17. Temperature variation of ultralow frequency modes and mean square displacements in solid lasamide (diuretic drug) studied by 35Cl-NQR, X-ray and DFT/QTAIM.

    PubMed

    Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia; Latosińska, Magdalena; Kasprzak, Jerzy; Tomczak, Magdalena; Maurin, Jan Krzysztof

    2012-10-25

    The application of combined (35)Cl-NQR/X-ray/DFT/QTAIM methods to study the temperature variation of anisotropic displacement parameters and ultralow frequency modes of anharmonic torsional vibrations in the solid state is illustrated on the example of 2,4-dichloro-5-sulfamolybenzoic acid (lasamide, DSBA) which is a diuretic and an intermediate in the synthesis of furosemide and thus its common impurity. The crystallographic structure of lasamide is solved by X-ray diffraction and refined to a final R-factor of 3.06% at room temperature. Lasamide is found to crystallize in the triclinic space group P-1, with two equivalent molecules in the unit cell a = 7.5984(3) Å, b = 8.3158(3) Å, c = 8.6892(3) Å; α = 81.212(3)°, β = 73.799(3)°, γ = 67.599(3)°. Its molecules form symmetric dimers linked by two short and linear intermolecular hydrogen bonds O-H···O (O-H···O = 2.648 Å and ∠OHO = 171.5°), which are further linked by weaker and longer intermolecular hydrogen bonds N-H···O (N-H···O = 2.965 Å and ∠NHO = 166.4°). Two (35)Cl-NQR resonance frequencies, 36.899 and 37.129 MHz, revealed at room temperature are assigned to chlorine sites at the ortho and para positions, relative to the carboxyl functional group, respectively. The difference in C-Cl(1) and C-Cl(2) bond lengths only slightly affects the value of (35)Cl-NQR frequencies, which results mainly from chemical inequivalence of chlorine atoms but also involvement in different intermolecular interactions pattern. The smooth decrease in both (35)Cl-NQR frequencies with increasing temperature in the range of 77-300 K testifies to the averaging of EFG tensor at each chlorine site due to anharmonic torsional vibrations. Lasamide is thermally stable; no temperature-induced release of chlorine or decomposition of this compound is detected. The temperature dependence of ultralow frequency modes of anharmonic small-angle internal torsional vibrations averaging EFG tensor and mean square angle

  18. Motion of chromosomal loci and the mean-squared displacement of a fractional Brownian motion in the presence of static and dynamic errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backlund, Mikael P.; Moerner, W. E.

    2015-03-01

    Mean-squared displacement (MSD) analysis is one of the most prevalent tools employed in the application of single-particle tracking to biological systems. In camera-based tracking, the effects of "static error" due to photon fluctuations and "dynamic error" due to motion blur on the MSD have been well-characterized for the case of pure Brownian motion, producing a known constant offset to the straight-line MSD. However, particles tracked in cellular environments often do not undergo pure Brownian motion, but instead can for instance exhibit anomalous diffusion wherein the MSD curve obeys a power law with respect to time, MSD=2D*τα, where D* is an effective diffusion coefficient and 0 < α <= 1. There are a number of models that can explain anomalous diffusive behavior in different subcellular contexts. Of these models, fractional Brownian motion (FBM) has been shown to accurately describe the motion of labeled particles such as mRNA and chromosomal loci as they traverse the cytoplasm or nucleoplasm (i.e. crowded viscoelastic environments). Despite the importance of FBM in biological tracking, there has yet to be a complete treatment of the MSD in the presence of static and dynamic errors analogous to the special case of pure Brownian motion. We here present a closed-form, analytical expression of the FBM MSD in the presence of both types of error. We have previously demonstrated its value in live-cell data by applying it to the study of chromosomal locus motion in budding yeast cells. Here we focus on validations in simulated data.

  19. Study of the charge radii of the stable lead isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Borchert, G.L.; Schult, O.W.B.; Speth, J.; Hansen, P.G.; Jonson, B.; Ravn, H.; McGrory, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    Isotope shifts have been measured of the K/sub ..cap alpha..l/ x-ray lines emitted after photo ionization of /sup 204/Pb, /sup 206/Pb, /sup 207/Pb and /sup 208/Pb samples. The results are compared with theoretical values for delta < r/sup 2/> calculated with a microscopic model. The x-ray shift data are also compared with optical data and the nuclear parameters lambda derived from electron scattering results.

  20. Change of caged dynamics at Tg in hydrated proteins: Trend of mean squared displacements after correcting for the methyl-group rotation contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, K. L.; Capaccioli, S.; Paciaroni, A.

    2013-06-01

    The question whether the dynamics of hydrated proteins changes with temperature on crossing the glass transition temperature like that found in conventional glassformers is an interesting one. Recently, we have shown that a change of temperature dependence of the mean square displacement (MSD) at Tg is present in proteins solvated with bioprotectants, such as sugars or glycerol with or without the addition of water, coexisting with the dynamic transition at a higher temperature Td. The dynamical change at Tg is similar to that in conventional glassformers at sufficiently short times and low enough temperatures, where molecules are mutually caged by the intermolecular potential. This is a general and fundamental property of glassformers which is always observed at or near Tg independent of the energy resolution of the spectrometer, and is also the basis of the dynamical change of solvated proteins at Tg. When proteins are solvated with bioprotectants they show higher Tg and Td than the proteins hydrated by water alone, due to the stabilizing action of excipients, thus the observation of the change of T-dependence of the MSD at Tg is unobstructed by the methyl-group rotation contribution at lower temperatures [S. Capaccioli, K. L. Ngai, S. Ancherbak, and A. Paciaroni, J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 1745 (2012)], 10.1021/jp2057892. On the other hand, in the case of proteins hydrated by water alone unambiguous evidence of the break at Tg is hard to find, because of their lower Tg and Td. Notwithstanding, in this paper, we provide evidence for the change at Tg of the T-dependence of proteins hydrated by pure water. This evidence turns out from (i) neutron scattering experimental investigations where the sample has been manipulated by either full or partial deuteration to suppress the methyl-group rotation contribution, and (ii) neutron scattering experimental investigations where the energy resolution is such that only motions with characteristic times shorter than 15 ps can be

  1. Matter Radii of Light Halo Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Khalili, J. S.; Tostevin, J. A.

    1996-05-01

    We reexamine the matter radii of diffuse halo nuclei, as deduced from reaction cross section measurements at high energy. Careful consideration is given to the intrinsic few-body structure of these projectiles and the adiabatic nature of the projectile-target interaction. Using 11Li, 11Be, and 8B as examples we show that data require significantly larger matter radii than previously reported. The revised value for 11Li of 3.55 fm is consistent with three-body models with significant 1s-intruder state components, which reproduce experimental 9Li momentum distributions following 11Li breakup, but were hitherto thought to be at variance with cross section data.

  2. Proton Distribution Radii of 12-19C Illuminate Features of Neutron Halos

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kanungo, R.; Horiuchi, W.; Hagen, Gaute; Jansen, Gustav R.; Navratil, Petr; Ameil, F.; Atkinson, J.; Ayyad, Y.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Dillmann, I.; et al

    2016-09-02

    We report proton radii of 12-19C densities derived from first accurate charge changing cross section measurements at 900A MeV with a carbon target. A thick neutron surface evolves from ~0.5 fm in 15C to ~1 fm in 19C. Also, the halo radius in 19C is found to be 6.4±0.7 fm as large as 11Li. Ab initio calculations based on chiral nucleon-nucleon and three-nucleon forces reproduce the radii well.

  3. Novel algorithm and MATLAB-based program for automated power law analysis of single particle, time-dependent mean-square displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umansky, Moti; Weihs, Daphne

    2012-08-01

    In many physical and biophysical studies, single-particle tracking is utilized to reveal interactions, diffusion coefficients, active modes of driving motion, dynamic local structure, micromechanics, and microrheology. The basic analysis applied to those data is to determine the time-dependent mean-square displacement (MSD) of particle trajectories and perform time- and ensemble-averaging of similar motions. The motion of particles typically exhibits time-dependent power-law scaling, and only trajectories with qualitatively and quantitatively comparable MSD should be ensembled. Ensemble averaging trajectories that arise from different mechanisms, e.g., actively driven and diffusive, is incorrect and can result inaccurate correlations between structure, mechanics, and activity. We have developed an algorithm to automatically and accurately determine power-law scaling of experimentally measured single-particle MSD. Trajectories can then categorized and grouped according to user defined cutoffs of time, amplitudes, scaling exponent values, or combinations. Power-law fits are then provided for each trajectory alongside categorized groups of trajectories, histograms of power laws, and the ensemble-averaged MSD of each group. The codes are designed to be easily incorporated into existing user codes. We expect that this algorithm and program will be invaluable to anyone performing single-particle tracking, be it in physical or biophysical systems. Catalogue identifier: AEMD_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMD_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 25 892 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5 572 780 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MATLAB (MathWorks Inc.) version 7.11 (2010b) or higher, program

  4. Reliable Radii for M Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Andrew; Feiden, Gregory A.; Gaidos, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Precise and accurate parameters for late-type (late K and M) dwarf stars are critical for characterizing their planets. A deluge of planets discovered by Kepler has driven the need for even more precise stellar radii. We present our efforts to better constrain the luminosity-radius and Teff-radius relations for late-type (K5-M6) stars, taking advantage of improved techniques to calculate bolometric fluxes and [Fe/H] for M dwarfs. We determine effective temperatures for these stars by comparing observed spectra to atmospheric models, and confirm the accuracy of these temperatures using stars with temperatures determined from long-baseline optical interferometry. Using the Stefan-Boltzmann law we can empirically determine radii for these stars to better than 5%. We find the Teff-radius relation depends strongly on [Fe/H], which was missed in earlier studies that used smaller samples or less precise methods. We expect our empirical relations to be increasingly useful with the arrival of Gaia parallaxes in the near future.

  5. Stellar radii from long-baseline interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervella, Pierre

    2008-10-01

    Long baseline interferometers now measure the angular diameters of nearby stars with sub-percent accuracy. They can be translated in photospheric radii when the parallax is known, thus creating a novel and powerful constraint for stellar models. I present applications of interferometric radius measurements to the modeling of main sequence stars. Over the last few years, we obtained accurate measurements of the linear radius of many of the nearest stars: Procyon A, 61 Cyg A & B, α Cen A & B, Sirius A, Proxima. . . Firstly, I describe the example of our modeling of Procyon A (F5IV-V) with the CESAM code, constrained using spectrophotometry, the linear radius, and asteroseismic frequencies. I also present our recent results on the low-mass 61 Cyg system (K5V+K7V), for which asteroseismic frequencies have not been detected yet.

  6. The mass and angular momentum distribution of simulated massive early-type galaxies to large radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xufen; Gerhard, Ortwin; Naab, Thorsten; Oser, Ludwig; Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma; Hilz, Michael; Churazov, Eugene; Lyskova, Natalya

    2014-03-01

    We study the dark and luminous mass distributions, circular velocity curves (CVCs), line-of-sight kinematics and angular momenta for a sample of 42 cosmological zoom simulations of galaxies with stellar masses from 2.0 × 1010 to 3.4 × 1011 M⊙ h-1. Using a temporal smoothing technique, we are able to reach large radii. We find the following. The dark matter halo density profiles outside a few kpc follow simple power-law models, with flat dark matter CVCs for lower mass systems, and rising CVCs for high-mass haloes. The projected stellar density distributions at large radii can be fitted by Sérsic functions with n ≳ 10, larger than for typical early-type galaxies (ETGs). The massive systems have nearly flat total (luminous plus dark matter) CVCs at large radii, while the less massive systems have mildly decreasing CVCs. The slope of the circular velocity at large radii correlates with circular velocity itself. The dark matter fractions within the projected stellar half-mass radius Re are in the range 15-30 per cent and increase to 40-65 per cent at 5Re. Larger and more massive galaxies have higher dark matter fractions. The fractions and trends with mass and size are in agreement with observational estimates, even though the stellar-to-total mass ratio is ˜2-3 times higher than estimated for ETGs. The short axes of simulated galaxies and their host dark matter haloes are well aligned and their short-to-long axis ratios are correlated. The stellar root mean square velocity vrms(R) profiles are slowly declining, in agreement with planetary nebulae observations in the outer haloes of most ETGs. The line-of-sight velocity fields {bar{v}} show that rotation properties at small and large radii are correlated. Most radial profiles for the cumulative specific angular momentum parameter λ(R) are nearly

  7. THERMAL PROCESSES GOVERNING HOT-JUPITER RADII

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, David S.; Burrows, Adam E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu

    2013-07-20

    There have been many proposed explanations for the larger-than-expected radii of some transiting hot Jupiters, including either stellar or orbital energy deposition deep in the atmosphere or deep in the interior. In this paper, we explore the important influences on hot-Jupiter radius evolution of (1) additional heat sources in the high atmosphere, the deep atmosphere, and deep in the convective interior; (2) consistent cooling of the deep interior through the planetary dayside, nightside, and poles; (3) the degree of heat redistribution to the nightside; and (4) the presence of an upper atmosphere absorber inferred to produce anomalously hot upper atmospheres and inversions in some close-in giant planets. In particular, we compare the radius expansion effects of atmospheric and deep-interior heating at the same power levels and derive the power required to achieve a given radius increase when night-side cooling is incorporated. We find that models that include consistent day/night cooling are more similar to isotropically irradiated models when there is more heat redistributed from the dayside to the nightside. In addition, we consider the efficacy of ohmic heating in the atmosphere and/or convective interior in inflating hot Jupiters. Among our conclusions are that (1) the most highly irradiated planets cannot stably have uB {approx}> 10 km s{sup -1} G over a large fraction of their daysides, where u is the zonal wind speed and B is the dipolar magnetic field strength in the atmosphere, and (2) that ohmic heating cannot in and of itself lead to a runaway in planet radius.

  8. Isotope-Shift Measurement of High-energy Highly Charged Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, S.; Ariga, T.; Inabe, N.; Kase, M.; Tanihata, I.; Wakasugi, M.; Yano, Y.

    2001-10-01

    Isotope-shift measurement by the laser spectroscopic method was aimed to apply for radioactive isotope beams up to uranium created by projectile fragmentation at RIKEN RI beam factory (T. Katayama, et al.,): Nucl. Phys., A626, 545c (1997).to make a systematic study of the mean square nuclear charge radii. The present work was started to verify the feasibility of the method. Projectile fragments are high-energy highly charged ions and weak currents. Therefore we designed ultralow-background photon-detection system (M. Wakasugi, et al.,): Nucl. Instr. and Meth., A419, 50 (1998).for collinear laser spectroscopy of such ion beams. To demonstrate isotope-shift measurement, we measured precisely the 1s2s ^3S_1-1s2p ^3P_0,1,2 transition energy of He-like ^12C ion accelerated up to 0.9 MeV/u and ^13C ion 0.6 MeV/u. For the precision measurement, the uncertainty coming from the ambiguity in the absolute ion beam velocity was suppressed by means of that the resonance energy was measured by two laser beams which propagate in parallel and anti-parallel directions to the ion beam. As the result, isotope shifts of these transitions were obtained with the accuracy of 10 %. The lower limit of the ion-beam intensity for the measurement is estimated to be 2000 ions/s.

  9. Hall Determination of Atomic Radii of Alkali Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houari, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    I will propose here an alternative method for determining atomic radii of alkali metals based on the Hall measurements of their free electron densities and the knowledge of their crystal structure. (Contains 2 figures.)

  10. Wetting morphologies on an array of fibers of different radii.

    PubMed

    Sauret, Alban; Boulogne, François; Cébron, David; Dressaire, Emilie; Stone, Howard A

    2015-05-28

    We investigate the equilibrium morphology of a finite volume of liquid placed on two parallel rigid fibers of different radii. As observed for identical radii fibers, the liquid is either in a column morphology or adopts a drop shape depending on the inter-fiber distance. However the cross-sectional area and the critical inter-fiber distance at which the transition occurs are both modified by the polydispersity of the fibers. Using energy considerations, we analytically predict the critical inter-fiber distance corresponding to the transition between the column and the drop morphologies. This distance depends both on the radii of the fibers and on the contact angle of the liquid. We perform experiments using a perfectly wetting liquid on two parallel nylon fibers: the results are in good agreement with our analytical model. The morphology of the capillary bridges between fibers of different radii is relevant to the modeling of large arrays of polydisperse fibers. PMID:25899307

  11. Neutron Radii from Low Energy Pion Scattering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyles, William

    Recent electron scattering measurements and muonic atom studies have allowed precise determinations of the charge distributions of nuclei. Measurements of the neutron distributions, however, have not progressed to this degree of sophistication, largely because of the uncertainties in the hadron-nucleus interaction. Charge distribution measurements provide good tests of nuclear structure calculations, but measurements of neutron distributions will provide independent constraints on these calculations and the potentials used. In this experiment, (pi)('-) differential cross section ratios were measured on pairs of isotopes (('36)S,('32)S), (('34)S,('32)S) with 50 MeV pions and (('26)Mg,('24)Mg) with 45 MeV pions. Absolute differential cross sections were also measured for ('32)S and ('24)Mg. Magnetic spectro -meters were used to collect the data. The cross section ratios were compared to optical model calcula-tions in which the parameters of a Fermi function representing the neutron distribution of the larger isotope of each pair were varied. The rms radius difference between the two isotopes producing the best fit was found to be independent of the details of the optical potential used, as long as the potential produced a fit to the absolute cross sections. The neutron distribution of the larger isotope was also rep-resented as a Fermi function modified by a sum of spherical Bessel functions, the coefficients of which were allowed to vary. The results for the rms radius differences were consistent with the Fermi function fits, except for ('34)S-('32)S, where the results differed by a full standard deviation. The rms radius differences found for the sulfur isotopes agreed with the results of shell-model calculations by Hodgson (Str82,Hod83). The extracted rms radius difference of the magnesium isotopes was one standard deviation less than the shell-model prediction. The results for the Fermi function fits, Fourier Bessell fits and the single particle potential (SPP

  12. Nuclear States with Abnormally Large Radii (size Isomers)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogloblin, A. A.; Demyanova, A. S.; Danilov, A. N.; Belyaeva, T. L.; Goncharov, S. A.

    2015-06-01

    Application of the methods of measuring the radii of the short-lived excited states (Modified diffraction model MDM, Inelastic nuclear rainbow scattering method INRS, Asymptotic normalization coefficients method ANC) to the analysis of some nuclear reactions provide evidence of existing in 9Be, 11B, 12C, 13C the excited states whose radii exceed those of the corresponding ground states by ~ 30%. Two types of structure of these "size isomers" were identified: neutron halo an α-clusters.

  13. ON THE ANOMALOUS RADII OF THE TRANSITING EXTRASOLAR PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, Gregory; Crismani, Matteo

    2011-03-01

    We present a systematic evaluation of the agreement between the observed radii of 90 well-characterized transiting extrasolar giant planets and their corresponding model radii. Our model radii are drawn from previously published calculations of coreless giant planets that have attained their asymptotic radii, and which have been tabulated for a range of planet masses and equilibrium temperatures. (We report a two-dimensional polynomial fitting function that accurately represents the models.) As expected, the model radii provide a statistically significant improvement over a null hypothesis that the sizes of giant planets are completely independent of mass and effective temperature. As is well known, however, fiducial models provide an insufficient explanation; the planetary radius anomalies, R{identical_to}R{sub obs}-R{sub pred}, are strongly correlated with planetary equilibrium temperature. We find that the radius anomalies have a best-fit dependence, R{proportional_to}T{sub eff}{sup {alpha}}, with {alpha} = 1.4 {+-} 0.6. Incorporating this relation into the model radii leads to substantially less scatter in the radius correlation. The extra temperature dependence represents an important constraint on theoretical models for hot Jupiters. Using simple scaling arguments, we find support for the hypothesis of Batygin and Stevenson that this correlation can be attributed to a planetary heating mechanism that is mediated by magnetohydrodynamic coupling between the planetary magnetic field and near-surface flow that is accompanied by ohmic dissipation at adiabatic depth. Additionally, we find that the temperature dependence is likely too strong to admit kinetic heating as the primary source of anomalous energy generation within the majority of the observed transiting planets.

  14. Evolution of cooperation among mobile agents with heterogenous view radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Wei-Ye; Du, Wen-Bo; Cao, Xian-Bin

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we study cooperative behavior among mobile agents; the agents have heterogenous view radii and they play the prisoner’s dilemma game with those being within their vision fields. It is found that the cooperation level is remarkably promoted when the heterogeneity of view radii is considered, and the degree distribution of the system is investigated to explain this interesting phenomenon. Moreover, we report that the cooperative behavior is best favored by low density, moderate view radius, and small moving speed. Our findings may be helpful in understanding cooperative behavior in natural and social systems consisting of mobile agents.

  15. Factors affecting the radii of close-in transiting exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enoch, B.; Collier Cameron, A.; Horne, K.

    2012-04-01

    Context. The radius of an exoplanet may be affected by various factors, including irradiation received from the host star, the mass of the planet and its heavy element content. A significant number of transiting exoplanets have now been discovered for which the mass, radius, semi-major axis, host star metallicity and stellar effective temperature are known. Aims: We use multivariate regression models to determine the power-law dependence of planetary radius on planetary equilibrium temperature Teq, planetary mass Mp, stellar metallicity [Fe/H], orbital semi-major axis a, and tidal heating rate Htidal, for 119 transiting planets in three distinct mass regimes. Methods: We fit models initially to all 119 planets, resulting in fairly high scatter between fitted and observed radii, and subsequently to three subsets of these planets: Saturn-mass planets, Jupiter-mass planets, and high-mass planets. Results: We find models for each subset that fit the observed planetary radii well and show the importance of the various environmental parameters on each subset. Conclusions: We determine that heating leads to larger planet radii, as expected, increasing mass leads to increased or decreased radii of low-mass (<0.5 RJ) and high-mass (>2.0 RJ) planets, respectively (with no mass effect on Jupiter-mass planets), and increased host-star metallicity leads to smaller planetary radii, indicating a relationship between host-star metallicity and planet heavy element content. For Saturn-mass planets, a good fit to the radii may be obtained from log(Rp/RJ) = -0.077 + 0.450 log(Mp/MJ) - 0.314 [Fe/H] + 0.671 log(a/AU) + 0.398 log(Teq/K). The radii of Jupiter-mass planets may be fit by log(Rp/RJ) = - 2.217 + 0.856 log(Teq/K) + 0.291 log(a/AU). High-mass planets' radii are best fit by log(Rp/RJ) = -1.067 + 0.380 log(Teq/K) - 0.093 log(Mp/MJ) - 0.057 [Fe/H] + 0.019 log(Htidal/1 × 1020). These equations produce a very good fit to the observed radii, with a mean absolute difference between

  16. Accurate nuclear radii and binding energies from a chiral interaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ekstrom, Jan A.; Jansen, G. R.; Wendt, Kyle A.; Hagen, Gaute; Papenbrock, Thomas F.; Carlsson, Boris; Forssen, Christian; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Navratil, Petr; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2015-05-01

    With the goal of developing predictive ab initio capability for light and medium-mass nuclei, two-nucleon and three-nucleon forces from chiral effective field theory are optimized simultaneously to low-energy nucleon-nucleon scattering data, as well as binding energies and radii of few-nucleon systems and selected isotopes of carbon and oxygen. Coupled-cluster calculations based on this interaction, named NNLOsat, yield accurate binding energies and radii of nuclei up to 40Ca, and are consistent with the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter. In addition, the low-lying collective Jπ=3- states in 16O and 40Ca are described accurately, while spectra for selected p- and sd-shellmore » nuclei are in reasonable agreement with experiment.« less

  17. Observational constraints on neutron star masses and radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. Coleman; Lamb, Frederick K.

    2016-03-01

    Precise and reliable measurements of the masses and radii of neutron stars with a variety of masses would provide valuable guidance for improving models of the properties of cold matter with densities above the saturation density of nuclear matter. Several different approaches for measuring the masses and radii of neutron stars have been tried or proposed, including analyzing the X-ray fluxes and spectra of the emission from neutron stars in quiescent low-mass X-ray binary systems and thermonuclear burst sources; fitting the energy-dependent X-ray waveforms of rotation-powered millisecond pulsars, burst oscillations with millisecond periods, and accretion-powered millisecond pulsars; and modeling the gravitational radiation waveforms of coalescing double neutron star and neutron star - black hole binary systems. We describe the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches, most of which currently have substantial systematic errors, and discuss the prospects for decreasing the systematic errors in each method.

  18. A differential equation for the Generalized Born radii.

    PubMed

    Fogolari, Federico; Corazza, Alessandra; Esposito, Gennaro

    2013-06-28

    The Generalized Born (GB) model offers a convenient way of representing electrostatics in complex macromolecules like proteins or nucleic acids. The computation of atomic GB radii is currently performed by different non-local approaches involving volume or surface integrals. Here we obtain a non-linear second-order partial differential equation for the Generalized Born radius, which may be solved using local iterative algorithms. The equation is derived under the assumption that the usual GB approximation to the reaction field obeys Laplace's equation. The equation admits as particular solutions the correct GB radii for the sphere and the plane. The tests performed on a set of 55 different proteins show an overall agreement with other reference GB models and "perfect" Poisson-Boltzmann based values. PMID:23676843

  19. Accurate nuclear radii and binding energies from a chiral interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ekstrom, Jan A.; Jansen, G. R.; Wendt, Kyle A.; Hagen, Gaute; Papenbrock, Thomas F.; Carlsson, Boris; Forssen, Christian; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Navratil, Petr; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2015-05-01

    With the goal of developing predictive ab initio capability for light and medium-mass nuclei, two-nucleon and three-nucleon forces from chiral effective field theory are optimized simultaneously to low-energy nucleon-nucleon scattering data, as well as binding energies and radii of few-nucleon systems and selected isotopes of carbon and oxygen. Coupled-cluster calculations based on this interaction, named NNLOsat, yield accurate binding energies and radii of nuclei up to 40Ca, and are consistent with the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter. In addition, the low-lying collective Jπ=3- states in 16O and 40Ca are described accurately, while spectra for selected p- and sd-shell nuclei are in reasonable agreement with experiment.

  20. Radii of atomic ions determined from diatomic ion-He bond lengths.

    PubMed

    Wright, Timothy G; Breckenridge, W H

    2010-03-11

    We propose a new definition of the effective radius of an atomic ion: the bond distance (R(e)) of the ion/He diatomic complex minus the van der Waals radius of the helium atom. Our rationale is that He is the most chemically inert and least polarizable atom, so that its interaction with the outer portions of the electron cloud causes the smallest perturbation of it. We show that such radii, which we denote R(XHe), make good qualitative sense. We also compare our R(XHe) values to more traditional ionic radii from solid crystal X-ray measurements, as well as estimates of such radii from "ionic" gas-phase MF, MOM, MF(+), and MO molecules, where M is a metal atom. Such comparisons lead to interesting conclusions about bonding in ionic crystals and in simple gas-phase oxide and fluoride molecules. The definition is shown to be reasonable for -1, +1, and even for many of the larger +2 atomic ions. Another advantage of the R(XHe) definition is that it is also consistently valid for ground states and excited states of both neutral atoms and atomic ions, even for open-shell np and nd cases where the electron clouds of the ions are not spherically symmetric and R(XHe) thus depends on the "approach" direction of the He atom. Finally, we note that when there is a contribution from covalent bonding with the He atom, and/or in cases where the ion is small and has a very high charge, so that there is distortion even of the He 1s electrons, R(XHe) is not expected to be representative of the size of the ion. We then suggest that in these cases small, and sometimes unphysical, values of R(XHe) are diagnostic of the fact that simple "physical" interactions have been supplemented by a "chemical" component. PMID:20055395

  1. Centrality dependence of pion freeze-out radii in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sN N}=2.76 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaraz, J. R. M.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Chunhui, Z.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; de, S.; de Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; de Falco, A.; de Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; de Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; di Bari, D.; di Mauro, A.; di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the measurement of freeze-out radii for pairs of identical-charge pions measured in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN}=2.76 TeV as a function of collision centrality and the average transverse momentum of the pair kT. Three-dimensional sizes of the system (femtoscopic radii), as well as direction-averaged one-dimensional radii are extracted. The radii decrease with kT, following a power-law behavior. This is qualitatively consistent with expectations from a collectively expanding system, produced in hydrodynamic calculations. The radii also scale linearly with 1 /3. This behavior is compared to world data on femtoscopic radii in heavy-ion collisions. While the dependence is qualitatively similar to results at smaller √{sNN}, a decrease in the ratio Rout/Rside is seen, which is in qualitative agreement with a specific prediction from hydrodynamic models: a change from inside-out to outside-in freeze-out configuration. The results provide further evidence for the production of a collective, strongly coupled system in heavy-ion collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  2. Variable atomic radii for continuum-solvent electrostatics calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Baojing; Agarwal, Manish; Wong, Chung F.

    2008-07-01

    We have developed a method to improve the description of solute cavity defined by the interlocking-sphere model for continuum-solvent electrostatics calculations. Many models choose atomic radii from a finite set of atom types or uses an even smaller set developed by Bondi [J. Phys. Chem. 68, 441 (1964)]. The new model presented here allowed each atom to adapt its radius according to its chemical environment. This was achieved by first approximating the electron density of a molecule by a superposition of atom-centered spherical Gaussian functions. The parameters of the Gaussian functions were then determined by optimizing a function that minimized the difference between the properties from the model and those from ab initio quantum calculations. These properties included the electrostatics potential on molecular surface and the electron density within the core of each atom. The size of each atom was then determined by finding the radius at which the electron density associated with the atom fell to a prechosen value. This value was different for different chemical elements and was chosen such that the averaged radius for each chemical element in a training set of molecules matched its Bondi radius. Thus, our model utilized only a few adjustable parameters—the above density cutoff values for different chemical elements—but had the flexibility of allowing every atom to adapt its radius according to its chemical environment. This variable-radii model gave better solvation energy for 31 small neutral molecules than the Bondi radii did, especially for a quantum mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann approach we developed earlier. The improvement was most significant for molecules with large dipole moment. Future directions for further improvement are also discussed.

  3. A Technical Memorandum On Core Radii In Lens Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanek, Christopher S.

    Quantitative estimates of lensing probabilities must be self-consistent. In particular, for asymptotically isothermal models: (1) using the $(3/2)^{1/2}$ correction for the velocity dispersion overestimates the expected number of lenses by 150\\% and their average separations by 50\\%, thereby introducing large cosmological errors; (2) when a core radius is added to the SIS model, the velocity dispersion must be increased; and (3) cross sections and magnification bias cannot be separated when computing the lensing probability. When we self-consistently calculate the effects of finite core radii in flat cosmological models, we find that the cosmological limits are independent of the core radius.

  4. Matter radii of {sup 32-35}Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Kanungo, R.; Perro, C.; Prochazka, A.; Farinon, F.; Knoebel, R.; Horiuchi, W.; Nociforo, C.; Aumann, T.; Geissel, H.; Gerl, J.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Mahata, K.; Scheidenberger, C.; Weick, H.; Winkler, M.; Boutin, D.; Lenske, H.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Davids, B.

    2011-02-15

    The interaction cross sections of {sup 32-35}Mg at 900A MeV have been measured using the fragment separator at GSI. The deviation from the r{sub 0}A{sup 1/3} trend is slightly larger for {sup 35}Mg, signaling the possible formation of a longer tail in the neutron distribution for {sup 35}Mg. The radii extracted from a Glauber model analysis with Fermi densities are consistent with models predicting the development of neutron skins.

  5. Correlating hydrodynamic radii with that of two-dimensional nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Yuan; Kan, Yuwei; Clearfield, Abraham; Choi, Hyunho; Liang, Hong

    2015-12-21

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is one of the most adapted methods to measure the size of nanoparticles, as referred to the hydrodynamic radii (R{sub h}). However, the R{sub h} represents only that of three-dimensional spherical nanoparticles. In the present research, the size of two-dimensional (2D) nanoparticles of yttrium oxide (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and zirconium phosphate (ZrP) was evaluated through comparing their hydrodynamic diameters via DLS with lateral sizes obtained using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. We demonstrate that the hydrodynamic radii are correlated with the lateral sizes of both square and circle shaped 2D nanoparticles. Two proportional coefficients, i.e., correcting factors, are proposed for the Brownian motion status of 2D nanoparticles. The correction is possible by simplifying the calculation of integrals in the case of small thickness approximation. The correcting factor has great significance for investigating the translational diffusion behavior of 2D nanoparticles in a liquid and in effective and low-cost measurement in terms of size and morphology of shape-specific nanoparticles.

  6. Correlating hydrodynamic radii with that of two-dimensional nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yuan; Kan, Yuwei; Choi, Hyunho; Clearfield, Abraham; Liang, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is one of the most adapted methods to measure the size of nanoparticles, as referred to the hydrodynamic radii (Rh). However, the Rh represents only that of three-dimensional spherical nanoparticles. In the present research, the size of two-dimensional (2D) nanoparticles of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) and zirconium phosphate (ZrP) was evaluated through comparing their hydrodynamic diameters via DLS with lateral sizes obtained using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. We demonstrate that the hydrodynamic radii are correlated with the lateral sizes of both square and circle shaped 2D nanoparticles. Two proportional coefficients, i.e., correcting factors, are proposed for the Brownian motion status of 2D nanoparticles. The correction is possible by simplifying the calculation of integrals in the case of small thickness approximation. The correcting factor has great significance for investigating the translational diffusion behavior of 2D nanoparticles in a liquid and in effective and low-cost measurement in terms of size and morphology of shape-specific nanoparticles.

  7. Charge Detection Mass Spectrometry with Almost Perfect Charge Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Keifer, David Z; Shinholt, Deven L; Jarrold, Martin F

    2015-10-20

    Charge detection mass spectrometry (CDMS) is a single-particle technique where the masses of individual ions are determined from simultaneous measurement of each ion's mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) and charge. CDMS has many desirable features: it has no upper mass limit, no mass discrimination, and it can analyze complex mixtures. However, the charge is measured directly, and the poor accuracy of the charge measurement has severely limited the mass resolution achievable with CDMS. Since the charge is quantized, it needs to be measured with sufficient accuracy to assign each ion to its correct charge state. This goal has now been largely achieved. By reducing the pressure to extend the trapping time and by implementing a novel analysis method that improves the signal-to-noise ratio and compensates for imperfections in the charge measurement, the uncertainty has been reduced to less than 0.20 e rmsd (root-mean-square deviation). With this unprecedented precision peaks due to different charge states are resolved in the charge spectrum. Further improvement can be achieved by quantizing the charge (rounding the measured charge to the nearest integer) and culling ions with measured charges midway between the integral values. After ions with charges more than one standard deviation from the mean are culled, the fraction of ions assigned to the wrong charge state is estimated to be 6.4 × 10(-5) (i.e., less than 1 in 15 000). Since almost all remaining ions are assigned to their correct charge state, the uncertainty in the mass is now almost entirely limited by the uncertainty in the m/z measurement. PMID:26418830

  8. Hypergravity effects on normal and avulsed developing avian radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negulesco, J. A.; Clark, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    Rhode Island red female chicks were subjected to complete closed fracture of the right radius at 2 weeks post-hatching. The animals were allowed to heal for 1 week at either earth-gravity or 2-G-hypergravity state with control and estrogen-injected groups. Intact and fractured radial length, weight, average epiphysial-diaphysial diameters, and length, width, and weight of healing fracture callus were measured. Daily 2000 IU estrogen administration for 7 d increased intact radial length. Estrogen augments the effects of the 2-G state by inhibiting growth and depleting the mass of both intact and fractured radii and by decreasing the average distal epiphysial diameter of fractured bones. Animals exposed to the hypergravity state without hormonal treatment showed decreased fractured radial length, weight, and smaller proximal epiphysial diameters. The measurable parameters of the fracture callus (width, length, and weight) were depressed by the hypergravity state regardless of whether the animal was untreated or supplemented with estrogen.

  9. Changes of charge radii and hyperfine interactions of the Dy isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. L.; Greenlees, G. W.

    1982-10-01

    A continuous wave dye laser and a thermal atomic beam were used to measure the optical isotope shifts and hyperfine splittings for the 5547 Å, 5639 Å, 5652 Å, 5974 Å, and the 5989 Å transition of the seven stable isotopes of dysprosium. The hyperfine splitting of the odd-A isotopes has been analyzed using the formalism of Sanders and Beck and the hyperfine anomaly has been extracted. Comparison with calculations using Nilsson wave functions is presented. The isotope shift measurements have been analyzed with published electronic and muonic x-ray isotope shifts to yield δ values and some estimates of the specific mass shift constant. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE 156-164Dy. Measured optical isotope shifts and hyperfine splittings. Deduced δ, A(4f126s 6p), B(4f126s 6p), and the hyperfine anomaly. Laser spectroscopy on atomic beams.

  10. Small radii of neutron stars as an indication of novel in-medium effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei-Zhou; Li, Bao-An; Fattoyev, F. J.

    2015-09-01

    At present, neutron star radii from both observations and model predictions remain very uncertain. Whereas different models can predict a wide range of neutron star radii, it is not possible for most models to predict radii that are smaller than about 10km, thus if such small radii are established in the future they will be very difficult to reconcile with model estimates. By invoking a new term in the equation of state that enhances the energy density, but leaves the pressure unchanged we simulate the current uncertainty in the neutron star radii. This new term can be possibly due to the exchange of the weakly interacting light U-boson with appropriate in-medium parameters, which does not compromise the success of the conventional nuclear models. The validity of this new scheme will be tested eventually by more precise measurements of neutron star radii.

  11. Cathode fall thickness of abnormal glow discharges between parallel-plane electrodes in different radii at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yangyang; Luo, Haiyun; Zou, Xiaobing; Wang, Xinxin

    2015-02-15

    In order to investigate the influence of electrode radius on the characteristics of cathode fall thickness, experiments of low-pressure (20 Pa ≤ p ≤ 30 Pa) abnormal glow discharge were carried out between parallel-plane electrodes in different radii keeping gap distance unchanged. Axial distributions of light intensity were obtained from the discharge images captured using a Charge Coupled Device camera. The assumption that the position of the negative glow peak coincides with the edge of cathode fall layer was verified based on a two-dimensional model, and the cathode fall thicknesses, d{sub c}, were calculated from the axial distributions of light intensity. It was observed that the position of peak emission shifts closer to the cathode as current or pressure grows. The dependence of cathode fall thickness on the gas pressure and normalized current J/p{sup 2} was presented, and it was found that for discharges between electrodes in large radius the curves of pd{sub c} against J/p{sup 2} were superimposed on each other, however, this phenomenon will not hold for discharges between the smaller electrodes. The reason for this phenomenon is that the transverse diffusions of charged particles are not the same in two gaps between electrodes with different radii.

  12. Calculations of neutron and proton radii of cesium isotopes. Final report, April 23--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This task involved the calculation of neutron and proton radii of cesium isotopes. The author has written a computer code that calculates radii according to two models: Myers 1983 and FRDM 1992. Results of calculations in both these models for both cesium and francium isotopes are attached as figures. He is currently interpreting these results in collaboration with D. Vieira and J.R. Nix, and they expect to use the computer code for further studies of nuclear radii.

  13. The Effective Temperatures, Radii and Masses of Dwarf Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhee

    1996-02-01

    Using the flux values determined with the infrared flux method (IRFM) developed by Blackwell and Lynas-Gray (1993), we derived the empirical relationship between flux (F v ) and (V — K) colour appropriate to Dwarf Cepheids. For three Dwarf Cepheids CY Aqr, YZ Boo and SZ Lyn where both VK photometry and radial velocities were available from the literature, effective temperatures were determined using the intrinsic Strömgren indices, model atmosphere grids for (V — K) and the relation between temperature and (V — K) colour. Then, by applying the infrared surface brightness method, radii and distances and hence masses and absolute magnitudes were estimated with effective temperatures determined by three different methods. It was found that the average mass of these variables is about 0.5 solar mass and this result supports the hypothesis that Dwarf Cepheids are pre-white dwarf objects. It was also confirmed that the temperatures determined with the IRFM are most successful in the application of the surface brightness method to the radius estimation of Dwarf Cepheids.

  14. The California-Kepler Survey: Precise Planet Radii and Metallicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Andrew; Marcy, G. W.; Johnson, J. A.; Morton, T. D.; Isaacson, H.

    2012-01-01

    For the small subset of sub-Neptune-size planets with well-measured masses and radii, bulk density varies by an order of magnitude, owing to great diversity in composition and atmospheric content. The ensemble of small planets discovered by Kepler have a radius distribution that rises steeply with decreasing size, with close-in sub-Neptune-size planets being an order of magnitude more common than hot Jupiters. However, the detailed structure of the planet radius distribution remains partially veiled by poorly known stellar properties from the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). Correlations of planet properties with stellar properties are similarly out of focus or unknown. To measure these crucial properties, our team is compiling a new catalog of stellar parameters for the Kepler planet hosts based on LTE modeling of high-resolution Keck-HIRES spectra. I will present initial results from this catalog. We expect detailed structure of the planet radius distribution to emerge, including deviations from a power-law model that suggest common planet sizes and preferred formation scenarios. It will also shed light on the variations of planet occurrence with orbital distance and stellar mass/metallicity, offering important clues for the formation of small worlds.

  15. Rotating neutron stars with exotic cores: masses, radii, stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haensel, P.; Bejger, M.; Fortin, M.; Zdunik, L.

    2016-03-01

    A set of theoretical mass-radius relations for rigidly rotating neutron stars with exotic cores, obtained in various theories of dense matter, is reviewed. Two basic observational constraints are used: the largest measured rotation frequency (716Hz) and the maximum measured mass (2 M ⊙ . The present status of measuring the radii of neutron stars is described. The theory of rigidly rotating stars in general relativity is reviewed and limitations of the slow rotation approximation are pointed out. Mass-radius relations for rotating neutron stars with hyperon and quark cores are illustrated using several models. Problems related to the non-uniqueness of the crust-core matching are mentioned. Limits on rigid rotation resulting from the mass-shedding instability and the instability with respect to the axisymmetric perturbations are summarized. The problem of instabilities and of the back-bending phenomenon are discussed in detail. Metastability and instability of a neutron star core in the case of a first-order phase transition, both between pure phases, and into a mixed-phase state, are reviewed. The case of two disjoint families (branches) of rotating neutron stars is discussed and generic features of neutron-star families and of core-quakes triggered by the instabilities are considered.

  16. MASSES, RADII, AND CLOUD PROPERTIES OF THE HR 8799 PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Cushing, Michael; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Freedman, Richard E-mail: dsaumon@lanl.gov E-mail: andrew.ackerman@nasa.gov E-mail: freedman@darkstar.arc.nasa.gov

    2012-08-01

    The near-infrared colors of the planets directly imaged around the A star HR 8799 are much redder than most field brown dwarfs of the same effective temperature. Previous theoretical studies of these objects have concluded that the atmospheres of planets b, c, and d are unusually cloudy or have unusual cloud properties. Some studies have also found that the inferred radii of some or all of the planets disagree with expectations of standard giant planet evolution models. Here, we compare the available data to the predictions of our own set of atmospheric and evolution models that have been extensively tested against observations of field L and T dwarfs, including the reddest L dwarfs. Unlike some previous studies, we require mutually consistent choices for effective temperature, gravity, cloud properties, and planetary radius. This procedure thus yields plausible values for the masses, effective temperatures, and cloud properties of all three planets. We find that the cloud properties of the HR 8799 planets are not unusual but rather follow previously recognized trends, including a gravity dependence on the temperature of the L to T spectral transition-some reasons for which we discuss. We find that the inferred mass of planet b is highly sensitive to whether or not we include the H- and the K-band spectrum in our analysis. Solutions for planets c and d are consistent with the generally accepted constraints on the age of the primary star and orbital dynamics. We also confirm that, like in L and T dwarfs and solar system giant planets, non-equilibrium chemistry driven by atmospheric mixing is also important for these objects. Given the preponderance of data suggesting that the L to T spectral type transition is gravity dependent, we present an exploratory evolution calculation that accounts for this effect. Finally we recompute the bolometric luminosity of all three planets.

  17. Galaxy Structure: Core Radii, and Central Mass Deficits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, A. W.; Trujillo, I.; Erwin, P.

    2004-05-01

    We investigate the nuclear and global structure of elliptical galaxies, and the apparent disparity between the Nuker and Sérsic light-profile models. We show that the so-called ``power-law" galaxies in fact have Sérsic r1/n profiles over their entire observed radial range. Consequently, only three (Sérsic-profile) parameters are required to simultaneously describe both the inner (HST-resolved) and outer profiles of low-luminosity (M > -20.5 B-mag) elliptical galaxies. We also find that ``core galaxies" have Sérsic profiles with a (partially evacuated) single power-law core. We have developed a modified (5-parameter) Sérsic profile with a power-law core to model the complete radial extent of luminous galaxies with cores. In addition to quantifying the global stellar distribution in these systems, we have derived new estimates of their core radii and other central properties. Comparison of the central stellar deficits with the galaxies' black hole masses suggests that the number of (dissipationless) major mergers that have produced luminous elliptical galaxies is around 1-2, rather than 8-10, which agrees with theory and implies that the galactic merger history of the Universe is roughly an order of magnitude less violent than previous observational analyses had suggested. Support for proposal number HST-AR-09927.01-A was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  18. THE OBSERVATIONAL AND THEORETICAL TIDAL RADII OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN M87

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Jeremy J.; Sills, Alison; Harris, William E.

    2012-02-10

    Globular clusters have linear sizes (tidal radii) which theory tells us are determined by their masses and by the gravitational potential of their host galaxy. To explore the relationship between observed and expected radii, we utilize the globular cluster population of the Virgo giant M87. Unusually deep, high signal-to-noise images of M87 are used to measure the effective and limiting radii of approximately 2000 globular clusters. To compare with these observations, we simulate a globular cluster population that has the same characteristics as the observed M87 cluster population. Placing these simulated clusters in the well-studied tidal field of M87, the orbit of each cluster is solved and the theoretical tidal radius of each cluster is determined. We compare the predicted relationship between cluster size and projected galactocentric distance to observations. We find that for an isotropic distribution of cluster velocities, theoretical tidal radii are approximately equal to observed limiting radii for R{sub gc} < 10 kpc. However, the isotropic simulation predicts a steep increase in cluster size at larger radii, which is not observed in large galaxies beyond the Milky Way. To minimize the discrepancy between theory and observations, we explore the effects of orbital anisotropy on cluster sizes, and suggest a possible orbital anisotropy profile for M87 which yields a better match between theory and observations. Finally, we suggest future studies which will establish a stronger link between theoretical tidal radii and observed radii.

  19. Masses, Radii, and Cloud Properties of the HR 8799 Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Cushing, Michael; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Freedman, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The near-infrared colors of the planets directly imaged around the A star HR 8799 are much redder than most field brown dwarfs of the same effective temperature. Previous theoretical studies of these objects have compared the photometric and limited spectral data of the planets to the predictions of various atmosphere and evolution models and concluded that the atmospheres of planets b, c, and d are unusually cloudy or have unusual cloud properties. Most studies have also found that the inferred radii of some or all of the planets disagree with expectations of standard giant planet evolution models. Here we compare the available data to the predictions of our own set of atmospheric and evolution models that have been extensively tested against field L and T dwarfs, including the reddest L dwarfs. Unlike almost all previous studies we specify mutually self-consistent choices for effective temperature, gravity, cloud properties, and planetary radius. This procedure yields plausible and self-consistent values for the masses, effective temperatures, and cloud properties of all three planets. We find that the cloud properties of the HR 8799 planets are in fact not unusual but rather follow previously recognized trends including a gravity dependence on the temperature of the L to T spectral transition, some reasons for which we discuss. We find that the inferred mass of planet b is highly sensitive to the H and K band spectrum. Solutions for planets c and particularly d are less certain but are consistent with the generally accepted constraints on the age of the primary star and orbital dynamics. We also confirm that as for L and T dwarfs and solar system giant planets, non-equilibrium chemistry driven by atmospheric mixing is also important for these objects. Given the preponderance of data suggesting that the L to T spectral type transition is gravity dependent, we present a new evolution calculation that predicts cooling tracks on the near-infrared color

  20. Bonded Radii and the Contraction of the Electron Density of the Oxygen Atom by Bonded Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Iversen, Bo B.; Spackman, M. A.

    2013-02-21

    The bonded radii for more than 550 bonded pairs of atoms, comprising more than 50 crystals, determined from experimental and theoretical electron density distributions, are compared with the effective ionic, ri(M), and crystal radii, rc(M), for metal atoms, M, bonded to O atoms. At odds with the fixed ionic radius of 1.40 Å, assumed for the O atom in the compilation of the ionic radii, the bonded radius for the atom, rb(O), is not fixed but displays a relatively wide range of values as the O atom is progressively polarized by the M-O bonded interactions: as such, rb(O) decreases systematically from 1.40 Å (the Pauling radius of the oxide anion) as bond lengths decrease when bonded to an electropositive atom like sodium, to 0.64 Å (Bragg’s atomic radius of the O atom) when bonded to an electronegative atom like nitrogen. Both rb(M) and rb(O) increase in tandum with the increasing coordination number of the M atom. The bonded radii of the M atoms are highly correlated with both ri(M) and rc(M), but they both depart systematically from rb(M) and become smaller as the electronegativity of the M atom increases and the M-O bond length decreases. The well-developed correlations between both sets of radii and rb(M) testifies to the relative precision of both sets of radii and the fact that both sets are highly correlated the M-O bond 1 lengths. On the other hand, the progressive departure of rb(O) from the fixed ionic radius of the O atom with the increasing electronegativity of the bonded M atom indicates that any compilation of sets of ionic radii, assuming that the radius for the oxygen atom is fixed in value, is problematical and impacts on the accuracy of the resulting sets of ionic and crystal radii thus compiled. The assumption of a fixed O atom radius not only results in a negative ionic radii for several atoms, but it also results in values of rb(M) that are much as ~ 0.6 Å larger than the ri(M) and rc(M) values, respectively, particularly for the more

  1. The Masses and Radii of the Eclipsing Binary zeta Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Philip D.; Harper, Graham M.; Brown, Alexander; Hummel, Christian A.

    1996-11-01

    stellar flux plus an interstellar extinction model to the flux-calibrated GHRS data. We find MK = 5.8±0.2 Msun, MB = 4.8±0.2 Msun, RK = 148±3 Rsun, and RB = 4.5±0.3 Rsun for the masses and radii of the ζ Aur stars. We determine the distance to ζ Aur to be 261±3 pc. Additionally, we refine the stellar parameters of the B star secondary presented in the 1995 spectroscopic study of Bennett, Brown, & Linsky. We also determine the effective temperature of the K star primary using values of the bolometric flux, angular diameter, and interstellar extinction derived in this study. The positions of the ζ Aur stars on the theoretical H-R diagram are compared to current evolutionary model tracks, and the resulting good agreement provides a strong check of the internal self-consistency of this analysis and the accuracy of the theoretical models. The ζ Aurigae stars are confirmed to be coeval with an age of 80±15 Myr.

  2. Interaction radii of proton-rich radioactive nuclei at A=60-80

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, G. F.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Lichtenthaler, R.; Villari, A. C. C.; Mittig, W.; Casandjian, J. M.; Lewitowicz, M.; Chartier, M.; Hirata, D.; Angelique, J. C.; Orr, N. A.; Audi, G.; Cunsolo, A.; Foti, A.; Donzeaud, C.; MacCormick, M.; Stephan, C.; Suomijarvi, T.; Tassan-Got, L.; Gillibert, A.

    1998-12-21

    The interaction radii of proton-rich, radioactive {sub 31}Ga, {sub 32}Ge, {sub 33}As, {sub 34}Se, {sub 35}Br isotopes were measured using the direct method. The secondary beams were produced using a {sup 78}Kr primary beam of 73 MeV/nucleon in conjunction with SISSI and the SPEG spectrometers at GANIL. Most elements show reduced radii which vary with N, with a minimum around N=36-38. The experimental reduced radii are compared to theoretical values obtained from Glauber reaction cross-section calculations based on Relativistic Mean Field (RMF) nuclear densities.

  3. SAR Images Generated Using the Least Mean Squares (LMS) Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minardi, John E., II; Minardi, Michael J.

    2007-04-01

    It is believed that the LMS algorithm can be used to form a two dimensional image from radar return data. A version of the LMS algorithm was written to form SAR images from radar phase history data. Images were formed from fifty sets of twenty synthetically generated random points. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was measured for each image and showed an average of 30 dB. A more complex synthetic scene was also formed from a black and white JPEG image. This image showed excellent qualitative results. Actual radar range data was collected from a set of vertical pins and from a model car painted with conductive paint. The data was from a full 360-degree aperture. The resulting images were of high quality; the vertical pins acted as pure point sources and indicated that the image had a resolution of 4.5 mm, which agrees with theory.

  4. Interactions of charged dust particles in clouds of charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundienkov, Vladimir; Yakovlenko, Sergey

    2004-03-01

    Two charged dust particles inside a cloud of charges are considered as Debye atoms forming a Debye molecule. Cassini coordinates are used for the numerical solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation for the charged cloud. The electric force acting on a dust particle by the other dust particle was determined by integrating the electrostatic pressure on the surface of the dust particle. It is shown that attractive forces appear when the following two conditions are satisfied. First, the average distance between dust particles should be approximately equal to two Debye radii. Second, attraction takes place when similar charges are concentrated predominantly on the dust particles. If the particles carry a small fraction of total charge of the same polarity, repulsion between the particles takes place at all distances. We apply our results to the experiments with thermoemission plasma and to the experiments with nuclear-pumped plasma.

  5. Magnetic structure of the distant geotail from -60 to -220 earth radii - ISEE-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.; Okida, R.; Jones, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    ISEE-3 magnetic-field measurements in the region of the geomagnetic tail from -80 to -220 earth radii are reported and discussed. A well-ordered field structure is found, comprising two 7-8-nT lobes separated by a plasma sheet, an embedded neutral sheet with significant By fields, and an intermittent plasma-sheet boundary layer with 5-nT-amplitude (peak-to-peak) electromagnetic waves. The plasma-sheet Bz distribution changes from principally northern orientation near the earth to an approximately equal north-south distribution at 200-220 earth radii. These findings are considered to be in general agreement with magnetic-reconnection models of the magnetosphere, with reconnection either throughout the region observed (in tearing-mode or plasmoid-formation models) or at a constant (about 220-earth-radii) or variable (40-80 to 220-earth-radii) X line (in X-line models).

  6. Atomic Structures of Molecules Based on Additivity of Atomic and/or Ionic Radii (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyrovska, Raji; Narayan, Sara

    2009-04-01

    We have shown in recent years that interatomic and interionic distances are sums of the radii of the adjacent atoms or ions. Many examples are provided and it is shown how the experimental bond lengths agree with the radii sums. The examples include inorganic compounds such as alkali halides, metal hydrides, and graphene; organic compounds such as aliphatic and aromatic compounds; and biochemical compounds such as nucleic acids, amino acids, caffeine-related compounds, and vitamins.

  7. Near-global survey of effective droplet radii in liquid water clouds using ISCCP data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Qingyan; Rossow, William B.; Lacis, Andrew B.

    1994-01-01

    A global survey of cloud particle size variations can provide crucial constraints on how cloud processes determine cloud liquid water contents and their variation with temperature, and further, may indicate the magnitude of aerosol effects on clouds. A method, based on a complete radiative transfer model for Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)-measured radiances, is described for retrieving cloud particle radii in liquid water clouds from satellite data currently available from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project. Results of sensitivity tests and validation studies provide error estimates. AVHRR data from NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 have been analyzed for January, April, July and October in 1987 and 1988. The results of this first survey reveal systematic continental and maritime differences and hemispheric contrasts that are indicative of the effects of associated aerosol concentration differences: cloud droplet radii in continental water clouds are about 2-3 micrometers smaller than in marine clouds, and droplet radii are about 1 micrometer smaller in marine clouds of the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere. The height dependencies of cloud droplet radii in continental and marine clouds are also consistent with differences in the vertical profiles of aerosol concentration. Significant seasonal and diurnal variations of effective droplet radii are also observed, particularly at lower latitudes. Variations of the relationship between cloud optical thickness and droplet radii may indicate variations in cloud microphysical regimes.

  8. On the critical radii for ramp induced shock wave and laminar boundary layer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Bibin; Kulkarni, Vinayak

    2013-11-01

    The shock wave and laminar boundary layer interaction is classical example of viscous and inviscid interaction. All the characteristic features of this interaction like separation length, separation and reattachment locations, upstream influence etc. are dependent on the leading edge bluntness. Upstream over pressure region and interaction of entropy layer with boundary layer alter this dynamics in the presence of blunt leading edge. Two critical radii corresponding to maximum separation size and separation length equal to reference sharp leading edge case are observed for this interaction during the present numerical studies. Freestream Mach number, wall temperature and freestream stagnation enthalpy are the governing parameters for the two critical radii for given configuration. Numerical simulations are then carried out to understand the effect of these parameters on the magnitude of the critical radii. Entropy layer swallowing by boundary layer and extension of over pressure region are reconsidered for alterations in these radii. Present studies are found very useful in devising mechanism for estimation of critical radii and as well for incorporating the amendment in the same due to change in governing parameters.

  9. Bose—Einstein correlations of charged kaons in p + p collisions with the STAR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigmatkulov, Grigory

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of charged kaon Bose-Einstein Correlations (BEC) measured in proton- proton collisions at √s =200 and 510 GeV with the STAR detector at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The one-dimensional correlation functions are studied as a function of the charged particle multiplicity. The femtoscopic radii, R, and the correlation strength, λ, are extracted. The dependence of the source radii and the correlation strengths on the particle multiplicity are investigated.

  10. Interaction radii of proton-rich radioactive nuclei at A=60{endash}80

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, G.F.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Villari, A.C.; Lichtenthaler, R.; Villari, A.C.; Mittig, W.; Chartier, M.; Casandjian, J.M.; Lewitowicz, M.; Ostrowski, A.N.; Hirata, D.; Angelique, J.C.; Orr, N.A.; Audi, G.; Cunsolo, A.; Foti, A.; Donzeaud, C.; MacCormick, M.; Stephan, C.; Suomijarvi, T.; Tassan-Got, L.; Gillibert, A.; Chartier, M.; Morrissey, D.J.; Sherrill, B.M.; Ostrowski, A.N.; Vieira, D.J.; Wouters, J.M.

    1998-12-01

    The interaction radii of proton-rich, radioactive {sub 31}Ga,thinsp{sub 32}Ge,thinsp{sub 33}As,thinsp{sub 34}Se,thinsp{sub 35}Br isotopes were measured using the direct method. The secondary beams were produced using a {sup 78}Kr primary beam of 73 MeV/nucleon in conjunction with SISSI and the SPEG spectrometers at GANIL. Most elements show reduced radii which vary with N, with a minimum around N=36{endash}38. The experimental reduced radii are compared to theoretical values obtained from Glauber reaction cross-section calculations based on Relativistic Mean Field (RMF) nuclear densities. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Energy losses in thermally cycled optical fibers constrained in small bend radii

    SciTech Connect

    Guild, Eric; Morelli, Gregg

    2012-09-23

    High energy laser pulses were fired into a 365μm diameter fiber optic cable constrained in small radii of curvature bends, resulting in a catastrophic failure. Q-switched laser pulses from a flashlamp pumped, Nd:YAG laser were injected into the cables, and the spatial intensity profile at the exit face of the fiber was observed using an infrared camera. The transmission of the radiation through the tight radii resulted in an asymmetric intensity profile with one half of the fiber core having a higher peak-to-average energy distribution. Prior to testing, the cables were thermally conditioned while constrained in the small radii of curvature bends. Single-bend, double-bend, and U-shaped eometries were tested to characterize various cable routing scenarios.

  12. A reflection ansatz for surfaces with electrically small radii of curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominek, Allen K.; Peters, Leon, Jr.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1987-01-01

    Uniform reflection coefficients are developed for two- and three-dimensional, edge-like, perfectly conducting surfaces in the deep lit region. The uniformity is with respect to the electrical size of the radii of curvature at the surface's specular point. This uniformity allows one to physically interpret the reflected field from a smooth surface as one of the radii of curvature approaches zero as a diffracted field. The coefficients are heuristically generated from the exact scattered field for a two dimensional parabolic cylinder with plane wave illumination. The significant variables in this solution are the radii of curvature at the specular point and the distance between the specular point and the incident shadow boundaries in the principal planes. The field prediction accuracy of these reflection cofficients are critically examined through comparisons with reflected fields extracted from scattered fields of canonical surfaces.

  13. A new determination of radii and limb parameters for Pluto and Charon from mutual event lightcurves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Eliot F.; Binzel, Richard P.

    1994-01-01

    Over the past several years Pluto-Charon mutual events have yielded progressively more accurate estimates of Charon's orbital elements and the radii of Pluto and Charon (e.g., Buie, Tholen, and Horne, 1992). Analysis of the 1988 stellar occultation by Pluto indicates a radius for Pluto that is about 4%, or 50 km, larger than the mutual event radius of 1151 km. One possible explanation for the discrepancy is that the mutual event modeling treats Pluto and Charon as uniformly bright disks. If they are limb-darkened, the mutual event fits could underestimate their radii. In this paper we use an independent mutual event data set (Young and Binzel, 1992) to fit for Pluto and Charon's radii in a manner independent of either object's limb profile or albedo distribution. Our least-squares solution indicates that Pluto's radius is 1164 +/- 22.9 km and Charon's radius is 621 +/- 20.6 km.

  14. EFFECT OF UNCERTAINTIES IN STELLAR MODEL PARAMETERS ON ESTIMATED MASSES AND RADII OF SINGLE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Sarbani; Verner, Graham A.; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne E-mail: gav@bison.ph.bham.ac.uk E-mail: y.p.elsworth@bham.ac.uk

    2012-02-10

    Accurate and precise values of radii and masses of stars are needed to correctly estimate properties of extrasolar planets. We examine the effect of uncertainties in stellar model parameters on estimates of the masses, radii, and average densities of solar-type stars. We find that in the absence of seismic data on solar-like oscillations, stellar masses can be determined to a greater accuracy than either stellar radii or densities; but to get reasonably accurate results the effective temperature, log g, and metallicity must be measured to high precision. When seismic data are available, stellar density is the most well-determined property, followed by radius, with mass the least well-determined property. Uncertainties in stellar convection, quantified in terms of uncertainties in the value of the mixing length parameter, cause the most significant errors in the estimates of stellar properties.

  15. The motion and magnetic structure of the plasma sheet near 30 earth radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowling, S. B.; Wolf, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    Data taken by the NASA-GSFC magnetometer aboard the Explorer 34 satellite are analyzed in an effort to ascertain the average motion and magnetic field structure of the plasma sheet near 30 earth radii. It is found that the flapping motion of the plasma sheet in the solar ecliptic Z-coordinate is characterized by a typical speed of 90 km/sec and an amplitude of plus or minus 2 earth radii. Results suggest that there exists a layer of nearly uniform cross-tail current density in the central region of the plasma sheet approximately 2.3-2.6 earth radii thick within which the solar-magnetospheric X-component of the magnetic field changes from 10 gamma to -10 gamma.

  16. The effect of starspots on the radii of low-mass pre-main-sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, R. J.; Jeffries, R. D.

    2014-07-01

    A polytropic model is used to investigate the effects of dark photospheric spots on the evolution and radii of magnetically active, low-mass (M < 0.5 M⊙), pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars. Spots slow the contraction along Hayashi tracks and inflate the radii of PMS stars by a factor of (1 - β)-N compared to unspotted stars of the same luminosity, where β is the equivalent covering fraction of dark starspots and N ≃ 0.45 ± 0.05. This is a much stronger inflation than predicted by Spruit & Weiss for main-sequence stars with the same β, where N ˜ 0.2-0.3. These models have been compared to radii determined for very magnetically active K- and M-dwarfs in the young Pleiades and NGC 2516 clusters, and the radii of tidally locked, low-mass eclipsing binary components. The binary components and zero-age main-sequence K-dwarfs have radii inflated by ˜10 per cent compared to an empirical radius-luminosity relation that is defined by magnetically inactive field dwarfs with interferometrically measured radii; low-mass M-type PMS stars, that are still on their Hayashi tracks, are inflated by up to ˜40 per cent. If this were attributable to starspots alone, we estimate that an effective spot coverage of 0.35 < β < 0.51 is required. Alternatively, global inhibition of convective flux transport by dynamo-generated fields may play a role. However, we find greater consistency with the starspot models when comparing the loci of active young stars and inactive field stars in colour-magnitude diagrams, particularly for the highly inflated PMS stars, where the large, uniform temperature reduction required in globally inhibited convection models would cause the stars to be much redder than observed.

  17. Responses of articular and epiphyseal cartilage zones of developing avian radii to estrone treatment and a 2-G environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negulesco, J. A.; Kossler, T.

    1978-01-01

    Histological measurements of radii from chickens exposed to estrone and hypergravity are reported. Female chicks at two weeks post-hatch were maintained for two weeks at earth gravity or 2 G with daily injections of 0.2 or 0.4 mg estrone. Animals were sacrificed after the last injection, and the radii were processed by described histological techniques. The results suggest that proximal and distal epiphyses of developing radii show different morphological responses to estrone and hypergravity.

  18. Investigation of Possible Electromagnetic Disturbances caused by Spacecraft-Plasma Interactions at 4 Radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okada, M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Goldstein, G. E.; Matsumoto, H.; Brinca, A. L.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1995-01-01

    The proposed Small Solar Probe mission features a close approach to the sun with a perihelion of 4 radii. Carbon molecules emitted from the spacecraft's heat shield will become ionized by electron impact and photoionization. The newly created ions and electrons may generate electromagnetic and electrostatic plasma waves which are possible sources of interference with in-situ plasma measurements.

  19. Fitted Hanbury-Brown-Twiss radii versus space-time variances in flow-dominated models

    SciTech Connect

    Frodermann, Evan; Heinz, Ulrich; Lisa, Michael Annan

    2006-04-15

    The inability of otherwise successful dynamical models to reproduce the Hanbury-Brown-Twiss (HBT) radii extracted from two-particle correlations measured at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is known as the RHIC HBT Puzzle. Most comparisons between models and experiment exploit the fact that for Gaussian sources the HBT radii agree with certain combinations of the space-time widths of the source that can be directly computed from the emission function without having to evaluate, at significant expense, the two-particle correlation function. We here study the validity of this approach for realistic emission function models, some of which exhibit significant deviations from simple Gaussian behavior. By Fourier transforming the emission function, we compute the two-particle correlation function, and fit it with a Gaussian to partially mimic the procedure used for measured correlation functions. We describe a novel algorithm to perform this Gaussian fit analytically. We find that for realistic hydrodynamic models the HBT radii extracted from this procedure agree better with the data than the values previously extracted from the space-time widths of the emission function. Although serious discrepancies between the calculated and the measured HBT radii remain, we show that a more apples-to-apples comparison of models with data can play an important role in any eventually successful theoretical description of RHIC HBT data.

  20. Fitted Hanbury-Brown Twiss radii versus space-time variances in flow-dominated models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frodermann, Evan; Heinz, Ulrich; Lisa, Michael Annan

    2006-04-01

    The inability of otherwise successful dynamical models to reproduce the Hanbury-Brown Twiss (HBT) radii extracted from two-particle correlations measured at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is known as the RHIC HBT Puzzle. Most comparisons between models and experiment exploit the fact that for Gaussian sources the HBT radii agree with certain combinations of the space-time widths of the source that can be directly computed from the emission function without having to evaluate, at significant expense, the two-particle correlation function. We here study the validity of this approach for realistic emission function models, some of which exhibit significant deviations from simple Gaussian behavior. By Fourier transforming the emission function, we compute the two-particle correlation function, and fit it with a Gaussian to partially mimic the procedure used for measured correlation functions. We describe a novel algorithm to perform this Gaussian fit analytically. We find that for realistic hydrodynamic models the HBT radii extracted from this procedure agree better with the data than the values previously extracted from the space-time widths of the emission function. Although serious discrepancies between the calculated and the measured HBT radii remain, we show that a more apples-to-apples comparison of models with data can play an important role in any eventually successful theoretical description of RHIC HBT data.

  1. Determination of mechanical properties of excised dog radii from lateral vibration experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, G. A.; Anliker, M.; Young, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental data which can be used as a guideline in developing a mathematical model for lateral vibrations of whole bone are reported. The study used wet and dry dog radii mounted in a cantilever configuration. Data are also given on the mechanical, geometric, and viscoelastic properties of bones.

  2. Absolute masses and radii determination in multiplanetary systems without stellar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almenara, J. M.; Díaz, R. F.; Mardling, R.; Barros, S. C. C.; Damiani, C.; Bruno, G.; Bonfils, X.; Deleuil, M.

    2015-11-01

    The masses and radii of extrasolar planets are key observables for understanding their interior, formation and evolution. While transit photometry and Doppler spectroscopy are used to measure the radii and masses respectively of planets relative to those of their host star, estimates for the true values of these quantities rely on theoretical models of the host star which are known to suffer from systematic differences with observations. When a system is composed of more than two bodies, extra information is contained in the transit photometry and radial velocity data. Velocity information (finite speed-of-light, Doppler) is needed to break the Newtonian MR-3 degeneracy. We performed a photodynamical modelling of the two-planet transiting system Kepler-117 using all photometric and spectroscopic data available. We demonstrate how absolute masses and radii of single-star planetary systems can be obtained without resorting to stellar models. Limited by the precision of available radial velocities (38 m s-1), we achieve accuracies of 20 per cent in the radii and 70 per cent in the masses, while simulated 1 m s-1 precision radial velocities lower these to 1 per cent for the radii and 2 per cent for the masses. Since transiting multiplanet systems are common, this technique can be used to measure precisely the mass and radius of a large sample of stars and planets. We anticipate these measurements will become common when the TESS and PLATO mission provide high-precision light curves of a large sample of bright stars. These determinations will improve our knowledge about stars and planets, and provide strong constraints on theoretical models.

  3. Effects on the geomagnetic tail at 60 earth radii of the geomagnetic storm of April 9, 1971.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, W. J.; Rich, F. J.; Reasoner, D. L.; Colburn, D. S.; Goldstein, B. E.

    1973-01-01

    A geomagnetic storm beginning with an sc occurred on Apr. 9, 1971. During the storm the charged particle lunar environment experiment at the Apollo 14 site, the solar wind spectrometer experiment at the Apollo 12 site, and the Ames magnetometers on Explorer 35 took data in the magnetosheath, at the magnetopause, in the plasma sheet, and in the high-latitude geomagnetic tail. The MIT Faraday cup and Ames magnetometers on board Explorer 33 monitored the solar wind. The data show that the storm was caused by a corotating tangential discontinuity in the solar wind, the magnetopause position is strongly dependent on the attack angle of the solar wind, and the tail field strength was indirectly measured to increase from 10 to 14 gamma after the sc. During the main phase the field strength in the tail was observed to increase to between 28 and 34 gamma. This increase is consistent with a thermal and magnetic compression of the tail radius from about 26 to about 16 earth radii.

  4. Influence of piezoceramic to fused silica plate thickness on the radii of curvature of piezoelectric bimorph mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libu, M.; Susanth, S.; Vasanthakumari, K. G.; Dileep Kumar, C. J.; Raghu, N.

    2012-01-01

    Piezoelectric based bimorph mirrors (PBM) find extensive use in focusing of x-ray beams. Many optical instruments require use of PBM whose radii of curvature can be tuned precisely. The 100 mm and 300 mm PBMs were fabricated with varying piezoelectric to fused silica plate thicknesses. The radii of curvature of free standing mirrors were measured as a function of voltage and it was found to decrease with increasing voltage. For a given piezoelectric plate thickness, as the fused silica thickness increases, the radii of curvature was found to increase owing to increase in stiffness of the mirror. On the other hand, for a given fused silica plate thickness, when the piezoelectric plate thickness is increased, the radii of curvature are decreased for a given electric field, due to increase in generated force. This study brings out the influence of piezoceramic to fused silica plate thickness on the radii of curvature of PBM.

  5. Counter-streaming electrons at the geomagnetic equator near 9 earth radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpar, D. M.; Quinn, J. M.; Shelley, E. G.

    1988-01-01

    AMPTE/CEE observations are used to study short-lived, highly anisotropic electron distributions in the region of the equatorial magnetosphere bewtween 6.6 earth radii and the CCE apogee at 8.8 earth radii. Intense bursts of highly collimated counterstreaming electrons were observed at keV energies with durations of a few tens of seconds to a few minutes near the geomagnetic equator on L-shells that intersect the high-latitude ionosphere in the region normally associated with the auroral zone. It is found that the counterstreaming electrons at energies below the peak energy are accompanied by simultaneous deep depressions of the locally mirroring fluxes. It is suggested that these equatorial electrons may result from the release of auroral electrons trapped beneath the auroral accelerating potentials at lower altitudes along the same magnetic flux tubes.

  6. Masses And Radii Of Neutron Stars Measured From Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guver, Tolga; Ozel, F.

    2011-09-01

    Low mass X-ray binaries that show thermonuclear bursts are ideal targets for constraining the equation of state of neutron star matter. The analysis of the time resolved, high count rate X-ray spectra allow a measurement of the Eddington limits and the apparent radii of neutron stars. Combined with an independent distance estimate, these spectroscopic quantities lead to the measurement of neutron star masses and radii. I will discuss the results of the application of this method to a number of X-ray binaries including EXO 1745-248, 4U 1820-30, 4U 1608-52,KS 1731-260, and SAX J1748.9-2021. I will also present the results from a comprehensive analysis of the entire RXTE archive of X-ray burst observations, which allows for a better quantification of the systematic uncertainties in these measurements.

  7. Measuring The Distances, Masses, and Radii of Neutron Stars In X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guver, Tolga; Ozel, F.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.

    2010-03-01

    Low mass X-ray binaries that have independent distance measurements and show thermonuclear X-ray bursts are ideal sources for constraining the equation of state of neutron star matter. I will introduce our program to systematically measure the distances, masses, and radii of neutron stars in such binaries. We utilize high energy resolution X-ray spectra to measure the ISM column densities to these sources as well as time resolved, high count rate X-ray spectra to study their bursts. I will discuss in detail how the combination of these observations have led to the measurement of the masses and radii of the neutron stars in the low mass X-ray binaries EXO 1745-248, 4U 1608-52, and 4U 1820-30.

  8. Return stroke speed of cloud-to-ground lightning estimated from elve hole radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaes, P. R.; Marshall, R. A.; Inan, U. S.

    2014-12-01

    We present the first measurements of the lightning return stroke speed that directly relate to the current return stroke, as opposed to its optical manifestation. The shape of elves is determined by the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) radiation pattern at D region altitudes, which is in turn controlled by the geometry and current propagation properties of the return stroke channel. In particular, numerical simulation of the EMP-ionosphere interaction shows a strong relationship between the elve "hole" radius and the current return stroke speed. The hole radii are measured from a data set of 55 elves observed with the PIPER photometer. Using these radii observations in conjunction with numerical simulations of the EMP, we perform Bayesian inference to estimate the distribution of return stroke speeds. The results show a maximum a posteriori probability return stroke speed estimate of 0.64c for elve producing lightning.

  9. Quiet time magnetospheric field depression at 2.3-3.6 earth radii.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiura, M.

    1973-01-01

    Flux gate magnetometer data from OGO 5 are presented that establish the existence of large field depressions under conditions of varying degree of disturbance at distances ranging from 2.3 to 3.6 earth radii at all local times. For this study, flux gate data obtained near perigee during the period of approximately one year from Jan. 21, 1969, to Feb. 23, 1970, were used.

  10. Determination of the capture radii of magnetite bearing hydroxide flocs in magnetic filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, M.; Franzreb, M.

    1998-11-01

    Magnetic filtration may be applied in water technology for the separation of flocs which are formed in a flocculation tank together with magnetite as an additive. The capture radius is an important mathematical quantity to calculate the performance of such filters in advance. Thus, the capture radii of magnetite bearing copper hydroxide flocs were measured with a direct visual evaluation of the floc trajectories in the neighborhood of a single magnetized wire. For this purpose, an experimental setup was assembled, which allowed the observation and the measurement of the trajectories. With the image processing system used, it was possible to observe flocs larger than 30 {micro}m and the flow velocity was limited to a maximum value of 20 mm/s. Capture radii were calculated by the established single-wire theory under the assumption of potential and creeping flow conditions. It has been proved that further information on the solids content of the flocs, which strongly influences the floc susceptibility, was necessary to obtain an agreement between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. By introducing a floc size dependent solids content into the single-wire theory, measured by means of sedimentation analysis, an accurate description of the observed capture radii was possible.

  11. Which processes shape stellar population gradients of massive galaxies at large radii?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, Michaela

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the differential impact of physical mechanisms, mergers (stellar accretion) and internal energetic phenomena, on the evolution of stellar population gradients in massive, present-day galaxies employing a set of high-resolution, cosmological zoom simulations. We demonstrate that negative metallicity and color gradients at large radii (>2Reff) originate from the accretion of metal-poor stellar systems. At larger radii, galaxies become typically more dominated by stars accreted from satellite galaxies in major and minor mergers. However, only strong galactic winds can sufficiently reduce the metallicity content of the accreted stars to realistically steepen the outer metallicity and colour gradients in agreement with present-day observations. In contrast, the gradients of the models without winds are inconsistent with observations (too flat). In the wind model, colour and metallicity gradients are significantly steeper for systems which have accreted stars in minor mergers, while galaxies with major mergers have relatively flat gradients, confirming previous results. This analysis greatly highlights the importance of both energetic processes and merger events for stellar population properties of massive galaxies at large radii. Our results are expected to significantly contribute to the interpretation of current and up-coming IFU surveys (like MaNGA and Califa), which in turn can help to better constrain still uncertain models for energetic processes in simulations.

  12. Larger Planet Radii Inferred from Stellar "Flicker" Brightness Variations of Bright Planet-host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua

    2014-06-01

    Most extrasolar planets have been detected by their influence on their parent star, typically either gravitationally (the Doppler method) or by the small dip in brightness as the planet blocks a portion of the star (the transit method). Therefore, the accuracy with which we know the masses and radii of extrasolar planets depends directly on how well we know those of the stars, the latter usually determined from the measured stellar surface gravity, log g. Recent work has demonstrated that the short-timescale brightness variations ("flicker") of stars can be used to measure log g to a high accuracy of ~0.1-0.2 dex. Here, we use flicker measurements of 289 bright (Kepmag < 13) candidate planet-hosting stars with T eff = 4500-6650 K to re-assess the stellar parameters and determine the resulting impact on derived planet properties. This re-assessment reveals that for the brightest planet-host stars, Malmquist bias contaminates the stellar sample with evolved stars: nearly 50% of the bright planet-host stars are subgiants. As a result, the stellar radii, and hence the radii of the planets orbiting these stars, are on average 20%-30% larger than previous measurements had suggested.

  13. LARGER PLANET RADII INFERRED FROM STELLAR ''FLICKER'' BRIGHTNESS VARIATIONS OF BRIGHT PLANET-HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua

    2014-06-10

    Most extrasolar planets have been detected by their influence on their parent star, typically either gravitationally (the Doppler method) or by the small dip in brightness as the planet blocks a portion of the star (the transit method). Therefore, the accuracy with which we know the masses and radii of extrasolar planets depends directly on how well we know those of the stars, the latter usually determined from the measured stellar surface gravity, log g. Recent work has demonstrated that the short-timescale brightness variations ({sup f}licker{sup )} of stars can be used to measure log g to a high accuracy of ∼0.1-0.2 dex. Here, we use flicker measurements of 289 bright (Kepmag < 13) candidate planet-hosting stars with T {sub eff} = 4500-6650 K to re-assess the stellar parameters and determine the resulting impact on derived planet properties. This re-assessment reveals that for the brightest planet-host stars, Malmquist bias contaminates the stellar sample with evolved stars: nearly 50% of the bright planet-host stars are subgiants. As a result, the stellar radii, and hence the radii of the planets orbiting these stars, are on average 20%-30% larger than previous measurements had suggested.

  14. A photometric and radial velocity study of six southern Cepheids. II - Binarity, radii, luminosities, and masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulson, I. M.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Gieren, W. P.

    1986-04-01

    The data now available for the Galactic Cepheids AQ Car (period = 9.77 days), XX Cen (10.95 days), XY Car (12.44 days), TT Aql (13.75 days), XX Car (15.71 days), and XZ Car (16.65 days) are analyzed for binarity, radius, luminosity, and mass. There is weak evidence only for binarity of XX Cen, XX Car, and XZ Car, and it is concluded that all six Cepheids may be considered to be single. The new velocity data for XX Cen suggest that it may belong to a binary system with an orbital period of 800 d. The radii are derived by an improved version of the Baade-Wesselink technique and are found to depend upon the color index used to define the surface brightness. The V - I radii, for instance, are 20-25 percent larger than the B - V radii, and it is suggested that the Cepheid mass discrepancy problem may be alleviated by use of appropriate colors in the B - W radius solutions.

  15. The Radii and Oblateness of Pluto and Charon: Preliminary Results from the 2015 New Horizons Flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisse, Carey M.; Nimmo, Francis; McKinnon, William B.; Umurhan, Orkan M.; Buie, Marc W.; Lauer, Tod R.; Roberts, James H.; Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Hal A.; Young, Leslie A.; Ennico-Smith, Kimberly; Olkin, Cathy B.

    2015-11-01

    We present preliminary results for the radii and oblateness of Pluto and Charon. Accurate determinations of the mean radii of Pluto and Charon are important for establishing their densities and bulk composition. A fossil bulge, if present, would place constraints on the thermal and orbital evolution of these bodies [1,2]. The New Horizons LORRI imaging system [3] has provided global images of Pluto and Charon, with best resolutions of 3.8 and 2.3 km/pix, respectively. Three separate approaches have been used to determine mean radii and oblateness from the images, two using a threshold DN value [4,5] and one using a maximum gradient method. These approaches were validated using synthetic images having a range of photometric functions. Tradeoffs between the limb center location and the derived shape in individual images can be reduced by combining limb pixel locations obtained from different imaged rotational phases.This work was supported by NASA's New Horizons project.[1] Robuchon & Nimmo, Icarus 216, 426, 2011. [2] McKinnon & Singer, DPS 46, abs. no. 419.07, 2014. [3] Cheng et al., SSR 140, 189, 2008. [4] Dermott & Thomas, Icarus 73, 25, 1988. [5] Thomason & Nimmo, LPSC 46, abs. no. 1462, 2015.

  16. Charge renormalization in nominally apolar colloidal dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Daniel J.; Hollingsworth, Andrew D.; Grier, David G.

    2016-04-01

    We present high-resolution measurements of the pair interactions between dielectric spheres dispersed in a fluid medium with a low dielectric constant. Despite the absence of charge control agents or added organic salts, these measurements reveal strong and long-ranged repulsions consistent with substantial charges on the particles whose interactions are screened by trace concentrations of mobile ions in solution. The dependence of the estimated charge on the particles' radii is consistent with charge renormalization theory and, thus, offers insights into the charging mechanism in this interesting class of model systems. The measurement technique, based on optical-tweezer manipulation and artifact-free particle tracking, makes use of optimal statistical methods to reduce measurement errors to the femtonewton frontier while covering an extremely wide range of interaction energies.

  17. Effects of Bending Radii on the Characteristics of Flexible Organic Solar Cells Investigated by Impedance Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoonbae; Ye, Donghyun; Won, Beomhee; Yu, SeGi; Jung, Donggeun

    2016-05-01

    Flexible organic solar cells (OSCs) were fabricated on an indium-tin-oxide (ITO)/poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrate and were subjected to bending tests with various bending radii. We observed that the photovoltaic properties of the OSCs precipitously deteriorated at a bending radius ≤ 0.75 cm. In order to investigate the effects of the bending test, the changes in the surface morphology and the sheet resistance of the ITO-coated PET samples were investigated, and the photovoltaic properties of bent and unbent OSCs were evaluated. Thereafter, equivalent circuits for the OSCs were assumed and the change in their parameters, such as resistance and capacitance, was observed. PMID:27483935

  18. Possible octupole deformation in Cs and Ba nuclei from their differential radii

    SciTech Connect

    Sheline, R.K.; Jain, A.K.; Jain, K.

    1988-12-01

    The odd-even staggering of the differential radii of Fr and Ra and the Cs and Ba nuclei is compared. This staggering is inverted in the region of known octupole deformation in the Fr and Ra nuclei. The normal staggering is eliminated in the Cs nuclei and attenuated in the Ba nuclei for neutron numbers 85--88. This fact is used to suggest the possible existence of octupole deformation and its neutron number range in the Cs and Ba nuclear ground states.

  19. NEUTRON STARS WITH SMALL RADII-THE ROLE OF {Delta} RESONANCES

    SciTech Connect

    Schuerhoff, Torsten; Schramm, Stefan; Dexheimer, Veronica

    2010-11-20

    Recent neutron star observations suggest that the masses and radii of neutron stars may be smaller than previously considered, which would disfavor a purely nucleonic equation of state (EoS). In our model, we use a flavor SU(3) sigma model that includes {Delta} resonances and hyperons in the EoS. We find that if the coupling of the {Delta} resonances to the vector mesons is slightly smaller than that of the nucleons, we can reproduce both the measured mass-radius relationship and the extrapolated EoS.

  20. Plastic set of smooth large radii of curvature thermal conductance specimens at light loads.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinzie, D. J., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Thermal contact conductance test data at high vacuum were obtained from two Armco iron specimens having smooth, large radii of curvature, convex, one-half wave length surfaces. The data are compared with calculations based on two macroscopic elastic deformation theories and an empirical expression. Major disagreement with the theories and fair agreement with the empirical expression resulted. Plastic deformation of all the contacting surfaces was verified from surface analyzer statistics. These results indicate that the theoretical assumption of macroscopic elastic deformation is inadequate for accurate prediction of heat transfer with light loads for Armco iron specimens similar to those used in this investigation.

  1. Radii and albedos of asteroids 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 15, 51, 433, and 511

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Morrison, D.

    1973-01-01

    The following radii (in kilometers) and visual geometric albedos are derived for nine asteroids from 10- and 20-micron radiometry: 1 Ceres (540, .06); 2 Pallas (275, .08); 3 Juno (125, .14); 4 Vesta (270, .21); 6 Hebe (110, .16); 15 Eunomia (135, .15); 51 Nemausa (80, .05); 433 Eros (12, .07); and 511 Davida (180, .04). Vesta has the highest albedo measured for an asteroid, while Davida, the lowest-albedo object in the sample, is one of the darkest known objects in the solar system. The median of all asteroid albedos measured to date is 0.1.-

  2. Plastic set of smooth large radii of curvature thermal conductance specimens at light loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinzie, D. J., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Thermal contact conductance test data at high vacuum were obtained from two Armco iron specimens having smooth, large radii of curvature, convex, one-half wave length surfaces. The data are compared with calculations based on two macroscopic elastic deformation theories and an empirical expression. Major disagreement with the theories and fair agreement with the empirical expression resulted. Plastic deformation of all the contacting surfaces was verified from surface analyzer statistics. These results indicate that the theoretical assumption of macroscopic elastic deformation is inadequate for accurate prediction of heat transfer with light loads for Armco iron specimens similar to those used in this investigation.

  3. The quantization of the radii of coordination spheres cubic crystals and cluster systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, G.; Emelyanov, S.; Ignatenko, N.; Ignatenko, G.

    2016-02-01

    The article deals with the creation of an algorithm for calculating the radii of coordination spheres and coordination numbers cubic crystal structure and cluster systems in liquids. Solution has important theoretical value since it allows us to calculate the amount of coordination in the interparticle interaction potentials, to predict the processes of growth of the crystal structures and processes of self-organization of particles in the cluster system. One option accounting geometrical and quantum factors is the use of the Fibonacci series to construct a consistent number of focal areas for cubic crystals and cluster formation in the liquid.

  4. Disk radii and grain sizes in Herschel-resolved debris disks

    SciTech Connect

    Pawellek, Nicole; Krivov, Alexander V.; Marshall, Jonathan P.; Montesinos, Benjamin; Ábrahám, Péter; Moór, Attila; Bryden, Geoffrey; Eiroa, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    The radii of debris disks and the sizes of their dust grains are important tracers of the planetesimal formation mechanisms and physical processes operating in these systems. Here we use a representative sample of 34 debris disks resolved in various Herschel Space Observatory (Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA) programs to constrain the disk radii and the size distribution of their dust. While we modeled disks with both warm and cold components, and identified warm inner disks around about two-thirds of the stars, we focus our analysis only on the cold outer disks, i.e., Kuiper-belt analogs. We derive the disk radii from the resolved images and find a large dispersion for host stars of any spectral class, but no significant trend with the stellar luminosity. This argues against ice lines as a dominant player in setting the debris disk sizes, since the ice line location varies with the luminosity of the central star. Fixing the disk radii to those inferred from the resolved images, we model the spectral energy distribution to determine the dust temperature and the grain size distribution for each target. While the dust temperature systematically increases toward earlier spectral types, the ratio of the dust temperature to the blackbody temperature at the disk radius decreases with the stellar luminosity. This is explained by a clear trend of typical sizes increasing toward more luminous stars. The typical grain sizes are compared to the radiation pressure blowout limit s {sub blow} that is proportional to the stellar luminosity-to-mass ratio and thus also increases toward earlier spectral classes. The grain sizes in the disks of G- to A-stars are inferred to be several times s {sub blow} at all stellar luminosities, in agreement with collisional models of debris disks. The sizes, measured in the units of s {sub blow}, appear to decrease

  5. Radii, shapes, and topography of the satellites of Uranus from limb coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, P. C.

    1988-03-01

    Limb coordinates are used to find the radii, shapes, and local topography of the five large satellites of Uranus. Umbriel, Titania, and Oberon are best fit by spheres. Miranda and Ariel are ellipsoids whose equatorial bulges are consistent with published mean densities. Limb topography on Miranda shows substantial deformation of both old cratered terrain and the younger coronae and complex faulting and uplift at the margins of the coronae. The maximum deformation is about 10 km. Umbriel's limb shows a basin of undetermined origin about 500 km across and 6 km deep.

  6. Electrostatic attraction of charged drops of water inside dropwise cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Shavlov, A. V.; Dzhumandzhi, V. A.

    2013-08-15

    Based on the analytical solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, we demonstrate that inside the electrically neutral system of charges an electrostatic attraction can occur between the like-charged particles, where charge Z ≫ 1 (in terms of elementary charge) and radius R > 0, whereas according to the literature, only repulsion is possible inside non-electrically neutral systems. We calculate the free energy of the charged particles of water inside a cluster and demonstrate that its minimum is when the interdroplet distance equals several Debye radii defined based on the light plasma component. The deepest minimum depth is in a cluster with close spatial packing of drops by type, in a face-centered cubic lattice, if almost all the electric charge of one sign is concentrated on the drops and that of the other sign is concentrated on the light compensation carriers of charge, where the charge moved by equilibrium carriers is rather small.

  7. Electrical Charging of the Clouds of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J.; Whitten, R. C.; Bakes, E. L. O.

    2003-01-01

    We have used recent data on graphitic cloud particles in the atmosphere or Titan to compute the electrical charging of the particles (radii ranging from 0.01 microns to 0.26 microns). The charging on the nightside was rather similar to that obtained earlier (Borucki et al, Icarus, 72, 604-622, 1987) except that charge distributions on the particles are now computed and recently obtained cloud particle sizes and density distributions were employed. The negative charge on particles of 0.26 microns peaked at 9 at 150 km altitude. The computations were repeated for the dayside with the addition of photoelectron emission by the particles as a result of the absorption of solar UV radiation. Particles (except the very smallest) now became positively charged with particles of radius 0.26 microns being charged up to +47. Next, very small particles (radii approximately 3 x 10^-4 microns) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were introduced and treated as sources of negative ions since they could be either neutral or carry one negative charge. Moreover, they are mobile so that they had to be treated like molecular size negative ions although much more massive. They had the effect of substantially reducing the electron densities in the altitude range 190 to 310 km to values less than the negative PAH densities and increasing the peak electron charge on the larger particles. Particles of radius 0.26 microns bore peak charges of plus or minus 47 at altitudes of approximately 250 km. The simulated effect of PAHs on the nightside proved to be much less pronounced; at the peak negative PAH density, it was less than the electron density. The physics governing these results will be discussed.

  8. A white-light /Fe X/H-alpha coronal transient observation to 10 solar radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, W. J.; Illing, R. M. E.; Sawyer, C. B.; House, L. L.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Howard, R. A.; Koomen, M. J.; Michels, D. J.; Smartt, R. N.; Dryer, M.

    1983-01-01

    Multitelescope observations of the coronal transient of April 15-16, 1980 provide simultaneous data from the Solar Maximum Mission Coronagraph/Polarimeter, the Solwind Coronagraph, and the new Emission line Coronagraph of the Sacramento Peak Observatory. An eruptive prominence-associated white light transient is for the first time seen as an unusual wave or brightening in Fe X 6374 A (but not in Fe XIV 5303 A). Several interpretations of this fleeting enhancement are offered. The prominence shows a slowly increasing acceleration which peaks at the time of the Fe event. The white light loop transient surrounding the prominence expands at a well-documented constant speed to solar radii, with an extrapolated start time at zero height coincident with the surface activity. This loop transient exemplifies those seen above 1.7 solar radii, in that leading the disturbance is a bright N(e)-enhanced) loop rather than a dark one. This is consistent with a report of the behavior of another eruptive event observed by Fisher and Poland (1981) which began as a density depletion in the lower corona, with a bright loop forming at greater altitudes. The top of the bright loop ultimately fades in the outer corona while slow radial growth continues in the legs.

  9. THE INFLUENCE OF ORBITAL ECCENTRICITY ON TIDAL RADII OF STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Jeremy J.; Harris, William E.; Sills, Alison; Hurley, Jarrod R.

    2013-02-20

    We have performed N-body simulations of star clusters orbiting in a spherically symmetric smooth galactic potential. The model clusters cover a range of initial half-mass radii and orbital eccentricities in order to test the historical assumption that the tidal radius of a cluster is imposed at perigalacticon. The traditional assumption for globular clusters is that since the internal relaxation time is larger than its orbital period, the cluster is tidally stripped at perigalacticon. Instead, our simulations show that a cluster with an eccentric orbit does not need to fully relax in order to expand. After a perigalactic pass, a cluster recaptures previously unbound stars, and the tidal shock at perigalacticon has the effect of energizing inner region stars to larger orbits. Therefore, instead of the limiting radius being imposed at perigalacticon, it more nearly traces the instantaneous tidal radius of the cluster at any point in the orbit. We present a numerical correction factor to theoretical tidal radii calculated at perigalacticon which takes into consideration both the orbital eccentricity and current orbital phase of the cluster.

  10. Radii and Shape of Pluto and Charon: Preliminary Results from New Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.; Lisse, C. M.; Umurhan, O. M.; McKinnon, W. B.; Buie, M. W.; Lauer, T.; Beyer, R. A.; Moore, J. M.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Olkin, C.; Ennico Smith, K.; Young, L. A.; Bierson, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate determinations of the mean radii of Pluto and Charon are important for establishing their densities and thus bulk composition. A fossil bulge, if present, would place constraints on the thermal and orbital evolution of these bodies [1,2]. The New Horizons LORRI imaging system [3] has provided global images of Pluto and Charon, with best resolutions of 3.8 and 2.3 km/pix, respectively. Three separate approaches have been used to determine mean radii and shape from the images, two using a threshold DN value [4,5] and one using a maximum gradient method. These approaches were validated using synthetic images having a range of photometric functions. Tradeoffs between the limb center location and the derived shape in individual images can be reduced by combining limb picks from different images. Preliminary results for both Pluto and Charon will be presented. [1] Robuchon & Nimmo, Icarus 216, 426, 2011. [2] McKinnon & Singer, DPS 46, abs. no. 419.07, 2014. [3] Cheng et al., SSR 140, 189, 2008. [4] Dermott & Thomas, Icarus 73, 25, 1988. [5] Thomason & Nimmo, LPSC 46, abs. no. 1462, 2015.

  11. Correlations of experimental isotope shifts with spectroscopic and mass observables

    SciTech Connect

    Cakirli, R. B.; Casten, R. F.; Blaum, K.

    2010-12-15

    Experimental differential observables relating to mean square charge radii, spectroscopic, and mass observables of even-even nuclei are presented for different regions in the nuclear chart. They exhibit remarkable correlations, not heretofore recognized, that provide a new perspective on structural evolution, especially in exotic nuclei. This can also be a guide for future measurements of charge radii, spectroscopic observables, and masses, as well as for future theoretical approaches.

  12. CHARGE IMBALANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, John

    1980-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the theory of charge imbalance, and to discuss its relevance to a number of experimental situations. We introduce the concepts of quasiparticle charge and charge imbalance, and discuss the generation and detection of charge imbalance by tunneling. We describe the relaxation of the injected charge imbalance by inelastic scattering processes, and show how the Boltzmann equation can be solved to obtain the steady state quasiparticle distribution and the charge relaxation rate. Details are given of experiments to measure charge imbalance and the charge relaxation rate when inelastic scattering is the predominant relaxation mechanism. Experiments on and theories of other charge relaxation mechanisms are discussed, namely relaxation via elastic scattering in the presence of energy gap anisotropy, or in the presence of a pair breaking mechanism such as magnetic impurities or an applied supercurrent or magnetic field. We describe three other situations in which charge imbalance occurs, namely the resistance of the NS interface, phase slip centers, and the flow of a supercurrent in the presence of a temperature gradient.

  13. High Precision, Directly Determined Radii and Effective Temperatures for Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Belle, Gerard

    Mission Statement. The radius and temperature scale of giant stars across the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram from red giant branch stars to horizontal branch stars is understood well enough to enable an accurate prediction of temperature and size for a given star to no better than ~2.5% and ~20%, respectively, based upon photometry. The primary reason for this is the lack of empirically determined radii and temperatures across the giant branches. One of the long-running strengths of optical interferometry has been the empirical determination of fundamental stellar parameters. Through direct measurements of effective temperature and linear radius, methods such as photometric colors that indirectly predict such values can be calibrated. A substantial body of data on this topic collected for giant stars remains unpublished and stands to benefit from the advances in ancillary data sources and computational techniques of the last dozen years. Previous efforts in this regard have been limited by data sample breadth and depth. The Experiment. We will use multi-technique and multi-wavelength data available in NASA's Archives to directly measure angular sizes and bolometric fluxes for giant stars, establishing the radius-temperature scale across the giant branches. Interferometric data from NASA's Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI) Archive in conjunction with recent advances in calibration techniques will allow us to directly establish fundamental parameters of temperature and radius for 425 giant stars at unprecedented levels of accuracy. The majority of these objects was observed repeatedly over the 11-year run of this well- understood instrument, allowing for exquisite control of observational systematics. Optical, near-infrared and mid-infrared data from NASA Archives, including 2MASS, COBE, MSX, and WISE will constrain the bolometric fluxes; the recent reanalysis of the Hipparcos data will provide unparalleled distances to each of the 425 giant stars in the sample. We

  14. A finite element stress analysis of spur gears including fillet radii and rim thickness effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S. H.; Huston, R. L.; Coy, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Spur gear stress analysis results are presented for a variety of loading conditions, support conditions, fillet radii, and rim thickness. These results are obtained using the SAP IV finite-element code. The maximum stresses, occurring at the root surface, substantially increase with decreasing rim thickness for partially supported rims (that is, with loose-fitting hubs). For fully supported rims (that is, with tight-fitting hubs), the root surface stresses slightly decrease with decreasing rim thickness. The fillet radius is found to have a significant effect upon the maximum stresses at the root surface. These stresses increase with increasing fillet radius. The fillet radius has little effect upon the internal root section stresses.

  15. Measurement of apparent cell radii using a multiple wave vector diffusion experiment.

    PubMed

    Weber, T; Ziener, C H; Kampf, T; Herold, V; Bauer, W R; Jakob, P M

    2009-04-01

    It had been previously shown that an idealized version of the two-wave-vector extension of the NMR pulsed-field-gradient spin echo diffusion experiment can be used to determine the apparent radius of geometries with restricted diffusion. In the present work, the feasibility of the experiment was demonstrated in an NMR imaging experiment, in which the apparent radius of axons in white matter tissue was determined. Moreover, numerical simulations have been carried out to determine the reliability of the results. For small diffusion times, the radius is systematically underestimated. Larger gradient area, finite length gradient pulses, and a statistical distribution of radii within a voxel all have a minor influence on the estimated radius. PMID:19205023

  16. Internal Charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.

    2014-01-01

    (1) High energy (>100keV) electrons penetrate spacecraft walls and accumulate in dielectrics or isolated conductors; (2) Threat environment is energetic electrons with sufficient flux to charge circuit boards, cable insulation, and ungrounded metal faster than charge can dissipate; (3) Accumulating charge density generates electric fields in excess of material breakdown strenght resulting in electrostatic discharge; and (4) System impact is material damage, discharge currents inside of spacecraft Faraday cage on or near critical circuitry, and RF noise.

  17. Neutron star masses and radii from quiescent low-mass x-ray binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimer, James M.; Steiner, Andrew W. E-mail: steiner3@uw.edu

    2014-04-01

    We perform a systematic analysis of neutron star radius constraints from five quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries and examine how they depend on measurements of their distances and amounts of intervening absorbing material, as well as their assumed atmospheric compositions. We construct and calibrate to published results a semi-analytic model of the neutron star atmosphere which approximates these effects for the predicted masses and radii. Starting from mass and radius probability distributions established from hydrogen-atmosphere spectral fits of quiescent sources, we apply this model to compute alternate sets of probability distributions. We perform Bayesian analyses to estimate neutron star mass-radius curves and equation of state (EOS) parameters that best-fit each set of distributions, assuming the existence of a known low-density neutron star crustal EOS, a simple model for the high-density EOS, causality, and the observation that the neutron star maximum mass exceeds 2 M {sub ☉}. We compute the posterior probabilities for each set of distance measurements and assumptions about absorption and composition. We find that, within the context of our assumptions and our parameterized EOS models, some absorption models are disfavored. We find that neutron stars composed of hadrons are favored relative to those with exotic matter with strong phase transitions. In addition, models in which all five stars have hydrogen atmospheres are found to be weakly disfavored. Our most likely models predict neutron star radii that are consistent with current experimental results concerning the nature of the nucleon-nucleon interaction near the nuclear saturation density.

  18. Measurements of Faraday Rotation through the Solar Corona at 4.6 Solar Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Fischer, P. D.; Buffo, J. J.; Spangler, S. R.

    2013-07-01

    Identifying and understanding (1) the coronal heating mechanism and (2) the acceleration mechanism for the high-speed solar wind are two of the most important modern problems in solar physics. Many competing models of the high-speed solar wind depend on the solar magnetic field inside heliocentric distances of 5 solar radii. We report on sensitive VLA full-polarization observations made in August, 2011, at 5.0 and 6.1 GHz (each with a bandwidth of 128 MHz) of the radio galaxy 3C228 through the solar corona at heliocentric distances of 4.6 - 5.0 solar radii. Observations at 5.0 GHz (C-band frequencies) permit measurements deeper in the corona than previous VLA observations at 1.4 and 1.7 GHz. These Faraday rotation observations provide unique information on the plasma density and magnetic field strength in this region of the corona. The measured Faraday rotation on this day was lower than our a priori expectations, but we have successfully modeled the measurement in terms of observed properties of the corona on the day of observation. Further, 3C228 provides two lines of sight (separated by 46”) that allow measurement of differential Faraday rotation. These data may provide constraints on the magnitude of coronal currents and, thus, on the role Joule heating plays in the corona. Fluctuations in the observed rotation measure may also place constraints on wave-turbulence models by constraining the magnitude of coronal Alfvén waves.

  19. Neutron star radii, universal relations, and the role of prior distributions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Steiner, Andrew W.; Lattimer, James M.; Brown, Edward F.

    2016-02-02

    We investigate constraints on neutron star structure arising from the assumptions that neutron stars have crusts, that recent calculations of pure neutron matter limit the equation of state of neutron star matter near the nuclear saturation density, that the high-density equation of state is limited by causality and the largest high-accuracy neutron star mass measurement, and that general relativity is the correct theory of gravity. We explore the role of prior assumptions by considering two classes of equation of state models. In a first, the intermediate- and high-density behavior of the equation of state is parameterized by piecewise polytropes. Inmore » the second class, the high-density behavior of the equation of state is parameterized by piecewise continuous line segments. The smallest density at which high-density matter appears is varied in order to allow for strong phase transitions above the nuclear saturation density. We critically examine correlations among the pressure of matter, radii, maximum masses, the binding energy, the moment of inertia, and the tidal deformability, paying special attention to the sensitivity of these correlations to prior assumptions about the equation of state. It is possible to constrain the radii of 1.4 solar mass neutron stars to be larger than 10 km, even without consideration of additional astrophysical observations, for example, those from photospheric radius expansion bursts or quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries. We are able to improve the accuracy of known correlations between the moment of inertia and compactness as well as the binding energy and compactness. Furthermore, we also demonstrate the existence of a correlation between the neutron star binding energy and the moment of inertia.« less

  20. THE MASS-RADIUS RELATION FOR 65 EXOPLANETS SMALLER THAN 4 EARTH RADII

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Lauren M.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    2014-03-01

    We study the masses and radii of 65 exoplanets smaller than 4 R {sub ⊕} with orbital periods shorter than 100 days. We calculate the weighted mean densities of planets in bins of 0.5 R {sub ⊕} and identify a density maximum of 7.6  g cm{sup –3} at 1.4 R {sub ⊕}. On average, planets with radii up to R {sub P} = 1.5 R {sub ⊕} increase in density with increasing radius. Above 1.5 R {sub ⊕}, the average planet density rapidly decreases with increasing radius, indicating that these planets have a large fraction of volatiles by volume overlying a rocky core. Including the solar system terrestrial planets with the exoplanets below 1.5 R {sub ⊕}, we find ρ{sub P} = 2.43 + 3.39(R {sub P}/R {sub ⊕}) g cm{sup –3} for R {sub P} < 1.5 R {sub ⊕}, which is consistent with rocky compositions. For 1.5 ≤ R {sub P}/R {sub ⊕} < 4, we find M {sub P}/M {sub ⊕} = 2.69(R {sub P}/R {sub ⊕}){sup 0.93}. The rms of planet masses to the fit between 1.5 and 4 R {sub ⊕} is 4.3 M {sub ⊕} with reduced χ{sup 2} = 6.2. The large scatter indicates a diversity in planet composition at a given radius. The compositional diversity can be due to planets of a given volume (as determined by their large H/He envelopes) containing rocky cores of different masses or compositions.

  1. Fossil hominin radii from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Laura; Carretero, José Miguel; García-González, Rebeca; Lorenzo, Carlos; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Quam, Rolf; Martínez, Ignacio; Gracia-Téllez, Ana; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    Complete radii in the fossil record preceding recent humans and Neandertals are very scarce. Here we introduce the radial remains recovered from the Sima de los Huesos (SH) site in the Sierra de Atapuerca between 1976 and 2011 and which have been dated in excess of 430 ky (thousands of years) ago. The sample comprises 89 specimens, 49 of which are attributed to adults representing a minimum of seven individuals. All elements are described anatomically and metrically, and compared with other fossil hominins and recent humans in order to examine the phylogenetic polarity of certain radial features. Radial remains from SH have some traits that differentiate them from those of recent humans and make them more similar to Neandertals, including strongly curved shafts, anteroposterior expanded radial heads and both absolutely and relatively long necks. In contrast, the SH sample differs from Neandertals in showing a high overall gracility as well as a high frequency (80%) of an anteriorly oriented radial tuberosity. Thus, like the cranial and dental remains from the SH site, characteristic Neandertal radial morphology is not present fully in the SH radii. We also analyzed the cross-sectional properties of the SH radial sample at two different levels: mid-shaft and at the midpoint of the neck length. When standardized by shaft length, no difference in the mid-shaft cross-sectional properties were found between the SH hominins, Neandertals and recent humans. Nevertheless, due to their long neck length, the SH hominins show a higher lever efficiency than either Neandertals or recent humans. Functionally, the SH radial morphology is consistent with more efficient pronation-supination and flexion-extension movements. The particular trait composition in the SH sample and Neandertals resembles more closely morphology evident in recent human males. PMID:26767960

  2. Neutron star radii, universal relations, and the role of prior distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, A. W.; Lattimer, J. M.; Brown, E. F.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate constraints on neutron star structure arising from the assumptions that neutron stars have crusts, that recent calculations of pure neutron matter limit the equation of state of neutron star matter near the nuclear saturation density, that the high-density equation of state is limited by causality and the largest high-accuracy neutron star mass measurement, and that general relativity is the correct theory of gravity. We explore the role of prior assumptions by considering two classes of equation of state models. In a first, the intermediate- and high-density behavior of the equation of state is parameterized by piecewise polytropes. In the second class, the high-density behavior of the equation of state is parameterized by piecewise continuous line segments. The smallest density at which high-density matter appears is varied in order to allow for strong phase transitions above the nuclear saturation density. We critically examine correlations among the pressure of matter, radii, maximum masses, the binding energy, the moment of inertia, and the tidal deformability, paying special attention to the sensitivity of these correlations to prior assumptions about the equation of state. It is possible to constrain the radii of 1.4 M_{⊙} neutron stars to be larger than 10km, even without consideration of additional astrophysical observations, for example, those from photospheric radius expansion bursts or quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries. We are able to improve the accuracy of known correlations between the moment of inertia and compactness as well as the binding energy and compactness. We also demonstrate the existence of a correlation between the neutron star binding energy and the moment of inertia.

  3. Hydrodynamical Numerical Simulation of Wind Production from Black Hole Hot Accretion Flows at Very Large Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, De-Fu; Yuan, Feng; Gan, Zhao-Ming; Yang, Xiao-Hong

    2016-02-01

    Previous works show that strong winds exist in hot accretion flows around black holes. Those works focus only on the region close to the black hole, so it is unknown whether or where the wind production stops at large radii. In this paper, we investigate this problem with hydrodynamical simulations. We take into account the gravities of both the black hole and the nuclear star clusters. For the latter, we assume that the velocity dispersion of stars is a constant and its gravitational potential \\propto {σ }2{ln}(r), where σ is the velocity dispersion of stars, and r is the distance from the center of the galaxy. We focus on the region where the gravitational potential is dominated by the star cluster. We find that, just as for the accretion flow at small radii, the mass inflow rate decreases inward, and the flow is convectively unstable. However, a trajectory analysis shows that there is very little wind launched from the flow. Our result, combined with the results of Yuan et al.’s study from 2015, indicates that the mass flux of wind launched from hot accretion flow {\\dot{M}}{{wind}}={\\dot{M}}{{BH}}(r/20{r}s), with r≲ {R}A\\equiv {{GM}}{{BH}}/{σ }2. Here, {\\dot{M}}{{BH}} is the accretion rate at the black hole horizon, and RA is similar to the Bondi radius. We argue that the inward decrease of inflow rate is not due to mass loss via wind, but to convective motion. The disappearance of wind outside RA must be due to the change of the gravitational potential, but the exact reason remains to be probed.

  4. On combining Thole's induced point dipole model with fixed charge distributions in molecular mechanics force fields.

    PubMed

    Antila, Hanne S; Salonen, Emppu

    2015-04-15

    The Thole induced point dipole model is combined with three different point charge fitting methods, Merz-Kollman (MK), charges from electrostatic potentials using a grid (CHELPG), and restrained electrostatic potential (RESP), and two multipole algorithms, distributed multipole analysis (DMA) and Gaussian multipole model (GMM), which can be used to describe the electrostatic potential (ESP) around molecules in molecular mechanics force fields. This is done to study how the different methods perform when intramolecular polarizability contributions are self-consistently removed from the fitting done in the force field parametrization. It is demonstrated that the polarizable versions of the partial charge models provide a good compromise between accuracy and computational efficiency in describing the ESP of small organic molecules undergoing conformational changes. For the point charge models, the inclusion of polarizability reduced the the average root mean square error of ESP over the test set by 4-10%. PMID:25753482

  5. Effect of ionic radii on the Curie temperature in Ba1-x-ySrxCayTiO3 compounds

    PubMed Central

    Berenov, A.; Le Goupil, F.; Alford, N.

    2016-01-01

    A series of Ba1-x-ySrxCayTiO3 compounds were prepared with varying average ionic radii and cation disorder on A-site. All samples showed typical ferroelectric behavior. A simple empirical equation correlated Curie temperature, TC, with the values of ionic radii of A-site cations. This correlation was related to the distortion of TiO6 octahedra observed during neutron diffraction studies. The equation was used for the selection of compounds with predetermined values of TC. The effects of A-site ionic radii on the temperatures of phase transitions in Ba1-x-ySrxCayTiO3 were discussed. PMID:27324841

  6. Charging machine

    DOEpatents

    Medlin, John B.

    1976-05-25

    A charging machine for loading fuel slugs into the process tubes of a nuclear reactor includes a tubular housing connected to the process tube, a charging trough connected to the other end of the tubular housing, a device for loading the charging trough with a group of fuel slugs, means for equalizing the coolant pressure in the charging trough with the pressure in the process tubes, means for pushing the group of fuel slugs into the process tube and a latch and a seal engaging the last object in the group of fuel slugs to prevent the fuel slugs from being ejected from the process tube when the pusher is removed and to prevent pressure liquid from entering the charging machine.

  7. Vacuum fluctuations and Brownian motion of a charged test particle near a reflecting boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Hongwei; Ford, L. H.

    2004-09-15

    We study the Brownian motion of a charged test particle coupled to electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations near a perfectly reflecting plane boundary. The presence of the boundary modifies the quantum fluctuations of the electric field, which in turn modifies the motion of the test particle. We calculate the resulting mean squared fluctuations in the velocity and position of the test particle. In the case of directions transverse to the boundary, the results are negative. This can be interpreted as reducing the quantum uncertainty which would otherwise be present.

  8. Anisotropic charged core envelope star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mafa Takisa, P.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    We study a charged compact object with anisotropic pressures in a core envelope setting. The equation of state is quadratic in the core and linear in the envelope. There is smooth matching between the three regions: the core, envelope and the Reissner-Nordström exterior. We show that the presence of the electric field affects the masses, radii and compactification factors of stellar objects with values which are in agreement with previous studies. We investigate in particular the effect of electric field on the physical features of the pulsar PSR J1614-2230 in the core envelope model. The gravitational potentials and the matter variables are well behaved within the stellar object. We demonstrate that the radius of the core and the envelope can vary by changing the parameters in the speed of sound.

  9. Charge separation in the aerodynamic breakup of micrometer-sized water droplets.

    PubMed

    Zilch, Lloyd W; Maze, Joshua T; Smith, John W; Ewing, George E; Jarrold, Martin F

    2008-12-25

    Charged water droplets generated by electrospray, sonic spray, and a vibrating orifice aerosol generator (VOAG) have been studied by digital macrophotography and image charge detection mass spectrometry. Image charge detection mass spectrometry provides information on the droplet size, charge, and velocity after transmission through a capillary interface. The digital images provide the droplet size distribution before they enter the capillary. Droplets with 10-100 microm radii generated by sonic spray and VOAG are reduced to 2-3 microm radii by transmission through the capillary interface. The droplets from sonic spray and VOAG are much more highly charged than expected for random charging, and positive droplets are much more prevalent than negative. For positive mode electrospray, >99% of the detected droplets carry a positive charge, whereas for negative mode electrospray, <30% of the detected droplets carry a negative charge (i.e., >70% carry a positive charge). These observation can all be accounted for by the aerodynamic breakup of the droplets in the capillary interface. This breakup reduces the droplets to a terminal size at which point further breakup does not occur. Charge separation during droplet breakup is responsible for the relatively high charges on the sonic spray and VOAG droplets and for the preference for positively charged droplets. The charge separation can be explained using the bag mechanism for droplet breakup and the electrical bilayer at the surface of water. PMID:19035820

  10. Radii, masses, and ages of 18 bright stars using interferometry and new estimations of exoplanetary parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligi, R.; Creevey, O.; Mourard, D.; Crida, A.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Nardetto, N.; Perraut, K.; Schultheis, M.; Tallon-Bosc, I.; ten Brummelaar, T.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Accurate stellar parameters are needed in numerous domains of astrophysics. The position of stars on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is an important indication of their structure and evolution, and it helps improve stellar models. Furthermore, the age and mass of stars hosting planets are required elements for studying exoplanetary systems. Aims: We aim at determining accurate parameters of a set of 18 bright exoplanet host and potential host stars from interferometric measurements, photometry, and stellar models. Methods: Using the VEGA/CHARA interferometer operating in the visible domain, we measured the angular diameters of 18 stars, ten of which host exoplanets. We combined them with their distances to estimate their radii. We used photometry to derive their bolometric flux and, then, their effective temperature and luminosity to place them on the H-R diagram. We then used the PARSEC models to derive their best fit ages and masses, with error bars derived from Monte Carlo calculations. Results: Our interferometric measurements lead to an average of 1.9% uncertainty on angular diameters and 3% on stellar radii. There is good agreement between measured and indirect estimations of angular diameters (either from SED fitting or from surface brightness relations) for main sequence (MS) stars, but not as good for more evolved stars. For each star, we provide a likelihood map in the mass-age plane; typically, two distinct sets of solutions appear (an old and a young age). The errors on the ages and masses that we provide account for the metallicity uncertainties, which are often neglected by other works. From measurements of its radius and density, we also provide the mass of 55 Cnc independently of models. From the stellar masses, we provide new estimates of semi-major axes and minimum masses of exoplanets with reliable uncertainties. We also derive the radius, density, and mass of 55 Cnc e, a super-Earth that transits its stellar host. Our exoplanetary

  11. DNA stretching on the wall surfaces in curved microchannels with different radii

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    DNA molecule conformation dynamics and stretching were made on semi-circular surfaces with different radii (500 to 5,000 μm) in microchannels measuring 200 μm × 200 μm in cross section. Five different buffer solutions - 1× Tris-acetate-EDTA (TAE), 1× Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE), 1× Tris-EDTA (TE), 1× Tris-phosphate-EDTA (TPE), and 1× Tris-buffered saline (TBS) solutions - were used with a variety of viscosity such as 40, 60, and 80 cP, with resultant 10−4 ≤ Re ≤ 10−3 and the corresponding 5 ≤ Wi ≤ 12. The test fluids were seeded with JOJO-1 tracer particles for flow visualization and driven through the test channels via a piezoelectric (PZT) micropump. Micro particle image velocimetry (μPIV) measuring technique was applied for the centered-plane velocity distribution measurements. It is found that the radius effect on the stretch ratio of DNA dependence is significant. The stretch ratio becomes larger as the radius becomes small due to the larger centrifugal force. Consequently, the maximum stretch was found at the center of the channel with a radius of 500 μm. PMID:25147488

  12. Acceleration of protons at 32 Jovian radii in the outer magnetosphere of jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schardt, A. W.; Mcdonald, F. B.; Trainor, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    During the inbound pass of Pioneer 10, a rapid ten-fold increase of the 0.2 to MeV proton flux was observed at 32 Jovian radii (R sub J). The total event lasted for 30 minutes and was made up of a number of superimposed individual events. At the time, the spacecraft was in the outer magnetosphere about 7 R sub J below the magnetic equator. Before and after the event, the proton flux was characteristic of the low flux level normally encountered between crossings of the magnetic equator. Flux changes at different energies were coherent within 1 minute; a time comparable to the time resolution of the data. The angular distributions were highly anisotropic with protons streaming towards Jupiter. A field-aligned dumbbell distribution was observed initially, and a pancake distribution just before the flux decayed to its pre-event value. The alpha particle flux changed as rapidly as the proton flux but peaked at different times. The energetic electron flux behaved differently; it increased gradually throughout the period.

  13. Adaptive niche radii and niche shapes approaches for niching with the CMA-ES.

    PubMed

    Shir, Ofer M; Emmerich, Michael; Bäck, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    While the motivation and usefulness of niching methods is beyond doubt, the relaxation of assumptions and limitations concerning the hypothetical search landscape is much needed if niching is to be valid in a broader range of applications. Upon the introduction of radii-based niching methods with derandomized evolution strategies (ES), the purpose of this study is to address the so-called niche radius problem. A new concept of an adaptive individual niche radius is applied to niching with the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA-ES). Two approaches are considered. The first approach couples the radius to the step size mechanism, while the second approach employs the Mahalanobis distance metric with the covariance matrix mechanism for the distance calculation, for obtaining niches with more complex geometrical shapes. The proposed approaches are described in detail, and then tested on high-dimensional artificial landscapes at several levels of difficulty. They are shown to be robust and to achieve satisfying results. PMID:20064027

  14. Quantifying mass segregation and new core radii for 54 Milky Way globular clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsbury, Ryan; Heyl, Jeremy; Richer, Harvey E-mail: heyl@phas.ubc.ca

    2013-11-20

    We present core radii for 54 Milky Way globular clusters determined by fitting King-Michie models to cumulative projected star count distributions. We find that fitting star counts rather than surface brightness profiles produces results that differ significantly due to the presence of mass segregation. The sample in each cluster is further broken down into various mass groups, each of which is fit independently, allowing us to determine how the concentration of each cluster varies with mass. The majority of the clusters in our sample show general agreement with the standard picture that more massive stars will be more centrally concentrated. We find that core radius versus stellar mass can be fit with a two-parameter power law. The slope of this power law is a value that describes the amount of mass segregation present in the cluster, and is measured independently of our distance from the cluster. This value correlates strongly with the core relaxation time and physical size of each cluster. Supplementary figures are also included showing the best fits and likelihood contours of fit parameters for all 54 clusters.

  15. Alfvenic Turbulence from the Sun to 65 Solar Radii: Numerical predictions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, J. C.; Chandran, B. D. G.

    2015-12-01

    The upcoming NASA Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission will fly to within 9 solar radii from the solar surface, about 7 times closer to the Sun than any previous spacecraft has ever reached. This historic mission will gather unprecedented remote-sensing data and the first in-situ measurements of the plasma in the solar atmosphere, which will revolutionize our knowledge and understanding of turbulence and other processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind. This close to the Sun the background solar-wind properties are highly inhomogeneous. As a result, outward-propagating Alfven waves (AWs) arising from the random motions of the photospheric magnetic-field footpoints undergo strong non-WKB reflections and trigger a vigorous turbulent cascade. In this talk I will discuss recent progress in the understanding of reflection-driven Alfven turbulence in this scenario by means of high-resolution numerical simulations, with the goal of predicting the detailed nature of the velocity and magnetic field fluctuations that the SPP mission will measure. In particular, I will place special emphasis on relating the simulations to relevant physical mechanisms that might govern the radial evolution of the turbulence spectra of outward/inward-propagating fluctuations and discuss the conditions that lead to universal power-laws.

  16. Tracing the stellar halo of an early type galaxy out to 25 effective radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rejkuba, Marina

    2016-08-01

    We have used ACS and WFC3 cameras on board HST to resolve stars in the halo of NGC 5128 out to 140 kpc (25 effective radii, R eff) along the major axis and 70 kpc (13 R eff) along the minor axis. This dataset provides an unprecedented radial coverage of stellar halo properties in any galaxy. Color-magnitude diagrams clearly reveal the presence of the red giant branch stars belonging to the halo of NGC 5128 even in the most distant fields. The V-I colors of the red giants enable us to measure the metallicity distribution in each field and so map the metallicity gradient over the sampled area. The stellar metallicity follows a shallow gradient and even out at 140 kpc (25 R eff) its median value does not go below [M/H]~-1 dex. We observe significant field-to-field metallicity and stellar density variations. The star counts are higher along the major axis when compared to minor axis field located 90 kpc from the galaxy centre, indicating flattening in the outer halo. These observational results provide new important constraints for the assembly history of the halo and the formation of this gE galaxy.

  17. Star Formation in Dwarf Galaxies as a Function of Cluster-Centric Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rude, Cody; Barkhouse, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy clusters form the largest structures in the universe. The cluster galaxy population differs both by morphology and star formation histories relative to the field population. Several physical mechanisms have been proposed to account for these differences, including ram pressure stripping due to the intracluster medium, and harassment from close encounters with other galaxies. Dwarf galaxies could prove to be particularly important as their low mass makes them more susceptible to external influences. This study looks for evidence of enhanced/quenching of star formation in dwarf galaxies using photometric u- and r-band data of several Abell clusters taken with the CFHT. From the combined sample, scaled by r200, composite luminosity functions (LFs) and histograms of galaxy color at various cluster-centric radii are constructed. An increase in the faint-end slope of the u-band LF relative to the r-band is a possible indicator of enhanced star formation. Comparisons of the inner and outer regions of the cluster sample may yield insights into the physical mechanisms that affect star formation of infalling cluster dwarf galaxies.

  18. GCM estimate of the indirect aerosol forcing using satellite-retrieved cloud droplet effective radii

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, O.

    1995-05-01

    In a recent paper, satellite data radiances were analyzed to retrieve cloud droplet effective radii and significant interhemispheric differences for both maritime and continental clouds were reported. The mean cloud droplet radius in the Northern Hemisphere is smaller than in the Southern Hemisphere by about 0.7 {mu}m. This hemispheric contrast suggests the presence of an aerosol effect on cloud droplet size and is consistent with higher cloud condensation nuclei number concentration in the Northern Hemisphere due to anthropogenic production of aerosol precursors. In the present study, we constrain a climate model with the satellite retrievals and discuss the climate forcing that can be inferred from the observed distribution of cloud droplet radius. Based on two sets of experiments, this sensitivity study suggests that the indirect radiative forcing by anthropogenic aerosols could be about -0.6 or -1 W m{sup -2} averaged in the 0{degrees}-50{degrees}N latitude band. The uncertainty of these estimates is difficult to assess but is at least 50%. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Fabrication of large radii toroidal surfaces by single point diamond turning

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, J.P.; Marlar, T.A.; Miller, A.C.

    1995-12-31

    An unconventional machining technique has been developed for producing relatively large radii quasi-toroidal surfaces which could not normally be produced by conventional diamond turning technology. The maximum radial swing capacity of a diamond turning lathe is the limiting factor for the rotational radius of any toroid. A typical diamond turned toroidal surface is produced when a part is rotated about the spindle axis while the diamond tool contours the surface with any curved path. Toric surfaces sliced horizontally, have been used in laser resonator cavities. This paper will address the fabrication of a special case of toroids where a rotating tool path is a circle whose center is offset from the rotational axis of the toroid by a distance greater than the minor radius of the tool path. The quasi-toroidal surfaces produced by this technique approximate all asymmetrical combinations of concave/convex sections of a torus. Other machine configurations have been reported which offer alternative approaches to the fabrication of concave asymmetric aspheric surfaces.

  20. DNA stretching on the wall surfaces in curved microchannels with different radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Shou-Shing; Wu, Fong-He; Tsai, Ming-Ju

    2014-08-01

    DNA molecule conformation dynamics and stretching were made on semi-circular surfaces with different radii (500 to 5,000 μm) in microchannels measuring 200 μm × 200 μm in cross section. Five different buffer solutions - 1× Tris-acetate-EDTA (TAE), 1× Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE), 1× Tris-EDTA (TE), 1× Tris-phosphate-EDTA (TPE), and 1× Tris-buffered saline (TBS) solutions - were used with a variety of viscosity such as 40, 60, and 80 cP, with resultant 10-4 ≤ Re ≤ 10-3 and the corresponding 5 ≤ Wi ≤ 12. The test fluids were seeded with JOJO-1 tracer particles for flow visualization and driven through the test channels via a piezoelectric (PZT) micropump. Micro particle image velocimetry (μPIV) measuring technique was applied for the centered-plane velocity distribution measurements. It is found that the radius effect on the stretch ratio of DNA dependence is significant. The stretch ratio becomes larger as the radius becomes small due to the larger centrifugal force. Consequently, the maximum stretch was found at the center of the channel with a radius of 500 μm.

  1. Systematic study of charged-pion and kaon femtoscopy in Au + Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Danley, D.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, R.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, M.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, T.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novak, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, A. S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xie, W.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    We present a systematic study of charged-pion and kaon interferometry in Au +Au collisions at √{s NN}=200 GeV. The kaon mean source radii are found to be larger than pion radii in the outward and longitudinal directions for the same transverse mass; this difference increases for more central collisions. The azimuthal-angle dependence of the radii was measured with respect to the second-order event plane and similar oscillations of the source radii were found for pions and kaons. Hydrodynamic models qualitatively describe the similar oscillations of the mean source radii for pions and kaons, but they do not fully describe the transverse-mass dependence of the oscillations.

  2. Systematic study of charged-pion and kaon femtoscopy in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We present a systematic study of charged pion and kaon interferometry in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV. The kaon mean source radii are found to be larger than pion radii in the outward and longitudinal directions for the same transverse mass; this difference increases for more central collisions. The azimuthal-angle dependence of the radii was measured with respect to the second-order event plane and similar oscillations of the source radii were found for pions and kaons. Hydrodynamic models qualitatively describe the similar oscillations of the mean source radii for pions and kaons, but they do not fully describe the transverse-mass dependence of the oscillations.

  3. Systematic study of charged-pion and kaon femtoscopy in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We present a systematic study of charged pion and kaon interferometry in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV. The kaon mean source radii are found to be larger than pion radii in the outward and longitudinal directions for the same transverse mass; this difference increases for more central collisions. The azimuthal-angle dependence of the radii was measured with respect to the second-order event plane and similar oscillations of the source radii were found for pions and kaons. Hydrodynamic models qualitatively describe the similar oscillations of the mean source radii for pions and kaons, but they do not fully describe the transverse-massmore » dependence of the oscillations.« less

  4. Erosion of carbon/carbon by solar wind charged particle radiation during a solar probe mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Witold; O'Donnell, Tim; Millard, Jerry

    1991-01-01

    The possible erosion of a carbon/carbon thermal shield by solar wind-charged particle radiation is reviewed. The present knowledge of erosion data for carbon and/or graphite is surveyed, and an explanation of erosion mechanisms under different charged particle environments is discussed. The highest erosion is expected at four solar radii. Erosion rates are analytically estimated under several conservative assumptions for a normal quiet and worst case solar wind storm conditions. Mass loss analyses and comparison studies surprisingly indicate that the predicted erosion rate by solar wind could be greater than by nominal free sublimation during solar wind storm conditions at four solar radii. The predicted overall mass loss of a carbon/carbon shield material during the critical four solar radii flyby can still meet the mass loss mission requirement of less than 0.0025 g/sec.

  5. In hot water: effects of temperature-dependent interiors on the radii of water-rich super-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Scott W.; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2016-05-01

    Observational advancements are leading to increasingly precise measurements of super-Earth masses and radii. Such measurements are used in internal structure models to constrain interior compositions of super-Earths. It is now critically important to quantify the effect of various model assumptions on the predicted radii. In particular, models often neglect thermal effects, a choice justified by noting that the thermal expansion of a solid Earth-like planet is small. However, the thermal effects for water-rich interiors may be significant. We have systematically explored the extent to which thermal effects can influence the radii of water-rich super-Earths over a wide range of masses, surface temperatures, surface pressures and water mass fractions. We developed temperature-dependent internal structure models of water-rich super-Earths that include a comprehensive temperature-dependent water equation of state. We found that thermal effects induce significant changes in their radii. For example, for super-Earths with 10 per cent water by mass, the radius increases by up to 0.5 R⊕ when the surface temperature is increased from 300 to 1000 K, assuming a surface pressure of 100 bar and an adiabatic temperature gradient in the water layer. The increase is even larger at lower surface pressures and/or higher surface temperatures, while changing the water fraction makes only a marginal difference. These effects are comparable to current super-Earth radial measurement errors, which can be better than 0.1 R⊕. It is therefore important to ensure that the thermal behaviour of water is taken into account when interpreting super-Earth radii using internal structure models.

  6. Implementation of a protein reduced point charge model toward molecular dynamics applications.

    PubMed

    Leherte, Laurence; Vercauteren, Daniel P

    2011-11-17

    A reduced point charge model was developed in a previous work from the study of extrema in smoothed charge density distribution functions generated from the Amber99 molecular electrostatic potential. In the present work, such a point charge distribution is coupled with the Amber99 force field and implemented in the program TINKER to allow molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of proteins. First applications to two polypeptides that involve α-helix and β-sheet motifs are analyzed and compared to all-atom MD simulations. Two types of coarse-grained (CG)-based trajectories are generated using, on one hand, harmonic bond stretching terms and, on the other hand, distance restraints. Results show that the use of the unrestrained CG conditions are sufficient to preserve most of the secondary structure characteristics but restraints lead to a better agreement between CG and all-atom simulation results such as rmsd, dipole moment, and time-dependent mean square deviation functions. PMID:21800922

  7. Nuclear Shape And Size Properties For Rare-earth Neutron-rich Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Benhamouda, N.; Oudih, M. R.; Allal, N. H.; Fellah, M.

    2009-01-28

    Two-neutron separation energies, quadrupole moments and mean square charge radii, are evaluated for even-even Osmium isotopes with 78{<=}N{<=}114. The calculations are performed in the framework of a microscopic model including the pairing correlations rigorously by means of the FSBCS (Fixed-Sharp-BCS) method.

  8. Crystallization of confined water pools with radii greater than 1 nm in AOT reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Akira; Yui, Hiroharu

    2014-07-01

    Freezing of water pools inside aerosol sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) reverse micelles has been investigated. Previous freezing experiments suffer from collision and fusion of AOT micelles and resultant loss of water from the water pool by shedding out during the cooling process. These phenomena have restricted the formation of ice to only when the radius of the water pool (Rw) is below 1 nm, and only amorphous ice has been observed. To overcome the size limitation, a combination of rapid cooling and a custom-made cell allowing thin sample loading is applied for instantaneous and homogeneous freezing. The freezing process is monitored with attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) measurements. A cooling rate of ca. -100 K/min and a sample thickness of ca. 50 μm overcomes the limitations mentioned above and allows the crystallization of water pools with larger radii (Rw > 1 nm). The corresponding ATR-IR spectra of the frozen water pools with Rw < 2.0 nm show similar features to the spectrum of metastable cubic ice (Ic). Further increase of the radius of the water pool (Rw > 2.0 nm), unfortunately, drastically decreased the integrated area of the ν(OH) band observed just after freezing, indicating the breakup of the micellar structure and shedding out of the water pool. In addition, it was revealed that Ic ice can also be formed in flexible organic self-assembled AOT reverse micelles for at least Rw ≤ ca. 2 nm, as well as in inorganic and solid materials with a pore radius of ca. 2 nm. The dependence of the phase transition temperature on the curvature of the reverse micelles is discussed from the viewpoint of the Gibbs-Thomson effect. PMID:24885023

  9. THE INNERMOST COLLIMATION STRUCTURE OF THE M87 JET DOWN TO ∼10 SCHWARZSCHILD RADII

    SciTech Connect

    Hada, Kazuhiro; Giroletti, Marcello; Giovannini, Gabriele; Kino, Motoki; Doi, Akihiro; Nagai, Hiroshi; Honma, Mareki; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki

    2013-09-20

    We investigated the detailed inner jet structure of M87 using Very Long Baseline Array data at 2, 5, 8.4, 15, 23.8, 43, and 86 GHz, especially focusing on the multi-frequency properties of the radio core at the jet base. First, we measured the size of the core region transverse to the jet axis, defined as W{sub c}, at each frequency ν, and found a relation between W{sub c} and ν: W{sub c}(ν)∝ν{sup –0.71±0.05}. Then, by combining W{sub c}(ν) and the frequency dependence of the core position r{sub c}(ν), which was obtained in our previous study, we constructed a collimation profile of the innermost jet W{sub c}(r) down to ∼10 Schwarzschild radii (R{sub s}) from the central black hole. We found that W{sub c}(r) smoothly connects with the width profile of the outer edge-brightened, parabolic jet and then follows a similar radial dependence down to several tens of R{sub s}. Closer to the black hole, the measured radial profile suggests a possible change in the jet collimation shape from the outer parabolic one, where the jet shape tends to become more radially oriented. This result could be related to a magnetic collimation process or/and interactions with surrounding materials at the jet base. The present results shed light on the importance of higher-sensitivity/resolution imaging studies of M87 at 86, 43, and 22 GHz; these studies should be examined more rigorously.

  10. Fabrication of large radii toroidal surfaces by single point diamond turning

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, J.P.; Marlar, T.A.; Miller, A.C.; Paterson, R. L.

    1995-12-31

    An unconventional machining technique has been developed for producing relatively large radii quasi-toroidal surfaces which could not normally be produced by conventional diamond turning technology. The maximum radial swing capacity of a diamond turning lathe is the limiting factor for the rotational radius of any toroid. A typical diamond turned toroidal surface is produced when a part is rotated about the spindle axis while the diamond tool contours the surface with any curved path. Toric surfaces sliced horizontally, have been used in laser resonator cavities. This paper will address the fabrication of a special case of toroids where a rotating tool path is a circle whose center is offset from the rotational axis of the toroid by a distance greater than the minor radius of the tool path. The quasi-toroidal surfaces produced by this technique approximate all asymmetrical combinations of concave/convex section of a torus. Other machine configurations have been reported which offer alternative approaches to the fabrication of concave asymmetric aspheric surfaces. Prototypes of unique lenses each having two quasi-toroidal surfaces were fabricated in the Ultraprecision Manufacturing Technology Center at form key components of a scanned laser focusing system. As an example of the problem faced, the specifications for one of the surfaces was equivalent to a section of a torus with a two meter diameter hole. The lenses were fabricated on a Nanoform 600 diamond turning lathe. This is a numerically controlled two axis T-base lathe with an air bearing spindle and oil hydrostatic slides. The maximum radial swing for this machine is approximately 0.3 meters.