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Sample records for mechanical analysis teoria

  1. Probabilistic analysis of mechanical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Priddy, T.G.; Paez, T.L.; Veers, P.S.

    1993-09-01

    This paper proposes a framework for the comprehensive analysis of complex problems in probabilistic structural mechanics. Tools that can be used to accurately estimate the probabilistic behavior of mechanical systems are discussed, and some of the techniques proposed in the paper are developed and used in the solution of a problem in nonlinear structural dynamics.

  2. Majorana Electroformed Copper Mechanical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Overman, Nicole R.; Overman, Cory T.; Kafentzis, Tyler A.; Edwards, Danny J.; Hoppe, Eric W.

    2012-04-30

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize ultra high purity electroformed copper for a variety of detector components and shielding. A preliminary mechanical evaluation was performed on the Majorana prototype electroformed copper material. Several samples were removed from a variety of positions on the mandrel. Tensile testing, optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and hardness testing were conducted to evaluate mechanical response. Analyses carried out on the Majorana prototype copper to this point show consistent mechanical response from a variety of test locations. Evaluation shows the copper meets or exceeds the design specifications.

  3. Mechanical analysis of eyelid morphology.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liangliang; Chen, Xi

    2013-08-01

    From a mechanical instability perspective a double eyelid is a double-folded thin film structure on a curved substrate, caused by compression as the film "slides" on the substrate. The underlying mechanics issues, in particular the requirements for forming a double folded structure, are studied using a modeling/simulation framework. A minimalist model is employed to explore the wrinkle to fold transition. Refined and enriched models are further developed based on anatomical structures, which demonstrate three critical factors for the formation of double layer folding of the eyelid. First, a crease line in the eyelid is essential where the local bending rigidity is relatively weak. Second, the skin above the crease line should be thin and wide enough. Third, the skin below the crease line should have a relatively large effective stiffness so it can be lifted as a whole when the eyes open. When the eye is opened beyond about 40% of its initial wrinkle wavelength, the double-folded structure emerges. Various types of eyelid morphologies are discussed based on the mechanistic model. The study provides useful insights for surgery, cosmetics, and morphogenesis, as well as microfabrication. PMID:23597858

  4. Analysis of Skylab fluid mechanics science demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegart, J. R.; Butz, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The results of the data reduction and analysis of the Skylab fluid mechanics demonstrations are presented. All the fluid mechanics data available from the Skylab missions were identified and surveyed. The significant fluid mechanics phenomena were identified and reduced to measurable quantities wherever possible. Data correlations were performed using existing theories. Among the phenomena analyzed were: static low-g interface shapes, oscillation frequency and damping of a liquid drop, coalescence, rotating drop, liquid films and low-g ice melting. A survey of the possible applications of the results was made and future experiments are recommended.

  5. Elucidation of wear mechanisms by ferrographic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The use of ferrographic analysis in conjunction with light and scanning electron microscopy is described for the elucidation of wear mechanisms taking place in operating equipment. Example of adhesive wear, abrasive wear, corrosive wear, rolling element fatigue, lubricant breakdown, and other wear modes are illustrated. In addition, the use of magnetic solutions to precipitate nonmagnetic debris from aqueous and nonaqueous fluids is described.

  6. An Analysis of the Auto Mechanic Occupation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, Michael; Thoman, LeRoy

    The general purpose of the occupational analysis is to provide workable, basic information dealing with the many and varied duties performed in the auto mechanic occupation. It identifies the broad area of skills and knowledge necessary to perform various tasks involved in diagnosis, maintenance, and repair of automotive systems. Selected…

  7. Diesel Mechanics. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a current comprehensive and verified employer competency program list for diesel mechanics. Each unit (with or without subunits) contains competencies and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability…

  8. A mechanical energy analysis of gait initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. A.; Verstraete, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of gait initiation (the transient state between standing and walking) is an important diagnostic tool to study pathologic gait and to evaluate prosthetic devices. While past studies have quantified mechanical energy of the body during steady-state gait, to date no one has computed the mechanical energy of the body during gait initiation. In this study, gait initiation in seven normal male subjects was studied using a mechanical energy analysis to compute total body energy. The data showed three separate states: quiet standing, gait initiation, and steady-state gait. During gait initiation, the trends in the energy data for the individual segments were similar to those seen during steady-state gait (and in Winter DA, Quanbury AO, Reimer GD. Analysis of instantaneous energy of normal gait. J Biochem 1976;9:253-257), but diminished in amplitude. However, these amplitudes increased to those seen in steady-state during the gait initiation event (GIE), with the greatest increase occurring in the second step due to the push-off of the foundation leg. The baseline level of mechanical energy was due to the potential energy of the individual segments, while the cyclic nature of the data was indicative of the kinetic energy of the particular leg in swing phase during that step. The data presented showed differences in energy trends during gait initiation from those of steady state, thereby demonstrating the importance of this event in the study of locomotion.

  9. HFIR vessel probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Dickson, T.L.

    1997-01-01

    The life of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel is limited by a radiation induced reduction in the material`s fracture toughness. Hydrostatic proof testing and probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses are being used to meet the intent of the ASME Code, while extending the life of the vessel well beyond its original design value. The most recent probabilistic evaluation is more precise and accounts for the effects of gamma as well as neutron radiation embrittlement. This analysis confirms the earlier estimates of a permissible vessel lifetime of at least 50 EFPY (100 MW).

  10. Analysis of mechanical joint in composite cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, C. S.; Kim, Y. W.; Park, J. S.

    Joining techniques of composite materials are of great interest in cylindrical structures as the application of composites is widely used for weight-sensitive structures. Little information for the mechanical fastening joint of the laminated shell structure is available in the literature. In this study, a finite element program, which was based on the first order shear deformation theory, was developed for the analysis of the mechanical joint in the laminated composite structure. The failure of the mechanical fastening joint for the laminated graphite/epoxy cylinder subject to internal pressure was analyzed by using the developed program. Modeling of the bolt head in the composite cylinder was studied, and the effect of steel reinforcement outside the composite cylinder on the failure was investigated. The stress component near the bolt head was influenced by the size of the bolt head. The failure load and the failure mode were dependent on the bolt diameter, the number of bolts, and fiber orientation. The failure load was constant when the edge distance exceeds three times the bolt diameter.

  11. Molecular mechanics conformational analysis of tylosin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Petko M.

    1998-01-01

    The conformations of the 16-membered macrolide antibiotic tylosin were studied with molecular mechanics (AMBER∗ force field) including modelling of the effect of the solvent on the conformational preferences (GB/SA). A Monte Carlo conformational search procedure was used for finding the most probable low-energy conformations. The present study provides complementary data to recently reported analysis of the conformations of tylosin based on NMR techniques. A search for the low-energy conformations of protynolide, a 16-membered lactone containing the same aglycone as tylosin, was also carried out, and the results were compared with the observed conformation in the crystal as well as with the most probable conformations of the macrocyclic ring of tylosin. The dependence of the results on force field was also studied by utilizing the MM3 force field. Some particular conformations were computed with the semiempirical molecular orbital methods AM1 and PM3.

  12. Obtaining railpad properties via dynamic mechanical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oregui, M.; de Man, A.; Woldekidan, M. F.; Li, Z.; Dollevoet, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we propose combining dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and the time-temperature superposition principle to determine various railpad dynamic properties. Having accurate information regarding the dynamic properties of a railpad is a fundamental requirement for designing tracks and understanding track deterioration. By testing three different railpad types, we demonstrate that the dynamic behavior of railpads over a wide frequency range can be successfully obtained under different preloads and temperatures if time-temperature superposition can be applied. To investigate railpad aging, worn railpads taken from a mainline in the Netherlands are tested. In this case, worn railpads are softer and possess a lower damping capacity than new railpads. In addition to performing these measurements, a Prony series material model is proposed to reproduce the dynamic behavior of railpads. The Prony series model is in good agreement with the measurements. Measured railpad dynamic properties and the corresponding Prony series numerical model provide valuable information for track design and modeling.

  13. Thermal mechanical analysis of sprag clutches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, Robert L.; Zab, Ronald Joseph; Kurniawan, Antonius S.

    1992-01-01

    Work done at Case Western Reserve University on the Thermal Mechanical analysis of sprag helicopter clutches is reported. The report is presented in two parts. The first part is a description of a test rig for the measurement of the heat generated by high speed sprag clutch assemblies during cyclic torsional loading. The second part describes a finite element modeling procedure for sliding contact. The test rig provides a cyclic torsional load of 756 inch-pounds at 5000 rpm using a four-square arrangement. The sprag clutch test unit was placed between the high speed pinions of the circulating power loop. The test unit was designed to have replaceable inner ad outer races, which contain the instrumentation to monitor the sprag clutch. The torque loading device was chosen to be a water cooled magnetic clutch, which is controlled either manually or through a computer. In the second part, a Generalized Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for non-linear dynamic problems is developed for solid materials. This formulation is derived from the basic laws and axioms of continuum mechanics. The novel aspect of this method is that we are able to investigate the physics in the spatial region of interest as material flows through it without having to follow material points. A finite element approximation to the governing equations is developed. Iterative Methods for the solution of the discrete finite element equations are explored. A FORTRAN program to implement this formulation is developed and a number of solutions to problems of sliding contact are presented.

  14. Thermal mechanical analysis of sprag clutches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, Robert L.; Zab, Ronald Joseph; Kurniawan, Antonius S.

    1992-07-01

    Work done at Case Western Reserve University on the Thermal Mechanical analysis of sprag helicopter clutches is reported. The report is presented in two parts. The first part is a description of a test rig for the measurement of the heat generated by high speed sprag clutch assemblies during cyclic torsional loading. The second part describes a finite element modeling procedure for sliding contact. The test rig provides a cyclic torsional load of 756 inch-pounds at 5000 rpm using a four-square arrangement. The sprag clutch test unit was placed between the high speed pinions of the circulating power loop. The test unit was designed to have replaceable inner ad outer races, which contain the instrumentation to monitor the sprag clutch. The torque loading device was chosen to be a water cooled magnetic clutch, which is controlled either manually or through a computer. In the second part, a Generalized Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for non-linear dynamic problems is developed for solid materials. This formulation is derived from the basic laws and axioms of continuum mechanics. The novel aspect of this method is that we are able to investigate the physics in the spatial region of interest as material flows through it without having to follow material points. A finite element approximation to the governing equations is developed. Iterative Methods for the solution of the discrete finite element equations are explored. A FORTRAN program to implement this formulation is developed and a number of solutions to problems of sliding contact are presented.

  15. Mechanical analysis of infant carrying in hominoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Lia Q.

    2008-04-01

    In all higher nonhuman primates, species survival depends upon safe carrying of infants clinging to body hair of adults. In this work, measurements of mechanical properties of ape hair (gibbon, orangutan, and gorilla) are presented, focusing on constraints for safe infant carrying. Results of hair tensile properties are shown to be species-dependent. Analysis of the mechanics of the mounting position, typical of heavier infant carrying among African apes, shows that both clinging and friction are necessary to carry heavy infants. As a consequence, a required relationship between infant weight, hair-hair friction coefficient, and body angle exists. The hair-hair friction coefficient is measured using natural ape skin samples, and dependence on load and humidity is analyzed. Numerical evaluation of the equilibrium constraint is in agreement with the knuckle-walking quadruped position of African apes. Bipedality is clearly incompatible with the usual clinging and mounting pattern of infant carrying, requiring a revision of models of hominization in relation to the divergence between apes and hominins. These results suggest that safe carrying of heavy infants justify the emergence of biped form of locomotion. Ways to test this possibility are foreseen here.

  16. A Coupled Thermal-Mechanical Analysis of Ultrasonic Bonding Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunbo (Sam); Li, Leijun

    2009-04-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) finite element model has been developed to simulate the coupled thermal-mechanical fields in ultrasonic welding of aluminum foils. Transient distributions and evolution of the in-process variables, including normal stress, shear stress, slide distance, heat generation, temperature, and plastic deformation on the contact interface, and their interactions have been studied in detail. The von Mises plastic strain from the simulation has been correlated with the measured bonded area of ultrasonic joints. A possible mechanism for ultrasonic bond formation is proposed. The severe, localized, plastic deformation at the bond region is believed to be the major phenomenon causing bond formation in ultrasonic welding.

  17. PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF MECHANICAL DRAFT COOLING TOWER

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Alfred Garrett, A; James02 Bollinger, J; Larry Koffman, L

    2009-02-10

    Industrial processes use mechanical draft cooling towers (MDCT's) to dissipate waste heat by transferring heat from water to air via evaporative cooling, which causes air humidification. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has cross-flow and counter-current MDCT's consisting of four independent compartments called cells. Each cell has its own fan to help maximize heat transfer between ambient air and circulated water. The primary objective of the work is to simulate the cooling tower performance for the counter-current cooling tower and to conduct a parametric study under different fan speeds and ambient air conditions. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model and performed the benchmarking analysis against the integral measurement results to accomplish the objective. The model uses three-dimensional steady-state momentum, continuity equations, air-vapor species balance equation, and two-equation turbulence as the basic governing equations. It was assumed that vapor phase is always transported by the continuous air phase with no slip velocity. In this case, water droplet component was considered as discrete phase for the interfacial heat and mass transfer via Lagrangian approach. Thus, the air-vapor mixture model with discrete water droplet phase is used for the analysis. A series of parametric calculations was performed to investigate the impact of wind speeds and ambient conditions on the thermal performance of the cooling tower when fans were operating and when they were turned off. The model was also benchmarked against the literature data and the SRS integral test results for key parameters such as air temperature and humidity at the tower exit and water temperature for given ambient conditions. Detailed results will be published here.

  18. Mechanics analysis of molar tooth splitting.

    PubMed

    Barani, Amir; Chai, Herzl; Lawn, Brian R; Bush, Mark B

    2015-03-01

    A model for the splitting of teeth from wedge loading of molar cusps from a round indenting object is presented. The model is developed in two parts: first, a simple 2D fracture mechanics configuration with the wedged tooth simulated by a compact tension specimen; second, a full 3D numerical analysis using extended finite element modeling (XFEM) with an embedded crack. The result is an explicit equation for splitting load in terms of indenter radius and key tooth dimensions. Fracture experiments on extracted human molars loaded axially with metal spheres are used to quantify the splitting forces and thence to validate the model. The XFEM calculations enable the complex crack propagation, initially in the enamel coat and subsequently in the interior dentin, to be followed incrementally with increasing load. The fracture evolution is shown to be stable prior to failure, so that dentin toughness, not strength, is the controlling material parameter. Critical conditions under which tooth splitting in biological and dental settings are likely to be met, however rare, are considered. PMID:25584989

  19. DYNAMIC MECHANICAL ANALYSIS CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.

    2012-02-29

    As part of the characterization of various glovebox glove material from four vendors, the permeability of gas through each type as a function of temperature was determined and a discontinuity in the permeability with temperature was revealed. A series of tests to determine the viscoelastic properties of the glove materials as a function of temperature using Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was initiated. The glass transition temperature and the elastic and viscoelastic properties as a function of temperature up to maximum use temperature were determined for each glove material. The glass transition temperatures of the gloves were -60 C for butyl, -30 C for polyurethane, -16 C Hypalon{reg_sign}, - 16 C for Viton{reg_sign}, and -24 C for polyurethane-Hypalon{reg_sign}. The glass transition was too complex for the butyl-Hypalon{reg_sign} and butyl-Viton{reg_sign} composite gloves to be characterized by a single glass transition temperature. All of the glass transition temperatures exceed the vendor projected use temperatures.

  20. Biomechanical analysis of the splenic avulsion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chebil, Omar; Behr, Michel; Auriault, Florent; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean

    2014-08-01

    The spleen is a frequently injured abdominal organ in road accidents, with an injury frequency close to 30%. The splenic avulsion exhibit a significant ratio of morbidity. It is clinically described as the complete failure of the pancreatico-splenic ligament (PSL) which is composed of splenic vessels and connective tissues. What are the biomechanical mechanisms involved with spleen avulsion? Is it possible to quantify tolerance levels of PSL structure? The current work combines both experimental and finite element (FE) investigations to determine the splenic avulsion process. Tensile tests on 13 PSL samples were performed up to failure. The experimental results provide reference data for model validation and showed a failure process starting at a peak force of 70±34 N combined with a peak strain of 105±26%. In an attempt to identify possible vessel ruptures within the PSL, a FE model of the PSL was developed including both vessels and connective tissues. The vessel wall behaviour up to failure was reproduced using an Ogden law and calibrated by inverse analysis according to literature data. The connective tissues function was modelled by a cohesion-loss interface. Once model correlation to experimental results was achieved, numerical simulation revealed that haemorrhage could occur even before the maximum peak is reached. Indeed, the first vessel ruptures were recorded at a strain of 92% at the upper lobe vein. PMID:24944004

  1. Dynamic analysis of mechanisms by finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Botsali, F.M.; Uenuevar, A.

    1996-11-01

    The need to increase productivity in order to decrease manufacturing costs lead to an increase in the working speeds of machines and mechanical systems used in manufacturing. A method is presented for investigating the dynamics of mechanisms with elastic links. Finite element method is used in the formulation of the dynamic problem. Modal transformation is used in order to reduce the number of equations of motion. Using the presented technique, elastic and rigid body motions of mechanism links are solved simultaneously. The presented method may be applied to spatial and open loop mechanisms including robot manipulators as well.

  2. Methods of stability analysis in nonlinear mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Warnock, R.L.; Ruth, R.D.; Gabella, W.; Ecklund, K.

    1989-01-01

    We review our recent work on methods to study stability in nonlinear mechanics, especially for the problems of particle accelerators, and compare our ideals to those of other authors. We emphasize methods that (1) show promise as practical design tools, (2) are effective when the nonlinearity is large, and (3) have a strong theoretical basis. 24 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Integrated Turbopump Thermo-Mechanical Design and Analysis Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, Mike

    2002-07-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the thermo-mechanical design and analysis tools used to control the steady and transient thermo-mechanical effects which drive life, reliability, and cost. The thermo-mechanical analysis tools provide upfront design capability by effectively leveraging existing component design tools to analyze and control: fits, clearance, preload; cooling requirements; stress levels, LCF (low cycle fatigue) limits, and HCF (high cycle fatigue) margin.

  4. On the kinematic analysis of robotic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, J.; Roth, B.

    1999-12-01

    The kinematic analyses, of manipulators and other robotic devices composed of mechanical links, usually depend on the solution of sets of nonlinear equations. There are a variety of both numerical and algebraic techniques available to solve such systems of equations and to give bounds on the number of solutions. These solution methods have also led to an understanding of how special choices of the various structural parameters of a mechanism influence the number of solutions inherent to the kinematic geometry of a given structure. In this paper, results from studying the kinematic geometry of such systems are reviewed, and the three most useful solution techniques are summarized. The solution techniques are polynomial continuation, Groebner bases, and elimination. The authors then discuss the results that have been obtained with these techniques in the solution of two basic problems, namely, the inverse kinematics for serial-chain manipulators, and the direct kinematics of in-parallel platform devices.

  5. Thermo-mechanical analysis of polyamide biocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattimer, Jessica Lynne

    Biobased fillers in thermoplastics have seen increased usage over the last several years. The increased usage of biobased fillers follows the ever-increasing thrust to reduce petroleum and synthetic petrochemical product consumption. Biocomposites made from polyolefin matrices have shown improved elastic moduli with moderate impact on strength. For engineering thermoplastics, the increased processing temperatures lead to degradation of the biomass, often detrimental for the mechanical performance. The goal of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of agricultural byproducts as fillers in polyamides, while minimizing the effects of increased processing temperatures. Torrefaction has been identified as an effective means of preparing biomass for introduction into polyamide. Polyamide biocomposites were produced and shown to have comparable mechanical properties to the neat matrix. Torrefied biomass was shown to produce tensile strengths within 70% of the neat matrix, increase elastic modulus by 150%, flexural strength by 170%, and flexural modulus by 154%.

  6. Analysis of Stabilization Mechanisms in Lifted Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Martinez, S.; Kronenburg, A.

    2009-12-01

    Flame stabilization and the mechanisms that govern the dynamics at the flame base have been subject to numerous studies in recent years. Recent results using a combined Large Eddy Simulation-Conditional Moment Closure (LES-CMC) approach to model the turbulent flow field and the turbulence-chemistry interactions has been successful in predicting flame ignition and stabilization by auto-ignition, but LES-CMCs capability of the accurate modelling of the competition between turbulent quenching and laminar and turbulent flame propagation at the anchor point has not been resolved. This paper will consolidate LES-CMC results by analysing a wide range of lifted flame geometries with different prevailing stabilization mechanisms. The simulations allow a clear distinction of the prevailing stabilization mechanisms for the different flames, LES-CMC accurately predicts the competition between turbulence and chemistry during the auto-ignition process, however, the dynamics of the extinction process and turbulent flame propagation are not well captured. The averaging process inherent in the CMC methods does not allow for an instant response of the transported conditionally averaged reactive species to the changes in the flow conditions and any response of the scalars will therefore be delayed. Stationary or quasi-stationary conditions, however, can be well predicted for all flame configurations.

  7. Mechanical and acoustic analysis in ultrasonic angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detwiler, Paul W.; Watkins, James F.; Rose, Eric A.; Ratner, A.; Vu, Louis P.; Severinsky, J. Y.; Rosenschein, Uri

    1991-05-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between ultrasonic tissue ablation and passive mechanical elasticity. Experience with ultrasonic angioplasty in experimental settings (in-vivo and in-vitro) together with clinical experience in peripheral vascular disease is reported. A model composed exclusively of a hydroxyproline ballistic gelatin matrix showed a negative correlation between material elasticity and the rate of ultrasonic ablation. This model provided a means of studying the effects of collagen content on ablation, exclusive of other biologic components. Ballistic gelatin ablation (mg/sec) was found to increase logarithmically with decreasing protein concentration over the range studied (20.00 to 1.25%). Ablation as a function of gelatin elasticity behaved in a similar manner. Temperature of the material ablated was also demonstrated to affect the rate of ablation. We conclude that the previously reported differences in ablation between thrombi and blood vessel are predictable based on the large difference in their mechanical elasticity, and that this difference provides a wide margin of safety.

  8. Mitophagy: mechanisms, pathophysiological roles, and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wen-Xing; Yin, Xiao-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles that regulate cellular energy homeostasis and cell death. The removal of damaged mitochondria through autophagy, a process called mitophagy, is thus critical for maintaining proper cellular functions. Indeed, mitophagy has been recently proposed to play critical roles in terminal differentiation of red blood cells, paternal mitochondrial degradation, neurodegenerative diseases, and ischemia or drug-induced tissue injury. Removal of damaged mitochondria through autophagy requires two steps: induction of general autophagy and priming of damaged mitochondria for selective autophagic recognition. Recent progress in mitophagy studies reveals that mitochondrial priming is mediated either by the Pink1-Parkin signaling pathway or the mitophagic receptors Nix and Bnip3. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge on the mechanisms of mitophagy. We also discuss the pathophysiological roles of mitophagy and current assays used to monitor mitophagy. PMID:22944659

  9. Kinematic analysis of a spatial mechanism for estimating shaking effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, P. S. S.; Satyadevi, A.; Gopala Krishna, A.; Eswaraiah, K.

    2015-12-01

    Spatial mechanisms are the most general category of kinematic devices. They offer the greatest capability to accomplish any desired kinematic task. A mechanism exerts forces and moments on its supporting frame, which result in vibration. Besides of its effect on efficiency, reducing vibration has become inevitable in the current industrial environment where stern standards on noise and vibration prevail. Balancing of shaking forces and shaking moments in mechanisms is important in order to improve their dynamic performance and fatigue life by reducing vibration, noise and wear. The analysis and synthesis of spatial mechanisms which involves extensive vector mathematics and linear algebra is to be simplified to be taught to engineers in undergraduate education. In the present paper the kinematic analysis of a spatial four-link RSCR mechanism is done to get the velocities and accelerations of its various links which is necessary for the estimation of inertia forces in a mechanism.

  10. Acoustic analysis of a mechanical circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Hubbert, Laila; Sundbom, Per; Loebe, Matthias; Peterzén, Bengt; Granfeldt, Hans; Ahn, Henrik

    2014-07-01

    Mechanical circulatory support technology is continually improving. However, adverse complications do occur with devastating consequences, for example, pump thrombosis that may develop in several parts of the pump system. The aim of this study was to design an experimental clot/thrombosis model to register and analyze acoustic signals from the left ventricular assist device (LVAD) HeartMate II (HMII) (Thoratec Corporation, Inc., Pleasanton, CA, USA) and detect changes in sound signals correlating to clots in the inflow, outflow, and pump housing. Using modern telecom techniques, it was possible to register and analyze the HMII pump-specific acoustic fingerprint in an experimental model of LVAD support using a mock loop. Increase in pump speed significantly (P<0.005) changed the acoustic fingerprint at certain frequency (0-23,000 Hz) intervals (regions: R1-3 and peaks: P1,3-4). When the ball valves connected to the tubing were narrowed sequentially by ∼50% of the inner diameter (to mimic clot in the out- and inflow tubing), the frequency spectrum changed significantly (P<0.005) in P1 and P2 and R1 when the outflow tubing was narrowed. This change was not seen to the same extent when the lumen of the ball valve connected to the inflow tube was narrowed by ∼50%. More significant (P<0.005) acoustic changes were detected in P1 and P2 and R1 and R3, with the largest dB figs. in the lower frequency ranges in R1 and P2, when artificial clots and blood clots passed through the pump system. At higher frequencies, a significant change in dB figs. in R3 and P4 was detected when clots passed through the pump system. Acoustic monitoring of pump sounds may become a valuable tool in LVAD surveillance. PMID:24372095

  11. Airflow analysis in mechanically ventilated obstructed rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priest, John Brian

    1999-11-01

    Local and mean air velocities and standard deviations were measured in realistic rooms. Obstructions represented occupants and equipment in the rooms, internal heat loads varied and supply air temperature differed from room averages. Experimental setups differed for the isothermal and nonisothermal tests. Room dimensions for isothermal tests were 2.44 m high by 4.88 x 4.88 m. Ten different obstruction ratios using three different inlet types were analyzed. Obstructions covered 0 to 30% floor area and from 0 to 75% of room height. Air was supplied at ventilation rates ranging between 0.8 and 1.1 m 3/s. Room dimensions for the nonisothermal tests were 2.44 m high by 3.66 x 7.32 m. Obstruction differences between solid versus open partitions for farrowing crates were investigated for three commercially available inlets using two ventilation loads. Ventilation rates were 0.11 to 1.18 m 3/s, simulating cold and warm weather ventilation conditions, respectively. Based on these data and theoretical calculations, a kinetic energy model that predicts average room air velocity and energy level was developed as a practical room air flow design and analysis tool. It was recommended that designers interested in using CFD as a tool should use a three dimensional laminar model for acceptable qualitative flow results. It was concluded that for typical room flowrates and inlet types the room air distribution system is obstruction ratio independent. Local velocities and standard deviations varied with each obstruction setup and inlet combination. However, average air velocities and turbulence intensities were not influenced by obstruction setups or inlet configurations. The decay rate of mean velocity kinetic energy in the bulk flow region was independent of obstructions and inlets. Room average kinetic energy was a function of the supplied kinetic energy within the supply jet plus internal kinetic energy resulting from internal heat load (convective energy).

  12. Analysis of frequency characteristics and sensitivity of compliant mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shanzeng; Dai, Jiansheng; Li, Aimin; Sun, Zhaopeng; Feng, Shizhe; Cao, Guohua

    2016-03-01

    Based on a modified pseudo-rigid-body model, the frequency characteristics and sensitivity of the large-deformation compliant mechanism are studied. Firstly, the pseudo-rigid-body model under the static and kinetic conditions is modified to enable the modified pseudo-rigid-body model to be more suitable for the dynamic analysis of the compliant mechanism. Subsequently, based on the modified pseudo-rigid-body model, the dynamic equations of the ordinary compliant four-bar mechanism are established using the analytical mechanics. Finally, in combination with the finite element analysis software ANSYS, the frequency characteristics and sensitivity of the compliant mechanism are analyzed by taking the compliant parallel-guiding mechanism and the compliant bistable mechanism as examples. From the simulation results, the dynamic characteristics of compliant mechanism are relatively sensitive to the structure size, section parameter, and characteristic parameter of material on mechanisms. The results could provide great theoretical significance and application values for the structural optimization of compliant mechanisms, the improvement of their dynamic properties and the expansion of their application range.

  13. Kinematic analysis of a flexible six-DOF parallel mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jing, Feng-Shui; Tan, Min; Hou, Zeng-Guang; Liang, Zi-Ze; Wang, Yun-Kuan; Gupta, Madan M; Nikiforuk, Peter N

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, a new type of six-degrees of freedom (DOF) flexible parallel mechanism (FPM) is presented. This type of parallel mechanism possesses several favorable properties: (1) its number of DOFs is independent of the number of serial chains which make up the mechanism; (2) it has no kinematical singularities; (3) it is designed to move on rails, and therefore its workspace is much larger than that of a conventional parallel manipulator; and (4) without changing the number of DOFs and the kinematics of the mechanisms, the number of the serial chains can be reconfigured according to the needs of the tasks. These properties make the mechanism very preferable in practice, especially for such tasks as joining huge ship blocks, in which the manipulated objects vary dramatically both in weights and dimensions. Furthermore, the mechanism can be used as either a fully actuated system or an underactuated system. In the fully actuated case, the mechanism has six DOF motion capabilities and manipulation capabilities. However, in the underactuated case, the mechanism still has six DOF motion capabilities, but it has only five DOF manipulation capabilities. In this paper, both the inverse and forward kinematics are studied and expressed in a closed form. The workspace and singularity analysis of the mechanism are also presented. An example is presented to illustrate how to calculate the kinematics of the mechanism in both fully-actuated and underactuated cases. Finally, an application of such a mechanism to manufacturing industry is introduced. PMID:16602597

  14. Ethical challenges in home mechanical ventilation: A secondary analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dybwik, Knut; Nielsen, Erik Waage; Brinchmann, Berit Støre

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the ethical challenges in home mechanical ventilation based on a secondary analysis of qualitative empirical data. The data included perceptions of healthcare professionals in hospitals and community health services and family members of children and adults using home mechanical ventilation. The findings show that a number of ethical challenges, or dilemmas, arise at all levels in the course of treatment: deciding who should be offered home mechanical ventilation, respect for patient and family wishes, quality of life, dignity and equal access to home mechanical ventilation. Other challenges were the impacts home mechanical ventilation had on the patient, the family, the healthcare services and the allocation of resources. A better and broader understanding of these issues is crucial in order to improve the quality of care for both patient and family and assist healthcare professionals involved in home mechanical ventilation to make decisions for the good of the patient and his or her family. PMID:22183963

  15. Mechanics of intraply hybrid composites - Properties, analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    A mechanics theory is developed for predicting the physical thermal, hygral and mechanical properties (including various strengths) of unidirectional intraply hybrid composites (UIHC) based on unidirectional properties of the constituent composites. Procedures are described which can use this theory in conjunction with composite mechanics computer codes and general purpose structural analysis finite element programs for the analysis/design of structural components made from intraply hybrid angleplied laminates (IHAL). Comparisons with limited data show that this theory predicts mechanical properties of UIHC and flexural stiffnesses of IHAL which are in good agreement with experimental data. The theory developed herein makes it possible to design and optimize structural components from IHAL based on a large class of available constituent fibers.

  16. Dynamic mechanical analysis: A practical introduction to techniques and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Menard, K.

    1999-03-01

    This introduction provides the chemist, chemical engineer, or materials scientists with a starting point to understand the applications of dynamic mechanical analysis, its workings, and its advantages and limitations. This book serves as a systematic study of manufacturing polymeric materials and components as well as for developing new materials. Contents include: introduction to dynamic mechanical analysis; basic rheological concepts: stress, strain, and flow; rheology basic: creep-recovery and stress relaxation; dynamic testing; time-temperature scans part 1: transitions in polymers; time and temperature studies part 2: thermosets; frequency scans; DMA applications to real problems: guidelines; and appendix: sample experiments for the DMA.

  17. Acoustic emission spectral analysis of fiber composite failure mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, D. M.; Williams, J. H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The acoustic emission of graphite fiber polyimide composite failure mechanisms was investigated with emphasis on frequency spectrum analysis. Although visual examination of spectral densities could not distinguish among fracture sources, a paired-sample t statistical analysis of mean normalized spectral densities did provide quantitative discrimination among acoustic emissions from 10 deg, 90 deg, and plus or minus 45 deg, plus or minus 45 deg sub s specimens. Comparable discrimination was not obtained for 0 deg specimens.

  18. Analysis of fluid/mechanical systems using EASY5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Robert W., Jr.; Arndt, Scott D.; Hurlbert, Eric A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper illustrates how the use of a general analysis package can simplify modeling and analyzing fluid/mechanical systems. One such package is EASY5, a Boeing Computer Services product. The basic transmission line equations for modeling piped fluid systems are presented, as well as methods of incorporating these equations into the EASY5 environment. The paper describes how this analysis tool has been used to model several fluid subsystems of the Space Shuttle Orbiter.

  19. UPDATE ON MECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF MONOLITHIC FUEL PLATES

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Burkes; F. J. Rice; J.-F. Jue; N. P. Hallinan

    2008-03-01

    Results on the relative bond strength of the fuel-clad interface in monolithic fuel plates have been presented at previous RRFM conferences. An understanding of mechanical properties of the fuel, cladding, and fuel / cladding interface has been identified as an important area of investigation and quantification for qualification of monolithic fuel forms. Significant progress has been made in the area of mechanical analysis of the monolithic fuel plates, including mechanical property determination of fuel foils, cladding processed by both hot isostatic pressing and friction bonding, and the fuel-clad composite. In addition, mechanical analysis of fabrication induced residual stress has been initiated, along with a study to address how such stress can be relieved prior to irradiation. Results of destructive examinations and mechanical tests are presented along with analysis and supporting conclusions. A brief discussion of alternative non-destructive evaluation techniques to quantify not only bond quality, but also bond integrity and strength, will also be provided. These are all necessary steps to link out-of-pile observations as a function of fabrication with in-pile behaviours.

  20. Analysis of Links Positions in Landing Gear Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewczyński, D.; Tora, G.

    2014-08-01

    This article contains a kinematic analysis of an aircraft chassis mechanism in a range of positions. The mechanism of the chassis is made up of several smaller subsystems with different functions. The first mechanism is used to eject the chassis before landing (touchdown) and fold it to hatchway after the lift off. The second mechanism is designed to perform rotation of the crossover with the wheel, in order to adjust the position of the wheel to fit it in the limited space in the hold. The third mechanism allows movement of the chassis resulting from the change in length of the damper. To determine the position of the following links of the mechanism calculus of vectors was applied in which unit vectors were used to represent the angular position of the links. The aim of the analysis is to determine the angle of convergence and the angle of heel wheels as a function of the variable length of hydraulic cylinder, length of the shock absorber, length of the regulations rods

  1. Computer aided analysis and optimization of mechanical system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haug, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose is to outline a computational approach to spatial dynamics of mechanical systems that substantially enlarges the scope of consideration to include flexible bodies, feedback control, hydraulics, and related interdisciplinary effects. Design sensitivity analysis and optimization is the ultimate goal. The approach to computer generation and solution of the system dynamic equations and graphical methods for creating animations as output is outlined.

  2. An Analysis of the Diesel Truck Mechanic Occupation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilo, Joseph L.

    The general purpose of the occupational analysis is to provide workable, basic information dealing with the many and varied duties performed in the diesel truck mechanic occupation. The document opens with a brief introduction followed by a job description. The bulk of the document is presented in table form. Thirteen duties are broken down into a…

  3. Computer-aided design and analysis of mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    An introduction to the computer programs developed to assist in the design and analysis of mechanisms is presented. A survey of the various types of programs which are available is given, and the most widely used programs are compared. The way in which the programs are used is discussed, and demonstrated with an example.

  4. An Analysis of the Waste Water Treatment Maintenance Mechanic Occupation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Anthony B.; And Others

    The general purpose of the occupational analysis is to provide workable, basic information dealing with the many and varied duties performed in the waste water treatment mechanics occupation. The document opens with a brief introduction followed by a job description. The bulk of the document is presented in table form. Twelve duties are broken…

  5. Fracture mechanics analysis of composite microcracking - Experimental results in fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nairn, J. A.; Liu, S.

    1990-01-01

    The Nairn (1989) variational mechanics analysis, which yields the energy release rate of a microcrack's formation between two existing microcracks, has proven useful in the fracture mechanics interpretation of cross-ply laminates' microcracking. Attention is presently given to the application of this energy release rate analysis to a fracture mechanics-based interpretation of microcrack formation during fatigue loading, for the case of fatigue experiments on three layups of Avimid K/IM6 laminates and four layups of Fiberite 934/T300 laminates. The single master Paris-law plot onto which the data from all layups of a given material system fall is claimed to offer a complete characterization of that system's microcrack-formation resistance during fatigue loading.

  6. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the mechanical actuation subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacher, J. L.; Montgomery, A. D.; Bradway, M. W.; Slaughter, W. T.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Mechanical Actuation System (MAS) hardware. Specifically, the MAS hardware consists of the following components: Air Data Probe (ADP); Elevon Seal Panel (ESP); External Tank Umbilical (ETU); Ku-Band Deploy (KBD); Payload Bay Doors (PBD); Payload Bay Radiators (PBR); Personnel Hatches (PH); Vent Door Mechanism (VDM); and Startracker Door Mechanism (SDM). The IOA analysis process utilized available MAS hardware drawings and schematics for defining hardware assemblies, components, and hardware items. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode.

  7. Scaling analysis for the investigation of slip mechanisms in nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savithiri, S.; Pattamatta, Arvind; Das, Sarit K.

    2011-07-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the effect of slip mechanisms in nanofluids through scaling analysis. The role of nanoparticle slip mechanisms in both water- and ethylene glycol-based nanofluids is analyzed by considering shape, size, concentration, and temperature of the nanoparticles. From the scaling analysis, it is found that all of the slip mechanisms are dominant in particles of cylindrical shape as compared to that of spherical and sheet particles. The magnitudes of slip mechanisms are found to be higher for particles of size between 10 and 80 nm. The Brownian force is found to dominate in smaller particles below 10 nm and also at smaller volume fraction. However, the drag force is found to dominate in smaller particles below 10 nm and at higher volume fraction. The effect of thermophoresis and Magnus forces is found to increase with the particle size and concentration. In terms of time scales, the Brownian and gravity forces act considerably over a longer duration than the other forces. For copper-water-based nanofluid, the effective contribution of slip mechanisms leads to a heat transfer augmentation which is approximately 36% over that of the base fluid. The drag and gravity forces tend to reduce the Nusselt number of the nanofluid while the other forces tend to enhance it.

  8. Failure analysis for micro-electrical-mechanical systems (MEMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.A.; Tangyunyong, P.; Barton, D.L.

    1997-10-01

    Micro-Electrical Mechanical Systems (MEMS) is an emerging technology with demonstrated potential for a wide range of applications including sensors and actuators for medical, industrial, consumer, military, automotive and instrumentation products. Failure analysis (FA) of MEMS is critically needed for the successful design, fabrication, performance analysis and reliability assurance of this new technology. Many devices have been examined using techniques developed for integrated circuit analysis, including optical inspection, scanning laser microscopy (SLM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focused ion beam (FIB) techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM), infrared (IR) microscopy, light emission (LE) microscopy, acoustic microscopy and acoustic emission analysis. For example, the FIB was used to microsection microengines that developed poor performance characteristics. Subsequent SEM analysis clearly demonstrated the absence of wear on gear, hub, and pin joint bearing surfaces, contrary to expectations. Another example involved the use of infrared microscopy for thermal analysis of operating microengines. Hot spots were located, which did not involve the gear or hub, but indicated contact between comb structures which drive microengines. Voltage contrast imaging proved useful on static and operating MEMS in both the SEM and the FIB and identified electrostatic clamping as a potentially significant contributor to failure mechanisms in microengines. This work describes MEMS devices, FA techniques, failure modes, and examples of FA of MEMS.

  9. Mechanical Network in Titin Immunoglobulin from Force Distribution Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wilmanns, Matthias; Gräter, Frauke

    2009-01-01

    The role of mechanical force in cellular processes is increasingly revealed by single molecule experiments and simulations of force-induced transitions in proteins. How the applied force propagates within proteins determines their mechanical behavior yet remains largely unknown. We present a new method based on molecular dynamics simulations to disclose the distribution of strain in protein structures, here for the newly determined high-resolution crystal structure of I27, a titin immunoglobulin (IG) domain. We obtain a sparse, spatially connected, and highly anisotropic mechanical network. This allows us to detect load-bearing motifs composed of interstrand hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic core interactions, including parts distal to the site to which force was applied. The role of the force distribution pattern for mechanical stability is tested by in silico unfolding of I27 mutants. We then compare the observed force pattern to the sparse network of coevolved residues found in this family. We find a remarkable overlap, suggesting the force distribution to reflect constraints for the evolutionary design of mechanical resistance in the IG family. The force distribution analysis provides a molecular interpretation of coevolution and opens the road to the study of the mechanism of signal propagation in proteins in general. PMID:19282960

  10. Conformational analysis of small molecules: NMR and quantum mechanics calculations.

    PubMed

    Tormena, Cláudio F

    2016-08-01

    This review deals with conformational analysis in small organic molecules, and describes the stereoelectronic interactions responsible for conformational stability. Conformational analysis is usually performed using NMR spectroscopy through measurement of coupling constants at room or low temperature in different solvents to determine the populations of conformers in solution. Quantum mechanical calculations are used to address the interactions responsible for conformer stability. The conformational analysis of a large number of small molecules is described, using coupling constant measurements in different solvents and at low temperature, as well as recent applications of through-space and through-hydrogen bond coupling constants JFH as tools for the conformational analysis of fluorinated molecules. Besides NMR parameters, stereoelectronic interactions such as conjugative, hyperconjugative, steric and intramolecular hydrogen bond interactions involved in conformational preferences are discussed. PMID:27573182

  11. Variational mechanics analysis of the stresses in microdrop debond specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheer, Robert J.; Nairn, John A.

    1991-01-01

    A recently derived variational mechanics analysis of stresses in single-fiber model composites has been applied to the analysis of the stresses in the microdrop debond specimen. The new analysis is more accurate than the commonly applied shear-lag or elastic-plastic analyses. The results from a sample stress state calculation suggest that interfacial failure between the fiber and the microdrop is by mode I or opening mode failure at the beginning of the microdrop. The opening mode failure is caused by a large tensile radial stress at the fiber/matrix interface. Previous analyses of microdrop debond data have been in terms of a shear strength. It is suggested that these analyses misrepresent microdrop debond results and recommend instead a failure analysis based on energy release rate and interfacial fracture toughness. A procedure for calculating the energy release rate for the growth of an interfacial crack is described.

  12. Behavior analysis and mechanism: One is not the other

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Edward K.

    1993-01-01

    Behavior analysts have been called mechanists, and behavior analysis is said to be mechanistic; that is, they are claimed to be aligned with the philosophy of mechanism. What this means is analyzed by (a) examining standard and specialized dictionary and encyclopedia definitions and descriptions of mechanism and its cognates and (b) reviewing contemporary representations of the mechanistic worldview in the literature on the philosophy of psychology. Although the term mechanism and its cognates are sometimes an honorific (e.g., “natural science”), their standard meanings, usages, and functions in society, science, psychology, and philosophy do not aptly characterize the discipline. These terms mischaracterize how behavior analysts conceptualize (a) the behavior of their subjects and the individuals with whom they work and (b) their own behavior as scientists. Discussion is interwoven throughout about the nature of terms and definitions in science. PMID:22478129

  13. Mechanics, analysis and geometry: 200 years after Lagrange.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francaviglia, M.

    This volume consists of articles written on the occasion of the bicentennial of the publication by J.-Louis Lagrange of his treatise, Mechanique Analytique (1788). This book opened a floodgate of contributions to mechanics by analysis. The resulting volume provides insight and perspective on various research problems in modern topics of physics, astrophysics, mathematics and the history of science. Furthermore it presents a balanced and authoritative account of the different branches and problems of mathematical physics that Lagrange originally studied and developed.

  14. Potential of isotope analysis (C, Cl) to identify dechlorination mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cretnik, Stefan; Thoreson, Kristen; Bernstein, Anat; Ebert, Karin; Buchner, Daniel; Laskov, Christine; Haderlein, Stefan; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Kliegman, Sarah; McNeill, Kristopher; Elsner, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Chloroethenes are commonly used in industrial applications, and detected as carcinogenic contaminants in the environment. Their dehalogenation is of environmental importance in remediation processes. However, a detailed understanding frequently accounted problem is the accumulation of toxic degradation products such as cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE) at contaminated sites. Several studies have addressed the reductive dehalogenation reactions using biotic and abiotic model systems, but a crucial question in this context has remained open: Do environmental transformations occur by the same mechanism as in their corresponding in vitro model systems? The presented study shows the potential to close this research gap using the latest developments in compound specific chlorine isotope analysis, which make it possible to routinely measure chlorine isotope fractionation of chloroethenes in environmental samples and complex reaction mixtures.1,2 In particular, such chlorine isotope analysis enables the measurement of isotope fractionation for two elements (i.e., C and Cl) in chloroethenes. When isotope values of both elements are plotted against each other, different slopes reflect different underlying mechanisms and are remarkably insensitive towards masking. Our results suggest that different microbial strains (G. lovleyi strain SZ, D. hafniense Y51) and the isolated cofactor cobalamin employ similar mechanisms of reductive dechlorination of TCE. In contrast, evidence for a different mechanism was obtained with cobaloxime cautioning its use as a model for biodegradation. The study shows the potential of the dual isotope approach as a tool to directly compare transformation mechanisms of environmental scenarios, biotic transformations, and their putative chemical lab scale systems. Furthermore, it serves as an essential reference when using the dual isotope approach to assess the fate of chlorinated compounds in the environment.

  15. Fracture mechanics analysis for various fiber/matrix interface loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, R. A.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Fiber/matrix (F/M) cracking was analyzed to provide better understanding and guidance in developing F/M interface fracture toughness tests. Two configurations, corresponding to F/M cracking at a broken fiber and at the free edge, were investigated. The effects of mechanical loading, thermal cooldown, and friction were investigated. Each configuration was analyzed for two loadings: longitudinal and normal to the fiber. A nonlinear finite element analysis was performed to model friction and slip at the F/M interface. A new procedure for fitting a square-root singularity to calculated stresses was developed to determine stress intensity factors (K sub I and K sub II) for a bimaterial interface crack. For the case of F/M cracking at a broken fiber with longitudinal loading, crack tip conditions were strongly influenced by interface friction. As a result, an F/M interface toughness test based on this case was not recommended because nonlinear data analysis methods would be required. For the free edge crack configuration, both mechanical and thermal loading caused crack opening, thereby avoiding frictional effects. A F/M interface toughness test based on this configuration would provide data for K(sub I)/K(sub II) ratios of about 0.7 and 1.6 for fiber and radial normal loading, respectively. However, thermal effects must be accounted for in the data analysis.

  16. Fracture mechanics analysis for various fiber/matrix interface loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Rajiv A.; Crews, John H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Fiber/matrix (F/M) cracking was analyzed to provide better understanding and guidance in developing F/M interface fracture toughness tests. Two configurations, corresponding to F/M cracking at a broken fiber and at the free edge, were investigated. The effects of mechanical loading, thermal cooldown, and friction were investigated. Each configuration was analyzed for two loadings: longitudinal and normal to the fiber. A nonlinear finite element analysis was performed to model friction and slip at the F/M interface. A new procedure for fitting a square-root singularity to calculated stresses was developed to determine stress intensity factors (K sub I and K sub II) for a bimaterial interface crack. For the case of F/M cracking at a broken fiber with longitudinal loading, crack tip conditions were strongly influenced by interface friction. As a result, an F/M interface toughness test based on this case was not recommended because nonlinear data analysis methods would be required. For the free edge crack configuration, both mechanical and thermal loading caused crack opening, theory avoiding fractional effects. A F/M interface toughness test based on this configuration would provide data for K(sub I/K(sub II) ratios of about 0.7 and 1.6 for fiber and radial normal loading, respectively. However, thermal effects must be accounted for in the data analysis.

  17. Fracture mechanics analysis for various fiber/matrix interface loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, R. A.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Fiber/matrix (F/M) cracking was analyzed to provide better understanding and guidance in developing F/M interface fracture toughness tests. Two configurations, corresponding to F/M cracking at a broken fiber and at the free edge, were investigated. The effects of mechanical loading, thermal cooldown, and friction were investigated. Each configuration was analyzed for two loadings: longitudinal and normal to the fiber. A nonlinear finite element analysis was performed to model friction and slip at the F/M interface. A new procedure for fitting a square-root singularity to calculated stresses was developed to determine stress intensity factors (K sub I and K sub II) for a bimaterial interface crack. For the case of F/M cracking at a broken fiber with longitudinal loading, crack tip conditions were strongly influenced by interface friction. As a result, an F/M interface toughness test based on this case was not recommended because nonlinear data analysis methods would be required. For the free edge crack configuration, both mechanical and thermal loading caused crack opening, thereby avoiding frictional effects. An F/M interface toughness test based on this configuration would provide data for K(sub I)/K(sub II) ratios of about 0.7 and 1.6 for fiber and radial normal loading, respectively. However, thermal effects must be accounted for in the data analysis.

  18. Statistical Mechanics Analysis of ATP Binding to a Multisubunit Enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun-Xin

    2014-10-01

    Due to inter-subunit communication, multisubunit enzymes usually hydrolyze ATP in a concerted fashion. However, so far the principle of this process remains poorly understood. In this study, from the viewpoint of statistical mechanics, a simple model is presented. In this model, we assume that the binding of ATP will change the potential of the corresponding enzyme subunit, and the degree of this change depends on the state of its adjacent subunits. The probability of enzyme in a given state satisfies the Boltzmann's distribution. Although it looks much simple, this model can fit the recent experimental data of chaperonin TRiC/CCT well. From this model, the dominant state of TRiC/CCT can be obtained. This study provide a new way to understand biophysical processe by statistical mechanics analysis.

  19. A Characterization of the Mechanical Behavior of Resin-Infiltrated Dentin Using Nanoscopic Dynamic Mechanical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ryou, Heonjune; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.; Arola, Dwayne

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the spatial variations in mechanical behavior of resin-infiltrated dentin using nanoscopic Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA). Objective The objectives were to: 1) evaluate the mechanical behavior of resin-infiltrated dentin using a scanning-based approach to nanoindentation, 2) identify contributions of the collagen matrix to time-dependent deformation of the hybrid layer, and 3) assess the importance of specimen hydration on the nanoDMA response. Methods Specimens of completely demineralized dentin infiltrated with commercial resin adhesive and control samples of resin adhesive were evaluated using a nanoindenter in scanning mode. The load and displacement responses were used to perform DMA and to estimate the complex (E*), storage (E’) and loss (E”) moduli over selected regions of evaluation. The importance of hydration on the mechanical behavior was also examined from a comparison of responses in the hydrated and dehydrated conditions. Results In the hydrated state the apparent complex, storage and loss moduli for the resin-infiltrated dentin samples were 3.5±0.3 GPa, 3.4±0.2 GPa and 0.9±0.3 GPa, respectively. Those values for the resin adhesive control were 2.7±0.3 GPa, 2.7±0.3 GPa and 0.2±0.02 GPa, respectively. Viscoelastic deformation of the resin-infiltrated collagen exceeded that occurring in regions of uniform resin adhesive. Though dehydration resulted in a significant increase in both the complex and storage moduli of the macro hybrid layer, the largest changes occurred to the resin adhesive. Significance The microstructure and hydration play critical roles on the mechanical behavior of the hybrid layer and nanoDMA provides a potent measurement tool for identifying the spatial variations. PMID:23639453

  20. Intraoral Laser Welding (ILW): ultrastructural and mechanical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Passaretti, Francesca; Villa, Elena; Nammour, Samir

    2010-05-01

    Nd:YAG, currently used since 1970 in dental laboratories to weld metals on dental prostheses has some limits such great dimensions, high costs and fixed delivery system. Recently it was proposed the possibility to use the Nd:YAG laser device commonly utilised in dental office, to repair broken fixed, removable and orthodontic prostheses and to weld metals directly into the mouth. The aim of this work is to value, through SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope), EDS (Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy) and DMA (Dynamic Mechanical Analysis), quality and mechanical strength of the welding process comparing a device normally used in dental lab and a device normally used in dental office for oral surgery. Sixteen CoCrMo metal plates and twenty steel orthodontic wires were divided in four groups: one was welded without metal apposition by laboratory laser, one was welded with metal apposition by laboratory laser, one was welded without metal apposition by office laser and one was welded with metal apposition by office laser. The welding process was analysed by SEM, EDS and DMA to compare the differences between the different samples. By SEM analysis it was seen that the plates welded by office laser without apposition metal showed a greater number of fissurations compared with the other samples. By EDS analysis it was seen a homogeneous composition of the metals in all the samples. The mechanical tests showed a similar elastic behaviour of the samples, with minimal differences between the two devices. No wire broke even under the maximum strength by the Analyser. This study seems to demonstrate that the welding process by office Nd:YAG laser device and the welding process by laboratory Nd:YAG laser device, analysed by SEM, EDS and DMA, showed minimal and not significant differences even if these data will be confirmed by a greater number of samples.

  1. Surge Nozzle NDE Specimen Mechanical Stress Improvement Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fredette, Lee F.

    2011-07-14

    The purpose of this project was to perform a finite element analysis of a pressurized water reactor pressurizer surge nozzle mock-up to predict both the weld residual stresses created in its construction and the final stress state after the application of the Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIP). Strain gages were applied to the inner diameter of the mock-up to record strain changes during the MSIP. These strain readings were used in an attempt to calculate the final stress state of the mock-up as well.

  2. Nonlinear fracture mechanics-based analysis of thin wall cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brust, Frederick W.; Leis, Brian N.; Forte, Thomas P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a simple analysis technique to predict the crack initiation, growth, and rupture of large-radius, R, to thickness, t, ratio (thin wall) cylinders. The method is formulated to deal both with stable tearing as well as fatigue mechanisms in applications to both surface and through-wall axial cracks, including interacting surface cracks. The method can also account for time-dependent effects. Validation of the model is provided by comparisons of predictions to more than forty full scale experiments of thin wall cylinders pressurized to failure.

  3. Adhesive fracture mechanics. [stress analysis for bond line interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, S. J.; Devries, K. L.; Williams, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    In studies of fracture mechanics the adhesive fracture energy is regarded as a fundamental property of the adhesive system. It is pointed out that the value of the adhesive fracture energy depends on surface preparation, curing conditions, and absorbed monolayers. A test method reported makes use of a disk whose peripheral part is bonded to a substrate material. Pressure is injected into the unbonded central part of the disk. At a certain critical pressure value adhesive failure can be observed. A numerical stress analysis involving arbitrary geometries is conducted.

  4. Control of a mechanical aeration process via topological sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelwahed, M.; Hassine, M.; Masmoudi, M.

    2009-06-01

    The topological sensitivity analysis method gives the variation of a criterion with respect to the creation of a small hole in the domain. In this paper, we use this method to control the mechanical aeration process in eutrophic lakes. A simplified model based on incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is used, only considering the liquid phase, which is the dominant one. The injected air is taken into account through local boundary conditions for the velocity, on the injector holes. A 3D numerical simulation of the aeration effects is proposed using a mixed finite element method. In order to generate the best motion in the fluid for aeration purposes, the optimization of the injector location is considered. The main idea is to carry out topological sensitivity analysis with respect to the insertion of an injector. Finally, a topological optimization algorithm is proposed and some numerical results, showing the efficiency of our approach, are presented.

  5. Fracture mechanics concepts in reliability analysis of monolithic ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manderscheid, Jane M.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Basic design concepts for high-performance, monolithic ceramic structural components are addressed. The design of brittle ceramics differs from that of ductile metals because of the inability of ceramic materials to redistribute high local stresses caused by inherent flaws. Random flaw size and orientation requires that a probabilistic analysis be performed in order to determine component reliability. The current trend in probabilistic analysis is to combine linear elastic fracture mechanics concepts with the two parameter Weibull distribution function to predict component reliability under multiaxial stress states. Nondestructive evaluation supports this analytical effort by supplying data during verification testing. It can also help to determine statistical parameters which describe the material strength variation, in particular the material threshold strength (the third Weibull parameter), which in the past was often taken as zero for simplicity.

  6. Cell mechanics through analysis of cell trajectories in microfluidic channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowie, Samuel; Alexeev, Alexander; Sulchek, Todd

    The understanding of dynamic cell behavior can aid in research ranging from the mechanistic causes of diseases to the development of microfluidic devices for cancer detection. Through analysis of trajectories captured from video of the cells moving in a specially designed microfluidic device, insight into the dynamic viscoelastic nature of cells can be found. The microfluidic device distinguishes cells viscoelastic properties through the use of angled ridges causing a series of compressions, resulting in differences in trajectories based on cell stiffness. Trajectories of cell passing through the device are collected using image processing methods and data mining techniques are used to relate the trajectories to cell properties obtained from experiments. Furthermore, numerical simulation of the cell and microfluidic device are used to match the experimental results from the trajectory analysis. Combination of the modeling and experimental data help to uncover how changes in cellular structures result in changes in mechanical properties.

  7. A κ-generalized statistical mechanics approach to income analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementi, F.; Gallegati, M.; Kaniadakis, G.

    2009-02-01

    This paper proposes a statistical mechanics approach to the analysis of income distribution and inequality. A new distribution function, having its roots in the framework of κ-generalized statistics, is derived that is particularly suitable for describing the whole spectrum of incomes, from the low-middle income region up to the high income Pareto power-law regime. Analytical expressions for the shape, moments and some other basic statistical properties are given. Furthermore, several well-known econometric tools for measuring inequality, which all exist in a closed form, are considered. A method for parameter estimation is also discussed. The model is shown to fit remarkably well the data on personal income for the United States, and the analysis of inequality performed in terms of its parameters is revealed as very powerful.

  8. In vivo liver tissue mechanical properties by Transient Elastography: comparison with Dynamic Mechanical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chatelin, Simon; Oudry, Jennifer; Périchon, Nicolas; Sandrin, Laurent; Allemann, Pierre; Soler, Luc; Willinger, Rémy

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of human liver is one of the most critical aspects of its numerical modeling for medical applications or impact biomechanics. Generally, model constitutive laws come from in vitro data. However, the elastic properties of liver may change significantly after death and with time. Furthermore, in vitro liver elastic properties reported in the literature have often not been compared quantitatively with in vivo liver mechanical properties on the same organ. In this study, both steps are investigated on porcine liver. The elastic property of the porcine liver, given by the shear modulus G, was measured by both Transient Elastography (TE) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA). Shear modulus measurements were realized on in vivo and in vitro liver to compare the TE and DMA methods and to study the influence of testing conditions on the liver viscoelastic properties. In vitro results show that elastic properties obtained by TE and DMA are in agreement. Liver tissue in the frequency range from 0.1 to 4 Hz can be modeled by a two-mode relaxation model. Furthermore, results show that the liver is homogeneous, isotropic and more elastic than viscous. Finally, it is shown in this study that viscoelastic properties obtained by TE and DMA change significantly with post mortem time and with the boundary conditions. PMID:21811013

  9. Application of dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) to determine the mechanical properties of pellets.

    PubMed

    Bashaiwoldu, Abraham B; Podczeck, F; Newton, J M

    2004-01-28

    Pellets of a wide range of mechanical properties were produced by the process of extrusion and spheronisation using various formulation factors. A range of mechanical properties from a simple fracture load to detailed load/displacement curves obtained when pellets were subjected to diametral compression test and a bed of pellets was compacted, were used to provide measure of tensile strength, deformability, linear strain, elastic modulus, yield and shear strength. Such conventional techniques resulted in irreversible damage to the structure of the pellets and were unable to establish the viscoelastic properties of the pellets. The application of the dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), however, allowed the determination of (1) an accurate Young's modulus of elasticity, which was found to be between 8.4 and 24-fold higher than that determined from the diametral compression test, (2) the presence of a reversible elastic deformation even after the yield point in terms of storage modulus and (3) a change in the values of the phase angle, which illustrates the increase in viscoelasticity of the pellets formed with ethanol, glyceryl monostearate (GMS) or glycerol, while a decrease in viscoelasticity with the incorporation of lactose into the microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) pellets. This work further demonstrated that the only feasible technique for determining the elastic and plastic deformability of the pellets is the one which subjects the specimen to stress/relaxation cycles and can determine the dissipated energy in terms of loss modulus or phase angle, and that is DMA. PMID:14706245

  10. Application of dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) to the determination of the mechanical properties of coated pellets.

    PubMed

    Bashaiwoldu, Abraham B; Podczeck, F; Newton, J M

    2004-04-15

    Pellets containing a model drug, paracetamol, and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) were designed to vary their mechanical properties by the incorporation of lactose, glyceryl monostearate (GMS), ethanol, or glycerol, and were produced by the process of extrusion and spheronization. The pellets were coated with an aqueous dispersion of ethyl cellulose (Surelease) to different levels of weight gain (5, 10, and 20%). The tensile strength, deformability, linear strain, elastic modulus, and shear strength of the coated and uncoated pellets were determined by conventional techniques, which are obtained from diametral compression test of individual pellets and compaction of a bed of pellets. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was performed on single pellets to determine the storage modulus and phase angle of the coated pellets. This work demonstrated that the coating film affected the mechanical properties of the pellets differently depending on the properties of the core pellets. Analysis of variance established a significant increase in the strength of the soft GMS- or glycerol-containing pellets with coating, while the effect of the coating material was not significant with respect to the elastic modulus, storage modulus, and phase angle of such pellets. The effects of the coating material on the elastic modulus, deformability, storage modulus, and phase angle of the rigid lactose-containing pellets were significant. The sinusoidal stress-relaxation cycle of the DMA illustrated the increase in the viscoelasticity of all the pellets after coating. Finally, the work demonstrate the advantages of DMA in determining the reversible or dissipated energy by means of storage modulus or phase angle when compared with the irreversible structural destruction of the pellets by conventional techniques. PMID:15072782

  11. a Numerical Method for Stability Analysis of Pinned Flexible Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, D. G.; Lee, S. W.

    1996-05-01

    A technique is presented to investigate the stability of mechanisms with pin-jointed flexible members. The method relies on a special floating frame from which elastic link co-ordinates are defined. Energies are easily developed for use in a Lagrange equation formulation, leading to a set of non-linear and mixed ordinary differential-algebraic equations of motion with constraints. Stability and bifurcation analysis is handled using a numerical procedure (generalized co-ordinate partitioning) that avoids the tedious and difficult task of analytically reducing the system of equations to a number equalling the system degrees of freedom. The proposed method was then applied to (1) a slider-crank mechanism with a flexible connecting rod and crank of constant rotational speed, and (2) a four-bar linkage with a flexible coupler with a constant speed crank. In both cases, a single pinned-pinned beam bending mode is employed to develop resonance curves and stability boundaries in the crank length-crank speed parameter plane. Flip and fold bifurcations are common occurrences in both mechanisms. The accuracy of the proposed method was also verified by comparison with previous experimental results [1].

  12. Quantitative Financial Analysis of Alternative Energy Efficiency Shareholder Incentive Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Chait, Michele; Edgar, George; Schlegel, Jeff; Shirley, Wayne

    2008-08-03

    Rising energy prices and climate change are central issues in the debate about our nation's energy policy. Many are demanding increased energy efficiency as a way to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and lower the total cost of electricity and energy services for consumers and businesses. Yet, as the National Action Plan on Energy Efficiency (NAPEE) pointed out, many utilities continue to shy away from seriously expanding their energy efficiency program offerings because they claim there is insufficient profit-motivation, or even a financial disincentive, when compared to supply-side investments. With the recent introduction of Duke Energy's Save-a-Watt incentive mechanism and ongoing discussions about decoupling, regulators and policymakers are now faced with an expanded and diverse landscape of financial incentive mechanisms, Determining the 'right' way forward to promote deep and sustainable demand side resource programs is challenging. Due to the renaissance that energy efficiency is currently experiencing, many want to better understand the tradeoffs in stakeholder benefits between these alternative incentive structures before aggressively embarking on a path for which course corrections can be time-consuming and costly. Using a prototypical Southwest utility and a publicly available financial model, we show how various stakeholders (e.g. shareholders, ratepayers, etc.) are affected by these different types of shareholder incentive mechanisms under varying assumptions about program portfolios. This quantitative analysis compares the financial consequences associated with a wide range of alternative incentive structures. The results will help regulators and policymakers better understand the financial implications of DSR program incentive regulation.

  13. Dynamic mechanical analysis of hydrogen purification substrates and membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinborn, Brandon

    Porous 420 stainless steel hydrogen purification substrates were fabricated using an ExOne R2 printer and sintered at temperatures of 1075 °C and 1100 °C for times ranging from 15 minutes to 240 minutes. Coatings of 1 micron silica beads, silica sol-gel, and palladium were applied to the sintered structure. Mechanical properties/degradation of each substrate/coating combination were evaluated using a cyclic 3-point loading condition imposed by a TA Q800 dynamic mechanical analysis unit (DMA). A constant deformation procedure was used while the required drive force for deformation and the elasticity (tan delta) were recorded throughout the cycle. Findings with respect to coating additions include: drive force increases with the addition of each coating, tan delta decreases with ceramic additions and increases with palladium addition (eventually decreases when membrane fails), and tan delta values become comparable with the addition of palladium regardless of other parameters. Findings with respect to sintering time and temperature include: drive force increases with increased sintering time and temperature, tan delta increases with increased sintering time at 1075 °C, and tan delta decreases with increased sintering time at 1100 °C. Overall, the palladium layer would likely remain intact in service due to actual force oscillations not being as extreme in service, poisoning would likely be the life limiting factor. Keywords: Sintering, dynamic mechanical properties, porous stainless steel, hydrogen purification, sol-gel.

  14. Critical Analysis of Wear Mechanisms in Cemented Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, Saurabh; Chattopadhyaya, Somnath

    2015-07-01

    Wear phenomena of cemented carbide (94 wt.% WC, 6 wt.% Co) tip of conical picks have been observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The conical pick is one type of the cutters which are used to excavate soft structure like coal. It has a cone-shaped abrasive part made of cemented carbide (CC). The picks, under study, have been used for coal mining in an underground mine through a continuous miner machine. During the critical analysis of four picks, wear mechanisms are categorized into four parts, such as, cracks, cavity formation in WC grains, grinding effect, and roughness of WC surface. Through a careful examination, the cracking mechanism has been further divided into three parts. They are cracks with overlapping surfaces, crack on a large surface of CC, and cracks in WC grains. In addition, the severe crushing and tearing of WC grains have also been clearly examined. The possible causes of each wear phenomenon have been explained comprehensively. Crushing and corrosion are the two wearing processes which have severely deteriorated the condition of the CC. Corrosion has been easily identified by observing a number of pores and triangular notches in the WC surface. The oxidation of WC grains due to corrosion has been established by EDS and XRD.

  15. Dynamic-Mechanical Analysis of Monodomain Nematic Liquid Crystalline Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, Atsushi; Terentjev, Eugene

    2003-03-01

    Dynamic-mechanical analysis was performed in the glassy, nematic and isotropic states of several monodomain nematic liquid crystalline elastomers (LCE) which differ in their degrees of anisotropy and internal microstructure. It was found that the type of network crosslinker makes a significant difference in the equilibrium properties of these elastomers, in particular, in their effective anisotropy. In spite of these differences, the observed dynamic-mechanical behaviour was very similar. The fact that there is a consistently high and wide loss over the whole nematic region, where storage modulus G' behaves non-monotonically, is most likely an indicator of the fact that the dynamic-mechanical response is not linear. Master curves have been built between the glassy state and the nematic-isotropic phase transition, where the modulus reaches a low-level soft plateau. Above the nematic-isotropic transition temperature Tni, the modulus rises substantially, since internal relaxation is no longer able to reduce the elastic response - and further time-temperature superposition fails. The dynamics of these elastomers are dominated by power laws, which was confirmed by the successful procedure of the master curve inversion (time-frequency inversion) to describe the static stress relaxation. Interestingly, it was found that mechanical properties characterized by power laws (in time) of stress relaxation match very well with the dynamic properties, where power laws (in frequency) were also observed in the dynamic modulus in the appropriate range of temperatures. The work demonstrates the potential for the use of nematic liquid crystalline elastomers in many acoustic and vibration damping applications.

  16. Development of test methodology for dynamic mechanical analysis instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, V. R.

    1982-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical analysis instrumentation was used for the development of specific test methodology in the determination of engineering parameters of selected materials, esp. plastics and elastomers, over a broad range of temperature with selected environment. The methodology for routine procedures was established with specific attention given to sample geometry, sample size, and mounting techniques. The basic software of the duPont 1090 thermal analyzer was used for data reduction which simplify the theoretical interpretation. Clamps were developed which allowed 'relative' damping during the cure cycle to be measured for the fiber-glass supported resin. The correlation of fracture energy 'toughness' (or impact strength) with the low temperature (glassy) relaxation responses for a 'rubber-modified' epoxy system was negative in result because the low-temperature dispersion mode (-80 C) of the modifier coincided with that of the epoxy matrix, making quantitative comparison unrealistic.

  17. Multiple methods integration for structural mechanics analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, J. M.; Aminpour, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    A new research area of multiple methods integration is proposed for joining diverse methods of structural mechanics analysis which interact with one another. Three categories of multiple methods are defined: those in which a physical interface are well defined; those in which a physical interface is not well-defined, but selected; and those in which the interface is a mathematical transformation. Two fundamental integration procedures are presented that can be extended to integrate various methods (e.g., finite elements, Rayleigh Ritz, Galerkin, and integral methods) with one another. Since the finite element method will likely be the major method to be integrated, its enhanced robustness under element distortion is also examined and a new robust shell element is demonstrated.

  18. Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis of Virgin TR-55 Silicone Rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Wilson, T S

    2009-10-09

    Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) of virgin TR-55 silicone rubber specimens was conducted. Dynamic frequency/temperature sweep tests were conducted over the ranges 0.1-100 rad/s and 30-100 C using a parallel plate test geometry. A strain of 0.2% was used, which was near the upper limit of the linear viscoelastic region of the material based on initial dynamic strain sweep tests. Master curves of G{prime} and G{double_prime} as a function of frequency were generated using time-temperature superposition (horizontal shift with initial vertical correction). The activation energy calculated from an Arrhenius fit to the horizontal shift factors was 178-355 kJ/mol. The calculated percent load retention at {approx}50 years was 61-68%.

  19. Structure-activity analysis and antiprion mechanism of isoprenoid compounds.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, Taichi; Nishizawa, Keiko; Sakasegawa, Yuji; Teruya, Kenta; Doh-ura, Katsumi

    2015-12-01

    The prion strain-specific mechanism by which normal prion protein is converted to abnormal prion protein remains largely unknown. This study found that insect juvenile hormone III reduced abnormal prion protein levels only in cells infected with the RML prion. We conducted a structure-activity analysis using juvenile hormone III biosynthetic intermediates in the isoprenoid pathway. Both farnesol and geranylgeraniol, the most potent inhibitors of abnormal prion protein formation, behaved in an RML prion-dependent fashion. Neither of them modified cellular and cell surface prion protein levels. Events downstream of this pathway include cholesterol biosynthesis and protein prenylation. However, neither of these isoprenoid compounds modified lipid raft microdomains and cellular cholesterol levels and neither affected the representative prenylated protein expression levels of prenylation pathways. Therefore, these isoprenoid compounds are a new class of prion strain-dependent antiprion compounds. They are useful for exploring strain-specific prion biology. PMID:26402376

  20. Nonlinear analysis of ubitron, orbitron, and gyroharmonitron mechanisms. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-11-01

    The research program during the contract period consisted of the analysis of the Ubitron/FEL amplifier in three-dimensions. The principal configuration of interest consisted of the propagation of an energetic electron beam through a loss-free rectangular waveguide in the presence of a linearly polarized wiggler field with parabolically tapered pole pieces. The purpose of the tapered pole faces is to provide a mechanism for focussing the electron beam in the plane of the bulk wiggler induced oscillation. A nonlinear theory and simulation code has been developed to study this configuration which can treat a multiple mode interaction, harmonic growth, efficiency enhancement by means of a tapered wiggler, the effect of beam thermal spread on the interaction, the injection of the beam into the wiggler, and detailed facets of the particle dynamics such as Betatron oscillations and velocity shear. Comparisons of the experiment at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are excellent.

  1. Analysis of loss mechanisms in polycrystalline thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sites, J. R.

    1990-08-01

    Our goal for thin-film polycrystalline solar cell analysis was to increase the useful information extracted from relatively straightforward electrical measurements. The strategy was to (1) systematize measurements and reporting, (2) organize results in terms of quantitative values for individual sources of current and voltage loss, and (3) evaluate possible analytical techniques to enhance precision and avoid pitfalls, and (4) insist on a viable physical explanation of each loss mechanism. Current-voltage, quantum efficiency, and capacitance measurements on CuInSe2 and CdTe solar cells from a variety of sources have been analyzed. In many cases losses were identified that may be lessened relatively easily. However, the operating voltage loss due to excessive forward recombination current throughout the depletion region remains the primary obstacle to efficiencies competitive with single crystal cells.

  2. Analysis of sponge zones for computational fluid mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Bodony, Daniel J. . E-mail: bodony@stanford.edu

    2006-03-01

    The use of sponge regions, or sponge zones, which add the forcing term -{sigma}(q - q {sub ref}) to the right-hand-side of the governing equations in computational fluid mechanics as an ad hoc boundary treatment is widespread. They are used to absorb and minimize reflections from computational boundaries and as forcing sponges to introduce prescribed disturbances into a calculation. A less common usage is as a means of extending a calculation from a smaller domain into a larger one, such as in computing the far-field sound generated in a localized region. By analogy to the penalty method of finite elements, the method is placed on a solid foundation, complete with estimates of convergence. The analysis generalizes the work of Israeli and Orszag [M. Israeli, S.A. Orszag, Approximation of radiation boundary conditions, J. Comp. Phys. 41 (1981) 115-135] and confirms their findings when applied as a special case to one-dimensional wave propagation in an absorbing sponge. It is found that the rate of convergence of the actual solution to the target solution, with an appropriate norm, is inversely proportional to the sponge strength. A detailed analysis for acoustic wave propagation in one-dimension verifies the convergence rate given by the general theory. The exponential point-wise convergence derived by Israeli and Orszag in the high-frequency limit is recovered and found to hold over all frequencies. A weakly nonlinear analysis of the method when applied to Burgers' equation shows similar convergence properties. Three numerical examples are given to confirm the analysis: the acoustic extension of a two-dimensional time-harmonic point source, the acoustic extension of a three-dimensional initial-value problem of a sound pulse, and the introduction of unstable eigenmodes from linear stability theory into a two-dimensional shear layer.

  3. A dynamic mechanical analysis technique for porous media

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, Adam J; McGarry, Matthew; Weaver, John B; Paulsen, Keith D

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) is a common way to measure the mechanical properties of materials as functions of frequency. Traditionally, a viscoelastic mechanical model is applied and current DMA techniques fit an analytical approximation to measured dynamic motion data by neglecting inertial forces and adding empirical correction factors to account for transverse boundary displacements. Here, a finite element (FE) approach to processing DMA data was developed to estimate poroelastic material properties. Frequency-dependent inertial forces, which are significant in soft media and often neglected in DMA, were included in the FE model. The technique applies a constitutive relation to the DMA measurements and exploits a non-linear inversion to estimate the material properties in the model that best fit the model response to the DMA data. A viscoelastic version of this approach was developed to validate the approach by comparing complex modulus estimates to the direct DMA results. Both analytical and FE poroelastic models were also developed to explore their behavior in the DMA testing environment. All of the models were applied to tofu as a representative soft poroelastic material that is a common phantom in elastography imaging studies. Five samples of three different stiffnesses were tested from 1 – 14 Hz with rough platens placed on the top and bottom surfaces of the material specimen under test to restrict transverse displacements and promote fluid-solid interaction. The viscoelastic models were identical in the static case, and nearly the same at frequency with inertial forces accounting for some of the discrepancy. The poroelastic analytical method was not sufficient when the relevant physical boundary constraints were applied, whereas the poroelastic FE approach produced high quality estimates of shear modulus and hydraulic conductivity. These results illustrated appropriate shear modulus contrast between tofu samples and yielded a consistent contrast in

  4. A dynamic mechanical analysis technique for porous media.

    PubMed

    Pattison, Adam Jeffry; McGarry, Matthew; Weaver, John B; Paulsen, Keith D

    2015-02-01

    Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) is a common way to measure the mechanical properties of materials as functions of frequency. Traditionally, a viscoelastic mechanical model is applied and current DMA techniques fit an analytical approximation to measured dynamic motion data by neglecting inertial forces and adding empirical correction factors to account for transverse boundary displacements. Here, a finite-element (FE) approach to processing DMA data was developed to estimate poroelastic material properties. Frequency-dependent inertial forces, which are significant in soft media and often neglected in DMA, were included in the FE model. The technique applies a constitutive relation to the DMA measurements and exploits a nonlinear inversion to estimate the material properties in the model that best fit the model response to the DMA data. A viscoelastic version of this approach was developed to validate the approach by comparing complex modulus estimates to the direct DMA results. Both analytical and FE poroelastic models were also developed to explore their behavior in the DMA testing environment. All of the models were applied to tofu as a representative soft poroelastic material that is a common phantom in elastography imaging studies. Five samples of three different stiffnesses were tested from 1-14 Hz with rough platens placed on the top and bottom surfaces of the material specimen under test to restrict transverse displacements and promote fluid-solid interaction. The viscoelastic models were identical in the static case, and nearly the same at frequency with inertial forces accounting for some of the discrepancy. The poroelastic analytical method was not sufficient when the relevant physical boundary constraints were applied, whereas the poroelastic FE approach produced high quality estimates of shear modulus and hydraulic conductivity. These results illustrated appropriate shear modulus contrast between tofu samples and yielded a consistent contrast in

  5. Mechanical analysis of UMo/Al dispersion fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Gwan Yoon; Kim, Yeon Soo; Sohn, Dong-Seong

    2015-11-01

    Deformation of fuel particles and mass transfer from the transverse end of fuel meat toward the meat center was observed. This caused plate thickness peaking at a location between the meat edge and the meat center. The underlying mechanism for this fuel volume transport is believed to be fission induced creep of the U-Mo/Al meat. Fuel meat swelling was measured using optical microscopy images of the cross sections of the irradiated test plates. The time-dependent meat swelling was modeled for use in numerical simulation. A distinctive discrepancy between the predicted and measured meat thickness was found at the meat ends, which was assumed to be due to creep-induced mass relocation from the meat end to the meat center region that was not considered in the meat swelling model. ABAQUS FEA simulation was performed to reproduce the observed phenomenon at the meat ends. Through the simulation, we obtained the effective creep rate constants for the interaction layers (IL) and aluminum matrix. In addition, we obtained the corresponding stress and strain analysis results that can be used to understand mechanical behavior of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel.

  6. Biomechanical Analysis of Force Distribution in Human Finger Extensor Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dan; Ren, Lei; Howard, David; Zong, Changfu

    2014-01-01

    The complexities of the function and structure of human fingers have long been recognised. The in vivo forces in the human finger tendon network during different activities are critical information for clinical diagnosis, surgical treatment, prosthetic finger design, and biomimetic hand development. In this study, we propose a novel method for in vivo force estimation for the finger tendon network by combining a three-dimensional motion analysis technique and a novel biomechanical tendon network model. The extensor mechanism of a human index finger is represented by an interconnected tendinous network moving around the phalanx's dorsum. A novel analytical approach based on the “Principle of Minimum Total Potential Energy” is used to calculate the forces and deformations throughout the tendon network of the extensor mechanism when subjected to an external load and with the finger posture defined by measurement data. The predicted deformations and forces in the tendon network are in broad agreement with the results obtained by previous experimental in vitro studies. The proposed methodology provides a promising tool for investigating the biomechanical function of complex interconnected tendon networks in vivo. PMID:25126576

  7. Silk Fiber Mechanics from Multiscale Force Distribution Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cetinkaya, Murat; Xiao, Senbo; Markert, Bernd; Stacklies, Wolfram; Gräter, Frauke

    2011-01-01

    Here we decipher the molecular determinants for the extreme toughness of spider silk fibers. Our bottom-up computational approach incorporates molecular dynamics and finite element simulations. Therefore, the approach allows the analysis of the internal strain distribution and load-carrying motifs in silk fibers on scales of both molecular and continuum mechanics. We thereby dissect the contributions from the nanoscale building blocks, the soft amorphous and the strong crystalline subunits, to silk fiber mechanics. We identify the amorphous subunits not only to give rise to high elasticity, but to also ensure efficient stress homogenization through the friction between entangled chains, which also allows the crystals to withstand stresses as high as 2 GPa in the context of the amorphous matrix. We show that the maximal toughness of silk is achieved at 10–40% crystallinity depending on the distribution of crystals in the fiber. We also determined a serial arrangement of the crystalline and amorphous subunits in lamellae to outperform a random or a parallel arrangement, putting forward what we believe to be a new structural model for silk and other semicrystalline materials. The multiscale approach, not requiring any empirical parameters, is applicable to other partially ordered polymeric systems. Hence, it is an efficient tool for the design of artificial silk fibers. PMID:21354403

  8. Mechanical analysis of conventional and small diameter conical implant abutments

    PubMed Central

    Moris, Izabela Cristina Maurício; Faria, Adriana Cláudia Lapria; de Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of the present study was to evaluate if a smaller morse taper abutment has a negative effect on the fracture resistance of implant-abutment connections under oblique compressive loads compared to a conventional abutment. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty morse taper conventional abutments (4.8 mm diameter) and smaller abutments (3.8 mm diameter) were tightened (20 Ncm) to their respective implants (3.5 × 11 mm) and after a 10 minute interval, implant/abutment assemblies were subjected to static compressive test, performed in a universal test machine with 1 mm/min displacement, at 45° inclination. The maximum deformation force was determined. Data were statistically analyzed by student t test. RESULTS Maximum deformation force of 4.8 mm and 3.8 mm abutments was approximately 95.33 kgf and 95.25 kgf, respectively, but no fractures were noted after mechanical test. Statistical analysis demonstrated that the evaluated abutments were statistically similar (P=.230). CONCLUSION Abutment measuring 3.8 mm in diameter (reduced) presented mechanical properties similar to 4.8 mm (conventional) abutments, enabling its clinical use as indicated. PMID:22977724

  9. Analysis of the Molecular Mechanisms of Reepithelialization in Drosophila Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Matsubayashi, Yutaka; Millard, Tom H.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: The epidermis provides the main barrier function of skin, and therefore its repair following wounding is an essential component of wound healing. Repair of the epidermis, also known as reepithelialization, occurs by collective migration of epithelial cells from around the wound edge across the wound until the advancing edges meet and fuse. Therapeutic manipulation of this process could potentially be used to accelerate wound healing. Recent Advances: It is difficult to analyze the cellular and molecular mechanisms of reepithelialization in human tissue, so a variety of model organisms have been used to improve our understanding of the process. One model system that has been especially useful is the embryo of the fruit fly Drosophila, which provides a simple, accessible model of the epidermis and can be manipulated genetically, allowing detailed analysis of reepithelialization at the molecular level. This review will highlight the key insights that have been gained from studying reepithelialization in Drosophila embryos. Critical Issues: Slow reepithelialization increases the risk of wounds becoming infected and ulcerous; therefore, the development of therapies to accelerate or enhance the process would be a great clinical advance. Improving our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie reepithelialization will help in the development of such therapies. Future Directions: Research in Drosophila embryos has identified a variety of genes and proteins involved in triggering and driving reepithelialization, many of which are conserved in humans. These novel reepithelialization proteins are potential therapeutic targets and therefore findings obtained in Drosophila may ultimately lead to significant clinical advances. PMID:27274434

  10. Biomechanical analysis of force distribution in human finger extensor mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Ren, Lei; Howard, David; Zong, Changfu

    2014-01-01

    The complexities of the function and structure of human fingers have long been recognised. The in vivo forces in the human finger tendon network during different activities are critical information for clinical diagnosis, surgical treatment, prosthetic finger design, and biomimetic hand development. In this study, we propose a novel method for in vivo force estimation for the finger tendon network by combining a three-dimensional motion analysis technique and a novel biomechanical tendon network model. The extensor mechanism of a human index finger is represented by an interconnected tendinous network moving around the phalanx's dorsum. A novel analytical approach based on the "Principle of Minimum Total Potential Energy" is used to calculate the forces and deformations throughout the tendon network of the extensor mechanism when subjected to an external load and with the finger posture defined by measurement data. The predicted deformations and forces in the tendon network are in broad agreement with the results obtained by previous experimental in vitro studies. The proposed methodology provides a promising tool for investigating the biomechanical function of complex interconnected tendon networks in vivo. PMID:25126576

  11. Elucidating Polypharmacological Mechanisms of Polyphenols by Gene Module Profile Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Xiong, Min; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Due to the diverse medicinal effects, polyphenols are among the most intensively studied natural products. However, it is a great challenge to elucidate the polypharmacological mechanisms of polyphenols. To address this challenge, we establish a method for identifying multiple targets of chemical agents through analyzing the module profiles of gene expression upon chemical treatments. By using FABIA algorithm, we have performed a biclustering analysis of gene expression profiles derived from Connectivity Map (cMap), and clustered the profiles into 49 gene modules. This allowed us to define a 49 dimensional binary vector to characterize the gene module profiles, by which we can compare the expression profiles for each pair of chemical agents with Tanimoto coefficient. For the agent pairs with similar gene expression profiles, we can predict the target of one agent from the other. Drug target enrichment analysis indicated that this method is efficient to predict the multiple targets of chemical agents. By using this method, we identify 148 targets for 20 polyphenols derived from cMap. A large part of the targets are validated by experimental observations. The results show that the medicinal effects of polyphenols are far beyond their well-known antioxidant activities. This method is also applicable to dissect the polypharmacology of other natural products. PMID:24968267

  12. Elucidating polypharmacological mechanisms of polyphenols by gene module profile analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Xiong, Min; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Due to the diverse medicinal effects, polyphenols are among the most intensively studied natural products. However, it is a great challenge to elucidate the polypharmacological mechanisms of polyphenols. To address this challenge, we establish a method for identifying multiple targets of chemical agents through analyzing the module profiles of gene expression upon chemical treatments. By using FABIA algorithm, we have performed a biclustering analysis of gene expression profiles derived from Connectivity Map (cMap), and clustered the profiles into 49 gene modules. This allowed us to define a 49 dimensional binary vector to characterize the gene module profiles, by which we can compare the expression profiles for each pair of chemical agents with Tanimoto coefficient. For the agent pairs with similar gene expression profiles, we can predict the target of one agent from the other. Drug target enrichment analysis indicated that this method is efficient to predict the multiple targets of chemical agents. By using this method, we identify 148 targets for 20 polyphenols derived from cMap. A large part of the targets are validated by experimental observations. The results show that the medicinal effects of polyphenols are far beyond their well-known antioxidant activities. This method is also applicable to dissect the polypharmacology of other natural products. PMID:24968267

  13. In silico analysis of the molecular mechanism of postmenopausal osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YANQING; WANG, YUEQIU; YANG, NAILONG; WU, SUNING; LV, YANHUA; XU, LILI

    2015-01-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis (PO) is a common disease in females >50 years of age worldwide and is becoming an increasing burden to society. The present study aimed to assess the molecular mechanism of PO using bioinformatic methods. The gene expression data from patients with PO and normal controls were downloaded from the ArrayExpress database provided by European Bioinformatics Institute. Following the screening of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) using the Limma package in R language, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways enrichment analysis was performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery online tools. Sequentially, modulators of the DEGs, including transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs, were predicted by the ChIP Enrichment Analysis databases and WEB-based GEne SeT AnaLysis Toolkit system, respectively. In addition, the protein-protein interaction network of DEGs was constructed via the search tool for the retrieval of interacting genes and then the functional modules were further analyzed via the cluster-Maker package and The Biological Networks Gene Ontology package within the Cytoscape software. A total of 482 DEGs, including 279 upregulated and 203 downregulated DEGs, were screened out. DEGs were predominantly enriched in the pathways of fatty acid metabolism, cardiac muscle contraction and DNA replication. TFs, including SMAD4, in addition to microRNAs, including the microRNA-125 (miR-125) family, miR-331 and miR-24, may be the modulators of the DEGs in PO. In addition, the five largest modules were identified with TTN, L1G1, ACADM, UQCRC2 and TRIM63 as the hub proteins, and they were associated with the biological processes of muscle contraction, DNA replication initiation, lipid modification, generation of precursor metabolites and energy, and regulation of acetyl-CoA biosynthetic process, respectively. SMAD4, CACNG1 and TRIM63 are suggested to be important factors in the molecular

  14. In silico analysis of the molecular mechanism of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanqing; Wang, Yueqiu; Yang, Nailong; Wu, Suning; Lv, Yanhua; Xu, Lili

    2015-11-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis (PO) is a common disease in females >50 years of age worldwide and is becoming an increasing burden to society. The present study aimed to assess the molecular mechanism of PO using bioinformatic methods. The gene expression data from patients with PO and normal controls were downloaded from the ArrayExpress database provided by European Bioinformatics Institute. Following the screening of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) using the Limma package in R language, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways enrichment analysis was performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery online tools. Sequentially, modulators of the DEGs, including transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs, were predicted by the ChIP Enrichment Analysis databases and WEB‑based GEne SeT AnaLysis Toolkit system, respectively. In addition, the protein‑protein interaction network of DEGs was constructed via the search tool for the retrieval of interacting genes and then the functional modules were further analyzed via the clusterMaker package and The Biological Networks Gene Ontology package within the Cytoscape software. A total of 482 DEGs, including 279 upregulated and 203 downregulated DEGs, were screened out. DEGs were predominantly enriched in the pathways of fatty acid metabolism, cardiac muscle contraction and DNA replication. TFs, including SMAD4, in addition to microRNAs, including the microRNA‑125 (miR‑125) family, miR‑331 and miR‑24, may be the modulators of the DEGs in PO. In addition, the five largest modules were identified with TTN, L1G1, ACADM, UQCRC2 and TRIM63 as the hub proteins, and they were associated with the biological processes of muscle contraction, DNA replication initiation, lipid modification, generation of precursor metabolites and energy, and regulation of acetyl‑CoA biosynthetic process, respectively. SMAD4, CACNG1 and TRIM63 are suggested to be important factors in the

  15. Atom depth analysis delineates mechanisms of protein intermolecular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Alocci, Davide; Bernini, Andrea; Niccolai, Neri

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •3D atom depth analysis is proposed to identify different layers in protein structures. •Amino acid contents for each layers have been analyzed for a large protein dataset. •Charged amino acids in the most external layer are present at very different extents. •Atom depth indexes of K residues reflect their side chains flexibility. •Mobile surface charges can be responsible for long range protein–protein recognition. -- Abstract: The systematic analysis of amino acid distribution, performed inside a large set of resolved protein structures, sheds light on possible mechanisms driving non random protein–protein approaches. Protein Data Bank entries have been selected using as filters a series of restrictions ensuring that the shape of protein surface is not modified by interactions with large or small ligands. 3D atom depth has been evaluated for all the atoms of the 2,410 selected structures. The amino acid relative population in each of the structural layers formed by grouping atoms on the basis of their calculated depths, has been evaluated. We have identified seven structural layers, the inner ones reproducing the core of proteins and the outer one incorporating their most protruding moieties. Quantitative analysis of amino acid contents of structural layers identified, as expected, different behaviors. Atoms of Q, R, K, N, D residues are increasingly more abundant in going from core to surfaces. An opposite trend is observed for V, I, L, A, C, and G. An intermediate behavior is exhibited by P, S, T, M, W, H, F and Y. The outer structural layer hosts predominantly E and K residues whose charged moieties, protruding from outer regions of the protein surface, reorient free from steric hindrances, determining specific electrodynamics maps. This feature may represent a protein signature for long distance effects, driving the formation of encounter complexes and the eventual short distance approaches that are required for protein

  16. Connecting caddisworm silk structure and mechanical properties: combined infrared spectroscopy and mechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Nicholas N; Pan, Huaizhong; Stewart, Russell J

    2016-06-01

    The underwater silk of an aquatic casemaking caddisfly larvae (Hesperophylax occidentalis) is viscoelastic, and displays distinct yield behaviour, large strain cycle hysteresis and near complete recovery of its initial strength and stiffness when unloaded. Yield followed by a stress plateau has been attributed to sequential rupture of serial Ca(2+)-cross-linked phosphoserine (pS) β-domains. Spontaneous recovery has been attributed to refolding of the Ca(2+)/pS domains powered by an elastic network. In this study, native Ca(2+) ions were exchanged with other metal ions, followed by combined mechanical and FTIR analysis to probe the contribution of pS/metal ion complexes to silk mechanical properties. After exchange of Ca(2+) with Na(+), the fibres are soft elastomers and the infrared spectra are consistent with Cv3 symmetry of the -[Formula: see text] groups. Multivalent metal ions decreased the -[Formula: see text] symmetry and the symmetric stretching modes (vs) split in a manner characteristic of ordered phosphate compounds, such as phosphate minerals and lamellar bilayers of phosphatidic acid lipids. Integrated intensities of the vs bands, indicative of the metal ion's effect on transition dipole moment of the P-O bonds, and thereby the strength of the phosphate metal complex, increased in the order: Na(+) < Mg(2+) < Sr(2+) < Ba(2+) < Ca(2+) < Eu(3+) < La(3+) < Zn(2+) < Fe(2+) With a subset of the metal ion series, the initial stiffness and yield stress of metal ion-exchanged fibres increased in the same order: [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] establishing the link between phosphate transition dipole moments and silk fibre strength. PMID:27278649

  17. Connecting caddisworm silk structure and mechanical properties: combined infrared spectroscopy and mechanical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Nicholas N.; Pan, Huaizhong; Stewart, Russell J.

    2016-01-01

    The underwater silk of an aquatic casemaking caddisfly larvae (Hesperophylax occidentalis) is viscoelastic, and displays distinct yield behaviour, large strain cycle hysteresis and near complete recovery of its initial strength and stiffness when unloaded. Yield followed by a stress plateau has been attributed to sequential rupture of serial Ca2+-cross-linked phosphoserine (pS) β-domains. Spontaneous recovery has been attributed to refolding of the Ca2+/pS domains powered by an elastic network. In this study, native Ca2+ ions were exchanged with other metal ions, followed by combined mechanical and FTIR analysis to probe the contribution of pS/metal ion complexes to silk mechanical properties. After exchange of Ca2+ with Na+, the fibres are soft elastomers and the infrared spectra are consistent with Cv3 symmetry of the – groups. Multivalent metal ions decreased the – symmetry and the symmetric stretching modes (vs) split in a manner characteristic of ordered phosphate compounds, such as phosphate minerals and lamellar bilayers of phosphatidic acid lipids. Integrated intensities of the vs bands, indicative of the metal ion's effect on transition dipole moment of the P–O bonds, and thereby the strength of the phosphate metal complex, increased in the order: Na+ < Mg2+ < Sr2+ < Ba2+ < Ca2+ < Eu3+ < La3+ < Zn2+ < Fe2+. With a subset of the metal ion series, the initial stiffness and yield stress of metal ion-exchanged fibres increased in the same order: establishing the link between phosphate transition dipole moments and silk fibre strength. PMID:27278649

  18. Numerical analysis of fume formation mechanism in arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashiro, Shinichi; Zeniya, Tasuku; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Tanaka, Manabu; Nakata, Kazuhiro; Murphy, Anthony B.; Yamamoto, Eri; Yamazaki, Kei; Suzuki, Keiichi

    2010-11-01

    In order to clarify the fume formation mechanism in arc welding, a quantitative investigation based on the knowledge of interaction among the electrode, arc and weld pool is indispensable. A fume formation model consisting of a heterogeneous condensation model, a homogeneous nucleation model and a coagulation model has been developed and coupled with the GTA or GMA welding model. A series of processes from evaporation of metal vapour to fume formation from the metal vapour was totally investigated by employing this simulation model. The aim of this paper is to visualize the fume formation process and clarify the fume formation mechanism theoretically through a numerical analysis. Furthermore, the reliability of the simulation model was also evaluated through a comparison of the simulation result with the experimental result. As a result, it was found that the size of the secondary particles consisting of small particles with a size of several tens of nanometres reached 300 nm at maximum and the secondary particle was in a U-shaped chain form in helium GTA welding. Furthermore, it was also clarified that most part of the fume was produced in the downstream region of the arc originating from the metal vapour evaporated mainly from the droplet in argon GMA welding. The fume was constituted by particles with a size of several tens of nanometres and had similar characteristics to that of GTA welding. On the other hand, if the metal transfer becomes unstable and the metal vapour near the droplet diffuses directly towards the surroundings of the arc not getting into the plasma flow, the size of the particles reaches several hundred nanometres.

  19. Analysis of toughening mechanisms in the Strombus gigas shell.

    PubMed

    DiPette, Scott; Ural, Ani; Santhanam, Sridhar

    2015-08-01

    A finite element analysis of the fracture mechanisms in the Strombus gigas conch shell is presented in this work. The S. gigas shell has a complex microarchitecture that consists of three main macroscopic layers of calcium carbonate: the inner, middle, and outer layers. Each layer is composed of lamellae of calcium carbonate, held together by a cohesive organic protein. As a result of this elaborate architecture, the S. gigas shell exhibits a much greater damage tolerance than the calcium carbonate by itself, with a work of fracture reported to be three magnitudes of order greater. The two main energy dissipating factors that contribute to this are multiple, parallel cracking along first-order interfaces in the inner and outer layers and crack bridging through the second-order interfaces of the middle layer. Finite element analysis was conducted to simulate and replicate flexural strength and work-of-fracture results obtained in the literature for both dry and wet physical bend test specimens. Several parameters were varied including protein strength and fracture toughness, initial protein damage, and the relative heights of macroscopic layers in order to create a model that predicted published, experimental results. The simulations indicate that having some initially weakened protein interfaces is key to matching the parallel cracking in the inner layer of the physical specimens. The wet models exhibit significantly higher work of fracture compared to the dry specimens in large part due to a crack growth resistance behavior in the middle layer, which was successfully modeled. The parametric studies that have been performed on the finite element models provide guidelines for manufacturing the ideal S. gigas-inspired, biomimetic composite. PMID:25955562

  20. Dynamic Analysis of Hammer Mechanism "Twin Hammer" of Impact Wrench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konečný, M.; Slavík, J.

    This paper describes function of the hammer mechanism "Twin hammer" the impact wrench, calculation of dynamic forces exerted on the mechanism and determining the contact pressures between the parts of the mechanism. The modelling of parts was performed in system Pro ENGINEER—standard. The simulation and finding dynamic forces was performed in advanced module Pro ENGINEER—mechanism design and finding contacts pressures in modul Pro ENGENEER—mechanica.

  1. Majorana Demonstrator Bolted Joint Mechanical and Thermal Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Reid, Douglas J.; Fast, James E.

    2012-06-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is designed to probe for neutrinoless double-beta decay, an extremely rare process with a half-life in the order of 1026 years. The experiment uses an ultra-low background, high-purity germanium detector array. The germanium crystals are both the source and the detector in this experiment. Operating these crystals as ionizing radiation detectors requires having them under cryogenic conditions (below 90 K). A liquid nitrogen thermosyphon is used to extract the heat from the detectors. The detector channels are arranged in strings and thermally coupled to the thermosyphon through a cold plate. The cold plate is joined to the thermosyphon by a bolted joint. This circular plate is housed inside the cryostat can. This document provides a detailed study of the bolted joint that connects the cold plate and the thermosyphon. An analysis of the mechanical and thermal properties of this bolted joint is presented. The force applied to the joint is derived from the torque applied to each one of the six bolts that form the joint. The thermal conductivity of the joint is measured as a function of applied force. The required heat conductivity for a successful experiment is the combination of the thermal conductivity of the detector string and this joint. The thermal behavior of the joint is experimentally implemented and analyzed in this study.

  2. Dissection of the Hormetic Curve: Analysis of Components and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lushchak, Volodymyr I.

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between the dose of an effector and the biological response frequently is not described by a linear function and, moreover, in some cases the dose-response relationship may change from positive/adverse to adverse/positive with increasing dose. This complicated relationship is called “hormesis”. This paper provides a short analysis of the concept along with a description of used approaches to characterize hormetic relationships. The whole hormetic curve can be divided into three zones: I – a lag-zone where no changes are observed with increasing dose; II – a zone where beneficial/adverse effects are observed, and III – a zone where the effects are opposite to those seen in zone II. Some approaches are proposed to analyze the molecular components involved in the development of the hormetic character of dose-response relationships with the use of specific genetic lines or inhibitors of regulatory pathways. The discussion is then extended to suggest a new parameter (half-width of the hormetic curve at zone II) for quantitative characterization of the hormetic curve. The problems limiting progress in the development of the hormesis concept such as low reproducibility and predictability may be solved, at least partly, by deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying the hormetic dose-effect relationship. PMID:25249836

  3. Immunosensor with Fluid Control Mechanism for Salivary Cortisol Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Masaki; Matsuda, Yohei; Sasaki, Shohei; Sasaki, Makoto; Kadoma, Yoshihiro; Imai, Yoshikatsu; Niwa, Daisuke; Shetty, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to demonstrate a new design for a cortisol immunosensor for the noninvasive and quantitative analysis of salivary cortisol. We propose a cortisol immunosensor with a fluid control mechanism which has both a vertical flow and a lateral flow. The detected current resulting from a competitive reaction between the sample cortisol and a glucose oxidase (GOD)-labeled cortisol conjugate was found to be inversely related to the concentration of cortisol in the sample solution. A calibration curve using the relative detected current showed an R2 = 0.98 and CV = 14% for a range of standard cortisol solutions corresponding to the concentrations of native salivary cortisol (0.1 – 10 ng/ml). The measurement could be accomplished within 35 minutes and the cortisol immunosensor could be reused. These results show promise for realizing an on-site and easy-to-use biosensor for cortisol. Used for evaluation of human salivary cortisol levels, the cortisol immunosensor measurement corresponded closely with commercially available ELISA method (R2 = 0.92). Our results indicate the promise of the new cortisol immunosensor for noninvasive, point-of care measurement of human salivary cortisol levels. PMID:22939507

  4. Morphological and mechanical analysis of electrospun shape memory polymer fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budun, Sinem; İşgören, Erkan; Erdem, Ramazan; Yüksek, Metin

    2016-09-01

    Shape memory block co-polymer Polyurethane (PU) fibers were fabricated by electrospinning technique. Four different solution concentrations (5 wt.%, 10 wt.%, 15 wt.% and 20 wt.%) were prepared by using Tetrahydrofuran (THF)/N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) (50:50, v/v) as solvents, and three different voltages (30 kV, 35 kV and 38.9 kV) were determined for the electrospinning process. Solution properties were explored in terms of viscosity and electrical conductivity. It was observed that as the polymer concentration increased in the solution, the conductivity declined. Morphological characteristics of the obtained fibers were analyzed through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) measurements. Findings indicated that fiber morphology varied especially with polymer concentration and applied voltage. Obtained fiber diameter ranged from 112 ± 34 nm to 2046 ± 654 nm, respectively. DSC analysis presented that chain orientation of the polymer increased after electrospinning process. Shape fixity and shape recovery calculations were realized. The best shape fixity value (92 ± 4%) was obtained for Y10K30 and the highest shape recovery measurement (130 ± 4%) was belonged to Y15K39. Mechanical properties of the electrospun webs were also investigated in both machine and transverse directions. Tensile and elongation values were also affected from fiber diameter distribution and morphological characteristics of the electrospun webs.

  5. Opto-thermo-mechanical analysis for the FAME Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolsky, Larry; Ambrose, Jay

    2004-01-01

    The Full-Sky Astrometric Mapping Explorer (FAME) instrument was designed to be an extremely accurate star mapper. To map the entire sky, the earth-orbiting FAME satellite rotates about its spin axis every 40 minutes, and uses solar pressure to precess about the spin axis every 40 days. The instrument had two apertures, separated by 84.3 degrees, allowing a star to be imaged twice in one rotation with about a 10 minute delay. This delay enables the elimination of most measurement errors. The light enters an aperture, bounces off of a compound fold flat mirror, (2 ULE fold flats bonded together at an 84.3 degree angle), passes through a Cassegrain telescope, and is imaged by the focal plane. The requirement for the fold flat"s dimensional stability is severe - the variation in the angle between the flats (basic angle) must be held to be held to 10 μarcsec during the 10 minute period between the first and second time a star is imaged. This paper presents a transient opto-thermo-mechanical analysis of the optical system.

  6. Kinetic and Mechanical Analysis of Live Tube Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cheshire, Alan M.; Kerman, Bilal E.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Spector, Alexander A.; Andrew, Deborah J.

    2008-01-01

    Ribbon is a nuclear BTB-domain protein required for morphogenesis of the salivary gland and trachea. We recently showed that ribbon mutants exhibit decreased Crumbs and Rab11-coincident apical vesicles and increased apical Moesin activity and microvillar structure during tube elongation. To learn how these molecular and morphological changes affect the dynamics of tubulogenesis, we optimized an advanced two-photon microscope to enable high-resolution live imaging of the salivary gland and trachea. Live imaging revealed that ribbon mutant tissues exhibit slowed and incomplete lumenal morphogenesis, consistent with previously described apical defects. Since Moesin activity correlates with cortical stiffness, we hypothesize that ribbon mutants suffer from increased apical stiffness during morphogenesis. We develop this hypothesis through mechanical analysis, using the advantages of live imaging to construct computational elastic and analytical viscoelastic models of tube elongation, which suggest that ribbon mutant tubes exhibit three- to five-fold increased apical stiffness and two-fold increased effective apical viscosity. PMID:18816822

  7. Mechanical Analysis of High Power Internally Cooled Annular Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Jiyun; No, Hee Cheon; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2004-05-15

    Annular fuel with internal flow is proposed to allow higher power density in pressurized water reactors. The structural behavior issues arising from the higher flow rate required to cool the fuel are assessed here, including buckling, vibrations, and potential wear problems. Five flow-induced vibration mechanisms are addressed: buckling instability, vortex-induced vibration, acoustic resonance, fluid-elastic instability, and turbulence-induced vibration. The structural behavior of the 17 x 17 traditional solid fuel array is compared with that of two types of annular fuels, a 15 x 15 array, and a 13 x 13 array.It is seen that the annular fuels are superior to the reference fuel in avoiding vibration-induced damage, even at a 50% increase in flow velocity above today's reactors. The higher resistance to vibration is mainly due to their relatively larger cross section area making them more rigid. The 13 x 13 annular fuel shows better structural performance than the 15 x 15 one due to its higher rigidity. Analysis of acoustic resonance of the inner channel cladding with pump blade passing frequencies showed that the acoustic frequencies are within 120% of the pulsation frequency. The annular fuel exhibits reduced impact, sliding, and fretting wear than the solid fuel, even at 150% flow rate of today's reactors.

  8. Spatiotemporal Analysis of Different Mechanisms for Interpreting Morphogen Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Richards, David M.; Saunders, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    During development, multicellular organisms must accurately control both temporal and spatial aspects of tissue patterning. This is often achieved using morphogens, signaling molecules that form spatially varying concentrations and so encode positional information. Typical analysis of morphogens assumes that spatial information is decoded in steady state by measuring the value of the morphogen concentration. However, recent experimental work suggests that both pre-steady-state readout and measurement of spatial and temporal derivatives of the morphogen concentration can play important roles in defining boundaries. Here, we undertake a detailed theoretical and numerical study of the accuracy of patterning—both in space and time—in models where readout is provided not by the morphogen concentration but by its spatial and temporal derivatives. In both cases we find that accurate patterning can be achieved, with sometimes even smaller errors than directly reading the morphogen concentration. We further demonstrate that such models provide other potential benefits to the system, such as the ability to switch on and off gene response with a high degree of spatiotemporal accuracy. Finally, we discuss how such derivatives might be calculated biologically and examine these models in relation to Sonic Hedgehog signaling in the vertebrate central nervous system. We show that, when coupled to a downstream transcriptional network, pre-steady-state measurement of the temporal change in the Shh morphogen is a plausible mechanism for determining precise gene boundaries in both space and time. PMID:25902445

  9. Analysis of barosensitive mechanisms in yeast for Pressure Regulated Fermentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Kazuki; Iwahashi, Hitoshi; Iguchi, Akinori; Shigematsu, Toru

    2013-06-01

    Introduction: We are intending to develop a novel food processing technology, Pressure Regulated Fermentation (PReF), using pressure sensitive (barosensitive) fermentation microorganisms. Objectives of our study are to clarify barosensitive mechanisms for application to PReF technology. We isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae barosensitive mutant a924E1 that was derived from the parent KA31a. Methods: Gene expression levels were analyzed by DNA microarray. The altered genes of expression levels were classified according to the gene function. Mutated genes were estimated by mating and producing diploid strains and confirmed by PCR of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Results and Discussion: Gene expression profiles showed that genes of `Energy' function and that of encoding protein localized in ``Mitochondria'' were significantly down regulated in the mutant. These results suggest the respiratory deficiency and relationship between barosensitivity and respiratory deficiency. Since the respiratory functions of diploids showed non Mendelian inheritance, the respiratory deficiency was indicated to be due to mtDNA mutation. PCR analysis showed that the region of COX1 locus was deleted. COX1 gene encodes the subunit 1 of cytochrome c oxidase. For this reason, barosensitivity is strongly correlated with mitochondrial functions.

  10. Pulmonary mechanics by spectral analysis of forced random noise.

    PubMed Central

    Michaelson, E D; Grassman, E D; Peters, W R

    1975-01-01

    The magnitude (Zrs) and phase angle (thetars) of the total respiratory impedance (Zrs), from 3 to 45 Hz, were rapidly obtained by a modification of the forced oscillation method, in which a random noise pressure wave is imposed on the respiratory system at the mouth and compared to the induced random flow using Fourier and spectral analysis. No significant amplitude or phase errors were introduced by the instrumentation. 10 normals, 5 smokers, and 5 patients with chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) were studied. Measurements of Zrs were corrected for the parallel shunt impedance of the mouth, which was independently measured during a Valsalva maneuver, and from which the mechanical properties of the mouth were derived. There were small differences in Zrs between normals and smokers but both behaved approximately like a second-order system with thetars = 0 degree in the range of 5--9 Hz, and thetars in the range of +40 degrees at 20 Hz and +60 degrees at 40 Hz. In COPD, thetars remained more negative (compared to normals and smokers) at all frequencies and crossed 0 between 15 and 29 Hz. Changes in Zrs, similar in those in COPD, were also observed at low lung volumes in normals. These changes, the effects of a bronchodilator in COPD, and deviations of Zrs from second-order behavior in normals, can best be explained by a two-compartment parallel model, in which time-constant discrepancies between the lung parenchyma and compliant airway keep compliant greater than inertial reactance, resulting in a more negative phase angle as frequency is increased. PMID:1184746

  11. CFD MODELING ANALYSIS OF MECHANICAL DRAFT COOLING TOWER

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Alfred Garrett, A; James02 Bollinger, J; Larry Koffman, L

    2008-03-03

    Industrial processes use mechanical draft cooling towers (MDCT's) to dissipate waste heat by transferring heat from water to air via evaporative cooling, which causes air humidification. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has a MDCT consisting of four independent compartments called cells. Each cell has its own fan to help maximize heat transfer between ambient air and circulated water. The primary objective of the work is to conduct a parametric study for cooling tower performance under different fan speeds and ambient air conditions. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to achieve the objective. The model uses three-dimensional steady-state momentum, continuity equations, air-vapor species balance equation, and two-equation turbulence as the basic governing equations. It was assumed that vapor phase is always transported by the continuous air phase with no slip velocity. In this case, water droplet component was considered as discrete phase for the interfacial heat and mass transfer via Lagrangian approach. Thus, the air-vapor mixture model with discrete water droplet phase is used for the analysis. A series of the modeling calculations was performed to investigate the impact of ambient and operating conditions on the thermal performance of the cooling tower when fans were operating and when they were turned off. The model was benchmarked against the literature data and the SRS test results for key parameters such as air temperature and humidity at the tower exit and water temperature for given ambient conditions. Detailed results will be presented here.

  12. Shaken baby syndrome: a biomechanics analysis of injury mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bandak, Faris A

    2005-06-30

    Traumatic infant shaking has been associated with the shaken baby syndrome (SBS) diagnosis without verification of the operative mechanisms of injury. Intensities for SBS have been expressed only in qualitative, unsubstantiated terms usually referring to acceleration/deceleration rotational injury and relating to falls from great heights onto hard surfaces or from severe motor vehicle crashes. We conducted an injury biomechanics analysis of the reported SBS levels of rotational velocity and acceleration of the head for their injury effects on the infant head-neck. Resulting forces were compared with experimental data on the structural failure limits of the cervical spine in several animal models as well as human neonate cadaver models. We have determined that an infant head subjected to the levels of rotational velocity and acceleration called for in the SBS literature, would experience forces on the infant neck far exceeding the limits for structural failure of the cervical spine. Furthermore, shaking cervical spine injury can occur at much lower levels of head velocity and acceleration than those reported for the SBS. These findings are consistent with the physical laws of injury biomechanics as well as our collective understanding of the fragile infant cervical spine from (1) clinical obstetric experience, (2) automotive medicine and crash safety experience, and (3) common parental experience. The findings are not, however, consistent with the current clinical SBS experience and are in stark contradiction with the reported rarity of cervical spine injury in children diagnosed with SBS. In light of the implications of these findings on child protection and their social and medico-legal significance, a re-evaluation of the current diagnostic criteria for the SBS and its application is suggested. PMID:15885948

  13. Application of symbolic computation to the analysis of mechanical systems, including robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, M. A.; Noble, B.

    1984-01-01

    This paper illustrates the application of symbolic computation in connection with three aspects of mechanical systems: (1) The derivation of dynamical equations by Lagrangian methods; (2) The analysis and synthesis of kinematic mechanisms; and (3) A robot manipulator arm.

  14. Transient thermal-mechanical coupling behavior analysis of mechanical seals during start-up operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, B. C.; Meng, X. K.; Shen, M. X.; Peng, X. D.

    2016-05-01

    A transient thermal-mechanical coupling model for a contacting mechanical seal during start-up has been developed. It takes into consideration the coupling relationship among thermal-mechanical deformation, film thickness, temperature and heat generation. The finite element method and multi-iteration technology are applied to solve the temperature distribution and thermal-mechanical deformation as well as their evolution behavior. Results show that the seal gap transforms from negative coning to positive coning and the contact area of the mechanical seal gradually decreases during start-up. The location of the maximum temperature and maximum contact pressure move from the outer diameter to inside diameter. The heat generation and the friction torque increase sharply at first and then decrease. Meanwhile, the contact force decreases and the fluid film force and leakage rate increase.

  15. Understanding the mechanism(s) of mosaic trisomy 21 by using DNA polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Pangalos, C; Avramopoulos, D; Blouin, J L; Raoul, O; deBlois, M C; Prieur, M; Schinzel, A A; Gika, M; Abazis, D; Antonarakis, S E

    1994-03-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism(s) underlying mosaicism for trisomy 21, we genotyped 17 families with mosaic trisomy 21 probands, using 28 PCR-detectable DNA polymorphic markers that map in the pericentromeric region and long arm of chromosome 21. The percentage of cells with trisomy 21 in the probands' blood lymphocytes was 6%-94%. There were two classes of autoradiographic results: In class I, a "third allele" of lower intensity was detected in the proband's DNA for at least two chromosome 21 markers. The interpretation of this result was that the proband had inherited three chromosomes 21 after meiotic nondisjunction (NDJ) (trisomy 21 zygote) and subsequently lost one because of mitotic (somatic) error, the lost chromosome 21 being that with the lowest-intensity polymorphic allele. The parental origin and the meiotic stage of NDJ could also be determined. In class II, a "third allele" was never detected. In these cases, the mosaicism probably occurred either by a postzygotic, mitotic error in a normal zygote that followed a normal meiosis (class IIA mechanism); by premeiotic, mitotic NDJ yielding an aneusomic zygote after meiosis, and subsequent mitotic loss (class IIB mechanism); or by a meiosis II error with lack of crossover in the preceding meiosis I, followed by mitotic loss after fertilization (class IIC mechanism). Among class II mechanisms, the most likely is mechanism IIA, while IIC is the least likely. There were 10 cases of class I and 7 cases of class II results.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8116616

  16. Reinforcement Mechanism Of Polyurethane-Urea/Clay Nanocomposites Probed By Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy And Dynamic Mechanical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, S. K.; Patri, M.; Sudarshan, K.; Pujari, P. K.; Khakhar, D. V.

    2010-12-01

    A basis for quantitative analysis of the reinforcement mechanism of polyurethane-urea/clay nanocomposites using two characterization methods, positron annihilation life time spectroscopy (PALS) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) is provided. DMA was used to measure the constrained volume fraction of amorphous soft segments induced by nanoclay and the storage modulus of the nanocomposites. The interfacial interactions in the nanocomposites were investigated by PALS. The modulus enhancement of the organoclay nanocomposites was found to have a good correlation with the volume fraction of the constrained region and the interfacial interactions.

  17. Analysis of fouling mechanisms in anaerobic membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Charfi, Amine; Ben Amar, Nihel; Harmand, Jérôme

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, we investigate the fouling mechanisms responsible for MF and UF membrane flux decline in Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactors (AnMBR). We have used the fouling mechanism models proposed by Hermia (1982), namely pore constriction, cake formation, complete blocking and intermediate blocking. Based on an optimization approach and using experimental data extracted from the literature, we propose a systematic procedure for identifying the most likely fouling mechanism in play. Short-term as well as long-term experiments are considered and discussed. It was found that short-term experiments are usually characterized by two fouling phases during which the same fouling mechanism or two different mechanisms affect the process. In contrast, in long-term experiments involving cleaning cycles, membrane fouling appears to be better ascribed to one phase only. The impact of abiotic parameters on membrane fouling mechanisms is reviewed and discussed in the light of these results. Finally, it is shown that the mechanism most responsible for membrane fouling in an AnMBR is cake formation. This main result will be useful for the future development of simple integrated models for optimization and control. PMID:22397816

  18. Spartan Release Engagement Mechanism (REM) stress and fracture analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlowe, D. S.; West, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    The revised stress and fracture analysis of the Spartan REM hardware for current load conditions and mass properties is presented. The stress analysis was performed using a NASTRAN math model of the Spartan REM adapter, base, and payload. Appendix A contains the material properties, loads, and stress analysis of the hardware. The computer output and model description are in Appendix B. Factors of safety used in the stress analysis were 1.4 on tested items and 2.0 on all other items. Fracture analysis of the items considered fracture critical was accomplished using the MSFC Crack Growth Analysis code. Loads and stresses were obtaind from the stress analysis. The fracture analysis notes are located in Appendix A and the computer output in Appendix B. All items analyzed met design and fracture criteria.

  19. Security Analysis of Yeh-Tsai Security Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yum, Dae Hyun; Shin, Jong Hoon; Lee, Pil Joong

    Yeh and Tsai recently proposed an enhanced mobile commerce security mechanism. They modified the lightweight security mechanism due to Lam, Chung, Gu, and Sun to relieve the burden of mobile clients. However, this article shows that a malicious WAP gateway can successfully obtain the mobile client's PIN by sending a fake public key of a mobile commerce server and exploiting information leakage caused by addition operation. We also present a countermeasure against the proposed attack.

  20. Understanding the mechanism(s) of mosaic trisomy 21 by using DNA polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Pangalos, C.; Avramopoulos, D.; Blouin, J. L.; Raoul, O.; deBlois, M. C.; Prieur, M.; Schinzel, A. A.; Gika, M.; Abazis, D.; Antonarakis, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism(s) underlying mosaicism for trisomy 21, we genotyped 17 families with mosaic trisomy 21 probands, using 28 PCR-detectable DNA polymorphic markers that map in the pericentromeric region and long arm of chromosome 21. The percentage of cells with trisomy 21 in the probands' blood lymphocytes was 6%-94%. There were two classes of autoradiographic results: In class I, a "third allele" of lower intensity was detected in the proband's DNA for at least two chromosome 21 markers. The interpretation of this result was that the proband had inherited three chromosomes 21 after meiotic nondisjunction (NDJ) (trisomy 21 zygote) and subsequently lost one because of mitotic (somatic) error, the lost chromosome 21 being that with the lowest-intensity polymorphic allele. The parental origin and the meiotic stage of NDJ could also be determined. In class II, a "third allele" was never detected. In these cases, the mosaicism probably occurred either by a postzygotic, mitotic error in a normal zygote that followed a normal meiosis (class IIA mechanism); by premeiotic, mitotic NDJ yielding an aneusomic zygote after meiosis, and subsequent mitotic loss (class IIB mechanism); or by a meiosis II error with lack of crossover in the preceding meiosis I, followed by mitotic loss after fertilization (class IIC mechanism). Among class II mechanisms, the most likely is mechanism IIA, while IIC is the least likely. There were 10 cases of class I and 7 cases of class II results.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 PMID:8116616

  1. Understanding the mechanism(s) of mosaic trisomy 21 by using DNA polymorphism analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pangalos, C.; Abazis, D.; Avramopoulos, D.; Blouin, J.L.; Antonaraksi, S.E. ); Raoul, O.; deBlois, M.C.; Prieur, M. ); Schinzel, A.A.

    1994-03-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism(s) underlying mosaicism for trisomy 21, the authors genotyped 17 families with mosaic trisomy 21 probands, using 28 PCR-detectable DNA polymorphic markers that map in the pericentromeric region and long arm of chromosome 21. The percentage of cells with trisomy 21 in the probands' blood lymphocytes was 6%-94%. There were two classes of autoradiographic results: In class I, a third allele' of lower intensity was detected in the proband's DNA for at least two chromosome 21 markers. The interpretation of this result was that the proband had inherited three chromosomes 21 after meiotic nondisjunction (NDJ) (trisomy 21 zygote) and subsequently lost one because of mitotic (somatic) error, the lost chromosome 21 being that with the lowest-intensity polymorphic allele. The parental origin and the meiotic stage of NDJ could also be determined. In class II, a third allele' was never detected. In these cases, the mosaicism probably occurred either by a postzygotic, mitotic error in anormal zygote that followed a normal meiosis (class IIA mechanism); by premeiotic, mitotic NDJ yielding an aneusomic zygote after meiosis, and subsequent mitotic loss (class IIB mechanism); or by a meiosis II error with lack of crossover in the preceding meiosis I, followed by mitotic loss after fertilization (class IIC mechanism). Among class II mechanisms, the most likely is mechanism IIA, while IIC is the least likely. There were 10 cases of class I and 7 cases of class II results. Within class I, there were nine cases with maternal meitoic errors (six meiosis I and three meiosis II errors, on the basis of pericentromeric markers) and one with paternal meiosis I error. The postzygotic loss of chromosome 21 was determined in eight maternal class I cases, and it was maternally derived in five cases and paternally derived in three; this suggests that the postzygotic loss of chromosome 21 is probably random. 28 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis of hypromellose 2910 free films.

    PubMed

    Cespi, Marco; Bonacucina, Giulia; Mencarelli, Giovanna; Casettari, Luca; Palmieri, Giovanni Filippo

    2011-10-01

    It is common practice to coat oral solid dosage forms with polymeric materials for controlled release purposes or for practical and aesthetic reasons. Good knowledge of thermo-mechanical film properties or their variation as a function of polymer grade, type and amount of additives or preparation method is of prime importance in developing solid dosage forms. This work focused on the dynamic mechanical thermal characteristics of free films of hypromellose 2910 (also known as HPMC), prepared using three grades of this polymer from two different manufacturers, in order to assess whether polymer chain length or origin affects the mechanical or thermo-mechanical properties of the final films. Hypromellose free films were obtained by casting their aqueous solutions prepared at a specific concentrations in order to obtain the same viscosity for each. The films were stored at room temperature until dried and then examined using a dynamic mechanical analyser. The results of the frequency scans showed no significant differences in the mechanical moduli E' and E″ of the different samples when analysed at room temperature; however, the grade of the polymer affected material transitions during the heating process. Glass transition temperature, apparent activation energy and fragility parameters depended on polymer chain length, while the material brand showed little impact on film performance. PMID:21645616

  3. Analysis of Internal Crack Healing Mechanism under Rolling Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Haitao; Ai, Zhengrong; Yu, Hailiang; Wu, Hongyan; Liu, Xianghua

    2014-01-01

    A new experimental method, called the ‘hole filling method’, is proposed to simulate the healing of internal cracks in rolled workpieces. Based on the experimental results, the evolution in the microstructure, in terms of diffusion, nucleation and recrystallisation were used to analyze the crack healing mechanism. We also validated the phenomenon of segmented healing. Internal crack healing involves plastic deformation, heat transfer and an increase in the free energy introduced by the cracks. It is proposed that internal cracks heal better under high plastic deformation followed by slow cooling after rolling. Crack healing is controlled by diffusion of atoms from the matrix to the crack surface, and also by the nucleation and growth of ferrite grain on the crack surface. The diffusion mechanism is used to explain the source of material needed for crack healing. The recrystallisation mechanism is used to explain grain nucleation and growth, accompanied by atomic migration to the crack surface. PMID:25003518

  4. Analysis of internal crack healing mechanism under rolling deformation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haitao; Ai, Zhengrong; Yu, Hailiang; Wu, Hongyan; Liu, Xianghua

    2014-01-01

    A new experimental method, called the 'hole filling method', is proposed to simulate the healing of internal cracks in rolled workpieces. Based on the experimental results, the evolution in the microstructure, in terms of diffusion, nucleation and recrystallisation were used to analyze the crack healing mechanism. We also validated the phenomenon of segmented healing. Internal crack healing involves plastic deformation, heat transfer and an increase in the free energy introduced by the cracks. It is proposed that internal cracks heal better under high plastic deformation followed by slow cooling after rolling. Crack healing is controlled by diffusion of atoms from the matrix to the crack surface, and also by the nucleation and growth of ferrite grain on the crack surface. The diffusion mechanism is used to explain the source of material needed for crack healing. The recrystallisation mechanism is used to explain grain nucleation and growth, accompanied by atomic migration to the crack surface. PMID:25003518

  5. Characterization of Esophageal Physiology Using Mechanical State Analysis.

    PubMed

    Leibbrandt, Richard E; Dinning, Phil G; Costa, Marcello; Cock, Charles; Wiklendt, Lukasz; Wang, Guangsong; Tack, Jan; van Beckevoort, Dirk; Rommel, Nathalie; Omari, Taher I

    2016-01-01

    The esophagus functions to transport swallowed fluids and food from the pharynx to the stomach. The esophageal muscles governing bolus transport comprise circular striated muscle of the proximal esophagus and circular smooth muscle of the distal esophagus. Longitudinal smooth muscle contraction provides a mechanical advantage to bolus transit during circular smooth muscle contraction. Esophageal striated muscle is directly controlled by neural circuits originating in the central nervous system, resulting in coordinated contractions. In contrast, the esophageal smooth muscle is controlled by enteric circuits modulated by extrinsic central neural connections resulting in neural relaxation and contraction. The esophageal muscles are modulated by sensory information arising from within the lumen. Contraction or relaxation, which changes the diameter of the lumen, alters the intraluminal pressure and ultimately inhibits or promotes flow of content. This relationship that exists between the changes in diameter and concurrent changes in intraluminal pressure has been used previously to identify the "mechanical states" of the circular muscle; that is when the muscles are passively or actively, relaxing or contracting. Detecting these changes in the mechanical state of the muscle has been difficult and as the current interpretation of esophageal motility is based largely upon pressure measurement (manometry), subtle changes in the muscle function during peristalsis can be missed. We hypothesized that quantification of mechanical states of the esophageal circular muscles and the pressure-diameter properties that define them, would allow objective characterization of the mechanisms that govern esophageal peristalsis. To achieve this we analyzed barium swallows captured by simultaneous videofluoroscopy and pressure with impedance recording. From these data we demonstrated that intraluminal impedance measurements could be used to determine changes in the internal diameter of

  6. Characterization of Esophageal Physiology Using Mechanical State Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leibbrandt, Richard E.; Dinning, Phil G.; Costa, Marcello; Cock, Charles; Wiklendt, Lukasz; Wang, Guangsong; Tack, Jan; van Beckevoort, Dirk; Rommel, Nathalie; Omari, Taher I.

    2016-01-01

    The esophagus functions to transport swallowed fluids and food from the pharynx to the stomach. The esophageal muscles governing bolus transport comprise circular striated muscle of the proximal esophagus and circular smooth muscle of the distal esophagus. Longitudinal smooth muscle contraction provides a mechanical advantage to bolus transit during circular smooth muscle contraction. Esophageal striated muscle is directly controlled by neural circuits originating in the central nervous system, resulting in coordinated contractions. In contrast, the esophageal smooth muscle is controlled by enteric circuits modulated by extrinsic central neural connections resulting in neural relaxation and contraction. The esophageal muscles are modulated by sensory information arising from within the lumen. Contraction or relaxation, which changes the diameter of the lumen, alters the intraluminal pressure and ultimately inhibits or promotes flow of content. This relationship that exists between the changes in diameter and concurrent changes in intraluminal pressure has been used previously to identify the “mechanical states” of the circular muscle; that is when the muscles are passively or actively, relaxing or contracting. Detecting these changes in the mechanical state of the muscle has been difficult and as the current interpretation of esophageal motility is based largely upon pressure measurement (manometry), subtle changes in the muscle function during peristalsis can be missed. We hypothesized that quantification of mechanical states of the esophageal circular muscles and the pressure-diameter properties that define them, would allow objective characterization of the mechanisms that govern esophageal peristalsis. To achieve this we analyzed barium swallows captured by simultaneous videofluoroscopy and pressure with impedance recording. From these data we demonstrated that intraluminal impedance measurements could be used to determine changes in the internal diameter

  7. Cantilever arrays for multiplexed mechanical analysis of biomolecular reactions.

    PubMed

    Yue, Min; Stachowiak, Jeanne C; Majumdar, Arunava

    2004-09-01

    Microchips containing arrays of cantilever beams have been used to mechanically detect and quantitatively analyze multiple reactions of DNA hybridization and antigen-antibody binding simultaneously. The reaction-induced deflection of a cantilever beam reflects the interplay between strain energy increase of the beam and the free energy reduction of a reaction, providing an ideal tool for investigating the connection between mechanics and chemistry of biomolecular reactions. Since free energy reduction is common for all reactions, the cantilever array forms a universal platform for label-free detection of various specific biomolecular reactions. A few such reactions and their implications in biology and biotechnology are discussed. PMID:16783934

  8. Progress of Stirling cycle analysis and loss mechanism characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, R. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An assessment of Stirling engine thermodynamic modeling and design codes shows a general deficiency; this deficiency is due to poor understanding of the fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena that occur in the oscillating flow and pressure level environment within the engines. Stirling engine thermodynamic loss mechanisms are listed. Several experimental and computational research efforts now underway to characterize various loss mechanisms are reviewed. The need for additional experimental rigs and rig upgrades is discussed. Recent developments and current efforts in Stirling engine thermodynamic modeling are also reviewed.

  9. Agricultural/Industrial Mechanical Technician. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for agricultural/industrial mechanical technician occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits),…

  10. Women's Eating Problems: An Analysis of a Coping Mechanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooker, Dawn; Convisser, Ellen

    1983-01-01

    Discusses clinical observations of women (N=100) with eating problems, focusing on emotional issues as well as how these women use food as a coping mechanism. Reported that therapy helped these women shed anxiety and fear about food and to see eating as something they consciously choose to do. (LLL)

  11. The Wayside Mechanic: An Analysis of Skill Acquisition in Ghana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Stephen Douglas

    This study describes and analyzes the nature of skill acquisition process in one indigenous, informal training system--the apprenticeship of the wayside mechanics workshops in Koforidua, Ghana. Chapter 2 places apprenticeships training in the wider context of artisanship and training. It traces the history of the West African craft shop and its…

  12. An Analysis of Knowledge Management Mechanisms in Healthcare Portals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chei Sian; Goh, Dion Hoe-Lian; Chua, Alton Y. K.

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare portals are becoming increasingly popular with Internet users since they play an important role in supporting interaction between individuals and healthcare organizations with a Web presence. Additionally, many of these organizations make use of knowledge management mechanisms on their healthcare portals to manage the abundance of…

  13. The distinct element analysis of toppling failure mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özge Dinç, Şaziye; Sinan Işık, Nihat; Karaca, Zeki

    2016-04-01

    This project investigates the toppling failure mechanisms of rock masses having different rock materials and discontinuity properties in slopes that are designed in different heights. For this purpose, PFC2D as a distinct element code was used to anticipate the post failure behaviors of rock masses. After the simulation of laboratory tests on the samples in 2 (width) *4 (height) m, macro mechanical properties of rock masses were determined to be assigned the slopes. The properties of discontinuities were set up based on the smooth-joint method in PFC. The movements in the slopes -equipped with persistent and non-persistent discontinuities- were analyzed by using gravity increase method. The results show that the post failure behaviors of all rock samples have been controlled primarily by joint location and joint length. In addition to this, an increase on the slope height has an influence on the failure mechanism such that triggers the materials to transit from the toppling to circular yielding manner in some models. It has been also worth note that all models begin to fail as soon as the wing cracks develop by tension stresses, thus the tensile strength of the relevant rock material is the most critical mechanic parameter on the failure.

  14. Mechanical analysis of a heat-shock induced developmental defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Sarah M.; McCleery, W. Tyler; Hutson, M. Shane

    2014-03-01

    Embryonic development in Drosophila is a complex process involving coordinated movements of mechanically interacting tissues. Perturbing this system with a transient heat shock can result in a number of developmental defects. In particular, a heat shock applied during the earliest morphogenetic movements of gastrulation can lead to apparent recovery, but then subsequent morphogenetic failure 5-6 hours later during germ band retraction. The process of germ band retraction requires an intact amnioserosa - a single layered extra-embryonic epithelial tissue - and heat shock at gastrulation can induce the later opening of holes in the amnioserosa. These holes are highly correlated with failures of germ band retraction. These holes could be caused by a combination of mechanical weakness in the amnioserosa or local increases in mechanical stress. Here, we assess the role of mechanical stress using confocal imaging to compare cell and tissue morphology in the amnioserosa of normal and heat-shocked embryos and laser hole drilling to map the stress field around the times and locations at which heat-shock induced holes open.

  15. Comprehensive mechanisms for combustion chemistry: Experiment, modeling, and sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dryer, F.L.; Yetter, R.A.

    1993-12-01

    This research program is an integrated experimental/numerical effort to study pyrolysis and oxidation reactions and mechanisms for small-molecule hydrocarbon structures under conditions representative of combustion environments. The experimental aspects of the work are conducted in large diameter flow reactors, at pressures from one to twenty atmospheres, temperatures from 550 K to 1200 K, and with observed reaction times from 10{sup {minus}2} to 5 seconds. Gas sampling of stable reactant, intermediate, and product species concentrations provides not only substantial definition of the phenomenology of reaction mechanisms, but a significantly constrained set of kinetic information with negligible diffusive coupling. Analytical techniques used for detecting hydrocarbons and carbon oxides include gas chromatography (GC), and gas infrared (NDIR) and FTIR methods are utilized for continuous on-line sample detection of light absorption measurements of OH have also been performed in an atmospheric pressure flow reactor (APFR), and a variable pressure flow (VPFR) reactor is presently being instrumented to perform optical measurements of radicals and highly reactive molecular intermediates. The numerical aspects of the work utilize zero and one-dimensional pre-mixed, detailed kinetic studies, including path, elemental gradient sensitivity, and feature sensitivity analyses. The program emphasizes the use of hierarchical mechanistic construction to understand and develop detailed kinetic mechanisms. Numerical studies are utilized for guiding experimental parameter selections, for interpreting observations, for extending the predictive range of mechanism constructs, and to study the effects of diffusive transport coupling on reaction behavior in flames. Modeling using well defined and validated mechanisms for the CO/H{sub 2}/oxidant systems.

  16. Failure Analysis and Mechanisms of Failure of Fibrous Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K. (Compiler); Shuart, M. J. (Compiler); Starnes, J. H., Jr. (Compiler); Williams, J. G. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    The state of the art of failure analysis and current design practices, especially as applied to the use of fibrous composite materials in aircraft structures is discussed. Deficiencies in these technologies are identified, as are directions for future research.

  17. An analysis of B cell selection mechanisms in germinal centers.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Hermann, Michael E; Maini, Philip K; Iber, Dagmar

    2006-09-01

    Affinity maturation of antibodies during immune responses is achieved by multiple rounds of somatic hypermutation and subsequent preferential selection of those B cells that express B cell receptors with improved binding characteristics for the antigen. The mechanism underlying B cell selection has not yet been defined. By employing an agent-based model, we show that for physiologically reasonable parameter values affinity maturation can be driven by competition for neither binding sites nor antigen--even in the presence of competing secreted antibodies. Within the tested mechanisms, only clonal competition for T cell help or a refractory time for the interaction of centrocytes with follicular dendritic cells is found to enable affinity maturation while generating the experimentally observed germinal centre characteristics and tolerating large variations in the initial antigen density. PMID:16707510

  18. Mechanical analysis of Drosophila indirect flight and jump muscles

    PubMed Central

    Swank, Douglas M.

    2011-01-01

    The genetic advantages of Drosophila make it a very appealing choice for investigating muscle development, muscle physiology and muscle protein structure and function. To take full advantage of this model organism, it has been vital to develop isolated Drosophila muscle preparations that can be mechanically evaluated. We describe techniques to isolate, prepare and mechanically analyze skinned muscle fibers from two Drosophila muscle types, the indirect flight muscle and the jump muscle. The function of the indirect flight muscle is similar to vertebrate cardiac muscle, to generate power in an oscillatory manner. The indirect flight muscle is ideal for evaluating the influence of protein mutations on muscle and cross-bridge stiffness, oscillatory power, and deriving cross-bridge rate constants. Jump muscle physiology and structure are more similar to skeletal vertebrate muscle than indirect flight muscle, and it is ideal for measuring maximum shortening velocity, force-velocity characteristics and steady-state power generation. PMID:22079350

  19. Mechanical analysis of Drosophila indirect flight and jump muscles.

    PubMed

    Swank, Douglas M

    2012-01-01

    The genetic advantages of Drosophila make it a very appealing choice for investigating muscle development, muscle physiology and muscle protein structure and function. To take full advantage of this model organism, it has been vital to develop isolated Drosophila muscle preparations that can be mechanically evaluated. We describe techniques to isolate, prepare and mechanically analyze skinned muscle fibers from two Drosophila muscle types, the indirect flight muscle and the jump muscle. The function of the indirect flight muscle is similar to vertebrate cardiac muscle, to generate power in an oscillatory manner. The indirect flight muscle is ideal for evaluating the influence of protein mutations on muscle and cross-bridge stiffness, oscillatory power, and deriving cross-bridge rate constants. Jump muscle physiology and structure are more similar to skeletal vertebrate muscle than indirect flight muscle, and it is ideal for measuring maximum shortening velocity, force-velocity characteristics and steady-state power generation. PMID:22079350

  20. Numerical analysis of biosonar beamforming mechanisms and strategies in bats.

    PubMed

    Müller, Rolf

    2010-09-01

    Beamforming is critical to the function of most sonar systems. The conspicuous noseleaf and pinna shapes in bats suggest that beamforming mechanisms based on diffraction of the outgoing and incoming ultrasonic waves play a major role in bat biosonar. Numerical methods can be used to investigate the relationships between baffle geometry, acoustic mechanisms, and resulting beampatterns. Key advantages of numerical approaches are: efficient, high-resolution estimation of beampatterns, spatially dense predictions of near-field amplitudes, and the malleability of the underlying shape representations. A numerical approach that combines near-field predictions based on a finite-element formulation for harmonic solutions to the Helmholtz equation with a free-field projection based on the Kirchhoff integral to obtain estimates of the far-field beampattern is reviewed. This method has been used to predict physical beamforming mechanisms such as frequency-dependent beamforming with half-open resonance cavities in the noseleaf of horseshoe bats and beam narrowing through extension of the pinna aperture with skin folds in false vampire bats. The fine structure of biosonar beampatterns is discussed for the case of the Chinese noctule and methods for assessing the spatial information conveyed by beampatterns are demonstrated for the brown long-eared bat. PMID:20815475

  1. Operation analysis of a Chebyshev-Pantograph leg mechanism for a single DOF biped robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Conghui; Ceccarelli, Marco; Takeda, Yukio

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, operation analysis of a Chebyshev-Pantograph leg mechanism is presented for a single degree of freedom (DOF) biped robot. The proposed leg mechanism is composed of a Chebyshev four-bar linkage and a pantograph mechanism. In contrast to general fully actuated anthropomorphic leg mechanisms, the proposed leg mechanism has peculiar features like compactness, low-cost, and easy-operation. Kinematic equations of the proposed leg mechanism are formulated for a computer oriented simulation. Simulation results show the operation performance of the proposed leg mechanism with suitable characteristics. A parametric study has been carried out to evaluate the operation performance as function of design parameters. A prototype of a single DOF biped robot equipped with two proposed leg mechanisms has been built at LARM (Laboratory of Robotics and Mechatronics). Experimental test shows practical feasible walking ability of the prototype, as well as drawbacks are discussed for the mechanical design.

  2. Nano Scale Mechanical Analysis of Biomaterials Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Diganta

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a probe-based microscope that uses nanoscale and structural imaging where high resolution is desired. AFM has also been used in mechanical, electrical, and thermal engineering applications. This unique technique provides vital local material properties like the modulus of elasticity, hardness, surface potential, Hamaker constant, and the surface charge density from force versus displacement curve. Therefore, AFM was used to measure both the diameter and mechanical properties of the collagen nanostraws in human costal cartilage. Human costal cartilage forms a bridge between the sternum and bony ribs. The chest wall of some humans is deformed due to defective costal cartilage. However, costal cartilage is less studied compared to load bearing cartilage. Results show that there is a difference between chemical fixation and non-chemical fixation treatments. Our findings imply that the patients' chest wall is mechanically weak and protein deposition is abnormal. This may impact the nanostraws' ability to facilitate fluid flow between the ribs and the sternum. At present, AFM is the only tool for imaging cells' ultra-structure at the nanometer scale because cells are not homogeneous. The first layer of the cell is called the cell membrane, and the layer under it is made of the cytoskeleton. Cancerous cells are different from normal cells in term of cell growth, mechanical properties, and ultra-structure. Here, force is measured with very high sensitivity and this is accomplished with highly sensitive probes such as a nano-probe. We performed experiments to determine ultra-structural differences that emerge when such cancerous cells are subject to treatments such as with drugs and electric pulses. Jurkat cells are cancerous cells. These cells were pulsed at different conditions. Pulsed and non-pulsed Jurkat cell ultra-structures were investigated at the nano meter scale using AFM. Jurkat cell mechanical properties were measured under

  3. Analysis of Mechanical Failure of Polymer Microneedles by Axial Force

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung-Hwan; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    A polymeric microneedle has been developed for drug delivery applications. The ultimate goal of the polymeric microneedle is insertion into the specified region without failure for effective transdermal drug delivery. Mechanical failure of various geometries of microneedles by axial load was modeled using the Euler formula and the Johnson formula to predict the failure force of tapered-column microneedles. These formulas were compared with measured data to identify the mechanical behavior of microneedles by determining the critical factors including the actual length and end-fixed factor. The comparison of the two formulas with the data showed good agreement at the end-fixity (K) of 0.7. This value means that a microneedle column has one fixed end and one pinned end, and that part of the microneedle was overloaded by axial load. When the aspect ratio of length to equivalent diameter is 12:1 at 3 GPa of Young’s modulus, there is a transition from the Euler region to the Johnson region by the decreased length and increased base diameter of the microneedle. A polymer having less than 3 GPa of stiffness would follow the Euler formula. A 12:1 aspect ratio of length to equivalent diameter of the microneedle was the mechanical indicator determining the failure mode between elastic buckling and inelastic buckling at less than 3 GPa of Young’s modulus of polymer. Microneedles with below a 12:1 aspect ratio of length-to-equivalent diameter and more than 3 GPa of Young’s were recommended for reducing sudden failure by buckling and for successfully inserting the microneedle into the skin. PMID:21218133

  4. Transcriptional profiling and biochemical analysis of mechanically induced cartilaginous tissues

    PubMed Central

    Salisbury Palomares, Kristy T.; Gerstenfeld, Louis C.; Wigner, Nathan A.; Lenburg, Marc E.; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Morgan, Elise F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective In order to characterize patterns of molecular expression that lead to cartilage formation in vivo in a post-natal setting, mRNA expression profiling was carried out across the timecourse of mechanically induced chondrogenesis. Methods Retired breeder Sprague-Dawley rats underwent production of a non-critical-size, transverse femoral osteotomy. Experimental animals (n=45) were subjected to bending stimulation (60° cyclic motion in the sagittal plane for 15 minutes/day) of the osteotomy gap beginning on post-operative day (POD) 10. Control animals (n=32) experienced continuous rigid fixation. mRNA isolated on POD 10, 17, 24, and 38 was analyzed using a microarray containing 608 genes involved in skeletal development, tissue differentiation, fracture healing, and mechanotransduction. The glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of the stimulated tissues was compared to native articular cartilage as a means of assessing the progression of chondrogenic development of the tissues. Results The majority of the 100 genes that were differentially expressed were upregulated in response to mechanical stimulation. Many of these genes are associated with articular cartilage development and maintenance, diarthroidal joint development, cell adhesion, extracellular matrix synthesis, signal transduction, and skeletal development. Quantitative real-time PCR results were consistent with the microarray findings. The GAG content of the stimulated tissues increased over time and was no different from that of articular cartilage at POD 38. Conclusions The mechanical stimulation caused upregulation of genes principally involved in joint cavity morphogenesis and critical to articular cartilage function. Further study of this type of stimulation may identify key signaling events required for post-natal, hyaline cartilage formation. PMID:20131271

  5. Analysis of beam loss mechanism in the Project X linac

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, J.-P.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Minimization of the beam losses in a multi-MW H{sup -} linac such as ProjectX to a level below 1 W/m is a challenging task. The impact of different mechanism of beam stripping, including stripping in electric and magnetic fields, residual gas, blackbody radiation and intra-beam stripping, is analyzed. Other sources of beam losses are misalignements of beamline elements and errors in RF fields and phases. We present in this paper requirements for dynamic errors and correction schemes to keep beam losses under control.

  6. Analysis of Jovian decametric data: Study of radio emission mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, D. H.; Arias, T. A.; Garnavich, P. M.; Rosenkranz, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    The Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 Planetary Radio Astronomy Experiments (PRA) have produced the finest set of Jovian decametric radio emission data ever obtained. Jovian decametric L-burst and S-burst arcs were characterized and the data reconciled with models for the radio emission geometry and mechanisms. The first major results involve comparisons of the distribution of arc separations with longitudes. The identification and analyses of systematic variations in the PRA data have yielded interesting results, but only the most obvious features of the data were examined. Analyses of the PRA data were extended with the use of new 6-Sec formats that are more sensitive to the S-bursts.

  7. ESTABLISHMENT OF A COMMUNITY MODELING AND ANALYSIS SUPPORT MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the fall of 2001, a Cooperative Research Agreement between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and MCNC began a Community Modeling and Analysis System (CMAS) center. The CMAS will foster development, distribution, and use of the Models-3/CMAQ (Community Multiscale ...

  8. Analysis, scientific computing and fundamental studies in fluid mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, H.B.; Saffman, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    Progress is reported on work in the following areas: vortex dynamics and turbulence, fingers and bubbles in Hele-Shaw cells and unbounded fluid, vortex reconnection, pattern selection in solidifying systems, Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, Wavy-Taylor vortex flows, high reynolds number laminar flows, and lastly numerical analysis and dynamical systems. (GHH)

  9. Mapping Learning and Game Mechanics for Serious Games Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnab, Sylvester; Lim, Theodore; Carvalho, Maira B.; Bellotti, Francesco; de Freitas, Sara; Louchart, Sandy; Suttie, Neil; Berta, Riccardo; De Gloria, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Although there is a consensus on the instructional potential of Serious Games (SGs), there is still a lack of methodologies and tools not only for design but also to support analysis and assessment. Filling this gap is one of the main aims of the Games and Learning Alliance (http://www.galanoe.eu) European Network of Excellence on Serious Games,…

  10. Dynamic mechanical analysis: A practical introduction to techniques and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Menard, K.

    1999-01-01

    This book introduces DMA, its history, and its current position as part of thermal analysis on polymers. It discusses major types of instrumentation, including oscillatory rotational, oscillatory axial, and torsional pendulum. It also describes analytical techniques in terms of utility, quality of data, methods of calibration, and suitability for different types of materials and assesses applications for thermoplastics, thermosetting systems, and thermosets.

  11. Identification of possible cytotoxicity mechanism of polyethylenimine by proteomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Khansarizadeh, M; Mokhtarzadeh, A; Rashedinia, M; Taghdisi, S M; Lari, P; Abnous, K H; Ramezani, M

    2016-04-01

    Polyethylenimine (PEI) is a polycation widely used for successful gene delivery both in vitro and in vivo experiments. However, different studies showed that PEI could be cytotoxic to transfected cells, and the mechanism of toxicity is poorly understood. Identification of PEI-interacting proteins may help in understanding the toxicity pathways. In this study, we investigated proteins that could interact with PEI in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (HT29). In order to identify the proteins interacting with PEI, PEI was immobilized to sepharose beads as solid matrix. The HT29 cell lysate were passed through the matrix. PEI-bound proteins were isolated, and further separation was performed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. After gel digestion, proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight (TOF)/TOF mass spectrometry. Our data indicated that most of the identified PEI-interacting proteins such as shock proteins, glutathione-S-transferases, and protein disulfide isomerase are involved in apoptosis process in cells. Thus, although this is a preliminary experiment implicating the involvement of some proteins in PEI cytotoxicity, it could partly explain the mechanism of PEI cytotoxicity in cells. PMID:26134983

  12. Mechanical and structural property analysis of bacterial cellulose composites.

    PubMed

    Dayal, Manmeet Singh; Catchmark, Jeffrey M

    2016-06-25

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) exhibits unique properties including high mechanical strength and high crystallinity. Improvement in the mechanical properties of BC is sought for many applications ranging from food to structural composites to biomedical materials. In this study, different additives including carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), pectin, gelatin, cornstarch, and corn steep liquor were included in the fermentation media to alter the BC produced. Three different concentrations (1%, 3% and 5%) were chosen for each of the additives, with no additive (0%) as the control. The produced BC was then analyzed to determine tensile and compression modulus. Amongst the tested additives, BC produced in media containing 3% (w/v) pectin had the maximum compressive modulus (142kPa), and BC produced in media containing 1% (w/v) gelatin exhibited the maximum tensile modulus (21MPa). Structural characteristics of BC and BC-additive composites were compared using X-Ray diffraction (XRD). The crystal size and crystallinity of BC was reduced when grown in the presence of CMC and gelatin while pectin only decreased the crystallite size. This suggested that CMC and gelatin may be incorporated into the BC fibril structure. The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images showed the increased micro-fibril aggregation in BC pellicles grown in the presence of additives to the culture media. PMID:27083837

  13. Analysis of Europan Cycloid Morphology and Implications for Formation Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, S. T.; Kattenhorn, S. A.

    2004-01-01

    Europa's highly fractured crust has been shown to contain features with a range of differing morphologies. Most lineaments on Europa are believed to have initiated as cracks, although the type of cracking (e.g. tensile vs. shear) remains unclear and may vary for different morphologies. Arcuate lineaments, called cycloids or flexi, have been observed in nearly all imaged regions of Europa and have been modeled as tensile fractures that were initiated in response to diurnal variations in tides. Despite this hypothesis about the formation mechanism, there have been no detailed analyses of the variable morphologies of cycloids. We have examined Galileo images of numerous locations on Europa to develop a catalog of the different morphologies of cycloids. This study focuses on variations in morphology along individual cycloid segments and differences in cusp styles between segments, while illustrating how morphologic evidence can help unravel formation mechanisms. In so doing, we present evidence for cycloid cusps forming due to secondary fracturing during strike-slip sliding on pre-existing cycloid segments.

  14. Experimental Analysis of the Mechanism of Hearing under Water

    PubMed Central

    Chordekar, Shai; Kishon-Rabin, Liat; Kriksunov, Leonid; Adelman, Cahtia; Sohmer, Haim

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of human hearing under water is debated. Some suggest it is by air conduction (AC), others by bone conduction (BC), and others by a combination of AC and BC. A clinical bone vibrator applied to soft tissue sites on the head, neck, and thorax also elicits hearing by a mechanism called soft tissue conduction (STC) or nonosseous BC. The present study was designed to test whether underwater hearing at low intensities is by AC or by osseous BC based on bone vibrations or by nonosseous BC (STC). Thresholds of normal hearing participants to bone vibrator stimulation with their forehead in air were recorded and again when forehead and bone vibrator were under water. A vibrometer detected vibrations of a dry human skull in all similar conditions (in air and under water) but not when water was the intermediary between the sound source and the skull forehead. Therefore, the intensities required to induce vibrations of the dry skull in water were significantly higher than the underwater hearing thresholds of the participants, under conditions when hearing by AC and osseous BC is not likely. The results support the hypothesis that hearing under water at low sound intensities may be attributed to nonosseous BC (STC). PMID:26770975

  15. Some Aspects on the Mechanical Analysis of Micro-Shutters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fettig, Rainer K.; Kuhn, Jonathan L.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Orloff, Jon; Lu, Shude

    1999-01-01

    An array of individually addressable micro-shutters is being designed for spectroscopic applications. Details of the design are presented in a companion paper. The mechanical design of a single shutter element has been completed. This design consists of a shutter blade suspended on a torsion beam manufactured out of single crystal silicon membranes. During operation the shutter blade will be rotated by 90 degrees out of the array plane. Thus, the stability and durability of the beams are crucial for the reliability of the devices. Structures were fabricated using focused ion beam milling in a FEI 620 dual beam machine, and subsequent testing was completed using the same platform. This allowed for short turn around times. We performed torsion and bending experiments to determine key characteristics of the membrane material. Results of measurements on prototype shutters were compared with the predictions of the numerical models. The data from these focused studies were used in conjunction with experiments and numerical models of shutter prototypes to optimize the design. In this work, we present the results of the material studies, and assess the mechanical performance of the resulting design.

  16. Analysis of thermal conductivity of polymeric nanocomposites under mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Suyoung; Yang, Seunghwa; Cho, Maenghyo

    2013-12-01

    When the plastic deformation is applied to neat polymer, the polymer chains are aligned and the thermal conductivity of neat polymer increases linearly along the loading direction. However, the thermal conductivity change of nanocomposites consisting of polymer matrix and nanofillers during plastic deformation is not simple. The volume fraction and size of nanofillers scarcely affect the structural change of polymer chains during the plastic deformation. In this study, the structural change of polymeric materials according to the mechanical loading and its effect on the thermal transport properties are investigated through a molecular dynamics simulation. To investigate the effects of nanofiller, its volume fraction, and size on the thermal transport properties, the unit cells of neat amorphous nylon 6 and nanocomposites consisting of amorphous nylon 6 matrix and spherical silica particles are prepared. The molecular unit cells are uniaxially stretched by applying constant strain along the loading directions. Then, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are performed to estimate the thermal conductivities during plastic deformation. The alignment of polymer chains is analyzed by tracing the orientation correlation function of each polymer molecule and the free volume change during the mechanical loading is also analyzed.

  17. Subgrain lath martensite mechanics: A numerical-experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maresca, F.; Kouznetsova, V. G.; Geers, M. G. D.

    2014-12-01

    Lath martensite reveals a specific hierarchical subgrain structure, with laths, blocks and packets of particular crystallography. The presence of interlath retained austenite layers has been reported in the literature. This paper investigates the potential influence of the interlath retained austenite on the mechanical behaviour of lath martensite subgrains. To this purpose, a martensite grain substructure is modelled using a crystal plasticity framework, with a BCC lath-FCC austenite bicrystal at the fine scale. The main novel contribution of this work is the validation of the hypothesis on the role of the interlath retained austenite in lath martensite using the experimental results reported in the literature. The main features of the experimentally observed deformation behaviour (stress-strain curve, slip activity and roughness pattern) are qualitatively well reproduced by the model. It is shown that the presence of austenite interlath films has the potential to remarkably enhance the local deformation of martensite. In spite of its minor volume fraction, it plays a major role in the orientation dependent mechanical behaviour of the aggregate. It is also shown that if the presence of interlath austenite is neglected, the observed experimental flow curves are not captured.

  18. Analysis of femtosecond quantum control mechanisms with colored double pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, Gerhard; Nuernberger, Patrick; Selle, Reimer; Dimler, Frank; Brixner, Tobias; Gerber, Gustav

    2006-09-15

    Fitness landscapes based on a limited number of laser pulse shape parameters can elucidate reaction pathways and can help to find the underlying control mechanism of optimal pulses determined by adaptive femtosecond quantum control. In a first experiment, we employ colored double pulses and systematically scan both the temporal subpulse separation and the relative amplitude of the two subpulses to acquire fitness landscapes. Comparison with results obtained from a closed-loop experiment demonstrates the capability of fitness landscapes for the revelation of possible control mechanisms. In a second experiment, using transient absorption spectroscopy, we investigate and compare the dependence of the excitation efficiency of the solvated dye molecule 5,5{sup '}-dichloro-11-diphenylamino-3,3{sup '}-diethyl-10,12-ethylene thiatricarbocyanine perchlorate (IR140) on selected pulse shapes in two parametrizations. The results show that very different pulse profiles can be equivalently adequate to maximize a given control objective. Fitness landscapes thus provide valuable information about different pathways along which a molecular system can be controlled with shaped laser pulses.

  19. Mechanical System Analysis/Design Tool (MSAT) Quick Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, HauHua; Kolb, Mark; Madelone, Jack

    1998-01-01

    MSAT is a unique multi-component multi-disciplinary tool that organizes design analysis tasks around object-oriented representations of configuration components, analysis programs and modules, and data transfer links between them. This creative modular architecture enables rapid generation of input stream for trade-off studies of various engine configurations. The data transfer links automatically transport output from one application as relevant input to the next application once the sequence is set up by the user. The computations are managed via constraint propagation - the constraints supplied by the user as part of any optimization module. The software can be used in the preliminary design stage as well as during the detail design of product development process.

  20. Failure mechanics of fiber composite notched charpy specimens. [stress analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1976-01-01

    A finite element stress analysis was performed to determine the stress variation in the vicinity of the notch and far field of fiber composites Charpy specimens (ASTM Standard). NASTRAN was used for the finite element analysis assuming linear behavior and equivalent static load. The unidirectional composites investigated ranged from Thornel 75 Epoxy to S-Glass/Epoxy with the fiber direction parallel to the long dimension of the specimen. The results indicate a biaxial stress state exists in (1) the notch vicinity which is dominated by transverse tensile and interlaminar shear and (2) near the load application point which is dominated by transverse compression and interlaminar shear. The results also lead to the postulation of hypotheses for the predominant failure modes, the fracture initiation, and the fracture process. Finally, the results indicate that the notched Charpy test specimen is not suitable for assessing the impact resistance of nonmetallic fiber composites directly.

  1. Dynamic fracture mechanics analysis for an edge delamination crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Doyle, James F.

    1994-01-01

    A global/local analysis is applied to the problem of a panel with an edge delamination crack subject to an impulse loading to ascertain the dynamic J integral. The approach uses the spectral element method to obtain the global dynamic response and local resultants to obtain the J integral. The variation of J integral along the crack front is shown. The crack behavior is mixed mode (Mode 2 and Mode 3), but is dominated by the Mode 2 behavior.

  2. Compatibility conditions of structural mechanics for finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Berke, Laszlo; Gallagher, Richard H.

    1990-01-01

    The equilibrium equations and the compatibility conditions are fundamental to the analyses of structures. However, anyone who undertakes even a cursory generic study of the compatibility conditions can discover, with little effort, that historically this facet of structural mechanics had not been adequately researched by the profession. Now the compatibility conditions (CC's) have been researched and are understood to a great extent. For finite element discretizations, the CC's are banded and can be divided into three distinct categories: (1) the interface CC's; (2) the cluster or field CC's; and (3) the external CC's. The generation of CC's requires the separating of a local region, then writing the deformation displacement relation (ddr) for the region, and finally, the eliminating of the displacements from the ddr. The procedure to generate all three types of CC's is presented and illustrated through examples of finite element models. The uniqueness of the CC's thus generated is shown.

  3. Analysis of thermal mechanical fatigue in titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. Steven; Mirdamadi, Massoud

    1993-01-01

    Titanium metal matrix composites are being evaluated for structural applications on advanced hypersonic vehicles. These composites are reinforced with ceramic fibers such as silicon carbide, SCS-6. This combination of matrix and fiber results in a high stiffness, high strength composite that has good retention of properties even at elevated temperatures. However, significant thermal stresses are developed within the composite between the fiber and the matrix due to the difference in their respective coefficients of thermal expansion. In addition to the internal stresses that are generated due to thermal cycling, the overall laminate will be subjected to considerable mechanical loads during the thermal cycling. In order to develop life prediction methodology, one must be able to predict the stresses and strains that occur in the composite's constituents during the complex loading. Thus the purpose is to describe such an analytical tool, VISCOPLY.

  4. [Exploration and analysis on the mechanism of sinew acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Liu, Nongyu

    2015-12-01

    In order to explore the mechanism of sinew acupuncture (SA), related literature is reviewed and analyzed in combination with clinical practice. It is believed that the clinical indications of SA mainly include sinew injury and sinew injury related diseases. Sinew and channel tissue is similar to the superficial and deep fascia, which has a close relationship with defensive qi. The pathogenesis of sinew injury results from the deficiency of defense qi, leading to stagnation of evil qi in sinew tissue. The manipulation of SA is featured with the floating and superficial needling, transverse needling at points without arrival of qi. SA treatment can activate the defense qi, regulate sinew and channels and disperse the evil qi in sinew and channels, by which it exerts therapeutic effects. The SA will have a promotion effects on acupuncture popularization. PMID:26964184

  5. Analysis of Jovian decametric data: Study of radio emission mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, D. H.; Arias, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    Data gathered by the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 Planetary Radio Astronomy Experiments (PRA) are unique in many ways including their frequency range, time resolution, polarization information and geometric characteristics. Studies of rapidly varying phenomena have thus far been hampered by paper display techniques which require large amounts of paper to exploit the full PRA time resolution. A software package capable of effectively displaying full 6s resolution PRA dynamic spectra on a high quality video monitor while compensating for the aforementioned variations was developed. The most striking phenomena revealed by the new display techniques is called Modulated Spectral Activity (MSA) because of its appearance in dynamic spectra as a series at least two parallel emission bands which drift back and forth in frequency on time scales of tens of seconds. In an attempt to locate and understand the MSA source mechanism, a catalogue has been compiled of the start and end of all known MSA events.

  6. Analysis of biomaterial latex-derived flow mechanical controller.

    PubMed

    Paula, Patricia M C; Rodrigues, Suelia S R; Brasil, Lourdes M; Silva, Rita C; da Rocha, Adson F

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the basic guidelines for developing an innovative biomedical device. It covers the issues of researching about a suitable material, developing a new device, and testing its proprieties to check its effectiveness. The goal of the device is to control food flow into the esophagus, reducing its volume and the speed of food intake to help in the treatment of obesity. This module, called Esophageal Flow Controller (EFC®), is made of latex. Three different models of prototypes were developed, and 10 units of each model had their constructive and mechanical characteristics evaluated. All of them have followed the same manufacturing cycle. The results showed that the Esophageal Flow Control module has all the essential characteristics of an effective device for flow control in the esophagus. PMID:21096751

  7. Estudo de soluções locais e cosmológicas em teorias do tipo tensor-escalar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva E Costa, S.

    2003-08-01

    Teorias do tipo tensor-escalar são a mais simples extensão possí vel da Relatividade Geral. Nessas teorias, cujo modelo padrão é a teoria de Brans-Dicke, a curvatura do espaço-tempo, descrita por componentes tensoriais, aparece acoplada a um campo escalar que, de certo modo, representa uma variação na constante de acoplamento da gravitação. Tais teorias apresentam soluções locais e cosmológicas que, em determinados limites, recaem nas apresentadas pela Relatividade Geral, mas que em outros limites trazem novidades, tais como conseqüências observacionais da evolução de flutuações primordiais distintas daquelas previstas pela Relatividade Geral (ver, por ex., Nagata et al., PRD 66, p. 103510 (2002)). Graças a esta possibilidade de trazer à luz novidades em relação à gravitação, teorias do tipo tensor-escalar podem ser vistas como um interessante campo alternativo de pesquisas para soluções dos problemas de massa faltante (ou escura) e/ou energia escura. Seguindo tal linha, este trabalho, ainda em sua fase inicial, apresenta soluções gerais de teorias do tipo tensor-escalar para diversas situações, verificando-se em que consiste a divergência dessas soluções dos casos tradicionais possí veis na Relatividade Geral. Como exemplos das soluções aqui apresentadas pode-se destacar uma expressão geral para diferentes soluções cosmológicas englobando diferentes tipos de matéria (representados por diferentes equações de estado), e a expressão para uma solução local representando um buraco negro com rotação, similar à solução de Kerr da Relatividade Geral. Por fim, é importante ressaltar que, embora aqui apresentem-se poucos resultados novos, na literatura sobre o assunto a maior parte das soluções apresentadas limita-se a uns poucos casos especí ficos, tal como soluções cosmológicas apenas com curvatura nula, e que mesmo as soluções disponí veis são, em geral, pouco divulgadas e, portanto, pouco conhecidas, e

  8. Forebrain Mechanisms of Nociception and Pain: Analysis through Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Kenneth L.

    1999-07-01

    Pain is a unified experience composed of interacting discriminative, affective-motivational, and cognitive components, each of which is mediated and modulated through forebrain mechanisms acting at spinal, brainstem, and cerebral levels. The size of the human forebrain in relation to the spinal cord gives anatomical emphasis to forebrain control over nociceptive processing. Human forebrain pathology can cause pain without the activation of nociceptors. Functional imaging of the normal human brain with positron emission tomography (PET) shows synaptically induced increases in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in several regions specifically during pain. We have examined the variables of gender, type of noxious stimulus, and the origin of nociceptive input as potential determinants of the pattern and intensity of rCBF responses. The structures most consistently activated across genders and during contact heat pain, cold pain, cutaneous laser pain or intramuscular pain were the contralateral insula and anterior cingulate cortex, the bilateral thalamus and premotor cortex, and the cerebellar vermis. These regions are commonly activated in PET studies of pain conducted by other investigators, and the intensity of the brain rCBF response correlates parametrically with perceived pain intensity. To complement the human studies, we developed an animal model for investigating stimulus-induced rCBF responses in the rat. In accord with behavioral measures and the results of human PET, there is a progressive and selective activation of somatosensory and limbic system structures in the brain and brainstem following the subcutaneous injection of formalin. The animal model and human PET studies should be mutually reinforcing and thus facilitate progress in understanding forebrain mechanisms of normal and pathological pain.

  9. Thermal-mechanical coupled analysis of a brake disk rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belhocine, Ali; Bouchetara, Mostefa

    2013-08-01

    The main purpose of this study is to analyze the thermomechanical behavior of the dry contact between the brake disk and pads during the braking phase. The simulation strategy is based on computer code ANSYS11. The modeling of transient temperature in the disk is actually used to identify the factor of geometric design of the disk to install the ventilation system in vehicles The thermal-structural analysis is then used with coupling to determine the deformation and the Von Mises stress established in the disk, the contact pressure distribution in pads. The results are satisfactory when compared to those of the specialized literature.

  10. Improved inhomogeneous finite elements for fabric reinforced composite mechanics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foye, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    There is a need to do routine stress/failure analysis of fabric reinforced composite microstructures to provide additional confidence in critical applications and guide materials development. Conventional methods of 3-D stress analysis are time consuming to set up, run and interpret. A need exists for simpler methods of modeling these structures and analyzing the models. The principal difficulty is the discrete element mesh generation problem. Inhomogeneous finite elements are worth investigating for application to these problems because they eliminate the mesh generation problem. However, there are penalties associated with these elements. Their convergence rates can be slow compared to homogeneous elements. Also, there is no accepted method for obtaining detailed stresses in the constituent materials of each element. This paper shows that the convergence rate can be significantly improved by a simple device which substitutes homogeneous elements for the inhomogeneous ones. The device is shown to work well in simple one and two dimensional problems. However, demonstration of the application to more complex two and three dimensional problems remains to be done. Work is also progressing toward more realistic fabric microstructural geometries.

  11. Endocrine-disrupting Chemicals: Review of Toxicological Mechanisms Using Molecular Pathway Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Oneyeol; Kim, Hye Lim; Weon, Jong-Il; Seo, Young Rok

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors are known to cause harmful effects to human through various exposure routes. These chemicals mainly appear to interfere with the endocrine or hormone systems. As importantly, numerous studies have demonstrated that the accumulation of endocrine disruptors can induce fatal disorders including obesity and cancer. Using diverse biological tools, the potential molecular mechanisms related with these diseases by exposure of endocrine disruptors. Recently, pathway analysis, a bioinformatics tool, is being widely used to predict the potential mechanism or biological network of certain chemicals. In this review, we initially summarize the major molecular mechanisms involved in the induction of the above mentioned diseases by endocrine disruptors. Additionally, we provide the potential markers and signaling mechanisms discovered via pathway analysis under exposure to representative endocrine disruptors, bisphenol, diethylhexylphthalate, and nonylphenol. The review emphasizes the importance of pathway analysis using bioinformatics to finding the specific mechanisms of toxic chemicals, including endocrine disruptors. PMID:25853100

  12. Proteomic analysis of the flooding tolerance mechanism in mutant soybean.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Nanjo, Yohei; Nishimura, Minoru

    2013-02-21

    Flooding stress of soybean is a serious problem because it reduces growth; however, flooding-tolerant cultivars have not been identified. To analyze the flooding tolerance mechanism of soybean, the flooding-tolerant mutant was isolated and analyzed using a proteomic technique. Flooding-tolerance tests were repeated five times using gamma-ray irradiated soybeans, whose root growth (M6 stage) was not suppressed even under flooding stress. Two-day-old wild-type and mutant plants were subjected to flooding stress for 2days, and proteins were identified using a gel-based proteomic technique. In wild-type under flooding stress, levels of proteins related to development, protein synthesis/degradation, secondary metabolism, and the cell wall changed; however, these proteins did not markedly differ in the mutant. In contrast, an increased number of fermentation-related proteins were identified in the mutant under flooding stress. The root tips of mutant plants were not affected by flooding stress, even though the wild-type plants had damaged root. Alcohol dehydrogenase activity in the mutant increased at an early stage of flooding stress compared with that of the wild-type. Taken together, these results suggest that activation of the fermentation system in the early stages of flooding may be an important factor for the acquisition of flooding tolerance in soybean. PMID:23313221

  13. Hypolipidemic effect of safflower yellow and primary mechanism analysis.

    PubMed

    Bao, L D; Wang, Y; Ren, X H; Ma, R L; Lv, H J; Agula, B

    2015-01-01

    We examined the hypolipidemic effect of safflower yellow (SY) on hyperlipidemic mice and its influence on the biological synthesis of cholesterol in cells. Over 4 weeks, the levels of total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in serum were detected using a kit; mouse liver samples were acquired for paraffin sections, and mouse liver cells were observed under light microscope. Chinese hamster ovary cells were cultured in vitro, and an amphotericin B-cell model was adopted to observe the inhibitory effect of SY on the biological synthesis of intracellular cholesterol. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect the survival rate of Chinese hamster ovary cells. The middle and high doses of SY significantly reduced the levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the serum of hyperlipidemic mice and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio (P < 0.05), and the fatty liver of hyperlipidemic mice was significantly alleviated. SY had a protective effect on Chinese hamster ovary cells following amphotericin B injury (P < 0.01). SY exerts significant hypolipidemic effects and prevents fatty liver in a mechanism associated with inhibition of the biosynthesis of intracellular cholesterol. PMID:26125829

  14. Fracture Mechanics Analysis of LH2 Feed Line Flow Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark A.; Dawicke, David S.; Brzowski, Matthew B.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Harris, Charles E.

    2006-01-01

    Inspections of the Space Shuttle Main Engine revealed fatigue cracks growing from slots in the flow liner of the liquid hydrogen (LH2) feed lines. During flight, the flow liners experience complex loading induced by flow of LH2 and the resonance characteristics of the structure. The flow liners are made of Inconel 718 and had previously not been considered a fracture critical component. However, fatigue failure of a flow liner could have catastrophic effect on the Shuttle engines. A fracture mechanics study was performed to determine if a damage tolerance approach to life management was possible and to determine the sensitivity to the load spectra, material properties, and crack size. The load spectra were derived separately from ground tests and material properties were obtained from coupon tests. The stress-intensity factors for the fatigue cracks were determined from a shell-dynamics approach that simulated the dominant resonant frequencies. Life predictions were obtained using the NASGRO life prediction code. The results indicated that adequate life could not be demonstrated for initial crack lengths of the size that could be detected by traditional NDE techniques.

  15. Mechanical and Infrared Thermography Analysis of Shape Memory Polyurethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieczyska, Elzbieta Alicja; Maj, Michal; Kowalczyk-Gajewska, Katarzyna; Staszczak, Maria; Urbanski, Leszek; Tobushi, Hisaaki; Hayashi, Shunichi; Cristea, Mariana

    2014-07-01

    Multifunctional new material—polyurethane shape memory polymer (PU-SMP)—was subjected to tension carried out at room temperature at various strain rates. The influence of effects of thermomechanical couplings on the SMP mechanical properties was studied, based on the sample temperature changes, measured by a fast and sensitive infrared camera. It was found that the polymer deformation process strongly depends on the strain rate applied. The initial reversible strain is accompanied by a small drop in temperature, called thermoelastic effect. Its maximal value is related to the SMP yield point and increases upon increase of the strain rate. At higher strains, the stress and temperature significantly increase, caused by reorientation of the polymer molecular chains, followed by the stress drop and its subsequent increase accompanying the sample rupture. The higher strain rate, the higher stress, and temperature changes were obtained, since the deformation process was more dynamic and has occurred in almost adiabatic conditions. The constitutive model of SMP valid in finite strain regime was developed. In the proposed approach, SMP is described as a two-phase material composed of hyperelastic rubbery phase and elastic-viscoplastic glassy phase, while the volume content of phases is specified by the current temperature.

  16. Systems analysis of the CO2 concentrating mechanism in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mangan, Niall M; Brenner, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic bacteria with a unique CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM), enhancing carbon fixation. Understanding the CCM requires a systems level perspective of how molecular components work together to enhance CO2 fixation. We present a mathematical model of the cyanobacterial CCM, giving the parameter regime (expression levels, catalytic rates, permeability of carboxysome shell) for efficient carbon fixation. Efficiency requires saturating the RuBisCO reaction, staying below saturation for carbonic anhydrase, and avoiding wasteful oxygenation reactions. We find selectivity at the carboxysome shell is not necessary; there is an optimal non-specific carboxysome shell permeability. We compare the efficacy of facilitated CO2 uptake, CO2 scavenging, and HCO3− transport with varying external pH. At the optimal carboxysome permeability, contributions from CO2 scavenging at the cell membrane are small. We examine the cumulative benefits of CCM spatial organization strategies: enzyme co-localization and compartmentalization. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02043.001 PMID:24842993

  17. Mechanical analysis of lightweight constructions manufactured with fused deposition modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagsik, A.; Josupeit, S.; Schoeppner, V.; Klemp, E.

    2014-05-01

    Additive production techniques have the advantage of manufacturing parts without needing a forming tool. One of the most used additive manufacturing processes is "Fused Deposition Modeling" (FDM) which allows the production of prototypes and end-use parts. Due to the manufacture layer by layer, also complex part geometries can be created in one working step. Furthermore, lightweight parts with specific inner core structures can be manufactured in order to achieve good weightrelated strength properties. In this paper the mechanical behavior of lightweight parts manufactured with the 3D production system Fortus 400mc from Stratasys and the material Polyetherimide (PEI) with the trade name Ultem*9085 is analyzed. The test specimens were built up with different inner structures and building directions. Therefore, test specimens with known lightweight core geometries (e.g. corrugated and honeycomb cores) were designed. A four-point bending test was conducted to analyze the strength properties as well as the weight-related strength properties. Additionally the influence of the structure width, the structure wall thickness and the top layer thickness was analyzed using a honeycomb structure.

  18. An Historical Perspective on the Theory and Practice of Soil Mechanical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, W. P.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Traces the history of soil mechanical analysis. Evaluates this history in order to place current concepts in perspective, from both a research and teaching viewpoint. Alternatives to traditional separation techniques for use in soils teaching laboratories are discussed. (TW)

  19. Fracture Mechanics Analysis of Stitched Stiffener-Skin Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, E. H.; Raju, I. S.; Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    An analysis based on plate finite elements and the virtual crack closure technique has been implemented to study the effect of stitching on mode I and mode II strain energy release rates for debond configurations. The stitches were modeled as discrete nonlinear fastener elements with a compliance determined by experiment. The axial and shear behavior of the stitches was considered, however, the two compliances and failure loads were assumed to be independent. Both a double cantilever beam (mode I) and a mixed mode skin-stiffener debond configuration were studied. In the double cantilever beam configurations, G(sub I) began to decrease once the debond had grown beyond the first row of stitches and was reduced to zero for long debonds. In the mixed-mode skin-stiffener configurations, G(sub I) showed a similar behavior as in the double cantilever beam configurations, however, G(sub u), continued to increase with increasing debond length.

  20. Mechanical Analysis of Cartilage Graft Reinforced with PDS Plate

    PubMed Central

    Conderman, Christian; Kinzinger, Michael; Manuel, Cyrus; Protsenko, Dmitry; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis This study attempts to characterize the biomechanical properties of a PDS-cartilage composite graft for use in septorhinoplasty. Study Design Experimental Study. Methods This study used a PDS analog, porcine cartilage cut to 1 × 5 × 20 mm, and a mechanical testing platform to measure flexure of a composite graft. Samples were assessed in four groups based on variations in suture pattern and orientation. The platform measured the force required to deflect the sample 2 mm in single cantilever beam geometry before and after the polymer was affixed to the specimen. Elastic Moduli were calculated before and after application of the polydioxanone polymer. Results The average modulus of the cartilage alone was 17 ± 0.9 MPa. The modulus of the composite cartilage-polymer graft with 2 suture fixation was 21.2 ± 1.5 MPa. The 3-suture configuration produced an increase to 25.8 ± 2.23 MPa. The four-suture configuration produced 23.1 ± 3.19 MPa. The five-suture configuration produced 25.7 ± 2.6 MPa. The modulus of the analog alone was 170 ± 30 MPa. The modulus of the 0.5 mm PDS was 692 ± 37.4 MPa. The modulus of the 0.15 mm perforated PDS was 447 ± 34.8 MPa. Conclusions The study found that suturing a polymer plate to cartilage resulted in enhanced stiffness of the composite. Under the conditions of the study, there was no significant difference in elastic moduli between suture configurations, making the two-suture linear configuration optimal in the one-plane cantilever deflection model. PMID:22965809

  1. Theoretical analysis of hydrogen spillover mechanism on carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Juarez-Mosqueda, Rosalba; Mavrandonakis, Andreas; Kuc, Agnieszka B.; Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Heine, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The spillover mechanism of molecular hydrogen on carbon nanotubes in the presence of catalytically active platinum clusters was critically and systematically investigated by using density-functional theory. Our simulation model includes a Pt4 cluster for the catalyst nanoparticle and curved and planar circumcoronene for two exemplary single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT), the (10,10) CNT and one of large diameter, respectively. Our results show that the H2 molecule dissociates spontaneously on the Pt4 cluster. However, the dissociated H atoms have to overcome a barrier of more than 2 eV to migrate from the catalyst to the CNT, even if the Pt4 cluster is at full saturation with six adsorbed and dissociated hydrogen molecules. Previous investigations have shown that the mobility of hydrogen atoms on the CNT surface is hindered by a barrier. We find that instead the Pt4 catalyst may move along the outer surface of the CNT with activation energy of only 0.16 eV, and that this effect offers the possibility of full hydrogenation of the CNT. Thus, although we have not found a low-energy pathway to spillover onto the CNT, we suggest, based on our calculations and calculated data reported in the literature, that in the hydrogen-spillover process the observed saturation of the CNT at hydrogen background pressure occurs through mobile Pt nanoclusters, which move on the substrate more easily than the substrate-chemisorbed hydrogens, and deposit or reattach hydrogens in the process. Initial hydrogenation of the carbon substrate, however, is thermodynamically unfavoured, suggesting that defects should play a significant role. PMID:25699250

  2. A unified approach to the analysis and design of elasto-plastic structures with mechanical contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendsoe, Martin P.; Olhoff, Niels; Taylor, John E.

    1990-01-01

    With structural design in mind, a new unified variational model has been developed which represents the mechanics of deformation elasto-plasticity with unilateral contact conditions. For a design problem formulated as maximization of the load carrying capacity of a structure under certain constraints, the unified model allows for a simultaneous analysis and design synthesis for a whole range of mechanical behavior.

  3. Statistical mechanical modeling: Computer simulations, analysis and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Balakrishna

    This thesis describes the applications of statistical mechanical models and tools, especially computational techniques to the study of several problems in science. We study in chapter 2, various properties of a non-equilibrium cellular automaton model, the Toom model. We obtain numerically the exponents describing the fluctuations of the interface between the two stable phases of the model. In chapter 3, we introduce a binary alloy model with three-body potentials. Unlike the usual Ising-type models with two-body interactions, this model is not symmetric in its components. We calculate the exact low temperature phase diagram using Pirogov-Sinai theory and also find the mean-field equilibrium properties of this model. We then study the kinetics of phase segregation following a quenching in this model. We find that the results are very similar to those obtained for Ising-type models with pair interactions, indicating universality. In chapter 4, we discuss the statistical properties of "Contact Maps". These maps, are used to represent three-dimensional structures of proteins in modeling problems. We find that this representation space has particular properties that make it a convenient choice. The maps representing native folds of proteins correspond to compact structures which in turn correspond to maps with low degeneracy, making it easier to translate the map into the detailed 3-dimensional structure. The early stage of formation of a river network is described in Chapter 5 using quasi-random spanning trees on a square lattice. We observe that the statistical properties generated by these models are quite similar (better than some of the earlier models) to the empirical laws and results presented by geologists for real river networks. Finally, in chapter 6 we present a brief note on our study of the problem of progression of heterogeneous breast tumors. We investigate some of the possible pathways of progression based on the traditional notions of DCIS (Ductal

  4. Phosphoproteomic analysis reveals regulatory mechanisms at the kidney filtration barrier.

    PubMed

    Rinschen, Markus M; Wu, Xiongwu; König, Tim; Pisitkun, Trairak; Hagmann, Henning; Pahmeyer, Caroline; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Kohli, Priyanka; Schnell, Nicole; Schermer, Bernhard; Dryer, Stuart; Brooks, Bernard R; Beltrao, Pedro; Krueger, Marcus; Brinkkoetter, Paul T; Benzing, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Diseases of the kidney filtration barrier are a leading cause of ESRD. Most disorders affect the podocytes, polarized cells with a limited capacity for self-renewal that require tightly controlled signaling to maintain their integrity, viability, and function. Here, we provide an atlas of in vivo phosphorylated, glomerulus-expressed proteins, including podocyte-specific gene products, identified in an unbiased tandem mass spectrometry-based approach. We discovered 2449 phosphorylated proteins corresponding to 4079 identified high-confidence phosphorylated residues and performed a systematic bioinformatics analysis of this dataset. We discovered 146 phosphorylation sites on proteins abundantly expressed in podocytes. The prohibitin homology domain of the slit diaphragm protein podocin contained one such site, threonine 234 (T234), located within a phosphorylation motif that is mutated in human genetic forms of proteinuria. The T234 site resides at the interface of podocin dimers. Free energy calculation through molecular dynamic simulations revealed a role for T234 in regulating podocin dimerization. We show that phosphorylation critically regulates formation of high molecular weight complexes and that this may represent a general principle for the assembly of proteins containing prohibitin homology domains. PMID:24511133

  5. Price Analysis of Railway Freight Transport under Marketing Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ying; Fang, Xiaoping; Chen, Zhiya

    Regarding the problems in the reform of the railway tariff system and the pricing of the transport, by means of assaying the influence of the price elasticity on the artifice used for price, this article proposed multiple regressive model which analyzed price elasticity quantitatively. This model conclude multi-factors which influences on the price elasticity, such as the averagely railway freight charge, the averagely freight haulage of proximate supersede transportation mode, the GDP per capita in the point of origin, and a series of dummy variable which can reflect the features of some productive and consume demesne. It can calculate the price elasticity of different classes in different domains, and predict the freight traffic volume on different rate levels. It can calculate confidence-level, and evaluate the relevance of each parameter to get rid of irrelevant or little relevant variables. It supplied a good theoretical basis for directing the pricing of transport enterprises in market economic conditions, which is suitable for railway freight, passenger traffic and other transportation manner as well. SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Science) software was used to calculate and analysis the example. This article realized the calculation by HYFX system(Ministry of Railways fund).

  6. Damped Mechanical Oscillator: Experiment and Detailed Energy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corridoni, Tommaso; D'Anna, Michele; Fuchs, Hans

    2014-02-01

    The damped oscillator is discussed in every high school textbook or introductory physics course, and a large number of papers are devoted to it in physics didactics journals. Papers typically focus on kinematic and dynamic aspects and less often on energy. Among the latter, some are devoted to the peculiar decreasing behavior of energy characterized by ripples, which can easily be demonstrated by using a dynamic modeling approach.8 In this note we consider an oscillator consisting of a cart running on a horizontal track, two springs, and a damping device created with magnets and a metal plate attached to the cart (Fig. 1). Using sensors and data-acquisition software,9 we measure kinematic quantities and three forces: those of the springs on the cart and, separately, the force between magnets and the plate. A detailed analysis of the energy exchanges between the cart and the interacting parts is obtained. In particular, we show that only the energy exchanges with the magnets are affected by dissipative processes while over a suitable time interval the net energy exchanged between cart and springs equals zero.

  7. [Analysis of synaptic neurotransmitter release mechanisms using bacterial toxins].

    PubMed

    Doussau, F; Humeau, Y; Vitiello, F; Popoff, M R; Poulain, B

    1999-01-01

    Several bacterial toxins are powerful and highly specific tools for studying basic mechanisms involved in cell biology. Whereas the clostridial neurotoxins are widely used by neurobiologists, many other toxins (i.e. toxins acting on small G-proteins or actin) are still overlooked. Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT, serotypes A-G) and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT), known under the generic term of clostridial neurotoxins, are characterized by their unique ability to selectively block neurotransmitter release. These proteins are formed of a light (Mr approximately 50) and a heavy (Mr approximately 100) chain which are disulfide linked. The cellular action of BoNT and TeNT involves several steps: heavy chain-mediated binding to the nerve ending membrane, endocytosis, and translocation of the light chain (their catalytic moiety) into the cytosol. The light chains each cleaves one of three, highly conserved, proteins (VAMP/synaptobrevin, syntaxin, and SNAP-25 also termed SNAREs) implicated in fusion of synaptic vesicles with plasma membrane at the release site. Hence, when these neurotoxins are applied extracellularly, they can be used as specific tools to inhibit evoked and spontaneous transmitter release from certain neurones whereas, when the membrane limiting steps are bypassed by the mean of intracellular applications, BoNTs orTeNT can be used to affect regulated secretion in various cell types. Several members of the Rho GTPase family have been involved in intracellular trafficking of synaptic vesicles and secretory organelles. As they are natural targets for several bacterial exoenzymes or cytotoxins, their role in neurotransmitter release can be probed by examining the action of these toxins on neurotransmission. Such toxins include: i) the non permeant C3 exoenzymes from C. botulinum or C. limosum which ADP-ribosylate and thereby inactivate Rho, ii) exoenzyme S from Pseudomonas aeruginosa which ADP-ribosylates different members of the Ras, Rab, Ral and Rap families, iii

  8. [Present status and trend of heart fluid mechanics research based on medical image analysis].

    PubMed

    Gan, Jianhong; Yin, Lixue; Xie, Shenghua; Li, Wenhua; Lu, Jing; Luo, Anguo

    2014-06-01

    With introduction of current main methods for heart fluid mechanics researches, we studied the characteristics and weakness for three primary analysis methods based on magnetic resonance imaging, color Doppler ultrasound and grayscale ultrasound image, respectively. It is pointed out that particle image velocity (PIV), speckle tracking and block match have the same nature, and three algorithms all adopt block correlation. The further analysis shows that, with the development of information technology and sensor, the research for cardiac function and fluid mechanics will focus on energy transfer process of heart fluid, characteristics of Chamber wall related to blood fluid and Fluid-structure interaction in the future heart fluid mechanics fields. PMID:25219260

  9. Analysis and modeling of resistive switching mechanisms oriented to resistive random-access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Da; Wu, Jun-Jie; Tang, Yu-Hua

    2013-03-01

    With the progress of the semiconductor industry, the resistive random-access memory (RAM) has drawn increasing attention. The discovery of the memristor has brought much attention to this study. Research has focused on the resistive switching characteristics of different materials and the analysis of resistive switching mechanisms. We discuss the resistive switching mechanisms of different materials in this paper and analyze the differences of those mechanisms from the view point of circuitry to establish their respective circuit models. Finally, simulations are presented. We give the prospect of using different materials in resistive RAM on account of their resistive switching mechanisms, which are applied to explain their resistive switchings.

  10. Analysis of the Resistance Mechanism of a Benzoxaborole Inhibitor Reveals Insight into the Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase Editing Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hanchao; Palencia, Andres; Seiradake, Elena; Ghaemi, Zhaleh; Cusack, Stephen; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Martinis, Susan

    2015-10-16

    A new class of antimicrobial benzoxaborole compounds was identified as a potent inhibitor of leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) and therefore of protein synthesis. In a novel mechanism, AN2690 (5-fluoro-1,3-dihydro-1-hydroxy-2,1-benzoxaborole) blocks fungal cytoplasmic LeuRS by covalently trapping tRNA(Leu) in the editing site of the enzyme's CP1 domain. However, some resistant mutation sites are located outside of the CP1 hydrolytic editing active site. Thus, their mode of action that undermines drug inhibition was not understood. A combination of X-ray crystallography, molecular dynamics, metadynamics, biochemical experiments, and mutational analysis of a distal benzoxaborole-resistant mutant uncovered a eukaryote-specific tyrosine "switch" that is critical to tRNA-dependent post-transfer editing. The tyrosine "switch" has three states that shift between interactions with a lysine and the 3'-hydroxyl of the tRNA terminus, to inhibit or promote post-transfer editing. The oxaborole's mechanism of action capitalizes upon one of these editing active site states. This tunable editing mechanism in eukaryotic and archaeal LeuRSs is proposed to facilitate precise quality control of aminoacylation fidelity. These mechanistic distinctions could also be capitalized upon for development of the benzoxaboroles as a broad spectrum antibacterial. PMID:26172575

  11. NASGRO(registered trademark): Fracture Mechanics and Fatigue Crack Growth Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce; Shivakumar, V.; Mettu, Sambi; Beek, Joachim; Williams, Leonard; Yeh, Feng; McClung, Craig; Cardinal, Joe

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes NASGRO, which is a fracture mechanics and fatigue crack growth analysis software package that is used to reduce risk of fracture in Space Shuttles. The contents include: 1) Consequences of Fracture; 2) NASA Fracture Control Requirements; 3) NASGRO Reduces Risk; 4) NASGRO Use Inside NASA; 5) NASGRO Components: Crack Growth Module; 6) NASGRO Components:Material Property Module; 7) Typical NASGRO analysis: Crack growth or component life calculation; and 8) NASGRO Sample Application: Orbiter feedline flowliner crack analysis.

  12. Disentangling the ambiguity of the lagged correlation function - analysis of the Walker circulation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Jakob; Kurths, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    A first step towards the investigation of tropical climate variability and teleconnections is the analysis of observations. Lagged correlation analysis is commonly used to gain insights into interaction mechanisms between climatological processes, in particular to determine the time delay and strength of a mechanism. In this talk, such an analysis is discussed on the mechanism of the Walker circulation. The influence of serial correlation on lagged correlation functions and regressions is investigated and it is demonstrated how this influence can lead to ambiguous and misleading conclusions about the time delay and strength of an interaction mechanism. To overcome the issues arising in interpreting the lag and strength of a correlation, we propose to use graphical models that encode the lag-specific causality between multiple processes. In this framework a certain partial correlation measure is derived that allows to very specifically measure the time delay and strength of a coupling mechanism. This approach is then shown to yield a more precise picture of the interaction mechanism of the Walker circulation. The talk is intended to serve as a guideline to interpret lagged correlations and regressions and introduces a more powerful approach to analyze time delays and strengths of interaction mechanisms.

  13. Skeletal mechanism generation for surrogate fuels using directed relation graph with error propagation and sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Niemeyer, Kyle E.; Sung, Chih-Jen; Raju, Mandhapati P.

    2010-09-15

    A novel implementation for the skeletal reduction of large detailed reaction mechanisms using the directed relation graph with error propagation and sensitivity analysis (DRGEPSA) is developed and presented with examples for three hydrocarbon components, n-heptane, iso-octane, and n-decane, relevant to surrogate fuel development. DRGEPSA integrates two previously developed methods, directed relation graph-aided sensitivity analysis (DRGASA) and directed relation graph with error propagation (DRGEP), by first applying DRGEP to efficiently remove many unimportant species prior to sensitivity analysis to further remove unimportant species, producing an optimally small skeletal mechanism for a given error limit. It is illustrated that the combination of the DRGEP and DRGASA methods allows the DRGEPSA approach to overcome the weaknesses of each, specifically that DRGEP cannot identify all unimportant species and that DRGASA shields unimportant species from removal. Skeletal mechanisms for n-heptane and iso-octane generated using the DRGEP, DRGASA, and DRGEPSA methods are presented and compared to illustrate the improvement of DRGEPSA. From a detailed reaction mechanism for n-alkanes covering n-octane to n-hexadecane with 2115 species and 8157 reactions, two skeletal mechanisms for n-decane generated using DRGEPSA, one covering a comprehensive range of temperature, pressure, and equivalence ratio conditions for autoignition and the other limited to high temperatures, are presented and validated. The comprehensive skeletal mechanism consists of 202 species and 846 reactions and the high-temperature skeletal mechanism consists of 51 species and 256 reactions. Both mechanisms are further demonstrated to well reproduce the results of the detailed mechanism in perfectly-stirred reactor and laminar flame simulations over a wide range of conditions. The comprehensive and high-temperature n-decane skeletal mechanisms are included as supplementary material with this article

  14. A perturbation analysis of a mechanical model for stable spatial patterning in embryology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentil, D. E.; Murray, J. D.

    1992-12-01

    We investigate a mechanical cell-traction mechanism that generates stationary spatial patterns. A linear analysis highlights the model's potential for these heterogeneous solutions. We use multiple-scale perturbation techniques to study the evolution of these solutions and compare our solutions with numerical simulations of the model system. We discuss some potential biological applications among which are the formation of ridge patterns, dermatoglyphs, and wound healing.

  15. Mechanical thrombectomy in patients with acute ischemic stroke: a cost-utility analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xuanqian; Lambrinos, Anna; Chan, Brian; Dhalla, Irfan A.; Krings, Timo; Casaubon, Leanne K.; Lum, Cheemun; Sikich, Nancy; Bharatha, Aditya; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Stotts, Grant; Saposnik, Gustavo; O'Callaghan, Christina; Kelloway, Linda; Hill, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The beneficial effects of endovascular treatment with new-generation mechanical thrombectomy devices compared with intravenous thrombolysis alone to treat acute large-artery ischemic stroke have been shown in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). This study aimed to estimate the cost utility of mechanical thrombectomy compared with the established standard of care. Methods: We developed a Markov decision process analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of treatment with mechanical thrombectomy plus intravenous thrombolysis versus treatment with intravenous thrombolysis alone from the public payer perspective in Canada. We conducted comprehensive literature searches to populate model inputs. We estimated the efficacy of mechanical thrombectomy plus intravenous thrombolysis from a meta-analysis of 5 RCTs, and we used data from the Oxford Vascular Study to model long-term clinical outcomes. We calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) using a 5-year time horizon. Results: The base case analysis showed the cost and effectiveness of treatment with mechanical thrombectomy plus intravenous thrombolysis to be $126 939 and 1.484 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), respectively, and the cost and effectiveness of treatment with intravenous thrombolysis alone to be $124 419 and 1.273 QALYs, respectively. The mechanical thrombectomy plus intravenous thrombolysis strategy was associated with an ICER of $11 990 per QALY gained. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that the probability of treatment with mechanical thrombectomy plus intravenous thrombolysis being cost-effective was 57.5%, 89.7% and 99.6% at thresholds of $20 000, $50 000 and $100 000 per QALY gained, respectively. The main factors influencing the ICER were time horizon, extra cost of mechanical thrombectomy treatment and age of the patient. Interpretation: Mechanical thrombectomy as an adjunct therapy to intravenous thrombolysis is cost-effective compared with

  16. Investigation on design and reliability analysis of a new deployable and lockable mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qing; Nie, Hong; Ren, Jie; Chen, Jinbao

    2012-04-01

    The traditional structure of the deployable and lockable mechanism on soft-landing gear system is complicated and unreliable. To overcome the defects, a new deployable and lockable mechanism for planetary probes is developed. The compression assembly shares a set of new mechanism with the deployment assembly and locking assembly. The new mechanism shows some advantages: more steady deployment, simpler mechanism and higher reliability. This paper presents an introduction of the deployment and locking theory of the new mechanism, and constitutes the fault tree, which would contribute to qualitative and quantitative analyses. In addition, probability importance and criticality importance of the new mechanism are derived and calculated. The reliability modeling and analysis of the mechanism are accomplished from static torque margin, torque and the work by torque. In investigation results, reliability rate that the new mechanism could deploy successfully is 0.999334. The crucial problems concentrate on the insufficiency of storage force torque of high strength spring, the lubrication failure between the inner cylinder and the outer cylinder of the strut and the stuck soft-landing gear system. And then, the paper presents some improvement approaches and suggestions according to the problems discussed above.

  17. An improved path flux analysis with multi generations method for mechanism reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Gou, Xiaolong

    2016-03-01

    An improved path flux analysis with a multi generations (IMPFA) method is proposed to eliminate unimportant species and reactions, and to generate skeletal mechanisms. The production and consumption path fluxes of each species at multiple reaction paths are calculated and analysed to identify the importance of the species and of the elementary reactions. On the basis of the indexes of each reaction path of the first, second, and third generations, the improved path flux analysis with two generations (IMPFA2) and improved path flux analysis with three generations (IMPFA3) are used to generate skeletal mechanisms that contain different numbers of species. The skeletal mechanisms are validated in the case of homogeneous autoignition and perfectly stirred reactor of methane and n-decane/air mixtures. Simulation results of the skeletal mechanisms generated by IMPFA2 and IMPFA3 are compared with those obtained by path flux analysis (PFA) with two and three generations, respectively. The comparisons of ignition delay times, final temperatures, and temperature dependence on flow residence time show that the skeletal mechanisms generated by the present IMPFA method are more accurate than those obtained by the PFA method, with almost the same number of species under a range of initial conditions. By considering the accuracy and computational efficiency, when using the IMPFA (or PFA) method, three generations may be the best choice for the reduction of large-scale detailed chemistry.

  18. Multiscale Thermo-Mechanical Design and Analysis of High Frequency and High Power Vacuum Electron Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamzina, Diana

    Diana Gamzina March 2016 Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Multiscale Thermo-Mechanical Design and Analysis of High Frequency and High Power Vacuum Electron Devices Abstract A methodology for performing thermo-mechanical design and analysis of high frequency and high average power vacuum electron devices is presented. This methodology results in a "first-pass" engineering design directly ready for manufacturing. The methodology includes establishment of thermal and mechanical boundary conditions, evaluation of convective film heat transfer coefficients, identification of material options, evaluation of temperature and stress field distributions, assessment of microscale effects on the stress state of the material, and fatigue analysis. The feature size of vacuum electron devices operating in the high frequency regime of 100 GHz to 1 THz is comparable to the microstructure of the materials employed for their fabrication. As a result, the thermo-mechanical performance of a device is affected by the local material microstructure. Such multiscale effects on the stress state are considered in the range of scales from about 10 microns up to a few millimeters. The design and analysis methodology is demonstrated on three separate microwave devices: a 95 GHz 10 kW cw sheet beam klystron, a 263 GHz 50 W long pulse wide-bandwidth sheet beam travelling wave tube, and a 346 GHz 1 W cw backward wave oscillator.

  19. Analysis of cause and mechanism for injection-induced seismicityat the Geysers Geothermal Field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Oldenburg, Curtis

    2007-06-14

    We analyzed relative contributions to the cause andmechanism of injection-induced seismicity at The Geysers geothermalfield, California, using coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanicalmodeling. Our analysis shows that the most important cause forinjection-induced seismicity is injection-induced cooling and associatedthermal-elastic shrinkage that changes the stress state in such a waythat mechanical failure and seismicity can be induced. Specifically, thecooling shrinkage results in unloading and associated loss of shearstrength in critically shear-stressed fractures, which are thenreactivated. Thus, our analysis shows that cooling-induced shear slipalong fractures is the dominant mechanism of injection-induced seismicityat The Geysers.

  20. Mechanical analysis of photo-electricity measure equipment shafting in mobile-platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Weiwei; Hu, Hongyi; Tan, Yi; Liu, Ruzhen

    2015-02-01

    Along with the development of technology, photo-electricity measure equipment has been from ground-fixed to mobile-platform borne, So it is need to mechanical analysis of shafting for adapt movement environment of mobile-platform. First listed three kinds of shafting form, then analysis mechanical station of the foremost component bearing in vertical load, radial load, swing load station, last work out the formulas, which was the theory for the shafting design in mobile-platforms photo-electricity equipment.

  1. A mechanism-based framework for the numerical analysis of creep in zircaloy-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Hu, Z.; Lu, W.; Thouless, M. D.

    2013-02-01

    A deformation-mechanism map has been developed for unirradiated zircaloy-4 based on the creep data available from the literature of the last 35 years. These data have been analyzed to identify different creep mechanisms, based on the forms of the relationships between stress, temperature and strain rate. This identification allowed the activation energies and other associated creep parameters to be derived for each mechanism. The creep parameters were used to construct a deformation-mechanism map for zircaloy-4 that shows the conditions under which different mechanisms are dominant. This information provides an important tool for assessing the effects of stress and temperature in design, especially when extrapolating to different regimes. As an example of how this information might be used in a numerical analysis for design purposes, a novel mechanism-based creep framework was implemented within a finite-element code. Although the framework was developed specifically for zircaloy-4, it provides a general example of how mechanism-based creep laws can be implemented into finite-element analyses. This approach allows the creep of complex geometries to be analyzed rigorously, with the dominant deformation mechanisms being identified and evolving automatically in response to the local temperatures and stresses.

  2. Analysis of bipolar linear circuit response mechanisms for high and low dose rate total dose irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Barnaby, H.; Tausch, H.J.; Turfler, R.; Cole, P.; Baker, P.; Pease, R.L.

    1996-12-01

    A methodology is presented for the identification of circuit total dose response mechanisms in bipolar linear microcircuits irradiated at high and low dose rates. This methodology includes manual circuit analysis, circuit simulations with SPICE using extracted device parameters, and selective irradiations of portions of the circuit using a scanning electron microscope.

  3. Postmodeling Sensitivity Analysis to Detect the Effect of Missing Data Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamshidian, Mortaza; Mata, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    Incomplete or missing data is a common problem in almost all areas of empirical research. It is well known that simple and ad hoc methods such as complete case analysis or mean imputation can lead to biased and/or inefficient estimates. The method of maximum likelihood works well; however, when the missing data mechanism is not one of missing…

  4. A Massively Parallel Solver for the Mechanical Harmonic Analysis of Accelerator Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    O. Kononenko

    2015-02-17

    ACE3P is a 3D massively parallel simulation suite that developed at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory that can perform coupled electromagnetic, thermal and mechanical study. Effectively utilizing supercomputer resources, ACE3P has become a key simulation tool for particle accelerator R and D. A new frequency domain solver to perform mechanical harmonic response analysis of accelerator components is developed within the existing parallel framework. This solver is designed to determine the frequency response of the mechanical system to external harmonic excitations for time-efficient accurate analysis of the large-scale problems. Coupled with the ACE3P electromagnetic modules, this capability complements a set of multi-physics tools for a comprehensive study of microphonics in superconducting accelerating cavities in order to understand the RF response and feedback requirements for the operational reliability of a particle accelerator. (auth)

  5. Layerwise mechanics and finite element for the dynamic analysis of piezoelectric composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, Dimitris A.; Heyliger, Paul R.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1996-01-01

    Laminate and structural mechanics for the analysis of laminated composite plate structures with piezoelectric actuators and sensors are presented. The theories implement layerwise representations of displacements and electric potential, and can model both the global and local electromechanical response of smart composite laminates. Finite-element formulations are developed for the quasi-static and dynamic analysis of smart composite structures containing piezoelectric layers. Comparisons with an exact solution illustrate the accuracy, robustness and capability of the developed mechanics to capture the global and local response of thin and/or thick laminated piezoelectric plates. Additional correlations and numerical applications demonstrate the unique capabilities of the mechanics in analyzing the static and free-vibration response of composite plates with distributed piezoelectric actuators and sensors.

  6. The research Of Multilayer Thermal Insulation With Mechanical Properties Based On Model Analysis Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lianhua, Yin

    The heat shield of aircraft is made of the major thrusts structure with multilayer thermal insulation part. For protecting against thermo-radiation from larger thrusting force engine,the heat shield is installed around this engine nearby.The multilayer thermal insulation part with multilayer radiation/reflection structure is made of reflection layer and interval layer.At vacuum condition,these materials is higher heat insulation capability than other material,is applied for lots of pats on aircraft extensively.But because of these material is made of metal and nonmetal,it is impossible to receive it's mechanical properties of materials from mechanical tests.These paper describes a new measure of mechanical properties of materials in the heat shield based on model analysis test.At the requirement for the first order lateral frequency,these measure provide for the FEM analysis foundation on the optimization structure of the heat shield.

  7. Mechanical Analysis of the Nb3Sn Dipole Magnet HD1

    SciTech Connect

    Ferracin, Paolo; Bartlett, Scott E.; Caspi, Shlomo; Dietderich, Daniel R.; Gourlay, Steve A.; Hannaford, Charles R.; Hafalia, Aurelio R.; Lietzke, Alan F.; Mattafirri, Sara; Sabbi, Gianluca

    2005-06-01

    The Superconducting Magnet Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has recently fabricated and tested HD1, a Nb3Sn dipole magnet. The magnet reached a 16 T field, and exhibited training quenches in the end regions and in the straight section. After the test, HD1 was disassembled and inspected, and a detailed 3D finite element mechanical analysis was done to investigate for possible quench triggers. The study led to minor modifications to mechanical structure and assembly procedure, which were verified in a second test (HD1b). This paper presents the results of the mechanical analysis, including strain gauge measurements and coil visual inspection. The adjustments implemented in the magnet structure are reported and their effect on magnet training discussed.

  8. Mechanical analysis of the Nb3Sn dipole magnet HD1

    SciTech Connect

    Ferracin, Paolo; Bartlett, Scott E.; Caspi, Shlomo; Dietderich,Daniel R.; Gourlay, Steve A.; Hannaford, Carles R.; Hafalia, Aurelio R.; Lietzke, Alan F.; Mattafirri, Sara; Sabbi, Gianluca

    2005-04-14

    The Superconducting Magnet Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has recently fabricated and tested HD1, a Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole magnet. The magnet reached a 16 T field, and exhibited training quenches in the end regions and in the straight section. After the test, HD1 was disassembled and inspected, and a detailed 3D finite element mechanical analysis was done to investigate for possible quench triggers. The study led to minor modifications to mechanical structure and assembly procedure, which were verified in a second test (HD1b). This paper presents the results of the mechanical analysis, including strain gauge measurements and coil visual inspection. The adjustments implemented in the magnet structure are reported and their effect on magnet training discussed.

  9. Workspace Analysis and Optimization of 3-PUU Parallel Mechanism in Medicine Base on Genetic Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yongchao; Zhao, Yang

    2015-01-01

    A novel 3-PUU parallel robot was put forward, on which kinematic analysis was conducted to obtain its inverse kinematics solution, and on this basis, the limitations of the sliding pair and the Hooke joint on the workspace were analyzed. Moreover, the workspace was solved through the three dimensional limit search method, and then optimization analysis was performed on the workspace of this parallel robot, which laid the foundations for the configuration design and further analysis of the parallel mechanism, with the result indicated that this type of robot was equipped with promising application prospect. In addition that, the workspace after optimization can meet more requirements of patients. PMID:26628930

  10. Analysis of an evaporator-condenser-separated mechanical vapor compression system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hong; Li, Yulong; Chen, Jiang

    2013-04-01

    An evaporator-condenser-separated mechanical vapor compression (MVC) system was presented. The better effect of descaling and antiscaling was obtained by the new system. This study focused on the method of thermodynamic analysis, and the energy and exergy flow diagrams were established by using the first and second law of thermodynamics analysis. The results show that the energy utilization rate is very high and the specific power consumption is low. Exergy analysis indicates that the exergy efficiency is low, and the largest exergy loss occurs within the evaporator -condenser and the compressor.

  11. User-defined Material Model for Thermo-mechanical Progressive Failure Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Previously a user-defined material model for orthotropic bimodulus materials was developed for linear and nonlinear stress analysis of composite structures using either shell or solid finite elements within a nonlinear finite element analysis tool. Extensions of this user-defined material model to thermo-mechanical progressive failure analysis are described, and the required input data are documented. The extensions include providing for temperature-dependent material properties, archival of the elastic strains, and a thermal strain calculation for materials exhibiting a stress-free temperature.

  12. Workspace Analysis and Optimization of 3-PUU Parallel Mechanism in Medicine Base on Genetic Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yongchao; Zhao, Yang

    2015-01-01

    A novel 3-PUU parallel robot was put forward, on which kinematic analysis was conducted to obtain its inverse kinematics solution, and on this basis, the limitations of the sliding pair and the Hooke joint on the workspace were analyzed. Moreover, the workspace was solved through the three dimensional limit search method, and then optimization analysis was performed on the workspace of this parallel robot, which laid the foundations for the configuration design and further analysis of the parallel mechanism, with the result indicated that this type of robot was equipped with promising application prospect. In addition that, the workspace after optimization can meet more requirements of patients. PMID:26628930

  13. Mechanics unloading analysis and experimentation of a new type of parallel biomimetic shoulder complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yulei; Li, Zhisen; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Wenwen; Zeng, Daxing; Zhou, Yulin

    2016-06-01

    The structure design for high ratio of carrying capacity to deadweight is one of the challenges for the bionic mechanism, while the problem concerning high carrying capacity has not yet be solved for the existing shoulder complex. A new type biomimetic shoulder complex, which adopts 3-PSS/S(P for prismatic pair, S for spherical pair) spherical parallel mechanism (SPM), is proposed. The static equilibrium equations of each component are established by using the vector method and the equations for constrain forces with certain load are solved. Then the constrain force on the middle limb and that on the side limbs are compared in order to verify the unloading performance of the mechanism. In addition, the prototype mechanism of the shoulder complex is developed, and the force feedback experiment is conducted to verify the static analysis, which indicates that the middle limb suffers most of the external force and the effect of mechanics unloading is achieved. The 3-PSS/S spherical parallel mechanism is presented for the shoulder complex, and the realization of mechanics unloading is benefit for the improvement of the carrying capacity of the shoulder complex.

  14. Application of nanoscopic dynamic mechanical analysis for evaluating the mechanical behavior of hard tissues and bonded interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryou, Heonjune

    2011-12-01

    In this study Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was applied to dentin, the macro hybrid layer and intact hybrid layers of the bonded dental restorative interface using nanoindentation. Both intertubular and peritubular dentin were evaluated by DMA using discrete and scanning mode nanoindentation. The complex (E*), loss (E"), and storage (E') moduli were quantified over a range of indentation loads and scanning frequencies. The storage modulus of the peritubular cuff (22.19 GPa0.05). A model bonded interface (i.e. the macro hybrid) was evaluated using scanning DMA. A new approach for hydrating samples using ethylene glycol solution was developed and then applied to identify the importance of hydration on the measured properties. Fully hydrated samples exhibited mean values of E*, E' and E" of 3.54 GPa, 3.42 GPa and 0.86 GPa, respectively, whereas fully dehydrated samples exhibited values of 4.01 GPa, 3.88 GPa and 0.94 GPa, respectively. There were significant differences in the complex modulus (p<0.05) and storage modulus (p<0.001) between the hydrated and dehydrated conditions. However, differences in the loss moduli with hydration were not significantly different (p>0.05). A dynamic loading frequency of 100 Hz and scanning frequency of 0.2 Hz were identified to provide the most reliable results in scanning the collagen-based systems. Lastly, the optimal testing parameters obtained from studying the macro hybrid layer were used to evaluate intact resin-dentin bonded interfaces. The property maps clearly distinguished variations in properties as a function of the constituents. It was

  15. Critical analysis on degradation mechanism of dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad Shahimin, Mukhzeer; Suhaimi, Suriati; Abd Wahid, Mohd Halim; Retnasamy, Vithyacharan; Ahmad Hambali, Nor Azura Malini; Reshak, Ali Hussain

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports on a précis of degradation mechanism for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSCs). The review indicates progress in the understanding of degradation mechanism, in particular, the large improvement in the analysis of the materials used in DSSCs. The paper discussed on the stability issues of the dye, advancement of the photoelectrode film lifetime, changes in the electrolyte components and degradation analysis of the counter electrode. The photoelectrochemical parameters were evaluated in view of the possible degradation routes via open circuit voltage (Voc), short circuit current (Isc), fill factor (FF) and overall conversion efficiency (η) from the current-voltage curve. This analysis covers several types of materials that have paved the way for better-performing solar cells and directly influenced the stability and reliability of DSSCs. The new research trend together with the previous research has been highlighted to examine the key challenges faced in developing the ultimate DSSCs.

  16. Analysis and inverse substructuring computation on dynamic quality of mechanical assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Guangqing; Yi, Chuijie; Fang, Ke

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical assembly has its own dynamic quality directly affecting the dynamic quality of whole product and should be considered in quality inspection and estimation of mechanical assembly. Based on functional relations between dynamic characteristics involved in mechanical assembly, the effects of assembling process on dynamic characteristics of substructural components of an assembly system are investigated by substructuring analysis. Assembly-coupling dynamic stiffness is clarified as the dominant factor of the effects and can be used as a quantitative measure of assembly dynamic quality. Two computational schemes using frequency response functions(FRFs) to determine the stiffness are provided and discussed by inverse substructuring analysis, including their applicable conditions and implementation procedure in application. Eigenvalue analysis on matrix-ratios of FRFs before and after assembling is employed and well validates the analytical outcomes and the schemes via both a lumped-parameter model and its analogic experimental counterpart. Applying the two schemes to inspect the dynamic quality provides the message of dynamic performance of the assembly system, and therefore improves conventional quality inspection and estimation of mechanical assembly in completeness.

  17. Analysis and inverse substructuring computation on dynamic quality of mechanical assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Guangqing; Yi, Chuijie; Fang, Ke

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical assembly has its own dynamic quality directly affecting the dynamic quality of whole product and should be considered in quality inspection and estimation of mechanical assembly. Based on functional relations between dynamic characteristics involved in mechanical assembly, the effects of assembling process on dynamic characteristics of substructural components of an assembly system are investigated by substructuring analysis. Assembly-coupling dynamic stiffness is clarified as the dominant factor of the effects and can be used as a quantitative measure of assembly dynamic quality. Two computational schemes using frequency response functions(FRFs) to determine the stiffness are provided and discussed by inverse substructuring analysis, including their applicable conditions and implementation procedure in application. Eigenvalue analysis on matrix-ratios of FRFs before and after assembling is employed and well validates the analytical outcomes and the schemes via both a lumped-parameter model and its analogic experimental counterpart. Applying the two schemes to inspect the dynamic quality provides the message of dynamic performance of the assembly system, and therefore improves conventional quality inspection and estimation of mechanical assembly in completeness.

  18. Biomechanical Analysis of the Human Finger Extensor Mechanism during Isometric Pressing

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dan; Howard, David; Ren, Lei

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the finger extensor mechanism on the bone-to-bone contact forces at the interphalangeal and metacarpal joints and also on the forces in the intrinsic and extrinsic muscles during finger pressing. This was done with finger postures ranging from very flexed to fully extended. The role of the finger extensor mechanism was investigated by using two alternative finger models, one which omitted the extensor mechanism and another which included it. A six-camera three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to capture the finger posture during maximum voluntary isometric pressing. The fingertip loads were recorded simultaneously using a force plate system. Two three-dimensional biomechanical finger models, a minimal model without extensor mechanism and a full model with extensor mechanism (tendon network), were used to calculate the joint bone-to-bone contact forces and the extrinsic and intrinsic muscle forces. If the full model is assumed to be realistic, then the results suggest some useful biomechanical advantages provided by the tendon network of the extensor mechanism. It was found that the forces in the intrinsic muscles (interosseus group and lumbrical) are significantly reduced by 22% to 61% due to the action of the extensor mechanism, with the greatest reductions in more flexed postures. The bone-to-bone contact force at the MCP joint is reduced by 10% to 41%. This suggests that the extensor mechanism may help to reduce the risk of injury at the finger joints and also to moderate the forces in intrinsic muscles. These apparent biomechanical advantages may be a result of the extensor mechanism's distinctive interconnected fibrous structure, through which the contraction of the intrinsic muscles as flexors of the MCP joint can generate extensions at the DIP and PIP joints. PMID:24732789

  19. Biomechanical analysis of the human finger extensor mechanism during isometric pressing.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Howard, David; Ren, Lei

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the finger extensor mechanism on the bone-to-bone contact forces at the interphalangeal and metacarpal joints and also on the forces in the intrinsic and extrinsic muscles during finger pressing. This was done with finger postures ranging from very flexed to fully extended. The role of the finger extensor mechanism was investigated by using two alternative finger models, one which omitted the extensor mechanism and another which included it. A six-camera three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to capture the finger posture during maximum voluntary isometric pressing. The fingertip loads were recorded simultaneously using a force plate system. Two three-dimensional biomechanical finger models, a minimal model without extensor mechanism and a full model with extensor mechanism (tendon network), were used to calculate the joint bone-to-bone contact forces and the extrinsic and intrinsic muscle forces. If the full model is assumed to be realistic, then the results suggest some useful biomechanical advantages provided by the tendon network of the extensor mechanism. It was found that the forces in the intrinsic muscles (interosseus group and lumbrical) are significantly reduced by 22% to 61% due to the action of the extensor mechanism, with the greatest reductions in more flexed postures. The bone-to-bone contact force at the MCP joint is reduced by 10% to 41%. This suggests that the extensor mechanism may help to reduce the risk of injury at the finger joints and also to moderate the forces in intrinsic muscles. These apparent biomechanical advantages may be a result of the extensor mechanism's distinctive interconnected fibrous structure, through which the contraction of the intrinsic muscles as flexors of the MCP joint can generate extensions at the DIP and PIP joints. PMID:24732789

  20. A poroviscohyperelastic model for numerical analysis of mechanical behavior of single chondrocyte.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trung Dung; Oloyede, Adekunle; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to use a poroviscohyperelastic (PVHE) model, which is developed based on the porohyperelastic (PHE) model to explore the mechanical deformation properties of single chondrocytes. Both creep and relaxation responses are investigated by using finite element analysis models of micropipette aspiration and atomic force microscopy experiments, respectively. The newly developed PVHE model is compared thoroughly with the standard neo-Hookean solid and PHE models. It has been found that the PVHE can accurately capture both creep and stress relaxation behaviors of chondrocytes better than other two models. Hence, the PVHE is a promising model to investigate mechanical properties of single chondrocytes. PMID:25588670

  1. Research in progress in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, fluid mechanics, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period October 1, 1993 through March 31, 1994. The major categories of the current ICASE research program are: (1) applied and numerical mathematics, including numerical analysis and algorithm development; (2) theoretical and computational research in fluid mechanics in selected areas of interest to LaRC, including acoustics and combustion; (3) experimental research in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics involving LaRC facilities and scientists; and (4) computer science.

  2. Analysis and optimal design of an underactuated finger mechanism for LARM hand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shuangji; Ceccarelli, Marco; Carbone, Giuseppe; Zhan, Qiang; Lu, Zhen

    2011-09-01

    This paper aims to present general design considerations and optimality criteria for underactuated mechanisms in finger designs. Design issues related to grasping task of robotic fingers are discussed. Performance characteristics are outlined as referring to several aspects of finger mechanisms. Optimality criteria of the finger performances are formulated after careful analysis. A general design algorithm is summarized and formulated as a suitable multi-objective optimization problem. A numerical case of an underactuated robot finger design for Laboratory of Robotics and Mechatronics (LARM) hand is illustrated with the aim to show the practical feasibility of the proposed concepts and computations.

  3. The slider motion error analysis by positive solution method in parallel mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Lisong; Zhu, Liang; Yang, Wenguo; Hu, Penghao

    2016-01-01

    Motion error of slider plays key role in 3-PUU parallel coordinates measuring machine (CMM) performance and influence the CMM accuracy, which attracts lots of experts eyes in the world, Generally, the analysis method is based on the view of space 6-DOF. Here, a new analysis method is provided. First, the structure relation of slider and guideway can be abstracted as a 4-bar parallel mechanism. So, the sliders can be considered as moving platform in parallel kinematic mechanism PKM. Its motion error analysis is also transferred to moving platform position analysis in PKM. Then, after establishing the positive and negative solutions, some existed theory and technology for PKM can be applied to analyze slider straightness motion error and angular motion error simultaneously. Thirdly, some experiments by autocollimator are carried out to capture the original error data about guideway its own error, the data can be described as straightness error function by fitting curvilinear equation. Finally, the Straightness error of two guideways are considered as the variation of rod length in parallel mechanism, the slider's straightness error and angular error can be obtained by putting data into the established model. The calculated result is generally consistent with experiment result. The idea will be beneficial on accuracy calibration and error correction of 3-PUU CMM and also provides a new thought to analyze kinematic error of guideway in precision machine tool and precision instrument.

  4. Deflection Analysis of the Space Shuttle External Tank Door Drive Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tosto, Michael A.; Trieu, Bo C.; Evernden, Brent A.; Hope, Drew J.; Wong, Kenneth A.; Lindberg, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    Upon observing an abnormal closure of the Space Shuttle s External Tank Doors (ETD), a dynamic model was created in MSC/ADAMS to conduct deflection analyses of the Door Drive Mechanism (DDM). For a similar analysis, the traditional approach would be to construct a full finite element model of the mechanism. The purpose of this paper is to describe an alternative approach that models the flexibility of the DDM using a lumped parameter approximation to capture the compliance of individual parts within the drive linkage. This approach allows for rapid construction of a dynamic model in a time-critical setting, while still retaining the appropriate equivalent stiffness of each linkage component. As a validation of these equivalent stiffnesses, finite element analysis (FEA) was used to iteratively update the model towards convergence. Following this analysis, deflections recovered from the dynamic model can be used to calculate stress and classify each component s deformation as either elastic or plastic. Based on the modeling assumptions used in this analysis and the maximum input forcing condition, two components in the DDM show a factor of safety less than or equal to 0.5. However, to accurately evaluate the induced stresses, additional mechanism rigging information would be necessary to characterize the input forcing conditions. This information would also allow for the classification of stresses as either elastic or plastic.

  5. Acoustical analysis of mechanical heart valve sounds for early detection of malfunction.

    PubMed

    Famaey, Nele; Defever, Korijn; Bielen, Paul; Flameng, Willem; Vander Sloten, Jos; Sas, Paul; Meuris, Bart

    2010-10-01

    Mechanical heart valves carry the disadvantage of lifelong antithrombotic therapy, due to the high risk of thrombus formation on the valve surface. Current diagnostic methods are incapable of detecting thrombus formation in an early stage. This article investigates a new diagnostic method, based on the analysis of the acoustic signal produced by the valve. This method should be capable of early detection of malfunction, thus permitting targeted medication and reducing valve-related complications and mortality. A measurement setup assuring optimal signal quality was developed, and a signal analysis program was implemented and validated on an in vitro mock circulatory loop. Next, four sheep were implanted with a bileaflet mechanical valve. The signals of their valves developing thrombosis were assessed on a weekly basis before explantation. Three sheep were sacrificed shortly after detection of malfunction according to the newly developed method. In each case, thrombus or membrane formation was detected on the leaflets upon explantation. In one sheep, no malfunction was found in the analysis, which was also confirmed by the condition of the valve upon explantation. These preliminary results indicate that acoustical analysis of mechanical heart valves permits early detection of valvular malfunction. Further research with more in vitro and animal testing is required to statistically validate these findings. PMID:20573536

  6. Finite element cochlea box model - Mechanical and electrical analysis of the cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolic, Milica; Teal, Paul D.; Isailovic, Velibor; Filipović, Nenad

    2015-12-01

    The primary role of the cochlea is to transform external sound stimuli into mechanical vibrations and then to neural impulses which are sent to the brain. A simplified cochlea box model was developed using the finite element method. Firstly, a mechanical model of the cochlea was analyzed. The box model consists of the basilar membrane and two fluid chambers - the scala vestibuli and scala tympani. The third chamber, the scala media, was neglected in the mechanical analysis. The best agreement with currently available analytical and experimental results was obtained when behavior of the fluid in the chambers was described using the wave acoustic equation and behavior of the basilar membrane was modeled with Newtonian dynamics. The obtained results show good frequency mapping. The second approach was to use an active model of the cochlea in which the Organ of Corti was included. The operation of the Organ of Corti involves the generation of current, caused by mechanical vibration. This current in turn causes a force applied to the basilar membrane, creating in this way an active feedback mechanism. A state space representation of the electro-mechanical model from existing literature was implemented and a first comparison with the finite element method is presented.

  7. Mechanical evaluation and fem analysis of stress in fixed partial dentures zirconium-ceramic

    PubMed Central

    CARDELLI, P.L.; VERTUCCI, V.; BALESTRA, F.; MONTANI, M.; ARCURI, C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective. Over the last several years, the Finite Element Analysis (FEM) has been widely recognized as a reference method in different fields of study, to simulate the distribution of mechanical stress, in order to evaluate the relative distribution of loads of different nature. The aim of this study is to investigate through the FEM analysis the stress distribution in fixed prostheses that have a core in Zirconia and a ceramic veneer supported by implants. Materials and methods. In this work we investigated the mechanical flexural strength of a ceramic material (Noritake®) and a of zirconium framework (Zircodent®) and the effects of the manufacturing processes of the material commonly performed during the production of fixed prostheses with CAD/CAM technology. Specifically three point bending mechanical tests were performed (three-point-bending) (1–3), using a machine from Test Equipment Instron 5566®, on two structures in zirconium framework-ceramic (structures supported by two implant abutments with pontic elements 1 and 2). A further in-depth analysis on the mechanical behavior in flexure of the specimens was conducted carrying out FEM studies in order to compare analog and digital data. Results. The analysis of the data obtained showed that the stresses are distributed in a different way according to the intrinsic elasticity of the structure. The analysis of FPD with four elements, the stresses are mainly concentrated on the surface of the load, while, in the FPD of three elements, much more rigid, the stresses are concentrated near the inner margins of the abutments. The concentration of many stresses in this point could be correlated to chipping (4) that is found in the outer edges of the structure, as a direct result of the ceramic brittleness which opposes the resilience of the structure subjected to bending. Conclusions. The analysis of the UY linear displacement confirms previous data, showing, in a numerical way, that the presence of the

  8. Automatic generation of skeletal mechanisms for ignition combustion based on level of importance analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Loevaas, Terese

    2009-07-15

    A level of importance (LOI) selection parameter is employed in order to identify species with general low importance to the overall accuracy of a chemical model. This enables elimination of the minor reaction paths in which these species are involved. The generation of such skeletal mechanisms is performed automatically in a pre-processing step ranking species according to their level of importance. This selection criterion is a combined parameter based on a time scale and sensitivity analysis, identifying both short lived species and species with respect to which the observable of interest has low sensitivity. In this work a careful element flux analysis demonstrates that such species do not interact in major reaction paths. Employing the LOI procedure replaces the previous method of identifying redundant species through a two step procedure involving a reaction flow analysis followed by a sensitivity analysis. The flux analysis is performed using DARS {sup copyright}, a digital analysis tool modelling reactive systems. Simplified chemical models are generated based on a detailed ethylene mechanism involving 111 species and 784 reactions (1566 forward and backward reactions) proposed by Wang et al. Eliminating species from detailed mechanisms introduces errors in the predicted combustion parameters. In the present work these errors are systematically studied for a wide range of conditions, including temperature, pressure and mixtures. Results show that the accuracy of simplified models is particularly lowered when the initial temperatures are close to the transition between low- and high-temperature chemistry. A speed-up factor of 5 is observed when using a simplified model containing only 27% of the original species and 19% of the original reactions. (author)

  9. In Situ Mechanical Analysis of Myofibrillar Perturbation and Aging on Soft, Bilayered Drosophila Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Gaurav; Fuhrmann, Alexander; Cammarato, Anthony; Engler, Adam J.

    2011-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a genetically malleable organism with a short life span, making it a tractable system in which to study mechanical effects of genetic perturbation and aging on tissues, e.g., impaired heart function. However, Drosophila heart-tube studies can be hampered by its bilayered structure: a ventral muscle layer covers the contractile cardiomyocytes. Here we propose an atomic force microscopy-based analysis that uses a linearized-Hertz method to measure individual mechanical components of soft composite materials. The technique was verified using bilayered polydimethylsiloxane. We further demonstrated its biological utility via its ability to resolve stiffness changes due to RNA interference to reduce myofibrillar content or due to aging in Drosophila myocardial layers. This protocol provides a platform to assess the mechanics of soft biological composite systems and, to our knowledge, for the first time, permits direct measurement of how genetic perturbations, aging, and disease can impact cardiac function in situ. PMID:22261050

  10. Mouse tetrad analysis provides insights into recombination mechanisms and hotspot evolutionary dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Francesca; Baudat, Frédéric; Grey, Corinne; Keeney, Scott; de Massy, Bernard; Jasin, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The ability to examine all chromatids from a single meiosis in yeast tetrads has been indispensable for defining mechanisms of homologous recombination initiated by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Using a broadly applicable strategy for the analysis of chromatids from a single meiosis at two recombination hotspots in mouse oocytes and spermatocytes, we demonstrate here the unidirectional transfer of information — gene conversion — in both crossovers and noncrossovers. Whereas gene conversion in crossovers is associated with reciprocal exchange, the unbroken chromatid is not altered in noncrossover gene conversions, providing strong evidence that noncrossovers arise from a distinct pathway. Gene conversion frequently spares the binding site of the hotspot-specifying protein PRDM9 with the result that erosion of the hotspot is slowed. Thus, mouse tetrad analysis demonstrates how unique aspects of mammalian recombination mechanisms shape hotspot evolutionary dynamics. PMID:25151354

  11. OTU Deubiquitinases Reveal Mechanisms of Linkage Specificity and Enable Ubiquitin Chain Restriction Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mevissen, Tycho E.T.; Hospenthal, Manuela K.; Geurink, Paul P.; Elliott, Paul R.; Akutsu, Masato; Arnaudo, Nadia; Ekkebus, Reggy; Kulathu, Yogesh; Wauer, Tobias; El Oualid, Farid; Freund, Stefan M.V.; Ovaa, Huib; Komander, David

    2013-01-01

    Summary Sixteen ovarian tumor (OTU) family deubiquitinases (DUBs) exist in humans, and most members regulate cell-signaling cascades. Several OTU DUBs were reported to be ubiquitin (Ub) chain linkage specific, but comprehensive analyses are missing, and the underlying mechanisms of linkage specificity are unclear. Using Ub chains of all eight linkage types, we reveal that most human OTU enzymes are linkage specific, preferring one, two, or a defined subset of linkage types, including unstudied atypical Ub chains. Biochemical analysis and five crystal structures of OTU DUBs with or without Ub substrates reveal four mechanisms of linkage specificity. Additional Ub-binding domains, the ubiquitinated sequence in the substrate, and defined S1’ and S2 Ub-binding sites on the OTU domain enable OTU DUBs to distinguish linkage types. We introduce Ub chain restriction analysis, in which OTU DUBs are used as restriction enzymes to reveal linkage type and the relative abundance of Ub chains on substrates. PMID:23827681

  12. [Mass Spectrometric Methods for Colorative Mechanism Analysis of Yaozhou Porcelain Glaze].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuan-fang; He, Miao-hong; Zhang, Shu-di; Hang, Wei

    2015-09-01

    An in-house-built femtosecond laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (fs-LI-TOFMS) has been applied to the multi-elemental analysis of porcelain glaze from Yaozhou kiln. The samples are selected representing products of different dynasties, including Tang, Five, Song, Jin, and Ming Dynasty. For exploring the colorative mechanism of Yaozhou porcelain through the elemental analysis of the glaze, the effects of all potential coloring elements, especially transition elements, were considered. There was a speculation that the typical Co-Cr-Fe-Mn recipe was used in the fabrication of Yaozhou black glaze; the low content of Fe and high content of Ni resulted in the porcelain of white glaze; an increase content of P could lead the porcelain to be yellow-glazed. Undoubtedly, this research is an important supplement to the study of the colorative mechanism of the Yaozhou porcelain system. PMID:26669145

  13. Atypical cytostatic mechanism of N-1-sulfonylcytosine derivatives determined by in vitro screening and computational analysis.

    PubMed

    Supek, Fran; Kralj, Marijeta; Marjanović, Marko; Suman, Lidija; Smuc, Tomislav; Krizmanić, Irena; Zinić, Biserka

    2008-04-01

    We have previously shown that N-1-sulfonylpyrimidine derivatives have strong antiproliferative activity on human tumor cell lines, whereby 1-(p-toluenesulfonyl)cytosine showed good selectivity with regard to normal cells and was easily synthesized on a large scale. In the present work we have used an interdisciplinary approach to elucidate the compounds' mechanistic class. An augmented number of cell lines (11) has allowed a computational search for compounds with similar activity profiles and/or mechanistic class by integrating our data with the comprehensive DTP-NCI database. We applied supervised machine learning methodology (Random Forest classifier), which offers information complementary to unsupervised algorithms commonly used for analysis of cytostatic activity profiles, such as self-organizing maps. The computational results taken together with cell cycle perturbation and apoptosis analysis of the cell lines point to an unusual mechanism of cytostatic action, possibly a combination of nucleic acid antimetabolite activity and a novel molecular mechanism. PMID:17898928

  14. Inverse thermoelastic analysis for thermal and mechanical loads identification using FBG data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Toshiya; Kamimura, Yukihiro; Igawa, Hirotaka; Morino, Yoshiki

    2014-12-01

    Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors have widely been used to monitor temperature and strain distributions as a part of the structural health monitoring system. Since FBG has the sensitivity to the variations in both temperature and strain, a compensation is required to separate the strain or temperature data from the sensor output which is the shift of the grating's Bragg wavelength. The present study develops a computational inverse thermoelastic analysis method to separately identify the thermal and mechanical boundary conditions (loads) from the output of the FBG sensor. Numerical study has been made for a corrugate-core sandwich integral thermal protection system (TPS) to examine the method. The discussion is focused on the computational stability. The results reveal that the identification of the mechanical load is less stable than that of the heat flux. It is also shown that the condition number of a coefficient matrix serves as the index of the stability of the inverse analysis.

  15. Application of Homotopy analysis method for mechanical model of deepwater SCR installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Xiangcheng; Xu, Hang

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, considering the process of deepwater SCR installation with the limitations of small deformation theory of beam and catenary theory, a mechanical model of deepwater SCR installation is given based on large deformation beam model. In the following model, getting the relation of the length of the riser, bending stiffness and the unit weight by dimensional analysis, the simple approximate analytical expressions are obtained by using Homotopy Analysis Method. In the same condition, the calculated results are compared with the proposed approximate analytical expressions, the catenary theory or the commercial software of nonlinear finite element program ORCAFLEX. Hopefully, a convenient and effective method for mechanical model of deepwater SCR installation is provided.

  16. Code System for Fracture Mechanics Analysis of Circumferential Surface Cracks in Pipes.

    SciTech Connect

    BRUST, F.

    1999-07-28

    Version 00 The NRCPIPES software is designed to perform elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis for a circumferential surface cracked pipe, i.e., to establish the fracture-failure condition in terms of sustainable load (or stress) or displacement. The NRCPIPES software also includes several evaluation procedures and acceptance criteria for circumferential surface flaws based on the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI criteria, the British R6 Revision 3 Option 1 criteria, and the original Net-Section-Collapse (limit-load) analysis.

  17. Code System for Fracture Mechanics Analysis of Circumferential Surface Cracks in Pipes.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-07-28

    Version 00 The NRCPIPES software is designed to perform elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis for a circumferential surface cracked pipe, i.e., to establish the fracture-failure condition in terms of sustainable load (or stress) or displacement. The NRCPIPES software also includes several evaluation procedures and acceptance criteria for circumferential surface flaws based on the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI criteria, the British R6 Revision 3 Option 1 criteria, and the original Net-Section-Collapsemore » (limit-load) analysis.« less

  18. Network Analysis Reveals the Recognition Mechanism for Mannose-binding Lectins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yunjie; Jian, Yiren; Zeng, Chen; Computational Biophysics Lab Team

    The specific carbohydrate binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) protein in plants makes it a very useful molecular tool for cancer cell detection and other applications. The biological states of most MBL proteins are dimeric. Using dynamics network analysis on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the model protein of MBL, we elucidate the short- and long-range driving forces behind the dimer formation. The results are further supported by sequence coevolution analysis. We propose a general framework for deciphering the recognition mechanism underlying protein-protein interactions that may have potential applications in signaling pathways.

  19. Thermo-mechanical analysis of LWR SiC/SiC composite cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Belgacem, M.; Richet, V.; Terrani, K. A.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L. L.

    2014-04-01

    A dedicated framework for thermo-mechanical analysis of the in-pile performance of SiC/SiC composite fuel cladding concepts in LWRs has been developed. This analysis framework focuses on cladding and omits any fuel-cladding interaction and fuel behavior. Since radial expansion of the cladding occurs early in life for these ceramic structures, fuel-cladding contact is expected to be delayed or eliminated and therefore it is not considered in this analysis. The analysis inputs recent out-of-pile and in-pile materials property data and phenomenological understanding of material evolution under neutron irradiation for nuclear-grade SiC/SiC composites to provide a best-estimate analysis. The analysis provides insight into the concept design and feasibility of SiC/SiC composite cladding concepts that exhibit significantly different behavior than metallic cladding structures. In particular, absence of any tangible creep (thermal or irradiation) coupled with a large and temperature-gradient-driven irradiation swelling strain gradient across the cladding, drive development of large stresses across the cladding thickness. The resulting analysis indicates that significant stresses develop after a modest neutron dose (∼1 dpa) and a pronounced variation across the cladding thickness exists and is opposite to that observed for metallic cladding structures where swelling or growth strains are either negligible (with small temperature dependence) or absent. Following this thermo-mechanical analysis, a best-estimate and parametric examination of SiC/SiC fuel rod cladding structures has been performed using appropriate Weibull statistics to prescribe basic design guidelines and to begin to define a probable design space.

  20. BATMAN-TCM: a Bioinformatics Analysis Tool for Molecular mechANism of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongyang; Guo, Feifei; Wang, Yong; Li, Chun; Zhang, Xinlei; Li, Honglei; Diao, Lihong; Gu, Jiangyong; Wang, Wei; Li, Dong; He, Fuchu

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), with a history of thousands of years of clinical practice, is gaining more and more attention and application worldwide. And TCM-based new drug development, especially for the treatment of complex diseases is promising. However, owing to the TCM's diverse ingredients and their complex interaction with human body, it is still quite difficult to uncover its molecular mechanism, which greatly hinders the TCM modernization and internationalization. Here we developed the first online Bioinformatics Analysis Tool for Molecular mechANism of TCM (BATMAN-TCM). Its main functions include 1) TCM ingredients' target prediction; 2) functional analyses of targets including biological pathway, Gene Ontology functional term and disease enrichment analyses; 3) the visualization of ingredient-target-pathway/disease association network and KEGG biological pathway with highlighted targets; 4) comparison analysis of multiple TCMs. Finally, we applied BATMAN-TCM to Qishen Yiqi dripping Pill (QSYQ) and combined with subsequent experimental validation to reveal the functions of renin-angiotensin system responsible for QSYQ's cardioprotective effects for the first time. BATMAN-TCM will contribute to the understanding of the "multi-component, multi-target and multi-pathway" combinational therapeutic mechanism of TCM, and provide valuable clues for subsequent experimental validation, accelerating the elucidation of TCM's molecular mechanism. BATMAN-TCM is available at http://bionet.ncpsb.org/batman-tcm. PMID:26879404

  1. BATMAN-TCM: a Bioinformatics Analysis Tool for Molecular mechANism of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongyang; Guo, Feifei; Wang, Yong; Li, Chun; Zhang, Xinlei; Li, Honglei; Diao, Lihong; Gu, Jiangyong; Wang, Wei; Li, Dong; He, Fuchu

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), with a history of thousands of years of clinical practice, is gaining more and more attention and application worldwide. And TCM-based new drug development, especially for the treatment of complex diseases is promising. However, owing to the TCM’s diverse ingredients and their complex interaction with human body, it is still quite difficult to uncover its molecular mechanism, which greatly hinders the TCM modernization and internationalization. Here we developed the first online Bioinformatics Analysis Tool for Molecular mechANism of TCM (BATMAN-TCM). Its main functions include 1) TCM ingredients’ target prediction; 2) functional analyses of targets including biological pathway, Gene Ontology functional term and disease enrichment analyses; 3) the visualization of ingredient-target-pathway/disease association network and KEGG biological pathway with highlighted targets; 4) comparison analysis of multiple TCMs. Finally, we applied BATMAN-TCM to Qishen Yiqi dripping Pill (QSYQ) and combined with subsequent experimental validation to reveal the functions of renin-angiotensin system responsible for QSYQ’s cardioprotective effects for the first time. BATMAN-TCM will contribute to the understanding of the “multi-component, multi-target and multi-pathway” combinational therapeutic mechanism of TCM, and provide valuable clues for subsequent experimental validation, accelerating the elucidation of TCM’s molecular mechanism. BATMAN-TCM is available at http://bionet.ncpsb.org/batman-tcm. PMID:26879404

  2. Failure analysis of porcupine quills under axial compression reveals their mechanical response during buckling.

    PubMed

    Torres, Fernando G; Troncoso, Omar P; Diaz, John; Arce, Diego

    2014-11-01

    Porcupine quills are natural structures formed by a thin walled conical shell and an inner foam core. Axial compression tests, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were all used to compare the characteristics and mechanical properties of porcupine quills with and without core. The failure mechanisms that occur during buckling were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and it was found that delamination buckling is mostly responsible for the decrease in the measured buckling stress of the quills with regard to predicted theoretical values. Our analysis also confirmed that the foam core works as an energy dissipater improving the mechanical response of an empty cylindrical shell, retarding the onset of buckling as well as producing a step wise decrease in force after buckling, instead of an instantaneous decrease in force typical for specimens without core. Cell collapse and cell densification in the inner foam core were identified as the key mechanisms that allow for energy absorption during buckling. PMID:25123434

  3. BATMAN-TCM: a Bioinformatics Analysis Tool for Molecular mechANism of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongyang; Guo, Feifei; Wang, Yong; Li, Chun; Zhang, Xinlei; Li, Honglei; Diao, Lihong; Gu, Jiangyong; Wang, Wei; Li, Dong; He, Fuchu

    2016-02-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), with a history of thousands of years of clinical practice, is gaining more and more attention and application worldwide. And TCM-based new drug development, especially for the treatment of complex diseases is promising. However, owing to the TCM’s diverse ingredients and their complex interaction with human body, it is still quite difficult to uncover its molecular mechanism, which greatly hinders the TCM modernization and internationalization. Here we developed the first online Bioinformatics Analysis Tool for Molecular mechANism of TCM (BATMAN-TCM). Its main functions include 1) TCM ingredients’ target prediction; 2) functional analyses of targets including biological pathway, Gene Ontology functional term and disease enrichment analyses; 3) the visualization of ingredient-target-pathway/disease association network and KEGG biological pathway with highlighted targets; 4) comparison analysis of multiple TCMs. Finally, we applied BATMAN-TCM to Qishen Yiqi dripping Pill (QSYQ) and combined with subsequent experimental validation to reveal the functions of renin-angiotensin system responsible for QSYQ’s cardioprotective effects for the first time. BATMAN-TCM will contribute to the understanding of the “multi-component, multi-target and multi-pathway” combinational therapeutic mechanism of TCM, and provide valuable clues for subsequent experimental validation, accelerating the elucidation of TCM’s molecular mechanism. BATMAN-TCM is available at http://bionet.ncpsb.org/batman-tcm.

  4. Fracture mechanics analysis of a high-pressure hydrogen facility compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vroman, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The investigation and analysis of a high-pressure hydrogen facility compressor is chronicled, and a life prediction based on fracture mechanics is presented. Crack growth rates in SA 105 Gr II steel are developed for the condition of sustained loading, using a hypothesis of hydrogen embrittlement associated with plastic zone reverse yielding. The resultant formula is compared with test data obtained from laboratory specimens.

  5. Fermilab Central Computing Facility: Energy conservation report and mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Krstulovich, S.F.

    1986-11-12

    This report is developed as part of the Fermilab Central Computing Facility Project Title II Design Documentation Update under the provisions of DOE Document 6430.1, Chapter XIII-21, Section 14, paragraph a. As such, it concentrates primarily on HVAC mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis and should be considered as a supplement to the Title I Design Report date March 1986 wherein energy related issues are discussed pertaining to building envelope and orientation as well as electrical systems design.

  6. An electro-mechanical periodic system with piezoelectric transducers and coupled circuitry: dynamic analysis and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.; Tang, J.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we integrate piezoelectric transducers and coupled circuitry, which themselves form an electrical periodic system, onto a mechanical structure to form an electro-mechanical periodic system. The overall dynamics of the electro-mechanical system can thus be altered by tuning the electrical parameters. A transfer-matrix-based modeling technique is adopted in the dynamic analysis, where each element is represented by two state vectors at its both ends with a transfer matrix relating them. As the transfer matrix has the advantage on describing harmonic motions within the element, the global analysis can be facilitated given the repetitive nature of periodic systems. Numerical simulations are conducted to demonstrate the characteristics of wave propagation and attenuation in terms of propagation constants. Effects of each tunable parameter are also discussed through detailed parametric analysis. The proposed system can be tailored to various engineering needs. One example is adaptive vibration isolation with tunable effective frequency range. Another example is vibration energy harvesting through the piezoelectric transducers and circuitry.

  7. Network Analysis Shows Novel Molecular Mechanisms of Action for Copper-Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Espinal-Enríquez, Jesús; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Mejía, Carmen; Ruiz-Azuara, Lena

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the mechanisms associated with the action of chemotherapeutic agents is fundamental to assess and account for possible side-effects of such treatments. Casiopeínas have demonstrated a cytotoxic effect by activation of pro-apoptotic processes in malignant cells. Such processes have been proved to activate the apoptotic intrinsic route, as well as cell cycle arrest. Despite this knowledge, the whole mechanism of action of Casiopeínas is yet to be completely understood. In this work we implement a systems biology approach based on two pathway analysis tools (Over-Representation Analysis and Causal Network Analysis) to observe changes in some hallmarks of cancer, induced by this copper-based chemotherapeutic agent in HeLa cell lines. We find that the metabolism of metal ions is exacerbated, as well as cell division processes being globally diminished. We also show that cellular migration and proliferation events are decreased. Moreover, the molecular mechanisms of liver protection are increased in the cell cultures under the actions of Casiopeínas, unlike the case in many other cytotoxic drugs. We argue that this chemotherapeutic agent may be promising, given its protective hepatic function, concomitant with its cytotoxic participation in the onset of apoptotic processes in malignant cells. PMID:26793116

  8. Continuum Damage Mechanics Models for the Analysis of Progressive Failure in Open-Hole Tension Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyonchan; Li, Yingyong; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of a state-of-the-art continuum damage mechanics model for interlaminar damage, coupled with a cohesive zone model for delamination is examined for failure prediction of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates. Limitations of continuum representations of intra-ply damage and the effect of mesh orientation on the analysis predictions are discussed. It is shown that accurate prediction of matrix crack paths and stress redistribution after cracking requires a mesh aligned with the fiber orientation. Based on these results, an aligned mesh is proposed for analysis of the open-hole tension specimens consisting of different meshes within the individual plies, such that the element edges are aligned with the ply fiber direction. The modeling approach is assessed by comparison of analysis predictions to experimental data for specimen configurations in which failure is dominated by complex interactions between matrix cracks and delaminations. It is shown that the different failure mechanisms observed in the tests are well predicted. In addition, the modeling approach is demonstrated to predict proper trends in the effect of scaling on strength and failure mechanisms of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates.

  9. Systems analysis of the mechanisms of cardiac diastolic function changes after microgravity exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Richard; Coleman, Thomas; Steven, Platts; Martin, David

    Detailed information concerning cardiac function was collected by two-dimensional and M-mode echocardiography at 10 days before flight and 3h after landing in astronauts returning from shuttle missions. A comparative analysis of this data suggests that cardiac diastolic function is reduced after microgravity exposure with little or no change in systolic function as measured by ejection fraction However, the mechanisms responsible for these adaptations have not been determined. In this study, an integrative computer model of human physiology that forms the framework for the Digital Astronaut Project (Guyton/Coleman/Summers Model) was used in a systems analysis of the echocardiographic data in the context of general cardiovascular physiologic functioning. The physiologic mechanisms involved in the observed changes were then determined by a dissection of model interrelationships. The systems analysis of possible physiologic mechanisms involved reveals that a loss of fluid from the myocardial interstitial space may lead to a stiffening of the myocardium and could potentially result in some of the cardiac diastolic dysfunction seen postflight. The cardiovascular dynamics may be different during spaceflight.

  10. Comparative Analysis of the Tour Jete and Aerial with Detailed Analysis of Aerial Takeoff Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierson, Mimi; Coplin, Kim

    2006-10-01

    Whether internally as muscle tension or from external sources, forces are necessary for all motion. This research focused on athletic rotations where conditions of flight are established during takeoff. By studying reaction forces that produce torques, moments of inertia, and linear and angular differences between distinct rotations around different principle axes of the body (tour jete in ballet - longitudinal axis; aerial in gymnastics - anteroposterior axis), and by looking at the values of angular momentum in the specific mechanics of aerial takeoff, we can gain insight into possible causes of injury, flaws in technique and limitations of athletes. Results showed significant differences in the horizontal and vertical components of takeoff between the tour jete and the aerial, and a realization that torque was produced in different biomechanical planes. Both rotations showed braking forces before takeoff to counteract forward momentum and increase vertical lift, but the angle of applied force varied, and the horizontal components of velocity and force and vertical velocity as well as moment of inertia throughout flight were consistently greater for the aerial. Breakdown of aerial takeoff highlighted the relative importance of the takeoff phases, showing that completion depends fundamentally upon the rotation of the rear foot and torso twisting during takeoff rather than the last foot in contact with the ground.