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1

AIR-BLAST PHENOMENA IN THE HIGH-PRESSURE REGION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surface level and aboveground static overpressures, near-surface ; differential pressures, and near-surface total pressures were measured on Burst ; Priscilla. Gages were placed at ground ranges from 450 ft to 4500 ft, with a ; concentration of measurements in the high-pressure region. Blast swttches, which ; measured arrival time only, were placed at several ranges, the closest at 100-ft ;

L. M. Swift; D. C. Sachs; A. R. Kriebel

1960-01-01

2

Developments in blast fragmentation measurement  

SciTech Connect

The digital image analysis program WipFrag has been developed under contract to INCO for use in quality control of underground blasting operations. This paper outlines the relevance of fragmentation to underground mining, the hardware and photography requirements, and key features and operating principles of the software. The science of granulometry offers a wide choice of statistics relating to the size and shape of fragments and the fabric and geometry of the rockpile. From these the authors have chosen to represent size distribution by the mass median diameter and the Rosin-Rammler coefficients. Fragment shape is measured by practical sphericity, a useful index to the slabbiness of the rock, which is often a factor in increased costs for loading, transportation and crushing. Concepts of resolution and accuracy are reviewed as they apply to digital image analysis systems. A method of calibration is described, using sieved crushed rock standards that simulate a range of rockpile uniformity conditions. Alternative zoom-merge procedures that combine images at various scales of magnification are expected to replace the empirical methods. Further research into blast optimization will require quantification of the triangular relationship between rock quality, blast parameters, and fragmentation statistics. Any one of these can be predicted knowing the other two, thus suggesting a new approach to measurement of rock mass quality. Routine fragmentation measurements might therefore give early warning of the need for modifications in stope spans, pit wall angles, and ground reinforcement and stabilization systems. Applications to measurement of rockfalls and rockbursts are also proposed.

Franklin, J.A. [Franklin Geotechnical Ltd., Orangeville, Ontario (Canada); [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Maerz, N.H.; Santamarina, J.C. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada)

1995-12-31

3

Measurements design and phenomena discrimination  

E-print Network

The construction of measurements suitable for discriminating signal components produced by phenomena of different types is considered. The required measurements should be capable of cancelling out those signal components which are to be ignored when focusing on a phenomenon of interest. Under the hypothesis that the subspaces hosting the signal components produced by each phenomenon are complementary, their discrimination is accomplished by measurements giving rise to the appropriate oblique projector operator. The subspace onto which the operator should project is selected by nonlinear techniques in line with adaptive pursuit strategies.

Laura Rebollo-Neira

2009-08-05

4

Measurement of Transmitted Blast Force-Time Histories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A simple, reliable, and cost effective method is presented for the measurement of transmitted force behind a panel subjected to blast loads. Sensors were designed for a specific blast environment and successfully used to measure transmitted blast force behind solid polyethylene plates of thickness 0.125 and 0.25 inches. Experimental data was collected and examined to reveal consistent differences in the response of different thicknesses of otherwise identical panels. Finally, recommendations are made for future design, construction and use of similar sensors.

Langhorst, Benjamin; Cook, Corey; Schondel, James; Chu, Henry S.

2010-06-01

5

Measurement of transmitted blast force-time histories  

SciTech Connect

A simple, reliable, and cost effective method is presented for the measurement of transmitted force behind a panel subjected to blast loads. Sensors were designed for a specific blast environment and successfully used to measure transmitted blast force behind solid polyethylene plates of thickness 0.125 and 0.25 inches. Experimental data was collected and examined to reveal consistent differences in the response of different thicknesses of otherwise identical panels. Finally, recommendations are made for future design, construction and use of similar sensors.

Dr. Benjamin Langhorst; Corey Cook; James Schondel; Dr. Henry S. Chu

2010-03-01

6

AN ATTEMPT TO ISOLATE THE BLAST PHENOMENA WHICH CONTRIBUTE MOST TO THE EARTH-WALL FAILURE OF EXCAVATIONS. Technical Report No. 1717  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 100-ton high-explosive test is described. The objectives were: to ; obtain an insight into the blast phenomena which contribute most to the failure ; of earth walls of excavations and to determine the vulnerability of the two-man ; foxhole to blast considering the soil type existing at the Canadian test site. ; To accomplish these objectives, l1 test excavations

J. E. Stilwell; A. J. Romano

1962-01-01

7

Laboratory-scale techniques for the measurement of a material response to an explosive blast  

E-print Network

Laboratory-scale techniques for the measurement of a material response to an explosive blast M Building, University Park, PA 16802, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 9 June 2008: 81.70.Bt Keywords: Explosive Blast testing Laboratory-scale Plate deformation a b s t r a c

Settles, Gary S.

8

Measurement of Blast Waves from Bursting Pressureized Frangible Spheres  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Small-scale experiments were conducted to obtain data on incident overpressure at various distances from bursting pressurized spheres. Complete time histories of blast overpressure generated by rupturing glass spheres under high internal pressure were obtained using eight side-on pressure transducers. A scaling law is presented, and its nondimensional parameters are used to compare peak overpressures, arrival times, impulses, and durations for different initial conditions and sizes of blast source. The nondimensional data are also compared, whenever possible, with results of theoretical calculations and compiled data for Pentolite high explosive. The scaled data are repeatable and show significant differences from blast waves generated by condensed high-explosives.

Esparza, E. D.; Baker, W. E.

1977-01-01

9

Develop of the Blast Furnace Soft Water Temperature Measurement System  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to ensure normal operation of the blast furnace (BF) closed loop soft water cooling system, cooling water temperature and the heat load must be controlled. It is the most important how the hundreds of large-scale blast furnace soft water temperature points for real-time detection. The DS18B20 digital thermometer was used as a temperature sensor. The DS18B20 communicates over

Zhang Lei; Zhou Fei; Qian Ya-ping

2008-01-01

10

MICRO-METER MEASUREMENT OF CRACKS TO COMPARE BLAST AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS.  

E-print Network

MICRO-METER MEASUREMENT OF CRACKS TO COMPARE BLAST AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS. Charles H Dowding or are considering building systems for manual downloading of data. Systems with manual downloading have been

11

An ultra-fast fiber optic pressure sensor for blast event measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Soldiers who are exposed to explosions are at risk of suffering traumatic brain injury (TBI). Since the causal relationship between a blast and TBI is poorly understood, it is critical to have sensors that can accurately quantify the blast dynamics and resulting wave propagation through a helmet and skull that are imparted onto and inside the brain. To help quantify the cause of TBI, it is important to record transient pressure data during a blast event. However, very few sensors feature the capabilities of tracking the dynamic pressure transients due to the rapid change of the pressure during blast events, while not interfering with the physical material layers or wave propagation. In order to measure the pressure transients efficiently, a pressure sensor should have a high resonant frequency and a high spatial resolution. This paper describes an ultra-fast fiber optic pressure sensor based on the Fabry-Perot principle for the application of measuring the rapid pressure changes in a blast event. A shock tube experiment performed in US Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center has demonstrated that the resonant frequency of the sensor is 4.12 MHz, which is relatively close to the designed theoretical value of 4.113 MHz. Moreover, the experiment illustrated that the sensor has a rise time of 120 ns, which demonstrates that the sensor is capable of observing the dynamics of the pressure transient during a blast event.

Wu, Nan; Zou, Xiaotian; Tian, Ye; Fitek, John; Maffeo, Michael; Niezrecki, Christopher; Chen, Julie; Wang, Xingwei

2012-05-01

12

On-line ultrasonic system for measuring thickness of the copper stave in the blast furnace  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The blast furnace is used make molten iron from sintered ore and the cokes in the steel industry. Recently, the copper stave cooling system placed on inner face of the blast furnace body to protect the steel shell from heat. In the high temperature environment, the wear between the stave and the material makes the cooling stave thinning by the downward movement of the materials in the blast furnace. It was impossible to access the copper stave with the ultrasonic sensor for measuring thickness because the copper stave is covered with the steel shell and there is backing refractory between the stave and the steel shell. The unique ultrasonic sensor which can approach the cooling stave through the cooling line was developed to measure thickness. The thickness can be measured with portable ultrasonic thickness sensor and can be monitored continuously with embedded sensors.

Choi, Sang-Woo; Kim, Dohoon

2012-05-01

13

Measuring the effects of blast-induced vibrations on buildings with fibre Bragg gratings  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the application of a fibre optic system to determine and evaluate the effects of blast-induced vibrations on buildings. For the first time in quarrying, fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) were used to measure wall strains and crack displacements in a residential structure at varying time intervals. The comparison of the results with measurements of common short-term vibration geophones

C. Drebenstedt; S. Paessler

2008-01-01

14

Fiber optic pyrometer and its application in hot-blast stove temperature measurement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Introduced in this paper are a technique of fiber optic dual-wavelength pyrometer and its principle, structure and characteristics. It was successfully applied under the hostile environment in hot-blast stoves to measure high-temperature. The efforts to overcome all difficulties, such as pressure, water vapor, and probe bend caused by thermal expansion, are reported in details. The resulting device is reliable, stable and accurate, and has immunity to harmful gas corrosion. The proposed pyrometer has a long lifetime. Therefore, it can replace the conventional thermo-electric-couple for temperature measurement in a blast furnace.

Li, Weilai; Jiang, Desheng; Zhu, Weijia

2004-03-01

15

Development of a multimodal blast sensor for measurement of head impact and over-pressurization exposure.  

PubMed

It is estimated that 10-20% of United States soldiers returning from Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) have suffered at least one instance of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) with many reporting persistent symptomology and long-term effects. This variation in blast response may be related to the complexity of blast waves and the many mechanisms of injury, including over-pressurization due to the shock wave and potential for blunt impacts to the head from shrapnel or from other indirect impacts (e.g., building, ground, and vehicle). To help differentiate the effects of primary, secondary, and tertiary effects of blast, a custom sensor was developed to simultaneously measure over-pressurization and blunt impact. Moreover, a custom, complementary filter was designed to differentiate the measurements of blunt (low-frequency bandwidth) from over-pressurization (high-frequency bandwidth). The custom sensor was evaluated in the laboratory using a shock tube to simulate shock waves and a drop fixture to simulate head impacts. Both bare sensors and sensor embedded within an ACH helmet coupon were compared to laboratory reference transducers under multiple loading conditions (n = 5) and trials at each condition (n = 3). For all comparative measures, peak magnitude, peak impulse, and cross-correlation measures, R (2) values, were greater than 0.900 indicating excellent agreement of peak measurements and time-series comparisons with laboratory measures. PMID:21994064

Chu, Jeffrey J; Beckwith, Jonathan G; Leonard, Daniel S; Paye, Corey M; Greenwald, Richard M

2012-01-01

16

Thermal mass: A comparison of measurements and blast predictions for six test cells in two climates  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report contains the results of the comparison of BLAST (Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics) predictions and measured data from three experimental test cells at each of two field sites operated by the New Mexico Research and Development Institute and the US National Bureau of Standards, respectively. For each cell, comparisons were made for three simulation time periods representing

W. L. Carroll; A. Mertol; R. Sullivan

1987-01-01

17

Measuring the velocities of particles in a shot-blasting chamber  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a method for measuring the velocity of a flow of particles accelerated on a shot-blasting wheel and then expanding into space at a wide angle of approximately 45°. The method uses the pulsed nature of the flow characteristic for turbo machinery with a finite number of wheel blades and calculates the velocity from the time shift between

G. Bombek; A. Hribernik

2010-01-01

18

Simultaneous Measurements of Temperature and Iron-Slag Ratio at Taphole of Blast Furnace  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As the initial process in an integrated steel-making plant, molten iron is produced in a blast furnace. The molten iron has a temperature between 1700 K and 1900 K. The outflow stream discharged from a taphole comprises the molten iron and slag (which is a mixture of molten oxides). Monitoring of the stream temperature is important because it has information on the thermal condition inside the blast furnace. A newly developed simultaneous measurement technique for temperature and iron-slag ratio is reported. A monochromatic CCD camera with a short exposure time is used to obtain a thermal image of the rapidly moving stream. The thermal image has a marble-like pattern caused by the physical separation of the iron and slag and their different optical properties. Iron thermometry is realized by automatically detecting the peak of the iron gray-level distribution on a histogram. Meanwhile, the thermal radiance of the semitransparent slag varies as a function of the thickness. The slag temperature is calculated from the maximum gray level, presuming that the emissivity of the slag is constant at a thick slag part. The slag ratio is measured by counting the number of pixels on the histogram. A field test was carried out at an operating blast furnace. The iron temperature, slag temperature, and slag ratio were successfully measured. This multiple image measurement is expected to be the new information source for stable blast furnace operation.

Sugiura, M.; Shinotake, A.; Nakashima, M.; Omoto, N.

2014-07-01

19

NASA CONNECT: Data Analysis and Measurement - Having a Solar Blast  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this program, students learn how NASA researchers study the Sun-Earth connection. Students learn about satellites that monitor the Sun: (Solar & Heliospheric Observatory) SOHO, Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), and Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) and (Highg Energy Solar Spectrostopic Imager) HESSI. They observe NASA researchers using data analysis and measurement to determine the solar cycle of the Sun. By conducting hands-on and web activities, students make connections between NASA research and the mathematics, science, and technology they learn in their classrooms. The program consists of two parts: a 30-minute video and an on-line educators guide.

2002-01-01

20

Correlating Multi-Phenomenology Measurements with Blast Design in a Copper Mine Chris Hayward and Brian Stump, Department of Geological Sciences, Southern Methodist University  

E-print Network

1 Correlating Multi-Phenomenology Measurements with Blast Design in a Copper Mine Chris Hayward Dodge Morenci, Inc. Blasting operations at one copper mine are studied in detail to examine the relation between blast design parameters and near-shot, in-mine, and regional seismic and acoustic observations

Stump, Brian W.

21

Evaluation of the performance of the blast analysis and measurement system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the years since the introduction of the C-weighted day-night average sound level (DNL) to assess the noise of military explosives, Army practice has evolved to incorporate linear peak sound-pressure level into the evaluation of military training noise. Although the DNL remains as the method of choice for National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation and for land-use planning, peak level is used by firing range operators for day-to-day complaint management. Several different monitoring system designs are being used at Army installations to provide range operators with real-time feedback on blast noise levels in nearby residential areas. One of these, the Blast Analysis and Measurement (BLAM) system, is a modified version of a sonic boom monitor designed by the U.S. Air Force. Data collected from two BLAM units located near a 120-mm tank gunnery range were evaluated in terms of hit rate and false-alarm rate over a range of 94 to 140 decibels linear peak. Hit- and false-alarm rates are compared with hit- and false-alarm rates reported for other blast noise monitoring system designs.

Luz, George A.

2001-05-01

22

An alternative method for the measurement of the mechanical impulse of a vertically directed blast.  

PubMed

An alternative method for the measurement of the total mechanical impulse of a vertically directed blast due to an explosive charge is presented. The method differs from apparatus that employ a vertically displaced mass (similar in principle to the ballistic pendulum) in that a relatively compact spring-damper system is employed to constrain the movement of the mass. The mechanical impulse is determined by integrating, with respect to time, the net force applied to the spring-damper system. The details of an explosive impulse measuring instrument rated to 12 kN s are presented. PMID:18681729

Turner, Geoffrey R

2008-07-01

23

BLAST: A FAR-INFRARED MEASUREMENT OF THE HISTORY OF STAR FORMATION  

SciTech Connect

We directly measure redshift evolution in the mean physical properties (far-infrared luminosity, temperature, and mass) of the galaxies that produce the cosmic infrared background (CIB), using measurements from the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST), and Spitzer which constrain the CIB emission peak. This sample is known to produce a surface brightness in the BLAST bands consistent with the full CIB, and photometric redshifts are identified for all of the objects. We find that most of the 70 mum background is generated at z approx< 1 and the 500 mum background generated at z approx> 1. A significant growth is observed in the mean luminosity from approx10{sup 9}-10{sup 12} L{sub sun}, and in the mean temperature by 10 K, from redshifts 0 < z < 3. However, there is only weak positive evolution in the comoving dust mass in these galaxies across the same redshift range. We also measure the evolution of the far-infrared luminosity density, and the star formation rate history for these objects, finding good agreement with other infrared studies up to z approx 1, exceeding the contribution attributed to optically selected galaxies.

Pascale, Enzo; Ade, Peter A. R.; Dye, Simon; Eales, Steve A.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, 5 The Parade, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Bock, James J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States); Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Ngo, Henry [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeff [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19104 (United States); Gundersen, Joshua O. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Hughes, David H. [Instituto Nacional de AstrofIsica Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Aptdo. Postal 51 y 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Netterfield, Calvin B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Olmi, Luca [University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Physics Department, Box 23343, UPR station, PR 00931 (United States); Patanchon, Guillaume, E-mail: enzo.pascale@astro.cf.ac.u [Universite Paris Diderot, Laboratoire APC, 10, rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet 75205 Paris (France)

2009-12-20

24

Measurement of effective blast energy for direct initiation of spherical gaseous detonations from high-voltage spark discharge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, effective energy from spark discharge for direct blast initiation of spherical gaseous detonations is investigated. In the experiment, direct initiation of detonation is achieved via a spark discharge from a high-voltage and low-inductance capacitor bank and the spark energy is estimated from the analysis of the current output. To determine the blast wave energy from the powerful spark, the time-of-arrival of the blast wave in air is measured at different radii using a piezoelectric pressure transducer. Good agreement is found in the scaled blast trajectories, i.e., scaled time c o· t/ R o where c o is the ambient sound speed, as a function of blast radius R s/ R o between the numerical simulation of a spherical blast wave from a point energy source and the experimental results where the explosion length scale R o is computed using the equivalent spark energy from the first 1/4 current discharge cycle. Alternatively, by fitting the experimental trajectories data, the blast energy estimated from the numerical simulation appears also in good agreement with that obtained experimentally using the 1/4 cycle criterion. Using the 1/4 cycle of spark discharge for the effective energy, direct initiation experiments of spherical gaseous detonations are carried out to determine the critical initiation energy in C2H2-2.5O2 mixtures with 70 and 0% argon dilution. The experimental results obtained from the 1/4 cycle of spark discharge agree well with the prediction from two initiation models, namely, the Lee's surface energy model and a simplified work done model. The main source of discrepancy in the comparison can be explained by the uncertainty of cell size measurement which is needed for both the semi-empirical models.

Zhang, B.; Ng, H. D.; Lee, J. H. S.

2012-01-01

25

Air blast measurements at 20 and 40 km distance from detonating 10 and 20 ton high explosive charges  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Air blast overpressure measurements have been made at 20 and 40 km distance from the detonation of 10 and 20 ton high explosive charges at Alvdalen Shooting Range in Sweden. Temperatures and wind velocities were also measured. Simple rules were set up and methods elaborated to avoid complaints, and damage to buildings outside the Alvdalen Shooting Range.

Eriksson, T.; Selin, B.; Aseborn, I.

1993-02-01

26

Comparison of building loads analysis and system thermodynamics (BLAST) computer program simulations and measured energy use for Army buildings. Interim report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes an analysis of actual measured energy consumption vs energy consumption simulated by the Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics (BLAST) computer program. A dental clinic and a battalion headquarters and classroom building were modeled; comparisons of the BLAST output using onsite weather and measured energy consumption data are made for the two buildings. The report includes tables

D. Herron; L. M. Windingland; D. C. Hittle

1980-01-01

27

Ionospheric Signature of Surface Mine Blasts from Global Positioning System Measurements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sources such as atmospheric or buried explosions and shallow earthquakes are known to produce infrasonic pressure waves in the atmosphere. Because of the coupling between neutral particles and electrons at ionospheric altitudes, these acoustic and gravity waves induce variations of the ionospheric electron density. The Global Positioning System (GPS) provides a way of directly measuring the total electron content in the ionosphere and, therefore, of detecting such perturbations in the upper atmosphere. In July and August 1996, three large surface mine blasts (1.5 Kt each) were detonated at the Black Thunder coal mine in eastern Wyoming. As part of a seismic and acoustic monitoring- experiment, we deployed five dual-frequency GPS receivers at distances ranging from 50 to 200 km from the mine and were able to detect the ionospheric perturbation caused by the blasts. The perturbation starts 10 to 15 min after the blast, lasts for about 30 min, and propagates with an apparent horizontal velocity of 1200 meters per second. Its amplitude reaches 3 x 10 (exp 14) el per square meters in the 7-3 min period band, a value close to the ionospheric perturbation caused by the M = 6.7 Northridge earthquake. The small signal-to-noise ratio of the perturbation can be improved by slant-stacking the electron content time-series recorded by the different GPS receivers taking into account the horizontal propagation of the perturbation. The energy of the perturbation is concentrated in the 200 to 300 second period band, a result consistent with previous observations and numerical model predictions. The 300 second band probably corresponds to gravity modes and shorter periods to acoustic modes, respectively. Using a 1-D stratified velocity model of the atmosphere we show that linear acoustic ray tracing fits arrival times at all GPS receivers. We interpret the perturbation as a direct acoustic wave caused by the explosion itself. This study shows that even relatively small subsurface events can produce ionospheric perturbations that are above the detection threshold of the GPS technique. By sensing derivative signals, which can be detected over a relatively broad region, it appears that GPS might be particularly useful for source characterization within the first acoustic quiet zone where infrasound would probably be ineffective. This suggests that dual-frequency GPS monitoring could contribute to Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty verification.

Calais, Eric; Minster, J. Bernard; Hofton, Michelle A.; Hedlin, Michael A. H.

1998-01-01

28

RESEARCH PAPERS : Ionospheric signature of surface mine blasts from Global Positioning System measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sources such as atmospheric or buried explosions and shallow earthquakes are known to produce infrasonic pressure waves in the atmosphere Because of the coupling between neutral particles and electrons at ionospheric altitudes, these acoustic and gravity waves induce variations of the ionospheric electron density. The Global Positioning System (GPS) provides a way of directly measuring the total electron content in the ionosphere and, therefore, of detecting such perturbations in the upper atmosphere. In July and August 1996, three large surface mine blasts (1.5 Kt each) were detonated at the Black Thunder coal mine in eastern Wyoming. As part of a seismic and acoustic monitoring experiment, we deployed five dual-frequency GPS receivers at distances ranging from 50 to 200 km from the mine and were able to detect the ionospheric perturbation caused by the blasts. The perturbation starts 10 to 15 min after the blast, lasts for about 30 min, and propagates with an apparent horizontal velocity of 1200 m s- 1. Its amplitude reaches 3 × 1014 el m- 2 in the 7-3 min period band, a value close to the ionospheric perturbation caused by the M=6.7 Northridge earthquake (Calais & Minster 1995). The small signal-to-noise ratio of the perturbation can be improved by slant-stacking the electron content time-series recorded by the different GPS receivers taking into account the horizontal propagation of the perturbation. The energy of the perturbation is concentrated in the 200 to 300 s period band, a result consistent with previous observations and numerical model predictions. The 300 s band probably corresponds to gravity modes and shorter periods to acoustic modes, respectively. Using a 1-D stratified velocity model of the atmosphere we show that linear acoustic ray tracing fits arrival times at all GPS receivers. We interpret the perturbation as a direct acoustic wave caused by the explosion itself. This study shows that even relatively small subsurface events can produce ionospheric perturbations that are above the detection threshold of the GPS technique. By sensing derivative signals, which can be detected over a relatively broad region, it appears that GPS might be particularly useful for source characterization within the first acoustic quiet zone where infrasound would probably be ineffective. This suggests that dual-frequency GPS monitoring could contribute to Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty verification.

Calais, Eric; Bernard Minster, J.; Hofton, Michelle; Hedlin, Michael

1998-01-01

29

Correlating Multi-Phenomenology Measurements with Blast Design in a Copper Mine Sponsored by Defense Threat Reduction Agency  

E-print Network

Correlating Multi-Phenomenology Measurements with Blast Design in a Copper Mine Sponsored by Defense Threat Reduction Agency Contract DSWA01-98-C-0176 The Mine The cooperating mine was the Morenci Mine operated by Phelps-Dodge in SE Arizona. The scale of the operation is illustrated below. The mine

Stump, Brian W.

30

Measurement of the fragmentation efficiency of rock mass blasting and its mining applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new approach in evaluating the fragmentation efficiency of rock mass blasting is presented. It differs from most of the methods as it is predicated on a pre-existing in situ block size distribution in the rock mass as defined by the natural discontinuity network. Blasting therefore accomplishes the supplementary fragmentation of the already fragmented rock mass, the efficiency of which

J. Aler; J. Du Mouza; M. Arnould

1996-01-01

31

Testing of an inertial-reference system concept to measure blast-induced displacements of vehicles. Final contract report, 23 March23 July 1987  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work is the first phase of a project to develop an inertial-reference system to measure the displacement of military vehicles exposed to a blast wave in large shock tubes or high-explosive simulations of nuclear weapons. Experimental data describing the movement of military vehicles by blast is required for survivability assessments of such vehicles and for validation of computer models

N. H. Ethridge; L. A. Dixon; W. F. Jackson

1987-01-01

32

Measuring the velocities of particles in a shot-blasting chamber  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a method for measuring the velocity of a flow of particles accelerated on a shot-blasting wheel and then expanding into space at a wide angle of approximately 45°. The method uses the pulsed nature of the flow characteristic for turbo machinery with a finite number of wheel blades and calculates the velocity from the time shift between the particles hitting two targets at a known distance. This method does not depend on the material properties of the particles; however, a large number of particles is required for a successful measurement. The impacts are detected with a microphone covered by a steel membrane, making the exposed parts cheap and easily replaceable. This makes the method suitable for industrial test-and-development purposes, including the efficiencies of acceleration measurements. A cross-correlation of the signals was used, but the characteristic cycle (one rotation of the wheel) had to be determined beforehand by overlapping and averaging several cycles in order to compensate for the fact that different particles would be hitting the targets.

Bombek, G.; Hribernik, A.

2010-08-01

33

Significance of the contacting and no contacting thermoelectric power measurements applied to grit blasted medical Ti6Al4V.  

PubMed

Grit blasting is a surface plastic deformation technique aimed to increase the surface area available for bone/implant apposition, which contributes to improve fixation and mechanical stability of Ti-6Al-4V implants. Besides roughening, grit blasting also causes surface contamination with embedded grit particles and subtle subsurface microstructural changes that, although does not challenge their biocompatibility, might influence other surface dominated properties like corrosion and ion release. Additional benefits are expected due to the induced compressive residual stresses, hence enhancing fatigue strength. The net effect depends on the type of particles used for blasting, but also on the amount of the subsurface cold work associated to the severe surface plastic deformation. In this work we study the potential of the non-contacting and contacting thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements in the analysis of the global changes induced in the Ti6Al4V when blasting the alloy with Al2O3 or ZrO2 particles, which yields a coarse and a fine rough surface, respectively. To reveal the effect of residual stresses, a set of specimens were thermally treated. The study proves that the non-contacting technique is more sensitive to the presence of residual stresses, whereas the contact technique is strongly influenced by the grain size refinements, work hardening and changes in solute. PMID:23827590

Carreon, H; Barriuso, S; Lieblich, M; González-Carrasco, J L; Jimenez, J A; Caballero, F G

2013-04-01

34

STUDY ON MEASUREMENT OF BLAST-INDUCED SEISM AND BUILDING SAFETY CRITERIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rationality of using particle vibration velocity to describe blast-induced seismic effect is testified by using the stress-strain relation of rock and soil,and characteristics of wave propagation. A lot of seismic wave diagrams and frequency spectrograms are obtained from a lot of blast-induced seism. The propagation law and parameters of seismic wave in different places are studied. The regulations of

Yan Zhixin; Wang Yonghe; Jiang Ping; Wang Houyu

35

Blast investigation by fast multispectral radiometric analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Knowledge regarding the processes involved in blasts and detonations is required in various applications, e.g. missile interception, blasts of high-explosive materials, final ballistics and IED identification. Blasts release large amount of energy in short time duration. Some part of this energy is released as intense radiation in the optical spectral bands. This paper proposes to measure the blast radiation by

A. D. Devir; Y. Bushlin; I. Mendelewicz; A. B. Lessin; M. Engel

2011-01-01

36

An Undergraduate Experiment for the Measurement of the Speed of Sound in Air: Phenomena and Discussion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, we present and discuss some phenomena in an undergraduate experiment for the measurement of the speed of sound in air. A square wave distorts when connected to a piezoelectric transducer. Moreover, the amplitude of the receiving signal varies with the driving frequency. Comparing with the Gibbs phenomenon, these phenomena can be…

Yang, Hujiang; Zhao, Xiaohong; Wang, Xin; Xiao, Jinghua

2012-01-01

37

Report of National Institute for Resources and Environment. No. 8: Research on blasting sound related to it's measurement, propagation prediction, control and evaluation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Measuring methods, propagation prediction, evaluation and control method of blasting sound are investigated from both theoretical and experimental aspects. Special features of blasting sound are compared with the properties of audible noise and low frequency sound. Problems on the measuring method and the frequency analysis of blasting sound are discussed. Relation between the properties of conventional sound level meter and its output signals are also investigated in relation to the measurement of blasting sound. Limitation on the time resolution and frequency resolution of digital filter and Fourier transform technique is also indicated. Analyzed results by wavelet transform show better time and frequency resolution and better understanding than Wigner-Ville analysis from the comparison of those results. Two methods to predict the time-sound pressures at a receiver are investigated. A control method of blasting sound is discussed theoretically. Possibilities of control of the sound pressure level and the frequency component at a receiver are discussed. Discussion on the evaluation of blasting sound is conducted from two aspects of human perception and response of building fittings. In case of blasting noise, quite high correlation is found between the sound exposure level (SLOW) and the pressure level measured by the 'SLOW' time weighting.

Isei, Takehiro; Kunimatsu, Sunao; Imaizumi, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Makoto; Kinoshita, Michiaki; Ogata, Yuji; Shiota, Masazumi; Uchida, Hidenobu; Obara, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Yoshio

1993-06-01

38

Localization of small arms fire using acoustic measurements of muzzle blast and/or ballistic shock wave arrivals.  

PubMed

The accurate localization of small arms fire using fixed acoustic sensors is considered. First, the conventional wavefront-curvature passive ranging method, which requires only differential time-of-arrival (DTOA) measurements of the muzzle blast wave to estimate the source position, is modified to account for sensor positions that are not strictly collinear (bowed array). Second, an existing single-sensor-node ballistic model-based localization method, which requires both DTOA and differential angle-of-arrival (DAOA) measurements of the muzzle blast wave and ballistic shock wave, is improved by replacing the basic external ballistics model (which describes the bullet's deceleration along its trajectory) with a more rigorous model and replacing the look-up table ranging procedure with a nonlinear (or polynomial) equation-based ranging procedure. Third, a new multiple-sensor-node ballistic model-based localization method, which requires only DTOA measurements of the ballistic shock wave to localize the point of fire, is formulated. The first method is applicable to situations when only the muzzle blast wave is received, whereas the third method applies when only the ballistic shock wave is received. The effectiveness of each of these methods is verified using an extensive set of real data recorded during a 7 day field experiment. PMID:23145587

Lo, Kam W; Ferguson, Brian G

2012-11-01

39

Radiometric macrostress depth distribution measurement in shot-blasting pipeline processing  

Microsoft Academic Search

An x-ray method is described for monitoring macroscopic stresses in the shot blasting of defective parts of pipelines. The\\u000a physical essence of the process is based on theoretical and experimental formulas relating the recorded x-ray fluorescence\\u000a flux to the parameters used in calculating the macroscopic stresses.

V. I. Bochenin

2007-01-01

40

Computer assisted blast design and assessment tools  

SciTech Connect

In general the software required by a blast designer includes tools that graphically present blast designs (surface and underground), can analyze a design or predict its result, and can assess blasting results. As computers develop and computer literacy continues to rise the development of and use of such tools will spread. An example of the tools that are becoming available includes: Automatic blast pattern generation and underground ring design; blast design evaluation in terms of explosive distribution and detonation simulation; fragmentation prediction; blast vibration prediction and minimization; blast monitoring for assessment of dynamic performance; vibration measurement, display and signal processing; evaluation of blast results in terms of fragmentation; and risk and reliability based blast assessment. The authors have identified a set of criteria that are essential in choosing appropriate software blasting tools.

Cameron, A.R. [Golder Associates Ltd., Sudbury, Ontario (Canada); Kleine, T.H. [Golder Associates Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Forsyth, W.W. [Golder Associates Ltd., Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

1995-12-31

41

Mold Slag Property Measurements to Characterize CC Mold Shell Gap Phenomena , B.G. Thomas1  

E-print Network

Mold Slag Property Measurements to Characterize CC Mold ­ Shell Gap Phenomena Y. Meng1 , B, Edmonton, Canada Keywords: Mold flux, Mold slag, Measurements, Friction coefficient, Viscosity, CCT, Modeling Abstract Multi-faceted experiments were conducted to measure the properties of several mold slags

Thomas, Brian G.

42

Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic-weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 4. 2. Measurement of surface-air movements associated with atomic blasts  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to record continuous measurements of the surface winds in the vicinity of an atomic blast immediately prior to the blast, during passage of the shock wave, and immediately after the blast with special regard to the blast-induced afterwind following local dissipation of the shock wave. From the data obtained, it was concluded that following an atomic explosion there are two specific causes of air-mass movement. One is related to the shock phenomenon and the other to the rising fireball. It can also be concluded that the heated-thermopile-type and strain-gage-type anemometers could be developed to yield more complete data on the air-mass movement at ground level following an atomic explosion.

Rados, R.M.; Bogert, J.C.; Haig, T.O.

1985-09-01

43

Pressure-Sensitive Paint Measurements of Transient Shock Phenomena  

PubMed Central

Measurements of the global pressure field created by shock wave diffraction have been captured optically using a porous pressure-sensitive paint. The pressure field created by a diffracting shock wave shows large increases and decreases in pressure and can be reasonably accurately captured using CFD. The substrate, a thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plate, has been dipped in a luminophore solution. TLC plates are readily available and easy to prepare. Illumination comes from two high-intensity broadband Xenon arc light sources with short-pass filters. The sample is imaged at 100 kHz using a Vision Research Phantom V710 in conjunction with a pair of long and short pass filters, creating a band. The PSP results are compared with numerical simulations of the flow using the commercial CFD package Fluent as part of ANSYS 13 for two Mach numbers. PMID:23549365

Quinn, Mark Kenneth; Kontis, Konstantinos

2013-01-01

44

Pressure-sensitive paint measurements of transient shock phenomena.  

PubMed

Measurements of the global pressure field created by shock wave diffraction have been captured optically using a porous pressure-sensitive paint. The pressure field created by a diffracting shock wave shows large increases and decreases in pressure and can be reasonably accurately captured using CFD. The substrate, a thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plate, has been dipped in a luminophore solution. TLC plates are readily available and easy to prepare. Illumination comes from two high-intensity broadband Xenon arc light sources with short-pass filters. The sample is imaged at 100 kHz using a Vision Research Phantom V710 in conjunction with a pair of long and short pass filters, creating a band. The PSP results are compared with numerical simulations of the flow using the commercial CFD package Fluent as part of ANSYS 13 for two Mach numbers. PMID:23549365

Quinn, Mark Kenneth; Kontis, Konstantinos

2013-01-01

45

The Evolution of Structural Order as a Measure of Thermal History of Coke in the Blast Furnace  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Investigations were carried out on cokes heat treated in the laboratory and on cokes extracted from the experimental blast furnace (EBF) raceway and hearth. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements were performed to investigate changes in structural order ( L c), chemical transformations in coke ash along with comparative thermodynamic equilibrium studies and the influence of melt. Three data processing approaches were used to compute L c values as a function of temperature and time and linear correlations were established between L c and heat treatment temperatures during laboratory investigations. These were used to estimate temperatures experienced by coke in various regions of EBF and estimated raceway temperatures were seen to follow the profile of combustion peak. The MgAl2O4 spinel was observed in coke submerged in slag during laboratory studies and in cokes found further into the raceway. Coke in contact with hot metal showed XRD peaks corresponding to presence of Fe3Si. The intensity of SiO2 peak in coke ash was seen to decrease with increasing temperature and disappeared at around 1770 K (1500 °C) due to the formation of SiC. This study has shown that the evolution of structural order and chemical transformations in coke could be used to estimate its thermal history in blast furnaces.

Lundgren, Maria; Khanna, Rita; Ökvist, Lena Sundqvist; Sahajwalla, Veena; Björkman, Bo

2014-04-01

46

Law Vendor Coupon Co2 Blasting Tests  

SciTech Connect

The objectives identified in the test specification for the vendor CO2 blasting tests are to determine the ability of CO2 blasting to remove a measurable amount of surface material from Type 304L stainless steel and to identify the approximate blasting parameters for future testing on radioactively contaminated coupons.

May, C.G.

2003-07-25

47

Blast injury.  

PubMed

The shock wave generated by an explosion ("blast wave") may cause injury in any or all of the following: (1) direct impact on the tissues of variations in environmental pressure; (2) flying glass and other debris set in motion by it; (3) propulsion of the body. Injuries in the first category affect gas-containing organs (ears, lungs and intestines), and acute death is attributed to air forced into the coronary vessels via damaged pulmonary alveoli. It is estimated that overpressure sufficient to cause lung injury may occur up to five miles from a 20-megaton nuclear explosion. The greatest single hazard from blast is, however, flying glass, and serious wounding from this cause is possible up to 12 miles from an explosion of this magnitude. PMID:6015742

de Candole, C A

1967-01-28

48

Blast Injury  

PubMed Central

The shock wave generated by an explosion (“blast wave”) may cause injury in any or all of the following: (1) direct impact on the tissues of variations in environmental pressure; (2) flying glass and other debris set in motion by it; (3) propulsion of the body. Injuries in the first category affect gas-containing organs (ears, lungs and intestines), and acute death is attributed to air forced into the coronary vessels via damaged pulmonary alveoli. It is estimated that overpressure sufficient to cause lung injury may occur up to five miles from a 20-megaton nuclear explosion. The greatest single hazard from blast is, however, flying glass, and serious wounding from this cause is possible up to 12 miles from an explosion of this magnitude. PMID:6015742

de Candole, C. A.

1967-01-01

49

Design Considerations for Remote High-Speed Pressure Measurements of Dynamic Combustion Phenomena  

SciTech Connect

As gas turbine combustion systems evolve to achieve ultra-low emission targets, monitoring and controlling dynamic combustion processes becomes increasingly important. These dynamic processes may include flame extinction, combustion-driven instabilities, or other dynamic combustion phenomena. Pressure sensors can be incorporated into the combustor liner design, but this approach is complicated by the harsh operating environment. One practical solution involves locating the sensor in a more remote location, such as outside the pressure casing. The sensor can be connected to the measurement point by small diameter tubing. Although this is a practical approach, the dynamics of the tubing can introduce significant errors into the pressure measurement. This paper addresses measurement errors associated with semi-infinite coil remote sensing setups and proposes an approach to improve the accuracy of these types of measurements.

Straub, D.L.; Ferguson, D.H.; Rohrssen, Robert (West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV); Perez, Eduardo (West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV)

2007-01-01

50

RESEARCH PAPERS : Ionospheric signature of surface mine blasts from Global Positioning System measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sources such as atmospheric or buried explosions and shallow earthquakes are known to produce infrasonic pressure waves in the atmosphere Because of the coupling between neutral particles and electrons at ionospheric altitudes, these acoustic and gravity waves induce variations of the ionospheric electron density. The Global Positioning System (GPS) provides a way of directly measuring the total electron content in

Eric Calais; J. Bernard Minster; Michelle Hofton; Michael Hedlin

1998-01-01

51

Determination of constant-volume balloon capabilities for aeronautical research. [specifically measurement of atmospheric phenomena  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The proper application of constant-volume balloons (CVB) for measurement of atmospheric phenomena was determined. And with the proper interpretation of the resulting data. A literature survey covering 176 references is included. the governing equations describing the three-dimensional motion of a CVB immersed in a flow field are developed. The flowfield model is periodic, three-dimensional, and nonhomogeneous, with mean translational motion. The balloon motion and flow field equations are cast into dimensionless form for greater generality, and certain significant dimensionless groups are identified. An alternate treatment of the balloon motion, based on first-order perturbation analysis, is also presented. A description of the digital computer program, BALLOON, used for numerically integrating the governing equations is provided.

Tatom, F. B.; King, R. L.

1977-01-01

52

PROTECTIVE DESIGNS FOR BLAST AND IMPACT THREATS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes methods for designing and implementing protective technologies for improving the blast and impact resistance of buildings. A protection plan for buildings may include designing blast-resistant columns, walls, and windows; other elements of security may also play a major part, including physical security measures such as: anti-ram barriers and fencing to demarcate a protective perimeter; features such as

J. E. Crawford

53

Structural blast design  

E-print Network

Blast design is a necessary part of design for more buildings in the United States. Blast design is no longer limited to underground shelters and sensitive military sites, buildings used by the general public daily must ...

Kieval, Tamar S. (Tamar Shoshana), 1980-

2004-01-01

54

An Integrated Model of Coal/Coke Combustion in a Blast Furnace  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A three-dimensional integrated mathematical model of the combustion of pulverized coal and coke is developed. The model is applied to the region of lance-blowpipe-tuyere-raceway-coke bed to simulate the operation of pulverized coal injection in an ironmaking blast furnace. The model integrates two parts: pulverized coal combustion model in the blowpipe-tuyere-raceway-coke bed and the coke combustion model in the coke bed. The model is validated against the measurements in terms of coal burnout and gas composition, respectively. The comprehensive in-furnace phenomena are simulated in the raceway and coke bed, in terms of flow, temperature, gas composition, and coal burning characteristics. In addition, underlying mechanisms for the in-furnace phenomena are analyzed. The model provides a cost-effective tool for understanding and optimizing the in-furnace flow-thermo-chemical characteristics of the PCI process in full-scale blast furnaces.

Shen, Y. S.; Guo, B. Y.; Yu, A. B.; Austin, P.; Zulli, P.

2010-03-01

55

A geophysical shock and air blast simulator at the National Ignition Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The energy partitioning energy coupling experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been designed to measure simultaneously the coupling of energy from a laser-driven target into both ground shock and air blast overpressure to nearby media. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from the NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of full-scale seismic and air blast phenomena. This report summarizes the development of the platform, the simulations, and calculations that underpin the physics measurements that are being made, and finally the data that were measured. Agreement between the data and simulation of the order of a factor of two to three is seen for air blast quantities such as peak overpressure. Historical underground test data for seismic phenomena measured sensor displacements; we measure the stresses generated in our ground-surrogate medium. We find factors-of-a-few agreement between our measured peak stresses and predictions with modern geophysical computer codes.

Fournier, K. B.; Brown, C. G.; May, M. J.; Compton, S.; Walton, O. R.; Shingleton, N.; Kane, J. O.; Holtmeier, G.; Loey, H.; Mirkarimi, P. B.; Dunlop, W. H.; Guyton, R. L.; Huffman, E.

2014-09-01

56

Flight test measurements and analysis of sonic boom phenomena near the shock wave extremity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The sonic boom flight test program conducted at Jackass Flats, Nevada, during the summer and fall of 1970 consisted of 121 sonic-boom-generating flights over the 1500 ft instrumented BREN tower. This test program was designed to provide information on several aspects of sonic boom, including caustics produced by longitudinal accelerations, caustics produced by steady flight near the threshold Mach number, sonic boom characteristics near lateral cutoff, and the vertical extent of shock waves attached to near-sonic airplanes. The measured test data, except for the near-sonic flight data, were analyzed in detail to determine sonic boom characteristics for these flight conditions and to determine the accuracy and the range of validity of linear sonic boom theory. The caustic phenomena observed during the threshold Mach number flights and during the transonic acceleration flights are documented and analyzed in detail. The theory of geometric acoustics is shown to be capable of predicting shock wave-ground intersections, and current methods for calculating sonic boom pressure signature away from caustics are shown to be reasonably accurate.

Haglund, G. T.; Kane, E. J.

1973-01-01

57

Blast investigation by fast multispectral radiometric analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Knowledge regarding the processes involved in blasts and detonations is required in various applications, e.g. missile interception, blasts of high-explosive materials, final ballistics and IED identification. Blasts release large amount of energy in short time duration. Some part of this energy is released as intense radiation in the optical spectral bands. This paper proposes to measure the blast radiation by a fast multispectral radiometer. The measurement is made, simultaneously, in appropriately chosen spectral bands. These spectral bands provide extensive information on the physical and chemical processes that govern the blast through the time-dependence of the molecular and aerosol contributions to the detonation products. Multi-spectral blast measurements are performed in the visible, SWIR and MWIR spectral bands. Analysis of the cross-correlation between the measured multi-spectral signals gives the time dependence of the temperature, aerosol and gas composition of the blast. Farther analysis of the development of these quantities in time may indicate on the order of the detonation and amount and type of explosive materials. Examples of analysis of measured explosions are presented to demonstrate the power of the suggested fast multispectral radiometric analysis approach.

Devir, A. D.; Bushlin, Y.; Mendelewicz, I.; Lessin, A. B.; Engel, M.

2011-06-01

58

Maerz, N. H., and Zhou, W., 1998. Optical digital fragmentation measuring systems -inherent sources of error. FRAGBLAST, The International Journal for Blasting and Fragmentation, Vol. 2, No. 4, pp. 415-  

E-print Network

sources of error. FRAGBLAST, The International Journal for Blasting and Fragmentation, Vol. 2, No. 4, pp a brief history of the evolution of measuring systems. Whereas the standard of measurement is currently are numerous: 1. The measurements can be completely automated, eliminating the expense of a human operator

Maerz, Norbert H.

59

Measurement of Flow Phenomena in a Lower Plenum Model of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Mean-velocity-field and turbulence data are presented that measure turbulent flow phenomena in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GTMHR) design. The data were obtained in the Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and are offered for assessing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). The flow in the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined cross flow - with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate geometry scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. The model is fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive-index of the working fluid so that optical techniques may be employed for the measurements. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits optical measurements to determine flow characteristics in complex passages in and around objects to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that will disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL system is its large size, leading to improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. A three-dimensional (3-D) Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system was used to collect the data. Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean bulk velocity) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. Uncertainty analyses and a discussion of the standard problem are included. The measurements reveal developing, non-uniform, turbulent flow in the inlet jets and complicated flow patterns in the model lower plenum. Data include three-dimensional vector plots, data displays along the coordinate planes (slices) and presentations that describe the component flows at specific regions in the model. Information on inlet conditions is also presented.

Hugh M. McIlroy, Jr.; Doanld M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

2010-02-01

60

Measurement of Flow Phenomena in a Lower Plenum Model of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Mean-velocity-field and turbulence data are presented that measure turbulent flow phenomena in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GTMHR) design. The data were obtained in the Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and are offered for assessing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. This paper reviews the experimental apparatus and procedures, presents a sample of the data set, and reviews the INL Standard Problem. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). The flow in the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined cross flow - with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate flow scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. The model is fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive-index of the mineral oil working fluid so that optical techniques may be employed for the measurements. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits optical measurements to determine flow characteristics in complex passages in and around objects to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that will disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL system is its large size, leading to improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. A three-dimensional (3-D) Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system was used to collect the data. Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean average flow rate) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. Uncertainty analysis and a discussion of the standard problem are included. The measurements reveal undeveloped, non-uniform, turbulent flow in the inlet jets and complicated flow patterns in the model lower plenum. Data include three-dimensional vector plots, data displays along the coordinate planes (slices) and presentations that describe the component flows at specific regions in the model. Information on inlet conditions are also presented.

Hugh M. McIlroy, Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

2008-05-01

61

Conditional probability assigned by a class of Hausdorff dimensional measures for hazard assessments in natural phenomena.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The probabilistic approach can be used to deal uncertainty in complex natural phenomena and conditional probability can be a tool to give hazard assessments. In this paper we propose to assess conditional probability, in the sense of Dubins and de Finetti, by a class of Hausdorff dimensional measures. A coherent conditional probability, in the sense of de Finetti, is a real function P defined on an arbitrary family of conditional events, satisfying the coherence condition. In this approach, the treatment of uncertainty is based on the interpretation of conditional events as partial information about an experiment and coherent conditional probability as a tool to represent the level of knowledge about it. New information about the experiment can be represented by a new conditional event and the updating of knowledge is equivalent to determine coherent extensions. There are both theoretical than practical reasons to investigate coherent conditional probabilities. From a theoretical mathematical point of view we have that coherence of conditional probability assures the property to be proper, that is P(A,H)=1 for every H contained in A. This property is not assured when conditional probability is defined in the axiomatic way, by the Radon-Nikodym derivative. From a practical point of view the advantage to assess coherent conditional probability, by a class of Hausdorff dimensional measures, is that it can be used as tool to asses probability to an event given a data set coming from a real problem. In fact in different fields of science (geology, biology, architecture) many data sets are fractal sets, i.e. are sets with non integer Hausdorff dimension; for example the hypocentre distribution of earthquakes is a fractal set so if we want to asses the probability that a given place will be the hypocentre of a future earthquake known the set of the previous ones, we need to have a tool able to handling fractal sets. Moreover the classification of several soils can be done by their Hausdorff dimensions. Many other examples of fractal sets of data can be found in Earth Sciences. The results proposed in this paper establish the coherence of conditional probability assigned by a class of Hausdorff dimensional measures. The future aim of this research is to development computer- assisted simulations to determine the Hausdorff dimensions and the Hausdorff dimensional measure of sets of data.

Doria, S.

2003-04-01

62

Porcine Head Response to Blast  

PubMed Central

Recent studies have shown an increase in the frequency of traumatic brain injuries related to blast exposure. However, the mechanisms that cause blast neurotrauma are unknown. Blast neurotrauma research using computational models has been one method to elucidate that response of the brain in blast, and to identify possible mechanical correlates of injury. However, model validation against experimental data is required to ensure that the model output is representative of in vivo biomechanical response. This study exposes porcine subjects to primary blast overpressures generated using a compressed-gas shock tube. Shock tube blasts were directed to the unprotected head of each animal while the lungs and thorax were protected using ballistic protective vests similar to those employed in theater. The test conditions ranged from 110 to 740?kPa peak incident overpressure with scaled durations from 1.3 to 6.9?ms and correspond approximately with a 50% injury risk for brain bleeding and apnea in a ferret model scaled to porcine exposure. Instrumentation was placed on the porcine head to measure bulk acceleration, pressure at the surface of the head, and pressure inside the cranial cavity. Immediately after the blast, 5 of the 20 animals tested were apneic. Three subjects recovered without intervention within 30?s and the remaining two recovered within 8?min following respiratory assistance and administration of the respiratory stimulant doxapram. Gross examination of the brain revealed no indication of bleeding. Intracranial pressures ranged from 80 to 390?kPa as a result of the blast and were notably lower than the shock tube reflected pressures of 300–2830?kPa, indicating pressure attenuation by the skull up to a factor of 8.4. Peak head accelerations were measured from 385 to 3845 G’s and were well correlated with peak incident overpressure (R2?=?0.90). One SD corridors for the surface pressure, intracranial pressure (ICP), and head acceleration are presented to provide experimental data for computer model validation. PMID:22586417

Shridharani, Jay K.; Wood, Garrett W.; Panzer, Matthew B.; Capehart, Bruce P.; Nyein, Michelle K.; Radovitzky, Raul A.; Bass, Cameron R. ‘Dale’

2012-01-01

63

Beat phenomena in metal nanowires, and their implications for resonance-based elastic property measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The elastic properties of 1D nanostructures such as nanowires are often measured experimentally through actuation of nanowires at their resonance frequency, and then relating the resonance frequency to the elastic stiffness using the elementary beam theory. In the present work, we utilize large scale molecular dynamics simulations to report a novel beat phenomenon in [110] oriented Ag nanowires. The beat phenomenon is found to arise from the asymmetry of the lattice spacing in the orthogonal elementary directions of [110] nanowires, i.e. the [1&cmb.macr;10] and [001] directions, which results in two different principal moments of inertia. Because of this, actuations imposed along any other direction are found to decompose into two orthogonal vibrational components based on the actuation angle relative to these two elementary directions, with this phenomenon being generalizable to <110> FCC nanowires of different materials (Cu, Au, Ni, Pd and Pt). The beat phenomenon is explained using a discrete moment of inertia model based on the hard sphere assumption; the model is utilized to show that surface effects enhance the beat phenomenon, while effects are reduced with increasing nanowire cross-sectional size or aspect ratio. Most importantly, due to the existence of the beat phenomena, we demonstrate that in resonance experiments only a single frequency component is expected to be observed, particularly when the damping ratio is relatively large or very small. Furthermore, for a large range of actuation angles, the lower frequency is more likely to be detected than the higher one, which implies that experimental predictions of the Young's modulus obtained from resonance may in fact be under-predictions. The present study therefore has significant implications for experimental interpretations of the Young's modulus as obtained via resonance testing.The elastic properties of 1D nanostructures such as nanowires are often measured experimentally through actuation of nanowires at their resonance frequency, and then relating the resonance frequency to the elastic stiffness using the elementary beam theory. In the present work, we utilize large scale molecular dynamics simulations to report a novel beat phenomenon in [110] oriented Ag nanowires. The beat phenomenon is found to arise from the asymmetry of the lattice spacing in the orthogonal elementary directions of [110] nanowires, i.e. the [1&cmb.macr;10] and [001] directions, which results in two different principal moments of inertia. Because of this, actuations imposed along any other direction are found to decompose into two orthogonal vibrational components based on the actuation angle relative to these two elementary directions, with this phenomenon being generalizable to <110> FCC nanowires of different materials (Cu, Au, Ni, Pd and Pt). The beat phenomenon is explained using a discrete moment of inertia model based on the hard sphere assumption; the model is utilized to show that surface effects enhance the beat phenomenon, while effects are reduced with increasing nanowire cross-sectional size or aspect ratio. Most importantly, due to the existence of the beat phenomena, we demonstrate that in resonance experiments only a single frequency component is expected to be observed, particularly when the damping ratio is relatively large or very small. Furthermore, for a large range of actuation angles, the lower frequency is more likely to be detected than the higher one, which implies that experimental predictions of the Young's modulus obtained from resonance may in fact be under-predictions. The present study therefore has significant implications for experimental interpretations of the Young's modulus as obtained via resonance testing. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: (1) Summary of all numerical testing results and (2) some corresponding derivation details. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31545a

Zhan, Haifei; Gu, Yuantong; Park, Harold S.

2012-10-01

64

Charging phenomena in dielectric/semiconductor heterostructures during x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The determination of the valence band offset (VBO) by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is commonly performed using the so-called Kraut's method that was developed for VBO determination in semiconductor/semiconductor heterojunctions. Although the physical model, which is the basis of the method, can be safely extended to dielectric/semiconductor (D/S) heterojunctions, in these systems a careful evaluation of the experimental results is necessary due to the differential charging phenomena originating at D/S interface during x-ray bombardment. As a consequence, precise determination of the VBO requires an accurate calibration of the energy scale in order to remove artifacts induced by the progressive charging of the oxide during the XPS measurement. In this work a detailed analysis of the band alignment between e-beam evaporated amorphous HfO2 films and Si substrates is reported. The HfO2/Si heterojunction was selected as a prototype for this study since HfO2 based dielectrics have already been implemented as gate dielectrics in real devices and have been the subject of a wide number of publications providing controversial results in terms of VBO values. A clear dependence of the binding energy of the Hf 4f and O 1s core lines on the thickness of the HfO2 film is identified. The time evolution of these signals indicates that different steady states are reached after prolonged x-ray bombardment depending on the thickness of the HfO2 films. On the basis of the original work of Iwata et al. [J. App. Phys. 79, 6653 (1996)], a rigorous method to remove these artifacts and empirically determine the real band offsets in D/S heterojunctions is proposed and validated by comparison with internal photoemission and photoconductivity data obtained on the same set of samples.

Perego, M.; Seguini, G.

2011-09-01

65

Development of a three-dimensional PIV measurement technique for the experimental study of air bubble collapse phenomena  

SciTech Connect

Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a quantitative flow measurement technique. The objective of this study is to develop a new three-dimensional PIV technique for the experimental study of air bubble collapse phenomena. A three-dimensional measurement technique is necessary since bubble collapse is a three-dimensional phenomenon. The investigation of the velocity flow field around a collapsing air bubble can provide detailed three-dimensional quantitative information to help improve the understanding of the related heat transfer processes.

Yang, Y.H.; Hassan, Y.A.; Schmidl, W.D. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1995-12-31

66

Proceedings of the eleventh annual symposium on explosives and blasting research  

SciTech Connect

These proceedings contain 26 papers presented at the conference. Topics relate to performance of explosives, blast wave propagation, charge malfunctions, building response to ground vibrations, tunnel excavations, detonator design, reduction of ground vibration, blast design, blast fragmentation measurement, and blast analysis. Most of the papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

NONE

1995-12-31

67

Dry ice blasting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As legal and societal pressures against the use of hazardous waste generating materials has increased, so has the motivation to find safe, effective, and permanent replacements. Dry ice blasting is a technology which uses CO2 pellets as a blasting medium. The use of CO2 for cleaning and stripping operations offers potential for significant environmental, safety, and productivity improvements over grit blasting, plastic media blasting, and chemical solvent cleaning. Because CO2 pellets break up and sublime upon impact, there is no expended media to dispose of. Unlike grit or plastic media blasting which produce large quantities of expended media, the only waste produced by CO2 blasting is the material removed. The quantity of hazardous waste produced, and thus the cost of hazardous waste disposal is significantly reduced.

Lonergan, Jeffrey M.

1992-04-01

68

Blast furnace stove control  

SciTech Connect

This paper outlines the process model and model-based control techniques implemented on the hot blast stoves for the No. 7 Blast Furnace at the Inland Steel facility in East Chicago, Indiana. A detailed heat transfer model of the stoves is developed. It is then used as part of a predictive control scheme to determine the minimum amount of fuel necessary to achieve the blast air requirements. The controller also considers maximum and minimum temperature constraints within the stove.

Muske, K.R. [Villanova Univ., PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Hansen, G.A.; Howse, J.W.; Cagliostro, D.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chaubal, P.C. [Inland Steel Industries Inc., East Chicago, IN (United States). Research Labs.

1998-12-31

69

Blast injury research models  

PubMed Central

Blast injuries are an increasing problem in both military and civilian practice. Primary blast injury to the lungs (blast lung) is found in a clinically significant proportion of casualties from explosions even in an open environment, and in a high proportion of severely injured casualties following explosions in confined spaces. Blast casualties also commonly suffer secondary and tertiary blast injuries resulting in significant blood loss. The presence of hypoxaemia owing to blast lung complicates the process of fluid resuscitation. Consequently, prolonged hypotensive resuscitation was found to be incompatible with survival after combined blast lung and haemorrhage. This article describes studies addressing new forward resuscitation strategies involving a hybrid blood pressure profile (initially hypotensive followed later by normotensive resuscitation) and the use of supplemental oxygen to increase survival and reduce physiological deterioration during prolonged resuscitation. Surprisingly, hypertonic saline dextran was found to be inferior to normal saline after combined blast injury and haemorrhage. New strategies have therefore been developed to address the needs of blast-injured casualties and are likely to be particularly useful under circumstances of enforced delayed evacuation to surgical care. PMID:21149352

Kirkman, E.; Watts, S.; Cooper, G.

2011-01-01

70

Porcine head response to blast  

E-print Network

Recent studies have shown an increase in the frequency of traumatic brain injuries related to blast exposure. However, the mechanisms that cause blast neurotrauma are unknown. Blast neurotrauma research using computational ...

Nyein, Michelle K.

71

Lightweight blast shield  

DOEpatents

A tandem warhead missile arrangement that has a composite material housing structure with a first warhead mounted at one end and a second warhead mounted near another end of the composite structure with a dome shaped composite material blast shield mounted between the warheads to protect the second warhead from the blast of the first warhead.

Mixon, Larry C. (Madison, AL); Snyder, George W. (Huntsville, AL); Hill, Scott D. (Toney, AL); Johnson, Gregory L. (Decatur, AL); Wlodarski, J. Frank (Huntsville, AL); von Spakovsky, Alexis P. (Huntsville, AL); Emerson, John D. (Arab, AL); Cole, James M. (Huntsville, AL); Tipton, John P. (Huntsville, AL)

1991-01-01

72

Near-Sun solar wind consequences of solar structure and dynamic phenomena observed by radio scintillation measurements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since radio propagation measurements using either natural or spacecraft radio signals are used for probing the solar wind in the vicinity of the sun, they represent a key tool for studying the interplanetary consequences of solar structure and dynamic phenomena. New information on the near sun consequences was obtained from radio scintillation observations of coherent spacecraft signals. The results covering density fluctuations, fractional density fluctuations, coronal streamers, heliospheric current sheets, coronal mass ejections and interplanetary shocks are reviewed. A joint ICE S-band (13 cm wavelength) Doppler scintillation measurement with the SOHO white-light coronograph (LASCO) is described.

Woo, Richard

1994-01-01

73

Paranormal phenomena  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Critical analysis is given of some paranormal phenomena events (UFO, healers, psychokinesis (telekinesis))reported in Moldova. It is argued that correct analysis of paranormal phenomena should be made in the framework of electromagnetism.

Gaina, Alex

1996-08-01

74

Passive blast pressure sensor  

SciTech Connect

A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

2013-03-19

75

ESF BLAST DESIGN ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose and objective of this design analysis are to develop controls considered necessary and sufficient to implement the requirements for the controlled drilling and blasting excavation of operations support alcoves and test support alcoves in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). The conclusions reached in this analysis will flow down into a construction specification ensuring controlled drilling and blasting excavation will be performed within the bounds established here.

E.F. fitch

1995-03-13

76

Effects of mine blasting on residential structures  

SciTech Connect

Blasting is common in the coal industry to remove rock overburden so that the exposed coal can be mechanically excavated. The ground vibrations and air blast produced by blasting are often felt by residents surrounding the mines. There has been a trend for regulatory authorities, especially those concerned with the environment, to impose low limits on blast vibration levels in response to community pressure, based on human perception and response to vibration. This paper reports the findings of an extensive study on a house which was located adjacent to a coal mine. The house was monitored for over 1 year and was subjected to ground peak particle velocity (PPV) ranging from 1.5 to 222 mm/s. The house was instrumented with accelerometers to measure its dynamic response due to blasting and it was also monitored for cracks before and after each blast. Based on this study, ground motion amplifications along the height of the structure have been established. A simplified methodology presented in this paper has been used to estimate the ground PPV at which cracking is likely.

Gad, E.F.; Wilson, J.L.; Moore, A.J.; Richards, A.B. [Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Vic. (Australia). Faculty of Engineering & Industrial Science

2005-08-01

77

On the Interaction and Coalescence if Spherical Blast Waves  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The scaling and similarity laws concerning the propagation of isolated spherical blast waves are briefly reviewed. Both point source explosions and high pressure gas explosions are considered. Test data on blast overpressure from the interaction and coalescence of spherical blast waves emanating from explosives in the form of shaped charges of different strength placed in the vicinity of a solid propellant stack are presented. These data are discussed with regard to the scaling laws concerning the decay of blast overpressure. The results point out the possibility of detecting source explosions from far-field pressure measurements.

Kandula, Max; Freeman, Robert J.

2005-01-01

78

Evolution of blast wave profiles in simulated air blasts: experiment and computational modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Shock tubes have been extensively used in the study of blast traumatic brain injury due to increased incidence of blast-induced neurotrauma in Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts. One of the important aspects in these studies is how to best replicate the field conditions in the laboratory which relies on reproducing blast wave profiles. Evolution of the blast wave profiles along the length of the compression-driven air shock tube is studied using experiments and numerical simulations with emphasis on the shape and magnitude of pressure time profiles. In order to measure dynamic pressures of the blast, a series of sensors are mounted on a cylindrical specimen normal to the flow direction. Our results indicate that the blast wave loading is significantly different for locations inside and outside of the shock tube. Pressure profiles inside the shock tube follow the Friedlander waveform fairly well. Upon approaching exit of the shock tube, an expansion wave released from the shock tube edges significantly degrades the pressure profiles. For tests outside the shock tube, peak pressure and total impulse reduce drastically as we move away from the exit and majority of loading is in the form of subsonic jet wind. In addition, the planarity of the blast wave degrades as blast wave evolves three dimensionally. Numerical results visually and quantitatively confirm the presence of vortices, jet wind and three-dimensional expansion of the planar blast wave near the exit. Pressure profiles at 90° orientation show flow separation. When cylinder is placed inside, this flow separation is not sustained, but when placed outside the shock tube this flow separation is sustained which causes tensile loading on the sides of the cylinder. Friedlander waves formed due to field explosives in the intermediate-to far-field ranges are replicated in a narrow test region located deep inside the shock tube.

Chandra, N.; Ganpule, S.; Kleinschmit, N. N.; Feng, R.; Holmberg, A. D.; Sundaramurthy, A.; Selvan, V.; Alai, A.

2012-09-01

79

Validation of an in-flight flow visualization scheme to quantitatively measure vortical flow phenomena  

E-print Network

A flow visualization measurement scheme was validated in flight. Strake vortex trajectories and axial core velocities were determined using pulsed smoke and high speed video. A gothic strake, operated at an angle of attack of 220 and a Reynolds...

Dorsett, Kenneth Merle

2012-06-07

80

30 CFR 75.1323 - Blasting circuits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Blasting § 75.1323 Blasting circuits. (a) Blasting circuits shall be protected from sources of stray electric current. (b) Detonators made...not be combined in the same blasting circuit. (c) Detonator leg wires...

2012-07-01

81

30 CFR 75.1323 - Blasting circuits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Blasting § 75.1323 Blasting circuits. (a) Blasting circuits shall be protected from sources of stray electric current. (b) Detonators made...not be combined in the same blasting circuit. (c) Detonator leg wires...

2013-07-01

82

30 CFR 75.1323 - Blasting circuits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Blasting § 75.1323 Blasting circuits. (a) Blasting circuits shall be protected from sources of stray electric current. (b) Detonators made...not be combined in the same blasting circuit. (c) Detonator leg wires...

2011-07-01

83

30 CFR 75.1323 - Blasting circuits.  

...Blasting § 75.1323 Blasting circuits. (a) Blasting circuits shall be protected from sources of stray electric current. (b) Detonators made...not be combined in the same blasting circuit. (c) Detonator leg wires...

2014-07-01

84

Excitation and Charge Exchange Phenomena in Astronomical Objects: Measurement of Cross Sections and Lifetimes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document addresses extreme ultraviolet radiation and X-ray emissions from comets, planets and heliospheric gases focusing on the measurement of charge-exchange cross sections and radiative lifetimes. Highly-charged heavy ions present in the solar wind, and their abundance relative to the total oxygen-ion abundance are detailed. The plan for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory high-charge ion facility is outlined detailing its ability to measure absolute collisional excitation cross sections, absolute charge-exchange cross sections, lifetimes of metastable ion levels, and X-ray emission spectra following charge changes.

Chutjian, Ara; Smith, S.; Lozano, J.; Cadez, I.; Greewnood, J.; Mawhovter, R.; Williams, I.; Niimura, M.

2003-01-01

85

Air blast loading of a cylindrical body  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pressure measurements were performed on the surface of a cylinder in shock tube experiments and in free field tests. In shock tube measurements, pressure waves with a rather sharp profile were observed, with overpressures ranging from 0.2 to 2 bar. Unsteady gain coefficients were obtained for weak and moderately strong incident shocks. In free field tests, blast waves at the

W. Heilig

1981-01-01

86

Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic-weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 6. Blast measurements. Part 2. Free-air peak-pressure measurements. Section 2. Telemetering from moored balloons  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this experiment was to determine the free-air peak-pressure as a function of distance from an atomic explosion. In this report, free-air peak-pressure is defined as the pressure at the head of the blast wave in regions where it has not been reinforced by a reflected wave. Operation in the test area was more difficult than anticipated. Heavy winds made balloon handling very difficult. On the whole, the radio link performed satisfactorily on all occasions and appears to be a reliable method. For some unknown reason, blast switches closer than 1,500 feet failed to give satisfactory signals. Pressures were computed using the Rankine-Hugoniot relation, which is based on the shock wave being a definite discontinuity in pressure. Since the pressures measured on the ground showed relatively long times, there has been some speculation that a true shock wave may not exist in free air. If a true shock wave does not exist in the free-air region, pressures as computed are not correct, and the method of this experiment cannot be used.

Frolich, A.J.

1985-09-01

87

Rotating Molten Metallic Drops and Related Phenomena: A New Approach to the Surface Tension Measurement  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Molten aluminum and tin drops were levitated in a high vacuum by controlled electric fields, and they were systematically rotated by applying by a rotating magnetic field. When the evolution of the drop shape was measured as a function of rotation frequency, it agreed quantitatively well with the Brown and Scriven's theoretical prediction. The normalized rotation frequencies at the bifurcation point agreed with the predicted value 0.559, within 2%. An anomalous phenomenon which totally deviated from the prediction was observed in rotating molten tin drops when they were kept in a high rotation rate for several hours. No anomaly was observed in aluminum drops when they underwent similar condition. It was speculated that under the strong centrifugal force in the drop the tin isotopes must be separating. Since Al-27 is essentially the only naturally abundant isotope in the aluminum drops, the same anomaly is not expected. Based on the shape deformation of a rotating drop, an alternate approach to the surface tension measurement was verified. This new surface tension measurement technique was applied to a glassforming alloy, Zr(41.2)Ti(13.8)Cu(12.5)Ni(10.0)Be(22.5) in its highly viscous states. Also demonstrated in the paper was a use of a molten aluminum drop to verify the Busse's prediction of the influence of the drop rotation on the drop oscillation frequency.

Rhim, Won-Kyu; Ishikawa, Takehiko

2000-01-01

88

Data Analysis Measurement: Having a Solar Blast! NASA Connect: Program 7 in the 2001-2002 Video Series. [Videotape].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

NASA Connect is an interdisciplinary, instructional distance learning program targeting students in grades 6-8. This videotape explains how engineers and researchers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) use data analysis and measurement to predict solar storms, anticipate how they will affect the Earth, and improve…

National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

89

Evaluation of ground vibration effect of blasting operations in a magnesite mine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ground vibrations induced by blasting are one of the fundamental problems in the mining industry and may cause severe damage to structures and plants nearby. Therefore, a vibration control study plays an important role in the minimization of environmental effects of blasting in mines. This paper presents the results of ground vibration measurement induced by bench blasting at Magnesite Incorporated

Hakan Ak; Melih Iphar; Mahmut Yavuz; Adnan Konuk

2009-01-01

90

CRCHD E-blast  

Cancer.gov

CRCHD E-blast CRCHD Web Site Updates The Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities (CRCHD) has recently updated some of its Web pages! Please take the time to browse through these updates. Site updates include: 2013 Annual Report to the Nation on

91

External Resource: Having a Solar Blast  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In Data Analysis and Measurement: Having a Solar Blast!, students will learn how NASA researchers study the Sun. They will learn how satellite technology plays a pivotal role in helping NASA researchers understand the Sun-Earth connection. Students will l

1900-01-01

92

Comparison of building loads analysis and system thermodynamics (BLAST) computer program simulations and measured energy use for army buildings. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes the results of a study which compared actual energy use data collected for two typical Army buildings by the Army's Fixed Facilities Energy Monitoring Project with energy-use data predicted by the US Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratory's (CERL's) Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics (BLAST) energy analysis computer program. It was concluded that to compare actual building

Herron

1981-01-01

93

Effect of Meteorological Phenomena in Measures of Background Radiation X and Gamma Rays in São José dos Campos, SP, Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective of this work was to perform a study on the influence of meteorological phenomena on the background radiation X and gamma rays in São José dos Campos, SP, Brazil on the last three years. For this, we performed the monitoring of the integrated radiations and also of the main meteorological parameters (rainfall, relative humidity, temperature and pressure) daily without interruptions and time resolution of one minute. Measurements of X and gamma radiation in the range of energies from 30 keV to 10 MeV, were carried out using a scintillator crystal of sodium iodide activated with Tallium [NaI(Tl)] coupled to a photomultiplier, with energy resolution of 15%. Rainfall, atmospheric pressure, temperature, and relative humidity were recorded using sensors coupled to a five-channel specific data logger. By correlating the data from the measurements of intensity of X and gamma radiations with the meteorological parameters, it was found that atmospheric precipitation with or without electric discharges phenomenon that was affected more in the spectrum of background radiation profile. Some of the reasons why these changes occur in the background profile are due the presence of environmental radon gas that is drawn to the surface during the occurrences of local rainfall. During dry periods, the spectra of X and gamma radiations showed a daily cycle (24 hour). In relation to relative humidity, temperature and pressure, it was found that these parameters had negligible influence on the profile changes of the background radiation in São José dos Campos, SP, Brazil.

Gomes, Marcelo; Spjeldvik, Walther; Gusev, Anatoly; Alves, Mauro; Martin, Inacio; Pinto, Marcos; Ferro, Marco A.; Concei, Flavio

94

Macro-mechanical modeling of blast-wave mitigation in foams. Part II: reliability of pressure measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A phenomenological study of the process occurring when a plane shock wave reflected off an aqueous foam column filling the test section of a vertical shock tube has been undertaken. The experiments were conducted with initial shock wave Mach numbers in the range 1.25le {M}_s le 1.7 and foam column heights in the range 100-450 mm. Miniature piezotrone circuit electronic pressure transducers were used to record the pressure histories upstream and alongside the foam column. The aim of these experiments was to find a simple way to eliminate a spatial averaging as an artifact of the pressure history recorded by the side-on transducer. For this purpose, we discuss first the common behaviors of the pressure traces in extended time scales. These observations evidently quantify the low frequency variations of the pressure field within the different flow domains of the shock tube. Thereafter, we focus on the fronts of the pressure signals, which, in turn, characterize the high-frequency response of the foam column to the shock wave impact. Since the front shape and the amplitude of the pressure signal most likely play a significant role in the foam destruction, phase changes and/or other physical factors, such as high capacity, viscosity, etc., the common practice of the data processing is revised and discussed in detail. Generally, side-on pressure measurements must be used with great caution when performed in wet aqueous foams, because the low sound speed is especially prone to this effect. Since the spatial averaged recorded pressure signals do not reproduce well the real behaviors of the pressure rise, the recorded shape of the shock wave front in the foam appears much thicker. It is also found that when a thin liquid film wet the sensing membrane, the transducer sensitivity was changed. As a result, the pressure recorded in the foam could exceed the real amplitude of the post-shock wave flow. A simple procedure, which allows correcting this imperfection, is discussed in detail.

Britan, A.; Liverts, M.; Shapiro, H.; Ben-Dor, G.

2013-02-01

95

Dynamic Response of a Stiffened Laminated Composite Plate Subjected to Blast Load  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper is concerned with the experimental and numerical study of stiffened laminated composite plates exposed to a normal blast shock wave. For this purpose a detonation is developed from the reaction of LPG-O2mixtures in a long circular cylindrical shock tube. The detonation wave goes through into the atmosphere from the open end of the shock tube and acts as a blast load on the stiffened laminated composite plate which is placed in front of the detonation tube. Mounting of the target plate on a steel frame is designed with the object of providing clamped boundary conditions. The air blast pressure distribution is obtained by the use of quartz crystal pressure transducers placed on the wooden model. Strains are measured at the different points on the stiffened laminated composite plate and stiffener. In the experiment and analysis two different load cases are examined. Furthermore, a finite element modelling and analysis of the blast loaded stiffened composite plate are presented and the numerical results are compared with the experimental ones. An agreement is found between the experimental and finite element results in both linear and non-linear ranges. A good prediction is performed for the peak strain in the plate. However a discrepancy is shown between the measured and predicted strains on the stiffener because of the adhesive layer between the plate and stiffener. Prediction of the response frequency that has a great importance in the dynamic phenomena correlates well with the experimental results. The effects of stiffener and loading conditions on the dynamic behavior are examined. Large deformation effects are taken into account for the second loading condition.

Türkmen, H. S.; Mecito?lu, Z.

1999-04-01

96

Blast Loading Experiments of Surrogate Models for Tbi Scenarios  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study aims to characterize the interaction of explosive blast waves through simulated anatomical models. We have developed physical models and a systematic approach for testing traumatic brain injury (TBI) mechanisms and occurrences. A simplified series of models consisting of spherical PMMA shells housing synthetic gelatins as brain simulants have been utilized. A series of experiments was conducted to compare the sensitivity of the system response to mechanical properties of the simulants under high strain-rate explosive blasts. Small explosive charges were directed at the models to produce a realistic blast wave in a scaled laboratory test cell setting. Blast profiles were measured and analyzed to compare system response severity. High-speed shadowgraph imaging captured blast wave interaction with the head model while particle tracking captured internal response for displacement and strain correlation. The results suggest amplification of shock waves inside the head near material interfaces due to impedance mismatches. In addition, significant relative displacement was observed between the interacting materials suggesting large strain values of nearly 5%. Further quantitative results were obtained through shadowgraph imaging of the blasts confirming a separation of time scales between blast interaction and bulk movement. These results lead to the conclusion that primary blast effects could cause TBI occurrences.

Alley, M. D.; Son, S. F.

2009-12-01

97

Biology of grit-blasted titanium alloy implants.  

PubMed

This study describes the biologic integration of grit-blasted titanium alloy (Ti-6A1-4V) implants that were press fit into the distal femoral canal of young adult rabbits and evaluated by histologic, histomorphometric, and biomechanical methods. Polished and aluminum oxide grit-blasted (4.2 +/- 0.7 microns surface roughness) solid implants were compared with titanium fibermetal implants. Nondecalcified cross sections were studied by histology, histomorphometry, and electron microscopy in the backscatter mode at 3, 6, and 12 weeks after implantation. Pullout strength was measured at 12 weeks. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and post-hoc Student-Newman-Keuls and Scheffe's tests. The blasted implants had significantly more bone intimately in contact with the implant surface (31%) than the fibermetal (17%), or solid polished implants (15%). By 3 weeks, woven bone had formed directly on the surface of the blasted implants, whereas there was a discrete space between woven bone and the other implants. Active remodeling of bone was shown by fluorochrome uptake at the surface of the blasted implants at 12 weeks after implantation. The strength of fixation of blasted and fiber-metal implants was significantly greater than polished implants at 12 weeks after implantation. Direct attachment of newly formed bone onto the blasted implant surface was confirmed by backscatter electron microscopy. The results of this study indicate that grit-blasted titanium surfaces provide an excellent surface for bone implant integration. PMID:7554621

Goldberg, V M; Stevenson, S; Feighan, J; Davy, D

1995-10-01

98

Transport Phenomena.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the problems created in graduate chemical engineering programs when students enter with a wide diversity of understandings of transport phenomena. Describes a two-semester graduate transport course sequence at the University of Notre Dame which focuses on fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer. (TW)

McCready, Mark J.; Leighton, David T.

1987-01-01

99

Fluctuation phenomena  

SciTech Connect

Fluctuation phenomena are the ''tip of the iceberg'' revealing the existence, behind even the most quiescent appearing macroscopic states, of an underlying world of agitated, ever-changing microscopic processes. While the presence of these fluctuations can be ignored in some cases, e.g. if one is satisfied with purely thermostatic description of systems in equilibrium, they are central to the understanding of other phenomena, e.g. the nucleation of a new phase following the quenching of a system into the co-existence region. This volume contains a collection of review articles, written by experts in the field, on the subject of fluctuation phenomena. Some of the articles are of a very general nature discussing the modern mathematical formulation of the problems involved, while other articles deal with specific topics such as kinetics of phase transitions and conductivity in solids. The juxtaposition of the variety of physical situations in which fluctuation phenomena play an important role is novel and should give the reader an insight into this subject.

Montroll, E.W.; Lebowitz, J.L.

1986-01-01

100

Light flavor hadron spectra at low $p_{T}$ and search for collective phenomena in high multiplicity pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions measured with the ALICE experiment  

E-print Network

Comprehensive results on transverse momentum distributions and their ratios for identified light flavor hadrons ($\\pi$, K, p) at low $p_{T}$ and mid-rapidity as a function of charged particle multiplicity are reported for pp collisions at 7 TeV. Particle mass dependent hardening of the spectral shapes in Pb-Pb collisions at 2.76 TeV were attributed to hydrodynamical flow and quantitatively parameterized with Boltzmann-Gibbs Blast Wave fits. In this contribution, we investigate the existence of collective phenomena in small systems: pp, p-Pb and peripheral Pb-Pb where similar patterns are observed in multiplicity dependent studies.

C. Andrei; for the ALICE Collaboration

2014-08-01

101

Poloidal field measurements during transient phenomena on MTX: Sawtooth perturbations and the effect of ECH on disruptions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A fifteen channel far-infrared polarimeter has been used to measure poloidal field (B(sub p)) profiles during transient events on MTX. Here we present experimental results on two separate phenomena. First, strong B(sub p) perturbations are observed to be correlated with the sawtooth crash. The on-axis safety factor q(sub 0) approximately 0.8, is approximately constant before and after the crash. Although the perturbed field profile during the crash is too complex to invert unambiguously, several observations concerning existing sawtooth models can be made. The low value of q(sub 0) combined with the large amplitude and complex radial structure of the B(sub p) perturbations, is more consistent with the stochastic or the double-layer reconnection sawtooth models rather than other standard models such as Kadomtsev reconnection or quasi-interchange. In addition, poloidal field measurements were made prior to disruptions on MTX, both with and without electron cyclotron heating (ECH). The disruption studied here, is related to the buildup of heavy-metal impurities in the core, which is particularly prevalent at lower densities. The impurity radiation leads to a collapse of the T(sub e), and J profiles followed by a disruption. The application of on-axis ECH during the T(sub e) collapse but prior to the disruption can repeak the T(sub e) and J profiles thus preventing the disruption. Since the core impurity radiation depends quite sensitively on T(sub e) heating significantly effects the power balance in the core, leading to stability for this type of disruption.

Rice, B. W.; Hooper, E. B.

1993-01-01

102

Integrated, Multi-Scale Characterization of Imbibition and Wettability Phenomena Using Magnetic Resonance and Wide-Band Dielectric Measurements  

SciTech Connect

The petrophysical properties of rocks, particularly their relative permeability and wettability, strongly influence the efficiency and the time-scale of all hydrocarbon recovery processes. However, the quantitative relationships needed to account for the influence of wettability and pore structure on multi-phase flow are not yet available, largely due to the complexity of the phenomena controlling wettability and the difficulty of characterizing rock properties at the relevant length scales. This project brings together several advanced technologies to characterize pore structure and wettability. Grain-scale models are developed that help to better interpret the electric and dielectric response of rocks. These studies allow the computation of realistic configurations of two immiscible fluids as a function of wettability and geologic characteristics. These fluid configurations form a basis for predicting and explaining macroscopic behavior, including the relationship between relative permeability, wettability and laboratory and wireline log measurements of NMR and dielectric response. Dielectric and NMR measurements have been made show that the response of the rocks depends on the wetting and flow properties of the rock. The theoretical models can be used for a better interpretation and inversion of standard well logs to obtain accurate and reliable estimates of fluid saturation and of their producibility. The ultimate benefit of this combined theoretical/empirical approach for reservoir characterization is that rather than reproducing the behavior of any particular sample or set of samples, it can explain and predict trends in behavior that can be applied at a range of length scales, including correlation with wireline logs, seismic, and geologic units and strata. This approach can substantially enhance wireline log interpretation for reservoir characterization and provide better descriptions, at several scales, of crucial reservoir flow properties that govern oil recovery.

Mukul M. Sharma; Steven L. Bryant; Carlos Torres-Verdin; George Hirasaki

2007-09-30

103

Development Of An Experiment For Measuring Flow Phenomena Occurring In A Lower Plenum For VHTR CFD Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the present report is to document the design of our first experiment to measure generic flow phenomena expected to occur in the lower plenum of a typical prismatic VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) concept. In the process, fabrication sketches are provided for the use of CFD (computational fluid dynamics) analysts wishing to employ the data for assessment of their proposed codes. The general approach of the project is to develop new benchmark experiments for assessment in parallel with CFD and coupled CFD/systems code calculations for the same geometry. One aspect of the complex flow in a prismatic VHTR is being addressed: flow and thermal mixing in the lower plenum ("hot streaking" issue). Current prismatic VHTR concepts were examined to identify their proposed flow conditions and geometries over the range from normal operation to decay heat removal in a pressurized cooldown. Approximate analyses were applied to determine key non-dimensional parameters and their magnitudes over this operating range. The flow in the lower plenum can locally be considered to be a situation of multiple jets into a confined crossflow -- with obstructions. Flow is expected to be turbulent with momentum-dominated turbulent jets entering; buoyancy influences are estimated to be negligible in normal full power operation. Experiments are needed for the combined features of the lower plenum flows. Missing from the typical jet experiments available are interactions with nearby circular posts and with vertical posts in the vicinity of vertical walls - with near stagnant surroundings at one extreme and significant crossflow at the other.

D. M. McEligot; K.G. Condie; G. E. Mc Creery; H. M. Mc Ilroy

2005-09-01

104

Pediatric blast lung injury from a fireworks-related explosion.  

PubMed

Blast injuries related to explosions have been described in the literature but are uncommon in children. We describe a multisystem blast injury in a child resulting from a commercial firework-related explosion in her home. She presented with respiratory failure, shock, altered level of consciousness, and multiple orthopedic injuries. The patient required immediate stabilization and resuscitation in the emergency department and a prolonged hospitalization. This report reviews the spectrum of injuries that are seen in blast-related trauma and the emergency measures needed for rapid stabilization of these critical patients. PMID:22668665

Ratto, Jessica; Johnson, Bernadette K; Condra, Cole S; Knapp, Jane F

2012-06-01

105

Energy release protection for pressurized systems. I - Review of studies into blast and fragmentation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Studies of blast and fragmentation hazards associated with a pressure system rupture are presented. Areas of concern related to blast hazards include the system energy (prior to its explosive failure), chemical characteristics of the media contained within a bursting pressure system, secondary explosions, and energy release. Such aspects of blast effect as height of the burst (in an above-the-ground explosion), dimensional effects of the explosive, multiple explosions, burning rate of the explosive, dynamic pressure, reflected pressure, and confinement (for explosions within an enclosed structure) are discussed. Also treated are hazards from fragments or missiles ejected (fragmentation hazards), including initial frament velocity, velocity retardation, range, blast-generated fragments (from adjacent structures), and media and soil ejection. Mathematical treatments and graphs representing the individual aspects of the blast and fragmentation phenomena are included.

Brown, S. J.

1985-12-01

106

Micro-blast waves using detonation transmission tubing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Micro-blast waves emerging from the open end of a detonation transmission tube were experimentally visualized in this study. A commercially available detonation transmission tube was used (Nonel tube, M/s Dyno Nobel, Sweden), which is a small diameter tube coated with a thin layer of explosive mixture (HMX + traces of Al) on its inner side. The typical explosive loading for this tube is of the order of 18 mg/m of tube length. The blast wave was visualized using a high speed digital camera (frame rate 1 MHz) to acquire time-resolved schlieren images of the resulting flow field. The visualization studies were complemented by computational fluid dynamic simulations. An analysis of the schlieren images showed that although the blast wave appears to be spherical, it propagates faster along the tube axis than along a direction perpendicular to the tube axis. Additionally, CFD analysis revealed the presence of a barrel shock and Mach disc, showing structures that are typical of an underexpanded jet. A theory in use for centered large-scale explosions of intermediate strength (10 < ? {p}/{p}_0 ? 0.02) gave good agreement with the blast trajectory along the tube axis. The energy of these micro-blast waves was found to be 1.25 ± 0.94 J and the average TNT equivalent was found to be 0.3. The repeatability in generating these micro-blast waves using the Nonel tube was very good (± 2 %) and this opens up the possibility of using this device for studying some of the phenomena associated with muzzle blasts in the near future.

Samuelraj, I. Obed; Jagadeesh, G.; Kontis, K.

2013-07-01

107

Saugus Iron Works Blast Furnace  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

A view of the Saugus Iron Works blast furnace, which smelted the iron from limonite, an iron ore. The limonite formed in nearby bogs, and was heated in the blast furnace until the iron melted and ran out the bottom of the furnace....

108

HIGH PRODUCTIVITY VACUUM BLASTING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the project is to increase the productivity and economics of existing vacuum blasting technology. This technology is used to remove radioactive contamination, PCB's and lead-base paint and provides worker and environmental protection by continuously recycling the blast media and the full containment of the dust generated in the process.

Dr. M.A. Ebadian

2000-01-13

109

Centrifugal shot blast system  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a demonstration of Concrete cleaning, Inc., modified centrifugal shot blast technology to remove the paint coating from concrete flooring. This demonstration is part of the Chicago Pile-5 (CP-5) Large-Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), office of Science and Technology (OST), Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA). The objective of the LSDP is to select and demonstrate potentially beneficial technologies at the Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) CP-5 Research Reactor. The purpose of the LSDP is to demonstrate that using innovative and improved decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technologies from various sources can result in significant benefits, such as decreased cost and increased health and safety, as compared with baseline D and D technologies. Potential markets exist for the innovative centrifugal shot blast system at the following sites: Fernald Environmental Management Project, Los Alamos, Nevada, Oak Ridge Y-12 and K-25, Paducah, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion site, and the Savannah River Site. This information is based on a revision to the OST Linkage Tables dated August 4, 1997.

NONE

1998-02-01

110

Rainbow phenomena: Development of a laser-based, non- intrusive technique for measuring droplet size, temperature and velocity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Liquid sprays appear in a variety of aerospace, automotive and industrial applications. In order to be able to employ the optimal spray configuration it is essential that one first develops a complete understanding of the fundamental phenomena that influence and control the overall spray performance for such applications. Toward this end, the development of advanced diagnostic tools is necessary for

Jeronimus Petrus Antonius Johannes van Beeck

1997-01-01

111

Characterising the acceleration phase of blast wave formation  

SciTech Connect

Intensely heated, localised regions in uniform fluids will rapidly expand and generate an outwardly propagating blast wave. The Sedov-Taylor self-similar solution for such blast waves has long been studied and applied to a variety of scenarios. A characteristic time for their formation has also long been identified using dimensional analysis, which by its very nature, can offer several interpretations. We propose that, rather than simply being a characteristic time, it may be interpreted as the definitive time taken for a blast wave resulting from an intense explosion in a uniform media to contain its maximum kinetic energy. A scaling relation for this measure of the acceleration phase, preceding the establishment of the blast wave, is presented and confirmed using a 1D planar hydrodynamic model.

Fox, T. E., E-mail: tef503@york.ac.uk; Pasley, J. [York Plasma Institute, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Robinson, A. P. L.; Schmitz, H. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

2014-10-15

112

Building BLAST for Coprocessor Accelerators Using Macah  

E-print Network

Building BLAST for Coprocessor Accelerators Using Macah by Ben Weintraub A senior thesis submitted sequences is fun- damental to many research pursuits in biology and genetics. BLAST (Basic Local Alignment the performance of the BLAST algorithm is a problem of great interest. BLAST compares a single query sequence

Hauck, Scott

113

Computational fluid dynamics study of pulverized coal combustion in blast furnace raceway  

SciTech Connect

In this work, a numerical model is used to study the flow and coal combustion along the coal plume in a large-scale setting simulating the lance-blowpipe-tuyere-raceway region of a blast furnace. The model formulation is validated against the measurements in terms of burnout for both low and high volatile coals. The typical phenomena related to coal combustion along the coal plume are simulated and analyzed. The effects of some operational parameters on combustion behavior are also investigated. The results indicate that oxygen as a cooling gas gives a higher coal burnout than methane and air. The underlying mechanism of coal combustion is explored. It is shown that under the conditions examined, coal burnout strongly depends on the availability of oxygen and residence time. Moreover, the influences of two related issues, i.e. the treatment of volatile matter (VM) and geometric setting in modeling, are investigated. The results show that the predictions of final burnouts using three different VM treatments are just slightly different, but all comparable to the measurements. However, the influence of the geometric setting is not negligible when numerically examining the combustion of pulverized coal under blast furnace conditions.

Shen, Y.S.; Maldonado, D.; Guo, B.Y.; Yu, A.B.; Austin, P.; Zulli, P. [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). School of Materials Science & Engineering

2009-12-15

114

Continuum modeling of neuronal cell under blast loading  

PubMed Central

Traumatic brain injuries have recently been put under the spotlight as one of the most important causes of accidental brain dysfunctions. Significant experimental and modeling efforts are thus ongoing to study the associated biological, mechanical and physical mechanisms. In the field of cell mechanics, progresses are also being made at the experimental and modeling levels to better characterize many of the cell functions such as differentiation, growth, migration and death, among others. The work presented here aims at bridging both efforts by proposing a continuum model of neuronal cell submitted to blast loading. In this approach, cytoplasm, nucleus and membrane (plus cortex) are differentiated in a representative cell geometry, and different material constitutive models are adequately chosen for each one. The material parameters are calibrated against published experimental work of cell nanoindentation at multiple rates. The final cell model is ultimately subjected to blast loading within a complete fluid-structure interaction computational framework. The results are compared to the nanoindentation simulation and the specific effects of the blast wave on the pressure and shear levels at the interfaces are identified. As a conclusion, the presented model successfully captures some of the intrinsic intracellular phenomena occurring during its deformation under blast loading and potentially leading to cell damage. It suggests more particularly the localization of damage at the nucleus membrane similarly to what has already been observed at the overall cell membrane. This degree of damage is additionally predicted to be worsened by a longer blast positive phase duration. As a conclusion, the proposed model ultimately provides a new three dimensional computational tool to evaluate intracellular damage during blast loading. PMID:22562014

Jérusalem, Antoine; Dao, Ming

2012-01-01

115

Portable convertible blast effects shield  

DOEpatents

A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more frusto-conically-tapered telescoping rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration by the friction fit of adjacent pairs of frusto-conically-tapered rings to each other.

Pastrnak, John W. (Livermore, CA); Hollaway, Rocky (Modesto, CA); Henning, Carl D. (Livermore, CA); Deteresa, Steve (Livermore, CA); Grundler, Walter (Hayward, CA); Hagler, Lisle B. (Berkeley, CA); Kokko, Edwin (Dublin, CA); Switzer, Vernon A. (Livermore, CA)

2011-03-15

116

Blasting casting to raise productivity  

SciTech Connect

Normally, surface mines employ draglines or truck and shovel systems to remove overburden. Blasting merely fragments and displaces the overburden enough to allow for easy digging. But during the past two decades, the effect of inflation and increased labor costs have encouraged unconventional methods of overburden removal. All of us are aware of the tremendous inflationary effects on costs of equipment, fuel, labor, interest, insurance, environmental compliance, etc. This has allowed the authors to take a new look at the use of explosives as an effective alternate method of overburden removal. This technique is known by several names, but basically blast casting or just casting best describes it. Other terms in vogue are explosive casting, controlled trajectory blasting, trajectory control blasting, and whatever terminology comes to mind.

Pilshaw, S.R.

1987-07-01

117

Portable convertible blast effects shield  

SciTech Connect

A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

Pastrnak, John W. (Livermore, CA); Hollaway, Rocky (Modesto, CA); Henning, Carl D. (Livermore, CA); Deteresa, Steve (Livermore, CA); Grundler, Walter (Hayward, CA); Hagler,; Lisle B. (Berkeley, CA); Kokko, Edwin (Dublin, CA); Switzer, Vernon A (Livermore, CA)

2010-10-26

118

Portable convertible blast effects shield  

DOEpatents

A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

Pastrnak, John W. (Livermore, CA); Hollaway, Rocky (Modesto, CA); Henning, Carl D. (Livermore, CA); Deteresa, Steve (Livermore, CA); Grundler, Walter (Hayward, CA); Hagler, Lisle B. (Berkeley, CA); Kokko, Edwin (Dublin, CA); Switzer, Vernon A (Livermore, CA)

2007-05-22

119

Fragmentation, Cost and Environmental Effects of Plaster Stemming Method for Blasting at A Basalt Quarry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, the plaster stemming application for blasting at a basalt quarry is studied. Drill cuttings are generally used in open pits and quarries as the most common stemming material since these are most readily available at blast sites. However, dry drill cuttings eject very easily from blastholes without offering much resistance to blast energy. The plaster stemming method has been found to be better than the drill cuttings stemming method due to increased confinement inside the hole and better utilization of blast explosive energy in the rock. The main advantage of the new stemming method is the reduction in the cost of blasting. At a basalt quarry, blasting costs per unit volume of rock were reduced to 15% by increasing burden and spacing distances. In addition, better fragmentation was obtained by using the plaster stemming method. Blast trials showed that plaster stemming produced finer material. In the same blast tests, +30 cm size fragments were reduced to 47.3% of the total, compared to 32.6% in the conventional method of drill cuttings stemming. With this method of stemming, vibration and air shock values increased slightly due to more blast energy being available for rock breakage but generally these increased values were small and stayed under the permitted limit for blast damage criteria unless measuring distance is too close.

Cevizci, Halim

2014-10-01

120

Finite element modeling of blast lung injury in sheep.  

PubMed

A detailed 3D finite element model (FEM) of the sheep thorax was developed to predict heterogeneous and volumetric lung injury due to blast. A shared node mesh of the sheep thorax was constructed from a computed tomography (CT) scan of a sheep cadaver, and while most material properties were taken from literature, an elastic-plastic material model was used for the ribs based on three-point bending experiments performed on sheep rib specimens. Anesthetized sheep were blasted in an enclosure, and blast overpressure data were collected using the blast test device (BTD), while surface lung injury was quantified during necropsy. Matching blasts were simulated using the sheep thorax FEM. Surface lung injury in the FEM was matched to pathology reports by setting a threshold value of the scalar output termed the strain product (maximum value of the dot product of strain and strain-rate vectors over all simulation time) in the surface elements. Volumetric lung injury was quantified by applying the threshold value to all elements in the model lungs, and a correlation was found between predicted volumetric injury and measured postblast lung weights. All predictions are made for the left and right lungs separately. This work represents a significant step toward the prediction of localized and heterogeneous blast lung injury, as well as volumetric injury, which was not recorded during field testing for sheep. PMID:25411822

Gibbons, Melissa M; Dang, Xinglai; Adkins, Mark; Powell, Brian; Chan, Philemon

2015-04-01

121

Investigation of blast-induced traumatic brain injury  

PubMed Central

Objective Many troops deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan have sustained blast-related, closed-head injuries from being within non-lethal distance of detonated explosive devices. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms associated with blast exposure that give rise to traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study attempts to identify the precise conditions of focused stress wave energy within the brain, resulting from blast exposure, which will correlate with a threshold for persistent brain injury. Methods This study developed and validated a set of modelling tools to simulate blast loading to the human head. Using these tools, the blast-induced, early-time intracranial wave motions that lead to focal brain damage were simulated. Results The simulations predict the deposition of three distinct wave energy components, two of which can be related to injury-inducing mechanisms, namely cavitation and shear. Furthermore, the results suggest that the spatial distributions of these damaging energy components are independent of blast direction. Conclusions The predictions reported herein will simplify efforts to correlate simulation predictions with clinical measures of TBI and aid in the development of protective headwear. PMID:24766453

Ludwigsen, John S.; Ford, Corey C.

2014-01-01

122

Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modeling for High Rate Pulverized Coal Injection (PCI) into the Blast Furnace  

SciTech Connect

Pulverized coal injection (PCI) into the blast furnace (BF) has been recognized as an effective way to decrease the coke and total energy consumption along with minimization of environmental impacts. However, increasing the amount of coal injected into the BF is currently limited by the lack of knowledge of some issues related to the process. It is therefore important to understand the complex physical and chemical phenomena in the PCI process. Due to the difficulty in attaining trus BF measurements, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling has been identified as a useful technology to provide such knowledge. CFD simulation is powerful for providing detailed information on flow properties and performing parametric studies for process design and optimization. In this project, comprehensive 3-D CFD models have been developed to simulate the PCI process under actual furnace conditions. These models provide raceway size and flow property distributions. The results have provided guidance for optimizing the PCI process.

Dr. Chenn Zhou

2008-10-15

123

Pressure measurements and high speed visualizations of the cavitation phenomena at deep part load condition in a Francis turbine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In a hydraulic power plant, it is essential to provide a reliable, sustainable and flexible energy supply. In recent years, in order to cover the variations of the renewable electricity production, hydraulic power plants are demanded to operate with more extended operating range. Under these off-design conditions, a hydraulic turbine is subject to cavitating swirl flow at the runner outlet. It is well-known that the helically/symmetrically shaped cavitation develops at the runner outlet in part load/full load condition, and it gives severe damage to the hydraulic systems under certain conditions. Although there have been many studies about partial and full load conditions, contributions reporting the deep part load condition are limited, and the cavitation behaviour at this condition is not yet understood. This study aims to unveil the cavitation phenomena at deep part load condition by high speed visualizations focusing on the draft tube cone as well as the runner blade channel, and pressure fluctuations associated with the phenomena were also investigated.

Yamamoto, K.; Müller, A.; Favrel, A.; Landry, C.; Avellan, F.

2014-12-01

124

Blasting Rocks and Blasting Cars Applied Engineering  

SciTech Connect

June 30, 2004 Berkeley Lab lecture: Deb Hopkins works with industries like automobile, mining and paper to improve their evaluation and measuring techniques. For several years, she has coordinated ... June 30, 2004 Berkeley Lab lecture: Deb Hopkins works with industries like automobile, mining and paper to improve their evaluation and measuring techniques. For several years, she has coordinated a program at Berkeley Lab funded under the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles, a collaboration between the federal government and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research. Nondestructive evaluation techniques to test a car's structural integrity are being developed for auto assembly lines.

LBNL

2008-07-02

125

30 CFR 77.1304 - Blasting agents; special provisions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Blasting agents; special provisions. (a) Sensitized ammonium nitrate blasting agents, and the components thereof prior...Circular 8179, “Safety Recommendations for Sensitized Ammonium Nitrate Blasting Agents,” or subsequent...

2010-07-01

126

30 CFR 77.1304 - Blasting agents; special provisions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Blasting agents; special provisions. (a) Sensitized ammonium nitrate blasting agents, and the components thereof prior...Circular 8179, “Safety Recommendations for Sensitized Ammonium Nitrate Blasting Agents,” or subsequent...

2012-07-01

127

30 CFR 77.1304 - Blasting agents; special provisions.  

...Blasting agents; special provisions. (a) Sensitized ammonium nitrate blasting agents, and the components thereof prior...Circular 8179, “Safety Recommendations for Sensitized Ammonium Nitrate Blasting Agents,” or subsequent...

2014-07-01

128

30 CFR 77.1304 - Blasting agents; special provisions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Blasting agents; special provisions. (a) Sensitized ammonium nitrate blasting agents, and the components thereof prior...Circular 8179, “Safety Recommendations for Sensitized Ammonium Nitrate Blasting Agents,” or subsequent...

2011-07-01

129

30 CFR 77.1304 - Blasting agents; special provisions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Blasting agents; special provisions. (a) Sensitized ammonium nitrate blasting agents, and the components thereof prior...Circular 8179, “Safety Recommendations for Sensitized Ammonium Nitrate Blasting Agents,” or subsequent...

2013-07-01

130

Laser-plasma simulations of astrophysical phenomena and novel applications to semiconductor annealing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At the frontier of plasma physics and technology are applications of laser-generated plasmas to laboratory simulations of astrophysical phenomena and to industrial processing. This article presents work at the Naval Research Laboratory in both of these areas. We show how laser plasmas are used to measure a blast wave corrugation overstability important in astrophysics. Detailed atomic physics calculations of radiative cooling within the blast front are used to develop a criterion of the existence of the overstability and are used to explain the experimental results. The criterion depends on quantities such as element abundances, densities, temperatures, and blast wave velocities—quantities which can be measured spectroscopically—and therefore used to infer whether astrophysical blast wave nonuniformities are the result of this instability. In other experiments, high-velocity jets are formed in the laboratory using miniature hollow cones. Jets produced by these cones are used to study the physics of jets occurring in supernovae and in star-forming accretion disks. In industrial semiconductor processing, annealing, that is, removing crystal damage and electrically activating the semiconductor, is a critical step. Industrial annealing techniques most often utilize heat generated by an oven, flash lamps, or a low-power laser. During such heating dopants within the semiconductor lattice diffuse and spread. This degrades the performance of circuits in which the individual circuit elements are very close to each other. We are developing an annealing technique in which shock or sound waves generated by a laser plasma are used to anneal the semiconductor. We have demonstrated that the method works over small areas and that it does not lead to significant dopant diffusion.

Grun, J.; Laming, M.; Manka, C.; Donnelly, D. W.; Covington, B. C.; Fischer, R. P.; Velikovich, A.; Khokhlov, A.

2003-10-01

131

Minimization of Blast furnace Fuel Rate by Optimizing Burden and Gas Distribution  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the research is to improve the competitive edge of steel mills by using the advanced CFD technology to optimize the gas and burden distributions inside a blast furnace for achieving the best gas utilization. A state-of-the-art 3-D CFD model has been developed for simulating the gas distribution inside a blast furnace at given burden conditions, burden distribution and blast parameters. The comprehensive 3-D CFD model has been validated by plant measurement data from an actual blast furnace. Validation of the sub-models is also achieved. The user friendly software package named Blast Furnace Shaft Simulator (BFSS) has been developed to simulate the blast furnace shaft process. The research has significant benefits to the steel industry with high productivity, low energy consumption, and improved environment.

Dr. Chenn Zhou

2012-08-15

132

Determination of explosive blast loading equivalencies with an explosively driven shock tube  

SciTech Connect

Recently there has been significant interest in evaluating the potential of many different non-ideal energetic materials to cause blast damage. We present a method intended to quantitatively compare the blast loading generated by different energetic materials through use of an explosively driven shock tube. The test explosive is placed at the closed breech end of the tube and initiated with a booster charge. The resulting shock waves are then contained and focused by the tube walls to form a quasi-one-dimensional blast wave. Pressure transducers along the tube wall measure the blast overpressure versus distance from the source and allow the use of the one-dimensional blast scaling relationship to determine the energy deposited into the blast wave per unit mass of test explosive. These values are then compared for different explosives of interest and to other methods of equivalency determination.

Jackson, Scott I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, John S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01

133

Numerical analysis for the multi-phase flow of pulverized coal injection inside blast furnace tuyere  

SciTech Connect

The pulverized coal injection (PCI) system was modified from single lance injection into double lance injection at No. 3 Blast Furnace of CSC. It is beneficial to reduce the cost of coke. However, the injected coal was found very close to the inner wall of the tuyere during the operation, such as to cause the possibility of erosion for the tuyere. In this study a three-dimensional mathematical model has been developed based on a computational fluid dynamics software PHOENICS to simulate the fluid flow phenomena inside blast furnace tuyere. The model was capable of handling steady-state, three-dimensional multi-phase flow of pulverized coal injection. The model was applied to simulate the flow patterns of the injection coal inside the tuyere with two kinds of lance design for the PCI system. The distribution of injection coal was simulated such as to estimate the possibility of erosion for the tuyere. The calculated results agreed with the operating experience of CSC plant and the optimum design of double lance was suggested. The model was also applied to simulate the oxygen concentration distribution with these different oxygen enrichments for the coal/oxygen lance system. The calculated results agreed with the experimental measurement. These test results demonstrate that the model is both reasonably reliable and efficient.

Chen, C.W. [Diwan College of Management, Tainan (Taiwan)

2005-09-01

134

Air blast loading of a cylindrical body  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pressure measurements were performed on the surface of a cylinder in shock tube experiments and in free field tests. In shock tube measurements, pressure waves with a rather sharp profile were observed, with overpressures ranging from 0.2 to 2 bar. Unsteady gain coefficients were obtained for weak and moderately strong incident shocks. In free field tests, blast waves at the point of contact with the body produced a reflected pressure of 4.3 bar, corresponding to an overpressure of 1.4 bar or a shock Mach number of 1.5. The results are presented in graphical form.

Heilig, W.

135

Implementation of the exploding wire technique to study blast-wave-structure interaction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effort invested in improving our understanding of the physics of high-energy explosion events has been steadily increasing since the latter part of the twentieth century. Moreover, the dramatic increase in computer power over the last two decades has made the numerical simulation approach the dominant tool for investigating blast phenomena and their effects. However, field tests, on both large and small scales, are still in use. In the current paper, we present an experimental tool to better resolve and study the blast-structure interaction phenomenon and to help validate the numerical simulations of the same. The experimental tool uses an exploding wire technique to generate small-scale cylindrical and spherical blast waves. This approach permits safe operation, high repeatability, and the use of advanced diagnostic systems. The system was calibrated using an analytical model, an empirical model, and numerical simulation. To insure that spherical blast geometry was achieved, a set of free air blast experiments was done in which high-speed photography was used to monitor the blast structure. A scenario in which an explosion occurred in the vicinity of a structure demonstrated the system's capabilities. Using this simple but not trivial configuration showed unequivocally the effectiveness of this tool. From this comparison, it was found that at early times of blast-structure interaction, the agreement between the two sets of results was very good, but at later times incongruences appeared. Effort has been made to interpret this observation. Furthermore, by using similitude analysis, the results obtained from the small-scale experiments can be applied to the full-scale problem. We have shown that an exploding wire system offers an inexpensive, safe, easy to operate, and effective tool for studying phenomena related to blast-wave-structure interactions.

Ram, O.; Sadot, O.

2012-11-01

136

Modelling the combustion of charcoal in a model blast furnace  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The pulverized charcoal (PCH) combustion in ironmaking blast furnaces is abstracting remarkable attention due to various benefits such as lowering CO2 emission. In this study, a three-dimensional CFD model is used to simulate the flow and thermo-chemical behaviours in this process. The model is validated against the experimental results from a pilot-scale combustion test rig for a range of conditions. The typical flow and thermo-chemical phenomena is simulated. The effect of charcoal type, i.e. VM content is examined, showing that the burnout increases with VM content in a linear relationship. This model provides an effective way for designing and optimizing PCH operation in blast furnace practice.

Shen, Yansong; Shiozawa, Tomo; Yu, Aibing; Austin, Peter

2013-07-01

137

BLAST: The Balloon-Borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

BLAST is the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Sub-millimeter Telescope. It will fly from a Long Duration Balloon (LDB) platform from Antarctica. The telescope design incorporates a 2 m primary mirror with large-format bolometer arrays operating at 250, 350 and 500 microns. By providing the first sensitive large-area (10 sq. deg.) sub-mm surveys at these wavelengths, BLAST will address some of the most important galactic and cosmological questions regarding the formation and evolution of stars, galaxies and clusters. Galactic and extragalactic BLAST surveys will: (1) identify large numbers of high-redshift galaxies; (2) measure photometric redshifts, rest-frame FIR luminosities and star formation rates thereby constraining the evolutionary history of the galaxies that produce the FIR and sub-mm background; (3) measure cold pre-stellar sources associated with the earliest stages of star and planet formation; (4) make high-resolution maps of diffuse galactic emission over a wide range of galactic latitudes. In addition to achieving the above scientific goals, the exciting legacy of the BLAST LDB experiment will be a catalogue of 3000-5000 extragalactic sub-mm sources and a 100 sq. deg. sub-mm galactic plane survey. Multi-frequency follow-up observations from SIRTF, ASTRO-F, and Herschel, together with spectroscopic observations and sub-arcsecond imaging from ALMA are essential to understand the physical nature of the BLAST sources.

Devlin, Mark; Ade, Peter; Bock, Jamie; Dicker, Simon; Griffin, Matt; Gunderson, Josh; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter; Hughes, David; Klein, Jeff

2004-01-01

138

Estimate of blast wave properties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Correlation and TNT-equivalent models for UVCE blast wave properties are reviewed, and a model which estimates blast parameters from information on the cloud and its location and uses these parameters to evaluate damage is presented. The prediction model is based on calculations for an ideal, homogeneous, hemispherical, centrally ignited vapor cloud. In case of a deflagration an energy release rate function, equivalent to a certain flame path, is assumed. The results of these calculations (peak pressures as a function of distance) are used together with data for a detonating cloud. The positive phase duration is derived from separate calculations. The method estimates maximum effect, and it is not possible to predict when little or no blast will be generated.

Zeeuwen, J. P.

139

DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF PROTECTIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVING BLAST RESISTANCE OF BUILDINGS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes methods for designing and implementing protective technologies for improving the blast resistance of buildings. A protection plan for buildings may include designing blast-resistant columns, walls, and windows; other elements of security may also play a major part, including physical security measures such as: anti-ram barriers and fencing to demarcate a protective perimeter; features such as lighting, CCTVs,

John E. Crawford; Shengrui Lan

140

First and second-law analyses of energy recoveries in blast-furnace regenerators  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examine various systems for the recovery of thermal energy from waste gases and for preheating in blast-furnace Cowper stoves, with the basic aim of improving efficiencies when utilizing blast-furnace gas with low net heating value at constant peak temperature. Using first- and second-law analyses, with suitably defined exergetic quantities, numerical values are given to measure energy savings.

G. Bisio

1996-01-01

141

Blast casting requires fresh assessment of methods  

SciTech Connect

The article says that because blast casting differs from conventional blasting, our ideas about explosive products, drilling, and initiating methods must change. The author discusses how to select a casting explosive and what factors are important in its selection. He also looks at how to determine the best blasthole diameter and burden blasting pattern.

Pilshaw, S.R.

1987-08-01

142

Simulation of Blast Waves with Headwind  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The blast wave resulting from an explosion was simulated to provide guidance for models estimating risks for human spacecraft flight. Simulations included effects of headwind on blast propagation, Blasts were modelled as an initial value problem with a uniform high energy sphere expanding into an ambient field. Both still air and cases with headwind were calculated.

Olsen, Michael E.; Lawrence, Scott W.; Klopfer, Goetz H.; Mathias, Dovan; Onufer, Jeff T.

2005-01-01

143

MOLECULAR CONTROL OF THE RICE BLAST DISEASE  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe grisea is a major constraint to rice production worldwide. The rice blast system is one of the best-characterized monocot model systems. The goal of this project is to understand molecular mechanisms of disease resistance using rice blast as a model system....

144

An RES-Based Model for Risk Assessment and Prediction of Backbreak in Bench Blasting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most blasting operations are associated with various forms of energy loss, emerging as environmental side effects of rock blasting, such as flyrock, vibration, airblast, and backbreak. Backbreak is an adverse phenomenon in rock blasting operations, which imposes risk and increases operation expenses because of safety reduction due to the instability of walls, poor fragmentation, and uneven burden in subsequent blasts. In this paper, based on the basic concepts of a rock engineering systems (RES) approach, a new model for the prediction of backbreak and the risk associated with a blast is presented. The newly suggested model involves 16 effective parameters on backbreak due to blasting, while retaining simplicity as well. The data for 30 blasts, carried out at Sungun copper mine, western Iran, were used to predict backbreak and the level of risk corresponding to each blast by the RES-based model. The results obtained were compared with the backbreak measured for each blast, which showed that the level of risk achieved is in consistence with the backbreak measured. The maximum level of risk [vulnerability index (VI) = 60] was associated with blast No. 2, for which the corresponding average backbreak was the highest achieved (9.25 m). Also, for blasts with levels of risk under 40, the minimum average backbreaks (<4 m) were observed. Furthermore, to evaluate the model performance for backbreak prediction, the coefficient of correlation ( R 2) and root mean square error (RMSE) of the model were calculated ( R 2 = 0.8; RMSE = 1.07), indicating the good performance of the model.

Faramarzi, F.; Ebrahimi Farsangi, M. A.; Mansouri, H.

2013-07-01

145

Predictions of Experimentally Observed Stochastic Ground Vibrations Induced by Blasting  

PubMed Central

In the present paper, we investigate the blast induced ground motion recorded at the limestone quarry “Suva Vrela” near Kosjeri?, which is located in the western part of Serbia. We examine the recorded signals by means of surrogate data methods and a determinism test, in order to determine whether the recorded ground velocity is stochastic or deterministic in nature. Longitudinal, transversal and the vertical ground motion component are analyzed at three monitoring points that are located at different distances from the blasting source. The analysis reveals that the recordings belong to a class of stationary linear stochastic processes with Gaussian inputs, which could be distorted by a monotonic, instantaneous, time-independent nonlinear function. Low determinism factors obtained with the determinism test further confirm the stochastic nature of the recordings. Guided by the outcome of time series analysis, we propose an improved prediction model for the peak particle velocity based on a neural network. We show that, while conventional predictors fail to provide acceptable prediction accuracy, the neural network model with four main blast parameters as input, namely total charge, maximum charge per delay, distance from the blasting source to the measuring point, and hole depth, delivers significantly more accurate predictions that may be applicable on site. We also perform a sensitivity analysis, which reveals that the distance from the blasting source has the strongest influence on the final value of the peak particle velocity. This is in full agreement with previous observations and theory, thus additionally validating our methodology and main conclusions. PMID:24358140

Kosti?, Sr?an; Perc, Matjaž; Vasovi?, Nebojša; Trajkovi?, Slobodan

2013-01-01

146

A General Viscosity Model for Molten Blast Furnace Slag  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Blast furnace slag is the most abundant slag in the steel industry. Its metallurgical properties are determined to a great extent by its viscosity. Therefore, it is necessary to establish a reliable viscosity model for blast furnace slag. In the current work, a simple, accurate, and physically meaningful viscosity model for a wide composition range of blast furnace slags is developed based on the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) equation: log ? = A + B/( T - C). The model is calibrated by a database containing 365 compositions and 1233 measurements of synthetic and industrial slags. The parameter A has a value of -3.10. The parameters B and C are related to the mass fraction ratio of (CaO + MgO) to (SiO2 + Al2O3) and liquidus temperature of the slag, respectively. Present viscosity model accurately predicts the viscosity of blast furnace slag with relative average error (?) of 0.211 (±0.180) and root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.239 Pa·s. A slight modification of this model can also predict the glass transition temperature of blast furnace slag satisfactorily.

Gan, Lei; Lai, Chaobin

2014-06-01

147

High resolution powder blast micromachining  

Microsoft Academic Search

Powder blasting, or Abrasive Jet Machining (AJM), is a technique in which a particle jet is directed towards a target for mechanical material removal. It is a fast, cheap and accurate directional etch technique for brittle materials like glass, silicon and ceramics. By introducing electroplated copper as a new mask material, the feature size of this process was decreased. It

Henk Wensink; J. W. Berenschot; Henri V. Jansen; Miko C. Elwenspoek

2000-01-01

148

Biologic response to complex blast waves  

SciTech Connect

Small, bare charges were detonated inside an M59 armored personnel carrier (APC) in an attempt to simulate the complex blast waves generated by the jets from shaped-charge warheads penetrating into armored vehicles. Anesthetized sheep were placed inside the APC at 92- and 122-cm ranges from 57- or 113-g pentolite charges. Pressure-time was measured by pressure transducers either mounted on the animals or free standing at comparable ranges on the opposite side of the vehicle. In general, the waveforms were characterized by an initial shock wave of less than 1-msec duration followed by repeated reflections of decreasing magnitude. No deaths nor lung hemorrhages were observed, but all the animals sustained severe ear injury. Animals subjected to peak overpressures of 1.2 to 2.3 bar from the 113-g explosions also received slight non-auditory blast injuries to the upper respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts; those exposed to peak overpressures of just under 1 bar from the 57-g charges did not. The non-auditory blast injuries inside the APC were more severe than those sustained by sheep at comparable distances from 113-g charges in the open. The results suggested that the biological consequences of a complex wave of the type encountered in this study can be equated approximately to a Friedlander wave with a peak overpressure equal to that of the complex wave and with a total impulse equal to the impulse over the first 2 to 3 msec of the complex wave. 9 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Richmond, D.R.; Yelverton, J.T.; Fletcher, E.R.; Phillips, Y.Y.

1985-01-01

149

Div-BLAST: Diversification of Sequence Search Results  

PubMed Central

Sequence similarity tools, such as BLAST, seek sequences most similar to a query from a database of sequences. They return results significantly similar to the query sequence and that are typically highly similar to each other. Most sequence analysis tasks in bioinformatics require an exploratory approach, where the initial results guide the user to new searches. However, diversity has not yet been considered an integral component of sequence search tools for this discipline. Some redundancy can be avoided by introducing non-redundancy during database construction, but it is not feasible to dynamically set a level of non-redundancy tailored to a query sequence. We introduce the problem of diverse search and browsing in sequence databases that produce non-redundant results optimized for any given query. We define diversity measures for sequences and propose methods to obtain diverse results extracted from current sequence similarity search tools. We also propose a new measure to evaluate the diversity of a set of sequences that is returned as a result of a sequence similarity query. We evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed methods in post-processing BLAST and PSI-BLAST results. We also assess the functional diversity of the returned results based on available Gene Ontology annotations. Additionally, we include a comparison with a current redundancy elimination tool, CD-HIT. Our experiments show that the proposed methods are able to achieve more diverse yet significant result sets compared to static non-redundancy approaches. In both sequence-based and functional diversity evaluation, the proposed diversification methods significantly outperform original BLAST results and other baselines. A web based tool implementing the proposed methods, Div-BLAST, can be accessed at cedar.cs.bilkent.edu.tr/Div-BLAST PMID:25531115

Eser, Elif; Can, Tolga; Ferhatosmano?lu, Hakan

2014-01-01

150

Conserving Energy in Blast Freezers Using Variable Frequency Drives  

E-print Network

A stationary blast freezer processing 22-lb cartons of sardines in 19,000 pound lots was modified to improve efficiency and to conserve energy. Baffles were first added to produce uniform air flow. Maximum measured freeze times of 12.6 hours fell...

Kolbe, E.; Ling, Q.; Wheeler, G.

2004-01-01

151

Cold blast furnace syndrome: a new source of toxic inhalation by nitrogen oxides  

PubMed Central

Methods: Fourteen workers developed acute respiratory symptoms shortly after exposure to "air blast" from blast furnace tuyeres. These included chest tightness, dyspnoea, rigors, and diaphoresis. Chest radiographs showed pulmonary infiltrates, and lung function a restrictive abnormality. This report includes a description of clinical features of the affected workers and elucidation of the probable cause of the outbreak. Results: Clinical features and occupational hygiene measurements suggested the most likely cause was inhalation of nitrogen oxides at high pressure and temperature. While the task could not be eliminated, engineering controls were implemented to control the hazard. No further cases have occurred. Conclusions: "Cold blast furnace syndrome" represents a previously undescribed hazard of blast furnace work, probably due to inhalation of nitrogen oxides. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute toxic inhalational injuries in blast furnace workers. PMID:15090669

Tague, I; Llewellin, P; Burton, K; Buchan, R; Yates, D

2004-01-01

152

Quantifying Transient 3D Dynamical Phenomena of Single mRNA Particles in Live Yeast Cell Measurements  

PubMed Central

Single-particle tracking (SPT) has been extensively used to obtain information about diffusion and directed motion in a wide range of biological applications. Recently, new methods have appeared for obtaining precise (10s of nm) spatial information in three dimensions (3D) with high temporal resolution (measurements obtained every 4ms), which promise to more accurately sense the true dynamical behavior in the natural 3D cellular environment. Despite the quantitative 3D tracking information, the range of mathematical methods for extracting information about the underlying system has been limited mostly to mean-squared displacement analysis and other techniques not accounting for complex 3D kinetic interactions. There is a great need for new analysis tools aiming to more fully extract the biological information content from in vivo SPT measurements. High-resolution SPT experimental data has enormous potential to objectively scrutinize various proposed mechanistic schemes arising from theoretical biophysics and cell biology. At the same time, methods for rigorously checking the statistical consistency of both model assumptions and estimated parameters against observed experimental data (i.e. goodness-of-fit tests) have not received great attention. We demonstrate methods enabling (1) estimation of the parameters of 3D stochastic differential equation (SDE) models of the underlying dynamics given only one trajectory; and (2) construction of hypothesis tests checking the consistency of the fitted model with the observed trajectory so that extracted parameters are not over-interpreted (the tools are applicable to linear or nonlinear SDEs calibrated from non-stationary time series data). The approach is demonstrated on high-resolution 3D trajectories of single ARG3 mRNA particles in yeast cells in order to show the power of the methods in detecting signatures of transient directed transport. The methods presented are generally relevant to a wide variety of 2D and 3D SPT tracking applications. PMID:24015725

Calderon, Christopher P.; Thompson, Michael A.; Casolari, Jason M.; Paffenroth, Randy C.; Moerner, W. E.

2013-01-01

153

Model for small arms fire muzzle blast wave propagation in air  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Accurate modeling of small firearms muzzle blast wave propagation in the far field is critical to predict sound pressure levels, impulse durations and rise times, as functions of propagation distance. Such a task being relevant to a number of military applications including the determination of human response to blast noise, gunfire detection and localization, and gun suppressor design. Herein, a time domain model to predict small arms fire muzzle blast wave propagation is introduced. The model implements a Friedlander wave with finite rise time which diverges spherically from the gun muzzle. Additionally, the effects in blast wave form of thermoviscous and molecular relaxational processes, which are associated with atmospheric absorption of sound were also incorporated in the model. Atmospheric absorption of blast waves is implemented using a time domain recursive formula obtained from numerical integration of corresponding differential equations using a Crank-Nicholson finite difference scheme. Theoretical predictions from our model were compared to previously recorded real world data of muzzle blast wave signatures obtained by shooting a set different sniper weapons of varying calibers. Recordings containing gunfire acoustical signatures were taken at distances between 100 and 600 meters from the gun muzzle. Results shows that predicted blast wave slope and exponential decay agrees well with measured data. Analysis also reveals the persistency of an oscillatory phenomenon after blast overpressure in the recorded wave forms.

Aguilar, Juan R.; Desai, Sachi V.

2011-11-01

154

Close-in Blast Waves from Spherical Charges*  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the close-in blast waves created by the detonation of spherical high explosives (HE) charges, via numerical simulations with our Arbitrary-Lagrange-Eulerian (ALE3D) code. We used a finely-resolved, fixed Eulerian 2-D mesh (200 ?m per cell) to capture the detonation of the charge, the blast wave propagation in air, and the reflection of the blast wave from an ideal surface. The thermodynamic properties of the detonation products and air were specified by the Cheetah code. A programmed-burn model was used to detonate the charge at a rate based on measured detonation velocities. The results were analyzed to evaluate the: (i) free air pressure-range curves: ?ps(R), (ii) free air impulse curves, (iii) reflected pressure-range curves, and (iv) reflected impulse-range curves. A variety of explosives were studied. Conclusions are: (i) close-in (R<10;cm/g^1/3), each explosive had its own (unique) blast wave (e.g., ?ps(R,;HE)˜a/R^n, where n is different for each explosive); (ii) these close-in blast waves do not scale with the ``Heat of Detonation'' of the explosive (because close-in, there is not enough time to fully couple the chemical energy to the air via piston work); (iii) instead they are related to the detonation conditions inside the charge. Scaling laws will be proposed for such close-in blast waves. *This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

Howard, William; Kuhl, Allen

2011-06-01

155

Moving shocks through metallic grids: their interaction and potential for blast wave mitigation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Numerical simulations and laboratory measurements have been used to illuminate the interaction of a moving shock wave impacting on metallic grids at various shock strengths and grid solidities. The experimental work was carried out in a large scale shock tube facility while computational work simulated the flow field with a time-dependent inviscid and a time-dependent viscous model. The pressure drop measured across the grids is a result of two phenomena which are associated with the impact of the shock on the metallic grids. First are the reflection and refraction of the incoming shock on the grid itself. This appears to be the main inviscid mechanism associated with the reduction of the strength of the transmitted shock. Second, viscous phenomena are present during the reflection and refraction of the wave as well as during the passage of the induced flow of the air through the grid. The experimental data of pressure drop across the grid obtained in the present investigation are compared with those obtained from computations. The numerical results slightly overpredict the experimental data of relative pressure drop which increases substantially with grid solidity at fixed flow Mach numbers. The processes of shock reflection and refraction are continuous and they can be extended in duration by using thicker grids that will result in lower compression rates of the structural loading and increase the viscous losses associated with these phenomena which will further attenuate the impacting shock. Preliminary theoretical analysis suggests that the use of a graded porosity/solidity material will result in higher pressure drop than a constant porosity/solidity material and thus provide effective blast mitigation.

Andreopoulos, Y.; Xanthos, S.; Subramaniam, K.

2007-07-01

156

Antioxidant treatment reduces blast-induced cochlear damage and hearing loss.  

PubMed

Exposure to blast overpressure has become one of the hazards of both military and civilian life in many parts of the world due to war and terrorist activity. Auditory damage is one of the primary sequela of blast trauma, affecting immediate situational awareness and causing permanent hearing loss. Protecting against blast exposure is limited by the inability to anticipate the timing of these exposures, particularly those caused by terrorists. Therefore a therapeutic regimen is desirable that is able to ameliorate auditory damage when administered after a blast exposure has occurred. The purpose of this study was to determine if administration of a combination of antioxidants 2,4-disulfonyl ?-phenyl tertiary butyl nitrone (HPN-07) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) beginning 1 h after blast exposure could reduce both temporary and permanent hearing loss. To this end, a blast simulator was developed and the operational conditions established for exposing rats to blast overpressures comparable to those encountered in an open-field blast of 14 pounds per square inch (psi). This blast model produced reproducible blast overpressures that resulted in physiological and physical damage to the auditory system that was proportional to the number and amplitude of the blasts. After exposure to 3 consecutive 14 psi blasts 100% of anesthetized rats had permanent hearing loss as determined at 21 days post exposure by auditory brainstem response (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) testing. Animals treated with HPN-07 and NAC after blast exposure showed a significant reduction in ABR threshold shifts and DPOAE level shifts at 2-16 kHz with significant reduction in inner hair cell (IHC) and outer hair cell (OHC) loss across the 5-36 kHz region of the cochlea compared with control animals. The time course of changes in the auditory system was documented at 3 h, 24 h, 7 day and 21 day after blast exposure. At 3 h after blast exposure the auditory brainstem response (ABR) threshold shifts were elevated by 60 dB in both treated and control groups. A partial recovery of to 35 dB was observed at 24 h in the controls, indicative of a temporary threshold shift (TTS) and there was essentially no further recovery by 21 days representing a permanent threshold shift (PTS) of about 30 dB. Antioxidant treatment increased the amount of both TTS and PTS recovery relative to controls by 10 and 20 dB respectively. Distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) reached a maximum level shift of 25-30 dB measured in both control and treated groups at 3 h after blast exposure. These levels did not change by day 21 in the control group but in the treatment group the level shifts began to decline at 24 h until by day 21 they were 10-20 dB below that of the controls. Loss of cochlear hair cells measured at 21 day after blast exposure was mostly in the outer hair cells (OHC) and broadly distributed across the basilar membrane, consistent with the distribution of loss of frequency responses as measured by ABR and DPOAE analysis and typical of blast-induced damage. OHC loss progressively increased after blast exposure reaching an average loss of 32% in the control group and 10% in the treated group at 21 days. These findings provide the first evidence that a combination of antioxidants, HPN-07 and NAC, can both enhance TTS recovery and prevent PTS by reducing damage to the mechanical and neural components of the auditory system when administered shortly after blast exposure. PMID:22326291

Ewert, Donald L; Lu, Jianzhong; Li, Wei; Du, Xiaoping; Floyd, Robert; Kopke, Richard

2012-03-01

157

Extragalactic Submillimetric Surveys with BLAST  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) has recently conducted an extragalactic submillimetric survey of the Chandra Deep Field South region of unprecedented size, depth, and angular resolution in three wavebands centered at 250, 350, and 500 ?m. BLAST wavelengths are chosen to study the Cosmic Infrared Background near its peak at 200 ?m. We find that most of the CIB at these wavelengths is contributed by galaxies detected at 24 ?m by the MIPS instrument on Spitzer, and that the source counts distribution shows a population with strongly evolving density and luminosity. These results anticipate what can be expected from the surveys that will be conducted with the SPIRE instrument on the Herschel space observatory.

Pascale, E.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bock, J. J.; Chapin, E. L.; Devlin, M. J.; Griffin, M.; Gundersen, J. O.; Halpern, M.; Hargrave, P. C.; Hughes, D. H.; Klein, J.; Marsden, G.; Martin, P. G.; Mauskopf, P.; Moncelsi, L.; Netterfield, C. B.; Ngo, H.; Olmi, L.; Patanchon, G.; Rex, M.; Scott, D.; Semisch, C.; Thomas, N.; Truch, M. D. P.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, G. S.; Viero, M. P.; Wiebe, D. V.

158

A miniature pressure sensor for blast event evaluation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a great potential threat to people who deal with explosive devices. Protection from TBI has attracted more and more interest. Great efforts have been taken to the studies on the understanding of the propagation of the blast events and its effect on TBI. However, one of the biggest challenges is that the current available pressure sensors are not fast enough to capture the blast wave especially the transient period. This paper reports an ultrafast pressure sensor that could be very useful for analysis of the fast changing blast signal. The sensor is based on Fabry-Perot (FP) principle. It uses a 45º angle polished fiber sitting in a V-groove on a silicon chip. The endface of the angle polished fiber and the diaphragm which is lifted off on the side wall of the V-groove form the FP cavity. The sensor is very small and can be mounted on different locations of a helmet to measure blast pressure simultaneously. The tests were conducted at Natick Soldier Research, Development, and Engineering Center (NSRDEC) in Natick, MA. The sensors were mounted in a shock tube, side by side with the reference sensors, to measure a rapidly increased pressure. The results demonstrated that our sensors' responses agreed well with those from the electrical reference sensors and their response time is comparable.

Wu, Nan; Wang, Wenhui; Tian, Ye; Niezrecki, Christopher; Wang, Xingwei

2011-06-01

159

Full-Trajectory Diagnosis of Laser-Driven Radiative Blast Waves in Search of Thermal Plasma Instabilities  

SciTech Connect

Experimental investigations into the dynamics of cylindrical, laser-driven, high-Mach-number shocks are used to study the thermal cooling instability predicted to occur in astrophysical radiative blast waves. A streaked Schlieren technique measures the full blast-wave trajectory on a single-shot basis, which is key for observing shock velocity oscillations. Electron density profiles and deceleration parameters associated with radiative blast waves were recorded, enabling the calculation of important blast-wave parameters including the fraction of radiated energy, {epsilon}, as a function of time for comparison with radiation-hydrodynamics simulations.

Moore, A. S.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Lazarus, J.; Hohenberger, M.; Robinson, J. S.; Smith, R. A.; Plant, T. J. A.; Symes, D. R.; Dunne, M. [Plasma Physics Division, AWE Aldermaston, RG7 4PR. United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Laser Consortium, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ. United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Ministry of Defence, Foxhill, Bath BA1 5AB. United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX. United Kingdom (United Kingdom)

2008-02-08

160

Photographs of Blast Effects on Structures  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This photograph collection shows a wood-frame house located 1,100 meters from ground zero, exposed to a nuclear blast at the Nevada Test Site. The test was Upshot-Knothole Annie, a 16 Kt tower shot, on March 17, 1953. Exposure to thermal radiation was 25 cal/cm2, about one-quarter of that experienced at ground zero in Hiroshima. The blast over pressure was 5 psi, and the blast wave created surface winds of 160 mph.

Christopher Griffith

161

Multiphase-flow numerical modeling of the 18 May 1980 lateral blast at Mount St. Helens, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Volcanic lateral blasts are among the most spectacular and devastating of natural phenomena, but their dynamics are still poorly understood. Here we investigate the best documented and most controversial blast at Mount St. Helens (Washington State, United States), on 18 May 1980. By means of three-dimensional multiphase numerical simulations we demonstrate that the blast front propagation, fi nal runout, and damage can be explained by the emplacement of an unsteady, stratifi ed pyroclastic density current, controlled by gravity and terrain morphology. Such an interpretation is quantitatively supported by large-scale observations at Mount St. Helens and will infl uence the defi nition and predictive mapping of hazards on blast-dangerous volcanoes worldwide. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

Ongaro, T.E.; Widiwijayanti, C.; Clarke, A.B.; Voight, B.; Neri, A.

2011-01-01

162

The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope: BLAST  

E-print Network

The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) is a sub-orbital surveying experiment designed to study the evolutionary history and processes of star formation in local galaxies (including the Milky Way) and galaxies at cosmological distances. The BLAST continuum camera, which consists of 270 detectors distributed between 3 arrays, observes simultaneously in broad-band (30%) spectral-windows at 250, 350, and 500 microns. The optical design is based on a 2m diameter telescope, providing a diffraction-limited resolution of 30" at 250 microns. The gondola pointing system enables raster mapping of arbitrary geometry, with a repeatable positional accuracy of ~30"; post-flight pointing reconstruction to ~5" rms is achieved. The on-board telescope control software permits autonomous execution of a pre-selected set of maps, with the option of manual override. In this paper we describe the primary characteristics and measured in-flight performance of BLAST. BLAST performed a test-flight in 2003 and has since made two scientifically productive long-duration balloon flights: a 100-hour flight from ESRANGE (Kiruna), Sweden to Victoria Island, northern Canada in June 2005; and a 250-hour, circumpolar-flight from McMurdo Station, Antarctica, in December 2006.

E. Pascale; P. A. R. Ade; J. J. Bock; E. L. Chapin; J. Chung; M. J. Devlin; S Dicker; M. Griffin; J. O. Gundersen; M. Halpern; P. C. Hargrave; D. H. Hughes; J. Klein; C. J. MacTavish; G. Marsden; P. G. Martin; T. G. Martin; P. Mauskopf; C. B. Netterfield; L. Olmi; G. Patanchon; M. Rex; D. Scott; C. Semisch; N. Thomas; M. D. P. Truch; C. Tucker; G. S. Tucker; M. P. Viero; D. V. Wiebe

2007-11-21

163

30 CFR 75.1310 - Explosives and blasting equipment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosives and blasting equipment. 75.1310 Section...SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1310 Explosives and blasting equipment. (a) Only...

2010-07-01

164

30 CFR 75.1310 - Explosives and blasting equipment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Explosives and blasting equipment. 75.1310 Section...SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1310 Explosives and blasting equipment. (a) Only...

2011-07-01

165

30 CFR 75.1310 - Explosives and blasting equipment.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Explosives and blasting equipment. 75.1310 Section...SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1310 Explosives and blasting equipment. (a) Only...

2014-07-01

166

30 CFR 75.1310 - Explosives and blasting equipment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Explosives and blasting equipment. 75.1310 Section...SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1310 Explosives and blasting equipment. (a) Only...

2013-07-01

167

30 CFR 75.1310 - Explosives and blasting equipment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Explosives and blasting equipment. 75.1310 Section...SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1310 Explosives and blasting equipment. (a) Only...

2012-07-01

168

INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING WEST, CAST HOUSE OF BLAST FURNACE NO. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING WEST, CAST HOUSE OF BLAST FURNACE NO. 1 AND BLAST FURNACE NO. 2. - Pittsburgh Steel Company, Monessen Works, Blast Furnace No. 1 & No. 2, Donner Avenue, Monessen, Westmoreland County, PA

169

GENERAL VIEW OF TURBOBLOWER BUILDING (LEFT), BLAST FURNACE (CENTER), AND ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

GENERAL VIEW OF TURBO-BLOWER BUILDING (LEFT), BLAST FURNACE (CENTER), AND HOT BLAST STOVES (RIGHT). - Republic Iron & Steel Company, Youngstown Works, Haselton Blast Furnaces, West of Center Street Viaduct, along Mahoning River, Youngstown, Mahoning County, OH

170

BLAST Autonomous Daytime Star Cameras  

E-print Network

We have developed two redundant daytime star cameras to provide the fine pointing solution for the balloon-borne submillimeter telescope, BLAST. The cameras are capable of providing a reconstructed pointing solution with an absolute accuracy camera combines a 1 megapixel CCD with a 200 mm f/2 lens to image a 2 degree x 2.5 degree field of the sky. The instruments are autonomous. An internal computer controls the temperature, adjusts the focus, and determines a real-time pointing solution at 1 Hz. The mechanical details and flight performance of these instruments are presented.

Marie Rex; Edward Chapin; Mark J. Devlin; Joshua Gundersen; Jeff Klein; Enzo Pascale; Donald Wiebe

2006-05-01

171

Simulation of the Reflected Blast Wave froma C-4 Charge  

SciTech Connect

The reflection of a blast wave from a C4 charge detonated above a planar surface is simulated with our ALE3D code. We used a finely-resolved, fixed Eulerian 2-D mesh (167 {micro}m per cell) to capture the detonation of the charge, the blast wave propagation in nitrogen, and its reflection from the surface. The thermodynamic properties of the detonation products and nitrogen were specified by the Cheetah code. A programmed-burn model was used to detonate the charge at a rate based on measured detonation velocities. Computed pressure histories are compared with pressures measured by Kistler 603B piezoelectric gauges at 8 ranges (GR = 0, 2, 4, 8, 10, and 12 inches) along the reflecting surface. Computed and measured waveforms and positive-phase impulses were similar, except at close-in ranges (GR < 2 inches), which were dominated by jetting effects.

Howard, W M; Kuhl, A L; Tringe, J W

2011-08-01

172

Reactive Blast Waves from Composite Charges  

SciTech Connect

Investigated here is the performance of composite explosives - measured in terms of the blast wave they drive into the surrounding environment. The composite charge configuration studied here was a spherical booster (1/3 charge mass), surrounded by aluminum (Al) powder (2/3 charge mass) at an initial density of {rho}{sub 0} = 0.604 g/cc. The Al powder acts as a fuel but does not detonate - thereby providing an extreme example of a 'non-ideal' explosive (where 2/3 of the charge does not detonate). Detonation of the booster charge creates a blast wave that disperses the Al powder and ignites the ensuing Al-air mixture - thereby forming a two-phase combustion cloud embedded in the explosion. Afterburning of the booster detonation products with air also enhances and promotes the Al-air combustion process. Pressure waves from such reactive blast waves have been measured in bomb calorimeter experiments. Here we describe numerical simulations of those experiments. A Heterogeneous Continuum Model was used to model the dispersion and combustion of the Al particle cloud. It combines the gasdynamic conservation laws for the gas phase with a dilute continuum model for the dispersed phase, as formulated by Nigmatulin. Inter-phase mass, momentum and energy exchange are prescribed by phenomenological models of Khasainov. It incorporates a combustion model based on mass conservation laws for fuel, air and products; source/sink terms are treated in the fast-chemistry limit appropriate for such gasdynamic fields, along with a model for mass transfer from the particle phase to the gas. The model takes into account both the afterburning of the detonation products of the booster with air, and the combustion of the Al particles with air. The model equations were integrated by high-order Godunov schemes for both the gas and particle phases. Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) was used to capture the energy-bearing scales of the turbulent flow on the computational grid, and to track/resolve reaction zones. Numerical simulations of the explosion fields from 1.5-g and 10-kg composite charges were performed. Computed pressure histories (red curve) are compared with measured waveforms (black curves) in Fig. 1. Comparison of these results with a waveform for a non-combustion case in nitrogen (blue curve) demonstrates that a reactive blast wave was formed. Cross-sectional views of the temperature field at various times are presented in Fig. 2, which shows that the flow is turbulent. Initially, combustion occurs at the fuel-air interface, and the energy release rate is controlled by the rate of turbulent mixing. Eventually, oxidizer becomes distributed throughout the cloud via ballistic mixing of the particles with air; energy release then occurs in a distributed combustion mode, and Al particle kinetics controls the energy release rate. Details of the Heterogeneous Continuum Model and results of the numerical simulations of composite charge explosions will be described in the paper.

Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E

2009-10-16

173

Teaching optical phenomena with Tracker  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since the invention and dissemination of domestic laser pointers, observing optical phenomena is a relatively easy task. Any student can buy a laser and experience at home, in a qualitative way, the reflection, refraction and even diffraction phenomena of light. However, quantitative experiments need instruments of high precision that have a relatively complex setup. Fortunately, nowadays it is possible to analyse optical phenomena in a simple and quantitative way using the freeware video analysis software ‘Tracker’. In this paper, we show the advantages of video-based experimental activities for teaching concepts in optics. We intend to show: (a) how easy the study of such phenomena can be, even at home, because only simple materials are needed, and Tracker provides the necessary measuring instruments; and (b) how we can use Tracker to improve students’ understanding of some optical concepts. We give examples using video modelling to study the laws of reflection, Snell’s laws, focal distances in lenses and mirrors, and diffraction phenomena, which we hope will motivate teachers to implement it in their own classes and schools.

Rodrigues, M.; Simeão Carvalho, P.

2014-11-01

174

Fluid dynamic aspects of jet noise generation. [noise measurement of jet blast effects from supersonic jet flow in convergent-divergent nozzles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Jet engine noise generation and noise propagation was investigated by studying supersonic nozzle flow of various nozzle configurations in an experimental test facility. The experimental facility was constructed to provide a coaxial axisymmetric jet flow of unheated air. In the test setup, an inner primary flow exhausted from a 7 in. exit diameter convergent--divergent nozzle at Mach 2, while a secondary flow had a 10 in. outside diameter and was sonic at the exit. The large dimensions of the jets permitted probes to be placed inside the jet core without significantly disturbing the flow. Static pressure fluctuations were measured for the flows. The nozzles were designed for shock free (balanced) flow at Mach 2. Data processing techniques and experimental procedures were developed in order to study induced disturbances at the edge of the supersonic flows, and the propagation of those disturbances throughout the flows. Equipment used (specifications are given) to record acoustic levels (far field noise) is described. Results and conclusions are presented and discussed. Diagrams of the jet flow fields are included along with photographs of the test stand.

Barra, V.; Panunzio, S.

1976-01-01

175

27 CFR 555.220 - Table of separation distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Table of separation distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives...Table of separation distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives...donor when barricaded (ft.) Ammonium nitrate Blasting agent...

2013-04-01

176

27 CFR 555.220 - Table of separation distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Table of separation distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives...Table of separation distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives...donor when barricaded (ft.) Ammonium nitrate Blasting agent...

2011-04-01

177

27 CFR 555.220 - Table of separation distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Table of separation distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives...Table of separation distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives...donor when barricaded (ft.) Ammonium nitrate Blasting agent...

2012-04-01

178

Mine blast injuries: ocular and social aspects  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND/AIMS—Landmines have long been used in conventional warfare. These are antipersonnel mines which continue to injure people long after a ceasefire without differentiating between friend or foe, soldier or civilian, women or children. This study focuses on Afghan non-combatants engaged in mine clearing operations in Afghanistan in the aftermath of the Russo-Afghan war. The patterns and types of injuries seen are described and experiences in their management, ways, and means to prevent them, and recommendations for the rehabilitation of the affected individuals are given.?METHODS—It is a retrospective and analytical study of 84 patients aged 19-56 years who sustained mine blast injuries during mine clearing operations in Afghanistan from November 1992 to January 1996. The study was carried out at a military hospital with tertiary care facilities. The patients were divided into three groups on the basis of their injuries. Group 1 required only general surgical attention, group 2 sustained only ocular injuries, while group 3 had combined ocular and general injuries. Patients in groups 2 and 3 were treated in two phases. The first phase aimed at immediate restoration of the anatomy, while restoration of function wherever possible was done in subsequent surgical procedures in the second phase.?RESULTS—It was observed that 51 out of 84 patients (60.7%) had sustained ocular trauma of a variable degree as a result of the blasts. The mean age of the victims was 29 years and they were all male. A total of 91 eyes of 51 patients (89.2%) had been damaged. Bilaterality of damage was seen in 40 (78.4%) patients. Most, 34 (37.3%), eyes became totally blind (NPL). Only a few escaped with injury mild enough not to impair vision. Foreign bodies, small and multiple, were found in the majority of eyes; most, however, were found in the anterior segment, and posterior segment injuries were proportionally less.?CONCLUSIONS—The prevalence of blindness caused by mine blast injuries is quite high. The resulting psychosocial trauma to the patients and their families is tremendous and has not been adequately highlighted. These injuries are a great drain on the country's resources. Enforcement of preventive measures and the use of protective gear and sophisticated equipment by the mine clearing personnel would prove to be far more economical in terms of human life as well as medical and economic resources. There is also need for greater attention towards the establishment of support groups and rehabilitation programmes for these individuals.?? PMID:10837390

Muzaffar, W.; Khan, M. D.; Akbar, M; Khan, M. D.; Malik, A. M.; Durrani, O.

2000-01-01

179

Viscoelastic Materials Study for the Mitigation of Blast-Related Brain Injury  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent preliminary research into the causes of blast-related brain injury indicates that exposure to blast pressures, such as from IED detonation or multiple firings of a weapon, causes damage to brain tissue resulting in Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Current combat helmets are not sufficient to protect the warfighter from this danger and the effects are debilitating, costly, and long-lasting. Commercially available viscoelastic materials, designed to dampen vibration caused by shock waves, might be useful as helmet liners to dampen blast waves. The objective of this research is to develop an experimental technique to test these commercially available materials when subject to blast waves and evaluate their blast mitigating behavior. A 40-mm-bore gas gun is being used as a shock tube to generate blast waves (ranging from 1 to 500 psi) in a test fixture at the gun muzzle. A fast opening valve is used to release nitrogen gas from the breech to impact instrumented targets. The targets consist of aluminum/ viscoelastic polymer/ aluminum materials. Blast attenuation is determined through the measurement of pressure and accelerometer data in front of and behind the target. The experimental technique, calibration and checkout procedures, and results will be presented.

Bartyczak, Susan; Mock, Willis, Jr.

2011-06-01

180

Characteristics of an explosive blast-induced brain injury in an experimental model.  

PubMed

Mild traumatic brain injury resulting from exposure to an explosive blast is associated with significant neurobehavioral outcomes in soldiers. Little is known about the neuropathologic consequences of such an insult to the human brain. This study is an attempt to understand the effects of an explosive blast in a large animal gyrencephalic brain blast injury model. Anesthetized Yorkshire swine were exposed to measured explosive blast levels in 3 operationally relevant scenarios: simulated free field (blast tube), high-mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicle surrogate, and building (4-walled structure). Histologic changes in exposed animals up to 2 weeks after blast were compared to a group of naive and sham controls. The overall pathologic changes in all 3 blast scenarios were limited, with very little neuronal injury, fiber tract demyelination, or intracranial hemorrhage observed. However, there were 2 distinct neuropathologic changes observed: increased astrocyte activation and proliferation and periventricular axonal injury detected with ?-amyloid precursor protein immunohistochemistry. We postulate that the increased astrogliosis observed may have a longer-term potential for the exacerbation of brain injury and that the pattern of periventricular axonal injury may be related to a potential for cognitive and mood disorders. PMID:22002430

de Lanerolle, Nihal C; Bandak, Faris; Kang, Dewey; Li, Alexander Y; Du, Fu; Swauger, Peter; Parks, Steven; Ling, Geoffrey; Kim, Jung H

2011-11-01

181

Blast dynamics at Mount St Helens on 18 May 1980  

USGS Publications Warehouse

At 8.32 a.m. on 18 May 1980, failure of the upper part of the north slope of Mount St Helens triggered a lateral eruption ('the blast') that devastated the conifer forests in a sector covering ???500 km2 north of the volcano. I present here a steady flow model for the blast dynamics and propose that through much of the devastated area the blast was a supersonic flow of a complex multiphase (solid, liquid, vapour) mixture. The shape of the blast zone; pressure, temperature, velocity (Mach number) and density distributions within the flow; positions of weak and strong internal shocks; and mass flux, energy flux, and total energy are calculated. The shape of blast zone was determined by the initial areal expansion from the reservoir, by internal expansion and compression waves (including shocks), and by the density of the expanding mixture. The pressure within the flow dropped rapidly away from the source of the blast until, at a distance of ???11 km, the flow became underpressured relative to the surrounding atmosphere. Weak shocks within the flow subparallel to the east and west margins coalesced at about this distance into a strong Mach disk shock, across which the flow velocities would have dropped from supersonic to subsonic as the pressure rose back towards ambient. The positions of the shocks may be reflected in differences in the patterns of felled trees. At the limits of the devastated area, the temperature had dropped only 20% from the reservoir temperature because the entrained solids thermally buffered the flow (the dynamic and thermodynamic effects of the admixture of the surrounding atmosphere and the uprooted forest and soils into the flow are not considered). The density of the flow decreased with distance until, at the limits of the blast zone, 20-25 km from the volcano, the density became comparable with that of the surrounding (dirty) atmosphere and the flow became buoyant and ramped up into the atmosphere. According to the model, the mass flux per unit area at the source was 0.6 ?? 104 g s-1 cm-2 and the energy flux per unit area was 2.5 MW cm-2. From the measured total ejected mass, 0.25 ?? 1015 g, the total energy released during the eruption was 1024 erg or 24 megatons. The model, triggering of the eruption and the transition from unsteady to steady flow, and applications to eyewitness observations and atmospheric effects are discussed in ref. 1. ?? 1981 Nature Publishing Group.

Kieffer, S.W.

1981-01-01

182

Blast-related fracture patterns: a forensic biomechanical approach  

PubMed Central

Improved protective measures and medical care has increased the survivability from battlefield injuries. In an attempt to reduce the debilitating consequences of blast injury, understanding and mitigating the effects of explosion on the extremities is key. In this study, forensic biomechanical analyses have been applied to determine mechanisms of injury after the traumatic event. The aims of this study were (i) to determine which effects of the explosion are responsible for combat casualty extremity bone injury in two distinct environments, namely open, free-field (open group), and in vehicle or in cover (enclosed group), and (ii) to determine whether patterns of combat casualty bone injury differed between environments. Medical records of casualties admitted to a military hospital in Afghanistan were reviewed over a six-month period. Explosive injuries have been sub-divided traditionally into primary, secondary and tertiary effects. All radiographs were independently reviewed by a military radiologist, a team of military orthopaedic surgeons and a team of academic biomechanists, in order to determine ‘zones of injury’ (ZoIs), and their related mechanisms. Sixty-two combat casualties with 115 ZoIs were identified. Thirty-four casualties in the open group sustained 56 ZoIs; 28 casualties in the enclosed group sustained 59 ZoIs. There was no statistical difference in mean ZoIs per casualty between groups (p = 0.54). There was a higher proportion of lower limb injuries in the enclosed group compared with the open group (p < 0.05). Of the casualties in the open group, 1 ZoI was owing to the primary effects of blast, 10 owing to a combination of primary and secondary blast effects, 23 owing to secondary blast effects and 24 owing to tertiary blast effects. In contrast, tertiary blast effects predominated in the enclosed group, accounting for 96 per cent of ZoIs. These data clearly demonstrate two distinct injury groups based upon the casualties' environment. The enclosed environment appears to attenuate the primary and secondary effects of the explosion. However, tertiary blast effects were the predominant mechanism of injury, with severe axial loading to the lower extremity being a characteristic of the fractures seen. The development of future mitigation strategies must focus on reducing all explosion-related injury mechanisms. Integral to this process is an urgent requirement to better understand the behaviour of bone in this unique environment. PMID:21123255

Ramasamy, Arul; Hill, Adam M.; Masouros, Spyros; Gibb, Iain; Bull, Anthony M. J.; Clasper, Jon C.

2011-01-01

183

Blast-related traumatic brain injury.  

PubMed

A bomb blast may cause the full severity range of traumatic brain injury (TBI), from mild concussion to severe, penetrating injury. The pathophysiology of blast-related TBI is distinctive, with injury magnitude dependent on several factors, including blast energy and distance from the blast epicentre. The prevalence of blast-related mild TBI in modern war zones has varied widely, but detection is optimised by battlefield assessment of concussion and follow-up screening of all personnel with potential concussive events. There is substantial overlap between post-concussive syndrome and post-traumatic stress disorder, and blast-related mild TBI seems to increase the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder. Post-concussive syndrome, post-traumatic stress disorder, and chronic pain are a clinical triad in this patient group. Persistent impairment after blast-related mild TBI might be largely attributable to psychological factors, although a causative link between repeated mild TBIs caused by blasts and chronic traumatic encephalopathy has not been established. The application of advanced neuroimaging and the identification of specific molecular biomarkers in serum for diagnosis and prognosis are rapidly advancing, and might help to further categorise these injuries. PMID:23884075

Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; McFarlane, Alexander C; Bragge, Peter; Armonda, Rocco A; Grimes, Jamie B; Ling, Geoffrey S

2013-09-01

184

Color changing photonic crystals detect blast exposure  

PubMed Central

Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is the “signature wound” of the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. However, with no objective information of relative blast exposure, warfighters with bTBI may not receive appropriate medical care and are at risk of being returned to the battlefield. Accordingly, we have created a colorimetric blast injury dosimeter (BID) that exploits material failure of photonic crystals to detect blast exposure. Appearing like a colored sticker, the BID is fabricated in photosensitive polymers via multi-beam interference lithography. Although very stable in the presence of heat, cold or physical impact, sculpted micro- and nano-structures of the BID are physically altered in a precise manner by blast exposure, resulting in color changes that correspond with blast intensity. This approach offers a lightweight, power-free sensor that can be readily interpreted by the naked eye. Importantly, with future refinement this technology may be deployed to identify soldiers exposed to blast at levels suggested to be supra-threshold for non-impact blast-induced mild TBI. PMID:21040795

Cullen, D. Kacy; Xu, Yongan; Reneer, Dexter V.; Browne, Kevin D.; Geddes, James W.; Yang, Shu; Smith, Douglas H.

2010-01-01

185

The Saugus Iron Works Blast Furnace  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

A view of the Saugus Iron Works blast furnace, which smelted the iron from limonite, an iron ore. The limonite formed in nearby bogs, and was heated in the blast furnace until the iron melted and ran out the bottom of the furnace. ...

186

Building BLAST for Coprocessor Accelerators Using Macah  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract The problem of detecting similarities between different genetic sequences is fun- damental to many,research pursuits in biology and genetics. BLAST (Basic Local Alignment and Search Tool) is the most commonly,used tool for identi- fying and assessing the significance of such similarities. With the quantity of available genetic sequence data rapidly increasing, improving the performance of the BLAST algorithm is

Ben Weintraub

187

Earthquake Engineering Mitigation of Blast Loading  

E-print Network

Earthquake Engineering Mitigation of Blast Loading Health Monitoring & Condition Assessment-structural building components, and visual sensing for dy- namic testing. Associate Professor Hyonny Kim comes to UC-fluidics and protective/energy absorbing materials provides synergy with the Department's ongoing work in blast mitigation

Wang, Deli

188

Highly concentrated foam formulation for blast mitigation  

SciTech Connect

A highly concentrated foam formulation for blast suppression and dispersion mitigation for use in responding to a terrorism incident involving a radiological dispersion device. The foam formulation is more concentrated and more stable than the current blast suppression foam (AFC-380), which reduces the logistics burden on the user.

Tucker, Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM); Gao, Huizhen (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-12-14

189

Existing and prospective blast-furnace conditions  

SciTech Connect

Blast-furnace conditions are investigated by means of a multizone model. The expected performance of prospective technologies is assessed, as well as the trends in blast-furnace processes. The model permits the identification of means of overcoming practical difficulties.

I.G. Tovarovskii; V.I. Bol'shakov; V.P. Lyalyuk; A.E. Merkulov; D. V. Pinchuk [Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Dnepropetrovsk (Ukraine). Institute of Ferrous Metallurgy

2009-07-15

190

Comparative Study on Calculation Methods of Blasting Vibration Velocity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to the extreme complexities in rock blasting and difficulties in theoretical or numerical analysis, and the enormous consumption of explosives in mining and construction operations, empirical or semi-empirical formulae for blasting vibration velocity (BVV) were obtained from observations and measurements in field blast tests and are still widely used all over the world. This paper investigates the fitting degree and characteristics of several calculation methods for BVV based on 34 sets of data samples from 27 projects belonging to 4 types. The results indicate that both the cube-root scaling formula and the square-root scaling formula have relatively good fitting degree, while the multiple regression analysis can give the best fitting outcome if the sample space satisfies certain requirements. Whether the cube-root scaling formula or the square-root scaling formula is chosen to analyze the relationship between BVV and scaled distance depends on the average scaled distance under cubic-root scaling. If the average scaled distance is over 0.1, the cube-root scaling formula should be used; otherwise, the square-root scaling formula should be used. Bigger samples integrated from data samples of different projects but in the same type were then analyzed to get the empirical relations for different types of projects. The correlation coefficients of these relations are quite good, thus these relations can be used for reference in other similar projects. This paper then discusses the physical meanings of parameters in different formulae, sample selection and parameter choice for BVV. It suggests that the current calculation methods for explosive charge, blasting-to-monitoring distance and scaled distance need to be improved. It also concludes that the integrated BVV from velocity components in three-dimensions is more reasonable on a theoretical basis. It can yield good results in predicting the blasting vibration, and should be used as widely as possible.

Liang, Qingguo; An, Yafang; Zhao, Lei; Li, Dewu; Yan, Liping

2011-01-01

191

Nondestructive thermoelectric evaluation of the grit blasting induced effects in metallic biomaterials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Grit blasting is a surface treatment process widely used to enhance mechanical fixation of the implants through increasing their roughness. Test samples of two metallic biomaterial alloys such 316LVM and Ti6Al4V were blasted by projecting Al2O3 and ZrO2 particles which yield a coarse and a fine rough surface. Then, the blasted samples were thermally treated before and after partial stress relaxation and measured by non-destructive thermoelectric techniques (NDTT), the non-contacting and contacting thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements respectively. It has been found that the TEP measurements are associated directly with the subtle material variations such as cold work and compressive residual stresses due to plastic deformation produced by grit blasting. The TEP measurements clearly demonstrate that the non-contact NDTT technique is very sensitive to the reverse transformation of the ?'-martensite (blasted 316LVM) and the expected relaxation of compressive residual stresses with increasing the severity of the thermal treatment (blasted 316LVM and Ti-6Al-4V), while the contact NDTT results are closely related to grain size refinement and work hardening.

Carreon, H.; Ruiz, A.; Barriuso, S.; González-Carrasco, J. L.; Caballero, F. G.; Lieblich, M.

2013-01-01

192

Back yard blasting on the quiet  

SciTech Connect

When R and F Coal Company of Ohio ''sweeps out the corners'' of many of its old sites, it often blasts ''literally in some family's back yard.'' Sequential blasting patterns allow for such work without unduly disturbing the residents. Four basic delay patterns are detailed in this article. Sequential timers, EB caps, HDP blast boosts, and bulk ANFO are used in the sequences. Electric blasting caps can be tested by means of a galvanometer for continuity and resistance whenever possible. The flexibility of programming firing times, in the four patterns, allows operators to fine tune the blasting techniques. End or back break are reduced, fragmentation is optimized, and vibration is held to a minimum.

Chironis, N.P.

1983-06-01

193

Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Program to Measure the Flow Phenomena in a Scaled Model of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor Lower Plenum for Validation of CFD Codes  

SciTech Connect

The experimental program that is being conducted at the Matched Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Flow Facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to obtain benchmark data on measurements of flow phenomena in a scaled model of a prismatic gas-cooled reactor lower plenum using 3-D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is presented. A description of the scaling analysis, experimental facility, 3-D PIV system, measurement uncertainties and analysis, experimental procedures and samples of the data sets that have been obtained are included. Samples of the data set that will be presented include mean-velocity-field and turbulence data in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GTMHR) design. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. The flow in the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined cross flow - with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate flow scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. The model is fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive-index of the mineral oil working fluid. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits high-quality measurements to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL MIR system is its large size which allows improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean average flow rate) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. The measurements reveal developing, non-uniform flow in the inlet jets and complicated flow patterns in the model lower plenum. Data include three-dimensional vector plots, data displays along the coordinate planes (slices) and charts that describe the component flows at specific regions in the model. Information on inlet velocity profiles is also presented.

Hugh M. McIlroy Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

2008-09-01

194

Coupled Phenomena in Chemistry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Various phenomena in chemistry and biology can be understood through Gibbs energy utilization. Some common phenomena in chemistry are explained including neutralization, hydrolysis, oxidation and reaction, simultaneous dissociation equilibrium of two weak acids, and common ion effect on solubility. (Author/SA)

Matsubara, Akira; Nomura, Kazuo

1979-01-01

195

Study of blast event propagation in different media using a novel ultrafast miniature optical pressure sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Traumatic brain injury (TBI, also called intracranial injury) is a high potential threat to our soldiers. A helmet structural health monitoring system can be effectively used to study the effects of ballistic/blast events on the helmet and human skull to prevent soldiers from TBI. However, one of the biggest challenges lies in that the pressure sensor installed inside the helmet system must be fast enough to capture the blast wave during the transient period. In this paper, an ultrafast optical fiber sensor is presented to measure the blast signal. The sensor is based on a Fabry-Pérot (FP) interferometeric principle. An FP cavity is built between the endface of an etched optical fiber tip and the silica thin diaphragm attached on the end of a multimode optical fiber. The sensor is small enough to be installed in different locations of a helmet to measure blast pressure simultaneously. Several groups of tests regarding multi-layer blast events were conducted to evaluate the sensors' performance. The sensors were mounted in different segments of a shock tube side by side with the reference sensors, to measure a rapidly increasing pressure. The segments of the shock tube were filled with different media. The results demonstrated that our sensors' responses agreed well with those from the electrical reference sensors. In addition, the home-made shock tube could provide a good resource to study the propagation of blast event in different media.

Zou, Xiaotian; Wu, Nan; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Hongtao; Niezrecki, Christopher; Wang, Xingwei

2011-06-01

196

FREE-AIR ATOMIC BLAST PRESSURE MEASUREMENTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies were made to determine the free-air peak overpressure vs. ; distance curve for air bursts at overpressure below those covered by existing ; data, the path of the triple point at high altitudes, and the relative strengths ; of the free-air and reflected shocks above the triple point and of tbe Mach shock ; below the triple point. The

N. A. Haskell; R. M. Brubaker

1954-01-01

197

Lead, chromium, and cadmium exposure during abrasive blasting.  

PubMed

An evaluation of lead, cadmium, and chromium exposure was conducted during abrasive blasting of a steel bridge to remove paint in preparation for repainting. Airborne lead concentrations were measured at several locations inside the containment structure, as well as near the workers' breathing zones. Airborne cadmium and chromium were also measured in the containment area. Blood lead levels were monitored in each worker. Airborne lead and cadmium levels in containment exceeded the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's permissible exposure limits by factors of 219 and 3.1, respectively. The use of supplied air-blasting helmets will not effectively reduce workers' lead exposure to the permissible exposure limits when airborne levels are as high as were measured in this study. Studies are needed to evaluate additional engineering controls and alternative paint removal methods. Evaluation of workers' exposure to lead and other hazardous metals is needed for projects involving abrasive blasting. Medical surveillance for cadmium and lead may be necessary for similar projects. PMID:8638970

Conroy, L M; Menezes-Lindsay, R M; Sullivan, P M; Cali, S; Forst, L

1996-01-01

198

LTC vacuum blasting machine (concrete): Baseline report  

SciTech Connect

The LTC shot blast technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The LTC 1073 Vacuum Blasting Machine uses a high-capacity, direct-pressure blasting system which incorporates a continuous feed for the blast media. The blast media cleans the surface within the contained brush area of the blast. It incorporates a vacuum system which removes dust and debris from the surface as it is blasted. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure during maintenance activities was minimal, but due to mechanical difficulties dust monitoring could not be conducted during operation. Noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each of these exposures is recommended because of the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place. This may cause the results to be inaccurate. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed environment. In addition, other safety and health issues found were ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, lockout/tagout, and arm-hand vibration.

NONE

1997-07-31

199

Serum-Based Protein Biomarkers in Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury Spectrum Disorder  

PubMed Central

The biological consequences of exposure to explosive blast are extremely complex. Serum protein biomarkers in blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) can aid in determining injury severity, monitoring progress, and predicting outcome. Exposure to blast results in varying degrees of physical injury. Explosive blast can also induce psychological stress that can contribute to or amplify the extent of physical damage. Given the complexity, scale of injury, and variety of symptoms, bTBI may be best described as a spectrum disorder. In this focused review, we summarize the status of serum protein biomarkers in bTBI in the context of the classification and pathological changes of other forms of TBI. Finally, we recommend specific and easily implementable measures to accelerate serum protein biomarker discovery and validation in bTBI. PMID:22783223

Agoston, Denes V.; Elsayed, Mohammad

2012-01-01

200

Characterization of novel blast resistant genes for US rice breeding  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Blast resistance genes, such as Pi-ta, conveying resistance up to 8 common US races of the blast pathogen (Magnaporthe oryzae), have been used for 20 years in the US rice (Oryza sativa) industry. However, Pi-ta is susceptible to two known US races of blast. Race IE-1K has caused blast outbreaks in A...

201

Behavior of Silicone Sealants in Bomb Blast Mitigating Window Designs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The threat of terrorist attack impacts our lives every day. Because this threat is very real, we have seen the use of bomb blast mitigating window designs grow significantly in recent years. Effective bomb blast mitigating window designs allow the window system to withstand a moderate bomb blast without causing significant injury to building occupants from the blast itself or

Kenneth Yarosh; Gerald Braeuer; Sigurd Sitte

2002-01-01

202

Predicting the effectiveness of blast wall barriers using neural networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Blast damage assessment of buildings and structural elements requires an accurate prediction of the blast loads in terms of the peak pressures and impulses. Blast loadings on structures have typically been evaluated using empirical relationships. These relationships assume that there are no obstacles between the explosive device and the target. If a blast barrier is used to protect personnel or

Alex M. Remennikov; Timothy A. Rose

2007-01-01

203

CO{sub 2} pellet blasting studies  

SciTech Connect

Initial tests with CO{sub 2} pellet blasting as a decontamination technique were completed in 1993 at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). During 1996, a number of additional CO{sub 2} pellet blasting studies with Alpheus Cleaning Technologies, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Pennsylvania State University were conducted. After the testing with Alpheus was complete, an SDI-5 shaved CO{sub 2} blasting unit was purchased by the ICPP to test and determine its capabilities before using in ICPP decontamination efforts. Results of the 1996 testing will be presented in this report.

Archibald, K.E.

1997-01-01

204

Transport phenomena in nanoporous materials.  

PubMed

Diffusion, that is, the irregular movement of atoms and molecules, is a universal phenomenon of mass transfer occurring in all states of matter. It is of equal importance for fundamental research and technological applications. The present review deals with the challenges of the reliable observation of these phenomena in nanoporous materials. Starting with a survey of the different variants of diffusion measurement, it highlights the potentials of "microscopic" techniques, notably the pulsed field gradient (PFG) technique of NMR and the techniques of microimaging by interference microscopy (IFM) and IR microscopy (IRM). Considering ensembles of guest molecules, these techniques are able to directly record mass transfer phenomena over distances of typically micrometers. Their concerted application has given rise to the clarification of long-standing discrepancies, notably between microscopic equilibrium and macroscopic non-equilibrium measurements, and to a wealth of new information about molecular transport under confinement, hitherto often inaccessible and sometimes even unimaginable. PMID:25123096

Kärger, Jörg

2015-01-12

205

On the Propagation and Interaction of Spherical Blast Waves  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The characteristics and the scaling laws of isolated spherical blast waves have been briefly reviewed. Both self-similar solutions and numerical solutions of isolated blast waves are discussed. Blast profiles in the near-field (strong shock region) and the far-field (weak shock region) are examined. Particular attention is directed at the blast overpressure and shock propagating speed. Consideration is also given to the interaction of spherical blast waves. Test data for the propagation and interaction of spherical blast waves emanating from explosives placed in the vicinity of a solid propellant stack are presented. These data are discussed with regard to the scaling laws concerning the decay of blast overpressure.

Kandula, Max; Freeman, Robert

2007-01-01

206

How to Measure Qualitative Understanding of DC-Circuit Phenomena--Taking a Closer Look at the External Representations of 9-Year-Olds  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Pupils' qualitative understanding of DC-circuit phenomena is reported to be weak. In numerous research reports lists of problems in understanding the functioning of simple DC-circuits have been presented. So-called mental model surveys have uncovered difficulties in different age groups, and in different phases of instruction. In this study, the…

Kallunki, Veera

2013-01-01

207

Economical solutions to blast mitigation on bridges  

E-print Network

Mitigating the energy created from a blast has been a topic of utmost importance in the terrorism-feared world of today. Main targets of concern are passageways that are significant to a specific area, such as bridges. ...

DeRogatis, Austin (Austin Patrick)

2008-01-01

208

Perfluorocarbon vapor tagging of blasting cap detonators  

DOEpatents

A plug for a blasting cap is made of an elastomer in which is dissolved a perfluorocarbon. The perfluorocarbon is released as a vapor into the ambient over a long period of time to serve as a detectable taggant.

Dietz, Russell N. (Shoreham, NY); Senum, Gunnar I. (Patchogue, NY)

1981-01-01

209

Critical distance for blast-resistant design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Blast loads have, in the recent past, become important service loads for certain categories of structures. An important task in blast-resistant design is to make a realistic prediction of the blast pressures. The distance of explosion from the structure is an important datum, governing the magnitude and duration of the blast loads. The current practice is to choose some arbitrary distance for design purposes. This paper presents some results of analytical studies to show that such a notion is likely to be erroneous, particularly for tall and slender structures. The elements of the blast phenomenon are reviewed, before going into the formulations leading to the 'critical blast distance' at which the transient dynamic response rises to a maximum. Based on the principle of Mach stem growth and consequent transformation of the spherical shock front into cylindrical or plane shock front, an expression for the distance at which the structure is fully engulfed by the Mach region is derived. This is the distance at which the cumulative blast effect reaches a maximum, and hence can be identified as critical distance. To verify this theory, certain numerical experiments are conducted on structures of different heights and diameters, such as cylindrical towers, a chimney and a cooling tower. The results of these studies have convincingly proved the existence of the critical ground-zero distance at which the cumulative blast effect reaches a maximum. It is concluded that this critical distance should be used as the design distance particularly for tall structures. It is also advisable to use a realistic type of shock front and shock reflection coefficient, consistent with the height of Mach stem, incidence angle and pressure magnitude.

Dharaneepathy, M. V.; Rao, M. N. Keshava; Santhakumar, A. R.

1995-02-01

210

Detecting Residues On Grit-Blasted Surfaces  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Addition of fluorescent or iridescent material to plastic grit particles proposed for detection of grit residues after grit-blast cleaning. Residual films visible by observing grit-blasted surfaces under infrared or ultraviolet light. Plastic grit contains fluorescent or iridescent additive in core and coating. Wherever grit material becomes embedded, additive makes it visible under infrared or ultraviolet light. Applicable to other grit materials, for example fluorescent or iridescent materials added to particles of glass, silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, or zirconium silicate.

Novak, H. L.; Zook, L. M.

1989-01-01

211

Patterns in Blast Injuries to the Hand  

Microsoft Academic Search

Blast injuries to the hand are not just a wartime phenomenon but also quite common in rural communities throughout northern\\u000a California. The purpose of this study is to review our experience with blast injuries in the community and review the most\\u000a common patterns in an attempt to identify the pathomechanics of the hand injury and the reconstructive procedures that are

Ron Hazani; Rudolf F. Buntic; Darrell Brooks

2009-01-01

212

Blast-Tube Cooling for Aircraft Generators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Established principles of hydraulics are used to develop and explain fundamentals of blast-tube cooling. It is shown that the pressure-volume curves of a blast tube can be determined by flight tests, and that the pressure-volume curve of a generator can be determined in the laboratory. From the two pressure-volume curves, the air-flow through the generator in flight can be predicted,

Cyril G. Veinott

1944-01-01

213

Isolation and characterization of CD34+ blast-derived exosomes in acute myeloid leukemia.  

PubMed

Exosomes are membrane-bound vesicles found in all biological fluids. AML patients' plasma collected at diagnosis contains elevated exosome levels relative to normal donor (ND) plasma. The molecular profile of AML exosomes changes in the course of therapy and may serve as a measure of disease progression or response to therapy. However, plasma contains a mix of exosomes derived from various cell types. To be able to utilize blast-derived exosomes as biomarkers for AML, we have developed an immunoaffinity-based capture method utilizing magnetic microbeads coated with anti-CD34 antibody (Ab). This Ab is specific for CD34, a unique marker of AML blasts. The capture procedure was developed using CD34+ exosomes derived from Kasumi-1 AML cell culture supernatants. The capture capacity of CD34microbeads was shown to linearly correlate with the input exosomes. A 10 uL aliquot of CD34 microbeads was able to capture all of CD34+ exosomes present in 100-1,000 uL of AML plasma. The levels of immunocaptured CD34+ exosomes correlated with the percentages of CD34+ blasts in the AML patients' peripheral blood. The immunocaptured exosomes had a typical cup-shaped morphology by transmission electron microscopy, and their molecular cargo was similar to that of parental blasts. These exosomes were biologically-active. Upon co-incubation with natural killer (NK) cells, captured blast-derived exosomes down-regulated surface NKG2D expression, while non-captured exosomes reduced expression levels of NKp46. Our data provide a proof-of-principle that blast-derived exosomes can be quantitatively recovered from AML patients' plasma, their molecular profile recapitulates that of autologous blasts and they retain the ability to mediate immune suppression. These data suggest that immunocaptured blast-derived exosomes might be useful in diagnosis and/or prognosis of AML in the future. PMID:25093329

Hong, Chang Sook; Muller, Laurent; Boyiadzis, Michael; Whiteside, Theresa L

2014-01-01

214

Medium-Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (MSTIDs) resulting from Chelyabinsk Meteor Blast  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A global network of GPS receivers continuously make line-of-sight (LOS) measurements of the total electron content (TEC) of the ionosphere. This TEC measurement data can be analyzed to 'persistently monitor' natural and man-made activity in the atmosphere (such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, rocket launches, etc) which propagate into the ionosphere to produce TIDs (Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances). As an example we have analyzed in detail the TIDs resulting from the 15 Feb 2013 Chelyabinsk meteor blast as observed by the Artu GPS receiver site in Arti, Russia close to the event. Seven of the GPS satellite measurements with LOS pierce points within 1000 km of the blast show disturbances. Four of these clearly show VTEC oscillations with ~12 minute periods. The other three show much weaker responses, but their LOS pierce points are far from the blast and their aspects between the geomagnetic field & blast propagation vector are unfavorable (near broadside). By fitting all seven measurements we estimate a propagation speed of ~380 m/s for these medium-scale TIDs. As future 'persistent surveillance' efforts we intend to investigate the observability of man-made activities such as static rocket engine firings in TEC measurements. Analysis of MSTIDs resulting from the Chelyabinsk meteor blast

Sheeks, B. J.; Warren, N.; Coster, A. J.

2013-12-01

215

A study on planar blast waves initiated by gaseous detonations. I - Estimation of initiation energy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An experimental study has been made of the initiation of planar blast waves by gaseous detonations. A gaseous detonation initiated by a DDT process is submitted into a long tube filled with air at various initial pressures. The measurement of the decay process of a produced shock wave indicates that it can be treated as a 'plane source' blast wave, although there exists a secondary shock wave, which may be a detonation wave reflected on an end wall of a driver tube, behind the blast wave front. As a result, the decay of a propagation Mach number and a peak overpressure of the wave front as a function of a distance from the initiation source and the initial pressure of the medium are described by the quasi-similar theory of the idealized plane source blast wave. Comparing the experimental results with the theory leads to the estimation of an initiation energy of the blast wave. The initiation energies of oxyhydrogen detonations for three different mixture strengths, three different initial pressures, and two different sizes of the driver tube are estimated to show that about 30-40 percent of the chemical energy contained initially in the driver tube is used to initiate the blast wave.

Ohyagi, S.; Yoshihashi, T.; Harigaya, Y.

216

Neuropathology of explosive blast traumatic brain injury.  

PubMed

During the conflicts of the Global War on Terror, which are Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) in Afghanistan and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), there have been over a quarter of a million diagnosed cases of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The vast majority are due to explosive blast. Although explosive blast TBI (bTBI) shares many clinical features with closed head TBI (cTBI) and penetrating TBI (pTBI), it has unique features, such as early cerebral edema and prolonged cerebral vasospasm. Evolving work suggests that diffuse axonal injury (DAI) seen following explosive blast exposure is different than DAI from focal impact injury. These unique features support the notion that bTBI is a separate and distinct form of TBI. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge pertaining to bTBI. Areas of discussion are: the physics of explosive blast generation, blast wave interaction with the bony calvarium and brain tissue, gross tissue pathophysiology, regional brain injury, and cellular and molecular mechanisms of explosive blast neurotrauma. PMID:22836523

Magnuson, John; Leonessa, Fabio; Ling, Geoffrey S F

2012-10-01

217

Ultra Safe And Secure Blasting System  

SciTech Connect

The Ultra is a blasting system that is designed for special applications where the risk and consequences of unauthorized demolition or blasting are so great that the use of an extraordinarily safe and secure blasting system is justified. Such a blasting system would be connected and logically welded together through digital code-linking as part of the blasting system set-up and initialization process. The Ultra's security is so robust that it will defeat the people who designed and built the components in any attempt at unauthorized detonation. Anyone attempting to gain unauthorized control of the system by substituting components or tapping into communications lines will be thwarted in their inability to provide encrypted authentication. Authentication occurs through the use of codes that are generated by the system during initialization code-linking and the codes remain unknown to anyone, including the authorized operator. Once code-linked, a closed system has been created. The system requires all components connected as they were during initialization as well as a unique code entered by the operator for function and blasting.

Hart, M M

2009-07-27

218

Building BLAST for Coprocessor Accelerators Using Macah  

E-print Network

The problem of detecting similarities between different genetic sequences is fundamental to many research pursuits in biology and genetics. BLAST (Basic Local Alignment and Search Tool) is the most commonly used tool for identifying and assessing the significance of such similarities. With the quantity of available genetic sequence data rapidly increasing, improving the performance of the BLAST algorithm is a problem of great interest. BLAST compares a single query sequence against a database of known sequences, employing a heuristic algorithm that consists of three stages arranged in a pipeline, such that the output of one stage feeds into the input of the next stage. Several recent studies have successfully investigated the use of Field-Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) to accelerate the execution of the BLAST algorithm, focusing on the first and second stages, which account for the vast majority of the algorithms execution time. While these results are encouraging, translating algorithms like BLAST that contain somewhat complex and unpredictable control flow and data access patterns into versions suitable for implementation on coprocessor accelerators like FPGAs turns out to be quite difficult using currently available tools. Such architectures are usually programmed using Hardware Description Languages (HDLs), which are significantly more difficult to learn and use than standard programming languages. In this paper, an accelerated version of the BLAST algorithm is presented, written in a new language called Macah, which is designed to make the task of programming coprocessor accelerators easier for programmers familiar with the widely-known C language.

Ben Weintraub

2008-01-01

219

Understanding the Physics of changing mass phenomena  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Changing mass phenomena, like a falling chain or a bungee jumper, might give surprising results, even for experienced physicists. They have resulted in hot discussions in journals, in which for instance Physics professors claim the impossibility of an acceleration larger then g in case of a bungee jumper. These phenomena are also interesting as topics for challenging student projects, and used as such by Dutch high school students. I will take these phenomena as the context in which I like to demonstrate the possibilities of ICT in the learning process of physics. Especially dynamical modeling enables us to describe these phenomena in an elegant way and with knowledge of high school mathematics. Furthermore tools for video-analysis and data from measurements with sensors allow us to study the phenomena in experiments. This example demonstrates the level of implementation of ICT in Physics Education in The Netherlands [1].

Ellermeijer, A. L.

2008-05-01

220

Blast resistance of prismatic sandwich structures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Metallic sandwich panels have emerged as candidate blast resistant structures that can be tailored to contain damage from impulsive loads of the type typically generated by explosives. When such panels are impulsively loaded, the stresses imposed by the core on the front face, as well as those transmitted through the core, govern the response metrics: especially the center displacement, the resistance to tearing and the loads transmitted to the supports. Prismatic cores such as I-, X-, Y- and Z- cores differ from other cores, such as foams and trusses, in that they do not exhibit constant dynamic crush strength, enabling collapse to occur in a controlled manner. Establishing relationships between core topology crushing response and panel performance is one of the major goals of this research. For this purpose a gas gun instrumented with high speed photography and direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar was built and used to perform laboratory scale high-speed impact tests. Samples of representative prismatic core unit cells were manufactured and tested in compression at axial velocities ranging from quasi-static to 200m/s. The dynamic strength and deformation (buckling) were measured and used to calibrate the imperfections in a finite element model. The model was then used to validate a constitutive model that can be used to predict the blast resistance of prismatic sandwich structures. This research identifies a simple dual level dynamic strength as a common response in metallic prismatic cores. This is due to the dominant effect of plastic shock generated by dynamic loading. Furthermore, it justifies the use of a simple dynamic axial compression test for calibration of the dynamic strength of the core. An analytical model that accounts for the shock effects in a homogenized core and embodies the dual-level dynamic strength is presented. It is shown to capture the experimental observations and simulated results with acceptable fidelity. This model provides the basis for a constitutive model that can be used to understand the response of sandwich plates subject to impulsive loads.

Ferri, Enrico

221

Gapped BLAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The BLAST programs are widely used tools for searching protein and DNA databases for sequence similarities. For protein comparisons, a variety of definitional, algorithmic and statistical refinements described here permits the execution time of the BLAST programs to be decreased substantially while enhancing their sensitivity to weak similarities. A new criterion for triggering the extension of word hits, combined with

Stephen F. Altschul; Thomas L. Madden; Alejandro A. Schäffer; Jinghui Zhang; Zheng Zhang; Webb C. Miller; David J. Lipman

1997-01-01

222

Determination of Optimal Blast Parameters for Construction of Blast-Created Rock-Fill Dams  

Microsoft Academic Search

The building of dams intended for various purposes, including hydraulic engineering, using the caving of the soil rims of canyons by pin-point blasting at the dam site is a promising trend in dam construction in mountainous regions. There is positive domestic and foreign experience with the construction of blast-created dams and cofferdams (the cofferdam for the Nurek hydroelectric power plant,

M. B. Étkin; A. E. Azarkovich

2001-01-01

223

Smooth blasting with the electronic delay detonator  

SciTech Connect

The authors utilized electronic detonators (EDs) to investigate the effect of high detonator delay accuracy on overbreak, remaining rock damage, and surface smoothness, in comparison with that of long-period delay detonators (0.25 sec interval) PDs. The experiments were conducted in a deep mine, in a test site region composed of very hard granodiorite with a seismic wave velocity of about 6.0 km/sec and a uniaxial compressive strength, uniaxial tensile strength, and Young`s modulus of 300 MPa, 12 MPa, and 73 GPa, respectively. The blasting design was for a test tunnel excavation of 8 m{sup 2} in cross section, with an advance per round of 2.5 m. Five rounds were performed, each with a large-hole cut and perimeter holes in a 0.4-m spacing charged with 20-mm-diameter water gel explosive to obtain low charge concentration. EDs were used in the holes on the perimeter of the right half, and PDs were used in all other holes. Following each shot, the cross section was measured by laser to determine amount of overbreak and surface smoothness. In situ seismic prospecting was used to estimate the depth of damage in the remaining rock, and the damage was further investigated by boring into both side walls.

Yamamoto, Masaaki [Asahi Chemical Industry Co., Ltd. (Japan); Ichijo, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Yoshiharu

1995-12-31

224

Ion exchange phenomena  

SciTech Connect

Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

2011-05-01

225

Blast Resistance and Damage Modelling of Fibre Metal Laminates to Blast Loads  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A robust and efficient computational model has been developed which is capable of modelling the dynamic non-linear behaviour of GLARE panels subjected to blast loadings. Numerical model validation have been performed considering case studies of GLARE panels subjected to a blast-type pressure pulse for which experimental data on the back-face deflection and post-damage observations were available. Excellent agreement of mid-point deflections and evidence of severe yield line deformation were shown and discussed against the performed blast tests. A further parametric study identified GLARE as a potential blast attenuating structure, exhibiting superior blast potential against monolithic aluminium plates. It was concluded that further work needed to be carried out to take into account the influence of geometry (cylindrical structures), pre-pressurisation effects and boundary conditions

Mohamed, Galal F. A.; Soutis, Costas; Hodzic, Alma

2012-06-01

226

Quantum phenomena in superconductors  

SciTech Connect

This paper contains remarks by the author on aspects of macroscopic quantum phenomena in superconductors. Some topics discussed are: Superconducting low-inductance undulatory galvanometer (SLUGS), charge imbalance, cylindrical dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUIDS), Geophysics, noise theory, magnetic resonance with SQUIDS, and macroscopic quantum tunneling. 23 refs., 4 figs. (LSP)

Clarke, J.

1987-08-01

227

Neutron Star Phenomena  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Various phenomena involving neutron stars are addressed. Electron-positron production in the near magnetosphere of gamma-ray pulsars is discussed along with magnetic field evolution in spun-up and spinning-down pulsars. Glitches and gamma-ray central engines are also discussed.

Ruderman, Malvin

1998-01-01

228

Characterization of blasted austenitic stainless steel and its corrosion resistance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is known that the corrosion resistance of stainless steel is deteriorated by blasting, but the reason for this deterioration is not clear. A blasted austenitic stainless steel plate (JIS-SUS304) has been characterized with comparison to the scraped and non-blasted specimens. The surface roughness of the blasted specimen is larger than that of materials finished with #180 paper. A martensite phase is formed in the surface layer of both blasted and scraped specimens. Compressive residual stress is generated in the blasted specimen and the maximum residual stress is formed at 50 100 µm from the surface. The corrosion potentials of the blasted specimen and subsequently solution treated specimen are lower than that of the non-blasted specimen. The passivation current densities of the blasted specimens are higher those of the non-blasted specimen. The blasted specimen and the subsequently solution treated specimen exhibit rust in 5% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution, while the non-blasted specimen and ground specimen do not rust in the solution. It is concluded that the deterioration of corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel through blasting is caused by the roughed morphology of the surface.

Otsubo, F.; Kishitake, K.; Akiyama, T.; Terasaki, T.

2003-12-01

229

30 CFR 57.6404 - Separation of blasting circuits from power source.  

...false Separation of blasting circuits from power source. 57...NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground...6404 Separation of blasting circuits from power source. (a...power source to a blasting circuit shall be locked in the...

2014-07-01

230

29 CFR 1926.906 - Initiation of explosive charges-electric blasting.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...blasting circuits or power circuits in accordance with the electric blasting cap manufacturer's... (e) When firing a circuit of electric blasting caps, care...condition. (i) A power circuit used for firing electric blasting caps shall...

2010-07-01

231

30 CFR 56.6404 - Separation of blasting circuits from power source.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Separation of blasting circuits from power source. 56...NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting § 56.6404 Separation of blasting circuits from power source. ...power source to a blasting circuit shall be locked in...

2013-07-01

232

29 CFR 1926.906 - Initiation of explosive charges-electric blasting.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...blasting circuits or power circuits in accordance with the electric blasting cap manufacturer's... (e) When firing a circuit of electric blasting caps, care...condition. (i) A power circuit used for firing electric blasting caps shall...

2011-07-01

233

30 CFR 56.6404 - Separation of blasting circuits from power source.  

... Separation of blasting circuits from power source. 56...NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting § 56.6404 Separation of blasting circuits from power source. ...power source to a blasting circuit shall be locked in...

2014-07-01

234

30 CFR 56.6404 - Separation of blasting circuits from power source.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Separation of blasting circuits from power source. 56...NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting § 56.6404 Separation of blasting circuits from power source. ...power source to a blasting circuit shall be locked in...

2010-07-01

235

30 CFR 57.6404 - Separation of blasting circuits from power source.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Separation of blasting circuits from power source. 57...NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground...6404 Separation of blasting circuits from power source. (a...power source to a blasting circuit shall be locked in the...

2011-07-01

236

30 CFR 57.6404 - Separation of blasting circuits from power source.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Separation of blasting circuits from power source. 57...NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground...6404 Separation of blasting circuits from power source. (a...power source to a blasting circuit shall be locked in the...

2013-07-01

237

30 CFR 57.6404 - Separation of blasting circuits from power source.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Separation of blasting circuits from power source. 57...NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground...6404 Separation of blasting circuits from power source. (a...power source to a blasting circuit shall be locked in the...

2012-07-01

238

29 CFR 1926.906 - Initiation of explosive charges-electric blasting.  

...blasting circuits or power circuits in accordance with the electric blasting cap manufacturer's... (e) When firing a circuit of electric blasting caps, care...condition. (i) A power circuit used for firing electric blasting caps shall...

2014-07-01

239

29 CFR 1926.906 - Initiation of explosive charges-electric blasting.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...blasting circuits or power circuits in accordance with the electric blasting cap manufacturer's... (e) When firing a circuit of electric blasting caps, care...condition. (i) A power circuit used for firing electric blasting caps shall...

2013-07-01

240

30 CFR 56.6404 - Separation of blasting circuits from power source.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Separation of blasting circuits from power source. 56...NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting § 56.6404 Separation of blasting circuits from power source. ...power source to a blasting circuit shall be locked in...

2012-07-01

241

29 CFR 1926.906 - Initiation of explosive charges-electric blasting.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...blasting circuits or power circuits in accordance with the electric blasting cap manufacturer's... (e) When firing a circuit of electric blasting caps, care...condition. (i) A power circuit used for firing electric blasting caps shall...

2012-07-01

242

30 CFR 56.6404 - Separation of blasting circuits from power source.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Separation of blasting circuits from power source. 56...NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting § 56.6404 Separation of blasting circuits from power source. ...power source to a blasting circuit shall be locked in...

2011-07-01

243

30 CFR 57.6404 - Separation of blasting circuits from power source.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Separation of blasting circuits from power source. 57...NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground...6404 Separation of blasting circuits from power source. (a...power source to a blasting circuit shall be locked in the...

2010-07-01

244

Effect of Blast Design on Crack Response C.H. Dowding  

E-print Network

of the structure for comparison with the crack response. 2 MEASURING CRACK RESPONSE Advances in sensor technology some 11 velocity transducers and 3 crack sensors measured excitation and response for each blast-term, weather induced crack response as well as the changes in temperature and humidity that produced

245

Fluid/Structure Interaction Computational Investigation of Blast-Wave Mitigation Efficacy of the Advanced Combat Helmet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To combat the problem of traumatic brain injury (TBI), a signature injury of the current military conflicts, there is an urgent need to design head protection systems with superior blast/ballistic impact mitigation capabilities. Toward that end, the blast impact mitigation performance of an advanced combat helmet (ACH) head protection system equipped with polyurea suspension pads and subjected to two different blast peak pressure loadings has been investigated computationally. A fairly detailed (Lagrangian) finite-element model of a helmet/skull/brain assembly is first constructed and placed into an Eulerian air domain through which a single planar blast wave propagates. A combined Eulerian/Lagrangian transient nonlinear dynamics computational fluid/solid interaction analysis is next conducted in order to assess the extent of reduction in intra-cranial shock-wave ingress (responsible for TBI). This was done by comparing temporal evolutions of intra-cranial normal and shear stresses for the cases of an unprotected head and the helmet-protected head and by correlating these quantities with the three most common types of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), i.e., axonal damage, contusion, and subdural hemorrhage. The results obtained show that the ACH provides some level of protection against all investigated types of mTBI and that the level of protection increases somewhat with an increase in blast peak pressure. In order to rationalize the aforementioned findings, a shockwave propagation/reflection analysis is carried out for the unprotected head and helmet-protected head cases. The analysis qualitatively corroborated the results pertaining to the blast-mitigation efficacy of an ACH, but also suggested that there are additional shockwave energy dissipation phenomena which play an important role in the mechanical response of the unprotected/protected head to blast impact.

Grujicic, M.; Bell, W. C.; Pandurangan, B.; Glomski, P. S.

2011-08-01

246

A parametric approach to shape field-relevant blast wave profiles in compressed-gas-driven shock tube.  

PubMed

Detonation of a high-explosive produces shock-blast wave, shrapnel, and gaseous products. While direct exposure to blast is a concern near the epicenter, shock-blast can affect subjects, even at farther distances. When a pure shock-blast wave encounters the subject, in the absence of shrapnels, fall, or gaseous products the loading is termed as primary blast loading and is the subject of this paper. The wave profile is characterized by blast overpressure, positive time duration, and impulse and called herein as shock-blast wave parameters (SWPs). These parameters in turn are uniquely determined by the strength of high explosive and the distance of the human subjects from the epicenter. The shape and magnitude of the profile determine the severity of injury to the subjects. As shown in some of our recent works (1-3), the profile not only determines the survival of the subjects (e.g., animals) but also the acute and chronic biomechanical injuries along with the following bio-chemical sequelae. It is extremely important to carefully design and operate the shock tube to produce field-relevant SWPs. Furthermore, it is vital to identify and eliminate the artifacts that are inadvertently introduced in the shock-blast profile that may affect the results. In this work, we examine the relationship between shock tube adjustable parameters (SAPs) and SWPs that can be used to control the blast profile; the results can be easily applied to many of the laboratory shock tubes. Further, replication of shock profile (magnitude and shape) can be related to field explosions and can be a standard in comparing results across different laboratories. Forty experiments are carried out by judiciously varying SAPs such as membrane thickness, breech length (66.68-1209.68?mm), measurement location, and type of driver gas (nitrogen, helium). The effects SAPs have on the resulting shock-blast profiles are shown. Also, the shock-blast profiles of a TNT explosion from ConWep software is compared with the profiles obtained from the shock tube. To conclude, our experimental results demonstrate that a compressed-gas shock tube when designed and operated carefully can replicate the blast time profiles of field explosions accurately. Such a faithful replication is an essential first step when studying the effects of blast induced neurotrauma using animal models. PMID:25520701

Sundaramurthy, Aravind; Chandra, Namas

2014-01-01

247

A Parametric Approach to Shape Field-Relevant Blast Wave Profiles in Compressed-Gas-Driven Shock Tube  

PubMed Central

Detonation of a high-explosive produces shock-blast wave, shrapnel, and gaseous products. While direct exposure to blast is a concern near the epicenter, shock-blast can affect subjects, even at farther distances. When a pure shock-blast wave encounters the subject, in the absence of shrapnels, fall, or gaseous products the loading is termed as primary blast loading and is the subject of this paper. The wave profile is characterized by blast overpressure, positive time duration, and impulse and called herein as shock-blast wave parameters (SWPs). These parameters in turn are uniquely determined by the strength of high explosive and the distance of the human subjects from the epicenter. The shape and magnitude of the profile determine the severity of injury to the subjects. As shown in some of our recent works (1–3), the profile not only determines the survival of the subjects (e.g., animals) but also the acute and chronic biomechanical injuries along with the following bio-chemical sequelae. It is extremely important to carefully design and operate the shock tube to produce field-relevant SWPs. Furthermore, it is vital to identify and eliminate the artifacts that are inadvertently introduced in the shock-blast profile that may affect the results. In this work, we examine the relationship between shock tube adjustable parameters (SAPs) and SWPs that can be used to control the blast profile; the results can be easily applied to many of the laboratory shock tubes. Further, replication of shock profile (magnitude and shape) can be related to field explosions and can be a standard in comparing results across different laboratories. Forty experiments are carried out by judiciously varying SAPs such as membrane thickness, breech length (66.68–1209.68?mm), measurement location, and type of driver gas (nitrogen, helium). The effects SAPs have on the resulting shock-blast profiles are shown. Also, the shock-blast profiles of a TNT explosion from ConWep software is compared with the profiles obtained from the shock tube. To conclude, our experimental results demonstrate that a compressed-gas shock tube when designed and operated carefully can replicate the blast time profiles of field explosions accurately. Such a faithful replication is an essential first step when studying the effects of blast induced neurotrauma using animal models. PMID:25520701

Sundaramurthy, Aravind; Chandra, Namas

2014-01-01

248

Helmet liner evaluation to mitigate head response from primary blast exposure.  

PubMed

Head injury resulting from blast loading, including mild traumatic brain injury, has been identified as an important blast-related injury in modern conflict zones. A study was undertaken to investigate potential protective ballistic helmet liner materials to mitigate primary blast injury using a detailed sagittal plane head finite element model, developed and validated against previous studies of head kinematics resulting from blast exposure. Five measures reflecting the potential for brain injury that were investigated included intracranial pressure, brain tissue strain, head acceleration (linear and rotational) and the head injury criterion. In simulations, these measures provided consistent predictions for typical blast loading scenarios. Considering mitigation, various characteristics of foam material response were investigated and a factor analysis was performed which showed that the four most significant were the interaction effects between modulus and hysteretic response, stress-strain response, damping factor and density. Candidate materials were then identified using the predicted optimal material values. Polymeric foam was found to meet the density and modulus requirements; however, for all significant parameters, higher strength foams, such as aluminum foam, were found to provide the highest reduction in the potential for injury when compared against the unprotected head. PMID:24559088

Lockhart, Philip A; Cronin, Duane S

2015-05-01

249

Laboratory-scale blast testing of materials using air-shock loading  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The deformation of materials due to near-field explosions is a complex topic with many military and anti-terrorism applications. Typical explosive blast testing is conducted on large ballistic ranges using several kilograms of explosives, at a high cost, and with limited instrumentation. We have developed a range of experimental techniques for performing explosive blast research in the laboratory using gram-range explosive charges. Here we present recent measurements of the deformation of aluminum panels subjected to a range of explosive blast impulses. Through an explosive characterization procedure the blast impulse produced by a charge is known a priori. Our approach then couples the known explosion energy to the aluminum panels via shock wave propagation through the air. Time-resolved three-dimensional motion of the panel surface response is directly measured via stereoscopic high-speed digital image correlation. The data are used to compare material deformation characteristics to explosive loading parameters. These laboratory techniques can be used for validation of computational simulations and to develop high-strain rate material strength models. Ultimately results from these gram-range tests can be scaled to predict full-scale blast response characteristics.

Svingala, Forrest; Biss, Matthew; Hargather, Michael; Settles, Gary

2009-11-01

250

Comprehensive report to Congress: Clean Coal Technology Program: Blast furnace granulated coal injection system demonstration project: A project proposed by: Bethlehem Steel Corporation  

SciTech Connect

Bethlehem Steel Corporation (BSC), of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, has requested financial assistance from DOE for the design, construction, and operation of a 2800-ton-per-day blast furnace granulated coal injection (BFGCI) system for each of two existing iron-making blast furnaces. The blast furnaces are located at BSC's facilities in Burns Harbor, Indiana. BFGCI technology involves injecting coal directly into an iron-making blast furnace and subsequently reduces the need for coke on approximately a pound of coke for pound of coal basis. BFGCI also increases blast furnace production. Coke will be replaced with direct coal injection at a rate of up to 400 pounds per NTHM. The reducing environment of the blast furnace enables all of the sulfur in the coal to be captured by the slag and hot metal. The gases exiting the blast furnace are cleaned by cyclones and then wet scrubbing to remove particulates. The cleaned blast furnace gas is then used as a fuel in plant processes. There is no measurable sulfur in the off gas. The primary environmental benefits derived from blast furnace coal injection result from the reduction of coke requirements for iron making. Reduced coke production will result in reduced releases of environmental contaminants from coking operations. 5 figs.

Not Available

1990-10-01

251

Use of probabilistic methods in evaluating blast performance of structures  

E-print Network

The social and political climate of the modern world has lead to increased concern over the ability of engineered structures to resist blast events which may be incurred during terrorist attacks. While blast resistance ...

Gillis, Andrew Nicholas

2011-01-01

252

30 CFR 57.6306 - Loading, blasting, and security.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...activities permitted within the blast site shall be those activities directly related to the blasting operation and the activities of surveying, stemming, sampling of geology, and reopening of holes, provided that reasonable care is exercised. Haulage...

2011-07-01

253

30 CFR 56.6306 - Loading, blasting, and security.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...activities permitted within the blast site shall be those activities directly related to the blasting operation and the activities of surveying, stemming, sampling of geology, and reopening of holes, provided that reasonable care is exercised. Haulage...

2012-07-01

254

30 CFR 56.6306 - Loading, blasting, and security.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...activities permitted within the blast site shall be those activities directly related to the blasting operation and the activities of surveying, stemming, sampling of geology, and reopening of holes, provided that reasonable care is exercised. Haulage...

2013-07-01

255

30 CFR 57.6306 - Loading, blasting, and security.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...activities permitted within the blast site shall be those activities directly related to the blasting operation and the activities of surveying, stemming, sampling of geology, and reopening of holes, provided that reasonable care is exercised. Haulage...

2012-07-01

256

Blast overpressure relief using air vacated buffer medium  

E-print Network

Blast waves generated by intense explosions cause damage to structures and human injury. In this thesis, a strategy is investigated for relief of blast overpressure resulting from explosions in air. The strategy is based ...

Avasarala, Srikanti Rupa

2009-01-01

257

68. DETAIL OF COOLING WATER PIPES FOR DOROTHY SIX BLAST ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

68. DETAIL OF COOLING WATER PIPES FOR DOROTHY SIX BLAST FURNACE. INTERIOR OF CAST HOUSE LOOKING NORTH. (Jet Lowe) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

258

INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING EAST, BLAST FURNACE NO. 1 CLOSEUP, IRON ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING EAST, BLAST FURNACE NO. 1 CLOSE-UP, IRON NOTCH IN CENTER. - Pittsburgh Steel Company, Monessen Works, Blast Furnace No. 1 & No. 2, Donner Avenue, Monessen, Westmoreland County, PA

259

INTERIOR VIEW OF BLAST FURNACE NO. 3 LOOKING EAST, SLAG ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

INTERIOR VIEW OF BLAST FURNACE NO. 3 LOOKING EAST, SLAG RUNNERS & GATES IN FOREGROUND. - Pittsburgh Steel Company, Monessen Works, Blast Furnace No. 3, Donner Avenue, Monessen, Westmoreland County, PA

260

EXTERIOR VIEW, BLAST FURNACE NO. 3 (JANE FURNACE) CENTER, NO. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

EXTERIOR VIEW, BLAST FURNACE NO. 3 (JANE FURNACE) CENTER, NO. 3 CAST HOUSE TO THE LEFT, WEST ORE BRIDGE TO THE RIGHT. - Pittsburgh Steel Company, Monessen Works, Blast Furnace No. 3, Donner Avenue, Monessen, Westmoreland County, PA

261

VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST WITH OPENHEARTH TO LEFT WITH BLAST FURNACE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST WITH OPEN-HEARTH TO LEFT WITH BLAST FURNACE NO. 2 AND CAST HOUSE TO THE RIGHT. - Pittsburgh Steel Company, Monessen Works, Blast Furnace No. 1 & No. 2, Donner Avenue, Monessen, Westmoreland County, PA

262

VIEW FACING EAST, VIEW FROM RIVER OF BLAST FURNACE NO. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW FACING EAST, VIEW FROM RIVER OF BLAST FURNACE NO. 3. DORR THICKENER & ORE BRIDGE AT LEFT, HOT BLAST STOVES & DUST CATCHER CENTER, CAST HOUSE AT RIGHT. - Pittsburgh Steel Company, Monessen Works, Donner Avenue, Monessen, Westmoreland County, PA

263

DETAIL VIEW OF BLAST FURNACE NO. 3 AREA BELOW BUSTLE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

DETAIL VIEW OF BLAST FURNACE NO. 3 AREA BELOW BUSTLE PIPE, CINDER NOTCH IN CENTER, SLAG RUNNER IN FOREGROUND. - Pittsburgh Steel Company, Monessen Works, Blast Furnace No. 3, Donner Avenue, Monessen, Westmoreland County, PA

264

6. Photocopy of a drawing of the lead blast furnace ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

6. Photocopy of a drawing of the lead blast furnace from J.L. Bray, The Principles of Metallurgy, Ginn & Co. New York, 1929. - International Smelting & Refining Company, Tooele Smelter, Blast Furnace Building, State Route 178, Tooele, Tooele County, UT

265

55. GENERAL NORTHEASTERN VIEW OF DOROTHY SIX BLAST FURNACE COMPLEX ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

55. GENERAL NORTHEASTERN VIEW OF DOROTHY SIX BLAST FURNACE COMPLEX WITH LADLE HOUSE AND IRON DESULPHERIZATION BUILDING ON RIGHT. (Jet Lowe) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

266

30 CFR 57.20031 - Blasting underground in hazardous areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Blasting underground in hazardous areas. 57.20031... SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Miscellaneous § 57.20031 Blasting underground in hazardous areas. In...

2012-07-01

267

30 CFR 57.20031 - Blasting underground in hazardous areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Blasting underground in hazardous areas. 57.20031... SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Miscellaneous § 57.20031 Blasting underground in hazardous areas. In...

2010-07-01

268

30 CFR 57.20031 - Blasting underground in hazardous areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Blasting underground in hazardous areas. 57.20031... SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Miscellaneous § 57.20031 Blasting underground in hazardous areas. In...

2013-07-01

269

30 CFR 57.20031 - Blasting underground in hazardous areas.  

...2014-07-01 false Blasting underground in hazardous areas. 57.20031... SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Miscellaneous § 57.20031 Blasting underground in hazardous areas. In...

2014-07-01

270

30 CFR 57.20031 - Blasting underground in hazardous areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Blasting underground in hazardous areas. 57.20031... SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Miscellaneous § 57.20031 Blasting underground in hazardous areas. In...

2011-07-01

271

30 CFR 57.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6605 Isolation of blasting...tracks, and shall be protected from sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected from any...

2013-07-01

272

30 CFR 57.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6605 Isolation of blasting...tracks, and shall be protected from sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected from any...

2011-07-01

273

30 CFR 56.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous Electricity § 56.6605 Isolation of blasting circuits. Lead...tracks, and shall be protected from sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected from any...

2013-07-01

274

30 CFR 56.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous Electricity § 56.6605 Isolation of blasting circuits. Lead...tracks, and shall be protected from sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected from any...

2010-07-01

275

30 CFR 57.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6605 Isolation of blasting...tracks, and shall be protected from sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected from any...

2012-07-01

276

30 CFR 56.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous Electricity § 56.6605 Isolation of blasting circuits. Lead...tracks, and shall be protected from sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected from any...

2011-07-01

277

30 CFR 57.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6605 Isolation of blasting...tracks, and shall be protected from sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected from any...

2010-07-01

278

30 CFR 56.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.  

...STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous Electricity § 56.6605 Isolation of blasting circuits. Lead...tracks, and shall be protected from sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected from any...

2014-07-01

279

30 CFR 56.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous Electricity § 56.6605 Isolation of blasting circuits. Lead...tracks, and shall be protected from sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected from any...

2012-07-01

280

30 CFR 57.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.  

...STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6605 Isolation of blasting...tracks, and shall be protected from sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected from any...

2014-07-01

281

Computational modeling of blast-induced traumatic brain injury  

E-print Network

Blast-induced TBI has gained prominence in recent years due to the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, yet little is known about the mechanical effects of blasts on the human head; no injury thresholds have been established ...

Nyein, Michelle K. (Michelle Kyaw)

2010-01-01

282

Hazardous Phenomena at Volcanoes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Volcanoes generate a wide variety of phenomena that can alter the Earth's surface and atmosphere and endanger people and property. While most of the natural hazards illustrated and described in this fact sheet are associated with eruptions, some, like landslides, can occur even when a volcano is quiet. Small events may pose a hazard only within a few miles of a volcano, while large events can directly or indirectly endanger people and property tens to hundreds of miles away.

Myers, Bobbie M.; Brantley, Steven R.

1995-01-01

283

Membrane Transport Phenomena (MTP)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The third semi-annual period of the MTP project has been involved with performing experiments using the Membrane Transport Apparatus (MTA), development of analysis techniques for the experiment results, analytical modeling of the osmotic transport phenomena, and completion of a DC-9 microgravity flight to test candidate fluid cell geometries. Preparations were also made for the MTP Science Concept Review (SCR), held on 13 June 1997 at Lockheed Martin Astronautics in Denver. These activities are detailed in the report.

Mason, Larry W.

1997-01-01

284

AZIMUTHAL VARIATION OF RADIATION OF SEISMIC ENERGY FROM CAST BLASTS  

E-print Network

the variation of vibration intensity at various angles (azimuths) from large cast blasts. These effects characteristics, blasting personnel can use this information to mitigate vibration effects on local structures could mitigate problems with vibration levels from future blasting operations. Regionally, the local

285

Nineteen-Foot Diameter Explosively Driven Blast Simulator  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes the 19-foot diameter blast tunnel at Sandia National Laboratories. The blast tunnel configuration consists of a 6 foot diameter by 200 foot long shock tube, a 6 foot diameter to 19 foot diameter conical expansion section that is 40 feet long, and a 19 foot diameter test section that is 65 feet long. Therefore, the total blast

MANUEL G

2001-01-01

286

Test of Some Hybrid Combinations to Rice Blast  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most devastating rice diseases worldwide. Blast resistant cultivars are recognized as the most efficacious and economical way to control this disease. Genetic resistance to rice blast is generally governed by a few major genes, often in c...

287

VIEW LOOKING NORTH, VIEW OF BLAST FURNACE NO. 2 (LEFT) ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW LOOKING NORTH, VIEW OF BLAST FURNACE NO. 2 (LEFT) SHARING THE SAME CAST HOUSE WITH BLAST FURNACE NO. 1. ORE BRIDGE & BLOWER HOUSE TO RIGHT, HULETT CAR DUMPER IS IN LEFT FOREGROUND. - Pittsburgh Steel Company, Monessen Works, Blast Furnace No. 1 & No. 2, Donner Avenue, Monessen, Westmoreland County, PA

288

Modelling blast loads on buildings in complex city geometries  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is concerned with an accurate prediction of the effects of adjacent structures on the blast loads on a building in urban terrain. Blast loadings on structures have typically been evaluated using empirical relationships. These relationships assume that there are no obstacles between the charge and the target. In real situations, the actual blast loads can either be reduced

Alex M. Remennikov; Timothy A. Rose

2005-01-01

289

Gram-range explosive blast scaling and associated materials response  

E-print Network

Gram-range explosive blast scaling and associated materials response M. J. Hargather1 , G. S. Laboratory-scale gram-range explosive blast testing of materials is shown to be feasible. Blast loading from directions is included. The promise of gram-range testing is to take on at least some of the burden now

Settles, Gary S.

290

An efficient square-root algorithm for BLAST  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bell Labs Layered Space-Time (BLAST) is a scheme for transmitting information over a rich-scattering wireless environment using multiple receive and transmit antennas. The main computational bottleneck in the BLAST algorithm is a “nulling and cancellation” step, where the optimal ordering for the sequential estimation and detection of the received signals is determined. To reduce the computational cost of BLAST, we

Babak Hassibi

2000-01-01

291

Hydrocortisone in culture protects the blast cells in acute myeloblastic leukemia from the lethal effects of cytosine arabinoside  

SciTech Connect

The blast cells in acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) respond to many of the same regulatory mechanisms that control normal hemopoiesis. These include the growth factors that bind to membrane receptors and steroid hormones or vitamins that have intracellular receptors. The authors report the effects in culture of the steroid glucocorticoid hydrocortisone on freshly explanted AML blasts from patients and on two continuous AML cell lines. Only small changes in clonogenic cell numbers in suspension cultures were seen in the presence of hydrocortisone. The most striking effect of the hormone was on the sensitivity of blasts cells to cytosine arabinoside (ara-C). In contrast to the response of AML blast cells to retinoic acid, a ligand for intracellular steroid receptors that sensitizes some blast populations to ara-C, hydrocortisone reduced the toxic effects of the drug. The protective action of hydrocortisone was not mediated through the cell cycle since exposure of blasts to hydrocortisone did not affect the percentage of cells in DNA synthesis as measured with the tritiated thymidine (3HTdR) suicide technique. The hydrocortisone effect could be demonstrated using a pulse (20 min) exposure protocol. Blasts pulsed with increasing specific activities of 3HTdR showed the usual response pattern with an initial loss in plating efficiency to about 50% of control, followed by a plateau, regardless of whether the cells had been exposed to hydrocortisone. Control blasts exposed to increasing ara-C concentrations gave very similar dose-response curves; in striking contrast, blast cells cultured in hydrocortisone, then pulsed with ara-C did not lose colony-forming ability even though the same population was sensitive to 3HTdR.

Yang, G.S.; Wang, C.; Minkin, S.; Minden, M.D.; McCulloch, E.A. (Ontario Cancer Institute, University of Toronto (Canada))

1991-07-01

292

Effect of Blast-Induced Vibration from New Railway Tunnel on Existing Adjacent Railway Tunnel in Xinjiang, China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The vibrations of existing service tunnels induced by blast-excavation of adjacent tunnels have attracted much attention from both academics and engineers during recent decades in China. The blasting vibration velocity (BVV) is the most widely used controlling index for in situ monitoring and safety assessment of existing lining structures. Although numerous in situ tests and simulations had been carried out to investigate blast-induced vibrations of existing tunnels due to excavation of new tunnels (mostly by bench excavation method), research on the overall dynamical response of existing service tunnels in terms of not only BVV but also stress/strain seemed limited for new tunnels excavated by the full-section blasting method. In this paper, the impacts of blast-induced vibrations from a new tunnel on an existing railway tunnel in Xinjiang, China were comprehensively investigated by using laboratory tests, in situ monitoring and numerical simulations. The measured data from laboratory tests and in situ monitoring were used to determine the parameters needed for numerical simulations, and were compared with the calculated results. Based on the results from in situ monitoring and numerical simulations, which were consistent with each other, the original blasting design and corresponding parameters were adjusted to reduce the maximum BVV, which proved to be effective and safe. The effect of both the static stress before blasting vibrations and the dynamic stress induced by blasting on the total stresses in the existing tunnel lining is also discussed. The methods and related results presented could be applied in projects with similar ground and distance between old and new tunnels if the new tunnel is to be excavated by the full-section blasting method.

Liang, Qingguo; Li, Jie; Li, Dewu; Ou, Erfeng

2013-01-01

293

Structural Response of Laminated Composite Shells Subjected to Blast Loading: Comparison of Experimental and Theoretical Methods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The results from a theoretical and experimental investigation of the dynamic response of cylindrically curved laminated composite shells subjected to normal blast loading are presented. The dynamic equations of motion for cylindrical laminated shells are derived using the assumptions of Love's theory of thin elastic shells. Kinematically admissible displacement functions are chosen to represent the motion of the clamped cylindrical shell and the governing equations are obtained in the time domain using the Galerkin method. The time-dependent equations of the cylindrically curved laminated shell are then solved by the Runge-Kutta-Verner method. Finite element modelling and analysis for the blast-loaded cylindrical shell are also presented. Experimental results for cylindrically curved laminated composite shells with clamped edges and subjected to blast loading are presented. The blast pressure and strain measurements are performed on the shell panels. The strain response frequencies of the clamped cylindrical shells subjected to blast load are obtained using the fast Fourier transformation technique. In addition, the effects of material properties on the dynamic behaviour are examined. The strain-time history curves show agreement between the experimental and analysis results in the longitudinal direction of the cylindrical panels. However, there is a discrepancy between the experimental and analysis results in the circumferential direction of the cylindrical panels. A good prediction is obtained for the response frequency of the cylindrical shell panels.

TÜRKMEN, H. S.

2002-01-01

294

The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) 2005: Calibration and Targeted Sources  

E-print Network

The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) operated successfully during a 100-hour flight from northern Sweden in June 2005 (BLAST05). As part of the calibration and pointing procedures, several compact sources were mapped, including solar system, Galactic, and extragalactic targets, specifically Pallas, CRL 2688, LDN 1014, IRAS 20126+4104, IRAS 21078+5211, IRAS 21307+5049, IRAS 22134+5834, IRAS 23011+6126, K3-50, W 75N, and Mrk 231. One additional source, Arp 220, was observed and used as our primary calibrator. Details of the overall BLAST05 calibration procedure are discussed here. The BLAST observations of each compact source are described, flux densities and spectral energy distributions are reported, and these are compared with previous measurements at other wavelengths. The 250, 350, and 500 um BLAST data can provide useful constraints to the amplitude and slope of the submillimeter continuum, which in turn may be useful for the improved calibration of other submillimeter instruments.

M. D. P. Truch; P. A. R. Ade; J. J. Bock; E. L. Chapin; M. J. Devlin; S. Dicker; M. Griffin; J. O. Gundersen; M. Halpern; P. C. Hargrave; D. H. Hughes; J. Klein; G. Marsden; P. G. Martin; P. Mauskopf; C. B. Netterfield; L. Olmi; E. Pascale; G. Patanchon; M. Rex; D. Scott; C. Semisch; C. Tucker; G. S. Tucker; M. P. Viero; D. V. Wiebe

2008-03-31

295

Glass-Bead Blasting Alters Antenna Surface  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Thermal-emissivity properties improved, and focal length adjusted. Experiments show gentle blasting with glass beads produces beneficial changes in macroscopic surface shapes and in microscopic surface features of lightweight microwave reflectors made of thin metal reflective surfaces on deformable substrates of aluminum honeycomb.

Fortenberry, James W.; Jilka, Richard L.; Kimmel, Boyce; Garcia, Ramon D.; Cofield, Richard E.; Klose, Gerhardt J.; O'Toole, Thomas

1987-01-01

296

Blast resistance of prismatic sandwich structures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Metallic sandwich panels have emerged as candidate blast resistant structures that can be tailored to contain damage from impulsive loads of the type typically generated by explosives. When such panels are impulsively loaded, the stresses imposed by the core on the front face, as well as those transmitted through the core, govern the response metrics: especially the center displacement, the

Enrico Ferri

2009-01-01

297

Blast wave mitigation by dry aqueous foams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents results of experiments and numerical modeling on the mitigation of blast waves using dry aqueous foams. The multiphase formalism is used to model the dry aqueous foam as a dense non-equilibrium two-phase medium as well as its interaction with the high explosion detonation products. New experiments have been performed to study the mass scaling effects. The experimental as well as the numerical results, which are in good agreement, show that more than an order of magnitude reduction in the peak overpressure ratio can be achieved. The positive impulse reduction is less marked than the overpressures. The Hopkinson scaling is also found to hold particularly at larger scales for these two blast parameters. Furthermore, momentum and heat transfers, which have the main dominant role in the mitigation process, are shown to modify significantly the classical blast wave profile and thereafter to disperse the energy from the peak overpressure due to the induced relaxation zone. In addition, the velocity of the fireball, which acts as a piston on its environment, is smaller than in air. Moreover, the greater inertia of the liquid phase tends to project the aqueous foam far from the fireball. The created gap tempers the amplitude of the transmitted shock wave to the aqueous foam. As a consequence, this results in a lowering of blast wave parameters of the two-phase spherical decaying shock wave.

Del Prete, E.; Chinnayya, A.; Domergue, L.; Hadjadj, A.; Haas, J.-F.

2013-02-01

298

Global efforts in managing rice blast disease  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Rice blast disease caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is a major destructive disease threatening global food security. Resistance (R) genes to M. oryzae are effective in preventing infections by strains of M. oryzae carry the corresponding avirulence (AVR) genes. Effectiveness of genetic resist...

299

BLAST: Building energy simulation in Hong Kong  

Microsoft Academic Search

The characteristics of energy use in buildings under local weather conditions were studied and evaluated using the energy simulation program BLAST-3.0. The parameters used in the energy simulation for the study and evaluation include the architectural features, different internal building heat load settings and weather data. In this study, mathematical equations and the associated coefficients useful to the industry were

Sai-Keung Fong

1999-01-01

300

Vehicle bomb blast effects and countermeasures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The impact of a vehicle bomb blast on a building can be determined by analyzing the: (1) over-pressure that the building structural elements can withstand, (2) standoff distance that can be enforced, and (3) potential damage from a specific amount of explosives detonated at an enforceable standoff distance. This paper is organized in three parts that address the potential effects

J. W. James; T. M. Wood; E. M. Kruse; J. D. Veatch

2001-01-01

301

Rice blast evaluation of newly introduced germplasm  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Genetic resistance to the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae (anamorph Pyricularia grisea oryzae) was identified in newly introduced rice germplasm through quarantine when tested in artificially inoculated greenhouse and field nursery tests during the 2007 growing season. Of 229 accessions, 31 we...

302

Cosmic Blasts Much More Common, Astronomers Discover  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A cosmic explosion seen last February may have been the "tip of an iceberg," showing that powerful, distant gamma ray bursts are outnumbered ten-to-one by less-energetic cousins, according to an international team of astronomers. A study of the explosion with X-ray and radio telescopes showed that it is "100 times less energetic than gamma ray bursts seen in the distant universe. We were able to see it because it's relatively nearby," said Alicia Soderberg, of Caltech, leader of the research team. The scientists reported their findings in the August 31 issue of the journal Nature. The explosion is called an X-ray flash, and was detected by the Swift satellite on February 18. The astronomers subsequently studied the object using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the Ryle radio telescope in the UK. "This object tells us that there probably is a rich diversity of cosmic explosions in our local Universe that we only now are starting to detect. These explosions aren't playing by the rules that we thought we understood," said Dale Frail of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. Illustration of a Magnetar Illustration of a Magnetar The February blast seems to fill a gap between ordinary supernova explosions, which leave behind a dense neutron star, and gamma ray bursts, which leave behind a black hole, a concentration of mass so dense that not even light can escape it. Some X-ray flashes, the new research suggests, leave behind a magnetar, a neutron star with a magnetic field 100-1000 times stronger than that of an ordinary neutron star. "This explosion occurred in a galaxy about 470 million light-years away. If it had been at the distances of gamma ray bursts, as much as billions of light-years away, we would not have been able to see it," Frail said. "We think that the principal difference between gamma ray bursts and X-ray flashes and ordinary supernova explosions is that the blasts that produce gamma rays and X-rays have disks of material rotating rapidly about the central object," Soderberg said. The powerful gamma ray bursts tap the tremendous gravitational energy of their black hole to produce strong beams of energetic radiation, while less-energetic X-ray bursts like the Feburary event tap energy from the strong magnetic field of the magnetar, the scientists speculated. "This discovery means that the 'zoo' of cosmic explosions has just gotten more numerous and more diverse. It also means that our understanding of how the cores of massive stars collapse to produce this variety of explosions is less complete than we had thought," Frail added. Multiwavelength follow-up observations were required by the team to measure the total energy release of the explosion. In particular, Soderberg adds that "Radio observations with the Very Large Array were additionally required to determine the geometry of the ejecta. We find that unlike typical GRBs which produce pencil-beam jets, this object more resembles a spherical explosion." In addition to Soderberg and Frail, the research team includes Shri Kulkarni. Ehud Nakar, Edo Berger, Brian Cameron, Avishay Gal-Yam, Re'em Sari, Mansi Kasiwal, Eran Ofek, Arne Rau, Brad Cenko, Eric Persson and Dae-Sik Moon of Caltech, Derrick Fox and Dave Burrows of Pennsylvania State University, Roger Chevalier of the University of Virginia, Tsvi Piran of the Hebrew University, Paul Price of the University of Hawaii, Brian Schmidt of Mount Stromlo Observatory in Australia, Guy Pooley of the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory in the UK, Bryan Penprase of Pomona College, and Neil Gehrels of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. http://www.nrao.edu/

2006-08-01

303

Introduction of new genetic material into human myeloid leukemic blast stem cells by retroviral infection  

SciTech Connect

An amphotropic retroviral vector containing the bacterial neomycin phosphotransferase gene (neo) was used to infect blast cells from patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia. The infected cells acquired a G418-resistant phenotype that was stable as measured in a clonogenic assay and in long-term suspension culture. Thus, gene transfer into stem cells was accomplished by this procedure. This approach for manipulating gene expression in blast stem cells provides a means to assess the roles of a variety of genes in self-renewal, differentiation, and leukemogenesis.

Smith, L.J.; Benchimol, S.

1988-02-01

304

Air blast reflecting on a rigid cylinder: simulation and reduced scale experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, the Multi-Material ALE formulation is applied to simulate the propagation of an air blast through the atmosphere, and its reflection on an assumed rigid cylindrical obstacle. The mathematical and numerical implementations of this formulation are presented. In order to validate the formulation and prove its ability to capture the propagation and reflection of high pressure waves, comparisons of the simulations with the experimental blast pressure measured on an assumed rigid cylinder are performed. The simulation conducted via the presented models and methods gives good predictions for pressure time histories recorded on the rigid cylinder.

Langlet, A.; Souli, M.; Aquelet, N.; Pennetier, O.; Girault, G.

2015-01-01

305

BLAST: a more efficient report with usability improvements.  

PubMed

The Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) website at the National Center for Biotechnology (NCBI) is an important resource for searching and aligning sequences. A new BLAST report allows faster loading of alignments, adds navigation aids, allows easy downloading of subject sequences and reports and has improved usability. Here, we describe these improvements to the BLAST report, discuss design decisions, describe other improvements to the search page and database documentation and outline plans for future development. The NCBI BLAST URL is http://blast.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. PMID:23609542

Boratyn, Grzegorz M; Camacho, Christiam; Cooper, Peter S; Coulouris, George; Fong, Amelia; Ma, Ning; Madden, Thomas L; Matten, Wayne T; McGinnis, Scott D; Merezhuk, Yuri; Raytselis, Yan; Sayers, Eric W; Tao, Tao; Ye, Jian; Zaretskaya, Irena

2013-07-01

306

Patterns in blast injuries to the hand.  

PubMed

Blast injuries to the hand are not just a wartime phenomenon but also quite common in rural communities throughout northern California. The purpose of this study is to review our experience with blast injuries in the community and review the most common patterns in an attempt to identify the pathomechanics of the hand injury and the reconstructive procedures that are required. This is a retrospective study of blast injuries to the hand treated between 1978 and 2006. Medical records, X-rays, and photos were reviewed to compile standard patient demographics and characterize the injury pattern. Explosives were classified based on their rate of decomposition. Reconstructive solutions were reviewed and characterized based on whether damaged tissues were repaired or replaced. Sixty-two patients were identified with blast injuries to their hand. Patients were predominantly male (92%) with an average age of 27 years. Firecrackers were the most commonly encountered explosives. Thirty-seven patients were identified as holding a low explosive in their dominant hand and were used for characterization of the injury pattern. The apparent pattern of injury was hyperextension and hyperabduction of the hand and digits. Common injuries were metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joint hyperextension with associated soft tissue avulsion, hyperabduction at the web spaces with associated palmar soft tissue tears, and finger disarticulation amputations worse at radial digits. Given the mechanisms of injury with tissue loss, surgical intervention generally involved tissue replacement rather than tissue repair. Blast injuries to the hand represent a broad spectrum of injuries that are associated with the magnitude of explosion and probably, the proximity to the hand. We were able to identify a repetitive pattern of injury and demonstrate the predominant use for delayed tissue replacement rather than microsurgical repair at the acute setting. PMID:18780004

Hazani, Ron; Buntic, Rudolf F; Brooks, Darrell

2009-03-01

307

Distinguishing Realistic Military Blasts from Firecrackers in Mitigation Studies of Blast Induced Traumatic Brain Injury  

SciTech Connect

In their Contributed Article, Nyein et al. (1,2) present numerical simulations of blast waves interacting with a helmeted head and conclude that a face shield may significantly mitigate blast induced traumatic brain injury (TBI). A face shield may indeed be important for future military helmets, but the authors derive their conclusions from a much smaller explosion than typically experienced on the battlefield. The blast from the 3.16 gm TNT charge of (1) has the following approximate peak overpressures, positive phase durations, and incident impulses (3): 10 atm, 0.25 ms, and 3.9 psi-ms at the front of the head (14 cm from charge), and 1.4 atm, 0.32 ms, and 1.7 psi-ms at the back of a typical 20 cm head (34 cm from charge). The peak pressure of the wave decreases by a factor of 7 as it traverses the head. The blast conditions are at the threshold for injury at the front of the head, but well below threshold at the back of the head (4). The blast traverses the head in 0.3 ms, roughly equal to the positive phase duration of the blast. Therefore, when the blast reaches the back of the head, near ambient conditions exist at the front. Because the headform is so close to the charge, it experiences a wave with significant curvature. By contrast, a realistic blast from a 2.2 kg TNT charge ({approx} an uncased 105 mm artillery round) is fatal at an overpressure of 10 atm (4). For an injury level (4) similar to (1), a 2.2 kg charge has the following approximate peak overpressures, positive phase durations, and incident impulses (3): 2.1 atm, 2.3 ms, and 18 psi-ms at the front of the head (250 cm from charge), and 1.8 atm, 2.5 ms, and 16.8 psi-ms at the back of the head (270 cm from charge). The peak pressure decreases by only a factor of 1.2 as it traverses the head. Because the 0.36 ms traversal time is much smaller than the positive phase duration, pressures on the head become relatively uniform when the blast reaches the back of the head. The larger standoff implies that the headform locally experiences a nearly planar blast wave. Also, the positive phase durations and blast impulses are much larger than those of (1). Consequently, the blast model used in (1) is spatially and temporally very different from a military blast. It would be useful to repeat the calculations using military blast parameters. Finally, (1) overlooks a significant part of (5). On page 1 and on page 3, (1) states that (5) did not consider helmet pads. But pages pages 3 and 4 of (5) present simulations of blast wave propagation across an ACH helmeted head form with and without pads. (5) states that when the pads are present, the 'underwash' of air under the helmet is blocked when compared to the case without. (1) reaches this same conclusion, but reports it as a new result rather than a confirmation of that already found in (5).

Moss, W C; King, M J; Blackman, E G

2011-01-21

308

Wolf-Rayet phenomena  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The properties of stars showing Wolf-Rayet phenomena are outlined along with the direction of future work. Emphasis is placed on the characteristics of W-R spectra. Specifically the following topics are covered: the absolute visual magnitudes; the heterogeneity of WN spectra; the existence of transition type spectra and compositions the mass loss rates; and the existence of very luminous and possibly very massive W-R stars. Also, a brief overview of current understanding of the theoretical aspects of stellar evolution and stellar winds and the various scenarios that have been proposed to understand W-R spectra are included.

Conti, P. S.

1982-01-01

309

Performance of some coupling methods for blast vibration monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Field guidelines and recommendations for blasting vibration monitoring on a hard surface, suggest that the geophone mount should be coupled to the ground in a way that depends on the anticipated vibration level. However, the quantitative performance of the coupling method is basically unknown. In order to investigate this, the ground-to-mount coupling transmissibility (i.e. ratio of the response of the geophones mount to the rock motion, as a function of frequency) was measured between 16 and 200 Hz in 43 tests using a vibration exciter. The geophone mounts were freely placed, hold with a sandbag and anchored on granite. Free placed mounts applied outside the suggested range of vibrations (i.e. frequencies above 50-70 Hz at 5 mm/s) lead to the largest expected errors (up to 7.5 dB). Distortion is still significant (1.02 dB), though to a minor degree, at lower levels where this method is recommended. Sandbagging limits the maximum expected error to 1.6 dB, but it is ranked as the worst method irrespective of the vibration level and the sandbag planting at frequencies below 40 Hz. Anchoring appears as the only analyzed method that achieves a stiff rock-to-mount coupling, ensuring consistent measurements for the frequencies commonly found in blasting independently of the vibration level and the mount characteristics.

Segarra, P.; Sanchidrián, J. A.; Castedo, R.; López, L. M.; del Castillo, I.

2015-01-01

310

LTC American`s, Inc. vacuum blasting machine: Baseline report  

SciTech Connect

The LTC shot blast technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The LTC 1073 Vacuum Blasting Machine uses a high-capacity, direct-pressure blasting system which incorporates a continuous feed for the blast media. The blast media cleans the surface within the contained brush area of the blast. It incorporates a vacuum system which removes dust and debris from the surface as it is blasted. The safety and health evaluation during the testing focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise.

NONE

1997-07-31

311

A computational model of blast loading on the human eye.  

PubMed

Ocular injuries from blast have increased in recent wars, but the injury mechanism associated with the primary blast wave is unknown. We employ a three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction computational model to understand the stresses and deformations incurred by the globe due to blast overpressure. Our numerical results demonstrate that the blast wave reflections off the facial features around the eye increase the pressure loading on and around the eye. The blast wave produces asymmetric loading on the eye, which causes globe distortion. The deformation response of the globe under blast loading was evaluated, and regions of high stresses and strains inside the globe were identified. Our numerical results show that the blast loading results in globe distortion and large deviatoric stresses in the sclera. These large deviatoric stresses may be indicator for the risk of interfacial failure between the tissues of the sclera and the orbit. PMID:23591604

Bhardwaj, Rajneesh; Ziegler, Kimberly; Seo, Jung Hee; Ramesh, K T; Nguyen, Thao D

2014-01-01

312

Improving scaling methods to estimate eruption energies from volcanic crater structures using blast experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In an ongoing effort to understand the relevant processes behind the formation of volcanic crater-, maar-, and diatreme structures, experiments producing craters with radii exceeding one meter were conducted at University at Buffalos Geohazards Field Station. A chemical explosive was used as energy source for the tests, and detonated in prepared test beds made from several stratified, compacted aggregates. The amount of explosive, as well as its depth of burial were varied in the twelve experiments. The detonations were recorded by a diverse set of sensors including high-speed/high-definition cameras, seismic and electric field sensors, normal- and infrasound microphones. Morphology and structures were documented after each blast by manual measurements and semi-automated photogrammetry. After all blasts were complete the structures excavated and analyzed. The measured sensor signals were evaluated and related to blast energies, depths of burial and crater morphologies. Former experiments e.g. performed by Goto et al. (2001; Geophys. Res. Lett. 28, 4287-4290) considered craters of single blasts at a given lateral position and found empirical relationships emphasizing the importance of length scaling with the cube root of the blasts energy E. For example the depth of burial producing the largest crater radius--the ';optimal' depth--is proportional to E1/3, as is the corresponding radius. Resembling natural processes creating crater and diatreme structures the experiments performed here feature several blasts at one lateral position. The dependencies on E1/3 could be roughly confirmed. Also the scaled depth correlated with the sensor signals capturing the blasts dynamics. However, significant scatter was introduced by the pre-existing morphologies. Using a suitable re-definition for the charges depth of burial (';eruption depth'), accounting for a pre-existing (crater) morphology, the measured dependencies of morphology and blast dynamics on E can be improved significantly. Correlating the distribution of material confining the charge, and its distance to the latter, this volume-centric defined effective depth could provide means to relate ejecta distribution and eruption dynamics to the involved eruption energies and pre-eruptive settings.

Sonder, I.; Graettinger, A. H.; Valentine, G.; Schmid, A.; Zimanowski, B.; Majji, M.; Ross, P.; White, J. D.; Taddeucci, J.; Lube, G.; Kueppers, U.; Bowman, D. C.

2013-12-01

313

MULTISCALE PHENOMENA IN MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect

This project developed and supported a technology base in nonequilibrium phenomena underpinning fundamental issues in condensed matter and materials science, and applied this technology to selected problems. In this way the increasingly sophisticated synthesis and characterization available for classes of complex electronic and structural materials provided a testbed for nonlinear science, while nonlinear and nonequilibrium techniques helped advance our understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of material microstructure, their evolution, fundamental to macroscopic functionalities. The project focused on overlapping areas of emerging thrusts and programs in the Los Alamos materials community for which nonlinear and nonequilibrium approaches will have decisive roles and where productive teamwork among elements of modeling, simulations, synthesis, characterization and applications could be anticipated--particularly multiscale and nonequilibrium phenomena, and complex matter in and between fields of soft, hard and biomimetic materials. Principal topics were: (i) Complex organic and inorganic electronic materials, including hard, soft and biomimetic materials, self-assembly processes and photophysics; (ii) Microstructure and evolution in multiscale and hierarchical materials, including dynamic fracture and friction, dislocation and large-scale deformation, metastability, and inhomogeneity; and (iii) Equilibrium and nonequilibrium phases and phase transformations, emphasizing competing interactions, frustration, landscapes, glassy and stochastic dynamics, and energy focusing.

A. BISHOP

2000-09-01

314

Fog phenomena on Mars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mars Express High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) images show impressive morning fog features in Valles Marineris and other regions of the surface of Mars. Temperatures have been determined, simultaneously to the imaging, by Mars Express Planetary Fourier Spectrometer (PFS). This identifies water ice rather than frozen CO 2 as the cause of the fog observations in Valles Marineris. Numerical estimates of the water vapor pressure, and the related atmospheric water content, at the frost-point (temperature of freezing or "re-sublimation" of water vapor) by a 1-dimensional planetary boundary layer model indicate that conditions in the planetary boundary layer can indeed temporarily favor the formation of ice particles. A systematic registration of sites of fog observations shows preferred regions and seasons on Mars for fog phenomena. In the first instance, the fog phenomena seem to be induced or supported by orographic effects but not directly by the distribution pattern of the atmospheric vapor or by the regional subsurface water content. This paper documents and thermodynamically verifies the existence of fog of water ice particles in the near-surface atmosphere of Mars.

Möhlmann, Diedrich T. F.; Niemand, Monika; Formisano, Vittorio; Savijärvi, Hannu; Wolkenberg, Paulina

2009-12-01

315

Modeling coal combustion behavior in an ironmaking blast furnace raceway: model development and applications  

SciTech Connect

A numerical model has been developed and validated for the investigation of coal combustion phenomena under blast furnace operating conditions. The model is fully three-dimensional, with a broad capacity to analyze significant operational and equipment design changes. The model was used in a number of studies, including: Effect of cooling gas type in coaxial lance arrangements. It was found that oxygen cooling improves coal burnout by 7% compared with natural gas cooling under conditions that have the same amount of oxygen enrichment in the hot blast. Effect of coal particle size distribution. It was found that during two similar periods of operation at Port Kembla's BF6, a difference in PCI capability could be attributed to the difference in coal size distribution. Effect of longer tuyeres. Longer tuyeres were installed at Port Kembla's BF5, leading to its reline scheduled for March 2009. The model predicted an increase in blast velocity at the tuyere nose due to the combustion of volatiles within the tuyere, with implications for tuyere pressure drop and PCI capability. Effect of lance tip geometry. A number of alternate designs were studied, with the best-performing designs promoting the dispersion of the coal particles. It was also found that the base case design promoted size segregation of the coal particles, forcing smaller coal particles to one side of the plume, leaving larger coal particles on the other side. 11 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

Maldonado, D.; Austin, P.R.; Zulli, P.; Guo B. [BlueScope Steel Research Laboratories, Port Kembla, NSW (Australia)

2009-03-15

316

Planar blast scaling with condensed-phase explosives in a shock tube  

SciTech Connect

Blast waves are strong shock waves that result from large power density deposition into a fluid. The rapid energy release of high-explosive (HE) detonation provides sufficiently high power density for blast wave generation. Often it is desirable to quantify the energy released by such an event and to determine that energy relative to other reference explosives to derive an explosive-equivalence value. In this study, we use condensed-phase explosives to drive a blast wave in a shock tube. The explosive material and quantity were varied to produce blast waves of differing strengths. Pressure transducers at varying lengths measured the post-shock pressure, shock-wave arrival time and sidewall impulse associated with each test. Blast-scaling concepts in a one-dimensional geometry were then used to both determine the energy release associated with each test and to verify the scaling of the shock position versus time, overpressure versus distance, and impulse. Most blast scaling measurements to-date have been performed in a three-dimensional geometry such as a blast arena. Testing in a three-dimensional geometry can be challenging, however, as spherical shock-wave symmetry is required for good measurements. Additionally, the spherical wave strength decays rapidly with distance and it can be necessary to utilize larger (several kg) quantities of explosive to prevent significant decay from occurring before an idealized blast wave has formed. Such a mode of testing can be expensive, require large quantities of explosive, and be limited by both atmospheric conditions (such as rain) and by noise complaints from the population density near the test arena. Testing is possible in more compact geometries, however. Non-planar blast waves can be formed into a quasi-planar shape by confining the shock diffraction with the walls of a shock tube. Regardless of the initial form, the wave shape will begin to approximate a planar front after successive wave reflections from the tube walls. Such a technique has previously been used to obtain blast scaling measurements in the planar geometry with gaseous explosives and the condensed-phase explosive nitroguanidine. Recently, there has been much interest in the blast characterization of various non-ideal high explosive (NIHE) materials. With non-ideals, the detonation reaction zone is significantly larger (up to several cm for ANFO) than more ideal explosives. Wave curvature, induced by charge-geometry, can significantly affect the energy release associated with NIHEs. To measure maximum NIHE energy release accurately, it is desirable to minimize any such curvature and, if possible, to overdrive the detonation shock to ensure completion of chemical reactions ahead of the sonic locus associated with the reaction zone. This is achieved in the current study through use of a powerful booster HE and a charge geometry consisting of short cylindrical lengths of NIHE initiated along the charge centerline.

Jackson, Scott L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-25

317

Anomalous Light Phenomena vs. Bioelectric Brain Activity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a research proposal concerning the instrumented investigation of anomalous light phenomena that are apparently correlated with particular mind states, such as prayer, meditation or psi. Previous research by these authors demonstrate that such light phenomena can be monitored and measured quite efficiently in areas of the world where they are reported in a recurrent way. Instruments such as optical equipment for photography and spectroscopy, VLF spectrometers, magnetometers, radar and IR viewers were deployed and used massively in several areas of the world. Results allowed us to develop physical models concerning the structural and time-variable behaviour of light phenomena, and their kinematics. Recent insights and witnesses have suggested to us that a sort of "synchronous connection" seems to exist between plasma-like phenomena and particular mind states of experiencers who seem to trigger a light manifestation which is very similar to the one previously investigated. The main goal of these authors is now aimed at the search for a concrete "entanglement-like effect" between the experiencer's mind and the light phenomena, in such a way that both aspects are intended to be monitored and measured simultaneously using appropriate instrumentation. The goal of this research project is twofold: a) to verify quantitatively the existence of one very particular kind of mind-matter interaction and to study in real time its physical and biophysical manifestations; b) to repeat the same kind of experiment using the same test-subject in different locations and under various conditions of geomagnetic activity.

Teodorani, M.; Nobili, G.

318

Blast exposure in rats with body shielding is characterized primarily by diffuse axonal injury.  

PubMed

Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the signature insult in combat casualty care. Survival with neurological damage from otherwise lethal blast exposures has become possible with body armor use. We characterized the neuropathologic alterations produced by a single blast exposure in rats using a helium-driven shock tube to generate a nominal exposure of 35 pounds per square inch (PSI) (positive phase duration ? 4 msec). Using an IACUC-approved protocol, isoflurane-anesthetized rats were placed in a steel wedge (to shield the body) 7 feet inside the end of the tube. The left side faced the blast wave (with head-only exposure); the wedge apex focused a Mach stem onto the rat's head. The insult produced ? 25% mortality (due to impact apnea). Surviving and sham rats were perfusion-fixed at 24 h, 72 h, or 2 weeks post-blast. Neuropathologic evaluations were performed utilizing hematoxylin and eosin, amino cupric silver, and a variety of immunohistochemical stains for amyloid precursor protein (APP), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1), ED1, and rat IgG. Multifocal axonal degeneration, as evidenced by staining with amino cupric silver, was present in all blast-exposed rats at all time points. Deep cerebellar and brainstem white matter tracts were most heavily stained with amino cupric silver, with the morphologic staining patterns suggesting a process of diffuse axonal injury. Silver-stained sections revealed mild multifocal neuronal death at 24 h and 72 h. GFAP, ED1, and Iba1 staining were not prominently increased, although small numbers of reactive microglia were seen within areas of neuronal death. Increased blood-brain barrier permeability (as measured by IgG staining) was seen at 24 h and primarily affected the contralateral cortex. Axonal injury was the most prominent feature during the initial 2 weeks following blast exposure, although degeneration of other neuronal processes was also present. Strikingly, silver staining revealed otherwise undetected abnormalities, and therefore represents a recommended outcome measure in future studies of blast TBI. PMID:21449683

Garman, Robert H; Jenkins, Larry W; Switzer, Robert C; Bauman, Richard A; Tong, Lawrence C; Swauger, Peter V; Parks, Steven A; Ritzel, David V; Dixon, C Edward; Clark, Robert S B; Bayir, Hülya; Kagan, Valerian; Jackson, Edwin K; Kochanek, Patrick M

2011-06-01

319

A mouse model of ocular blast injury that induces closed globe anterior and posterior pole damage  

PubMed Central

We developed and characterized a mouse model of primary ocular blast injury. The device consists of: a pressurized air tank attached to a regulated paintball gun with a machined barrel; a chamber that protects the mouse from direct injury and recoil, while exposing the eye; and a secure platform that enables fine, controlled movement of the chamber in relation to the barrel. Expected pressures were calculated and the optimal pressure transducer, based on the predicted pressures, was positioned to measure output pressures at the location where the mouse eye would be placed. Mice were exposed to one of three blast pressures (23.6, 26.4, or 30.4psi). Gross pathology, intraocular pressure, optical coherence tomography, and visual acuity were assessed 0, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after exposure. Contralateral eyes and non-blast exposed mice were used as controls. We detected increased damage with increased pressures and a shift in the damage profile over time. Gross pathology included corneal edema, corneal abrasions, and optic nerve avulsion. Retinal damage was detected by optical coherence tomography and a deficit in visual acuity was detected by optokinetics. Our findings are comparable to those identified in Veterans of the recent wars with closed eye injuries as a result of blast exposure. In summary, this is a relatively simple system that creates injuries with features similar to those seen in patients with ocular blast trauma. This is an important new model for testing the short-term and long-term spectrum of closed globe blast injuries and potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:22504073

Hines-Beard, Jessica; Marchetta, Jeffrey; Gordon, Sarah; Chaum, Edward; Geisert, Eldon E.; Rex, Tonia S.

2012-01-01

320

Droplet Breakup Mechanisms in Air-blast Atomizers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Atomization processes are encountered in many natural and man-made phenomena. Examples are pollen release by plants, human cough or sneeze, engine fuel injectors, spray paint and many more. The physics governing the atomization of liquids is important in understanding and utilizing atomization processes in both natural and industrial processes. We have observed the governing physics of droplet breakup in an air-blast water atomizer using a high magnification, high speed, and high resolution LASER imaging technique. The droplet breakup mechanisms are investigated in three major categories. First, the liquid drops are flattened to form an oblate ellipsoid (lenticular deformation). Subsequent deformation depends on the magnitude of the internal forces relative to external forces. The ellipsoid is converted into a torus that becomes stretched and disintegrates into smaller drops. Second, the drops become elongated to form a long cylindrical thread or ligament that break up into smaller drops (Cigar-shaped deformation). Third, local deformation on the drop surface creates bulges and protuberances that eventually detach themselves from the parent drop to form smaller drops.

Aliabadi, Amir Abbas; Taghavi, Seyed Mohammad; Lim, Kelly

2011-11-01

321

Weld pool phenomena  

SciTech Connect

During welding, the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure are affected by the interaction of the heat source with the metal. The interaction affects the fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transfer in the weld pool, and the solidification behavior of the weld metal. In recent years, there has been a growing recognition of the importance of the weld pool transport processes and the solid state transformation reactions in determining the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure. The relation between the weld pool transport processes and the composition and structure is reviewed. Recent applications of various solidification theories to welding are examined to understand the special problems of weld metal solidification. The discussion is focussed on the important problems and issues related to weld pool transport phenomena and solidification. Resolution of these problems would be an important step towards a science based control of composition, structure and properties of the weld metal.

David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Zacharia, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); DebRoy, T. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1994-09-01

322

Attoheat transport phenomena  

E-print Network

Fascinating developments in optical pulse engineering over the last 20 years lead to the generation of laser pulses as short as few femtosecond, providing a unique tool for high resolution time domain spectroscopy. However, a number of the processes in nature evolve with characteristic times of the order of 1 fs or even shorter. Time domain studies of such processes require at first place sub-fs resolution, offered by pulse depicting attosecond localization. The generation, characterization and proof of principle applications of such pulses is the target of the attoscience. In the paper the thermal processes on the attosecond scale are described. The Klein-Gordon and Proca equations are developed. The relativistic effects in the heat transport on nanoscale are discussed. It is shown that the standard Fourier equation can not be valid for the transport phenomena induced by attosecond laser pulses. The heat transport in nanoparticles and nanotubules is investigated.

J. Marciak-Kozlowska; M. Pelc; M. A. Kozlowski

2009-06-09

323

Transport phenomena in nanofluidics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The transport of fluid in and around nanometer-sized objects with at least one characteristic dimension below 100nm enables the occurrence of phenomena that are impossible at bigger length scales. This research field was only recently termed nanofluidics, but it has deep roots in science and technology. Nanofluidics has experienced considerable growth in recent years, as is confirmed by significant scientific and practical achievements. This review focuses on the physical properties and operational mechanisms of the most common structures, such as nanometer-sized openings and nanowires in solution on a chip. Since the surface-to-volume ratio increases with miniaturization, this ratio is high in nanochannels, resulting in surface-charge-governed transport, which allows ion separation and is described by a comprehensive electrokinetic theory. The charge selectivity is most pronounced if the Debye screening length is comparable to the smallest dimension of the nanochannel cross section, leading to a predominantly counterion containing nanometer-sized aperture. These unique properties contribute to the charge-based partitioning of biomolecules at the microchannel-nanochannel interface. Additionally, at this free-energy barrier, size-based partitioning can be achieved when biomolecules and nanoconstrictions have similar dimensions. Furthermore, nanopores and nanowires are rooted in interesting physical concepts, and since these structures demonstrate sensitive, label-free, and real-time electrical detection of biomolecules, the technologies hold great promise for the life sciences. The purpose of this review is to describe physical mechanisms on the nanometer scale where new phenomena occur, in order to exploit these unique properties and realize integrated sample preparation and analysis systems.

Schoch, Reto B.; Han, Jongyoon; Renaud, Philippe

2008-07-01

324

Modeling of aqueous foam blast wave attenuation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of aqueous foams enables the mitigation of blast waves induced by the explosion of energetic materials. The two-phase confinement gives rise to interphase interactions between the gaseous and liquid phases, which role have been emphasized in shock-tube studies with solid foams [1, 2]. Multifluid formalism enables the thermo-mechanical disequilibria between phases to be taken into account. The flow model ensures the correct estimation of the acoustic impedance of the two-phase media. As for the numerical scheme, Riemann solvers are used to describe the microscopic fluid interactions, the summation of which provides the multiphase flux. The role of the different transfer mechanisms is evaluated in the case where the liquid ligaments of the foam matrix have been shattered into droplets by the shock impingement. Characteristics of blast waves in heterogeneous media leads to a decrease of overpressure. The numerical results have been compared favorably to experimental data [3, 4].

Del Prete, E.; Chinnayya, A.; Hadjadj, A.; Domergue, L.; Haas, J.-F.; Imbert, B.

325

A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting  

SciTech Connect

A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

2006-07-01

326

Pilot plant testing of Illinois coal for blast furnace injection. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995  

SciTech Connect

A potentially new use for Illinois coal is its use as a fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as the first step in steel production. Because of its increasing cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is now being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of Illinois coal in the blast furnace injection process in a new and unique pilot plant test facility. This investigation is significant to the use of Illinois coal in that the limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high sulfur and chlorine contents are suitable feedstocks for blast furnace injection. This study is unique in that it is the first North American effort to directly determine the nature of the combustion of coal injected into a blast furnace. This proposal is a follow-up to one funded for the 1993--94 period. It is intended to complete the study already underway with the Armco and Inland steel companies and to demonstrate quantitatively the suitability of both the Herrin No. 6 and Springfield No. 5 coals for blast furnace injection. The main feature of the current work is the testing of Illinois coals at CANMET`s (Canadian Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology) pilot plant coal combustion facility. This facility simulates blowpipe-tuyere conditions in an operating blast furnace, including blast temperature (900{degrees}C), flow pattern (hot velocity 200 m/s), geometry, gas composition, coal injection velocity (34 m/s) and residence time (20 ms). The facility is fully instrumented to measure air flow rate, air temperature, temperature in the reactor, wall temperature, preheater coil temperature and flue gas analysis. During this quarter there were two major accomplishments.

Crelling, J.C.

1995-12-31

327

Simple Phenomena, Slow Motion, Surprising Physics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a few simple experiments that are worthwhile for slow motion recording and analysis either because of interesting phenomena that can be seen only when slowed down significantly or because of the ability to do precise time measurements. The experiments described in this article are quite commonly done in Czech schools. All…

Koupil, Jan; Vicha, Vladimir

2011-01-01

328

Blast cell methotrexate-polyglutamate accumulation in vivo differs by lineage, ploidy, and methotrexate dose in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.  

PubMed Central

High-dose methotrexate (HDMTX) is a component of most treatment protocols for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), yet recent studies of receptor-mediated transport and saturable polyglutamylation have questioned its rationale. To investigate this in vivo, methotrexate and its active polyglutamated metabolites (MTX-PG) were measured in bone marrow blasts obtained from 101 children randomized to single-agent therapy with either HDMTX (1 g/m2 per 24 h i.v., n = 47) or low-dose MTX (LDMTX, 30 mg/m2 by mouth every 6 h x 6, n = 54), before remission induction therapy. Blast concentrations of total MTX-PGs (median 460 vs 1380 pmol/10(9) cells) and of long-chain MTX-glu4-6 were both significantly higher after HDMTX (P < 0.001). With either treatment, MTX-PGs were significantly higher in B-lineage blasts than in T-lineage blasts (LDMTX P = 0.001, HDMTX P = 0.03). In a multiple regression analysis of B-lineage ALL, blast MTX-PG was significantly related to MTX dose (or plasma MTX concentration), lymphoblast ploidy (hyperdiploid > nonhyperdiploid), and percentage S-phase. This is the first evidence that HDMTX achieves higher MTX-PG concentrations in ALL blasts in vivo, establishing a rationale for HDMTX in the treatment of childhood ALL, especially T-lineage or nonhyperdiploid B-lineage ALL, disease characteristics associated with a poor prognosis on conventional therapy. Images PMID:7525652

Synold, T W; Relling, M V; Boyett, J M; Rivera, G K; Sandlund, J T; Mahmoud, H; Crist, W M; Pui, C H; Evans, W E

1994-01-01

329

The Kirovskiy Explosion of September 29, 1996: Example of a CTB Event Notification for a Routine Mining Blast  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

- On September 29, 1996, a routine mining blast of about 390 metric tons was detonated underground at the Kirovskiy mine in the central Kola Peninsula. The United States was notified two weeks in advance that the blast was to take place and was given the date, approximate time, location and total charge. The explosion was detected and located by the prototype International Data Center (pIDC) and published in the Reviewed Event Bulletin (REB). Detailed information about the blast, including the type and depth of mining operation, the underground charge configuration, and the blasting delay pattern, is reviewed and combined with a seismological analysis of the event. The seismic analysis points to a possible associated tectonic component to the blast, consisting of a small rock burst or induced tremor, spall, or some combination of these mechanisms, that may have enhanced the shear waves, produced large Rg waves at low frequency, and small Pn/Sn and Pn/Lg amplitude ratios at high frequency. While these discriminants might identify the event as an earthquake, the spectral/cepstral analysis of the event clearly shows the ripple-fire delays. This event provides important confidence-building measures for both location calibration, in the form of travel-time corrections for location of mine events in this region, and for improved understanding of seismic discriminants expected for large mine blasts that may have an associated induced tectonic component (e.g., spall, mine tremor or rock burst).

Baumgardt, D. R.; Leith, W.

330

Quarry blasts assessment and their environmental impacts on the nearby oil pipelines, southeast of Helwan City, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ground vibrations induced by blasting in the cement quarries are one of the fundamental problems in the quarrying industry and may cause severe damage to the nearby utilities and pipelines. Therefore, a vibration control study plays an important role in the minimization of environmental effects of blasting in quarries. The current paper presents the influence of the quarry blasts at the National Cement Company (NCC) on the two oil pipelines of SUMED Company southeast of Helwan City, by measuring the ground vibrations in terms of Peak Particle Velocity (PPV). The seismic refraction for compressional waves deduced from the shallow seismic survey and the shear wave velocity obtained from the Multi channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) technique are used to evaluate the closest site of the two pipelines to the quarry blasts. The results demonstrate that, the closest site of the two pipelines is of class B, according to the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP) classification and the safe distance to avoid any environmental effects is 650 m, following the deduced Peak Particle Velocity (PPV) and scaled distance (SD) relationship (PPV = 700.08 × SD-1.225) in mm/s and the Air over Pressure (air blast) formula (air blast = 170.23 × SD-0.071) in dB. In the light of prediction analysis, the maximum allowable charge weight per delay was found to be 591 kg with damage criterion of 12.5 mm/s at the closest site of the SUMED pipelines.

Mohamed, Adel M. E.; Mohamed, Abuo El-Ela A.

2013-06-01

331

Centrifugal shot blasting. Innovative technology summary report  

SciTech Connect

At the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), the Facilities Closure and Demolition Projects Integrated Remedial Design/Remedial Action (RD/RA) work plan calls for the removal of one inch (1 in) depth of concrete surface in areas where contamination with technetium-99 has been identified. This report describes a comparative demonstration between two concrete removal technologies: an innovative system using Centrifugal Shot Blasting (CSB) and a modified baseline technology called a rotary drum planer.

Not Available

1999-07-01

332

The Blast Energy Efficiency of GRBs  

E-print Network

Using data mostly assembled by previous authors, we consider the linear correlation between the apparent radiative efficiency $\\epsilon_{\\gamma}$ (defined as the ratio of isotropic equivalent radiative output to inferred isotropic equivalent kinetic energy of the blast) and $E_{peak}^{\\alpha}$ where $1.4efficiency is $\\sim 7$. We also find preliminary evidence (with a small sample) for a separate class of weak GRB afterglows.

David Eichler Daniel Jontof-Hutter

2005-03-24

333

Explosive parcel containment and blast mitigation container  

SciTech Connect

The present invention relates to a containment structure for containing and mitigating explosions. The containment structure is installed in the wall of the building and has interior and exterior doors for placing suspicious packages into the containment structure and retrieving them from the exterior of the building. The containment structure has a blast deflection chute and a blowout panel to direct over pressure from explosions away from the building, surrounding structures and people.

Sparks, Michael H. (Frederick County, MD)

2001-06-12

334

Considerations for animal models of blast-related traumatic brain injury and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.  

PubMed

The association of military blast exposure and brain injury was first appreciated in World War I as commotio cerebri, and later as shell shock. Similar injuries sustained in modern military conflicts are now classified as mild traumatic brain injury (TBI). Recent research has yielded new insights into the mechanisms by which blast exposure leads to acute brain injury and chronic sequelae, including postconcussive syndrome, post-traumatic stress disorder, post-traumatic headache, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a tau protein neurodegenerative disease. Impediments to delivery of effective medical care for individuals affected by blast-related TBI include: poor insight into the heterogeneity of neurological insults induced by blast exposure; limited understanding of the mechanisms by which blast exposure injures the brain and triggers sequelae; failure to appreciate interactive injuries that affect frontal lobe function, pituitary regulation, and neurovegetative homeostasis; unknown influence of genetic risk factors, prior trauma, and comorbidities; absence of validated diagnostic criteria and clinical nosology that differentiate clinical endophenotypes; and lack of empirical evidence to guide medical management and therapeutic intervention. While clinicopathological analysis can provide evidence of correlative association, experimental use of animal models remains the primary tool for establishing causal mechanisms of disease. However, the TBI field is confronted by a welter of animal models with varying clinical relevance, thereby impeding scientific coherence and hindering translational progress. Animal models of blast TBI will be far more translationally useful if experimental emphasis focuses on accurate reproduction of clinically relevant endpoints (output) rather than scaled replication of idealized blast shockwaves (input). The utility of an animal model is dependent on the degree to which the model recapitulates pathophysiological mechanisms, neuropathological features, and neurological sequelae observed in the corresponding human disorder. Understanding the purpose of an animal model and the criteria by which experimental results derived from the model are validated are critical components for useful animal modeling. Animal models that reliably demonstrate clinically relevant endpoints will expedite development of new treatments, diagnostics, preventive measures, and rehabilitative strategies for individuals affected by blast TBI and its aftermath. PMID:25478023

Goldstein, Lee E; McKee, Ann C; Stanton, Patric K

2014-01-01

335

Effect of grit-blasting on substrate roughness and coating adhesion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Statistically designed experiments were performed to compare the surface roughness produced by grit blasting A36/1020 steel using different abrasives. Grit blast media, blast pressure, and working distance were varied using a Box-type statistical design of experiment (SDE) approach. The surface textures produced by four metal grits (HG16, HG18, HG25, and HG40) and three conventional grits (copper slag, coal slag, and chilled iron) were compared. Substrate roughness was measured using surface profilometry and correlated with operating parameters. The HG16 grit produced the highest surface roughness of all the grits tested. Aluminum and zinc-aluminum coatings were deposited on the grit-blasted substrates using the twin-wire electric are (TWEA) process. Bond strength of the coatings was measured with a portable adhesion tester in accordance with ASTM standard D 4541. The coatings on substrates roughened with steel grit exhibit superior bond strength to those prepared with conventional grit. For aluminum coatings sprayed onto surfaces prepared with the HG16 grit, the bond strength was most influenced by current, spray distance, and spray gun pressure (in that order). The highest bond strength for the zinc-aluminum coatings was attained on surfaces prepared using the metal grits.

Varacalle, Dominic J.; Guillen, Donna Post; Deason, Douglas M.; Rhodaberger, William; Sampson, Elliott

2006-09-01

336

[Update: blast and explosion trauma].  

PubMed

In recent decades, acoustic shock and explosion traumas have increased in frequency in the general population. Beside the use of fireworks and firearms, airbag ignitions and explosions caused by terror or suicidal acts are also relevant. Depending on duration and strength of the sound pressure affecting the human ear, isolated inner ear damage or additional ear drum perforation and interruption of the middle ear ossicle chain can result. By means of otoscopy, pure tone audiometry, measurement of otoacoustic emissions, and other neurootological examinations, the severity of the trauma can be determined. With prompt and adequate therapy, permanent hearing loss can be minimized. In particular, the measurement of otoacoustic emissions allows conclusions to be made on the functionality of the outer hair cells which are damaged first in most cases. Histological investigations on noise-exposed cochleas show extensive damage to the outer hair cells in the frequency range between 1.0 and 4.0 kHz, which correlates well with audiometric measurements. PMID:21769579

van de Weyer, P S; Praetorius, M; Tisch, M

2011-08-01

337

Ultimate in building energy analysis: DOE2 and BLAST  

Microsoft Academic Search

The DOE-2 and BLAST computer programs are investigated in terms of their usefulness in building energy analysis. DOE-2 and BLAST are generally classed as high-level, computer-dynamic methods that are based on hour-by-hour computation. The characteristics of DOE-2 and BLAST are discussed with emphasis on their solar simulation features, and their capabilities are contrasted and related. Typical applications of the programs

B. D. Hunn

1981-01-01

338

Operation Sun Beam, Shots Little Feller II and Small Boy. Project Officer's report - Project 7. 16. Airborne E-field radiation measurements of electromagnetic-pulse phenomena  

SciTech Connect

Airborne measurements of the absolute vertical electric field (E-field) of the radiated electromagnetic pulse were attempted for Shots Little Feller II and Small Boy. Instrumentation included calibrated vertical whip antennas, wideband magnetic tape recorders, and photographs of oscilloscope traces. One instrumented aircraft participated in Little Feller II (C-131F); two aircraft participated in Small Boy (a C-131F and an A-3A). No detectable signals were recorded for either event. It is concluded that the vertical E-field intensities encountered were below the calibrated levels of the instrumentation or the method of instrumentation and calibration was inadequate for nonrepetitive pulse signals.

Butler, K.L.

1985-09-01

339

Real-time measurement of bubbling phenomena in a three-dimensional gas-fluidized bed using ultrafast magnetic resonance imaging.  

PubMed

Ultrafast magnetic resonance imaging has been applied for the first time to measure simultaneously both the rise velocities and coalescence of bubbles, and the dynamics of the solid phase in a gas-solid two-phase flow. Here, we consider the hydrodynamics within a gas-fluidized bed of particles of diameter 0.5 mm contained within a column of internal diameter 50 mm; gas velocities in the range of 0.18-0.54 m/s were studied. The data are of sufficient temporal and spatial resolution that bubble size and the evolution of bubble size and velocity following coalescence events are determined. PMID:16712162

Müller, C R; Davidson, J F; Dennis, J S; Fennell, P S; Gladden, L F; Hayhurst, A N; Mantle, M D; Rees, A C; Sederman, A J

2006-04-21

340

Arcjet Cathode Phenomena  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

1989-01-01

341

Arcjet cathode phenomena  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

1989-01-01

342

Mechanisms and Treatment of Blast Induced Hearing Loss  

PubMed Central

The main objective of this study is to provide an overview of the basic mechanisms of blast induced hearing loss and review pharmacological treatments or interventions that can reduce or inhibit blast induced hearing loss. The mechanisms of blast induced hearing loss have been studied in experimental animal models mimicking features of damage or injury seen in human. Blast induced hearing loss is characterized by perforation and rupture of the tympanic membrane, ossicular damage, basilar membrane damage, inner and outer hair cell loss, rupture of round window, changes in chemical components of cochlear fluid, vasospasm, ischemia, oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, hematoma, and hemorrhage in both animals and humans. These histopathological consequences of blast exposure can induce hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness, and headache. The pharmacological approaches to block or inhibit some of the auditory pathological consequences caused by blast exposure have been developed with antioxidant drugs such as 2,4-disulfonyl ?-phenyl tertiary butyl nitrone (HXY-059, now called HPN-07) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC). A combination of antioxidant drugs (HPN-07 and NAC) was administered to reduce blast induced cochlear damage and hearing loss. The combination of the antioxidant drugs can prevent or treat blast induced hearing loss by reducing damage to the mechanical and neural component of the auditory system. Although information of the underlying mechanisms and treatment of blast induced hearing loss are provided, further and deep research should be achieved due to the limited and controversial knowledge. PMID:24653882

2012-01-01

343

13. BUILDING NO. 621, INTERIOR, TOP OF BLASTING TUB UNDERNEATH ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

13. BUILDING NO. 621, INTERIOR, TOP OF BLASTING TUB UNDERNEATH SAWDUST HOPPER. BLASTING TUB HAS DOUBLE WALLS OF 3/4' THICK STEEL ARMOR PLATE. CHARGE TO BE TESTED IS BURIED IN SAWDUST WITH FLAME RESISTANT CHEMICALS. ELEVATOR BEHIND TUB CARRIES SAWDUST BACK TO TOP OF SAWDUST HOPPER AFTER TEST IS COMPLETED AND SAWDUST IN BLASTING TUB HAS BEEN SIFTED FOR SHELL FRAGMENTS. LOUVERS IN WALLS ARE HINGED FREELY SO THEY OPEN TO RELIEVE BLAST PRESSURE DURING A TEST. - Picatinny Arsenal, 600 Area, Test Areas District, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

344

Mechanisms of hearing loss after blast injury to the ear.  

PubMed

Given the frequent use of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) around the world, the study of traumatic blast injuries is of increasing interest. The ear is the most common organ affected by blast injury because it is the body's most sensitive pressure transducer. We fabricated a blast chamber to re-create blast profiles similar to that of IEDs and used it to develop a reproducible mouse model to study blast-induced hearing loss. The tympanic membrane was perforated in all mice after blast exposure and found to heal spontaneously. Micro-computed tomography demonstrated no evidence for middle ear or otic capsule injuries; however, the healed tympanic membrane was thickened. Auditory brainstem response and distortion product otoacoustic emission threshold shifts were found to be correlated with blast intensity. As well, these threshold shifts were larger than those found in control mice that underwent surgical perforation of their tympanic membranes, indicating cochlear trauma. Histological studies one week and three months after the blast demonstrated no disruption or damage to the intra-cochlear membranes. However, there was loss of outer hair cells (OHCs) within the basal turn of the cochlea and decreased spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) and afferent nerve synapses. Using our mouse model that recapitulates human IED exposure, our results identify that the mechanisms underlying blast-induced hearing loss does not include gross membranous rupture as is commonly believed. Instead, there is both OHC and SGN loss that produce auditory dysfunction. PMID:23840874

Cho, Sung-Il; Gao, Simon S; Xia, Anping; Wang, Rosalie; Salles, Felipe T; Raphael, Patrick D; Abaya, Homer; Wachtel, Jacqueline; Baek, Jongmin; Jacobs, David; Rasband, Matthew N; Oghalai, John S

2013-01-01

345

Cosmic Blasts Much More Common, Astronomers Discover  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A cosmic explosion seen last February may have been the "tip of an iceberg," showing that powerful, distant gamma ray bursts are outnumbered ten-to-one by less-energetic cousins, according to an international team of astronomers. The VLA The Very Large Array CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for VLA gallery) A study of the explosion with X-ray and radio telescopes showed that it is "100 times less energetic than gamma ray bursts seen in the distant universe. We were able to see it because it's relatively nearby," said Alicia Soderberg, of Caltech, leader of the research team. The scientists reported their findings in the August 31 issue of the journal Nature. The explosion is called an X-ray flash, and was detected by the Swift satellite on February 18. The astronomers subsequently studied the object using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the Ryle radio telescope in the UK. "This object tells us that there probably is a rich diversity of cosmic explosions in our local Universe that we only now are starting to detect. These explosions aren't playing by the rules that we thought we understood," said Dale Frail of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. The February blast seems to fill a gap between ordinary supernova explosions, which leave behind a dense neutron star, and gamma ray bursts, which leave behind a black hole, a concentration of mass so dense that not even light can escape it. Some X-ray flashes, the new research suggests, leave behind a magnetar, a neutron star with a magnetic field 100-1000 times stronger than that of an ordinary neutron star. "This explosion occurred in a galaxy about 470 million light-years away. If it had been at the distances of gamma ray bursts, as much as billions of light-years away, we would not have been able to see it," Frail said. "We think that the principal difference between gamma ray bursts and X-ray flashes and ordinary supernova explosions is that the blasts that produce gamma rays and X-rays have disks of material rotating rapidly about the central object," Soderberg said. The powerful gamma ray bursts tap the tremendous gravitational energy of their black hole to produce strong beams of energetic radiation, while less-energetic X-ray bursts like the Feburary event tap energy from the strong magnetic field of the magnetar, the scientists speculated. "This discovery means that the 'zoo' of cosmic explosions has just gotten more numerous and more diverse. It also means that our understanding of how the cores of massive stars collapse to produce this variety of explosions is less complete than we had thought," Frail added. Multiwavelength follow-up observations were required by the team to measure the total energy release of the explosion. In particular, Soderberg adds that "Radio observations with the Very Large Array were additionally required to determine the geometry of the ejecta. We find that unlike typical GRBs which produce pencil-beam jets, this object more resembles a spherical explosion." In addition to Soderberg and Frail, the research team includes Shri Kulkarni. Ehud Nakar, Edo Berger, Brian Cameron, Avishay Gal-Yam, Re'em Sari, Mansi Kasiwal, Eran Ofek, Arne Rau, Brad Cenko, Eric Persson and Dae-Sik Moon of Caltech, Derrick Fox and Dave Burrows of Pennsylvania State University, Roger Chevalier of the University of Virginia, Tsvi Piran of the Hebrew University, Paul Price of the University of Hawaii, Brian Schmidt of Mount Stromlo Observatory in Australia, Guy Pooley of the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory in the UK, Bryan Penprase of Pomona College, and Neil Gehrels of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

2006-08-01

346

The Role of Family Phenomena in Posttraumatic Stress in Youth  

PubMed Central

Topic Youth face trauma that can cause posttraumatic stress (PTS). Purpose 1). To identify the family phenomena used in youth PTS research; and 2). Critically examine the research findings regarding the relationship between family phenomena and youth PTS. Sources Systematic literature review in PsycInfo, PILOTS, CINAHL, and MEDLINE. Twenty-six empirical articles met inclusion criteria. Conclusion Measurement of family phenomena included family functioning, support, environment, expressiveness, relationships, cohesion, communication, satisfaction, life events related to family, parental style of influence, and parental bonding. Few studies gave clear conceptualization of family or family phenomena. Empirical findings from the 26 studies indicate inconsistent empirical relationships between family phenomena and youth PTS, though a majority of the prospective studies support a relationship between family phenomena and youth PTS. Future directions for leadership by psychiatric nurses in this area of research and practice are recommended. PMID:21344778

Deatrick, Janet A.

2010-01-01

347

Physics of IED Blast Shock Tube Simulations for mTBI Research.  

PubMed

Shock tube experiments and simulations are conducted with a spherical gelatin filled skull-brain surrogate, in order to study the mechanisms leading to blast induced mild traumatic brain injury. A shock tube including sensor system is optimized to simulate realistic improvised explosive device blast profiles obtained from full scale field tests. The response of the skull-brain surrogate is monitored using pressure and strain measurements. Fluid-structure interaction is modeled using a combination of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for the air blast, and a finite element model for the structural response. The results help to understand the physics of wave propagation, from air blast into the skull-brain. The presence of openings on the skull and its orientation does have a strong effect on the internal pressure. A parameter study reveals that when there is an opening in the skull, the skull gives little protection and the internal pressure is fairly independent on the skull stiffness; the gelatin shear stiffness has little effect on the internal pressure. Simulations show that the presence of pressure sensors in the gelatin hardly disturbs the pressure field. PMID:21960984

Mediavilla Varas, Jesus; Philippens, M; Meijer, S R; van den Berg, A C; Sibma, P C; van Bree, J L M J; de Vries, D V W M

2011-01-01

348

Physics of IED Blast Shock Tube Simulations for mTBI Research  

PubMed Central

Shock tube experiments and simulations are conducted with a spherical gelatin filled skull–brain surrogate, in order to study the mechanisms leading to blast induced mild traumatic brain injury. A shock tube including sensor system is optimized to simulate realistic improvised explosive device blast profiles obtained from full scale field tests. The response of the skull–brain surrogate is monitored using pressure and strain measurements. Fluid–structure interaction is modeled using a combination of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for the air blast, and a finite element model for the structural response. The results help to understand the physics of wave propagation, from air blast into the skull–brain. The presence of openings on the skull and its orientation does have a strong effect on the internal pressure. A parameter study reveals that when there is an opening in the skull, the skull gives little protection and the internal pressure is fairly independent on the skull stiffness; the gelatin shear stiffness has little effect on the internal pressure. Simulations show that the presence of pressure sensors in the gelatin hardly disturbs the pressure field. PMID:21960984

Mediavilla Varas, Jesus; Philippens, M.; Meijer, S. R.; van den Berg, A. C.; Sibma, P. C.; van Bree, J. L. M. J.; de Vries, D. V. W. M.

2011-01-01

349

Surface roughness estimation of shot-blasted steel bars using machine vision  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the manufacturing process steel bars are cleaned of roll scale by shot blasting, before further processing the bars by drawing. The main goal of this project is to increase the automation of the shot blasting process by machine vision. For this purpose a method is needed for estimating the surface roughness and other anomalies from the steel bars from digital images after the shot blasting. The goal of this method is to estimate if the quality of shot blasting is sufficient considering the quality of the final products after the drawing. In this project a method for normalising the images is considered and several methods for estimating the actual roughness level are experimented. During the experiments a best method was one where the roughness levels are calculated directly from the images as if the images were similar to other measuring sources and the grey-level values in the images represent the deviation on the bar surface. This at least separates the different samples.

Lyden, Sami; Kalviainen, Heikki A.; Nykanen, Jari

2004-10-01

350

1997 Oxford University Press 33893402Nucleic Acids Research, 1997, Vol. 25, No. 17 Gapped BLAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of  

E-print Network

and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs Stephen F. Altschul*, Thomas L. Madden-Specific Iterated BLAST (PSI- BLAST) program runs at approximately the same speed per iteration as gapped BLAST, but in many cases is much more sensitive to weak but biologically relevant sequence similarities. PSI

Batzoglou, Serafim

351

Avalanche Phenomena in Pore Draining  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hysteresis curves measured for superfluid ^4He capillary condensation in Nuclepore membrane indicate deviations from the independent element model. Nuclepore is an interesting material to study since every pore threads the membrane from top to bottom, but non-trivial in the sense that pore intersections seem to play an important role in the hysteresis phenomena observed. Especially interesting in the hysteresis is the sharp draining which occurs as the pores first begin to empty. This has been seen in other hysteretic capillary systems.footnote J. H. Page, J. Liu, B. Abeles, H. W. Deckman, and D. A. Weitz, Phys. Rev. Letters 71, 1216 (1993), for example. We have observed the existence of steps, or avalanches(M. P. Lilly, P. T. Finley, and R. B. Hallock, Phys. Rev. Letters 71), 4186 (1993). , as large groups of pores (<~10^7 out of a total sample size of ~ 10^9 pores) empty in the steep, initial portion of the draining curve. By use of spatially separated detectors, we show that avalanches involve macroscopic (rather than just local) regions of the Nuclepore. We report measurements of the size distribution, duration, and spatial extent of the avalanche events.

Lilly, M. P.; Hallock, R. B.

1996-03-01

352

29 CFR 1926.905 - Loading of explosives or blasting agents.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Loading of explosives or blasting agents. 1926.905 Section...FOR CONSTRUCTION Blasting and the Use of Explosives § 1926.905 Loading of explosives or blasting agents. (a)...

2010-07-01

353

77 FR 31878 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Blasting...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Request; Blasting Operations and Use of Explosives Standard ACTION: Notice...Blasting Operations and Use of Explosives Standard,'' to the Office of Management...INFORMATION: The Blasting and Use of Explosives Standard at 29 CFR part 1926,...

2012-05-30

354

29 CFR 1926.904 - Storage of explosives and blasting agents.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Storage of explosives and blasting agents. 1926.904 Section...FOR CONSTRUCTION Blasting and the Use of Explosives § 1926.904 Storage of explosives and blasting agents. (a)...

2012-07-01

355

29 CFR 1926.904 - Storage of explosives and blasting agents.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Storage of explosives and blasting agents. 1926.904 Section...FOR CONSTRUCTION Blasting and the Use of Explosives § 1926.904 Storage of explosives and blasting agents. (a)...

2010-07-01

356

29 CFR 1926.904 - Storage of explosives and blasting agents.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Storage of explosives and blasting agents. 1926.904 Section...FOR CONSTRUCTION Blasting and the Use of Explosives § 1926.904 Storage of explosives and blasting agents. (a)...

2013-07-01

357

29 CFR 1926.904 - Storage of explosives and blasting agents.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Storage of explosives and blasting agents. 1926.904 Section...FOR CONSTRUCTION Blasting and the Use of Explosives § 1926.904 Storage of explosives and blasting agents. (a)...

2014-07-01

358

30 CFR 817.68 - Use of explosives: Records of blasting operations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Location, date, and time of the blast. (c) Name, signature...the blaster conducting the blast. (d) Identification...in feet, from the nearest blast hole to the nearest dwelling, public building, school, church,...

2013-07-01

359

30 CFR 817.68 - Use of explosives: Records of blasting operations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Location, date, and time of the blast. (c) Name, signature...the blaster conducting the blast. (d) Identification...in feet, from the nearest blast hole to the nearest dwelling, public building, school, church,...

2011-07-01

360

30 CFR 816.68 - Use of explosives: Records of blasting operations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Location, date, and time of the blast. (c) Name, signature...the blaster conducting the blast. (d) Identification...in feet, from the nearest blast hole to the nearest dwelling, public building, school, church,...

2010-07-01

361

30 CFR 816.68 - Use of explosives: Records of blasting operations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Location, date, and time of the blast. (c) Name, signature...the blaster conducting the blast. (d) Identification...in feet, from the nearest blast hole to the nearest dwelling, public building, school, church,...

2013-07-01

362

30 CFR 817.68 - Use of explosives: Records of blasting operations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Location, date, and time of the blast. (c) Name, signature...the blaster conducting the blast. (d) Identification...in feet, from the nearest blast hole to the nearest dwelling, public building, school, church,...

2010-07-01

363

30 CFR 816.68 - Use of explosives: Records of blasting operations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Location, date, and time of the blast. (c) Name, signature...the blaster conducting the blast. (d) Identification...in feet, from the nearest blast hole to the nearest dwelling, public building, school, church,...

2012-07-01

364

30 CFR 816.68 - Use of explosives: Records of blasting operations.  

...Location, date, and time of the blast. (c) Name, signature...the blaster conducting the blast. (d) Identification...in feet, from the nearest blast hole to the nearest dwelling, public building, school, church,...

2014-07-01

365

30 CFR 816.68 - Use of explosives: Records of blasting operations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Location, date, and time of the blast. (c) Name, signature...the blaster conducting the blast. (d) Identification...in feet, from the nearest blast hole to the nearest dwelling, public building, school, church,...

2011-07-01

366

30 CFR 817.68 - Use of explosives: Records of blasting operations.  

...Location, date, and time of the blast. (c) Name, signature...the blaster conducting the blast. (d) Identification...in feet, from the nearest blast hole to the nearest dwelling, public building, school, church,...

2014-07-01

367

30 CFR 817.68 - Use of explosives: Records of blasting operations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Location, date, and time of the blast. (c) Name, signature...the blaster conducting the blast. (d) Identification...in feet, from the nearest blast hole to the nearest dwelling, public building, school, church,...

2012-07-01

368

BLAST: RESOLVING THE COSMIC SUBMILLIMETER BACKGROUND  

SciTech Connect

The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) has made 1 deg{sup 2}, deep, confusion-limited maps at three different bands, centered on the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey South Field. By calculating the covariance of these maps with catalogs of 24 mum sources from the Far-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey, we have determined that the total submillimeter intensities are 8.60 +- 0.59, 4.93 +- 0.34, and 2.27 +- 0.20 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} at 250, 350, and 500 mum, respectively. These numbers are more precise than previous estimates of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) and are consistent with 24 mum-selected galaxies generating the full intensity of the CIB. We find that the fraction of the CIB that originates from sources at z >= 1.2 increases with wavelength, with 60% from high-redshift sources at 500 mum. At all BLAST wavelengths, the relative intensity of high-z sources is higher for 24 mum-faint sources than that for 24 mum-bright sources. Galaxies identified as active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by their Infrared Array Camera colors are 1.6-2.6 times brighter than the average population at 250-500 mum, consistent with what is found for X-ray-selected AGNs. BzK-selected galaxies are found to be moderately brighter than typical 24 mum-selected galaxies in the BLAST bands. These data provide high-precision constraints for models of the evolution of the number density and intensity of star-forming galaxies at high redshift.

Marsden, Gaelen; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Ngo, Henry [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Pascale, Enzo [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, 5 The Parade, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Bock, James J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States); Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Klein, Jeff [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Gundersen, Joshua O. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Hughes, David H. [Instituto Nacional de AstrofIsica Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Aptdo. Postal 51 y 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Magnelli, Benjamin [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service d'Astrophysique, Bat. 709, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Netterfield, Calvin B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Olmi, Luca [Physics Department, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Box 23343, UPR station, Puerto Rico 00931 (United States); Patanchon, Guillaume, E-mail: gmarsden@phas.ubc.c [Universite Paris Diderot, Laboratoire APC, 10, rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet 75205 Paris (France)

2009-12-20

369

NASA TEERM Project: Corn Based Blast Media  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Coatings removal is a necessary part of the maintenance, repair, and overhaul activities at many NASA centers and contractor support sites. Sensitive substrates, such as composites and thin aluminum alloys require special handling such as the use of chemical stripping, pneumatic hand sanding, or softer blast media. Type V, acrylic based PMB is commonly used to de-coat, strip, or de-paint the delicate substrates of the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) currently used in support of the Shuttle and slated to be used in support of CxP.

Griffin, Chuck

2009-01-01

370

Simulation of the reflected blast wave from a C-4 charge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The reflection of a blast wave from a C4 charge detonated above a planar surface is simulated with our ALE3D code. We used a finely-resolved, fixed Eulerian 2-D mesh (167 ?m per cell) to capture the detonation of the charge, the blast wave propagation in nitrogen, and its reflection from the surface. The thermodynamic properties of the detonation products and nitrogen were specified by the Cheetah code. A programmed-burn model was used to detonate the charge at a rate based on measured detonation velocities. Computed pressure histories are compared with pressures measured by Kistler 603B piezoelectric gauges at 7 ranges (GR = 0, 5.08, 10.16, 15.24, 20.32, 25.4, and 30.48 cm) along the reflecting surface. Computed and measured waveforms and positive-phase impulses were similar, except at close-in ranges (GR < 5 cm), which were dominated by jetting effects.

Howard, W. Michael; Kuhl, Allen L.; Tringe, Joseph

2012-03-01

371

Blast mines: physics, injury mechanisms and vehicle protection.  

PubMed

Since World War II, more vehicles have been lost to land mines than all other threats combined. Anti-vehicular (AV) mines are capable of disabling a heavy vehicle, or completely destroying a lighter vehicle. The most common form of AV mine is the blast mine, which uses a large amount of explosive to directly damage the target. In a conventional military setting, landmines are used as a defensive force-multiplier and to restrict the movements of the opposing force. They are relatively cheap to purchase and easy to acquire, hence landmines are also potent weapons in the insurgents' armamentarium. The stand-offnature of its design has allowed insurgents to cause significant injuries to security forces in current conflicts with little personal risk. As a result, AV mines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs) have become the most common cause of death and injury to Coalition and local security forces operating in Iraq and Afghanistan. Detonation of an AV mine causes an explosive, exothermic reaction which results in the formation of a shockwave followed by a rapid expansion of gases. The shockwave is mainly reflected by the soillair interface and fractures the soil cap overthe mine. The detonation products then vent through the voids in the soil, resulting in a hollow inverse cone which consists of the detonation gases surrounded by the soil ejecta. It is the combination of the detonation products and soil ejecta that interact with the target vehicle and cause injury to the vehicle occupants. A number of different strategies are required to mitigate the blast effects of an explosion. Primary blast effects can be reduced by increasing the standoff distance between the seat of the explosion and the crew compartment. Enhancement of armour on the base of the vehicle, as well as improvements in personal protection can prevent penetration of fragments. Mitigating tertiary effects can be achieved by altering the vehicle geometry and structure, increasing vehicle mass, as well as developing new strategies to reduce the transfer of the impulse through the vehicle to the occupants. Protection from thermal injury can be provided by incorporating fire resistant materials into the vehicle and in personal clothing. The challenge for the vehicle designer is the incorporation of these protective measures within an operationally effective platform. PMID:20397600

Ramasamy, A; Hill, A M; Hepper, A E; Bull, A M J; Clasper, J C

2009-12-01

372

Pilot plant testing of Illinois coal for blast furnace injection. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of Illinois coal in the blast furnace injection process in a new and unique pilot plant test facility. This investigation is significant to the use of Illinois coal in that the limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high sulfur and chlorine contents are suitable feedstocks for blast furnace injection. This study is unique in that it is the first North American effort to directly determine the nature of the combustion of coal injected into a blast furnace. It is intended to complete the study already underway with the Armco and Inland steel companies and to demonstrate quantitatively the suitability of both the Herrin No. 6 and Springfield No. 5 coals for blast furnace injection. The main feature of the current work is the testing of Illinois coals at CANMET`s (Canadian Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology) pilot plant coal combustion facility. This facility simulates blowpipe-tuyere conditions in an operating blast furnace, including blast temperature (900 C), flow pattern (hot velocity 200 m/s), geometry, gas composition, coal injection velocity (34 m/s) and residence time (20 ms). The facility is fully instrumented to measure air flow rate, air temperature, temperature in the reactor, wall temperature, preheater coil temperature and flue gas analysis. During this quarter a sample of the Herrin No. 6 coal (IBCSP 112) was delivered to the CANMET facility and testing is scheduled for the week of 11 December 1994. Also at this time, all of the IBCSP samples are being evaluated for blast furnace injection using the CANMET computer model.

Crelling, J.C. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Geology

1994-12-31

373

Seismo-acoustic analysis of the near quarry blasts using Plostina small aperture array  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seismic and acoustic signals are important to recognize different type of industrial blasting sources in order to discriminate between them and natural earthquakes. We have analyzed the seismic events listed in the Romanian catalogue (Romplus) for the time interval between 2011 and 2012, and occurred in the Dobrogea region, in order to determine detection seismo-acoustic signals of quarry blasts by Plostina array stations. Dobrogea is known as a seismic region characterized by crustal earthquakes with low magnitudes; at the same time, over 40 quarry mines are located in the area, being sources of blasts recorded both with the seismic and infrasound sensors of the Romanian Seismic Network. Plostina seismo-acoustic array, deployed in the central part of Romania, consists of 7 seismic sites (3C broad-band instruments and accelerometers) collocated with 7 infrasound instruments. The array is particularly used for the seismic monitoring of the local and regional events, as well as for the detection of infrasonic signals produced by various sources. Considering the characteristics of the infrasound sensors (frequency range, dynamic, sensibility), the array proved its efficiency in observing the signals produced by explosions, mine explosion and quarry blasts. The quarry mines included for this study cover distances of two hundreds of kilometers from the station and routinely generate explosions that are detected as seismic and infrasonic signals with Plostina array. The combined seismo-acoustic analysis uses two types of detectors for signal identification: one, applied for the seismic signal identification, is based on array processing techniques (beamforming and frequency-wave number analysis), while the other one, which is used for infrasound detection and characterization, is the automatic detector DFX-PMCC (Progressive Multi-Channel Correlation Method). Infrasonic waves generated by quarry blasts have frequencies ranging from 0.05 Hz up to at least 6 Hz and amplitudes below 5 Pa. Seismic data analysis shows that the frequency range of the signals are above 2 Hz. Surface explosions such as quarry blasts are useful sources for checking detection and location efficiency, when seismic measurements are added. The process is crucial for discrimination purposes and for establishing of a set of ground-truth infrasound events. Ground truth information plays a key role in the interpretation of infrasound signals, by including near-field observations from industrial blasts.

Ghica, Daniela; Stancu, Iulian; Ionescu, Constantin

2013-04-01

374

Identification of major blast resistance genes in the southern US  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Resistance (R) genes in rice play important roles in preventing infections of rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. In order to identify more R genes for different rice growing areas in the Southern US, an extensive field survey of the blast fungus was performed from 2012 to 2013. A total of 500 is...

375

Modelling and evaluation of the micro abrasive blasting process  

Microsoft Academic Search

Micro abrasive blasting (MAB) is becoming an important machining technique for the cost effective fabrication of micro devices. The material removal process is based on the erosion of a mask-protected brittle substrate by an abrasive-laden air jet. To exploit the potentials of this technique for applications of industrial interest, the blasting process has to become more efficient and better predictable.

M. Achtsnick; P. F. Geelhoed; A. M. Hoogstrate; B. Karpuschewski

2005-01-01

376

Current advances on genetic resistance to rice blast disease  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Rice blast disease caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most threatening fungal diseases resulting in significant annual crop losses worldwide. Blast disease has been effectively managed by a combination of resistant (R) gene deployment, application of fungicides, and suita...

377

EXTERIOR VIEW, NO. 3 CAST HOUSE CENTER AND BLAST FURNACE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

EXTERIOR VIEW, NO. 3 CAST HOUSE CENTER AND BLAST FURNACE NO. 3 (JANE FURNACE)/ORE BRIDGE TO THE RIGHT, WITH SINTERING PLANT CONVEYORS & TRANSFER HOUSE IN FOREGROUND. - Pittsburgh Steel Company, Monessen Works, Blast Furnace No. 3, Donner Avenue, Monessen, Westmoreland County, PA

378

5. SOUTHERN VIEW OF BLAST FURNACES No. 3, No. 4, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. SOUTHERN VIEW OF BLAST FURNACES No. 3, No. 4, AND No. 6, WITH ORE YARD IN THE FOREGROUND. BUILDING ON THE LEFT IS THE CENTRAL BOILER HOUSE. (Jet Lowe) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

379

General view of blast furnace "A"; looking southeast; The building ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

General view of blast furnace "A"; looking southeast; The building to the right is the crucible steel building - Bethlehem Steel Corporation, South Bethlehem Works, Blast Furnace "A", Along Lehigh River, North of Fourth Street, West of Minsi Trail Bridge, Bethlehem, Northampton County, PA

380

Performance of Runtime Optimization on BLAST Technical Report  

E-print Network

Performance of Runtime Optimization on BLAST Technical Report Department of Computer Science and Engineering University of Minnesota 4-192 EECS Building 200 Union Street SE Minneapolis, MN 55455-0159 USA TR 04-038 Performance of Runtime Optimization on BLAST Abhinav Das, Jiwei Lu, Howard Chen, Jinpyo Kim

Minnesota, University of

381

Building comfort analysis using BLAST: A case study. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Energy analysis programs have traditionally modeled energy consumption of new or existing facilities. A new feature of the Building Loads Analysis and Systems Thermodynamics (BLAST) computer program includes the ability to model comfort parameters in addition to evaluating building energy performance. This study demonstrates this unique BLAST feature by examining the comfort parameters at a new Air Force Housing (UEPH)

R. J. Nemeth; L. K. Lwrie

1991-01-01

382

BLUNT TRAUMA FROM BLAST-INDUCED BUILDING DEBRIS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Protecting building occupants from blast effects is a primary focus of current research. One of the primary injury mechanisms is blunt trauma, as structural and architectural elements of the building as well as building contents are projected by the force of the blast and impact humans inside the building. A series of experiments was performed recently in which instrumented anthropomorphic

David Bogosian; Hrire Der Avanessian

383

Using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for blast wave predictions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Explosions will, in most cases, generate blast waves. While simple models (e.g., Multi Energy Method) are useful for simple explosion geometries, most practical explosions are far from trivial and require detailed analyses. For a reliable estimate of the blast from a gas explosion it is necessary to know the explosion strength. The source explosion may not be symmetric; the pressure

Olav R. Hansen; Peter Hinze; Derek Engel; Scott Davis

2010-01-01

384

7. Air Blast Circuit Breaker Compressors, view to the southeast. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. Air Blast Circuit Breaker Compressors, view to the southeast. The air blast circuit breakers are visible in the left background of the photograph. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Noxon Rapids Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, South bank of Clark Fork River at Noxon Rapids, Noxon, Sanders County, MT

385

VIEW OF THE #2 BLAST FURNACE FROM THE EAST, SHOWING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW OF THE #2 BLAST FURNACE FROM THE EAST, SHOWING SKIP HOIST, DUST CATCHER AND STOCK BINS IN THE FOREGROUND. #2 CASTING SHED IS TO THE LEFT, HOT BLAST MAIN IS ON THE RIGHT. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

386

Blast-furnace performance with coal-dust injection  

SciTech Connect

For the blast furnace shop at OAO Alchevskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (AMK) the injection of pulverized fuel is promising. Preliminary steps toward its introduction are underway, including analytical research. In this context, blast furnace performance when using pulverized coal is calculated in this study.

G.G. Vasyura [OAO Alchevskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat, Alchevsk (Russian Federation)

2007-07-01

387

Computational studies of polyurea coated steel plate under blast loads  

E-print Network

structural dynamics analysis #12;Blast simulation · PUMA2, a computational fluid dynamics computer code. Validation of PUMA2 - Over-Pressure #12;Pressure Loading at the Center of the Plate · Results obtained using-Blast 2.2, Applied Research Associates, Inc.] #12;Comparison between PUMA2 and TM5- 1300 · TM5

388

Computation of viscous blast wave flowfields  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method to determine unsteady solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations was developed and applied. The structural finite-volume, approximately factored implicit scheme uses Newton subiterations to obtain the spatially and temporally second-order accurate time history of the interaction of blast-waves with stationary targets. The inviscid flux is evaluated using MacCormack's modified Steger-Warming flux or Roe flux difference splittings with total variation diminishing limiters, while the viscous flux is computed using central differences. The use of implicit boundary conditions in conjunction with a telescoping in time and space method permitted solutions to this strongly unsteady class of problems. Comparisons of numerical, analytical, and experimental results were made in two and three dimensions. These comparisons revealed accurate wave speed resolution with nonoscillatory discontinuity capturing. The purpose of this effort was to address the three-dimensional, viscous blast-wave problem. Test cases were undertaken to reveal these methods' weaknesses in three regimes: (1) viscous-dominated flow; (2) complex unsteady flow; and (3) three-dimensional flow. Comparisons of these computations to analytic and experimental results provided initial validation of the resultant code. Addition details on the numerical method and on the validation can be found in the appendix. Presently, the code is capable of single zone computations with selection of any permutation of solid wall or flow-through boundaries.

Atwood, Christopher A.

1991-01-01

389

Mercury in dumped blast furnace sludge.  

PubMed

Blast furnace sludge (BFS) is a waste generated in the production of pig iron and was dumped in sedimentation ponds. Sixty-five samples from seven BFS locations in Europe were investigated regarding the toxic element mercury (Hg) for the first time. The charge material of the blast furnace operations revealed Hg contents from 0.015 to 0.097mgkg(-1). In comparison, the Hg content of BFS varied between 0.006 and 20.8mgkg(-1) with a median of 1.63mgkg(-1), which indicates enrichment with Hg. For one site with a larger sample set (n=31), Hg showed a stronger correlation with the total non-calcareous carbon (C) including coke and graphite (r=0.695; n=31; p<0.001). It can be assumed that these C-rich compounds are hosting phases for Hg. The solubility of Hg was rather low and did not exceed 0.43% of total Hg. The correlation between the total Hg concentration and total amount of NH4NO3-soluble Hg was relatively poor (r=0.496; n=27; p=0.008) indicating varying hazard potentials of the different BFS. Finally, BFS is a mercury-containing waste and dumped BFS should be regarded as potentially mercury-contaminated sites. PMID:24290303

Földi, Corinna; Dohrmann, Reiner; Mansfeldt, Tim

2014-03-01

390

Membrane Transport Phenomena (MTP)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The activities during the fourth semi-annual period of the MTP project have involved the completion of the Science Concept Review (SCR) presentation and peer review, continuation of analyses for the mass transfer coefficients measured from MTA experiment data, and development of the second generation (MTP-II) instrument. The SCR panel members were generated several recommendations for the MTP project recommendations are : Table 1 Summary of Primary SCR Panel Recommendations (1) Continue and refine development of mass transfer coefficient analyses (2) Refine and upgrade analytical modeling associated with the MTP experiment. (3) Increase resolution of measurements in proximity of the membrane interface. (4) Shift emphasis to measurement of coupled transport effects (i.e., development of MTP phase II experiment concept).

Mason, Larry W.

1997-01-01

391

Note: A table-top blast driven shock tube  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The prevalence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury in conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has motivated laboratory scale experiments on biomedical effects of blast waves and studies of blast wave transmission properties of various materials in hopes of improving armor design to mitigate these injuries. This paper describes the design and performance of a table-top shock tube that is more convenient and widely accessible than traditional compression driven and blast driven shock tubes. The design is simple: it is an explosive driven shock tube employing a rifle primer that explodes when impacted by the firing pin. The firearm barrel acts as the shock tube, and the shock wave emerges from the muzzle. The small size of this shock tube can facilitate localized application of a blast wave to a subject, tissue, or material under test.

Courtney, Michael W.; Courtney, Amy C.

2010-12-01

392

A Table-top Blast Driven Shock Tube  

E-print Network

The prevalence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury in conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has motivated laboratory scale experiments on biomedical effects of blast waves and studies of blast wave transmission properties of various materials in hopes of improving armor design to mitigate these injuries. This paper describes the design and performance of a table-top shock tube that is more convenient and widely accessible than traditional compression driven and blast driven shock tubes. The design is simple: it is an explosive driven shock tube employing a rifle primer which explodes when impacted by the firing pin. The firearm barrel acts as the shock tube, and the shock wave emerges from the muzzle. The small size of this shock tube can facilitate localized application of a blast wave to a subject, tissue, or material under test.

Courtney, Michael; 10.1063/1.3518970

2011-01-01

393

SURFACE PREPARATION OF STEEL SUBSTRATES USING GRIT-BLASTING  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of grit blasting for thermal spray applications is to ensure a strong mechanical bond between the substrate and the coating by the enhanced roughening of the substrate material. This study presents statistically designed experiments that were accomplished to investigate the effect of abrasives on roughness for A36/1020 steel. The experiments were conducted using a Box statistical design of experiment (SDE) approach. Three grit blasting parameters and their effect on the resultant substrate roughness were investigated. These include blast media, blast pressure, and working distance. The substrates were characterized for roughness using surface profilometry. These attributes were correlated with the changes in operating parameters. Twin-Wire Electric Arc (TWEA) coatings of aluminum and zinc/aluminum were deposited on the grit-blasted substrates. These coatings were then tested for bond strength. Bond strength studies were conducted utilizing a portable adhesion tester following ASTM standard D4541.

Donna Post Guillen; D. J. Varacalle, Jr.; D. Deason; W. Rhodaberger; E. Sampson

2005-05-01

394

Visualization of explosion phenomena using a high-speed video camera with an uncoupled objective lens by fiber-optic  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Visualization of explosion phenomena is very important and essential to evaluate the performance of explosive effects. The phenomena, however, generate blast waves and fragments from cases. We must protect our visualizing equipment from any form of impact. In the tests described here, the front lens was separated from the camera head by means of a fiber-optic cable in order to be able to use the camera, a Shimadzu Hypervision HPV-1, for tests in severe blast environment, including the filming of explosions. It was possible to obtain clear images of the explosion that were not inferior to the images taken by the camera with the lens directly coupled to the camera head. It could be confirmed that this system is very useful for the visualization of dangerous events, e.g., at an explosion site, and for visualizations at angles that would be unachievable under normal circumstances.

Tokuoka, Nobuyuki; Miyoshi, Hitoshi; Kusano, Hideaki; Hata, Hidehiro; Hiroe, Tetsuyuki; Fujiwara, Kazuhito; Yasushi, Kondo

2008-11-01

395

Ordering Phenomena in Undercooled Alloys  

SciTech Connect

Much of the work performed under this grant was devoted to using modern ideas in kinetics to understand atom movements in metallic alloys far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Kinetics arguments were based explicitly on the vacancy mechanism for atom movements. The emphasis was on how individual atom movements are influenced by the local chemical environment of the moving atom, and how atom movements cause changes in the local chemical environments. The author formulated a kinetic master equation method to treat atom movements on a crystal lattice with a vacancy mechanism. Some of these analyses [3,10,16] are as detailed as any treatment of the statistical kinetics of atom movements in crystalline alloys. Three results came from this work. Chronologically they were (1) A recognition that tracking time dependencies is not necessarily the best way to study kinetic phenomena. If multiple order parameters can be measured in a material, the ''kinetic path'' through the space spanned by these order parameters maybe just as informative about the chemical factors that affect atom movements [2,3,5-7,9-11,14-16,18,19,21,23,24,26,36,37]. (2) Kinetic paths need not follow the steepest gradient of the free energy function (this should be well-known), and for alloys far from equilibrium the free energy function can be almost useless in describing kinetic behavior. This is why the third result surprised me. (3) In cluster approximations with multiple order parameters, saddle points are common features of free energy functions. Interestingly, kinetic processes stall or change time scale when the kinetic path approaches a state at a saddle point in the free energy function, even though these states exist far from thermodynamic equilibrium. The author calls such a state a ''pseudostable'' (falsely stable) state [6,21,26]. I have also studied these phenomena by more ''exact'' Monte Carlo simulations. The kinetic paths showed features similar to those found in analytical theories. The author found that a microstructure with interfaces arranged in space as a periodic minimal surface is a probably an alloy at a saddle point in its free energy function [21,26,37].

Fultz, Brent

1997-07-17

396

PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN THE EXPANDING BLAST WAVE OF {eta} CARINA'S GREAT ERUPTION OF 1843  

SciTech Connect

Non-thermal hard X-ray and high-energy (HE; 1 MeV {<=} E {<=} 100 GeV) {gamma}-ray emission in the direction of {eta} Carina has been recently detected using the INTEGRAL, AGILE, and Fermi satellites. So far this emission has been interpreted in the framework of particle acceleration in the colliding wind region between the two massive stars. However, the existence of a very fast moving blast wave which originates in the historical 1843 'Great Eruption' provides an alternative particle acceleration site in this system. Here, we explore an alternate scenario and find that inverse Compton emission from electrons accelerated in the blast wave can naturally explain both the flux and spectral shape of the measured hard X-ray and HE {gamma}-ray emission. This scenario is further supported by the lack of significant variability in the INTEGRAL and Fermi measured fluxes.

Ohm, S.; Domainko, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, P.O. Box 103980, D 69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Hinton, J. A., E-mail: stefan.ohm@mpi-hd.mpg.d, E-mail: wilfried.domainko@mpi-hd.mpg.d, E-mail: jim.hinton@leicester.ac.u [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

2010-08-01

397

The polar bear phenomena  

SciTech Connect

Results from measuring the thermal profile of polar bear pelts, reflectiveness of the pelts, and total thermal conversion data lead to the conclusion that the pelts from an ultra-efficient thermal diode for solar-thermal conversion. The transfer of the thermal energy from the surface of the fur to the skin where it is absorbed cannot be thermal, and therefore must be radiative. This process must have an efficiency of better than 90:0090 percent to account for measured values. The radiative transfer process is not known at present. To understand it, a detailed knowledge of the microscopic parameters of the pelts must be obtained. This is the current thrust of the polar solar research. If the process can be understood and synthesized,it will provide a major breakthrough in the area of solar-thermal energy conversion.

Maw, P.K. (United Kingdom Ingersoll-Rand Sales Company, Ltd., Horwich, Bolton Lancashire, BL6 6JN (GB)); Lane, M.T.

1990-02-01

398

Schizoid phenomena in substance abusers.  

PubMed

It is hypothesized that the spectrum of schizoid disorders, schizoid phenomena, and the underlying psychodynamics can often be found in the gamut of addictions and stand in the way of recovery. Features of schizoidness, the varieties of schizoid presentations, the etiology and pathogenesis of drug/alcohol abuse in the schizoid, and readily clinically apparent psychodynamic features are discussed. Schizoid phenomena can be dealt with effectively with an informed psychotherapy. PMID:12095001

Armstrong, Ralph H

2002-01-01

399

A Novel Approach for Blast-Induced Flyrock Prediction Based on Imperialist Competitive Algorithm and Artificial Neural Network  

PubMed Central

Flyrock is one of the major disturbances induced by blasting which may cause severe damage to nearby structures. This phenomenon has to be precisely predicted and subsequently controlled through the changing in the blast design to minimize potential risk of blasting. The scope of this study is to predict flyrock induced by blasting through a novel approach based on the combination of imperialist competitive algorithm (ICA) and artificial neural network (ANN). For this purpose, the parameters of 113 blasting operations were accurately recorded and flyrock distances were measured for each operation. By applying the sensitivity analysis, maximum charge per delay and powder factor were determined as the most influential parameters on flyrock. In the light of this analysis, two new empirical predictors were developed to predict flyrock distance. For a comparison purpose, a predeveloped backpropagation (BP) ANN was developed and the results were compared with those of the proposed ICA-ANN model and empirical predictors. The results clearly showed the superiority of the proposed ICA-ANN model in comparison with the proposed BP-ANN model and empirical approaches. PMID:25147856

Marto, Aminaton; Jahed Armaghani, Danial; Tonnizam Mohamad, Edy; Makhtar, Ahmad Mahir

2014-01-01

400

BLAST OBSERVATIONS OF RESOLVED GALAXIES: TEMPERATURE PROFILES AND THE EFFECT OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI ON FIR TO SUBMILLIMETER EMISSION  

SciTech Connect

Over the course of two flights, the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) made resolved maps of seven nearby (<25 Mpc) galaxies at 250, 350, and 500 mum. During its 2005 June flight from Sweden, BLAST observed a single nearby galaxy, NGC 4565. During the 2006 December flight from Antarctica, BLAST observed the nearby galaxies NGC 1097, NGC 1291, NGC 1365, NGC 1512, NGC 1566, and NGC 1808. We fit physical dust models to a combination of BLAST observations and other available data for the galaxies observed by Spitzer. We fit a modified blackbody to the remaining galaxies to obtain total dust mass and mean dust temperature. For the four galaxies with Spitzer data, we also produce maps and radial profiles of dust column density and temperature. We measure the fraction of BLAST detected flux originating from the central cores of these galaxies and use this to calculate a 'core fraction', an upper limit on the 'active galactic nucleus fraction' of these galaxies. We also find our resolved observations of these galaxies give a dust mass estimate 5-19 times larger than an unresolved observation would predict. Finally, we are able to use these data to derive a value for the dust mass absorption coefficient of kappa = 0.29 +- 0.03 m{sup 2} kg{sup -1} at 250 mum. This study is an introduction to future higher-resolution and higher-sensitivity studies to be conducted by Herschel and SCUBA-2.

Wiebe, Donald V.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Pascale, Enzo [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, 5 The Parade, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Bock, James J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States); Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon; Klein, Jeff; Rex, Marie [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Gundersen, Joshua O. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Hughes, David H. [Instituto Nacional de AstrofIsica Optica y Electronica, Aptdo. Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Martin, Peter G. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Netterfield, Calvin B. [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A7 (Canada); Olmi, Luca [Istituto di Radioastronomia, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125, Firenze (Italy); Patanchon, Guillaume [Laboratoire APC, 10, rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet 75205 Paris (France)

2009-12-20

401

Preparation of Aluminum Coatings by Atmospheric Plasma Spraying and Dry-Ice Blasting and Their Corrosion Behavior  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aluminum coating, as an example of spray coating material with low hardness, was deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying while dry-ice blasting was applied during the deposition process. The deposited coatings were characterized in terms of microstructure, porosity, phase composition, and the valence states. The results show that the APS aluminum coatings with dry-ice blasting present a porosity of 0.35 ± 0.02%, which is comparable to the bulk material formed by the mechanical compaction. In addition, no evident oxide has been detected, except for the very thin and impervious oxide layer at the outermost layer. Compared to plasma-sprayed Al coatings without dry-ice blasting, the adhesion increased by 52% for Al substrate using dry-ice blasting, while 25% for steel substrate. Corrosion behavior of coated samples was evaluated in 3.5 wt.% NaCl aqueous using electrochemistry measurements. The electrochemical results indicated that APS Al coating with dry-ice blasting was more resistant to pitting corrosion than the conventional plasma-sprayed Al coating.

Dong, Shu-Juan; Song, Bo; Zhou, Gen-Shu; Li, Chang-Jiu; Hansz, Bernard; Liao, Han-Lin; Coddet, Christian

2013-10-01

402

Bioceramic inlays do not improve mechanical incorporation of grit-blasted titanium stems in the proximal sheep femur.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to determine, if bioactive glass (BG) surface inlays improve osseointegration of titanium implants in the proximal femur of adult sheep. In simulation of uncemented primary stems (nine animals), only the proximal part of the implants was grit-blasted and three surface slots of the grit-blasted region were filled with sintered BG microspheres. Primary stems were implanted using press-fit technique. In revision stem simulation (eight animals), grit-blasting was extended over the whole implant and seven perforating holes of the stem were filled by sintered BG granules. Revision stems were implanted with a mixture of autogenous bone graft and BG granules. Comparison with solid partially or fully grit-blasted control stems implanted in the contralateral femurs was performed in the primary and revision stem experiments at 12 and 25 weeks, respectively. Implant incorporation was evaluated by torsional failure testing and histomorphometry. Only one-third of the primary stems anchored mechanically to bone. The revision stems incorporated better and the BG inlays of the revision stems showed ingrowth of new bone. However, there were no significant differences in the torsional failure loads between the stems with BG inlays and the control stems. In conclusion, surface BG inlays gave no measurable advantage in mechanical incorporation of grit-blasted titanium implants. Overall, the proximal sheep femur, characterized by minimal amount of cancellous bone and the presence of adipocytic bone marrow, seemed to present compromised bone healing conditions. PMID:19437438

Keränen, Pauli; Koort, Jyri; Itälä, Ari; Ylänen, Heimo; Dalstra, Michel; Hupa, Mikko; Kommonen, Bertel; Aro, Hannu T

2010-03-15

403

Development of Rock Engineering Systems-Based Models for Flyrock Risk Analysis and Prediction of Flyrock Distance in Surface Blasting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The environmental effects of blasting must be controlled in order to comply with regulatory limits. Because of safety concerns and risk of damage to infrastructures, equipment, and property, and also having a good fragmentation, flyrock control is crucial in blasting operations. If measures to decrease flyrock are taken, then the flyrock distance would be limited, and, in return, the risk of damage can be reduced or eliminated. This paper deals with modeling the level of risk associated with flyrock and, also, flyrock distance prediction based on the rock engineering systems (RES) methodology. In the proposed models, 13 effective parameters on flyrock due to blasting are considered as inputs, and the flyrock distance and associated level of risks as outputs. In selecting input data, the simplicity of measuring input data was taken into account as well. The data for 47 blasts, carried out at the Sungun copper mine, western Iran, were used to predict the level of risk and flyrock distance corresponding to each blast. The obtained results showed that, for the 47 blasts carried out at the Sungun copper mine, the level of estimated risks are mostly in accordance with the measured flyrock distances. Furthermore, a comparison was made between the results of the flyrock distance predictive RES-based model, the multivariate regression analysis model (MVRM), and, also, the dimensional analysis model. For the RES-based model, R 2 and root mean square error (RMSE) are equal to 0.86 and 10.01, respectively, whereas for the MVRM and dimensional analysis, R 2 and RMSE are equal to (0.84 and 12.20) and (0.76 and 13.75), respectively. These achievements confirm the better performance of the RES-based model over the other proposed models.

Faramarzi, Farhad; Mansouri, Hamid; Farsangi, Mohammad Ali Ebrahimi

2014-07-01

404

Characterisation of underground blast-induced ground motions from large-scale field tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

An in-situ large-scale underground blast test program was conducted to investigate stress wave characteristics inside the medium, at the soil-rock interface and on the soil ground surface. The stress wave measurements were made through a vertical borehole and a horizontal borehole inside the rock mass, and along several horizontal lines arranged at the rock-soil interface and on the soil surface.

C. Wu; Y. Lu; H. Hao; W. K. Lim; Y. Zhou; C. C. Seah

2003-01-01

405

X-ray technique for the estimation of residual stresses after shot-blasting metal forming  

Microsoft Academic Search

A technique is developed for the correction of the depth distribution of residual stresses measured by an X-ray method with\\u000a allowance for their relaxation upon the removal of surface layers. This technique is applied to the study of a D16 aluminum\\u000a alloy strip subjected to shot-blasting metal forming. This technique can be used to estimate the distribution of residual\\u000a stresses

S. Ya. Betsofen; V. V. Plikhunov; A. A. Ashmarin

2008-01-01

406

Friction behavior of laser beam texture sheets and shot blast sheets  

Microsoft Academic Search

The friction behaviors of steel sheets at the corners of die and punch, under different conditions of surface textures (laser\\u000a beam texture, shot blast texture), steel sheet rolling directions and lubricants, are studied by both SEM micro-surface observations\\u000a and friction coefficients measurement. The results show the friction coefficient at the corner of die is smaller than that\\u000a at the corner

Luo-ping Xu; Xu-bang Qin; Hong-sheng Huang; Wen-hua Bao

2000-01-01

407

X-ray technique for the estimation of residual stresses after shot-blasting metal forming  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A technique is developed for the correction of the depth distribution of residual stresses measured by an X-ray method with allowance for their relaxation upon the removal of surface layers. This technique is applied to the study of a D16 aluminum alloy strip subjected to shot-blasting metal forming. This technique can be used to estimate the distribution of residual stresses across massive parts after various types of treatment.

Betsofen, S. Ya.; Plikhunov, V. V.; Ashmarin, A. A.

2008-04-01

408

A multisite study of the relationships between blast exposures and symptom reporting in a post-deployment active duty military population with mild traumatic brain injury.  

PubMed

Explosive devices have been the most frequent cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among deployed contemporary U.S. service members. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of previous cumulative blast exposures (that did or did not result in TBI) on later post-concussion and post-traumatic symptom reporting after sustaining a mild TBI (MTBI). Participants were 573 service members who sustained MTBI divided into four groups by number of blast exposures (1, 2, 3, and 4-10) and a nonblast control group. Post-concussion symptoms were measured using the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms using the Post-traumatic Checklist-Civilian version (PCL-C). Results show groups significantly differed on total NSI scores (p<0.001), where symptom endorsement increased as number of reported blast exposures increased. Total NSI scores were significantly higher for the 3- and 4-10 blast groups compared with the 1- and 2-blast groups with effect sizes ranging from small to moderate (d=0.31 to 0.63). After controlling for PTSD symptoms using the PCL-C total score, NSI total score differences remained between the 4-10-blast group and the 1- and 2-blast groups, but were less pronounced (d=0.35 and d=0.24, respectively). Analyses of NSI subscale scores using PCL-C scores as a covariate revealed significant between-blast group differences on cognitive, sensory, and somatic, but not affective symptoms. Regression analyses revealed that cumulative blast exposures accounted for a small but significant amount of the variance in total NSI scores (4.8%; p=0.009) and total PCL-C scores (2.3%; p<0.001). Among service members exposed to blast, post-concussion symptom reporting increased as a function of cumulative blast exposures. Future research will need to determine the relationship between cumulative blast exposures, symptom reporting, and neuropathological changes. PMID:25036531

Reid, Matthew W; Miller, Kelly J; Lange, Rael T; Cooper, Douglas B; Tate, David F; Bailie, Jason; Brickell, Tracey A; French, Louis M; Asmussen, Sarah; Kennedy, Jan E

2014-12-01

409

Blast mitigation capabilities of aqueous foam.  

SciTech Connect

A series of tests involving detonation of high explosive blanketed by aqueous foam (conducted from 1982 to 1984) are described in primarily terms of recorded peak pressure, positive phase specific impulse, and time of arrival. The investigation showed that optimal blast mitigation occurs for foams with an expansion ratio of about 60:1. Simple analyses representing the foam as a shocked single phase mixture are presented and shown inadequate. The experimental data demonstrate that foam slows down and broadens the propagated pressure disturbance relative to a shock in air. Shaped charges and flyer plates were evaluated for operation in foam and appreciable degradation was observed for the flyer plates due to drag created by the foam.

Hartman, William Franklin; Larsen, Marvin Elwood; Boughton, Bruce A.

2006-02-01

410

LTC vacuum blasting maching (concrete): Baseline report: Greenbook (Chapter)  

SciTech Connect

The LTC shot blast technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjuction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The LTC 1073 Vacuum Blasting Machine uses a high-capacity, direct-pressure blasting system which incorporates a continuous feed for the blast media. The blast media cleans the surface within the contained brush area of the blast. It incorporates a vacuum system which removes dust and debris from the surface as it is blasted. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure during maintenance activities was minimal, but due to mechanical difficulties dust monitoring could not be conducted during operation. Noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each of these exposures is recommended because of the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place. This may cause the results to be inaccurate. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed environment. In addition, other safety and health issues found were ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, lockout/tagout, and arm-hand vibration.

NONE

1997-07-31

411

Mercury in dumped blast furnace sludge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Blast furnace sludge (BFS) is a waste generated in the production of pig iron and was dumped in sedimentation ponds. As these wastes often contain high contents of zinc, lead, cadmium, and arsenic, significant hazards to environmental surroundings may arise from former BFS sedimentation ponds. Sixty-five samples from seven BFS locations in Europe were investigated regarding the toxic element mercury (Hg) for the first time. The charge material of the blast furnace operations (coke, iron ores, and additives such as olivine, bauxite, ilmenite and gravels) revealed Hg contents from 0.015 to 0.093 mg kg-1. In comparison, the Hg content of BFS varied between 0.006 and 20.8 mg kg-1 with a median of 1.63 mg kg-1, which indicates enrichment with Hg. For one site with a larger sample set (n = 31), Hg showed a stronger correlation with the total non-calcareous carbon (C) including coke and graphite (r = 0.695; n = 31; p < 0.001). It can be assumed that these C-rich compounds are hosting phases for Hg. The solubility of Hg was rather low and did not exceed 0.43% of total Hg. The correlation between the total Hg concentration and total amount of NH4NO3-soluble Hg was relatively poor (r = 0.496; n = 27; p = 0.008) indicating varying hazard potentials of the different BFS. Consequently, BFS is a mercury-containing waste and dumped BFS should be regarded as potentially mercury-contaminated sites.

Földi, Corinna

2014-05-01

412

Compressive strength after blast of sandwich composite materials.  

PubMed

Composite sandwich materials have yet to be widely adopted in the construction of naval vessels despite their excellent strength-to-weight ratio and low radar return. One barrier to their wider use is our limited understanding of their performance when subjected to air blast. This paper focuses on this problem and specifically the strength remaining after damage caused during an explosion. Carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite skins on a styrene-acrylonitrile (SAN) polymer closed-cell foam core are the primary composite system evaluated. Glass-fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite skins were also included for comparison in a comparable sandwich configuration. Full-scale blast experiments were conducted, where 1.6×1.3?m sized panels were subjected to blast of a Hopkinson-Cranz scaled distance of 3.02?m?kg(-1/3), 100?kg TNT equivalent at a stand-off distance of 14?m. This explosive blast represents a surface blast threat, where the shockwave propagates in air towards the naval vessel. Hopkinson was the first to investigate the characteristics of this explosive air-blast pulse (Hopkinson 1948 Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 89, 411-413 (doi:10.1098/rspa.1914.0008)). Further analysis is provided on the performance of the CFRP sandwich panel relative to the GFRP sandwich panel when subjected to blast loading through use of high-speed speckle strain mapping. After the blast events, the residual compressive load-bearing capacity is investigated experimentally, using appropriate loading conditions that an in-service vessel may have to sustain. Residual strength testing is well established for post-impact ballistic assessment, but there has been less research performed on the residual strength of sandwich composites after blast. PMID:24711494

Arora, H; Kelly, M; Worley, A; Del Linz, P; Fergusson, A; Hooper, P A; Dear, J P

2014-05-13

413

Probabilistic Dynamic Logic of Phenomena and Cognition  

E-print Network

The purpose of this paper is to develop further the main concepts of Phenomena Dynamic Logic (P-DL) and Cognitive Dynamic Logic (C-DL), presented in the previous paper. The specific character of these logics is in matching vagueness or fuzziness of similarity measures to the uncertainty of models. These logics are based on the following fundamental notions: generality relation, uncertainty relation, simplicity relation, similarity maximization problem with empirical content and enhancement (learning) operator. We develop these notions in terms of logic and probability and developed a Probabilistic Dynamic Logic of Phenomena and Cognition (P-DL-PC) that relates to the scope of probabilistic models of brain. In our research the effectiveness of suggested formalization is demonstrated by approximation of the expert model of breast cancer diagnostic decisions. The P-DL-PC logic was previously successfully applied to solving many practical tasks and also for modelling of some cognitive processes.

Vityaev, Evgenii; Perlovsky, Leonid; Smerdov, Stanislav

2011-01-01

414

Phenomena resulting from hypergolic contact  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Understanding hypergolic ignition is critical for the safe and successful operation of hypergolic engines. The complex coupling of physical and chemical processes during hypergolic ignition complicates analysis of the event. Presently, hypergolic ignition models cannot simulate liquid contact and mixing or liquid-phase chemical reactions, and rely on experimental results for validation. In some cases, chemical kinetics of hypergolic propellants and fluid dynamics of droplet collisions couple to produce unexpected phenomena. This research investigates contact between droplets and pools of liquid hypergolic propellants under various conditions in order to investigate these liquid-phase reactions and categorize the resulting interaction. During this experiment, 142 drop tests were performed to investigate phenomena associated with hypergolic contact of various propellants. A drop of fuel impacted a semi-ellipsoidal pool of oxidizer at varying impact velocities and impact geometries. The temperature, pressure, ambient atmosphere, and propellant quality were all controlled during the experiment, as these factors have been shown to influence hypergolic ignition delay. Three distinct types of impacts were identified: explosions, bounces, and splashes. The impact type was found to depend on the impact Weber number and impact angle. Splashes occurred above a critical Weber number of 250, regardless of impact angle. Explosions occurred for Weber numbers less than 250, and for impact angles less than seven degrees. If the impact angle was greater than seven degrees then the test resulted in a bounce. Literature related to explosions induced by hypergolic contact was reviewed. Explosions were observed to occur inconsistently, a feature that has never been addressed. Literature related to non-reactive splashing, bouncing, and coalescence was reviewed for insight into the explosion phenomenon. I propose that the dependence of impact angle on the transition between explosion and bounce impacts is partially responsible for the explosion inconsistency in literature. No explosions were observed for the alternative hypergolic propellants tested, which could be due to lower gas production rates or the absence of reactive intermediate species present in certain propellant chemistry. In either case, the fluid dynamics of the impact was consistent, but the chemical kinetics of the propellants were different, and presumably, the two did not couple as strongly. Based on the results, explosions appear to be a mixing driven process caused by the coupling between the fluid dynamics of the impact and the chemical kinetics of the propellants. Upon contact, the fuel drop merges with the oxidizer pool. Liquid-phase neutralization reactions produce enough heat to vaporize propellants, which then accumulate within a gas pocket inside the pool. Exothermic gas-phase reactions result in an explosion originating from within the propellant pool. In addition to investigation of the explosion phenomenon, high-speed videos were taken of the first microseconds of hypergolic contact to observe the liquid-phase chemical reactions in detail. The delay between contact and first gas production was measured to be between 20 and 200 microseconds for monomethylhydrazine and red fuming nitric acid. This delay provides insight into the speed of the liquid-phase chemical reactions, and has helped to calibrate liquid-based ignition models. This research has categorized different interactions resulting from hypergolic contact, and found that the impact Weber number and impact angle were the controlling parameters. I propose that slight changes in the impact angle went unobserved by previous researchers and were partially responsible for the explosion inconsistency in literature. Microsecond scale time delays were measured between contact and gas production and have been used to calibrate previously unknown rate constants of liquid-phase chemical reactions.

Forness, Jordan M.

415

EDITORIAL: Quantum phenomena in Nanotechnology Quantum phenomena in Nanotechnology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Twenty years ago the Institute of Physics launched the journal Nanotechnology from its publishing house based in the home town of Paul Dirac, a legendary figure in the development of quantum mechanics at the turn of the last century. At the beginning of the 20th century, the adoption of quantum mechanical descriptions of events transformed the existing deterministic world view. But in many ways it also revolutionised the progress of research itself. For the first time since the 17th century when Francis Bacon established inductive reasoning as the means of advancing science from fact to axiom to law, theory was progressing ahead of experiments instead of providing explanations for observations that had already been made. Dirac's postulation of antimatter through purely theoretical investigation before its observation is the archetypal example of theory leading the way for experiment. The progress of nanotechnology and the development of tools and techniques that enabled the investigation of systems at the nanoscale brought with them many fascinating observations of phenomena that could only be explained through quantum mechanics, first theoretically deduced decades previously. At the nanoscale, quantum confinement effects dominate the electrical and optical properties of systems. They also render new opportunities for manipulating the response of systems. For example, a better understanding of these systems has enabled the rapid development of quantum dots with precisely determined properties, which can be exploited in a range of applications from medical imaging and photovoltaic solar cells to quantum computation, a radically new information technology being currently developed in many labs worldwide. As the first ever academic journal in nanotechnology, {\\it Nanotechnology} has been the forum for papers detailing progress of the science through extremely exciting times. In the early years of the journal, the investigation of electron spin led to the formulation of quantum cellular automata, a new paradigm for computing as reported by Craig S Lent and colleagues (Lent C S, Tougaw P D, Porod W and Bernstein G H 1993 Nanotechnology 4 49-57). The increasingly sophisticated manipulation of spin has been an enduring theme of research throughout this decade, providing a number of interesting developments such as spin pumping (Cota E, Aguado R, Creffield C E and Platero G 2003 Nanotechnology 14 152-6). The idea of spin qubits, proposed by D Loss and D P DiVincenzo (1998 Phys. Rev. A 57 120), developed into an established option for advancing research in quantum computing and continues to drive fruitful avenues of research, such as the integrated superconductive magnetic nanosensor recently devised by researchers in Italy (Granata C, Esposito E, Vettoliere A, Petti L and Russo M 2008 Nanotechnology 19 275501). The device has a spin sensitivity in units of the Bohr magneton of 100 spin Hz-1/2 and has large potential for applications in the measurement of nanoscale magnetization and quantum computing. The advance of science and technology at the nanoscale is inextricably enmeshed with advances in our understanding of quantum effects. As Nanotechnology celebrates its 20th volume, research into fundamental quantum phenomena continues to be an active field of research, providing fertile pasture for developing nanotechnologies.

Loss, Daniel

2009-10-01

416

An assessment of environmental impacts of quarry-blasting operation: a case study in Istanbul, Turkey  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluates the impacts resulting from quarry-blasting operation on nearby buildings and structures as it generates ground vibration, air blast, and fly rocks. In this paper, first blasting operation and its possible environmental effects are defined. Then the methods of blast-vibration prediction and commonly accepted criteria to prevent damage were introduced. A field experimental work was conducted to minimize

Cengiz Kuzu; Hasan Ergin

2005-01-01

417

Evaluation of copper slag blast media for railcar maintenance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Copper slag was tested as a blasting substitute for zirconium silicate which is used to remove paint from railroad cars. The copper slag tested is less costly, strips paint faster, is produced near the point of need, provides a good bonding surface for paint, and permits the operator to work in a more comfortable position, i.e., standing nearly erect instead of having to crouch. Outdoor blasting with the tested Blackhawk (20 to 40 mesh) copper slag is also environmentally acceptable to the State of Utah. Results of tests for the surface erosion rate with copper slag blasting are included.

Sagers, N. W.; Finlayson, Mack H.

1989-01-01

418

Hybrid S2/Carbon Epoxy Composite Armours Under Blast Loads  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Civil and military structures, such as helicopters, aircrafts, naval ships, tanks or buildings are susceptible to blast loads as terroristic attacks increases, therefore there is the need to design blast resistant structures. During an explosion the peak pressure produced by shock wave is much greater than the static collapse pressure. Metallic structures usually undergo large plastic deformations absorbing blast energy before reaching equilibrium. Due to their high specific properties, fibre-reinforced polymers are being considered for energy absorption applications in blast resistant armours. A deep insight into the relationship between explosion loads, composite architecture and deformation/fracture behaviour will offer the possibility to design structures with significantly enhanced energy absorption and blast resistance performance. This study presents the results of a numerical investigation aimed at understanding the performance of a hybrid composite (glass/carbon fibre) plate subjected to blast loads using commercial LS-DYNA software. In particular, the paper deals with numerical 3D simulations of damages caused by air blast waves generated by C4 charges on two fully clamped rectangular plates made of steel and hybrid (S2/Carbon) composite, respectively. A Multi Materials Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (MMALE) formulation was used to simulate the shock phenomenon. For the steel plates, the Johnson-Cook material model was employed. For the composite plates both in-plane and out-of-plane failure criteria were employed. In particular, a contact tiebreak formulation with a mixed mode failure criteria was employed to simulate delamination failure. As for the steel plates the results showed that excellent correlation with the experimental data for the two blast load conditions in terms of dynamic and residual deflection for two different C4 charges. For the composite plates the numerical results showed that, as expected, a wider delamination damage was observed for the higher blast loads case. Widespread tensile matrix damage was experienced for both blast load cases, while only for 875 g blast load fiber failure damage was observed. This agrees well with the experimental data showing that the composite panel was not able to resist to the 875 g blast load.

Dolce, F.; Meo, Michele; Wright, A.; French, M.; Bernabei, M.

2012-06-01

419

Hot blast stove process model and model-based controller  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the process model and model-based control techniques implemented on the hot blast stoves for the No. 7 Blast Furnace at the Inland Steel facility in East Chicago, Indiana. A detailed heat transfer model of the stoves is developed and verified using plant data. This model is used as part of a predictive control scheme to determine the minimum amount of fuel necessary to achieve the blast air requirements. The model is also used to predict maximum and minimum temperature constraint violations within the stove so that the controller can take corrective actions while still achieving the required stove performance.

Muske, K.R. [Villanova Univ., PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Howse, J.W.; Hansen, G.A.; Cagliostro, D.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Computational Science Methods Group; Chaubal, P.C. [Inland Steel Industries, Inc., East Chicago, IN (United States). Research Labs.

1998-12-31

420

Study of radiative blast waves generated on the Z-beamlet laser.  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the original goals of the project to study the Vishniac Overstability on blast waves produced using the Z-Beamlet laser facility as well as the actual results. The proposed work was to build on earlier work on the facility and result in the best characterized set of data for such phenomena in the laboratory. To accomplish the goals it was necessary to modify the existing probe laser at the facility so that it could take multiple images over the course of 1-2 microseconds. Troubles with modifying the probe laser are detailed as well as the work that went into said modifications. The probe laser modification ended up taking the entire length of the project and were the major accomplishment of the research.

Edens, Aaron D.; Schwarz, Jens

2012-02-01

421

Microgravity Transport Phenomena Experiment (MTPE) Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Microgravity Transport Phenomena Experiment (MTPE) is a fluids experiment supported by the Fundamentals in Biotechnology program in association with the Human Exploration and Development of Space (BEDS) initiative. The MTP Experiment will investigate fluid transport phenomena both in ground based experiments and in the microgravity environment. Many fluid transport processes are affected by gravity. Osmotic flux kinetics in planar membrane systems have been shown to be influenced by gravimetric orientation, either through convective mixing caused by unstably stratified fluid layers, or through a stable fluid boundary layer structure that forms in association with the membrane. Coupled transport phenomena also show gravity related effects. Coefficients associated with coupled transport processes are defined in terms of a steady state condition. Buoyancy (gravity) driven convection interferes with the attainment of steady state, and the measurement of coupled processes. The MTP Experiment measures the kinetics of molecular migration that occurs in fluids, in response to the application of various driving potentials. Three separate driving potentials may be applied to the MTP Experiment fluids, either singly or in combination. The driving potentials include chemical potential, thermal potential, and electrical potential. Two separate fluid arrangements are used to study membrane mediated and bulk fluid transport phenomena. Transport processes of interest in membrane mediated systems include diffusion, osmosis, and streaming potential. Bulk fluid processes of interest include coupled phenomena such as the Soret Effect, Dufour Effect, Donnan Effect, and thermal diffusion potential. MTP Experiments are performed in the Microgravity Transport Apparatus (MTA), an instrument that has been developed specifically for precision measurement of transport processes. Experiment fluids are contained within the MTA fluid cells, designed to create a one dimensional flow geometry of constant cross sectional area, and to facilitate fluid filling and draining operations in microgravity. The fluid cells may be used singly for bulk solutions, or in a Stokes diaphragm configuration to investigate membrane mediated phenomena. Thermal and electrical driving potentials are applied to the experiment fluids through boundary plates located at the ends of the fluid cells. In the ground based instrument, two constant temperature baths circulate through reservoirs adjacent to the boundary plates, and establish the thermal environment within the fluid cells. The boundary plates also serve as electrodes for measurement and application of electrical potentials. The Fluid Manipulation System associated with the MTA is a computer controlled system that enables storage and transfer of experiment fluids during on orbit operations. The system is used to automatically initiate experiments and manipulate fluids by orchestrating pump and valve operations through scripted sequences. Unique technologies are incorporated in the MTA for measurement of fluid properties. Volumetric Flow Sensors have been developed for precision measurement of total fluid volume contained within the fluid cells over time. This data is most useful for measuring the kinetics of osmosis, where fluid is transported from one fluid cell to another through a semipermeable membrane. The MicroSensor Array has been designed to perform in situ measurement of several important fluid parameters, providing simultaneous measurement of solution composition at multiple locations within the experiment fluids. Micromachined sensors and interface electronics have been developed to measure temperature, electrical conductivity, pH, cation activity, and anion activity. The Profile Refractometer uses a laser optical system to directly image the fluid Index of Refraction profile that exists along the MTA fluid cell axis. A video system acquires images of the RI profile over time, and records the transport kinetics that occur upon application of chemical, thermal, or electrical driving potentials. Image proces

Mason, Larry W.

1999-01-01

422

Thermal-destruction products of coal in the blast-furnace gas-purification system  

SciTech Connect

The lean, poorly clinkering coal and anthracite used to replace coke in blast furnaces has a considerable content of volatile components (low-molecular thermaldestruction products), which enter the water and sludge of the blast-furnace gas-purification system as petroleum products. Therefore, it is important to study the influence of coal on the petroleum-product content in the water and sludge within this system. The liberation of primary thermal-destruction products is investigated for anthracite with around 4 wt % volatiles, using a STA 449C Jupiter thermoanalyzer equipped with a QMC 230 mass spectrometer. The thermoanalyzer determines small changes in mass and thermal effects with high accuracy (weighing accuracy 10{sup -8} g; error in measuring thermal effects 1 mV). This permits experiments with single layers of coal particles, eliminating secondary reactions of its thermal-destruction products.

A.M. Amdur; M.V. Shibanova; E.V. Ental'tsev [Russian Academy of Sciences, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation). Russia Institute of Metallurgy

2008-10-15

423

BLAST Observations of the South Ecliptic Pole Field: Number Counts and Source Catalogs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present results from a survey carried out by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) on a 9 deg2 field near the South Ecliptic Pole at 250, 350, and 500 ?m. The median 1? depths of the maps are 36.0, 26.4, and 18.4 mJy, respectively. We apply a statistical method to estimate submillimeter galaxy number counts and find that they are in agreement with other measurements made with the same instrument and with the more recent results from Herschel/SPIRE. Thanks to the large field observed, the new measurements give additional constraints on the bright end of the counts. We identify 132, 89, and 61 sources with S/N >=4 at 250, 350, 500 ?m, respectively and provide a multi-wavelength combined catalog of 232 sources with a significance >=4? in at least one BLAST band. The new BLAST maps and catalogs are available publicly at http://blastexperiment.info.

Valiante, Elisabetta; Ade, Peter A. R.; Bock, James J.; Braglia, Filiberto G.; Chapin, Edward L.; Devlin, Mark J.; Griffin, Matthew; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter C.; Hughes, David H.; Klein, Jeff; Marsden, Gaelen; Mauskopf, Philip; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Patanchon, Guillaume; Rex, Marie; Scott, Douglas; Scott, Kimberly; Semisch, Christopher; Stabenau, Hans; Thomas, Nicholas; Truch, Matthew D. P.; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Gregory S.; Viero, Marco P.; Wiebe, Donald V.

2010-12-01

424

Ultra fast all-optical fiber pressure sensor for blast event evaluation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a great potential threat to soldiers who are exposed to explosions or athletes who receive cranial impacts. Protecting people from TBI has recently attracted a significant amount of attention due to recent military operations in the Middle East. Recording pressure transient data in a blast event is very critical to the understanding of the effects of blast events on TBI. However, due to the fast change of the pressure during blast events, very few sensors have the capability to effectively track the dynamic pressure transients. This paper reports an ultra fast, miniature and all-optical fiber pressure sensor which could be mounted at different locations of a helmet to measure the fast changing pressure simultaneously. The sensor is based on Fabry-Perot (FP) principle. The end face of the fiber is wet etched. A well controlled thickness silicon dioxide diaphragm is thermal bonded on the end face to form an FP cavity. A shock tube test was conducted at Natick Soldier Research Development and Engineering Center, where the sensors were mounted in a shock tube side by side with a reference sensor to measure the rapidly changing pressure. The results of the test demonstrated that the sensor developed had an improved rise time (shorter than 0.4 ?s) when compared to a commercially available reference sensor.

Wu, Nan; Wang, Wenhui; Tian, Ye; Niezrecki, Christopher; Wang, Xingwei

2011-05-01

425

Heat-transfer phenomena in water-cooled zinc-fuming furnace jackets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the zinc slag-fuming process, zinc is removed from lead blast furnace slag by reduction with a coal-air mixture injected into the slag through submerged tuyeres. The furnace is constructed of water-cooled jackets which freeze a slag layer and contain the bath. This greatly reduces vessel wear caused by the violently agitated and corrosive bath. The jackets, however, fail due to the formation of cracks which grow from the slag face through the working face of the jacket to the water channel. In this study, in-plant measurements and mathematical modeling of heat transfer in the jackets have been combined to elucidate the mechanism of failure. The working face of a water jacket was instrumented with thermocouples and installed in a fuming furnace at the Trail smelter of Cominco Ltd., Trail, BC. Measurements revealed the presence of large thermal transients or temperature “spikes” in the panel in the region immediately above the tuyeres. These were generally observed during charging and tapping of the furnace and are likely associated with disturbances on the surface of the bath or gas injection effects when the liquid level is low. Temperatures at the midthickness were seen to rise by as much as 180 °C above the steady-state level. Under these conditions, low-cycle fatigue may lead to crack formation and propagation. A mathematical modeling analysis of the transient freezing phenomena indicates that the temperature spikes are associated with sudden slag falloff and direct contact of molten slag on the jacket. In order to reduce slag falloff, an increased number of anchoring fins should be used in critical areas.

Scholey, K. E.; Richards, G. G.; Samarasekera, I. V.

1991-04-01

426

The physical properties of the blast wave produced by a stoichiometric propane/oxygen explosion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The trajectory of the primary shock produced by the explosion of a nominal 18.14 t (20 tn) hemispherical propane/oxygen charge was analysed previously to provide the physical properties immediately behind the shock, but gave no information about the time-resolved properties throughout the blast wave. The present study maps all the physical properties of the wave throughout and beyond the positive durations for a range of distances from about 1.6-18 m scaled to a 1 kg charge at NTP. The physical properties were calculated using a hydro-code to simulate the flow field produced by a spherical piston moving with a specific trajectory. This technique has been used extensively to determine the physical properties of blast waves from a variety of sources for which the piston path was determined by high-speed photography of smoke tracers established close to the charges immediately before detonation. In the case of the propane/oxygen explosion, smoke tracer data were not available to determine the trajectory of the spherical piston. An arbitrary piston path was used and its trajectory iteratively adjusted until it produced a blast wave with a primary shock whose trajectory exactly matched the measured trajectory from the propane/oxygen explosion. Throughout the studied flow field the time histories of hydrostatic pressure, density and particle velocity are well described by fits to the modified Friedlander equation. The properties are presented as functions of scaled radius and are compared with the properties of the blast wave from a 1 kg TNT surface burst explosion, and with other measurements of the same explosion.

Dewey, M. C.; Dewey, J. M.

2014-11-01

427

The physical properties of the blast wave produced by a stoichiometric propane/oxygen explosion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The trajectory of the primary shock produced by the explosion of a nominal 18.14 t (20 tn) hemispherical propane/oxygen charge was analysed previously to provide the physical properties immediately behind the shock, but gave no information about the time-resolved properties throughout the blast wave. The present study maps all the physical properties of the wave throughout and beyond the positive durations for a range of distances from about 1.6-18 m scaled to a 1 kg charge at NTP. The physical properties were calculated using a hydro-code to simulate the flow field produced by a spherical piston moving with a specific trajectory. This technique has been used extensively to determine the physical properties of blast waves from a variety of sources for which the piston path was determined by high-speed photography of smoke tracers established close to the charges immediately before detonation. In the case of the propane/oxygen explosion, smoke tracer data were not available to determine the trajectory of the spherical piston. An arbitrary piston path was used and its trajectory iteratively adjusted until it produced a blast wave with a primary shock whose trajectory exactly matched the measured trajectory from the propane/oxygen explosion. Throughout the studied flow field the time histories of hydrostatic pressure, density and particle velocity are well described by fits to the modified Friedlander equation. The properties are presented as functions of scaled radius and are compared with the properties of the blast wave from a 1 kg TNT surface burst explosion, and with other measurements of the same explosion.

Dewey, M. C.; Dewey, J. M.

2014-07-01

428

Scaling law in thermal phenomena  

E-print Network

In this paper the scaling law for the relaxation times in thermal phenomena is investigated. It is shown that dependent on the value of the parameter K=E/m(c\\alpha)^2,where E is the energy which is delivered to the system, m is the parton mass and \\alpha=1/137 for electromagnetic interaction and \\alpha=0.16 for strong interaction respectively, heat transport is diffusive, for K1. For the system with N partons the relaxation time is scaled as \\tau^N\\to N (\\hbar/(mc\\alpha)^2). Key words: Thermal phenomena, scaling

M. Kozlowski; J. Marciak-Kozlowska

2006-10-29

429

Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena  

USGS Publications Warehouse

So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

Neuzil, C.E.

1995-01-01

430

Compare pilot-scale and industry-scale models of pulverized coal combustion in an ironmaking blast furnace  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to understand the complex phenomena of pulverized coal injection (PCI) process in blast furnace (BF), mathematical models have been developed at different scales: pilot-scale model of coal combustion and industry-scale model (in-furnace model) of coal/coke combustion in a real BF respectively. This paper compares these PCI models in aspects of model developments and model capability. The model development is discussed in terms of model formulation, their new features and geometry/regions considered. The model capability is then discussed in terms of main findings followed by the model evaluation on their advantages and limitations. It is indicated that these PCI models are all able to describe PCI operation qualitatively. The in-furnace model is more reliable for simulating in-furnace phenomena of PCI operation qualitatively and quantitatively. These models are useful for understanding the flow-thermo-chemical behaviors and then optimizing the PCI operation in practice.

Shen, Yansong; Yu, Aibing; Zulli, Paul

2013-07-01

431

Blast-induced moderate neurotrauma (BINT) elicits early complement activation and tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF?) release in a rat brain.  

PubMed

Blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT) is a major medical concern yet its etiology is largely undefined. Complement activation may play a role in the development of secondary injury following traumatic brain injury; however, its role in BINT is still undefined. The present study was designed to characterize the complement system and adaptive immune-inflammatory responses in a rat model of moderate BINT. Anesthetized rats were exposed to a moderate blast (120 kPa) using an air-driven shock tube. Brain tissue injury, systemic and local complement, cerebral edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and pro-inflammatory cytokine production were measured at 0.5, 3, 48, 72, 120, and 168 h. Injury to brain tissue was evaluated by histological evaluation. Systemic complement was measured via ELSIA. The remaining measurements were determined by immunohistoflourescent staining. Moderate blast triggers moderate brain injuries, elevated levels of local brain C3/C5b-9 and systemic C5b-9, increased leukocyte infiltration, unregulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF?), and aquaporin-4 in rat brain cortex at 3- and 48-hour post blast. Early immune-inflammatory response to BINT involves complement and TNF?, which correlates with hippocampus and cerebral cortex damage. Complement and TNF? activation may be a novel therapeutic target for reducing the damaging effects of BINT inflammation. PMID:22537900

Dalle Lucca, Jurandir J; Chavko, Mikulas; Dubick, Michael A; Adeeb, Saleena; Falabella, Michael J; Slack, Jessica L; McCarron, Richard; Li, Yansong

2012-07-15

432

Blast TBI Models, Neuropathology, and Implications for Seizure Risk.  

PubMed

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to explosive blast exposure is a leading combat casualty. It is also implicated as a key contributor to war related mental health diseases. A clinically important consequence of all types of TBI is a high risk for development of seizures and epilepsy. Seizures have been reported in patients who have suffered blast injuries in the Global War on Terror but the exact prevalence is unknown. The occurrence of seizures supports the contention that explosive blast leads to both cellular and structural brain pathology. Unfortunately, the exact mechanism by which explosions cause brain injury is unclear, which complicates development of meaningful therapies and mitigation strategies. To help improve understanding, detailed neuropathological analysis is needed. For this, histopathological techniques are extremely valuable and indispensable. In the following we will review the pathological results, including those from immunohistochemical and special staining approaches, from recent preclinical explosive blast studies. PMID:24782820

Kovacs, S Krisztian; Leonessa, Fabio; Ling, Geoffrey S F

2014-01-01

433

30 CFR 56.6306 - Loading, blasting, and security.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...shall be those activities directly related to the blasting operation and the activities of surveying, stemming, sampling of geology, and reopening of holes, provided that reasonable care is exercised. Haulage activity is permitted near the base of...

2011-07-01

434

30 CFR 56.6306 - Loading, blasting, and security.  

...shall be those activities directly related to the blasting operation and the activities of surveying, stemming, sampling of geology, and reopening of holes, provided that reasonable care is exercised. Haulage activity is permitted near the base of...

2014-07-01

435

30 CFR 57.6306 - Loading, blasting, and security.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...shall be those activities directly related to the blasting operation and the activities of surveying, stemming, sampling of geology, and reopening of holes, provided that reasonable care is exercised. Haulage activity is permitted near the base of...

2013-07-01

436

30 CFR 57.6306 - Loading, blasting, and security.  

...shall be those activities directly related to the blasting operation and the activities of surveying, stemming, sampling of geology, and reopening of holes, provided that reasonable care is exercised. Haulage activity is permitted near the base of...

2014-07-01

437

Rib butterfly fractures as a possible indicator of blast trauma.  

PubMed

Forensic anthropologists have become increasingly involved in the interpretation of skeletal trauma caused by exploding ordnance. This study examines the cause and significance of butterfly fractures observed in a recent study investigating skeletal blast trauma by Christensen et al. Fractured ribs resulting from blast events carried out in the original study were re-examined revealing that rib butterfly fractures with the tensile indicator on the visceral surface were present in 100% of viable pig specimens. Additionally, manual fracture testing was performed on 46 pig ribs to simulate the bending force believed to have been sustained in the original blast events. Fracture testing resulted in 93% of specimens presenting butterfly fractures with the tensile indicator on the visceral surface. This fracture pattern differs significantly from that normally observed in association with other types of trauma events and may aid forensic anthropologists and other investigators in the identification and interpretation of blast events. PMID:23126284

Christensen, Angi M; Smith, Victoria A

2013-01-01

438

Pulverized coal injection operation on CSC No. 3 blast furnace  

SciTech Connect

The pulverized coal injection system was introduced for the first time in No. 1 and No. 2 blast furnace at China Steel Corporation (CSC) in 1988. Currently the coal injection rate for both blast furnaces has steadily risen to 70--89 kg/thm (designed value). No 3 blast furnace (with an inner volume of 3400 m3) was also equipped with a PCI system of Armco type and started coal injection on November 17, 1993. During the early period, some problems such as injection lance blocking, lance-tip melting down, flexible hose wear, grind mill tripping occasionally interrupted the stable operation of blast furnace. After a series of efforts offered on equipment improvement and operation adjustment, the PC rate currently reaches to 90--110 kg/thm and furnace stable operation is still being maintained with productivity more than 2.20.

Chan, C.M.; Hsu, C.H. [China Steel Corp., Kaohsiung (Taiwan, Province of China)

1996-12-31

439

30 CFR 780.13 - Operation plan: Blasting.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the limitations the operator will meet with regard to ground vibration and airblast, the bases for those limitations, and the methods to be applied in controlling the adverse effects of blasting operations. (b) Monitoring system....

2010-07-01

440

30 CFR 780.13 - Operation plan: Blasting.  

...the limitations the operator will meet with regard to ground vibration and airblast, the bases for those limitations, and the methods to be applied in controlling the adverse effects of blasting operations. (b) Monitoring system....

2014-07-01

441

30 CFR 780.13 - Operation plan: Blasting.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...the limitations the operator will meet with regard to ground vibration and airblast, the bases for those limitations, and the methods to be applied in controlling the adverse effects of blasting operations. (b) Monitoring system....

2013-07-01

442

30 CFR 57.22607 - Blasting on shift (III mines).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Explosives... When blasting on shift, tests for methane shall be made in the mine atmosphere...not be done when 1.0 percent or more methane is...

2010-07-01

443

30 CFR 57.22607 - Blasting on shift (III mines).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Explosives... When blasting on shift, tests for methane shall be made in the mine atmosphere...not be done when 1.0 percent or more methane is...

2011-07-01

444

Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Blast Crisis Arises from Progenitors FRANZISKA MICHOR  

E-print Network

and could be the cells from which CML originates [14, 18, 19]. Progression to blast crisis is driven by additional genetic and/or epigenetic events such as duplication of the Ph chromo- some, trisomy 8

445

Blast overpressure after tire explosion: a fatal case.  

PubMed

Fatal blast injuries are generally reported in literature as a consequence of the detonation of explosives in war settings. The pattern of lesion depends on the position of the victim in relation to the explosion, on whether the blast tracks through air or water, and whether it happens in the open air or within an enclosed space and the distance from the explosion. Tire explosion-related injuries are rarely reported in literature. This study presents a fatal case of blast overpressure due to the accidental explosion of a truck tire occurring in a tire repair shop. A multidisciplinary approach to the fatality involving forensic pathologists and engineers revealed that the accidental explosion, which caused a series of primary and tertiary blast wave injuries, was due to tire deterioration. PMID:24247639

Pomara, Cristoforo; D'Errico, Stefano; Riezzo, Irene; Perilli, Gabriela; Volpe, Umberto; Fineschi, Vittorio

2013-12-01

446

Decontamination of DWPF canisters by glass frit blasting  

SciTech Connect

High-level radioactive waste at the Savannah River Plant will be incorporated in borosilicate glass for permanent disposal. The waste glass will be encapsulated in a 304L stainless steel canister. During the filling operation the outside of the canister will become contaminated. This contamination must be reduced to an accepable level before the canister leaves the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Tests with contaminated coupons have demonstrated that this decontamination can be accomplished by blasting the surface with glass frit. The contaminated glass frit byproduct of this operation is used as a feedstock for the waste glass process, so no secondary waste is created. Three blasting techniques, using glass frit as the blasting medium, were evaluated. Air-injected slurry blasting was the most promising and was chosen for further development. The optimum parametric values for this process were determined in tests using coupon weight loss as the output parameter. 1 reference, 13 figures, 3 tables.

Ward, C R; Rankin, W N

1984-01-01

447

'Hidden' Brain Damage Seen in Vets with Blast Injuries  

MedlinePLUS

... Iraq and Afghanistan who were injured by homemade bombs show an unusual pattern of damage, a small ... combat veterans. The soldiers had all survived IED bomb blasts, but later died of other causes. The ...

448

VIEW OF DOUBLE ROOF CAST HOUSE OF BLAST FURNACE NO. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW OF DOUBLE ROOF CAST HOUSE OF BLAST FURNACE NO. 3. COKE PLANT & MONESSEN BUSINESS DISTRICT IN BACKGROUND. VIEW FACING EAST. - Pittsburgh Steel Company, Monessen Works, Donner Avenue, Monessen, Westmoreland County, PA

449

VIEW FROM PARK DRIVE LOOKING WEST, SHOWING WHEELING PITTSBURGH BLAST ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW FROM PARK DRIVE LOOKING WEST, SHOWING WHEELING PITTSBURGH BLAST FURNACES WITH PAROCHIAL SCHOOL (ST. LEONARDS) IN FOREGROUND. - Pittsburgh Steel Company, Monessen Works, Donner Avenue, Monessen, Westmoreland County, PA

450

VIEW FROM PARK DRIVE LOOKING WEST, SHOWING WHEELING PITTSBURGH BLAST ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW FROM PARK DRIVE LOOKING WEST, SHOWING WHEELING PITTSBURGH BLAST FURNACES WITH PAROCHIAL SCHOOL (ST. LEONARDS) IN FOREGROUND - Pittsburgh Steel Company, Monessen Works, Donner Avenue, Monessen, Westmoreland County, PA

451

31. VIEW OF DEMOLITION OF FOUNDRY SAND BLASTING AND CLEANING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

31. VIEW OF DEMOLITION OF FOUNDRY SAND BLASTING AND CLEANING BUILDING FROM INSIDE FOUNDRY. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Mount Clare Shops, South side of Pratt Street between Carey & Poppleton Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

452

2. DETAIL, EAST ENTRANCE, SHOWING OUTER BLAST DOOR AND INNER ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. DETAIL, EAST ENTRANCE, SHOWING OUTER BLAST DOOR AND INNER DOORS. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Instrumentation & Control Building, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

453

33. VIEW OF ROOF TRUSSING SYSTEM OF SAND BLASTING AND ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

33. VIEW OF ROOF TRUSSING SYSTEM OF SAND BLASTING AND CLEANING BUILDING. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Mount Clare Shops, South side of Pratt Street between Carey & Poppleton Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

454

3. Underground blast doors, BC corridor, at entry to building ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. Underground blast doors, BC corridor, at entry to building 501, looking west - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Command Center, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

455

BLDG 250, OVERVIEW SHOWING BERMS AND BLAST WALLS. Naval ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

BLDG 250, OVERVIEW SHOWING BERMS AND BLAST WALLS. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Ammo Rework-Overhaul Building, Forty-second Street between Jamestown & Iwo Jima Streets, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

456

32. VIEW OF DEMOLISHED FOUNDRY SAND BLASTING AND CLEANING BUILDING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

32. VIEW OF DEMOLISHED FOUNDRY SAND BLASTING AND CLEANING BUILDING AFTER DUST HAS SETTLED. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Mount Clare Shops, South side of Pratt Street between Carey & Poppleton Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

457

7. DETAIL SHOWING BLAST SHIELDED WINDOWS, WEST SIDE. Edwards ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. DETAIL SHOWING BLAST SHIELDED WINDOWS, WEST SIDE. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Instrumentation & Control Building, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

458

29. DETAIL VIEW OF FOUNDRY SAND BLASTING AND CLEANING BUILDING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

29. DETAIL VIEW OF FOUNDRY SAND BLASTING AND CLEANING BUILDING UNDER DEMOLITION. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Mount Clare Shops, South side of Pratt Street between Carey & Poppleton Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

459

30. VIEW OF DEMOLITION OF FOUNDRY SAND BLASTING AND CLEANING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

30. VIEW OF DEMOLITION OF FOUNDRY SAND BLASTING AND CLEANING BUILDING FROM INSIDE FOUNDRY. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Mount Clare Shops, South side of Pratt Street between Carey & Poppleton Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

460

14. Inner double blast door entrance to perimeter acquisition radar ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

14. Inner double blast door entrance to perimeter acquisition radar building security area - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND