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Sample records for measure milk contaminated

  1. Chemical contaminants in human milk: an overview.

    PubMed Central

    Sonawane, B R

    1995-01-01

    This review contains a succinct overview of the nature and extent of the problem of contamination of human milk with environmental and occupational chemicals, excluding drugs. Factors influencing the levels of contaminants in breast milk are discussed. Also, data on major chemicals of concern with potential health risk(s) to the general population and risk-benefit considerations are dealt with briefly. Based on the available data on the subject, research needs have been identified and policy recommendations are suggested. PMID:8549474

  2. Polychlorinated biphenyl contamination of nursing mothers' milk in Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Wickizer, T.M.; Brilliant, L.B.; Copeland, R.; Tilden, R.

    1981-02-01

    As part of an effort to assess the extent and distribution of PCB contamination in the human population of Michigan, PCB levels in the breast milk of Michigan nursing mothers were investigated. All of the 1057 samples collected from 68 counties contained PCB residues ranging from trace amounts to 5.1 ppm. The mean PCB level was 1.496 ppm. The public health significance of PCB contamination in human populations and the implications of PCB contamination of human milk for current breast-feeding practices are discussed. Several precautionary measures for nursing mothers are recommended.

  3. Microbial Contamination of Human Milk Purchased Via the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Joseph S.; McNamara, Kelly A.; Gudimetla, Vishnu; Dillon, Chelsea E.; Kwiek, Jesse J.; Geraghty, Sheela R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify microbial contamination of human milk purchased via the Internet as an indicator of disease risk to recipient infants. METHODS: Cross-sectional sample of human milk purchased via a popular US milk-sharing Web site (2012). Individuals advertising milk were contacted to arrange purchase, and milk was shipped to a rented mailbox in Ohio. The Internet milk samples (n = 101) were compared with unpasteurized samples of milk donated to a milk bank (n = 20). RESULTS: Most (74%) Internet milk samples were colonized with Gram-negative bacteria or had >104 colony-forming units/mL total aerobic count. They exhibited higher mean total aerobic, total Gram-negative, coliform, and Staphylococcus sp counts than milk bank samples. Growth of most species was positively associated with days in transit (total aerobic count [log10 colony-forming units/mL] β = 0.71 [95% confidence interval: 0.38–1.05]), and negatively associated with number of months since the milk was expressed (β = −0.36 [95% confidence interval: −0.55 to −0.16]), per simple linear regression. No samples were HIV type 1 RNA-positive; 21% of Internet samples were cytomegalovirus DNA-positive. CONCLUSIONS: Human milk purchased via the Internet exhibited high overall bacterial growth and frequent contamination with pathogenic bacteria, reflecting poor collection, storage, or shipping practices. Infants consuming this milk are at risk for negative outcomes, particularly if born preterm or are medically compromised. Increased use of lactation support services may begin to address the milk supply gap for women who want to feed their child human milk but cannot meet his or her needs. PMID:24144714

  4. Chemical contaminants in breast milk: time trends and regional variability.

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Gina M; Weiss, Pilar M

    2002-01-01

    Research on environmentally related chemical contaminants in breast milk spans several decades and dozens of countries. The ability to use this research as an environmental indicator is limited because of a lack of consistent protocols. Data on xenobiotics in breast milk are influenced by choices in sample selection, sample pooling, analysis, and reporting. In addition, most studies have focused only on a small panel of persistent organic pollutants, despite indications that a wide range of additional chemical contaminants may also enter breast milk. Despite these limitations, however, it is possible to draw some generalizations. In this paper we review available data on levels of organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), metals, and solvents in breast milk. Examples drawn from around the world illustrate the available data and the patterns that have appeared in various areas over time. Over the past few decades, levels of the organochlorine pesticides, PCBs, and dioxins have declined in breast milk in countries where these chemicals have been banned or otherwise regulated. In contrast, the levels of PBDEs are rising. Regional differences in levels of xenobiotics in breast milk are related to historical and current local use patterns. Diet is a major factor that influences breast milk levels of persistent organic pollutants, with patterns in fish consumption playing a particularly significant role. Improved global breast milk monitoring programs would allow for more consistent data on trends over time, detection of new xenobiotics in breast milk, and identification of disproportionately exposed populations. PMID:12055065

  5. Multivariate statistical approach to a data set of dioxin and furan contaminations in human milk

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, G.U.M.; Sjostrom, M.; Swanson, S.E. ); Furst, P.; Kruger, C.; Meemken, H.A.; Groebel, W. )

    1988-05-01

    The levels of chlorinated dibenzodioxins, PCDDs, and dibenzofurans, PCDFs, in human milk have been of great concern after the discovery of the toxic 2,3,7,8-substituted isomers in milk of European origin. As knowledge of environmental contamination of human breast milk increases, questions will continue to be asked about possible risks from breast feeding. Before any recommendations can be made, there must be knowledge of contaminant levels in mothers' breast milk. Researchers have measured PCB and 17 different dioxins and furans in human breast milk samples. To date the data has only been analyzed by univariate and bivariate statistical methods. However to extract as much information as possible from this data set, multivariate statistical methods must be used. Here the authors present a multivariate analysis where the relationships between the polychlorinated compounds and the personalia of the mothers have been studied. For the data analysis partial least squares (PLS) modelling has been used.

  6. Biofilm in milking equipment on a dairy farm as a potential source of bulk tank milk contamination with Listeria monocytogenes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The quality and safety of raw milk are important attributes for consumers of milk and dairy products. The objective of this study was to assess the presence of a L. monocytogenes biofilm in milking equipment as a potential source of bulk tank milk contamination on a dairy farm. Weekly tests to monit...

  7. Raman-spectroscopy-based chemical contaminant detection in milk powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Sagar; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Kim, Moon S.

    2015-05-01

    Addition of edible and inedible chemical contaminants in food powders for purposes of economic benefit has become a recurring trend. In recent years, severe health issues have been reported due to consumption of food powders contaminated with chemical substances. This study examines the effect of spatial resolution used during spectral collection to select the optimal spatial resolution for detecting melamine in milk powder. Sample depth of 2mm, laser intensity of 200mw, and exposure time of 0.1s were previously determined as optimal experimental parameters for Raman imaging. Spatial resolution of 0.25mm was determined as the optimal resolution for acquiring spectral signal of melamine particles from a milk-melamine mixture sample. Using the optimal resolution of 0.25mm, sample depth of 2mm and laser intensity of 200mw obtained from previous study, spectral signal from 5 different concentration of milk-melamine mixture (1%, 0.5%, 0.1%, 0.05%, and 0.025%) were acquired to study the relationship between number of detected melamine pixels and corresponding sample concentration. The result shows that melamine concentration has a linear relation with detected number of melamine pixels with correlation coefficient of 0.99. It can be concluded that the quantitative analysis of powder mixture is dependent on many factors including physical characteristics of mixture, experimental parameters, and sample depth. The results obtained in this study are promising. We plan to apply the result obtained from this study to develop quantitative detection model for rapid screening of melamine in milk powder. This methodology can also be used for detection of other chemical contaminants in milk powders.

  8. Milk and serum standard reference materials for monitoring organic contaminants in human samples.

    PubMed

    Schantz, Michele M; Eppe, Gauthier; Focant, Jean-François; Hamilton, Coreen; Heckert, N Alan; Heltsley, Rebecca M; Hoover, Dale; Keller, Jennifer M; Leigh, Stefan D; Patterson, Donald G; Pintar, Adam L; Sharpless, Katherine E; Sjödin, Andreas; Turner, Wayman E; Vander Pol, Stacy S; Wise, Stephen A

    2013-02-01

    Four new Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) have been developed to assist in the quality assurance of chemical contaminant measurements required for human biomonitoring studies, SRM 1953 Organic Contaminants in Non-Fortified Human Milk, SRM 1954 Organic Contaminants in Fortified Human Milk, SRM 1957 Organic Contaminants in Non-Fortified Human Serum, and SRM 1958 Organic Contaminants in Fortified Human Serum. These materials were developed as part of a collaboration between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with both agencies contributing data used in the certification of mass fraction values for a wide range of organic contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, chlorinated pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners, and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (PCDD) and dibenzofuran (PCDF) congeners. The certified mass fractions of the organic contaminants in unfortified samples, SRM 1953 and SRM 1957, ranged from 12 ng/kg to 2200 ng/kg with the exception of 4,4'-DDE in SRM 1953 at 7400 ng/kg with expanded uncertainties generally <14 %. This agreement suggests that there were no significant biases existing among the multiple methods used for analysis. PMID:23132544

  9. Characterization of Contaminants from a Sanitized Milk Processing Plant

    PubMed Central

    Cleto, Sara; Matos, Sónia; Kluskens, Leon; Vieira, Maria João

    2012-01-01

    Milk processing lines offer a wide variety of microenvironments where a diversity of microorganisms can proliferate. We sampled crevices and junctions where, due to deficient reach by typical sanitizing procedures, bacteria can survive and establish biofilms. The sampling sites were the holding cell, cold storage tank, pasteurizer and storage tank - transfer pump junction. The culturable bacteria that were isolated after the sanitation procedure were predominantly Pseudomonas spp., Serratia spp, Staphylococcus sciuri and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. We assayed several phenotypic characteristics such as the ability to secrete enzymes and siderophores, as well as the capacity of the strains to form biofilms that might contribute to their survival in a mixed species environment. The Pseudomonas spp. isolates were found to either produce proteases or lecithinases at high levels. Interestingly, protease production showed an inverse correlation with siderophore production. Furthermore, all of the Serratia spp. isolates were strong biofilm formers and spoilage enzymes producers. The organisms identified were not mere contaminants, but also producers of proteins with the potential to lower the quality and shelf-life of milk. In addition, we found that a considerable number of the Serratia and Pseudomonas spp. isolated from the pasteurizer were capable of secreting compounds with antimicrobial properties. PMID:22761957

  10. Aflatoxin M1 contamination of human breast milk in Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Jafarian-Dehkordi, Abbas; Pourradi, Nasibeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: During the last decades there has been great attention paid to aflatoxins. They are highly toxic, immunosuppressive, mutagenic, teratogenic, and carcinogenic compounds. Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1), a hydroxylated metabolite of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), is formed in the liver and excreted into the breast milk. It is considered to cause certain hygienic risks for infant health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of the AFM1 in the breast milk using AFM1 in milk as a biomarker for exposure to aflatoxin B1 and determine the level of AFM1 contamination in the lactating mothers in Isfahan, Iran. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out on 80 lactating women randomly selected from two urban health centers. Mother's milk samples and information on food intake were collected from the participants using structured food-frequency questionnaire. Breast milk samples were tested for AFM1 by a competitive ELISA technique. Results: Our findings showed that only one sample was contaminated with AFM1 with concentrations of 6.8 ng/L. However, the AFM1 level in this sample was lower than the maximum tolerable limit (25 ng/L) accepted by the European Communities and Codex Alimentarius. Conclusion: Although the concentration of AFM1 in none of the samples was higher than the acceptable level, the presence of AFM1 in only one of them confirms the need for developing strategies to reduce exposure to aflatoxin in foods and to carry out biological monitoring of aflatoxins as a food quality control measure routinely. PMID:24524032

  11. Determination of hormone contaminants in milk replacers by high-performance liquid chromatography and immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Rapp, M; Meyer, H H

    1989-04-01

    Certain milk replacers were reported to cause 19-nortestosterone (NT)-positive urine samples after feeding them to veal calves. In order to find the possible source of contamination, milk replacers and crude fat and meat meal from homogenized veal calves and commercial crude fat from a rendering plant were analysed for NT plus its metabolites and constituents of illicit 'cocktails' (NT esters, estradiol benzoate and medroxyprogesterone acetate). The steroids were separated using different high-performance liquid chromatographic systems and measured by specific immunoassays. The results show that animal food processed from carcasses of treated animals contains hormone concentrations that may cause positive urine samples in animals fed on such feed. PMID:2745647

  12. Aflatoxin M1 contamination in commercial samples of milk and dairy products in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, V P; Bu-Abbas, A; Alaa-Basuny; Al-Johar, W; Al-Mufti, S; Siddiqui, M K

    2001-11-01

    As part of the programme on monitoring of environmental contaminants in food stuff in Kuwait, 54 samples of fresh full cream and skimmed milk, powdered milk, yoghurt, and infant formula were analysed for aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) by HPLC following sample clean up using immuno-affinity columns. Of samples, 28% were contaminated with AFM1 with 6% being above the maximum permissible limit of 0.2 microgl(-1). Three fresh cow milk samples collected from a private local producer showed the highest level of 0.21 microg l(-1) AFM1. There was no contamination with AFM1 in powdered milk and infant formulas. These results show the necessity of a survey involving a larger number of milk and its products and suggest that presently the contamination of milk and milk products with AFM1 does not appear to be a serious health problem in Kuwait. Nevertheless, a continuous surveillance programme may be warranted to monitor regularly the occurrence of aflatoxins in the animal feeds responsible for current limited contamination and to note rapidly and worsening in the situation that may depend on market changes or on unfavourable climatic developments. PMID:11665741

  13. Food safety in raw milk production: risk factors associated to bacterial DNA contamination.

    PubMed

    Cerva, Cristine; Bremm, Carolina; Reis, Emily Marques dos; Bezerra, André Vinícius Andrade; Loiko, Márcia Regina; Cruz, Cláudio Estêvão Farias da; Cenci, Alexander; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos

    2014-06-01

    While human illness from milkborne pathogens may be linked to contamination of the product after pasteurization or improper pasteurization, such diseases are usually associated with consumption of raw milk or its by-products. Molecular biology tools were applied to investigate contamination by Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., some pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli, and Campylobacter jejuni in 548 raw milk samples from 125 dairy farms established in two regions from southern Brazil. Moreover, 15 variables were evaluated for their association with raw milk contamination levels, and the risk factors were determined by multiple regression analysis. Salmonella spp. were more frequently detected, followed by pathogenic E. coli. There was difference in contamination index between the regions, in which risk factors such as temporary cattle confinement, low milk production, low milking machine cleaning frequency, and milk storage area without tile walls were identified. The risk factors were specific to each region studied. Nevertheless, the data can be used to improve milk quality of dairy farms/herds with similar management practices. PMID:24715203

  14. Bacillus cereus spores during housing of dairy cows: factors affecting contamination of raw milk.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, M; Christiansson, A; Svensson, B

    2007-06-01

    The contamination of raw milk with Bacillus cereus spores was studied during the indoor confinement of dairy cattle. The occurrence of spores in fresh and used bedding material, air samples, feed, feces, and the rinse water from milking equipment was compared with the spore level in bulk tank milk on 2 farms, one of which had 2 different housing systems. A less extensive study was carried out on an additional 5 farms. High spore concentrations of >100 spores/L in the raw milk were found on 4 of the farms. The number of spores found in the feed, feces, and air was too small to be of importance for milk contamination. Elevated spore contents in the rinse water from the milking equipment (up to 322 spores/L) were observed and large numbers of spores were found in the used bedding material, especially in free stalls with >5 cm deep sawdust beds. At most, 87,000 spores/g were found in used sawdust bedding. A positive correlation was found between the spore content in used bedding material and milk (r = 0.72). Comparison of the genetic fingerprints obtained by the random amplified polymorphic DNA PCR of isolates of B. cereus from the different sources indicated that used bedding material was the major source of contamination. A separate feeding experiment in which cows were experimentally fed B. cereus spores showed a positive relationship between the number of spores in the feed and feces and in the feces and milk (r = 0.78). The results showed that contaminated feed could be a significant source of spore contamination of raw milk if the number of spores excreted in the feces exceeded 100,000/g. PMID:17517714

  15. Vaccinia virus Transmission through Experimentally Contaminated Milk Using a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Rehfeld, Izabelle Silva; Guedes, Maria Isabel Maldonado Coelho; Fraiha, Ana Luiza Soares; Costa, Aristóteles Gomes; Matos, Ana Carolina Diniz; Fiúza, Aparecida Tatiane Lino; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela

    2015-01-01

    Bovine vaccinia (BV) is a zoonosis caused by Vaccinia virus (VACV), which affects dairy cattle and humans. Previous studies have detected the presence of viable virus particles in bovine milk samples naturally and experimentally contaminated with VACV. However, it is not known whether milk contaminated with VACV could be a route of viral transmission. However, anti-Orthopoxvirus antibodies were detected in humans from BV endemic areas, whom had no contact with affected cows, which suggest that other VACV transmission routes are possible, such as consumption of contaminated milk and dairy products. Therefore, it is important to study the possibility of VACV transmission by contaminated milk. This study aimed to examine VACV transmission, pathogenesis and shedding in mice orally inoculated with experimentally contaminated milk. Thirty mice were orally inoculated with milk containing 107 PFU/ml of VACV, and ten mice were orally inoculated with uncontaminated milk. Clinical examinations were performed for 30 consecutive days, and fecal samples and oral swabs (OSs) were collected every other day. Mice were euthanized on predetermined days, and tissue and blood samples were collected. Nested-PCR, plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), viral isolation, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) methods were performed on the collected samples. No clinical changes were observed in the animals. Viral DNA was detected in feces, blood, OSs and tissues, at least in one of the times tested. The lungs displayed moderate to severe interstitial lymphohistiocytic infiltrates, and only the heart, tonsils, tongue, and stomach did not show immunostaining at the IHC analysis. Neutralizing antibodies were detected at the 20th and 30th days post infection in 50% of infected mice. The results revealed that VACV contaminated milk could be a route of viral transmission in mice experimentally infected, showing systemic distribution and shedding through feces and oral mucosa, albeit

  16. Development of the breast milk expression experience measure.

    PubMed

    Flaherman, Valerie J; Gay, Barbara; Scott, Cheryl; Aby, Janelle; Stewart, Anita L; Lee, Kathryn A

    2013-07-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding provides optimal nutrition through 6 months. Recent research has shown that milk expression may affect breastfeeding duration. A woman's experience with milk expression might mediate the effect of milk expression on breastfeeding duration. The objective of this study was to develop a measure to evaluate women's experiences of expressing milk. Based on the available literature, we developed a brief measure of the Breast Milk Expression Experience (BMEE) assessing three dimensions: (1) social support for milk expression; (2) ease of learning how to express milk; and (3) personal experiences of milk expression. All items used 1-5 Likert scales, with higher scores indicating better experiences. We administered the items immediately after expression to 68 mothers who expressed milk post-partum. We evaluated this measure for reliability using Cronbach's alpha. Mothers completing the BMEE were 57% primiparous with 75% vaginal births. The BMEE demonstrated appropriate reliability with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.703 for the summary index and 0.719-0.763 for social support, learning experience and personal experience subscales. The BMEE also indicated good predictive validity; of the six mothers who had a mean score <3 on the 11-item scale post-partum, two (33.3%) were expressing breast milk at 1 month, compared with 37 (80.4%) of the 46 mothers who had a mean score ≥3 on the 11-item scale post-partum (P = 0.012). The BMEE is a promising measure of milk expression experience in this population. Use of this measure may allow improved understanding of women's experiences expressing milk. PMID:22236401

  17. Contactless measurement of cow behavior in a milking robot.

    PubMed

    Pastell, M; Aisla, A M; Hautala, M; Poikalainen, V; Praks, J; Veermäe, I; Ahokas, J

    2006-08-01

    We have worked on automatically measuring the behavior of dairy cows during automatic milking. A milking robot offers a unique possibility for a dynamic measurement of physical data. Four strain gauge scales were installed into a milking robot in order to measure the weight of each leg separately, and a laser distance sensor was placed next to the robot in order to measure the radial movement of the cow's body surface. The data were collected into a PC. Three video cameras were installed to observe the system, and the data were recorded digitally. From the data, the dynamic weight or load of each leg and the respiration rate of a cow could be measured. Different stages of milking were observed, and the changes in behavior during milking were analyzed. The acquired information could be used to judge a cow's restlessness and welfare--for example, leg health and stress. PMID:17186758

  18. Distribution of aflatoxin M1 in cheese obtained from milk artificially contaminated.

    PubMed

    López, C; Ramos, L; Ramadán, S; Bulacio, L; Perez, J

    2001-02-28

    Small-scale manufacture of cheese using artificially AFM1 contaminated milk as raw material to study the distribution of such toxin both in whey and in cheese, was carried out. Whole milk with undetectable levels of AFM1 was used. The toxin was added in concentration that varied from 1.7 to 2.0 microg/l of milk. After the home-made production of cheese, the concentration of AFM1 was determined both in whey and in cheese, using the enzymatic immunoassay technique. The greatest proportion, 60%, was detected in whey while 40% AFM1 remained in cheese. PMID:11252507

  19. Microbial contamination of water intended for milk container washing in smallholder dairy farming and milk retailing houses in southern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Amenu, Kebede; Shitu, Desalew; Abera, Mesele

    2016-01-01

    The water used during handling and processing of milk products can be potential sources of microbial contamination with possible negative consequences on food safety. Especially, the water used in keeping the hygiene of milking and milk storage utensils is crucial to keep the quality and safety of the products. Therefore, the current study was designed to assess the bacteriological quality of water used for cleaning milking and milk storage equipment in smallholder dairy production in Hawassa and its surroundings. A total of 79 water samples were collected: 26 from milk collecting houses in Hawassa and 53 from selected smallholder dairy farms (Hawassa = 14, Arsi Negele = 29 and Yirgalem = 10). Out of the total samples, 18 samples were collected directly from pipe and 61 from storage containers (46 from narrow opening and 15 from wide opening containers). The overall prevalence of E. coli exceeding zero CFU/ml was 39.2 %. From analyzed samples, high prevalence of positive samples for E. coli was found in water samples taken from wide opening containers (66.7 %). A number of bacteria were isolated and presumptively identified which include Bacillus sp. 6.3 % (n = 5), Citrobacter sp. 1.3 %(n = 1), E. coli 39.2 % (n = 31), Enterobacter sp. 2.5 % (n = 2), Klebisella sp. 7.6 % (n = 6), Micrococcus sp. 6.3 % (n = 5), Pseudomonas sp. 6.3 % (n = 5), Staphylococcus aureus 6.3 % (n = 5), Staphylococcus epidermidis 13.9 % (n = 11) and Streptococcus sp. 1.3 % (n = 1). The bacteriological quality of water especially, water stored in household storage containers in present study area was found to be contaminated with different bacteria indicating potential food safety problem and health risk to the society. In this respect, people handling water should be educated on its proper handling and the risk of contamination during storage. To minimize contamination, materials with narrow mouth and lid should be used. Further study is recommended on

  20. Microbial Contamination and Hygiene of Fresh Cow’s Milk Produced by Smallholders in Western Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Knight-Jones, Theodore J.D.; Hang’ombe, M. Bernard; Songe, Mwansa M.; Sinkala, Yona; Grace, Delia

    2016-01-01

    A field study was performed to assess safety of smallholder fresh cow’s milk around Mongu, Western Province, Zambia. This involved observation and sampling of milk along the value chain from milking to point-of-sale and storage. Samples were collected from 86 cows, from 9 farmers, selling through two dairy cooperatives, with additional samples from informal markets. Production was very low; around one litre/day/cow and 10 L/day/herd. The milk was typically transported by bicycle in high ambient temperatures without refrigeration until reaching the point-of-sale (journey times of 30–120 min), where it was sold without pasteurisation despite milk-borne zoonoses being endemic (bovine tuberculosis (bTB) and Brucellosis). Although microbiological contamination was initially low, with geometric mean total bacterial count (TBC) of 425 cfu/mL (cfu = colony forming units) upon arrival at point-of-sale, poor hygiene led to high bacterial loads later on (geometric mean TBC > 600,000 cfu/mL after two days refrigeration), with almost all samples culture positive for Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. After milking, milk was kept for 100–223 min at temperatures favouring microbial growth (median 34 °C) and sold without a microbial kill step. In this situation limited variation in observed standards of milk hygiene had no significant effect on milk end-product bacterial counts. Options for refrigerated transport are limited. Pasteurisation at the cooperative should be investigated, as this would largely remove pathogenic microbes present in the milk whether resulting from cattle infection or poor hygiene during milking and transportation. As milk is also purchased directly from producers, on-farm milk heating options should also be assessed. Smallholders may benefit from access to national markets by providing milk to large dairies, which have systems for ensuring safety. However, this requires significant investment and an increased and more consistent supply of

  1. Microbial Contamination and Hygiene of Fresh Cow's Milk Produced by Smallholders in Western Zambia.

    PubMed

    Knight-Jones, Theodore J D; Hang'ombe, M Bernard; Songe, Mwansa M; Sinkala, Yona; Grace, Delia

    2016-01-01

    A field study was performed to assess safety of smallholder fresh cow's milk around Mongu, Western Province, Zambia. This involved observation and sampling of milk along the value chain from milking to point-of-sale and storage. Samples were collected from 86 cows, from 9 farmers, selling through two dairy cooperatives, with additional samples from informal markets. Production was very low; around one litre/day/cow and 10 L/day/herd. The milk was typically transported by bicycle in high ambient temperatures without refrigeration until reaching the point-of-sale (journey times of 30-120 min), where it was sold without pasteurisation despite milk-borne zoonoses being endemic (bovine tuberculosis (bTB) and Brucellosis). Although microbiological contamination was initially low, with geometric mean total bacterial count (TBC) of 425 cfu/mL (cfu = colony forming units) upon arrival at point-of-sale, poor hygiene led to high bacterial loads later on (geometric mean TBC > 600,000 cfu/mL after two days refrigeration), with almost all samples culture positive for Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. After milking, milk was kept for 100-223 min at temperatures favouring microbial growth (median 34 °C) and sold without a microbial kill step. In this situation limited variation in observed standards of milk hygiene had no significant effect on milk end-product bacterial counts. Options for refrigerated transport are limited. Pasteurisation at the cooperative should be investigated, as this would largely remove pathogenic microbes present in the milk whether resulting from cattle infection or poor hygiene during milking and transportation. As milk is also purchased directly from producers, on-farm milk heating options should also be assessed. Smallholders may benefit from access to national markets by providing milk to large dairies, which have systems for ensuring safety. However, this requires significant investment and an increased and more consistent supply of milk

  2. Fumonisin B1 contamination in breast milk and its exposure in infants under 6 months of age in Rombo, Northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Magoha, Happy; De Meulenaer, Bruno; Kimanya, Martin; Hipolite, Danstan; Lachat, Carl; Kolsteren, Patrick

    2014-12-01

    The carry-over of fumonisin B1 from contaminated feed into dairy milk also suggests its carry-over from contaminated food into breast milk. This study assessed fumonisin B1 contamination in breast milk and associated exposures of infants under 6 months of age. Breast milk samples were collected from 131 lactating mothers and the weight of their infants was measured during the first month of lactation. Fumonisin B1 was extracted using methanol:acetone, cleaned up with Strong Anion Exchange columns and quantified by HPLC. Fumonisin B1 exposure in each child was estimated using deterministic approach. Out of the 131 samples, 58 (44.3%) contained fumonisin B1 at levels ranging from 6.57 to 471.05 ng/ml. Of the contaminated samples, 10.3% had fumonisin B1 levels above the EU limit of 200 ppb for fumonisins in infants' food. Exposure in the infants ranged from 0.78 to 64.93 µg/kg body weight (bw) per day (median, 3 µg/kg bw/day) and exceeded the provisional maximum tolerable limit of 2 µg/kg bw/day in 29% of the infants. In conclusion, breast milk from mothers in Northern Tanzania is contaminated with fumonisins at levels that lead to unacceptable exposures in infants. Strategies to prevent lactating mothers from fumonisin exposure are urgently needed to minimise fumonisin exposure in infants. PMID:25280923

  3. Analytic considerations for measuring environmental chemicals in breast milk.

    PubMed Central

    Needham, Larry L; Wang, Richard Y

    2002-01-01

    The presence of environmental chemicals in human breast milk is of general concern because of the potential health consequence of these chemicals to the breast-fed infant and the mother. In addition to the mother's exposure, several features determine the presence of environmental chemicals in breast milk and their ability to be determined analytically. These include maternal factors and properties of the environmental chemical--both physical and chemical--such as its lipid solubility, degree of ionization, and molecular weight. Environmental chemicals with high lipid solubility are likely to be found in breast milk; they include polyhalogenated compounds such as polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, organochlorine insecticides, and polybrominated diphenylethers. These fat-soluble chemicals are incorporated into the milk as it is synthesized, and they must be measured in accordance with the fat content of the milk to allow for meaningful comparisons within an individual and among populations. Although the analytic approach selected to measure the environmental chemical is predominantly determined by the characteristics of the chemical, the concentration of the chemical in the milk sample and the existence of structurally similar chemicals (e.g., congeners) must be considered as well. In general, the analytic approach for measuring environmental chemicals in breast milk is similar to the approach for measuring the same chemicals in other matrices, except special considerations must be given for the relatively high fat content of milk. The continued efforts of environmental scientists to measure environmental chemicals in breast milk is important for defining the true contribution of these chemicals to public health, especially to the health of the newborn. Work is needed for identifying and quantifying additional environmental chemicals in breast milk from the general population and for developing analytic

  4. Optical measurements on contaminated surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonham, T. E.; Schmitt, R. J.; Linford, R. M. F.

    1975-01-01

    A bidirectional reflectometer system was developed for in situ measurements of the changes in spectral reflectance of surfaces contaminated with films of organic materials. The system permits experiments with films of controlled thickness in an environment that simulates the thermal, radiation, and vacuum conditions of space. The mechanical and optical construction of the reflectometer are discussed in detail, and actual data curves are used to illustrate its operation and performance.

  5. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for the monitoring of she-donkey's milk contamination or adulteration.

    PubMed

    Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Muccilli, Vera; Saletti, Rosaria; Foti, Salvatore

    2013-02-01

    Donkey's milk (DM), representing a safe and alternative food in both IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated cow's milk protein allergy, can be categorized as precious pharma-food. Moreover, an economically relevant interest for the use of DM in cosmetology is also developing. The detection of adulterations and contaminations of DM is a matter of fundamental importance from both an economic and allergenic standpoint, and, to this aim, fast and efficient analytical approaches to assess the authenticity of this precious nutrient are desirable. Here, a rapid matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based method aimed to the detection of bovine or caprine milk in raw DM is reported. The presence of the extraneous milks was revealed by monitoring the protein profiles of the most abundant whey proteins, α-lactalbumin (α-LA) and β-lactoglobulin, used as molecular markers. The possibility of obtaining a quantitative analysis of the level of cow or goat milk in DM based on the MALDI-TOF peak areas of α-LAs was also explored. The results showed that the experimental quantitative values were in good agreement with the real composition of each mixture. As pretreatment of the milk samples is not required, and owing to the speed and the high sensitivity of MALDI-MS, the protocol here reported could represent a reliable method for routine analyses aimed to assess the absence of contamination in raw fresh DM samples. PMID:23378086

  6. AFM1 in Milk: Physical, Biological, and Prophylactic Methods to Mitigate Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Giovati, Laura; Magliani, Walter; Ciociola, Tecla; Santinoli, Claudia; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AFs) are toxic, carcinogenic, immunosuppressive secondary metabolites produced by some Aspergillus species which colonize crops, including many dietary staple foods and feed components. AFB1 is the prevalent and most toxic among AFs. In the liver, it is biotransformed into AFM1, which is then excreted into the milk of lactating mammals, including dairy animals. AFM1 has been shown to be cause of both acute and chronic toxicoses. The presence of AFM1 in milk and dairy products represents a worldwide concern since even small amounts of this metabolite may be of importance as long-term exposure is concerned. Contamination of milk may be mitigated either directly, decreasing the AFM1 content in contaminated milk, or indirectly, decreasing AFB1 contamination in the feed of dairy animals. Current strategies for AFM1 mitigation include good agricultural practices in pre-harvest and post-harvest management of feed crops (including storage) and physical or chemical decontamination of feed and milk. However, no single strategy offers a complete solution to the issue. PMID:26512694

  7. AFM₁ in Milk: Physical, Biological, and Prophylactic Methods to Mitigate Contamination.

    PubMed

    Giovati, Laura; Magliani, Walter; Ciociola, Tecla; Santinoli, Claudia; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano

    2015-10-01

    Aflatoxins (AFs) are toxic, carcinogenic, immunosuppressive secondary metabolites produced by some Aspergillus species which colonize crops, including many dietary staple foods and feed components. AFB₁ is the prevalent and most toxic among AFs. In the liver, it is biotransformed into AFM₁, which is then excreted into the milk of lactating mammals, including dairy animals. AFM₁ has been shown to be cause of both acute and chronic toxicoses. The presence of AFM₁ in milk and dairy products represents a worldwide concern since even small amounts of this metabolite may be of importance as long-term exposure is concerned. Contamination of milk may be mitigated either directly, decreasing the AFM₁ content in contaminated milk, or indirectly, decreasing AFB₁ contamination in the feed of dairy animals. Current strategies for AFM₁ mitigation include good agricultural practices in pre-harvest and post-harvest management of feed crops (including storage) and physical or chemical decontamination of feed and milk. However, no single strategy offers a complete solution to the issue. PMID:26512694

  8. Cesium separation from contaminated milk using magnetic particles containing crystalline silicotitantes.

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, L.; Kaminski, M.; Chemical Engineering

    2000-11-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear reactor disaster in 1986 contaminated vast regions of prime grazing land. Subsequently, milk produced in the region has been contaminated with small amounts of the long-lived fission product cesium-137, and the Ukraine is seeking to deploy a simple separation process that will remove the Cs and preserve the nutritional value of the milk. Tiny magnetic particles containing crystalline silicotitanates (CST) have been manufactured and tested to this end. The results show that partitioning efficiency is optimized with low ratios of particle mass to volume. To achieve 90% Cs decontamination in a single-stage process, <3 g of magnetic CST per l milk is sufficient with a 30-min mixing time. A two-stage process would utilize <0.4 g/l per stage. The modeling of the magnetic CST system described herein can be achieved rather simply which is important for deployment in the affected Ukraine region.

  9. Raman-spectroscopy-based chemical contaminant detection in milk powder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Addition of edible and inedible chemical contaminants in food powders for purposes of economic benefit has become a recurring trend. In recent years, severe health issues have been reported due to consumption of food powders contaminated with chemical substances. This study examines the effect of sp...

  10. Milk contamination and resistance to processing conditions determine the fate of Lactococcus lactis bacteriophages in dairies.

    PubMed

    Madera, Carmen; Monjardín, Cristina; Suárez, Juan E

    2004-12-01

    Milk contamination by phages, the susceptibility of the phages to pasteurization, and the high levels of resistance to phage infection of starter strains condition the evolution dynamics of phage populations in dairy environments. Approximately 10% (83 of 900) of raw milk samples contained phages of the quasi-species c2 (72%), 936 (24%), and P335 (4%). However, 936 phages were isolated from 20 of 24 (85%) whey samples, while c2 was detected in only one (4%) of these samples. This switch may have been due to the higher susceptibility of c2 to pasteurization (936-like phages were found to be approximately 35 times more resistant than c2 strains to treatment of contaminated milk in a plate heat exchanger at 72 degrees C for 15 s). The restriction patterns of 936-like phages isolated from milk and whey were different, indicating that survival to pasteurization does not result in direct contamination of the dairy environment. The main alternative source of phages (commercial bacterial starters) does not appear to significantly contribute to phage contamination. Twenty-four strains isolated from nine starter formulations were generally resistant to phage infection, and very small progeny were generated upon induction of the lytic cycle of resident prophages. Thus, we postulate that a continuous supply of contaminated milk, followed by pasteurization, creates a factory environment rich in diverse 936 phage strains. This equilibrium would be broken if a particular starter strain turned out to be susceptible to infection by one of these 936-like phages, which, as a consequence, became prevalent. PMID:15574937

  11. Ultrasonic measurement of milk coagulation time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakkali, F.; Moudden, A.; Faiz, B.; Amghar, A.; Maze, G.; Montero de Espinosa, F.; Akhnak, M.

    2001-12-01

    Using a pulse reflection technique an ultrasonic system has been developed to monitor in situ the coagulation process of rennetted milk. The velocity and attenuation of ultrasonic waves through coagulating milk were continuously monitored. The observed changes in ultrasonic velocity during coagulation were used to predict the coagulation time. The coagulation time is indicative of the transition from the enzymatic phase to the physicochemical phase. The determination of coagulation time has a decisive role in determining the qualities of the end product in cheesemaking.

  12. Radiocesium levels measured in breast milk one year after the reactor accident at Chernobyl

    SciTech Connect

    Assimakopoulos, P.A.; Ioannides, K.G.; Pakou, A.A.; Lolis, D.; Zikopoulos, K.; Dusias, B.

    1989-01-01

    One hundred-two samples of colostral milk, collected during spring of 1987, approximately one year after the reactor accident at Chernobyl, were measured for radiocesium contamination. The data showed a normal-type distribution with a mean contamination concentration of 16.4 Bq L-1. A weak correlation of the data to the mothers' diet was established by taking into account four of the main staples in the area. The corresponding transfer coefficient was deduced with a value of fm = 0.06 +/- 0.03 d L-1. The resultant effective dose received by breast-feeding infants was estimated, on the average, as 0.012 mrem d-1.

  13. Changing patterns of cow's milk contamination with organochlorine compounds in Israel (1976-1986)

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.; Cucos, S.; Grafstein, O.; Lemesch, C.

    1988-01-01

    Environmental pollution with organochlorine insecticides (OCIs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCGs) has decreased due to restriction and/or banning of these compounds. However, several recent reports indicate that pollution with OCIs and PCBs still does exist, and may be of public and environmental health significance even in developed countries. Cow's milk is one of the most important media where organochlorine compound (OCC) levels are monitored. On the one hand, milk and its products play a central role in human nutrition and, on the other, highly lipophilic OCCs can accumulate in fat-rich milk products. In a previous study, the authors reported a significant decrease in OCC content in both farm and market milk in Israel between the mid-1970s and early 1980s. The clearest decrease was seen in the cases of DDT, dieldrin and lindane, but not as much as for heptachlor epoxide (HE) and PCBs. The present study was undertaken to follow up the observed trends and to determine whether cow's milk contamination with OCC presently poses a public health problem in Israel.

  14. Arcobacter butzleri, Arcobacter cryaerophilus, and Arcobacter skirrowii Circulation in a Dairy Farm and Sources of Milk Contamination.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, Federica; Lucchi, Alex; Di Francesco, Antonietta; Delogu, Mauro; Grilli, Ester; Guarniero, Ilaria; Stancampiano, Laura; Manfreda, Gerardo; Merialdi, Giuseppe; Serraino, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Even though dairy cows are known carriers of Arcobacter species and raw or minimally processed foods are recognized as the main sources of human Arcobacter infections in industrialized countries, data on Arcobacter excretion patterns in cows and in milk are scant. This study aimed to identify potentially pathogenic Arcobacter species in a dairy herd and to investigate the routes of Arcobacter transmission among animals and the potential sources of cattle infection and milk contamination. A strategy of sampling the same 50 dairy animals, feed, water, and milk every month for a 10-month period, as well as the sampling of quarter milk, animal teats, the milking environment, and animals living on the farm (pigeons and cats), was used to evaluate, by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), the characteristic patterns in animals, their living environment, and the raw milk they produced. Of the 463 samples collected, 105 (22.6%) were positive for Arcobacter spp. by culture examination. All the matrices except quarter milk and pigeon gut samples were positive, with prevalences ranging from 15 to 83% depending on the sample. Only three Arcobacter species, Arcobacter cryaerophilus (54.2%), A. butzleri (34.2%), and A. skirrowii (32.3%), were detected. PFGE analysis of 370 isolates from positive samples provided strong evidence of Arcobacter circulation in the herd: cattle likely acquire the microorganisms by orofecal transmission, either by direct contact or from the environment, or both. Water appears to be a major source of animal infection. Raw milk produced by the farm and collected from a bulk tank was frequently contaminated (80%) by A. butzleri; our PFGE findings excluded primary contamination of milk, whereas teats and milking machine surfaces could be sources of Arcobacter milk contamination. PMID:26002896

  15. Arcobacter butzleri, Arcobacter cryaerophilus, and Arcobacter skirrowii Circulation in a Dairy Farm and Sources of Milk Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Giacometti, Federica; Lucchi, Alex; Di Francesco, Antonietta; Delogu, Mauro; Grilli, Ester; Guarniero, Ilaria; Stancampiano, Laura; Manfreda, Gerardo; Merialdi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Even though dairy cows are known carriers of Arcobacter species and raw or minimally processed foods are recognized as the main sources of human Arcobacter infections in industrialized countries, data on Arcobacter excretion patterns in cows and in milk are scant. This study aimed to identify potentially pathogenic Arcobacter species in a dairy herd and to investigate the routes of Arcobacter transmission among animals and the potential sources of cattle infection and milk contamination. A strategy of sampling the same 50 dairy animals, feed, water, and milk every month for a 10-month period, as well as the sampling of quarter milk, animal teats, the milking environment, and animals living on the farm (pigeons and cats), was used to evaluate, by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), the characteristic patterns in animals, their living environment, and the raw milk they produced. Of the 463 samples collected, 105 (22.6%) were positive for Arcobacter spp. by culture examination. All the matrices except quarter milk and pigeon gut samples were positive, with prevalences ranging from 15 to 83% depending on the sample. Only three Arcobacter species, Arcobacter cryaerophilus (54.2%), A. butzleri (34.2%), and A. skirrowii (32.3%), were detected. PFGE analysis of 370 isolates from positive samples provided strong evidence of Arcobacter circulation in the herd: cattle likely acquire the microorganisms by orofecal transmission, either by direct contact or from the environment, or both. Water appears to be a major source of animal infection. Raw milk produced by the farm and collected from a bulk tank was frequently contaminated (80%) by A. butzleri; our PFGE findings excluded primary contamination of milk, whereas teats and milking machine surfaces could be sources of Arcobacter milk contamination. PMID:26002896

  16. Reliability and Consistency of Surface Contamination Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rouppert, F.; Rivoallan, A.; Largeron, C.

    2002-02-26

    Surface contamination evaluation is a tough problem since it is difficult to isolate the radiations emitted by the surface, especially in a highly irradiating atmosphere. In that case the only possibility is to evaluate smearable (removeable) contamination since ex-situ countings are possible. Unfortunately, according to our experience at CEA, these values are not consistent and thus non relevant. In this study, we show, using in-situ Fourier Transform Infra Red spectrometry on contaminated metal samples, that fixed contamination seems to be chemisorbed and removeable contamination seems to be physisorbed. The distribution between fixed and removeable contamination appears to be variable. Chemical equilibria and reversible ion exchange mechanisms are involved and are closely linked to environmental conditions such as humidity and temperature. Measurements of smearable contamination only give an indication of the state of these equilibria between fixed and removeable contamination at the time and in the environmental conditions the measurements were made.

  17. Aflatoxin M1 contamination of milk and ice cream in Abeokuta and Odeda local governments of Ogun State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Atanda, Olusegun; Oguntubo, Adenike; Adejumo, Oloyede; Ikeorah, John; Akpan, Iyang

    2007-07-01

    A survey was undertaken to determine the aflatoxin M(1) contamination of milk and some locally produced dairy products in Abeokuta and Odeda local governments of Ogun State, Nigeria. Samples of human and cow milk, yoghurt, "wara", ice cream and "nono" were collected randomly within the local governments and analysed for aflatoxin M(1) using the two-dimensional TLC. Aflatoxin M(1) contamination in the range of 2.04-4.00 microg l(-1) was noticed only in milk and ice cream. In particular, samples of human milk, cow milk and ice cream recorded high scores of 4.0 microg l(-1), 2.04 microg l(-1) and 2.23 microg l(-1), respectively in Abeokuta local governments and a score of 4.0 microg l(-1) for cow milk in Odeda local government. This indicates a high level contamination in the local governments since the weighted mean concentration of aflatoxin M1 in milk for African diet is 0.002 microg l(-1). Therefore the concentration of AFB1 in feeds which is transformed to AFM1 in milk should be reduced by good manufacturing and good storage practices. Furthermore, there is need for stringent quality control during processing and distribution of these products. PMID:17490709

  18. Udder measurements and milk production in two Awassi sheep genotypes and their crosses.

    PubMed

    Iñiguez, L; Hilali, M; Thomas, D L; Jesry, G

    2009-09-01

    To improve the effectiveness of community-based breeding programs for increased milk production, the values of different udder measurements for predicting milk production traits during the milking period were assessed over 3 yr on 273 Awassi ewes. Machine milking of ewes began after weaning, 56 d after parturition, and continued until the milk yield of the ewes was <200 mL/d. Milk yield obtained by hand milking and milk composition were measured weekly, and days in milk, total milk yield, and total yields of protein, fat, and nonfat solids in milk were calculated for each ewe. On d 70 of milking, morphological traits of the whole udder (circumference, width, height, and length), udder cistern (height), and teats (length, width, and position score) were measured. On the same day, the milk yield of ewes was recorded by hand milking. Positive and moderate to strong correlations (r = 0.36 to 0.76) between udder circumference and width, teat width, and milk production traits of total milk yield, and total yields of protein, fat, and nonfat solids were found. However, a more accurate predictor of milk production traits was milk yield on d 70, as higher positive correlations between this variable and the milk production traits were found (r = 0.63 to 0.89). Nine farmers were invited to independently estimate the hand-milked milk yield performance of a sample of 169 ewes (d 15 to 45 of milking) by visually observing each ewe and making a subjective linear score (1 to 5). Their assessments were significantly correlated with milk yield on the day of the observation (r = 0.52), total milk yield (r = 0.50), and days in milk (r = 0.45). Considering the perception details provided by farmers concerning each of the subjective linear scores, it was found that most predictive linear udder measurements of udder circumference and width and teat width identified in this study were implicit in these scores. The predictive ability of the measurements studied have practical implications

  19. Residues of legacy organochlorine contaminants in the milk of Alpine and Saanen goats from the central region of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Schettino, Beatriz; Gutiérrez, Rey; Ortiz, Rutilio; Vega, Salvador; Urban, Georgina; Ramírez, Acacia

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated a suite of legacy organochlorine contaminants in the milk of two breeds of goats raised in the central region of Mexico, where this agricultural production is of national (Mexican) economic importance. Forty milk samples from Alpine and Saanen goats were assessed. It was found that the concentrations of the majority of organochlorine pesticides in milk samples were lower than those stipulated in Mexican and international regulation. The values in both breeds of goat exceeded the upper permissible limits of Codex Alimentarius for delta hexachloro cyclohexane (HCH) (17.3 of samples of Saanen) and heptachlor plus heptachlor epoxide (50 % and 13 % of samples). It may be concluded that milk from these goat breeds from central Mexico showed some risks of contamination in certain times of the year (dry season). However, under further assessment and use of pesticides the goat's milk will likely be safe for human consumption and for use in products such as cheeses, regional candies and desserts (cajeta). In recent years, goat milk production has increased in the central regions and it is an economic alternative to milk from livestock. It is necessary to continue the monitoring of goat's milk to assess the presence and control of HCHs through best management practices. PMID:23689930

  20. Contamination of breast milk obtained by manual expression and breast pumps in mothers of very low birthweight infants.

    PubMed

    Boo, N Y; Nordiah, A J; Alfizah, H; Nor-Rohaini, A H; Lim, V K

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the rates of bacterial contamination of expressed breast milk (EBM) obtained by manual expression and breast pumps in mothers of very low birthweight (VLBW) infants (<1501 g). This was a randomized, controlled study carried out on 28 mothers of such babies and 92 specimens of EBM were collected: 41 specimens from 13 mothers assigned to the manual group and 51 specimens from 15 mothers in the breast-pump group. EBM was cultured quantitatively by the Miles and Misra method. Breast milk expressed by breast pumps (86.3% or 44/51 specimens) had a significantly higher rate of bacterial contamination than milk expressed by the manual method (61.0% or 25/41 specimens) (P= 0.005). When breast milk was expressed in the hospital, there was no significant difference in contamination rates between the two methods. When breast milk was expressed at home, the rates of bacterial contamination by staphylococci (P= 0.003) and Gram-negative bacilli (P= 0.002) were significantly higher in the breast-pump group than the manual group. In conclusion, the rate of bacterial contamination of EBM of mothers of VLBW infants was high, especially when EBM was obtained by the breast pump or when expression was carried out at home. PMID:11740876

  1. Polychlorinated dibenzofurans and dibenzo-p-dioxins and other chlorinated contaminants in cow milk from various locations in Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Rappe, C.; Nygren, M.; Lindstroem, G.; Buser, H.R.; Blaser, O.; Wuethrich, C.

    1987-10-01

    Six samples of cow milk from various locations in Switzerland were analyzed for polychlorinated dibenzo-furans (PCDFs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and other chlorinated contaminants. Sub parts per trillion levels of 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDFs and PCDDs were found in all samples. The levels were higher in samples collected in the vicinity of incinerators. Non-2,3,7,8-substituted PCDDs and PCDFs were not found in the milk samples.

  2. Phytoestrogens in milk: Overestimations caused by contamination of the hydrolytic enzyme used during sample extraction.

    PubMed

    Bláhová, L; Kohoutek, J; Procházková, T; Prudíková, M; Bláha, L

    2016-09-01

    Isoflavones are natural phytoestrogens with antioxidant and endocrine-disrupting potencies. Monitoring of their levels is important to ensure the high quality and safety of food, milk, and dairy products. The efficiency and accuracy of phytoestrogen analyses in complex matrices such as milk depend on the extraction procedure, which often uses hydrolysis by means of the β-glucuronidase/sulfatase enzyme originating from Helix pomatia. The present study reveals that the commercially available hydrolytic enzyme is contaminated by several phytoestrogen isoflavones (genistein, daidzein, formononetin, and biochanin A) and their metabolite equol, as well as flavones (naringenin and apigenin) and coumestrol. We show that the concentrations of daidzein and genistein in the enzyme could have impaired the results of analyses of the main isoflavones in several previously published studies. Of 8 analyzed compounds, only equol was confirmed in the present study and it serves as a reliable marker of phytoestrogens originating from cow feed. Critical reassessment of phytoestrogen concentrations in milk is needed because several previously published studies might have overestimated the concentrations depending on the extraction procedure used. PMID:27394955

  3. Spectrograph Measures Contamination Of Optical Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flint, Bruce K.; Fancy, Robert D.; Jarratt, Robert V., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Scanning-monochromator spectrograph designed to measure contamination on surfaces of optical elements as function of time. Repeatedly exposes samples to environment, then measures their transmittances or reflectances over range of wavelengths. Intended for use at vacuum-ultraviolet wavelengths to evaluate effects of outgassing, heating, and cooling on optical instruments. Principle of operation also applicable to spectral monitoring of time-dependent contamination at other wavelengths and in laboratory, industrial, or other settings.

  4. Retrospective analysis of a listeria monocytogenes contamination episode in raw milk goat cheese using quantitative microbial risk assessment tools.

    PubMed

    Delhalle, L; Ellouze, M; Yde, M; Clinquart, A; Daube, G; Korsak, N

    2012-12-01

    In 2005, the Belgian authorities reported a Listeria monocytogenes contamination episode in cheese made from raw goat's milk. The presence of an asymptomatic shedder goat in the herd caused this contamination. On the basis of data collected at the time of the episode, a retrospective study was performed using an exposure assessment model covering the production chain from the milking of goats up to delivery of cheese to the market. Predictive microbiology models were used to simulate the growth of L. monocytogenes during the cheese process in relation with temperature, pH, and water activity. The model showed significant growth of L. monocytogenes during chilling and storage of the milk collected the day before the cheese production (median increase of 2.2 log CFU/ml) and during the addition of starter and rennet to milk (median increase of 1.2 log CFU/ml). The L. monocytogenes concentration in the fresh unripened cheese was estimated to be 3.8 log CFU/g (median). This result is consistent with the number of L. monocytogenes in the fresh cheese (3.6 log CFU/g) reported during the cheese contamination episode. A variance-based method sensitivity analysis identified the most important factors impacting the cheese contamination, and a scenario analysis then evaluated several options for risk mitigation. Thus, by using quantitative microbial risk assessment tools, this study provides reliable information to identify and control critical steps in a local production chain of cheese made from raw goat's milk. PMID:23212008

  5. New technique for oil backstreaming contamination measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Speier, H. J.; Sieg, R. M.; Drotos, M. N.; Dunning, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    Due to the large size and the number of diffusion pumps, space simulation chambers cannot be easily calibrated by the usual test dome method for measuring backstreaming from oil diffusion pumps. In addition, location dependent contamination may be an important parameter of the test. The backstreaming contamination in the Space Power Facility (SPF) near Sandusky, Ohio, the largest space simulation vacuum test chamber in the U.S.A. was measured. Small size clean silicon wafers as contamination sensors placed at all desired measurement sites were used. The facility used diffusion pumps with DC 705 oil. The thickness of the contamination oil film was measured using ellipsometry. Since the oil did not wet uniformly the silicon substrate, two analysis models were developed to measure the oil film: continuous, homogeneous film and islands of oil with the islands varying in coverage fraction and height. In both cases, the contamination film refractive index was assumed to be that of DC 705. The second model improved the ellipsometric analysis quality parameter by up to two orders of magnitude, especially for the low coverage cases. Comparison of the two models for our case shows that the continuous film model overestimates the oil volume by less than 50 percent. Absolute numbers for backstreaming are in good agreement with published results for diffusion pumps. Good agreement was also found between the ellipsometric results and measurements done by x ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on samples exposed to the same vacuum runs.

  6. Should milk-specific IgE antibodies be measured in adults in primary care?

    PubMed Central

    Anthoni, Sari; Elg, Peter; Haahtela, Tari; Kolho, Kaija-Leena

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the association of milk-IgE antibodies in serum to milk-related gastrointestinal symptoms in adults in primary care. Design Open clinical study. Setting Five outpatient clinics in primary care in Southern Finland. Subjects A total of 756 subjects who reported milk-related gastrointestinal symptoms in primary care and as controls 101 subjects with no such symptoms. Methods IgE values for specific food antigens were measured (Pharmacia CAP System) in a total of 857 subjects. All food screen-positive samples (>0.35 IU/l) were analysed further for IgE for untreated skimmed milk (milk-IgE) and for boiled milk. Those found positive for milk-IgE were invited for an open milk challenge test. Results Some 5.4% (46/857) of all subjects had a positive IgE antibody screen for food antigens. Of those with a positive food screen, 28% (13/46) had milk-IgE antibodies comprising 1.5% of the total group screened. The prevalence of milk-IgE was not statistically different between those with milk-related symptoms and those with no such symptoms. IgE antibodies for boiled milk were rare. All specific IgE antibody levels were low. Bloating was the only observed symptom in milk challenge tests. Conclusion IgE antibodies to cow's milk were relatively rare in the adult population and were not indicative of milk protein allergy. The observed IgE levels were low and did not correlate with subjective milk-related symptoms. The measurement of milk-specific IgE in adults should be discouraged in outpatient clinics. PMID:18609255

  7. Application of a real time PCR method to detect castor toxin contamination in fluid milk and eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The castor seed contains ricin, which is one of the most potent biological toxins and is widely considered to be a threat agent for bioterrorism. In this study, a rapid and sensitive PCR method was developed for the detection of castor contamination in milk and liquid egg samples. Primers targeting ...

  8. Ultra-small volume interdigital sensors for the measurement of human breast milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, A.; Pang, W. W.; Lai, C. T.; Hartmann, P.

    2007-12-01

    A palm-size interdigital impedance sensor incorporating a 10 μL sample reservoir, temperature sensor and hybrid heater was fabricated to determine the feasibility of measuring macronutrients in ultra-small volumes of human breast milk. Comparisons with previous measurements of homogenized cows milk show excellent agreement with fat measurement. Human breast milk however shows no correlation with fat but a surprising correlation with protein. Our investigations and proposed methods to improve the correlation and measurement accuracy are discussed.

  9. 14. Protective measures for activities in Chernobyl's radioactively contaminated territories.

    PubMed

    Nesterenko, Alexey V; Nesterenko, Vassily B

    2009-11-01

    Owing to internally absorbed radionuclides, radiation levels for individuals living in the contaminated territories of Belarus, Ukraine, and Russia have been increasing steadily since 1994. Special protective measures in connection with agriculture, forestry, hunting, and fishing are necessary to protect the health of people in all the radioactively contaminated territories. Among the measures that have proven to be effective in reducing levels of incorporated radionuclides in meat production are food additives with ferrocyanides, zeolites, and mineral salts. Significant decreases in radionuclide levels in crops are achieved using lime/Ca as an antagonist of Sr-90, K fertilizers as antagonists of Cs-137, and phosphoric fertilizers that form a hard, soluble phosphate with Sr-90. Disk tillage and replowing of hayfields incorporating applications of organic and mineral fertilizers reduces the levels of Cs-137 and Sr-90 three- to fivefold in herbage grown in mineral soils. Among food technologies to reduce radionuclide content are cleaning cereal seeds, processing potatoes into starch, processing carbohydrate-containing products into sugars, and processing milk into cream and butter. There are several simple cooking techniques that decrease radionuclides in foodstuffs. Belarus has effectively used some forestry operations to create "a live partition wall," to regulate the redistribution of radionuclides into ecosystems. All such protective measures will be necessary in many European territories for many generations. PMID:20002058

  10. Monopropellant thruster exhaust plume contamination measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baerwald, R. K.; Passamaneck, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    The potential spacecraft contaminants in the exhaust plume of a 0.89N monopropellant hydrazine thruster were measured in an ultrahigh quartz crystal microbalances located at angles of approximately 0 deg, + 15 deg and + or - 30 deg with respect to the nozzle centerline. The crystal temperatures were controlled such that the mass adhering to the crystal surface at temperatures of from 106 K to 256 K could be measured. Thruster duty cycles of 25 ms on/5 seconds off, 100 ms on/10 seconds off, and 200 ms on/20 seconds off were investigated. The change in contaminant production with thruster life was assessed by subjecting the thruster to a 100,000 pulse aging sequence and comparing the before and after contaminant deposition rates. The results of these tests are summarized, conclusions drawn, and recommendations given.

  11. Dietary exposure to phenolic and methoxylated organohalogen contaminants in relation to their concentrations in breast milk and serum in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yukiko; Nishimura, Eri; Kato, Yoshihisa; Harada, Kouji H; Koizumi, Akio; Haraguchi, Koichi

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated human exposure to neutral, phenolic, and methoxylated organohalogen contaminants (OHCs) in a duplicate diet study to evaluate their concentrations in breast milk and serum of Okinawan people from Japan during 2004-2009. Dietary intakes of phenolic OHCs were predominantly 2,4,6-tribromophenol (TriBP), followed by tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), and 6-hydroxy-2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (6-OH-BDE47). After exposure, TriBP and TBBPA were transferred to breast milk, whereas 6-OH-BDE47 was selectively retained in serum. Despite a lower dietary exposure to pentachlorophenol and 4-hydroxy-CB187, both were retained in serum. For the methoxylated OHCs, 2,4,6-tribromoanisole (TriBA) and 6-methoxy-BDE47 were the predominant dietary contaminants, of which TriBA was present in both breast milk and serum, whereas 6-methoxy-BDE47 was selectively transferred to breast milk. These findings suggest that dietary exposure to phenolic and methoxylated OHCs may result in differential partitioning between breast milk and serum with different pharmacokinetic or exposure routes. PMID:24263137

  12. MEASUREMENT OF CONTAMINATION IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contamination of environmental samples and measurement system can be monitored through the systematic use of appropriate quality control (QC) blanks. uring the last decade, a proliferation of terms for these QC samples has taken place, making the specification of appropriate blan...

  13. Apparatus for measuring surface particulate contamination

    DOEpatents

    Woodmansee, Donald E.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring surface particulate contamination includes a tool for collecting a contamination sample from a target surface, a mask having an opening of known area formed therein for defining the target surface, and a flexible connector connecting the tool to the mask. The tool includes a body portion having a large diameter section defining a surface and a small diameter section extending from the large diameter section. A particulate collector is removably mounted on the surface of the large diameter section for collecting the contaminants. The tool further includes a spindle extending from the small diameter section and a spool slidingly mounted on the spindle. A spring is disposed between the small diameter section and the spool for biasing the spool away from the small diameter section. An indicator is provided on the spindle so as to be revealed when the spool is pressed downward to compress the spring.

  14. A spatial, statistical approach to map the risk of milk contamination by β-hexachlorocyclohexane in dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Battisti, Sabrina; Caminiti, Antonino; Ciotoli, Giancarlo; Panetta, Valentina; Rombolà, Pasquale; Sala, Marcello; Ubaldi, Alessandro; Scaramozzino, Paola

    2013-11-01

    In May 2005, beta-hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH) was found in a sample of bovine bulk milk from a farm in the Sacco River valley (Latium region, central Italy). The primary source of contamination was suspected to be industrial discharge into the environment with the Sacco River as the main mean of dispersion. Since then, a surveillance programme on bulk milk of the local farms was carried out by the veterinary services. In order to estimate the spatial probability of β- HCH contamination of milk produced in the Sacco River valley and draw probability maps of contamination, probability maps of β-HCH values in milk were estimated by indicator kriging (IK), a geo-statistical estimator, and traditional logistic regression (LR) combined with a geographical information systems approach. The former technique produces a spatial view of probabilities above a specific threshold at non-sampled locations on the basis of observed values in the area, while LR gives the probabilities in specific locations on the basis of certain environmental predictors, namely the distance from the river, the distance from the pollution site, the elevation above the river level and the intrinsic vulnerability of hydro-geological formations. Based on the β-HCH data from 2005 in the Sacco River valley, the two techniques resulted in similar maps of high risk of milk contamination. However, unlike the IK method, the LR model was capable of estimating coefficients that could be used in case of future pollution episodes. The approach presented produces probability maps and define high-risk areas already in the early stages of an emergency before sampling operations have been carried out. PMID:24258885

  15. Lead Levels in the Breast Milk of Nursing Andean Mothers Living in a Lead-Contaminated Environment

    PubMed Central

    Counter, S. Allen; Buchanan, Leo H.; Ortega, Fernando; Chiriboga, Roberto; Correa, Rommy; Collaguaso, María Angela

    2015-01-01

    Concentrations of lead (Pb) in breast milk (PbM) and blood (PbB) were measured in a current cohort of lactating mothers living in Andean communities where women of child-bearing age engage in the occupational use of Pb, and compared to results obtained in earlier studies. Mean PbM concentration in the current group of breastfeeding mothers tested in 2012/2013 was 3.73 μg/l (SD: 7.3; range: 0.049 - 28.04), and significantly lower than the 9.83 μg/l (SD: 12.75; range: 0.2 - 49) previously observed in breastfeeding mothers in the study area from 1999 to 2007. Breastfeeding women in the current cohort showed an average PbM/PbB ratio of 3.6%, which is in agreement with other studies. The mean PbB level obtained for the current cohort was 7.8 μg/dl (SD: 5.2; range: 1.4 - 21), and significantly lower than the mean PbB level of 20.8 μg/dl (SD: 16.4; range: 4-73) obtained for the comparison group of breastfeeding mothers tested between 1999-2007. A correlation of .687 between paired PbM and maternal PbB was found, indicating that maternal PbB level is a significant predictor of PbM. Current PbM levels remain higher than international averages, but indicate that maternal Pb exposure has declined over time in the environmentally Pb-contaminated study area. The current reduction in Pb in milk and blood of breastfeeding mothers may be due to adherence to a Pb-exposure education and prevention program initiated by the authors in the study area years earlier, as well as recent improvements in local healthcare delivery. PMID:25072821

  16. Analysis of breast milk to assess exposure to chlorinated contaminants in Kazakstan: high levels of 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in agricultural villages of southern Kazakstan.

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, K; Petreas, M X; Chuvakova, T; Kazbekova, G; Druz, N; Seminova, G; Sharmanov, T; Hayward, D; She, J; Visita, P; Winkler, J; McKinney, M; Wade, T J; Grassman, J; Stephens, R D

    1998-01-01

    To assess levels of chlorinated contaminants in breast milk, we measured organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in breast milk samples collected in 1994 according to the World Health Organization protocol from 92 donors that were representative of regional populations in southern Kazakstan. High levels (10-120 pg/g fat) of 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the most toxic of the PCDD/PCDF congeners, were found in breast milk samples from an agricultural region. TCDD was the major contributor (75%) to the international toxicity equivalents of these samples. The same distinctive PCDD/PCDF congener pattern was found in 15 breast milk samples and 4 serum samples collected in 1996 in a follow-up study, and has now been confirmed by three analytical laboratories. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9831540

  17. A Retail Survey of Brazilian Milk and Minas Frescal Cheese, and a Contaminated Dairy Plant, To Establish The Prevalence, Relatedness, and Sources of Listeria monocytogenes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was designed to recover Listeria monocytogenes from pasteurized milk and Minas Frescal cheese (MFC) sampled at retail and to identify the source(s) of contaminated products in the corresponding dairy processing plant and farm. Fifty milk samples (9 brands, 5-7 samples/brand) and 55 MFC sampl...

  18. Assessment of Risk Factors in Milk Contamination with Staphylococcus aureus in Urban and Peri-Urban Small-Holder Dairy Farming in Central Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tigabu, E; Asrat, D; Kassa, T; Sinmegn, T; Molla, B; Gebreyes, W

    2015-12-01

    Assessment of risk factors associated with milk production systems is central to ensuring quality and safety of milk and milk products. This study was aimed at identifying possible risk factors in milk contamination in urban and peri-urban areas of the central high lands of Ethiopia. A total of 477 on-farm pooled milk (n = 433) and combined bulk milk samples (n = 44) were collected and processed using standard microbiological techniques to isolate and characterize Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, 433 individual farm owners and 22 collection centre owners were interviewed using a structured and pre-tested questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine risk factors. Of the total individual on-farm pooled milk samples analysed (n = 433), it was found that 103 of the individual milk samples (24%) and 17 of the combined bulk milk (39%) were positive for S. aureus. This difference in prevalence was statistically significant. Even though there were a number of potential variables associated with the recovery of S. aureus in bovine milk, four variables including cleaning milk container with hot water and detergent [Adjusted OR: 0.342, 95% CI, (0.166, 0.701)], mastitis check [Adjusted OR: 3.019, 95% CI (1.542, 5.913)], travel time to collection centres [Adjusted OR: 4.932, 95% CI, (2.265, 10.739)] and amount of milk delivered by farmers to collection centres per day [Adjusted OR: 1.059 (1.032, 1.087 β = 0.057)] were found to be statistically significantly associated with isolation of S. aureus. We recommend a targeted educational intervention on defined risk factors to reduce the post-harvest S. aureus contamination of raw milk in urban and peri-urban milk shed areas of central Ethiopia. PMID:25916167

  19. Contribution to the study of staphylococcus contamination of cows' milk on a number of farms in Algiers: its impact on human health.

    PubMed

    Hamiroune, M; Berber, A; Boubekeur, S

    2014-12-01

    The authors describe a survey and screening programme for staphylococcus. The study covers 14 dairy farms in the Algiers region, from which 203 samples of cows' milk were taken for bacteriological testing. The survey results show that poor husbandry conditions are the main cause of staphylococcus in cows' milk. Staphylococcus was found in the milk of 30% of the cows sampled. These results were influenced by a variety of factors, in that: the contamination rate rose with the number of pregnancies, age, and volume of milk output of the cow, as well as the bedding thickness; the milk contamination rate was greater when milking occurred outside a milking parlour and when it was performed by machine; higher rates of staphylococcus infection were found in the milk of cows at the end of lactation, in red and white breeds, and in those with cylindricalteats. Identification of the bacteria found (staphylococcus) showed that coagulase- negative staphylococci were present in 67.21% of samples, whereas coagulase- positive staphylococci were present in only 32.79%. The average count for the latter was equal to 0.54 x 10(4) colony-forming units per ml of Staphylococcus aureus. Seventy percent of the milk analysed was free from staphylococci and most of the bacteria identified were not pathogenic to consumers (coagulase- negative staphylococci); nevertheless, consuming fresh milk still presents a degree of risk. PMID:25812225

  20. Relationship between external and internal udder and teat measurements of machine milked dromedary camels.

    PubMed

    Atigui, Moufida; Marnet, Pierre-Guy; Harrabi, Hager; Bessalah, Salma; Khorchani, Touhami; Hammadi, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to determine the relationship between internal and external udder and teat measurements and evaluate their correlation with milk yield and milk partitioning in the udder of dromedary camels. Six Maghrebi camels reared under intensive conditions were monitored at early, middle, and late lactation. Udder measurements included udder depth, udder horizontal circumference, fore and rear teat length and diameter. Besides, scans of the left fore and rear quarters were taken in duplicate before morning milking (16 h) using an oxytocin receptor blocking agent (Atosiban) to determine teat and gland distension before milk ejection. Cisternal and alveolar milk volumes were then evaluated. Correlation coefficients were calculated between the performed udder external and ultrasonographical measurements and cisternal and daily milk production on the measurement day. Significant effect of lactation stage was observed in all measured traits. All internal and external measurements decreased significantly at late lactation as well as cisternal and total milk yield. The quarter cisternal area averaged 16.3 ± 2.2 cm(2) and decreased about three times at late lactation compared to early and middle lactation. All external and internal measurements were positively and highly correlated (P < 0.001). The knowledge of the relationship between udder internal and external morphological traits would permit to predict udder cisternal storage capacity and can ultimately be adopted to improve milk storage capacity of dromedary camels. PMID:27129886

  1. Evaluation of bacterial contamination in raw milk, ultra-high temperature milk and infant formula using single molecule, real-time sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qiangchuan; Xu, Haiyan; Zheng, Yi; Xi, Xiaoxia; Kwok, Lai-Yu; Sun, Zhihong; Zhang, Heping; Zhang, Wenyi

    2015-12-01

    The Pacific Biosciences (Menlo Park, CA) single molecule, real-time sequencing technology (SMRT) was reported to have some advantages in analyzing the bacterial profile of environmental samples. In this study, the presence of bacterial contaminants in raw milk, UHT milk, and infant formula was determined by SMRT sequencing of the full length 16S rRNA gene. The bacterial profiles obtained at different taxonomic levels revealed clear differences in bacterial community structure across the 16 analyzed dairy samples. No indicative pathogenic bacteria were found in any of these tested samples. However, some of the detected bacterial species (e.g., Bacillus cereus, Enterococcus casseliflavus, and Enterococcus gallinarum) might potentially relate with product quality defects and bacterial antibiotic gene transfer. Although only a limited number of dairy samples were analyzed here, our data have demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of using the SMRT sequencing platform in detecting bacterial contamination. Our paper also provides interesting reference information for future development of new precautionary strategies for controlling the dairy safety in large-scale industrialized production lines. PMID:26476945

  2. Contamination of polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in breast milk in Korea: time-course variation, influencing factors, and exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunggyu; Kim, Sunmi; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, In-Seok; Park, Jeongim; Kim, Hai-Joong; Lee, Jeong Jae; Choi, Gyuyeon; Choi, Sooran; Kim, Sungjoo; Kim, Su Young; Choi, Kyungho; Kim, Sungkyoon; Moon, Hyo-Bang

    2013-11-01

    Breast milk is a noninvasive specimen to assess maternal and infant exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). In this study, 206 breast milk samples were collected from 87 participants during lactation, at <7, 15, 30, or 90 days postpartum in four cities in Korea. The total concentrations of PCBs (ΣPCB) and OCPs (ΣOCP) ranged from contaminants measured in our study were relatively lower than those reported for European, African and Asian populations. Within a month postpartum typically after day seven the levels of ΣPCB and ΣOCP significantly increased. Some OCP compounds were correlated with maternal age, BMI, parity, and delivery mode. Certain types of dietary habits such as seafood and noodle consumption were significantly associated with ΣPCB and ΣOCP. The estimated daily intakes (EDIs) of ΣPCB and ΣOCP were 45.2-127 ng kg(-1) bw day(-1) and 625-1259 ng kg(-1) bw day(-1) during lactation, respectively, which are lower than the threshold values proposed by the US EPA and Health Canada. The exposure of Korean infants to chlordanes via breast milk had a potential health risk which deserves further investigation. PMID:24112654

  3. Raman spectral imaging for quantitative contaminant evaluation in skim milk powder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study uses a point-scan Raman spectral imaging system for quantitative detection of melamine in milk powder. A sample depth of 2 mm and corresponding laser intensity of 200 mW were selected after evaluating the penetration of a 785 nm laser through milk powder. Horizontal and vertical spatial r...

  4. Microbial contamination of milk and dairy products from restaurants in Spain.

    PubMed

    Sospedra, Isabel; Rubert, Josep V; Soler, Carla; Soriano, Jose M; Mañes, Jordi

    2009-12-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the microbiological quality of milk and some dairy products, including 95 lots of warm milk, 95 lots of milk conserved at room temperature, and 75 lots of dairy products collected from restaurants in Spain. According to the European microbiological criteria (92/46/EEC, 93/43/EEC, and Commission Regulation No. 2073/2005), 31% and 35% of the total examined lots exceed the adopted limits of mesophilic aerobic counts and Enterobacteriaceae, respectively. This may be due to incorrect handling of milk and dairy products and inadequate cleaning and sanitization of milk container. Further, 2% of all the lots examined were positive for the presence of Escherichia coli. All lots, however, were negative for Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella spp. These results emphasize the need for applying and maintaining good hygienic practices in the restaurants. PMID:19737068

  5. Survey of di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate plasticizer contamination of retail Danish milks.

    PubMed

    Petersen, J H

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of residues of di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP) in retail whole milk in samples from one German and 14 Danish dairies is reported. The investigation was performed about six months after the use of DEHP-plasticized milk tubing was banned in Denmark. The results indicate a mean concentration of DEHP lower than 50 micrograms/litre in retail whole milk. Based on these data and the Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) for DEHP of 25 micrograms/kg body weight laid down by the EEC Scientific Committee for Food, it is concluded that the intake of DEHP from milk and milk products does not, even through a whole life, constitute a danger to health for the Danish population. PMID:1812016

  6. Accumulation of persistent organochlorine contaminants in milk and serum of farmers from Ghana.

    PubMed

    Ntow, William J; Tagoe, Laud Mike; Drechsel, Pay; Kelderman, Peter; Gijzen, Huub J; Nyarko, Elvis

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, the concentrations of persistent organochlorine (OC) pesticides such as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and dieldrin in pooled samples of human breast milk (n=109), and serum (n=115) from vegetable farmers in Ghana, during 2005, were determined. Gas chromatography with mass spectrometry was used to quantify residue levels on a lipid basis of the OCs. The pattern of OCs in human fluid showed that DDTs was consistently the prevalent OC in milk and blood. The levels of DDTs, HCHs, and dieldrin in the breast milk samples were found to correlate positively with age of the milk sample donors (r(s)=0.606, 0.770, and 0.540, respectively). When blood serum levels of the OCs were compared between male and female farmers, no pronounced relationship for HCHs and HCB (p>0.05) was observed. However, DDTs and dieldrin residues were significantly higher (p<0.05) in males than in females. There was association between breast milk and serum residues. When daily intakes of DDTs and HCHs to infants through human breast milk were estimated, some individual farmers (in the case of DDTs) and all farmers (in the case of HCHs) accumulated OCs in breast milk above the threshold (tolerable daily intake, TDI, guidelines proposed by Health Canada) for adverse effects, which may raise concern on children health. PMID:17931619

  7. Enterococcus and Lactobacillus contamination of raw milk in a farm dairy environment.

    PubMed

    Kagkli, Dafni Maria; Vancanneyt, Marc; Hill, Colin; Vandamme, Peter; Cogan, Timothy M

    2007-03-10

    Enterococci and lactobacilli are ubiquitously found in the intestinal microflora of humans and animals. The aim of the present study was to determine the importance of bovine faeces as a source of these organisms in raw milk. One hundred and fifty six putative enterococci and 362 lactobacilli were isolated from bovine faeces (n=26), cows' teats, raw milk, the milking machine and the milking environment on one farm. The clonal relationships of each group were investigated using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and representatives of the different clusters were identified by repetitive DNA element (rep)-PCR fingerprinting, protein profiling, phenylalanyl-tRNA synthase (pheS) sequence analysis or 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Lactobacilli were present at approximately 3 orders of magnitude greater than enterococci in the bovine faeces. The majority of the bovine faecal enterococcal isolates were identified as Aerococcus viridans. Seven teat isolates belonged to a potential novel Aerococcus sp. and one bovine faecal isolate to a potential second novel Aerococcus sp. The lactobacilli present in the bovine faeces were predominantly Lactobacillus mucosae and Lactobacillus brevis, with small numbers of Lactobacillus plantarum. Only one Enterococcus (a strain of E. casseliflavus) out of 76 and one Lactobacillus (a strain of L. parabuchneri/kefir) out of 247 of the bovine faecal isolates was found in the milk. The major source of these bacteria in the milk was the milking equipment. PMID:17189657

  8. Food contaminant analysis at high resolution mass spectrometry: application for the determination of veterinary drugs in milk.

    PubMed

    Romero-González, R; Aguilera-Luiz, M M; Plaza-Bolaños, P; Frenich, A Garrido; Vidal, J L Martínez

    2011-12-30

    Veterinary drugs (VDs) can remain in milk as a consequence of their use in livestock. In order to control the levels of VD residues in milk, screening methodologies can be applied for a rapid discrimination among negative and non-negative samples. In a second stage, non-negative samples are classified as negative or positive samples by using a confirmation method. Pre-target screening methods in low resolution MS (LRMS) are normally applied, but the number of analytes is limited, whereas the information obtained by full scan acquisition in high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) is improved. Here, three screening methods (running time<4 min) based on Orbitrap, quadrupole-time of flight (QqTOF) and triple quadrupole (QqQ) have been compared, using in all cases ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC). For HRMS, the identification of the VDs was based on retention time (RT) and accurate mass measurements. Confirmation was based on the monitoring of fragments generated without precursor selection. The performance characteristics of the screening method provided reliable information regarding the presence or absence of the compounds below an established value, including uncertainty region and cut-off values. Better results in terms of cut-off values (≤ 5.0 μg kg(-1), except for spiramycin with a cut-off of 13.4 μg kg(-1) for milk samples and 43.1 μg kg(-1) for powdered milk based, emamectin with a cut-off of 42.2 μg kg(-1) for milk samples and doxycycline, with a cut-off value of 15.8 μg kg(-1) in powdered milk-based infant formulae) and uncertainty region were obtained using the Orbitrap-based screening method, which was submitted to further validation and used to analyze different real milk samples. The proposed method can be used in routine analysis, providing reliable results. PMID:22098928

  9. Milking the data: Measuring milk off-take in extensive livestock systems. Experimental evidence from Niger

    PubMed Central

    Zezza, Alberto; Federighi, Giovanni; Kalilou, Amadou Adamou; Hiernaux, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Milk is an important source of cash and nutrients for many households in developing countries. Yet, our understanding of the role of dairy production in livelihoods and nutritional outcomes is hindered by the lack of decent quality household survey data. Data on milk off-take for human consumption are difficult to collect in household surveys for a number of reasons which make accurate recall challenging for the respondent (continuous production and seasonality among others), introducing possibly severe biases in the computation of full household incomes and farm sales, as well as in the estimation of the contribution of livestock (specifically dairy) production to agricultural value added and the livelihoods of rural households. This paper presents results from a validation exercise implemented in Niger, where alternative survey instruments based on recall methods were administered to randomly selected households, and compared to a 12-month system of physical monitoring and recording of milk production. The results of the exercise show that reasonably accurate estimates via recall methods are possible, and provide a clear ranking of questionnaire design options that can inform future survey operations. PMID:26973375

  10. Implementation of iodine biokinetic model for interpreting I-131 contamination in breast milk after the Fukushima nuclear disaster

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Kotaro; Kurihara, Osamu; Kim, Eunjoo; Yoshida, Satoshi; Sakai, Kazuo; Akashi, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    After the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant run by Tokyo Electric Power Company in 2011, breast milk samples obtained from volunteers living in Fukushima and neighboring prefectures were examined and small amounts of I-131 (2.2–36.3 Bq/kg) were detected in some samples. In this work, the I-131 concentrations in breast milk from nursing mothers in Ibaraki prefecture were calculated based on the iodine biokinetic model during lactation together with time-variable intake scenarios by inhalation of ambient air and ingestion of tap water, using the authors’ code. The calculated I-131 concentrations in breast milk generally agreed with those measured for the volunteers. Based on the results, thyroid equivalent doses to breast-fed infants were estimated for each place of residence of the volunteers on the assumption that these infants consumed 800 ml of breast milk every day, resulting in 10–11 mSv for Mito and Kasama cities and 1.1–1.8 mSv for Tsukuba and Moriya cities. It was suggested that breast milk consumption could be a major contributor to internal dose of breast-fed infants in areas with mild I-131 pollution; however, further studies considering personal behavior surveys would be necessary to estimate individual doses. PMID:26198990

  11. Implementation of iodine biokinetic model for interpreting I-131 contamination in breast milk after the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

    PubMed

    Tani, Kotaro; Kurihara, Osamu; Kim, Eunjoo; Yoshida, Satoshi; Sakai, Kazuo; Akashi, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    After the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant run by Tokyo Electric Power Company in 2011, breast milk samples obtained from volunteers living in Fukushima and neighboring prefectures were examined and small amounts of I-131 (2.2-36.3 Bq/kg) were detected in some samples. In this work, the I-131 concentrations in breast milk from nursing mothers in Ibaraki prefecture were calculated based on the iodine biokinetic model during lactation together with time-variable intake scenarios by inhalation of ambient air and ingestion of tap water, using the authors' code. The calculated I-131 concentrations in breast milk generally agreed with those measured for the volunteers. Based on the results, thyroid equivalent doses to breast-fed infants were estimated for each place of residence of the volunteers on the assumption that these infants consumed 800 ml of breast milk every day, resulting in 10-11 mSv for Mito and Kasama cities and 1.1-1.8 mSv for Tsukuba and Moriya cities. It was suggested that breast milk consumption could be a major contributor to internal dose of breast-fed infants in areas with mild I-131 pollution; however, further studies considering personal behavior surveys would be necessary to estimate individual doses. PMID:26198990

  12. Implementation of iodine biokinetic model for interpreting I-131 contamination in breast milk after the Fukushima nuclear disaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Kotaro; Kurihara, Osamu; Kim, Eunjoo; Yoshida, Satoshi; Sakai, Kazuo; Akashi, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    After the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant run by Tokyo Electric Power Company in 2011, breast milk samples obtained from volunteers living in Fukushima and neighboring prefectures were examined and small amounts of I-131 (2.2-36.3 Bq/kg) were detected in some samples. In this work, the I-131 concentrations in breast milk from nursing mothers in Ibaraki prefecture were calculated based on the iodine biokinetic model during lactation together with time-variable intake scenarios by inhalation of ambient air and ingestion of tap water, using the authors’ code. The calculated I-131 concentrations in breast milk generally agreed with those measured for the volunteers. Based on the results, thyroid equivalent doses to breast-fed infants were estimated for each place of residence of the volunteers on the assumption that these infants consumed 800 ml of breast milk every day, resulting in 10-11 mSv for Mito and Kasama cities and 1.1-1.8 mSv for Tsukuba and Moriya cities. It was suggested that breast milk consumption could be a major contributor to internal dose of breast-fed infants in areas with mild I-131 pollution; however, further studies considering personal behavior surveys would be necessary to estimate individual doses.

  13. Milk is a useful test meal for measurement of small bowel transit time.

    PubMed

    Kondo, T; Liu, F; Toda, Y

    1994-12-01

    To improve and standardize the measurement of small bowel transit time, milk was employed for the test meal instead of the conventional lactulose meal. Although 92% of the subjects were lactase deficient, only 2% were milk intolerant and 13% were lactose intolerant. Small bowel transit time with milk (milk breath hydrogen test) was 113 +/- 9 min (mean +/- SE, n = 20); the normal range calculated from the mean +/- 2 SD was 31-195 min. The coefficient of variation in the milk hydrogen breath test was 13 +/- 4% (n = 6), whereas in the lactulose hydrogen breath test, it was 39 +/- 16% (n = 10). The frequency of non-hydrogen producers, the occurrence of discomfort, and the reproducibility were better, though not significantly so, in the milk hydrogen breath test than in the lactulose. Since lactase activity in the intestine is variable in lactase-deficient subjects, small bowel transit times for milk may change from subject to subject. However, individual reproducibility of the milk hydrogen breath test is good. It could be useful for pharmacological experiments using paired comparison, for screening tests, or for the follow up of diseases in which small bowel transit time is affected. PMID:7874265

  14. The potential of measuring serum amyloid A in individual ewe milk and in farm bulk milk for monitoring udder health on sheep dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Winter, Petra; Miny, Martina; Fuchs, Klemens; Baumgartner, Walter

    2006-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the diagnostic value of measuring serum amyloid A (SAA) concentrations in milk of individual ewes and in farm bulk milk for monitoring udder health. Udder health was calculated by examining a randomly selected group of seven flocks at each farm visit by means of California mastitis test and bacteriological examination of 5749 milk samples. SAA was determined additionally in 267 randomly selected milk samples from six flocks. Thirty-one bulk milk samples from these farms were tested for SCC and SAA levels. Subclinical infections were detected in 29.5% of samples whereas no clinical infections were observed. Intramammary infected udder halves showed significantly elevated SAA concentrations (121.3+/-25.3 microg/ml) in milk compared to the levels of healthy udder halves (8.0+/-1.9 microg/ml; p<0.001). SAA was significantly elevated in sheep with elevated CMT scores and positive bacteriological results. Bulk milk SAA levels ranged from 18.6+/-6.7 to 37.4+/-14.1 microg/ml and showed a positive correlation with bSCC (r=0.38, p=0.018) but not with percent infected glands (r=0.022, p=0.453). This study demonstrated that SAA levels in milk can be used to detect subclinical mastitis in individual ewes whereas further investigations are needed to determine the value of measuring SAA in bulk milk for monitoring flock udder health. PMID:16677674

  15. Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine contaminated milk powder induced status epilepticus in two siblings and two dogs.

    PubMed

    Intusoma, Utcharee; Sornsrivichai, Vorasith

    2009-10-01

    A cluster of patients with tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TETS) intoxication was reported in Thailand. Two siblings, a-six-month-old boy and a-four-year-old girl, and their domestic dogs presented with status epilepticus within 10 minutes after ingesting milk prepared from the same tin container of milk powder. Although the cases showed normal neurodevelopment at one-year follow-up, physicians should be informed of this lethal neurotoxic agent, especially in an era of terroristic activity. PMID:19845251

  16. The application of scattered light to transmitted light rate in the measurement of milk constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhen; Wu, Juan; Zou, Zhongyu; Zhao, Hong

    2006-11-01

    This paper presents a new method to measure the constituents of the milk, which uses the scattered light to transmitted light rate of the laser(called s-t rate for short) to detect the protein and fat content of the milk. The basic theory is discussed in the test in detail and the feasibility of the plan is analyzed. A relation curve between the fat and protein of milk and the ratio is built by multiple linear regression method. The uncertainty of the result is mentioned in the paper.

  17. MEASURING CONTAMINANT RESUSPENSION RESULTING FROM SEDIMENT CAPPING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Sediment Issue summarizes two studies undertaken at marine sites by the National Risk Management Research Laboratory of U.S. EPA to evaluate the resuspension of surface materials contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) b...

  18. Food safety hazards associated with consumption of raw milk.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Stephen P; Boor, Kathryn J; Murphy, Steven C; Murinda, Shelton E

    2009-09-01

    An increasing number of people are consuming raw unpasteurized milk. Enhanced nutritional qualities, taste, and health benefits have all been advocated as reasons for increased interest in raw milk consumption. However, science-based data to substantiate these claims are limited. People continue to consume raw milk even though numerous epidemiological studies have shown clearly that raw milk can be contaminated by a variety of pathogens, some of which are associated with human illness and disease. Several documented milkborne disease outbreaks occurred from 2000-2008 and were traced back to consumption of raw unpasteurized milk. Numerous people were found to have infections, some were hospitalized, and a few died. In the majority of these outbreaks, the organism associated with the milkborne outbreak was isolated from the implicated product(s) or from subsequent products made at the suspected dairy or source. In contrast, fewer milkborne disease outbreaks were associated with consumption of pasteurized milk during this same time period. Twenty nine states allow the sale of raw milk by some means. Direct purchase, cow-share or leasing programs, and the sale of raw milk as pet food have been used as means for consumers to obtain raw milk. Where raw milk is offered for sale, strategies to reduce risks associated with raw milk and products made from raw milk are needed. Developing uniform regulations including microbial standards for raw milk to be sold for human consumption, labeling of raw milk, improving sanitation during milking, and enhancing and targeting educational efforts are potential approaches to this issue. Development of pre- and postharvest control measures to effectively reduce contamination is critical to the control of pathogens in raw milk. One sure way to prevent raw milk-associated foodborne illness is for consumers to refrain from drinking raw milk and from consuming dairy products manufactured using raw milk. PMID:19737059

  19. Evaluation of Commercial Probes for On-Line Electrical Conductivity Measurements during Goat Gland Milking Process

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Gema; Díaz, Jose Ramon; Sabater, Jose Maria; Perez, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of the milk electrical conductivity (EC) during mechanical milking has been widely studied for mastitis detection on cows because its improving of welfare and animal health, although research about small ruminants is scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of three commercial conductimeters to be used during mechanical milking of small ruminant halves, especially Murciano-Granadina goats. The objective of this research was to integrate the probes on the milking unit and to check the suitability of the probe selected. The results presented in this research have guided authors to discard the commercial probes and to establish the requirements of a new probe design that is briefly outlined in the conclusions of this contribution. PMID:22666042

  20. Levels and profiles of brominated and chlorinated contaminants in human breast milk from Thessaloniki, Greece.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadou, Lida; Malarvannan, Govindan; Covaci, Adrian; Iossifidou, Eleni; Tzafettas, John; Zournatzi-Koiou, Vassiliki; Kalantzi, Olga-Ioanna

    2016-01-01

    Human breast milk samples (n=87) collected between July 2004 and July 2005 from primipara and multipara mothers from Thessaloniki, Greece were analysed for six groups of persistent organic pollutants (POPs): polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), chlordane compounds (CHLs), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB). DDTs [median: 410ng/g lipid weight (lw)], PCBs (median: 90ng/g lw) and HCHs (median: 40ng/g lw) were the predominantly identified compounds in all the breast milk samples. Levels of PBDEs (median: 1.5ng/g lw) in human breast milk samples from Thessaloniki, Greece were lower compared to other countries. Maternal age had a positive correlation with most compounds, but not with PBDEs. Women with a higher occupational exposure to PBDEs (i.e., working in office environments) had higher PBDE concentrations than all others and showed strong correlations, especially for BDE 47 and BDE 153. None of the analysed compounds showed any correlation with parity. Based on these levels, the daily intake of each group of POPs via human milk was calculated and compared with the tolerable daily intakes (TDI) or the reference doses (RfD). For the majority of samples (85 out of 87) a higher daily intake of PCBs than the TDI was calculated, while 11 out of 87 samples had a higher HCB intake than the TDI. The TDI and the RfD were not exceeded for DDTs and PBDEs, respectively. This is the first report of brominated flame retardants in human breast milk from Greece. PMID:26367190

  1. Routing of Fatty Acids from Fresh Grass to Milk Restricts the Validation of Feeding Information Obtained by Measuring (13)C in Milk.

    PubMed

    Auerswald, Karl; Schäufele, Rudi; Bellof, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    Dairy production systems vary widely in their feeding and livestock-keeping regimens. Both are well-known to affect milk quality and consumer perceptions. Stable isotope analysis has been suggested as an easy-to-apply tool to validate a claimed feeding regimen. Although it is unambiguous that feeding influences the carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) in milk, it is not clear whether a reported feeding regimen can be verified by measuring δ(13)C in milk without sampling and analyzing the feed. We obtained 671 milk samples from 40 farms distributed over Central Europe to measure δ(13)C and fatty acid composition. Feeding protocols by the farmers in combination with a model based on δ(13)C feed values from the literature were used to predict δ(13)C in feed and subsequently in milk. The model considered dietary contributions of C3 and C4 plants, contribution of concentrates, altitude, seasonal variation in (12/13)CO2, Suess's effect, and diet-milk discrimination. Predicted and measured δ(13)C in milk correlated closely (r(2) = 0.93). Analyzing milk for δ(13)C allowed validation of a reported C4 component with an error of <8% in 95% of all cases. This included the error of the method (measurement and prediction) and the error of the feeding information. However, the error was not random but varied seasonally and correlated with the seasonal variation in long-chain fatty acids. This indicated a bypass of long-chain fatty acids from fresh grass to milk. PMID:26567466

  2. Evaluation of the effects of ultraviolet light on bacterial contaminants inoculated into whole milk and colostrum, and on colostrum immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Pereira, R V; Bicalho, M L; Machado, V S; Lima, S; Teixeira, A G; Warnick, L D; Bicalho, R C

    2014-05-01

    Raw milk and colostrum can harbor dangerous microorganisms that can pose serious health risks for animals and humans. According to the USDA, more than 58% of calves in the United States are fed unpasteurized milk. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of UV light on reduction of bacteria in milk and colostrum, and on colostrum IgG. A pilot-scale UV light continuous (UVC) flow-through unit (45 J/cm(2)) was used to treat milk and colostrum. Colostrum and sterile whole milk were inoculated with Listeria innocua, Mycobacterium smegmatis, Salmonella serovar Typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Acinetobacter baumannii before being treated with UVC. During UVC treatment, samples were collected at 5 time points and bacteria were enumerated using selective media. The effect of UVC on IgG was evaluated using raw colostrum from a nearby dairy farm without the addition of bacteria. For each colostrum batch, samples were collected at several different time points and IgG was measured using ELISA. The UVC treatment of milk resulted in a significant final count (log cfu/mL) reduction of Listeria monocytogenes (3.2 ± 0.3 log cfu/mL reduction), Salmonella spp. (3.7 ± 0.2 log cfu/mL reduction), Escherichia coli (2.8 ± 0.2 log cfu/mL reduction), Staph. aureus (3.4 ± 0.3 log cfu/mL reduction), Streptococcus spp. (3.4 ± 0.4 log cfu/mL reduction), and A. baumannii (2.8 ± 0.2 log cfu/mL reduction). The UVC treatment of milk did not result in a significant final count (log cfu/mL) reduction for M. smegmatis (1.8 ± 0.5 log cfu/mL reduction). The UVC treatment of colostrum was significantly associated with a final reduction of bacterial count (log cfu/mL) of Listeria spp. (1.4 ± 0.3 log cfu/mL reduction), Salmonella spp. (1.0 ± 0.2 log cfu/mL reduction), and Acinetobacter spp. (1.1 ± 0.3 log cfu/mL reduction), but not of E. coli (0.5 ± 0.3 log cfu/mL reduction), Strep. agalactiae (0.8 ± 0.2 log cfu/mL reduction), and

  3. [Actual use of milk and its products and estimation of the degree of their contamination].

    PubMed

    Normatova, Sh A; Bakhritdinov, Sh S

    2011-01-01

    The actual use of milk and its products was studied in the population of the Fergana Valley and the daily intake of heavy metals, pesticides, nitrates, antibiotics, and other foreign substances was hygienically evaluated. Guidelines were developed to set up critical control points for the hazard analysis of production factors and the sale and storage of dairy products, which were approved by the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Uzbekistan. PMID:21604394

  4. Behavior of Different Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Serotypes in Various Experimentally Contaminated Raw-Milk Cheeses

    PubMed Central

    Miszczycha, Stéphane D.; Perrin, Frédérique; Ganet, Sarah; Jamet, Emmanuel; Tenenhaus-Aziza, Fanny; Montel, Marie-Christine

    2013-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is an important cause of food-borne illness. The public health implication of the presence of STEC in dairy products remains unclear. Knowledge of STEC behavior in cheeses would help to evaluate the human health risk. The aim of our study was to observe the growth and survival of experimentally inoculated STEC strains in raw-milk cheeses manufactured and ripened according to five technological schemes: blue-type cheese, uncooked pressed cheese with long ripening and with short ripening steps, cooked cheese, and lactic cheese. Cheeses were contaminated with different STEC serotypes (O157:H7, O26:H11, O103:H2, and O145:H28) at the milk preparation stage. STEC growth and survival were monitored on selective media during the entire manufacturing process. STEC grew (2 to 3 log10 CFU · g−1) in blue-type cheese and the two uncooked pressed cheeses during the first 24 h of cheese making. Then, STEC levels progressively decreased in cheeses that were ripened for more than 6 months. In cooked cheese and in lactic cheese with a long acidic coagulation step (pH < 4.5), STEC did not grow. Their levels decreased after the cooking step in the cooked cheese and after the coagulation step in the lactic cheese, but STEC was still detectable at the end of ripening and storage. A serotype effect was found: in all cheeses studied, serotype O157:H7 grew less strongly and was less persistent than the others serotypes. This study improves knowledge of the behavior of different STEC serotypes in various raw-milk cheeses. PMID:23087038

  5. Estimates of marker effects for measures of milk flow in the Italian brown Swiss dairy cattle population

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Milkability is a complex trait that is characterized by milk flow traits including average milk flow rate, maximum milk flow rate and total milking time. Milkability has long been recognized as an economically important trait that can be improved through selection. By improving milkability, management costs of milking decrease through reduced labor and improved efficiency of the automatic milking system, which has been identified as an important factor affecting net profit. The objective of this study was to identify markers associated with electronically measured milk flow traits, in the Italian Brown Swiss population that could potentially improve selection based on genomic predictions. Results Sires (n = 1351) of cows with milk flow information were genotyped for 33,074 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers distributed across 29 Bos taurus autosomes (BTA). Among the six milk flow traits collected, ascending time, time of plateau, descending time, total milking time, maximum milk flow and average milk flow, there were 6,929 (time of plateau) to 14,585 (maximum milk flow) significant SNP markers identified for each trait across all BTA. Unique regions were found for each of the 6 traits providing evidence that each individual milk flow trait offers distinct genetic information about milk flow. This study was also successful in identifying functional processes and genes associated with SNPs that influences milk flow. Conclusions In addition to verifying the presence of previously identified milking speed quantitative trait loci (QTL) within the Italian Brown Swiss population, this study revealed a number of genomic regions associated with milk flow traits that have never been reported as milking speed QTL. While several of these regions were not associated with a known gene or QTL, a number of regions were associated with QTL that have been formerly reported as regions associated with somatic cell count, somatic cell score and udder morphometrics

  6. Automatic Measurement of Low Level Contamination on Concrete Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tachibana, M.; Itoh, H.; Shimada, T.; Yanagihara, S.

    2002-02-28

    Automatic measurement of radioactivity is necessary for considering cost effectiveness in final radiological survey of building structures in decommissioning nuclear facilities. The RAPID (radiation measuring pilot device for surface contamination) was developed to be applied to automatic measurement of low level contamination on concrete surfaces. The RAPID has a capability to measure contamination with detection limit of 0.14 Bq/cm2 for 60Co in 30 seconds of measurement time and its efficiency is evaluated to be 5 m2/h in a normal measurement option. It was confirmed that low level contamination on concrete surfaces could be surveyed by the RAPID efficiently compared with direct measurement by workers through its actual application.

  7. Long-Term Prospective Study of 6104 Survivors of Arsenic Poisoning During Infancy Due to Contaminated Milk Powder in 1955

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hideo; Tsukuma, Hideaki; Oshima, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Background In 1955, an outbreak of arsenic poisoning caused by ingestion of arsenic-contaminated dry milk occurred in western Japan. We assessed the excess mortality among Japanese who were poisoned during this episode as infants. Methods We identified and enrolled 6104 survivors (mean age at enrollment, 27.4 years) who had ingested contaminated milk when they were age 2 years or younger; they were followed until 2006 (mean duration of follow-up, 24.3 years). Death certificates of subjects who died between 1982 and 2006 were examined to calculate cause-specific standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) using the mortality rate among Osaka residents as the standard. Results There was no significant excess overall mortality (SMR: 1.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.0–1.2). However, significant excess mortality in both sexes was observed from diseases of the nervous system (3.7, 1.9–6.2). Excess mortality from all causes of death decreased to unity beyond 10 years after study enrollment. The 408 men who were unemployed at the time of enrollment in the study had a significantly elevated risk of death from diseases of the nervous system (25.3, 10.8–58.8), respiratory diseases (8.6, 3.1–16.8), circulatory diseases (3.2, 1.6–5.2), and external causes (2.6, 1.4–4.1). Conclusions As compared with the general population, survivors of arsenic poisoning during infancy had a significantly higher mortality risk from diseases of the nervous system. PMID:20736507

  8. Surface contamination monitoring by the measurement of scattering distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carosso, Paola A.; Pugel, Nancy J.

    1987-06-01

    This paper describes the use of Bidirectional Scattering Distribution Functions (BSDF) to quantify surface degradation, thus providing an effective method for contamination monitoring. This approach to contamination monitoring is based on the use of witness surfaces (mirrors or glass slides) located next to the critical surfaces. Contaminant accretion can be monitored during all phases of spacecraft fabrication, assembly, and testing. The method can be applied in other areas of contamination control such as monitoring of clean room environments. The BSDF can also prove extremely useful in establishing contamination control requirements and acceptability criteria. This paper describes the apparatus adopted to perform BSDF measurements and discusses some practical aspects of data collection. The results obtained in contamination monitoring programs performed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center are presented. Some possible new applications of this monitoring technique are also addressed.

  9. Comparison of breast milk vitamin A concentration measured in fresh milk by a rapid field assay (the iCheck FLUORO) with standard measurement of stored milk by HPLC.

    PubMed

    Engle-Stone, R; Haskell, M J; La Frano, M R; Ndjebayi, A O; Nankap, M; Brown, K H

    2014-08-01

    Availability of rapid, point-of-contact analytical methods would facilitate the use of breast milk vitamin A concentration (BMVA) to assess vitamin A (VA) status. We compared BMVA concentrations measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) (the standard technique) with those by iCheck FLUORO, a new portable fluorometer that can rapidly quantify BMVA. Casual breast milk samples (n=154) were collected during a representative survey in Yaoundé and Douala, Cameroon. Milk fat and BMVA concentrations (by iCheck) were measured in fresh milk in the field. After storage at <-20 °C, BMVA concentrations were also measured by HPLC. BMVA values from the two methods were highly correlated (R(2)=0.72 for BMVA/l; R(2)=0.62 for BMVA/g fat, both P<0.0001). HPLC values were greater than iCheck values on average, and the difference increased with increasing BMVA. The iCheck FLUORO could be useful for monitoring fortification programs, but before-after surveys to assess change in BMVA concentrations should use one method consistently. PMID:24736678

  10. Brominated flame retardants and polychlorinated biphenyls in human breast milk from several locations in India: potential contaminant sources in a municipal dumping site.

    PubMed

    Devanathan, Gnanasekaran; Subramanian, Annamalai; Sudaryanto, Agus; Takahashi, Shin; Isobe, Tomohiko; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2012-02-01

    This study investigated the status of contamination of organohalogen compounds (OCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and brominated flame retardant (BFRs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) in human milk samples from several locations in India. The levels of OCs were significantly higher in the milk of mothers living in and near municipal dumping site than other locations indicating that the open dumping sites for municipal wastes act as potential sources of these contaminants in India. The PCB concentrations observed in this study tended to decrease compared to those in the matched locations reported previously, probably due to the restriction of technical PCB usage in India. PBDE levels in human milk were two to three folds lower than those of PCBs in all the sampling locations investigated. Congener profiles of PCBs and PBDEs were different between samples from the dumping site mothers and general populations in other areas suggesting the presence of region-specific sources and pathways. HBCDs were detected in human milk from only two sites, with much lower concentrations and detection frequencies compared to PCBs and PBDEs. When hazard quotients (HQs) of PCBs and PBDEs were estimated for infant health risk, the HQs in some milk samples from the dumping site exceeded the threshold value (HQ>1) of PCBs, indicating the potential risk for infants in the specific site. PMID:22208746

  11. In vitro gastrointestinal mimetic protocol for measuring bioavailable contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to measurements of contaminants in the soil and other organic or environmental materials, using a biologically relevant chemical analysis that will measure the amount of contaminants in a given sample that may be expected to be absorbed by a human being ingesting the contaminated soil. According to the present invention, environmental samples to be tested are added to a pre-prepared physiological composition of bile salts and lipids. They are thoroughly mixed and then the resulting mixture is separated e.g. by centrifugation. The supernatant is then analyzed for the presence of contaminants and these concentrations are compared to the level of contaminants in the untreated samples. It is important that the bile salts and lipids be thoroughly pre-mixed to form micelles.

  12. Short communication: Toxicokinetics of ochratoxin A in dairy ewes and carryover to milk following a single or long-term ingestion of contaminated feed.

    PubMed

    Boudra, H; Saivin, S; Buffiere, C; Morgavi, D P

    2013-10-01

    Ruminal microbes have the capacity to inactivate ochratoxins, rendering ruminants less sensitive to this fungal contaminant found in cereal feeds. However, ochratoxin A has been reported in milk surveys. The objective of this study was to assess the toxicokinetics, excretion, and transmission into milk of ochratoxin A using doses similar to those of naturally occurring field contaminations. Six Lacaune dairy ewes in late lactation were separated into 2 groups that received a single dose of contaminated wheat containing 5 or 30 μg of ochratoxin A/kg of body weight. After administration, toxicokinetics and excretion were monitored for 48 h. Subsequently, ewes were administered the corresponding toxin dose daily for 24 d followed by a second toxicokinetics and excretion monitoring period for this long-term exposure. The doses used did not affect production or health of ewes. After a single dose, ochratoxin A and its main metabolite, ochratoxin α, were found in blood 1h postexposure. The maximum blood concentrations of ochratoxin A and α, respectively, were dose dependent and were observed, on average, 6 and 8h after exposure. Long-term exposure increased the maximum concentration of ochratoxin A detected in blood, whereas ochratoxin α was not affected. In contrast, the time to reach the maximum concentration was reduced to 3h for both molecules. Ochratoxins, essentially ochratoxin α, were mainly excreted in feces. Ochratoxin A and α were detected in milk at concentrations that were dose dependent but with a low carryover rate (<0.02%). Chronic administration did not increase the concentration of toxin in milk. Even though ochratoxin A can escape ruminal degradation and traces were found in milk of experimentally exposed ewes, the low carryover of ochratoxin A in milk minimizes the risk to consumers. PMID:23972496

  13. Analysis of breast milk to assess exposure to chlorinated contaminants in Kazakhstan: sources of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposures in an agricultural region of southern Kazakhstan.

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, K; Chuvakova, T; Kazbekova, G; Hayward, D; Tulenova, A; Petreas, M X; Wade, T J; Benedict, K; Cheng, Y Y; Grassman, J

    1999-01-01

    High levels of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD; up to 208 pg/g fat) were measured in samples of breast milk collected in 1997 from 64 donors [41 first-time mothers (primiparae)] living on state farms in southern Kazakhstan. TCDD was the major contributor (70%) to the toxic equivalents, matching the congener patterns found in breast milk and serum samples collected in 1994 and 1996 from donors in nearby villages. The highest TCDD levels were found in state farms adjacent to a reservoir (zone A), which receives agricultural runoff from cotton fields. TCDD levels in zone A were significantly higher than levels in a region more distant (zone B; > 10 miles) from the reservoir (zone A: mean 53 pg/g, n = 17; zone B: mean 21 pg/g, n = 24; p = 0.0017). Levels of TCDD in breast milk and animal-derived foodstuffs were 10 times U.S. levels. Body burden and dietary data suggest that exposures to TCDD are chronic, environmental, and long term and may be related to the use of chemicals in cotton agriculture. The data suggest that the most likely source is the use of cotton defoliants contaminated with TCDD, and the most likely pathway for human exposure is via the consumption of contaminated foodstuffs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10515712

  14. [Chemical pollution and breast milk: Taking positions].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Gómez, N M; Ares, S; Hernández-Aguilar, M T; Ortega-García, J A; Paricio-Talayero, J M; Landa-Rivera, L

    2013-12-01

    Chemical pollution affects all ecosystems of our planet. Human milk has been used as a biomarker of environmental pollution as, due to bioaccumulation processes in fat tissue, many chemical compounds reach measurable concentrations that can be readily tested in breast milk. Quite frequently information about the presence of contaminants in breast milk appears in the media, leading to misunderstanding among parents and health professionals, and in some cases breastfeeding the child is stopped. In this article, the Breastfeeding Committee of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics stresses the importance of promoting breastfeeding as the healthiest option, because its benefits clearly outweigh any health risks associated with chemical contaminants in breast milk. Breast milk contains protective factors that counteract the potential effects related to prenatal exposure to environmental pollutants. This article summarises the key recommendations to reduce the level of chemical contaminants in breast milk. It also highlights the importance of government involvement in the development of programs to eliminate or reduce chemical contamination of food and the environment. In this way, the negative effects on child health resulting from exposure to these toxic compounds through the placenta and breast milk may be prevented. PMID:23791806

  15. Immunosorbent analysis of toxin contamination in milk and ground beef using IgY-based ELISA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analytical methodology to detect ricin and Shiga toxins (Stx) in food matrices is important because of the potential use of ricin in food as a terrorist weapon, and the presence of Stx in food as a result of contamination with Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC) that has lead to serious foodborne d...

  16. Levels of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans in breast milk samples from three dioxin-contaminated hotspots of Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Manh, Ho Dung; Kido, Teruhiko; Tai, Pham The; Okamoto, Rie; Honma, Seijiro; Liang, Sun Xian; Anh, Le Thai; Maruzeni, Shoko; Nghi, Tran Ngoc; Nishijo, Muneko; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Nhu, Dang Duc; Van Tung, Dao; Hung, Nguyen Ngoc; Son, Le Ke

    2015-04-01

    We determined polychlorinated dibenzodioxin (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDF) levels in breast milk of 143 primiparae living around the three most dioxin-contaminated areas of Vietnam. The women sampled lived in the vicinity of former U.S. air bases at Bien Hoa (n=51), Phu Cat (n=23), and Da Nang (n=69), which are known as dioxin hotspots. Breast milk samples from Bien Hoa City, where residents live very close to the air base, showed high levels of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), with 18% of the samples containing >5 pgTCDD/g lipid. However, Phu Cat residents lived far from the air base and their samples showed lower TCDD levels, with none containing >5 pgTCDD/g lipid. In Da Nang, TCDD levels in mothers from Thanh Khe (close to the air base, n=43) were significantly higher than those in mothers from Son Tra (far from the air base, n=26), but not other PCDD and PCDF (PCDD/F) congeners. Although TCDD levels in Bien Hoa were the highest among these hotspots, levels of other PCDD/F congeners as well as the geometric mean concentration of total PCDD/F level in Bien Hoa (9.3 pg toxic equivalents [TEQ]/g lipid) were significantly lower than the level observed in Phu Cat (14.1 pgTEQ/g lipid), Thanh Khe (14.3 pgTEQ/g lipid), and Son Tra (13.9 pgTEQ/g lipid). Our findings indicated that residents living close to former U.S. air bases were exposed to elevated levels of TCDD, but not of other PCDD/F congeners. PMID:25569577

  17. Online Oxide Contamination Measurement and Purification Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, D. E.; Godfroy, T. J.; Webster, K. L.; Garber, A. E.; Polzin, K. A.; Childers, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    Liquid metal sodium-potassium (NaK) has advantageous thermodynamic properties indicating its use as a fission reactor coolant for a surface (lunar, martian) power system. A major area of concern for fission reactor cooling systems is system corrosion due to oxygen contaminants at the high operating temperatures experienced. A small-scale, approximately 4-L capacity, simulated fission reactor cooling system employing NaK as a coolant was fabricated and tested with the goal of demonstrating a noninvasive oxygen detection and purification system. In order to generate prototypical conditions in the simulated cooling system, several system components were designed, fabricated, and tested. These major components were a fully-sealed, magnetically-coupled mechanical NaK pump, a graphite element heated reservoir, a plugging indicator system, and a cold trap. All system components were successfully demonstrated at a maximum system flow rate of approximately 150 cc/s at temperatures up to 550 C. Coolant purification was accomplished using a cold trap before and after plugging operations which showed a relative reduction in oxygen content.

  18. Case-study and risk management of dioxins and PCBs bovine milk contaminations in a high industrialized area in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Bertocchi, Luigi; Ghidini, Sergio; Fedrizzi, Giorgio; Lorenzi, Valentina

    2015-07-01

    Milk supplied to a dairy plant in Brescia City (Northern Italy) was found to be contaminated by dioxin like PCBs at levels above the European (EU) action limit (2 pg WHO-TEQ/g fat). As a consequence, 14 dairy farms were sampled individually, in order to identify and possibly eliminate the source of contamination. All the farms were located in Brescia or just nearby, an area that is characterized by a strong industrialization. Four out of the 14 farms showed contamination levels above the legal maximum limit set by European Commission at 5.5 pg WHO-TEQ/g fat for the sum of dioxins and DL-PCBs. Concentrations of 8.16, 6.83, 5.71 and 5.65 pg WHO-TEQ/g fat were detected. In the three most polluted farms, cow ration was substituted with feed coming from uncontaminated areas and the time needed to reduce milk pollution was evaluated. In all the three farms, contamination levels dropped below the EU legal limit after only 1 month from the removal of the pollution source. In each sampled farm, DL-PCBs were the major contributors to the total WHO-TEQ level, with percentages up to 87% in the most contaminated one. PCB 126 WHO-TEQ value explained by itself large part of this contamination, and its decrease was fundamental for the reduction of milk contamination levels. This study provides an example of an on-field successful emergency intervention that succeeded in decontamination of dairy cows, allowing a fast restart of their production activity. PMID:25637240

  19. Contamination of in vivo bone-lead measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, A. C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper addresses one aspect of the calibration of a 109 Cd-based K-shell x-ray fluorescence measurement system, namely the treatment of the calibration line intercept. Under circumstances of contamination, the intercept may warrant statistical treatment different from that currently performed. This paper proposes refinements to the existing method of subtracting the phantom calibration line intercept from in vivo responses in the calculation of in vivo concentrations. These refinements are recommended because the existing method can underestimate in vivo concentrations by a small amount under normal operating conditions. Contamination of the calibration standard matrix of plaster of Paris by both lead and non-lead contaminants is addressed.

  20. MEASUREMENT OF SURFACE ALPHA CONTAMINATION USING ELECTRET ION CHAMBERS

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    Electret ion chambers (EICs) are known to be inexpensive, reliable, passive, integrating devices used for measurement of ionizing radiation. Their application for measurement of alpha contamination on surfaces was recently realized. This two-year project deals with the evaluation of electret ion chambers with different types of electrets and chambers for measurement of surface alpha contamination, their demonstration at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, a cost-benefit comparison with the existing methods, and the potential deployment at DOE sites. During the first year (FY98) of the project, evaluation of the EICS was completed. It was observed that EICS could be used for measurement of free release level of alpha contamination for transuranics (100 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} fixed). DOE sites, where demonstration of EIC technology for surface alpha contamination measurements could be performed, were also identified. During FY99, demonstration and deployment of EICS at DOE sites are planned. A cost-benefit analysis of the EIC for surface alpha contamination measurement will also be performed.

  1. A new technique for oil backstreaming contamination measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Speier, H. J.; Sieg, R. M.; Drotos, M. N.; Dunning, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    Due to the large size and the number of diffusion pumps, space simulation chambers cannot be easily calibrated by the usual test dome method for measuring backstreaming from oil diffusion pumps. In addition, location dependent contamination may be an important parameter of the test. The backstreaming contamination was measured in the Space Power Facility (SPF) near Sandusky, OH, the largest space simulation vacuum test chamber in the U.S.. Small clean silicon wafers placed at all desired measurement sites were used as contamination sensors. The facility used diffusion pumps with DC 705 oil. The thickness of the contamination oil film was measured using ellipsometry. Since the oil did not wet the silicon substrate uniformly, two analysis models were developed to measure the oil film: (1) continuous, homogeneous film; and (2) islands of oil with the islands varying in coverage fraction and height. In both cases, the contamination film refractive index was assumed to be that of DC 705. The second model improved the ellipsometric analysis quality parameter by up to two orders of magnitude, especially for the low coverage cases. Comparison of the two models shows that the continuous film model overestimates the oil volume by less than 50 percent. Absolute numbers for backstreaming are in good agreement with published results for diffusion pumps. Good agreement was also found between the ellipsometric results and measurements done by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on examples exposed to the same vacuum runs.

  2. Comparison of Contamination Model Predictions to LDEF Surface Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Tim; Rantanen, Ray; Pippin, Gary; Finckenor, Miria

    1998-01-01

    Contaminant deposition measurements have been made on species content and depth profiles on three experiments trays from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), Auger, Argon sputtering, Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis. The integrated spacecraft environment model (ISEM) was used to predict the deposition levels of the contaminants measured on the three trays. The details of the modeling and assumptions used are presented along with the predictions for the deposition on select surfaces on the trays. These are compared to the measured results. The trays represent surfaces that have a high atomic oxygen flux, and intermediate oxygen flux, and no oxygen flux. All surfaces received significant solar Ultraviolet flux. It appears that the atomic oxygen was the primary agent that caused significant deposition to occur. Surfaces that saw significant contaminant flux solar UV and no atomic oxygen did not show any appreciable levels of observable deposition. The implications of the atom ic oxygen interaction with contaminant deposits containing silicon contaminant sources is discussed. The primary contaminant sources are DC61104 adhesive and Z306 paint. The results and interpretation of the findings have a potential significant impact on spacecraft surfaces that are exposed to solar UV and atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit.

  3. Effects of 3 sequestering agents on milk aflatoxin M1 concentration and the performance and immune status of dairy cows fed diets artificially contaminated with aflatoxin B1.

    PubMed

    Ogunade, I M; Arriola, K G; Jiang, Y; Driver, J P; Staples, C R; Adesogan, A T

    2016-08-01

    This study examined whether adding 3 mycotoxin-sequestering agents to diets contaminated with aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) would reduce milk aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) concentration, and improve the performance and alter immune status of dairy cows. Fifteen lactating dairy cows were used in an experiment with an incomplete crossover design including four 28-d periods. Treatments included a control diet (C), a toxin diet (T; 1,725µg of AFB1/head per day; 75µg/kg), and diets containing the toxin and 20g/head per day of a proprietary mixture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product containing a low (SEQ1) or high (SEQ2) dose of a chlorophyll-based additive, or a low dose of the chlorophyll-based additive and sodium bentonite clay (SEQ3). Sequestering agents were top-dressed on the total mixed ration (TMR) daily in each period, and AFB1 was dosed orally in gelatin capsules before the TMR was fed on d 21 to 25. Milk was sampled twice daily on d 20 to 28 and plasma was sampled on d 20 and 25. Sequestering agents did not affect milk AFM1 concentration during the toxin-dosing period. However, after AFB1 was withdrawn, the sequestering agents reduced the time required (24 vs. 48h) to reduce the milk AFM1 concentration below the Food and Drug Administration action level of 0.5µg/kg. Feeding T instead of C tended to reduce milk and fat-corrected milk yields, but feeding SEQ1 prevented these effects. Red blood cell count and hemoglobin concentration were reduced by feeding T instead of C, but not by feeding SEQ1, SEQ2, or SEQ3. The mean fluorescence intensity of antibody staining for 2 leukocyte adhesion molecules, L-selectin (CD62L) and β-integrin (CD18), tended to be greatest when SEQ1 and SEQ3 were fed. Plasma acid-soluble protein concentration was decreased by feeding SEQ1, SEQ2, and SEQ3 instead of T. Sequestering agents had no effect on milk AFM1 concentration, but they reduced the time required to reduce milk AFM1 concentration to a safe level after withdrawal of AFB1 from

  4. Fuzzy measurement based image testing for oil particles contamination level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Xianming; Li, Chuan; Chen, Bin

    2010-11-01

    The oil contamination level testing is important for its using and maintenance which is the basement of the oil contamination control is required higher by the developing device system, and the testing method is urgently needed to be studied for improving the process method and the maintenance quality of the contaminated oil. To classify the level of particles contamination in lubricant, CCD imaging technology is used to capture microscopic digital image of the oil particles sample . The digital image was processed and segmented in order that the computer can recognize and understand the particle targets by using image testing algorithm to measure the sizes, amounts and distributions of particles. The oil contamination level can be measured effectively by the economical and convenient method in which there is little air bubble and bead leading to false particle targets. To improve the influence produced by the false particle targets, One method is that a series of dynamical image samples from the contaminated oil in the multi-period and the multi-state are captured and used to test the particle targets, and the further method is to employ the fuzzy measurement using Gaussian subjection function, which describes the distribution of the standard evidences and the distribution of the testing data, and the testing probabilities of the evidence are weighed by the matching degree of the two distributions, which is used to classify the oil particles contamination level .The test shows that the oil particles contamination level diagnosis reliability is improved and the diagnosis uncertainty is reduced. This method combining with other testing methods by using the multi-information fusion method will be further studied later.

  5. Data on milk dioxin contamination linked with the location of fodder croplands allow to hypothesize the origin of the pollution source in an Italian valley.

    PubMed

    Desiato, Rosanna; Bertolini, Silvia; Baioni, Elisa; Crescio, Maria Ines; Scortichini, Giampiero; Ubaldi, Alessandro; Sparagna, Bruno; Cuttica, Giancarlo; Ru, Giuseppe

    2014-11-15

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs) have similar toxic, endocrine-disrupting, and carcinogenic activity. They are classified as persistent organic pollutants accumulating in the environment and the tissues of living organisms. High concentrations of PCDD/F and dl-PCB have been detected in bovine milk collected in a Piedmont valley (Northwestern Italy) since 2004. This geographic study describes the local distribution of pollution from PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs. Since their presence in animal products could be traced back to the ingestion of contaminated fodder, dioxin levels in cow milk were related to the distribution of fodder cropland parcels. Specifically, the aim of the study was to determine, through an exploratory approach, whether the contamination was consistent with one common point source of contamination or different scattered sources. Data for PCDD/F and dl-PCB concentrations in the bulk milk from 27 herds, sampled over a 4-year period (2004-2007), were matched to the georeferenced land parcels the dairy farmers used for growing fodder. Isopleth maps of dioxin concentrations were estimated with ordinary kriging. The highest level of pollution for both PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs was geographically juxtaposed: in both instances, the location of the local steel plant was within this extremely highly polluted area. The study results support the hypothesis for one common point source of contamination in the valley. The exploratory spatial analysis applied in this research may provide a valuable, novel approach to straightforward identification of a highly likely source of dioxin contamination of dairy products (even in the absence of top soil contamination data). PMID:25194902

  6. Uncertainties Associated with Flux Measurements Due to Heterogeneous Contaminant Distributions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass flux and mass discharge measurements at contaminated sites have been applied to assist with remedial management, and can be divided into two broad categories: point-scale measurement techniques and pumping methods. Extrapolation across un-sampled space is necessary when usi...

  7. Transfer of aflatoxin B1 from feed to milk and from milk to curd and whey in dairy sheep fed artificially contaminated concentrates.

    PubMed

    Battacone, G; Nudda, A; Palomba, M; Pascale, M; Nicolussi, P; Pulina, G

    2005-09-01

    An experiment was carried out using dairy ewes to study the transfer of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) from feed to milk and from milk to cheese. The effects of AFB1 on liver function and hematological parameters were also investigated. Fifteen ewes were assigned to treatments in replicated 3 x 3 Latin squares. The experimental groups received 32, 64, or 128 microg/d of pure AFB1 for 7 d followed by 5 d of clearance. On the sixth day of the first period, the total daily milk produced by each ewe was collected separately and processed into cheese. The results indicate that the level of AFB1 used did not adversely affect animal health and milk production traits. The aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) concentrations in milk approached a steady-state condition in all treated groups between 2 and 7 d after the start of treatment. The mean AFM1 concentrations of treated groups in steady-state condition (184.4, 324.7, and 596.9 ng/kg in ewes fed 32, 64, or 128 microg of AFB1, respectively) were significantly affected by the AFB1 doses. The AFM1 concentration was linearly related to the AFB1 intake/kg of BW. The carry-over values of AFB1 from feed into AFM1 in milk (0.26 to 0.33%) were not influenced by the AFB1 doses. The AFM1 concentrations in curd and whey were linearly related to the AFM1 concentrations in the unprocessed milk. PMID:16107394

  8. Detection limits of antimicrobials in ewe milk by delvotest photometric measurements.

    PubMed

    Althaus, R L; Torres, A; Montero, A; Balasch, S; Molina, M P

    2003-02-01

    The Delvotest method detection limits per manufacturer's instructions at a fixed reading time of 3 h for 24 antimicrobial agents were determined in ewe milk by photometric measurement. For each drug, eight concentrations were tested on 20 ewe milk samples from individual ewes. Detection limits, determined by means of logistic regression models, were (microg/kg): 3, amoxycillin; 2, ampicillin; 18, cloxacillin; 1, penicillin "G"; 34, cefadroxil; 430, cephalosporin "C"; 40, cephalexin; 20, cefoperazone; 33, Ceftiofur; 18, cefuroxime; 6100, streptomycin; 1200, gentamycin; 2600, neomycin; 830, erythromycin; 100, tylosin; 180, doxycycline; 320, oxytetracycline; 590, tetracycline; 88, sulfadiazine; 44, sulfamethoxazole; 140, sulfametoxypyridazine; 48, sulfaquinoxaline; 12,000, chloramphenicol; and 290, trimethoprim. Whereas the beta-lactam antibiotics, sulphonamides, and tylosin were detected by Delvotest method at levels equal to those of maximum residue limits, its sensitivity needs to be enhanced to detect aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, and trimethoprim residues in ewe milk or to develop an integrated residue detection system for ewe milk with different sensitive microorganisms for each group of antiinfectious agents. PMID:12647952

  9. Expressed breast milk on a neonatal unit: a hazard analysis and critical control points approach.

    PubMed

    Cossey, Veerle; Jeurissen, Axel; Thelissen, Marie-José; Vanhole, Chris; Schuermans, Annette

    2011-12-01

    With the increasing use of human milk and growing evidence of the benefits of mother's milk for preterm and ill newborns, guidelines to ensure its quality and safety are an important part of daily practice in neonatal intensive care units. Operating procedures based on hazard analysis and critical control points can standardize the handling of mother's expressed milk, thereby improving nutrition and minimizing the risk of breast milk-induced infection in susceptible newborns. Because breast milk is not sterile, microorganisms can multiply when the milk is not handled properly. Additional exogenous contamination should be prevented. Strict hygiene and careful temperature and time control are important during the expression, collection, transport, storage, and feeding of maternal milk. In contrast to formula milk, no legal standards exist for the use of expressed maternal milk. The need for additional measures, such as bacteriological screening or heat treatment, remains unresolved. PMID:21640434

  10. Light scattering and transmission measurement using digital imaging for online analysis of constituents in milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Pranay; Sarma, Sanjay E.

    2015-05-01

    Milk is an emulsion of fat globules and casein micelles dispersed in an aqueous medium with dissolved lactose, whey proteins and minerals. Quantification of constituents in milk is important in various stages of the dairy supply chain for proper process control and quality assurance. In field-level applications, spectrophotometric analysis is an economical option due to the low-cost of silicon photodetectors, sensitive to UV/Vis radiation with wavelengths between 300 - 1100 nm. Both absorption and scattering are witnessed as incident UV/Vis radiation interacts with dissolved and dispersed constituents in milk. These effects can in turn be used to characterize the chemical and physical composition of a milk sample. However, in order to simplify analysis, most existing instrument require dilution of samples to avoid effects of multiple scattering. The sample preparation steps are usually expensive, prone to human errors and unsuitable for field-level and online analysis. This paper introduces a novel digital imaging based method of online spectrophotometric measurements on raw milk without any sample preparation. Multiple LEDs of different emission spectra are used as discrete light sources and a digital CMOS camera is used as an image sensor. The extinction characteristic of samples is derived from captured images. The dependence of multiple scattering on power of incident radiation is exploited to quantify scattering. The method has been validated with experiments for response with varying fat concentrations and fat globule sizes. Despite of the presence of multiple scattering, the method is able to unequivocally quantify extinction of incident radiation and relate it to the fat concentrations and globule sizes of samples.

  11. Study on measurement of milk constituents by NIR analysis (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhonghai; Xu, Kexin; Han, Yonghui

    2005-06-01

    In this paper an attempt ofNIR analysis to measure the milk constituents is introduced. In milk, light is absorbed and scattered simultaneously. The concentrations of each component no longer have linear relationship to the absorbency, but proportional to the absorption coefficient and scattering coefficient. It is necessary to separate the effect of absorption and scattering. Compare with the widely used NIR method, we do not calibrate the prediction model by diffuse reflectance. The calibration is composed by two steps. Firstly, the optical parameters are measured by double integrating sphere; secondly, calibration is made by optical parameters. Concentration of protein and fat are within reasonable range. Fifty samples are acquired for calibration. The experimental result shows a higher prediction accuracy of protein than the intensity calibration method, and a comparable accuracy of fat.

  12. Effective lactation yield: A measure to compare milk yield between cows with different dry period lengths.

    PubMed

    Kok, A; van Middelaar, C E; Engel, B; van Knegsel, A T M; Hogeveen, H; Kemp, B; de Boer, I J M

    2016-04-01

    To compare milk yields between cows or management strategies, lactations are traditionally standardized to 305-d yields. The 305-d yield, however, gives no insight into the combined effect of additional milk yield before calving, decreased milk yield after calving, and a possible shorter calving interval in the case of a shortened dry period. We aimed to develop a measure that would enable the comparison of milk yield between cows with different dry period (DP) lengths. We assessed the importance of accounting for additional milk yield before calving and for differences in calving interval. The 305-d yield was compared with a 365-d yield, which included additional milk yield in the 60 d before calving. Next, an effective lactation yield was computed, defined as the daily yield from 60d before calving to 60 d before the next calving, to account for additional milk yield before calving and for differences in calving interval. Test-day records and drying-off dates of 15 commercial farms were used to compute the 305-d, 365-d, and effective lactation yields for individual cows. We analyzed 817 second-parity lactations preceded by no DP, a short DP (20 to 40 d), or a conventional DP (49 to 90 d). Compared with cows with a conventional DP, the 305-d yield of cows with no DP was 7.0 kg of fat- and protein-corrected milk (FPCM) per day lower, and the 305-d yield of cows with a short DP was 2.3 kg of FPCM per day lower. Including additional milk yield before calving in the 365-d yield reduced this difference to 3.4 kg of FPCM per cow per day for cows with no DP and to 0.9 kg of FPCM per cow per day for cows with a short DP. Compared with cows with a conventional DP, median days open were reduced by 25d for cows with no DP and by 18d for cows with a short DP. Accounting for these differences in calving interval in the effective lactation yield further decreased yield reductions for cows with no DP or a short DP by 0.3 kg of FPCM per cow per day. At the herd level, estimated

  13. Post-consumer contamination in high-density polyethylene (HDPE) milk bottles and the design of a bottle-to-bottle recycling process.

    PubMed

    Welle, F

    2005-10-01

    Six hundred conventional recycled HDPE flake samples, which were recollected and sorted in the UK, were screened for post-consumer contamination levels. Each analysed sample consisted of 40-50 individual flakes so that the amount of analysed individual containers was in the range 24,000-30,000 post-consumer milk bottles. Predominant contaminants in hot-washed flake samples were unsaturated oligomers, which can be also be found in virgin high-density polyethylene (HDPE) pellet samples used for milk bottle production. In addition, the flavour compound limonene, the degradation product of antioxidant additives di-tert-butylphenol and low amounts of saturated oligomers were found in higher concentrations in the post-consumer samples in comparison with virgin HDPE. However, the overall concentrations in post-consumer recycled samples were similar to or lower than concentration ranges in comparison with virgin HDPE. Contamination with other HDPE untypical compounds was rare and was in most cases related to non-milk bottles, which are <2.1% of the input material of the recycling process. The maximum concentration found in one sample of 1 g was estimated as 130 mg kg(-1), which corresponds to a contamination of 5200-6500 mg kg(-1) in the individual bottle. The recycling process investigated was based on an efficient sorting process, a hot-washing of the ground bottles, and a further deep-cleaning of the flakes with high temperatures and vacuum. Based on the fact that the contamination levels of post-consumer flake samples are similar to virgin HDPE and on the high cleaning efficiency of the super-clean recycling process especially for highly volatile compounds, the recycling process investigated is suitable for recycled post-consumer HDPE bottles for direct food-contact applications. However, hand-picking after automatically sorting is recommended to decrease the amount of non-milk bottles. The conclusions for suitability are valid, provided that the migration testing of

  14. Measurement of iron absorption from meals contaminated with iron

    SciTech Connect

    Hallberg, L.; Bjoern-Rasmussen, E.

    1981-12-01

    A method is described to measure in vitro the extent of isotopic exchange between the native nonheme food iron and added inorganic reduction to radioiron tracer. The food is digested with pepsin and trypsin in the presence of radioiron. The exchangeability of food iron is calculated from the specific activity in the food and in an extract of bathophenantroline in isoamyl alcohol obtained after digesting this food. The precision and accuracy of the method is illustrated by two kinds of studies, those in which different amounts of contamination iron are added to a meal and those evaluating contamination iron in natural meals. The present method will make it possible to measure validly iron absorption from meals contaminated with unknown amounts of iron of unknown exchangeability with the extrinsic radioiron tracer.

  15. Unbiased contaminant removal for 3D galaxy power spectrum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalus, B.; Percival, W. J.; Bacon, D. J.; Samushia, L.

    2016-08-01

    We assess and develop techniques to remove contaminants when calculating the 3D galaxy power spectrum. We separate the process into three separate stages: (i) removing the contaminant signal, (ii) estimating the uncontaminated cosmological power spectrum, (iii) debiasing the resulting estimates. For (i), we show that removing the best-fit contaminant (mode subtraction), and setting the contaminated components of the covariance to be infinite (mode deprojection) are mathematically equivalent. For (ii), performing a Quadratic Maximum Likelihood (QML) estimate after mode deprojection gives an optimal unbiased solution, although it requires the manipulation of large N_mode^2 matrices (Nmode being the total number of modes), which is unfeasible for recent 3D galaxy surveys. Measuring a binned average of the modes for (ii) as proposed by Feldman, Kaiser & Peacock (1994, FKP) is faster and simpler, but is sub-optimal and gives rise to a biased solution. We present a method to debias the resulting FKP measurements that does not require any large matrix calculations. We argue that the sub-optimality of the FKP estimator compared with the QML estimator, caused by contaminants is less severe than that commonly ignored due to the survey window.

  16. Relationship between test-day measures of somatic cell count and milk production in California dairy cows.

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, J W; Thurmond, M C; Lasslo, L

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between test-day measures of milk somatic cell count and milk yield was evaluated using the November 1985 test data from 8352 Holstein cattle (2923 primiparous and 5429 multiparous cows) located in ten Tulare County, California dairies. Following correction for herd and stage of lactation effects, design variable regression was used to create separate models for primiparous and multiparous cows predicting the changes in milk production associated with milk somatic cell count class. Cell counts were stratified by 1/2 loge cell count (x1000 cells/mL) units, permitting comparisons with previous studies. Cell counts less than 148,000/mL were not found to be associated with significant reductions in milk yield when compared to the reference class (cell counts less than 20,000/mL). Consistent incremental decreases in milk production were not noted with increasing cell count strata, even following the natural log transformation. The most dramatic production losses were noted in the range of 148,000 to 665,000 cells/mL. Primiparous cattle in the 403,000 to 665,000 cell count strata experienced a 5.22 kg (19.72%) decrease in test-day milk yield. Multiparous cattle in the same class experienced 3.01 kg (7.82%) reductions in milk production. Primiparous and multiparous cows had similar production losses. The study population differed from previous studies on the basis of herd size, milk production and the level of udder health, measured by milk somatic cell count. These differences and the choice of experimental design may in part explain differences in study results and conclusions. PMID:2713782

  17. Measuring electric fields from surface contaminants with neutral atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Obrecht, J. M.; Wild, R. J.; Cornell, E. A.

    2007-06-15

    In this paper we demonstrate a technique of utilizing magnetically trapped neutral {sup 87}Rb atoms to measure the magnitude and direction of stray electric fields emanating from surface contaminants. We apply an alternating external electric field that adds to (or subtracts from) the stray field in such a way as to resonantly drive the trapped atoms into a mechanical dipole oscillation. The growth rate of the oscillation's amplitude provides information about the magnitude and sign of the stray field gradient. Using this measurement technique, we are able to reconstruct the vector electric field produced by surface contaminants. In addition, we can accurately measure the electric fields generated from adsorbed atoms purposely placed onto the surface and account for their systematic effects, which can plague a precision surface-force measurement. We show that baking the substrate can reduce the electric fields emanating from adsorbate and that the mechanism for reduction is likely surface diffusion, not desorption.

  18. Association between Milk and Milk Product Consumption and Anthropometric Measures in Adult Men and Women in India: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Satija, Ambika; Agrawal, Sutapa; Bowen, Liza; Khandpur, Neha; Kinra, Sanjay; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Reddy, Kolli Srinath; Smith, George Davey; Ebrahim, Shah

    2013-01-01

    Background The nutritional aetiology of obesity remains unclear, especially with regard to the role of dairy products in developing countries. Objective To examine whether milk/milk product consumption is associated with obesity and high waist circumference among adult Indians. Methods Information on plain milk, tea, curd and buttermilk/lassi consumption assessed using a Food Frequency Questionnaire was obtained from the cross-sectional sib-pair designed Indian Migration Study (3698 men and 2659 women), conducted at four factory locations across north, central and south India. The anthropometric measures included were Body Mass Index (BMI) and Waist Circumference (WC). Mixed-effect logistic regression models were conducted to accommodate sib-pair design and adjust for potential confounders. Results After controlling for potential confounders, the risk of being obese (BMI≥25 kg/m2) was lower among women (OR = 0.57;95%CI:0.43−0.76;p≤0.0001) and men (OR = 0.67;95%CI: 0.51−0.87;p = 0.005), and the risk of a high WC (men: >90 cm; women: >80 cm) was lower among men (OR = 0.71;95%CI:0.54−0.93;p = 0.005) and women (OR = 0.79;95%CI:0.59−1.05;p>0.05) who consume ≥1 portions of plain milk daily than those who do not consume any milk. The inverse association between daily plain milk consumption and obesity was also confirmed in sibling-pair analyses. Daily tea consumption of ≥1 portion was associated with obesity (OR = 1.51;95%CI:1.00−2.25;p>0.050) and high WC (OR = 1.65;95%CI:1.08−2.51;p>0.019) among men but not among women but there was no strong evidence of association of curd and buttermilk/lassi consumption with obesity and high waist circumference among both men and women. Conclusions The independent, inverse association of daily plain milk consumption with the risk of being obese suggests that high plain milk intake may lower the risk of obesity in adult Indians. However, this is an observational finding and

  19. [The role of bacterial contamination of milking utensils and disinfecting solutions as a possible cause of clinical mastitis in dairy cows].

    PubMed

    Hässig, M; Sigrist, S M; Corti, S; Giezendanner, N; Stephan, R

    2011-06-01

    Various instruments and utensils used during milking as well as teat dip solutions were examined for contamination with coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS). The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between contaminated fomites and udder infection in dairy cows. A total of 344 cows from ten dairy farms with the highest rate of clinical mastitis among the farms serviced by the Ambulatory Clinic of the University of Zurich were included in the study. Each farm was visited five times. All lactating cows, with the exception of those undergoing antibiotic treatment, were examined immediately before milking using the California Mastitis Test (CMT). A milk sample was collected from positive quarters. Items used to clean the udder, which included wood wool, paper towels and disinfecting towels as well as the milker's hands and the teat dip cup were swabbed for bacteriological examination. Water samples, samples of teat dip and cleaning solutions were also collected and cultured. Our results demonstrate that cleaning and disinfecting solutions have the potential to transmit udder pathogens and cause clinical mastitis. The most common CNS isolated from quarter samples were S. saprophyticus, S. sciuri and S. chromogenes, and the most common CNS isolated from utensils, cleaning and disinfecting solutions were S. fleuretii, S. vitulus, S. equorum, S. sciuri, S. haemolyticus, S. succinus and S. saprophyticus. PMID:21638262

  20. METHOD EVALUATION TO MEASURE PERSISTENT BIOACCUMULATIVE TOXIC POLLUTANTS IN COW MILK

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is important to understand the persistent and bioaccumulative toxic (PBT) levels in milk, as milk fat may be one of the highest dietary sources of PBT exposure. Analysis of milk also allows the opportunity to investigate geographic variability, as milk is produced and distrib...

  1. Neurological and neuropsychological functions in adults with a history of developmental arsenic poisoning from contaminated milk powder.

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Kato, Tsuguhiko; Ohta, Hitoshi; Bellinger, David C; Matsuoka, Kenichi; Grandjean, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    During the summer of 1955, mass arsenic poisoning of bottle-fed infants occurred in the western part of Japan due to contaminated milk powder, and more than 100 died; some childhood victims were later found to suffer from neurological sequelae in adolescence. This unique incident enabled us to explore infancy as a critical period of arsenic exposure in regard to developmental neurotoxicity and its possible persistence through adulthood. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the association between developmental arsenic exposure and the neurological outcomes more than 50 years later. We conducted a retrospective cohort study during the period from April 2012 to February 2013 in two hospitals in Okayama Prefecture, Japan. The study sample consisted of 50 individuals: 27 known poisoning victims from Okayama Prefecture, and 23 non-exposed local controls of similar age. In addition to neurological examination, we adapted a battery of neurophysiological and neuropsychological tests to identify the types of brain functions affected by early-life arsenic exposure. While limited abnormalities were found in the neurophysiological tests, neuropsychological deficits were observed. Except for Finger tapping, all test scores in the exposed group--Vocabulary and Block Design from Wechsler Adults Intelligent Scale III, Design memory subtest from Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning 2, and Grooved pegboard test--were substantially below those obtained by the unexposed. The exposed group showed average performance at least 1.2 standard deviations below the average for the controls. Exposed participants performed less well than controls, even after exclusion of subjects with recognized disabilities or those with a high level of education. Adults who had suffered arsenic poisoning during infancy revealed neuropsychological dysfunctions, even among those subjects not recognized as having disabilities. Developmental neurotoxicity due to arsenic likely results in permanent

  2. The Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point's (HACCP) concept as applied to some chemical, physical and microbiological contaminants of milk on dairy farms. A prototype.

    PubMed

    Lievaart, J J; Noordhuizen, J P T M; van Beek, E; van der Beek, C; van Risp, A; Schenkel, J; van Veersen, J

    2005-03-01

    Quality management on dairy farms becomes more and more important regarding the different areas of animal health, animal welfare and food safety. Monitoring animals, farm conditions and farm records can be extended with risk identification and risk management. The hazard analysis critical control point's system is useful as an on farm strategy to control the product as well as the production process on the areas of animal health, animal welfare and food safety. This article deals in detail with the question how to develop a qualitative method where risk can be defined as an interaction between probability and impact. Two parts of the production process (milk harvest and treatment of cows) where used as an example how to apply the hazard analysis critical control point's system on chemical, physical and microbiological contaminants of milk. Not just only by summarizing the different critical checkpoints for each area but also by giving them a precise judgement of probability and impact. PMID:15835281

  3. Retail Survey of Brazilian Milk and Minas Frescal Cheese and a Contaminated Dairy Plant To Establish Prevalence, Relatedness, and Sources of Listeria monocytogenes Isolates▿

    PubMed Central

    Brito, J. Renaldi F.; Santos, Emilia M. P.; Arcuri, Edna F.; Lange, Carla C.; Brito, Maria A. V. P.; Souza, Guilherme N.; Cerqueira, Mônica M. P. O.; Beltran, J. Marcela Soto; Call, Jeffrey E.; Liu, Yanhong; Porto-Fett, Anna C. S.; Luchansky, John B.

    2008-01-01

    A study was designed to recover Listeria monocytogenes from pasteurized milk and Minas frescal cheese (MFC) sampled at retail establishments (REs) and to identify the contamination source(s) of these products in the corresponding dairy processing plant. Fifty milk samples (9 brands) and 55 MFC samples (10 brands) were tested from REs located in Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais, Brazil. All milk samples and 45 samples from 9 of 10 MFC brands tested negative for L. monocytogenes; however, “brand F” of MFC obtained from REs 119 and 159 tested positive. Thus, the farm/plant that produced brand F MFC was sampled; all samples from the milking parlor tested negative for L. monocytogenes, whereas several sites within the processing plant and the MFC samples tested positive. All 344 isolates recovered from retail MFC, plant F MFC, and plant F environmental samples were serotype 1/2a and displayed the same AscI or ApaI fingerprints. Since these results established that the storage coolers served as the contamination source of the MFC, plant F was closed so that corrective renovations could be made. Following renovation, samples from sites that previously tested positive for the pathogen were collected from the processing environment and from MFC on multiple visits; all tested negative for L. monocytogenes. In addition, on subsequent visits to REs 159 and 119, all MFC samples tested negative for the pathogen. Studies are ongoing to quantify the prevalence, levels, and types of L. monocytogenes in MFC and associated processing plants to lessen the likelihood of listeriosis in Brazil. PMID:18502929

  4. The contamination of acoustic pressure measurements by sensor oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Surry, J.; Kezele, D.; Risley, C.

    1996-04-01

    The significance of micromotion (sensor) noise contamination of low frequency, low level, ambient ocean acoustic measurements has been pursued experimentally and analytically. Oceanographic hydrophones are subject to small motions resulting from various phenomena; the present study focussed on a pressure-sensitive hydrophone exposed to vertical oscillations. While under such imposed motion, the responses from a pressure-sensitive hydrophone and a collocated accelerometer were analyzed relative to a stationary reference hydrophone. The imposed motion was vertical, colored noise (1 to 50 Hz) of various acceleration amplitudes (10 {mu}g to 10 mg), transmitted through an elastic isolation suspension. Formation of Frequency Response Functions between the measured transducer signals, demonstrated that a three component model of the hydrophone signal predicts the response-to-motion contamination of the acoustic signal. In the lower frequency range, the vertical motion through the static head gradient generates a signal similar to the response-to-acoustic signal, while in the upper frequency range, the hydrophone responds inertially to the motion. For acceleration greater than 30 {mu}g, these components masked the laboratory ambient sound, except in a narrow frequency band where the two motion related components canceled each other. The in-water acceleration sensitivity of the hydrophone was found to be higher than the measured in-air value, apparently due to two hydrodynamic effects: water mass loading predicted by a classical added-mass term and a greatly magnifying effect from an adjacent moving body. Extrapolating the results to a deep ocean environment, the hydrophone signals would be contaminated below 5 Hz. A spectral technique is demonstrated to remove both forms of motion contamination from laboratory data. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Dynamical Mass Measurements of Contaminated Galaxy Clusters Using Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntampaka, Michelle; Trac, Hy; Sutherland, Dougal; Fromenteau, Sebastien; Poczos, Barnabas; Schneider, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are a rich source of information for examining fundamental astrophysical processes and cosmological parameters, however, employing clusters as cosmological probes requires accurate mass measurements derived from cluster observables. We study dynamical mass measurements of galaxy clusters contaminated by interlopers, and show that a modern machine learning (ML) algorithm can predict masses by better than a factor of two compared to a standard scaling relation approach. We create a mock catalog from Multidark's publicly-available N-body MDPL1 simulation where a simple cylindrical cut around the cluster center allows interlopers to contaminate the clusters. In the standard approach, we use a power law scaling relation to infer cluster mass from galaxy line of sight (LOS) velocity dispersion. The presence of interlopers in the catalog produces a wide, flat fractional mass error distribution, with width = 2.13. We employ the Support Distribution Machine (SDM) class of algorithms to learn from distributions of data to predict single values. Applied to distributions of galaxy observables such as LOS velocity and projected distance from the cluster center, SDM yields better than a factor-of-two improvement (width = 0.67). Remarkably, SDM applied to contaminated clusters is better able to recover masses than even a scaling relation approach applied to uncontaminated clusters. We show that the SDM method more accurately reproduces the cluster mass function, making it a valuable tool for employing cluster observations to evaluate cosmological models.

  6. Preventive measures reducing superficial mycobiotic contamination of grain.

    PubMed

    Steponavičius, Dainius; Raila, Algirdas; Steponavičienė, Aušra; Lugauskas, Albinas; Kemzūraitė, Aurelija

    2012-01-01

    Search for the preventive measures reducing the accumulation of mycotoxin producers in food raw material was carried out. Active ventilation was used; the impact of the electro-chemically activated air (ozone) and electro-chemically activated water (anolyte) on the micromycetes prevailing in grain raw material for food (GRMF) was determined. The GRMF was dried by active ventilation using the ozone-air mixture. Ozone (concentration 1250 ppb) disinfects the surface of the raw material and creates conditions unfavourable for the increase of mycobiotic contamination in drying upper layers of the grain mound. Within 8 days the contamination of GRMF in a mound decreased by 50%, while in its lower layers - more than 3 times. Ventilation of the mound with the above-mentioned concentration of the ozone-air mixture has ceased the active functioning of Fusarium avenaceum, F. graminearum, F. poae, F. solani, F. tricinctum F. sporotrichioides micromycetes and has considerably retarded the development of Alternaria alternata and other fungi. Anolyte (0.05% of chlorine concentration) reduced the mycobiotic contamination of GRMF by almost 2.5 times. The optimal treatment duration is from 0.5 to 1 hour. The optimal technical parameters, allowing the use of these measures for the preparation of grain food safety technologies, were elaborated; they are designed for more efficient protection of human health against micromycetes and their toxic metabolites, which are abundantly produced and released into the environment. PMID:22742787

  7. Strategy for the reduction of Trichloromethane residue levels in farm bulk milk.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Siobhan; Gleeson, David; Jordan, Kieran; Furey, Ambrose; O'Sullivan, Kathleen; O'Brien, Bernadette

    2013-05-01

    High fat dairy products, such as butter and margarine can be contaminated during the milk production process with a residue called Trichloromethane (TCM), which results from the use of chlorine based detergent solutions. Although, TCM concentrations in Irish products are not at levels that are a public health issue, such contamination can cause marketing difficulties in countries to which Irish products are being exported. In an attempt to reduce such milk residues, a template procedure was developed, tried and tested on 43 farms (from 3 processing companies). This involved identifying farms with high TCM milk, applying corrective action in the form of advice and recommendations to reduce TCM and re-measuring milks from these farms. Trichloromethane in milk was measured by head-space gas chromatography with electron capture detector. The TCM reduction strategy proved successful in significantly reducing the levels in milk in the farms tested, e.g. TCM was reduced from 0.006 to the target of 0.002 mg/kg (P < 0.05). The strategy was then applied to farms who supplied milk to six Irish dairy processors with the objective of reducing TCM in those milks to a level of ≤ 0.002 mg/kg. Initially, milk tankers containing milks from approximately 10-15 individual farms were sampled and analysed and tankers with high TCM (>0.002 mg/kg) identified. Individual herd milks contributing to these tankers were subsequently sampled and analysed and farms supplying high TCM identified. Guidance and advice was provided to the high TCM milk suppliers and levels of TCM of these milk supplies were monitored subsequently. A significant reduction (minimum P < 0.05) in milk TCM was observed in 5 of the 6 dairy processor milks, while a numerical reduction in TCM was observed in the remaining processor milk. PMID:23473534

  8. Effect of cleaning procedure and hygienic condition of milking equipment on bacterial count of bulk tank milk.

    PubMed

    Bava, Luciana; Zucali, Maddalena; Sandrucci, Anna; Brasca, Milena; Vanoni, Laura; Zanini, Lucio; Tamburini, Alberto

    2011-05-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the characteristics of cleaning procedures for milking equipment applied in intensive dairy farms in Lombardy (Italy) and to study their relationships with bacterial count of bulk milk and hygienic condition of milking machine components. A group of 22 dairy farms was visited twice (winter and summer) in order to collect bulk tank milk and post-rinse water samples and swabs from liners and milk receiver. Samples were analysed to determine: standard plate count (SPC), laboratory pasteurization count (LPC), psychrotrophic bacteria count (PBC), coliform count (CC) and Escherichia coli. Cleaning procedures were monitored using electronic milk flow meters with specific software for the measurement of the duration of each cleaning phase, circulating solution temperature and electrical conductivity, turbulence and water filling percentage of pipelines. The results showed that farms classified as high and low milk total bacteria count significantly differed both in terms of liners and receiver bacterial contamination and in terms of water temperature reached during the detergent phase of cleaning milking equipment. Significant positive correlations were found among total bacteria count in milk and bacterial contamination of the liners. Maximum water temperature reached during the cleaning cycle of milking equipment was very low (34.4±8.9°C on average); most of the observations (88.6%) corresponded to water temperatures <45°C. Cleaning temperature was related to psychrotrophic bacteria count of milk and post-rinse water and coliform count in liners. Routine check and regulation of water temperature during the washing phase of the milking machine can be a simple and effective way to control one of the main risk factors for bacteriological quality of bulk tank milk. PMID:21371358

  9. Elementary and Middle School Children's Acceptance of Lower Calorie Flavored Milk as Measured by Milk Shipment and Participation in the National School Lunch Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yon, Bethany A.; Johnson, Rachel K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) new nutrition standards for school meals include sweeping changes setting upper limits on calories served and limit milk offerings to low fat or fat-free and, if flavored, only fat-free. Milk processors are lowering the calories in flavored milks. As changes to milk impact…

  10. Maternal risk factors associated with increased dioxin concentrations in breast milk in a hot spot of dioxin contamination in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Anh, Nguyen Thi Nguyet; Nishijo, Muneko; Tai, Pham The; Maruzeni, Shoko; Morikawa, Yuko; Anh, Tran Hai; Van Luong, Hoang; Dam, Pham Minh; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Son, Le Ke; Nishijo, Hisao

    2014-01-01

    This study looked to identify determinants of exposure to dioxin in breast milk from breast-feeding women in a hot spot of dioxin exposure in Vietnam. Breast milk was collected from 140 mothers 1 month after delivery. The risk factors investigated included length of residency, drinking of well water and the frequency of animal food consumption. Cluster analysis was performed to identify dietary patterns of fish and meat portions, fish variety and egg variety. Residency, age and parity were clearly associated with increased dioxin levels. Drinking well water and the consumption of marine crab and shrimps were related to higher levels of furans in breast milk. The consumption of quail eggs also appeared to be associated with increased levels of some dioxin isomers in this area. Some mothers who ate no or less meat than fish and mothers who consumed more freshwater fish than marine fish had lower levels of dioxins in their breast milk. However, the type of water and the eating habits of mothers contributed only partly to the increased dioxin levels in their breast milk; the length of residency was the most important risk factor associated with increased dioxin body burdens of mothers. PMID:24149970

  11. Stability of sulfonamides, nitrofurans, and chloramphenicol residues in preserved raw milk samples measured by liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Noa, Mario; Perez, Norima; Gutierrez, Rey; Escobar, Irma; Diaz, Gilberto; Vega, Salvador; Prado, Guadalupe; Urban, Georgina

    2002-01-01

    A stability study was made of 10 antimicrobials: 6 sulfonamides, 3 nitrofurans, and chloramphenicol residues in raw milk samples preserved with 0.1 % potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7) and 0.05% mercuric bichloride (HgCl2) during cold storage for 7 days. Preserved milk samples fortified with 50 ppb of each antimicrobial were analyzed by liquid chromatography (modified AOAC Method 993.32). Drugs were extracted with chloroform-acetone after solvent evaporation residues were dissolved with aqueous sodium acetate buffer solution (0.02M, pH 4.8), and fat was removed with hexane. Sulfonamides and chloramphenicol were detected at 275 nm (UV) by using a gradient system of sodium acetate buffer solution-acetonitrile starting at 95 + 5 (v/v) and finishing at 80 + 20 (v/v). Nitrofurans were detected at 375 nm (UV) isocratically with sodium acetate buffer solution-acetonitrile (80 + 20, v/v). Residues stability was measured through recovery data. Sulfamethoxazole, sulfachloropyridazine, nitrofurazone, furazolidone, and furaltadone residues remained stable in the presence of either preservative for 7 days. Sulfamethazine and chloramphenicol were not affected by K2Cr2O7, but had significant losses (p <0.05) when HgCl2 was used: 26.2 and 13.4%, respectively. Average recoveries of sulfamonomethoxine, sulfamerazine, and sulfathiazole significantly decreased by Day 7, with losses of 17.1, 17.2, and 23.2% for K2Cr2O7, and 23.3, 20.7, and 48.0% for HgCl2, respectively. During 5 days of cold storage all antimicrobials tested, except sulfathiazole, remained stable in milk samples preserved with 0.1 % K2Cr2O7 or 0.05% HgCl2. PMID:12477207

  12. Review of methods to measure internal contamination in an emergency.

    PubMed

    Youngman, M J

    2015-06-01

    In the event of a radiation emergency, people close to the site of the incident may be exposed to radiation by external exposure, or as a result of intakes of radioactive material. For these incidents it may be necessary to monitor members of the public both for external and internal contamination. This work reviews currently available equipment for the assessment of internal exposure following an emergency. It concentrates on incidents involving the spread of radioactive material and on contamination by radionuclides which emit penetrating radiation. It is essential that this monitoring is carried out as soon as possible so that people who have been exposed at a level which could have an effect on health can be identified and receive prompt medical assessment. Proposed action levels to identify people who need medical attention are reviewed to determine the required sensitivity of monitoring equipment. For releases containing gamma-ray emitting radionuclides the best means of measuring internal contamination is to use detectors placed close to the body (whole body or partial body monitoring). Laboratory based whole body monitors could be used but these may well be inconveniently located and so equipment which can be deployed to the site of an incident has been developed and these are described. The need for rapid selection and prioritisation of people for monitoring, methods to deal with potentially high numbers of contaminated people and the requirement for a means of rapidly interpreting monitoring information are also discussed.It has been found that for many types of incidents and scenarios, systems based on unshielded high-resolution detectors and hand-held instruments do have the required sensitivity to identify people who require medical assessment. PMID:25884230

  13. HIGH BREAST MILK LEVELS OF POLYCHLORINATEDE BIPHENYLS (PCBS) AMONG FOUR WOMEN LIVING ADJACENT TO A PCB-CONTAMINATED WASTE SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a consequence of contamination by effluents from local electronics manufacturing facilities, the New Bedford Harbor and estuary in southeastern Massachusetts is among the sites in the United States that are considered the most highly contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (...

  14. Effects on milk yield of milking interval regularity and teat cup attachment failures with robotic milking systems.

    PubMed

    Bach, Alex; Busto, Isabel

    2005-02-01

    A database consisting of 35291 milking records from 83 cows was built over a period of 10 months with the objectives of studying the effect of teat cup attachment failures and milking interval regularity on milk production with an automated milking system (AMS). The database collected records of lactation number, days in milk (DIM), milk production, interval between milkings (for both the entire udder and individual quarters in case of a teat cup attachment failure) and average and peak milk flows for each milking. The weekly coefficient of variation (CV) of milking intervals was used as a measure of milking regularity. DIM, milking intervals, and CV of milking intervals were divided into four categories coinciding with the four quartiles of their respective distributions. The data were analysed by analysis of variance with cow as a random effect and lactation number, DIM, the occurrence of a milking failure, and the intervals between milkings or the weekly CV of milking intervals as fixed effects. The incidence of attachment failures was 7.6% of total milkings. Milk production by quarters affected by a milking failure following the failure was numerically greater owing to the longer interval between milkings. When accounting for the effect of milking intervals, milk production by affected quarters following a milking failure was 26% lower than with regular milkings. However, the decrease in milk production by quarters affected by milking failures was more severe as DIM increased. Average and peak milk flows by quarters affected by a milking failure were lower than when milkings occurred normally. However, milk production recovered its former level within seven milkings following a milking failure. Uneven frequency (weekly CV of milking intervals >27%) decreased daily milk yield, and affected multiparous more negatively than primiparous cows. PMID:15747737

  15. Measurement of total hemispherical emissivity of contaminated mirror surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Facey, T. A.; Nonnenmacher, A. L.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of dust contamination on the total hemispherical emissivity (THE) of a 1.5-inch-diameter Al/MgF2-coated telescope mirror are investigated experimentally. The THE is determined by means of cooling-rate measurements in the temperature range 10-14.5 C in a vacuum of 100 ntorr or better. Photographs and drawings of the experimental setup are provided, and results for 11 dust levels are presented in tables and graphs. It is shown that dust has a significant effect on THE, but the experimental losses are only about half those predicted for perfectly black dust in perfect thermal contact with the mirror surface.

  16. A Model for Measurements of Lognormally Distributed Environmental Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Charles B. Davis, Danny Field, Thomas E. Gran

    2009-05-21

    This paper proposes a more nearly reasonable model for the actual measurement distribution, called here the “Davis Mixed Model” (DMM). The DMM is derived by multiplying the probability density function of unobservable actual concentrations (assumed LN) by the conditional density of measurements given the concentrations (assumed heteroscedastic normal), and then integrating to obtain the marginal distribution of the observable measurements. The DMM is complicated and analytically intractable; its probability density function (PDF) is itself an integral, for example, and closed-form expressions for percentiles, let alone estimators, do not exist. The DMM can be fit to data via Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE), however, and a fitted model can be used to generate data for evaluating the actual performance of candidate UTL or other estimation procedures. The Industrial Hygiene application motivating this work involves surface sampling surveys for removable beryllium (Be) contamination, with data from Inductively Coupled Plasma – Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analyses. Similar issues will arise quite generally with censored environmental data for other contaminants and analytical methods. The conclusions presented in this paper focus on the regions of the DMM parameter space arising in surveying numerous Department of Energy (DOE) facilities associated with the Nevada Test Site (NTS).

  17. High concentrations of haptocorrin interfere with routine measurement of cobalamins in human serum and milk. A problem and its solution.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Human milk and occasional serum samples contain high concentrations of unsaturated haptocorrin (apoHC), which may influence measurement of cobalamins (Cbl). Methods: Cbl in serum samples spiked with increasing amounts of apoHC were measured employing the Centaur, Cobas and Architect anal...

  18. Applying a kinetic method to an indirect ELISA measuring Ostertagia ostertagi antibodies in milk

    PubMed Central

    Vanderstichel, Raphaël; Dohoo, Ian; Markham, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) are frequently run as endpoint ELISAs (e-ELISAs). However, kinetic ELISAs (k-ELISAs) have certain advantages over e-ELISAs. The objective of this study was to understand the relationship between e-ELISA and k-ELISA results. Specifically, to determine whether it was possible to run both k-ELISA and e-ELISA on the same plate and establish an appropriate time interval for k-ELISA measurements. A normalization method for k-ELISA slopes (slope ratio) is proposed. Using an indirect e-ELISA test measuring antibodies against Ostertagia ostertagi in milk from dairy cattle, we found that running a k-ELISA had no effect on optical density ratio results of an e-ELISA on the same plate, and that agreement was very strong at 10, 15, and 28 min, allowing for a reduction in the total processing time for ELISA tests. PMID:26130849

  19. Development of a new instrument for the measurement of the milk constituents based on the embedded system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhen; Wu, Juan; Su, Lijun; Li, Zhonggang; Zhao, Hong

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents a new way for measuring milk constituents. The new technology utilizes the scattered light to transmitted light ratio of laser light to determine the amount of protein and fat in milk. Fundamental theories of this new technology are discussed in detail and the design blueprint of an embedded system built based on this technology is outlined. Furthermore, the protein concentrations measured by the newly developed instrument are fit well with the authentic results from Dairy Quality Supervision and Inspection Center of the Country, indicating the instrument is feasible and has great potential for the application in dairy industry

  20. Penetration Depth Measurement of Near-Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging Light for Milk Powder.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Kim, Moon S; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Mo, Changyeun; Esquerre, Carlos; Delwiche, Stephen; Zhu, Qibing

    2016-01-01

    The increasingly common application of the near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging technique to the analysis of food powders has led to the need for optical characterization of samples. This study was aimed at exploring the feasibility of quantifying penetration depth of NIR hyperspectral imaging light for milk powder. Hyperspectral NIR reflectance images were collected for eight different milk powder products that included five brands of non-fat milk powder and three brands of whole milk powder. For each milk powder, five different powder depths ranging from 1 mm-5 mm were prepared on the top of a base layer of melamine, to test spectral-based detection of the melamine through the milk. A relationship was established between the NIR reflectance spectra (937.5-1653.7 nm) and the penetration depth was investigated by means of the partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) technique to classify pixels as being milk-only or a mixture of milk and melamine. With increasing milk depth, classification model accuracy was gradually decreased. The results from the 1-mm, 2-mm and 3-mm models showed that the average classification accuracy of the validation set for milk-melamine samples was reduced from 99.86% down to 94.93% as the milk depth increased from 1 mm-3 mm. As the milk depth increased to 4 mm and 5 mm, model performance deteriorated further to accuracies as low as 81.83% and 58.26%, respectively. The results suggest that a 2-mm sample depth is recommended for the screening/evaluation of milk powders using an online NIR hyperspectral imaging system similar to that used in this study. PMID:27023555

  1. Penetration Depth Measurement of Near-Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging Light for Milk Powder

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Min; Kim, Moon S.; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Mo, Changyeun; Esquerre, Carlos; Delwiche, Stephen; Zhu, Qibing

    2016-01-01

    The increasingly common application of the near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging technique to the analysis of food powders has led to the need for optical characterization of samples. This study was aimed at exploring the feasibility of quantifying penetration depth of NIR hyperspectral imaging light for milk powder. Hyperspectral NIR reflectance images were collected for eight different milk powder products that included five brands of non-fat milk powder and three brands of whole milk powder. For each milk powder, five different powder depths ranging from 1 mm–5 mm were prepared on the top of a base layer of melamine, to test spectral-based detection of the melamine through the milk. A relationship was established between the NIR reflectance spectra (937.5–1653.7 nm) and the penetration depth was investigated by means of the partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) technique to classify pixels as being milk-only or a mixture of milk and melamine. With increasing milk depth, classification model accuracy was gradually decreased. The results from the 1-mm, 2-mm and 3-mm models showed that the average classification accuracy of the validation set for milk-melamine samples was reduced from 99.86% down to 94.93% as the milk depth increased from 1 mm–3 mm. As the milk depth increased to 4 mm and 5 mm, model performance deteriorated further to accuracies as low as 81.83% and 58.26%, respectively. The results suggest that a 2-mm sample depth is recommended for the screening/evaluation of milk powders using an online NIR hyperspectral imaging system similar to that used in this study. PMID:27023555

  2. Human milk banking.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, Esther Marie; Wood, Angela; Fiske, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Forms of human milk banking and donation have been present for more than a century worldwide, but, since 1985, the Human Milk Banking Association of North America (HM BANA) has established guidelines to make the use of donor's breast milk safe and the second best form of feeding to maternal breast milk for a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) infant. The Indiana Mother's Human Milk Bank provides an extensive and meticulous process of selecting breast milk donors. The process begins with a phone interview with a potential donor and includes the review of the donor's medical records, blood laboratory screening, medication and dietary intake, as well as consent from the donor's pediatrician. The milk bank follows steps of collecting, storing, and receiving the breast milk in accordance with the guidelines of the HM BANA. Pasteurization is the method used to ensure the proper heating and cooling of breast milk. Despite the rigorous pasteurization method, the donor's breast milk will not lose most of the important beneficial components needed for sick or ill NICU infants. Every batch of pasteurized breast milk will be cultured for any possible contamination and shipped to NICUs after it has been cleared by laboratory testing. PMID:23666187

  3. Milk-borne campylobacter infection.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, D A; Jones, D M

    1981-01-01

    The common factor in 13 recent outbreaks of Campylobacter jejuni enteritis was the consumption of unpasteurised or incompletely pasteurised milk. C jejuni is a common commensal in the alimentary tract of milking cows, but it is not clear how the milk becomes contaminated with the organism. Pasteurisation will readily eliminate the organism from milk. In England and Wales 3% of milk retailed is still unpasteurised, and in the light of these findings it is suggested that only pasteurised milk should be sold to the public. PMID:6786504

  4. A research on measuring and analyzing the optical properties of fluorescent whitening agent in soybean milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xingyue; Zhao, Zhimin; Zhang, Lin; Qian, Kun; Wang, Lexin; Lan, Xiufeng

    2015-03-01

    A research on measuring and analyzing the fluorescence spectra of fluorescent whitening agent in soybean milk was explained in this paper. At the temperature of 30 °C, linear relationship was found good between fluorescence intensity and concentration of fluorescent whitening agent in the range of 0.015-0.25 mg/mL when the emission wavelength was 437 nm and excitation wavelength was 347 nm. Modeling analysis showed that the correlation coefficient was 0.996, the relative standard deviation (RSD) ranged from 0.45% to 0.73% and the recovery of standard addition ranged from 96.80% to 102.67%, which testified the validity of the method. This research provided a new way for detecting the unedible fluorescent whitening agent content in food production.

  5. Measures of de novo synthesis of milk components from propionate in lactating goats

    SciTech Connect

    Emmanuel, B.; Kennelly, J.J.

    1985-02-01

    Possible direct contributions of propionate to de novo synthesis of milk components by the mammary gland of lactating goats fed a concentrate-roughage diet have been studied in vivo by primed constant infusion of (1-carbon-14)propionate into the right mammary artery. Specific radioactivities of milk galactose, fatty acids, and protein were higher in the infused than in the uninfused half of the mammary gland, suggesting de novo synthesis of these compounds in the udder. Specific radioactivities of milk glucose in both udder halves were identical, ruling out any possibility of mammary gland-derived glucose from propionate of blood plasma under the experimental conditions. Of milk galactose, .8% was derived from propionate of blood plasma, and of milk glucose, 98% was derived from glucose of blood plasma. After intraruminal infusion of unlabeled propionic acid at 11 g/h, concentration of propionate in blood plasma was doubled, its contribution to milk galactose was increased to 1.5%, and proportions of milk odd-numbered fatty acids were increased. Propionate was incorporated largely into milk odd-numbered fatty acids. The authors conclude that small amounts of propionate can be incorporated into principal components of milk in the mammary gland of lactating goats.

  6. Contaminant discharge and uncertainty estimates from passive flux meter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klammler, Harald; Hatfield, Kirk; GuimarãEs da Luz, Joana AngéLica; Annable, Michael D.; Newman, Mark; Cho, Jaehyun; Peacock, Aaron; Stucker, Valerie; Ranville, James; Cabaniss, Steven A.; Rao, P. S. C.

    2012-02-01

    The passive flux meter (PFM) measures local cumulative water and contaminant fluxes at an observation well. Conditional stochastic simulation accounting for both spatial correlation and data skewness is introduced to interpret passive flux meter observations in terms of probability distributions of discharges across control planes (transects) of wells. An estimator of the effective number of independent data is defined and applied in the development of two significantly simpler approximate methods for estimating discharge distributions. One method uses a transformation of the t statistic to account for data skewness and the other method is closely related to the classic bootstrap. The approaches are demonstrated with passive flux meter data from two field sites (a trichloroethylene [TCE] plume at Ft. Lewis, WA, and a uranium plume at Rifle, CO). All methods require that the flux heterogeneity is sufficiently represented by the data and maximum differences in discharge quantile estimates between methods are ˜7%.

  7. Transfer kinetics and coefficients of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 134}Cs, and {sup 137}Cs from forage contaminated by Chernobyl fallout to milk of cows

    SciTech Connect

    Fabbri, S.; Sogni, R.; Lusardi, E.

    1994-04-01

    A experiment was conducted to study kinetics, transfer coefficients, and biological half-lives of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 134}Cs, and {sup 137}Cs from feed to milk. A cow was fed a diet containing alfalfa hay contaminated by Chernobyl fallout for 14.5 wk. The time-dependent activity in milk was approximated by a two-compartment model with fast biological half-lives of 2, 0.9, and 1 d and slow biological half-lives of 36.9, 8.7, and 12.4 d for {sup 90}Sr, {sup 134}Cs, and {sup 137}Cs respectively. The transfer coefficients determined in the experiment were 0.0008 d L{sup -1} for {sup 90}Sr, 0.0029 d L{sup -1} for {sup 137}Cs, and 0.0031 d L{sup -1} for {sup 137}Cs. The biological elimination phases of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs were described by a two-compartment model while a one-compartment model was proposed for {sup 90}Sr. 18 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Raw Milk Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Lucey, John A.

    2015-01-01

    There continues to be considerable public debate on the possible benefits regarding the growing popularity of the consumption of raw milk. However, there are significant concerns by regulatory, or public health, organizations like the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention because of risk of contracting milkborne illnesses if the raw milk is contaminated with human pathogens. This review describes why pasteurization of milk was introduced more than 100 years ago, how pasteurization helped to reduce the incidence of illnesses associated with raw milk consumption, and the prevalence of pathogens in raw milk. In some studies, up to a third of all raw milk samples contained pathogens, even when sourced from clinically healthy animals or from milk that appeared to be of good quality. This review critically evaluates some of the popularly suggested benefits of raw milk. Claims related to improved nutrition, prevention of lactose intolerance, or provision of “good” bacteria from the consumption of raw milk have no scientific basis and are myths. There are some epidemiological data that indicate that children growing up in a farming environment are associated with a decreased risk of allergy and asthma; a variety of environmental factors may be involved and there is no direct evidence that raw milk consumption is involved in any “protective” effect. PMID:27340300

  9. Effects of Milk Replacer Formulation on Measures of Mammary Growth and Composition in Holstein Heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Overfeeding prepubertal heifers may impair mammary parenchymal growth and reduce milk production, but dietary impacts in pre-weaned heifers are unknown. This study was to evaluate effects of milk replacer (MR) composition on: mass and composition of mammary parenchyma and fat pad (MFP), growth hormo...

  10. Current Measures on Radioactive Contamination in Japan: A Policy Situation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gilmour, Stuart; Miyagawa, Shoji; Kasuga, Fumiko; Shibuya, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Background The Great East Japan Earthquake on 11th March 2011 and the subsequent Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant disaster caused radioactive contamination in the surrounding environment. In the immediate aftermath of the accident the Government of Japan placed strict measures on radio-contamination of food, and enhanced radio-contamination monitoring activities. Japan is a pilot country in the WHO Foodborne Disease Burden Epidemiology Reference Group (FERG), and through this initiative has an opportunity to report on policy affecting chemicals and toxins in the food distribution network. Nuclear accidents are extremely rare, and a policy situation analysis of the Japanese government’s response to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident is a responsibility of Japanese scientists. This study aims to assess Japan government policies to reduce radio-contamination risk and to identify strategies to strengthen food policies to ensure the best possible response to possible future radiation accidents. Methods and Findings We conducted a hand search of all publicly available policy documents issued by the Cabinet Office, the Food Safety Commission, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW), the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fishery (MAFF) and prefectural governments concerning food safety standards and changes to radiation and contamination standards since March 11th, 2011. We extracted information on food shipment and sales restrictions, allowable radio-contamination limits, monitoring activities and monitoring results. The standard for allowable radioactive cesium (Cs-134 and Cs-137) of 100 Bq/Kg in general food, 50 Bq/Kg in infant formula and all milk products, and 10 Bq/Kg in drinking water was enforced from April 2012 under the Food Sanitation Law, although a provisional standard on radio-contamination had been applied since the nuclear accident. Restrictions on the commercial sale and distribution of specific meat, vegetable and fish products

  11. Fluorescence photon migration techniques for the on-farm measurement of somatic cell count in fresh cow's milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, Geoffrey; Kuennemeyer, Rainer; Claycomb, Rod W.

    2005-04-01

    Currently, the state of the art of mastitis detection in dairy cows is the laboratory-based measurement of somatic cell count (SCC), which is time consuming and expensive. Alternative, rapid, and reliable on-farm measurement methods are required for effective farm management. We have investigated whether fluorescence lifetime measurements can determine SCC in fresh, unprocessed milk. The method is based on the change in fluorescence lifetime of ethidium bromide when it binds to DNA from the somatic cells. Milk samples were obtained from a Fullwood Merlin Automated Milking System and analysed within a twenty-four hour period, over which the SCC does not change appreciably. For reference, the milk samples were also sent to a testing laboratory where the SCC was determined by traditional methods. The results show that we can quantify SCC using the fluorescence photon migration method from a lower bound of 4x105 cells mL-1 to an upper bound of 1 x 107 cells mL-1. The upper bound is due to the reference method used while the cause of the lower boundary is unknown, yet.

  12. Measurement of thermal characteristics of spray-dried milk and juice blend.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Hanan S; Abu Shelaibi, A A; Laleye, L C; Ismail, I A

    2009-01-01

    Blended concentrated grape/peach (G/P) juice 60% total soluble solids (TSS) with condensed whole cow milk 40% TSS (1.5:8.5) was spray dried using a pilot-scale spray drier FT 80 at feeding pressure 7,000 Pa, at chamber temperature 180 degrees C and at chamber pressure -110 Pa. The glass transition state of blended G/P juice-milk powder, three pure sugars (glucose, sucrose and lactose) and casein were studied using differential scanning calorimetry. The calorimetry showed that G/P juice-milk powder is a glassy material. The glass transition temperature of blended G/P juice-milk powder at 0.248 water activity was 42 degrees C, compared with commercial full milk powder (control) of 29 degrees C at 0.334 at water activity (a(w)). PMID:19468952

  13. Measurement of thyroid hormones in donkey (Equus asinus) blood and milk: validation of ELISA kits and evaluation of sample collection, handling and storage.

    PubMed

    Todini, Luca; Malfatti, Alessandro; Salimei, Elisabetta; Fantuz, Francesco

    2010-11-01

    Donkey's milk is well tolerated by human infants with cow's milk allergy and is useful in the treatment of human immune-related diseases and in the prevention of atherosclerosis. Thyroid hormones (TH) stimulate lactation and active triiodothyronine (T3) in colostrum and milk could take paracrine action supporting lactogenesis in the mother, and play physiological roles for the suckling offspring (systemic or within the gastrointestinal tract). The aims were to measure TH concentrations in donkey blood and milk, validate ELISA methods, evaluate the effects of sample collection and post-collection handling and the stability of TH in milk and blood serum and plasma samples. In milk and blood samples obtained from lactating jennies total concentrations of TH were assayed using competitive-type ELISA kits. Good validation results were obtained for both TH concentrations in blood serum and plasma and T3 in milk samples extracted with cold (-20°C) ethanol alkalinized (pH 9·0) with NH4OH. In most of the milk extract samples, thyroxine (T4) concentrations resulted below the sensitivity threshold. Intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variations of TH concentrations in different blood and milk samples were below 10%. Parallelism tests gave displacement lines parallel to those of the calibrators for both TH in blood serum and plasma and for T3 in milk extracts. Mean recovery rates were between 95% and 123%, but the concentration values approaching the highest calibrators were overestimated. Therefore, serum and plasma samples for T3 assay must be previously diluted with buffer. Both TH concentrations in blood serum and plasma and T3 in milk did not change during storage for up to 6 months at -20°C. In conclusion, the ELISA methods tested in the present study are suitable for determination of both TH concentrations in donkey blood samples, and for T3 measurement in milk, after extraction with cold alkaline ethanol. PMID:20822570

  14. Milk demystified by chemistry.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2014-09-01

    This article traces the decline of milk from a heavenly elixir to a tradeable food. Early cultures regarded milk not as a simple nutrient, but a living fluid. Heroes and gods were believed to have been nurtured by animals after being abandoned. Character traits were assumed to be transmitted by milk; infantile diseases were attributed to "bad milk", whereas "good milk" was used as a remedy. With chemical methods developed at the end of the 18th century, it became known that human milk was higher in sugar and lower in protein than cow's milk. During the 19th century, "scientific" feeding emerged that meant modifying cow's milk to imitate the proportion of nutrients in human milk. In Boston from 1893, Rotch initiated the "percentage" method, requiring a physician's prescription. In Paris from 1894, Budin sterilized bottled infant milk. In Berlin in 1898, Rubner measured oxygen and energy uptake by calorimetry, prompting feeding by calories, and Czerny introduced regulated feeding by the clock. These activities ignored the emotional dimension of infant nutrition and the anti-infective properties of human milk. They may have also enhanced the decline in breastfeeding, which reached an all-time low in 1971. Milk's demystification made artificial nutrition safer, but paved the way for commercially produced infant formula. PMID:24558227

  15. Modeling Ellipsometry Measurements of Molecular Thin-Film Contamination on Genesis Array Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, Michael J.; Stansbery, E. K.; McNamara, K. M.

    2006-01-01

    The discovery of a molecular thin-film contamination on Genesis flown array samples changed the course of preliminary assessment strategies. Analytical techniques developed to measure solar wind elemental abundances must now compensate for a thin-film contamination. Currently, this is done either by experimental cleaning before analyses or by depth-profiling techniques that bypass the surface contamination. Inside Johnson Space Center s Genesis dedicated ISO Class 4 (Class 10) cleanroom laboratory, the selection of collector array fragments allocated for solar wind analyses are based on the documentation of overall surface quality, visible surface particle contamination greater than 1 m, and the amount of thin film contamination measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Documenting the exact thickness, surface topography, and chemical composition of these contaminates is also critical for developing accurate cleaning methods. However, the first step in characterization of the molecular film is to develop accurate ellipsometry models that will determine an accurate thickness measurement of the contamination film.

  16. Measurements of stable isotope ratios in milk samples from a farm placed in the mountains of Transylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Magdas, D. A. Cristea, G. Bot, A.; Puscas, R.; Radu, S.; Mirel, V.; Cordea, D. V.; Mihaiu, M.

    2013-11-13

    Product origin is of great importance for consumers especially because its association in consumer's perception with food quality, freedom from disease or pollution. Stable isotope ratio analysis is a powerful technique in food authenticity and traceability control which has been introduced within the European wine industry to ensure authenticity of wine provenance and to detect adulteration. Isotopic ratios measurements have also been successfully to other food commodities like: fruit juices, honey and dairy foods. The δ{sup 18}O and δ{sup 2}H content in milk water reflects the isotope composition of the ground water drunk by animals. Seasonal effects are also very important: in summer, milk water contains higher δ{sup 18}O and δ{sup 2}H values due to the fresh plants that are ate by animals. Relative carbon stable isotope abundances in total milk reflect the isotopic composition of the diet fed to the dairy cows. In this study the hydrogen, oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of 15 milk samples coming from a unit placed in the mountains of Transylvania was investigated. The distribution of the obtained isotopic values was than discussed taking into account that all the animals were feed with the same type of forage and consumed water was taken from the same source.

  17. Measurements of stable isotope ratios in milk samples from a farm placed in the mountains of Transylvania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdas, D. A.; Cristea, G.; Cordea, D. V.; Bot, A.; Puscas, R.; Radu, S.; Mirel, V.; Mihaiu, M.

    2013-11-01

    Product origin is of great importance for consumers especially because its association in consumer's perception with food quality, freedom from disease or pollution. Stable isotope ratio analysis is a powerful technique in food authenticity and traceability control which has been introduced within the European wine industry to ensure authenticity of wine provenance and to detect adulteration. Isotopic ratios measurements have also been successfully to other food commodities like: fruit juices, honey and dairy foods. The δ18O and δ2H content in milk water reflects the isotope composition of the ground water drunk by animals. Seasonal effects are also very important: in summer, milk water contains higher δ18O and δ2H values due to the fresh plants that are ate by animals. Relative carbon stable isotope abundances in total milk reflect the isotopic composition of the diet fed to the dairy cows. In this study the hydrogen, oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of 15 milk samples coming from a unit placed in the mountains of Transylvania was investigated. The distribution of the obtained isotopic values was than discussed taking into account that all the animals were feed with the same type of forage and consumed water was taken from the same source.

  18. a New Method for Measuring Macroparticulate Systems Applied to Measuring Syneresis of Renneted Milk Gels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynes, Jonathan R.

    Syneresis is an integral part of cheese manufacture. The rate and extent of syneresis affect the properties of cheese. There are many factors that affect syneresis, but measured results vary because of inaccuracies in measuring techniques. To better control syneresis, an accurate mathematical description must be developed. Current mathematical models describing syneresis are limited because of inherent error in measuring techniques used to develop them. Developing an accurate model requires an accurate way to measure syneresis. The curd becomes a particle in a whey suspension when the coagulum is cut. The most effective technique to measure particle size, without interference, is with light. Approximations to rigorous Maxwellian theory render useable results for a variety of particle sizes. Assumptions of Fraunhofer diffraction theory relate absorption to the cross sectional area of a particle that is much larger than the wavelength of light being used. By applying diffraction theory to the curd-whey system, this researcher designed a new apparatus to permit measurement of large particle systems. The apparatus was tested, and calibrated, with polyacrylic beads. Then the syneresis of curd was measured with this apparatus. The apparatus was designed to measure particles in suspension. Until some syneresis takes place, curd does not satisfy this condition. Theoretical assumptions require a monolayer of scattering centers. The sample container must be thin enough to preclude stacking of the particles. This presents a unique problem with curd. If the coagulum is cut in the sample cell, it adheres to the front and back surfaces and does not synerese. The curd must be coagulated and cut externally and transferred to the sample cell with a large amount of whey. This measurement technique has other limitations that may be overcome with commercially available accessories.

  19. Effect of liner design, pulsator setting, and vacuum level on bovine teat tissue changes and milking characteristics as measured by ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, David E; O'Callaghan, Edmond J; Rath, Myles V

    2004-01-01

    : Friesian-type dairy cows were milked with different machine settings to determine the effect of these settings on teat tissue reaction and on milking characteristics. Three teat-cup liner designs were used with varying upper barrel dimensions (wide-bore WB = 31.6 mm; narrow-bore NB = 21.0 mm; narrow-bore NB1 = 25.0 mm). These liners were tested with alternate and simultaneous pulsation patterns, pulsator ratios (60:40 and 67:33) and three system vacuum levels (40, 44 and 50 kPa). Teat tissue was measured using ultrasonography, before milking and directly after milking. The measurements recorded were teat canal length (TCL), teat diameter (TD), cistern diameter (CD) and teat wall thickness (TWT).Teat tissue changes were similar with a system vacuum level of either 50 kPa (mid-level) or 40 kPa (low-level). Widening the liner upper barrel bore dimension from 21.0 mm (P < 0.01) or 25.0 mm (P < 0.001) to 31.6 mm increased the magnitude of changes in TD and TWT after machine milking. Milk yield per cow was significantly (P < 0.05) higher and cluster-on time was reduced (P < 0.01) with the WB cluster as compared to the NB1 cluster. Minimum changes in teat tissue parameters were achieved with system vacuum level of 40 kPa and 50 kPa using NB and WB clusters, respectively. Similar changes in teat tissue and milk yield per cow were observed with alternate and simultaneous pulsation patterns. Widening pulsator ratio from 60:40 to 67:33 did not have negative effects on changes in teat tissue and had a positive effect on milk yield and milking time. Milk liner design had a bigger effect on teat tissue changes and milking characteristics than pulsation settings. PMID:21851658

  20. Reproducibility and repeatability of measures of milk coagulation properties and predictive ability of mid-infrared reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dal Zotto, R; De Marchi, M; Cecchinato, A; Penasa, M; Cassandro, M; Carnier, P; Gallo, L; Bittante, G

    2008-10-01

    The objectives of the study were to estimate the reproducibility and repeatability of milk coagulation properties (MCP) measured by a computerized renneting meter (CRM) and to evaluate the predictive ability of mid-infrared spectroscopy (MIRS) as an innovative technology for the assessment of rennet coagulation time (RCT, min) and curd firmness (a(30), mm). Four samples without addition of preservative (NP) and 4 samples with Bronopol addition (PS) were collected from each of 83 Holstein-Friesian cows. Six hours after collection, 2 replicated measures of MCP were obtained with CRM using 1 NP and 1 PS sample from each cow. Mid-infrared spectra of the remaining NP and PS samples from each animal were recorded after 6 h, 4 d, and 8 d after sampling. Two groups of calibration equations were developed using MIRS spectra and CRM measures of MCP as reference data obtained from analysis of NP and PS, respectively. Reproducibility and repeatability of CRM measures were obtained from REML estimation of variance components on the basis of a linear model including the fixed effects of herd and days in milk class and the random effects of cows, sample treatment (addition or no addition of preservative), and the interaction between cow and sample treatment. Coefficient of reproducibility is an indicator of the agreement between 2 measurements of MCP for the same milk sample preserved with or without addition of Bronopol. Coefficient of repeatability is an indicator of the agreement between repeated measures of MCP. Pearson correlations between MCP measures for NP and PS were 0.97 and 0.83 for RCT and a(30), respectively. Reproducibility of CRM measures under different preserving conditions of milk was 93.5% for RCT and 64.6% for a(30). Repeatabilities of RCT and a(30) measures were 95.7 and 77.3%, respectively. Based on the estimated cross-validation standard errors and coefficients of determination and ratios of standard errors of cross-validation to standard deviation of

  1. Mycotoxins in Bovine Milk and Dairy Products: A Review.

    PubMed

    Becker-Algeri, Tania Aparecida; Castagnaro, Denise; de Bortoli, Kennidy; de Souza, Camila; Drunkler, Deisy Alessandra; Badiale-Furlong, Eliana

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a literature review of the occurrence of several mycotoxins in bovine milk and dairy products, because it is the main type of milk produced and marketed worldwide. Mycotoxins are produced by different genera of filamentous fungi and present serious health hazards such as carcinogenicity and mutagenicity. Under favorable growth conditions, toxigenic fungi produce mycotoxins which contaminate the lactating cow's feedstuff. During metabolism, these mycotoxins undergo biotransformation and are secreted in milk. Data show that there is a seasonal trend in the levels of mycotoxins in milk, with these being higher in the cold months probably due to the prolonged storage required for the cattle feeds providing favorable conditions for fungal growth. Good agricultural and storage practices are therefore of fundamental importance in the control of toxigenic species and mycotoxins. Although aflatoxins (especially aflatoxin M1 ) are the mycotoxins of greater incidence in milk and dairy products, this review shows that other mycotoxins, such as fumonisin, ochratoxin A, trichothecenes, zearalenone, T-2 toxin, and deoxynivalenol, can also be found in these products. Given that milk is widely consumed and is a source of nutrients, especially in childhood, a thorough investigation of the occurrence of mycotoxins as well the adoption of measures to minimize their contamination of milk is essential. PMID:26799355

  2. Chemical Biomarkers of Human Breast Milk Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Massart, Francesco; Gherarducci, Giulia; Marchi, Benedetta; Saggese, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Human milk is, without question, the best source of nutrition for infants containing the optimal balance of fats, carbohydrates and proteins for developing babies. Breastfeeding provides a range of benefits for growth, immunity and development building a powerful bond between mother and her child. Recognition of the manifold benefits of breast milk has led to the adoption of breast-feeding policies by numerous health and professional organizations such as the World Health Organization and American Academy of Pediatrics. In industrially developed as well as in developing nations, human milk contamination by toxic chemicals such as heavy metals, dioxins and organohalogen compounds, however, is widespread and is the consequence of decades of inadequately controlled pollution. Through breastfeeding, the mother may transfer to the suckling infant potentially toxic chemicals to which the mother has previously been exposed. In the present review, environmental exposure, acquisition and current levels of old and emerging classes of breast milk pollutants are systematically presented. Although scientific evidences indicated that the advantages of breast-feeding outweigh any risks from contaminants, it is important to identify contaminant trends, to locate disproportionately exposed populations, and to take public health measures to improve chemical BM pollution as possible. PMID:19578503

  3. Application of an imaging plate system to the direct measurement of a fixed surface contamination.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Masahiro; Kimura, Keiji; Sato, Rumi; Koike, Yuya; Iimoto, Takeshi; Tanaka, Satoru

    2014-08-01

    An imaging plate (IP) system was used as an effective detector for direct measurement of radioactive surface contamination. The IP system displayed images designating the locations and extent of fixed surface contamination of uranyl acetate. The amount of radioactive waste produced during decontamination was reduced because the contaminated spots could be isolated; furthermore, creation of radioactive dust during removal of contamination was prevented because the contaminated spots could be removed without being pulverized. The images were used in efficiently and safely isolating the location of fixed surface contamination. The IP system surface contamination detection limit for uranyl acetate was 2.5 × 10 Bq cm, a value much lower than the surface contamination limit and the clearance level. PMID:24978288

  4. [Cow's milk protein allergy through human milk].

    PubMed

    Denis, M; Loras-Duclaux, I; Lachaux, A

    2012-03-01

    Cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) is the first allergy that affects infants. In this population, the incidence rate reaches 7.5%. The multiplicity and aspecificity of the symptoms makes its diagnosis sometimes complicated, especially in the delayed type (gastrointestinal, dermatological, and cutaneous). CMPA symptoms can develop in exclusively breastfed infants with an incidence rate of 0.5%. It, therefore, raises questions about sensitization to cow's milk proteins through breast milk. Transfer of native bovine proteins such as β-lactoglobulin into the breast milk is controversial: some authors have found bovine proteins in human milk but others point to cross-reactivity between human milk proteins and cow's milk proteins. However, it seems that a small percentage of dietary proteins can resist digestion and become potentially allergenic. Moreover, some authors suspect the transfer of some of these dietary proteins from the maternal bloodstream to breast milk, but the mechanisms governing sensitization are still being studied. Theoretically, CMPA diagnosis is based on clinical observations, prick-test or patch-test results, and cow's milk-specific IgE antibody concentration. A positive food challenge test usually confirms the diagnosis. No laboratory test is available to make a certain diagnosis, but the detection of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in the mother's milk, for example, seems to be advantageous since it is linked to CMA. Excluding cow's milk from the mother's diet is the only cure when she still wants to breastfeed. Usually, cow's milk proteins are reintroduced after 6 months of exclusion. Indeed, the prognosis for infants is very good: 80% acquire a tolerance before the age of 3 or 4 years. Mothers should not avoid dairy products during pregnancy and breastfeeding as preventive measures against allergy. PMID:22226014

  5. RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT OF PREVENTION AND CONTROL MEASURES FOR MOLD CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division, Indoor Environment Management Branch has, since 1995, conducted research into controlling biological contamination in the indoor environment. In this paper four areas of research are discusse...

  6. Effects of automatic cluster removal and feeding during milking on milking efficiency, milk yield and milk fat quality.

    PubMed

    Ferneborg, Sabine; Stadtmüller, Larissa; Pickova, Jana; Wiking, Lars; Svennersten-Sjaunja, Kerstin

    2016-05-01

    In order to increase milking efficiency, the effects of two different cluster take-off levels (200 and 800 g/min) and feeding vs. not feeding during milking were tested in a Latin square design study including 32 cows. Milk yield, milking time, milk flow and milking interval were measured and milk samples were analysed for gross composition, sodium and potassium concentration, free fatty acid (FFA) content, milk fat globule (MFG) size, MFG membrane (MFGM) material and fatty acid composition. Residual milk was harvested to evaluate udder emptying. Increasing the take-off level from 200 to 800 g/min at the whole udder level decreased milking time and increased harvest flow. Udder emptying decreased slightly, but there were no effects on milk yield, FFA content or MFGM. There were interactive effects of take-off level and feeding during milking on content of fatty acids C4:0, C6:0, C16:0, C18:3(n-3) and C20:0. Feeding during milking increased milk yield per day and decreased milking interval. Sodium and potassium concentrations in milk were unaffected by treatments, indicating no loss of tight junction integrity. From these results, it is clear that feeding during milking should be used to increase milk yield and improve milking efficiency, regardless of take-off level used, and that the effect of feeding is more pronounced when a low take-off level is used. Feeding seemed to counteract the effects of the low take-off level on milking time and milking interval. Low take-off levels can therefore be used in combination with feeding. PMID:27210491

  7. Testing for polychlorinated biphenyls in human milk

    SciTech Connect

    Wickizer, T.M.; Brilliant, L.B.

    1981-09-01

    Reports of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination of human milk have raised questions about the possible risks of breast-feeding and whether nursing mothers ought to have their breast milk tested. Current data on contamination of human milk are needed so that pediatricians can make informed recommendations about breast milk testing and breast-feeding. With consideration of recent findings of PCB contamination of human milk in Michigan, recommendations concerning breast milk testing and breast-feeding are made. No major changes in current breast-feeding practices are advised. However, breast milk testing is recommended for certain nursing mothers who have had potentially high exposure to PCBs. Limiting the duration of breast-feeding may also be advisable for mothers with high PCB milk fat levels in order to reduce infant exposure to PCBs.

  8. Bidirectional Reflectance Function Measurement of Molecular Contaminant Scattering in the Vacuum Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Gregory, Don A.

    2006-01-01

    Bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) measurements of optical surfaces both before and after molecular contamination were done using UV, VUV and visible light. Molecular contamination of optical surfaces from outgassed material has been shown in many cases to proceed from acclimation centers, and to produce many roughly hemispherical "islands" of contamination on the surface. Vacuum Ultraviolet (VW) wavelengths are used here to measure angularly scattered light from optical surfaces.

  9. Milk Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Milk Allergy KidsHealth > For Teens > Milk Allergy Print A ... on to find out. What Happens With a Milk Allergy? Food allergies involve the body's immune system, ...

  10. On Removing Interloper Contamination from Intensity Mapping Power Spectrum Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidz, Adam; Taylor, Jessie

    2016-07-01

    Line intensity mapping experiments seek to trace large-scale structures by measuring the spatial fluctuations in the combined emission, in some convenient spectral line, from individually unresolved galaxies. An important systematic concern for these surveys is line confusion from foreground or background galaxies emitting in other lines that happen to lie at the same observed frequency as the “target” emission line of interest. We develop an approach to separate this “interloper” emission at the power spectrum level. If one adopts the redshift of the target emission line in mapping from observed frequency and angle on the sky to co-moving units, the interloper emission is mapped to the wrong co-moving coordinates. Because the mapping is different in the line of sight and transverse directions, the interloper contribution to the power spectrum becomes anisotropic, especially if the interloper and target emission are at widely separated redshifts. This distortion is analogous to the Alcock–Paczynski test, but here the warping arises from assuming the wrong redshift rather than an incorrect cosmological model. We apply this to the case of a hypothetical [C ii] emission survey at z˜ 7 and find that the distinctive interloper anisotropy can, in principle, be used to separate strong foreground CO emission fluctuations. In our models, however, a significantly more sensitive instrument than currently planned is required, although there are large uncertainties in forecasting the high-redshift [C ii] emission signal. With upcoming surveys, it may nevertheless be useful to apply this approach after first masking pixels suspected of containing strong interloper contamination.

  11. On Removing Interloper Contamination from Intensity Mapping Power Spectrum Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidz, Adam; Taylor, Jessie

    2016-07-01

    Line intensity mapping experiments seek to trace large-scale structures by measuring the spatial fluctuations in the combined emission, in some convenient spectral line, from individually unresolved galaxies. An important systematic concern for these surveys is line confusion from foreground or background galaxies emitting in other lines that happen to lie at the same observed frequency as the “target” emission line of interest. We develop an approach to separate this “interloper” emission at the power spectrum level. If one adopts the redshift of the target emission line in mapping from observed frequency and angle on the sky to co-moving units, the interloper emission is mapped to the wrong co-moving coordinates. Because the mapping is different in the line of sight and transverse directions, the interloper contribution to the power spectrum becomes anisotropic, especially if the interloper and target emission are at widely separated redshifts. This distortion is analogous to the Alcock–Paczynski test, but here the warping arises from assuming the wrong redshift rather than an incorrect cosmological model. We apply this to the case of a hypothetical [C ii] emission survey at z∼ 7 and find that the distinctive interloper anisotropy can, in principle, be used to separate strong foreground CO emission fluctuations. In our models, however, a significantly more sensitive instrument than currently planned is required, although there are large uncertainties in forecasting the high-redshift [C ii] emission signal. With upcoming surveys, it may nevertheless be useful to apply this approach after first masking pixels suspected of containing strong interloper contamination.

  12. Application of passive sampling for measuring dissolved concentrations of organic contaminants in the water column at three marine superfund sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    At contaminated sediment sites, including U.S. EPA Superfund sites, it is critical to measure water column concentrations of freely dissolved contaminants to understand the complete exposure of aquatic organisms to hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). However, historically a...

  13. Diurnal differences in milk composition and its influence on in vitro growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli in bovine quarter milk.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, S W F; Boerhout, E M; Ravesloot, L; Daemen, A J J M; Benedictus, L; Rutten, V P M G; Koets, A P

    2016-07-01

    In experimental intramammary inoculation studies, it has been observed that mastitis susceptibility is influenced, among others, by cow factors. To identify milk characteristics leading to these differences, quarter milk samples of morning and evening milk were collected and analyzed for their composition (protein, fat, lactose, urea, lactoferrin, lactoperoxidase, and β-lactoglobulin concentrations), somatic cell count, and antibodies against Staphylococcus aureus. Furthermore, in vitro growth of S. aureus and Escherichia coli in fresh quarter milk samples was determined. All measured parameters differed significantly between quarters and also between morning and evening milk with the exception of lactose levels. In addition, quantitative growth of S. aureus and E. coli was significantly different in morning milk compared with evening milk. Mixed model analysis revealed that replication of S. aureus was negatively associated with the presence of fat, S. aureus-specific IgG1 antibodies, contamination of the milk sample and morning milk. Replication of E. coli was negatively associated with fat concentrations, and positively associated with morning milk. The significant difference between morning and evening milk supports the theory that changes in milk composition influence bacterial growth. Although all determined milk components differed significantly between quarters and in time no significant association with bacterial growth could be identified with the exception of fat for both studied species and IgG1 titers for S. aureus. The negative association of fat with bacterial growth was assumed to occur due to activation of lipolysis by milk handling and can most likely be neglected for in vivo relevance. The fact that S. aureus-specific IgG1 titers were negatively associated with S. aureus growth in vitro encourages the ongoing effort to develop a vaccine against S. aureus-induced mastitis. PMID:27132103

  14. Phenotypic analysis of cheese yields and nutrient recoveries in the curd of buffalo milk, as measured with an individual model cheese-manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Cipolat-Gotet, C; Bittante, G; Cecchinato, A

    2015-01-01

    Traits associated with cheese yield and milk nutrient recovery in curd are used to describe the efficiency of the cheese-making process. This is fundamental for all dairy species, including the Italian Mediterranean buffalo, which is largely used for milk production aimed at the dairy industry. To assess cheese-making traits among buffalo, a model cheese-manufacturing process was tested; it was capable of processing 24 samples per run, using 0.5-L samples of milk from individual buffalo. In total, 180 buffalo reared in 7 herds located in Northeast Italy were sampled once. Briefly, each sample was weighed and heated (35°C for 30min), inoculated with starter culture (90min), and mixed with rennet (51.2 international milk-clotting units/L of milk). After 10min of gelation, the curd was cut; 5min after the cut, the curd was separated from the whey, and the curd was subjected to draining (for 30min) and pressing (18h). The curd and whey were weighed, analyzed for pH and the total solid, fat, lactose, and protein contents, and subjected to estimation of the energy content. Three measures of cheese yield (%CY), %CYCURD, %CYSOLIDS, and %CYWATER, were computed as the ratios between the weight of the curd, the curd dry matter, and the water retained in the curd, respectively, and the weight of the milk processed. These traits were multiplied by the daily milk yield to define the 3 corresponding measures of daily cheese yield (dCY, kg/d). The milk component recoveries (REC) in the curd, RECFAT, RECPROTEIN, and RECSOLIDS, represented the ratios between the weights of the fat, protein, and total solids in the curd, respectively, and the corresponding components in the milk. Finally, energy recovery (RECENERGY) was estimated. The values for %CYCURD, %CYSOLIDS, %CYWATER, RECPROTEIN, RECFAT, RECSOLIDS, and RECENERGY averaged 25.6, 12.7, 12.9, 80.4, 95.1, 66.7, and 79.3%, respectively, indicating that buffalo milk has a higher aptitude to cheese-making than bovine milk. The effect

  15. Case Report of Sepsis in Neonates Fed Expressed Mother's Milk.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sandra L; Serke, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Mother's milk is the recommended food for premature infants cared for in the NICU. In the cases presented in this article, mothers pumped their milk into food-grade aseptic plastic containers. Milk was refrigerated before use. In Case 1, an infant developed Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis. In Case 2, an infant developed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Both cases were attributed to contaminated mother's milk. Proper cleaning and sterilization of pump parts is essential to prevent milk contamination. PMID:27486089

  16. Quality Indicators for Human Milk Use in Very Low Birthweight Infants: Are We Measuring What We Should be Measuring?

    PubMed Central

    Bigger, Harold R.; Fogg, Louis J.; Patel, Aloka; Johnson, Tricia; Engstrom, Janet L.; Meier, Paula P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to compare the currently used human milk (HM) quality indicators that measure whether very low birthweight (VLBW; <1500 g birthweight) infants “ever” received HM and whether they were still receiving HM at discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to the actual amount and timing of HM received. Study Design This study used data from a large NIH-funded cohort study and calculated whether VLBW infants ever received HM (HM-Ever) and of these infants, the percentage who were still receiving HM at NICU discharge (HM-DC). Then, the HM-DC indicator (exclusive, partial and none) was compared with the amount and timing of HM feedings received by these same infants. Results Of the 291 VLBW infants who met inclusion criteria, 285 received some HM (HM-Ever = 98%). At NICU discharge (HM-DC), 24.2%, 15.1% and 60.7% were receiving exclusive, partial and no HM, respectively. Of the 60.7% infants with no HM-DC, some had received higher amounts of HM during the NICU hospitalization than infants categorized as exclusive and partial for HM-DC. Of the infants with no HM-DC, 76.8% and 59.7% had received exclusive HM during the Days 1–14 and Days 1–28 exposure periods, respectively. Conclusion The average daily dose (HM-DD; in mL/kg/d) and cumulative percentage (HM-PCT; as % of cumulative enteral intake) of HM feedings were sufficient to significantly reduce the risk of multiple morbidities, including late onset sepsis, necrotizing enterocolitis, neurocognitive delay and rehospitalization, in the majority of the VLBW infants who were discharged with no HM-DC. Quality indicators that focus on the amount and timing of HM feedings in the NICU should be added to the HM-Ever and HM-DC measures. PMID:24526005

  17. Characterization of Alpha Contamination in Lanthanum Trichloride Scintillators Using Coincidence Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Milbrath, Brian D.; Runkle, Robert C.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Kaye, William R.; Lepel, Elwood A.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Smith, Leon E.

    2005-08-01

    The commercial availability of LaCl3:Ce scintillators has been much anticipated due to their significantly lower resolution relative to NaI(Tl). Our investigation of these scintillators in regards to the effect of their improved resolution for coincidence gamma-ray measurement applications revealed that the scintillators had a large, internal alpha contamination affecting the gamma-ray energy range from 1700-3000 keV. One passive method of identifying contaminants relies on exploiting coincident signatures. Aided by a coincidence lookup library developed at PNNL, we determined that the parent contaminant is Ac-227 via an alpha-gamma coincidence measurement. In this paper, we characterize the level of contamination and describe our coincidence measurement technique. The Ac-227 concentration was approximately 0.13 ppt. We demonstrate that this coincidence technique measures minimum detectable activities much lower than singles gamma-ray spectroscopy. We also discuss gamma- and beta-contamination in these scintillators.

  18. Solubility measurement of uranium in uranium-contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Elless, M.; Hoffman, F.

    1993-08-01

    A short-term equilibration study involving two uranium-contaminated soils at the Fernald site was conducted as part of the In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. The goal of this study is to predict the behavior of uranium during on-site remediation of these soils. Geochemical modeling was performed on the aqueous species dissolved from these soils following the equilibration study to predict the on-site uranium leaching and transport processes. The soluble levels of total uranium, calcium, magnesium, and carbonate increased continually for the first four weeks. After the first four weeks, these components either reached a steady-state equilibrium or continued linearity throughout the study. Aluminum, potassium, and iron, reached a steady-state concentration within three days. Silica levels approximated the predicted solubility of quartz throughout the study. A much higher level of dissolved uranium was observed in the soil contaminated from spillage of uranium-laden solvents and process effluents than in the soil contaminated from settling of airborne uranium particles ejected from the nearby incinerator. The high levels observed for soluble calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate are probably the result of magnesium and/or calcium carbonate minerals dissolving in these soils. Geochemical modeling confirms that the uranyl-carbonate complexes are the most stable and dominant in these solutions. The use of carbonate minerals on these soils for erosion control and road construction activities contributes to the leaching of uranium from contaminated soil particles. Dissolved carbonates promote uranium solubility, forming highly mobile anionic species. Mobile uranium species are contaminating the groundwater underlying these soils. The development of a site-specific remediation technology is urgently needed for the FEMP site.

  19. Checking Contamination during Storage of Carbonaceous Chondrites for Micro FTIR Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    We examined organic contamination by Fourier transform infrared micro spectroscopic (micro FTIR) measurements of carbonaceous chondrite samples. Carbonaceous chondrites, Tagish Lake (C2), Murchison (CM2) and Moss (CO3), and some mineral powder samples pressed on aluminum plates were measured by micro FTIR before and after storage in several containers with silicone rubber mat. During storage, samples did not touch directly anything except the holding aluminum plates. The carbonaceous chondrites containing hydrous minerals (Tagish Lake and Murchison) pressed on aluminum plates and measured by transmission-reflection micro FTIR measurements were found to be contaminated during storage after only one day, as revealed by an increase of approximately 2965 /cm and approximately 1260 /cm peaks. The Moss meteorite which contains no hydrous minerals, did not show an increase of these peaks, indicating no organic contamination. This difference is probably related to the differing mineralogy and physical properties (including porosity and permeability) of these chondrites. Hydrous minerals such as antigorite, muscovite, montmorillonite and silica gel showed organic contamination by the same infrared measurements, while anhydrous materials such as SiO2 and KBr showed no contamination. These results indicate importance of surface OH groups for the organic contamination. Organic contamination was found on silica gel samples pressed on aluminum plates when they were stored within containers including silicone rubber, silicone grease or adhesive tape. Long path gas cell FTIR measurements for silicone rubber indicated methylsiloxane oligomers were released from the silicone rubber. In-situ heating infrared measurements on the contaminated antigorite and Tagish Lake showed decrease of the 1262 /cm (Si-CH3) and 2963 /cm (CH3) peaks from room temperature to 200-300 C indicating desorption of volatile contaminants. These results indicate that careful preparation and storage are

  20. Waste minimization measures associated with the analysis of {sup 137}Cs in coconut milk collected from the Marshall Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, T.; Jones, H.; Wong, K.; Robinson, W.

    1998-05-01

    The Marshall Islands Environmental Characterization and Dose Assessment Program has recently implemented waste minimization measures to reduce low level radioactive (LLW) and low level mixed (LLWMIXED) waste streams at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Several thousand environmental samples are collected annually from former US nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands, and returned to LLNL for processing and radiometric analysis. In the past, we analyzed coconut milk directly by gamma-spectrometry after adding formaldehyde (as preservative) and sealing the fluid in metal cans. This procedure was not only tedious and time consuming but generated storage and waste disposal problems. We have now reduced the number of coconut milk samples required for analysis from 1500 per year to approximately 250, and developed a new analytical procedure which essentially eliminates the associated mixed radioactive waste stream. Coconut milk samples are mixed with a few grams of ammonium-molydophosphate (AMP) which quantitatively scavenges the target radionuclide cesium 137 in an ion-exchange process. The AMP is then separated from the mixture and sealed in a plastic container. The bulk sample material can be disposed of as a non- radioactive non-hazardous waste, and the relatively small amount of AMP conveniently counted by gamma-spectrometry, packaged and stored for future use.

  1. Effect of purificatory measures through cow's urine and milk on strychnine and brucine content of Kupeelu (Strychnos nuxvomica Linn.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Swarnendu; Shukla, V J; Acharya, Rabinarayan

    2012-01-01

    Strychnos nux vomica Linn.(Loganaceae) commonly known as Nux vomica (Kupeelu), is a poisonous plant and its seeds are used widely in Ayurvedic system of medicine since time immemorial. Ayurveda advocates that nux vomica seeds are to be administered in therapeutics only after going through certain purificatory measures (Shodhana). There are more than six media: cow's urine (Go mutra), cow's milk (Go dugdha), cow's ghee (Go ghrita), Kanji (thin gruel), castor oil (Eranda taila) and fresh ginger juice (Ardraka swarasa) etc., which have been reported in different classical texts of Ayurveda for proper processing of nux vomica seeds. In this study, an attempt has been made to purify the seeds by using three different methods as described in ancient treatise by using cow's urine and cow's milk as media alone and together. This study revealed that all the methods studied reduced the toxicity of strychnine and brucine contents in comparison to the raw seeds as determined by HPTLC. Out of these three methods maximum reduction in strychnine and brucine contents was found when the seeds were purified by keeping them in cow's urine for seven days followed by boiling in cow's milk for three hrs. PMID:23983327

  2. LAND TREATMENT OF PAH-CONTAMINATED SOIL: PERFORMANCE MEASURED BY CHEMICAL AND TOXICITY ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of a soil remediation process can be determined by measuring the reduction in target soil contaminant concentrations and by assessing the treatment's ability to lower soil toxicity. Land treatment of polycyclic armomatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil from a ...

  3. LAND TREATMENT OF PAH-CONTAMINATED SOIL: PERFORMANCE MEASURED BY CHEMICAL AND TOXICITY ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of a soil remediation process can be determined by measuring the reduction in target soil contaminant concentrations and by assessing the treatment's ability to lower soil toxicity. Land treatment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil from a ...

  4. Human Milk Fortification in India.

    PubMed

    Kler, Neelam; Thakur, Anup; Modi, Manoj; Kaur, Avneet; Garg, Pankaj; Soni, Arun; Saluja, Satish

    2015-01-01

    Human milk fortification in preterm babies has become a standard of care in developed countries. Use of human milk fortifier (HMF) in very-low-birthweight infants is not a routine practice in India. There are concerns about high osmolality, feed intolerance, necrotizing enterocolitis, risk of contamination and added cost associated with use of HMF. There are limited data from India which address the issue of safety and short-term benefits of human milk fortification. This chapter highlights the issues related to human milk fortification in our country. PMID:26111571

  5. Effects of feeding diets based on transgenic soybean meal and soybean hulls to dairy cows on production measures and sensory quality of milk.

    PubMed

    Weiss, W P; Simons, C T; Ekmay, R D

    2015-12-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine whether feeding meal and hulls derived from genetically modified soybeans to dairy cows affected production measures and sensory qualities of milk. The soybeans were genetically modified (Event DAS-444Ø6-6) to be resistant to multiple herbicides. Twenty-six Holstein cows (13/treatment) were fed a diet that contained meal and hulls derived from transgenic soybeans or a diet that contained meal and hulls from a nontransgenic near-isoline variety. Soybean products comprised approximately 21% of the diet dry matter, and diets were formulated to be nearly identical in crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, energy, and minerals and vitamins. The experimental design was a replicated 2×2 Latin square with a 28-d feeding period. Dry matter intake (21.3 vs. 21.4kg/d), milk yield (29.3 vs. 29.4kg/d), milk fat (3.70 vs. 3.68%), and milk protein (3.10 vs. 3.12%) did not differ between cows fed control or transgenic soybean products, respectively. Milk fatty acid profile was virtually identical between treatments. Somatic cell count was significantly lower for cows fed transgenic soybean products, but the difference was biologically trivial. Milk was collected from all cows in period 1 on d 0 (before treatment), 14, and 28 for sensory evaluation. On samples from all days (including d 0) judges could discriminate between treatments for perceived appearance of the milk. The presence of this difference at d 0 indicated that it was likely not a treatment effect but rather an initial bias in the cow population. No treatment differences were found for preference or acceptance of the milk. Overall, feeding soybean meal and hulls derived from this genetically modified soybean had essentially no effects on production or milk acceptance when fed to dairy cows. PMID:26454286

  6. Factors affecting variation of different measures of cheese yield and milk nutrient recovery from an individual model cheese-manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Cipolat-Gotet, C; Cecchinato, A; De Marchi, M; Bittante, G

    2013-01-01

    Cheese yield (CY) is the most important technological trait of milk, because cheese-making uses a very high proportion of the milk produced worldwide. Few studies have been carried out at the level of individual milk-producing animals due to a scarcity of appropriate procedures for model-cheese production, the complexity of cheese-making, and the frequent use of the fat and protein (or casein) contents of milk as a proxy for cheese yield. Here, we report a high-throughput cheese manufacturing process that mimics all phases of cheese-making, uses 1.5-L samples of milk from individual animals, and allows the simultaneous processing of 15 samples per run. Milk samples were heated (35°C for 40 min), inoculated with starter culture (90 min), mixed with rennet (51.2 international milk-clotting units/L of milk), and recorded for gelation time. Curds were cut twice (10 and 15 min after gelation), separated from the whey, drained (for 30 min), pressed (3 times, 20 min each, with the wheel turned each time), salted in brine (for 60 min), weighed, and sampled. Whey was collected, weighed, and sampled. Milk, curd, and whey samples were analyzed for pH, total solids, fat content, and protein content, and energy content was estimated. Three measures of percentage cheese yield (%CY) were calculated: %CY(CURD), %CY(SOLIDS), and %CY(WATER), representing the ratios between the weight of fresh curd, the total solids of the curd, and the water content of the curd, respectively, and the weight of the milk processed. In addition, 3 measures of daily cheese yield (dCY, kg/d) were defined, considering the daily milk yield. Three measures of nutrient recovery (REC) were computed: REC(FAT), REC(PROTEIN), and REC(SOLIDS), which represented the ratio between the weights of the fat, protein, and total solids in the curd, respectively, and the corresponding components in the milk. Energy recovery, REC(ENERGY), represented the energy content of the cheese compared with that in the milk. This

  7. Space Shuttle contamination measurements from flights STS-1 through STS-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlers, H. K. F.; Jacobs, S.; Leger, L. J.; Miller, E.

    1983-01-01

    Results of contamination measurements performed on the initial four flights of the Space Shuttle Orbiter are summarized and compared with requirements contained in the Space Shuttle Flight and Ground System Specifications and those formulated by the Contamination Requirements Definition Group. In general, the results of measurements carried out with the induced environment contamination monitor indicate that molecular fluxes, deposition rates, and average counts of particulates are within the requirements and close to predicted values. Among the exceptions, were such special circumstances as water dumps, payload bay door closures, and RCS engine, APU, and flash evaporator operations which led to molecular and particulate contamination levels exceeding the limits. In cases where these circumstances would interfere with sensitive payload operations, careful mission planning to preclude a contamination source by operational limitation should be done to avoid losses.

  8. Short communication: milk output in llamas (Lama glama) in relation to energy intake and water turnover measured by an isotope dilution technique.

    PubMed

    Riek, A; Klinkert, A; Gerken, M; Hummel, J; Moors, E; Südekum, K-H

    2013-03-01

    Despite the fact that llamas have become increasingly popular as companion and farm animals in both Europe and North America, scientific knowledge on their nutrient requirements is scarce. Compared with other livestock species, relatively little is known especially about the nutrient and energy requirements for lactating llamas. Therefore, we aimed to measure milk output in llama dams using an isotope dilution technique and relate it to energy intakes at different stages of lactation. We also validated the dilution technique by measuring total water turnover (TWT) directly and comparing it with values estimated by the isotope dilution technique. Our study involved 5 lactating llama dams and their suckling young. Milk output and TWT were measured at 4 stages of lactation (wk 3, 10, 18, and 26 postpartum). The method involved the application of the stable hydrogen isotope deuterium ((2)H) to the lactating dam. Drinking water intake and TWT decreased significantly with lactation stage, whether estimated by the isotope dilution technique or calculated from drinking water and water ingested from feeds. In contrast, lactation stage had no effect on dry matter intake, metabolizable energy (ME) intake, or the milk water fraction (i.e., the ratio between milk water excreted and TWT). The ratios between TWT measured and TWT estimated (by isotope dilution) did not differ with lactation stage and were close to 100% in all measurement weeks, indicating that the D(2)O dilution technique estimated TWT with high accuracy and only small variations. Calculating the required ME intakes for lactation from milk output data and gross energy content of milk revealed that, with increasing lactation stage, ME requirements per day for lactation decreased but remained constant per kilogram of milk output. Total measured ME intakes at different stages of lactation were similar to calculated ME intakes from published recommendation models for llamas. PMID:23332845

  9. Use of Passive Samplers to Measure Dissolved Organic Contaminants in a Temperate Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measuring dissolved concentrations of organic contaminants can be challenging given their low solubilities and high particle association. However, to perform accurate risk assessments of these chemicals, knowing the dissolved concentration is critical since it is considered to b...

  10. Rapid Contamination During Storage of Carbonaceous Chondrites Prepared for Micro FTIR Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kebukawa, Yoko; Nakashima, Satoru; Otsuka, Takahiro; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Zolensky, ichael E.

    2008-01-01

    The carbonaceous chondrites Tagish Lake and Murchison, which contain abundant hydrous minerals, when pressed on aluminum plates and analyzed by micro FTIR, were found to have been contaminated during brief (24 hours) storage. This contamination occurred when the samples were stored within containers which included silicone rubber, silicone grease or adhesive tape. Long-path gas cell FTIR measurements for silicone rubber revealed the presence of contaminant volatile molecules having 2970 cm(sup -1) (CH3) and 1265 cm(sup -1) (Si-CH3) peaks. These organic contaminants are found to be desorbed by in-situ heating infrared measurements from room temperature to 200-300 C. Careful preparation and storage are therefore needed for precious astronomical samples such as meteorites, IDPs and mission returned samples from comets, asteroids and Mars, if useful for FTIR measurements are to be made.

  11. The Measurement of Protein in Powdered Milk Products and Infant Formulas: A Review and Recent Developments.

    PubMed

    Elgar, Dave; Evers, Jaap M; Holroyd, Stephen E; Johnson, Richard; Rowan, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are a key nutritional component of both powdered milk and infant formula types of product, and reliable methods for their determination are important for manufacturing and international trade. In this review, we distinguish between methods used for determining protein quality for nutrition purposes and those used for determining chemically defined protein. The former methods cover the ability of a dietary protein source to meet human nutritional requirements for the indispensable amino acids. The latter are chemical methods for the determination of total protein and can be divided into three broad types: total nitrogen determination, direct protein determination, and indirect protein determination. Current techniques and recent developments in each are reviewed. PMID:26823162

  12. Simultaneous Measurement of Zinc, Copper, Lead and Cadmium in Baby Weaning Food and Powder Milk by DPASV.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Naficeh; Oveisi, Mohammad Reza; Jannat, Behrooz; Hajimahmoodi, Mannan; Behfar, Abdolazim; Behzad, Masoomeh; Norouzi, Narges; Oveisi, Morvarid; Jannat, Behzad

    2014-01-01

    Apart from the breast milk, infant formula and baby weaning food have a special role in infant diet. Infants and young children are very susceptible to amount of trace elements. Copper and zinc are two elements that add in infant food. Lead and cadmium are heavy metals that enter to food chain unavoidably. DPASV is a benefit and applicable method for measurement of trace elements in food products. In this study, concentration of zinc, copper, lead and cadmium in four brands of baby food (rice and wheat based) and powder milk was analyzed with DPASV and polarograph set. Total Mean ± SE of zinc, copper, lead and cadmium in baby foods (n = 240) were 11.86 ± 1.474 mg/100g, 508.197 ± 83.154 μg/100g, 0.445 ± 0.006, 0.050 ± 0.005 mg/Kg respectively. Also these amount in powder milk (n = 240) were 3.621± 0.529 mg/100g, 403.822 ± 133.953 μg/100g, 0.007 ± 0.003, 0.060 ± 0.040 mg/Kg respectively. Zinc level in baby food type I was higher than lablled value (P = 0.030), but in other brands was not difference. Concentration of copper in all of samples was in labeled range (P > 0.05). In each four products, level of lead and cadmium were lower than the standard limit (P < 0.05). Amount of zinc and lead in baby food I, had difference versus other products. Concentration of zinc, camium in baby food type I, was higher than type II (P = 0.043, 0.001 respectively). Concentration of lead and cadmium in baby food type II, was higher than infant formulas, but are in standard limit. PMID:24734090

  13. Problem on estimation of the content of 131I in milk in the ``iodine'' period of the Chernobyl accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrushchinskii, A. A.; Kuten', S. A.; Budevich, N. M.; Minenko, V. F.; Zhukova, O. M.; Luk'yanov, N. K.

    2007-11-01

    Measurements of the beta-activity of milk, serving as the main source of information on the radioactive contamination of the environment by the iodine isotope 131I, carried out on a DP-100 radiometer in the early post-Chernobyl period (1986) in Belarus, have been mathematically simulated. The results obtained allow the conclusion that the indicated measurements should be analyzed again with consideration for all of the nuclides present in milk.

  14. Characterization of organic contaminants in porous media using nuclear magnetic resonance and spectral induced polarization measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupert, Y. K.

    2015-12-01

    The remediation and monitoring of soils and groundwater contaminated with organic compounds is an important goal of many environmental restoration efforts. This laboratory research focuses on combining two innovative geophysical methods: nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and spectral induced polarization (SIP) to assess their suitability to characterize and quantify organic contaminants in porous media. Toluene, a light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL), and ethoxy-nonafluorobutane, an engineered dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL), have been selected as representative organic contaminants. Low-field NMR relaxation time (T2) measurements and diffusion-relaxation (D-T2) correlation measurements, as well as low frequency SIP measurements (<10 kHz) are performed to quantify the amount of these two organic compounds in the presence of water in three types of porous media (sands, clay, and various sand-clay mixtures). The T2, D-T2, and SIP measurements are made on water, toluene, and the synthetic DNAPL in each porous media to understand the effect of different porous media on the NMR and SIP responses in each fluid. We then plan to make measurements on water-organic mixtures with varied concentrations of organic compounds in each porous medium to resolve the NMR and SIP response of the organic contaminants from that of water and to quantify the amount of organic contaminants. Building a relationship between SIP and NMR signatures from organic contaminants not only provides a fundamental yet important petrophysical relationship, but also builds a framework for continued investigation into how these two methods synergize. This will also provide spatially dense information about organic contaminated natural sediments at scales that will improve the quantitative characterization and remediation of contaminated sites.The remediation and monitoring of soils and groundwater contaminated with organic compounds is an important goal of many environmental restoration efforts

  15. Identification of gram-negative bacteria from critical control points of raw and pasteurized cow milk consumed at Gondar town and its suburbs, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Milk is highly prone to contamination and can serve as an efficient vehicle for human transmission of foodborne pathogens, especially gram-negative bacteria, as these are widely distributed in the environment. Methods This cross-sectional study of gram-negative staining bacterial contamination of milk meant for human consumption was carried out from October 2010 to May 2011 in Gondar town, Ethiopia. Milk samples were collected from critical control points, from production to consumption, that were hypothesized to be a source of potential contamination. Milk sampling points included smallholder’s milk producers, dairy co-operatives, a milk processing plant, and supermarkets. The hygienic procedures applied during milking, milk collection, transportation, pasteurization, and postpasteurization storage conditions at these specified critical control points were evaluated. Standard bacteriological cultivation and biochemical assays were used to isolate and identify bacterial pathogens in the milk samples. Results The results of the current study showed that conditions for contamination of raw milk at different critical points were due to less hygienic practices in pre-milking udder preparation, sub-optimal hygiene of milk handlers, and poor sanitation practices associated with milking and storage equipments. Among all critical control points considered, transportation containers at milk collection centers and at processing plants were found to be the most heavily contaminated with gram-negative staining bacterial species. Overall, 54 different bacterial species were indentified, and Escherichia coli (29.6%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (18.5%), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (16.7%), were the most commonly identified gram-negative staining bacterial pathogens. Of particular interest was that no gram-negative staining bacteria were isolated from pasteurized milk samples with varying shelf life. Conclusion This study showed the presence of diverse pathogenic gram

  16. Measuring transfer of 14C-PCB from maternal diet to milk in a goat model using an accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janle, E.; Sojka, J.; Jackson, G. S.; Lachcik, P.; Einstien, J. A.; Santerre, C. R.

    2007-06-01

    Environmental pollutants pose a substantial risk to nursing infants. Many of these toxicants (i.e. PCBs, PBDEs, mercury) are passed from the maternal diet to the nursing infant in breast milk. Determining the toxicokinetics has been difficult to measure due to ethical limitations. Since extremely small amounts of 14C can be measured using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), a goat model was used to establish a minimum oral dose of 14C-labeled PCB (2,2‧,4,4‧,5,5‧-hexachlorobiphenyl-UL-14C) that could be given to a lactating animal and traced into the milk. An oral dose of 66 nCi/kg body weight (1.84 μg PCB/kg bw) was administered. Plasma and milk samples were collected for 2 months after dosing. The concentration of 14C label reached a peak value of 1.71 ng/ml PCB equivalents in the milk on day 2 and then declined to about 135 pg/ml PCB equivalents in the milk at 3 weeks. A second goat was administered a smaller dose (22 nCi/kg bw; 616 ng PCB/kg bw). A peak concentration of 485 pg PCB equivalents/ml milk occurred at 3 days and declined to 77.6 pg PCB equivalents/ml milk by 3 weeks. Our results indicated that an even lower dosage of labeled-PCB could be used due to the extreme sensitivity of AMS measurement. Extrapolating from current data it is estimated that the dose could be reduced by a factor of 20 (31 ng PCB/kg bw; 1.1 nCi/kg bw) and still be detectable after 2 months. Thus, the potential exists for developing protocols for studying toxicokinetics in humans using radiologically- and toxicologically-benign doses of labeled environmental toxicants.

  17. [Application of infrared spectroscopy technique to protein content fast measurement in milk powder based on support vector machines].

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Cao, Fang; Feng, Shui-Juan; He, Yong

    2008-05-01

    In the present study, the JASCO Model FTIR-4 000 fourier transform infrared spectrometer (Japan) was used, with a valid range of 7 800-350 cm(-1). Seven brands of milk powder were bought in a local supermarket. Milk powder was compressed into a uniform tablet with a diameter of 5 mm and a thickness of 2 mm, and then scanned by the spectrometer. Each sample was scanned 40 times and the data were averaged. About 60 samples were measured for each brand, and data for 409 samples were obtained. NIRS analysis was based on the range of 4 000 to 6 666 cm(-1), while MIRS analysis was between 400 and 4 000 cm(-1). The protein content was determined by kjeldahl method and the factor 6.38 was used to convert the nitrogen values to protein. The protein content value is the weight of protein per 100 g of milk powder. The NIR data of the milk powder exhibited slight differences. Univariate analysis was not really appropriate for analyzing the data sets. From NIRS region, it could be observed that the trend of different curves is similar. The one around 4 312 cm(-1) embodies the vibration of protein. From MIRS region, it could be determined that there are many differences between transmission value curves. Two troughs around 1 545 and 1 656 cm(-1) stand for the vibration of amide I and II bands of protein. The smoothing way of Savitzky-Golay with 3 segments and zero polynomials and multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) were applied for denoising. First 8 important principle components (PCs), which were obtained from principle component analysis (PCA), were the optimal input feature subset. Least-squares support vector machines was applied to build the protein prediction model based on infrared spectral transmission value. The prediction result was better than that of traditional PLS regression model as the determination coefficient for prediction (R(p)2) is 0.951 7 and root mean square error for prediction (RMSEP) is 0.520 201. These indicate that LS-SVM is a powerful tool for

  18. Measurement of residual radioactive surface contamination by 2-D laser heated TLD

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.C.

    1997-06-01

    The feasibility of applying and adapting a two-dimensional laser heated thermoluminescence dosimetry system to the problem of surveying for radioactive surface contamination was studied. The system consists of a CO{sub 2} laser-based reader and monolithic arrays of thin dosimeter elements. The arrays consist of 10,201 thermoluminescent phosphor elements of 40 micron thickness, covering a 900 cm{sup 2} area. Array substrates are 125 micron thick polyimide sheets, enabling them to easily conform to regular surface shapes, especially for survey of surfaces that are inaccessible for standard survey instruments. The passive, integrating radiation detectors are sensitive to alpha and beta radiation at contamination levels below release guideline limits. Required contact times with potentially contaminated surfaces are under one hour to achieve detection of transuranic alpha emission at 100 dpm/100 cm{sup 2}. Positional information obtained from array evaluation is useful for locating contamination zones. Unique capabilities of this system for survey of sites, facilities and material include measurement inside pipes and other geometrical configurations that prevent standard surveys, and below-surface measurement of alpha and beta emitters in contaminated soils. These applications imply a reduction of material that must be classified as radioactive waste by virtue of its possibility of contamination, and cost savings in soil sampling at contaminated sites.

  19. Donor human milk banking and the emergence of milk sharing.

    PubMed

    Landers, Susan; Hartmann, Ben T

    2013-02-01

    Donor human milk has emerged as the preferred substrate to feed extremely preterm infants, when mother's own milk is unavailable. This article summarizes the clinical data demonstrating the safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of feeding donor human milk to premature babies. It describes the current state of milk banking in North America, as well as other parts of the world, and the differing criteria for donor selection, current pasteurization techniques, and quality control measures. A risk assessment methodology is proposed, which would allow milk banks globally to assess the safety of their process and respond appropriately to differing risk environments. PMID:23178068

  20. Biosurfactants and increased bioavailability of sorbed organic contaminants: Measurements using a biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Palumbo, A.V.; Applegate, B.; Saylor, G.S.

    1993-12-31

    Bioremediation of sites contaminated with hydrophobic materials that sorb onto the soil matrix is very difficult due to reduced microbial (bio)availability. Following biosurfactant addition, we have measured an increase in contaminant bioavailability by using a lux biosensor. Direct microbial bioavailability was determined by using a genetically engineered microbial bioreporter strain of Pseudomonas putida. This strain was engineered so the lux genes, which code for light production, are transcriptionally fused with genes that code for contaminant degradation and are thus induced in the presence of specific compounds. By using a bioreporter we can quantify the actual microbial bioavailability of the contaminants and compare it to concentrations measured by other analytical methods (e.g. gas chromatograph). It is possible that these values are not equal to each other. Thus, bioremediation rates may not be accurately predicted if bioavailability is not considered.

  1. Measures of self-efficacy and norms for low-fat milk consumption are reliable and related to beverage consumption among 5th graders at school lunch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to determine the reliability and validity of scales measuring low-fat milk consumption self-efficacy and norms during school lunch among a cohort of 5th graders. Two hundred seventy-five students completed lunch food records and a psychosocial questionnaire measuring self-efficacy ...

  2. Quantitative risk assessment of Listeriosis due to consumption of raw milk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the risk of illnesses for raw milk consumers due to L. monocytogenes contamination in raw milk sold by permitted raw milk dealers, and the risk of listeriosis for people on farms who consume raw milk. Three scenarios were evaluated for raw milk sold by ...

  3. Integration of analytical and biological measurements for assessing the effects of contaminants present at a Great Lakes area of concern

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing the potential biological impacts of complex contaminant mixtures in aquatic environments is a challenge. Instrumental analyses of site waters provide insights into the occurrence of contaminants, but provide little information about possible effects. Biological measur...

  4. Effect of Safety Measures on Bacterial Contamination Rates of Blood Components in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Walther-Wenke, Gabriele; Däubener, Walter; Heiden, Margarethe; Hoch, Jochen; Hornei, Britt; Volkers, Peter; von König, Carl Heinz Wirsing

    2011-01-01

    Summary Requirements for bacterial testing of blood components on a defined quantity as part of routine quality control were introduced in Germany by the National Advisory Committee Blood of the German Federal Ministry of Health in 1997. The philosophy was to establish standardized methods for bacterial testing. Numerous measures to reduce the risk of bacterial contamination were implemented into the blood donation and manufacturing processes between 1999 and 2002. German Blood establishments performed culture-based bacterial testing on random samples of platelet concentrates (PCs), red blood cells (RBCs) and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and reported data out of the production periods 1998, 2001 and 2005/2006. While the bacterial contamination rate of apheresis PCs remained nearly unchanged, it decreased by 70% for pooled PCs to a rate of 0.158% in the last observation period. Leukocyte-depleted RBCs with diversion of the initial blood volume showed a contamination rate of 0.029% which is significantly lower than that of RBCs without leukocyte depletion and diversion (0.157%). The contamination rate of plasma decreased by 80%. Preventive measures resulted in a significant reduction of bacterial contamination of blood components. Long-term monitoring with standardized methods for bacteria testing supports evaluation of the cumulative effect of contamination reducing measures. PMID:22016691

  5. Distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in human breast milk from various locations in Tunisia: levels of contamination, influencing factors, and infant risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Ennaceur, S; Gandoura, N; Driss, M R

    2008-09-01

    The concentrations of dichlorodiphenytrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs), dieldrin, and 20 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were determined in 237 human breast milk samples collected from 12 locations in Tunisia. Gas chromatography with electron capture detector (GC-ECD) was used to identify and quantify residue levels on a lipid basis of organochlorine compounds (OCs). The predominant OCs in human breast milk were PCBs, p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDT, HCHs, and HCB. Concentrations of DDTs in human breast milk from rural areas were significantly higher than those from urban locations (p<0.05). With regard to PCBs, we observed the predominance of mid-chlorinated congeners due to the presence of PCBs with high K(ow) such as PCB 153, 138, and 180. Positive correlations were found between concentrations of OCs in human breast milk and age of mothers and number of parities, suggesting the influence of such factors on OC burdens in lactating mothers. The comparison of daily intakes of PCBs, DDTs, HCHs, and HCB to infants through human breast milk with guidelines proposed by WHO and Health Canada shows that some individuals accumulated OCs in breast milk close to or higher than these guidelines. PMID:18614165

  6. Distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in human breast milk from various locations in Tunisia: Levels of contamination, influencing factors, and infant risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Ennaceur, S. Gandoura, N.; Driss, M.R.

    2008-09-15

    The concentrations of dichlorodiphenytrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs), dieldrin, and 20 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were determined in 237 human breast milk samples collected from 12 locations in Tunisia. Gas chromatography with electron capture detector (GC-ECD) was used to identify and quantify residue levels on a lipid basis of organochlorine compounds (OCs). The predominant OCs in human breast milk were PCBs, p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDT, HCHs, and HCB. Concentrations of DDTs in human breast milk from rural areas were significantly higher than those from urban locations (p<0.05). With regard to PCBs, we observed the predominance of mid-chlorinated congeners due to the presence of PCBs with high K{sub ow} such as PCB 153, 138, and 180. Positive correlations were found between concentrations of OCs in human breast milk and age of mothers and number of parities, suggesting the influence of such factors on OC burdens in lactating mothers. The comparison of daily intakes of PCBs, DDTs, HCHs, and HCB to infants through human breast milk with guidelines proposed by WHO and Health Canada shows that some individuals accumulated OCs in breast milk close to or higher than these guidelines.

  7. SOIL-GAS MEASUREMENT FOR DETECTION OF SUBSURFACE ORGANIC CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lockheed Gas Analysis System (LGAS) grab-sampling method and the PETREX Static Surface Trapping Pyrolysis/Mass Spectrometry (SST-Py/MS) passive sampling technique for soil-gas measurement have been field tested at the Pittman Lateral near Henderson, Nevada. This site has unco...

  8. Cow's milk and goat's milk.

    PubMed

    Turck, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Cow's milk is increasingly suggested to play a role in the development of chronic degenerative, non-communicable disorders whereas goat's milk is advocated as having several health benefits. Cow's milk is a rich and cheap source of protein and calcium, and a valuable food for bone health. Despite their high content in saturated fats, consumption of full-fat dairy products does not seem to cause significant changes in cardiovascular disease risk variables. Early introduction of cow's milk is a strong negative determinant of iron status. Unmodified cow's milk does not meet nutritional requirements of infants although it is acceptable to add small volumes of cow's milk to complementary foods. Cow's milk protein allergy has a prevalence ranging from 2 to 7%, and the age of recovery is usually around 2-3 years. The evidence linking cow's milk intake to a later risk of type 1 diabetes or chronic degenerative, non-communicable disorders (obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, hypertension) is not convincing. Milk probably protects against colorectal cancer, diets high in calcium are a probable cause of prostate cancer, and there is limited evidence suggesting that high consumption of milk and dairy products increases the risk for prostate cancer. There is no evidence to support the use of a cow's milk-free diet as a primary treatment for individuals with autistic spectrum disorders. Unmodified goat's milk is not suitable for infants because of the high protein and minerals content and of a low folate content. Goat's milk has no clear nutritional advantage over cow's milk and is not less allergenic. The European Food Safety Authority recently stated that proteins from goat's milk can be suitable as a protein source for infant and follow-on formula, provided the final product complies with the compositional criteria laid down in Directive 2006/141/EC. PMID:24029787

  9. Two-pulse rapid remote surface contamination measurement.

    SciTech Connect

    Headrick, Jeffrey M.; Kulp, Thomas J.; Bisson, Scott E.; Reichardt, Thomas A.; Farrow, Roger L.

    2010-11-01

    This project demonstrated the feasibility of a 'pump-probe' optical detection method for standoff sensing of chemicals on surfaces. Such a measurement uses two optical pulses - one to remove the analyte (or a fragment of it) from the surface and the second to sense the removed material. As a particular example, this project targeted photofragmentation laser-induced fluorescence (PF-LIF) to detect of surface deposits of low-volatility chemical warfare agents (LVAs). Feasibility was demonstrated for four agent surrogates on eight realistic surfaces. Its sensitivity was established for measurements on concrete and aluminum. Extrapolations were made to demonstrate relevance to the needs of outside users. Several aspects of the surface PF-LIF physical mechanism were investigated and compared to that of vapor-phase measurements. The use of PF-LIF as a rapid screening tool to 'cue' more specific sensors was recommended. Its sensitivity was compared to that of Raman spectroscopy, which is both a potential 'confirmer' of PF-LIF 'hits' and is also a competing screening technology.

  10. America's Children and the Environment: Measures of Contaminants, Body Burdens, and Illnesses. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Tracey J.; Axelrad, Daniel A.; Kyle, Amy D.; Nweke, Onyemaechi; Miller, Gregory G.

    Noting that children may be affected by environmental contaminants in ways quite different from the way adults are affected, this report is the second on trends in measures reflecting environmental factors that may affect the U.S. children's health and well-being. A list of measures and key findings begins the report, followed by five main…

  11. HMI Measured Doppler Velocity Contamination from the SDO Orbit Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherrer, Philip H.; SDO HMI Team

    2016-05-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) measures sets of filtergrams which are converted into velocity and magnetic field maps each 45-seconds with its front camera and each 12 minutes with its side camera. In addition to solar phototspheric motions the velocity measurements include a direct component from the line-of-sight component of the SDO orbit. Since the magnetic field is computed as the difference between the velocity measured in left and right circular polarization the orbit velocity is canceled only if the celocity is properly calibrated. When the orbit component of the velocity is subtracted for each pixel the remaining "solar" velocity shows a residual signal which is equal to about 2% of the c. +- 3000 m/s orbit velocity in a nearly linear relationship. This implies an error in our knowledge of some of the details of as-built filter components. The model instrument transmission profile is required for calibration of all HMI level 1.5 “observable” quantities. This systematic error is very likely the source of 12- and 24-hour variations in most HMI data products. Over the years since launch a substantial effort has been dedicated to understanding the origin of this problem. While the instrument as presently calibrated (Couvidat et al. 2012 and 2016) meets all of the “Level-1” mission requirements it fails to meet the stated goal of 10 m/s accuracy for velocity data products and some not stated but generally assumed goals for other products. For the velocity measurements this has not been a significant problem since the prime HMI goals of obtaining data for helioseismology are not affected by this systematic error. However the orbit signal leaking into the magnetograms and vector magnetograms degrades the ability to accomplish some of the mission science goals at the expected levels of accuracy. This poster presents the current state of understanding of the source of this systematic error and

  12. Microbial interactions with organic contaminants in soil: definitions, processes and measurement.

    PubMed

    Semple, Kirk T; Doick, Kieron J; Wick, Lukas Y; Harms, Hauke

    2007-11-01

    There has been and continues to be considerable scientific interest in predicting bioremediation rates and endpoints. This requires the development of chemical techniques capable of reliably predicting the bioavailability of organic compounds to catabolically active soil microbes. A major issue in understanding the link between chemical extraction and bioavailability is the problem of definition; there are numerous definitions, of varying degrees of complexity and relevance, to the interaction between organic contaminants and microorganisms in soil. The aim of this review is to consider the bioavailability as a descriptor for the rate and extent of biodegradation and, in an applied sense, bioremediation of organic contaminants in soil. To address this, the review will (i) consider and clarify the numerous definitions of bioavailability and discuss the usefulness of the term 'bioaccessibility'; (ii) relate definition to the microbiological and chemical measurement of organic contaminants' bioavailability in soil, and (iii) explore the mechanisms employed by soil microorganisms to attack organic contaminants in soil. PMID:17881105

  13. Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences

    SciTech Connect

    Logue, J.M.; McKone, T.E.; Sherman, M. H.; Singer, B.C.

    2010-05-10

    Identifying air pollutants that pose a potential hazard indoors can facilitate exposure mitigation. In this study, we compiled summary results from 77 published studies reporting measurements of chemical pollutants in residences in the United States and in countries with similar lifestyles. These data were used to calculate representative mid-range and upper bound concentrations relevant to chronic exposures for 267 pollutants and representative peak concentrations relevant to acute exposures for 5 activity-associated pollutants. Representative concentrations are compared to available chronic and acute health standards for 97 pollutants. Fifteen pollutants appear to exceed chronic health standards in a large fraction of homes. Nine other pollutants are identified as potential chronic health hazards in a substantial minority of homes and an additional nine are identified as potential hazards in a very small percentage of homes. Nine pollutants are identified as priority hazards based on the robustness of measured concentration data and the fraction of residences that appear to be impacted: acetaldehyde; acrolein; benzene; 1,3-butadiene; 1,4-dichlorobenzene; formaldehyde; naphthalene; nitrogen dioxide; and PM{sub 2.5}. Activity-based emissions are shown to pose potential acute health hazards for PM{sub 2.5}, formaldehyde, CO, chloroform, and NO{sub 2}.

  14. In situ measurements of scattering from contaminated optics in the Vacuum Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Linton, Roger C.; Whitaker, Ann F.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's In Situ Contamination Effects Facility has been used to measure the time dependence of the angular reflectance from molecularly contaminated optical surfaces in the vacuum ultraviolet. The light scattering measurements are accomplished in situ on optical surfaces in real time during deposition of molecular contaminants. The measurements are taken using noncoherent VUV sources with the predominant wavelengths being the krypton resonance lines at 1236 and 1600 angstroms. Detection of the scattered light is accomplished using a set of three solar blind VUV photomultipliers. An in-plane VUV BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function) experiment is described and details of the on-going program to characterize optical materials exposed to the space environment is reported.

  15. [Methodological Approaches to the Organization of Counter Measures Taking into Account Landscape Features of Radioactively Contaminated Territories].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, V K; Sanzharova, N I

    2016-01-01

    Methodological approaches to the organization of counter measures are considered taking into account the landscape features of the radioactively contaminated territories. The current status and new requirements to the organization of counter measures in the contaminated agricultural areas are analyzed. The basic principles, objectives and problems of the formation of counter measures with regard to the landscape characteristics of the territory are presented; also substantiated are the organization and optimization of the counter measures in radioactively contaminated agricultural landscapes. PMID:27245009

  16. 21 CFR 510.105 - Labeling of drugs for use in milk-producing animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... conditions of use intended to prevent the contamination of milk from the use of such drugs. (b) Preparations... would result in contamination of the milk; or (2) The label should bear the following statement... contamination of the milk, neither of the above warning statements is required....

  17. UQ and Decision Making for Groundwater Contamination: A Measure-Theoretic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattis, S. A.; Dawson, C.; Butler, T.

    2014-12-01

    The movement of contaminant plumes in underground aquifers is highly dependent on many hydrogeological parameters. We model the transport with an advection, diffusion, reaction system requiring the specification of porosity, flow direction, flow speed, dispersivities, and effects of geochemical reactions. It is often prohibitively expensive or impossible to make accurate and reliable measurements of these parameters in the field. It is also difficult to know the position and shape of a contaminant plume at a given time or the exact details of the source of the contamination, e.g. size, location, origin time, and magnitude. If decisions are to be made regarding contaminant remediation strategies or predictions of future contaminant concentrations in and near water-supply wells, then these uncertain hydrogeological and source parameters need to be analyzed and estimated. We utilize a measure-theoretic framework to formulate and solve the physics-based stochastic inverse problem to quantify the uncertainty for these parameters. We solve the model using both analytical and finite element solutions. We define quantities of interest (QoI) for the groundwater contaminant problem in terms of observable field measurements. We develop adjoint problems to compute accurate and reliable a posteriori error estimates of the QoIs. The adjoint solutions are also useful in the solution of the inverse problem. The measure-theoretic formulation and solution of the inverse problem and modeling framework define a solution as a probability measure on the parameter domain. In the typical case where the number of output quantities is less than the number of parameters, the inverse of the map from parameters to data defines a type of generalized contour map where the geometry plays a pivotal role in determining an optimal set of QoI. We determine and analyze solutions for geometrically distinct QoI defining reduced-dimension set-valued inverses for this measure-theoretic inverse framework.

  18. Impact of the removal of chocolate milk from school milk programs for children in Saskatoon, Canada.

    PubMed

    Henry, Carol; Whiting, Susan J; Phillips, Theodosia; Finch, Sarah L; Zello, Gordon A; Vatanparast, Hassan

    2015-03-01

    Studies in the United States report inclusion of flavoured milk in the diets of children and youth improves nutrient intakes. No research has investigated the contribution of flavoured milk to overall milk intake or the milk preferences of Canadian children. The objective of the study was to measure milk consumption (plain milk and flavoured milk) by children in an elementary school environment and investigate factors contributing to milk choice. A mixed-method research design was applied across 6 schools for 12 weeks. Milk waste was measured in grades 1-8 for 12 weeks. Weeks 1-4 (phase 1) and 9-12 (phase 3) provided both plain milk and flavoured milk as chocolate milk while weeks 5-8 (phase 2) provided plain milk only. Beverage Frequency Questionnaires were used in each phase (in grades 5-8 only) to assess usual beverage consumption. Statistical nutrient modelling was conducted to determine the effects of removing chocolate milk during phase 2 as a milk choice. Later, focus groups were conducted with students in grades 5-8 to determine what influences them to choose/not choose to drink milk. Total milk intake decreased by 12.3% when chocolate milk was removed from the schools (26.6% ± 5.2% to 14.31% ± 1.6%, p < 0.001). Milk choice was influenced by environmental factors as well as taste, cost, convenience, and variety. Total milk intake was associated with location (p = 0.035) and cost (p < 0.001), with rural students and/or those students receiving free milk drinking the greatest amount of milk. Nutrient modelling revealed chocolate milk is more cost-efficient and convenient at providing nutrients than alternative food/drink combinations. PMID:25585706

  19. Milk protein composition and stability changes affected by iron in water sources.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aili; Duncan, Susan E; Knowlton, Katharine F; Ray, William K; Dietrich, Andrea M

    2016-06-01

    Water makes up more than 80% of the total weight of milk. However, the influence of water chemistry on the milk proteome has not been extensively studied. The objective was to evaluate interaction of water-sourced iron (low, medium, and high levels) on milk proteome and implications on milk oxidative state and mineral content. Protein composition, oxidative stability, and mineral composition of milk were investigated under conditions of iron ingestion through bovine drinking water (infused) as well as direct iron addition to commercial milk in 2 studies. Four ruminally cannulated cows each received aqueous infusions (based on water consumption of 100L) of 0, 2, 5, and 12.5mg/L Fe(2+) as ferrous lactate, resulting in doses of 0, 200, 500 or 1,250mg of Fe/d, in a 4×4Latin square design for a 14-d period. For comparison, ferrous sulfate solution was directly added into commercial retail milk at the same concentrations: control (0mg of Fe/L), low (2mg of Fe/L), medium (5mg of Fe/L), and high (12.5mg of Fe/L). Two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-tandem time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry analysis was applied to characterize milk protein composition. Oxidative stability of milk was evaluated by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay for malondialdehyde, and mineral content was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. For milk from both abomasal infusion of ferrous lactate and direct addition of ferrous sulfate, an iron concentration as low as 2mg of Fe/L was able to cause oxidative stress in dairy cattle and infused milk, respectively. Abomasal infusion affected both caseins and whey proteins in the milk, whereas direct addition mainly influenced caseins. Although abomasal iron infusion did not significantly affect oxidation state and mineral balance (except iron), it induced oxidized off-flavor and partial degradation of whey proteins. Direct

  20. Empirical Measurement and Model Validation of Infrared Spectra of Contaminated Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Sean

    The goal of this thesis was to validate predicted infrared spectra of liquid contaminated surfaces from a micro-scale bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model through the use of empirical measurement. Liquid contaminated surfaces generally require more sophisticated radiometric modeling to numerically describe surface properties. The Digital Image and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model utilizes radiative transfer modeling to generate synthetic imagery for a variety of applications. Aside from DIRSIG, a micro-scale model known as microDIRSIG has been developed as a rigorous ray tracing physics-based model that could predict the BRDF of geometric surfaces that are defined as micron to millimeter resolution facets. The model offers an extension from the conventional BRDF models by allowing contaminants to be added as geometric objects to a micro-facet surface. This model was validated through the use of Fourier transform infrared spectrometer measurements. A total of 18 different substrate and contaminant combinations were measured and compared against modeled outputs. The substrates used in this experiment were wood and aluminum that contained three different paint finishes. The paint finishes included no paint, Krylon ultra-flat black, and Krylon glossy black. A silicon based oil (SF96) was measured out and applied to each surface to create three different contamination cases for each surface. Radiance in the longwave infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum was measured by a Design and Prototypes (D&P) Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and a Physical Sciences Inc. Adaptive Infrared Imaging Spectroradiometer (AIRIS). The model outputs were compared against the measurements quantitatively in both the emissivity and radiance domains. A temperature emissivity separation (TES) algorithm had to be applied to the measured radiance spectra for comparison with the microDIRSIG predicted emissivity spectra. The model predicted

  1. Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling System for Real-Time Field Screening of Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, L.B.; Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A.; Selph, M.M.; Williams, C.V.

    1999-02-22

    Sampling during environmental drilling is essential to fully characterize the spatial distribution and migration of near surface contaminants. However, analysis of the samples is expensive and time-consuming: off-site laboratory analysis can take weeks or months. An alternative screening technology, Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling (EMWD), could save money and valuable time by quickly distinguishing between contaminated and uncontaminated areas. Real time measurements provided by an EMWD system enable on-the-spot decisions to be made regarding sampling strategies. The system also enhances worker safety and provides the added flexibility of being able to steer a drill bit in or out of hazardous zones.

  2. Reducing uncertainty in ecological risk assessment: The pros of measuring contaminant exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, J.A.; Pease, A.

    1995-12-31

    Wildlife species (mammals, birds and reptiles) are primarily exposed to contamination in soils via ingestion of food. Uncertainties in risk analyses for this pathway are largely associated with the estimation of the amount of contamination in food items. The benefits of measuring contaminant concentrations in food items are examined based on comparison of risk results with and without measurements of exposure. At two hazardous waste sites, plants and earthworms were analyzed for metals and organics. Site-specific bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) were calculated and compared to literature reported values. In general, the metals concentrations in plant samples were higher than those predicted by literature values with the exception of cadmium and copper. Metal concentrations measured in invertebrates (worms) were lower than those predicted by literature values with the exception of arsenic. Literature BAFs did not adequately predict concentrations of barium, mercury or copper in invertebrate tissue. In the ecological risk assessments for both of the sites, if site-specific measurements were used, risks for wildlife species were not predicted. However if literature BAF values were used, unacceptable risks were predicted. The higher estimates of risks were associated with overestimates of dietary exposures of lead, cadmium, chromium, copper and zinc. Measurement of contaminant exposures provided for a more realistic and cost-effective estimate of ecological risks. The effect of using the empirical data on the magnitude of risks were evaluated including decisions concerning remediation. A cost-benefit analysis will be provided comparing the costs of measurement of exposures versus remediation.

  3. Hyperspectral sensing based analysis for determining milk adulteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimbahune, Sanjay; Ghouse, Syed M.; B. S., Mithun; Shinde, Sujit; Jha, Amit Kumar

    2016-05-01

    This research work was designed to evaluate the suitability and applicability of hyperspectral radiometry technology for robustly detecting adulterants in diary milk. The most common milk adulterants are (a) soda, (b) urea, (c) water and (d) detergents. The main contribution of this paper is to build a mathematical model to enable quantifying the degree of common adulterants present in milk. Data was collected using a portable spectroradiometer (Eko MS-720) which measures the spectral irradiance in the range from visible to near-infrared irradiance (350 nm 1050 nm) using samples of milk contaminated with four different adulterants (soda, urea, water and detergent) with known degree of contamination deliberately added in milk. In this study, we used the data in the range of 350 - 1050 nm to identify spectral signatures of different adulterants with different degree of concentration. Data cleansing, in the form of pre-processing was followed by machine learning techniques to create a model to capture the adulterants and also the degree of adulteration. Linear regression along with wrapper subset eval as attribute evaluator and best first search as search option was found to create the best model. Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) and Correlation Coefficient (CC) metrics were used to select the best model. The best model for detecting the degree of adulteration due to soda, urea, water and detergent in milk was found to have an RMSE of 0.027, 0.0069, 0.0382 and 0.0281 respectively while CC was 0.9919, 0.9997, 0.9887 and 0.9938 respectively. The preliminary experimental results demonstrate the effective use of spectroradiometer and machine learning technique in reliably detecting adulterants in milk.

  4. Exposure of infants to ochratoxin A with breast milk.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, K; Blaszkewicz, M; Campos, V; Vega, M; Degen, G H

    2014-03-01

    The nephrotoxic and carcinogenic mycotoxin ochratoxin A (OTA) is a worldwide contaminant in food commodities and also found frequently in human biological fluids. Dietary contaminants ingested by nursing mothers can appear in breast milk. But the rate of lactational transfer of OTA has not been investigated so far at various stages of breastfeeding. Therefore, and to investigate OTA exposure of Chilean infants, we conducted a longitudinally designed study in mother-child pairs (n = 21) with parallel collection of maternal blood, milk and of infant urine samples over a period of up to 6 months. Validated analytical methods were applied to determine OTA concentrations in all biological samples (n = 134). OTA was detected in almost all maternal blood plasma, at concentrations ranging between 72 and 639 ng/L. The OTA concentrations in breast milk were on average one quarter of those measured in plasma (M/P ratio 0.25). Interestingly, a higher fraction of circulating OTA was excreted in colostrum (M/P 0.4) than with mature milk (M/P ≤ 0.2). Infants exposure was calculated as daily intake from our new data for OTA levels in breast milk, and taking into account milk consumption and body weight as additional variables: Chilean infants have an average intake of 12.7 ± 9.1 ng/kg bw during the first 6 days after delivery while intake with mature milk results in average values close to 5.0 ng/kg bw/day. Their OTA exposure is discussed in the context of tolerable intake values suggested by different scientific bodies. Moreover, the study design enabled a comparison of OTA intake and infant urine concentrations over the breastfeeding period. The statistical analysis of n = 27 paired values showed a good correlation (r = 0.57) for this type of studies and thereby confirms that urinary OTA analysis in infants is a valid biomarker of exposure. PMID:24270973

  5. Influence of milk yeild stage of lactation, and body conditions on dairy cattle lying behavior measured using an automated activity monitoring sensor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The lying times of lactating Holstein-Friesian cows of varying body condition scores (BCS) and milk yield were measured using IceTag™ animal activity monitors in the Barony College dairy herd. A three-week average BCS was calculated for each cow; and in total 84 cows were selected equally between 3...

  6. Means to remove electrode contamination effect of Langmuir probe measurement in space

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, K.-I.; Lee, C. H.; Fang, H. K.; Cheng, C. Z.

    2012-05-15

    Precaution to remove the serious effect of electrode contamination in Langmuir probe experiments has not been taken in many space measurements because the effect is either not understood or ignored. We stress here that one should pay extra attention to the electrode contamination effect to get accurate and reliable plasma measurements so that the long time effort for sounding rocket/satellite missions does not end in vain or becomes less fruitful. In this paper, we describe two main features of voltage-current characteristic curves associated with the contaminated Langmuir probe, which are predicted from the equivalent circuit model, which we proposed in 1970's. We then show that fast sweeping dc Langmuir probes can give reliable results in the steady state regime. The fast sweeping probe can also give reliable results in transient situations such as satellite moves through plasma bubble in the ionosphere where the electron density drastically changes. This fact was first confirmed in our laboratory experiment.

  7. Means to remove electrode contamination effect of Langmuir probe measurement in space.

    PubMed

    Oyama, K-I; Lee, C H; Fang, H K; Cheng, C Z

    2012-05-01

    Precaution to remove the serious effect of electrode contamination in Langmuir probe experiments has not been taken in many space measurements because the effect is either not understood or ignored. We stress here that one should pay extra attention to the electrode contamination effect to get accurate and reliable plasma measurements so that the long time effort for sounding rocket/satellite missions does not end in vain or becomes less fruitful. In this paper, we describe two main features of voltage-current characteristic curves associated with the contaminated Langmuir probe, which are predicted from the equivalent circuit model, which we proposed in 1970's. We then show that fast sweeping dc Langmuir probes can give reliable results in the steady state regime. The fast sweeping probe can also give reliable results in transient situations such as satellite moves through plasma bubble in the ionosphere where the electron density drastically changes. This fact was first confirmed in our laboratory experiment. PMID:22667663

  8. Radioactivity measurement of radioactive contaminated soil by using a fiber-optic radiation sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Hanyoung; Kim, Rinah; Moon, Joo Hyun

    2016-06-01

    A fiber-optic radiation sensor (FORS) was developed to measure the gamma radiation from radioactive contaminated soil. The FORS was fabricated using an inorganic scintillator (Lu,Y)2SiO5:Ce (LYSO:Ce), a mixture of epoxy resin and hardener, aluminum foil, and a plastic optical fiber. Before its real application, the FORS was tested to determine if it performed adequately. The test result showed that the measurements by the FORS adequately followed the theoretically estimated values. Then, the FORS was applied to measure the gamma radiation from radioactive contaminated soil. For comparison, a commercial radiation detector was also applied to measure the same soil samples. The measurement data were analyzed by using a statistical parameter, the critical level to determine if net radioactivity statistically different from background was present in the soil sample. The analysis showed that the soil sample had radioactivity distinguishable from background.

  9. [Study on the deteriorating course of fresh milk by laser-induced fluorescence spectra].

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Yu, C Q; Li, J Z; Yan, J X

    2001-12-01

    Along with the development of living standard, people's demand for food quality and food hygiene also rises. People demand food not only with rich nutrition, inexpensive price, but also with safety. So food hygiene test is paid common attention of society. Milk is a nourishing food and is loved by people. Sour milk goods from milk is also in great demand. But nourishing foods are good for growing many microbes. Fresh milk and sour milk are easy contaminated by microbes and go bad. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technology is an important part of modern optics. It is broadly applied in biomedicine, diagnostics, test of food hygiene, environment protecting, owing to its high sensitivity, high speed, automation, untouched testing. In this paper, we attempted to LIF technology to test milk food quality. We used the third harmonics pulsed Nd:YAG laser (355 nm) as the exciting source, and a multi-track spectrometer as the detector and measured the intensities of apply LIF of fresh milk and sour milk during their deteriorating course. Test system and test method are introduced, fluorescence spectra of deteriorating course are also attached. The test result makes clear that there are close connection between deteriorating course and fluorescence spectra. PMID:12958890

  10. Cryogenic BRDF measurements at 10.6 micrometers and 0.63 micrometers on contaminated mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiber, B. L.; Bryson, R. J.; Bertrand, W. T.; Wood, B. E.

    1995-02-01

    Effects of contaminants on optical surface are concern for space-based systems. Many systems contain cryogenic optical systems that operate at temperatures where gases condense. This study presents experimental results of the effects of condensed gases and spacecraft contaminants on highly polished (superpolished) mirror surfaces cooled, under vacuum to temperatures near 16 K and 70 K. After condensing contaminants on the mirror, the change in the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) was obtained at wavelengths of 10.6 and 0.6328 um for various contaminant thicknesses up to 15 um. For a mirror surface of 16 K, BRDF changes for the following contaminant films were obtained: air, N2, O2, H2O, CO, CO2, and Ar. For a mirror surface near 70 K, the BRDF changes from condensed films of the following outgassing effluents were measured: RS12M polycyanate, Nusil CV2500 silicone, Solithane 113/Cl 13-300 urethane, RTVS60 silicone, and 1120. In addition, using measured optical properties and the thin-film interference theory-based computer program CALCRT, the spectral reflectance of an 80 K aluminum mirror was calculated for H2O, CO and RTV560. This report was sponsored by the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) through Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) and by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Space Environmental Effects Program.

  11. Dynamic measurements of ultraviolet-enhanced silica contamination by photoluminescence-based diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Alexandre; Quesnel, Etienne; Reymermier, Maryse

    2009-01-01

    The ultraviolet-enhanced (UV-enhanced) contamination of optical components leads to an untimely aging of sealed laser systems, photolithography, and synchrotron installations. The laser-induced deposition of organic films on silica substrates and coatings significantly reduces their transmission and degrades their optical functions. In this paper, measurements of organic contaminant films growth under 213 nm laser irradiation performed on silica Corning 7980 grade ArF are reported. We present an in situ contaminant layer growth diagnostic based on silica photoluminescence measurements. The purpose was to determine the photodeposition kinetics as a function of controlled environmental conditions and fluence and to find out the experimental conditions in which the growth of contamination films was significantly reduced. We then demonstrated that with a low partial pressure of oxygen, the growth of carbonaceous films is drastically reduced during UV laser irradiation whereas with water and nitrogen it was not the case. We also proposed a physical modeling of the UV-enhanced silica contamination processes.

  12. Space Flight Experiments to Measure Polymer Erosion and Contamination on Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillis, Maura C.; Youngstrom, Erica E.; Marx, Laura M.; Hammerstrom, Anne M.; Finefrock, Katherine D.; Youngstrom, Christiane A.; Kaminski, Carolyn; Fine, Elizabeth S.; Hunt, Patricia K.; deGroh, Kim K.

    2002-01-01

    Atomic oxygen erosion and silicone contamination are serious issues that could damage or destroy spacecraft components after orbiting for an extended period of time, such as on a space station or satellite. An experiment, the Polymer Erosion And Contamination Experiment (PEACE) will be conducted to study the effects of atomic oxygen (AO) erosion and silicone contamination, and it will provide information and contribute to a solution for these problems. PEACE will fly 43 different polymer materials that will be analyzed for AO erosion effects through two techniques: mass loss measurement and recession depth measurement. Pinhole cameras will provide information about the arrival direction of AO, and silicone contamination pinhole cameras will identify the source of silicone contamination on a spacecraft. All experimental hardware will be passively exposed to AO for up to two weeks in the actual space environment when it flies in the bay of a space shuttle. A second set of the PEACE Polymers is being exposed to the space environment for erosion yield determination as part of a second experiment, Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE). MISSE is a collaboration between several federal agencies and aerospace companies. During a space walk on August 16, 2001, MISSE was attached to the outside of the International Space Station (ISS) during an extravehicular activity (EVA), where it began its exposure to AO for approximately 1.5 years. The PEACE polymers, therefore, will be analyzed after both short-term and long-term AO exposures for a more complete study of AO effects.

  13. Potential for use of optical measurements to understand the fate of urban contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamaschi, B. A.; Downing, B. D.; Fleck, J.; Kraus, T. E.; Pellerin, B. A.; Corsi, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    Contamination associated with urban environments can dramatically affect aquatic ecosystems, yet our ability to gage its impact is hampered by the fact that contamination occurs episodically and we are often most interested in the effects in highly dynamic environments; ephemeral and dynamic systems require large numbers of samples to monitor, and the cost associated with characterizing the contribution of urban contaminants in an individual sample using conventional tracers can be prohibitively expensive. We propose that optical measurements may be used to help characterize urban contaminant fluxes in dynamic systems using in situ instruments as well as to assess the contribution of urban material to individual water samples using inexpensive lab-based measurements. We have used measurements of optical properties both in the laboratory and in situ at high temporal and spatial resolution to differentiate among sources of water, and as proxies for contaminants such as mercury (Hg), methylmercury, pharmaceuticals, and wastewater. These measurements include determination of spectral properties of absorbance, attenuation, fluorescence, and scatter in aqueous samples. We present examples of how such measurements can serve as tracers of urban-derived water sources, and provide information about source and biogeochemical processing. One example demonstrates how in situ fluorescence and scattering measurements were used to track the transport of Hg contamination into the San Francisco Estuary. We measured the tidally-driven exchange of Hg between the estuary and a tidal wetland over spring-neap in three different seasons. In situ measurements of scatter (turbidity) and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) were highly related to total mercury concentrations, and we used these measurements to calculate flux into and out of the wetland. Another example in a dynamic river system illustrates how data collected at a high spatial resolution, again using in situ optical

  14. Skylab experiment performance evaluation manual. Appendix S: Experiment T027 contamination measurement sample array (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tonetti, B. B.

    1973-01-01

    Analyses for Experiment T027, Contamination Measurement Sample Array (MSFC), to be used for evaluating the performance of the Skylab corrollary experiments under preflight, inflight, and post-flight conditions are presented. Experiment contingency plan workaround procedure and malfunction analyses are presented in order to assist in making the experiment operationally successful.

  15. IN SITU APPARENT CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENTS AND MICROBIAL POPULATION DISTRIBUTION AT A HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATED SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the bulk electrical conductivity and microbial population distribution in sediments at a site contaminated with light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL). The bulk conductivity was measured using in situ vertical resistivity probes, while the most probable number met...

  16. A direct passive method for measuring water and contaminant fluxes in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatfield, Kirk; Annable, Michael; Cho, Jaehyun; Rao, P. S. C.; Klammler, Harald

    2004-12-01

    This paper introduces a new direct method for measuring water and contaminant fluxes in porous media. The method uses a passive flux meter (PFM), which is essentially a self-contained permeable unit properly sized to fit tightly in a screened well or boring. The meter is designed to accommodate a mixed medium of hydrophobic and/or hydrophilic permeable sorbents, which retain dissolved organic/inorganic contaminants present in the groundwater flowing passively through the meter. The contaminant mass intercepted and retained on the sorbent is used to quantify cumulative contaminant mass flux. The sorptive matrix is also impregnated with known amounts of one or more water soluble 'resident tracers'. These tracers are displaced from the sorbent at rates proportional to the groundwater flux; hence, in the current meter design, the resident tracers are used to quantify cumulative groundwater flux. Theory is presented and quantitative tools are developed to interpret the water flux from tracers possessing linear and nonlinear elution profiles. The same theory is extended to derive functional relationships useful for quantifying cumulative contaminant mass flux. To validate theory and demonstrate the passive flux meter, results of multiple box-aquifer experiments are presented and discussed. From these experiments, it is seen that accurate water flux measurements are obtained when the tracer used in calculations resides in the meter at levels representing 20 to 70 percent of the initial condition. 2,4-Dimethyl-3-pentanol (DMP) is used as a surrogate groundwater contaminant in the box aquifer experiments. Cumulative DMP fluxes are measured within 5% of known fluxes. The accuracy of these estimates generally increases with the total volume of water intercepted.

  17. Bacteriological examination of milk and milk products sold in Harare.

    PubMed

    Igumbor, E O; Obi, C L; Milingo, T

    2000-01-01

    A study to assess the bacteriological quality of milk and ice cream was conducted using the direct plate count method and the methylene blue dye reduction test. A total of 105 milk and 95 ice cream samples were obtained form two factories (depots) and distributing supermarkets (outlets) in Harare. Under the methylene blue test, all milk and ice cream samples passed the hour and 2 hour tests respectively. However, 99% of the milk and 69% of the ice cream samples reduced the dye after 5.5 and 4 hrs respectively. The results from the direct plate counts revealed the presence of both pathogens and non-pathogens. The median plate counts in the milk and ice cream were found 400 cfu / ml and 100 cfu / ml respectively. Organisms isolated in both samples and in all outlets were similar, these included Bacillus spp. Coagulase Staphlococcus spp., microcuccus spp., Steptococcus spp., Diphthroids, Fusiform bacterial Klebsiella spp., and Citrobacter spp. No significant differences were found in the plate counts of the samples obtained from the depots and outlets for the milk (P = 0.542, df = 1)) and ice cream samples (P = 0.377, df = 1). Results further revealed that there was no significant difference in isolates obtained form strawberry ice cream (0.0096). The study has therefore, revealed that milk and milk product sold in various outlets in Harare contained a variety of bacteria of public health importance and also that the methylene blue dye reduction test is not reliable for the detection of bacterial contaminants in dairy products. It is thus suggested that the use of methylene blue dyes be adapted in combination with other tests such as the plate count in assessing bacterial contaminants in milk products. PMID:17650038

  18. Designer milk.

    PubMed

    Sabikhi, Latha

    2007-01-01

    Dairy biotechnology is fast gaining ground in the area of altering milk composition for processing and/or animal and human health by employing nutritional and genetic approaches. Modification of the primary structure of casein, alteration in the lipid profile, increased protein recovery, milk containing nutraceuticals, and replacement for infant formula offer several advantages in the area of processing. Less fat in milk, altered fatty acid profiles to include more healthy fatty acids such as CLA and omega-fats, improved amino acid profiles, more protein, less lactose, and absence of beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) are some opportunities of "designing" milk for human health benefits. Transgenic technology has also produced farm animals that secrete in their milk, human lactoferrin, lysozyme, and lipase so as to simulate human milk in terms of quality and quantity of these elements that are protective to infants. Cow milk allergenicity in children could be reduced by eliminating the beta-LG gene from bovines. Animals that produce milk containing therapeutic agents such as insulin, plasma proteins, drugs, and vaccines for human health have been genetically engineered. In order to cater to animal health, transgenic animals that express in their mammary glands, various components that work against mastitis have been generated. The ultimate acceptability of the "designer" products will depend on ethical issues such as animal welfare and safety, besides better health benefits and increased profitability of products manufactured by the novel techniques. PMID:17900499

  19. Milk lipids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Milk fat conveys a number of desirable qualities to food, and various lipid components contribute to human nutrition and health. Over 96% of milk lipids consist of triacylglycerols, which contain a variety of fatty acids. Di- and monoacylglycerols, free fatty acids, sterols, and phospho-, glyco-,...

  20. Success of interventions in mastitis problems with Staphylococcus aureus after the introduction of an automatic milking system.

    PubMed

    Ruf, J; Johler, S; Merz, A; Stalder, U; Hässig, M

    2015-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is often the cause of mastitis problems in dairy herds and causes great economic losses. In this study, isolates from a dairy herd with a known S. aureus mastitis problem were examined by means of molecular methods (spa typing, PFGE, and DNA microarray) to investigate their epidemiological relationship and the success of intervention measures. The investigated dairy farm has a herd size of 60 cows and uses a fully automated milking system for milk production. A S. aureus strain, which contaminated the automated milking system and was subsequently spread among the herd through the latter, was suspected to be the origin of the mastitis problem within the herd. Thanks to the applied molecular methods, the common origin of the S. aureus isolates from the collected milk and swab samples could be shown. By culling chronically infected cows, optimising dry cow management and ensuring reliable intermediate cluster disinfection, the bulk milk somatic cell count improved. PMID:26753327

  1. Measurement of the effects of particulate contamination on X-ray reflectivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, P.; Mclaughlin, E. R.; Schwartz, D. A.; Van Speybroeck, L. P.; Bilbro, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    Because particles of sizes larger than a few tenths microns adversely affect high resolution X-ray telescopes by scattering and absorbing X-rays, the cleanliness required to maintain the about 1 percent overall calibration precision desired for the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) is being investigated. At the grazing angles used for the AXAF mirrors, each particle shadows a surface area about 100 times its geometric area, necessitating glass occlusion specifications much more stringent than typically stipulated for visible-light particulate contamination. On test flats coated with gold, controlled levels of contamination have been deposited spanning the range from 5 x 10 to the -5th to 0.005 fractional area covered, and the absorption component of extinction has been measured over a range of grazing angles and X-ray energies to verify the predicted effects of particulate contamination.

  2. EVALUATION OF DIOXIN IN U.S. COW'S MILK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Milk fat is likely to be among the highest dietary sources of exposure to persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic (PBT) contaminants, thus it is important to understand PBT levels in milk. Schaum had previously reported on concentrations of 21 PBTs in the United States milk suppl...

  3. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurement of isotope ratios in depleted uranium contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, Michael D

    2003-09-01

    Laser ablation of pressed soil pellets was examined as a means of direct sample introduction to enable inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) screening of soils for residual depleted uranium (DU) contamination. Differentiation between depleted uranium, an anthropogenic contaminant, and naturally occurring uranium was accomplished on the basis of measured 235U/238U isotope ratios. The amount of sample preparation required for laser ablation is considerably less than that typically required for aqueous sample introduction. The amount of hazardous laboratory waste generated is diminished accordingly. During the present investigation, 235U/238U isotope ratios measured for field samples were in good agreement with those derived from gamma spectrometry measurements. However, substantial compensation was required to mitigate the effects of impaired pulse counting attributed to sample inhomogeneity and sporadic introduction of uranium analyte into the plasma. PMID:14611049

  4. Application of Passive Sampling for Measuring Dissolved Concentrations of Organic Contaminants in the Water Column at Three U.S. EPA Marine Superfund Sites.

    EPA Science Inventory

    At contaminated sediment sites, including U.S. EPA Superfund sites, it is critical to measure water column concentrations of freely dissolved contaminants to understand the complete exposure of aquatic organisms to hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). Historically, acquiring...

  5. Application of Passive Sampling for Measuring Dissolved Concentrations of Organic Contaminants in the Water Column at Three U.S. EPA Marine Superfund Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    At contaminated sediment sites, including U.S. EPA Superfund sites, it is critical to measure water column concentrations of freely dissolved contaminants to understand the complete exposure of aquatic organisms to hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). Historically acquiring ...

  6. Measurement of 90Sr in contaminated Fukushima soils using liquid scintillation counter.

    PubMed

    Kavasi, N; Sahoo, S K; Arae, H; Yoshida, S; Sorimachi, A; Tokonami, S

    2015-11-01

    A method based on liquid scintillation counting system has been developed for the measurement of (90)Sr in Fukushima soil samples due to contamination of (134)Cs and (137)Cs. Three soil samples were collected within 30 km radius from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP). Activity concentration of (134)Cs and (137)Cs were measured using a gamma spectroscopy system with high-purity germanium detector. (90)Sr contamination is little elevated but comparable with the background contamination level that originated from atmospheric nuclear weapon tests, whereas radiocesium contamination has increased significantly. Activity concentration of (90)Sr in the soil samples varied in the range of 10.4±0.6-22.0±1.2 Bq kg(-1). Activity concentrations of (134)Cs and (137)Cs in the soil samples were in the range of 28.2±0.2-56.3±0.2 kBq kg(-1) and 35.2±0.1-70.2±0.2 kBq kg(-1), respectively (reference date for decay correction is 1 December 2011). PMID:25956786

  7. Characterization and Remediation of Contaminated Sites:Modeling, Measurement and Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, N. B.; Rao, P. C.; Poyer, I. C.; Christ, J. A.; Zhang, C. Y.; Jawitz, J. W.; Werth, C. J.; Annable, M. D.; Hatfield, K.

    2008-05-01

    The complexity of natural systems makes it impossible to estimate parameters at the required level of spatial and temporal detail. Thus, it becomes necessary to transition from spatially distributed parameters to spatially integrated parameters that are capable of adequately capturing the system dynamics, without always accounting for local process behavior. Contaminant flux across the source control plane is proposed as an integrated metric that captures source behavior and links it to plume dynamics. Contaminant fluxes were measured using an innovative technology, the passive flux meter at field sites contaminated with dense non-aqueous phase liquids or DNAPLs in the US and Australia. Flux distributions were observed to be positively or negatively correlated with the conductivity distribution, depending on the source characteristics of the site. The impact of partial source depletion on the mean contaminant flux and flux architecture was investigated in three-dimensional complex heterogeneous settings using the multiphase transport code UTCHEM and the reactive transport code ISCO3D. Source mass depletion reduced the mean contaminant flux approximately linearly, while the contaminant flux standard deviation reduced proportionally with the mean (i.e., coefficient of variation of flux distribution is constant with time). Similar analysis was performed using data from field sites, and the results confirmed the numerical simulations. The linearity of the mass depletion-flux reduction relationship indicates the ability to design remediation systems that deplete mass to achieve target reduction in source strength. Stability of the flux distribution indicates the ability to characterize the distributions in time once the initial distribution is known. Lagrangian techniques were used to predict contaminant flux behavior during source depletion in terms of the statistics of the hydrodynamic and DNAPL distribution. The advantage of the Lagrangian techniques lies in their

  8. Fear of people by cows and effects on milk yield, behavior, and heart rate at milking.

    PubMed

    Rushen, J; De Passillé, A M; Munksgaard, L

    1999-04-01

    To examine the ability of cows to recognize people and the effects of the fear of people by cows at milking, cows (n = 14) were handled by two people; one handled the cows gently, and the other handled them aversively. The handlers wore clothes of different color. After handling, the cows stood further from the aversive handler than from the gentle handler. When the handlers changed the color of their clothing, the cows did not discriminate between them. The gentle handler stood close to the cows for one milking, and the aversive handler stood close to the cows for another milking. For two control milkings, neither handler was present. Measurements included milking duration, milk yield, residual milk, heart rates, incidence of movement, and kicking behavior of the cows. Compared with control milkings, the presence of the gentle handler did not change milk yield or residual milk. The presence of the aversive handler increased residual milk by 70%. Kicking behavior of cows during milking was reduced with either handler present, and kicking during udder preparation was reduced with the aversive handler present. For cows that best discriminated between the handlers, the presence of the aversive handler increased movement and heart rate during milking. For cows that did not discriminate well between the handlers, the presence of either handler increased heart rate and decreased movement during milking. Cows recognized individual people, and the fear of people who are present during milking may reduce milk yield. PMID:10212458

  9. Antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella enterica isolates from bulk tank milk and milk filters in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-typhoid Salmonella is frequently associated with dairy cattle and their environment. Despite well-developed milking hygiene protocols, fecal contamination can occur and Salmonella has often been isolated from bulk milk. Salmonella isolates were recovered from US bulk tank milk as part of the NAH...

  10. The associations between milk production, milk composition and Salmonella in the bulk milk supplies of dairy farms in Ontario.

    PubMed Central

    McClure, L H; McEwen, S A; Martin, S W

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess changes in dairy herd milk production and milk composition associated with changes in Salmonella contamination of bulk milk on dairy farms in southwestern Ontario. Twenty-three dairy farms that had submitted milk filters for culture from which Salmonella were isolated (cases) and 23 farms that submitted Salmonella-negative milk filters (controls) were included in the study. The rolling herd averages for milk and fat of case and control farms for the months of December 1985, December 1986 and April 1987 were compared and no significant differences were detected. Case and control farms were divided into three groups (A,B,C) on the basis of Salmonella culture results of milk filters submitted at various time periods throughout the study. Daily and monthly changes in milk production and composition parameters that reflected the time periods of milk filter culture were compared. The following unconditional associations between a changing Salmonella infection status on dairy farms and changes in milk production or composition variables were significant (p less than or equal to 0.05): group A: case farms had higher plate loop counts than control farms; group B: case farms had younger cows than control farms; group C: case farms had cows with longer average days in lactation than control farms. After analytical control of confounding variables, the disappearance of Salmonella from bulk milk supplies of dairy farms was associated with a decrease in percent fat and in somatic cell count. PMID:2713783