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Sample records for measured mimo-ofdm channels

  1. Measurement-Based Performance Evaluation of Coded MIMO-OFDM Spatial Multiplexing with MMSE Spatial Filtering in an Indoor Line-of-Sight Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimoto, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Ohgane, Takeo; Ogawa, Yasutaka

    The MIMO system can meet the growing demand for higher capacity in wireless communication fields. So far, the authors have reported that, based on channel measurements, uncoded performance of narrowband MIMO spatial multiplexing in indoor line-of-sight (LOS) environments generally outperforms that in non-LOS (NLOS) ones under the same transmit power condition. In space-frequency coded MIMO-OFDM spatial multiplexing, however, we cannot expect high space-frequency diversity gain in LOS environments because of high fading correlations and low frequency selectivity of channels so that the performance may degrade unlike uncoiled cases. In this letter, we present the practical performance of coded MIMO-OFDM spatial multiplexing based on indoor channel measurements. The results show that an LOS environment tends to provide lower space-frequency diversity effect whereas the MIMO-OFDM spatial multiplexing performance is still better in the environment compared with an NLOS environment.

  2. Channel Estimation and ISI/ICI Cancellation for MIMO-OFDM Systems with Insufficient Cyclic Prefix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Yi-Jen; Chen, Chien-Sheng; Chang, Ting-Wei

    In multi-input multi-output orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (MIMO-OFDM) systems, the multipath components whose delays exceed cyclic prefix (CP) cause inter-symbol interference (ISI) and inter-carrier interference (ICI), which may degrade system performance severely. In this paper, we propose a joint channel estimation and ISI/ICI cancellation scheme in which a limited CP is used in a trade-off against high-rate performance in MIMO-OFDM systems. A channel estimation scheme based on the criterion of Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm can be proposed through the use of a training symbol. The EM algorithm uses an iterative procedure to estimate channel parameters and can estimate channel impulse response (CIR) accurately enough to mitigate ISI/ICI influences. Through the accurate CIR estimation, an efficient method has been developed to counteract ISI/ICI influences in signal detection in the case where the inserted CP length is less than the CIR length. Simulation results show that the proposed method can significantly enhance the overall MIMO-OFDM system performance after only a few iterations.

  3. Channel Acquisition for Massive MIMO-OFDM With Adjustable Phase Shift Pilots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Li; Gao, Xiqi; Swindlehurst, A. Lee; Zhong, Wen

    2016-03-01

    We propose adjustable phase shift pilots (APSPs) for channel acquisition in wideband massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems employing orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) to reduce the pilot overhead. Based on a physically motivated channel model, we first establish a relationship between channel space-frequency correlations and the channel power angle-delay spectrum in the massive antenna array regime, which reveals the channel sparsity in massive MIMO-OFDM. With this channel model, we then investigate channel acquisition, including channel estimation and channel prediction, for massive MIMO-OFDM with APSPs. We show that channel acquisition performance in terms of sum mean square error can be minimized if the user terminals' channel power distributions in the angle-delay domain can be made non-overlapping with proper phase shift scheduling. A simplified pilot phase shift scheduling algorithm is developed based on this optimal channel acquisition condition. The performance of APSPs is investigated for both one symbol and multiple symbol data models. Simulations demonstrate that the proposed APSP approach can provide substantial performance gains in terms of achievable spectral efficiency over the conventional phase shift orthogonal pilot approach in typical mobility scenarios.

  4. Precise SER Analysis and Performance Results of OSTBC MIMO-OFDM Systems over Uncorrelated Nakagami-m Fading Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad Ansari, Ejaz; Rajatheva, Nandana

    Although the topic of multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) based orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) over different fading channels is well investigated, its closed form symbol error rate (SER) expressions and performance results employing orthogonal space time block codes (OSTBCs) over uncorrelated frequency-selective Nakagami-m fading channels are still not available. The closed form expressions are extremely useful for evaluating system's performance without carrying out time consuming simulations. Similarly, the performance results are also quite beneficial for determining the system's performance in the sense that many practical wireless standards extensively employ MIMO-OFDM systems in conjunction with M-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (M-QAM) constellation. This paper thus, derives exact closed form expressions for the SER of M-ary Gray-coded one and two dimensional constellations when an OSTBC is employed and Nt transmit antennas are selected for transmission over frequency-selective Nakagami-m fading channels. For this purpose, first an exact closed-form of average SER expression of OSTBC based MIMO-OFDM system for M-ary phase shift keying (M-PSK) using traditional probability density function (PDF) approach is derived. We then compute exact closed form average SER expressions for M-ary pulse amplitude modulation (M-PAM) and M-QAM schemes by utilizing this generalized result. These expressions are valid over both frequency-flat and frequency-selective Nakagami-m fading MIMO channels and can easily be evaluated without using any numerical integration methods. We also show that average SER of MIMO-OFDM system using OSTBC in case of frequency-selective Rayleigh fading channels remains independent to the number of taps, L of that fading channel and the performance of the same system for two-tap un-correlated Rayleigh and Nakagami-m fading channels is better than that of the correlated one. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulation of MIMO-OFDM system

  5. Independent component analysis based channel equalization for 6 × 6 MIMO-OFDM transmission over few-mode fiber.

    PubMed

    He, Zhixue; Li, Xiang; Luo, Ming; Hu, Rong; Li, Cai; Qiu, Ying; Fu, Songnian; Yang, Qi; Yu, Shaohua

    2016-05-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate two independent component analysis (ICA) based channel equalizers (CEs) for 6 × 6 MIMO-OFDM transmission over few-mode fiber. Compared with the conventional channel equalizer based on training symbols (TSs-CE), the proposed two ICA-based channel equalizers (ICA-CE-I and ICA-CE-II) can achieve comparable performances, while requiring much less training symbols. Consequently, the overheads for channel equalization can be substantially reduced from 13.7% to 0.4% and 2.6%, respectively. Meanwhile, we also experimentally investigate the convergence speed of the proposed ICA-based CEs. PMID:27137537

  6. Proportional Data Rate Fairness Resource Allocation for MIMO-OFDM Multiple Access Channel by Considering the Correlation Effect of Line of Sight and Non Line of Sight Channel Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maung, Sann Maw; Sasase, Iwao

    In the MIMO-OFDM multiple access channel (MIMO-OFDM-MAC) uplink scenario, the base station decides the uplink parameters for multiple users based on channel state information (CSI) from each user in the system. The performance of MIMO-OFDM-MAC systems can be significantly improved by using an adaptive transmission and resource allocation schemes which consider the correlation effect of line of sight (LOS) and non line of sight (NLOS) channel conditions for different users in the system. A lot of papers have been published on resource allocation schemes for MIMO-OFDM systems. However, most of these resource allocation schemes have been considered for MIMO-OFDMA systems, where users are separated in the frequency domain and each user uses the same uplink and downlink channels in the same channel conditions. On the other hand, in the mulituser MIMO-OFDM systems, more than one user can be assigned the same frequency and channel conditions for the MIMO-OFDM broadcast channel (downlink) and MIMO-OFDM-MAC channel (uplink) are not the same. Therefore, the same resource allocation schemes for the conventional MIMO-OFDM systems can not be applied to multiuser MIMO-OFDM systems with different uplink and downlink channel conditions. Until now, most of the resource allocation schemes have been considered only for downlink MIMO-OFDM broadcast (MIMO-OFDM-BC) channel and very few papers tackle the fairness among users. Moreover, no paper considers a scheme to realize proportional data rate fairness among users in the MIMO-OFDM-MAC condition. In this paper, we propose a proportional data rate fairness resource allocation scheme with adaptive bit loading for MIMO-ODFM-MAC systems by considering the correlation effects of LOS and NLOS channel conditions in both spatial and frequency domains. Computer simulation results show that the proposed scheme can give larger system capacity while maintaining the proportional data rate fairness requirements among users in the system under the

  7. Low-mobility channel tracking for MIMO-OFDM communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagadarai, Srikanth; Wyglinski, Alexander M.; Anderson, Christopher R.

    2013-12-01

    It is now well understood that by exploiting the available additional spatial dimensions, multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) communication systems provide capacity gains, compared to a single-input single-output systems without increasing the overall transmit power or requiring additional bandwidth. However, these large capacity gains are feasible only when the perfect knowledge of the channel is available to the receiver. Consequently, when the channel knowledge is imperfect, as is common in practical settings, the impact of the achievable capacity needs to be evaluated. In this study, we begin with a general MIMO framework at the outset and specialize it to the case of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) systems by decoupling channel estimation from data detection. Cyclic-prefixed OFDM systems have attracted widespread interest due to several appealing characteristics not least of which is the fact that a single-tap frequency-domain equalizer per subcarrier is sufficient due to the circulant structure of the resulting channel matrix. We consider a low-mobility wireless channel which exhibits inter-block channel variations and apply Kalman tracking when MIMO-OFDM communication is performed. Furthermore, we consider the signal transmission to contain a stream of training and information symbols followed by information symbols alone. By relying on predicted channel states when training symbols are absent, we aim to understand how the improvements in channel capacity are affected by imperfect channel knowledge. We show that the Kalman recursion procedure can be simplified by the optimal minimum mean square error training design. Using the simplified recursion, we derive capacity upper and lower bounds to evaluate the performance of the system.

  8. An ICA based MIMO-OFDM VLC scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fangqing; Deng, Honggui; Xiao, Wei; Tao, Shaohua; Zhu, Kaicheng

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel ICA based MIMO-OFDM VLC scheme, where ICA is applied to convert the MIMO-OFDM channel into several SISO-OFDM channels to reduce computational complexity in channel estimation, without any spectral overhead. Besides, the FM is first investigated to further modulate the OFDM symbols to eliminate the correlation of the signals, so as to improve the separation performance of the ICA algorithm. In the 4×4MIMO-OFDM VLC simulation experiment, LOS path and NLOS paths are both considered, each transmitting signal at 100 Mb/s. Simulation results show that the BER of the proposed scheme reaches the 10-5 level at SNR=20 dB, which is a large improvement compared to the traditional schemes.

  9. Space-Frequency Block Code with Matched Rotation for MIMO-OFDM System with Limited Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Abhayapala, Thushara D.; Jayalath, Dhammika; Smith, David; Athaudage, Chandra

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a novel matched rotation precoding (MRP) scheme to design a rate one space-frequency block code (SFBC) and a multirate SFBC for MIMO-OFDM systems with limited feedback. The proposed rate one MRP and multirate MRP can always achieve full transmit diversity and optimal system performance for arbitrary number of antennas, subcarrier intervals, and subcarrier groupings, with limited channel knowledge required by the transmit antennas. The optimization process of the rate one MRP is simple and easily visualized so that the optimal rotation angle can be derived explicitly, or even intuitively for some cases. The multirate MRP has a complex optimization process, but it has a better spectral efficiency and provides a relatively smooth balance between system performance and transmission rate. Simulations show that the proposed SFBC with MRP can overcome the diversity loss for specific propagation scenarios, always improve the system performance, and demonstrate flexible performance with large performance gain. Therefore the proposed SFBCs with MRP demonstrate flexibility and feasibility so that it is more suitable for a practical MIMO-OFDM system with dynamic parameters.

  10. Development and experimental validation of downlink multiuser MIMO-OFDM in gigabit wireless LAN systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Koichi; Asai, Yusuke; Kudo, Riichi; Ichikawa, Takeo; Takatori, Yasushi; Mizoguchi, Masato

    2013-12-01

    Multiuser multiple-input multiple-output (MU-MIMO) has been proposed as a means to improve spectrum efficiency for various future wireless communication systems. This paper reports indoor experimental results obtained for a newly developed and implemented downlink (DL) MU-MIMO orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) transceiver for gigabit wireless local area network systems in the microwave band. In the transceiver, the channel state information (CSI) is estimated at each user and fed back to an access point (AP) on a real-time basis. At the AP, the estimated CSI is used to calculate the transmit beamforming weight for DL MU-MIMO transmission. This paper also proposes a recursive inverse matrix computation scheme for computing the transmit weight in real time. Experiments with the developed transceiver demonstrate its feasibility in a number of indoor scenarios. The experimental results clarify that DL MU-MIMO-OFDM transmission can achieve a 972-Mbit/s transmission data rate with simple digital signal processing of single-antenna users in an indoor environment.

  11. Power amplifier linearization technique with IQ imbalance and crosstalk compensation for broadband MIMO-OFDM transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorio, Fernando; Cousseau, Juan; Werner, Stefan; Riihonen, Taneli; Wichman, Risto

    2011-12-01

    The design of predistortion techniques for broadband multiple input multiple output-OFDM (MIMO-OFDM) systems raises several implementation challenges. First, the large bandwidth of the OFDM signal requires the introduction of memory effects in the PD model. In addition, it is usual to consider an imbalanced in-phase and quadrature (IQ) modulator to translate the predistorted baseband signal to RF. Furthermore, the coupling effects, which occur when the MIMO paths are implemented in the same reduced size chipset, cannot be avoided in MIMO transceivers structures. This study proposes a MIMO-PD system that linearizes the power amplifier response and compensates nonlinear crosstalk and IQ imbalance effects for each branch of the multiantenna system. Efficient recursive algorithms are presented to estimate the complete MIMO-PD coefficients. The algorithms avoid the high computational complexity in previous solutions based on least squares estimation. The performance of the proposed MIMO-PD structure is validated by simulations using a two-transmitter antenna MIMO system. Error vector magnitude and adjacent channel power ratio are evaluated showing significant improvement compared with conventional MIMO-PD systems.

  12. Adaptive reconfigurable V-BLAST type equalizer for cognitive MIMO-OFDM radios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozden, Mehmet Tahir

    2015-12-01

    An adaptive channel shortening equalizer design for multiple input multiple output-orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (MIMO-OFDM) radio receivers is considered in this presentation. The proposed receiver has desirable features for cognitive and software defined radio implementations. It consists of two sections: MIMO decision feedback equalizer (MIMO-DFE) and adaptive multiple Viterbi detection. In MIMO-DFE section, a complete modified Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization of multichannel input data is accomplished using sequential processing multichannel Givens lattice stages, so that a Vertical Bell Laboratories Layered Space Time (V-BLAST) type MIMO-DFE is realized at the front-end section of the channel shortening equalizer. Matrix operations, a major bottleneck for receiver operations, are accordingly avoided, and only scalar operations are used. A highly modular and regular radio receiver architecture that has a suitable structure for digital signal processing (DSP) chip and field programable gate array (FPGA) implementations, which are important for software defined radio realizations, is achieved. The MIMO-DFE section of the proposed receiver can also be reconfigured for spectrum sensing and positioning functions, which are important tasks for cognitive radio applications. In connection with adaptive multiple Viterbi detection section, a systolic array implementation for each channel is performed so that a receiver architecture with high computational concurrency is attained. The total computational complexity is given in terms of equalizer and desired response filter lengths, alphabet size, and number of antennas. The performance of the proposed receiver is presented for two-channel case by means of mean squared error (MSE) and probability of error evaluations, which are conducted for time-invariant and time-variant channel conditions, orthogonal and nonorthogonal transmissions, and two different modulation schemes.

  13. MIMO OFDM radar IRCI free range reconstruction with sufficient cyclic prefix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xiang-gen; Zhang, Tianxian; Kong, Lingjiang

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we propose MIMO OFDM radar with sufficient cyclic prefix (CP), where all OFDM pulses transmitted from different transmitters share the same frequency band and are orthogonal to each other for every subcarrier in the discrete frequency domain. The orthogonality is not affected by time delays from transmitters. Thus, our proposed MIMO OFDM radar has the same range resolution as single transmitter radar and achieves full spatial diversity. Orthogonal designs are used to achieve this orthogonality across the transmitters, with which it is only needed to design OFDM pulses for the first transmitter. We also propose a joint pulse compression and pulse coherent integration for range reconstruction. In order to achieve the optimal SNR for the range reconstruction, we apply the paraunitary filterbank theory to design the OFDM pulses. We then propose a modified iterative clipping and filtering (MICF) algorithm for the designs of OFDM pulses jointly, when other important factors, such as peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) in time domain, are also considered. With our proposed MIMO OFDM radar, there is no interference for the range reconstruction not only across the transmitters but also across the range cells in a swath called inter-range-cell interference (IRCI) free that is similar to our previously proposed CP based OFDM radar for single transmitter. Simulations are presented to illustrate our proposed theory and show that the CP based MIMO OFDM radar outperforms the existing frequency-band shared MIMO radar with polyphase codes and also frequency division MIMO radar.

  14. A joint swarm intelligence algorithm for multi-user detection in MIMO-OFDM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fengye; Du, Dakun; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Zhijun

    2014-11-01

    In the multi-input multi-output orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (MIMO-OFDM) system, traditional multi-user detection (MUD) algorithms that usually used to suppress multiple access interference are difficult to balance system detection performance and the complexity of the algorithm. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a joint swarm intelligence algorithm called Ant Colony and Particle Swarm Optimisation (AC-PSO) by integrating particle swarm optimisation (PSO) and ant colony optimisation (ACO) algorithms. According to simulation results, it has been shown that, with low computational complexity, the MUD for the MIMO-OFDM system based on AC-PSO algorithm gains comparable MUD performance with maximum likelihood algorithm. Thus, the proposed AC-PSO algorithm provides a satisfactory trade-off between computational complexity and detection performance.

  15. A robust and scalable neuromorphic communication system by combining synaptic time multiplexing and MIMO-OFDM.

    PubMed

    Srinivasa, Narayan; Zhang, Deying; Grigorian, Beayna

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a novel architecture for enabling robust and efficient neuromorphic communication. The architecture combines two concepts: 1) synaptic time multiplexing (STM) that trades space for speed of processing to create an intragroup communication approach that is firing rate independent and offers more flexibility in connectivity than cross-bar architectures and 2) a wired multiple input multiple output (MIMO) communication with orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) techniques to enable a robust and efficient intergroup communication for neuromorphic systems. The MIMO-OFDM concept for the proposed architecture was analyzed by simulating large-scale spiking neural network architecture. Analysis shows that the neuromorphic system with MIMO-OFDM exhibits robust and efficient communication while operating in real time with a high bit rate. Through combining STM with MIMO-OFDM techniques, the resulting system offers a flexible and scalable connectivity as well as a power and area efficient solution for the implementation of very large-scale spiking neural architectures in hardware. PMID:24807453

  16. Experimental investigation of inter-core crosstalk tolerance of MIMO-OFDM/OQAM radio over multicore fiber system.

    PubMed

    He, Jiale; Li, Borui; Deng, Lei; Tang, Ming; Gan, Lin; Fu, Songnian; Shum, Perry Ping; Liu, Deming

    2016-06-13

    In this paper, the feasibility of space division multiplexing for optical wireless fronthaul systems is experimentally demonstrated by implementing high speed MIMO-OFDM/OQAM radio signals over 20km 7-core fiber and 0.4m wireless link. Moreover, the impact of optical inter-core crosstalk in multicore fibers on the proposed MIMO-OFDM/OQAM radio over fiber system is experimentally evaluated in both SISO and MIMO configurations for comparison. The experimental results show that the inter-core crosstalk tolerance of the proposed radio over fiber system can be relaxed to -10 dB by using the proposed MIMO-OFDM/OQAM processing. These results could guide high density multicore fiber design to support a large number of antenna modules and a higher density of radio-access points for potential applications in 5G cellular system. PMID:27410359

  17. Achievable rate maximization for decode-and-forward MIMO-OFDM networks with an energy harvesting relay.

    PubMed

    Du, Guanyao; Yu, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the system achievable rate for the multiple-input multiple-output orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (MIMO-OFDM) system with an energy harvesting (EH) relay. Firstly we propose two protocols, time switching-based decode-and-forward relaying (TSDFR) and a flexible power splitting-based DF relaying (PSDFR) protocol by considering two practical receiver architectures, to enable the simultaneous information processing and energy harvesting at the relay. In PSDFR protocol, we introduce a temporal parameter to describe the time division pattern between the two phases which makes the protocol more flexible and general. In order to explore the system performance limit, we discuss the system achievable rate theoretically and formulate two optimization problems for the proposed protocols to maximize the system achievable rate. Since the problems are non-convex and difficult to solve, we first analyze them theoretically and get some explicit results, then design an augmented Lagrangian penalty function (ALPF) based algorithm for them. Numerical results are provided to validate the accuracy of our analytical results and the effectiveness of the proposed ALPF algorithm. It is shown that, PSDFR outperforms TSDFR to achieve higher achievable rate in such a MIMO-OFDM relaying system. Besides, we also investigate the impacts of the relay location, the number of antennas and the number of subcarriers on the system performance. Specifically, it is shown that, the relay position greatly affects the system performance of both protocols, and relatively worse achievable rate is achieved when the relay is placed in the middle of the source and the destination. This is different from the MIMO-OFDM DF relaying system without EH. Moreover, the optimal factor which indicates the time division pattern between the two phases in the PSDFR protocol is always above 0.8, which means that, the common division of the total transmission time into two equal phases in

  18. Low-bit rate feedback strategies for iterative IA-precoded MIMO-OFDM-based systems.

    PubMed

    Teodoro, Sara; Silva, Adão; Dinis, Rui; Gameiro, Atílio

    2014-01-01

    Interference alignment (IA) is a promising technique that allows high-capacity gains in interference channels, but which requires the knowledge of the channel state information (CSI) for all the system links. We design low-complexity and low-bit rate feedback strategies where a quantized version of some CSI parameters is fed back from the user terminal (UT) to the base station (BS), which shares it with the other BSs through a limited-capacity backhaul network. This information is then used by BSs to perform the overall IA design. With the proposed strategies, we only need to send part of the CSI information, and this can even be sent only once for a set of data blocks transmitted over time-varying channels. These strategies are applied to iterative MMSE-based IA techniques for the downlink of broadband wireless OFDM systems with limited feedback. A new robust iterative IA technique, where channel quantization errors are taken into account in IA design, is also proposed and evaluated. With our proposed strategies, we need a small number of quantization bits to transmit and share the CSI, when comparing with the techniques used in previous works, while allowing performance close to the one obtained with perfect channel knowledge. PMID:24678274

  19. Low-Bit Rate Feedback Strategies for Iterative IA-Precoded MIMO-OFDM-Based Systems

    PubMed Central

    Teodoro, Sara; Silva, Adão; Dinis, Rui; Gameiro, Atílio

    2014-01-01

    Interference alignment (IA) is a promising technique that allows high-capacity gains in interference channels, but which requires the knowledge of the channel state information (CSI) for all the system links. We design low-complexity and low-bit rate feedback strategies where a quantized version of some CSI parameters is fed back from the user terminal (UT) to the base station (BS), which shares it with the other BSs through a limited-capacity backhaul network. This information is then used by BSs to perform the overall IA design. With the proposed strategies, we only need to send part of the CSI information, and this can even be sent only once for a set of data blocks transmitted over time-varying channels. These strategies are applied to iterative MMSE-based IA techniques for the downlink of broadband wireless OFDM systems with limited feedback. A new robust iterative IA technique, where channel quantization errors are taken into account in IA design, is also proposed and evaluated. With our proposed strategies, we need a small number of quantization bits to transmit and share the CSI, when comparing with the techniques used in previous works, while allowing performance close to the one obtained with perfect channel knowledge. PMID:24678274

  20. Quantification of MDL-induced signal degradation in MIMO-OFDM mode-division multiplexing systems.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu; Li, Juhao; Zhu, Paikun; Wu, Zhongying; Chen, Yuanxiang; He, Yongqi; Chen, Zhangyuan

    2016-08-22

    Mode-division multiplexing (MDM) transmission over few-mode optical fiber has emerged as a promising technology to enhance transmission capacity, in which multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) digital signal processing (DSP) after coherent detection is used to demultiplex the signals. Compared with conventional single-mode systems, MIMO-MDM systems suffer non-recoverable signal degradation induced by mode-dependent loss (MDL). In this paper, the MDL-induced signal degradation in orthogonal-frequency-division-multiplexing (OFDM) MDM systems is theoretically quantified in terms of mode-average error vector magnitude (EVM) through frequency domain norm analysis. A novel scalar MDL metric is proposed considering the probability distribution of the practical MDM input signals, and a closed-form expression for EVM measured after zero-force (ZF) MIMO equalization is derived. Simulation results show that the EVM estimations utilizing the novel MDL metric remain unbiased for unrepeated links. For a 6 × 100 km 20-mode MDM transmission system, the estimation accuracy is improved by more than 90% compared with that utilizing traditional condition number (CN) based MDL metric. The proposed MDL metric can be used to predict the MDL-induced SNR penalty in a theoretical manner, which will be beneficial for the design of practical MIMO-MDM systems. PMID:27557176

  1. Parallel Multistage Decision Feedback Equalizer for Single-Carrier Layered Space-Time Systems in Frequency-Selective Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Wang, Haifeng; Cheng, Shixin; Chen, Ming

    2004-12-01

    Space-time transmission techniques can greatly increase the spectral efficiency. In this paper, a parallel multistage decision feedback equalizer (PMDFE) is proposed for single-carrier layered space-time systems with a fixed cyclic prefix over frequency-selective channels. It is composed of a parallel interference canceller, a multiple-input single-output decision feedback equalizer (MISO-DFE), and a linear combiner. The soft output of the MISO-DFE is linearly combined with the previous tentative soft decision. In addition, an algorithm is proposed to obtain tentative soft and hard decisions for initializing the equalizer. The initializing complexity of the PMDFE is lower than that of MIMO-OFDM. Simulation results show that the PMDFE outperforms MIMO-OFDM and previously existing equalizers for single-carrier layered space-time systems.

  2. Field Experiments on Real-Time 1-Gbps High-Speed Packet Transmission in MIMO-OFDM Broadband Packet Radio Access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taoka, Hidekazu; Higuchi, Kenichi; Sawahashi, Mamoru

    This paper presents experimental results in real propagation channel environments of real-time 1-Gbps packet transmission using antenna-dependent adaptive modulation and channel coding (AMC) with 4-by-4 MIMO multiplexing in the downlink Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) radio access. In the experiment, Maximum Likelihood Detection employing QR decomposition and the M-algorithm (QRM-MLD) with adaptive selection of the surviving symbol replica candidates (ASESS) is employed to achieve such a high data rate at a lower received signal-to-interference plus background noise power ratio (SINR). The field experiments, which are conducted at the average moving speed of 30km/h, show that real-time packet transmission of greater than 1Gbps in a 100-MHz channel bandwidth (i.e., 10bits/second/Hz) is achieved at the average received SINR of approximately 13.5dB using 16QAM modulation and turbo coding with the coding rate of 8/9. Furthermore, we show that the measured throughput of greater than 1Gbps is achieved at the probability of approximately 98% in a measurement course, where the maximum distance from the cell site was approximately 300m with the respective transmitter and receiver antenna separation of 1.5m and 40cm with the total transmission power of 10W. The results also clarify that the minimum required receiver antenna spacing is approximately 10cm (1.5 carrier wave length) to suppress the loss in the required received SINR at 1-Gbps throughput to within 1dB compared to that assuming the fading correlation between antennas of zero both under non-line-of-sight (NLOS) and line-of-sight (LOS) conditions.

  3. Information capacities of quantum measurement channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holevo, A. S.

    2013-03-01

    We study the relation between the unassisted and entanglement-assisted classical capacities C and Cea of entanglement-breaking channels. We argue that the gain of entanglement assistance Cea/C > 1 generically for measurement channels with unsharp observables; in particular for the measurements with pure posterior states the information loss in the entanglement-assisted protocol is zero, resulting in an arbitrarily large gain for very noisy or weak signal channels. This is illustrated by examples of continuous observables corresponding to state tomography in finite dimensions and heterodyne measurement. In contrast, state preparations are characterized by the property of having no gain of entanglement assistance, Cea/C = 1.

  4. Entanglement in channel discrimination with restricted measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, William; Piani, Marco; Watrous, John

    2010-09-15

    We study the power of measurements implementable with local quantum operations and classical communication (LOCC) measurements in the setting of quantum channel discrimination. More precisely, we consider discrimination procedures that attempt to identify an unknown channel, chosen uniformly from two known alternatives, that take the following form: (i) the input to the unknown channel is prepared in a possibly entangled state with an ancillary system, (ii) the unknown channel is applied to the input system, and (iii) an LOCC measurement is performed on the output and ancillary systems, resulting in a guess for which of the two channels was given. The restriction of the measurement in such a procedure to be an LOCC measurement is of interest because it isolates the entanglement in the initial input-ancillary systems as a resource in the setting of channel discrimination. We prove that there exist channel discrimination problems for which restricted procedures of this sort can be at either of the two extremes: they may be optimal within the set of all discrimination procedures (and simultaneously outperform all strategies that make no use of entanglement), or they may be no better than unentangled strategies (and simultaneously suboptimal within the set of all discrimination procedures).

  5. Variable is better than invariable: sparse VSS-NLMS algorithms with application to adaptive MIMO channel estimation.

    PubMed

    Gui, Guan; Chen, Zhang-xin; Xu, Li; Wan, Qun; Huang, Jiyan; Adachi, Fumiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Channel estimation problem is one of the key technical issues in sparse frequency-selective fading multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) communication systems using orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) scheme. To estimate sparse MIMO channels, sparse invariable step-size normalized least mean square (ISS-NLMS) algorithms were applied to adaptive sparse channel estimation (ACSE). It is well known that step-size is a critical parameter which controls three aspects: algorithm stability, estimation performance, and computational cost. However, traditional methods are vulnerable to cause estimation performance loss because ISS cannot balance the three aspects simultaneously. In this paper, we propose two stable sparse variable step-size NLMS (VSS-NLMS) algorithms to improve the accuracy of MIMO channel estimators. First, ASCE is formulated in MIMO-OFDM systems. Second, different sparse penalties are introduced to VSS-NLMS algorithm for ASCE. In addition, difference between sparse ISS-NLMS algorithms and sparse VSS-NLMS ones is explained and their lower bounds are also derived. At last, to verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms for ASCE, several selected simulation results are shown to prove that the proposed sparse VSS-NLMS algorithms can achieve better estimation performance than the conventional methods via mean square error (MSE) and bit error rate (BER) metrics. PMID:25089286

  6. Variable Is Better Than Invariable: Sparse VSS-NLMS Algorithms with Application to Adaptive MIMO Channel Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Guan; Chen, Zhang-xin; Xu, Li; Wan, Qun; Huang, Jiyan; Adachi, Fumiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Channel estimation problem is one of the key technical issues in sparse frequency-selective fading multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) communication systems using orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) scheme. To estimate sparse MIMO channels, sparse invariable step-size normalized least mean square (ISS-NLMS) algorithms were applied to adaptive sparse channel estimation (ACSE). It is well known that step-size is a critical parameter which controls three aspects: algorithm stability, estimation performance, and computational cost. However, traditional methods are vulnerable to cause estimation performance loss because ISS cannot balance the three aspects simultaneously. In this paper, we propose two stable sparse variable step-size NLMS (VSS-NLMS) algorithms to improve the accuracy of MIMO channel estimators. First, ASCE is formulated in MIMO-OFDM systems. Second, different sparse penalties are introduced to VSS-NLMS algorithm for ASCE. In addition, difference between sparse ISS-NLMS algorithms and sparse VSS-NLMS ones is explained and their lower bounds are also derived. At last, to verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms for ASCE, several selected simulation results are shown to prove that the proposed sparse VSS-NLMS algorithms can achieve better estimation performance than the conventional methods via mean square error (MSE) and bit error rate (BER) metrics. PMID:25089286

  7. Measurements of gravity driven granular channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facto, Kevin

    This dissertation presents experiments that studied two gravity driven granular channel flows. The first experiment used magnetic resonance imaging to measure the density and displacement distributions of poppy seeds flowing in a rough walled channel. Time-averaged measurements of normalized velocity and density showed little flow speed dependence. Instantaneous measurements, however, showed marked velocity dependence in the displacement distributions. There was evidence of aperiodic starting and stopping at lower flow speeds and the onset of density waves on a continuous flow at higher speeds. The second experiment measured forces in all three spatial directions at the boundary of a flow of steel balls. The relationship between the normal and the tangential forces were examined statistically and compared to the Coulomb friction model. For both large and small forces, the tangential and normal forces are unrelated, as there appears to be a strong tendency for the tangential force to maintain a value that will bear the weight the weight of the particles in flow.

  8. Measurement of stream channel habitat using sonar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flug, M.; Seitz, H.; Scott, J.

    1998-01-01

    An efficient and low cost technique using a sonar system was evaluated for describing channel geometry and quantifying inundated area in a large river. The boat-mounted portable sonar equipment was used to record water depths and river width measurements for direct storage on a laptop computer. The field data collected from repeated traverses at a cross-section were evaluated to determine the precision of the system and field technique. Results from validation at two different sites showed average sample standard deviations (S.D.s) of 0.12 m for these complete cross-sections, with coefficient of variations of 10%. Validation using only the mid-channel river cross-section data yields an average sample S.D. of 0.05 m, with a coefficient of variation below 5%, at a stable and gauged river site using only measurements of water depths greater than 0.6 m. Accuracy of the sonar system was evaluated by comparison to traditionally surveyed transect data from a regularly gauged site. We observed an average mean squared deviation of 46.0 cm2, considering only that portion of the cross-section inundated by more than 0.6 m of water. Our procedure proved to be a reliable, accurate, safe, quick, and economic method to record river depths, discharges, bed conditions, and substratum composition necessary for stream habitat studies. ?? 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Stochastic Wireless Channel Modeling, Estimation and Identification from Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Olama, Mohammed M; Djouadi, Seddik M; Li, Yanyan

    2008-07-01

    This paper is concerned with stochastic modeling of wireless fading channels, parameter estimation, and system identification from measurement data. Wireless channels are represented by stochastic state-space form, whose parameters and state variables are estimated using the expectation maximization algorithm and Kalman filtering, respectively. The latter are carried out solely from received signal measurements. These algorithms estimate the channel inphase and quadrature components and identify the channel parameters recursively. The proposed algorithm is tested using measurement data, and the results are presented.

  10. Measuring Ion Channels on Solid Supported Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Patrick; Dueck, Benjamin; Mourot, Alexandre; Hatahet, Lina; Fendler, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Application of solid supported membranes (SSMs) for the functional investigation of ion channels is presented. SSM-based electrophysiology, which has been introduced previously for the investigation of active transport systems, is expanded for the analysis of ion channels. Membranes or liposomes containing ion channels are adsorbed to an SSM and a concentration gradient of a permeant ion is applied. Transient currents representing ion channel transport activity are recorded via capacitive coupling. We demonstrate the application of the technique to liposomes reconstituted with the peptide cation channel gramicidin, vesicles from native tissue containing the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, and membranes from a recombinant cell line expressing the ionotropic P2X2 receptor. It is shown that stable ion gradients, both inside as well as outside directed, can be applied and currents are recorded with an excellent signal/noise ratio. For the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and the P2X2 receptor excellent assay quality factors of Z′ = 0.55 and Z′ = 0.67, respectively, are obtained. This technique opens up new possibilities in cases where conventional electrophysiology fails like the functional characterization of ion channels from intracellular compartments. It also allows for robust fully automatic assays for drug screening. PMID:19580777

  11. Capillary wave measurements on helically-supported capillary channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandurwala, Fahim; Thiessen, David

    2010-10-01

    NASA is considering power generation by the Rankine cycle to save weight on long-duration manned missions to the moon or Mars. Phase separation technology is critical to this process in microgravity. Arrays of capillary channels might be useful for filtering liquid drops from a flowing vapor. The efficiency of droplet capture by a helically-supported capillary channel is being studied. A droplet impinging on the channel launches capillary waves that propagate down the channel helping to dissipate some of the drop's kinetic energy. High-speed video of the channel combined with image processing allows for measurement of the amplitude and speed of the wave packets. Increasing the pitch of the support structure decreases the wave speed. An understanding of the dynamic response of the channel to drop impact is a first step in predicting drop-capture efficiency.

  12. Measurement of multipath delay profile in land mobile satellite channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikegami, Tetsushi; Arakaki, Yoshiya; Wakana, Hiromitsu; Suzuki, Ryutaro

    1993-01-01

    Mobile satellite communication channel has been evaluated mainly with fading statistics of signal. When bandwidth of transmitting signal becomes wider, frequency selectivity of fading becomes a significant factor of the channel. Channel characteristics, not only signal variation but multipath delay spread should be evaluated. A multipath measurement system is proposed and developed for mobile satellite applications. With this system and ETS-V satellite, multipath delay profiles are measured in various environments including Tokyo metropolis and Sapporo city at 1.5 GHz. Results show that the maximum excess delay is within 1 microsec and the maximum delay spread is 0.2 microsecs at elevation angles of 40 to 47 degrees. In wideband signal transmission of about 1 MHz and more, designers should consider the effect of selective fading due to the multipath of land mobile satellite channel.

  13. Channel capacities versus entanglement measures in multiparty quantum states

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2010-01-15

    For quantum states of two subsystems, highly entangled states have a higher capacity of transmitting classical as well as quantum information, and vice versa. We show that this is no more the case in general: Quantum capacities of multiaccess channels, motivated by communication in quantum networks, do not have any relation with genuine multiparty entanglement measures. Importantly, the statement is demonstrated for arbitrary multipartite entanglement measures. Along with revealing the structural richness of multiaccess channels, this gives us a tool to classify multiparty quantum states from the perspective of its usefulness in quantum networks, which cannot be visualized by any genuine multiparty entanglement measure.

  14. Ion movement through gramicidin A channels. Single-channel measurements at very high potentials.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, O S

    1983-01-01

    The patch-clamp technique of Mueller (1975, Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci., 274:247-264) and Neher and Sakmann (1976, Nature (Lond.), 260:799-802) was modified to be suitable for single-channel measurements in lipid bilayers at potentials up to 500 mV. This method was used to study gramicidin A single-channel current-voltage characteristics. It was found that the sublinear current-voltage behavior normally observed at low permeant ion concentrations and rather low potentials (V less than or equal to 200 mV) continues to be seen all the way up to 500 mV. This phenomenon is characteristic of the low permeant ion situation in which the channel is far from saturation, and implies that the overall rate constant for association between ion and channel is very weakly, if at all, voltage dependent. The magnitude of the single channel currents at 500 mV is consistent with the notion that the aqueous convergence conductance is a significant factor in determining the permeability characteristics of the gramicidin A channel. PMID:6188500

  15. A Portable MIMO Testbed and Selected Channel Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goud, Paul, Jr.; Hang, Robert; Truhachev, Dmitri; Schlegel, Christian

    2006-12-01

    A portable[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) testbed that is based on field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and which operates in the 902-928 MHz industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) band has been developed by the High Capacity Digital Communications (HCDC) Laboratory at the University of Alberta. We present a description of the HCDC testbed along with MIMO channel capacities that were derived from measurements taken with the HCDC testbed for three special locations: a narrow corridor, an athletics field that is surrounded by a metal fence, and a parkade. These locations are special because the channel capacities are different from what is expected for a typical indoor or outdoor channel. For two of the cases, a ray-tracing analysis has been performed and the simulated channel capacity values closely match the values calculated from the measured data. A ray-tracing analysis, however, requires accurate geometrical measurements and sophisticated modeling for each specific location. A MIMO testbed is ideal for quickly obtaining accurate channel capacity information.

  16. Digital correlator for the portable channel prober measurement instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peo, George E., Jr.

    1987-12-01

    This document describes a Digital Correlator for the Portable Channel Prober Measurement Instrument being developed by the Naval Research Laboratory for use in experiments designed to characterize high frequency (HF) radio channels. This Digital Correlator is a digital signal processor designed and constructed by Stow Computer, 111 old Bolton Road, Stow, MA 01775, (617/508) 897-6838. Two Digital Correlators are integrated into the existing Digital Pre-processor to make a Portable Wideband HF Channel Analyzer. The Portable Wideband HF Channel Analyzer will be located at the receiving site of the channel probing experiment and is situated between the coherent radio receiver and the microcomputer used for data recording and analysis. The Portable Wideband HF Channel Analyzer computes the delay power spectrum of the received waveform. The in-phase and quadrature outputs of the receiver are sampled and converted to digital values by the Analog to Digital Converter, integrated by the Integrator, and correlated with a stored replica of the transmitted waveform by two Digital Correlators. The resulting tap gains are then read by the system microcomputer using the microcomputer interface.

  17. Measurement and Modeling of Narrowband Channels for Ultrasonic Underwater Communications.

    PubMed

    Cañete, Francisco J; López-Fernández, Jesús; García-Corrales, Celia; Sánchez, Antonio; Robles, Encarnación; Rodrigo, Francisco J; Paris, José F

    2016-01-01

    Underwater acoustic sensor networks are a promising technology that allow real-time data collection in seas and oceans for a wide variety of applications. Smaller size and weight sensors can be achieved with working frequencies shifted from audio to the ultrasonic band. At these frequencies, the fading phenomena has a significant presence in the channel behavior, and the design of a reliable communication link between the network sensors will require a precise characterization of it. Fading in underwater channels has been previously measured and modeled in the audio band. However, there have been few attempts to study it at ultrasonic frequencies. In this paper, a campaign of measurements of ultrasonic underwater acoustic channels in Mediterranean shallow waters conducted by the authors is presented. These measurements are used to determine the parameters of the so-called κ-μ shadowed distribution, a fading model with a direct connection to the underlying physical mechanisms. The model is then used to evaluate the capacity of the measured channels with a closed-form expression. PMID:26907281

  18. Measurement and Modeling of Narrowband Channels for Ultrasonic Underwater Communications

    PubMed Central

    Cañete, Francisco J.; López-Fernández, Jesús; García-Corrales, Celia; Sánchez, Antonio; Robles, Encarnación; Rodrigo, Francisco J.; Paris, José F.

    2016-01-01

    Underwater acoustic sensor networks are a promising technology that allow real-time data collection in seas and oceans for a wide variety of applications. Smaller size and weight sensors can be achieved with working frequencies shifted from audio to the ultrasonic band. At these frequencies, the fading phenomena has a significant presence in the channel behavior, and the design of a reliable communication link between the network sensors will require a precise characterization of it. Fading in underwater channels has been previously measured and modeled in the audio band. However, there have been few attempts to study it at ultrasonic frequencies. In this paper, a campaign of measurements of ultrasonic underwater acoustic channels in Mediterranean shallow waters conducted by the authors is presented. These measurements are used to determine the parameters of the so-called κ-μ shadowed distribution, a fading model with a direct connection to the underlying physical mechanisms. The model is then used to evaluate the capacity of the measured channels with a closed-form expression. PMID:26907281

  19. Protecting entanglement from correlated amplitude damping channel using weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xing; Yao, Yao; Xie, Ying-Mao; Wang, Xing-Hua; Li, Yan-Ling

    2016-06-01

    Based on the quantum technique of weak measurement, we propose a scheme to protect the entanglement from correlated amplitude damping decoherence. In contrast to the results of memoryless amplitude damping channel, we show that the memory effects play a significant role in the suppression of entanglement sudden death and protection of entanglement under severe decoherence. Moreover, we find that the initial entanglement could be drastically amplified by the combination of weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal even under the correlated amplitude damping channel. The underlying mechanism can be attributed to the probabilistic nature of weak measurements.

  20. Ultrasound Doppler Velocimetry Measurements in Turbulent Liquid Metal Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivero, Michel; Jian, Dandan; Karcher, Christian; Cuevas, Sergio

    2010-11-01

    Control of molten metal flow using magnetic fields is important in industrial applications. The Electromagnetic Flow Control Channel (EFCO) is an experimental test facility, located at Ilmenau University of Technology, for the development of such kind of control systems. The working fluid is the low-melting liquid metal alloy GaInSn in eutectic composition. In this channel, flow control is realized by combining and coupling the non-contact flow driving technology of electromagnetic pumps based on rotating permanent magnets and the non-contact flow rate measurement technology termed Lorentz Force Velocimetry (LFV). The flow rate is adjusted by controlling the rotation rate of the permanent magnet system. Physically, LFV is based on measuring the force acting on a magnet system. This force is induced by the melt flow passing through the static magnetic field generated by the system and is proportional to the flow. To calibrate such flow meters, we apply UDV technique to measure and analyse both turbulent hydrodynamic and MHD flow profiles in EFCO at various Reynolds numbers.

  1. Modeling potentiometric measurements in topological insulators including parallel channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seokmin; Diep, Vinh; Datta, Supriyo; Chen, Yong P.

    2012-08-01

    The discovery of spin-polarized states at the surface of three-dimensional topological insulators (TI) like Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 motivates intense interests in possible electrical measurements demonstrating unique signatures of these unusual states. Here we show that a three-terminal potentiometric set-up can be used to probe them by measuring the voltage change of a detecting magnet upon reversing its magnetization. We present numerical results using a nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF)-based model to show the corresponding signal quantitatively in various transport regimes. We then provide an analytical expression for the resistance (the measured voltage difference divided by an applied current) that agrees with NEGF results well in both ballistic and diffusive limits. This expression is applicable to TI surface states, two-dimensional electrons with Rashba spin-split bands, and any combination of multiple channels, including bulk parallel states in TI, which makes it useful in analyzing experimental results.

  2. Wide Range Neutron Flux Measuring Channel for Aerospace Application

    SciTech Connect

    Cibils, R. M.; Busto, A.; Gonella, J. L.; Martinez, R.; Chielens, A. J.; Otero, J. M.; Nunez, M.; Tropea, S. E.

    2008-01-21

    The use of classical techniques for neutron flux measurements in nuclear reactors involves the switching between several detection chains as the power grows up to 10 decades. In space applications where mass and size constraints are of key significance, such volume of hardware represents a clear disadvantage. Instead of requiring different instruments for each reactor operating range (start-up, ramping-up, and nominal power), a single instrument chain should be desirable. A Wide Range Neutron Detector (WRND) system, combining a classic pulse Counting Channel with a Campbell's theorem based Fluctuation Channel can be implemented for the monitoring and control of a space nuclear reactor. Such an instrument will allow for a reduction in the complexity of space-based nuclear instrumentation and control systems. In this presentation we will discuss the criteria and tradeoffs involved in the development of such a system. We will focus particularly on the characteristics of the System On Chip (SOC) and the DSP board used to implement this instrument.

  3. Channel Measurement and Modeling for 5G Urban Microcellular Scenarios.

    PubMed

    Peter, Michael; Weiler, Richard J; Göktepe, Barış; Keusgen, Wilhelm; Sakaguchi, Kei

    2016-01-01

    In order to support the development of channel models for higher frequency bands, multiple urban microcellular measurement campaigns have been carried out in Berlin, Germany, at 60 and 10 GHz. In this paper, the collected data is uniformly analyzed with focus on the path loss (PL) and the delay spread (DS). It reveals that the ground reflection has a dominant impact on the fading behavior. For line-of-sight conditions, the PL exponents are close to free space propagation at 60 GHz, but slightly smaller (1.62) for the street canyon at 10 GHz. The DS shows a clear dependence on the scenario (median values between 16 and 38 ns) and a strong distance dependence for the open square and the wide street canyon. The dependence is less distinct for the narrow street canyon with residential buildings. This behavior is consistent with complementary ray tracing simulations, though the simplified model tends to overestimate the DS. PMID:27556462

  4. GIS technology for spatiotemporal measurements of gully channel width evolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field observations of gully evolution in active croplands have often revealed the presence of a less erodible soil layer that is typically associated with tillage practices (i.e. plowpan). This more erosion-resistant layer limits channel incision forcing the gully channel to expand laterally through...

  5. Measurement of the linear polarization of channeling radiation in silicon and diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Rzepka, M.; Buschhorn, G.; Diedrich, E.; Kotthaus, R.; Kufner, W.; Roessl, W.; Schmidt, K.H.; Hoffmann-Stascheck, P.; Genz, H.; Nething, U.; Richter, A.; Sellschop, J.P.F.

    1995-07-01

    Utilizing 90{degree} Compton scattering the linear polarization of channeling radiation produced at the superconducting accelerator S-DALINAC with 62 MeV electrons in silicon and diamond has been measured in the energy range between 50 and 400 keV. Planar channeling radiation due to transitions involving transversal bound as well as unbound states is completely linearly polarized perpendicular to the channeling plane. Axial channeling radiation does not show linear polarization.

  6. Molecular origins of conduction channels observed in shot-noise measurements.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Gemma C; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Frauenheim, Thomas; Di Carlo, Aldo; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Hush, Noel S

    2006-11-01

    Measurements of shot noise from single molecules have indicated the presence of various conduction channels. We present three descriptions of these channels in molecular terms showing that the number of conduction channels is limited by bottlenecks in the molecule and that the channels can be linked to transmission through different junction states. We introduce molecular-conductance orbitals, which allow the transmission to be separated into contributions from individual orbitals and contributions from interference between pairs of orbitals. PMID:17090069

  7. Linear signal-compensated amplifier for reactor power measuring channels

    SciTech Connect

    Khaleeq, M. Tahir; Atique-ur-Rahman,; Ahmed, Eijaz

    2006-07-15

    A linear amplifier with automatic signal compensation has been developed for nuclear channels. The amplifier controls its sensitivity automatically according to the reference input within the desired settings and has automatic signal compensation capability for use in the nuclear channels. The amplifier will be used in the existing safety channel of Pakistan Research Reactor-1, where the system has an independent sensitivity control unit for manual compensation of xenon effect. The new amplifier will improve the safety of the system. The amplifier is tested and the results found are in very good agreement with the designed specifications. This article presents design and construction of the amplifier and test results.

  8. Linear signal-compensated amplifier for reactor power measuring channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaleeq, M. Tahir; Atique-ur-Rahman, Ahmed, Eijaz

    2006-07-01

    A linear amplifier with automatic signal compensation has been developed for nuclear channels. The amplifier controls its sensitivity automatically according to the reference input within the desired settings and has automatic signal compensation capability for use in the nuclear channels. The amplifier will be used in the existing safety channel of Pakistan Research Reactor-1, where the system has an independent sensitivity control unit for manual compensation of xenon effect. The new amplifier will improve the safety of the system. The amplifier is tested and the results found are in very good agreement with the designed specifications. This article presents design and construction of the amplifier and test results.

  9. Channel Bow in Boiling Water Reactors - Hot Cell Examination Results and Correlation to Measured Bow

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, S.T.; Lin, Y.P.; Dubecky, M.A.; Mader, E.V.

    2007-07-01

    An increase in frequency of fuel channel-control blade interference has been observed in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) in recent years. Many of the channels leading to interference were found to bow towards the control blade in a manner that was inconsistent with the expected bow due to other effects. The pattern of bow appeared to indicate a new channel bow mechanism that differed from the predominant bow mechanism caused by differential growth due to fast-fluence gradients. In order to investigate this new type of channel bow, coupons from several channels with varying degrees of bow were returned to the GE Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) for Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE). This paper describes the characteristics of channel corrosion and hydrogen pickup observed, and relates the observations to the channel exposure level, control history, and measured channel bow. The channels selected for PIE had exposures in the range of 36-48 GWd/MTU and covered a wide range of measured bow. The coupons were obtained at 4 elevations from opposing channel sides adjacent and away from the control blade. The PIE performed on these coupons included visual examination, metallography, and hydrogen concentration measurements. A new mechanism of control-blade shadow corrosion-induced channel bow was found to correlate with differences in the extent of corrosion and corresponding differences in the hydrogen concentration between opposite sides of the channels. The increased corrosion on the control blade sides was found to be dependent on the level of control early in the life of the channel. The contributions of other potential factors leading to increased channel bow and channel-control blade interference are also discussed in this paper. (authors)

  10. Method of measuring nitric oxide release by vascular endothelial cells grown in microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinpour, S.; Liu, A. C.; Barakat, A. I.; Choy, J. C.; Gray, B. L.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a simple and versatile method is presented which enables detection of nitric oxide (NO) released from vascular endothelial cells (ECs) cultured in microfluidic structures. The culturing system and NO measurement method allow cell shape to be controlled in a non-invasive manner using microfluidic structures while NO release is monitored for cell shape versus function studies. The culturing system consists of arrays of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fluidic channels 120 micrometers in depth and ranging from 100 micrometers to 3 mm in width. The number of channels in each array is varied to yield a constant cell culture surface area (75 mm2) independent of channel width. The channel surfaces are collagen-coated and ECs are cultured to confluence within the channels. A cell scraper is then used to scrape extraneous cells cultured between channels, and NO measurements are made 18 to 24 hours later. A chemiluminescence-based sensor system (NOA 280i, Sievers NO Analyzer) is utilized to measure sample NO. Initial results indicate that NO concentrations can be measured from different microfluidic channel-containing samples using this method. It is shown that there is no significant difference in NO concentration derived from channels of different widths even though the degree of cell elongation varies due to physical constraint by microfluidic channel walls. However, cells treated with TNFα release more NO than untreated cells in fluidic channels, which is comparable to the function of ECs cultured in conventional culturing systems such as culturing dishes.

  11. Rapid estimation of recharge potential in ephemeral-stream channels using electromagnetic methods, and measurements of channel and vegetation characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Callegary, J.B.; Leenhouts, J.M.; Paretti, N.V.; Jones, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    To classify recharge potential (RCP) in ephemeral-stream channels, a method was developed that incorporates information about channel geometry, vegetation characteristics, and bed-sediment apparent electrical conductivity (??a). Recharge potential is not independently measurable, but is instead formulated as a site-specific, qualitative parameter. We used data from 259 transects across two ephemeral-stream channels near Sierra Vista, Arizona, a location with a semiarid climate. Seven data types were collected: ??a averaged over two depth intervals (0-3 m, and 0-6 m), channel incision depth and width, diameter-at-breast-height of the largest tree, woody-plant and grass density. A two-tiered system was used to classify a transect's RCP. In the first tier, transects were categorized by estimates of near-surface-sediment hydraulic permeability as low, moderate, or high using measurements of 0-3 m-depth ??a. Each of these categories was subdivided into low, medium, or high RCP classes using the remaining six data types, thus yielding a total of nine RCP designations. Six sites in the study area were used to compare RCP and ??a with previously measured surrogates for hydraulic permeability. Borehole-averaged percent fines showed a moderate correlation with both shallow and deep ??a measurements, however, correlation of point measurements of saturated hydraulic conductivity, percent fines, and cylinder infiltrometer measurements with ??a and RCP was generally poor. The poor correlation was probably caused by the relatively large measurement volume and spatial averaging of ??a compared with the spatially-limited point measurements. Because of the comparatively large spatial extent of measurement transects and variety of data types collected, RCP estimates can give a more complete picture of the major factors affecting recharge at a site than is possible through point or borehole-averaged estimates of hydraulic permeability alone. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Sub-micrometer fluidic channel for measuring photon emitting entities

    SciTech Connect

    Stavis, Samuel M; Edel, Joshua B; Samiee, Kevan T; Craighead, Harold G

    2014-11-18

    A nanofluidic channel fabricated in fused silica with an approximately 500 nm square cross section was used to isolate, detect and identify individual quantum dot conjugates. The channel enables the rapid detection of every fluorescent entity in solution. A laser of selected wavelength was used to excite multiple species of quantum dots and organic molecules, and the emission spectra were resolved without significant signal rejection. Quantum dots were then conjugated with organic molecules and detected to demonstrate efficient multicolor detection. PCH was used to analyze coincident detection and to characterize the degree of binding. The use of a small fluidic channel to detect quantum dots as fluorescent labels was shown to be an efficient technique for multiplexed single molecule studies. Detection of single molecule binding events has a variety of applications including high throughput immunoassays.

  13. Near-bed turbulence and sediment flux measurements in tidal channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, S.A.; Whealdon-Haught, D.R.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the hydrodynamics and sediment transport dynamics in tidal channels is important for studies of estuary geomorphology, sediment supply to tidal wetlands, aquatic ecology and fish habitat, and dredging and navigation. Hydrodynamic and sediment transport data are essential for calibration and testing of numerical models that may be used to address management questions related to these topics. Herein we report preliminary analyses of near-bed turbulence and sediment flux measurements in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, a large network of tidal channels and wetlands located at the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, California, USA (Figure 1). Measurements were made in 6 channels spanning a wide range of size and tidal conditions, from small channels that are primarily fluvial to large channels that are tidally dominated. The results of these measurements are summarized herein and the hydrodynamic and sediment transport characteristics of the channels are compared across this range of size and conditions.

  14. Measurement of the nuclear energy loss under channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, H.; Mertens, A.

    2001-07-01

    Neutral Ne atoms with keV energies are scattered under channeling conditions, i.e. at a glancing angle of incidence, from a LiF(001) surface. By means of a time-of-flight method with a pulsed neutral beam we record energy distributions for scattered projectiles. For this specific system the small energy transferred to the crystal lattice ("nuclear energy loss") during channeling via binary collisions with large impact parameters dominates the dissipation of projectile energy. All other excitations of the solid can be brought to a negligible level.

  15. Measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel at CDF and D0

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, Tuula; /Helsinki U. /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.

    2005-10-01

    We present recent analyses of the top quark mass measurement in dileptonic channel. The measurements use 200-360 pb{sup -1} of data collected by CDF and D0 experiments. The future prospects are discussed as well.

  16. Taking the Measure of Channel One: A Three Year Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Jerome; And Others

    Channel One is a daily 12-minute news broadcast for schoolwide rebroadcast to grades 6 through 12. Three years of independent research have tracked its impact on schools and students. This document contains an executive summary and final report that discusses the research findings, focusing on the research during the 1992-93 school year. At that…

  17. Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03693 Channel

    This channel is located south of Iani Chaos.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -10.9N, Longitude 345.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  18. High Resolution Measurements In U-Channel Technique And Implications For Sedimentological Purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acar, Dursun; Cagatay, Namık; Sarı, Erol; Eris, Kadir; Biltekin, Demet; Akcer, Sena; Meydan Gokdere, Feray; Makaroglu, Ozlem; Bulkan, Ozlem; Arslan, Tugce; Albut, Gulum; Yalamaz, Burak; Yakupoglu, Nurettin; Sabuncu, Asen; Fillikci, Betul; Yıldız, Guliz

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical features in-stu drilling for sediment cores and vacuum forces that affect while obtaining the sediments to the core tube are formed concave shaped deformations. Even in the half sections, concave deformation form still appears. During MCSL measurements, Laminae which forms concave shaped deformation, show interference thus, values indicate overall results for several laminae instead of single lamina. These interferenced data is not appropriate for paleoceanography studies which require extend accuracy and high frequency data set to describe geochemical and climatological effects in high resolution. U-Channel technique provides accurate location and isolated values for each lamina. In EMCOL Laboratories, U-channel provide well saturated and air-free environment for samples and, by using these technique U-channels are prepared with modificated MCSL for data acquisition. Even below millimeter scale sampling rate provides the separation of each lamina and, physical properties of every each lamina. Cover of u-channel is made by homogenous plastic in shape of rectangular prism geometry. Thus, during measurement, MSCL sensors may harm the sediment; however u-channel covers the sediment from this unwanted deformation from MSCL itself. U-channel technique can present micro scale angular changes in the laminae. Measurements that have been taken from U-channel are compared with the traditional half core measurements. Interestingly, accuracy of the positions for each lamina is much more detailed and, the resolution is progressively higher. Results from P Wave and Gamma ray density provide removed interference effects on each lamina. In this technique, it is high recommended that U-channel widens the resolution of core logging and generates more cleansed measurements in MCSL. For P- Wave Used Synthetic seismograms that modelled by MSCL data set which created from U-channel technique dictates each anomalies related with climatological and geological changes. Keywords

  19. Peer-to-peer MIMO radio channel measurements in a rural area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Jonathan; Chizhik, Dmitry; Samardzija, Dragan; Valenzuela, Reinaldo A.

    2006-05-01

    To demonstrate a real-time, mobile, peer-to-peer, ad-hoc networked MIMO system in a realistic tactical environment, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has instituted a program, called Mobile Network MIMO (MNM). To assess the communication channel quality for ground level MIMO nodes, a comprehensive channel measurement and modeling effort was carried out to determine quantities such as spatial correlations, delay spread as well as propagation loss. It was found that median 8x10 MIMO capacity supported by the channel was about 8 times the corresponding 1x1 capacity, and 3.2 times the corresponding 1x10 capacity. Also conducted were wideband soundings of such channels, where it was found that the median rms delay spreads were 0.6 μs. Reported are measurements and an empirical model of pathloss, spatial correlation scales, and crosspolarization properties of rural peer-to-peer channels.

  20. Parametric Channeling Radiation and its Application to the Measurement of Electron Beam Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Takabayashi, Y.

    2010-06-23

    We have proposed a method for observing parametric channeling radiation (PCR) and of applying it to the measurement of electron beam energy. The PCR process occurs if the energy of the channeling radiation coincides with the energy of the parametric X-ray radiation (PXR). The PCR process can be regarded as the diffraction of 'virtual channeling radiation'. We developed a scheme for beam energy measurement and designed an experimental setup. We also estimated the beam parameters, and calculated the angular distributions of PXR and PCR. These considerations indicate that the observation of PCR is promising.

  1. Measurement of the t-channel single top quark production cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Aguilo, Ernest; Ahsan, Mahsana; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls /Northeastern U.

    2009-07-01

    The D0 collaboration reports direct evidence for electroweak production of single top quarks through the t-channel exchange of a virtual W boson. This is the first analysis to isolate an individual single top quark production channel. We select events containing an isolated electron or muon, missing transverse energy, and two, three or four jets from 2.3 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. One or two of the jets are identified as containing a b hadron. We combine three multivariate techniques optimized for the t-channel process to measure the t- and s-channel cross sections simultaneously. We measure cross sections of 3.14{sub -0.80}{sup +0.94} pb for the t-channel and 1.05 {+-} 0.81 pb for the s-channel. The measured t-channel result is found to have a significance of 4.8 standard deviations and is consistent with the standard model prediction.

  2. Separate in situ measurements of ECA under land and channel in PEM fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higier, Andrew; Liu, Hongtan

    2012-10-01

    Separate in situ measurements of electrochemical areas (ECA) under land and channel areas in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells are realized using cyclic voltammetry. Experiments are carried out using special membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) in single-channel serpentine flow fields with different widths of channels and lands. The experimental results show that ECAs are significantly higher in the areas under the land than that under the channel. ECA-normalized polarization curves show that ECA is the most significant factor causing higher current density under the land than under the channel in the high cell potential region, and the true concentration polarization under the land in the low potential region is actually much greater than what can be seen in conventional polarization curves. Further experimental results show that, within the compression pressure range examined, ECA increases with compression pressure significantly.

  3. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass Simultaneously in Dilepton and Lepton + Jets Decay Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorko, Wojciech T.

    2008-12-01

    The authors present the first measurement of the top quark mass using simultaneously data from two decay channels. They use a data sample of √s = 1.96 TeV collisions with integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb-1 collected by the CDF II detector. They select dilepton and lepton + jets channel decays of t$\\bar{t}$ pairs and reconstruct two observables in each topology. They use non-parametric techniques to derive probability density functions from simulated signal and background samples. The observables are the reconstructed top quark mass and the scalar sum of transverse energy of the event in the dilepton topology and the reconstructed top quark mass and the invariant mass of jets from the W boson decay in lepton + jets channel. They perform a simultaneous fit for the top quark mass and the jet energy scale which is constrained in situ by the hadronic W boson resonance from the lepton + jets channel. Using 144 dilepton candidate events and 332 lepton + jets candidate events they measure: Mtop = 171.9 ± 1.7 (stat. + JES) ± 1.1 (other sys.) GeV/c2 = 171.9 ± 2.0 GeV/c2. The measurement features a robust treatment of the systematic uncertainties, correlated between the two channels and develops techniques for a future top quark mass measurement simultaneously in all decay channels. Measurements of the W boson mass and the top quark mass provide a constraint on the mass of the yet unobserved Higgs boson. The Higgs boson mass implied by measurement presented here is higher than Higgs boson mass implied by previously published, most precise CDF measurements of the top quark mass in lepton + jets and dilepton channels separately.

  4. A New Top Mass Measurement in The Dilepton Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Trovato, Marco; /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U.

    2008-01-01

    The top quark discovery completed the present picture of the fundamental constituents of the nature. Since then, the Collider Detector at Fermilab and D0 Collaborations have been spending great efforts to measure its properties better. About 30 times larger than the second heaviest quark, the mass of the top has been measured with increased statistic and more and more sophisticated techniques in order to reduce as much as possible its uncertainty. This is because the top is expected to play a fundamental role in the Standard Model. The value of its mass sets boundaries on the mass of the unobserved Higgs boson, and perhaps more appealing, studies of its properties might lead to the discovery of new physics.

  5. A 128-channel picoammeter system and its application on charged particle beam current distribution measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Deyang Liu, Junliang; Xue, Yingli; Zhang, Mingwu; Cai, Xiaohong; Hu, Jianjun; Dong, Jinmei; Li, Xin

    2015-11-15

    A 128-channel picoammeter system is constructed based on instrumentation amplifiers. Taking advantage of a high electric potential and narrow bandwidth in DC energetic charged beam measurements, a current resolution better than 5 fA can be achieved. Two sets of 128-channel strip electrodes are implemented on printed circuit boards and are employed for ion and electron beam current distribution measurements. Tests with 60 keV O{sup 3+} ions and 2 keV electrons show that it can provide exact boundaries when a positive charged particle beam current distribution is measured.

  6. Temperature and Pressure Measurements and Visualization of He II Cavitation Flow through Venturi Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, T.; Murakami, M.; Harada, K.

    2004-06-23

    He II cavitation flow through a Venturi channel was experimentally investigated through temperature and pressure measurements and optical visualization. So far some distinctive features of cavitation between He II and He I flows were clarified. Then, detailed measurements were added for further investigation, such as the measurements of the temperature drop distribution throughout the flow channel and the void fraction. Further considerations were given on the cavitation inception with emphasis on the superheating of liquid helium, and the effect of the flow separation on cavitation.

  7. A 128-channel picoammeter system and its application on charged particle beam current distribution measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Deyang; Liu, Junliang; Xue, Yingli; Zhang, Mingwu; Cai, Xiaohong; Hu, Jianjun; Dong, Jinmei; Li, Xin

    2015-11-01

    A 128-channel picoammeter system is constructed based on instrumentation amplifiers. Taking advantage of a high electric potential and narrow bandwidth in DC energetic charged beam measurements, a current resolution better than 5 fA can be achieved. Two sets of 128-channel strip electrodes are implemented on printed circuit boards and are employed for ion and electron beam current distribution measurements. Tests with 60 keV O3+ ions and 2 keV electrons show that it can provide exact boundaries when a positive charged particle beam current distribution is measured.

  8. Measurement of heat transfer and pressure drop in rectangular channels with turbulence promoters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, J. C.; Park, J. S.; Ibrahim, M. Y.

    1986-01-01

    Periodic rib turbulators were used in advanced turbine cooling designs to enhance the internal heat transfer. The objective of the present project was to investigate the combined effects of the rib angle of attack and the channel aspect ratio on the local heat transfer and pressure drop in rectangular channels with two opposite ribbed walls for Reynolds number varied from 10,000 to 60,000. The channel aspect ratio (W/H) was varied from 1 to 2 to 4. The rib angle of attack (alpha) was varied from 90 to 60 to 45 to 30 degree. The highly detailed heat transfer coefficient distribution on both the smooth side and the ribbed side walls from the channel sharp entrance to the downstream region were measured. The results showed that, in the square channel, the heat transfer for the slant ribs (alpha = 30 -45 deg) was about 30% higher that of the transverse ribs (alpha = 90 deg) for a constant pumping power. However, in the rectangular channels (W/H = 2 and 4, ribs on W side), the heat transfer at alpha = 30 -45 deg was only about 5% higher than 90 deg. The average heat transfer and friction correlations were developed to account for rib spacing, rib angle, and channel aspect ratio over the range of roughness Reynolds number.

  9. Interplay between appearance and disappearance channels for precision measurements of θ23 and δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coloma, Pilar; Minakata, Hisakazu; Parke, Stephen J.

    2014-11-01

    We discuss how the C P -violating phase δ and the mixing angle θ23 can be measured precisely in an environment where there are strong correlations between them. This is achieved by paying special attention to the mutual roles and the interplay between the appearance and the disappearance channels in long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. We analyze and clarify the general structure of the θ23-θ13-δ degeneracy for both the appearance and disappearance channels in a more complete fashion than what has previously been discussed in the literature. A full understanding of this degeneracy is of vital importance if θ23 is close to maximal mixing. The relative importance between the appearance and disappearance channels depends upon the particular setup and how close to maximal mixing nature has chosen the value for θ23. For facilities that operate with a narrow band beam or a wideband beam centered on the first oscillation extremum, the contribution of the disappearance channel depends critically on the systematic uncertainties assumed for this channel, whereas for facilities that operate at energies above the first oscillation extremum or at the second oscillation extremum, the appearance channels dominate. On the other hand, for δ we find that the disappearance channel usually improves the sensitivity, modestly for facilities around the first oscillation extremum and more significantly for facilities operating at an energy above the first oscillation extremum, especially near δ ˜±π /2 .

  10. Interplay between Appearance and Disappearance Channels for Precision Measurements of θ₂₃ and δ

    SciTech Connect

    Coloma, Pilar; Minakata, Hisakazu; Parke, Stephen J.

    2014-11-01

    We discuss how the CP violating phase δ and the mixing angle θ₂₃ can be measured precisely in an environment where there are strong correlations between them. This is achieved by paying special attention to the mutual roles and the interplay between the appearance and the disappearance channels in long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. We analyze and clarify the general structure of the θ₂₃ - θ₁₃ - δ degeneracy for both the appearance and disappearance channels in a more complete fashion than what has previously been discussed in the literature. A full understanding of this degeneracy is of vital importance if θ₂₃ is close to maximal mixing. The relative importance between the appearance and disappearance channels depends upon the particular setup and how close to maximal mixing Nature has chosen the value for θ₂₃. For facilities that operate with a narrow band beam or a wide band beam centered on the first oscillation extremum, the contribution of the disappearance channel depends critically on the systematic uncertainties assumed for this channel. Whereas for facilities that operate at energies above the first oscillation extremum or at the second oscillation extremum the appearance channels dominate. On the other hand, for δ we find that the disappearance channel usually improves the sensitivity, modestly for facilities around the first oscillation extremum and more significantly for facilities operating at an energy above the first oscillation extremum, especially near δ ~ ± π/2.

  11. Multifrequency channel microwave reflectometer with frequency hopping operation for density fluctuation measurements in Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuzawa, T.; Kawahata, K.; Ejiri, A.

    2010-10-15

    In order to measure the internal structure of density fluctuations using a microwave reflectometer, the broadband frequency tunable system, which has the ability of fast and stable hopping operation, has been improved in the Large Helical Device. Simultaneous multipoint measurement is the key issue of this development. For accurate phase measurement, the system utilizes a single sideband modulation technique. Currently, a dual channel heterodyne frequency hopping reflectometer system has been constructed and applied to the Alfven eigenmode measurements.

  12. Rényi entropy measure of noise-aided information transmission in a binary channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Rousseau, David; Delahaies, Agnès

    2010-05-01

    This paper analyzes a binary channel by means of information measures based on the Rényi entropy. The analysis extends, and contains as a special case, the classic reference model of binary information transmission based on the Shannon entropy measure. The extended model is used to investigate further possibilities and properties of stochastic resonance or noise-aided information transmission. The results demonstrate that stochastic resonance occurs in the information channel and is registered by the Rényi entropy measures at any finite order, including the Shannon order. Furthermore, in definite conditions, when seeking the Rényi information measures that best exploit stochastic resonance, then nontrivial orders differing from the Shannon case usually emerge. In this way, through binary information transmission, stochastic resonance identifies optimal Rényi measures of information differing from the classic Shannon measure. A confrontation of the quantitative information measures with visual perception is also proposed in an experiment of noise-aided binary image transmission.

  13. Effect of weak measurement on entanglement distribution over noisy channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Wen; Yu, Sixia; Zhang, Deng-Yu; Oh, C H

    2016-01-01

    Being able to implement effective entanglement distribution in noisy environments is a key step towards practical quantum communication, and long-term efforts have been made on the development of it. Recently, it has been found that the null-result weak measurement (NRWM) can be used to enhance probabilistically the entanglement of a single copy of amplitude-damped entangled state. This paper investigates remote distributions of bipartite and multipartite entangled states in the amplitudedamping environment by combining NRWMs and entanglement distillation protocols (EDPs). We show that the NRWM has no positive effect on the distribution of bipartite maximally entangled states and multipartite Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states, although it is able to increase the amount of entanglement of each source state (noisy entangled state) of EDPs with a certain probability. However, we find that the NRWM would contribute to remote distributions of multipartite W states. We demonstrate that the NRWM can not only reduce the fidelity thresholds for distillability of decohered W states, but also raise the distillation efficiencies of W states. Our results suggest a new idea for quantifying the ability of a local filtering operation in protecting entanglement from decoherence. PMID:26935775

  14. Effect of weak measurement on entanglement distribution over noisy channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin-Wen; Yu, Sixia; Zhang, Deng-Yu; Oh, C. H.

    2016-03-01

    Being able to implement effective entanglement distribution in noisy environments is a key step towards practical quantum communication, and long-term efforts have been made on the development of it. Recently, it has been found that the null-result weak measurement (NRWM) can be used to enhance probabilistically the entanglement of a single copy of amplitude-damped entangled state. This paper investigates remote distributions of bipartite and multipartite entangled states in the amplitudedamping environment by combining NRWMs and entanglement distillation protocols (EDPs). We show that the NRWM has no positive effect on the distribution of bipartite maximally entangled states and multipartite Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states, although it is able to increase the amount of entanglement of each source state (noisy entangled state) of EDPs with a certain probability. However, we find that the NRWM would contribute to remote distributions of multipartite W states. We demonstrate that the NRWM can not only reduce the fidelity thresholds for distillability of decohered W states, but also raise the distillation efficiencies of W states. Our results suggest a new idea for quantifying the ability of a local filtering operation in protecting entanglement from decoherence.

  15. Effect of weak measurement on entanglement distribution over noisy channels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin-Wen; Yu, Sixia; Zhang, Deng-Yu; Oh, C. H.

    2016-01-01

    Being able to implement effective entanglement distribution in noisy environments is a key step towards practical quantum communication, and long-term efforts have been made on the development of it. Recently, it has been found that the null-result weak measurement (NRWM) can be used to enhance probabilistically the entanglement of a single copy of amplitude-damped entangled state. This paper investigates remote distributions of bipartite and multipartite entangled states in the amplitudedamping environment by combining NRWMs and entanglement distillation protocols (EDPs). We show that the NRWM has no positive effect on the distribution of bipartite maximally entangled states and multipartite Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states, although it is able to increase the amount of entanglement of each source state (noisy entangled state) of EDPs with a certain probability. However, we find that the NRWM would contribute to remote distributions of multipartite W states. We demonstrate that the NRWM can not only reduce the fidelity thresholds for distillability of decohered W states, but also raise the distillation efficiencies of W states. Our results suggest a new idea for quantifying the ability of a local filtering operation in protecting entanglement from decoherence. PMID:26935775

  16. Voltage-dependent gating and gating charge measurements in the Kv1.2 potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Itzel G.; Rangel-Yescas, Gisela E.; Carrasco-Zanini, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Much has been learned about the voltage sensors of ion channels since the x-ray structure of the mammalian voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.2 was published in 2005. High resolution structural data of a Kv channel enabled the structural interpretation of numerous electrophysiological findings collected in various ion channels, most notably Shaker, and permitted the development of meticulous computational simulations of the activation mechanism. The fundamental premise for the structural interpretation of functional measurements from Shaker is that this channel and Kv1.2 have the same characteristics, such that correlation of data from both channels would be a trivial task. We tested these assumptions by measuring Kv1.2 voltage-dependent gating and charge per channel. We found that the Kv1.2 gating charge is near 10 elementary charges (eo), ∼25% less than the well-established 13–14 eo in Shaker. Next, we neutralized positive residues in the Kv1.2 S4 transmembrane segment to investigate the cause of the reduction of the gating charge and found that, whereas replacing R1 with glutamine decreased voltage sensitivity to ∼50% of the wild-type channel value, mutation of the subsequent arginines had a much smaller effect. These data are in marked contrast to the effects of charge neutralization in Shaker, where removal of the first four basic residues reduces the gating charge by roughly the same amount. In light of these differences, we propose that the voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) of Kv1.2 and Shaker might undergo the same physical movement, but the septum that separates the aqueous crevices in the VSD of Kv1.2 might be thicker than Shaker’s, accounting for the smaller Kv1.2 gating charge. PMID:25779871

  17. Voltage-dependent gating and gating charge measurements in the Kv1.2 potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Itzel G; Rangel-Yescas, Gisela E; Carrasco-Zanini, Julia; Islas, León D

    2015-04-01

    Much has been learned about the voltage sensors of ion channels since the x-ray structure of the mammalian voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.2 was published in 2005. High resolution structural data of a Kv channel enabled the structural interpretation of numerous electrophysiological findings collected in various ion channels, most notably Shaker, and permitted the development of meticulous computational simulations of the activation mechanism. The fundamental premise for the structural interpretation of functional measurements from Shaker is that this channel and Kv1.2 have the same characteristics, such that correlation of data from both channels would be a trivial task. We tested these assumptions by measuring Kv1.2 voltage-dependent gating and charge per channel. We found that the Kv1.2 gating charge is near 10 elementary charges (eo), ∼25% less than the well-established 13-14 eo in Shaker. Next, we neutralized positive residues in the Kv1.2 S4 transmembrane segment to investigate the cause of the reduction of the gating charge and found that, whereas replacing R1 with glutamine decreased voltage sensitivity to ∼50% of the wild-type channel value, mutation of the subsequent arginines had a much smaller effect. These data are in marked contrast to the effects of charge neutralization in Shaker, where removal of the first four basic residues reduces the gating charge by roughly the same amount. In light of these differences, we propose that the voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) of Kv1.2 and Shaker might undergo the same physical movement, but the septum that separates the aqueous crevices in the VSD of Kv1.2 might be thicker than Shaker's, accounting for the smaller Kv1.2 gating charge. PMID:25779871

  18. End-to-end quality measure for transmission of compressed imagery over a noisy coded channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korwar, V. N.; Lee, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    For the transmission of imagery at high data rates over large distances with limited power and system gain, it is usually necessary to compress the data before transmitting it over a noisy channel that uses channel coding to reduce the effect of noise introduced errors. Both compression and channel noise introduce distortion into the imagery. In order to design a communication link that provides adequate quality of received images, it is necessary first to define some suitable distortion measure that accounts for both these kinds of distortion and then to perform various tradeoffs to arrive at system parameter values that will provide a sufficiently low level of received image distortion. The overall mean square error is used as the distortion measure and a description of how to perform these tradeoffs are included.

  19. The Faroe Bank Channel overflow in one year of continuous current and hydrographic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullgren, Jenny; Fer, Ilker; Darelius, Elin

    2014-05-01

    Cold, dense water from the Nordic Seas flows out into the North Atlantic across the shallow Iceland-Scotland ridge through a few deeper passages, the deepest of which (at 840 m) is the narrow Faroe Bank Channel. The overflow is swift, with velocities exceeding 1 m/s, and associated with strong vertical mixing. Here we present results from eight hydrographic and current meter moorings that were deployed in the Faroe Bank Channel overflow region during the period 28 May 2012 to 5 June 2013, measuring current velocity, temperature, and salinity at hourly or higher sampling frequencies. One array of three moorings - the channel section - was placed at about 8° 30'W, just downstream of the sill in the channel. Another array, the slope section, with four moorings was located some 60 km further downstream, at about 9° 40'W. At the easternmost (channel) section, the cold plume was thick, with water colder than 3°C - considered as plume water - occupying the bottom 200 m at all times. At the slope section, the plume has thinned considerably as a result of entrainment of overlying warmer water. Mesoscale oscillations at periods of a few days dominated the temporal variability of velocity and temperature at both mooring sections. The mesoscale oscillation period, indicated by a peak in the energy density spectrum, was longer at the channel than the slope section (four and six days, respectively). A spectral peak at the diurnal tidal frequency is observed in the channel, but is absent on the slope. We will discuss these and other aspects of how the plume structure and variability develops along its path as the dense overflow exits the Faroe Bank Channel.

  20. A Novel, High Resolution, Non-Contact Channel Temperature Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Q.; Stark, B.; Kayali, S.

    1998-01-01

    An in-situ optical technique based on infrared emission spectroscopy has been developed for non-contact measurement of the temperature of a hot spot in the gate channel of a GaAs metal/semiconductor field effect transistor (MESFET).

  1. Multi-channel transimpedance measurement of a planar electromagnetic sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dixiang; Xie, Ruifang; Zhou, Weihong; Hu, Hengjiang; Pan, Mengchun

    2015-02-01

    Planar electromagnetic sensor arrays have advantages such as nice coherence, fast response speed and high sensitivity, which can be used for micro damage inspection of crucial parts in equipment, and the key point in improving the inspection performance is to achieve a precise measurement of multi-channel transimpedances (the inductive voltages divided by the exciting current of the sensor). The principle and characteristics of planar electromagnetic sensor arrays are introduced in this paper, and a digital lock-in impedance measurement algorithm was investigated, with which the interference and noise in inductive voltage signals can be restrained effectively and the amplitude and phase of the transimpedance can be obtained with good repeatability. An eight channel impedance measurement system was established based on a field programmable gate array and utilized to inspect the micro damage in metal materials, and the experimental data were analyzed. The experimental results show that the impedance measurement has excellent repeatability when the sensor array is placed in air, and the maximum measurement error of the complete transimpedance measurement system is lower than 10%. A micro crack with a size of 1 mm (length) × 0.1 mm (width) × 1 mm (depth) can be detected through the measurement of multi-channel transimpedance in the planar electromagnetic sensor array.

  2. Measurements on the satellite-mobile channel at L and S bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H.; Gardiner, J. G.; Barton, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    An experiment is described in which measurements are made on the satellite-mobile channel at L and S bands. A light aircraft carrying a c.w. beacon is flown at elevation angles of 40, 60 and 80 degrees to a mobile receiver. The signal strength at the mobile is recorded in open, urban, suburban and tree shadowed environments. This data is then analyzed to produce statistics for the channel with respect to frequency, elevation angle, and environment. Results are presented together with a brief discussion, suggested interpretation, and conclusion.

  3. In situ measurements of particle friction angles in steep, narrow channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prancevic, J.; Lamb, M. P.

    2013-12-01

    The persistent observation that sediment requires increased fluid stresses to move on steeper channels has inspired a wide range of explanations, which can loosely be divided into those that invoke increased grain stability (friction angle, φ) and those that require altered flow hydraulics in steep channels. Measurements of bulk fluid forces over a wide range of channel slopes (θ ≤ 22°) have been obtained using laboratory flume experiments that can control for grain stability and show that altered flow hydraulics do play a role in increased critical shear stress. However, measurements of grain stability are almost all limited to channel slopes less than a few degrees. These friction angle studies have been conducted by tilting a fixed gravel bed with a single loose particle until dislodgment, or by directly measuring the forces required to dislodge a particle using a load cell. The latter methodology is less common but offers the advantage of quickly measuring the friction angles of in situ grains in natural river channels. Indeed, it has enabled the collection of extremely large datasets at low slopes [e.g., Johnston et al., 1998]. We are adding to this dataset with measurements from several natural steep channels in the San Gabriel Mountains, CA to test if the particle friction angle changes systematically as a function of slope or width-to-grain size ratio (W/D50), which is thought to determine the propensity for particle jamming. Using a load cell that records peak forces we measure the minimum force required to pull a particle from its pocket in the downstream direction and the particle weight. Particles are sampled over a regular grid and we record the percentage of the particle buried by fines and the qualitative degree of interlocking. Preliminary results from three sites with bed slopes of θ = 2.9°, 3.2°, and 9.0° suggest that the at-a-site variability in friction angle is much higher than between-site variability, and that median values do not

  4. Single channel and ensemble hERG conductance measured in droplet bilayers.

    PubMed

    Vijayvergiya, Viksita; Acharya, Shiv; Poulos, Jason; Schmidt, Jacob

    2015-02-01

    The human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) encodes the potassium channel Kv11.1, which plays a key role in the cardiac action potential and has been implicated in cardiac disorders as well as a number of off-target pharmaceutical interactions. The electrophysiology of this channel has been predominantly studied using patch clamp, but lipid bilayers have the potential to offer some advantages, including apparatus simplicity, ease of use, and the ability to control the membrane and solution compositions. We made membrane preparations from hERG-expressing cells and measured them using droplet bilayers, allowing measurement of channel ensemble currents and 13.5 pS single channel currents. These currents were ion selective and were blockable by E-4031 and dofetilide in a dose-dependent manner, allowing determination of IC50 values of 17 nM and 9.65 μM for E-4031 and dofetilide, respectively. We also observed time- and voltage- dependent currents following step changes in applied potential that were similar to previously reported patch clamp measurements. PMID:25653065

  5. Coupled Radon and Water Temperature Measurements to Characterize the Effects of Altered Stream Channel Planform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amerson, B. E.; Poole, G. C.; O'Daniel, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    In summer 2011, a 2.6 km reach of Meacham Creek, Oregon, USA, was altered from a straight, steep wall-based channel to more a sinuous, low-gradient channel. Key objectives of this restoration project were to increase the rate and magnitude of hyporheic exchange. The overarching goal was to initiate increased buffering and lagging of water temperature in the subsurface to mitigate warm surface water temperature in Meacham Creek, an important spawning and rearing stream for depressed populations of Chinook salmon and summer steelhead. To evaluate progress toward project goals and objectives, stream temperature and groundwater temperature in 22 wells have been measured hourly at the restoration site since March 2011. In addition, the radioactive isotope 222Rn was measured in each well and in the surface water on two occasions. The relative residence time of down welling stream water measured in the wells can be determined by ranked amplitude depression and lagged phase of annual temperature signals in the wells relative to that of the open channel flow. Residence times predicted by annual temperature signal dynamics are corroborated by 222Rn concentrations in each well. The data collected to date provide a foundation for developing a groundwater thermal model to predict the effects of channel reconfiguration on ground-surface water exchange and associated temperature effects at the reach scale.

  6. Effects of horizontal velocity variations on ultrasonic velocity measurements in open channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, E.D.

    1992-01-01

    Use of an ultrasonic velocity meter to determine discharge in open channels involves measuring the velocity in a line between transducers in the stream and relating that velocity to the average velocity in the stream. The standard method of calculating average velocity in the channel assumes that the velocity profile in the channel can be represented by the one-dimensional von Karman universal velocity profile. However, the velocity profile can be described by a two-dimensional equation that accounts for the horizontal velocity variations induced by the channel sides. An equation to calculate average velocity accounts for the two-dimensional variations in velocity within a stream. The use of this new equation to calculate average velocity was compared to the standard method in theoretical trapezoidal cross sections and in the L-31N and Snapper Creek Extension Canals near Miami, Florida. These comparisons indicate that the two-dimensional variations have the most significant effect in narrow, deep channels. Also, the two-dimensional effects may be significant in some field situations and need to be considered when determining average velocity and discharge with an ultrasonic velocity meter.

  7. Fluorescence combined with excised patch: measuring calcium currents in plant cation channels.

    PubMed

    Gradogna, Antonella; Scholz-Starke, Joachim; Gutla, Paul Vijay Kanth; Carpaneto, Armando

    2009-04-01

    Combined application of the patch-clamp technique and fura-2 fluorescence detection enables the study of study calcium fluxes or related increases in cytosolic calcium concentration. Here we used the excised patch configuration, focusing the photomultiplier on the tip of the recording pipette where the fluorescent dye was present (FLEP, fluorescence combined with excised patch). This configuration has several advantages, i.e. a lack of delay in loading the fluorophore, of interference by internal calcium buffers and of photobleaching, due to the quasi-infinite dye reservoir inside the pipette. Upon voltage stimulation of tonoplast patches, sustained and robust fluorescence signals indicated permeation of calcium through the slow vacuolar (SV) channel. Both SV currents and fluorescence signal changes were absent in the presence of SV channel inhibitors and in vacuoles from Arabidopsis tpc1 knockout plants that lack SV channel activity. The fractional calcium currents of this non-selective cation channel were voltage-dependent, and were approximately 10% of the total SV currents at elevated positive potentials. Interestingly, calcium permeation could be recorded as the same time as oppositely directed potassium fluxes. These events would have been impossible to detect using patch-clamp measurements alone. Thus, we propose use of the FLEP technique for the study of divalent ion-selective channels or transporters that may be difficult to access using conventional electrophysiological approaches. PMID:19067975

  8. In situ measured current structures of the eddy field in the Mozambique Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ternon, J. F.; Roberts, M. J.; Morris, T.; Hancke, L.; Backeberg, B.

    2014-02-01

    Circulation and the related biological production have been studied during five cruises conducted in the Mozambique Channel (MZC) between 2005 and 2010. The circulation in the MZC is known to be highly turbulent, favouring enhanced primary production as a result of mesoscale eddy dynamics, and connectivity throughout the Channel due to the variable currents associated with migrating eddies. This paper presents the results of in situ measurements that characterize the horizontal and vertical currents in the surface and subsurface layers (0-500 m). The in situ data were analysed together with the geostrophic eddy field observed from satellite altimeter measurements. Different circulation regimes were investigated, including the "classical" anticyclonic eddy generated at the Channel narrows (16°S), the enhancement of southward migrating eddies by merging with structures (both cyclonic and anticyclonic) formed in the east of the Channel, and the presence of a fully developed cyclonic eddy at the Channel narrows. Comparison between in situ measurements (S-ADCP and velocities derived from surface drifters) and the geostrophic current derived from sea surface height measurements indicated that the latter can provide a reliable, quantitative description of eddy driven circulation in the MZC, with the exception that these currents are weaker by as much 30%. It is also suggested from in situ observation (drifters) that the departure from geostrophy of the surface circulation might be linked to strong wind conditions. Finally, our observations highlight that a-geostrophic currents need to be considered in future research to facilitate a more comprehensive description of the circulation in this area.

  9. Tsallis entropy measure of noise-aided information transmission in a binary channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Delahaies, Agnès; Rousseau, David

    2011-06-01

    Noise-aided information transmission via stochastic resonance is shown and analyzed in a binary channel by means of information measures based on the Tsallis entropy. The analysis extends the classic reference of binary information transmission based on the Shannon entropy, and also parallels a recent study based on the Rényi entropy. The conditions for a maximally pronounced stochastic resonance identify optimal Tsallis measures. The study involves a correspondence between Tsallis and Rényi information measures, specially relevant to the characterization of stochastic resonance, and establishing that for such effects identical properties are shared in common by both Tsallis and Rényi measures.

  10. Measuring kinetics of complex single ion channel data using mean-variance histograms.

    PubMed Central

    Patlak, J B

    1993-01-01

    The measurement of single ion channel kinetics is difficult when those channels exhibit subconductance events. When the kinetics are fast, and when the current magnitudes are small, as is the case for Na+, Ca2+, and some K+ channels, these difficulties can lead to serious errors in the estimation of channel kinetics. I present here a method, based on the construction and analysis of mean-variance histograms, that can overcome these problems. A mean-variance histogram is constructed by calculating the mean current and the current variance within a brief "window" (a set of N consecutive data samples) superimposed on the digitized raw channel data. Systematic movement of this window over the data produces large numbers of mean-variance pairs which can be assembled into a two-dimensional histogram. Defined current levels (open, closed, or sublevel) appear in such plots as low variance regions. The total number of events in such low variance regions is estimated by curve fitting and plotted as a function of window width. This function decreases with the same time constants as the original dwell time probability distribution for each of the regions. The method can therefore be used: 1) to present a qualitative summary of the single channel data from which the signal-to-noise ratio, open channel noise, steadiness of the baseline, and number of conductance levels can be quickly determined; 2) to quantify the dwell time distribution in each of the levels exhibited. In this paper I present the analysis of a Na+ channel recording that had a number of complexities. The signal-to-noise ratio was only about 8 for the main open state, open channel noise, and fast flickers to other states were present, as were a substantial number of subconductance states. "Standard" half-amplitude threshold analysis of these data produce open and closed time histograms that were well fitted by the sum of two exponentials, but with apparently erroneous time constants, whereas the mean

  11. Photogrammetric survey to measure the bed topography of a laboratory large amplitude meandering channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Brutto, Mauro

    2010-05-01

    One of the main characteristics of the rivers that exhibit a meandering planform is the continuous evolution of the planimetric shape. In order to limit flooding risks and to control the ecological equilibrium of the areas neighboring the channel, it is important to define a forecast methodology of the channel evolution. The pattern of the channel evolution strongly depends on the configuration of the "stable" bed topography along the channel in every stage of the evolution itself. Previous works [Schumm, 1963; Schumm, 1972; Jackson, 1975; Hooke, 1976; Ren and Jun, 1989; Whiting and Dietrich, 1993] show that the localization of the erosion and deposition zones along the channel is not standard but it depends on the planimetric shape of the channel itself. For example, it was shown that at the early stage of a meander wave evolution (small value of deflection angle J0) the deepest erosion of the bed is localized at the inner bank between the sections corresponding respectively to the inflection point and to the apex of the bend. In channels with "large" sinuosity (large value of deflection angle J0) the deepest erosion is localized in the outer bank near the apex of the bend [Yalin, 1992]. Recently, da Silva et al. [2006] verified that every different sinuosity (every J0) has its own convective flow pattern and, as previously observed in a large amplitude meandering channel by Termini (1996), the knowledge of the convective structure of the depth-averaged "initial" (determined at t=0 with flat bed) flow, which is associated only to changing channel curvature, can be used to predict the general features of bed topography. Thus, the knowledge of the stable bed topography is important to predict the channel planimetric evolution. In this paper the equilibrium bed topography determined in a large meandering laboratory channel has been first measured by a using a profile indicator PV09 by Delft Hydraulics (precision of 0.1 mm). The PV09 is designed to maintain a constant

  12. Assessing the performance of multi-purpose channel management measures at increasing scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Mark; Addy, Steve

    2016-04-01

    In addition to hydroclimatic drivers, sediment deposition from high energy river systems can reduce channel conveyance capacity and lead to significant increases in flood risk. There is an increasing recognition that we need to work with the interplay of natural hydrological and morphological processes in order to attenuate flood flows and manage sediment (both coarse and fine). This typically includes both catchment (e.g. woodland planting, wetlands) and river (e.g. wood placement, floodplain reconnection) restoration approaches. The aim of this work was to assess at which scales channel management measures (notably wood placement and flood embankment removal) are most appropriate for flood and sediment management in high energy upland river systems. We present research findings from two densely instrumented research sites in Scotland which regularly experience flood events and have associated coarse sediment problems. We assessed the performance of a range of novel trial measures for three different scales: wooded flow restrictors and gully tree planting at the small scale (<1 km2), floodplain tree planting and engineered log jams at the intermediate scale (5-60 km2), and flood embankment lowering at the large scale (350 km2). Our results suggest that at the smallest scale, care is needed in the installation of flow restrictors. It was found for some restrictors that vertical erosion can occur if the tributary channel bed is disturbed. Preliminary model evidence suggested they have a very limited impact on channel discharge and flood peak delay owing to the small storage areas behind the structures. At intermediate scales, the ability to trap sediment by engineered log jams was limited. Of the 45 engineered log jams installed, around half created a small geomorphic response and only 5 captured a significant amount of coarse material (during one large flood event). As scale increases, the chance of damage or loss of wood placement is greatest. Monitoring

  13. A wireless multi-channel bioimpedance measurement system for personalized healthcare and lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Javier; Ausín, José Luis; Lorido, Antonio Manuel; Redondo, Francisco; Duque-Carrillo, Juan Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Miniaturized, noninvasive, wearable sensors constitute a fundamental prerequisite for pervasive, predictive, and preventive healthcare systems. In this sense, this paper presents the design, realization, and evaluation of a wireless multi-channel measurement system based on a cost-effective high-performance integrated circuit for electrical bioimpedance (EBI) measurements in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 1 MHz. The resulting on-chip spectrometer provides high measuring EBI capabilities and together with a low-cost, commercially available radio frequency transceiver device. It provides reliable wireless communication, constitutes the basic node to build EBI wireless sensor networks (EBI-WSNs). The proposed EBI-WSN behaves as a high-performance wireless multi-channel EBI spectrometer, where the number of channels is completely scalable and independently configurable to satisfy specific measurement requirements of each individual. A prototype of the EBI node leads to a very small printed circuit board of approximately 8 cm2 including chip-antenna, which can operate several years on one 3-V coin cell battery and make it suitable for long-term preventive healthcare monitoring. PMID:23739358

  14. Measurement of top quark polarisation in t-channel single top quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-11-09

    Our first measurement of the top quark spin asymmetry, sensitive to the top quark polarisation, in t-channel single top quark production is presented. It is based on a sample of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. A high-purity sample of t-channel single top quark events with an isolated muon is selected. Signal and background components are estimated using a fit to data. Furthermore, a differential cross section measurement, corrected for detector effects, of an angular observable sensitive to the top quark polarisation is performed. The differential distribution is used to extract a top quark spin asymmetry of 0.26 ± 0.03 (stat) ± 0.10 (syst), which is compatible with a p-value of 4.6% with the standard model prediction of 0.44.

  15. Measurement of top quark polarisation in t-channel single top quark production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Awad, A.; El Sawy, M.; Mahrous, A.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.

    2016-04-01

    A first measurement of the top quark spin asymmetry, sensitive to the top quark polarisation, in t-channel single top quark production is presented. It is based on a sample of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. A high-purity sample of t-channel single top quark events with an isolated muon is selected. Signal and background components are estimated using a fit to data. A differential cross section measurement, corrected for detector effects, of an angular observable sensitive to the top quark polarisation is performed. The differential distribution is used to extract a top quark spin asymmetry of 0.26 ± 0.03(stat) ± 0.10(syst), which is compatible with a p-value of 4.6% with the standard model prediction of 0.44. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Measurement of top quark polarisation in t-channel single top quark production

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-04-13

    Our first measurement of the top quark spin asymmetry, sensitive to the top quark polarisation, in t-channel single top quark production is presented. It is based on a sample of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. A high-purity sample of t-channel single top quark events with an isolated muon is selected. Signal and background components are estimated using a fit to data. Furthermore, a differential cross section measurement, corrected for detector effects, of an angular observable sensitive to the top quark polarisation is performed. The differential distribution is usedmore » to extract a top quark spin asymmetry of 0.26 ± 0.03 (stat) ± 0.10 (syst), which is compatible with a p-value of 4.6% with the standard model prediction of 0.44.« less

  17. Measurements of the Top Quark Mass in the Dilepton Decay Channel at the D0 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Grohsjean, Alexander

    2008-10-01

    We present the most recent measurements of the top quark mass in the dilepton decay channel at the D0 experiment using proton-antiproton collisions with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Tevatron collider. Two different methods have been used: the Neutrino Weighting and the Matrix Element method. The combined results yield a top mass of 174.4 +-3.8 GeV.

  18. Lightning Return-Stroke Current Waveforms Aloft, from Measured Field Change, Current, and Channel Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willett, J. C.; LeVine, D. M.; Idone, V. P.

    2006-01-01

    Three-dimensional reconstructions of six rocket-triggered lightning channels are derived from stereo photographs. These reconstructed channels are used to infer the behavior of the current in return strokes above the ground from current waveforms measured at the channel base and electric-field-change waveforms measured at a range of 5.2 kilometers for 24 return strokes in these channels. Streak photographs of 14 of the same strokes are analyzed to determine the rise times, propagation speeds, and amplitudes of relative light intensity for comparison with the electrical inferences. Results include the following: 1) The fine structure of the field-change waveforms that were radiated by these subsequent return strokes can be explained, in large part, by channel geometry. 2) The average 10 - 90% rise time of the stroke current increased by about a factor of seven in our sample, from an observed 0.31 plus or minus 0.17 microseconds at the surface to an inferred 2.2 plus or minus 0.5 microcseconds at 1 kilometer path length above the surface. 3) The three-dimensional propagation speed of the current front averaged 1.80 plus or minus 0.24 X 10(exp 8) meters per second over channel lengths typically greater than 1 kilometer. 4) Assuming that the measured current was entirely due to the return stroke forced an unreasonably large and abrupt reduction in inferred current amplitude over the first few tens of meters above the surface, especially in cases when the leader was bright relative to its stroke. Therefore, a significant fraction of the current at the surface was probably due to the leader, at least in such cases. 5) Peak return-stroke currents decreased by approximately 37 plus or minus 12% from 100 meters to 1 kilometer of path length above the surface. Because of uncertainty about how to partition the measured current between leader and return stroke, we are unable to infer the variation of current amplitude near the ground.

  19. Rényi entropy measure of noise-aided information transmission in a binary channel.

    PubMed

    Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Rousseau, David; Delahaies, Agnès

    2010-05-01

    This paper analyzes a binary channel by means of information measures based on the Rényi entropy. The analysis extends, and contains as a special case, the classic reference model of binary information transmission based on the Shannon entropy measure. The extended model is used to investigate further possibilities and properties of stochastic resonance or noise-aided information transmission. The results demonstrate that stochastic resonance occurs in the information channel and is registered by the Rényi entropy measures at any finite order, including the Shannon order. Furthermore, in definite conditions, when seeking the Rényi information measures that best exploit stochastic resonance, then nontrivial orders differing from the Shannon case usually emerge. In this way, through binary information transmission, stochastic resonance identifies optimal Rényi measures of information differing from the classic Shannon measure. A confrontation of the quantitative information measures with visual perception is also proposed in an experiment of noise-aided binary image transmission. PMID:20866190

  20. Development of 200-channel mapping system for tissue oxygenation measured by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwayama, Masatsugu; Kohata, Daisuke; Shao, Jun; Kudo, Nobuki; Hamaoka, Takatumi; Katsumura, Toshihito; Yamamoto, Katsuyuki

    2000-07-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a very useful technique for noninvasive measurement of tissue oxygenation. Among various methods of NIRS, continuous wave near-infrared spectroscopy (CW- NIRS) is especially suitable for real-time measurement and for practical use. CW-NIRS has recently been applied in vivo reflectance imaging of muscle oxygenation and brain activity. However, conventional mapping systems do not have a sufficient mapping area at present. Moreover, they do not enable quantitative measurement of tissue oxygenation because conventional NIRS is based on the inappropriate assumption that tissue is homogeneous. In this study, we developed a 200-channel mapping system that enables measurement of changes in oxygenation and blood volume and that covers a wider area (30 cm x 20 cm) than do conventional systems. The spatial resolution (source- detector separation) of this system is 15 mm. As for the effcts of tissue inhomogeneity on muscle oxygenation measurement, subcutaneous adipose tissue greatly reduces measurement sensitivity. Therefore, we also used a correction method for influence of the subcutaneous fat layer so that we could obtain quantitative changes in concentrations of oxy- and deoxy- hemoglobin. We conducted exercise tests and measured the changed in hemoglobin concentration in the thigh using the new system. The working muscles in the exercises could be imaged, and the heterogeneity of the muscles was shown. These results demonstrated the new 200-channel mapping system enables observation of the distribution of muscle metabolism and localization of muscle function.

  1. Measuring flood discharge in unstable stream channels using ground-penetrating radar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spicer, K.R.; Costa, J.E.; Placzek, G.

    1997-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted to test the ability of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to measure stream-channel cross sections at high flows without the necessity of placing instruments in the water. Experiments were conducted at four U.S. Geological Survey gaging stations in southwest Washington State. With the GPR antenna suspended above the water surface from a bridge or cableway, traverses were made across stream channels to collect radar profile plots of the streambed. Subsequent measurements of water depth were made using conventional depth-measuring equipment (weight and tape) and were used to calculate radar signal velocities. Other streamflow-parameter data were collected to examine their relation to radar signal velocity and to claritv of streambed definition. These initial tests indicate that GPR is capable of producing a reasonably accurate (??20%) stream-channel profile and discharge far more quickly than conventional stream-gaging procedures, while avoiding the problems and hazards associated with placing instruments in the water.

  2. Error Vector Magnitude (EVM) Measurement to Characterize Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) Channel Impairment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mebratu, Derssie; Kegege, Obadiah; Shaw, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Digital signal transmits via a carrier wave, demodulates at a receiver and locates an ideal constellation position. However, a noise distortion, carrier leakage and phase noise divert an actual constellation position of a signal and locate to a new position. In order to assess a source of noise and carrier leakage, Bit Error Rate (BER) measurement technique is also used to evaluate the number of erroneous bit per bit transmitted signal. In addition, we present, Error Vector Magnitude (EVM), which measures an ideal and a new position, assesses a source of signal distortion, and evaluates a wireless communication system's performance with a single metric. Applying EVM technique, we also measure the performance of a User Services Subsystem Component Replacement (USSCR) modem. Furthermore, we propose EVM measurement technique in the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite system (TDRS) to measure and evaluate a channel impairment between a ground (transmitter) and the terminal (receiver) at White Sands Complex.

  3. Phase distribution measurements in narrow rectangular channels using image-processing techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, C.L.; Ruggles, A.E.

    1992-06-01

    Phase distribution of air-water flow in a narrow rectangular channel is examined using image-processing techniques. Ink is added to the water, and clear channel walls were used to allow high-speed, still photographs and video tape to be taken of the air-water flow field. Flow field images are digitized and stored in a Macintosh IIci computer using a frame grabber board. Local grey levels are related to liquid thickness in the flow channel using a calibration fixture. Image-processing shareware is used to calculate the spatially averaged liquid thickness from the image of the flow field. Time-averaged spatial liquid distributions are calculated using image calculation algorithms. The spatially averaged liquid distribution is calculated from the time-averaged spatial liquid distribution to formulate the combined temporally and spatially averaged liquid fraction values. The temporally and spatially averaged liquid fractions measured using this technique compare well to those predicted from pressure gradient measurements at zero superficial liquid velocity. 11 refs.

  4. Visual evoked potential (VEP) measured by simultaneous 64-channel EEG and 3T fMRI.

    PubMed

    Bonmassar, G; Anami, K; Ives, J; Belliveau, J W

    1999-06-23

    We present the first simultaneous measurements of evoked potentials (EPs) and fMRI hemodynamic responses to visual stimulation. Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded both inside and outside the static 3T magnetic field, and during fMRI examination. We designed, constructed, and tested a non-magnetic 64-channel EEG recording cap. By using a large number of EEG channels it is possible to design a spatial filter capable of removing the artifact noise present when recording EEG/EPs within a strong magnetic field. We show that the designed spatial filter is capable of recovering the ballistocardiogram-contaminated original EEG signal. Isopotential plots of the electrode array recordings at the peak of the VEP response (approximately 100ms) correspond well with simultaneous fMRI observed activated areas of primary and secondary visual cortices. PMID:10501528

  5. Measurements of Shear Lift Force on a Bubble in Channel Flow in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Motil, Brian J.; Skor, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Under microgravity conditions, the shear lift force acting on bubbles, droplets or solid particles in multiphase flows becomes important because under normal gravity, this hydrodynamic force is masked by buoyancy. This force plays an important role in furnishing the detachment process of bubbles in a setting where a bubble suspension is needed in microgravity. In this work, measurements of the shear lift force acting on a bubble in channel flow are performed. The shear lift force is deduced from the bubble kinematics using scaling and then compared with predictions from models in literature that address different asymptotic and numerical solutions. Basic trajectory calculations are then performed and the results are compared with experimental data of position of the bubble in the channel. A direct comparison of the lateral velocity of the bubbles is also made with the lateral velocity prediction from investigators, whose work addressed the shear lift on a sphere in different two-dimensional shear flows including Poiseuille flow.

  6. AG Channel Measurement and Modeling Results for Over-Sea Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matolak, David; Sun, Rouyu

    2014-01-01

    This report describes results from flight tests conducted in an over-sea environment, for the purpose of characterizing the air-to-ground (AG) channel, for future unmanned aircraft system (UAS) communication system analysis and design. These results are for the first of a set of several flight tests conducted in different ground site (GS) environments. An ultimate aim of all these tests is the development of models for the AG channel that can be used in communication system evaluation. In this report we provide measured results for propagation path loss, root-mean square delay spread (RMS-DS), and the correlation coefficient of the primary received signal components on the four antennas (two antennas for C-band, two for L-band). For path loss, the curved-earth two-ray model provides a reasonable fit to the measured data, altered by several dB at the shortest link distances by aircraft antenna pattern effects. This two-ray model also accounts for the majority of measured RMS-DS results of a few tens of nanoseconds, except for the occasional intermittent reflections from surface objects. These intermittent reflections yield RMS-DS values up to several hundred nanoseconds. For portions of the flight path that were over a harbor area highly populated with boats, the channel was found to be more "continuously dispersive," with RMS-DS reaching approximately 250 ns. A separate model will be developed for this over-harbor setting. The correlation coefficient results are still undergoing analysis; preliminary observations are that correlation between signals on the same-band antennas is generally large (>0.6) for the C-band straight flight paths, whereas for the L-band signals and for the oval-shaped flight paths the correlation is generally small (below 0.4). Inter-band correlations are typically very small, and are well modeled as zero-mean Gaussian in distribution, with a standard deviation less than 0.2. Hence the over-sea channel effects in the two bands can be

  7. Quantum Markov chains, sufficiency of quantum channels, and Rényi information measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Nilanjana; Wilde, Mark M.

    2015-12-01

    A short quantum Markov chain is a tripartite state {ρ }{ABC} such that system A can be recovered perfectly by acting on system C of the reduced state {ρ }{BC}. Such states have conditional mutual information I(A;B| C) equal to zero and are the only states with this property. A quantum channel {N} is sufficient for two states ρ and σ if there exists a recovery channel using which one can perfectly recover ρ from {N}(ρ ) and σ from {N}(σ ). The relative entropy difference D(ρ \\parallel σ )-D({N}(ρ )\\parallel {N}(σ )) is equal to zero if and only if {N} is sufficient for ρ and σ. In this paper, we show that these properties extend to Rényi generalizations of these information measures which were proposed in (Berta et al 2015 J. Math. Phys. 56 022205; Seshadreesan et al 2015 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 48 395303), thus providing an alternate characterization of short quantum Markov chains and sufficient quantum channels. These results give further support to these quantities as being legitimate Rényi generalizations of the conditional mutual information and the relative entropy difference. Along the way, we solve some open questions of Ruskai and Zhang, regarding the trace of particular matrices that arise in the study of monotonicity of relative entropy under quantum operations and strong subadditivity of the von Neumann entropy.

  8. Lightning Return-Stroke Current Waveforms Aloft, From Measured Field Change, Current, and Channel Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willett, J. C.; LeVine, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    Direct current measurements are available near the attachment point from both natural cloud-to-ground lightning and rocket-triggered lightning, but little is known about the rise time and peak amplitude of return-stroke currents aloft. We present, as functions of height, current amplitudes, rise times, and effective propagation velocities that have been estimated with a novel remote-sensing technique from data on 24 subsequent return strokes in six different lightning flashes that were triggering at the NASA Kennedy Space Center, FL, during 1987. The unique feature of this data set is the stereo pairs of still photographs, from which three-dimensional channel geometries were determined previously. This has permitted us to calculate the fine structure of the electric-field-change (E) waveforms produced by these strokes, using the current waveforms measured at the channel base together with physically reasonable assumptions about the current distributions aloft. The computed waveforms have been compared with observed E waveforms from the same strokes, and our assumptions have been adjusted to maximize agreement. In spite of the non-uniqueness of solutions derived by this technique, several conclusions seem inescapable: 1) The effective propagation speed of the current up the channel is usually significantly (but not unreasonably) faster than the two-dimensional velocity measured by a streak camera for 14 of these strokes. 2) Given the deduced propagation speed, the peak amplitude of the current waveform often must decrease dramatically with height to prevent the electric field from being over-predicted. 3) The rise time of the current wave front must always increase rapidly with height in order to keep the fine structure of the calculated field consistent with the observations.

  9. Robust state transfer in the quantum spin channel via weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi; Yao, Chunmei; Zou, Jian

    2013-10-01

    Using the weak measurement (WM) and quantum measurement reversal (QMR) approach, robust state transfer and entanglement distribution can be realized in the spin-(1)/(2) Heisenberg chain. We find that the ultrahigh fidelity and long distance of quantum state transfer with certain success probability can be obtained using proper WM and QMR, i.e., the average fidelity of a general pure state from 80% to almost 100%, which is almost size independent. We also find that the distance and quality of entanglement distribution for the Bell state and the general Werner mixed state can be obviously improved by the WM and QMR approach.

  10. Multi-channel optical pyrometer for sub-nanosecond temperature measurements at NDCX-I/II

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P.A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Waldron, W.L.

    2011-04-13

    We present a detailed technical description of a fast multi-channel pyrometer designed for warm-dense-matter (WDM) experiments with intense heavy ion beams at the neutralized-drift-compression-experiment linear accelerator (NDCX-I/II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The unique features of the described instrument are its sub-nanosecond temporal resolution (100 ps rise-time) and a broad range, 1,500 K - 12,000 K of measurable brightness temperatures in the visible and near-infrared regions of the spectrum. The working scheme, calibration procedure, experimental data obtained with the pyrometer and future applications are presented.

  11. Navigation Signal Disturbances by Multipath Propagation - Scaled Measurements with a Universal Channel Sounder Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geise, Robert; Neubauer, Bjoern; Zimmer, Georg

    2015-11-01

    The performance of navigation systems is always reduced by unwanted multipath propagation. This is especially of practical importance for airborne navigation systems like the instrument landing system (ILS) or the VHF omni directional radio range (VOR). Nevertheless, the quantitative analysis of corresponding, potentially harmful multipath propagation disturbances is very difficult due to the large parameter space. Experimentally difficulties arise due to very expensive, real scale measurement campaigns and numerical simulation techniques still have shortcomings which are briefly discussed. In this contribution a new universal approach is introduced on how to measure very flexibly multipath propagation effects for arbitrary navigation systems using a channel sounder architecture in a scaled measurement environment. Two relevant scenarios of multipath propagation and the impact on navigation signals are presented. The first describes disturbances of the ILS due to large taxiing aircraft. The other example shows the influence of rotating wind turbines on the VOR.

  12. Factors affecting measurement of channel thickness in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Dou, Haiyang; Jung, Euo Chang; Lee, Seungho

    2015-05-01

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) has been considered to be a useful tool for simultaneous separation and characterization of polydisperse macromolecules or colloidal nanoparticles. AF4 analysis requires the knowledge of the channel thickness (w), which is usually measured by injecting a standard with known diffusion coefficient (D) or hydrodynamic diameter (dh). An accurate w determination is a challenge due to its uncertainties arising from the membrane's compressibility, which may vary with experimental condition. In the present study, influence of factors including the size and type of the standard on the measurement of w was systematically investigated. The results revealed that steric effect and the particles-membrane interaction by van der Waals or electrostatic force may result in an error in w measurement. PMID:25817708

  13. Using a novel flood prediction model and GIS automation to measure the valley and channel morphology of large river networks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional methods for measuring river valley and channel morphology require intensive ground-based surveys which are often expensive, time consuming, and logistically difficult to implement. The number of surveys required to assess the hydrogeomorphic structure of large river n...

  14. Precise measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel at D0.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Aoki, M; Arov, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calpas, B; Camacho-Pérez, E; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chen, G; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De la Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Guo, F; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De la Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jamin, D; Jayasinghe, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kulikov, S; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otero y Garzón, G J; Padilla, M; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Salcido, P; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, K J; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2011-08-19

    We measure the top quark mass (m(t)) in p ̄p collisions at a center of mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV using dilepton t ̄t→W(+)bW(-) ̄b→ℓ(+)ν(ℓ)bℓ(-) ̄ν(ℓ) ̄b events, where ℓ denotes an electron, a muon, or a tau that decays leptonically. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb(-1) collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We obtain m(t)=174.0±1.8(stat)±2.4(syst) GeV, which is in agreement with the current world average m(t)=173.3±1.1 GeV. This is currently the most precise measurement of m(t) in the dilepton channel. PMID:21929164

  15. Field intercomparison of channel master ADCP with RiverSonde Radar for measuring river discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spain, P.; Marsden, R.; Barrick, D.; Teague, C.; Ruhl, C.

    2005-01-01

    The RiverSonde radar makes non-contact measurement of a horizontal swath of surface velocity across a river section. This radar, which has worked successfully at several rivers in the Western USA, has shown encouraging correlation with simultaneous measurements of average currents at one level recorded by an acoustic travel-time system. This work reports a field study intercomparing data sets from a 600 kHz Channel Master ADCP with the RiverSonde radar. The primary goal was to begin to explore the robustness of the radar data as a reliable index of discharge. This site Is at Three Mile Slough in Northern California, USA. The larger intent of the work is to examine variability in space and time of the radar's surface currents compared with subsurface flows across the river section. Here we examine data from a couple of periods with strong winds. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  16. Purity of Gaussian states: Measurement schemes and time evolution in noisy channels

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, Matteo G.A.; Illuminati, Fabrizio; Serafini, Alessio; De Siena, Silvio

    2003-07-01

    We present a systematic study of the purity for Gaussian states of single-mode continuous variable systems. We prove the connection of purity to observable quantities for these states, and show that the joint measurement of two conjugate quadratures is necessary and sufficient to determine the purity at any time. The statistical reliability and the range of applicability of the proposed measurement scheme are tested by means of Monte Carlo simulated experiments. We then consider the dynamics of purity in noisy channels. We derive an evolution equation for the purity of general Gaussian states both in thermal and in squeezed thermal baths. We show that purity is maximized at any given time for an initial coherent state evolving in a thermal bath, or for an initial squeezed state evolving in a squeezed thermal bath whose asymptotic squeezing is orthogonal to that of the input state.

  17. Bulk velocity measurements by video analysis of dye tracer in a macro-rough channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghilardi, T.; Franca, M. J.; Schleiss, A. J.

    2014-03-01

    Steep mountain rivers have hydraulic and morphodynamic characteristics that hinder velocity measurements. The high spatial variability of hydraulic parameters, such as water depth (WD), river width and flow velocity, makes the choice of a representative cross-section to measure the velocity in detail challenging. Additionally, sediment transport and rapidly changing bed morphology exclude the utilization of standard and often intrusive velocity measurement techniques. The limited technical choices are further reduced in the presence of macro-roughness elements, such as large, relatively immobile boulders. Tracer tracking techniques are among the few reliable methods that can be used under these conditions to evaluate the mean flow velocity. However, most tracer tracking techniques calculate bulk flow velocities between two or more fixed cross-sections. In the presence of intense sediment transport resulting in an important temporal variability of the bed morphology, dead water zones may appear in the few selected measurement sections. Thus a technique based on the analysis of an entire channel reach is needed in this study. A dye tracer measurement technique in which a single camcorder visualizes a long flume reach is described and developed. This allows us to overcome the problem of the presence of dead water zones. To validate this video analysis technique, velocity measurements were carried out on a laboratory flume simulating a torrent, with a relatively gentle slope of 1.97% and without sediment transport, using several commonly used velocity measurement instruments. In the absence of boulders, salt injections, WD and ultrasonic velocity profiler measurements were carried out, along with dye injection technique. When boulders were present, dye tracer technique was validated only by comparison with salt tracer. Several video analysis techniques used to infer velocities were developed and compared, showing that dye tracking is a valid technique for bulk velocity

  18. HF Channel Availability under Ionospheric Disturbances: Model, Method and Measurements as Contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulunay, E.; Senalp, E. T.; Tulunay, Y.; Warrington, E. M.; Sari, M. O.

    2009-04-01

    variation of group range and line-of-sight Doppler velocity of the HF Radar echo signal were investigated. HF radar system under ionospheric disturbances has been identified globally and some operational suggestions have been presented. It is possible for the HF radar operator to estimate the possible skip distance and possible single hop group ranges for the given frequencies of 11 MHz and 14 MHz [Buyukpabuscu, 2007]. (iii) The measurements over the HF band during the 29 March 2006 total solar eclipse in Antalya (36° N; 30° E) Turkey was conducted from the channel occupancy and atmospheric noise points of view. The whole HF band ranging from 1 to 30 MHz has been swept using 10 kHz peak and 200 Hz average detectors of a certified EMI receiver equipped with a calibrated active monopole antenna. The changes in the atmospheric noise during the eclipse were reported [Tulunay, 2006]. The model based, theoretical and experimental works mentioned are promising and have potential for future research and developments. References Buyukpabuscu S.O. (2007), System Identification with Particular Interest On The High Frequency Radar Under Ionospheric Disturbances, MS Thesis, Electrical and Electronics Eng., Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara, Turkey, February 2007. Sari M.O. (2006), A New Approach For The Assessment Of Hf Channel Availability Under Ionospheric Disturbances, MS Thesis, Electrical and Electronics Eng., Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara, Turkey, September 2006. Tulunay E., E. M. Warrington, Y. Tulunay, Y. Bahadırlar, A.S. Türk, R. Çaputçu, T. Yapıcı , E.T. Şenalp (2006), Propagation Related Measurements during Three Solar Eclipses in Turkey, IET 10th International Conference on Ionospheric Radio Systems & Techniques, IRST 2006, 18-21 July 2006, London, UK.

  19. Multi-point measurements of ULF wave phases using a multi-channel energetic ion detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, N.; Kivelson, M. G.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Williams, D. J.; Fritz, T. A.

    1988-01-01

    The oscillation of differential fluxes of energetic ions modulated by a ULF wave often shows a phase shift between measurements in back-to-back detectors with look directions perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. In a plasma of a single ion species, the phase difference is caused by displacement of the effective measurement positions by one ion gyroradius to each side of the detector. As the wave phase is periodic, the observed phase shift can correspond to a family of possible wavelengths. Simultaneous measurements of the flux modulations in different energy channels, which are equivalent to measurements of the wave phase at different positions, may make it possible to single out a unique wavelength consistent with all the measurements. Using the medium-energy-particle experiments ISEE-1 and 2, each of which may serve as a back-to-back detector, the above method was applied to a compressional Pc 5 wave observed near the equatorial plane at L between about 7 and 11. The transverse propagation properties of the wave were determined unambiguously.

  20. Genetic Interactions Found Between Calcium Channel Genes Modulate Amyloid Load Measured by Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Koran, Mary Ellen I.; Hohman, Timothy J.; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) is known to have a complex, oligogenic etiology, with considerable genetic heterogeneity. We investigated the influence of genetic interactions between genes in the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathway on amyloid-beta (Aβ) deposition as measured by PiB or AV-45 ligand positron emission tomography (PET) to aid in understanding LOAD’s genetic etiology. Subsets of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohorts were used for discovery and for two independent validation analyses. A significant interaction between RYR3 and CACNA1C was confirmed in all three of the independent ADNI datasets. Both genes encode calcium channels expressed in the brain. The results shown here support previous animal studies implicating interactions between these calcium channels in amyloidigenesis and suggest that the pathological cascade of this disease may be modified by interactions in the amyloid-calcium axis. Future work focusing on the mechanisms of such relationships may inform targets for clinical intervention. PMID:24026422

  1. Aircraft Engine On-Line Diagnostics Through Dual-Channel Sensor Measurements: Development of a Baseline System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Takahisa; Simon, Donald L.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a baseline system which utilizes dual-channel sensor measurements for aircraft engine on-line diagnostics is developed. This system is composed of a linear on-board engine model (LOBEM) and fault detection and isolation (FDI) logic. The LOBEM provides the analytical third channel against which the dual-channel measurements are compared. When the discrepancy among the triplex channels exceeds a tolerance level, the FDI logic determines the cause of the discrepancy. Through this approach, the baseline system achieves the following objectives: (1) anomaly detection, (2) component fault detection, and (3) sensor fault detection and isolation. The performance of the baseline system is evaluated in a simulation environment using faults in sensors and components.

  2. An Inflatable and Wearable Wireless System for Making 32-Channel Electroencephalogram Measurements.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi-Hsin; Lu, Shao-Wei; Chuang, Chun-Hsiang; King, Jung-Tai; Chang, Che-Lun; Chen, Shi-An; Chen, Sheng-Fu; Lin, Chin-Teng

    2016-07-01

    Potable electroencephalography (EEG) devices have become critical for important research. They have various applications, such as in brain-computer interfaces (BCI). Numerous recent investigations have focused on the development of dry sensors, but few concern the simultaneous attachment of high-density dry sensors to different regions of the scalp to receive qualified EEG signals from hairy sites. An inflatable and wearable wireless 32-channel EEG device was designed, prototyped, and experimentally validated for making EEG signal measurements; it incorporates spring-loaded dry sensors and a novel gasbag design to solve the problem of interference by hair. The cap is ventilated and incorporates a circuit board and battery with a high-tolerance wireless (Bluetooth) protocol and low power consumption characteristics. The proposed system provides a 500/250 Hz sampling rate, and 24 bit EEG data to meet the BCI system data requirement. Experimental results prove that the proposed EEG system is effective in measuring audio event-related potential, measuring visual event-related potential, and rapid serial visual presentation. Results of this work demonstrate that the proposed EEG cap system performs well in making EEG measurements and is feasible for practical applications. PMID:26780814

  3. Turbulent Channel Flow Measurements with a Nano-scale Thermal Anemometry Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Sean; Witte, Brandon

    2014-11-01

    Using a Nano-scale Thermal Anemometry Probe (NSTAP), streamwise velocity was measured in a turbulent channel flow wind tunnel at Reynolds numbers ranging from Reτ = 500 to Reτ = 4000 . Use of these probes results in the a sensing-length-to-viscous-length-scale ratio of just 5 at the highest Reynolds number measured. Thus measured results can be considered free of spatial filtering effects. Point statistics are compared to recently published DNS and LDV data at similar Reynolds numbers and the results are found to be in good agreement. However, comparison of the measured spectra provide further evidence of aliasing at long wavelengths due to application of Taylor's frozen flow hypothesis, with increased aliasing evident with increasing Reynolds numbers. In addition to conventional point statistics, the dissipative scales of turbulence are investigated with focus on the wall-dependent scaling. Results support the existence of a universal pdf distribution of these scales once scaled to account for large-scale anisotropy. This research is supported by KSEF Award KSEF-2685-RDE-015.

  4. Top-quark mass measurement in the dilepton channel using in situ jet energy scale calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Su

    2012-09-01

    We employ a top-quark mass measurement technique in the dilepton channel with in situ jet energy scale calibration. Three variables having different jet energy scale dependences are used simultaneously to extract not only the top-quark mass but also the energy scale of the jet from a single likelihood fit. Monte Carlo studies with events corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5fb-1 proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider s=7TeV are performed. Our analysis suggests that the overall jet energy scale uncertainty can be significantly reduced and the top-quark mass can be determined with a precision of less than 1GeV/c2, including jet energy scale uncertainty, at the Large Hadron Collider.

  5. FMCW channel sounder with digital processing for measuring the coherence of wideband HF radio links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salous, S.

    1986-08-01

    Multipath propagation, and in particular, the interference between the ordinary and the extraordinary waves, places a fundamental constraint on the performance of wideband HF skywave radio links. Furthermore, the dispersive nature of ionospheric propagation causes phase nonlinearity and hence distortion of narrow pulses. In this paper, an FMCW wideband sounder built for the purposes of characterizing the channel is described. Spectral analysis of the audio output of the sounder via the FFT algorithm is shown to permit measurement of thef amplitude/frequency function, the polarization bandwidth, the fade rate, the fade depth and the distortion of a narrow pulse, all for a desired isolated ionospheric propagation mode. The sounder was used to collect data over an oblique path in the UK. The results of applying the FFT processing technique to the experimental data are presented.

  6. Channel Strain in Advanced Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors Measured Using Nano-Beam Electron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Akio; Nakamura, Hidetatsu; Fukai, Toshinori; Ikarashi, Nobuyuki

    2008-04-01

    Using high-precision nano-beam electron diffraction (NBD), we clarified the influences of stress liner and the stress of shallow trench isolation on channel strain in advanced metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs). For systematic strain measurements, we improved the precision of NBD by observing large reciprocal lattice vectors under appropriate diffraction conditions. The absolute value of the channel strain increases by stress liner as gate length decreases, although the drive current increase due to stress liner saturates at a shorter channel length. The normal strain in the gate length direction is inversely proportional to the distance from the gate electrode to the shallow trench isolation (STI). Furthermore, the relationship between measured channel strain induced by STI and drive current change was shown. The drive current of n- and p-MOSFET changes about 5% with 2×10-3 channel strain variation. This result suggests that reducing the shallow trench isolation stress is effective for controlling the drive current change, depending on the active region layout. We conclude that the experimental measurement of channel strain is necessary for device and circuit design.

  7. UAV Measurement of the 2015 Large Flood Impact in Kinugawa River on Riverine Vegetation and Channel Form Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Hitoshi; Inoue, Toshiya; Chigasaki, Yuka

    2016-04-01

    This presentation gives the results of field observation for a flood impact on riverine environment measured by using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The flood we examined occurred on September 9-10, 2015 in Kinugawa River, Japan, owing to the heavy rainfall that brought tremendous volume of water on the Kanto and Tohoku regions of Japan. In Kinugawa River, the largest record flood occurred in this time, resulting in the levee failure and the corresponding flood disaster in Joso City located in the downstream part of Kinugawa River, as well as the large flood impact on the riverine environment in the Kinugawa channel network. In order to investigate the very initial state of the after-flood-impact throughout the channel network, 13 channel sections with 2 km in longitudinal length were chosen and observed in October 2015. Orthochromatic images of the river channel sections obtained by the UAV measurement with a geographic information system (GIS) were used for analyzing the changes in riverine vegetation distributions and channel form profiles. The results show that there exist three characteristic river segments having different impact-response states in vegetation and channel form changes. The river sections in the most upstream segment indicated severe damage of trees and herbs as well as large movement of gravel bed material, while those in the most downstream segment showed relatively small damage in vegetation distribution and small change in channel forms. Furthermore, relationships between the vegetation damage, channel deformation, channel slopes, and bed shear stresses calculated by a numerical simulation model were discussed in detail along the river network.

  8. Label-free viscosity measurement of complex fluids using reversal flow switching manipulation in a microfluidic channel

    PubMed Central

    Jun Kang, Yang; Ryu, Jeongeun; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2013-01-01

    The accurate viscosity measurement of complex fluids is essential for characterizing fluidic behaviors in blood vessels and in microfluidic channels of lab-on-a-chip devices. A microfluidic platform that accurately identifies biophysical properties of blood can be used as a promising tool for the early detections of cardiovascular and microcirculation diseases. In this study, a flow-switching phenomenon depending on hydrodynamic balancing in a microfluidic channel was adopted to conduct viscosity measurement of complex fluids with label-free operation. A microfluidic device for demonstrating this proposed method was designed to have two inlets for supplying the test and reference fluids, two side channels in parallel, and a junction channel connected to the midpoint of the two side channels. According to this proposed method, viscosities of various fluids with different phases (aqueous, oil, and blood) in relation to that of reference fluid were accurately determined by measuring the switching flow-rate ratio between the test and reference fluids, when a reverse flow of the test or reference fluid occurs in the junction channel. An analytical viscosity formula was derived to measure the viscosity of a test fluid in relation to that of the corresponding reference fluid using a discrete circuit model for the microfluidic device. The experimental analysis for evaluating the effects of various parameters on the performance of the proposed method revealed that the fluidic resistance ratio (RJL/RL, fluidic resistance in the junction channel (RJL) to fluidic resistance in the side channel (RL)) strongly affects the measurement accuracy. The microfluidic device with smaller RJL/RL values is helpful to measure accurately the viscosity of the test fluid. The proposed method accurately measured the viscosities of various fluids, including single-phase (Glycerin and plasma) and oil-water phase (oil vs. deionized water) fluids, compared with conventional methods. The proposed

  9. Three-channel three-dimensional self-mixing thin-slice solid-state laser-Doppler measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtomo, Takayuki; Sudo, Seiichi; Otsuka, Kenju

    2009-01-20

    We report successful real-time three-channel self-mixing laser-Doppler measurements with extreme optical sensitivity using a laser-diode-pumped thin-slice Nd:GdVO4 laser in the carrier-frequency-division-multiplexing scheme with three pairs of acoustic optical modulators (i.e., frequency shifters) and a three-channel FM-wave demodulation circuit. We demonstrate (1) simultaneous independent measurement of three different nanometer-vibrating targets, (2) simultaneous measurements of small particles in Brownian motion from three directions, and (3) identification of the velocity vector of small particles moving in water flowing in a small-diameter glass pipe.

  10. Characterization and Absolute QE Measurements of Delta-Doped N-Channel and P-Channel CCDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacquot, Blake C.; Monacos, Steve P.; Jones, Todd J.; Blacksberg, Jordana; Hoenk, Michael E.; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the methodology for making absolute quantum efficiency (QE) measurements from the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) through the near infrared (NIR) on delta-doped silicon CCDs. Delta-doped detectors provide an excellent platform to validate measurements through the VUV due to their enhanced UV response. The requirements for measuring QE through the VUV are more strenuous than measurements in the near UV and necessitate, among other things, the use of a vacuum monochromator, and good camera vacuum to prevent chip condensation, and more stringent handling requirements. The system used for these measurements was originally designed for deep UV characterization of CCDs for the WF/PC instrument on Hubble and later for Cassini CCDs.

  11. MTF and PSF measurements of the CCD273-84 detector for the Euclid visible channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindells, I.; Wheeler, R.; Darby, S.; Bowring, S.; Burt, D.; Bell, R.; Duvet, L.; Walton, D.; Cole, R.

    2014-08-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) and e2v, together with the Euclid Imaging Consortium, have designed and manufactured pre-development models of a novel imaging detector for the visible channel of the Euclid space telescope. The new detector is an e2v back-illuminated, 4k x 4k, 12 micron square pixel CCD designated CCD273-84. The backilluminated detectors have been characterised for many critical performance parameters such as read noise, charge transfer efficiency, quantum efficiency, Modulation Transfer Function and Point Spread Function. Initial analysis of the MTF and PSF performance of the detectors has been performed by e2v and at MSSL and the results have enabled the Euclid VIS CCD project to move in to the C/D or flight phase delivery contract. This paper describes the CCD273-84 detector, the test method used for MTF measurements at e2v and the test method used for PSF measurements at MSSL. Results are presented for MTF measurements at e2v over all pre development devices. Also presented is a cross comparison of the data from the MTF and PSF measurement techniques on the same device. Good agreement between the measured PSF Full Width Half Maximum and the equivalent Full Width Half Maximum derived from the MTF images and test results is shown, with results that indicate diffusion FWHM values at or below 10 micron for the CCD273-84 detectors over the spectral range measured. At longer wavelengths the diffusion FWHM is shown to be in the 6-8 micron range.

  12. Application of left- and right-looking SAR stereo to depth measurements of the Ammavaru outflow channel, Lada Terra, Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    Venusian channels are too narrow to be resolved by Magellan's radar altimeter, so they are not visible in the standard topographic data products. Stereo image data, in addition to their benefit to geologic mapping of Venus structures as a whole, are indispensible in measuring the topography across the channels. These measurements can then be used in conjunction with the regional topographic maps based on the altimeter data to produce cross-sectional areas for the channels and estimate the fluid discharge through them. As an example of the application of the stereo image data to venusian channels, a number of test depth and profile measurements were made of the large outflow channel system in Lada Terra, centered at 50 deg S latitude, 21 deg E longitude (F-MIDR 50S021). These measurements were made by viewing the cycle 1 and 2 digital FMIDRs in stereo on a display monitor, so as to minimize the errors in measuring parallax displacement as much as possible. The MIDRs are produced at a scale of 75 m/pixel. This corresponds to a vertical scale of about 17 m/pixel, when calculating the height of a feature from its parallax displacement. An error in placement determination of 1 pixel was assumed to characterize the vertical accuracy as plus or minus 17 m. When this technique was applied to the outflow channel, it was noted that the walls of the collapsed terrain source and 'trough reach' of the channel are laid over in both the cycle 1 and 2 images. This is evident when examining the distance between features on the plateau and the cliff walls in the two images. The layover 'shifts' the features closer to the apparent edge of the wall relative to the oppositely illuminated image.

  13. Measurement of Channel Morphology in a Headwater Stream using Low-Altitude Photography and a 3D Model Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nidaira, K.; Hiraoka, M.; Gomi, T.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We developed a method for measuring detail channel morphology using a low elevation photographic scanning. This study was conducted in a 36-m step-pool channel segment in a headwater stream of Ooborazawa watershed located in 20 km south of Tokyo. The channels were covered by Boenninghausenia japonica and Oplismenus undulatifolius var. undulatifolius. Therefore, topographic measurement in high altitude (up to 5 m) using a drone is not applicable. D50 and D90 of channel substrates were 4 cm and 21 cm, respectively. A plastic case that equipped with two digital cameras (RICOH CX5) is mounted at the top of 2.2 m of a glass fiber pole. Photos were taken every 5 seconds from 1.8 m above ground surface. Eleven ground control points (GCP) were installed and measured coordinates. We developed digital 3D topographic model using PhotoScan Pro edition version 1.0.0 and the developed 1 cm contour map using ArcGIS version 10.2. Furthermore, we measured the number, height, and length of steps for examining the accuracy of data. Resolution of obtained topographic model was from 9 to 11 mm per pixel. 1 cm of particle was identified using photo was 1 cm. Estimated step height was agreed to the measured step height in the field. We detected maximum channel scour from October to December, 2014 with (146.5 mm/day for maximum daily rain) occurred at pools with 13cm changes , while 5 to 10 cm of changes in sediment deposition occurred from Mya to June, 2015 with 78.5 mm/day of maximum daily rain. Disposition of sediment was concentration within the sequences of step structures. Our method allows us for understanding detail sediment movement and resultant localized channel changes in steep channels.

  14. Characteristics of four-channel Cherenkov-type detector for measurements of runaway electrons in the ISTTOK tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Plyusnin, V. V.; Duarte, P.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.

    2010-10-15

    A diagnostics capable of characterizing the runaway and superthermal electrons has been developing on the ISTTOK tokamak. In previous paper, a use of single-channel Cherenkov-type detector with titanium filter for runaway electron studies in ISTTOK was reported. To measure fast electron populations with different energies, a prototype of a four-channel detector with molybdenum filters was designed. Test-stand studies of filters with different thicknesses (1, 3, 7, 10, 20, 50, and 100 {mu}m) have shown that they should allow the detection of electrons with energies higher than 69, 75, 87, 95, 120, 181, and 260 keV, respectively. First results of measurements with the four-channel detector revealed the possibility to measure reliably different fast electrons populations simultaneously.

  15. Direct measurements by submersible of surge-type turbidity currents in a fjord channel, southeast Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, E.A. . Dept. of Geology); Powell, R.D. . Geology Dept.); Lawson, D.E. ); Carlson, P.R. )

    1992-01-01

    High density, high-speed turbidity currents were observed and their properties measured in submarine channels in Queen Inlet, southeast Alaska during June, 1990 and 1991. A ROV submersible fitted with two video cameras, a CTD, an optical backscatter turbidity monitor (OBS), and electromagnetic current meter, and sidescan sonar was used to collect data from within and above the flows. Multiple flows were recorded during a ROV dive at 2.3 km from the delta front in a channel at 104 m depth. Flows were marked by sudden increases in turbidity and current velocity. In one flow, turbidity increased from 300 to 1,600 OBS units (instrument maximum) in 10 sec, and within 9.4 min, salinity (S) steadily decreased by 12.1 ppt, with only a 0.2 C temperature (T) increase. Density differences between the flow and ambient water require a minimum sediment concentration of 97 g/l. Maximum flow velocity exceeded 3.3 m/s. A vertical ROV profile indicated a flow thickness of 10 m. The upper surface was visually identified by billowing suspended sediment and by fluctuating OBS and T as ambient and flow water mixed in turbulent eddies. A faster S decrease and slower T increase with distance into and away from the flow indicate that thermal diffusive processes were less efficient than convective mass transfer. The S change indicates that flow water and ambient water mixed well beyond the flow defined by high turbidity. Warm water temperatures within the flow and low meltwater stream discharge suggest that these flows originated from the delta front and are not continuous underflows.

  16. Evaluating the use of drone photogrammetry for measurement of stream channel morphology and response to high flow events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Katie; Ballow, William

    2015-04-01

    Traditional high-precision survey methods for stream channel measurement are labor-intensive and require wadeability or boat access to streams. These conditions limit the number of sites researchers are able to study and generally prohibit the possibility of repeat channel surveys to evaluate short-term fluctuations in channel morphology. In recent years, unmanned aerial vehicles (drones) equipped with photo and video capabilities have become widely available and affordable. Concurrently, developments in photogrammetric software offer unprecedented mapping and 3D rendering capabilities of drone-captured photography. In this study, we evaluate the potential use of drone-mounted cameras for detailed stream channel morphometric analysis. We used a relatively low-cost drone (DJI Phantom 2+ Vision) and commercially available, user friendly software (Agisoft Photscan) for photogrammetric analysis of drone-captured stream channel photography. Our test study was conducted on Proctor Creek, a highly responsive urban stream in Atlanta, Georgia, within the crystalline Piedmont region of the southeastern United States. As a baseline, we performed traditional high-precision survey methods to collect morphological measurements (e.g., bankfull and wetted width, bankfull and wetted thalweg depth) at 11 evenly-spaced transects, following USGS protocols along reaches of 20 times average channel width. We additionally used the drone to capture 200+ photos along the same reaches, concurrent with the channel survey. Using the photogrammetry software, we generated georeferenced 3D models of the stream channel, from which morphological measurements were derived from the 11 transects and compared with measurements from the traditional survey method. We additionally explored possibilities for novel morphometric characterization available from the continuous 3D surface, as an improvement on the limited number of detailed cross-sections available from standard methods. These results showed

  17. Voltage clamp measurements of sodium channel properties in rabbit cardiac Purkinje fibres.

    PubMed

    Colatsky, T J

    1980-08-01

    1. Voltage clamp studies of the excitatory sodium current, INa, were carried out in rabbit cardiac Purkinje fibres using th two-micro-electrode technique. Previous work has shown the rabbit Purkinje fibre to have relatively simple morphology (Sommer & Johnson, 1968) and electrical structure (Colatsky & Tsien, 1979a) compared to other cardiac preparations. 2. Non-uniformities in membrane potential were kept small by reducing the size of INa to less than 50 microA/cm2 of total membrane surface area through prepulse inactivation or removal of external sodium, Nao. Temporal resolution was improved by cooling to 10-26 degrees C. These adjustments did not greatly alter the measured properties of the sodium channel. 3. Under these conditions, sodium currents were recorded satisfying a number of criteria for adequate voltage control. Direct measurement of longitudinal non-uniformity using a second voltage electrode showed only small deviations at the time of peak current. 4. The properties of the sodium channel were examined using conventional protocols. Both peak sodium permeability, PNa, and steady-state sodium inactivation, h infinity, showed a sigmoidal dependence on membrane potential. PNa rose steeply with small depolarizations, increasing roughly e-fold per 3.2 mV, and reaching half-maximal activation at -30 +/- 2 mV. The h infinity -V curve had a midpoint of -74.9 +/- 2 mV and a reciprocal slope of 4.56 +/- 0.13 mV at temperatures of 10-19.5 degrees C, and showed a dependence on temperature, shifting to more negative potentials with cooling (approximately 3 mV/10 degrees C). Recovery of INa from inactivation in double pulse experiments followed a single exponential time course with time constants of 108-200 msec at 19 degrees C for holding potentials near -80 mV. No attempt was made to describe the activation kinetics because of uncertainties about the early time course of the current. 5. These data predict a maximum duration for INa of less than 1-2 msec and a

  18. Objectively measuring signal detectability, contrast, blur and noise in medical images using channelized joint observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, Bart; Luong, Hiêp; Platiša, Ljiljana; Philips, Wilfried

    2013-03-01

    To improve imaging systems and image processing techniques, objective image quality assessment is essential. Model observers adopting a task-based quality assessment strategy by estimating signal detectability measures, have shown to be quite successful to this end. At the same time, costly and time-consuming human observer experiments can be avoided. However, optimizing images in terms of signal detectability alone, still allows a lot of freedom in terms of the imaging parameters. More specifically, fixing the signal detectability defines a manifold in the imaging parameter space on which different "possible" solutions reside. In this article, we present measures that can be used to distinguish these possible solutions from each other, in terms of image quality factors such as signal blur, noise and signal contrast. Our approach is based on an extended channelized joint observer (CJO) that simultaneously estimates the signal amplitude, scale and detectability. As an application, we use this technique to design k-space trajectories for MRI acquisition. Our technique allows to compare the different spiral trajectories in terms of blur, noise and contrast, even when the signal detectability is estimated to be equal.

  19. Three-Dimensional Holographic Refractive-Index Measurement of Continuously Flowing Cells in a Microfluidic Channel

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Yongjin; Lue, Niyom; Hamza, Bashar; Martel, Joseph; Irimia, Daniel; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Choi, Wonshik; Yaqoob, Zahid; So, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Refractive index of biological specimens is a source of intrinsic contrast that can be explored without any concerns of photobleaching or harmful effects caused by extra contrast agents. In addition, RI contains rich information related to the metabolism of cells at the cellular and subcellular levels. Here, we report a no-moving parts approach that provides three-dimensional refractive index maps of biological samples continuously flowing in a microfluidic channel. Specifically, we use line illumination and off-axis digital holography to record the angular spectra of light scattered from flowing samples at high speed. Applying the scalar diffraction theory, we obtain accurate RI maps of the samples from the measured spectra. Using this method, we demonstrate label-free 3-D imaging of live RKO human colon cancer cells and RPMI8226 multiple myeloma cells, and obtain the volume, dry mass and density of these cells from the measured 3-D refractive index maps. Our results show that the reported method, alone or in combination with the existing flow cytometry techniques, promises as a quantitative tool for stain-free characterization of large number of cells. PMID:25419536

  20. Channelled spectrum method for birefringence dispersion measurement of anisotropic Mylar film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanaâ, F.; Palierne, J. F.; Gharbia, M.

    2016-07-01

    A convenient and accurate interferometric technique for measuring the birefringence dispersion of anisotropic Mylar film according to a continuous spectral range of wavelengths in the ultraviolet, visible and near infrared region, using the so called "Channelled Spectrum" method is described. The technique proposed here consists of considering all the experimental data, not only the minima of the transmitted light obtained after recording the transmitted light that travelled a Mylar film sandwiched between two crossed polarizers. Furthermore, we are able to measure the transmission coefficients of the polarizers, the absorption of the Mylar sheet, and other parameters involved in the experiment by using a spectroscopic detection. Thus, the transmission of the Mylar sheet vs wavelength is deduced. Using the dispersion of the optical birefringence given by the birefringence dispersion theory for uniaxial organic compounds ie the one band, three-band, and Cauchy models, and by applying a nonlinear fitting procedure on the recorded experimental data, we have obtained the parameters involved in the expressions of the optical birefringence and we have computed the optical birefringence of the Mylar film vs wavelengths. In the visible and near-infrared regions, all models give excellent fits to the experimental data. In the UV region, the three-band model considers the resonance effect. Thus, in the near-resonance region the results from the three-band model are more accurate.

  1. Three-Dimensional Holographic Refractive-Index Measurement of Continuously Flowing Cells in a Microfluidic Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Yongjin; Lue, Niyom; Hamza, Bashar; Martel, Joseph; Irimia, Daniel; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Choi, Wonshik; Yaqoob, Zahid; So, Peter

    2014-02-01

    The refractive index of biological specimens is a source of intrinsic contrast that can be explored without any concerns of photobleaching or harmful effects caused by extra contrast agents. In addition, the refractive index contains rich information related to the metabolism of cells at the cellular and subcellular levels. Here, we report a no-moving-parts approach that provides three-dimensional refractive-index maps of biological samples continuously flowing in a microfluidic channel. Specifically, we use line illumination and off-axis digital holography to record the angular spectra of light scattered from flowing samples at high speed. Applying the scalar diffraction theory, we obtain accurate refractive-index maps of the samples from the measured spectra. Using this method, we demonstrate label-free three-dimensional imaging of live RKO human colon cancer cells and RPMI8226 multiple myeloma cells, and obtain the volume, dry mass, and density of these cells from the measured three-dimensional refractive-index maps. Our results show that the reported method, alone or in combination with the existing flow cytometry techniques, shows promise as a quantitative tool for stain-free characterization of a large number of cells.

  2. Calcium channel stability measured by gradual loss of excitability in pawn mutants of Paramecium aurelia.

    PubMed

    Schein, S J

    1976-12-01

    Mutants of Paramecium aurelia that are unable to reverse swimming direction are called pawns. They lack the inward ionic (calcium) current required for the upstroke of the electrically excitable membrane response. By following the progressive loss of reversal response and excitability in cells that are suddenly changed from a heterozygous (wild-type) state to a homozygous mutant state, an estimate of the stability and mean lifetime of the calcium channel has been obtained. During rapid growth, channel dilution due to division occurred, but no channel decay was observed. Under conditions of slow growth, decay could also be observed; channel lifetime was found to be from 5 to 8 days. PMID:1035256

  3. Measurements of the average properties of a bidisperse suspension of bubbles rising in a vertical channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano-Garcia, J. C.; Zenit, R.

    2008-11-01

    This investigation presents an experimental study of a system for which the bubble size is not monodisperse. In this work an experimental equipment was designed to study the behaviour of a bidisperse suspension of bubbles rising in a vertical channel, in which the dual limit of small Weber and large Reynolds number is satisfied. Bubbles were produced using capillaries of two distinct inner diameters. Using water and water-glycerin mixtures, the range of Reynolds numbers was extended from 50 to 500, approximately. To avoid coalescence, a small amount of salt was added to the interstitial fluid, which did not affect the fluid properties significantly. Measurements of the size, bubble velocity, aspect ratio as well the equivalent diameter of the bubbles were obtained as a function of gas volume fraction. We found that the bidisperse nature of the flow changes the dynamics in a significant manner. We observed a modification of the flow agitation, characterized by the liquid velocity variance. Although the decrease of the mean velocity with gas volume fraction is similar to that observed for monodisperse flows (Martínez et. al. 2007), a general increase of the magnitude of fluctuations is observed for certain combinations of bubble size and gas fraction ratios.

  4. Determination of the manning coefficient from measured bed roughness in natural channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Limerinos, John Thomas

    1970-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to test the hypothesis that basic values of the Manning roughness coefficient of stream channels may be related to (1) some characteristic size of the streambed particles and to (2) the distribution of particle size. These two elements involving particle size can be combined into a single element by weighting characteristic particle sizes. The investigation was confined to channels with coarse bed material to avoid the complication of bed-form roughness that is associated with alluvial channels composed of fine bed material. Fifty current-meter measurements of discharge and appropriate field surveys were made at 11 sites on California streams for the purpose of computing the roughness coefficient, n, by the Manning formula. The test sites were selected to give a wide range in average size of bed material, and the discharge measurements and surveys were made at such times as to provide data covering a suitable range in stream depth. The sites selected were relatively free of the extraneous flow-retarding effects associated with irregular channel conformation and streambank vegetation. The characteristic bed-particle sizes used in the analyses were the 16,- 50,- and 84-percentile sizes as obtained from a cumulative frequency distribution of the diameters of randomly sampled surficial bed material. Separate distributions were computed for the minimum and intermediate values of the three diameters of a particle. The minimum diameters of the streambed particles were used in the study because a particle at rest on the bed invariably has its minimum diameter in the vertical position; this diameter is, therefore, the most representative measure of roughness height. The intermediate diameter was also studied because this is the diameter most easily measurable-either by sieve analysis or by photographic techniques--and--because it is the diameter that had been used in previous studies by other investigators. No significant

  5. Measurement of light charged particles in the decay channels of medium-mass excited compound nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdré, S.; Barlini, S.; Casini, G.; Pasquali, G.; Piantelli, S.; Carboni, S.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Benzoni, G.; Bini, M.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Bruno, M.; Camera, F.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F.; D'Agostino, M.; Degerlier, M.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Montanari, D.; Morelli, L.; Nannini, A.; Nicolini, R.; Poggi, G.; Vannini, G.; Wieland, O.; Bednarczyk, P.; Ciemała, M.; Dudek, J.; Fornal, B.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Matejska-Minda, M.; Mazurek, K.; Męczyński, W. M.; Myalski, S.; Styczeń, J.; Ziębliński, M.

    2014-03-01

    The 48Ti on 40Ca reactions have been studied at 300 and 600 MeV focusing on the fusion-evaporation (FE) and fusion-fission (FF) exit channels. Energy spectra and multiplicities of the emitted light charged particles have been compared to Monte Carlo simulations based on the statistical model. Indeed, in this mass region (A ~ 100) models predict that shape transitions can occur at high spin values and relatively scarce data exist in the literature about coincidence measurements between evaporation residues and light charged particles. Signals of shape transitions can be found in the variations of the lineshape of high energy gamma rays emitted from the de-excitation of GDR states gated on different region of angular momenta. For this purpose it is important to keep under control the FE and FF processes, to regulate the statistical model parameters and to control the onset of possible pre-equilibrium emissions from 300 to 600 MeV bombarding energy.

  6. Measurements and simulation of ionospheric scattering on VHF and UHF radar signals: Channel scattering function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Neil C.; Cannon, Paul S.; Groves, Keith M.

    2009-02-01

    The design and operation of transionospheric VHF and UHF radars requires knowledge of amplitude and phase scintillation due to ionospheric scattering. Phase coherence is of particular importance where long coherent integration periods and large bandwidths are required. A thin phase screen, parabolic equation based, Trans-Ionospheric Radio Propagation Simulator (TIRPS) is described. Modeled channel scattering functions (CSFs) are compared to experimental VHF and UHF data derived from the Advanced Research Projects Agency Long-range Tracking and Instrumentation Radar on Kwajalein Island (9.4°N, 166.8°E). TIRPS quantitatively reproduces the experimental results, including the quasi-parabolic profile observed in the measured CSFs under strong turbulence conditions. Variations in the simulated CSF with ionospheric phase screen parameters are also presented. Under conditions of high integrated strength of turbulence (CkL), a low phase spectral index (p = 1), indicating relatively dense small-scale irregularities, produces pronounced range spreading. Conversely, when the spectral index is high (p = 4), indicative of strong focusing/defocusing by large-scale irregularities, there is increased Doppler spreading and, when the outer scale of irregularities is large, a greater likelihood of asymmetry of the CSF about the zero Doppler axis.

  7. Automatic Measurement of Water Levels by Using Image Identification Method in Open Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung Yang, Han; Xue Yang, Jia

    2014-05-01

    Water level data is indispensable to hydrology research, and it is important information for hydraulic engineering and overall utilization of water resources. The information of water level can be transmitted to management office by the network so that the management office may well understand whether the river level is exceeding the warning line. The existing water level measurement method can only present water levels in a form of data without any of images, the methods which make data just be a data and lack the sense of reality. Those images such as the rising or overflow of river level that the existing measurement method cannot obtain simultaneously. Therefore, this research employs a newly, improved method for water level measurement. Through the Video Surveillance System to record the images on site, an image of water surface will be snapped, and then the snapped image will be pre-processed and be compared with its altitude reference value to obtain a water level altitude value. With the ever-growing technology, the application scope of image identification is widely in increase. This research attempts to use image identification technology to analyze water level automatically. The image observation method used in this research is one of non-contact water level gage but it is quite different from other ones; the image observation method is cheap and the facilities can be set up beside an embankment of river or near the houses, thus the impact coming from external factors will be significantly reduced, and a real scene picture will be transmitted through wireless transmission. According to the dynamic water flow test held in an indoor experimental channel, the results of the research indicated that all of error levels of water level identification were less than 2% which meant the image identification could achieve identification result at different water levels. This new measurement method can offer instant river level figures and on-site video so that a

  8. Aircraft Engine On-Line Diagnostics Through Dual-Channel Sensor Measurements: Development of an Enhanced System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Takahisa; Simon, Donald L.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, an enhanced on-line diagnostic system which utilizes dual-channel sensor measurements is developed for the aircraft engine application. The enhanced system is composed of a nonlinear on-board engine model (NOBEM), the hybrid Kalman filter (HKF) algorithm, and fault detection and isolation (FDI) logic. The NOBEM provides the analytical third channel against which the dual-channel measurements are compared. The NOBEM is further utilized as part of the HKF algorithm which estimates measured engine parameters. Engine parameters obtained from the dual-channel measurements, the NOBEM, and the HKF are compared against each other. When the discrepancy among the signals exceeds a tolerance level, the FDI logic determines the cause of discrepancy. Through this approach, the enhanced system achieves the following objectives: 1) anomaly detection, 2) component fault detection, and 3) sensor fault detection and isolation. The performance of the enhanced system is evaluated in a simulation environment using faults in sensors and components, and it is compared to an existing baseline system.

  9. Simple measures of channel habitat complexity predict transient hydraulic storage in streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stream thalweg depth profiles (along path of greatest channel depth) and woody debris tallies have recently become components of routine field procedures for quantifying physical habitat in national stream monitoring efforts. Mean residual depth, standard deviation of thalweg dep...

  10. An innovative approach to recognizing and parameterizing sparse channel networks in fractured rocks based on field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, J. H.

    2009-12-01

    Groundwater flow through fractured crystalline rocks has long been recognized as flow through a network of channels. Our new approach to the concept is to recognize that real channel systems at depth are composed of long distances between intersections, much larger than the intersection of recognizable fractures. We term them 'sparse channel networks'. Sparse channel networks have some key attributes. They percolate at much lower area to volume densities than equidimensional fracture networks. They are less well interconnected than equidimensional fracture networks. Above all they are less capable of adhering to imposed boundary conditions than any other system of flowing groundwater. The concept has been arrived at by re-examining 25 year old experiments in the Stripa Underground Research Laboratory in Sweden. It has been discovered that what was previously interpreted as a low permeability skin around underground openings caused by damage during excavation is, in reality, a direct outcome of the sparseness of the channel network and its inability to conform to the radial flow assumption inherent in the interpretation. Skin is therefore a direct field measure of the parameters defining the network. In the Stripa case, channels appear to extend in the order of 10 or 20 metres without intersection or bifurcation. Other characteristics of sparse channel networks are the tendency to form well connected patches (or compartments) separated by occasional 'chokes'. These compartments, sometimes of head, and often of individual water chemistry, are the second method of parameterization in the field. A further characteristic is the tendency for exploratory boreholes to behave as significant components of the systems because they are so sparse. The paper briefly describes how such systems were recognized in the Stripa experiments and how they have been modelled using a specially constructed lattice network model. The paper concludes with some ideas on how to conduct tests to

  11. The First measurement of the top quark mass at CDF II in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels simultaneously

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, Michael G.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab /Purdue U.

    2008-09-01

    The authors present a measurement of the mass of the top quark using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at Fermilab's Tevatron. This is the first measurement of the top quark mass using top-antitop pair candidate events in the lepton + jets and dilepton decay channels simultaneously. They reconstruct two observables in each channel and use a non-parametric kernel density estimation technique to derive two-dimensional probability density functions from simulated signal and background samples. The observables are the top quark mass and the invariant mass of two jets from the W decay in the lepton + jets channel, and the top quark mass and the scalar sum of transverse energy of the event in the diletpon channel. They perform a simultaneous fit for the top quark mass and the jet energy scale, which is constrained in situ by the hadronic W boson mass. using 332 lepton + jets candidate events and 144 diletpon candidate events, they measure the top quark mass to be m{sub top} = 171.9 {+-} 1.7 (stat. + JES) {+-} 1.1 (other sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} = 171.9 {+-} 2.0 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  12. Development of information-measuring channels of the monitoring system of quality cut for technological process laser cutting of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhov, Yuri T.; Matiushin, I. V.

    2001-01-01

    In the paper the researches on development of informational - measuring channels of quality indexes monitoring of laser cutting process with use of acoustic and optical signals of a different range are submitted. The estimations of their information significance and efficiency of use of acoustic and optical signals of a different range are submitted. The estimation of their information significance and efficiency of use are reduced. The structure of the informational - measuring research stand including the basic measuring channels for definition critical by criteria of quality and productivity of process parameters is offered. The carried out researches are aimed to system engineering of monitoring and the quality control of laser cutting processing of materials in real-time mode.

  13. Two-channel algorithm for single-shot, high-resolution measurement of optical wavefronts using two image sensors.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Jin; Okamoto, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Atsushi; Takabayashi, Masanori; Tomita, Akihisa

    2015-10-10

    We propose a two-channel holographic diversity interferometer (2ch-HDI) system for single-shot and highly accurate measurements of complex amplitude fields with a simple optical setup. In this method, two phase-shifted interference patterns are generated, without requiring a phase-shifting device, by entering a circularly polarized reference beam into a polarizing beam splitter, and the resulting patterns are captured simultaneously using two image sensors. However, differences in the intensity distributions of the two image sensors may lead to serious measurement errors. Thus, we also develop a two-channel algorithm optimized for the 2ch-HDI to compensate for these differences. Simulation results show that this algorithm can compensate for such differences in the intensity distributions in the two image sensors. Experimental results confirm that the combination of the 2ch-HDI and the calculation algorithm significantly enhances measurement accuracy. PMID:26479799

  14. Innovative frequency measurement technique used in the design of a single channel frequency to digital converter ASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramalingam, Neranjen; Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    1996-09-01

    The frequency to digital converter (FDC) is an application specific integrated circuit. The chip has been designed to handle one input channel but can easily be expanded to handle multiple channels of frequencies. The channel is capable of measuring frequencies from 100 Hz to 100 kHz. The power consumption of the chip is very low. The frequency measurement accuracy is better than 0.1 percent. The conversion rate per channel is 100 samples/second which can be carried too. The chip has a built-in test equipment to verify its operation. It is able to generate frequencies like 8 Mhz, 4Mhz, 2Mhz and 1Mhz which can be fed as optional clock frequencies depending on the accuracy desired. The FDC chip can be interfaced to a 16 bit bus. To meet these stringent specifications of the FDC chip an innovative frequency measurement technique has been devised called the hybrid technique of frequency measurement. The technique proves to be very accurate and it is found that by varying the sampling rate the range of input frequencies over which this accuracy can be achieved also changes. The specifications are particularly strict so that it is possible to use the chip for any military application for which a very reliable operation is demanded. The FDC chip is hence ideal for control and guidance purposes. The chip has wide ranging applications. In conjunction with sensors such as accelerometers it can be used to design smart sensors. The chip can play a vital role in engine controllers and in pressure measurements using vibrating type transducers. Sometimes to isolate transducers, the output is converted to frequency and isolation is achieved using opto-isolators; then by measuring the frequency using this chip this can be converted to digital information.

  15. Measurement of the Shear Lift Force on a Bubble in a Channel Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Motil, Brian; Skor, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Two-phase flow systems play vital roles in the design of some current and anticipated space applications of two-phase systems which include: thermal management systems, transfer line flow in cryogenic storage, space nuclear power facilities, design and operation of thermal bus, life support systems, propulsion systems, In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), and space processes for pharmaceutical applications. The design of two-phase flow systems for space applications requires a clear knowledge of the behaviors of the dispersed phase (bubble), its interaction with the continuous phase (liquid) and its effect on heat and mass transfer processes, The need to understand the bubble generation process arises from the fact that for all space applications, the size and distribution of bubbles are extremely crucial for heat and mass transfer control. One important force in two-phase flow systems is the lift force on a bubble or particle in a liquid shear flow. The shear lift is usually overwhelmed by buoyancy in normal gravity, but it becomes an important force in reduced gravity. Since the liquid flow is usually sheared because of the confining wall, the trajectories of bubbles and particles injected into the liquid flow are affected by the shear lift in reduced gravity. A series of experiments are performed to investigate the lift force on a bubble in a liquid shear flow and its effect on the detachment of a bubble from a wall under low gravity conditions. Experiments are executed in a Poiseuille flow in a channel. An air-water system is used in these experiments that are performed in the 2.2 second drop tower. A bubble is injected into the shear flow from a small injector and the shear lift is measured while the bubble is held stationary relative to the fluid. The trajectory of the bubble prior, during and after its detachment from the injector is investigated. The measured shear lift force is calculated from the trajectory of the bubble at the detachment point. These

  16. Highly selective water channel activity measured by voltage clamp: Analysis of planar lipid bilayers reconstituted with purified AqpZ

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Peter; Saparov, Sapar M.; Borgnia, Mario J.; Agre, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Aquaporins are membrane channels selectively permeated by water or water plus glycerol. Conflicting reports have described ion conductance associated with some water channels, raising the question of whether ion conductance is a general property of the aquaporin family. To clarify this question, a defined system was developed to simultaneously measure water permeability and ion conductance. The Escherichia coli water channel aquaporin-Z (AqpZ) was studied, because it is a highly stable tetramer. Planar lipid bilayers were formed from unilamellar vesicles containing purified AqpZ. The hydraulic conductivity of bilayers made from the total extract of E. coli lipids increased 3-fold if reconstituted with AqpZ, but electric conductance was unchanged. No channel activity was detected under voltage-clamp conditions, indicating that less than one in 109 transport events is electrogenic. Microelectrode measurements were simultaneously undertaken adjacent to the membrane. Changes in sodium concentration profiles accompanying transmembrane water flow permitted calculation of the activation energies: 14 kcal/mol for protein-free lipid bilayers and 4 kcal/mol for lipid bilayers containing AqpZ. Neither the water permeability nor the electric conductivity exhibited voltage dependence. This sensitive system demonstrated that AqpZ is permeated by water but not charged ions and should permit direct analyses of putative electrogenic properties of other aquaporins. PMID:11493683

  17. AG Channel Measurement and Modeling Results for Over-Water and Hilly Terrain Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matolak, David W.; Sun, Ruoyu

    2015-01-01

    This report describes work completed over the past year on our project, entitled "Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Research: The AG Channel, Robust Waveforms, and Aeronautical Network Simulations." This project is funded under the NASA project "Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS)." In this report we provide the following: an update on project progress; a description of the over-freshwater and hilly terrain initial results on path loss, delay spread, small-scale fading, and correlations; complete path loss models for the over-water AG channels; analysis for obtaining parameter statistics required for development of accurate wideband AG channel models; and analysis of an atypical AG channel in which the aircraft flies out of the ground site antenna main beam. We have modeled the small-scale fading of these channels with Ricean statistics, and have quantified the behavior of the Ricean K-factor. We also provide some results for correlations of signal components, both intra-band and inter-band. An updated literature review, and a summary that also describes future work, are also included.

  18. An episode of rapid bedrock channel incision during the last glacial cycle, measured with 10Be

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reusser, L.; Bierman, P.; Pavich, M.; Larsen, J.; Finkel, R.

    2006-01-01

    We use 10Be to infer when, how fast, and why the Susquehanna River incised through bedrock along the U.S. Atlantic seaboard, one of the world's most prominent and ancient passive margins. Although the rate at which large rivers incise rock is a fundamental control on the development of landscapes, relatively few studies have directly measured how quickly such incision occurs either in tectonically active environments or along passive margins. Exposure ages of fluvially carve d, bedrock strath terraces, preserved along the lower Susquehanna River, demonstrate that even along a passive margin, large rivers are capable of incising through rock for short periods of time at rates approaching those recorded in tectonically active regions, such as the Himalayas. Over eighty samples, collected along and between three prominent levels of strath terraces within Holtwood Gorge, indicate that the Susquehanna River incised more than 10 meters into the Appalachian Piedmont during the last glacial cycle. Beginning ???36 ka, incision rates increased dramatically, and remained elevated until ???14 ka. The northern half of the Susquehanna basin was glaciated during the late Wisconsinan; however, similar rates and timing of incision occurred in the unglaciated Potomac River basin immediately to the south. The concurrence of incision periods on both rivers suggests that glaciation and associated meltwater were not the primary drivers of incision. Instead, it appears that changing climatic conditions during the late Pleistocene promoted an increase in the frequency and magnitude of flood events capable of exceeding thresholds for rock detachment and bedrock erosion, thus enabling a short-lived episode of rapid incision into rock. Although this study has constraine d the timing and rate of bedrock incision along the largest river draining the Atlantic passive margin, the dates alone cannot explain fully why, or by what processes, this incision occurred. However, cosmogenic dating offers

  19. Blood viscoelasticity measurement using steady and transient flow controls of blood in a microfluidic analogue of Wheastone-bridge channel

    PubMed Central

    Jun Kang, Yang; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Accurate measurement of blood viscoelasticity including viscosity and elasticity is essential in estimating blood flows in arteries, arterials, and capillaries and in investigating sub-lethal damage of RBCs. Furthermore, the blood viscoelasticity could be clinically used as key indices in monitoring patients with cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we propose a new method to simultaneously measure the viscosity and elasticity of blood by simply controlling the steady and transient blood flows in a microfluidic analogue of Wheastone-bridge channel, without fully integrated sensors and labelling operations. The microfluidic device is designed to have two inlets and outlets, two side channels, and one bridge channel connecting the two side channels. Blood and PBS solution are simultaneously delivered into the microfluidic device as test fluid and reference fluid, respectively. Using a fluidic-circuit model for the microfluidic device, the analytical formula is derived by applying the linear viscoelasticity model for rheological representation of blood. First, in the steady blood flow, the relationship between the viscosity of blood and that of PBS solution (μBlood/μPBS) is obtained by monitoring the reverse flows in the bridge channel at a specific flow-rate rate (QPBSSS/QBloodL). Next, in the transient blood flow, a sudden increase in the blood flow-rate induces the transient behaviors of the blood flow in the bridge channel. Here, the elasticity (or characteristic time) of blood can be quantitatively measured by analyzing the dynamic movement of blood in the bridge channel. The regression formula (ABlood (t) = Aα + Aβ exp [−(t − t0)/λBlood]) is selected based on the pressure difference (ΔP = PA − PB) at each junction (A, B) of both side channels. The characteristic time of blood (λBlood) is measured by analyzing the area (ABlood) filled with blood in the bridge channel by selecting an appropriate detection window in the

  20. A New Void Fraction Measurement Method for Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow in Small Channels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huajun; Ji, Haifeng; Huang, Zhiyao; Wang, Baoliang; Li, Haiqing; Wu, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    Based on a laser diode, a 12 × 6 photodiode array sensor, and machine learning techniques, a new void fraction measurement method for gas-liquid two-phase flow in small channels is proposed. To overcome the influence of flow pattern on the void fraction measurement, the flow pattern of the two-phase flow is firstly identified by Fisher Discriminant Analysis (FDA). Then, according to the identification result, a relevant void fraction measurement model which is developed by Support Vector Machine (SVM) is selected to implement the void fraction measurement. A void fraction measurement system for the two-phase flow is developed and experiments are carried out in four different small channels. Four typical flow patterns (including bubble flow, slug flow, stratified flow and annular flow) are investigated. The experimental results show that the development of the measurement system is successful. The proposed void fraction measurement method is effective and the void fraction measurement accuracy is satisfactory. Compared with the conventional laser measurement systems using standard laser sources, the developed measurement system has the advantages of low cost and simple structure. Compared with the conventional void fraction measurement methods, the proposed method overcomes the influence of flow pattern on the void fraction measurement. This work also provides a good example of using low-cost laser diode as a competent replacement of the expensive standard laser source and hence implementing the parameter measurement of gas-liquid two-phase flow. The research results can be a useful reference for other researchers’ works. PMID:26828488

  1. A New Void Fraction Measurement Method for Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow in Small Channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Huajun; Ji, Haifeng; Huang, Zhiyao; Wang, Baoliang; Li, Haiqing; Wu, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    Based on a laser diode, a 12 × 6 photodiode array sensor, and machine learning techniques, a new void fraction measurement method for gas-liquid two-phase flow in small channels is proposed. To overcome the influence of flow pattern on the void fraction measurement, the flow pattern of the two-phase flow is firstly identified by Fisher Discriminant Analysis (FDA). Then, according to the identification result, a relevant void fraction measurement model which is developed by Support Vector Machine (SVM) is selected to implement the void fraction measurement. A void fraction measurement system for the two-phase flow is developed and experiments are carried out in four different small channels. Four typical flow patterns (including bubble flow, slug flow, stratified flow and annular flow) are investigated. The experimental results show that the development of the measurement system is successful. The proposed void fraction measurement method is effective and the void fraction measurement accuracy is satisfactory. Compared with the conventional laser measurement systems using standard laser sources, the developed measurement system has the advantages of low cost and simple structure. Compared with the conventional void fraction measurement methods, the proposed method overcomes the influence of flow pattern on the void fraction measurement. This work also provides a good example of using low-cost laser diode as a competent replacement of the expensive standard laser source and hence implementing the parameter measurement of gas-liquid two-phase flow. The research results can be a useful reference for other researchers' works. PMID:26828488

  2. Real-time Full-spectral Imaging and Affinity Measurements from 50 Microfluidic Channels using Nanohole Surface Plasmon Resonance†

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Si Hoon; Lindquist, Nathan C.; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Jordan, Luke R.; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    With recent advances in high-throughput proteomics and systems biology, there is a growing demand for new instruments that can precisely quantify a wide range of receptor-ligand binding kinetics in a high-throughput fashion. Here we demonstrate a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging spectroscopy instrument capable of extracting binding kinetics and affinities from 50 parallel microfluidic channels simultaneously. The instrument utilizes large-area (~cm2) metallic nanohole arrays as SPR sensing substrates and combines a broadband light source, a high-resolution imaging spectrometer and a low-noise CCD camera to extract spectral information from every channel in real time with a refractive index resolution of 7.7 × 10−6. To demonstrate the utility of our instrument for quantifying a wide range of biomolecular interactions, each parallel microfluidic channel is coated with a biomimetic supported lipid membrane containing ganglioside (GM1) receptors. The binding kinetics of cholera toxin b (CTX-b) to GM1 are then measured in a single experiment from 50 channels. By combining the highly parallel microfluidic device with large-area periodic nanohole array chips, our SPR imaging spectrometer system enables high-throughput, label-free, real-time SPR biosensing, and its full-spectral imaging capability combined with nanohole arrays could enable integration of SPR imaging with concurrent surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. PMID:22895607

  3. Real time measurements of sediment transport and bed morphology during channel altering flow and sediment transport events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, Joanna Crowe; Waters, Kevin A.; Cannatelli, Kristen M.

    2015-09-01

    Real-time measurements of bed changes over a reach are a missing piece needed to link bed morphology with sediment transport processes during unsteady flows when the bed adjusts quickly to changing transport rates or visual observation of the bed is precluded by fine sediment in the water column. A new technique is presented that provides continuous measurement of sediment movement over the length of a flume. A bedload monitoring system (BLMS) was developed that makes use of pressure pillows under a false flume bottom to measure sediment and water weights over discrete flume channel sections throughout a flow event. This paper details the construction of the BLMS and provides examples of its use in a laboratory setting to reconstruct bed slopes during unsteady flows and to create a real-time record of sediment transport rates across the flume channel bed during a sediment transporting flow. Data gathered from the BLMS compared well against techniques commonly in use in flume studies. When the BLMS was analyzed in conjunction with bed surface DEMs and differenced DEMs, a complete transport and bed adjustment picture was constructed. The difference DEMs provided information on the spatial extent of bed morphology changes. The BLMS supplied the data record necessary to reconstruct sediment transport records through the downstream channel, including locations and time periods of temporary sediment storage and supply. The BLMS makes it possible to construct a continuous record of the spatial distribution of sediment movement through the flume, including areas of temporary aggradation and degradation. Exciting implications of future research that incorporates a BLMS include a more informed management of river systems as a result of improved temporal predictions of sediment movement and the associated changes in channel slope and bed morphology.

  4. Hybrid Two-phase Flow Measurements in a Narrow Channel Using Neutron Radiography and Liquid Film Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Daisuke; Saito, Yasushi; Kawabata, Yuji

    Gas-liquid two-phase flow in a narrow gap has been studied to develop a solid target cooling system for an accelerator driven system. Flow measurements are important to understand two-phase flow dynamics also in such a narrow channel. Although contact methods can measure detailed structure of two-phase flow, the intrusive effect on the flow becomes relatively larger in such a small channel. Therefore, non-intrusive measurement would be desirable. Neutron radiography (NRG) is one of the powerful tools for gas-liquid two-phase flow measurement and void fraction distribution can be estimated from the acquired images. However, the temporal resolution of NRG is about 100∼1,000 Hz depending on the neutron flux and it should be increased to investigate flow dynamics. So the authors focused on a hybrid measurement of the NRG and a conductance liquid film sensor (LFS). The combination of these methods can complement the spatial and temporal information of the flow. In this study, the hybrid measurements were performed by NRG and LFS to visualize the detailed structure of narrow two-phase flow.

  5. Measuring inorganic nitrate species with short time resolution from an aircraft platform by dual-channel ozone chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Roger L.; Valente, Ralph J.; Meagher, James F.

    1998-09-01

    A measurement technique for determining nitrate (the sum of nitric acid and particulate nitrate) with a few seconds time resolution in plumes is needed to resolve within-plume features. A technique using dual ozone-chemiluminescent NO detectors with a selective nitrate scrubber in one sampling train is promising if used with an appropriate sampling inlet, and if nitrate is the desired analyte. We report the design of, and preliminary results from a dual channel ozone-chemiluminescent system, each channel containing a gold-CO catalyzed converter which reduces all odd nitrogen species (NOy) quantitatively to NO; one channel also contains a nylon filter to remove nitrate from the air stream prior to the converter (this signal is termed NOy*). This system was deployed successfully in a Bell 205 helicopter during the 1995 Southern Oxidants Study Nashville Ozone Study. The converters were mounted forward near the air intake, and zero air and calibration gases admitted simultaneously to both channels during flight operations. The difference signal between the two channels (NOy-NOy*) indicated apparent nitrate levels in the sampled air with a time resolution of <5 s and a limit of detection of about 1 ppbv. Nitrate levels observed with this system in plumes and background air during the Nashville Ozone Study were highly correlated with ozone and varied from below detection limits to ≈20 ppbv. Nitrate levels were also highly correlated with the calculated difference between NOy and the sum of NO and NO2 (NOz). Higher nitrate levels as a fraction of NOz were found in power plant plumes (≥60%) compared with urban plumes (≈50%) and background air, consistent with apparently lower ozone production efficiencies in power plant plumes vis-à-vis urban plumes.

  6. An L2F-measurement device with image rotator prism for flow velocity analysis in rotating coolant channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beversdorff, M.; Hein, O.; Schodl, R.

    1993-02-01

    For further improvement of the turbine blade cooling process, the knowledge concerning the heat transfer in radial coolant channels has to be deepened. Due to rotation, the velocity distribution, as well as the turbulence structure and therefore the heat transfer, will be influenced. To carry out experimental data of the flow field within a rotating duct a non-intrusive continuous measuring system (Laser-Two-Focus) with an image rotator prism is presented. The design of the system is explained in detail. Problems of application are discussed and results of the first successful measurements compared with numerical results are presented.

  7. Addition of a channel for XCO observations to a portable FTIR spectrometer for greenhouse gas measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Frank; Frey, Matthias; Kiel, Matthäus; Blumenstock, Thomas; Harig, Roland; Keens, Axel; Orphal, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    The portable FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectrometer EM27/SUN, dedicated to the precise and accurate observation of column-averaged abundances of methane and carbon dioxide, has been equipped with a second detector channel, which allows the detection of additional species, especially carbon monoxide. This allows an improved characterisation of observed carbon dioxide enhancements and makes the extended spectrometer especially suitable as a validation tool of ESA's Sentinel 5 Precursor mission, as it now covers the same spectral region as used by the infrared channel of the TROPOMI (TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument) sensor. The extension presented here does not rely on a dichroic, but instead a fraction of the solar beam is decoupled near the aperture stop of the spectrometer using a small plane mirror. This approach allows maintaining the camera-controlled solar tracker set-up, which is referenced to the field stop in front of the primary detector. Moreover, the upgrade of existing instruments can be performed without alterating the optical set-up of the primary channel and resulting changes of the instrumental characteristics of the original instrument.

  8. Comparative measurements of natural convection heat transfer in channels by holographic interferometry and schlieren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosini, Dario; Tanda, Giovanni

    2006-01-01

    In this work, natural convection heat transfer in vertical channels is experimentally investigated by applying different optical techniques, namely holographic interferometry and schlieren. Both these techniques are based on the temperature dependence of the air refractive index but they detect different optical quantities and their use involves different instrumentation and optical components. Optical methods, non-intrusive in nature, are particularly suitable for the visualization of flow and thermal fields as witnessed by their increasing use in a range of scientific and engineering disciplines; for this reason, the introduction of these experimental tools into a laboratory course can be of high value. Physics and engineering students can get familiarized with optical techniques, grasp the basics of thermal phenomena, usually elusive, which can be more easily understood if they are made visible, and begin to master digital image analysis, a key skill in laboratory activities. A didactic description of holographic interferometry and schlieren is provided and experimental results obtained for vertical, smooth and rib-roughened channels with asymmetrical heating are presented. A comparison between distributions of the local heat transfer coefficient (or its dimensionless counterpart, the Nusselt number) revealed good agreement between the results separately obtained by the two techniques, thus proving their suitability for investigating free convection heat transfer in channels.

  9. Coherent optical OFDM: theory and design.

    PubMed

    Shieh, W; Bao, H; Tang, Y

    2008-01-21

    Coherent optical OFDM (CO-OFDM) has recently been proposed and the proof-of-concept transmission experiments have shown its extreme robustness against chromatic dispersion and polarization mode dispersion. In this paper, we first review the theoretical fundamentals for CO-OFDM and its channel model in a 2x2 MIMO-OFDM representation. We then present various design choices for CO-OFDM systems and perform the nonlinearity analysis for RF-to-optical up-converter. We also show the receiver-based digital signal processing to mitigate self-phase-modulation (SPM) and Gordon-Mollenauer phase noise, which is equivalent to the midspan phase conjugation. PMID:18542158

  10. Non-invasive cerebral blood volume measurement during seizures using multi-channel near infrared spectroscopic topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Eiju; Maki, Atsushi; Kawaguchi, Fumio; Yamashita, Yuichi; Koizumi, Hideaki; Mayanagi, Yoshiaki

    2000-07-01

    Near infrared spectroscopic topography (NIRS) is widely recognized as a noninvasive method to measure the regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) dynamics coupled with neuronal activities. We analyzed the rCBV change in the early phase of epileptic seizures in 12 consecutive patients with medically intractable epilepsy. Seizure was induced by bemegride injection. We used eight-channel NIRS in nine cases and 24 channel in three cases. In all of the cases, rCBV increased rapidly after the seizure onset on the focus side. The increased rCBV was observed for about 30 - 60 s. The NIRS method can be applied to monitor the rCBV change continuously during seizures. Therefore, this method may be combined with ictal SPECT as one of the most reliable noninvasive methods of focus diagnosis.

  11. Interior channels in Martian valleys: Constraints on fluvial erosion by measurements of the Mars Express High Resolution Stereo Camera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaumann, R.; Reiss, D.; Frei, S.; Neukum, G.; Scholten, F.; Gwinner, K.; Roatsch, T.; Matz, K.-D.; Mertens, V.; Hauber, E.; Hoffmann, H.; Kohler, U.; Head, J.W.; Hiesinger, H.; Carr, M.H.

    2005-01-01

    In High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) images of the Mars Express Mission a 130 km long interior channel is identified within a 400 km long valley network system located in the Lybia Montes. Ages of the valley floor and the surroundings as derived from crater counts define a period of ???350 Myrs during which the valley might have been formed. Based on HRSC stereo measurements the discharge of the interior channel is estimated at ???4800 in m3/S, corresponding to a runoff production rate of ??? cm/day. Mass balances indicate erosion rates of a few cm/year implying the erosion activity in the valley to a few thousand years for continuous flow, or one or more orders of magnitude longer time spans for more intermittent flows. Therefore, during the Hesperian, relatively brief but recurring episodes of erosion intervals are more likely than sustained flow. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Initial Measurement of Intrapixel Variations in Back-Illuminated, High-Resistivity, p-Channel, Charge Coupled Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puls, Jason; Oluseyi, Hakeem M.

    2008-05-01

    In 1929 Edwin Hubble discovered the universe's expansion. Seventy years later it was unexpectedly found that the rate of expansion is accelerating due to some vast cosmic energy. This cosmic energy, apparently gravitationally repulsive and spread homogeneously through the universe, has come to be known as dark energy. To better understand this universal force, scientists utilize Type Ia supernovae and weak gravitational lensing as cosmological probes. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is developing the Supernova Acceleration Probe (SNAP), a proposed space-based telescope that will be used to identify and measure supernovae and measure weak gravitational lensing signals across fifteen square degrees of the sky. The SNAP telescope will incorporate an innovative camera that consists of back-illuminated, high-resistivity, p-channel charged coupled devices (CCDs) for visible to near-infrared light detection. Presented are results obtained from the measurement and analysis of a 10.5 μm pixel pitch, 1.4k by 1.4k format, p-channel CCD fabricated on high-resistivity silicon at LBNL. The fully depleted device is 300 μm thick and backside illuminated. We report on the first measurement of the intrapixel sensitivity and spatial variations of these CCDs. We also report measurements of electric field distortions near the edges of the CCD active area.

  13. Two-channel method for measuring losses in a ring optical resonator at a wavelength of 632.8 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarova, V. V.; Bessonov, A. S.; Bondarev, A. L.; Makeev, A. P.; Petrukhin, E. A.

    2016-07-01

    A two-channel method is proposed for measuring losses in an optical ring resonator (RR), in which eigenmodes (counterpropagating waves) are excited by means of a Zeeman ring He – Ne laser with a wavelength of 632.8 nm. The measured frequency splitting of the laser counterpropgating waves is used to determine the absolute value of losses in an exemplary RR. The value of losses in the measured RR is determined by comparing the resonance width of the output radiation intensity with the resonance width of the radiation intensity for an exemplary resonator. The algorithm of intensity resonance processing takes into account the distortions caused by the dynamic effect, which allows a significant increase in the accuracy (up to 1% – 2%) and sensitivity of the proposed method. The measured losses in the RR with a perimeter of 28 cm constitute 80 – 5000 ppm.

  14. Measurements of the charge asymmetry using the dilepton decay channel in pp collisions at = 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Gonzalez, J. Suarez; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Heracleous, N.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Keaveney, J.; Kim, T. J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Velde, C. Vander; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Garcia, G.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Mccartin, J.; Rios, A. A. Ocampo; Ryckbosch, D.; Diblen, S. Salva; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Marono, M. Vidal; Garcia, J. M. Vizan; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Junior, M. Correa Martins; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; De Souza, S. Fonseca; Malbouisson, H.; Malek, M.; Figueiredo, D. Matos; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Da Silva, W. L. Prado; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Manganote, E. J. Tonelli; Pereira, A. Vilela; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Plestina, R.; Tao, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, Q.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Montoya, C. A. Carrillo; Sierra, L. F. Chaparro; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Moreno, B. Gomez; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Morovic, S.; Tikvica, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Kamel, A. Ellithi; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Florent, A.; de Cassagnac, R. Granier; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. b.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Brochet, S.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Alvarez, J. D. Ruiz; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Donckt, M. Vander; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Calpas, B.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Caudron, J.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Ahmad, W. Haj; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Pardos, C. Diez; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Grebenyuk, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Habib, S.; Hauk, J.; Hellwig, G.; Hempel, M.; Horton, D.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Krämer, M.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, F.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Cipriano, P. M. Ribeiro; Riedl, C.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Stein, M.; Trevino, A. D. R. Vargas; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Martin, M. Aldaya; Blobel, V.; Enderle, H.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Gosselink, M.; Haller, J.; Höing, R. S.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Pietsch, N.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sibille, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Guthoff, M.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Held, H.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Kuznetsova, E.; Pardo, P. Lobelle; Martschei, D.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, Th.; Niegel, M.; Nürnberg, A.; Oberst, O.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Röcker, S.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Zeise, M.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kesisoglou, S.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-giotis, I.; Gouskos, L.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Jones, J.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Karancsi, J.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Kaur, M.; Mehta, M. Z.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Sharma, A.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Singh, A. P.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.; Arfaei, H.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Jafari, A.; Khakzad, M.; Najafabadi, M. Mohammadi; Naseri, M.; Mehdiabadi, S. Paktinat; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Vetere, M. Lo; Musenich, R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellato, M.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Galanti, M.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giubilato, P.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Passaseo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Moon, C. S.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Grassi, M.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Ortona, G.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Schizzi, A.; Umer, T.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kim, T. Y.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Son, D. C.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Zero J.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, C.; Park, I. C.; Park, S.; Ryu, G.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kwon, E.; Lee, B.; Lee, J.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; La Cruz, I. Heredia-de; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Villasenor-Cendejas, L. M.; Moreno, S. Carrillo; Valencia, F. Vazquez; Ibarguen, H. A. Salazar; Linares, E. Casimiro; Pineda, A. Morelos; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Doesburg, R.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Asghar, M. I.; Butt, J.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Qazi, S.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Wrochna, G.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Wolszczak, W.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Faccioli, P.; Parracho, P. G. Ferreira; Gallinaro, M.; Nguyen, F.; Antunes, J. Rodrigues; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Golutvin, I.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Korenkov, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Tikhonenko, E.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Spiridonov, A.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Savrin, V.; Tsirova, N.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Djordjevic, M.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Maestre, J. Alcaraz; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Llatas, M. Chamizo; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Peris, A. Delgado; Vázquez, D. Domínguez; Bedoya, C. Fernandez; Ramos, J. P. Fernández; Ferrando, A.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Lopez, O. Gonzalez; Lopez, S. Goy; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Merino, G.; De Martino, E. Navarro; Yzquierdo, A. Pérez-Calero; Pelayo, J. Puerta; Olmeda, A. Quintario; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Willmott, C.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Menendez, J. Fernandez; Folgueras, S.; Caballero, I. Gonzalez; Iglesias, L. Lloret; Cifuentes, J. A. Brochero; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Campderros, J. Duarte; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Sanchez, J. Gonzalez; Graziano, A.; Virto, A. Lopez; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Rivero, C. Martinez; Matorras, F.; Sanchez, F. J. Munoz; Gomez, J. Piedra; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Cortabitarte, R. Vilar; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Bernet, C.; Bianchi, G.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Christiansen, T.; Perez, J. A. Coarasa; Colafranceschi, S.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Dobson, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Eugster, J.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Giffels, M.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Giunta, M.; Glege, F.; Garrido, R. Gomez-Reino; Gowdy, S.; Guida, R.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Karavakis, E.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Orsini, L.; Cortezon, E. Palencia; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Racz, A.; Reece, W.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Santanastasio, F.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sekmen, S.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; del Arbol, P. Martinez Ruiz; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Favaro, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Rikova, M. Ivova; Kilminster, B.; Mejias, B. Millan; Ngadiuba, J.; Robmann, P.; Snoek, H.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Bartalini, P.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Shi, X.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wang, M.; Wilken, R.; Asavapibhop, B.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Topaksu, A. Kayis; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sogut, K.; Cerci, D. 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M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Outschoorn, V. I. Martinez; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Ratnikova, N.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Cheng, T.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kurt, P.; Moon, D. H.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Duru, F.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Kenny, R. P.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Barfuss, A. F.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Dutta, V.; Ceballos, G. Gomez; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Oliveros, S.; Perera, L.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Suarez, R. Gonzalez; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Meier, F.; Snow, G. R.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Massironi, A.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Lusito, L.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Vuosalo, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Jindal, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zenz, S. C.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Vargas, J. E. Ramirez; Alagoz, E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Robles, J.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Don, C. Kottachchi Kankanamge; Lamichhane, P.; Belknap, D. A.; Borrello, L.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sakharov, A.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Woods, N.

    2014-04-01

    The charge asymmetry in proton-proton collisions at = 7 TeV is measured using the dilepton decay channel (ee, e μ, or μμ). The data correspond to a total integrated luminosity of 5.0 fb-1, collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The tt and lepton charge asymmetries, defined as the differences in absolute values of the rapidities between the reconstructed top quarks and antiquarks and of the pseudorapidities between the positive and negative leptons, respectively, are measured to be A C = -0 .010 ± 0 .017 (stat .) ± 0 .008 (syst .) and = 0 .009 ± 0 .010 (stat .) ± 0 .006 (syst .). The lepton charge asymmetry is also measured as a function of the invariant mass, rapidity, and transverse momentum of the system. All measurements are consistent with the expectations of the standard model. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Validation of MODIS-derived bidirectional reflectivity retrieval algorithm in mid-infrared channel with field measurements.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bo-Hui; Wu, Hua-; Li, Zhao-Liang; Nerry, Françoise

    2012-07-30

    This work addressed the validation of the MODIS-derived bidirectional reflectivity retrieval algorithm in mid-infrared (MIR) channel, proposed by Tang and Li [Int. J. Remote Sens. 29, 4907 (2008)], with ground-measured data, which were collected from a field campaign that took place in June 2004 at the ONERA (Office National d'Etudes et de Recherches Aérospatiales) center of Fauga-Mauzac, on the PIRRENE (Programme Interdisciplinaire de Recherche sur la Radiométrie en Environnement Extérieur) experiment site [Opt. Express 15, 12464 (2007)]. The leaving-surface spectral radiances measured by a BOMEM (MR250 Series) Fourier transform interferometer were used to calculate the ground brightness temperatures with the combination of the inversion of the Planck function and the spectral response functions of MODIS channels 22 and 23, and then to estimate the ground brightness temperature without the contribution of the solar direct beam and the bidirectional reflectivity by using Tang and Li's proposed algorithm. On the other hand, the simultaneously measured atmospheric profiles were used to obtain the atmospheric parameters and then to calculate the ground brightness temperature without the contribution of the solar direct beam, based on the atmospheric radiative transfer equation in the MIR region. Comparison of those two kinds of brightness temperature obtained by two different methods indicated that the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) between the brightness temperatures estimated respectively using Tang and Li's algorithm and the atmospheric radiative transfer equation is 1.94 K. In addition, comparison of the hemispherical-directional reflectances derived by Tang and Li's algorithm with those obtained from the field measurements showed that the RMSE is 0.011, which indicates that Tang and Li's algorithm is feasible to retrieve the bidirectional reflectivity in MIR channel from MODIS data. PMID:23038327

  16. Volume transport and mixing of the Faroe Bank Channel overflow from one year of moored measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullgren, Jenny E.; Darelius, Elin; Fer, Ilker

    2016-03-01

    One-year long time series of current velocity and temperature from eight moorings deployed in the Faroe Bank Channel (FBC) are analysed to describe the structure and variability of the dense overflow plume on daily to seasonal timescales. Mooring arrays were deployed in two sections: located 25 km downstream of the main sill, in the channel that geographically confines the overflow plume at both edges (section C), and 60 km further downstream, over the slope (section S). At section C, the average volume transport of overflow waters ( < 3 °C) from the Nordic Seas towards the Iceland Basin was 1.3 ± 0.3 Sv; at section S, transport of modified overflow water ( < 6 °C) was 1.7 ± 0.7 Sv. The volume transport through the slope section was dominated by mesoscale variability at 3-5-day timescales. A simplified view of along-path entrainment of a gravity current may not be accurate for the FBC overflow. As the plume proceeds into the stratified ambient water, there is substantial detrainment from the deeper layer (bounded by the 3 °C isotherm), of comparable magnitude to the entrainment into the interfacial layer (between the 3 and 6 °C isotherms). A time series of gradient Richardson numbers suggests a quiescent plume core capped by turbulent near bottom and interfacial layers in the channel. At section S, in contrast, the entire overflow plume is turbulent. Based on a two-layer heat budget constructed for the overflow, time mean vertical diffusivities across the top of the bottom layer and across the interfacial layer were (30 ± 15) × 10-4 and (120 ± 43) × 10-4 m2 s-1, respectively.

  17. Multiscale bloom dynamics from a high frequency autonomous measurement system in the Eastern English Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derot, Jonathan; Schmitt, François; Gentilhomme, Valérie

    2014-05-01

    We consider here a dataset from an Eulerian automated system, located on the coastal area of the French side of the English Channel (Boulogne-sur-Mer), called MAREL Carnot, operated by IFREMER (France). This system records more than 15 physico-chemical parameters at 20 minutes intervals, and at the constant depth of -1,5m whatever the tidal range. Our study focuses on the period 2004 to 2011. The objective of this study is to have a better understanding of the bloom fluorescence multiscale dynamics, as regards the coastal area of English Channel and possible influence of temperature on this dynamics. Annual blooms are visible, superposed to multiscale fluctuations. The probability density function (PDF) of the fluorescence time series very nicely obeys a power law with slope -2. The PDF for annual portions obeys also power laws, with slopes which are related to the annual average. Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is used to study the dynamics and display the power spectrum, which will be linked with these dynamics. EMD method is also used to extract a trend and isolate the blooms from the high frequency dynamics. We show that the high frequency part of the fluorescence dynamics has a very large variance during bloom events, compared to normal conditions. We also show that there is a link between the mean winter temperature and the strength of bloom next spring. These results contribute to statistically characterize the bloom dynamics and extract some possible universal relations. Keywords: English Channel; Autonomous monitoring; Power spectra; EMD method; Probability density functions; Power laws.

  18. Volume transport and mixing of the Faroe Bank Channel overflow from one year of moored measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullgren, J. E.; Darelius, E.; Fer, I.

    2015-10-01

    One-year long time series of current velocity and temperature from ten moorings deployed in the Faroe Bank Channel (FBC) are analysed to describe the structure and variability of the dense overflow plume on daily to seasonal time scales. Mooring arrays are deployed in two sections: located 25 km downstream of the main sill, in the channel that geographically confines the overflow plume at both edges (section C), and 60 km further downstream, over the slope (section S). At section C, the average volume transport of overflow waters (< 3 °C) from the Nordic Seas towards the Iceland Basin is 1.3 ± 0.3 Sv; at Section S, transport of modified overflow water (< 6 °C) is 1.8 ± 0.7 Sv. The volume transport through the slope section is dominated by mesoscale variability at 3-5 day time scale. A simplified view of along-path entrainment of a gravity current is not accurate for the FBC overflow. As the plume proceeds into the stratified ambient water, there is substantial detrainment from the deeper layer (bounded by the 3 °C isotherm), of comparable magnitude to the entrainment into the interfacial layer (between the 3 and 6 °C isotherms). Time series of gradient Richardson number suggests a quiescent plume core capped by turbulent near bottom and interfacial layers in the channel. At section S, in contrast, the entire overflow plume is turbulent. Based on a two-layer heat budget constructed for the overflow, mean diffusivities across the top of the bottom layer, and across the interfacial layer are (30 ± 15) × 10-4 m2 s-1 and (119 ± 43) × 10-4 m2 s-1, respectively.

  19. Alternative measures of dispersion applied to flow in a convoluted channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroni, Monica; Kleinfelter-Domelle, Natalie; Cushman, John H.

    2009-05-01

    Steady flow in a convoluted channel is studied via Particle Tracking Velocimetry. The channel is constructed from a sequence of closed parallel cylindrical tubes welded together in plane which are then sliced down the lateral mid-plane and the lower complex is laterally shifted relative to the upper complex. Flow is induced in the lateral direction normal to the axis of the tubes. The a-time, Ta, finite-size Lyapunov exponent, λa, and the real-space self- and distinct-part of the intermediate scattering functions, Gs and Gd, and the pair density function, Gp, are computed from the data. Particle trajectories, velocity maps and streamlines show the channel has two prominent recirculation zones and a main flow region. The first passage time probability density function of tagged particles past a plane transverse to the mean flow illustrates how particles are delayed by recirculation zones. The delay caused by fluid element folding is manifested in single particle statistics such as the first passage time and the slowing increase in horizontal evolution of Gs. Gp describes initial particle distribution and allows areas in the flow domain trapping particles to be identified and visualized. Gd shows the evolution of the average separation of pairs of particles and when examined in a recirculation zone, it evolves little because of fluid element rotation. λa gives information on what transpires at a fixed scale and provides an estimate of the rate at which particles initially separated by a distance x separate to a distance ax as opposed to Gd which allows one to view changes over time. At small separations, λ1.3 approaches a constant and for intermediate separations it scales as x-0.8.

  20. Measurement of a mixed-spin-channel Feshbach resonance in 87 Rb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erhard, M.; Schmaljohann, H.; Kronjäger, J.; Bongs, K.; Sengstock, K.

    2004-03-01

    We report on the observation of a mixed-spin-channel Feshbach resonance at the low magnetic field value of 9.09±0.01 G for a mixture of ∣ 2,-1 > and ∣ 1,+1 > states in 87 Rb . This mixture is important for applications of multicomponent Bose-Einstein condensates of 87 Rb , e.g., in spin mixture physics and for quantum entanglement. Values for position, height, and width of the resonance are reported and compared to a recent theoretical calculation of this resonance.

  1. Measuring the heat-transfer coefficient of nanofluid based on copper oxide in a cylindrical channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzei, D. V.; Minakov, A. V.; Rudyak, V. Ya.; Dekterev, A. A.

    2014-03-01

    The heat-transfer coefficient of nanofluid during its flow in a cylindrical channel is studied experimentally. The studied nanofluid was prepared based on distilled water and CuO nanoparticles. Nanoparticle concentration varied in the range from 0.25 to 2% in the volume. The nanofluid was stabilized using a xanthane gum biopolymer the mass concentration of which did not exceed 0.03%. Considerable intensification of heat transfer was found. The nanofluid appeared to be Newtonian when particle concentrations exceeded 0.25%. Estimates for rheological parameters of the nanofluid and thermal conductivity coefficient have been obtained.

  2. A Novel Field-Circuit FEM Modeling and Channel Gain Estimation for Galvanic Coupling Real IBC Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yue-Ming; Wu, Zhu-Mei; Pun, Sio-Hang; Mak, Peng-Un; Vai, Mang-I; Du, Min

    2016-01-01

    Existing research on human channel modeling of galvanic coupling intra-body communication (IBC) is primarily focused on the human body itself. Although galvanic coupling IBC is less disturbed by external influences during signal transmission, there are inevitable factors in real measurement scenarios such as the parasitic impedance of electrodes, impedance matching of the transceiver, etc. which might lead to deviations between the human model and the in vivo measurements. This paper proposes a field-circuit finite element method (FEM) model of galvanic coupling IBC in a real measurement environment to estimate the human channel gain. First an anisotropic concentric cylinder model of the electric field intra-body communication for human limbs was developed based on the galvanic method. Then the electric field model was combined with several impedance elements, which were equivalent in terms of parasitic impedance of the electrodes, input and output impedance of the transceiver, establishing a field-circuit FEM model. The results indicated that a circuit module equivalent to external factors can be added to the field-circuit model, which makes this model more complete, and the estimations based on the proposed field-circuit are in better agreement with the corresponding measurement results. PMID:27049386

  3. A Novel Field-Circuit FEM Modeling and Channel Gain Estimation for Galvanic Coupling Real IBC Measurements.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yue-Ming; Wu, Zhu-Mei; Pun, Sio-Hang; Mak, Peng-Un; Vai, Mang-I; Du, Min

    2016-01-01

    Existing research on human channel modeling of galvanic coupling intra-body communication (IBC) is primarily focused on the human body itself. Although galvanic coupling IBC is less disturbed by external influences during signal transmission, there are inevitable factors in real measurement scenarios such as the parasitic impedance of electrodes, impedance matching of the transceiver, etc. which might lead to deviations between the human model and the in vivo measurements. This paper proposes a field-circuit finite element method (FEM) model of galvanic coupling IBC in a real measurement environment to estimate the human channel gain. First an anisotropic concentric cylinder model of the electric field intra-body communication for human limbs was developed based on the galvanic method. Then the electric field model was combined with several impedance elements, which were equivalent in terms of parasitic impedance of the electrodes, input and output impedance of the transceiver, establishing a field-circuit FEM model. The results indicated that a circuit module equivalent to external factors can be added to the field-circuit model, which makes this model more complete, and the estimations based on the proposed field-circuit are in better agreement with the corresponding measurement results. PMID:27049386

  4. Surface CO 2 measurements in the English Channel and Southern Bight of North Sea using voluntary observing ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padin, X. A.; Vázquez-Rodríquez, M.; Ríos, A. F.; Pérez, F. F.

    2007-06-01

    Ships of opportunity have been used to investigate ocean-atmosphere CO 2 fluxes in the English Channel and Southern Bight of the North Sea. Continuous underway measurements of the fugacity of seawater carbon dioxide ( fCO 2sw), chlorophyll, temperature and salinity have been performed along 26 transects during the spring and autumn periods. The spatial fCO 2sw distribution along the Channel and Southern Bight is modulated by the photosynthetic activity, temperature changes and water mixing between inputs from the North Atlantic Ocean and riverine discharges. The seasonal variability of fCO 2sw is assessed and discussed in terms of the biology and temperature effects, these having similar impacts. The variation of fCO 2sw shows similar interannual patterns, with lower values in spring. The annual average of air-sea CO 2 fluxes places the English Channel as neutral area of CO 2 uptake. The spring and autumn data allow differentiating between distal and proximal continental areas. The Southern Bight shows a tendency towards net CO 2 uptake on the distal continental shelf, whereas the Scheldt and Thames Plumes show a CO 2 source behaviour on the proximal continental shelves.

  5. Measuring Temperature-Dependent Propagating Disturbances in Coronal Fan Loops Using Multiple SDO-AIA Channels and Surfing Transform Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uritskiy, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.; Viall, Nicholeen M.; Ofman, Leon

    2013-01-01

    A set of co-aligned high resolution images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is used to investigate propagating disturbances (PDs) in warm fan loops at the periphery of a non-flaring active region NOAA AR 11082. To measure PD speeds at multiple coronal temperatures, a new data analysis methodology is proposed enabling quantitative description of sub visual coronal motions with low signal-to-noise ratios of the order of 0.1. The technique operates with a set of one-dimensional surfing signals extracted from position-timeplots of several AIA channels through a modified version of Radon transform. The signals are used to evaluate a two-dimensional power spectral density distribution in the frequency - velocity space which exhibits a resonance in the presence of quasi-periodic PDs. By applying this analysis to the same fan loop structures observed in several AIA channels, we found that the traveling velocity of PDs increases with the temperature of the coronal plasma following the square root dependence predicted for the slow mode magneto-acoustic wave which seems to be the dominating wave mode in the studied loop structures. This result extends recent observations by Kiddie et al. (2012) to a more general class of fan loop systems not associated with sunspots and demonstrating consistent slow mode activity in up to four AIA channels.

  6. On the subjective evaluation of the interference protection ratios' measurements for co-channel FM-TV signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groumpos, P. P.; Whyte, W.

    1983-01-01

    Results of subjective measurements made to determine the relationship between the image impairment grade and the wanted-signal to interference power ratios (C/I) for co-channel FM television signals are presented. The variation of C/I ratio with picture impairment grade is investigated for three different noise levels. The assessment of impairment grade due to thermal noise only and to picture content is also investigated. A statistical analysis for performed experiments is presented. The results presented here may be used by communication system designers to determine the required system characteristics.

  7. Visible and near-infrared channel calibration of the GOES-6 VISSR using high-altitude aircraft measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gilbert R.; Levin, Robert H.; Koyanagi, Robert S.; Wrigley, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    Present and future visible and near-infrared wavelength sensors mounted on operational satellites do not have on-board absolute calibration devices. One means of establishing an in-orbit calibration for a satellite sensor is to make simultaneous measurements of a bright, relatively uniform scene along the satellite view vector from a calibrated instrument on board a high altitude aircraft. Aircraft data were recorded over White Sands, New Mexico, and the coincident aircraft and orbiting satellite data is compared for the visible and near-infrared wavelength channel of the GOES-6 Visible Infrared Spin-Scan Radiometer.

  8. A measurement of top quark pair differential cross-section dσ/dmtt in the dilepton channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lie, Ki; Errede, Steven; Vichou, Irene

    2013-04-01

    This analysis presents a study of the measurement of the differential cross section as a function of invariant mass of the top quark pairs using 7TeV 2011 data recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Events of top-antitop pairs are selected in the di-lepton channel. The reconstructed differential distribution is subtracted with estimated backgrounds and is unfolded to correct for detector response and acceptance using the SVD algorithm. Tests on unfolding with MC simulated data are performed. Effects of the main sources of systematic uncertainties on the differential distribution are estimated.

  9. Characterization of the transport properties of channel delta-doped structures by light-modulated Shubnikov-de Haas measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mena, R. A.; Schacham, S. E.; Haugland, E. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Young, P. G.; Bibyk, S. B.; Ringel, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    The transport properties of channel delta-doped quantum well structures were characterized by conventional Hall effect and light-modulated Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) effect measurements. The large number of carriers that become available due to the delta-doping of the channel, leads to an apparent degeneracy in the well. As a result of this degeneracy, the carrier mobility remains constant as a function of temperature from 300 K down to 1.4 K. The large amount of impurity scattering, associated with the overlap of the charge carriers and the dopants, resulted in low carrier mobilities and restricted the observation of the oscillatory magneto-resistance used to characterize the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) by conventional SdH measurements. By light-modulating the carriers, we were able to observe the SdH oscillation at low magnetic fields, below 1.4 tesla, and derive a value for the quantum scattering time. Our results for the ratio of the transport and quantum scattering times are lower than those previously measured for similar structures using much higher magnetic fields.

  10. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass at CDF Using the Template Method in the Lepton + Jets Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Adelman, Jahred A.

    2008-06-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV is presented. The analysis uses a template method, in which the overconstrained kinematics of the Lepton+Jets channel of the t$\\bar{t}$ system are used to measure a single quantity, the reconstructed top quark mass, that is strongly correlated with the true top quark mass. in addition, the dijet mass of the hadronically decaying W boson is used to constrain in situ the uncertain jet energy scale in the CDF detector. Two-dimensional probability density functions are derived using a kernel density estimate-based machinery. Using 1.9 fb-1 of data, the top quark mass is measured to be 171.8$+1.9\\atop{-1.9}$(stat.) ± 1.0(syst.)GeV/c2.

  11. Observations of Binary Stars with the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument. VI. Measures during 2014 at the Discovery Channel Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horch, Elliott P.; van Belle, Gerard T.; Davidson, James W., Jr.; Ciastko, Lindsay A.; Everett, Mark E.; Bjorkman, Karen S.

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of 938 speckle measures of double stars and suspected double stars drawn mainly from the Hipparcos Catalog, as well as 208 observations where no companion was noted. One hundred fourteen pairs have been resolved for the first time. The data were obtained during four observing runs in 2014 using the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument at Lowell Observatory's Discovery Channel Telescope. The measurement precision obtained when comparing to ephemeris positions of binaries with very well-known orbits is generally less than 2 mas in separation and 0.°5 in position angle. Differential photometry is found to have internal precision of approximately 0.1 mag and to be in very good agreement with Hipparcos measures in cases where the comparison is most relevant. We also estimate the detection limit in the cases where no companion was found. Visual orbital elements are derived for six systems.

  12. Visual measurement of the evaporation process of a sessile droplet by dual-channel simultaneous phase-shifting interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peng; Zhong, Liyun; Luo, Chunshu; Niu, Wenhu; Lu, Xiaoxu

    2015-01-01

    To perform the visual measurement of the evaporation process of a sessile droplet, a dual-channel simultaneous phase-shifting interferometry (DCSPSI) method is proposed. Based on polarization components to simultaneously generate a pair of orthogonal interferograms with the phase shifts of π/2, the real-time phase of a dynamic process can be retrieved with two-step phase-shifting algorithm. Using this proposed DCSPSI system, the transient mass (TM) of the evaporation process of a sessile droplet with different initial mass were presented through measuring the real-time 3D shape of a droplet. Moreover, the mass flux density (MFD) of the evaporating droplet and its regional distribution were also calculated and analyzed. The experimental results show that the proposed DCSPSI will supply a visual, accurate, noncontact, nondestructive, global tool for the real-time multi-parameter measurement of the droplet evaporation. PMID:26178451

  13. Measurement of wavefront distortions by the method of aperture sounding with spatially separated channels

    SciTech Connect

    Prilepskiy, Boris V; Alikhanov, Alexey N; Berchenko, Evgeniy A; Kiselev, Vladimir Yu; Narusbek, Ernest A; Filatov, Aleksander S

    2005-08-31

    Features of the formation of signals in wavefront sensors with the single-frequency light wave phase modulation and spatial separation of control channels are considered. Analysis is performed for sensors in which phase modulation is governed by a controlled element located in the pupil of the optical system of a sensor or in the focal plane of the objective of this system. Peculiarities of the signal formation for a tilted wavefront are considered separately for internal points of the exit pupil in the case of light wave phase modulation in the pupil. It is shown that a signal at the modulation frequency in these wavefront sensors for points located far from the pupil boundaries is determined by the wavefront curvature. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  14. Measurement and evaluation of radar cross section for furniture in an indoor propagation channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maw, M. M.; Supanakoon, P.; Promwong, S.; Takada, J.

    2014-11-01

    This paper has attempted to evaluate the radar cross section (RCS) of two furniture items in an indoor environment in a frequency range of 3-7 GHz of the ultra-wideband (UWB) range. The RCS evaluation is achieved through an extended version of the radar equation that incorporates the channel transfer function of scattering. The time-gating method was applied to remove the multipath effect, a phenomenon which typically occurs in the indoor environment. Two double-ridged waveguide horn antennas for both vertical and horizontal polarizations were used to obtain the transfer function of scattering of the furniture prior to analysis in order to derive their bistatic RCS. The RCS results validate the applicability of the proposed extended radar equation to the indoor propagation prediction.

  15. Multi-channel optical sensor-array for measuring ballistocardiograms and respiratory activity in bed.

    PubMed

    Brüser, Christoph; Kerekes, Anna; Winter, Stefan; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Our work covers improvements in sensors and signal processing for unobtrusive, long-term monitoring of cardiac (and respiratory) rhythms using only non-invasive vibration sensors. We describe a system for the unobtrusive monitoring of vital signs by means of an array of novel optical ballistocardiography (BCG) sensors placed underneath a regular bed mattress. Furthermore, we analyze the systems spatial sensitivity and present proof-of-concept results comparing our system to a more conventional BCG system based on a single electromechanical-film (EMFi) sensor. Our preliminary results suggest that the proposed optical multi-channel system could have the potential to reduce beat-to-beat heart rate estimation errors, as well as enable the analysis of more complex breathing patterns. PMID:23367061

  16. Results of multiband (L, S, Ku band) propagation measurements and model for high elevation angle land mobile satellite channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, M. A. N.; Butt, G.; Evans, Barry G.; Richharia, M.

    1993-01-01

    Signal propagation in the land mobile satellite (LMS) service is an important consideration due to its critical impact on the overall economic and commercial viability of the system. At frequencies allocated for LMS systems, shadowing of the line-of-sight (LOS) signal as well as multipath propagation phenomena can severely impair the link availability. In particular, as most of the studies have shown, the shadowing of LOS signal causes long and deep fades in a variety of mobile environments due to the inherent nature of the channel between the satellite and a mobile. Roadside obstacles, such as buildings, trees, utility poles etc., in the immediate vicinity of a mobile and the surrounding terrain are major sources of signal shadowing in LMS links. Therefore, a proper knowledge of link degradation is essential for cost-effective planning of a satellite based mobile communication system. The results of a propagation campaign undertaken to characterize the fading nature of LMS channel at high elevation angles is presented. It was envisaged that one of the most important physical variables contributing to the amount of LOS signal shadowing is the elevation angle of the satellite. At higher elevation angles to the satellite, less obstructions in the direct satellite-to-mobile path would therefore amount to statistically better link availability. Narrowband channel measurements were carried out at three RF frequencies corresponding to L (1.3 GHz), S (2.32/2.45 GHz), and Ku (10.4 GHz) bands. The campaign itself was divided into two phases to observe the effects of seasonal variation of foliage on the roadside trees. Phase measurements were carried out in September 1991 and in April 1992. Some important aspects from the statistical analysis of the propagation data are presented.

  17. Measurement of flow speed in the channels of novel threadlike structures on the surfaces of mammalian organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Baeckkyoung; Kim, Min Su; Lee, Byung-Cheon; Yoo, Jung Sun; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kim, Youn-Joong; Kim, Ki-Woo; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2008-02-01

    There have been several reports on novel threadlike structures (NTSs) on the surfaces of the internal organs of rats and rabbits since their first observation by Bonghan Kim in 1963. To confirm this novel circulatory function, it is necessary to observe the flow of liquid through the NTS as well as the structurally corroborating channels in the NTS. In this article, we report on the measurement of the flow speed of Alcian blue solution in the NTSs on the organ surfaces of rabbits, and we present electron microscopic images depicting the cribrous cross-section with channels. The speed was measured as 0.3 ± 0.1 mm/s, and the flow distance was up to 12 cm. The flow was unidirectional, and the phase contrast microscopic images showed that the NTSs were strongly stained with Alcian blue. The ultrastructure of the NTSs revealed by cryo-scanning electron microscopy and high-voltage electron microscopy showed that (1) there were cell-like bodies and globular clumps of matter inside the sinus of the channel with thin strands of segregated zones which is a microscopic evidence of the liquid flow, (2) the sinuses have wall structures surrounded with extracellular matrices of collagenous fibers, and (3) there exists a cribriform structure of sinuses. To understand the mechanism for the circulation, a quantitative analysis of the flow speed has been undertaken applying a simplified windkessel model. In this analysis, it was shown that the liquid flow through the NTSs could be due to peristaltic motion of the NTS itself.

  18. Results of multiband (L, S, Ku band) propagation measurements and model for high elevation angle land mobile satellite channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, M. A. N.; Butt, G.; Evans, Barry G.; Richharia, M.

    1993-08-01

    Signal propagation in the land mobile satellite (LMS) service is an important consideration due to its critical impact on the overall economic and commercial viability of the system. At frequencies allocated for LMS systems, shadowing of the line-of-sight (LOS) signal as well as multipath propagation phenomena can severely impair the link availability. In particular, as most of the studies have shown, the shadowing of LOS signal causes long and deep fades in a variety of mobile environments due to the inherent nature of the channel between the satellite and a mobile. Roadside obstacles, such as buildings, trees, utility poles etc., in the immediate vicinity of a mobile and the surrounding terrain are major sources of signal shadowing in LMS links. Therefore, a proper knowledge of link degradation is essential for cost-effective planning of a satellite based mobile communication system. The results of a propagation campaign undertaken to characterize the fading nature of LMS channel at high elevation angles is presented. It was envisaged that one of the most important physical variables contributing to the amount of LOS signal shadowing is the elevation angle of the satellite. At higher elevation angles to the satellite, less obstructions in the direct satellite-to-mobile path would therefore amount to statistically better link availability. Narrowband channel measurements were carried out at three RF frequencies corresponding to L (1.3 GHz), S (2.32/2.45 GHz), and Ku (10.4 GHz) bands. The campaign itself was divided into two phases to observe the effects of seasonal variation of foliage on the roadside trees. Phase measurements were carried out in September 1991 and in April 1992. Some important aspects from the statistical analysis of the propagation data are presented.

  19. Simultaneous measurement of Ca2+ influx and reversal potentials in recombinant N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channels.

    PubMed Central

    Schneggenburger, R

    1996-01-01

    The Ca(2+) permeability of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) channels was studied in human embryonic kidney cells transfected with the NR1-NR2A subunit combination. To determine the fractional Ca(2+) current (P(f)), measurements of fura-2-based Ca(2+) influx and whole-cell currents were made in symmetrical monovalent ion concentrations at membrane potentials between -50 mV and the reversal potential. The ratios of Ca(2+) flux over net whole-cell charge at 2, 5, and 10 mM external Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca](o)) were identical at a membrane potential close to the reversal potential of the monovalent current component. Assuming unity of P(f) at this potential, the percentage of current carried by Ca(2+) was found to be 18.5 +/- 1.3% at 2 mM [Ca](o) and -50 mV. This value, which is higher than the ones reported previously, was confirmed in independent experiments in which a pure flux of Ca(2+) through NMDA-R channels was used to calibrate the Ca(2+) influx signals. The measured values of fractional Ca(2+) currents, which agree with the predictions of the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equations, are also compatible with a two-barrier model for ion permeation, in which the differences between the energy barriers for Ca(2+) and monovalent ions are similar on the external and internal membrane sides. Images FIGURE 5 PMID:9172740

  20. Measurement of the Coolant Channel Temperatures and Pressures of a Cooled Radial-Inflow Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicicco, L. Danielle; Nowlin, Brent C.; Tirres, Lizet

    1994-01-01

    Instrumentation has been installed on the surface of a cooled radial-inflow turbine. Thermocouples and miniature integrated sensor pressure transducers were installed to measure steady state coolant temperatures, blade wall temperatures, and coolant pressures. These measurements will eventually be used to determine the heat transfer characteristics of the rotor. This paper will describe the procedures used to install and calibrate the instrumentation and the testing methods followed. A limited amount of data will compare the measured values to the predicted values.

  1. Measurement of mode coupling distribution along a few-mode fiber using a synchronous multi-channel OTDR.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Masataka; Yoshida, Masato; Hirooka, Toshihiko

    2014-12-15

    We describe the nondestructive measurement of mode coupling along a few-mode fiber using a synchronous multi-channel optical time-domain reflectometer (OTDR). By installing a few-mode fiber (FMF) coupler made with a phase mask method, we excite the LP01 mode in an FMF under the test as an input mode, and then we detect backward Rayleigh scattered LP11a or LP11b modes, which were generated as a result of the mode coupling through the coupler. The mode coupling distribution between the LP01 and LP11a,b modes along the test FMF was successfully measured with a 10-m spatial resolution by obtaining the ratio between the backscattered LP01 mode and LP11a or LP11b. The value of the mode coupling obtained with the present method agreed well with that obtained with the conventional transmission method. PMID:25607078

  2. Measurement of damping and temperature: Precision bounds in Gaussian dissipative channels

    SciTech Connect

    Monras, Alex; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2011-01-15

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the performance of different classes of Gaussian states in the estimation of Gaussian phase-insensitive dissipative channels. In particular, we investigate the optimal estimation of the damping constant and reservoir temperature. We show that, for two-mode squeezed vacuum probe states, the quantum-limited accuracy of both parameters can be achieved simultaneously. Moreover, we show that for both parameters two-mode squeezed vacuum states are more efficient than coherent, thermal, or single-mode squeezed states. This suggests that at high-energy regimes, two-mode squeezed vacuum states are optimal within the Gaussian setup. This optimality result indicates a stronger form of compatibility for the estimation of the two parameters. Indeed, not only the minimum variance can be achieved at fixed probe states, but also the optimal state is common to both parameters. Additionally, we explore numerically the performance of non-Gaussian states for particular parameter values to find that maximally entangled states within d-dimensional cutoff subspaces (d{<=}6) perform better than any randomly sampled states with similar energy. However, we also find that states with very similar performance and energy exist with much less entanglement than the maximally entangled ones.

  3. Calibration of the visible and near-infrared channels of the NOAA-9 AVHRR using high-altitude aircraft measurements from August 1985 and October 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gilbert R.; Levin, Robert H.; Koyanagi, Robert S.; Wrigley, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    Visible and near infrared wavelength sensors mounted on operational satellites now in use do not have onboard absolute calibration devices. One means of establishing an in-orbit calibration for a satellite sensor is to make simultaneous measurement of a bright, relatively uniform scene along the satellite view vector from a calibrated instrument on board a high altitude aircraft. Herein, aircraft data were recorded over White Sands, New Mexico at satellite overpass time. Comparison of the coincident aircraft and orbiting satellite data for the visible and near infrared wavelength channels of the NOAA-9 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer shows that the calibration of the visible channel was unchanged from prelaunch values, but that the near infrared channel has degraded 6 percent by Aug. 1985. By Oct. 1986 the visible channel had degraded 13 percent and the near infrared channel had degraded 19 percent.

  4. 32-Channel System to Measure the Electrophysiological Properties of Bioengineered Cardiac Muscle.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Betsy H; Reddy, Anilkumar K; Zewei Tao; Madala, Sridhar; Birla, Ravi K

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop, assess, and validate a custom 32-channel system to analyze the electrical properties of 3-D artificial heart muscle (3D-AHM). In this study, neonatal rat cardiac cells were cultured in a fibrin gel to drive the formation of 3D-AHM. Once the tissues were fully formed, the customized electrocardiogram (EKG) sensing system was used to obtain the different electrophysiological characteristics of the muscle constructs. Additionally, this system was used to evaluate the electrical properties of native rat hearts, for comparison to the fabricated tissues and native values found in the literature. Histological evaluation showed extensive cellularization and cardiac tissue formation. EKG data analysis yielded time delays between the signals ranging from 0 to 7 ms. Optical maps exhibited slight trends in impulse propagation throughout the fabricated tissue. Conduction velocities were calculated longitudinally at 277.81 cm/s, transversely at 300.79 cm/s, and diagonally at 285.68 cm/s for 3D-AHM. The QRS complex exhibited an R-wave amplitude of 438.42 ± 36.96 μV and an average duration of 317.5 ± 16.5 ms for the tissue constructs. The data collected in this study provide a clearer picture about the intrinsic properties of the 3D-AHM while proving our system's efficacy for EKG data procurement. To achieve a viable and permanent solution, the bioengineered heart muscle must physiologically resemble native heart tissue as well as mimic its electrical properties for proper contractile function. This study allows us to monitor such properties and assess the necessary changes that will improve construct development and function. PMID:25667345

  5. Acoustic signal propagation and measurement in natural stream channels for application to surrogate bed load measurements: Halfmoon Creek, Colorado.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monitoring sediment-generated noise using submerged hydrophones is a surrogate method for measuring bed load transport in streams with the potential for improving estimates of bed load transport through widespread, inexpensive monitoring. Understanding acoustic signal propagation in natural stream e...

  6. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and emissivity of lunar regolith simulant using dual-channel millimeter-wave radiometry.

    PubMed

    McCloy, J S; Sundaram, S K; Matyas, J; Woskov, P P

    2011-05-01

    Millimeter wave (MMW) radiometry can be used for simultaneous measurement of emissivity and temperature of materials under extreme environments (high temperature, pressure, and corrosive environments). The state-of-the-art dual channel MMW passive radiometer with active interferometric capabilities at 137 GHz described here allows for radiometric measurements of sample temperature and emissivity up to at least 1600 °C with simultaneous measurement of sample surface dynamics. These capabilities have been used to demonstrate dynamic measurement of melting of powders of simulated lunar regolith and static measurement of emissivity of solid samples. The paper presents the theoretical background and basis for the dual-receiver system, describes the hardware in detail, and demonstrates the data analysis. Post-experiment analysis of emissivity versus temperature allows further extraction from the radiometric data of millimeter wave viewing beam coupling factors, which provide corroboratory evidence to the interferometric data of the process dynamics observed. These results show the promise of the MMW system for extracting quantitative and qualitative process parameters for industrial processes and access to real-time dynamics of materials behavior in extreme environments. PMID:21639528

  7. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and emissivity of lunar regolith simulant using dual-channel millimeter-wave radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, J. S.; Sundaram, S. K.; Matyas, J.; Woskov, P. P.

    2011-01-01

    Millimeter wave (MMW) radiometry can be used for simultaneous measurement of emissivity and temperature of materials under extreme environments (high temperature, pressure, and corrosive environments). The state-of-the-art dual channel MMW passive radiometer with active interferometric capabilities at 137 GHz described here allows for radiometric measurements of sample temperature and emissivity up to at least 1600 °C with simultaneous measurement of sample surface dynamics. These capabilities have been used to demonstrate dynamic measurement of melting of powders of simulated lunar regolith and static measurement of emissivity of solid samples. The paper presents the theoretical background and basis for the dual-receiver system, describes the hardware in detail, and demonstrates the data analysis. Post-experiment analysis of emissivity versus temperature allows further extraction from the radiometric data of millimeter wave viewing beam coupling factors, which provide corroboratory evidence to the interferometric data of the process dynamics observed. Finally, these results show the promise of the MMW system for extracting quantitative and qualitative process parameters for industrial processes and access to real-time dynamics of materials behavior in extreme environments.

  8. A Novel Variable Selection Method Based on a Partial KL Information Measure and Its Application to Channel Selection for Bioelectric Signal Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibanoki, Taro; Shima, Keisuke; Tsuji, Toshio; Takaki, Takeshi; Otsuka, Akira; Chin, Takaaki

    This paper proposes a novel variable selection method based on the KL information measure, and applies it to optimal channel selection for bioelectric signal classification. Generally, the accuracy of classifcation for bioelectric signals is greatly influenced by measuring positions of the signals as well as individual physical abilities of a user. Therefore, it is effective for classification to select optimal positions for each user in advance. In the proposed method, the probability density functions (pdfs) of measured data are estimated through learning of a multidimensional probabilistic neural network (PNN) based on the KL information theory. Then, a partial KL information measure is newly defined to evaluate contribution of each dimension in the data. The effective dimensions can be selected eliminating ineffective ones based on the partial KL information in a one-by-one manner. In the experiments, the proposed method was applied to EMG electrode selection with six subjects (including an amputee), and the effective channels were selected from all channels attached to each subject's forearm. Experimental results showed that the number of channels was reduced with 36.1±12.5 [%], and the average classification rate using selected channels by the proposed method was 98.99±1.31 [%]. These results indicated that the proposed method is capable to select effective channels (optimal or semi-optimal) for accurate classification.

  9. Channeling energy loss of He 2+ in Si by transmission and back-scattering measurements: Experiments and computer modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lulli, G.; Albertazzi, E.; Bentini, G. G.; Bianconi, M.; Lotti, R.

    2002-06-01

    Path-dependent electronic stopping of 3.35 MeV He 2+ ions in Si, is investigated by Rutherford back-scattering channeling in Si/SiO 2 wafers and transmission energy loss measurements in thin (1 1 0) membranes. A model which makes use of the 3-D Si electron density to calculate the stopping due to valence electrons, and the program convolution approximation for swift particles (CASP) to calculate the stopping due to core electrons, has been introduced into a Monte Carlo code for the simulation of channeling. The only adjustment allowed is the normalization to the empirical random stopping. An agreement of simulations and experiments within ±10-15% is obtained if both valence and core electron stopping components are scaled in the normalization procedure. To perform a significant comparison with the results obtained by a full atomic (CASP) model, we have also used a different normalization scheme, keeping the core component fixed and scaling only the valence electron contribution. In this case the results of the solid model, although slightly less accurate, become very similar to those obtained with the free-atom model.

  10. Temperature Dependence of the Gorter-Mellink Exponent m Measured in a Channel Containing He II

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, A.; Maeda, M.; Dantsuka, T.; Yuyama, M.; Kamioka, Y.

    2006-04-27

    Steady state heat transport through He II was investigated. The exponent m in the Gorter-Mellink equation which gives heat flux dependence of the temperature gradient was measured in a wide range of heat flux. Our results indicate that there is no heat flux dependency of the exponent m in the heat flux region of our measurement. The exponent m is 3.4 at temperatures much lower than the lambda point and decreases down to 3.3 as the temperature approaches the lambda point.

  11. MULTI-CHANNEL PULSED DOPPLER SIGNAL PROCESSING FOR VASCULAR MEASUREMENTS IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Anilkumar K.; Madala, Sridhar; Jones, Alan D.; Caro, Walter A.; Eberth, John F.; Pham, Thuy T.; Taffet, George E.; Hartley, Craig J.

    2009-01-01

    The small size, high heart rate, and small tissue displacement of a mouse require small sensors that are capable of high spatial and temporal tissue displacement resolutions and multichannel data acquisition systems with high sampling rates for simultaneous measurement of high fidelity signals. We developed and evaluated an ultrasound-based mouse vascular research system (MVRS) that can be used to characterize vascular physiology in normal, transgenic, surgically altered, and disease models of mice. The system consists of multiple 10/20MHz ultrasound transducers, analog electronics for Doppler displacement and velocity measurement, signal acquisition and processing electronics, and personal computer based software for real-time and offline analysis. In-vitro testing of the system showed that it is capable of measuring tissue displacement as low as 0.1 µm and tissue velocity (µm/s) starting from 0. The system can measure blood velocities up to 9 m/s (with 10 MHz Doppler at a PRF of 125 kHz) and has a temporal resolution of 0.1 milliseconds. Ex-vivo tracking of an excised mouse carotid artery wall using our Doppler technique and a video pixel tracking technique showed high correlation (R2=0.99). The system can be used to measure diameter changes, augmentation index, impedance spectra, pulse wave velocity, characteristic impedance, forward and backward waves, reflection coefficients, coronary flow reserve, and cardiac motion in murine models. The system will facilitate the study of mouse vascular mechanics and arterial abnormalities resulting in significant impact on the evaluation and screening of vascular disease in mice. PMID:19854566

  12. Measurement of the top quark mass with a matrix element method in the lepton plus jets channel at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, Brian; /UCLA

    2006-05-01

    The authors present a measurement of the mass of the top quark from p{bar p} collisions at 1.96 TeV observed with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) at the Fermilab Tevatron Run II. The events have the decay signature of p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t} in the lepton plus jets channel in which at least one jet is identified as coming from a secondary vertex and therefore a b-hadron. The largest systematic uncertainty, the jet energy scale (JES), is convoluted with the statistical error using an in-situ measurement of the hadronic W boson mass. They calculate a likelihood for each event using leading-order t{bar t} and W+jets cross-sections and parameterized parton showering. The final measured top quark mass and JES systematic is extracted from a joint likelihood of the product of individual event likelihoods. From 118 events observed in 680 pb{sup -1} of data, they measure a top quark mass of 174.09 {+-} 2.54 (stat+JES) {+-} 1.35(syst) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  13. A substorm-associated enhancement in the XUV radiation measuring channel observed by ESP/EVE/SDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yan; Wang, Hua-Ning; Shen, Chao; Du, Zhan-Le

    2016-06-01

    Comparing the ESP/EVE/SDO flux data of 2011 Feb 6, with the counterparts of XRS/GOES and SEM/SOHO, we find that there is an enhancement that is not apparent in the two latter datasets. The enhancement, possibly regarded as a flare at first glimpse, nevertheless, does not involve an energy-release from the Sun. Based on the enhancement, we combine data from SXI/GOES 15 into a synthesized analysis, and concluded that it arises from a particle-associated enhancement in the channel that measures XUV radiation. Paradoxically, it seems to be somewhat of a particle-avalanching process. Prior to the event, a moderate geomagnetic storm took place. Subsequently, while the event is proceeding, a geomagnetic substorm is simultaneously observed. Therefore, the particles, though unidentified, are probably energetic electrons induced by substorm injection.

  14. Design and characterization of a 32-channel heterodyne radiometer for electron cyclotron emission measurements on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Han, X.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. Li, E. Z.; Hu, L. Q.; Gao, X.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-07-15

    A 32-channel heterodyne radiometer has been developed for the measurement of electron cyclotron emission (ECE) on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). This system collects X-mode ECE radiation spanning a frequency range of 104–168 GHz, where the frequency coverage corresponds to a full radial coverage for the case with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.3 T. The frequency range is equally spaced every 2 GHz from 105.1 to 167.1 GHz with an RF bandwidth of ∼500 MHz and the video bandwidth can be switched among 50, 100, 200, and 400 kHz. Design objectives and characterization of the system are presented in this paper. Preliminary results for plasma operation are also presented.

  15. Design and characterization of a 32-channel heterodyne radiometer for electron cyclotron emission measurements on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak.

    PubMed

    Han, X; Liu, X; Liu, Y; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C; Li, E Z; Hu, L Q; Gao, X

    2014-07-01

    A 32-channel heterodyne radiometer has been developed for the measurement of electron cyclotron emission (ECE) on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). This system collects X-mode ECE radiation spanning a frequency range of 104-168 GHz, where the frequency coverage corresponds to a full radial coverage for the case with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.3 T. The frequency range is equally spaced every 2 GHz from 105.1 to 167.1 GHz with an RF bandwidth of ~500 MHz and the video bandwidth can be switched among 50, 100, 200, and 400 kHz. Design objectives and characterization of the system are presented in this paper. Preliminary results for plasma operation are also presented. PMID:25085139

  16. A dual-channel, focusing x-ray spectrograph with uniform dispersion for Z pinch plasmas measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Qingguo; Li Zeren; Chen Guanhua; Ye Yan; Huang Xianbin; Cai Hongchun; Li Jing; Xiao Shali

    2012-01-15

    A dual-channel, focusing x-ray spectrograph with uniform dispersion (i.e., the linear dispersion of this spectrograph is a constant) is described for measuring the x-ray spectra emission from the hot, dense Al Z pinch plasmas. The spectrograph uses double uniform-dispersed crystals (e.g., a Quartz 1010 crystal and a Mica 002 crystal) as dispersion elements and a double-film box as detector to achieve the simultaneous recording of the time integrated spectrum covering a wide spectral range of {approx}5-9 A. Since this spectrograph disperse the x-rays on the detector plane with uniform spacing for every wavelength, it needs not the calibration of the wavelength with spatial coordinate, thereby own the advantages of easiness and veracity for spectra identification. The design of this spectrograph and the example of experiment on the ''Yang'' accelerator are presented.

  17. Performance analysis of short-range NLOS UV communication system using Monte Carlo simulation based on measured channel parameters.

    PubMed

    Luo, Pengfei; Zhang, Min; Han, Dahai; Li, Qing

    2012-10-01

    The research presented in this paper is a performance study of short-range NLOS ultraviolet (UV) communication system, using a Monte-Carlo-based system-level model, in which the channel parameters, such as the path loss and the background noise are experimentally measured using an outdoor UV communication test-bed. Various transceiver geometry and background noise condition are considered. Furthermore, 4 modulation schemes are compared, which provides an insight into the performance prediction and the system trade-offs among the path loss, the optical power, the distance, the link geometry, the bit rate and the bit error rate. Finally, advices are given on UV system design and performance improvement. PMID:23188312

  18. Analysis of performance measures with single channel fuzzy queues under two class by using ranking method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueen, Zeina; Ramli, Razamin; Zaibidi, Nerda Zura

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a procedure to find different performance measurements under crisp value terms for new single fuzzy queue FM/F(H1,H2)/1 with two classes, where arrival rate and service rates are all fuzzy numbers which are represented by triangular and trapezoidal fuzzy numbers. The basic idea is to obtain exact crisp values from the fuzzy value, which is more realistic in the practical queueing system. This is done by adopting left and right ranking method to remove the fuzziness before computing the performance measurements using conventional queueing theory. The main advantage of this approach is its simplicity in application, giving exact real data around fuzzy values. This approach can also be used in all types of queueing systems by taking two types of symmetrical linear membership functions. Numerical illustration is solved in this article to obtain two groups of crisp values in the queueing system under consideration.

  19. Effect of optical channel impairments on measured jitter at 10 Gbps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Charles E.; Bianchi, Charles H.

    2003-08-01

    Operators of today's high-speed optical communications networks are required to deliver error-free transmission and continuously increasing bit rates. The complexity of synchronous optical networks (SONET, SDH) and high-speed data communications systems (Gigabit Ethernet) allows little tolerance for signal impairment. As a result, strict requirements on performance metrics such as synchronization, jitter, bit error rate (BER), and availability are all necessary. This paper reviews jitter and how it may affect the performance of optical communications systems. This will include discussion of important jitter parameters, sources of jitter, and test methods used to measure jitter in optical networks. Measurements of various jitter scenarios on OC-192 transmission will be presented, and the impact of optical signal impairments on OC-192 performance will be shown. Finally, the relationships between optical signal impairments, observed jitter, and 10GbE stressed-eye tests will be discussed.

  20. An expert system for the selection of a suitable method for flow measurement in open channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonovic, Slobodan P.

    1990-01-01

    The science of stream gaging has evolved through the years, mainly from the experiences and innovations of its practitioners. Stream-gaging procedures are standardized on the national and international level. However, the selection of a suitable method for flow measurement is still a fairly complex process. The knowledge-based system described in the paper is designed to aid the user in the selection process. Two aspects of selection are considered: physical characteristics of the gaging site and available equipment and/or structures at the gaging site. The system has been designed for the potential use in Environment Canada. The paper also discusses the rule-based expert system development tool, VP-Expert. Final conclusion of the research presented in the paper is that the expert system technology may help in the surface flow measurement process. The application seems to be natural, since stream gaging procedures are mainly derived from actual practice and experience.

  1. Confirmatory measurement experiences at the Savannah River Site using a portable multi-channel analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Monson, R.W.; Jeffcoat, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    A continuing concern within the DOE complex is the control and accountability of special nuclear material. It is not enough to have a paper record of accountable material but it must be physically verified on a statistical sampling basis. The Material Control and Accountability section of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company has been developing a technique to confirm radioactive isotopes of interest in the field using a battery operated portable multichannel analyzer and a sodium iodide gamma probe detector. A description of the instrument and examples of actual confirmatory measurements at a variety of locations and environments will be presented.

  2. Dual channel photoacoustic hygrometer for airborne measurements: background, calibration, laboratory and in-flight inter-comparison tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tátrai, D.; Bozóki, Z.; Smit, H.; Rolf, C.; Spelten, N.; Krämer, M.; Filges, A.; Gerbig, C.; Gulyás, G.; Szabó, G.

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes a tunable diode laser based dual channel photoacoustic (PA) humidity measuring system called WaSul-Hygro primarily designed for aircraft based environment research. It is calibrated for total pressures and water vapor (WV) volume mixing ratios (VMRs) possible during airborne applications. WV VMR is calculated by using pressure dependent calibration curves and a cubic spline interpolation method. Coverage of the entire atmospheric humidity concentration range which might be encountered during airborne measurements is facilitated by applying an automated sensitivity mode switching algorithm. The calibrated PA system was validated through laboratory and airborne inter-comparisons, which proved that the repeatability, the estimated accuracy and the response time of the system is 0.5 ppmV or 0.5% of the actual reading (whichever value is the greater), 5% of the actual reading within the VMR range of 1-12 000 ppmV and 2 s, respectively. The upper detection limit of the system is about 85 000 ppmV, limited only by condensation of water vapor on the walls of the 318 K heated PA cells and inlet lines. The unique advantage of the presented system is its applicability for simultaneous water vapor and total water volume mixing ratio measurements.

  3. Dual-channel photoacoustic hygrometer for airborne measurements: background, calibration, laboratory and in-flight intercomparison tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tátrai, D.; Bozóki, Z.; Smit, H.; Rolf, C.; Spelten, N.; Krämer, M.; Filges, A.; Gerbig, C.; Gulyás, G.; Szabó, G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a tunable diode laser-based dual-channel photoacoustic (PA) humidity measuring system primarily designed for aircraft-based environment research. It is calibrated for total pressure and water vapor (WV) volume mixing ratios (VMRs) possible during airborne applications. WV VMR is calculated by using pressure-dependent calibration curves and a cubic spline interpolation method. Coverage of the entire atmospheric humidity concentration range that might be encountered during airborne measurements is facilitated by applying an automated sensitivity mode switching algorithm. The calibrated PA system was validated through laboratory and airborne intercomparisons, which proved that the repeatability, the estimated accuracy and the response time of the system are 0.5 ppmV or 0.5% of the actual reading (whichever value is the greater), 5% of the actual reading within the VMR range of 1-12 000 ppmV and 2 s, respectively. The upper detection limit of the system is theoretically about 85 000 ppmV, limited only by condensation of water vapor on the walls of the 318 K heated PA cells and inlet lines, and was experimentally verified up to 20 000 ppmV. The unique advantage of the presented system is its applicability for simultaneous water vapor and total water volume mixing ratio measurements.

  4. Quantum Tasks with Non-maximally Quantum Channels via Positive Operator-Valued Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jia-Yin; Luo, Ming-Xing; Mo, Zhi-Wen

    2013-01-01

    By using a proper positive operator-valued measure (POVM), we present two new schemes for probabilistic transmission with non-maximally four-particle cluster states. In the first scheme, we demonstrate that two non-maximally four-particle cluster states can be used to realize probabilistically sharing an unknown three-particle GHZ-type state within either distant agent's place. In the second protocol, we demonstrate that a non-maximally four-particle cluster state can be used to teleport an arbitrary unknown multi-particle state in a probabilistic manner with appropriate unitary operations and POVM. Moreover the total success probability of these two schemes are also worked out.

  5. High-speed scanning interferometric focusing by fast measurement of binary transmission matrix for channel demixing.

    PubMed

    Tao, Xiaodong; Bodington, Dare; Reinig, Marc; Kubby, Joel

    2015-06-01

    Using the fast measurement of a binary transmission matrix and a digital micromirror device, we demonstrate high-speed interferometric focusing through highly dynamic scattering media with binary intensity modulation. The scanning of speckles for reference optimization gives stable focusing, which can be used for focusing through a fast changing media or two dimensional scanning through a slowly changing scattering media. The system allows dynamic focusing at 12.5 Hz with 1024 input modes, and more than 60 times intensity enhancement. It was tested with a moving diffuser, a mouse brain and skull tissue. The experiment with a live drosophila embryo shows its potential in compensating dynamic scattering in live biological tissue. PMID:26072785

  6. Multi-channel Doppler backscattering measurements in the C-2 field reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, L. Peebles, W. A.; Ruskov, E.; Deng, B. H.; Gota, H.; Gupta, D.; Tuszewski, M.; Douglass, J.; Binderbauer, M.; Tajima, T.

    2014-11-15

    A versatile heterodyne Doppler Backscattering (DBS) system is used to measure density fluctuation levels (in the wavenumber range kρ{sub s} ≤ 50), and the toroidal E × B flow velocity in the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). Six tunable frequencies in three waveguide bands (26 GHz ≤ f ≤ 90 GHz) are launched using monostatic beam optics, via a quasi-optical beam combiner/polarizer and an adjustable parabolic focusing mirror (inside the vacuum enclosure) achieving Gaussian beam spot sizes of 3–5.5 cm at the X/O-mode cutoff. The DBS system covers plasma densities of 0.8 × 10{sup 13} ≤ n{sub e} ≤ 1 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3}, and provides access to the FRC core (up to the field null) and across the FRC separatrix into the scrape-off layer plasma.

  7. Channel probe measurements for the American Sector Clutter Experiment, January 1994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, T. J.

    1994-05-01

    The ionospheric phenomenon called Equatorial Spread F encompasses a variety of effects associated with plasma irregularities occurring in the post-sunset and nighttime ionosphere near the magnetic equator. These irregularities can seriously degrade the performance of systems which involve either of necessity or inadvertently radio propagation through the equatorial ionosphere. One such system is Over-the-Horizon (OTH) radars which operate in the high-frequency (hf) band and use ionospheric reflection for forward and backscatter propagation to ranges of thousands of kilometers. When such radars are directed towards the equator, Spread F irregularities can cause scintillation effects which may be aliased into the ranges of interest and have the effect of causing, excess clutter in which targets may be hidden. In January, 1994 Los Alamos participated in a campaign to measure Spread F effects on OTH propagation from the United States looking towards South America in conjunction with local diagnostics in Peru. During the campaign Los Alamos fielded a 1600 km bistatic path between Piura, Peru, and Arequipa, Peru, the one-hop reflection region for this path was near the magnetic equator. We obtained four types of measurements: an oblique ionogram between Piura and Arequipa every three minutes; Doppler spread and spatial correlation for a single frequency cw path between Piura and Arequipa; Doppler spread, time-delay spread, and spatial coherence for a 10 kHz bandwidth path between Piura and Arequipa, and Doppler spread and time-delay spread for the one-way path between the AVA radar in New York and Arequipa, Peru. This report describes the diagnostic experiments that we carried out and gives a brief description of some of the data we obtained.

  8. Channel probe measurements for the American sector clutter experiment, January, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, T.J.

    1994-05-20

    The ionospheric phenomenon called Equatorial Spread F encompasses a variety of effects associated with plasma irregularities occurring in the post-sunset and nighttime ionosphere near the magnetic equator. These irregularities can seriously degrade the performance of systems which involve either of necessity or inadvertently radio propagation through the equatorial ionosphere. One such system is Over-the-Horizon (OTH) radars which operate in the high-frequency (hf) band and use ionospheric reflection for forward and backscatter propagation to ranges of thousands of kilometers. When such radars are directed towards the equator, Spread F irregularities can cause scintillation effects which may be aliased into the ranges of interest and have the effect of causing, excess clutter in which targets may be hidden. In January, 1994 Los Alamos participated in a campaign to measure Spread F effects on OTH propagation from the United States looking towards South America in conjunction with local diagnostics in Peru. During the campaign Los Alamos fielded a 1600 km bistatic path between Piura, Peru, and Arequipa, Peru-, the one-hop reflection region for this path was near the magnetic equator, We obtained four types of measurements: an oblique ionogram between Piura and Arequipa every three minutes; Doppler spread and spatial correlation for a single frequency cw path between Piura and Arequipa; Doppler spread, time-delay spread, and spatial coherence for a 10 kHz bandwidth path between Piura and Arequipa-, and Doppler spread and time-delay spread for the one-way path between the AVA radar in New York and Arequipa, Peru. This report describes the diagnostic experiments that we carried out and gives a brief description of some of the data we obtained.

  9. Assimilative model for ionospheric dynamics employing delay, Doppler, and direction of arrival measurements from multiple HF channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, Sergey V.; Nickisch, L. J.; Hausman, Mark; Zunich, George

    2016-03-01

    We describe the development of new HF data assimilation capabilities for our ionospheric inversion algorithm called GPSII (GPS Ionospheric Inversion). Previously existing capabilities of this algorithm included assimilation of GPS total electron content data as well as assimilation of backscatter ionograms. In the present effort we concentrated on developing assimilation tools for data related to HF propagation channels. Measurements of propagation delay, angle of arrival, and the ionosphere-induced Doppler from any number of known propagation links can now be utilized by GPSII. The resulting ionospheric model is consistent with all assimilated measurements. This means that ray tracing simulations of the assimilated propagation links are guaranteed to be in agreement with measured data within the errors of measurement. The key theoretical element for assimilating HF data is the raypath response operator (RPRO) which describes response of raypath parameters to infinitesimal variations of electron density in the ionosphere. We construct the RPRO out of the fundamental solution of linearized ray tracing equations for a dynamic magnetoactive plasma. We demonstrate performance and internal consistency of the algorithm using propagation delay data from multiple oblique ionograms (courtesy of Defence Science and Technology Organisation, Australia) as well as with time series of near-vertical incidence sky wave data (courtesy of the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity HFGeo Program Government team). In all cases GPSII produces electron density distributions which are smooth in space and in time. We simulate the assimilated propagation links by performing ray tracing through GPSII-produced ionosphere and observe that simulated data are indeed in agreement with assimilated measurements.

  10. Measurements and coupled reaction channels analysis of one- and two-proton transfer reactions for the 28Si + 90,94Zr systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkal, Sunil; Mandal, S.; Jhingan, A.; Gehlot, J.; Sugathan, P.; Golda, K. S.; Madhavan, N.; Garg, Ritika; Goyal, Savi; Mohanto, Gayatri; Sandal, Rohit; Chakraborty, Santosh; Verma, Shashi; Behera, Bivash; Eleonora, G.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Singh, R.

    2012-03-01

    Measurements of angular distributions for one- and two-proton stripping reactions for 28Si + 90,94Zr systems were performed at 120 MeV. The experiment was carried out with the 28Si beam at Inter University Accelerator Center, New Delhi. The theoretical calculations were performed using the quantum mechanical coupled reaction channels code fresco. The distorted wave Born approximation calculations reproduced the experimental angular distributions for the one-proton transfer channel for both the systems reasonably well but failed for the two-proton transfer channel. Coupled channels calculations including various intermediate states (involving target and projectile inelastic excitations before and/or after transfer) along with the sequential transfer were able to reproduce the two-proton transfer angular distributions for both the systems reasonably well. It seems that at an energy above the Coulomb barrier, there is significant contribution of the indirect multistep and sequential transfer to the two-proton stripping reaction.

  11. Dynamics and aggregation of the peptide ion channel alamethicin. Measurements using spin-labeled peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, S J; Ellena, J F; Cafiso, D S

    1991-01-01

    Two spin-labeled derivatives of the ion conductive peptide alamethicin were synthesized and used to examine its binding and state of aggregation. One derivative was spin labeled at the C-terminus and the other, a leucine analogue, was spin labeled at the N-terminus. In methanol, both the C and N terminal labeled peptides were monomeric. In aqueous solution, the C-terminal derivative was monomeric at low concentrations, but aggregated at higher concentrations with a critical concentration of 23 microM. In the membrane, the C-terminal label was localized to the membrane-aqueous interface using 13C-NMR, and could assume more than one orientation. The membrane binding of the C-terminal derivative was examined using EPR, and it exhibited a cooperativity seen previously for native alamethicin. However, this cooperativity was not the result of an aggregation of the peptide in the membrane. When the spectra of either the C or N-terminal labeled peptide were examined over a wide range of membrane lipid to peptide ratios, no evidence for aggregation could be found and the peptides remained monomeric under all conditions examined. Because electrical measurements on this peptide provide strong evidence for an ion-conductive aggregate, the ion-conductive form of alamethicin likely represents a minor fraction of the total membrane bound peptide. PMID:1717016

  12. Electron temperature measurements during electron cyclotron heating on PDX using a ten channel grating polychromator

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallo, A.; Hsuan, H.; Boyd, D.; Grek, B.; Johnson, D.; Kritz, A.; Mikkelsen, D.; LeBlanc, B.; Takahashi, H.

    1984-10-01

    During first harmonic electron cyclotron heating (ECH) on the Princeton Divertor Experiment (PDX) (R/sub 0/ = 137 cm, a = 40 cm), electron temperature was monitored using a grating polychromator which measured second harmonic electron cyclotron emission from the low field side of the tokamak. Interference from the high power heating pulse on the broadband detectors in the grating instrument was eliminated by using a waveguide filter in the transmission line which brought the emission signal to the grating instrument. Off-axis (approx. 4 cm) location of the resonance zone resulted in heating without sawtooth or m = 1 activity. However, heating with the resonance zone at the plasma center caused very large amplitude sawteeth accompanied by strong m = 1 activity: ..delta..T/T/sub MAX/ approx. = 0.41, sawtooth period approx. = 4 msec, m = 1 period approx. = 90 ..mu.. sec, (11 kHz). This is the first time such intense MHD activity driven by ECH has been observed. (For both cases there was no sawtooth activity in the ohmic phase of the discharge before ECH.) At very low densities there is a clear indication that a superthermal electron population is created during ECH.

  13. Top Quark Mass Measurement in the Lepton plus Jets Channel Using a Modified Matrix Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2008-12-01

    The authors report a measurement of the top quark mass, m{sub t}, obtained from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. They analyze a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 rfb{sup -1}. They select events with an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets in the central region of the detector, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. They calculate a signal likelihood using a matrix element integration method, where the matrix element is modified by using effective propagators to take into account assumptions on event kinematics. The event likelihood is a function of m{sub t} and a parameter JES that determines in situ the calibration of the jet energies. They use a neural network discriminant to distinguish signal from background events. They also apply a cut on the peak value of each event likelihood curve to reduce the contribution of background and badly reconstructed events. Using the 318 events that pass all selection criteria, they find m{sub t} = 172.7 {+-} 1.8 (stat. + JES) {+-} 1.2(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  14. Feasibility of using an acoustic velocity meter to measure flow in the Chipps Island channel, Suisun Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffard, Stuart H.

    1980-01-01

    Tests were conducted in 1978 to determine the feasibility of using an acoustic velocity meter to measure the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta outflow in the Chipps Island Channel, Suisun Bay, Calif. Three parts of transducers with frequencies of 100, 40, and 24 kilohertz were installed on a cross-channel test path and operated at three elevations, 15.5, 8.0, and 4.0 feet below mean lower low water, to test signal transmission at varying depths. Transmission was most reliable at the lowest depth, and the 24-kilohertz transducers at the 7-millivolt threshold of signal strength met the study 's criterion of no persistent signal loss of more than one hour 's duration in any phase of the tidal cycle. Signal strength was statistically correlated with the environmental factors of wind velocity, wind direction, solar insolation, electrical conductivity, water temperature, water velocity, stage, rate of change in stage, and the acceleration of the rate of change in stage. All correlations were weak. Signal strength is apparently a function of the interaction of several environmental factors. A 32-day test to observe if aquatic growth on the transducers would affect signal transmission showed no reduction in signal strength. Suspended-sediment samples indicated that both the size and concentration of particles are greater than presumed in earlier studies. According to the results of this study, chances are good for reliable transmission of acoustic velocity meter signals. Usually some signals were much stronger than the average 20-second signal strength at 15-minute intervals used for correlation and the frequency analysis. Superior equipment is now being developed specifically for the Chipps Island site to transmit signals several times stronger than the signals analyzed in these tests. (USGS)

  15. Sediment, water column, and open-channel denitrification in rivers measured using membrane-inlet mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisinger, Alexander J.; Tank, Jennifer L.; Hoellein, Timothy J.; Hall, Robert O.

    2016-05-01

    Riverine biogeochemical processes are understudied relative to headwaters, and reach-scale processes in rivers reflect both the water column and sediment. Denitrification in streams is difficult to measure, and is often assumed to occur only in sediment, but the water column is potentially important in rivers. Dissolved nitrogen (N) gas flux (as dinitrogen (N2)) and open-channel N2 exchange methods avoid many of the artificial conditions and expenses of common denitrification methods like acetylene block and 15N-tracer techniques. We used membrane-inlet mass spectrometry and microcosm incubations to quantify net N2 and oxygen flux from the sediment and water column of five Midwestern rivers spanning a land use gradient. Sediment and water column denitrification ranged from below detection to 1.8 mg N m-2 h-1 and from below detection to 4.9 mg N m-2 h-1, respectively. Water column activity was variable across rivers, accounting for 0-85% of combined microcosm denitrification and 39-85% of combined microcosm respiration. Finally, we estimated reach-scale denitrification at one Midwestern river using a diel, open-channel N2 exchange approach based on reach-scale metabolism methods, providing an integrative estimate of riverine denitrification. Reach-scale denitrification was 8.8 mg N m-2 h-1 (95% credible interval: 7.8-9.7 mg N m-2 h-1), higher than combined sediment and water column microcosm estimates from the same river (4.3 mg N m-2 h-1) and other estimates of reach-scale denitrification from streams. Our denitrification estimates, which span habitats and spatial scales, suggest that rivers can remove N via denitrification at equivalent or higher rates than headwater streams.

  16. Accuracy of acoustic velocity metering systems for measurement of low velocity in open channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius; Curtis, R.E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) accuracy depends on equipment limitations, the accuracy of acoustic-path length and angle determination, and the stability of the mean velocity to acoustic-path velocity relation. Equipment limitations depend on path length and angle, transducer frequency, timing oscillator frequency, and signal-detection scheme. Typically, the velocity error from this source is about +or-1 to +or-10 mms/sec. Error in acoustic-path angle or length will result in a proportional measurement bias. Typically, an angle error of one degree will result in a velocity error of 2%, and a path-length error of one meter in 100 meter will result in an error of 1%. Ray bending (signal refraction) depends on path length and density gradients present in the stream. Any deviation from a straight acoustic path between transducer will change the unique relation between path velocity and mean velocity. These deviations will then introduce error in the mean velocity computation. Typically, for a 200-meter path length, the resultant error is less than one percent, but for a 1,000 meter path length, the error can be greater than 10%. Recent laboratory and field tests have substantiated assumptions of equipment limitations. Tow-tank tests of an AVM system with a 4.69-meter path length yielded an average standard deviation error of 9.3 mms/sec, and the field tests of an AVM system with a 20.5-meter path length yielded an average standard deviation error of a 4 mms/sec. (USGS)

  17. Comparison of the PLTEMP code flow instability predictions with measurements made with electrically heated channels for the advanced test reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, E.

    2011-06-09

    When the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) was designed in the 1960s the potential for fuel element burnout by a phenomenon referred to at that time as 'autocatalytic vapor binding' was of serious concern. This type of burnout was observed to occur at power levels considerably lower than those that were known to cause critical heat flux. The conversion of the MURR from HEU fuel to LEU fuel will probably require significant design changes, such as changes in coolant channel thicknesses, that could affect the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the reactor core. Therefore, the redesign of the MURR to accommodate an LEU core must address the same issues of fuel element burnout that were of concern in the 1960s. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was designed at about the same time as the MURR and had similar concerns with regard to fuel element burnout. These concerns were addressed in the ATR by two groups of thermal-hydraulic tests that employed electrically heated simulated fuel channels. The Croft (1964), Reference 1, tests were performed at ANL. The Waters (1966), Reference 2, tests were performed at Hanford Laboratories in Richland Washington. Since fuel element surface temperatures rise rapidly as burnout conditions are approached, channel surface temperatures were carefully monitored in these experiments. For self-protection, the experimental facilities were designed to cut off the electric power when rapidly increasing surface temperatures were detected. In both the ATR reactor and in the tests with electrically heated channels, the heated length of the fuel plate was 48 inches, which is about twice that of the MURR. Whittle and Forgan (1967) independently conducted tests with electrically heated rectangular channels that were similar to the tests by Croft and by Walters. In the Whittle and Forgan tests the heated length of the channel varied among the tests and was between 16 and 24 inches. Both Waters and Whittle and Forgan show that the cause of the

  18. Flow measurement of a two-phase fluid around a cylinder in a channel using particle image velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Y.A.; Martinez, R.S.; Philip, O.G.; Schmidl, W.D.

    1994-12-31

    The particle image velocimetry (PIV) flow measurement technique was used to study two-phase flow over cylindrical rods inserted in a channel. For the two-phase flow study, a mixture of water and small air bubbles was used. The water flow rate was 378 cm{sup 3}/s and the airflow rate was {approximately}30 cm{sup 3}/s. The water was seeded with fluorescent particle tracers in order to record the position of the particles and the air bubbles independently. Then the data were analyzed to obtain the velocity fields for both experiments. One of the major concerns with steam generator operation is the tube vibration caused by turbulent flow buffeting. The vibration can cause wear on the tube joints that may eventually lead to ruptures and leaks. This repair procedure can be very costly. To help avoid this problem, experimental data are needed to test the empirical correlations that predict the behavior of the turbulent flow around the cylinders. The PIV flow measurement technique can be used to acquire that experimental data.

  19. Measurements of the properties of the Higgs-like Boson in the four lepton decay channel with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Tingting

    On July 4, 2012, experimental physicists from both the A Toroidal LHC Apparatus (ATLAS), and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiments at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC), reported evidence for the existence of a particle consistent with the Higgs boson at the level of 5 standard deviations, with a mass around 125 GeV. In March 2013, in the light of the updated ATLAS and CMS results, CERN announced that the new particle was indeed a Higgs boson. Having analyzed two-and-a-half times more data than was available for the discovery announcement in July, the confidence of observation has risen to 10 standard deviations. The experiments were also able to show that the properties of the particle as well as the ways it interacts with other particles were well-matched with those of a Higgs boson, which is expected to have spin 0 and even(+) parity. This dissertation presents Higgs property measurements using the "golden" channel Higgs decay to four leptons. My key contribution has been the analysis of the spin-parity quantum numbers, one of the essential measurements to establishing the new boson as the Higgs boson. This analysis is performed on events that are most consistent with decays of the new boson. The Higgs-like boson is found to be compatible with the SM expectation of JP = 0+ when compared pairwise with other hypothesis.

  20. Direct measurement of volume flux in the Faroe-Shetland Channel and over the Iceland-Faroe Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossby, T.; Flagg, C. N.

    2012-04-01

    Determining the exchange of water across the Iceland-Faroe-Scotland ridge is of fundamental interest because it measures the rate of transformation of North Atlantic water into dense water and thus the strength of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC). Here we study this exchange by monitoring all water flowing through the area east of Iceland to near the bottom or ˜600 m depth using a 75 kHz acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) mounted on the high-seas ferry M/F Norröna. Starting in March 2008, currents have been measured in the Faroe-Shetland Channel (FSC) and along the Iceland-Faroe Ridge (IFR) on the ferry's weekly round-trips between Iceland and Denmark. The detided average transports (to the north) across the two sections are 4.1 ± 0.1 Sv (106 m2s-1) through the FSC and 4.4 ± 0.25 Sv across the IFR (this excludes ˜1.6 Sv circulating around the Faroes). The Norröna program is ongoing.

  1. The use of visible-channel data from NOAA satellites to measure total ozone amount over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boime, Robert D.; Warren, Steven G.; Gruber, Arnold

    1994-01-01

    Accurate, detailed maps of total ozone were not available until the launch of the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) in late 1978. However, the Scanning Radiometer (SR), an instrument on board the NOAA series satellites during the 1970s, had a visible channel that overlapped closely with the Chappuis absorption band of ozone. We are investigating whether data from the SR can be used to map Antarctic ozone prior to 1978. The method is being developed with 1980s data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), which succeeded the SR on the NOAA polar-orbiting satellites. Visible-derived total ozone maps can then be compared able on the NOAA satellites, which precludes the use of a differential absorption technique to measure ozone. Consequently, our method works exclusively over scenes whose albedos are large and unvarying, i.e. scenes that contain ice sheets and/or uniform cloud-cover. Initial comparisons of time series for October-December 1987 at locations in East Antarctica show that the visible absorption by ozone in measurable and that the technique may be usable for the 1970s, but with much less accuracy than TOMS. This initial test assumes that clouds, snow, and ice all reflect the same percentage of visible light towards the satellite, regardless of satellite position or environmental conditions. This assumption is our greatest source of error. To improve the accuracy of ozone retrievals, realistic anisotropic reflectance factors are needed, which are strongly influenced by cloud and snow surface features.

  2. Measurement of the Standard Model $ZZ$ Cross-Section in the $ZZ \\to \\ell\\ell\\ell\\ell$ Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Tatiana Isabel

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis we study one of the last corners of the Standard Model to be thoroughly investigated in a hadron collider, the production of two simultaneous Z bosons. We analyze 6.1 fb-1 of data produced at Fermilab at a center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV and recorded by the CDF experiment. The predicted cross-section is 1.4 pb and we measured 2.18+0.64 -0.63 pb (stat) 0:30 (syst) using 14 observed events. This is the largest set of candidate events in this channel yet found and with our estimated signal in the sample of 9.54 events provides the smallest percentage uncertainty on the ZZ cross-section to date. We also use this large set of events to yield kinematic plots and measure ZZ properties that will be of use in probing for new physics in the future.

  3. Measurement of the top quark mass with the template method in the tbar{t} tolepton+jets channel using ATLAS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarri, P.; Cambiaghi, M.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carrillo Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda Hernandez, A. M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Cataneo, F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S. A.; Cevenini, F.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, T.; Chen, X.; Cheng, S.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciba, K.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M. D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Clifft, R. W.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coe, P.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colas, J.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cook, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Côté, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cuthbert, C.; Cwetanski, P.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Silva, P. V. M.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Dawson, J. W.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Castro Faria Salgado, P. E.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De la Torre, H.; De Lotto, B.; de Mora, L.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dean, S.; Dearnaley, W. 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C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walbersloh, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wunstorf, R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, G.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zinonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2012-06-01

    The top quark mass has been measured using the template method in the tbar{t}tolepton+jets channel based on data recorded in 2011 with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The data were taken at a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of √{s}=7 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1.04 fb-1. The analyses in the e+jets and μ+jets decay channels yield consistent results. The top quark mass is measured to be m top=174.5±0.6stat±2.3syst GeV.

  4. Gramicidin Channels: Versatile Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Olaf S.; Koeppe, Roger E., II; Roux, Benoît

    Gramicidin channels are miniproteins in which two tryptophan-rich subunits associate by means of transbilayer dimerization to form the conducting channels. That is, in contrast to other ion channels, gramicidin channels do not open and close; they appear and disappear. Each subunit in the bilayer-spanning channel is tied to the bilayer/solution interface through hydrogen bonds that involve the indole NH groups as donors andwater or the phospholipid backbone as acceptors. The channel's permeability characteristics are well-defined: gramicidin channels are selective for monovalent cations, with no measurable permeability to anions or polyvalent cations; ions and water move through a pore whose wall is formed by the peptide backbone; and the single-channel conductance and cation selectivity vary when the amino acid sequence is varied, even though the permeating ions make no contact with the amino acid side chains. Given the plethora of available experimental information—for not only the wild-type channels but also for channels formed by amino acid-substituted gramicidin analogues—gramicidin channels continue to provide important insights into the microphysics of ion permeation through bilayer-spanning channels. For similar reasons, gramicidin channels constitute a system of choice for evaluating computational strategies for obtaining mechanistic insights into ion permeation through the more complex channels formed by integral membrane proteins.

  5. Low-energy Rutherford backscattering-ion channeling measurement system with the use of several tens keV hydrogen and a time-of-flight spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Masataka; Kobayashi, Naoto; Hayashi, Nobuyuki

    1996-10-01

    We have developed a low-energy Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS)-ion channeling measurement system for the analysis of thin films and solid surfaces with the use of several tens keV hydrogen ions and a time-of-flight spectrometer which was originally developed by Mendenhall and Weller. The depth resolution of our system is better than that of a conventional RBS system with MeV helium ions and silicon surface barrier detectors. This measurement system is very small in size compared to the conventional RBS-ion channeling measurement system with the use of MeV He ions, because of the small ion accelerator for several tens keV ions. The analysis of crystalline thin films which utilizes ion channeling effect can be performed with the use of this low-energy RBS-ion channeling measurement system. The in situ observation of the thermal reaction between iron and silicon substrate with the use of this measurement system is also demonstrated.

  6. Ozone column density determination from direct irradiance measurements in the ultraviolet performed by a four-channel precision filter radiometer.

    PubMed

    Ingold, T; Mätzler, C; Wehrli, C; Heimo, A; Kämpfer, N; Philipona, R

    2001-04-20

    Ultraviolet light was measured at four channels (305, 311, 318, and 332 nm) with a precision filter radiometer (UV-PFR) at Arosa, Switzerland (46.78 degrees , 9.68 degrees , 1850 m above sea level), within the instrument trial phase of a cooperative venture of the Swiss Meteorological Institute (MeteoSwiss) and the Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos/World Radiation Center. We retrieved ozone-column density data from these direct relative irradiance measurements by adapting the Dobson standard method for all possible single-difference wavelength pairs and one double-difference pair (305/311 and 305/318) under conditions of cloud-free sky and of thin clouds (cloud optical depth <2.5 at 500 nm). All UV-PFR retrievals exhibited excellent agreement with those of collocated Dobson and Brewer spectrophotometers for data obtained during two months in 1999. Combining the results of the error analysis and the findings of the validation, we propose to retrieve ozone-column density by using the 305/311 single difference pair and the double-difference pair. Furthermore, combining both retrievals by building the ratio of ozone-column density yields information that is relevant to data quality control. Estimates of the 305/311 pair agree with measurements by the Dobson and Brewer instruments within 1% for both the mean and the standard deviation of the differences. For the double pair these values are in a range up to 1.6%. However, this pair is less sensitive to model errors. The retrieval performance is also consistent with satellite-based data from the Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (EP-TOMS) and the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment instrument (GOME). PMID:18357202

  7. Comparative Evaluation of Hyperspectral Imaging and Bathymetric Lidar for Measuring Channel Morphology Across a Range of River Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legleiter, C. J.; Overstreet, B. T.; Glennie, C. L.; Pan, Z.; Fernandez-Diaz, J. C.; Singhania, A.

    2014-12-01

    Reliable topographic information is critical to many applications in the riverine sciences. Quantifying morphologic change, modeling flow and sediment transport, and assessing aquatic habitat all require accurate, spatially distributed measurements of bed elevation. Remote sensing has emerged as a powerful tool for acquiring such data, but the capabilities and limitations associated with various remote sensing techniques must be evaluated systematically. In this study, we assessed the potential of hyperspectral imaging and bathymetric LiDAR for measuring channel morphology across a range of conditions in two distinct field sites: the clear-flowing Snake River in Grand Teton National Park and the confluence of the Blue and Colorado Rivers in north-central Colorado, USA. Field measurements of water column optical properties highlighted differences among these streams, including the highly turbid Muddy Creek also entering the Colorado, and enabled theoretical calculations of bathymetric precision (smallest detectable change in depth) and dynamic range (maximum detectable depth). Hyperspectral imaging can yield more precise depth estimates in shallow, clear water but bathymetric LiDAR could provide more consistent performance across a broader range of depths. Spectrally-based depth retrieval was highly accurate on the Snake River but less reliable in the more complex confluence setting. Stratification of the Blue/Colorado site into clear and turbid subsets did not improve depth retrieval performance. To obtain bed elevations, image-derived depth estimates were subtracted from water surface elevations derived from near-infrared LiDAR acquired at the same time as the hyperspectral images. For the water-penetrating green LiDAR, bed elevations were inferred from laser waveforms. On the Snake River, hyperspectral imaging resulted in smaller mean and root mean square errors than bathymetric LiDAR, but at the Blue/Colorado site the optical approach was subject to a shallow

  8. Measuring Ca2+-Dependent Modulation of Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channels in HEK-293T Cells.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jessica R; Lee, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca(2+) (Cav) channels regulate a variety of biological processes, such as muscle contraction, gene expression, and neurotransmitter release. Cav channels are subject to diverse forms of regulation, including those involving the Ca(2+) ions that permeate the pore. High voltage-activated Cav channels undergo Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation (CDI) and facilitation (CDF), which can regulate processes such as cardiac rhythm and synaptic plasticity. CDI and CDF differ slightly between Cav1 (L-type) and Cav2 (P/Q-, N-, and R-type) channels. Human embryonic kidney cells transformed with SV40 large T-antigen (HEK-293T) are advantageous for studying CDI and CDF of a particular type of Cav channel. HEK-293T cells do not express endogenous Cav channels, but Cav channels can be expressed exogenously at high levels in these cells by transient transfection. This protocol describes how to characterize and analyze Ca(2+)-dependent modulation of recombinant Cav channels in HEK-293T cells. PMID:27587775

  9. A four-channel portable solar radiometer for measuring particulate and/or aerosol opacity and concentration of NO2 and SO2 in stack plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, R. J.; Gregory, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Solar absorption radiometry has been investigated as a method of measuring stackplume effluents. A simple and inexpensive instrument was constructed for observing the sun at four wavelengths: 800, 600, 400, and 310 nm. Higher wavelength channels measured the effect of the particulates and NO2, and an ultraviolet channel measured the contribution of SO2 to the attenuation. Stack-plume measurements of opacity and concentration of NO2 and SO2 were in basic agreement with in-stack measurements. The major limitation on the use of the radiometer is the requirement for an accessible viewing position which allows the sun-plume-observer relationship to be attained. It was concluded that the solar radiometer offers an inexpensive method for monitoring plume effluents when the viewing position is not restricted.

  10. Droplet interface bilayer reconstitution and activity measurement of the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Barriga, Hanna M. G.; Booth, Paula; Haylock, Stuart; Bazin, Richard; Templer, Richard H.; Ces, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) provide an exciting new platform for the study of membrane proteins in stable bilayers of controlled composition. To date, the successful reconstitution and activity measurement of membrane proteins in DIBs has relied on the use of the synthetic lipid 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC). We report the functional reconstitution of the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) into DIBs composed of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), a lipid of significantly greater biological relevance than DPhPC. MscL functionality has been demonstrated using a fluorescence-based assay, showing that dye flow occurs across the DIB when MscL is gated by the cysteine reactive chemical 2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl methane thiosulfonate bromide (MTSET). MscL has already been the subject of a number of studies investigating its interaction with the membrane. We propose that this method will pave the way for future MscL studies looking in detail at the effects of controlled composition or membrane asymmetry on MscL activity using biologically relevant lipids and will also be applicable to other lipid–protein systems, paving the way for the study of membrane proteins in DIBs with biologically relevant lipids. PMID:25008079

  11. Thin Film XRF measurements (Wet and dry) of Black Sea Sediment Samples And Their Elemental Comparisons With Same Core U Channel Sample.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acar, Dursun; Eris, Kadir; Sarı, Erol; Genc, S. Can

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the XRF data from about 0.3mm thin film sediment core. We prepared 3 different model from same sediment core. The main aim is the finding for elemental changing of spectra variety and their comparison with physical changes of samples about mass and water content. Our XRF measurements were carried out by ITRAX (Cox System), and we have documented the some useful and more precision tricks; a) the first point is that the wet or dry nature of the core, b) the second is the use of U channel sample or thin film sample. For base referencing for the selected elements, we prepared normal wet U channel sample with the thickness of 1.5 cm. We used thin material (film) for keeping the humidty of every core sample's surface. Because humidity loss very high on thin film core sample and very effective to get bad results related to changing of topography and beam emission related to loss of pore water. Our XRF measurements have revealed that the Zn, Ti, Si, V,S, Cr, Mn, Ba, K and Ca elements were measured more precisely and accurate using by the dry thin film sample than those of wet U channel and wet thin sediment sample experiments. Beside this, Y, Zr, Nb, Rb, Sr, Ir, Fe,Co, Ni and Al elements were measured from the wet U channeled core more reliable with respect to the former. Lead (Pb) and Cd elements have behaved constantly during the three types of measurements. Keywords: Thin film XRF, U channel, Elements, Sediment, Measurement

  12. A measurement of the top pair production cross-section in the dilepton channel using lepton plus track selection

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Corrinne Elaine; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2007-06-01

    Using 1.1 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) from Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron, they measure the t{bar t} production cross section in events with two leptons, significant missing transverse energy, and {ge} 2 jets. As the Run II dataset grows, more stringent tests of Standard Model predictions for the top quark sector are becoming possible. The dilepton channel, where both top quarks decay t {yields} Wb {yields} {ell}{nu}b, is of particular interest due to its high purity even in the absence of a b jet 'tagging' requirement. Use of an isolated track as the second lepton significant increases the dilepton acceptance, at the price of some increase in background, particular from W + jets events where one of the jets is identified as a lepton. With the amount of data available, it has been possible to improve the estimate of the contribution from that background, reflected in a reduced systematic uncertainty. Assuming a branching ratio of BR(W {yields} {ell}{nu}) = 10.8% and a top mass of m{sub t} = 175 GeV/c{sup 2}, the measured cross-section is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t}) = 8.3 {+-} 1.3(stat.) {+-} 0.7(syst.) {+-} 0.5(lumi.) pb. The result is consistent with the Standard Model prediction of 6.7{sub -0.9}{sup +0.7} pb and represents a significant improvement in precision over previous results using this selection.

  13. Measurement of the $s$-channel Single Top Quark Cross Section at the CDF Experiment and Contributions to the Evidence of $H\\rightarrow bb$ at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hao

    2014-08-01

    In this thesis, we present the measurement of the s-channel single top quark production cross section. In the cross section measurement we use data generated by protonantiproton collisions at the center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV and collected by the CDF Run II detector. The total data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 9.4 fb-1.

  14. Measurement of the top quark mass with the matrix element method in the semileptonic decay channel at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Haefner, Petra

    2008-07-31

    The top quark plays a special role in the Standard Model of Particle Physics. With its enormous mass of about 170 GeV it is as heavy as a gold atom and is the only quark with a mass near the electroweak scale. Together with theW boson mass, the top quark mass allows indirect constraints on the mass of the hypothetical Higgs boson, which might hold the clue to the origin of mass. Top pair production with a semileptonic decay t $\\bar{t}$ →W±W b$\\bar{b}$ →q $\\bar{t}$lnb$\\bar{b}$ is the ”golden channel” for mass measurements, due to a large branching fraction and a relatively low background contamination compared to other decay channels. Top mass measurements based on this decay, performed with the matrix element method, have always been among the single best measurements in the world. In 2007, the top mass world average broke the 1% level of precision. Its measurement is no longer dominated by statistical but instead by systematic uncertainties. The reduction of systematic uncertainties has therefore become a key issue for further progress. This thesis introduces two new developments in the treatment of b jets. The first improvement is an optimization in the way b identification information is used. It leads to an enhanced separation between signal and background processes and reduces the statistical uncertainty by about 16%. The second improvement determines differences in the detector response and thus the energy scales of light jets and b jets. Thereby, it addresses the major source of systematic uncertainty in the latest top mass measurements. The method was validated on Monte Carlo events at the generator level, calibrated with fully simulated events, including detector simulation, and applied to D0 Run II data corresponding to 1 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. Possible sources of systematic uncertainties were studied. The top mass is measured to be: mt = (169.2±3.5(stat.)±1.0(syst.)) GeV . The

  15. Measurements and coupled reaction channels analysis of one and two proton transfer reactions for 28Si+90,94Zr systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkal, Sunil; Mandal, S.; Jhingan, A.; Gehlot, J.; Sugathan, P.; Golda, K. S.; Madhavan, N.; Garg, Ritika; Goyal, Savi; Mohanto, Gayatri; Verma, S.; Sandal, Rohit; Behera, Bivash; Eleonora, G.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Singh, R.

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of angular distributions for one and two proton stripping reactions for 28Si+90,94Zr systems were performed at lab energy 120 MeV with 28Si beam at Inter University Accelerator Center, New Delhi. Theoretical calculations performed using the quantum mechanical coupled reaction channels code FRESCO (including various intermediate states involving target and projectile excitations before and/or after transfer along with sequential transfer) were able to reproduce one and two proton transfer angular distributions for both the systems reasonably well. It was found that the DWBA calculations could describe the one proton transfer data well for both the systems but failed to reproduce the angular distributions for two proton transfer channels. The present measurements underline the importance of sequential transfer at energies much above the Coulomb barrier. We had also performed transfer reaction measurements for these systems in the sub- and near barrier region using recoil mass separator.

  16. RFI channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceliece, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A class of channel models is presented which exhibit varying burst error severity much like channels encountered in practice. An information-theoretic analysis of these channel models is made, and conclusions are drawn that may aid in the design of coded communication systems for realistic noisy channels.

  17. Measuring the strong electrostatic and magnetic fields with proton radiography for ultra-high intensity laser channeling on fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Uematsu, Y.; Iwawaki, T.; Habara, H. Tanaka, K. A.; Ivancic, S.; Theobald, W.; Lei, A. L.

    2014-11-15

    In order to investigate the intense laser propagation and channel formation in dense plasma, we conducted an experiment with proton deflectometry on the OMEGA EP Laser facility. The proton image was analyzed by tracing the trajectory of mono-energetic protons, which provides understanding the electric and magnetic fields that were generated around the channel. The estimated field strengths (E ∼ 10{sup 11} V/m and B ∼ 10{sup 8} G) agree with the predictions from 2D-Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, indicating the feasibility of the proton deflectometry technique for over-critical density plasma.

  18. Measuring the strong electrostatic and magnetic fields with proton radiography for ultra-high intensity laser channeling on fast ignitiona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uematsu, Y.; Ivancic, S.; Iwawaki, T.; Habara, H.; Lei, A. L.; Theobald, W.; Tanaka, K. A.

    2014-11-01

    In order to investigate the intense laser propagation and channel formation in dense plasma, we conducted an experiment with proton deflectometry on the OMEGA EP Laser facility. The proton image was analyzed by tracing the trajectory of mono-energetic protons, which provides understanding the electric and magnetic fields that were generated around the channel. The estimated field strengths (E ˜ 1011 V/m and B ˜ 108 G) agree with the predictions from 2D-Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, indicating the feasibility of the proton deflectometry technique for over-critical density plasma.

  19. Measuring the strong electrostatic and magnetic fields with proton radiography for ultra-high intensity laser channeling on fast ignition.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Y; Ivancic, S; Iwawaki, T; Habara, H; Lei, A L; Theobald, W; Tanaka, K A

    2014-11-01

    In order to investigate the intense laser propagation and channel formation in dense plasma, we conducted an experiment with proton deflectometry on the OMEGA EP Laser facility. The proton image was analyzed by tracing the trajectory of mono-energetic protons, which provides understanding the electric and magnetic fields that were generated around the channel. The estimated field strengths (E ∼ 10(11) V/m and B ∼ 10(8) G) agree with the predictions from 2D-Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, indicating the feasibility of the proton deflectometry technique for over-critical density plasma. PMID:25430358

  20. Langmuir Probe Measurements Within the Discharge Channel of the 20-kW NASA-300M and NASA-300MS Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas W.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2013-01-01

    NASA is presently developing a high-power, high-efficiency, long-lifetime Hall thruster for the Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission. In support of this task, studies have been performed on the 20-kW NASA-300M Hall thruster to aid in the overall design process. The ability to incorporate magnetic shielding into a high-power Hall thruster was also investigated with the NASA- 300MS, a modified version of the NASA-300M. The inclusion of magnetic shielding would allow the thruster to push existing state-of-the-art technology in regards to service lifetime, one of the goals of the Technology Demonstration Mission. Langmuir probe measurements were taken within the discharge channels of both thrusters in order to characterize differences at higher power levels, as well as validate ongoing modeling efforts using the axisymmetric code Hall2De. Flush-mounted Langmuir probes were also used within the channel of the NASA-300MS to verify that magnetic shielding was successfully applied. Measurements taken from 300 V, 10 kW to 600 V, 20 kW have shown plasma potentials near anode potential and electron temperatures of 4 to 12 eV at the walls near the thruster exit plane of the NASA-300MS, verifying magnetic shielding and validating the design process at this power level. Channel centerline measurements on the NASA-300M from 300 V, 10 kW to 500 V, 20 kW show the electron temperature peak at approximately 0.1 to 0.2 channel lengths upstream of the exit plane, with magnitudes increasing with discharge voltage. The acceleration profiles appear to be centered about the exit plane with a width of approximately 0.3 to 0.4 channel lengths. Channel centerline measurements on the NASA-300MS were found to be more challenging due to additional probe heating. Ionization and acceleration zones appeared to move downstream on the NASA-300MS compared to the NASA-300M, as expected based on the shift in peak radial magnetic field. Additional measurements or alternative

  1. Elimination of the gate and drain bias stresses in I-V characteristics of WSe2 FETs by using dual channel pulse measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun-Mo; Cho, In-Tak; Kang, Won-Mook; Park, Byung-Gook; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2016-08-01

    Intrinsic transfer and output characteristics of WSe2 field effect transistors are obtained by adopting the dual channel pulsed I-V measurement. Due to the DC gate bias stress during the measurement, a large hysteresis is observed and increased with increasing the sweeping range of the gate bias in the transfer curves. In addition, as a drain bias increases, the drain bias stress during the measurement induces the threshold voltage shift. The output curves measured by a DC method are significantly affected by the drain bias sweeping direction and the previous measurement, which leads to a large error in the analysis. By using the dual channel pulsed I-V measurement with a short turn-on time (10-4 s), a long turn-off time (1 s), and a base voltage (gate and drain bias during turn-off time) of 0 V, hysteretic behaviors caused by the gate bias stress and threshold voltage shift due to the drain bias stress in transfer curves are eliminated. The effect of the drain bias sweeping direction and the previous measurement in output curves are also eliminated, and the output curves show a typical field effect behavior. The intrinsic characteristics of WSe2 field effect transistors show negligible hysteresis and remarkably enhanced mobility (˜200 cm2/V s), and higher current drive capability compared to those of DC measurements.

  2. Erosion Control and Recultivation Measures at a Headrace Channel of a Hydroelectric Power Plant using Different Combined Soil Bioengineering Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obriejetan, M.; Florineth, F.; Rauch, H. P.

    2012-04-01

    As a consequence of land use change resulting in an increased number of slope protection constructions and with respect to effects associated with climate change like extremes in temperatures and temperature variations or increased frequency of heavy precipitation, adaptation strategies for sustainable erosion protection systems are needed which meet ecological compatibility and economical requirements. Therefore a wide range of different technical solutions respectively geotextiles and geotextile-related products (blankets, nettings, grids etc.) are available on the market differing considerably in function, material, durability and pricing. Manufacturers usually provide product-specific information pertaining to application field, functional range or (technical) installation features whereas vegetational aspects are frequently neglected while vegetation can contribute substantially to increased near-surface erosion protection respectively slope stability. Though, the success of sustainable erosion control is directly dependent on several vegetational aspects. Adequate development of a functional vegetation layer in combination with geotextiles is closely associated to application aspects such as seeding technique, sowing date and intensity, seed-soil contact or maintenance measures as well as to qualitative aspects like seed quality, germination rates, area of origin, production method or certification. As a general guideline, erosion control within an initial phase is directly related to restoration techniques whereas vegetation specifics with regard to species richness or species composition play a key role in medium to long-term development and slope protection. In this context one of the fundamental objectives of our study is the identification and subsequently the determination of the main interaction processes between technical and biological components of combined slope protection systems. The influence of different geotextile characteristics on specific

  3. Ratiometric and colorimetric near-infrared sensors for multi-channel detection of cyanide ion and their application to measure β-glucosidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Panfei; Xu, Yongqian; Li, Hongjuan; Liu, Shuhui; Lu, Aiping; Sun, Shiguo

    2015-11-01

    A near-infrared sensor for cyanide ion (CN-) was developed via internal charge transfer (ICT). This sensor can selectively detect CN- either through dual-ratiometric fluorescence (logarithm of I414/I564 and I803/I564) or under various absorption (356 and 440 nm) and emission (414, 564 and 803 nm) channels. Especially, the proposed method can be employed to measure β-glucosidase by detecting CN- traces in commercial amygdalin samples.

  4. Ratiometric and colorimetric near-infrared sensors for multi-channel detection of cyanide ion and their application to measure β-glucosidase

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Panfei; Xu, Yongqian; Li, Hongjuan; Liu, Shuhui; Lu, Aiping; Sun, Shiguo

    2015-01-01

    A near-infrared sensor for cyanide ion (CN−) was developed via internal charge transfer (ICT). This sensor can selectively detect CN− either through dual-ratiometric fluorescence (logarithm of I414/I564 and I803/I564) or under various absorption (356 and 440 nm) and emission (414, 564 and 803 nm) channels. Especially, the proposed method can be employed to measure β-glucosidase by detecting CN− traces in commercial amygdalin samples. PMID:26549546

  5. Measurements of the Top Anti-Top Production Cross Section and Top Quark Mass in the Hadronically Decaying Tau + Jets Decay Channel at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Hare, Daryl Curtis

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we present the first exclusive observation of the t-t → hadronic τ + jets decay channel. Using these events, we measure the t-t pair production cross section and the top quark mass in 2.2 fb-1 of data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab provides collisions of protons and anti-protons at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV and is one of only two accelerators in the world with enough energy to produce top quarks. With a branching fraction of nearly 10%, the hadronic τ + jets decay channel is the third largest t-t decay mode, and it has only been minimally explored. This the first measurement of the t-t pair production cross section in this decay channel at CDF and the first measurement of the top quark mass in this decay channel in the world. The analysis introduces a new method to recover the total momentum of the ν produced in the τ decay and an artificial neural network to reduce the contribution from the largest background source, QCD multijet background. The t-t pair production cross section is extracted by minimizing a negative log likelihood function which compares the number of observed events to the number of expected events for a given t-t cross section. The top quark mass is extracted by minimizing a negative log likelihood function built from signal and ii background probabilities which are based on the matrix elements for t-t production and decay and W + 4 parton production, respectively. Using events selected with exactly 1 hadronically decaying τ, exactly 4 jets with at least 1 identified as having originated from a b quark, and large missing transverse energy, we measure the t-t pair production cross section to be 8.8 ± 3.3 (stat.) ± 2.2 (syst.) pb and the top quark mass to be 172.7±9.3 (stat.) ±3.7 (syst.) GeV. We find both values to be in good agreement with

  6. Refining measurements of lateral channel movement from image time series by quantifying spatial variations in registration error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, Devin M.; Legleiter, Carl J.

    2016-04-01

    Remotely sensed data provides information on river morphology useful for examining channel change at yearly-to-decadal time scales. Although previous studies have emphasized the need to distinguish true geomorphic change from errors associated with image registration, standard metrics for assessing and summarizing these errors, such as the root-mean-square error (RMSE) and 90th percentile of the distribution of ground control point (GCP) error, fail to incorporate the spatial structure of this uncertainty. In this study, we introduce a framework for evaluating whether observations of lateral channel migration along a meandering channel are statistically significant, given the spatial distribution of registration error. An iterative leave-one-out cross-validation approach was used to produce local error metrics for an image time series from Savery Creek, Wyoming, USA, and to evaluate various transformation equations, interpolation methods, and GCP placement strategies. Interpolated error surfaces then were used to create error ellipses representing spatially variable buffers of detectable change. Our results show that, for all five sequential image pairs we examined, spatially distributed estimates of registration error enabled detection of a greater number of statistically significant lateral migration vectors than the spatially uniform RMSE or 90th percentile of GCP error. Conversely, spatially distributed error metrics prevented changes from being mistaken as real in areas of greater registration error. Our results also support the findings of previous studies: second-order polynomial functions on average yield the lowest RMSE, and errors are reduced by placing GCPs on the floodplain rather than on hillslopes. This study highlights the importance of characterizing the spatial distribution of image registration errors in the analysis of channel change.

  7. Jamming in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; Steel, Fiona

    2011-03-01

    We study jamming of low aspect-ratio cylindrical Delrin grains in a vertical channel. Grain heights are less than their diameter so the grains resemble antacid tablets, coins, or poker chips. These grains are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section where the channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. Grains are sometimes observed to form jams, stable structures supported by the channel walls with no support beneath them. The probability of jam occurrence and the strength or robustness of a jam is effected by grain and channel sizes. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability and jam strength in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories. Supported by an Undergraduate Research Grant from Penn State Erie, The Behrend College.

  8. Optimal channels for channelized quadratic estimators.

    PubMed

    Kupinski, Meredith K; Clarkson, Eric

    2016-06-01

    We present a new method for computing optimized channels for estimation tasks that is feasible for high-dimensional image data. Maximum-likelihood (ML) parameter estimates are challenging to compute from high-dimensional likelihoods. The dimensionality reduction from M measurements to L channels is a critical advantage of channelized quadratic estimators (CQEs), since estimating likelihood moments from channelized data requires smaller sample sizes and inverting a smaller covariance matrix is easier. The channelized likelihood is then used to form ML estimates of the parameter(s). In this work we choose an imaging example in which the second-order statistics of the image data depend upon the parameter of interest: the correlation length. Correlation lengths are used to approximate background textures in many imaging applications, and in these cases an estimate of the correlation length is useful for pre-whitening. In a simulation study we compare the estimation performance, as measured by the root-mean-squared error (RMSE), of correlation length estimates from CQE and power spectral density (PSD) distribution fitting. To abide by the assumptions of the PSD method we simulate an ergodic, isotropic, stationary, and zero-mean random process. These assumptions are not part of the CQE formalism. The CQE method assumes a Gaussian channelized likelihood that can be a valid for non-Gaussian image data, since the channel outputs are formed from weighted sums of the image elements. We have shown that, for three or more channels, the RMSE of CQE estimates of correlation length is lower than conventional PSD estimates. We also show that computing CQE by using a standard nonlinear optimization method produces channels that yield RMSE within 2% of the analytic optimum. CQE estimates of anisotropic correlation length estimation are reported to demonstrate this technique on a two-parameter estimation problem. PMID:27409452

  9. PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY MEASUREMENTS IN A REPRESENTATIVE GAS-COOLED PRISMATIC REACTOR CORE MODEL: FLOW IN THE COOLANT CHANNELS AND INTERSTITIAL BYPASS GAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Conder; Richard Skifton; Ralph Budwig

    2012-11-01

    Core bypass flow is one of the key issues with the prismatic Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor, and it refers to the coolant that navigates through the interstitial, non-cooling passages between the graphite fuel blocks instead of traveling through the designated coolant channels. To determine the bypass flow, a double scale representative model was manufactured and installed in the Matched Index-of-Refraction flow facility; after which, stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was employed to measure the flow field within. PIV images were analyzed to produce vector maps, and flow rates were calculated by numerically integrating over the velocity field. It was found that the bypass flow varied between 6.9-15.8% for channel Reynolds numbers of 1,746 and 4,618. The results were compared to computational fluid dynamic (CFD) pre-test simulations. When compared to these pretest calculations, the CFD analysis appeared to under predict the flow through the gap.

  10. Comparison of MCNP calculation and measurement of neutron fluence in a channel for short-time irradiation in the LVR-15 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lahodova, Z.; Flibor, S.; Klupak, V.; Kucera, J.; Marek, M.; Viererbl, L.

    2006-07-01

    The main purpose of this work was to evaluate the neutron energy distribution in a channel of the LVR-15 reactor used mostly for short-time neutron activation analysis. Twenty types of activation monitors were irradiated in this channel equipped with a pneumatic facility with a transport time of 3.5 s. The activities measured and the corresponding reaction rates were used to determinate the neutron spectrum. The reaction rates were compared with MCNP calculations to confirm the results. The second purpose of this work was to verify our nuclear data library used for the reaction rate calculations. The experiment results were also incorporated into our database system of neutron energy distribution at the reactor core. (authors)

  11. Measurements of the top - anti-top Production Cross Section at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV and Top Mass in the Dielectron Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Kozminski, Joseph Francis

    2005-05-01

    The first measurement of the top-antitop production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using 243 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at Fermilab is presented. In this analysis, only the dielectron final state is considered. Five events are observed, and 0.93 background events are expected. The measured cross section, after accounting for the expected branching ratio to the dielectron channel, is {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 14.9{sub -7.0}{sup +9.4}(stat){sub -1.8}{sup +2.5}(syst) {+-} 1.0 (lumi) pb, which agrees with the predicted cross section for top quarks with a mass of 175 GeV. In addition, a first-pass at a measurement of the top mass using the neutrino-weighting method is presented. This measurement is also performed in the dielectron channel using the five events observed in the cross section measurement.

  12. Athermalized channeled spectropolarimeter enhancement.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Julia Craven; Way, Brandyn Michael; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan; Hunt, Jeffery P.

    2013-09-01

    Channeled spectropolarimetry can measure the complete polarization state of light as a function of wavelength. Typically, a channeled spectropolarimeter uses high order retarders made of uniaxial crystal to amplitude modulate the measured spectrum with the spectrally-dependent Stokes polarization information. A primary limitation of conventional channeled spectropolarimeters is related to the thermal variability of the retarders. Thermal variation often forces frequent system recalibration, particularly for field deployed systems. However, implementing thermally stable retarders, made of biaxial crystal, results in an athermal channeled spectropolarimeter that relieves the need for frequent recalibration. This report presents experimental results for an anthermalized channeled spectropolarimeter prototype produced using potassium titanyl phosphate. The results of this prototype are compared to the current thermal stabilization state of the art. Finally, the application of the technique to the thermal infrared is studied, and the athermalization concept is applied to an infrared imaging spectropolarimeter design.

  13. Generalized channeled polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Alenin, Andrey S; Tyo, J Scott

    2014-05-01

    Channeled polarimeters measure polarization by modulating the measured intensity in order to create polarization-dependent channels that can be demodulated to reveal the desired polarization information. A number of channeled systems have been described in the past, but their proposed designs often unintentionally sacrifice optimality for ease of algebraic reconstruction. To obtain more optimal systems, a generalized treatment of channeled polarimeters is required. This paper describes methods that enable handling of multi-domain modulations and reconstruction of polarization information using linear algebra. We make practical choices regarding use of either Fourier or direct channels to make these methods more immediately useful. Employing the introduced concepts to optimize existing systems often results in superficial system changes, like changing the order, orientation, thickness, or spacing of polarization elements. For the two examples we consider, we were able to reduce noise in the reconstruction to 34.1% and 57.9% of the original design values. PMID:24979633

  14. TRP Channels

    PubMed Central

    Venkatachalam, Kartik; Montell, Craig

    2011-01-01

    The TRP (Transient Receptor Potential) superfamily of cation channels is remarkable in that it displays greater diversity in activation mechanisms and selectivities than any other group of ion channels. The domain organizations of some TRP proteins are also unusual, as they consist of linked channel and enzyme domains. A unifying theme in this group is that TRP proteins play critical roles in sensory physiology, which include contributions to vision, taste, olfaction, hearing, touch, and thermo- and osmosensation. In addition, TRP channels enable individual cells to sense changes in their local environment. Many TRP channels are activated by a variety of different stimuli and function as signal integrators. The TRP superfamily is divided into seven subfamilies: the five group 1 TRPs (TRPC, TRPV, TRPM, TRPN, and TRPA) and two group 2 subfamilies (TRPP and TRPML). TRP channels are important for human health as mutations in at least four TRP channels underlie disease. PMID:17579562

  15. Measurement of the Forward-Backward Asymmetry in Top-Antitop Quark Events in the Lepton+Jets Channel at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Orbaker, Douglas Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We present a measurement of forward-backward asymmetries in top-antitop quark pairs produced in proton-antiproton collisions decaying via the lepton+jets channel. Using data recorded by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb-1, we measure the forward-backward asymmetry in top-antitop quark events to be $\\left(9.2 \\pm 3.7\\right)\\%$, after background processes have been subtracted. After correcting for the effects of acceptance and detector reconstruction, we measure an asymmetry of $\\left(19.6 \\pm 6.5\\right)\\%$. In addition, we measure an acceptance-corrected asymmetry based on the lepton from top-antitop quark decay of $\\left(15.2 \\pm 4.0\\right)\\%$. We compare these results to predictions from the MC@NLO next-to-leading-order QCD simulation.

  16. Quick measurement of continuous absorption spectrum in ion beam pulse radiolysis: Application of optical multi-channel detector into transient species observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamatsu, Kazuhiro; Muroya, Yusa; Yamashita, Shinichi; Kimura, Atsushi; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2016-02-01

    A quick measurement system of a continuous absorption spectrum covering a wide range from 200 to 950 nm was constructed by employing an optical multi-channel detector. Ion beam pulse radiolysis with 12.5 MeV/u He, 18.3 MeV/u C and 17.5 MeV/u Ne ions were performed with the measurement system. Transient absorption spectrum of (S C N) 2 • - was clearly observed in KSCN aqueous solutions within a few minutes in spite of their very small absorbance, demonstrating high sensitivity of 0.001-0.003 in absorbance in the range from 260 to 660 nm as well as short measurement time of a few minutes. Two different absorption peaks attributed to Br2 • - and Br3 - were observed simultaneously in NaBr aqueous solutions, showing powerfulness of the measurement system in overviewing chemical kinetics under ion beam irradiation especially in not well investigated chemical systems.

  17. Cell volume measured by total internal reflection microfluorimetry: application to water and solute transport in cells transfected with water channel homologs.

    PubMed Central

    Farinas, J; Simanek, V; Verkman, A S

    1995-01-01

    Total internal reflection (TIR) microfluorimetry was established as a method to measure continuously the volume of adherent cells and applied to measure membrane permeabilities in cells transfected with water channel homologs. Cytosol was labeled with the membrane-impermeant fluorophore calcein. Fluorescence was excited by the TIR evanescent field in a thin section of cytosol (approximately 150 nm) adjacent to the cell-substrate interface. Because cytosolic fluorophore number per cell remains constant, the TIR fluorescence signal should be inversely related to cell volume. For small volume changes in Sf-9 and LLC-PK1 cells, relative TIR fluorescence was nearly equal to inverse relative cell volume; deviations from the ideal were modeled theoretically. To measure plasma membrane osmotic water permeability, Pf, the time course of osmotically induced cell volume change was inferred from the TIR fluorescence signal. LLC-PK1 cells expressing the CHIP28 water channel had an HgCl2-sensitive, threefold increase in Pf compared to nontransfected cells (Pf = 0.0043 cm/s at 10 degrees C). Solute permeability was measured from the TIR fluorescence time course in response to solute gradients. Glycerol permeability in Sf-9 cells expressing the water channel homolog GLIP was (1.3 +/- 0.2) x 10(-5) cm/s (22 degrees C), greater than that of (0.36 +/- 0.04) x 10(-5) cm/s (n = 4, p < 0.05) for control cells, indicating functional expression of GLIP. Water and urea permeabilities were similar in GLIP-expressing and control cells. The TIR method should be applicable to the study of water and solute permeabilities and cell volume regulation in cells of arbitrary shape and size. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:7540430

  18. Smart multi-channel two-dimensional micro-gas chromatography for rapid workplace hazardous volatile organic compounds measurement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Seo, Jung Hwan; Li, Yubo; Chen, Di; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Fan, Xudong

    2013-03-01

    We developed a novel smart multi-channel two-dimensional (2-D) micro-gas chromatography (μGC) architecture that shows promise to significantly improve 2-D μGC performance. In the smart μGC design, a non-destructive on-column gas detector and a flow routing system are installed between the first dimensional separation column and multiple second dimensional separation columns. The effluent from the first dimensional column is monitored in real-time and decision is then made to route the effluent to one of the second dimensional columns for further separation. As compared to the conventional 2-D μGC, the greatest benefit of the smart multi-channel 2-D μGC architecture is the enhanced separation capability of the second dimensional column and hence the overall 2-D GC performance. All the second dimensional columns are independent of each other, and their coating, length, flow rate and temperature can be customized for best separation results. In particular, there is no more constraint on the upper limit of the second dimensional column length and separation time in our architecture. Such flexibility is critical when long second dimensional separation is needed for optimal gas analysis. In addition, the smart μGC is advantageous in terms of elimination of the power intensive thermal modulator, higher peak amplitude enhancement, simplified 2-D chromatogram re-construction and potential scalability to higher dimensional separation. In this paper, we first constructed a complete smart 1 × 2 channel 2-D μGC system, along with an algorithm for automated control/operation of the system. We then characterized and optimized this μGC system, and finally employed it in two important applications that highlight its uniqueness and advantages, i.e., analysis of 31 workplace hazardous volatile organic compounds, and rapid detection and identification of target gas analytes from interference background. PMID:23303462

  19. Long-term high frequency phytoplankton dynamics, recorded from a coastal water autonomous measurement system in the eastern English Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derot, J.; Schmitt, F. G.; Gentilhomme, V.; Zongo, S. B.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, high frequency fluorescence fluctuations, recorded from 2004 to 2011 using an autonomous underwater monitoring system in the eastern English Channel, at 20-min time resolutions, are analyzed. Annual blooms are superposed to multiscale fluctuations. The probability density function (pdf) of the fluorescence time series obeys a power law with slope -2. The pdf for annual portions also obeys power laws, with slopes related to the annual average. Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is used to study the dynamics and display the power spectrum, which is different from the temperature power spectrum. EMD is also used to extract a trend and isolate the blooms from the high frequency dynamics.

  20. Measuring temperature-dependent propagating disturbances in coronal fan loops using multiple SDO/AIA channels and the surfing transform technique

    SciTech Connect

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Ofman, Leon; Davila, Joseph M.; Viall, Nicholeen M.

    2013-11-20

    A set of co-aligned high-resolution images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory is used to investigate propagating disturbances (PDs) in warm fan loops at the periphery of a non-flaring active region NOAA AR 11082. To measure PD speeds at multiple coronal temperatures, a new data analysis methodology is proposed enabling a quantitative description of subvisual coronal motions with low signal-to-noise ratios of the order of 0.1%. The technique operates with a set of one-dimensional 'surfing' signals extracted from position-time plots of several AIA channels through a modified version of Radon transform. The signals are used to evaluate a two-dimensional power spectral density distribution in the frequency-velocity space that exhibits a resonance in the presence of quasi-periodic PDs. By applying this analysis to the same fan loop structures observed in several AIA channels, we found that the traveling velocity of PDs increases with the temperature of the coronal plasma following the square-root dependence predicted for slow mode magneto-acoustic waves which seem to be the dominating wave mode in the loop structures studied. This result extends recent observations by Kiddie et al. to a more general class of fan loop system not associated with sunspots and demonstrating consistent slow mode activity in up to four AIA channels.

  1. Changes in Atmospheric Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) over the English Channel - 1.5 Years of Measurements from the Penlee Point Atmospheric Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mingxi; Bell, Thomas; Hopkins, Frances; Smyth, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric sulfur dioxide (SO2) was measured continuously from the Penlee Point Atmospheric Observatory near Plymouth, United Kingdom between May 2014 and November 2015. This coastal site is exposed to marine air across a wide wind sector. The predominant southwesterly winds carry relatively clean background Atlantic air. In contrast, air from the southeast is heavily influenced by exhaust plumes from ships in the English Channel as well as near near the Plymouth Sound. International Maritime Organization regulation came into force in January 2015 to reduce sulfur emissions tenfold in Sulfur Emission Control Areas such as the English Channel. We observed a three-fold reduction from 2014 to 2015 in the estimated ship-emitted SO2 during southeasterly winds. Dimethylsulfide (DMS) is an important source of atmospheric SO2 even in this semi-polluted region. The relative contribution of DMS oxidation to the SO2 burden over the English Channel increased from ~1/3 in 2014 to ~1/2 in 2015 due to the reduction in ship sulfur emissions. Our diel analysis suggests that SO2 is removed from the marine atmospheric boundary layer in about half a day, with dry deposition to the ocean accounting for a quarter of the total loss.

  2. Measuring Temperature-dependent Propagating Disturbances in Coronal Fan Loops Using Multiple SDO/AIA Channels and the Surfing Transform Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.; Viall, Nicholeen M.; Ofman, Leon

    2013-11-01

    A set of co-aligned high-resolution images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory is used to investigate propagating disturbances (PDs) in warm fan loops at the periphery of a non-flaring active region NOAA AR 11082. To measure PD speeds at multiple coronal temperatures, a new data analysis methodology is proposed enabling a quantitative description of subvisual coronal motions with low signal-to-noise ratios of the order of 0.1%. The technique operates with a set of one-dimensional "surfing" signals extracted from position-time plots of several AIA channels through a modified version of Radon transform. The signals are used to evaluate a two-dimensional power spectral density distribution in the frequency-velocity space that exhibits a resonance in the presence of quasi-periodic PDs. By applying this analysis to the same fan loop structures observed in several AIA channels, we found that the traveling velocity of PDs increases with the temperature of the coronal plasma following the square-root dependence predicted for slow mode magneto-acoustic waves which seem to be the dominating wave mode in the loop structures studied. This result extends recent observations by Kiddie et al. to a more general class of fan loop system not associated with sunspots and demonstrating consistent slow mode activity in up to four AIA channels.

  3. A Measurement of the mass of the Top Quark in the di-lepton channels using the D0 Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Fatakia, Sarosh Noshir

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation describes a measurement of the mass of the top quark using events consistent with the hypothesis t{bar t} {yields} bW{sup +} {bar b}W{sup -} {yields} bl{sup +}{nu}{bar b}l{sup -}{bar {nu}}, where (l=e,{mu}). The events are obtained from nearly 230 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data collected by the D0 experiment between 2002 and 2004 during Run II. In this decay channel two neutrinos remain undetected. Extraction of the mass of the top quark by kinematic reconstruction is not possible because the event is under-constrained. Therefore, a dynamical likelihood method is developed to obtain the mass of the top quark. The mass of top quark obtained from the candidate events selected in the di-electron channel and the e{mu} channel is: 154.1 {sup +14.2}{sub -12.8}(stat.) {+-}6.6 (syst.) GeV.

  4. Growth and contribution of stocked channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus (Rafinesque, 1818): the importance of measuring post-stocking performance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, David R.; Long, James M.

    2015-01-01

    In this study it was sought to quantify post-stocking growth, survival, and contribution of advanced size (178 mm total length [TL]) channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus fingerlings, something rarely done. Channel catfish populations were evaluated before (May 2010) and after (May to August 2011 and 2012) stocking. Relative abundance, stocking contribution, and growth were different (P < 0.05) in the two study impoundments (lakes Lone Chimney and Greenleaf, Oklahoma). For fish stocked in Lake Lone Chimney, stocking contribution was lower (3–35%), and average length and weight of stocked fish by age-2 reached 230 mm TL and 85 g, whereas the stocking contribution (84–98%) and growth in length (340 mm TL) and weight (280 g) were higher by age-2 in Lake Greenleaf. Given these unambiguous differences of post-stocking performance, benchmark metrics that represent population-level information such as relative abundance and average length and weight of the sample masked these significant differences, highlighting the importance of marking hatchery-fish and then following them through time to determine the effectiveness of stocking. These results suggest that stock enhancement programmes would benefit from studies that quantify post-stocking performance of hatchery fish.

  5. Regional Relations in Bankfull Channel Characteristics determined from flow measurements at selected stream-gaging stations in West Virginia, 1911-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Messinger, Terence; Wiley, Jeffrey B.

    2004-01-01

    Three bankfull channel characteristics?cross-sectional area, width, and depth?were significantly correlated with drainage area in regression equations developed for two regions in West Virginia. Channel characteristics were determined from analysis of flow measurements made at 74 U.S. Geological Survey stream-gaging stations at flows between 0.5 and 5.0 times bankfull flow between 1911 and 2002. Graphical and regression analysis were used to delineate an 'Eastern Region' and a 'Western Region,' which were separated by the boundary between the Appalachian Plateaus and Valley and Ridge Physiographic Provinces. Streams that drained parts of both provinces had channel characteristics typical of the Eastern Region, and were grouped with it. Standard error for the six regression equations, three for each region, ranged between 8.7 and 16 percent. Cross-sectional area and depth were greater relative to drainage area for the Western Region than they were for the Eastern Region. Regression equations were defined for streams draining between 46.5 and 1,619 square miles for the Eastern Region, and between 2.78 and 1,354 square miles for the Western Region. Stream-gaging stations with two or more cross sections where flow had been measured at flows between 0.5 and 5.0 times the 1.5-year flow showed poor replication of channel characteristics compared to the 95-percent confidence intervals of the regression, suggesting that within-reach variability for the stream-gaging stations may be substantial. A disproportionate number of the selected stream-gaging stations were on large (drainage area greater than 100 square miles) streams in the central highlands of West Virginia, and only one stream-gaging station that met data-quality criteria was available to represent the region within about 50 miles of the Ohio River north of Parkersburg, West Virginia. Many of the cross sections were at bridges, which can change channel shape. Although the data discussed in this report may not be

  6. Measurement of brightness temperature of two-dimensional electron gas in channel of a high electron mobility transistor at ultralow dissipation power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, A. M.; Shulga, V. M.; Turutanov, O. G.; Shnyrkov, V. I.

    2016-07-01

    A technically simple and physically clear method is suggested for direct measurement of the brightness temperature of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the channel of a high electron mobility transistor (HEMT). The usage of the method was demonstrated with the pseudomorphic HEMT as a specimen. The optimal HEMT dc regime, from the point of view of the "back action" problem, was found to belong to the unsaturated area of the static characteristics possibly corresponding to the ballistic electron transport mode. The proposed method is believed to be a convenient tool to explore the ballistic transport, electron diffusion, 2DEG properties and other electrophysical processes in heterostructures.

  7. Bs0 lifetime measurement in the CP-odd decay channel Bs0→J/ψ f0(980)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2016-07-06

    Here, the lifetime of the Bs0 meson is measured in the decay channel Bs0→J/ψπ+π- with 880 ≤ Mπ+π- ≤ 1080 MeV/c2, which is mainly a CP-odd state and dominated by the f0(980) resonance. In 10.4 fb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector in Run II of the Tevatron, the lifetime of the Bs0 meson is measured to be τ(Bs0) = 1.70 ± 0.14(stat) ± 0.05(syst) ps. Neglecting CP violation in Bs0/more » $$\\bar{B}$$0s mixing, the measurement can be translated into the width of the heavy mass eigenstate of the Bs0, ΓH = 0.59 ± 0.05(stat) ± 0.02(syst) ps-1.« less

  8. Bs0 lifetime measurement in the C P -odd decay channel Bs0→J /ψ f 0(980 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brochmann, M.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franc, J.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Hernández-Villanueva, M.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.

    2016-07-01

    The lifetime of the Bs0 meson is measured in the decay channel Bs0→J /ψ π+π- with 880 ≤Mπ+π-≤1080 MeV /c2 , which is mainly a C P -odd state and dominated by the f0(980 ) resonance. In 10.4 fb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector in Run II of the Tevatron, the lifetime of the Bs0 meson is measured to be τ (Bs0)=1.70 ±0.14 (stat ) ±0.05 (syst) ps . Neglecting C P violation in Bs0/B¯s0 mixing, the measurement can be translated into the width of the heavy mass eigenstate of the Bs0, ΓH=0.59 ±0.05 (stat ) ±0.02 (syst ) ps-1 .

  9. $$B^{0}_{s}$$ Lifetime Measurement in the CP-odd Decay Channel $$B^{0}_{s} \\to J/\\psi\\mbox{ }f_{0}(980)$$

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, V. M.

    2016-07-06

    Here, the lifetime of the Bs0 meson is measured in the decay channel Bs0→J/ψπ+π- with 880 ≤ Mπ+π- ≤ 1080 MeV/c2, which is mainly a CP-odd state and dominated by the f0(980) resonance. In 10.4 fb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector in Run II of the Tevatron, the lifetime of the Bs0 meson is measured to be τ(Bs0) = 1.70 ± 0.14(stat) ± 0.05(syst) ps. Neglecting CP violation in Bs0/more » $$\\bar{B}$$0s mixing, the measurement can be translated into the width of the heavy mass eigenstate of the Bs0, ΓH = 0.59 ± 0.05(stat) ± 0.02(syst) ps-1.« less

  10. Jamming in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; McCausland, Jeffrey; Steel, Fiona

    2010-03-01

    We experimentally study jamming of cylindrical grains in a vertical channel. The grains have a low aspect-ratio (height/diameter < 1) so their shape is like antacid tablets or poker chips. They are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section. The channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. It is observed that grains sometimes jam in this apparatus. In a jam, grains form a stable structure from one side of the channel to the other with nothing beneath them. Jams may be strong enough to support additional grains above. The probability of a jam occurring is a function of the grain height and diameter. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories.

  11. Simultaneous retrieval of T(p) and CO2 VMR from two-channel non-LTE limb radiances and application to daytime SABER/TIMED measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezac, L.; Kutepov, A.; Russell, J. M.; Feofilov, A. G.; Yue, J.; Goldberg, R. A.

    2015-08-01

    The kinetic temperature, Tk, and carbon dioxide, CO2 density, are key parameters that characterize the energetics and dynamics of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region. The Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on-board the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite has been providing global, simultaneous measurements of limb radiance in 10 spectral channels continuously since late January 2002. In this paper we (1) present a methodology for a self-consistent simultaneous retrieval of temperature/pressure, Tk(p), and CO2 volume mixing ratio (VMR) from the broadband infrared limb measurements in the 15 and 4.3 μm channels, and (2) qualitatively describe the first results on the CO2 VMR and Tk obtained from application of this technique to the SABER 15 and 4.3 μm channels, including issues, which demand additional constraints to be applied. The self-consistent two-channel retrieval architecture updates parameters at all altitudes simultaneously, and it is built upon iterative switching between two retrieval modules, one for CO2 and one for Tk. A detailed study of sensitivity, stability and convergence was carried out to validate the algorithm. The Tk/CO2 VMR distribution can be reliably retrieved without biases connected with this non-linear inverse problem starting with an initial guess as far as ±20% of CO2 VMR and ±15 K from the solution (as global shift, or somewhat larger if only local deviations are considered). In polar summer toward high latitudes the retrieved CO2 VMR profile shows a local peak around 90 km. We discuss details of this feature and show that: (a) it is not an algorithm artifact or instability, (b) additional a priori constraints are needed in order to obtain a physical profile and to remove this peak, and (c) several possibilities are explored as to uncover the real cause of this feature, but no firm conclusion can be reached at this time. This

  12. The NOAA Water Instrument: A Two-Channel, Tunable Diode Laser-Based Hygrometer for Measurement of Water Vapor and Cirrus Cloud Ice Water Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Thornberry, T. D.; Rollins, A. W.; Gao, R. S.; Watts, L. A.; Ciciora, S. J.; McLaughlin, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    The recently developed NOAA Water instrument is a two-channel, closed-path, tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer designed for the measurement of water vapor and enhanced total water (vapor + inertially enhanced condensed-phase) from the NASA Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) or other high-altitude research aircraft. Combining the measurements from the two channels allows the determination of cloud ice water content (IWC), an important metric for evaluating the radiative properties of cirrus clouds. The instrument utilizes wavelength-modulated spectroscopy with second harmonic detection near 2694 nm to achieve high precision with a 79 cm double-pass optical path. The detection cells are operated under constant temperature, pressure and flow conditions to maintain a constant sensitivity to H2O independent of the ambient sampling environment. An on-board calibration system is used to perform periodic in situ calibrations to verify the stability of the instrument sensitivity during flight. For the water vapor channel, ambient air is sampled perpendicular to the flow past the aircraft in order to reject cloud particles, while the total water channel uses a heated, forward-facing inlet to sample both water vapor and cloud particles. The total water inlet operates subisokinetically, thereby inertially enhancing cloud particle number in the sample flow and affording increased cirrus IWC sensitivity. The NOAA Water instrument was flown for the first time during the second deployment of the Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) in February-March 2013 on board the Global Hawk UAS. The instrument demonstrated a typical in-flight precision (1 s, 1 σ) of better than 0.17 parts per million (ppm, 10-6 mol/mol), with an overall H2O vapor measurement uncertainty of 5% ± 0.23 ppm. The inertial enhancement for cirrus cloud particle sampling under ATTREX flight conditions ranged from 33-48 for ice particles larger than 8 µm in diameter, depending primarily

  13. Behavior of an inversion-based precipitation retrieval algorithm with high-resolution AMPR measurements including a low-frequency 10.7-GHz channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. A.; Xiang, X.; Mugnai, A.; Hood, R. E.; Spencer, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    A microwave-based, profile-type precipitation retrieval algorithm has been used to analyze high-resolution passsive microwave measurements over an ocean background, obtained by the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) flown on a NASA ER-2 aircraft. The analysis is designed to first determine the improvements that can be gained by adding brightness temperature information from the AMPR low-frequency channel (10.7 GHz) to a multispectral retrieval algorithm nominally run with satellite information at 19, 37, and 85 GHz. The impact of spatial resolution degradation of the high-resolution brightness temperature information on the retrieved rain/cloud liquid water contents and ice water contents is then quantified in order to assess the possible biases inherent to satellite-based retrieval. Careful inspection of the high-resolution aircraft dataset reveals five distinctive brightness temperature features associated with cloud structure and scattering effects that are not generally detectable in current passive microwave satellite measurements. Results suggest that the inclusion of 10.7-GHz information overcomes two basic problems associated with three-channel retrieval. Intercomparisons of retrievals carried out at high-resolution and then averaged to a characteristic satellite scale to the corresponding retrievals in which the brightness temperatures are first convolved down to the satellite scale suggest that with the addition of the 10.7-GHz channel, the rain liquid water contents will not be negatively impacted by special resolution degradation. That is not the case with the ice water contents as they appear ti be quite sensitive to the imposed scale, the implication being that as spatial resolution is reduced, ice water contents will become increasingly underestimated.

  14. Measurement of the t-channel single top quark production cross section in pp collisions at √s=7  TeV.

    PubMed

    Chatrchyan, S; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Bansal, S; Benucci, L; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Maes, J; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Devroede, O; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, M; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Hreus, T; Marage, P E; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Adler, V; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Lellouch, J; Marinov, A; McCartin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Walsh, S; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Ceard, L; Cortina Gil, E; De Favereau De Jeneret, J; Delaere, C; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Hollar, J; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Nuttens, C; Ovyn, S; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Brito, L; De Jesus Damiao, D; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Aldá, W L; Carvalho, W; Da Costa, E M; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Oguri, V; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Bernardes, C A; Dias, F A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Lagana, C; Marinho, F; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Darmenov, N; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Tcholakov, V; Trayanov, R; Dimitrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Karadzhinova, A; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Xiao, H; Xu, M; Zang, J; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Guo, S; Guo, Y; Li, W; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Zou, W; Cabrera, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Attikis, A; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Khalil, S; Mahmoud, M A; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Tiko, A; Azzolini, V; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Karjalainen, A; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Choudhury, S; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Shreyber, I; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Benhabib, L; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Broutin, C; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dahms, T; Dobrzynski, L; Elgammal, S; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Wyslouch, B; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J-M; Cardaci, M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Ferro, C; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Greder, S; Juillot, P; Karim, M; Le Bihan, A-C; Mikami, Y; Van Hove, P; Fassi, F; Mercier, D; Baty, C; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Bedjidian, M; Bondu, O; Boudoul, G; Boumediene, D; Brun, H; Chasserat, J; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Sordini, V; Tosi, S; Tschudi, Y; Verdier, P; Lomidze, D; Anagnostou, G; Beranek, S; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Heracleous, N; Hindrichs, O; Jussen, R; Klein, K; Merz, J; Mohr, N; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Sprenger, D; Weber, H; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Ata, M; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Erdmann, M; Fischer, R; Hebbeker, T; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Höing, R S; Klimkovich, T; Klingebiel, D; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Lingemann, J; Magass, C; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Papacz, P; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Steggemann, J; Teyssier, D; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Heydhausen, D; Hoehle, F; Kargoll, B; Kress, T; Kuessel, Y; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Pooth, O; Rennefeld, J

    2011-08-26

    Electroweak production of the top quark is measured for the first time in pp collisions at √=7  TeV, using a data set collected with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36  pb⁻¹. With an event selection optimized for t-channel production, two complementary analyses are performed. The first one exploits the special angular properties of the signal, together with background estimates from the data. The second approach uses a multivariate analysis technique to probe the compatibility with signal topology expected from electroweak top-quark production. The combined measurement of the cross section is 83.6±29.8(stat+syst)±3.3(lumi)  pb, consistent with the standard model expectation. PMID:21929225

  15. Channeling of aluminum in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.G.; Hopkins, C.G.

    1985-05-15

    A systematic study of channeling of aluminum in the silicon crystal is reported. Depth distributions measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry are reported for 40-, 75-, and 150-keV aluminum channeled in the <100> and <110> directions of silicon. The profile dependence on alignment angle is shown for 150-keV aluminum in the <110> of silicon. Aluminum has low electronic stopping in silicon and corresponding deep channeled profiles are observed for aligned implants and deep channeling tails are observed on random implants. The maximum channeling range for 150-keV Al in <100> silicon is about 2.8 ..mu..m and is about 6.4 ..mu..m in <110> silicon. Some ions will reach the maximum channeling range even for 2/sup 0/ misalignment. Many of the deep channeling tails and ''supertails'' reported in earlier literature can be explained by the normal channeling of aluminum in silicon.

  16. Implementation of Rotational Raman Channel in Multiwavelength Aerosol Lidar to Improve Measurements of Particle Extinction and Backscattering at 532 NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovskii, Igor; Whiteman, David N.; Korenskiy, Michael; Suvorina, A.; Perez-Ramirez, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    We describe a practical implementation of rotational Raman (RR) measurements in an existing Mie-Raman lidar to obtain measurements of aerosol extinction and backscattering at 532 nm. A 2.3 nm width interference filter was used to select a spectral range characterized by low temperature sensitivity within the anti-Stokes branch of the RR spectrum. Simulations demonstrate that the temperature dependence of the scattering cross section does not exceed 1.0% in the 230-300K range making accurate correction for this dependence quite easy. With this upgrade, the NASA/GSFC multiwavelength Raman lidar has demonstrated useful α532 measurements and was used for regular observations. Examples of lidar measurements and inversion of optical data to the particle microphysics will be given in presentation.

  17. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross-section with ATLAS in the single lepton channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. 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B.; Savard, P.; Savinov, V.; Savu, D. O.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Says, L. P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scallon, O.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schäfer, U.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schamov, A. G.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schlereth, J. L.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, M.; Schöning, A.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schuh, S.; Schuler, G.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, J. W.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaver, L.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shichi, H.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siebel, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Sondericker, J.; Soni, N.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, Hs.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suita, K.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Swedish, S.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szeless, B.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teinturier, M.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Thadome, J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Traynor, D.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tyrvainen, H.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walbersloh, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wunstorf, R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, G.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zalite, Yo. K.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zinonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2012-05-01

    A measurement of the production cross-section for top quark pairs (ttbar) in pp collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV is presented using data recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Events are selected in the single lepton topology by requiring an electron or muon, large missing transverse momentum and at least three jets. With a data sample of 35 pb-1, two different multivariate methods, one of which uses b-quark jet identification while the other does not, use kinematic variables to obtain cross-section measurements of σttbar = 187 ± 11 (stat.)-17+18 (syst.) ± 6 (lumi.) pb and σttbar = 173 ± 17(stat.)-16+18 (syst.) ± 6 (lumi.) pb respectively. The two measurements are in agreement with each other and with QCD calculations. The first measurement has a better a priori sensitivity and constitutes the main result of this Letter.

  18. Calibration of the ATLAS Forward Calorimeter and a Study of the Top Quark Production Cross-section Measurement in the Dilepton Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heelan, Louise

    2011-12-01

    Over the last 20 years the ATLAS detector has gone from an idea to an operational detector. In that time thousands of people have contributed by way of research, development, installation, calibration, maintenance, and analysis. This thesis describes my contribution to that effort. A test beam took place in 2003 with the ATLAS forward calorimeter. With this data the electromagnetic response of FCal1 was confirmed to be within +/- 1.5% from unity in the range of energies from 10 GeV to 200 GeV. The intrinsic energy resolution of the FCal was found to be (27.0 +/- 1.0)%/ E ⊕ (3.5 +/- 0.1)% for electrons and (86.5 +/- 3.6)%/ E ⊕ (7.2 +/- 1.1)% for hadrons (with a simple hadronic weighting scheme applied). Variations in parameters of the topological clustering algorithm were studied, and a suggestion is made that the energy cut parameter of the algorithm be increased from the default 500 MeV to about 1 GeV. A study with electrons and hadrons confirms that using calorimeter shower shape information, a likelihood can be built and used to help identify these two types of showers. Monte Carlo and data comparisons find that the electromagnetic energy scale of the Monte Carlo agrees with the data within +/-2% for 10 GeV to 200 GeV hadrons. However, the Monte Carlo showers tend to be more dense, more narrow, and shorter than the data for high energy hadrons (with energies ≥ 60 GeV). Using the test beam data and Monte Carlo, a study was made on the characteristics of energy deposition at large values of |eta| near the LHC beam pipe. A correction for the energy loss is suggested in order to improve the response by 13% and the energy resolution by 12% for hadrons striking the FCal front face at 4.3 < |eta| < 4.9. This thesis also examines the expected performance of the ATLAS detector to a tt¯ cross-section measurement using the dilepton decay channel, with either electrons or muons in the final state along with jets and missing transverse energy. The choice of generator

  19. The role of hydrographic parameters, measured from a ship of opportunity, in bloom formation of Karenia mikimotoi in the English Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, S. E.; Hartman, M. C.; Hydes, D. J.; Smythe-Wright, D.; Gohin, F.; Lazure, P.

    2014-12-01

    Unusually high chlorophyll values (~ 14 mg Chl m- 3 at 5 m depth), recorded on a ship of opportunity (SOO) in July 2010, indicated the occurrence of a potential Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) in the Western approaches of the English Channel. This bloom, located at 49.7°N, 3.2°W was observed via complementary datasets. These included data from samples collected for microscopic phytoplankton identification, information from satellite maps to follow geographical bloom development and in situ data to identify hydrographic factors related to bloom initiation. The relationships between chlorophyll-fluorescence, temperature, salinity and wind speed were examined. The intense summer bloom predominantly consisted of the dinoflagellate Karenia mikimotoi and followed an increase in sea surface temperature (to 18.5 °C). A mid-channel bloom of this magnitude along the SOO route was last seen in 2003. In both years the peak biomass was associated with K. mikimotoi blooms, which occurred at the same location and coincided with the least saline, warmest water and lowest wind speeds. This study demonstrates that ships of opportunity are a useful tool to identify and track HAB events through continuous in situ measurements and for the frequent sampling opportunities that they provide.

  20. Measurement of the Top Pair Production Cross Section in the Lepton + Jets Channel Using a Jet Flavor Discriminant

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-01

    We present a new method to measure the top quark pair production cross section and the background rates with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb-1 from pp¯ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II Detector. We select events with a single electron or muon candidate, missing transverse energy, and at least one b-tagged jet. We perform a simultaneous fit to a jet flavor discriminant across nine samples defined by the number of jets and b-tags. An advantage of this approach is that many systematic uncertainties are measured in situ and inversely scale with integrated luminosity. We measure a top cross section of σtt¯ = 7.64 ± 0.57 (stat + syst) ± 0.45 (luminosity) pb.

  1. Measurement of the Top Pair Production Cross Section in the Lepton + Jets Channel Using a Jet Flavor Discriminant

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-01

    We present a new method to measure the top quark pair production cross section and the background rates with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb-1 from pp¯ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II Detector. We select events with a single electron or muon candidate, missing transverse energy, and at least one b-tagged jet. We perform a simultaneous fit to a jet flavor discriminant across nine samples defined by the number of jets and b-tags. An advantage of this approach is that many systematic uncertainties are measured in situ and inversely scale withmore » integrated luminosity. We measure a top cross section of σtt¯ = 7.64 ± 0.57 (stat + syst) ± 0.45 (luminosity) pb.« less

  2. $W$ boson polarization measurement in the $t\\bar{t}$ dilepton channel using the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-05-01

    We present a measurement of W boson polarization in top-quark decays in t{bar t} events with decays to dilepton final states using 5.1 fb{sup -1} integrated luminosity in p{bar p} collisions collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron. A simultaneous measurement of the fractions of longitudinal (f{sub 0}) and right-handed (f{sub +}) W bosons yields the results f{sub 0} = 0.71{sub -0.17}{sup +0.18}(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst) and f{sub +} = -0.07 {+-} 0.09(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst). Combining this measurement with our previous result based on single lepton final states, we obtain f{sub 0} = 0.84 {+-} 0.09(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst) and f{sub +} = -0.16 {+-} 0.05(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst). The results are consistent with standard model expectation.

  3. Channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter provides a comprehensive overview of channel catfish aquaculture. Sections include fish biology; commercial culture; culture facilities; production practices; water quality management; nutrition, feeding and feed formulation; infectious diseases; harvesting and processing; and the...

  4. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in the Lepton+Jets Channel Using the Lepton Transverse Momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-01-01

    This letter reports a measurement of the top quark mass, M{sub top}, in data from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV corresponding to 2.7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. Events with the lepton+jets topology are selected. An unbinned likelihood is constructed based on the dependence of the lepton transverse momentum, P{sub T}, on M{sub top}. A maximum likelihood fit to the data yields a measured mass M{sub top} = 176.9 {+-} 8.0{sub stat} {+-} 2.7{sub syst} GeV/c{sup 2}. In this measurement, the contribution by the jet energy scale uncertainty to the systematic error is negligible. The result provides an important consistency test for other M{sub top} measurements where explicit use of the jet energy is made for deriving the top quark mass.

  5. Measurements of the $$t\\bar{t}$$ charge asymmetry using the dilepton decay channel in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 7 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-04-30

    The t t-bar charge asymmetry in proton-proton collisions atmore » $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 7 TeV is measured using the dilepton decay channel (ee, e mu, or mu mu). The data correspond to a total integrated luminosity of 5.0 inverse femtobarns, collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The t t-bar and lepton charge asymmetries, defined as the differences in absolute values of the rapidities between the reconstructed top quarks and antiquarks and of the pseudorapidities between the positive and negative leptons, respectively, are measured to be Ac = -0.010 +/- 0.017 (stat.) +/- 0.008 (syst.) and Aclep = 0.009 +/- 0.010 (stat.) +/- 0.006 (syst). The lepton charge asymmetry is also measured as a function of the invariant mass, rapidity, and transverse momentum of the t t-bar system. All measurements are consistent with the expectations of the standard model.« less

  6. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the lepton+jets channel using a matrix element technique with the CDF II detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-10-14

    A measurement of the top-quark mass is presented using Tevatron data from proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector. Events are selected from a sample of candidates for production of tt̄ pairs that decay into the lepton+jets channel. The top-quark mass is measured with an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal and background matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterized jet-to-parton transfer functions. The likelihood function is maximized with respect to the top-quark mass, the signal fraction in the sample, and amore » correction to the jet energy scale (JES) calibration of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction ({Delta}{sub JES}) amounts to an additional in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using the data sample of 578 lepton+jets candidate events, corresponding to 3.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, the top-quark mass is measured to be mt = 172.4± 1.4 (stat + ΔJES) ± 1.3 (syst) GeV/c2.« less

  7. Measurements of the $t\\bar{t}$ charge asymmetry using the dilepton decay channel in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-04-30

    The t t-bar charge asymmetry in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 7 TeV is measured using the dilepton decay channel (ee, e mu, or mu mu). The data correspond to a total integrated luminosity of 5.0 inverse femtobarns, collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The t t-bar and lepton charge asymmetries, defined as the differences in absolute values of the rapidities between the reconstructed top quarks and antiquarks and of the pseudorapidities between the positive and negative leptons, respectively, are measured to be Ac = -0.010 +/- 0.017 (stat.) +/- 0.008 (syst.) and Aclep = 0.009 +/- 0.010 (stat.) +/- 0.006 (syst). The lepton charge asymmetry is also measured as a function of the invariant mass, rapidity, and transverse momentum of the t t-bar system. All measurements are consistent with the expectations of the standard model.

  8. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the lepton+jets channel using a matrix element technique with the CDF II detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-10-14

    A measurement of the top-quark mass is presented using Tevatron data from proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector. Events are selected from a sample of candidates for production of tt̄ pairs that decay into the lepton+jets channel. The top-quark mass is measured with an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal and background matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterized jet-to-parton transfer functions. The likelihood function is maximized with respect to the top-quark mass, the signal fraction in the sample, and a correction to the jet energy scale (JES) calibration of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction ({Delta}{sub JES}) amounts to an additional in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using the data sample of 578 lepton+jets candidate events, corresponding to 3.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, the top-quark mass is measured to be mt = 172.4± 1.4 (stat + ΔJES) ± 1.3 (syst) GeV/c2.

  9. Measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel using the neutrino weighting algorithm at CDF II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabik, Simon

    We measure the top quark mass using approximately 359 pb-1 of data from pp¯ collisions at s = 1.96 GeV at CDF Run II. We select tt¯ candidates that are consistent with two W bosons decaying to a charged lepton and a neutrino following tt¯ → W+W-bb¯ → l+l- nn¯ bb¯. Only one of the two charged leptons is required to be identified as an electron or a muon candidate, while the other is simply a well measured track. We use a neutrino weighting algorithm which weighs each possibility of neutrino direction to reconstruct a top quark mass in each event. We compare the resulting distribution to Monte Carlo templates to obtain a top quark mass of 170.8+6.9-6.5 (stat) +/- 4.6 (syst) GeV/c 2.

  10. A two-channel, tunable diode laser-based hygrometer for measurement of water vapor and cirrus cloud ice water content in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornberry, T. D.; Rollins, A. W.; Gao, R. S.; Watts, L. A.; Ciciora, S. J.; McLaughlin, R. J.; Fahey, D. W.

    2014-08-01

    The recently developed NOAA Water instrument is a two-channel, closed-path, tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer designed for the measurement of water vapor and enhanced total water (vapor + inertially enhanced condensed-phase) in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere from the NASA Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) or other high-altitude research aircraft. The instrument utilizes wavelength-modulated spectroscopy with second harmonic detection near 2694 nm to achieve high precision with a 79 cm double-pass optical path. The detection cells are operated under constant temperature, pressure and flow conditions to maintain a constant sensitivity to H2O independent of the ambient sampling environment. An on-board calibration system is used to perform periodic in situ calibrations to verify the stability of the instrument sensitivity during flight. For the water vapor channel, ambient air is sampled perpendicular to the flow past the aircraft in order to reject cloud particles, while the total water channel uses a heated, forward-facing inlet to sample both water vapor and cloud particles. The total water inlet operates subisokinetically, thereby inertially enhancing cloud particle number in the sample flow and affording increased cloud water content sensitivity. The NOAA Water instrument was flown for the first time during the second deployment of the Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) in February-March 2013 on board the Global Hawk UAS. The instrument demonstrated a typical in-flight precision (1 s, 1σ) of better than 0.17 parts per million (ppm, 10-6 mol mol-1), with an overall H2O vapor measurement uncertainty of 5% ± 0.23 ppm. The inertial enhancement for cirrus cloud particle sampling under ATTREX flight conditions ranged from 33-48 for ice particles larger than 8 μm in diameter, depending primarily on aircraft altitude. The resulting ice water content detection limit (2σ) was 0.023-0.013 ppm, corresponding to approximately 2

  11. A two-channel, tunable diode laser-based hygrometer for measurement of water vapor and cirrus cloud ice water content in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornberry, T. D.; Rollins, A. W.; Gao, R. S.; Watts, L. A.; Ciciora, S. J.; McLaughlin, R. J.; Fahey, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    The recently developed NOAA Water instrument is a two-channel, closed-path, tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer designed for the measurement of upper troposphere/lower stratosphere water vapor and enhanced total water (vapor + inertially enhanced condensed phase) from the NASA Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) or other high-altitude research aircraft. The instrument utilizes wavelength-modulated spectroscopy with second harmonic detection near 2694 nm to achieve high precision with a 79 cm double-pass optical path. The detection cells are operated under constant temperature, pressure, and flow conditions to maintain a constant sensitivity to H2O independent of the ambient sampling environment. An onboard calibration system is used to perform periodic in situ calibrations to verify the stability of the instrument sensitivity during flight. For the water vapor channel, ambient air is sampled perpendicular to the flow past the aircraft in order to reject cloud particles, while the total water channel uses a heated, forward-facing inlet to sample both water vapor and cloud particles. The total water inlet operates subisokinetically, thereby inertially enhancing cloud particle number in the sample flow and affording increased cloud water content sensitivity. The NOAA Water instrument was flown for the first time during the second deployment of the Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) in February-March 2013 on the NASA Global Hawk UAS. The instrument demonstrated a typical in-flight precision (1 s, 1σ) of better than 0.17 parts per million (ppm, 10-6 mol mol-1), with an overall H2O vapor measurement uncertainty of 5% ± 0.23 ppm. The inertial enhancement for cirrus cloud particle sampling under ATTREX flight conditions ranged from 33 to 48 for ice particles larger than 8 μm in diameter, depending primarily on aircraft altitude. The resulting ice water content detection limit (2σ) was 0.023-0.013 ppm, corresponding to approximately 2 μg m

  12. CDF measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton + jets channel using the multivariate template method

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, John; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    The authors measure the mass of the top quark using 162 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF experiment at FNAL in Run II. The decay chain t{bar t} {yields} bq{bar q}{bar b}lv is studied using a novel technique called the Multivariate Template Method (MTM). Using this technique they obtain a result of M{sub top} = 179.6{sub -6.3}{sup +6.4} {+-} 6.8 GeV/c{sup 2} for the top quark.

  13. Confirmatory measurement experiences at the Savannah River Site using a portable multi-channel analyzer. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Monson, R.W.; Jeffcoat, R.D.

    1993-07-01

    A continuing concern within the DOE complex is the control and accountability of special nuclear material. It is not enough to have a paper record of accountable material but it must be physically verified on a statistical sampling basis. The Material Control and Accountability section of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company has been developing a technique to confirm radioactive isotopes of interest in the field using a battery operated portable multichannel analyzer and a sodium iodide gamma probe detector. A description of the instrument and examples of actual confirmatory measurements at a variety of locations and environments will be presented.

  14. Raman Channel Temperature Measurement of SiC MESFET as a Function of Ambient Temperature and DC Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Eldridge, Jeffrey J.; Krainsky, Isay L.

    2009-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to measure the junction temperature of a Cree SiC MESFET as a function of the ambient temperature and DC power. The carrier temperature, which is approximately equal to the ambient temperature, is varied from 25 C to 450 C, and the transistor is biased with VDS=10V and IDS of 50 mA and 100 mA. It is shown that the junction temperature is approximately 52 and 100 C higher than the ambient temperature for the DC power of 500 and 1000 mW, respectively.

  15. Deformability measurement of red blood cells using a microfluidic channel array and an air cavity in a driving syringe with high throughput and precise detection of subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yang Jun; Ha, Young-Ran; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) deformability has been considered a potential biomarker for monitoring pathological disorders. High throughput and detection of subpopulations in RBCs are essential in the measurement of RBC deformability. In this paper, we propose a new method to measure RBC deformability by evaluating temporal variations in the average velocity of blood flow and image intensity of successively clogged RBCs in the microfluidic channel array for specific time durations. In addition, to effectively detect differences in subpopulations of RBCs, an air compliance effect is employed by adding an air cavity into a disposable syringe. The syringe was equally filled with a blood sample (V(blood) = 0.3 mL, hematocrit = 50%) and air (V(air) = 0.3 mL). Owing to the air compliance effect, blood flow in the microfluidic device behaved transiently depending on the fluidic resistance in the microfluidic device. Based on the transient behaviors of blood flows, the deformability of RBCs is quantified by evaluating three representative parameters, namely, minimum value of the average velocity of blood flow, clogging index, and delivered blood volume. The proposed method was applied to measure the deformability of blood samples consisting of homogeneous RBCs fixed with four different concentrations of glutaraldehyde solution (0%-0.23%). The proposed method was also employed to evaluate the deformability of blood samples partially mixed with normal RBCs and hardened RBCs. Thereafter, the deformability of RBCs infected by human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum was measured. As a result, the three parameters significantly varied, depending on the degree of deformability. In addition, the deformability measurement of blood samples was successfully completed in a short time (∼10 min). Therefore, the proposed method has significant potential in deformability measurement of blood samples containing hematological diseases with high throughput and precise detection of

  16. A single-camera technique for simultaneous measurement of large solid particles transported in rapid shallow channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuyen, Nguyen Ba; Cheng, Nian-Sheng

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes a measurement technique that was successfully applied in a study of bed load transport of large spherical solid particles in a shallow and supercritical flow ( Fr = 2.59-3.17) down a steep slope. The experimental condition was characterized by the relatively large solid particle size compared to the flow depth ( d p / h = 0.23-0.35), and compared to the tracer diameter ( d p / d t ≈ 130). The technique incorporated particle image velocimetry and particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) to simultaneously measure the characteristics of the two phases. In order to detect true solid particles and to distinguish them from each other and the unwanted objects, a particle characterization (PCR) algorithm based on Hough transform was employed. The output from the PCR process was utilized for PTV, as well as to generate the corresponding tracer images for special needs. Validation tests have confirmed the pixel accuracy and high reliability of the combined technique. Experimental results obtained with the developed technique include flow velocities, particle velocities, and concentration. The analysis has shown that the particle concentration profile followed an exponential relationship of the form similar to that of Rouse's profiles, despite the large d p / h ratio. It also revealed the effect of phase interaction, as a low loading rate of light particles on the order of O(10-3) could yield a noticeable slowdown in the streamwise fluid velocity.

  17. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in the Di-lepton Channel using the Dalitz-Goldstein Method

    SciTech Connect

    Hare, Matthew Frederick

    2010-10-01

    This dissertation describes a measurement of the mass of the top quark using a method developed by G. Goldstein and R.H. Dalitz. It is based on 2.0 fb-1 of data collected by the Collider Detector Facility at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratories. Di-lepton events were observed from colliding protons with anti-protons with √s = 1.96 TeV in the Tevatron Collider. A total of 145 candidate events were observed with 49 expected to be from background. These events include two neutrinos which elude detection. The method begins by assuming an initial top quark mass and solves for the neutrino momenta using a geometrical construction. The method samples over a range of likely top quark masses choosing the most consistent mass via a likelihood function. An important distinguishing feature of this method from others is its lack of dependence on the missing transverse energy, a quantity that is poorly measured by the experiment. This analysis determines the top quark mass to be Mtop = 172.3 ± 3.4(stat.) ± 2.0(syst.) GeV/c2 (Mtop = 170.5 ± 3.7(stat.) ± 1.8(syst.) GeV/c2 with b-tagging).

  18. Measurement of the B0s lifetime in the exclusive decay channel B0s-->J/psiphi.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahmed, S N; Ahn, S H; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Arnoud, Y; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Babukhadia, L; Bacon, T C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Baffioni, S; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beauceron, S; Beaudette, F; Begel, M; Bellavance, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Besson, A; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Bhattacharjee, M; Binder, M; Bischoff, A; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Bonamy, P; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Boswell, C; Brandt, A; Briskin, G; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Butler, J M; Bystricky, J; Canelli, F; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Casey, D; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevalier, L; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Chopra, S; Christiansen, T; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clark, A R; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Colling, D J; Coney, L; Connolly, B; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Coss, J; Cothenet, A; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cristetiu, M; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; da Motta, H; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Dean, S; Del Signore, K; Déliot, F; Delsart, P A; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dong, H; Doulas, S; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Eltzroth, J T; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, D; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fast, J; Fatakia, S N; Fein, D; Feligioni, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleuret, F; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Freeman, W; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Gao, M; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Geurkov, G; Ginther, G; Goldmann, K; Golling, T; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Graham, G; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Green, J A; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grinstein, S; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gu, W; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haggerty, H; Hagopian, S; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, C; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hanlet, P; Harder, K; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, C; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hebert, C; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hou, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Huang, J; Huang, Y; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Jiang, Y; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Johnson, P; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kado, M M; Käfer, D; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kau, D; Ke, Z; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Kim, K H; Klima, B; Klute, M; Kohli, J M; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Kotwal, A V; Koubarovsky, A; Kouznetsov, O; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Krane, J; Krishnaswamy, M R; Krzywdzinski, S; Kubantsev, M; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuznetsov, V E; Lager, S; Lahrichi, N; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Leggett, C; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, X; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Lu, J; Lubatti, H J; Lucotte, A; Lueking, L; Luo, C; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Maity, M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Manankov, V; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Marshall, T; Martens, M; Martin, M I; Mattingly, S E K; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; McMahon, T; Meder, D; Melanson, H L; Melnitchouk, A; Meng, X; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Miao, C; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mitrevski, J; Mokhov, N; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Mostafa, M; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Nang, F; Narain, M; Narasimham, V S; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Olivier, B; Oshima, N; Otero y Garzón, G J; Padley, P; Papageorgiou, K; Parashar, N; Park, J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, O; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Phaf, L; Piegaia, R; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pope, B G; Popkov, E; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Przybycien, M B; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Reay, N W; Renardy, J-F; Reucroft, S; Rha, J; Ridel, M; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sabirov, B M; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schukin, A A; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shephard, W D; Shpakov, D; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skow, D; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Smolek, K; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Song, Y; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sorín, V; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stanton, N R; Stark, J; Steele, J; Steinbrück, G; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tentindo-Repond, S; Thomas, E; Thooris, B; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torborg, J; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Trippe, T G; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Von Vlimant, J-R; Toerne, E; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Wahl, H D; Walker, R; Wallace, N; Wang, Z-M; Warchol, J; Warsinsky, M; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wegner, M; Wermes, N; White, A; White, V; Whiteson, D; Wicke, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wittlin, J; Wlodek, T; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wu, Z; Wyatt, T R; Xu, Q; Xuan, N; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yen, Y; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zabi, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zdrazil, M; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, B; Zhang, D; Zhang, X; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zheng, H; Zhou, B; Zhou, Z; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zitoun, R; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

    2005-02-01

    Using the exclusive decay B0s-->J/psi(mu+mu-)phi(K+K-), we report the most precise single measurement of the B0s lifetime. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of approximately 220 pb(-1) collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider in 2002-2004. We reconstruct 337 signal candidates, from which we extract the B0s lifetime, tau(B0s)=1.444(+0.098)(-0.090)(stat)+/-0.020(sys) ps. We also report a measurement for the lifetime of the B0 meson using the exclusive decay B0-->J/psi(mu+mu-)K*0(892)(K+pi-). We reconstruct 1370 signal candidates, obtaining tau(B0)=1.473(+0.052)(-0.050)(stat)+/-0.023(sys) ps, and the ratio of lifetimes, tau(B0s)/tau(B0)=0.980(+0.076)(-0.071)(stat)+/-0.003(sys). PMID:15783550

  19. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in the dilepton channel using lepton+track selection

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Robert Emil

    2008-11-01

    The production cross section for t$\\bar{t}$ pairs decaying into two lepton final states was measured using data from the D0 detector at Fermilab. The measurement was made using a lepton+track selection, where one lepton is fully identified and the second lepton is observed as an isolated track. This analysis is designed to complement similar studies using two fully identified leptons [1]. The cross section for the lepton+track selection was found to be σ = 5.2-1.4+1.6(stat)-0.8+0.9(syst) ± 0.3(lumi) pb. The combined cross section using both the lepton+track data and the data from the electron+electron, electron+muon, and muon+muon samples is: σ = 6.4-0.9+0.9(stat)-0.7+0.8(syst) ± 0.4(lumi) pb.

  20. Measurement of the t-channel single top-quark production cross section in pp collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. 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A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaver, L.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shichi, H.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Soni, N.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Styles, N. A.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, Hs.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suita, K.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Swedish, S.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szeless, B.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teinturier, M.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Thadome, J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Wendler, S.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wunstorf, R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, G.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zanello, L.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zinonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zsenei, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2012-10-01

    We report a measurement of the cross section of single top-quark production in the t-channel using 1.04 fb-1 of pp collision data at √{ s} = 7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Selected events feature one electron or muon, missing transverse momentum, and two or three jets, exactly one of them identified as originating from a b quark. The cross section is measured by fitting the distribution of a multivariate discriminant constructed with a neural network, yielding σt = 83 ± 4 (stat .)-19+20 (syst .) pb, which is in good agreement with the prediction of the Standard Model. Using the ratio of the measured to the theoretically predicted cross section and assuming that the top-quark-related CKM matrix elements obey the relation |Vtb | ≫ |Vts | , |Vtd |, the coupling strength at the W-t-b vertex is determined to be |Vtb | =1.13-0.13+0.14. If it is assumed that |Vtb | ⩽ 1 a lower limit of |Vtb | > 0.75 is obtained at the 95% confidence level.

  1. Measurement of the top quark mass using the template method in the lepton plus jets channel with in situ W ---> j j calibration at CDF-II

    SciTech Connect

    Adelman, Jahred A.; Arguin, J.F.; Bellettini, G.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Chlachidze, G.; Demortier, L.; Gibson, A.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.K.; Maruyama, T.; Sato, K.; Shochet, M.; Sinervo, P.; Tomura, T.; Velev, G.; Xie, S.; Yang, U.K.; /Chicago U. /Toronto U. /INFN, Pisa /Dubna, JINR /Rockefeller U. /LBL, Berkeley /Tsukuba U. /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    We report an updated measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton plus jets channel of t{bar t} events from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. This measurement uses a dataset with integrated luminosity of 680 pb{sup -1}, containing 360 t{bar t} candidates separated into four subsamples. A top quark mass is reconstructed for each event by using energy and momentum constraints on the top quark pair decay products. We also employ the reconstructed mass of hadronic W boson decays W {yields} jj to constrain in situ the largest systematic uncertainty of the top quark mass measurement: the jet energy scale. Monte Carlo templates of the reconstructed top quark and W boson mass are produced as a function of the true top quark mass and the jet energy scale. The distribution of reconstructed top quark and W boson mass in the data are compared to the Monte Carlo templates using a likelihood fit to obtain: M{sub top} = 173.4 {+-} 2.8 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  2. Simultaneous measurement of the geometry and the internal 3D velocity field of a micron sized droplet confined in a channel using Astigmatism-PTV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Tobias; Cierpka, Christian; Kähler, Christian J.

    2012-11-01

    Astigmatism-PTV is a method that allows to measure with a single camera the fully three-dimensional, three-component velocity field. The technique is ideally suited for microfluidic velocity measurements without errors due to in-plane and out-of-plane averaging (Cierpka et al. Meas Scie Tech 21, 2010). Recently it was shown, that the interface between two fluids or the surrounding fluid and droplets or bubbles can be estimated as well with the technique (Rossi et al., Meas Scie Tech 22, 2010). In this contribution the advantages of both techniques are combined to measure the shape of a droplet inside a micro channel along with the internal 3D flow field of the droplet induced by the surrounding fluid. For the current investigation, particles were only distributed within oil-droplets. Therefore the shape of the droplet could be later reconstructed by the volumetric particle positions and the velocity can be estimated tracking the same particles in consecutive frames of the same dataset. The procedure allows the simultaneous determination of the shape and the droplet velocity as well as the inner flow field and offers a great potential for current research.

  3. Double-channel crystal spectrograph for measuring plasma x-ray in the 1.33-2.46-nm region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiancai; Zhong, Xianxin; Xiao, Shali; Chen, Yu; Yang, Guohong; Gao, Jie

    2004-10-01

    In order to measure laser-produced plasma x-ray in the 1.33-2.46-nm region, an elliptical crystal spectrograph has been designed and fabricated. The potassium acid phthalate (KAP) crystal with a 2d spacing of 2.663 nm is used as the x-ray dispersive element, it is elliptically bent and glued on a rustless-steel substrate with a 0.9586 eccentricity and a 1350-mm focal distance. The spectrograph is equipped with an x-ray charge-coupled device (CCD) camera for recording the space-resolved spectrum on one port, and an x-ray streak camera for recording the time-resolved spectrum on another port. The first testing experiment was carried out on the XG-2 target chamber, the experimental results demonstrate that the spectral resolution is about 640 for this spectrograph.

  4. TRP channels.

    PubMed

    Benemei, Silvia; Patacchini, Riccardo; Trevisani, Marcello; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2015-06-01

    Evidence is accumulating on the role of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, namely TRPV1, TRPA1, TRPV4 and TRPM8, expressed by C- and Aδ-fibres primary sensory neurons, in cough mechanism. Selective stimuli for these channels have been proven to provoke and, more rarely, to inhibit cough. More importantly, cough threshold to TRP agonists is increased by proinflammatory conditions, known to favour cough. Off-target effects of various drugs, such as tiotropium or desflurane, seem to produce their protective or detrimental actions on airway irritation and cough via TRPV1 and TRPA1, respectively. Thus, TRPs appear to encode the process that initiates or potentiates cough, activated by exogenous irritants and endogenous proinflammatory mediators. More research on TRP channels may result in innovative cough medicines. PMID:25725213

  5. Vertical Resolved Dust Mass Concentration and Backscatter Coefficient Retrieval of Asian Dust Plume Using Quartz Raman Channel in Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Young M.; Mueller, Detlef; Shin, Sungkyun

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present a method for estimating vertical resolved mass concentration of dust immersed in Asian dust plume using Raman scattering of quartz (silicon dioxide, silica). During the Asian dust period of March 15, 16, and 21 in 2010, Raman lidar measurements detected the presence of quartz, and successfully showed the vertical profiles of the quartz backscatter coefficient. Since the Raman backscatter coefficient was connected with the Raman backscatter differential cross section and the number density of quartz molecules, the mass concentration of quartz in the atmosphere can be estimated from the quartz backscatter coefficient. The weight percentage from 40 to 70 % for quartz in the Asian dust was estimated from references. The vertical resolved mass concentration of dust was estimated by quartz mass concentration and weight percentage. We also present a retrieval method to obtain dust backscatter coefficient from the mixed Asian dust and pollutant layer. OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosol and Clouds) simulations were conducted to calculate dust backscatter coefficient. The retrieved dust mass concentration was used as an input parameter for the OPAC calculations. These approaches in the study will be useful for characterizing the quartz dominated in the atmospheric aerosols and estimating vertical resolved mass concentration of dust. It will be especially applicable for optically distinguishing the dust and non-dust aerosols in studies on the mixing state of Asian dust plume. Additionally, the presented method combined with satellite observations is enable qualitative and quantitative monitoring for Asian dust.

  6. Particle image velocimetry measurements for opposing flow in a vertical channel with a differential and asymmetric heating condition

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Suastegui, L.; Trevino, C.

    2007-10-15

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were carried out in an experimental investigation of laminar mixed convection in a vertical duct with a square cross-section. The main downward water-flow is driven by gravity while a portion of a lateral side is heated, and buoyancy forces produce non-stationary vortex structures close to the heated region. Various ranges of the Grashof number, Gr are studied in combination with the Reynolds number, Re varying from 300 to 700. The values of the generalized buoyancy parameter or Richardson number, Ri = Gr/Re{sup 2} parallel to the Grashof number are included in the results. The influence of these nondimensional parameters and how they affect the fluid flow structure and vortex sizes and locations are reported. The flow patterns are nonsymmetric, periodic, and exhibit increasing complexity and frequency for increasing buoyancy. For the averaged values of the resulting vortex dimensions, it was found that a better and more congruent representation occurs when employing the Grashof and Reynolds numbers as independent parameters. (author)

  7. Fracture channel waves

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.; Yi, W.; Myer, L.R.; Cook, N.G.; Schoenberg, M.

    1999-03-01

    The properties of guided waves which propagate between two parallel fractures are examined. Plane wave analysis is used to obtain a dispersion equation for the velocities of fracture channel waves. Analysis of this equation demonstrates that parallel fractures form an elastic waveguide that supports two symmetric and two antisymmetric dispersive Rayleigh channel waves, each with particle motions and velocities that are sensitive to the normal and tangential stiffnesses of the fractures. These fracture channel waves degenerate to shear waves when the fracture stiffnesses are large, to Rayleigh waves and Rayleigh-Lamb plate waves when the fracture stiffnesses are low, and to fracture interface waves when the fractures are either very closely spaced or widely separated. For intermediate fracture stiffnesses typical of fractured rock masses, fracture channel waves are dispersive and exhibit moderate to strong localization of guided wave energy between the fractures. The existence of these waves is examined using laboratory acoustic measurements on a fractured marble plate. This experiment confirms the distinct particle motion of the fundamental antisymmetric fracture channel wave (A{sub 0} mode) and demonstrates the ease with which a fracture channel wave can be generated and detected. {copyright} 1999 American Geophysical Union

  8. Determination of the hyperpolarizability components of hemicyanine dyes by measuring the anisotropic fluorescence and second harmonic of the dyes uniformly aligned within zeolite channels.

    PubMed

    Shim, Tae Kyu; Kim, Doseok; Lee, Myoung Hee; Rhee, Bum Ku; Cheong, Hyeonsik M; Kim, Hyun Sung; Yoon, Kyung Byung

    2006-08-31

    A unidirectional ensemble of hemicyanine molecules was prepared by inserting the molecules into the vertical channels of a uniformly oriented zeolite (silicalite-1) film grown on a glass substrate. Fluorescence from this sample excited with light polarized along the vertical channel was 50 times larger than that excited with light polarized orthogonal to the vertical channel direction. These vertically aligned hemicyanine dyes were used to determine the ratio of the molecular hyperpolarizability components beta(zxx)/beta(zzz) of hemicyanine. PMID:16927975

  9. Determination of the hyperpolarizability components of hemicyanine dyes by measuring the anisotropic fluorescence and second harmonic of the dyes uniformly aligned within zeolite channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doseok; Shim, Taekyu; Lee, Myounghee; Rhee, Bumku; Cheong, Hyeonsik; Kim, Hyunsung; Yoon, Kyungbyung

    2007-03-01

    Unidirectional ensemble of hemicyanine molecules was prepared by inserting the molecules into the vertical channels of a uniformly-oriented zeolite (silicalite-1) film grown on a glass substrate. Fluorescence from this sample excited with light polarized along the vertical channel was 50 times larger than that excited with light polarized orthogonal to the vertical channel direction. This vertically aligned hemicyanine dyes were used to determine the ratio of the molecular hyperpolarizability components βzxx/βzzz of hemicyanine.

  10. Improving virtual channel discrimination in a multi-channel context.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Arthi G; Shannon, Robert V; Landsberger, David M

    2012-04-01

    Improving spectral resolution in cochlear implants is key to improving performance in difficult listening conditions (e.g. speech in noise, music, etc.). Current focusing might reduce channel interaction, thereby increasing spectral resolution. Previous studies have shown that combining current steering and current focusing reduces spread of excitation and improves virtual channel discrimination in a single-channel context. It is unclear whether the single-channel benefits from current focusing extend to a multi-channel context, in which the physical and perceptual interference of multiple stimulated channels might overwhelm the benefits of improved spectral resolution. In this study, signal discrimination was measured with and without current focusing, in the presence of competing stimuli on nearby electrodes. Results showed that signal discrimination was consistently better with current focusing than without, regardless of the amplitude of the competing stimuli. Therefore, combining current steering and current focusing may provide more effective spectral cues than are currently available. PMID:22616092

  11. Transport in rectangular quadrupole channels

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, E.

    1983-08-01

    Multiple electrostatic quadrupole arrays can be produced in many different geometries. However, the fabrication process can be considerably simplified if the poles are rectangular. This is especially true for millimeter sized channels. This paper presents the results of a series of measurements comparing the space charge limits in cylindrical and rectangular quadrupole channels.

  12. The channels of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Victor R.

    1988-01-01

    The geomorphology of Mars is discussed, focusing on the Martian channels. The great flood channels of Mars, the processes of channel erosion, and dendritic channel networks, are examined. The topography of the Channeled Scabland region of the northwestern U.S. is described and compared to the Martian channels. The importance of water in the evolution of the channel systems is considered.

  13. Spillover Paleoflood Channels on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, G.; Baker, V.; Ori, Gian; Baliva, Antonio

    1996-09-01

    We investigated spillover paleoflood channels connecting large basins in the northern plains of Mars. These channels are one of several types of direct evidence for the existance of large volumes of water on the surface during certain episodes of Martian history. Among the channels, the most spectacular are a group of braided channels (20N, 175) connecting the Elysium and Amazonis basins. This entire system is about 500 km long and up to 130 km wide. Based on the photoclinometric measurements of the channel geometry, we estimated that the scale of flooding could have been comparable to that of the catastrophic Lake Missoula floods on Earth. Recently discovered terrestrial paleoflood spillways connecting basins in central Asia are analogous to these Martian spillover channels in both their scale and their likely formation mechanisms.

  14. Starburst Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    Translucent carbon dioxide ice covers the polar regions of Mars seasonally. It is warmed and sublimates (evaporates) from below, and escaping gas carves a numerous channel morphologies.

    In this example (figure 1) the channels form a 'starburst' pattern, radiating out into feathery extensions. The center of the pattern is being buried with dust and new darker dust fans ring the outer edges. This may be an example of an expanding morphology, where new channels are formed as the older ones fill and are no longer efficiently channeling the subliming gas out.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003443_0980 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 21-Apr-2007. The complete image is centered at -81.8 degrees latitude, 76.2 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 247.1 km (154.4 miles). At this distance the image scale is 24.7 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects 74 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel. The image was taken at a local Mars time of 04:52 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 71 degrees, thus the sun was about 19 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 223.4 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  15. Determining electrical properties based on B1 fields measured in an MR scanner using a multi-channel transmit/receive coil: a general approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiaen; Zhang, Xiaotong; Van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Schmitter, Sebastian; He, Bin

    2013-07-01

    Electrical properties tomography (EPT) is a recently developed noninvasive technology to image the electrical conductivity and permittivity of biological tissues at Larmor frequency in magnetic resonance scanners. The absolute phase of the complex radio-frequency magnetic field (B1) is necessary for electrical property calculation. However, due to the lack of practical methods to directly measure the absolute B1 phases, current EPT techniques have been achieved with B1 phase estimation based on certain assumptions on object anatomy, coil structure and/or electromagnetic wave behavior associated with the main magnetic field, limiting EPT from a larger variety of applications. In this study, using a multi-channel transmit/receive coil, the framework of a new general approach for EPT has been introduced, which is independent on the assumptions utilized in previous studies. Using a human head model with realistic geometry, a series of computer simulations at 7 T were conducted to evaluate the proposed method under different noise levels. Results showed that the proposed method can be used to reconstruct the conductivity and permittivity images with noticeable accuracy and stability. The feasibility of this approach was further evaluated in a phantom experiment at 7 T.

  16. Calibration and performance of a new in situ multi-channel fluorometer for measurement of colored dissolved organic matter in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conmy, Robyn N.; Coble, Paula G.; Castillo, Carlos E. Del

    2004-02-01

    The development of multispectral in situ fluorescence instruments greatly enhances the study of the optical properties of Colored Organic Matter (COM). Here, we tested the inter-instrument variability of three WetLabs, Inc. SAFIres using quinine sulfate standards. As with any fluorometer, intensity and spectral biases in fluorescence output due to properties of the SAFIre's optical components necessitate corrections. Low response of the instrument to quinine sulfate and lack of an excitation/emission channel at the fluorescence maximum of this standard precluded direct spectral calibration. Calibrations conducted using seawater as a secondary standard provided an acceptable alternative. The field performance of the SAFIre from two experiments is presented here. Time series contour plots show that the instrument has the ability to detect small differences in COM optical properties, and observed fluorescence emission ratios are indicative of changes in sources of the material over the course of the study. The SAFIre was found to extend multispectral measurements to include high spatial and high temporal resolution.

  17. Chaos in quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosur, Pavan; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Roberts, Daniel A.; Yoshida, Beni

    2016-02-01

    We study chaos and scrambling in unitary channels by considering their entanglement properties as states. Using out-of-time-order correlation functions to diagnose chaos, we characterize the ability of a channel to process quantum information. We show that the generic decay of such correlators implies that any input subsystem must have near vanishing mutual information with almost all partitions of the output. Additionally, we propose the negativity of the tripartite information of the channel as a general diagnostic of scrambling. This measures the delocalization of information and is closely related to the decay of out-of-time-order correlators. We back up our results with numerics in two non-integrable models and analytic results in a perfect tensor network model of chaotic time evolution. These results show that the butterfly effect in quantum systems implies the information-theoretic definition of scrambling.

  18. Measurements of fiducial and differential cross sections for Higgs boson production in the diphoton decay channel at TeV with ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernat, P.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, T. T.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Byszewski, M.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charfeddine, D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Daniells, A. C.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobos, D.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Dwuznik, M.; Dyndal, M.; Ebke, J.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Engelmann, R.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Florez Bustos, A. C.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, C.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Glonti, G. L.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goeringer, C.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L. S.; GonCcalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Gozpinar, S.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grishkevich, Y. V.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guicheney, C.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Gunther, J.; Guo, J.; Gupta, S.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guttman, N.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harper, D.; Harrington, R. D.; Harris, O. M.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Heller, C.; Heller, M.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hensel, C.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillert, S.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hoffman, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Hofmann, J. I.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holmes, T. R.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Horii, Y.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, D.; Hu, X.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. 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F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savard, P.; Savu, D. O.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellers, G.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K. Yu.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Struebig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittig, T.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wright, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2014-09-01

    Measurements of fiducial and differential cross sections are presented for Higgs boson production in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of TeV. The analysis is performed in the H → γγ decay channel using 20.3 fb-1 of data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The signal is extracted using a fit to the diphoton invariant mass spectrum assuming that the width of the resonance is much smaller than the experimental resolution. The signal yields are corrected for the effects of detector inefficiency and resolution. The pp → H → γγ fiducial cross section is measured to be 43.2 ±9.4(stat.) {-/2.9 + 3.2} (syst.) ±1.2(lumi)fb for a Higgs boson of mass 125.4GeV decaying to two isolated photons that have transverse momentum greater than 35% and 25% of the diphoton invariant mass and each with absolute pseudorapidity less than 2.37. Four additional fiducial cross sections and two cross-section limits are presented in phase space regions that test the theoretical modelling of different Higgs boson production mechanisms, or are sensitive to physics beyond the Standard Model. Differential cross sections are also presented, as a function of variables related to the diphoton kinematics and the jet activity produced in the Higgs boson events. The observed spectra are statistically limited but broadly in line with the theoretical expectations. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Measurement of the production cross section for W + {gamma} in the electron channel in {radical}s = 1.8 TeV {bar p}p collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, D.P.

    1993-11-01

    The production cross section times decay branching ratio for W{sub +{gamma}} in the electron decay channel in {radical}s = 1.8 TeV {bar p}-p collisions has been measured using W {yields} e{gamma} data sample obtained from the CDF 1988--1989 Tevatron collider run. For photons in the central region ({vert_bar}{eta}{sub {gamma}}{vert_bar} < 1.1) of the CDF detector with transverse energies E{sub T}{sup {gamma}} 5.0 GeV and lepton-photon angular separation {Delta}R{sub {ell}}{gamma} > 0.7, eight electron W{sub {gamma}} candidates were observed. From these events, the production cross section times decay branching ratio for the electron sample was measured to be a {sigma} {center_dot} B(W{sub {gamma}}){sub exp} = 17.0{sub {minus}13.4}{sup +13.6}(stat. + syst.)pb. The W{sub {gamma}} cross section is sensitive to the anomalous couplings of the W boson. Using the W{sub {gamma}} cross section measurement, the absence of an excess of large E{sub T} photons accompanying the production of a W boson enables one to obtain direct limits on anomalous WW{sub {gamma}} couplings. The experimental limits on the anomalous couplings was measured to be {minus}7.2 < {Delta}{kappa} < +7.7 ({lambda} = 0) and {minus}3.5 < {lambda} < +3.4 ({Delta}{kappa} = 0) at 95% CL. These experimental limits impose contraints on possible internal structure of the W boson with compositeness scale sensitivity {Lambda}{sub W} {ge} 1 TeV for saturation of unitarity, corresponding to probing a distance scale of order L{sub W} {le} 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} fm. The experimental limits on anomalous WW{sub {gamma}} couplings place bounds on the higher-order electromagnetic moments of the W boson -- the magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments and the W boson mean-squared charge radius. The experimental results presented in this thesis are in good agreement with Standard Model expectations.

  20. FAITH Water Channel Flow Visualization

    NASA Video Gallery

    Water channel flow visualization experiments are performed on a three dimensional model of a small hill. This experiment was part of a series of measurements of the complex fluid flow around the hi...

  1. Channel Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldo, Andrea; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Rigon, Riccardo

    This review proceeds from Luna Leopold's and Ronald Shreve's lasting accomplishments dealing with the study of random-walk and topologically random channel networks. According to the random perspective, which has had a profound influence on the interpretation of natural landforms, nature's resiliency in producing recurrent networks and landforms was interpreted to be the consequence of chance. In fact, central to models of topologically random networks is the assumption of equal likelihood of any tree-like configuration. However, a general framework of analysis exists that argues that all possible network configurations draining a fixed area are not necessarily equally likely. Rather, a probability P(s) is assigned to a particular spanning tree configuration, say s, which can be generally assumed to obey a Boltzmann distribution: P(s) % e^-H(s)/T, where T is a parameter and H(s) is a global property of the network configuration s related to energetic characters, i.e. its Hamiltonian. One extreme case is the random topology model where all trees are equally likely, i.e. the limit case for T6 4 . The other extreme case is T 6 0, and this corresponds to network configurations that tend to minimize their total energy dissipation to improve their likelihood. Networks obtained in this manner are termed optimal channel networks (OCNs). Observational evidence suggests that the characters of real river networks are reproduced extremely well by OCNs. Scaling properties of energy and entropy of OCNs suggest that large network development is likely to effectively occur at zero temperature (i.e. minimizing its Hamiltonian). We suggest a corollary of dynamic accessibility of a network configuration and speculate towards a thermodynamics of critical self-organization. We thus conclude that both chance and necessity are equally important ingredients for the dynamic origin of channel networks---and perhaps of the geometry of nature.

  2. Analysis of the Performance Characteristics of the Five-Channel Microtops II Sun Photometer for Measuring Aerosol Optical Thickness and Precipitable Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles; Levy, Robert; Kaufman, Yoram; Remer, Lorraine A.; Li, Rong-Rong; Martins, Vanderlei J.; Holben, Brent N.; Abuhassan, Nader; Slutsker, Ilya; Eck, Thomas F.; Pietras, Christophe; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Five Microtops II sun photometers were studied in detail at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to determine their performance in measuring aerosol optical thickness (AOT or Tau(sub alphalambda) and precipitable column water vapor (W). Each derives Tau(sub alphalambda) from measured signals at four wavelengths lambda (340, 440, 675, and 870 nm), and W from the 936 nm signal measurements. Accuracy of Tau(sub alphalambda) and W determination depends on the reliability of the relevant channel calibration coefficient (V(sub 0)). Relative calibration by transfer of parameters from a more accurate sun photometer (such as the Mauna-Loa-calibrated AERONET master sun photometer at GSFC) is more reliable than Langley calibration performed at GSFC. It was found that the factory-determined value of the instrument constant for the 936 nm filter (k= 0.7847) used in the Microtops' internal algorithm is unrealistic, causing large errors in V(sub 0(936)), Tau(sub alpha936), and W. Thus, when applied for transfer calibration at GSFC, whereas the random variation of V(aub 0) at 340 to 870 nm is quite small, with coefficients of variation (CV) in the range of 0 to 2.4%, at 936 nm the CV goes up to 19%. Also, the systematic temporal variation of V(sub 0) at 340 to 870 nm is very slow, while at 936 nm it is large and exhibits a very high dependence on W. The algorithm also computes Tau(sub alpha936) as 0.91Tau(sub alpha870), which is highly simplistic. Therefore, it is recommended to determine Tau(sub alpha936) by logarithmic extrapolation from Tau(sub alpha675) and Tau(sub alpha 870. From the operational standpoint of the Microtops, apart from errors that may result from unperceived cloud contamination, the main sources of error include inaccurate pointing to the Sun, neglecting to clean the front quartz window, and neglecting to calibrate correctly. If these three issues are adequately taken care of, the Microtops can be quite accurate and stable, with root mean square (rms

  3. Measurement of the t$\\bar{t}$ production cross section in the ET+jets channel at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Compostella, Gabriele

    2008-03-06

    This thesis is focused on an inclusive search of the t$\\bar{t}$ → ET + jets decay channel by means of neural network tools in proton antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). At the Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$ collider top quarks are mainly produced in pairs through quark-antiquark annihilation and gluon-gluon fusion processes; in the Standard Model description, the top quark then decays to a W boson and a b quark almost 100% of the times, so that its decay signatures are classified according to the W decay modes. When only one W decays leptonically, the t$\\bar{t}$ event typically contains a charged lepton, missing transverse energy due to the presence of a neutrino escaping from the detector, and four high transverse momentum jets, two of which originate from b quarks. In this thesis we describe a t$\\bar{t}$ production cross section measurement which uses data collected by a 'multijet' trigger, and selects this kind of top decays by requiring a high-PT neutrino signature and by using an optimized neural network to discriminate top quark pair production from backgrounds. In Chapter 1, a brief review of the Standard Model of particle physics will be discussed, focusing on top quark properties and experimental signatures. In Chapter 2 will be presented an overview of the Tevatron accelerator chain that provides p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at the center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV, and proton and antiproton beams production procedure will be discussed. The CDF detector and its components and subsystems used for the study of p{bar p} collisions provided by the Tevatron will be described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 will detail the reconstruction procedures used in CDF to detect physical objects exploiting the features of the different detector subsystems. Chapter 5 will provide an overview of the main concepts regarding Artificial Neural Networks, one of the most important tools we will use in the

  4. The neutron channeling phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Khanouchi, A; Sabir, A; Boulkheir, M; Ichaoui, R; Ghassoun, J; Jehouani, A

    1997-01-01

    Shields, used for protection against radiation, are often pierced with vacuum channels for passing cables and other instruments for measurements. The neutron transmission through these shields is an unavoidable phenomenon. In this work we study and discuss the effect of channels on neutron transmission through shields. We consider an infinite homogeneous slab, with a fixed thickness (20 lambda, with lambda the mean free path of the neutron in the slab), which contains a vacuum channel. This slab is irradiated with an infinite source of neutrons on the left side and on the other side (right side) many detectors with windows equal to 2 lambda are placed in order to evaluate the neutron transmission probabilities (Khanouchi, A., Aboubekr, A., Ghassoun, J. and Jehouani, A. (1994) Rencontre Nationale des Jeunes Chercheurs en Physique. Casa Blanca Maroc; Khanouchi, A., Sabir, A., Ghassoun, J. and Jehouani, A. (1995) Premier Congré International des Intéractions Rayonnements Matière. Eljadida Maroc). The neutron history within the slab is simulated by the Monte Carlo method (Booth, T. E. and Hendricks, J. S. (1994) Nuclear Technology 5) and using the exponential biasing technique in order to improve the Monte Carlo calculation (Levitt, L. B. (1968) Nuclear Science and Engineering 31, 500-504; Jehouani, A., Ghassoun, J. and Aboubker, A. (1994) In Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Radiation Physics, Rabat, Morocco). Then different geometries of the vacuum channel have been studied. For each geometry we have determined the detector response and calculated the neutron transmission probability for different detector positions. This neutron transmission probability presents a peak for the detectors placed in front of the vacuum channel. This study allowed us to clearly identify the neutron channeling phenomenon. One application of our study is to detect vacuum defects in materials. PMID:9463884

  5. Detecting Lower Bounds to Quantum Channel Capacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchiavello, Chiara; Sacchi, Massimiliano F.

    2016-04-01

    We propose a method to detect lower bounds to quantum capacities of a noisy quantum communication channel by means of a few measurements. The method is easily implementable and does not require any knowledge about the channel. We test its efficiency by studying its performance for most well-known single-qubit noisy channels and for the generalized Pauli channel in an arbitrary finite dimension.

  6. Detecting Lower Bounds to Quantum Channel Capacities.

    PubMed

    Macchiavello, Chiara; Sacchi, Massimiliano F

    2016-04-01

    We propose a method to detect lower bounds to quantum capacities of a noisy quantum communication channel by means of a few measurements. The method is easily implementable and does not require any knowledge about the channel. We test its efficiency by studying its performance for most well-known single-qubit noisy channels and for the generalized Pauli channel in an arbitrary finite dimension. PMID:27104688

  7. Polyamine Block of Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, Harley T.; Cheng, Wayland W.L.; Nichols, Colin G.

    2011-01-01

    Polyamine blockade of inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channels underlies their steep voltage-dependence observed in native cells. The structural determinants of polyamine blockade and the structure-activity profile of endogenous polyamines requires specialized methodology for characterizing polyamine interactions with Kir channels. Recent identification and growing interest in the structure and function of prokaryotic Kir channels (KirBacs) has driven the development of new techniques for measuring ion channel activity. Several methods for measuring polyamine interactions with prokaryotic and eukaryotic Kir channels are discussed. PMID:21318869

  8. Single-Channel Recording of Ligand-Gated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Plested, Andrew J R

    2016-01-01

    Single-channel recordings reveal the microscopic properties of individual ligand-gated ion channels. Such recordings contain much more information than measurements of ensemble behavior and can yield structural and functional information about the receptors that participate in fast synaptic transmission in the brain. With a little care, a standard patch-clamp electrophysiology setup can be adapted for single-channel recording in a matter of hours. Thenceforth, it is a realistic aim to record single-molecule activity with microsecond resolution from arbitrary cell types, including cell lines and neurons. PMID:27480725

  9. Joint source-channel coding with allpass filtering source shaping for image transmission over noisy channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jianfei; Chen, Chang W.

    2000-04-01

    In this paper, we proposed a fixed-length robust joint source- channel coding (JSCC) scheme for image transmission over noisy channels. Three channel models are studied: binary symmetric channels (BSC) and additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channels for memoryless channels, and Gilbert-Elliott channels (GEC) for bursty channels. We derive, in this research, an explicit operational rate-distortion (R-D) function, which represents an end-to-end error measurement that includes errors due to both quantization and channel noise. In particular, we are able to incorporate the channel transition probability and channel bit error rate into the R-D function in the case of bursty channels. With the operational R-D function, bits are allocated not only among different subsources, but also between source coding and channel coding so that, under a fixed transmission rate, an optimum tradeoff between source coding accuracy and channel error protection can be achieved. This JSCC scheme is also integrated with allpass filtering source shaping to further improve the robustness against channel errors. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme can achieve not only high PSNR performance, but also excellent perceptual quality. Compared with the state-of-the-art JSCC schemes, this proposed scheme outperforms most of them especially when the channel mismatch occurs.

  10. Five-Channel Polychromator Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eskridge, Richard; Dobson, Chris; Lee, Mike; Robertson, Tony

    1995-01-01

    Five-channel polychromator head samples Raman-scattering spectrum simultaneously at five wavelengths. Each channel consists of 1-mm fiber-optic cable that is individually translatable along dispersion axis of spectrometer to provide both flexibility and fine-tuning capability. Laser raman thermometer not thermometer in usual sense of word, but noncontact spectrometer that measures temperature indirectly in terms of relative intensities of selected Raman-scattering spectral lines.

  11. Characterizing Spatial Patterns of Cloud Cover and Fog Inundation in the Northern Channel Islands Using Satellite Datasets and Comparison to Ground Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, B.; Still, C. J.; Fischer, D. T.; Iacobellis, S. F.; Toomey, M. P.; Greer, B.; Baguskas, S. A.; Williams, P.; McEachern, K.

    2012-12-01

    Coastal forests in Mediterranean climates are frequently covered by clouds or immersed in fog. Previous studies suggest that clouds strongly modulate forest distributions as well as carbon budgets in these semi-arid environments. Both low level stratocumulus cloud cover and fog can enhance the water status of vegetation along the Californian coast and the Channel Islands by reducing solar insolation, raising relative humidity and supplying water directly to the landscape during otherwise warm and rainless summers. While summertime fog and stratus cover in California's Channel Islands can ameliorate summer drought stress and enhance soil water budgets, they have different spatial patterns. These differing spatial patterns and the resulting shifts in relative ecological importance of fog and stratus are largely unknown. The overall objective of this project was to map spatial distributions of daytime cloud cover frequency for the California Channel Islands, and to predict probabilities of surface cloud (fog) contact and immersion for these islands. Daytime cloud cover maps were generated for the Channel Islands using data from GOES satellite imagery. Cloud frequency maps were compared and found to be in agreement with solar insolation data collected at several sites on Santa Cruz and Santa Rosa islands for the summer of 2005. These cloud frequency maps were then combined with airport cloud height data and topographic data to map estimated weekly and monthly fog inundation. The fog inundation maps were then compared to fog drip data collected at several sites on the two islands. Correlation between fog inundation and fog drip accumulation enabled spatial and temporal extrapolation to understand seasonal and inter-annual variations in cloud cover frequency and fog inundation and drip. Future studies will use these cloud and fog distributions for water balance modeling and studies of plant geography and forest distributions.

  12. Multi-channel seismic reflection measurements in the Eurasian Basin, Arctic Ocean, from U.S. ice station Fram-IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoffersen, Yngve; Husebye, Eystein S.

    1985-04-01

    We present the first multi-channel seismic reflection data ever collected from the Eurasian Basin of the Arctic Ocean. The 200 km data set was acquired by a 20 channel sonobuoy array deployed at U.S. ice drift station FRAM-IV and operated for 34 days about 370 km north of Svalbard in April-May 1982. Cross array drift and ice floe rotation which may constitute the most serious obstacle to the advantage of multi-channel data acquisition did only occur to a minor degree during the experiment and render most of the data set suitable for processing using common mid-point binning. A 0.7-1.4 s (two-way traveltime) thick sedimentary section has been deposited over oceanic crust of mid-Oligocene age below the Barents Abyssal Plain. In the deepest part, sediments are infilling topographic lows which indicate predominantly turbidite deposition. Erosional truncations are only locally present in the central part of the section. Conformable bedforms deposited over gentle basement highs indicate a relatively stable bottom current regime since mid-Oligocene time. Thus the establishment of a deep water connection between the Arctic Ocean and lower latitude water masses appear to have had only minor effect on Eurasian Basin bottom current circulation. Extensive submarine slide scars on the north slope of Yermak Plateau show that mass waste have been a sediment source to the Barents Abyssal Plain.

  13. Hanle-effect measurements of spin injection from Mn{sub 5}Ge{sub 3}C{sub 0.8}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-contacts into degenerately doped Ge channels on Si

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Inga Anita Rolseth, Erlend; Reiter, Sebastian; Schulze, Jörg; Chang, Li-Te; Tang, Jianshi; Wang, Kang L.; Sürgers, Christoph; Stefanov, Stefan; Chiussi, Stefano

    2014-12-01

    We report electrical spin injection and detection in degenerately doped n-type Ge channels using Mn{sub 5}Ge{sub 3}C{sub 0.8}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/n{sup +}-Ge tunneling contacts for spin injection and detection. The whole structure is integrated on a Si wafer for complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor compatibility. From three-terminal Hanle-effect measurements, we observe a spin accumulation up to 10 K. The spin lifetime is extracted to be 38 ps at T = 4 K using Lorentzian fitting, and the spin diffusion length is estimated to be 367 nm due to the high diffusion coefficient of the highly doped Ge channel.

  14. On Multiple-Input Multiple-Output OFDM with Index Modulation for Next Generation Wireless Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basar, Ertugrul

    2016-08-01

    Multiple-input multiple-output orthogonal frequency division multiplexing with index modulation (MIMO-OFDM-IM) is a novel multicarrier transmission technique which has been proposed recently as an alternative to classical MIMO-OFDM. In this scheme, OFDM with index modulation (OFDM-IM) concept is combined with MIMO transmission to take advantage of the benefits of these two techniques. In this paper, we shed light on the implementation and error performance analysis of the MIMO-OFDM-IM scheme for next generation 5G wireless networks. Maximum likelihood (ML), near-ML, simple minimum mean square error (MMSE) and ordered successive interference cancellation (OSIC) based MMSE detectors of MIMO-OFDM-IM are proposed and their theoretical performance is investigated. It has been shown via extensive computer simulations that MIMO-OFDM-IM scheme provides an interesting trade-off between error performance and spectral efficiency as well as it achieves considerably better error performance than classical MIMO-OFDM using different type detectors and under realistic conditions.

  15. Channel models for wireless body area networks.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Kenichi; Aoyagi, Akahiro; Takada, Jun-Ichi; Katayama, Norihiko; Yekeh, Kamya; Takehiko, Yazdandoost; Kohno, Kobayashi Ryuji

    2008-01-01

    Wireless patient monitoring using wearable sensors is a promising application. This paper provides stochastic channel models for wireless body area network (WBAN) on the human body. Parameters of the channel models are extracted from measured channel transfer functions (CTFs) in a hospital room. Measured frequency bands are selected so as to include permissible bands for WBAN; ultra wideband (UWB), the industry, science and medical (ISM) bands, and wireless medical telemetry system (WMTS) bands. As channel models, both a path loss model and a power delay profile (PDP) model are considered. But, even though path loss models are derived for the all frequency bands, PDP model is only for the UWB band due to the highly frequency selectiveness of UWB channels. The parameters extracted from the measurement results are summarized for each channel model. PMID:19162968

  16. Evaporative cooling in microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltezos, George; Rajagopal, Aditya; Scherer, Axel

    2006-08-01

    Evaporative cooling is an effective and energy efficient way to rapidly remove heat from a system. Specifically, evaporative cooling in microfluidic channels can provide a cost-effective solution for the cooling of electronic devices and chemical reactors. Here we present microfluidic devices fabricated by using soft-lithography techniques to form simple fluidic junctions between channels carrying refrigerant and channels carrying N2 gas. The effects of channel geometry and delivery pressure on the performance of refrigeration through vaporization of acetone, isopropyl alcohol, and ethyl ether were characterized. By varying gas inlet pressures, refrigerants, and angles of the microfluidic junctions, optimal cooling conditions were found. Refrigeration rates in excess of 40°C/s were measured, and long lasting subzero cooling in the junction could be observed.

  17. Channeled spectropolarimetry using iterative reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dennis J.; LaCasse, Charles F.; Craven, Julia M.

    2016-05-01

    Channeled spectropolarimeters (CSP) measure the polarization state of light as a function of wavelength. Conventional Fourier reconstruction suffers from noise, assumes the channels are band-limited, and requires uniformly spaced samples. To address these problems, we propose an iterative reconstruction algorithm. We develop a mathematical model of CSP measurements and minimize a cost function based on this model. We simulate a measured spectrum using example Stokes parameters, from which we compare conventional Fourier reconstruction and iterative reconstruction. Importantly, our iterative approach can reconstruct signals that contain more bandwidth, an advancement over Fourier reconstruction. Our results also show that iterative reconstruction mitigates noise effects, processes non-uniformly spaced samples without interpolation, and more faithfully recovers the ground truth Stokes parameters. This work offers a significant improvement to Fourier reconstruction for channeled spectropolarimetry.

  18. Eight-Channel Continuous Timer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Steven

    2004-01-01

    A custom laboratory electronic timer circuit measures the durations of successive cycles of nominally highly stable input clock signals in as many as eight channels, for the purpose of statistically quantifying the small instabilities of these signals. The measurement data generated by this timer are sent to a personal computer running software that integrates the measurements to form a phase residual for each channel and uses the phase residuals to compute Allan variances for each channel. (The Allan variance is a standard statistical measure of instability of a clock signal.) Like other laboratory clock-cycle-measuring circuits, this timer utilizes an externally generated reference clock signal having a known frequency (100 MHz) much higher than the frequencies of the input clock signals (between 100 and 120 Hz). It counts the number of reference-clock cycles that occur between successive rising edges of each input clock signal of interest, thereby affording a measurement of the input clock-signal period to within the duration (10 ns) of one reference clock cycle. Unlike typical prior laboratory clock-cycle-measuring circuits, this timer does not skip some cycles of the input clock signals. The non-cycle-skipping feature is an important advantage because in applications that involve integration of measurements over long times for characterizing nominally highly stable clock signals, skipping cycles can degrade accuracy. The timer includes a field-programmable gate array that functions as a 20-bit counter running at the reference clock rate of 100 MHz. The timer also includes eight 20-bit latching circuits - one for each channel - at the output terminals of the counter. Each transition of an input signal from low to high causes the corresponding latching circuit to latch the count at that instant. Each such transition also sets a status flip-flop circuit to indicate the presence of the latched count. A microcontroller reads the values of all eight status flipflops

  19. Jamming of Cylindrical Grains in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; Spier, Gregory; Barr, Nicholas; Steel, Fiona

    2012-02-01

    We study jamming of low aspect-ratio cylindrical Delrin grains in a vertical channel. These cylindrical grains resemble antacid tablets, poker chips, or coins since their height is less than their diameter. Grains are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section where the channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. Within this channel, grains are sometimes observed to form jams, stable structures supported by the channel walls with no support beneath them. The probability of jam occurrence and the strength or robustness of a jam is effected by the grain dimensions and channel size. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability and jam strength in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories.

  20. Equalization in redundant channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulpule, Bhalchandra R. (Inventor); Collins, Robert E. (Inventor); Cominelli, Donald F. (Inventor); O'Neill, Richard D. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A miscomparison between a channel's configuration data base and a voted system configuration data base in a redundant channel system having identically operating, frame synchronous channels triggers autoequalization of the channel's historical signal data bases in a hierarchical, chronological manner with that of a correctly operating channel. After equalization, symmetrization of the channel's configuration data base with that of the system permits upgrading of the previously degraded channel to full redundancy. An externally provided equalization command, e.g., manually actuated, can also trigger equalization.

  1. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    applications that must be stable against environmental perturbations, such as acceleration or power supply variations. Measurements on fabricated devices in fact confirm predictions by the new model of up to 4x improvement in frequency stability against DC-bias voltage variations for contour-mode disk resonators as the resistance loading their ports increases. By enhancing circuit visualization, this circuit model makes more obvious the circuit design procedures and topologies most beneficial for certain mechanical circuits, e.g., filters and oscillators. The second method enables simultaneous low motional resistance ( Rx 70,000) at 61 MHz using an improved ALD-partial electrode-to-resonator gap filling technique that reduces the Q-limiting surface losses of previous renditions by adding an alumina pre-coating before ALD of the gap-filling high-k dielectric. This effort increases the Q over the ˜10,000 of previous renditions by more than 6x towards demonstration of the first VHF micromechanical resonators in any material, piezoelectric or not, to meet the simultaneous high Q (>50,000) and low motional resistance Rx (< 200O) specs highly desired for front-end frequency channelizer requirements in cognitive and software-defined radio architectures. The methods presented in this chapter finally overcome the high impedance bottleneck that has plagued capacitively transduced micro-mechanical resonators over the past decade. The third method introduces a capacitively transduced micromechanical resonator constructed in hot filament CVD boron-doped microcrystalline diamond (MCD) structural material that posts a measured Q of 146,580 at 232.441 kHz, which is 3x higher than the previous high for conductive polydiamond. Moreover, radial-contour mode disk resonators fabricated in the same MCD film and using material mismatched stems exhibit a Q of 71,400 at 299.86 MHz. The material used here further exhibits an acoustic velocity of 18,516 m/s, which is now the highest to date among

  2. A functional assay to measure postsynaptic gamma-aminobutyric acidB responses in cultured spinal cord neurons: Heterologous regulation of the same K+ channel

    SciTech Connect

    Kamatchi, G.L.; Ticku, M.K. )

    1991-02-01

    The stimulation of postsynaptic gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptors leads to slow inhibitory postsynaptic potentials due to the influx of K(+)-ions. This was studied biochemically, in vitro in mammalian cultured spinal cord neurons by using 86Rb as a substitute for K+. (-)-Baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, produced a concentration-dependent increase in the 86Rb-influx. This effect was stereospecific and blocked by GABAB receptor antagonists like CGP 35 348 (3-aminopropyl-diethoxymethyl-phosphonic acid) and phaclofen. Apart from the GABAB receptors, both adenosine via adenosine1 receptors and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) via 5-HT1 alpha agonists also increased the 86Rb-influx. These agonists failed to show any additivity between them when they were combined in their maximal concentration. In addition, their effect was antagonized specifically by their respective antagonists without influencing the others. These findings suggest the presence of GABAB, adenosine1 and 5-HT1 alpha receptors in the cultured spinal cord neurons, which exhibit a heterologous regulation of the same K(+)-channel. The effect of these agonists were antagonized by phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, an activator of protein kinase C, and pretreatment with pertussis toxin. This suggests that these agonists by acting on their own receptors converge on the same K(+)-channel through the Gi/Go proteins. In summary, we have developed a biochemical functional assay for studying and characterizing GABAB synaptic pharmacology in vitro, using spinal cord neurons.

  3. Channel nut tool

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Marvin

    2016-01-12

    A method, system, and apparatus for installing channel nuts includes a shank, a handle formed on a first end of a shank, and an end piece with a threaded shaft configured to receive a channel nut formed on the second end of the shaft. The tool can be used to insert or remove a channel nut in a channel framing system and then removed from the channel nut.

  4. A three channel telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesho, Jeffery C.; Eaton, Harry A. C.

    1993-01-01

    A three channel telemetry system intended for biomedical applications is described. The transmitter is implemented in a single chip using a 2 micron BiCMOS processes. The operation of the system and the test results from the latest chip are discussed. One channel is always dedicated to temperature measurement while the other two channels are generic. The generic channels carry information from transducers that are interfaced to the system through on-chip general purpose operational amplifiers. The generic channels have different bandwidths: one from dc to 250 Hz and the other from dc to 1300 Hz. Each generic channel modulates a current controlled oscillator to produce a frequency modulated signal. The two frequency modulated signals are summed and used to amplitude modulate the temperature signal which acts as a carrier. A near-field inductive link telemeters the combined signals over a short distance. The chip operates on a supply voltage anywhere from 2.5 to 3.6 Volts and draws less than 1 mA when transmitting a signal. The chip can be incorporated into ingestible, implantable and other configurations. The device can free the patient from tethered data collection systems and reduces the possibility of infection from subcutaneous leads. Data telemetry can increase patient comfort leading to a greater acceptance of monitoring.

  5. Measurement of the t anti-t production cross-section at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV in the combined lepton+track and e mu channel using 370 pb**-1 of D0 data

    SciTech Connect

    Lager, Sara; /Stockholm U.

    2006-05-01

    A measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in the dilepton final states using a lepton+track selection and secondary vertex b-tagging is presented. One of the two leptons from the decay of the t{bar t} pair is allowed to be identified only as an isolated track to improve the selection efficiency. The result is combined with a measurement in the t{bar t} {yields} e{mu} final state. The measurements are based on 370 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 experiment at the Tevatron collider. The preliminary cross section obtained in the combined lepton+track and e{mu} channel is: {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 8.6{sub -1.7}{sup +1.9}(stat) {+-} 1.1(syst) {+-} 0.6(lumi) pb.

  6. Measurement of the B0s lifetime using the semileptonic decay channel B0s → D-sμ+vX

    SciTech Connect

    Lizarraga, Marco Antonio Carrasco

    2009-11-01

    We report a measurement of the B0s lifetime in the semileptonic decay channel BB0s → D-sμ+vX (and its charge conjugate), using approximately 0.4 fb-1 of data collected with the DØ detector during 2002–2004. Using 5176 reconstructed D-s μ+ signal events, we have measured the B0s lifetime to be τ (B0s) = 1.398 ± 0.044 (stat)+0.028 -0.025 (syst) ps. This is the most precise measurement of the B0s lifetime to date.

  7. Measurements of the Top-quark Mass and the $t\\bar{t}$ Cross Section in the Hadronic $\\tau +$ Jets Decay Channel at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-08-01

    We present the first direct measurement of the top-quark mass using t{bar t} events decaying in the hadronic {tau} + jets decay channel. Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, we measure the t{bar t} cross section, {sigma}{sub t{bar t}}, and the top-quark mass, M{sub top}. We extract M{sub top} from a likelihood based on per-event probabilities calculated with leading-order signal and background matrix elements. We measure {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 8.8 {+-} 3.3 (stat) {+-} 2.2 (syst) pb and M{sub top} = 172.7 {+-} 9.3 (stat) {+-} 3.7 (syst) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  8. The Earliest Ion Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M. A.; Wei, C.

    2009-12-01

    Supplying protocells with ions required assistance from channels spanning their membrane walls. The earliest channels were most likely short proteins that formed transmembrane helical bundles surrounding a water-filled pore. These simple aggregates were capable of transporting ions with efficiencies comparable to those of complex, contemporary ion channels. Channels with wide pores exhibited little ion selectivity but also imposed only modest constraints on amino acid sequences of channel-forming proteins. Channels with small pores could have been selective but also might have required a more precisely defined sequence of amino acids. In contrast to modern channels, their protocellular ancestors had only limited capabilities to regulate ion flux. It is postulated that subsequent evolution of ion channels progressed primarily to acquire precise regulation, and not high efficiency or selectivity. It is further proposed that channels and the surrounding membranes co-evolved.

  9. Microfluidic channel fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Don W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2001-01-01

    A new channel structure for microfluidic systems and process for fabricating this structure. In contrast to the conventional practice of fabricating fluid channels as trenches or grooves in a substrate, fluid channels are fabricated as thin walled raised structures on a substrate. Microfluidic devices produced in accordance with the invention are a hybrid assembly generally consisting of three layers: 1) a substrate that can or cannot be an electrical insulator; 2) a middle layer, that is an electrically conducting material and preferably silicon, forms the channel walls whose height defines the channel height, joined to and extending from the substrate; and 3) a top layer, joined to the top of the channels, that forms a cover for the channels. The channels can be defined by photolithographic techniques and are produced by etching away the material around the channel walls.

  10. [Synopsis about the hypothesis of "information channel" of channel-collateral system].

    PubMed

    Chang, Xi-Lang

    2008-10-01

    The author of the present paper founded a theorem about the "incompleteness of single channel structure" (nerve, blood vessel, lymphatic, interspace, aperture, etc.) through quantitative and qualitative analysis about the economic information channel in the human body, which eliminates the probability of single channel structure in the information channel of channel (meridian)-collateral system. After comprehensive analysis on the current researches, the author puts forward a neodoxy, i.e., the body "information channel" structure of the channel-collateral system, mainly follows the distribution regularity of systemic statistics, and is not a single specific entity; various layers of the information channel in the main stems of the channel-collaterals are composed of optimized structure tissues. Hence, the structure of this information channel of channel-collateral system is an overall-optimized, sequential and compatible systemic structure. From this neodoxy, the author brings forward a working principle of channel-collaterals, which is supported theoretically by bio-auxology. The longitudinal distribution of the main stems of meridian-collaterals is considered to result from that in the process of the animal evolution, in the animals moving forward, the microscopic complicated movement of intracorporeal information and energy molecules is related to the forward macroscopic and non-uniform movement of organism in trans-measure. Its impulse and kinetic momentum forms a main vector in the longitudinal direction of the body (the direction of the main stem of channel-collaterals). In order to adapt to and utilize natural regularities, the main stems of the channel-collaterals gradually differentiate and evolve in the living organism, forming a whole system. The "hypothesis of biological origin of channel-collateral system" and "that of information channel of the channel-collaterals in the body" constitute a relatively complete theoretical system framework. PMID

  11. Measurement of the top quark mass in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels using √s = 7   TeV ATLAS data

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-17

    The top quark mass was measured in the channels tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton (lepton = e,μ) based on ATLAS data recorded in 2011. The data were taken at the LHC with a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1. The tt¯→ lepton+jets analysis uses a three-dimensional template technique which determines the top quark mass together with a global jet energy scale factor (JSF), and a relative b-to-light-jet energy scale factor (bJSF), where the terms b-jets and light-jets refer to jets originating from b-quarks and u, d, c, s-quarks or gluons, respectively. The analysis of the tt¯→ dilepton channel exploits a one-dimensional template method using the mℓb observable, defined as the average invariant mass of the two lepton+b-jet pairs in each event. The top quark mass is measured to be 172.33 ± 0.75 (stat + JSF + bJSF) ± 1.02(syst) GeV, and 173.79 ± 0.54(stat) ± 1.30(syst) GeV in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels, respectively. Thus, the combination of the two results yields mtop = 172.99 ± 0.48(stat) ± 0.78(syst) GeV, with a total uncertainty of 0.91 GeV.

  12. Measurement of the top quark mass in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels using √s = 7   TeV ATLAS data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-17

    The top quark mass was measured in the channels tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton (lepton = e,μ) based on ATLAS data recorded in 2011. The data were taken at the LHC with a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1. The tt¯→ lepton+jets analysis uses a three-dimensional template technique which determines the top quark mass together with a global jet energy scale factor (JSF), and a relative b-to-light-jet energy scale factor (bJSF), where the terms b-jets and light-jets refer to jets originating from b-quarks and u, d, c, s-quarks ormore » gluons, respectively. The analysis of the tt¯→ dilepton channel exploits a one-dimensional template method using the mℓb observable, defined as the average invariant mass of the two lepton+b-jet pairs in each event. The top quark mass is measured to be 172.33 ± 0.75 (stat + JSF + bJSF) ± 1.02(syst) GeV, and 173.79 ± 0.54(stat) ± 1.30(syst) GeV in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels, respectively. Thus, the combination of the two results yields mtop = 172.99 ± 0.48(stat) ± 0.78(syst) GeV, with a total uncertainty of 0.91 GeV.« less

  13. Measurement of the t-channel single-top-quark production cross section and of the $\\mid V_{tb} \\mid$ CKM matrix element in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$= 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-06-16

    Our measurements are presented of the t-channel single-top-quark production cross section in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The results are based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The cross section is measured inclusively, as well as separately for top (t) and antitop (t¯), in final states with a muon or an electron. The measured inclusive t-channel cross section is σ t-ch. = 83.6 ± 2.3 (stat.) ± 7.4 (syst.) pb. The single t and t¯ cross sections are measured to be σ t-ch.(t) = 53.8 ± 1.5 (stat.) ± 4.4 (syst.) pb and σ t-ch. (t¯) = 27.6 ± 1.3 (stat.) ± 3.7 (syst.) pb, respectively. The measured ratio of cross sections is R t-ch. = σ t-ch.(t)/σ t-ch. (t¯) = 1.95 ± 0.10 (stat.) ± 0.19 (syst.), in agreement with the standard model prediction. Finally, the modulus of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element V tb is extracted and, in combination with a previous CMS result at √s = 7 TeV, a value |V tb| = 0.998 ± 0.038 (exp.) ± 0.016 (theo.) is obtained.

  14. Measurement of the t-channel single-top-quark production cross section and of the $$\\mid V_{tb} \\mid$$ CKM matrix element in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$= 8 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-06-16

    Our measurements are presented of the t-channel single-top-quark production cross section in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The results are based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The cross section is measured inclusively, as well as separately for top (t) and antitop (t¯), in final states with a muon or an electron. The measured inclusive t-channel cross section is σ t-ch. = 83.6 ± 2.3 (stat.) ± 7.4 (syst.) pb. The single t and t¯ cross sections are measured to be σ t-ch.(t) =more » 53.8 ± 1.5 (stat.) ± 4.4 (syst.) pb and σ t-ch. (t¯) = 27.6 ± 1.3 (stat.) ± 3.7 (syst.) pb, respectively. The measured ratio of cross sections is R t-ch. = σ t-ch.(t)/σ t-ch. (t¯) = 1.95 ± 0.10 (stat.) ± 0.19 (syst.), in agreement with the standard model prediction. Finally, the modulus of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element V tb is extracted and, in combination with a previous CMS result at √s = 7 TeV, a value |V tb| = 0.998 ± 0.038 (exp.) ± 0.016 (theo.) is obtained.« less

  15. Fading channel simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, P.E.; Fitzgerald, T.J.

    1991-12-31

    This invention relates to high frequency (HF) radio signal propagation through fading channels and, more particularly, to simulation of fading channels in order to characterize HF radio system performance in transmitting and receiving signals through such fading channels. Fading channel effects on a transmitted communication signal are simulated with both frequency and time variations using a channel scattering function to affect the transmitted signal. A conventional channel scattering function is converted to a series of channel realizations by multiplying the square root of the channel scattering function by a complex number of which the real and imaginary parts are each independent variables. The two-dimensional inverse-FFT of this complex-valued channel realization yields a matrix of channel coefficients that provide a complete frequency-time description of the channel. The transmitted radio signal is segmented to provide a series of transmitted signal and each segment is subject to FFT to generate a series of signal coefficient matrices. The channel coefficient matrices and signal coefficient matrices are then multiplied and subjected to inverse-FFT to output a signal representing the received affected radio signal. A variety of channel scattering functions can be used to characterize the response of a transmitter-receiver system to such atmospheric effects.

  16. The Flow of Gases in Narrow Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, R E H

    1951-01-01

    Measurements were made of the flow of gases through various narrow channels a few microns wide at average pressures from 0.00003 to 40 cm. Hg. The flow rate, defined as the product of pressure and volume rate of flow at unit pressure difference, first decreased linearly with decrease in mean pressure in the channel, in agreement with laminar-flow theory, reached a minimum when the mean path length was approximately equal to the channel width, and then increased to a constant value. The product of flow rate and square root of molecular number was approximately the same function of mean path length for all gases for a given channel.

  17. Slow inactivation of Na(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged depolarizing pulses that last seconds to minutes cause slow inactivation of Na(+) channels, which regulates neuron and myocyte excitability by reducing availability of inward current. In neurons, slow inactivation has been linked to memory of previous excitation and in skeletal muscle it ensures myocytes are able to contract when K(+) is elevated. The molecular mechanisms underlying slow inactivation are unclear even though it has been studied for 50+ years. This chapter reviews what is known to date regarding the definition, measurement, and mechanisms of voltage-gated Na(+) channel slow inactivation. PMID:24737231

  18. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002580.htm Calcium channel blocker overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Calcium channel blockers are a type of medicine used ...

  19. Model-independent measurement of $\\boldsymbol{t}$-channel single top quark production in $\\boldsymbol{p\\bar{p}}$ collisions at $\\boldsymbol{\\sqrt{s}=1.96}$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2011-05-01

    We present a model-independent measurement of t-channel electroweak production of single top quarks in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, and selecting events containing an isolated electron or muon, missing transverse energy and one or two jets originating from the fragmentation of b quarks, we measure a cross section {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tqb + X) = 2.90 {+-} 0.59 (stat + syst) pb for a top quark mass of 172.5 GeV. The probability of the background to fluctuate and produce a signal as large as the one observed is 1.6 x 10{sup -8}, corresponding to a significance of 5.5 standard deviations.

  20. Model-independent measurement of t-channel single top quark production in p(p)over-bar collisions at,root s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Ancu, L. S.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, R.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cochran, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Eller, P.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Focke, C.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Khatidze, D.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; et al.

    2011-11-17

    We present a model-independent measurement of t-channel electroweak production of single top quarks in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, and selecting events containing an isolated electron or muon, missing transverse energy and one or two jets originating from the fragmentation of b quarks, we measure a cross section {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tqb + X) = 2.90 {+-} 0.59 (stat + syst) pb for a top quark mass of 172.5 GeV. The probability of the background to fluctuate and produce a signal as large as the one observed is 1.6 x 10{sup -8}, corresponding to a significance of 5.5 standard deviations.

  1. Non-intrusive OSNR measurement of polarization-multiplexed signals with spectral shaping and subject to fiber non-linearity with minimum channel spacing of 37.5GHz.

    PubMed

    Gariépy, Daniel; Searcy, Steven; He, Gang; Tibuleac, Sorin

    2016-09-01

    A non-intrusive OSNR measurement technique relying on the detailed spectral comparison of an optical signal with its "noise-free" spectrum is described, including mathematical basis, validity conditions and algorithmic steps. The technique's performance is experimentally demonstrated with 100G PM-QPSK and 200G PM-16QAM signals subject to fiber non-linearity induced by 100G PM-QPSK and 10G NRZ-OOK neighbors. The OSNR measurement performance is also demonstrated when root-raised cosine spectral shaping is applied to the signals, with channel spacings of 50GHz and 37.5GHz. Experimental results for OSNR levels up to 30dB and launch powers up to 3dB above the optimum BER launch conditions are shown for different system and signal configurations. PMID:27607623

  2. Channel degradation in southeastern Nebraska Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wahl, Kenneth L.; Weiss, Linda S.

    1995-01-01

    Many stream channels in southeastern Nebraska were dredged and straightened during 1904-15. The resulting channels were both shorter and steeper than the original channels. Tests for time trends were conducted using the nonparametric Kendall tau test to see if the channels have responded to these changes. Tests were conducted on the stages associated with specific discharges and on measurement characteristics at gaging stations. Tests also were conducted on hydrologic forcing variables (annual mean precipitation, annual peak discharges, annual mean discharge, and annual mean base flows). The null hypothesis (that the data were free from trend) was rejected for stages associated with the mean of the annual discharges for 6 of 7 gaging stations in the study area, but was accepted for all 3 gages on the main stem of the Missouri River. The trends at the 6 streamflow gaging stations were for decreasing stages (degrading channels) for specific discharges. The rates of change ranged from about 0.2 to 0.5 m per decade. Mean stream bed elevations computed for individual discharge measurements at these streamflow gaging stations confirmed that the channels are degrading. However, neither the precipitation nor flow variables show evidence of trends. The tendency for the channels to degrade thus cannot be attributed to changes in runoff characteristics and are assumed to be a response to the channel modifications in the early 1900's. Indications are that the channels presently are continuing to degrade.

  3. Asymmetric weak-pinning superconducting channels: Vortex ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, K.; Heitmann, T. W.; Song, C.; Defeo, M. P.; Plourde, B. L. T.; Hesselberth, M. B. S.; Kes, P. H.

    2007-12-01

    The controlled motion of objects through narrow channels is important in many fields. We have fabricated asymmetric weak-pinning channels in a superconducting thin-film strip for controlling the dynamics of vortices. The lack of pinning allows the vortices to move through the channels with the dominant interaction determined by the shape of the channel walls. We present measurements of vortex dynamics in the channels and compare these with similar measurements on a set of uniform-width channels. While the uniform-width channels exhibit a symmetric response for both directions through the channel, the vortex motion through the asymmetric channels is quite different, with substantial asymmetries in both the static depinning and dynamic flux flow. This vortex ratchet effect has a rich dependence on magnetic field and driving force amplitude.

  4. Sodium Channel Inhibiting Marine Toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellyn, Lyndon E.

    Saxitoxin (STX), tetrodotoxin (TTX) and their many chemical relatives are part of our daily lives. From killing people who eat seafood containing these toxins, to being valuable research tools unveiling the invisible structures of their pharmacological receptor, their global impact is beyond measure. The pharmacological receptor for these toxins is the voltage-gated sodium channel which transports Na ions between the exterior to the interior of cells. The two structurally divergent families of STX and TTX analogues bind at the same location on these Na channels to stop the flow of ions. This can affect nerves, muscles and biological senses of most animals. It is through these and other toxins that we have developed much of our fundamental understanding of the Na channel and its part in generating action potentials in excitable cells.

  5. Channel catfish pond fertilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most successful aquaculture enterprise in the U.S. is channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus production. In the U.S., 257 million kg of channel catfish were sold in 2007 at a value of $455 million. Large-scale commercial channel catfish culture began in the late 1950s and expanded rapidly from 1978...

  6. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    applications that must be stable against environmental perturbations, such as acceleration or power supply variations. Measurements on fabricated devices in fact confirm predictions by the new model of up to 4x improvement in frequency stability against DC-bias voltage variations for contour-mode disk resonators as the resistance loading their ports increases. By enhancing circuit visualization, this circuit model makes more obvious the circuit design procedures and topologies most beneficial for certain mechanical circuits, e.g., filters and oscillators. The second method enables simultaneous low motional resistance ( Rx 70,000) at 61 MHz using an improved ALD-partial electrode-to-resonator gap filling technique that reduces the Q-limiting surface losses of previous renditions by adding an alumina pre-coating before ALD of the gap-filling high-k dielectric. This effort increases the Q over the ˜10,000 of previous renditions by more than 6x towards demonstration of the first VHF micromechanical resonators in any material, piezoelectric or not, to meet the simultaneous high Q (>50,000) and low motional resistance Rx (< 200O) specs highly desired for front-end frequency channelizer requirements in cognitive and software-defined radio architectures. The methods presented in this chapter finally overcome the high impedance bottleneck that has plagued capacitively transduced micro-mechanical resonators over the past decade. The third method introduces a capacitively transduced micromechanical resonator constructed in hot filament CVD boron-doped microcrystalline diamond (MCD) structural material that posts a measured Q of 146,580 at 232.441 kHz, which is 3x higher than the previous high for conductive polydiamond. Moreover, radial-contour mode disk resonators fabricated in the same MCD film and using material mismatched stems exhibit a Q of 71,400 at 299.86 MHz. The material used here further exhibits an acoustic velocity of 18,516 m/s, which is now the highest to date among

  7. Using multi-channel level sets to measure the cytoplasmic localization of HCMV pUL97 in GFP-B-gal fusion constructs.

    PubMed

    Held, Christian; Webel, Rike; Palmisano, Ralf; Hutterer, Corina; Marschall, Manfred; Wittenberg, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Human cytomegalovirus UL97-encoded protein kinase (pUL97) phosphorylates cellular and viral proteins and is critical for viral replication. To quantify the efficiency of nuclear translocation and to elucidate the role of putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) elements, immunofluorescence analysis of different pUL97 expression constructs was performed. Since manual quantitation of respective expression levels lacks objectivity and reproducibility, and is time-consuming as well, a computer-based model is established. This model enables objective quantitation of the degree of cytoplasmic localization λ. To determine the degree of cytoplasmic localization of different pUL97-GFP-β-gal fusion proteins automatically, a multi-channel segmentation of the nucleus and cytoplasm of transfected HeLa cells is performed in DAPI and GFP micrographs. A watershed transform-based segmentation scheme is used for the segmentation of the cell nuclei. Subsequently, the cytoplasm is segmented using a fast marching level set method. Based on the segmentation of cell nuclei and cytoplasm, λ can be determined for each HeLa cell by quantitation of the ratio of average signal intensity outside and inside the nucleus. The degree of cytoplasmic localization of an individual construct is then determined by evaluating the average and standard deviation of λ for the corresponding HeLa cells. Evaluation demonstrates that nuclear transport of pUL97 is a multilayered mechanism resulting in different efficiencies of nuclear translocation between a small and a large isoform and objective quantitation of the cytoplasmic localization is possible with a high accuracy (96.7% and 94.3%). PMID:24445057

  8. Diffractively produced Z bosons in the muon decay channel in p-pbar collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV, and the measurement of the efficiency of the D0 Run II luminosity monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Tamsin L

    2006-04-01

    The first analysis of diffractively produced Z bosons in the muon decay channel is presented, using data taken by the D0 detector at the Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 109 pb{sup -1}. The diffractive sample is defined using the fractional momentum loss {zeta} of the intact proton or antiproton measured using the calorimeter and muon detector systems. In a sample of 10791 (Z/{gamma})* {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} events, 24 diffractive candidate events are found with {zeta} < 0.02. The first work towards measuring the cross section times branching ratio for diffractive production of (Z/{gamma})* {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} is presented for the kinematic region {zeta} < 0.02. The first work towards measuring the cross section times branching ratio for diffractive production of (Z/{gamma})* {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} is presented for the kinematic region {zeta} < 0.02. The systematic uncertainties are not yet sufficiently understood to present the cross section result. In addition, the first measurement of the efficiency of the Run II D0 Luminosity Monitor is presented, which is used in all cross section measurements. The efficiency is: {var_epsilon}{sub LM} = (90.9 {+-} 1.8)%.

  9. Bacterial Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Compton, Emma L R; Mindell, Joseph A

    2010-09-01

    Bacterial ion channels were known, but only in special cases, such as outer membrane porins in Escherichia coli and bacterial toxins that form pores in their target (bacterial or mammalian) membranes. The exhaustive coverage provided by a decade of bacterial genome sequencing has revealed that ion channels are actually widespread in bacteria, with homologs of a broad range of mammalian channel proteins coded throughout the bacterial and archaeal kingdoms. This review discusses four groups of bacterial channels: porins, mechano-sensitive (MS) channels, channel-forming toxins, and bacterial homologs of mammalian channels. The outer membrane (OM) of gram-negative bacteria blocks access of essential nutrients; to survive, the cell needs to provide a mechanism for nutrients to penetrate the OM. Porin channels provide this access by forming large, nonspecific aqueous pores in the OM that allow ions and vital nutrients to cross it and enter the periplasm. MS channels act as emergency release valves, allowing solutes to rapidly exit the cytoplasm and to dissipate the large osmotic disparity between the internal and external environments. MS channels are remarkable in that they do this by responding to forces exerted by the membrane itself. Some bacteria produce toxic proteins that form pores in trans, attacking and killing other organisms by virtue of their pore formation. The review focuses on those bacterial toxins that kill other bacteria, specifically the class of proteins called colicins. Colicins reveal the dangers of channel formation in the plasma membrane, since they kill their targets with exactly that approach. PMID:26443789

  10. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Ranade, Sanjeev S; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-09-23

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is essential for various physiological processes such as the conscious sensations of touch and hearing, and the unconscious sensation of blood flow. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels. PMID:26402601

  11. C. elegans TRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Rui; Xu, X.Z. Shawn

    2010-01-01

    TRP (transient receptor potential) channels represent a superfamily of cation channels found in all eukaryotes. The C. elegans genome encodes seventeen TRP channels covering all of the seven TRP subfamilies. Genetic analyses in C. elegans have implicated TRP channels in a wide spectrum of behavioral and physiological processes, ranging from sensory transduction (e.g. chemosensation, touch sensation, proprioception and osmosensation) to fertilization, drug dependence, organelle biogenesis, apoptosis, gene expression, and neurotransmitter/hormone release. Many C. elegans TRP channels share similar activation and regulatory mechanisms with their vertebrate counterparts. Studies in C. elegans have also revealed some previously unrecognized functions and regulatory mechanisms of TRP channels. C. elegans represents an excellent genetic model organism for the study of function and regulation of TRP channels in vivo. PMID:21290304

  12. High accuracy refractive index measurement system for germanium and silicon using the channelled spectrum method in the range of 3 to 15 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straube, Hilmar; Hell, Christian

    2016-05-01

    The refractive index of germanium is known only up to the third decimal according to publicly available sources. This data from various authors shows deviations in the order of several 10-3 not to be explained by experimental errors of the refractive index measurement. This is a strong indication that there is optically relevant material property variation. We present an interferometric method to measure the refractive index and its temperature dependency on etalon samples, which are cheaper to prepare with high quality than prism samples needed for the classical method of index measurement. Resolution and stability of our method is better than 10-4. The method can be used for both germanium and silicon. Our goal is to be able to produce material with optically relevant specifications. This is in contrast to the conventional method of specifying these important IR-optical materials in terms of electrical properties such as dopant type and concentration.

  13. Measurement of the W Boson Helicity Fractions in t t Events at √{ s}=8 TeV in the Lepton+Jets Channel with ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannenwald, Benjamin; Kareem, Mohammad; Kagan, Harris; Lemmer, Boris; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Llacer, Maria Moreno; Quadt, Arnulf; Atlas Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The relative fractions of longitudinally, left-handed, and right-handed polarized W bosons produced in lepton+jets t t decays are measured using proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV as recorded in 2012 with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1. A kinematic fitting technique is used to reconstruct the final state objects, and the helicity fractions are obtained via a template fit to data. The helicity angle is calculated and the relative fractions computed simultaneously for both the leptonically and hadronically decaying W bosons. This represents the first-ever direct measurement of helicity fractions using hadronic W decays. Results from orthogonal signal regions are combined to increase the overall sensitivity of the final measurement. The extracted helicity fractions are then compared to NLO predictions from the Standard Model.

  14. Erratum: Measurement of the $$t \\bar{t}$$ production cross section in the dilepton channel in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-02-05

    In this study, the top-antitop quark (tt¯) production cross section is measured in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC, using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb–1. The measurement is performed by analysing events with a pair of electrons or muons, or one electron and one muon, and at least two jets, one of which is identified as originating from hadronisation of a bottom quark. The measured cross section is 239±2 (stat.)±11 (syst.)±6 (lum.) pb, for an assumed top-quark mass of 172.5 GeV, in agreement with the predictionmore » of the standard model.« less

  15. Erratum: Measurement of the $t \\bar{t}$ production cross section in the dilepton channel in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-02-05

    In this study, the top-antitop quark (tt¯) production cross section is measured in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC, using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb–1. The measurement is performed by analysing events with a pair of electrons or muons, or one electron and one muon, and at least two jets, one of which is identified as originating from hadronisation of a bottom quark. The measured cross section is 239±2 (stat.)±11 (syst.)±6 (lum.) pb, for an assumed top-quark mass of 172.5 GeV, in agreement with the prediction of the standard model.

  16. Channeled partial Mueller matrix polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alenin, Andrey S.; Tyo, J. S.

    2015-09-01

    In prior work,1,2 we introduced methods to treat channeled systems in a way that is similar to Data Reduction Method (DRM), by focusing attention on the Fourier content of the measurement conditions. Introduction of Q enabled us to more readily extract the performance of the system and thereby optimize it to obtain reconstruction with the least noise. The analysis tools developed for that exercise can be expanded to be applicable to partial Mueller Matrix Polarimeters (pMMPs), which were a topic of prior discussion as well. In this treatment, we combine the principles involved in both of those research trajectories and identify a set of channeled pMMP families. As a result, the measurement structure of such systems is completely known and the design of a channeled pMMP intended for any given task becomes a search over a finite set of possibilities, with the additional channel rotation allowing for a more desirable Mueller element mixing.

  17. Electron Density and Two-Channel Neutron Emission Measurements in Steady-State Spherical Inertial-Electrostatically Confined Plasmas, with Review of the One-Dimensional Kinetic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Chris C.; Hrbud, Ivana

    2004-01-01

    Electron density measurements have been made in steady-state plasmas in a spherical inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) discharge using microwave interferometry. Plasma cores interior to two cathodes, having diameters of 15 and 23 cm, respectively, were probed over a transverse range of 10 cm with a spatial resolution of about 1.4 cm for buffer gas pressures from 0.2 to 6 Pa in argon and deuterium. The transverse profiles are generally flat, in some cases with eccentric symmetric minima, and give mean densities of from approx. = 0.4 to 7 x 10(exp 10)/cu cm, the density generally increasing with the neutral gas pressure. Numerical solutions of the one-dimensional Poisson equation for IEC plasmas are reviewed and energy distribution functions are identified which give flat transverse profiles. These functions are used with the plasma approximation to obtain solutions which also give densities consistent with the measurements, and a double potential well solution is obtained which has minima qualitatively similar to those observed. Explicit consideration is given to the compatibility of the solutions interior and exterior to the cathode, and to grid transparency. Deuterium fusion neutron emission rates were also measured and found to be isotropic, to within the measurement error, over two simultaneous directions. Anisotropy was observed in residual emissions during operation with nonfusing hydrogen- 1. The deuterium rates are consistent with predictions from the model.

  18. Measurement of the B(s)(0) lifetime in the flavor-specific decay channel B(s)(0)→D(s)(-)μ(+)νX.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agnew, J P; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Augsten, K; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Borysova, M; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Buszello, C P; Camacho-Pérez, E; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Caughron, S; Chakrabarti, S; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dominguez, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Fauré, A; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garbincius, P H; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-González, J A; Gavrilov, V; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Gogota, O; Golovanov, G; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Holzbauer, J L; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jayasinghe, A; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Katsanos, I; Kaur, M; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kiselevich, I; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Lammers, S; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lei, X; Lellouch, J; Li, D; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mansour, J; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nguyen, H T; Nunnemann, T; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Pleier, M-A; Podstavkov, V M; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Savitskyi, M; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shaw, S; Shchukin, A A; Simak, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verkheev, A Y; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yang, S; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J M; Zennamo, J; Zhao, T G; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2015-02-13

    We present an updated measurement of the B(s)(0) lifetime using the semileptonic decays B(s)(0)→D(s)(-)μ(+)νX, with D(s)(-)→ϕπ(-) and ϕ→K(+)K(-) (and the charge conjugate process). This measurement uses the full Tevatron Run II sample of proton-antiproton collisions at √[s]=1.96  TeV, comprising an integrated luminosity of 10.4  fb(-1). We find a flavor-specific lifetime τ(fs)(B(s)(0))=1.479±0.010(stat)±0.021(syst)  ps. This technique is also used to determine the B(0) lifetime using the analogous B(0)→D(-)μ(+)νX decay with D(-)→ϕπ(-) and ϕ→K(+)K(-), yielding τ(B(0))=1.534±0.019(stat)±0.021(syst)  ps. Both measurements are consistent with the current world averages, and the B(s)(0) lifetime measurement is one of the most precise to date. Taking advantage of the cancellation of systematic uncertainties, we determine the lifetime ratio τ(fs)(B(s)(0))/τ(B(0))=0.964±0.013(stat)±0.007(syst). PMID:25723207

  19. Measurement of the B0s lifetime in the flavor-specific decay channel B0s → D-sμ+νX

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-02-09

    We present an updated measurement of the B0s lifetime using the semileptonic decays B0s → D-sμ+νX, with D–s → π– and Φ → K+K– (and the charge conjugate process). This measurement uses the full Tevatron Run II sample of proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV, comprising an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb–1. We find a flavor-specific lifetime τfs(B0s) = 1.479 ± 0.010(stat) ± 0.021(syst) ps. This technique is also used to determine the B0 lifetime using the analogous B0 → D–μ+νX decay with D– → Φπ– and Φ → K+K–, yielding τ(B0) = 1.534 ± 0.019(stat) ± 0.021(syst) ps.more » Both measurements are consistent with the current world averages, and the B0s lifetime measurement is one of the most precise to date. As a result, taking advantage of the cancellation of systematic uncertainties, we determine the lifetime ratio τfs(B0s)/τ(B0) = 0.964 ± 0.013(stat) ± 0.007(syst).« less

  20. Electron Density and Two-Channel Neutron Emission Measurements in Steady-State Spherical Inertial-Electrostatically Confined Plasmas, with Review of the 1-D Kinetic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Chris C.; Hrbud, Ivana

    2004-01-01

    Electron density measurements have been made in steady-state plasmas in a spherical inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) discharge using microwave interferometry. Plasma cores interior to two cathodes, having diameters of 15 and 23 cm, respectively, were probed over a transverse range of 10 cm with a spatial resolution of about 1.4 cm for buffer gas pressures from 0.2 to 6 Pa in argon and deuterium. The transverse profiles are generally flat, in some cases with eccentric symmetric minima, and give mean densities of from approx. = 0.4 to 7x 10(exp 10)/cu cm, the density generally increasing with the neutral gas pressure. Numerical solutions of the 1-D Poisson equation for EC plasmas are reviewed and energy distribution functions are identified which give flat transverse profiles. These functions are used with the plasma approximation to obtain solutions which also give densities consistent with the measurements, and a double potential well solution is obtained which has minima qualitatively similar to those observed. Explicit consideration is given to the compatibility of the solutions interior and exterior to the cathode, and to grid transparency. Deuterium fusion neutron emission rates were also measured and found to be isotropic, to within the measurement error, over two simultaneous directions. Anisotropy was observed in residual emissions during operation with non-fusing hydrogen-1. The deuterium rates are consistent with predictions from the model.

  1. Correlation Between Channel Profile and Plan View Drainage Network Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelef, E.; Hilley, G. E.

    2011-12-01

    This research explores the relationship between the plan-view network and profile geometry of channels using high-resolution digital topography and numerical models. In particular, we study the relations between plan-view morphometrics of the channel network and the mechanics of land-shaping processes as reflected by channel profile concavity. This analysis addresses one of the long-standing questions in geomorphology relating to the mechanistic significance of various plan-view channel network geometry measures. Statistically based studies suggest that Hortonian measures of channel network architecture (e.g. bifurcation ratio, area ratio, and length ratio) describe virtually all possible network geometries, and hence are not diagnostic when evaluating the origins of the geometry of a particular network. Our analyses of high resolution DEMs that capture different channel profile concavities (i.e debris flow vs. fluvial flows), as well as the topography of landscapes produced by process-based numerical models affirms this conclusion and indicates that Hortonian measures, as well as Hack exponent, are insensitive to channel concavity. In contrast, channel frequency (number of channel segments per area) appears to provide a measure that is sensitive to channel concavity. As such, channel frequency appears to discern between landscapes dominated by different land-shaping processes that produce different channel profile concavities. In the context of headword growing networks, the observed relations between concavity and channel frequency can be modeled through the coupled effect of concavity and surface roughness on the competition between headword growing channels. Our results suggest that the plan-view geometry of channel networks does not simply arise from random deflection of channels that once joined, cannot separate, but rather reflects the underlying processes that incise through rock and transport mass through the channel network

  2. Measurement of the w and z cross sections in the electron channel for p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV and extraction of the w total width from the ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, John Michael; /Kansas U.

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation presents measurements of the inclusive production cross sections for W and Z gauge bosons decaying through the electron channel with p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The ratio of these cross sections is then used to extract the W total width. The Standard Model (SM) of electroweak and strong interactions is a collection of theories which together encompass what is currently known about the elementary particles that make up matter and the forces through which they interact. Experimentalists are constantly searching for violations of the Standard Model by making precision measurements of predicted interactions. The decay of the W boson is one such interaction. The rate of its decay is reflected in its width which is predicted to high precision using Standard Model-based calculations. Therefore, a high precision experimental width measurement would be very sensitive to any such violation. In principle the W and Z boson production cross sections could also be good Standard Model tests. However, a precise knowledge of integrated luminosity is required which is unfortunately difficult to obtain at the Tevatron. In fact, the W and Z cross section results can be used to obtain a more precise luminosity measurement. The data set consists of a total integrated luminosity of 177 pb{sup -1} collected from September 2002 to September 2003 using the D0 detector at Fermilab.

  3. Measurement of toverline{t} production with additional jet activity, including b quark jets, in the dilepton decay channel using pp collisions at √{s} = 8 {TeV}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Yonamine, R.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak