Science.gov

Sample records for mechanical folding kinetics

  1. Kinetic partitioning mechanism of HDV ribozyme folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiawen; Gong, Sha; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Wenbing

    2014-01-01

    RNA folding kinetics is directly tied to RNA biological functions. We introduce here a new approach for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. This approach is based on our previous established helix-based method for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure. In this approach, the transition rates for an elementary step: (1) formation, (2) disruption of a helix stem, and (3) helix formation with concomitant partial melting of an incompatible helix, are calculated with the free energy landscape. The folding kinetics of the Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and the mutated sequences are studied with this method. The folding pathways are identified by recursive searching the states with high net flux-in(out) population starting from the native state. The theory results are in good agreement with that of the experiments. The results indicate that the bi-phasic folding kinetics for the wt HDV sequence is ascribed to the kinetic partitioning mechanism: Part of the population will quickly fold to the native state along the fast pathway, while another part of the population will fold along the slow pathway, in which the population is trapped in a non-native state. Single mutation not only changes the folding rate but also the folding pathway.

  2. Kinetic partitioning mechanism of HDV ribozyme folding

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiawen; Gong, Sha; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Wenbing

    2014-01-14

    RNA folding kinetics is directly tied to RNA biological functions. We introduce here a new approach for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. This approach is based on our previous established helix-based method for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure. In this approach, the transition rates for an elementary step: (1) formation, (2) disruption of a helix stem, and (3) helix formation with concomitant partial melting of an incompatible helix, are calculated with the free energy landscape. The folding kinetics of the Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and the mutated sequences are studied with this method. The folding pathways are identified by recursive searching the states with high net flux-in(out) population starting from the native state. The theory results are in good agreement with that of the experiments. The results indicate that the bi-phasic folding kinetics for the wt HDV sequence is ascribed to the kinetic partitioning mechanism: Part of the population will quickly fold to the native state along the fast pathway, while another part of the population will fold along the slow pathway, in which the population is trapped in a non-native state. Single mutation not only changes the folding rate but also the folding pathway.

  3. Insights into Coupled Folding and Binding Mechanisms from Kinetic Studies.

    PubMed

    Shammas, Sarah L; Crabtree, Michael D; Dahal, Liza; Wicky, Basile I M; Clarke, Jane

    2016-03-25

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are characterized by a lack of persistent structure. Since their identification more than a decade ago, many questions regarding their functional relevance and interaction mechanisms remain unanswered. Although most experiments have taken equilibrium and structural perspectives, fewer studies have investigated the kinetics of their interactions. Here we review and highlight the type of information that can be gained from kinetic studies. In particular, we show how kinetic studies of coupled folding and binding reactions, an important class of signaling event, are needed to determine mechanisms. PMID:26851275

  4. Translation Initiation is Controlled by RNA Folding Kinetics via a Ribosome Drafting Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Espah Borujeni, Amin; Salis, Howard M

    2016-06-01

    RNA folding plays an important role in controlling protein synthesis as well as other cellular processes. Existing models have focused on how RNA folding energetics control translation initiation rate under equilibrium conditions but have largely ignored the effects of nonequilibrium RNA folding. We introduce a new mechanism, called "ribosome drafting", that explains how a mRNA's folding kinetics and the ribosome's binding rate collectively control its translation initiation rate. During cycles of translation, ribosome drafting emerges whenever successive ribosomes bind to a mRNA faster than the mRNA can refold, maintaining it in a nonequilibrium state with an acceleration of protein synthesis. Using computational design, time-correlated single photon counting, and expression measurements, we demonstrate that slow-folding and fast-folding RNA structures with equivalent folding energetics can vary protein synthesis rates by 1000-fold. We determine the necessary conditions for ribosome drafting by characterizing mRNAs with rationally designed ribosome binding rates, folding kinetics, and folding energetics, confirming the predictions of a nonequilibrium Markov model of translation. Our results have widespread implications, illustrating how competitive folding and assembly kinetics can shape the gene expression machinery's sequence-structure-function relationship inside cells. PMID:27199273

  5. Fast protein folding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fast folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well less than 1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even “slow” folding processes: fast folders are small, relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general as well as some work that is left to do. PMID:24641816

  6. Kinetic folding mechanism of an integral membrane protein examined by pulsed oxidative labeling and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yan; Brown, Leonid; Konermann, Lars

    2011-07-01

    We report the application of pulsed oxidative labeling for deciphering the folding mechanism of a membrane protein. SDS-denatured bacteriorhodopsin (BR) was refolded by mixing with bicelles in the presence of free retinal. At various time points (20 ms to 1 day), the protein was exposed to a microsecond ·OH pulse that induces oxidative modifications at solvent-accessible methionine side chains. The extent of labeling was determined by mass spectrometry. These measurements were complemented by stopped-flow spectroscopy. Major time-dependent changes in solvent accessibility were detected for M20 (helix A) and M118 (helix D). Our kinetic data indicate a sequential folding mechanism, consistent with models previously suggested by others on the basis of optical data. Yet, ·OH labeling provides additional structural insights. An initial folding intermediate I(1) gets populated within 20 ms, concomitantly with formation of helix A. Subsequent structural consolidation leads to a transient species I(2). Noncovalent retinal binding to I(2) induces folding of helix D, thereby generating an intermediate I(R). In the absence of retinal, the latter transition does not take place. Hence, formation of helix D depends on retinal binding, whereas this is not the case for helix A. As the cofactor settles deeper into its binding pocket, a final transient species I(R) is generated. This intermediate converts into native BR within minutes by formation of the retinal-K216 Schiff base linkage. The combination of pulsed covalent labeling and optical spectroscopy employed here should also be suitable for exploring the folding mechanisms of other membrane proteins. PMID:21570983

  7. Folding mechanism of reduced cytochrome c: Equilibrium and kinetic properties in the presence of carbon monoxide

    PubMed Central

    Latypov, Ramil F.; Maki, Kosuke; Cheng, Hong; Luck, Stanley D.; Roder, Heinrich

    2008-01-01

    Despite close structural similarity, the ferric and ferrous forms of cytochrome c (cyt c) differ greatly in terms of their ligand binding properties, stability, folding and dynamics. The reduced heme iron binds diatomic ligands such as CO only under destabilizing conditions that promote weakening or disruption of the native methionine-iron linkage. This makes CO a useful conformational probe for detecting partially structured states that cannot be observed in the absence of endogenous ligands. Heme absorbance, circular dichroism and NMR were used to characterize the denaturant-induced unfolding equilibrium of Fe2+ cyt c in the presence and absence of CO. In addition to the native state (N), which does not bind CO, and the unfolded CO-complex (U-CO), a structurally distinct CO-bound form (M-CO) accumulates to high levels (~75% of the population) at intermediate guanidine hydrochloride concentrations. Comparison of the unfolding transition for different conformational probes reveals that M-CO is a compact state containing a native-like helical core and regions of local disorder in the segment containing the native Met80 ligand and adjacent loops. Kinetic measurements of CO binding and dissociation under native, partially denaturing and fully unfolded conditions indicate that a state, M, that is structurally analogous to M-CO is populated even in the absence of CO. The binding energy of the CO ligand lowers the free energy of this high-energy state to such an extent that it accumulates even under mildly denaturing equilibrium conditions. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters obtained in this study provide a fully self-consistent description of the linked unfolding/CO-binding equilibria of reduced cyt c. PMID:18761351

  8. Mechanics of Curved Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Marcelo A.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2011-03-01

    Despite an almost two thousand year history, origami, the art of folding paper, remains a challenge both artistically and scientifically. Traditionally, origami is practiced by folding along straight creases. A whole new set of shapes can be explored, however, if, instead of straight creases, one folds along arbitrary curves. We present a mechanical model for curved fold origami in which the energy of a plastically-deformed crease is balanced by the bending energy of developable regions on either side of the crease. Though geometry requires that a sheet buckle when folded along a closed curve, its shape depends on the elasticity of the sheet. NSF DMR-0846582.

  9. RNA under tension: Folding Landscapes, Kinetic partitioning Mechanism, and Molecular Tensegrity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jong-Chin; Hyeon, Changbong; Thirumalai, D

    2012-11-19

    Non-coding RNA sequences play a great role in controlling a number of cellular functions, thus raising the need to understand their complex conformational dynamics in quantitative detail. In this perspective, we first show that single molecule pulling when combined with with theory and simulations can be used to quantitatively explore the folding landscape of nucleic acid hairpins, and riboswitches with tertiary interactions. Applications to riboswitches, which are non-coding RNA elements that control gene expression by undergoing dynamical conformational changes in response to binding of metabolites, lead to an organization principle that assembly of RNA is determined by the stability of isolated helices. We also point out the limitations of single molecule pulling experiments, with molecular extension as the only accessible parameter, in extracting key parameters of the folding landscapes of RNA molecules. PMID:23336034

  10. A New Folding Kinetic Mechanism for Human Transthyretin and the Influence of the Amyloidogenic V30M Mutation.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Catarina S H; Almeida, Zaida L; Vaz, Daniela C; Faria, Tiago Q; Brito, Rui M M

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation into insoluble amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, chief among them Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Although caused by different proteins, these pathologies share some basic molecular mechanisms with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP), a rare hereditary neuropathy caused by amyloid formation and deposition by transthyretin (TTR) in the peripheral and autonomic nervous systems. Among the amyloidogenic TTR mutations known, V30M-TTR is the most common in FAP. TTR amyloidogenesis (ATTR) is triggered by tetramer dissociation, followed by partial unfolding and aggregation of the low conformational stability monomers formed. Thus, tetramer dissociation kinetics, monomer conformational stability and competition between refolding and aggregation pathways do play a critical role in ATTR. Here, we propose a new model to analyze the refolding kinetics of WT-TTR and V30M-TTR, showing that at pH and protein concentrations close to physiological, a two-step mechanism with a unimolecular first step followed by a second-order second step adjusts well to the experimental data. Interestingly, although sharing the same kinetic mechanism, V30M-TTR refolds at a much slower rate than WT-TTR, a feature that may favor the formation of transient species leading to kinetic partition into amyloidogenic pathways and, thus, significantly increasing the probability of amyloid formation in vivo. PMID:27589730

  11. Length dependent folding kinetics of phenylacetylene oligomers: Structural characterization of a kinetic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmer, Sidney P.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2005-03-01

    Using simulation to study the folding kinetics of 20-mer poly-phenylacetylene (pPA) oligomers, we find a long time scale trapped kinetic phase in the cumulative folding time distribution. This is demonstrated using molecular dynamics to simulate an ensemble of over 100 folding trajectories. The simulation data are fit to a four-state kinetic model which includes the typical folded and unfolded states, along with an intermediate state, and most surprisingly, a kinetically trapped state. Topologically diverse conformations reminiscent of α helices, β turns, and sheets in proteins are observed, along with unique structures in the form of knots. The nonhelical conformations are implicated, on the basis of structural correlations to kinetic parameters, to contribute to the trapped kinetic behavior. The strong solvophobic forces which mediate the folding process and produce a stable helical folded state also serve to overstabilize the nonhelical conformations, ultimately trapping them. From our simulations, the folding time is predicted to be on the order of 2.5-12.5 μs in the presence of the trapped kinetic phase. The folding mechanism for these 20-mer chains is compared with the previously reported folding mechanism for the pPA 12-mer chains. A linear scaling relationship between the chain length and the mean first passage time is predicted in the absence of the trapped kinetic phase. We discuss the major implications of this discovery in the design of self-assembling nanostructures.

  12. Kinetic Analysis of Protein Folding Lattice Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hu; Zhou, Xin; Liaw, Chih Young; Koh, Chan Ghee

    Based on two-dimensional square lattice models of proteins, the relation between folding time and temperature is studied by Monte Carlo simulation. The results can be represented by a kinetic model with three states — random coil, molten globule, and native state. The folding process is composed of nonspecific collapse and final searching for the native state. At high temperature, it is easy to escape from local traps in the folding process. With decreasing temperature, because of the trapping in local traps, the final searching speed decreases. Then the folding shows chevron rollover. Through the analysis of the fitted parameters of the kinetic model, it is found that the main difference between the energy landscapes of the HP model and the Go model is that the number of local minima of the Go model is less than that of the HP model.

  13. Probing Kinetic Mechanisms of Protein Function and Folding with Time-Resolved Natural and Magnetic Chiroptical Spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    Kliger, David S.; Chen, Eefei; Goldbeck, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent and ongoing developments in time-resolved spectroscopy have made it possible to monitor circular dichroism, magnetic circular dichroism, optical rotatory dispersion, and magnetic optical rotatory dispersion with nanosecond time resolution. These techniques have been applied to determine structural changes associated with the function of several proteins as well as to determine the nature of early events in protein folding. These studies have required new approaches in triggering protein reactions as well as the development of time-resolved techniques for polarization spectroscopies with sufficient time resolution and sensitivity to probe protein structural changes. PMID:22312279

  14. Protein folding and misfolding: mechanism and principles.

    PubMed

    Englander, S Walter; Mayne, Leland; Krishna, Mallela M G

    2007-11-01

    Two fundamentally different views of how proteins fold are now being debated. Do proteins fold through multiple unpredictable routes directed only by the energetically downhill nature of the folding landscape or do they fold through specific intermediates in a defined pathway that systematically puts predetermined pieces of the target native protein into place? It has now become possible to determine the structure of protein folding intermediates, evaluate their equilibrium and kinetic parameters, and establish their pathway relationships. Results obtained for many proteins have serendipitously revealed a new dimension of protein structure. Cooperative structural units of the native protein, called foldons, unfold and refold repeatedly even under native conditions. Much evidence obtained by hydrogen exchange and other methods now indicates that cooperative foldon units and not individual amino acids account for the unit steps in protein folding pathways. The formation of foldons and their ordered pathway assembly systematically puts native-like foldon building blocks into place, guided by a sequential stabilization mechanism in which prior native-like structure templates the formation of incoming foldons with complementary structure. Thus the same propensities and interactions that specify the final native state, encoded in the amino-acid sequence of every protein, determine the pathway for getting there. Experimental observations that have been interpreted differently, in terms of multiple independent pathways, appear to be due to chance misfolding errors that cause different population fractions to block at different pathway points, populate different pathway intermediates, and fold at different rates. This paper summarizes the experimental basis for these three determining principles and their consequences. Cooperative native-like foldon units and the sequential stabilization process together generate predetermined stepwise pathways. Optional misfolding errors

  15. Temperature dependence of protein folding kinetics in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Minghao; Xu, Yangfan; Gruebele, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We measure the stability and folding rate of a mutant of the enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) inside bone tissue cells as a function of temperature from 38 to 48 °C. To facilitate measurement in individual living cells, we developed a rapid laser temperature stepping method capable of measuring complete thermal melts and kinetic traces in about two min. We find that this method yields improved thermal melts compared to heating a sample chamber or microscope stage. By comparing results for six cells with in vitro data, we show that the protein is stabilized by about 6 kJ/mole in the cytoplasm, but the temperature dependence of folding kinetics is similar to in vitro. The main difference is a slightly steeper temperature dependence of the folding rate in some cells that can be rationalized in terms of temperature-dependent crowding, local viscosity, or hydrophobicity. The observed rate coefficients can be fitted within measurement uncertainty by an effective two-state model, even though PGK folds by a multistate mechanism. We validate the effective two-state model with a three-state free energy landscape of PGK to illustrate that the effective fitting parameters can represent a more complex underlying free energy landscape. PMID:22665776

  16. Folding with thermal-mechanical feedback: Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treagus, Susan H.; Hudleston, Peter J.

    2009-07-01

    A recent paper in this Journal by Bruce Hobbs, Klaus Regenauer-Lieb and Alison Ord [Hobbs, B., Regenauer-Lieb, K., Ord, A., 2008. Folding with thermal-mechanical feedback. Journal of Structural Geology 30, 1572-1592] presents an alternative theory to the traditional Biot-Ramberg theory for folding of viscous rocks that involves non-equilibrium thermodynamics and thermal-mechanical feedback. The authors convey a strong message throughout their paper that the folds produced by this theoretical and numerical modelling are geologically realistic and provide a better explanation for many natural folds than the traditional theory. They promise the same approach for boudinage, and present this folding paper as part of a "unified framework for rock deformation processes". Readers of the Journal of Structural Geology might be led to conclude that this paper provides a good alternative model for folding of rocks. Our discussion will disagree, on four counts.

  17. Chemical, physical, and theoretical kinetics of an ultrafast folding protein

    PubMed Central

    Kubelka, Jan; Henry, Eric R.; Cellmer, Troy; Hofrichter, James; Eaton, William A.

    2008-01-01

    An extensive set of equilibrium and kinetic data is presented and analyzed for an ultrafast folding protein—the villin subdomain. The equilibrium data consist of the excess heat capacity, tryptophan fluorescence quantum yield, and natural circular-dichroism spectrum as a function of temperature, and the kinetic data consist of time courses of the quantum yield from nanosecond-laser temperature-jump experiments. The data are well fit with three kinds of models—a three-state chemical-kinetics model, a physical-kinetics model, and an Ising-like theoretical model that considers 105 possible conformations (microstates). In both the physical-kinetics and theoretical models, folding is described as diffusion on a one-dimensional free-energy surface. In the physical-kinetics model the reaction coordinate is unspecified, whereas in the theoretical model, order parameters, either the fraction of native contacts or the number of native residues, are used as reaction coordinates. The validity of these two reaction coordinates is demonstrated from calculation of the splitting probability from the rate matrix of the master equation for all 105 microstates. The analysis of the data on site-directed mutants using the chemical-kinetics model provides information on the structure of the transition-state ensemble; the physical-kinetics model allows an estimate of the height of the free-energy barrier separating the folded and unfolded states; and the theoretical model provides a detailed picture of the free-energy surface and a residue-by-residue description of the evolution of the folded structure, yet contains many fewer adjustable parameters than either the chemical- or physical-kinetics models. PMID:19033473

  18. Folding and unfolding kinetics of a single semiflexible polymer.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Natsuhiko

    2008-06-01

    We investigate theoretically the kinetics of the folding transition of a single semiflexible polymer. In the folding transition, the growth rate decreases with an increase in the number of monomers in the collapsed domain, suggesting that the main contribution to dissipation is from the motion of the domain. In the unfolding transition, the dynamic scaling exponents 1/8 and 1/4 were determined for the disentanglement and relaxation steps, respectively. We performed Langevin dynamics simulations to test our theory. It is found that our theory is in good agreement with simulations. We also propose the kinetics of the transitions in the presence of a hydrodynamic interaction. PMID:18643293

  19. Proteome folding kinetics is limited by protein halflife.

    PubMed

    Zou, Taisong; Williams, Nickolas; Ozkan, S Banu; Ghosh, Kingshuk

    2014-01-01

    How heterogeneous are proteome folding timescales and what physical principles, if any, dictate its limits? We answer this by predicting copy number weighted folding speed distribution - using the native topology - for E.coli and Yeast proteome. E.coli and Yeast proteomes yield very similar distributions with average folding times of 100 milliseconds and 170 milliseconds, respectively. The topology-based folding time distribution is well described by a diffusion-drift mutation model on a flat-fitness landscape in free energy barrier between two boundaries: i) the lowest barrier height determined by the upper limit of folding speed and ii) the highest barrier height governed by the lower speed limit of folding. While the fastest time scale of the distribution is near the experimentally measured speed limit of 1 microsecond (typical of barrier-less folders), we find the slowest folding time to be around seconds ([Formula: see text]8 seconds for Yeast distribution), approximately an order of magnitude less than the fastest halflife (approximately 2 minutes) in the Yeast proteome. This separation of timescale implies even the fastest degrading protein will have moderately high (96%) probability of folding before degradation. The overall agreement with the flat-fitness landscape model further hints that proteome folding times did not undergo additional major selection pressures - to make proteins fold faster - other than the primary requirement to "sufficiently beat the clock" against its lifetime. Direct comparison between the predicted folding time and experimentally measured halflife further shows 99% of the proteome have a folding time less than their corresponding lifetime. These two findings together suggest that proteome folding kinetics may be bounded by protein halflife. PMID:25393560

  20. Oxidative folding of peptides with cystine-knot architectures: kinetic studies and optimization of folding conditions.

    PubMed

    Reinwarth, Michael; Glotzbach, Bernhard; Tomaszowski, Michael; Fabritz, Sebastian; Avrutina, Olga; Kolmar, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive peptides often contain several disulfide bonds that provide the main contribution to conformational rigidity and structural, thermal, or biological stability. Among them, cystine-knot peptides-commonly named "knottins"-make up a subclass with several thousand natural members. Hence, they are considered promising frameworks for peptide-based pharmaceuticals. Although cystine-knot peptides are available through chemical and recombinant synthetic routes, oxidative folding to afford the bioactive isomers still remains a crucial step. We therefore investigated the oxidative folding of ten protease-inhibiting peptides from two knottin families, as well as that of an HIV entry inhibitor and of aprotinin, under two conventional sets of folding conditions and by a newly developed procedure. Kinetic studies identified folding conditions that resulted in correctly folded miniproteins with high rates of conversion even for highly hydrophobic and aggregation-prone peptides in concentrated solutions. PMID:23229141

  1. Dependence of Internal Friction on Folding Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An outstanding challenge in protein folding is understanding the origin of “internal friction” in folding dynamics, experimentally identified from the dependence of folding rates on solvent viscosity. A possible origin suggested by simulation is the crossing of local torsion barriers. However, it was unclear why internal friction varied from protein to protein or for different folding barriers of the same protein. Using all-atom simulations with variable solvent viscosity, in conjunction with transition-path sampling to obtain reaction rates and analysis via Markov state models, we are able to determine the internal friction in the folding of several peptides and miniproteins. In agreement with experiment, we find that the folding events with greatest internal friction are those that mainly involve helix formation, while hairpin formation exhibits little or no evidence of friction. Via a careful analysis of folding transition paths, we show that internal friction arises when torsion angle changes are an important part of the folding mechanism near the folding free energy barrier. These results suggest an explanation for the variation of internal friction effects from protein to protein and across the energy landscape of the same protein. PMID:25721133

  2. The primary dynamics in protein folding: the earliest kinetic steps.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callender, Robert

    1996-03-01

    A novel laser-induced temperature jump (T-jump) of 20 C or more is used to initiate the unfolding process of peptides and proteins on the picosecond time scale, and amide I time-resolved infrared absorbance transients are used to characterize the resulting kinetics. We have used this method to study the kinetics of folding and unfolding of a small 21 residue alanine based peptide and molten globule and native states of apomyoglobin, models for the helix which is an basic motif found in proteins. An essential result of our study is that the folding kinetics of a short length of peptide can occur within a few tens of nanoseconds which is much shorter than the time scale of the formation of intramolecular tertiary contacts from one point of a polypeptide chain to another. Furthermore, we observed that helices stabilized by tertiary contact formation unfold slower than helices surrounded by solvent by three orders of magnitude. These results bear directly on the protein folding problem, that is how do proteins fold from a large number of heterogeneous unfolded states to find the specific biologically active folded state on biologically relevent time scales, by suggesting that secondary structure forms first followed by tertiary structure. This work is a collaborative effort with R. GILMANSHIN at City College and S. WILLIAMS, R. B. DYER, and W. H. WOODRUFF at CST-4, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545.

  3. Thermodynamics and kinetics of apoazurin folding under macromolecular crowding effect and chemical interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zegarra, Fabio; Cheung, Margaret

    2013-03-01

    Proteins fold in a cellular milieu crowded by different kinds of macromolecules. They exert volume exclusion impacting protein folding processes in vivo. Folding processes, however, has been studied by chemical denaturation under in vitro conditions. The impact of the two factors as an attempt to advance the understanding of folding mechanism in vivo is not understood. Here, we investigate the folding mechanisms of apoazurin affected by the macromolecular crowding and chemical interference by using coarse-grained molecular simulations. Crowding agents are modeled as hard-spheres and the chemical denaturation effects are implemented into an energy function of the side chain and backbone interactions. Protein folding stability, mechanism, and kinetics rates of apoazurin under chemical interference and macromolecular crowding conditions are being investigated. Supported by NSF, Molecular & Cellular Biosciences (MCB0919974).

  4. Effects of mutation, truncation, and temperature on the folding kinetics of a WW domain.

    PubMed

    Maisuradze, Gia G; Zhou, Rui; Liwo, Adam; Xiao, Yi; Scheraga, Harold A

    2012-07-20

    The purpose of this work is to show how mutation, truncation, and change of temperature can influence the folding kinetics of a protein. This is accomplished by principal component analysis of molecular-dynamics-generated folding trajectories of the triple β-strand WW domain from formin binding protein 28 (FBP28) (Protein Data Bank ID: 1E0L) and its full-size, and singly- and doubly-truncated mutants at temperatures below and very close to the melting point. The reasons for biphasic folding kinetics [i.e., coexistence of slow (three-state) and fast (two-state) phases], including the involvement of a solvent-exposed hydrophobic cluster and another delocalized hydrophobic core in the folding kinetics, are discussed. New folding pathways are identified in free-energy landscapes determined in terms of principal components for full-size mutants. Three-state folding is found to be a main mechanism for folding the FBP28 WW domain and most of the full-size and truncated mutants. The results from the theoretical analysis are compared to those from experiment. Agreements and discrepancies between the theoretical and experimental results are discussed. Because of its importance in understanding protein kinetics and function, the diffusive mechanism by which the FBP28 WW domain and its full-size and truncated mutants explore their conformational space is examined in terms of the mean-square displacement and principal component analysis eigenvalue spectrum analyses. Subdiffusive behavior is observed for all studied systems. PMID:22560992

  5. Protein Folding and Mechanisms of Proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Villanueva, José Fernando; Díaz-Molina, Raúl; García-González, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Highly sophisticated mechanisms that modulate protein structure and function, which involve synthesis and degradation, have evolved to maintain cellular homeostasis. Perturbations in these mechanisms can lead to protein dysfunction as well as deleterious cell processes. Therefore in recent years the etiology of a great number of diseases has been attributed to failures in mechanisms that modulate protein structure. Interconnections among metabolic and cell signaling pathways are critical for homeostasis to converge on mechanisms associated with protein folding as well as for the preservation of the native structure of proteins. For instance, imbalances in secretory protein synthesis pathways lead to a condition known as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress which elicits the adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR). Therefore, taking this into consideration, a key part of this paper is developed around the protein folding phenomenon, and cellular mechanisms which support this pivotal condition. We provide an overview of chaperone protein function, UPR via, spatial compartmentalization of protein folding, proteasome role, autophagy, as well as the intertwining between these processes. Several diseases are known to have a molecular etiology in the malfunction of mechanisms responsible for protein folding and in the shielding of native structure, phenomena which ultimately lead to misfolded protein accumulation. This review centers on our current knowledge about pathways that modulate protein folding, and cell responses involved in protein homeostasis. PMID:26225966

  6. Protein Folding and Mechanisms of Proteostasis.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Villanueva, José Fernando; Díaz-Molina, Raúl; García-González, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Highly sophisticated mechanisms that modulate protein structure and function, which involve synthesis and degradation, have evolved to maintain cellular homeostasis. Perturbations in these mechanisms can lead to protein dysfunction as well as deleterious cell processes. Therefore in recent years the etiology of a great number of diseases has been attributed to failures in mechanisms that modulate protein structure. Interconnections among metabolic and cell signaling pathways are critical for homeostasis to converge on mechanisms associated with protein folding as well as for the preservation of the native structure of proteins. For instance, imbalances in secretory protein synthesis pathways lead to a condition known as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress which elicits the adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR). Therefore, taking this into consideration, a key part of this paper is developed around the protein folding phenomenon, and cellular mechanisms which support this pivotal condition. We provide an overview of chaperone protein function, UPR via, spatial compartmentalization of protein folding, proteasome role, autophagy, as well as the intertwining between these processes. Several diseases are known to have a molecular etiology in the malfunction of mechanisms responsible for protein folding and in the shielding of native structure, phenomena which ultimately lead to misfolded protein accumulation. This review centers on our current knowledge about pathways that modulate protein folding, and cell responses involved in protein homeostasis. PMID:26225966

  7. Mechanical Models of Fault-Related Folding

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A. M.

    2003-01-09

    The subject of the proposed research is fault-related folding and ground deformation. The results are relevant to oil-producing structures throughout the world, to understanding of damage that has been observed along and near earthquake ruptures, and to earthquake-producing structures in California and other tectonically-active areas. The objectives of the proposed research were to provide both a unified, mechanical infrastructure for studies of fault-related foldings and to present the results in computer programs that have graphical users interfaces (GUIs) so that structural geologists and geophysicists can model a wide variety of fault-related folds (FaRFs).

  8. Periodic and stochastic thermal modulation of protein folding kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Platkov, Max; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-07-21

    Chemical reactions are usually observed either by relaxation of a bulk sample after applying a sudden external perturbation, or by intrinsic fluctuations of a few molecules. Here we show that the two ideas can be combined to measure protein folding kinetics, either by periodic thermal modulation, or by creating artificial thermal noise that greatly exceeds natural thermal fluctuations. We study the folding reaction of the enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase driven by periodic temperature waveforms. As the temperature waveform unfolds and refolds the protein, its fluorescence color changes due to FRET (Förster resonant Energy Transfer) of two donor/acceptor fluorophores labeling the protein. We adapt a simple model of periodically driven kinetics that nicely fits the data at all temperatures and driving frequencies: The phase shifts of the periodic donor and acceptor fluorescence signals as a function of driving frequency reveal reaction rates. We also drive the reaction with stochastic temperature waveforms that produce thermal fluctuations much greater than natural fluctuations in the bulk. Such artificial thermal noise allows the recovery of weak underlying signals due to protein folding kinetics. This opens up the possibility for future detection of a stochastic resonance for protein folding subject to noise with controllable amplitude.

  9. Periodic and stochastic thermal modulation of protein folding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Platkov, Max; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-07-21

    Chemical reactions are usually observed either by relaxation of a bulk sample after applying a sudden external perturbation, or by intrinsic fluctuations of a few molecules. Here we show that the two ideas can be combined to measure protein folding kinetics, either by periodic thermal modulation, or by creating artificial thermal noise that greatly exceeds natural thermal fluctuations. We study the folding reaction of the enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase driven by periodic temperature waveforms. As the temperature waveform unfolds and refolds the protein, its fluorescence color changes due to FRET (Förster resonant Energy Transfer) of two donor/acceptor fluorophores labeling the protein. We adapt a simple model of periodically driven kinetics that nicely fits the data at all temperatures and driving frequencies: The phase shifts of the periodic donor and acceptor fluorescence signals as a function of driving frequency reveal reaction rates. We also drive the reaction with stochastic temperature waveforms that produce thermal fluctuations much greater than natural fluctuations in the bulk. Such artificial thermal noise allows the recovery of weak underlying signals due to protein folding kinetics. This opens up the possibility for future detection of a stochastic resonance for protein folding subject to noise with controllable amplitude. PMID:25053342

  10. Periodic and stochastic thermal modulation of protein folding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Platkov, Max; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Chemical reactions are usually observed either by relaxation of a bulk sample after applying a sudden external perturbation, or by intrinsic fluctuations of a few molecules. Here we show that the two ideas can be combined to measure protein folding kinetics, either by periodic thermal modulation, or by creating artificial thermal noise that greatly exceeds natural thermal fluctuations. We study the folding reaction of the enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase driven by periodic temperature waveforms. As the temperature waveform unfolds and refolds the protein, its fluorescence color changes due to FRET (Förster resonant Energy Transfer) of two donor/acceptor fluorophores labeling the protein. We adapt a simple model of periodically driven kinetics that nicely fits the data at all temperatures and driving frequencies: The phase shifts of the periodic donor and acceptor fluorescence signals as a function of driving frequency reveal reaction rates. We also drive the reaction with stochastic temperature waveforms that produce thermal fluctuations much greater than natural fluctuations in the bulk. Such artificial thermal noise allows the recovery of weak underlying signals due to protein folding kinetics. This opens up the possibility for future detection of a stochastic resonance for protein folding subject to noise with controllable amplitude. PMID:25053342

  11. Periodic and stochastic thermal modulation of protein folding kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platkov, Max; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Chemical reactions are usually observed either by relaxation of a bulk sample after applying a sudden external perturbation, or by intrinsic fluctuations of a few molecules. Here we show that the two ideas can be combined to measure protein folding kinetics, either by periodic thermal modulation, or by creating artificial thermal noise that greatly exceeds natural thermal fluctuations. We study the folding reaction of the enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase driven by periodic temperature waveforms. As the temperature waveform unfolds and refolds the protein, its fluorescence color changes due to FRET (Förster resonant Energy Transfer) of two donor/acceptor fluorophores labeling the protein. We adapt a simple model of periodically driven kinetics that nicely fits the data at all temperatures and driving frequencies: The phase shifts of the periodic donor and acceptor fluorescence signals as a function of driving frequency reveal reaction rates. We also drive the reaction with stochastic temperature waveforms that produce thermal fluctuations much greater than natural fluctuations in the bulk. Such artificial thermal noise allows the recovery of weak underlying signals due to protein folding kinetics. This opens up the possibility for future detection of a stochastic resonance for protein folding subject to noise with controllable amplitude.

  12. Folded membrane dialyzer with mechanically sealed edges

    DOEpatents

    Markley, Finley W.

    1976-01-01

    A semipermeable membrane is folded in accordion fashion to form a stack of pleats and the edges are sealed so as to isolate the opposite surfaces of the membrane. The stack is contained within a case that provides ports for flow of blood in contact with one surface of the membrane through channels formed by the pleats and also provides ports for flow of a dialysate through channels formed by the pleats in contact with the other surface of the membrane. The serpentine side edges of the membrane are sealed by a solidified plastic material, whereas effective mechanical means are provided to seal the end edges of the folded membrane. The mechanical means include a clamping strip which biases case sealing flanges into a sealed relationship with end portions of the membrane near the end edges, which portions extend from the stack and between the sealing flanges.

  13. Cooperative folding kinetics of BBL protein and peripheral subunit-binding domain homologues

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wookyung; Chung, Kwanghoon; Cheon, Mookyung; Heo, Muyoung; Han, Kyou-Hoon; Ham, Sihyun; Chang, Iksoo

    2008-01-01

    Recent experiments claiming that Naf-BBL protein follows a global downhill folding raised an important controversy as to the folding mechanism of fast-folding proteins. Under the global downhill folding scenario, not only do proteins undergo a gradual folding, but folding events along the continuous folding pathway also could be mapped out from the equilibrium denaturation experiment. Based on the exact calculation using a free energy landscape, relaxation eigenmodes from a master equation, and Monte Carlo simulation of an extended Muñoz–Eaton model that incorporates multiscale-heterogeneous pairwise interactions between amino acids, here we show that the very nature of a two-state cooperative transition such as a bimodal distribution from an exact free energy landscape and biphasic relaxation kinetics manifest in the thermodynamics and folding–unfolding kinetics of BBL and peripheral subunit-binding domain homologues. Our results provide an unequivocal resolution to the fundamental controversy related to the global downhill folding scheme, whose applicability to other proteins should be critically reexamined. PMID:18272497

  14. Microsecond Microfluidic Mixing for Investigation of Protein Folding Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzog, D E; Santiago, J G; Bakajin, O

    2003-06-25

    We have developed and characterized a mixer to study the reaction kinetics of protein folding on a microsecond timescale. The mixer uses hydrodynamic focusing of pressure-driven flow in a microfluidic channel to reduce diffusion times as first demonstrated by Knight et al.[1]. Features of the mixer include 1 {micro}s mixing times, sample consumptions of order 1 nl/s, loading sample volumes on the order of microliters, and the ability to manufacture in fused silica for compatibility with most spectroscopic methods.

  15. Microsecond Microfluidic Mixing for Investigation of Protein Folding Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzog, D E; Santiago, J G; Bakajin, O

    2005-02-10

    We have developed and characterized a mixer to study the reaction kinetics of protein folding on a microsecond timescale. The mixer uses hydrodynamic focusing of pressure-driven flow in a microfluidic channel to reduce diffusion times as first demonstrated by Knight et al.[1]. Features of the mixer include 1 {micro}s mixing times, sample consumptions of order 1 nl/s, loading sample volumes on the order of microliters, and the ability to manufacture in fused silica for compatibility with most spectroscopic methods.

  16. When fast is better: protein folding fundamentals and mechanisms from ultrafast approaches

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Victor; Cerminara, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Protein folding research stalled for decades because conventional experiments indicated that proteins fold slowly and in single strokes, whereas theory predicted a complex interplay between dynamics and energetics resulting in myriad microscopic pathways. Ultrafast kinetic methods turned the field upside down by providing the means to probe fundamental aspects of folding, test theoretical predictions and benchmark simulations. Accordingly, experimentalists could measure the timescales for all relevant folding motions, determine the folding speed limit and confirm that folding barriers are entropic bottlenecks. Moreover, a catalogue of proteins that fold extremely fast (microseconds) could be identified. Such fast-folding proteins cross shallow free energy barriers or fold downhill, and thus unfold with minimal co-operativity (gradually). A new generation of thermodynamic methods has exploited this property to map folding landscapes, interaction networks and mechanisms at nearly atomic resolution. In parallel, modern molecular dynamics simulations have finally reached the timescales required to watch fast-folding proteins fold and unfold in silico. All of these findings have buttressed the fundamentals of protein folding predicted by theory, and are now offering the first glimpses at the underlying mechanisms. Fast folding appears to also have functional implications as recent results connect downhill folding with intrinsically disordered proteins, their complex binding modes and ability to moonlight. These connections suggest that the coupling between downhill (un)folding and binding enables such protein domains to operate analogically as conformational rheostats. PMID:27574021

  17. When fast is better: protein folding fundamentals and mechanisms from ultrafast approaches.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Victor; Cerminara, Michele

    2016-09-01

    Protein folding research stalled for decades because conventional experiments indicated that proteins fold slowly and in single strokes, whereas theory predicted a complex interplay between dynamics and energetics resulting in myriad microscopic pathways. Ultrafast kinetic methods turned the field upside down by providing the means to probe fundamental aspects of folding, test theoretical predictions and benchmark simulations. Accordingly, experimentalists could measure the timescales for all relevant folding motions, determine the folding speed limit and confirm that folding barriers are entropic bottlenecks. Moreover, a catalogue of proteins that fold extremely fast (microseconds) could be identified. Such fast-folding proteins cross shallow free energy barriers or fold downhill, and thus unfold with minimal co-operativity (gradually). A new generation of thermodynamic methods has exploited this property to map folding landscapes, interaction networks and mechanisms at nearly atomic resolution. In parallel, modern molecular dynamics simulations have finally reached the timescales required to watch fast-folding proteins fold and unfold in silico All of these findings have buttressed the fundamentals of protein folding predicted by theory, and are now offering the first glimpses at the underlying mechanisms. Fast folding appears to also have functional implications as recent results connect downhill folding with intrinsically disordered proteins, their complex binding modes and ability to moonlight. These connections suggest that the coupling between downhill (un)folding and binding enables such protein domains to operate analogically as conformational rheostats. PMID:27574021

  18. Negative activation enthalpies in the kinetics of protein folding.

    PubMed

    Oliveberg, M; Tan, Y J; Fersht, A R

    1995-09-12

    Although the rates of chemical reactions become faster with increasing temperature, the converse may be observed with protein-folding reactions. The rate constant for folding initially increases with temperature, goes through a maximum, and then decreases. The activation enthalpy is thus highly temperature dependent because of a large change in specific heat (delta Cp). Such a delta Cp term is usually presumed to be a consequence of a large decrease in exposure of hydrophobic surfaces to water as the reaction proceeds from the denatured state to the transition state for folding: the hydrophobic side chains are surrounded by "icebergs" of water that melt with increasing temperature, thus making a large contribution to the Cp of the denatured state and a smaller one to the more compact transition state. The rate could also be affected by temperature-induced changes in the conformational population of the ground state: the heat required for the progressive melting of residual structure in the denatured state will contribute to delta Cp. By examining two proteins with different refolding mechanisms, we are able to find both of these two processes; barley chymotrypsin inhibitor 2, which refolds from a highly unfolded state, fits well to a hydrophobic interaction model with a constant delta Cp of activation, whereas barnase, which refolds from a more structured denatured state, deviates from this ideal behavior. PMID:7568045

  19. A simple model for calculating the kinetics of protein folding from three-dimensional structures.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, V; Eaton, W A

    1999-09-28

    An elementary statistical mechanical model was used to calculate the folding rates for 22 proteins from their known three-dimensional structures. In this model, residues come into contact only after all of the intervening chain is in the native conformation. An additional simplifying assumption is that native structure grows from localized regions that then fuse to form the complete native molecule. The free energy function for this model contains just two contributions-conformational entropy of the backbone and the energy of the inter-residue contacts. The matrix of inter-residue interactions is obtained from the atomic coordinates of the three-dimensional structure. For the 18 proteins that exhibit two-state equilibrium and kinetic behavior, profiles of the free energy versus the number of native peptide bonds show two deep minima, corresponding to the native and denatured states. For four proteins known to exhibit intermediates in folding, the free energy profiles show additional deep minima. The calculated rates of folding the two-state proteins, obtained by solving a diffusion equation for motion on the free energy profiles, reproduce the experimentally determined values surprisingly well. The success of these calculations suggests that folding speed is largely determined by the distribution and strength of contacts in the native structure. We also calculated the effect of mutations on the folding kinetics of chymotrypsin inhibitor 2, the most intensively studied two-state protein, with some success. PMID:10500173

  20. Monitoring the folding kinetics of a β-hairpin by time-resolved IR spectroscopy in silico.

    PubMed

    Daidone, Isabella; Thukral, Lipi; Smith, Jeremy C; Amadei, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Protein folding is one of the most fundamental problems in modern biochemistry. Time-resolved infrared (IR) spectroscopy in the amide I region is commonly used to monitor folding kinetics. However, associated atomic detail information on the folding mechanism requires simulations. In atomistic simulations structural order parameters are typically used to follow the folding process along the simulated trajectories. However, a rigorous test of the reliability of the mechanisms found in the simulations requires calculation of the time-dependent experimental observable, i.e., in the present case the IR signal in the amide I region. Here, we combine molecular dynamics simulation with a mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics theoretical methodology, the Perturbed Matrix Method, in order to characterize the folding of a β-hairpin peptide, through modeling the time-dependence of the amide I IR signal. The kinetic and thermodynamic data (folding and unfolding rate constants, and equilibrium folded- and unfolded-state probabilities) obtained from the fit of the calculated signal are in good agreement with the available experimental data [Xu et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, 125, 15388-15394]. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the simulation of the time-resolved IR signal of a complex process occurring on a long (microsecond) time scale. PMID:25777154

  1. Folding kinetics of WW domains with the united residue force field for bridging microscopic motions and experimental measurements

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rui; Maisuradze, Gia G.; Suñol, David; Todorovski, Toni; Macias, Maria J.; Xiao, Yi; Scheraga, Harold A.; Czaplewski, Cezary; Liwo, Adam

    2014-01-01

    To demonstrate the utility of the coarse-grained united-residue (UNRES) force field to compare experimental and computed kinetic data for folding proteins, we have performed long-time millisecond-timescale canonical Langevin molecular dynamics simulations of the triple β-strand from the Formin binding protein 28 WW domain and six nonnatural variants, using UNRES. The results have been compared with available experimental data in both a qualitative and a quantitative manner. Complexities of the folding pathways, which cannot be determined experimentally, were revealed. The folding mechanisms obtained from the simulated folding kinetics are in agreement with experimental results, with a few discrepancies for which we have accounted. The origins of single- and double-exponential kinetics and their correlations with two- and three-state folding scenarios are shown to be related to the relative barrier heights between the various states. The rate constants obtained from time profiles of the fractions of the native, intermediate, and unfolded structures, and the kinetic equations fitted to them, correlate with the experimental values; however, they are about three orders of magnitude larger than the experimental ones for most of the systems. These differences are in agreement with the timescale extension derived by scaling down the friction of water and averaging out the fast degrees of freedom when passing from all-atom to a coarse-grained representation. Our results indicate that the UNRES force field can provide accurate predictions of folding kinetics of these WW domains, often used as models for the study of the mechanisms of proein folding. PMID:25489078

  2. Autotransporters: The Cellular Environment Reshapes a Folding Mechanism to Promote Protein Transport

    PubMed Central

    Braselmann, Esther; Clark, Patricia L.

    2012-01-01

    We know very little about how the cellular environment affects protein folding mechanisms. Here, we focus on one unique aspect of that environment that is difficult to recapitulate in the test tube: the effect of a folding vector. When protein folding is initiated at one end of the polypeptide chain, folding starts from a much smaller ensemble of conformations than during refolding of a full-length polypeptide chain. But to what extent can vectorial folding affect protein folding kinetics and the conformations of folding intermediates? We focus on recent studies of autotransporter proteins, the largest class of virulence proteins from pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. Autotransporter proteins are secreted across the bacterial inner membrane from N→C-terminus, which, like refolding in vitro, retards folding. But in contrast, upon C→N-terminal secretion across the outer membrane autotransporter folding proceeds orders of magnitude faster. The potential impact of vectorial folding on the folding mechanisms of other proteins is also discussed. PMID:23687560

  3. Scaling approach to the folding kinetics of large proteins.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Erik D; Grishin, Nick V

    2006-01-01

    We study a nucleation-growth model of protein folding and extend it to describe larger proteins with multiple folding units. The model is of one of an extremely simple type in which amino acids are allowed just two states--either folded (frozen) or unfolded. Its energetics are heterogeneous and Gō-like, the energy being defined in terms of the number of atom-to-atom contacts that would occur between frozen amino acids in the native crystal structure of the protein. Each collective state of the amino acids is intended to represent a small free energy microensemble consisting of the possible configurations of unfolded loops, open segments, and free ends constrained by the cross-links that form between folded parts of the molecule. We approximate protein free energy landscapes by an infinite subset of these microensemble topologies in which loops and open unfolded segments can be viewed roughly as independent objects for the purpose of calculating their entropy, and we develop a means to implement this approximation in Monte Carlo simulations. We show that this approach describes transition state structures (phi values) more accurately and identifies folding intermediates that were unavailable to previous versions of the model that restricted the number of loops and nuclei. PMID:16486182

  4. Mechanical Folding and Unfolding of Protein Barnase at the Single-Molecule Level.

    PubMed

    Alemany, Anna; Rey-Serra, Blanca; Frutos, Silvia; Cecconi, Ciro; Ritort, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The unfolding and folding of protein barnase has been extensively investigated in bulk conditions under the effect of denaturant and temperature. These experiments provided information about structural and kinetic features of both the native and the unfolded states of the protein, and debates about the possible existence of an intermediate state in the folding pathway have arisen. Here, we investigate the folding/unfolding reaction of protein barnase under the action of mechanical force at the single-molecule level using optical tweezers. We measure unfolding and folding force-dependent kinetic rates from pulling and passive experiments, respectively, and using Kramers-based theories (e.g., Bell-Evans and Dudko-Hummer-Szabo models), we extract the position of the transition state and the height of the kinetic barrier mediating unfolding and folding transitions, finding good agreement with previous bulk measurements. Measurements of the force-dependent kinetic barrier using the continuous effective barrier analysis show that protein barnase verifies the Leffler-Hammond postulate under applied force and allow us to extract its free energy of folding, ΔG0. The estimated value of ΔG0 is in agreement with our predictions obtained using fluctuation relations and previous bulk studies. To address the possible existence of an intermediate state on the folding pathway, we measure the power spectrum of force fluctuations at high temporal resolution (50 kHz) when the protein is either folded or unfolded and, additionally, we study the folding transition-path time at different forces. The finite bandwidth of our experimental setup sets the lifetime of potential intermediate states upon barnase folding/unfolding in the submillisecond timescale. PMID:26745410

  5. Single-molecule kinetics under force: probing protein folding and enzymatic activity with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wesley

    2010-03-01

    Weak non-covalent bonds between and within single molecules govern many aspects of biological structure and function (e.g. DNA base-paring, receptor-ligand binding, protein folding, etc.) In living systems, these interactions are often subject to mechanical forces, which can greatly alter their kinetics and activity. My group develops and applies novel single-molecule manipulation techniques to explore and quantify these force-dependent kinetics. Using optical tweezers, we have quantified the force-dependent unfolding and refolding kinetics of different proteins, including the cytoskeletal protein spectrin in collaboration with E. Evans's group [1], and the A2 domain of the von Willebrand factor blood clotting protein in collaboration with T. Springer's group [2]. Furthermore, we have studied the kinetics of the ADAMTS13 enzyme acting on a single A2 domain, and have shown that physiolgical forces in the circulation can act as a cofactor for enzymatic cleavage, regulating hemostatic activity [2]. References: 1. E. Evans, K. Halvorsen, K. Kinoshita, and W.P. Wong, Handbook of Single Molecule Biophysics, P. Hinterdorfer, ed., Springer (2009). 2. X. Zhang, K. Halvorsen, C.-Z. Zhang, W.P. Wong, and T.A. Springer, Science 324 (5932), 1330-1334 (2009).

  6. Ultrafast Absorption Kinetics of NADH in Folded and Unfolded Conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiner, Z.; Roland, T.; Léonard, J.; Haacke, S.; Groma, G. I.

    2013-03-01

    The non-radiative energy transfer is shown to occur on a ˜3ps time scale for NADH in the folded form in H2O. Addition of methanol thermodynamically favours the open form, for which energy transfer does not occur.

  7. Simulating replica exchange simulations of protein folding with a kinetic network model

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Weihua; Andrec, Michael; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M.

    2007-01-01

    Replica exchange (RE) is a generalized ensemble simulation method for accelerating the exploration of free-energy landscapes, which define many challenging problems in computational biophysics, including protein folding and binding. Although temperature RE (T-RE) is a parallel simulation technique whose implementation is relatively straightforward, kinetics and the approach to equilibrium in the T-RE ensemble are very complicated; there is much to learn about how to best employ T-RE to protein folding and binding problems. We have constructed a kinetic network model for RE studies of protein folding and used this reduced model to carry out “simulations of simulations” to analyze how the underlying temperature dependence of the conformational kinetics and the basic parameters of RE (e.g., the number of replicas, the RE rate, and the temperature spacing) all interact to affect the number of folding transitions observed. When protein folding follows anti-Arrhenius kinetics, we observe a speed limit for the number of folding transitions observed at the low temperature of interest, which depends on the maximum of the harmonic mean of the folding and unfolding transition rates at high temperature. The results shown here for the network RE model suggest ways to improve atomic-level RE simulations such as the use of “training” simulations to explore some aspects of the temperature dependence for folding of the atomic-level models before performing RE studies. PMID:17878309

  8. Theoretical volume profiles as a tool for probing transition states: folding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, H; Weinberg, N

    2014-03-28

    The mechanism by which conformational changes, particularly folding and unfolding, occur in proteins and other biopolymers has been widely discussed in the literature. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of protein folding present a formidable challenge since these conformational changes occur on a time scale much longer than what can be afforded at the current level of computational technology. Transition state (TS) theory offers a more economic description of kinetic properties of a reaction system by relating them to the properties of the TS, or for flexible systems, the TS ensemble (TSE). The application of TS theory to protein folding is limited by ambiguity in the definition of the TSE for this process. We propose to identify the TSE for conformational changes in flexible systems by comparison of its experimentally determined volumetric property, known as the volume of activation, to the structure-specific volume profile of the process calculated using MD. We illustrate this approach by its successful application to unfolding of a model chain system. PMID:24697422

  9. Protein Folding Mechanism of the Dimeric AmphiphysinII/Bin1 N-BAR Domain

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Tobias; Balbach, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    The human AmphyphisinII/Bin1 N-BAR domain belongs to the BAR domain superfamily, whose members sense and generate membrane curvatures. The N-BAR domain is a 57 kDa homodimeric protein comprising a six helix bundle. Here we report the protein folding mechanism of this protein as a representative of this protein superfamily. The concentration dependent thermodynamic stability was studied by urea equilibrium transition curves followed by fluorescence and far-UV CD spectroscopy. Kinetic unfolding and refolding experiments, including rapid double and triple mixing techniques, allowed to unravel the complex folding behavior of N-BAR. The equilibrium unfolding transition curve can be described by a two-state process, while the folding kinetics show four refolding phases, an additional burst reaction and two unfolding phases. All fast refolding phases show a rollover in the chevron plot but only one of these phases depends on the protein concentration reporting the dimerization step. Secondary structure formation occurs during the three fast refolding phases. The slowest phase can be assigned to a proline isomerization. All kinetic experiments were also followed by fluorescence anisotropy detection to verify the assignment of the dimerization step to the respective folding phase. Based on these experiments we propose for N-BAR two parallel folding pathways towards the homodimeric native state depending on the proline conformation in the unfolded state. PMID:26368922

  10. A quantitative treatment of the kinetics of the folding transition of ribonuclease A.

    PubMed

    Hagerman, P J; Baldwin, R L

    1976-04-01

    New experimental data and a quantitative theoretical treatment are given for the kinetics of the thermal folding transition of ribonuclease A at pH 3.0. A three-species mechanism is used as a starting point for the analysis: U1 (slow) in equilibrium U2(fast) in equilibrium N, where U1 and U2 are two forms of the unfolded enzyme with markedly different rates of refolding and N is the native enzyme. This mechanism is based on certain facts established in previous studies of refolding. The kinetics of unfolding and refolding show two phases a fast phase and a slow phase, over a range of temperatures extending above the transition midpoint, Tm. The three-species mechanism can be used in this range. At higher temperatures a new much faster kinetic phase is also observed corresponding to the transient formation of a new intermediate (I). Although the general solution for a four-species mechanism is complex it is not difficult to extend the three-species analysis for the special case found here, in which the fast reaction (I in equilibrium N) is well separated from the other two reactions. At temperatures below the transition zone the slow phase of refolding becomes kinetically complex. No attempt has been made to extend the analysis to include this effect. The basic test of the three-state analysis is the prediction as a function of temperature of alpha2, the relative amplitude of the fast phase, both for unfolding and refolding. At temperatures above Tm for which the three-state analysis must be extended to include the new intermediate I, a crresponding quanitity alpha2(cor) is predicted and compared with measured values. Data used in the three-state prediction are values of tau2 and tau1, the time constants of the fast and slow kinetic phases, plus a single value of alpha2 measured when tau2 and tau1 are well separated. The observed and predicted values of alpha2 agree within experimental error. The analysis predicts correctly that, for these experiments, alpha2 should

  11. The X-38 V-201 Fin Fold Actuation Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lupo, Christian; Robertson, Brandan; Gafka, George

    2004-01-01

    The X-38 Vehicle 201 (V-201) is a space flight prototype lifting body vehicle that was designed to launch to orbit in the Space Shuttle orbiter payload bay. Although the project was cancelled in May 2003, many of the systems were nearly complete. This paper will describe the fin folding actuation mechanism flight subsystems and development units as well as lessons learned in the design, assembly, development testing, and qualification testing. The two vertical tail fins must be stowed (folded inboard) to allow the orbiter payload bay doors to close. The fin folding actuation mechanism is a remotely or extravehicular activity (EVA) actuated single fault tolerant system consisting of seven subsystems capable of repeatedly deploying or stowing the fins.

  12. Quantifying the Sources of Kinetic Frustration in Folding Simulations of Small Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Experiments and atomistic simulations of polypeptides have revealed structural intermediates that promote or inhibit conformational transitions to the native state during folding. We invoke a concept of “kinetic frustration” to quantify the prevalence and impact of these behaviors on folding rates within a large set of atomistic simulation data for 10 fast-folding proteins, where each protein’s conformational space is represented as a Markov state model of conformational transitions. Our graph theoretic approach addresses what conformational features correlate with folding inhibition and therefore permits comparison among features within a single protein network and also more generally between proteins. Nonnative contacts and nonnative secondary structure formation can thus be quantitatively implicated in inhibiting folding for several of the tested peptides. PMID:25136267

  13. Topography of funneled landscapes determines the thermodynamics and kinetics of protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Oliveira, Ronaldo J.; Chu, Xiakun; Whitford, Paul C.; Chahine, Jorge; Han, Wei; Wang, Erkang; Onuchic, José N.; Leite, Vitor B.P.

    2012-01-01

    The energy landscape approach has played a fundamental role in advancing our understanding of protein folding. Here, we quantify protein folding energy landscapes by exploring the underlying density of states. We identify three quantities essential for characterizing landscape topography: the stabilizing energy gap between the native and nonnative ensembles δE, the energetic roughness ΔE, and the scale of landscape measured by the entropy S. We show that the dimensionless ratio between the gap, roughness, and entropy of the system accurately predicts the thermodynamics, as well as the kinetics of folding. Large Λ implies that the energy gap (or landscape slope towards the native state) is dominant, leading to more funneled landscapes. We investigate the role of topological and energetic roughness for proteins of different sizes and for proteins of the same size, but with different structural topologies. The landscape topography ratio Λ is shown to be monotonically correlated with the thermodynamic stability against trapping, as characterized by the ratio of folding temperature versus trapping temperature. Furthermore, Λ also monotonically correlates with the folding kinetic rates. These results provide the quantitative bridge between the landscape topography and experimental folding measurements. PMID:23019359

  14. Probing the protein-folding mechanism using denaturant and temperature effects on rate constants

    PubMed Central

    Guinn, Emily J.; Kontur, Wayne S.; Tsodikov, Oleg V.; Shkel, Irina; Record, M. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Protein folding has been extensively studied, but many questions remain regarding the mechanism. Characterizing early unstable intermediates and the high–free-energy transition state (TS) will help answer some of these. Here, we use effects of denaturants (urea, guanidinium chloride) and temperature on folding and unfolding rate constants and the overall equilibrium constant as probes of surface area changes in protein folding. We interpret denaturant kinetic m-values and activation heat capacity changes for 13 proteins to determine amounts of hydrocarbon and amide surface buried in folding to and from TS, and for complete folding. Predicted accessible surface area changes for complete folding agree in most cases with structurally determined values. We find that TS is advanced (50–90% of overall surface burial) and that the surface buried is disproportionately amide, demonstrating extensive formation of secondary structure in early intermediates. Models of possible pre-TS intermediates with all elements of the native secondary structure, created for several of these proteins, bury less amide and hydrocarbon surface than predicted for TS. Therefore, we propose that TS generally has both the native secondary structure and sufficient organization of other regions of the backbone to nucleate subsequent (post-TS) formation of tertiary interactions. The approach developed here provides proof of concept for the use of denaturants and other solutes as probes of amount and composition of the surface buried in coupled folding and other large conformational changes in TS and intermediates in protein processes. PMID:24043778

  15. Mechanics, Structure and Dynamics of Metaphase Chromosome Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marko, John F.

    2014-03-01

    During cell division, eukaryote chromosomes are restructured from a relatively dispersed interphase form, into a relatively compact folded metaphase form. I will discuss experiments aimed at analyzing the folding scheme of metaphase chromosomes, where mechanical response and biochemical perturbation are used as tools for diagnosing structure. Experiments with nucleases reveal that the continuity of the metaphase chromosome depends on DNA, i.e., that the metaphase chromosome can be considered to be a ``chromatin gel.'' Experiments with topoisomerases indicate that chromatin entanglements play an appreciable role in determining chromosome mechanical properties, suggesting that they may play a structural role. We further show that perturbation of condensin complexes dramatically changes metaphase chromosome mechanics. Finally we report results of fluorescence visualization of distributions of condensin I and II along metaphase chromosomes. Supported by NSF Grants MCB-1022117 and DMR-1206868, and by NIH Grants 1U54CA143869-01, 1U54HD076188 and 1R01GM105847-01.

  16. Statistical mechanics of simple models of protein folding and design.

    PubMed Central

    Pande, V S; Grosberg, A Y; Tanaka, T

    1997-01-01

    It is now believed that the primary equilibrium aspects of simple models of protein folding are understood theoretically. However, current theories often resort to rather heavy mathematics to overcome some technical difficulties inherent in the problem or start from a phenomenological model. To this end, we take a new approach in this pedagogical review of the statistical mechanics of protein folding. The benefit of our approach is a drastic mathematical simplification of the theory, without resort to any new approximations or phenomenological prescriptions. Indeed, the results we obtain agree precisely with previous calculations. Because of this simplification, we are able to present here a thorough and self contained treatment of the problem. Topics discussed include the statistical mechanics of the random energy model (REM), tests of the validity of REM as a model for heteropolymer freezing, freezing transition of random sequences, phase diagram of designed ("minimally frustrated") sequences, and the degree to which errors in the interactions employed in simulations of either folding and design can still lead to correct folding behavior. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 PMID:9414231

  17. Highly anomalous energetics of protein cold denaturation linked to folding-unfolding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Romero-Romero, M Luisa; Inglés-Prieto, Alvaro; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2011-01-01

    Despite several careful experimental analyses, it is not yet clear whether protein cold-denaturation is just a "mirror image" of heat denaturation or whether it shows unique structural and energetic features. Here we report that, for a well-characterized small protein, heat denaturation and cold denaturation show dramatically different experimental energetic patterns. Specifically, while heat denaturation is endothermic, the cold transition (studied in the folding direction) occurs with negligible heat effect, in a manner seemingly akin to a gradual, second-order-like transition. We show that this highly anomalous energetics is actually an apparent effect associated to a large folding/unfolding free energy barrier and that it ultimately reflects kinetic stability, a naturally-selected trait in many protein systems. Kinetics thus emerges as an important factor linked to differential features of cold denaturation. We speculate that kinetic stabilization against cold denaturation may play a role in cold adaptation of psychrophilic organisms. Furthermore, we suggest that folding-unfolding kinetics should be taken into account when analyzing in vitro cold-denaturation experiments, in particular those carried out in the absence of destabilizing conditions. PMID:21829584

  18. Kinetically coupled folding of a single HIV-1 glycoprotein 41 complex in viral membrane fusion and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Junyi; Rebane, Aleksander A.; Ma, Lu; Gao, Ying; Zhang, Yongli

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 glycoprotein 41 (gp41) mediates viral entry into host cells by coupling its folding energy to membrane fusion. Gp41 folding is blocked by fusion inhibitors, including the commercial drug T20, to treat HIV/AIDS. However, gp41 folding intermediates, energy, and kinetics are poorly understood. Here, we identified the folding intermediates of a single gp41 trimer-of-hairpins and measured their associated energy and kinetics using high-resolution optical tweezers. We found that folding of gp41 hairpins was energetically independent but kinetically coupled: Each hairpin contributed a folding energy of ∼−23 kBT, but folding of one hairpin successively accelerated the folding rate of the next one by ∼20-fold. Membrane-mimicking micelles slowed down gp41 folding and reduced the stability of the six-helix bundle. However, the stability was restored by cooperative folding of the membrane-proximal external region. Surprisingly, T20 strongly inhibited gp41 folding by actively displacing the C-terminal hairpin strand in a force-dependent manner. The inhibition was abolished by a T20-resistant gp41 mutation. The energetics and kinetics of gp41 folding established by us provides a basis to understand viral membrane fusion, infection, and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26038562

  19. Subcellular modulation of protein VlsE stability and folding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tai, Jonathan; Dave, Kapil; Hahn, Vincent; Guzman, Irisbel; Gruebele, Martin

    2016-05-01

    The interior of a cell interacts differently with proteins than a dilute buffer because of a wide variety of macromolecules, chaperones, and osmolytes that crowd and interact with polypeptide chains. We compare folding of fluorescent constructs of protein VlsE among three environments inside cells. The nucleus increases the stability of VlsE relative to the cytoplasm, but slows down folding kinetics. VlsE is also more stable in the endoplasmic reticulum, but unlike PGK, tends to aggregate there. Although fluorescent-tagged VlsE and PGK show opposite stability trends from in vitro to the cytoplasm, their trends from cytoplasm to nucleus are similar. PMID:27129718

  20. Kinetic folding design of aptazyme-regulated expression devices as riboswitches for metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Sparkman-Yager, David; Correa-Rojas, Rodrigo A; Carothers, James M

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in the fields of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering have opened the doors for the microbial production of biofuels and other valuable organic compounds. There remain, however, significant metabolic hurdles to the production of these compounds in cost-effective quantities. This is due, in part, to mismatches between the metabolic engineer's desire for high yields and the microbe's desire to survive. Many valuable compounds, or the intermediates necessary for their biosynthesis, prove deleterious at the desired production concentrations. One potential solution to these toxicity-related issues is the implementation of nonnative dynamic genetic control mechanisms that sense excessively high concentrations of metabolic intermediates and respond accordingly to alleviate their impact. One potential class of dynamic regulator is the riboswitch: cis-acting RNA elements that regulate the expression of downstream genes based on the presence of an effector molecule. Here, we present combined methods for constructing aptazyme-regulated expression devices (aREDs) through computational cotranscriptional kinetic folding design and experimental validation. These approaches can be used to engineer aREDs within novel genetic contexts for the predictable, dynamic regulation of gene expression in vivo. PMID:25605393

  1. Thermodynamics, kinetics, and salt-dependence of folding of YopM, a large leucine-rich repeat protein

    PubMed Central

    Kloss, Ellen; Barrick, Doug

    2011-01-01

    Small globular proteins have many contacts between residues that are distant in primary sequence. These contacts create a complex network between sequence-distant segments of secondary structure, which may be expected to promote the cooperative folding of globular proteins. Although repeat proteins, which are made up of tandem modular units, lack sequence-distant contacts, several of considerable length have been shown to undergo cooperative two-state folding. To explore the limits of cooperativity in repeat proteins, we have studied the unfolding of YopM, a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) protein of over 400 residues. Despite its large size and modular architecture (15 repeats), YopM equilibrium unfolding is highly cooperative, and shows a very strong dependence on urea concentration. In contrast, kinetic studies of YopM folding indicate a mechanism that includes one or more transient intermediates. The urea dependence of the folding and unfolding rates suggests a relatively small transition state ensemble. As with the urea dependence, we have found an extreme dependence of the free energy of unfolding on salt concentration. This salt dependence likely results from general screening of a large number of unfavorable columbic interactions in the folded state, rather than from specific cation binding. PMID:18793647

  2. Deconstructing time-resolved optical rotatory dispersion kinetic measurements of cytochrome c folding: from molten globule to the native state.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eefei; Kliger, David S

    2012-01-01

    The far-UV time-resolved optical rotatory dispersion (TRORD) technique has contributed significantly to our understanding of nanosecond secondary structure kinetics in protein folding and function reactions. For reduced cytochrome c, protein folding kinetics have been probed largely from the unfolded to the native state. Here we provide details about sample preparation and the TRORD apparatus and measurements for studying folding from a partly unfolded state to the native secondary structure conformation of reduced cytochrome c. PMID:22760330

  3. The initial step of DNA hairpin folding: a kinetic analysis using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiho; Doose, Sören; Neuweiler, Hannes; Sauer, Markus

    2006-01-01

    Conformational fluctuations of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligonucleotides were studied in aqueous solution by monitoring contact-induced fluorescence quenching of the oxazine fluorophore MR121 by intrinsic guanosine residues (dG). We applied fluorescence correlation spectroscopy as well as steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to analyze kinetics of DNA hairpin folding. We first characterized the reporter system by investigating bimolecular quenching interactions between MR121 and guanosine monophosphate in aqueous solution estimating rate constants, efficiency and stability for formation of quenched complexes. We then studied the kinetics of complex formation between MR121 and dG residues site-specifically incorporated in DNA hairpins. To uncover the initial steps of DNA hairpin folding we investigated complex formation in ssDNA carrying one or two complementary base pairs (dC–dG pairs) that could hybridize to form a short stem. Our data show that incorporation of a single dC–dG pair leads to non-exponential decays for opening and closing kinetics and reduces rate constants by one to two orders of magnitude. We found positive activation enthalpies independent of the number of dC–dG pairs. These results imply that the rate limiting step of DNA hairpin folding is not determined by loop dynamics, or by mismatches in the stem, but rather by interactions between stem and loop nucleotides. PMID:16687657

  4. Navigating ligand protein binding free energy landscapes: universality and diversity of protein folding and molecular recognition mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhivker, Gennady M.; Rejto, Paul A.; Bouzida, Djamal; Arthurs, Sandra; Colson, Anthony B.; Freer, Stephan T.; Gehlhaar, Daniel K.; Larson, Veda; Luty, Brock A.; Marrone, Tami; Rose, Peter W.

    2001-03-01

    Thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of ligand-protein binding are studied for the methotrexate-dihydrofolate reductase system from the binding free energy profile constructed as a function of the order parameter. Thermodynamic stability of the native complex and a cooperative transition to the unique native structure suggest the nucleation kinetic mechanism at the equilibrium transition temperature. Structural properties of the transition state ensemble and the ensemble of nucleation conformations are determined by kinetic simulations of the transmission coefficient and ligand-protein association pathways. Structural analysis of the transition states and the nucleation conformations reconciles different views on the nucleation mechanism in protein folding.

  5. Quantifying Instrumental Artifacts in Folding Kinetics Measured by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Krishna; Woodside, Michael T

    2016-07-26

    Force spectroscopy is commonly used to measure the kinetics of processes occurring in single biological molecules. These measurements involve attaching the molecule of interest to micron-sized or larger force probes via compliant linkers. Recent theoretical work has described how the properties of the probes and linkers can alter the observed kinetics from the intrinsic behavior of the molecule in isolation. We applied this theory to estimate the errors in measurements of folding made using optical tweezers. Errors in the folding rates arising from instrument artifacts were only ∼20% for constant-force measurements of DNA hairpins with typical choices of linker length and probe size. Measurements of transition paths using a constant trap position at high trap stiffness were also found to be in the low-artifact limit. These results indicate that typical optical trap measurements of kinetics reflect the dynamics of the molecule fairly well, and suggest practical limitations on experimental design to ensure reliable kinetic measurements. PMID:27369870

  6. Folding with thermal-mechanical feedback: A reply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Bruce E.; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Ord, Alison

    2009-07-01

    A unified theory of deformation at all scales is outlined. Processes operating during deformation and metamorphism can be coupled in the form of reaction-diffusion equations. Solutions to these equations depend on the specific processes that dominate the dissipation of energy. Hobbs et al. (2008) is concerned with a scale where deformation and conduction of heat dominate and this corresponds to the regional scale. Other papers present results for other length and time scales. Boudinage develops through these processes in materials where the strict Biot theory predicts no boudinage. The strict Biot theory is applicable only at the instant of instability and provides no information on the subsequent growth of the folds. Analytical results for growth to large amplitudes show that only one wavelength develops and not a spectrum of wavelengths as proposed by Treagus and Hudleston (in press) and others. The wavelength to thickness ratio that finally develops is strongly dependent on boundary conditions and so such ratios tell us nothing about the conditions of folding unless these boundary conditions are known. The processes involved in folding with thermal-mechanical feedback are identical for single- and multi-layer systems so that it requires little space to expand the discussion to multi-layers.

  7. Kinetics and energetics of the translocation of maltose binding protein folding mutants.

    PubMed

    Tomkiewicz, Danuta; Nouwen, Nico; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2008-03-14

    Protein translocation in Escherichia coli is mediated by the translocase that, in its minimal form, comprises a protein-conducting pore (SecYEG) and a motor protein (SecA). The SecYEG complex forms a narrow channel in the membrane that allows passage of secretory proteins (preproteins) in an unfolded state only. It has been suggested that the SecA requirement for translocation depends on the folding stability of the mature preprotein domain. Here we studied the effects of the signal sequence and SecB on the folding and translocation of folding stabilizing and destabilizing mutants of the mature maltose binding protein (MBP). Although the mutations affect the folding of the precursor form of MBP, these are drastically overruled by the combined unfolding stabilization of the signal sequence and SecB. Consequently, the translocation kinetics, the energetics and the SecA and SecB dependence of the folding mutants are indistinguishable from those of wild-type preMBP. These data indicate that unfolding of the mature domain of preMBP is likely not a rate-determining step in translocation when the protein is targeted to the translocase via SecB. PMID:18241889

  8. Order of steps in the cytochrome C folding pathway: evidence for a sequential stabilization mechanism.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Mallela M G; Maity, Haripada; Rumbley, Jon N; Lin, Yan; Englander, S Walter

    2006-06-23

    Previous work used hydrogen exchange (HX) experiments in kinetic and equilibrium modes to study the reversible unfolding and refolding of cytochrome c (Cyt c) under native conditions. Accumulated results now show that Cyt c is composed of five individually cooperative folding units, called foldons, which unfold and refold as concerted units in a stepwise pathway sequence. The first three steps of the folding pathway are linear and sequential. The ordering of the last two steps has been unclear because the fast HX of the amino acid residues in these foldons has made measurement difficult. New HX experiments done under slower exchange conditions show that the final two foldons do not unfold and refold in an obligatory sequence. They unfold separately and neither unfolding obligately contains the other, as indicated by their similar unfolding surface exposure and the specific effects of destabilizing and stabilizing mutations, pH change, and oxidation state. These results taken together support a sequential stabilization mechanism in which folding occurs in the native context with prior native-like structure serving to template the stepwise formation of subsequent native-like foldon units. Where the native structure of Cyt c requires sequential folding, in the first three steps, this is found. Where structural determination is ambiguous, in the final two steps, alternative parallel folding is found. PMID:16690080

  9. Role of mechanical factors in cortical folding development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Mir Jalil; Zhang, Tuo; Li, Xiao; Liu, Tianming; Wang, Xianqiao

    2015-09-01

    Deciphering mysteries of the structure-function relationship in cortical folding has emerged as the cynosure of recent research on brain. Understanding the mechanism of convolution patterns can provide useful insight into the normal and pathological brain function. However, despite decades of speculation and endeavors the underlying mechanism of the brain folding process remains poorly understood. This paper focuses on the three-dimensional morphological patterns of a developing brain under different tissue specification assumptions via theoretical analyses, computational modeling, and experiment verifications. The living human brain is modeled with a soft structure having outer cortex and inner core to investigate the brain development. Analytical interpretations of differential growth of the brain model provide preliminary insight into the critical growth ratio for instability and crease formation of the developing brain followed by computational modeling as a way to offer clues for brain's postbuckling morphology. Especially, tissue geometry, growth ratio, and material properties of the cortex are explored as the most determinant parameters to control the morphogenesis of a growing brain model. As indicated in results, compressive residual stresses caused by the sufficient growth trigger instability and the brain forms highly convoluted patterns wherein its gyrification degree is specified with the cortex thickness. Morphological patterns of the developing brain predicted from the computational modeling are consistent with our neuroimaging observations, thereby clarifying, in part, the reason of some classical malformation in a developing brain.

  10. Ultrafast folding kinetics and cooperativity of villin headpiece in single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Žoldák, Gabriel; Stigler, Johannes; Pelz, Benjamin; Li, Hongbin; Rief, Matthias

    2013-11-01

    In this study we expand the accessible dynamic range of single-molecule force spectroscopy by optical tweezers to the microsecond range by fast sampling. We are able to investigate a single molecule for up to 15 min and with 300-kHz bandwidth as the protein undergoes tens of millions of folding/unfolding transitions. Using equilibrium analysis and autocorrelation analysis of the time traces, the full energetics as well as real-time kinetics of the ultrafast folding of villin headpiece 35 and a stable asparagine 68 alanine/lysine 70 methionine variant can be measured directly. We also performed Brownian dynamics simulations of the response of the bead-DNA system to protein-folding fluctuations. All key features of the force-dependent deflection fluctuations could be reproduced: SD, skewness, and autocorrelation function. Our measurements reveal a difference in folding pathway and cooperativity between wild-type and stable variant of headpiece 35. Autocorrelation force spectroscopy pushes the time resolution of single-molecule force spectroscopy to ∼10 µs thus approaching the timescales accessible for all atom molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:24145407

  11. Complex RNA Folding Kinetics Revealed by Single-Molecule FRET and Hidden Markov Models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a hidden Markov model and optimization procedure for photon-based single-molecule FRET data, which takes into account the trace-dependent background intensities. This analysis technique reveals an unprecedented amount of detail in the folding kinetics of the Diels–Alderase ribozyme. We find a multitude of extended (low-FRET) and compact (high-FRET) states. Five states were consistently and independently identified in two FRET constructs and at three Mg2+ concentrations. Structures generally tend to become more compact upon addition of Mg2+. Some compact structures are observed to significantly depend on Mg2+ concentration, suggesting a tertiary fold stabilized by Mg2+ ions. One compact structure was observed to be Mg2+-independent, consistent with stabilization by tertiary Watson–Crick base pairing found in the folded Diels–Alderase structure. A hierarchy of time scales was discovered, including dynamics of 10 ms or faster, likely due to tertiary structure fluctuations, and slow dynamics on the seconds time scale, presumably associated with significant changes in secondary structure. The folding pathways proceed through a series of intermediate secondary structures. There exist both compact pathways and more complex ones, which display tertiary unfolding, then secondary refolding, and, subsequently, again tertiary refolding. PMID:24568646

  12. Exploring the mechanisms used by promiscuous chaperones to assist protein folding in the cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewett, Andrew I.

    There are two popular theories to explain how molecular chaperones boost the yield of folded protein in the cell: According to the Anfinsen cage model, (ACM) chaperonins protect denatured proteins from aggregation. A competing theory, the iterative annealing model (IAM) claims that ATP regulated chaperone binding and release accelerates folding by freeing proteins from long-lived kinetic traps. We present experimental and kinetic evidence to argue that the IAM is not a complete picture of how the GroEL/ES chaperonin works. Surprisingly some substrate proteins experience folding rate enhancements without undergoing multiple rounds of ATP-induced binding and release from the chaperonin. An explanation of this data requires going beyond the ACM and IAM models. Our work uses molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the folding of a highly frustrated protein within a chaperonin cavity. The chaperonin interior is modeled by a sphere with variable degree of attraction to the protein inside. We demonstrate that this cavity, similar to the weakly hydrophobic interior of the GroEL cavity upon complexion with ATP and GroES, is sufficient to accelerate the folding of a frustrated protein by more than an order of magnitude. Our simulations uncover a novel form of the IAM in which the substrate exhibits spontaneous binding and release from the wall of the chaperonin cage. This mimics the behavior observed in the standard IAM, with the difference that thermal fluctuations, rather than ATP, allow the substrate to unbind from the chaperone. An growing number of smaller cageless chaperones have been discovered that can assist protein folding without the consumption of ATP, including artificial "minichaperones" (fragments of larger chaperones). It is tempting to speculate that the same thermally-driven IAM mechanism could play a role with these chaperones as well. We performed additional simulations of protein folding outside the sphere. We find that in order to accelerate

  13. Electrostatic mechanism of nucleosomal array folding revealed by computer simulation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian; Zhang, Qing; Schlick, Tamar

    2005-01-01

    Although numerous experiments indicate that the chromatin fiber displays salt-dependent conformations, the associated molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here, we apply an irregular Discrete Surface Charge Optimization (DiSCO) model of the nucleosome with all histone tails incorporated to describe by Monte Carlo simulations salt-dependent rearrangements of a nucleosomal array with 12 nucleosomes. The ensemble of nucleosomal array conformations display salt-dependent condensation in good agreement with hydrodynamic measurements and suggest that the array adopts highly irregular 3D zig-zag conformations at high (physiological) salt concentrations and transitions into the extended “beads-on-a-string” conformation at low salt. Energy analyses indicate that the repulsion among linker DNA leads to this extended form, whereas internucleosome attraction drives the folding at high salt. The balance between these two contributions determines the salt-dependent condensation. Importantly, the internucleosome and linker DNA–nucleosome attractions require histone tails; we find that the H3 tails, in particular, are crucial for stabilizing the moderately folded fiber at physiological monovalent salt. PMID:15919827

  14. KINETICS AND MECHANISMS OF SOIL BIOGEOCHEMICAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The application of kinetic studies to soil chemistry is useful to determine reaction mechanisms and fate of nutrients and environmental contaminants. How deeply one wishes to query the mechanism depends on the detail sought. Reactions that involve chemical species in more than on...

  15. Mechanisms and kinetics of coal hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, R M; Furlong, M W

    1981-05-01

    Colorado School of Mines is engaged in an experimental program to develop comprehensive models for the effects of coal composition upon the kinetics and mechanisms of coal hydrogenation, for the effects of mineral matter additives (disposable catalysts) upon kinetics and mechanisms of coal hydrogenation, and for the kinetics and mechanisms of the hydrogenation of coal derived products such as preasphaltenes, and asphaltenes. Experimental work was completed on a suite of bituminous coals, thus completing the initial phase of the coal reactivity study. Eleven of the 14 coals of the suite were successfully run in duplicate. Conversion to THF solubles was correlated well by pseudo-second order kinetics. The resulting kinetic rate constants correlated with H/C ratio, mean-max vitrinite reflectance, and a specially-defined fraction of reactive macerals. The data did not correlate well with O/C ratios of the parent coals. Computer-derived statistical fits of various kinetic models were limited in their effectiveness at fitting the experimental data. Experimental work on the first phase of the disposal catalyst studies was completed. Statistical significance testing of the experimental data showed: fractional conversion and yield of light hydrocarbon products increased with time; and mineral properties of the additives were more significant in increasing overall conversion than the additive surface areas. The relative effects of the additives are given.

  16. The Ensemble Folding Kinetics of the FBP28 WW Domain Revealed by an All-atom Monte Carlo Simulation in a Knowledge-based Potential

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiabin; Huang, Lei; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we apply a detailed all-atom model with a transferable knowledge-based potential to study the folding kinetics of Formin-Binding protein, FBP28, which is a canonical three-stranded β-sheet WW domain. Replica exchange Monte Carlo (REMC) simulations starting from random coils find native-like (C α RMSD of 2.68Å) lowest energy structure. We also study the folding kinetics of FBP28 WW domain by performing a large number of ab initio Monte Carlo folding simulations. Using these trajectories, we examine the order of formation of two β –hairpins, the folding mechanism of each individual β– hairpin, and transition state ensemble (TSE) of FBP28 WW domain and compare our results with experimental data and previous computational studies. To obtain detailed structural information on the folding dynamics viewed as an ensemble process, we perform a clustering analysis procedure based on graph theory. Further, a rigorous Pfold analysis is used to obtain representative samples of the TSEs showing good quantitative agreement between experimental and simulated Φ values. Our analysis shows that the turn structure between first and second β strands is a partially stable structural motif that gets formed before entering the TSE in FBP28 WW domain and there exist two major pathways for the folding of FBP28 WW domain, which differ in the order and mechanism of hairpin formation. PMID:21365688

  17. Kinetic Definition of Protein Folding Transition State Ensembles and Reaction Coordinates

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Christopher D.; Rhee, Young Min; Pande, Vijay S.

    2006-01-01

    Using distributed molecular dynamics simulations we located four distinct folding transitions for a 39-residue ββαβ protein fold. To characterize the nature of each room temperature transition, we calculated the probability of transmission for 500 points along each free energy barrier. We introduced a method for determining transition states by employing the transmission probability, Ptrans, and determined which conformations were transition state ensemble members (Ptrans ≈ 0.5). The transmission probability may be used to characterize the barrier in several ways. For example, we ran simulations at 82°C, determined the change in Ptrans with temperature for all 2,000 conformations, and quantified Hammond behavior directly using Ptrans correlation. Additionally, we propose that diffusion along Ptrans may provide the configurational diffusion rate at the top of the barrier. Specifically, given a transition state conformation x0 with estimated Ptrans = 0.5, we selected a large set of subsequent conformations from independent trajectories, each exactly a small time δt after x0 (250 ps). Calculating Ptrans for the new trial conformations, we generated the P(Ptrans|δt = 250 ps) distribution that reflected diffusion. This approach provides a novel perspective on the diffusive nature of a protein folding transition and provides a framework for a quantitative study of activated relaxation kinetics. PMID:16617068

  18. Kinetic Network Study of the Diversity and Temperature Dependence of Trp-Cage Folding Pathways: Combining Transition Path Theory with Stochastic Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Weihua; Gallicchio, Emilio; Deng, Nanjie; Andrec, Michael; Levy, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new approach to study a multitude of folding pathways and different folding mechanisms for the 20-residue mini-protein Trp-Cage using the combined power of replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations for conformational sampling, Transition Path Theory (TPT) for constructing folding pathways and stochastic simulations for sampling the pathways in a high dimensional structure space. REMD simulations of Trp-Cage with 16 replicas at temperatures between 270K and 566K are carried out with an all-atom force field (OPLSAA) and an implicit solvent model (AGBNP). The conformations sampled from all temperatures are collected. They form a discretized state space that can be used to model the folding process. The equilibrium population for each state at a target temperature can be calculated using the Weighted-Histogram-Analysis Method (WHAM). By connecting states with similar structures and creating edges satisfying detailed balance conditions, we construct a kinetic network that preserves the equilibrium population distribution of the state space. After defining the folded and unfolded macrostates, committor probabilities (Pfold) are calculated by solving a set of linear equations for each node in the network and pathways are extracted together with their fluxes using the TPT algorithm. By clustering the pathways into folding “tubes”, a more physically meaningful picture of the diversity of folding routes emerges. Stochastic simulations are carried out on the network and a procedure is developed to project sampled trajectories onto the folding tubes. The fluxes through the folding tubes calculated from the stochastic trajectories are in good agreement with the corresponding values obtained from the TPT analysis. The temperature dependence of the ensemble of Trp-Cage folding pathways is investigated. Above the folding temperature, a large number of diverse folding pathways with comparable fluxes flood the energy landscape. At low temperature

  19. Pertactin β-helix folding mechanism suggests common themes for the secretion and folding of autotransporter proteins

    PubMed Central

    Junker, Mirco; Schuster, Christopher C.; McDonnell, Andrew V.; Sorg, Kelli A.; Finn, Mary C.; Berger, Bonnie; Clark, Patricia L.

    2006-01-01

    Many virulence factors secreted from pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria are autotransporter proteins. The final step of autotransporter secretion is C → N-terminal threading of the passenger domain through the outer membrane (OM), mediated by a cotranslated C-terminal porin domain. The native structure is formed only after this final secretion step, which requires neither ATP nor a proton gradient. Sequence analysis reveals that, despite size, sequence, and functional diversity among autotransporter passenger domains, >97% are predicted to form parallel β-helices, indicating this structural topology may be important for secretion. We report the folding behavior of pertactin, an autotransporter passenger domain from Bordetella pertussis. The pertactin β-helix folds reversibly in isolation, but folding is much slower than expected based on size and native-state topology. Surprisingly, pertactin is not prone to aggregation during folding, even though folding is extremely slow. Interestingly, equilibrium denaturation results in the formation of a partially folded structure, a stable core comprising the C-terminal half of the protein. Examination of the pertactin crystal structure does not reveal any obvious reason for the enhanced stability of the C terminus. In vivo, slow folding would prevent premature folding of the passenger domain in the periplasm, before OM secretion. Moreover, the extra stability of the C-terminal rungs of the β-helix might serve as a template for the formation of native protein during OM secretion; hence, vectorial folding of the β-helix could contribute to the energy-independent translocation mechanism. Coupled with the sequence analysis, the results presented here suggest a general mechanism for autotransporter secretion. PMID:16549796

  20. Comparative analysis of the folding dynamics and kinetics of an engineered knotted protein and its variants derived from HP0242 of Helicobacter pylori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang-Wei; Liu, Yu-Nan; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Jackson, Sophie E.; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the mechanism by which a polypeptide chain thread itself spontaneously to attain a knotted conformation has been a major challenge in the field of protein folding. HP0242 is a homodimeric protein from Helicobacter pylori with intertwined helices to form a unique pseudo-knotted folding topology. A tandem HP0242 repeat has been constructed to become the first engineered trefoil-knotted protein. Its small size renders it a model system for computational analyses to examine its folding and knotting pathways. Here we report a multi-parametric study on the folding stability and kinetics of a library of HP0242 variants, including the trefoil-knotted tandem HP0242 repeat, using far-UV circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. Equilibrium chemical denaturation of HP0242 variants shows the presence of highly populated dimeric and structurally heterogeneous folding intermediates. Such equilibrium folding intermediates retain significant amount of helical structures except those at the N- and C-terminal regions in the native structure. Stopped-flow fluorescence measurements of HP0242 variants show that spontaneous refolding into knotted structures can be achieved within seconds, which is several orders of magnitude faster than previously observed for other knotted proteins. Nevertheless, the complex chevron plots indicate that HP0242 variants are prone to misfold into kinetic traps, leading to severely rolled-over refolding arms. The experimental observations are in general agreement with the previously reported molecular dynamics simulations. Based on our results, kinetic folding pathways are proposed to qualitatively describe the complex folding processes of HP0242 variants.

  1. The cross-road between the mechanisms of protein folding and aggregation; study of human stefin B and its H75W mutant.

    PubMed

    Smajlović, Aida; Berbić, Selma; Žerovnik, Eva

    2011-11-18

    The role of the aromatic residue at site 75 to protein stability, the mechanism of folding and the mechanism of amyloid-fibril formation were investigated for the human stefin B variant (bearing Y at site 31) and its point mutation H75W. With an aim to reveal the conformation at the cross-road between folding and aggregation, first, the kinetics of folding and oligomer formation by human stefin B(Y31) variant were studied. It was found to fold in three kinetic phases at pH 4.8 and 10% TFE; the pH and solvent conditions that transform the protein into amyloid fibrils at longer times. The same pH leads to the formation of native-like intermediate (known from previous studies of this variant), meaning that the process of folding and amyloid-fibril formation share the same structural intermediate, which is in this case native-like and dimeric. At pH 5.8 and 7.0 stefin B folded to the native state in four kinetic phases over two intermediates. In distinction, the mutant H75W did not fold to completion, ending in intermediate states at all pH values studied: 4.8, 5.8 and 7.0. At pH 4.8 and 5.8, the mutant folded in one kinetic phase to the intermediate of the "molten globule" type, which leads to the conclusion that its mechanism of folding differs from the one of the parent stefin B at the same pH. At pH 7.0 the mutant H75W folded in three kinetic phases to a native-like intermediate, analogous to folding of stefin B at pH 4.8. PMID:22033403

  2. The E. coli thioredoxin folding mechanism: the key role of the C-terminal helix.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Diego S; Sánchez, Ignacio E; Garrote, Ana; Sica, Mauricio P; Santos, Javier

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the unfolding mechanism of oxidized Escherichia coli thioredoxin (EcTRX) was investigated experimentally and computationally. We characterized seven point mutants distributed along the C-terminal α-helix (CTH) and the preceding loop. The mutations destabilized the protein against global unfolding while leaving the native structure unchanged. Global analysis of the unfolding kinetics of all variants revealed a linear unfolding route with a high-energy on-pathway intermediate state flanked by two transition state ensembles TSE1 and TSE2. The experiments show that CTH is mainly unfolded in TSE1 and the intermediate and becomes structured in TSE2. Structure-based molecular dynamics are in agreement with these experiments and provide protein-wide structural information on transient states. In our model, EcTRX folding starts with structure formation in the β-sheet, while the protein helices coalesce later. As a whole, our results indicate that the CTH is a critical module in the folding process, restraining a heterogeneous intermediate ensemble into a biologically active native state and providing the native protein with thermodynamic and kinetic stability. PMID:25463044

  3. NADH peroxidase: kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein reductase isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed and all support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. Further support for the ping-pong nature of the kinetic mechanism are the hydrogen peroxide independent transhydrogenase activity of the enzyme, measured either with thio-NAD or with radiolabeled NAD (isotope exchange studies). Kinetic parameters will be presented for a number of reduced pyridine nucleotide analogs. Analogs which have been modified in the adenine ring exhibit much higher K/sub m/'s relative to their adenine analogs. NADH peroxidase catalyzes the stereo-specific removal of the 4S hydrogen of NADH and primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects have been determined for a number of these substrates with 4S-deuterated molecules. There is a strong correlation between their steady-state K/sub m/ and /sup D/V/K. Small values for /sup D/V are interpreted as supporting rate-limitation in the oxidative half-reaction. These data will be discussed in terms of a kinetic and chemical mechanism proposed for NADH peroxidase.

  4. Improvements in Mixing Time and Mixing Uniformity in Devices Designed for Studies of Protein Folding Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Shuhuai; Bakajin, Olgica

    2007-08-01

    Using a microfluidic laminar flow mixer designed for studies of protein folding kinetics, we demonstrate a mixing time of 1 +/- 1 micros with sample consumption on the order of femtomoles. We recognize two limitations of previously proposed designs: (1) size and shape of the mixing region, which limits mixing uniformity and (2) the formation of Dean vortices at high flow rates, which limits the mixing time. We address these limitations by using a narrow shape-optimized nozzle and by reducing the bend of the side channel streamlines. The final design, which combines both of these features, achieves the best performance. We quantified the mixing performance of the different designs by numerical simulation of coupled Navier-Stokes and convection-diffusion equations and experiments using fluorescence resonance energy-transfer (FRET)-labeled DNA.

  5. Entanglement in correlated random spin chains, RNA folding and kinetic roughening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Laguna, Javier; Santalla, Silvia N.; Ramírez, Giovanni; Sierra, Germán

    2016-07-01

    Average block entanglement in the 1D XX-model with uncorrelated random couplings is known to grow as the logarithm of the block size, in similarity to conformal systems. In this work we study random spin chains whose couplings present long range correlations, generated as gaussian fields with a power-law spectral function. Ground states are always planar valence bond states, and their statistical ensembles are characterized in terms of their block entropy and their bond-length distribution, which follow power-laws. We conjecture the existence of a critical value for the spectral exponent, below which the system behavior is identical to the case of uncorrelated couplings. Above that critical value, the entanglement entropy violates the area law and grows as a power law of the block size, with an exponent which increases from zero to one. Interestingly, we show that XXZ models with positive anisotropy present the opposite behavior, and strong correlations in the couplings lead to lower entropies. Similar planar bond structures are also found in statistical models of RNA folding and kinetic roughening, and we trace an analogy between them and quantum valence bond states. Using an inverse renormalization procedure we determine the optimal spin-chain couplings which give rise to a given planar bond structure, and study the statistical properties of the couplings whose bond structures mimic those found in RNA folding.

  6. Acid stability of the kinetically stable alkaline serine protease possessing polyproline II fold.

    PubMed

    Rohamare, Sonali; Javdekar, Vaishali; Dalal, Sayli; Nareddy, Pavan Kumar; Swamy, Musti J; Gaikwad, Sushama M

    2015-02-01

    The kinetically stable alkaline serine protease from Nocardiopsis sp.; NprotI, possessing polyproline II fold (PPII) was characterized for its pH stability using proteolytic assay, fluorescence and Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). NprotI was found to be functionally stable when incubated at pH 1.0, even after 24 h, while after incubation at pH 10.0, drastic loss in the activity was observed. The enzyme showed enhanced activity after incubation at pH 1.0 and 3.0, at higher temperature (50-60 °C). NprotI maintained the overall PPII fold in broad pH range as seen using far UV CD spectroscopy. The PPII fold of NprotI incubated at pH 1.0 remained fairly intact up to 70 °C. Based on the isodichroic point and Tm values revealed by secondary structural transitions, different modes of thermal denaturation at pH 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0 were observed. DSC studies of NprotI incubated at acidic pH (pH 1.0-5.0) showed Tm values in the range of 74-76 °C while significant decrease in Tm (63.8 °C) was observed at pH 10.0. NprotI could be chemically denatured at pH 5.0 (stability pH) only with guanidine thiocynate. NprotI can be classified as type III protein among the three acid denatured states. Acid tolerant and thermostable NprotI can serve as a potential candidate for biotechnological applications. PMID:25576306

  7. A unified mechanism for protein folding: predetermined pathways with optional errors.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Mallela M G; Englander, S Walter

    2007-03-01

    There is a fundamental conflict between two different views of how proteins fold. Kinetic experiments and theoretical calculations are often interpreted in terms of different population fractions folding through different intermediates in independent unrelated pathways (IUP model). However, detailed structural information indicates that all of the protein population folds through a sequence of intermediates predetermined by the foldon substructure of the target protein and a sequential stabilization principle. These contrary views can be resolved by a predetermined pathway--optional error (PPOE) hypothesis. The hypothesis is that any pathway intermediate can incorporate a chance misfolding error that blocks folding and must be reversed for productive folding to continue. Different fractions of the protein population will then block at different steps, populate different intermediates, and fold at different rates, giving the appearance of multiple unrelated pathways. A test of the hypothesis matches the two models against extensive kinetic folding results for hen lysozyme which have been widely cited in support of independent parallel pathways. The PPOE model succeeds with fewer fitting constants. The fitted PPOE reaction scheme leads to known folding behavior, whereas the IUP properties are contradicted by experiment. The appearance of a conflict with multipath theoretical models seems to be due to their different focus, namely on multitrack microscopic behavior versus cooperative macroscopic behavior. The integration of three well-documented principles in the PPOE model (cooperative foldons, sequential stabilization, optional errors) provides a unifying explanation for how proteins fold and why they fold in that way. PMID:17322530

  8. Mechanisms of integral membrane protein insertion and folding

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The biogenesis, folding, and structure of α-helical membrane proteins (MPs) are important to understand because they underlie virtually all physiological processes in cells including key metabolic pathways, such as the respiratory chain and the photosystems, and the transport of solutes and signals across membranes. Nearly all MPs require translocons—often referred to as protein-conducting channels—for proper insertion into their target membrane. Remarkable progress toward understanding the structure and functioning of translocons has been made during the past decade. Here we review and assess this progress critically. All available evidence indicates that MPs are equilibrium structures that achieve their final structural states by folding along thermodynamically controlled pathways. The main challenge for cells is the targeting and membrane insertion of highly hydrophobic amino acid sequences. Targeting and insertion are managed in cells principally by interactions between ribosomes and membrane-embedded translocons. Our review examines the biophysical and biological boundaries of membrane protein insertion and the folding of polytopic membrane proteins in vivo. A theme of the review is the under-appreciated role of basic thermodynamic principles in MP folding and assembly. Thermodynamics not only dictates the final folded structure, it is the driving force for the evolution of the ribosome-translocon system of assembly. We conclude the review with a perspective suggesting a new view of translocon-guided MP insertion. PMID:25277655

  9. Kinetic mechanism of Plasmodium falciparum hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sourav; Nagappa, Lakshmeesha K; Prahladarao, Vasudeva S; Balaram, Hemalatha

    2015-12-01

    Plasmodium falciparum hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (PfHGXPRT) exhibits a kinetic mechanism that differs from that of the human homolog. Human HGPRT follows a steady-state ordered mechanism, wherein PRPP binding precedes the binding of hypoxanthine/guanine and release of product IMP/GMP is the rate limiting step. In the current study, initial velocity kinetics with PfHGXPRT indicates a steady-state ordered mechanism, wherein xanthine binding is conditional to the binding of PRPP. The value of the rate constant for IMP dissociation is greater by 183-fold than the kcat for hypoxanthine phosphoribosylation and this results in the absence of burst in progress curves from pre-steady-state kinetics. Further, IMP binding is 1000 times faster (4s(-1) at 0.5μM IMP) when compared to the kcat (3.9±0.2×10(-3)s(-1)) for the reverse IMP pyrophosphorolysis reaction. These results lend support to the fact that in both forward and reverse reactions, the process of chemical conversion (formation of IMP/hypoxanthine) is slow and the events of ligand association and dissociation are faster. PMID:26902413

  10. Mechanical Modeling and Computer Simulation of Protein Folding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prigozhin, Maxim B.; Scott, Gregory E.; Denos, Sharlene

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, science education and modern technology are bridged to teach students at the high school and undergraduate levels about protein folding and to strengthen their model building skills. Students are guided from a textbook picture of a protein as a rigid crystal structure to a more realistic view: proteins are highly dynamic…

  11. Reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for hydrocarbon fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, C J; Cremer, M A; Heap, M P; Chen, J -Y; Westbrook, C K; Maurice, L Q

    1999-12-10

    Using CARM (Computer Aided Reduction Method), a computer program that automates the mechanism reduction process, a variety of different reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for ethylene and n-heptane have been generated. The reduced mechanisms have been compared to detailed chemistry calculations in simple homogeneous reactors and experiments. Reduced mechanisms for combustion of ethylene having as few as 10 species were found to give reasonable agreement with detailed chemistry over a range of stoichiometries and showed significant improvement over currently used global mechanisms. The performance of reduced mechanisms derived from a large detailed mechanism for n-heptane was compared to results from a reduced mechanism derived from a smaller semi-empirical mechanism. The semi-empirical mechanism was advantageous as a starting point for reduction for ignition delay, but not for PSR calculations. Reduced mechanisms with as few as 12 species gave excellent results for n-heptane/air PSR calculations but 16-25 or more species are needed to simulate n-heptane ignition delay.

  12. Evolution of ribonuclease in relation to polypeptide folding mechanisms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, E. A.; Cohen, M. S.; Gold, M. H.; Kim, J.-K.

    1972-01-01

    Comparisons of the N-terminal region of pancreatic RNAase in seven species are presented, taking into account cow, bison, deer, rat, pig, kangaroo, and turtle. The available limited evidence on hypervariable regions indicates that there is still an evolutionary constraint on them. It is proposed that there is a selection pressure acting on all regions of a protein sequence in evolution. Mutations that tend to obstruct the folding process can lead to various intensities of selection pressure.

  13. Kinetic study and mechanism of Niclosamide degradation.

    PubMed

    Zaazaa, Hala E; Abdelrahman, Maha M; Ali, Nouruddin W; Magdy, Maimana A; Abdelkawy, M

    2014-11-11

    A spectrophotometric kinetic study of Niclosamide alkaline degradation as a function of drug concentration, alkaline concentration and temperature has been established utilizing double divisor-ratio spectra spectrophotometric method. The developed method allowed determination of Niclosamide in presence of its alkaline degradation products; namely; 2-chloro-4-nitro aniline (DEG I) and 5-chloro salicylic acid (DEG II) with characterization of its degradation mechanism. It was found that degradation kinetic of Niclosamide followed pseudo-first order under the established experimental conditions with a degradation rate constant (k) of 0.0829 mol/h and half life (t1/2) of 8.35 h. The overall degradation rate constant as a function of the temperature under the given conditions obeyed Arrhenius equation where the activation energy was calculated to be 3.41 kcal/mol. PMID:24892546

  14. Kinetic study and mechanism of Niclosamide degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaazaa, Hala E.; Abdelrahman, Maha M.; Ali, Nouruddin W.; Magdy, Maimana A.; Abdelkawy, M.

    2014-11-01

    A spectrophotometric kinetic study of Niclosamide alkaline degradation as a function of drug concentration, alkaline concentration and temperature has been established utilizing double divisor-ratio spectra spectrophotometric method. The developed method allowed determination of Niclosamide in presence of its alkaline degradation products; namely; 2-chloro-4-nitro aniline (DEG I) and 5-chloro salicylic acid (DEG II) with characterization of its degradation mechanism. It was found that degradation kinetic of Niclosamide followed pseudo-first order under the established experimental conditions with a degradation rate constant (k) of 0.0829 mol/h and half life (t1/2) of 8.35 h. The overall degradation rate constant as a function of the temperature under the given conditions obeyed Arrhenius equation where the activation energy was calculated to be 3.41 kcal/mol.

  15. Mechanisms of Oxidative Protein Folding in the Bacterial Cell Envelope

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Disulfide-bond formation is important for the correct folding of a great number of proteins that are exported to the cell envelope of bacteria. Bacterial cells have evolved elaborate systems to promote the joining of two cysteines to form a disulfide bond and to repair misoxidized proteins. In the past two decades, significant advances have occurred in our understanding of the enzyme systems (DsbA, DsbB, DsbC, DsbG, and DsbD) used by the gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli to ensure that correct pairs of cysteines are joined during the process of protein folding. However, a number of fundamental questions about these processes remain, especially about how they occur inside the cell. In addition, recent recognition of the increasing diversity among bacteria in the disulfide bond–forming capacity and in the systems for introducing disulfide bonds into proteins is raising new questions. We review here the marked progress in this field and discuss important questions that remain for future studies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 13, 1231–1246. PMID:20367276

  16. Critical taper wedge mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts on Venus - Initial results from Magellan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suppe, John; Connors, Chris

    1992-01-01

    Examples of fold-and-thrust belts from a variety of tectonic settings on Venus are introduced. Predictions for the mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts on Venus are examined on the basis of wedge theory, rock mechanics data, and currently known conditions on Venus. The theoretical predictions are then compared with new Magellan data.

  17. Using D-amino acids to delineate the mechanism of protein folding: Application to Trp-cage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culik, Robert M.; Annavarapu, Srinivas; Nanda, Vikas; Gai, Feng

    2013-08-01

    Using the miniprotein Trp-cage as a model, we show that D-amino acids can be used to facilitate the delineation of protein folding mechanism. Specifically, we study the folding-unfolding kinetics of three Trp-cage mutants where the native glycine residue near the C-terminus of the α-helix is replaced by a D-amino acid. A previous study showed that these mutations increase the Trp-cage stability, due to a terminal capping effect. Our results show that the stabilizing effect of D-asparagine and D-glutamine originates almost exclusively from a decrease in the unfolding rate, while the D-alanine mutation results in a similar decrease in the unfolding rate, but it also increases the folding rate. Together, these results support a folding mechanism wherein the α-helix formation in the transition state is nucleated at the N-terminus, whereas those long-range native interactions stabilizing this helix are developed at the downhill side of the folding free energy barrier.

  18. Studies of combustion kinetics and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Gutman, D.

    1993-12-01

    The objective of the current research is to gain new quantitative knowledge of the kinetics and mechanisms of polyatomic free radicals which are important in hydrocarbon combustion processes. The special facility designed and built for these (which includes a heatable tubular reactor coupled to a photoionization mass spectrometer) is continually being improved. Where possible, these experimental studies are coupled with theoretical ones, sometimes conducted in collaboration with others, to obtain an improved understanding of the factors determining reactivity. The decomposition of acetyl radicals, isopropyl radicals, and n-propyl radicals have been studied as well as the oxidation of methylpropargyl radicals.

  19. Connecting thermal and mechanical protein (un)folding landscapes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Noel, Jeffrey K; Sulkowska, Joanna I; Levine, Herbert; Onuchic, José N

    2014-12-16

    Molecular dynamics simulations supplement single-molecule pulling experiments by providing the possibility of examining the full free energy landscape using many coordinates. Here, we use an all-atom structure-based model to study the force and temperature dependence of the unfolding of the protein filamin by applying force at both termini. The unfolding time-force relation τ(F) indicates that the force-induced unfolding behavior of filamin can be characterized into three regimes: barrier-limited low- and intermediate-force regimes, and a barrierless high-force regime. Slope changes of τ(F) separate the three regimes. We show that the behavior of τ(F) can be understood from a two-dimensional free energy landscape projected onto the extension X and the fraction of native contacts Q. In the low-force regime, the unfolding rate is roughly force-independent due to the small (even negative) separation in X between the native ensemble and transition state ensemble (TSE). In the intermediate-force regime, force sufficiently separates the TSE from the native ensemble such that τ(F) roughly follows an exponential relation. This regime is typically explored by pulling experiments. While X may fail to resolve the TSE due to overlap with the unfolded ensemble just below the folding temperature, the overlap is minimal at lower temperatures where experiments are likely to be conducted. The TSE becomes increasingly structured with force, whereas the average order of structural events during unfolding remains roughly unchanged. The high-force regime is characterized by barrierless unfolding, and the unfolding time approaches a limit of ∼10 μs for the highest forces we studied. Finally, a combination of X and Q is shown to be a good reaction coordinate for almost the entire force range. PMID:25517160

  20. Understanding the kinetic mechanism of RNA single base pair formation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojun; Yu, Tao; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2016-01-01

    RNA functions are intrinsically tied to folding kinetics. The most elementary step in RNA folding is the closing and opening of a base pair. Understanding this elementary rate process is the basis for RNA folding kinetics studies. Previous studies mostly focused on the unfolding of base pairs. Here, based on a hybrid approach, we investigate the folding process at level of single base pairing/stacking. The study, which integrates molecular dynamics simulation, kinetic Monte Carlo simulation, and master equation methods, uncovers two alternative dominant pathways: Starting from the unfolded state, the nucleotide backbone first folds to the native conformation, followed by subsequent adjustment of the base conformation. During the base conformational rearrangement, the backbone either retains the native conformation or switches to nonnative conformations in order to lower the kinetic barrier for base rearrangement. The method enables quantification of kinetic partitioning among the different pathways. Moreover, the simulation reveals several intriguing ion binding/dissociation signatures for the conformational changes. Our approach may be useful for developing a base pair opening/closing rate model. PMID:26699466

  1. Analysis of the pH-dependent thermodynamic stability, local motions, and microsecond folding kinetics of carbonmonoxycytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-09-15

    This paper analyzes the effect of pH on thermodynamic stability, low-frequency local motions and microsecond folding kinetics of carbonmonoxycytochrome c (Cyt-CO) all across the alkaline pH-unfolding transition of protein. Thermodynamic analysis of urea-induced unfolding transitions of Cyt-CO measured between pH 6 and pH 11.9 reveals that Cyt-CO is maximally stable at pH∼9.5. Dilution of unfolded Cyt-CO into refolding medium forms a native-like compact state (NCO-state), where Fe(2+)-CO interaction persists. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters measured for slow thermally-driven CO dissociation (NCO→N+CO) and association (N+CO→NCO) reactions between pH 6.5 and pH 13 reveal that the thermal-motions of M80-containing Ω-loop are decreased in subdenaturing limit of alkaline pH. Laser photolysis of Fe(2+)-CO bond in NCO-state triggers the microsecond folding (NCO→N). The microsecond kinetics measured all across the alkaline pH-unfolding transition of Cyt-CO produce rate rollover in the refolding limb of chevron plot, which suggests a glass transition of NCO en route to N. Between pH 7 and pH 11.9, the natural logarithm of the microsecond folding rate varies by < 1.5 units while the natural logarithm of apparent equilibrium constant varies by 11.8 units. This finding indicates that the pH-dependent ionic-interactions greatly affect the global stability of protein but have very small effect on folding kinetics. PMID:27424489

  2. A Two-step Mechanism for the Folding of Actin by the Yeast Cytosolic Chaperonin

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Sarah F.; Leatherbarrow, Robin J.; Willison, Keith R.

    2011-01-01

    Actin requires the chaperonin containing TCP1 (CCT), a hexadecameric ATPase essential for cell viability in eukaryotes, to fold to its native state. Following binding of unfolded actin to CCT, the cavity of the chaperone closes and actin is folded and released in an ATP-dependent folding cycle. In yeast, CCT forms a ternary complex with the phosducin-like protein PLP2p to fold actin, and together they can return nascent or chemically denatured actin to its native state in a pure in vitro folding assay. The complexity of the CCT-actin system makes the study of the actin folding mechanism technically challenging. We have established a novel spectroscopic assay through selectively labeling the C terminus of yeast actin with acrylodan and observe significant changes in the acrylodan fluorescence emission spectrum as actin is chemically unfolded and then refolded by the chaperonin. The variation in the polarity of the environment surrounding the fluorescent probe during the unfolding/folding processes has allowed us to monitor actin as it folds on CCT. The rate of actin folding at a range of temperatures and ATP concentrations has been determined for both wild type CCT and a mutant CCT, CCT4anc2, defective in folding actin in vivo. Binding of the non-hydrolysable ATP analog adenosine 5′-(β,γ-imino)triphosphate to the ternary complex leads to 3-fold faster release of actin from CCT following addition of ATP, suggesting a two-step folding process with a conformational change occurring upon closure of the cavity and a subsequent final folding step involving packing of the C terminus to the native-like state. PMID:21056978

  3. Mechanically and optically reliable folding structure with a hyperelastic material for seamless foldable displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyuk-Jun; Shim, HongShik; Kim, Sunkook; Choi, Woong; Chun, Youngtea; Kee, InSeo; Lee, SangYoon

    2011-04-01

    We report a mechanically and optically robust folding structure to realize a foldable active matrix organic-light-emitting-diode (AMOLED) display without a visible crease at the junction. A nonlinear stress analysis, based on a finite element method, provided an optimized design. The folding-unfolding test on the structure exhibited negligible deterioration of the relative brightness at the junction of the individual panels up to 105 cycles at a folding radius of 1 mm, indicating highly reliable mechanical and optical tolerances. These results demonstrate the feasibility of seamless foldable AMOLED displays, with potentially important technical implications on fabricating large size flexible displays.

  4. Solvation and desolvation effects in protein folding: native flexibility, kinetic cooperativity and enthalpic barriers under isostability conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhirong; Chan, Hue Sun

    2005-11-01

    As different parts of a protein chain approach one another during folding, they are expected to encounter desolvation barriers before optimal packing is achieved. This impediment originates from the water molecule's finite size, which entails a net energetic cost for water exclusion when the formation of compensating close intraprotein contacts is not yet complete. Based on recent advances, we extend our exploration of these microscopic elementary desolvation barriers' roles in the emergence of generic properties of protein folding. Using continuum Gō-like C(alpha) chain models of chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 (CI2) and barnase as examples, we underscore that elementary desolvation barriers between a protein's constituent groups can significantly reduce native conformational fluctuations relative to model predictions that neglected these barriers. An increasing height of elementary desolvation barriers leads to thermodynamically more cooperative folding/unfolding transitions (i.e., higher overall empirical folding barriers) and higher degrees of kinetic cooperativity as manifested by more linear rate-stability relationships under constant temperature. Applying a spatially non-uniform thermodynamic parametrization we recently introduced for the pairwise C(alpha) potentials of mean force, the present barnase model further illustrates that desolvation is a probable physical underpinning for the experimentally observed high intrinsic enthalpic folding barrier under isostability conditions. PMID:16280624

  5. Mechanism and kinetics of hydrated electron diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, Kafui A.; Coudert, Francois-Xavier; Boutin, Anne

    2008-08-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the mechanism and kinetics of hydrated electron diffusion. The electron center of mass is found to exhibit Brownian-type behavior with a diffusion coefficient considerably greater than that of the solvent. As previously postulated by both experimental and theoretical works, the instantaneous response of the electron to the librational motions of surrounding water molecules constitutes the principal mode of motion. The diffusive mechanism can be understood within the traditional framework of transfer diffusion processes, where the diffusive step is akin to the exchange of an extramolecular electron between neighboring water molecules. This is a second-order process with a computed rate constant of 5.0 ps{sup -1} at 298 K. In agreement with experiment the electron diffusion exhibits Arrhenius behavior over the temperature range of 298-400 K. We compute an activation energy of 8.9 kJ mol{sup -1}. Through analysis of Arrhenius plots and the application of a simple random walk model it is demonstrated that the computed rate constant for exchange of an excess electron is indeed the phenomenological rate constant associated with the diffusive process.

  6. How Well Does a Funneled Energy Landscape Capture the Folding Mechanism of Spectrin Domains?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Three structurally similar domains from α-spectrin have been shown to fold very differently. Firstly, there is a contrast in the folding mechanism, as probed by Φ-value analysis, between the R15 domain and the R16 and R17 domains. Secondly, there are very different contributions from internal friction to folding: the folding rate of the R15 domain was found to be inversely proportional to solvent viscosity, showing no apparent frictional contribution from the protein, but in the other two domains a large internal friction component was evident. Non-native misdocking of helices has been suggested to be responsible for this phenomenon. Here, I study the folding of these three proteins with minimalist coarse-grained models based on a funneled energy landscape. Remarkably, I find that, despite the absence of non-native interactions, the differences in folding mechanism of the domains are well captured by the model, and the agreement of the Φ-values with experiment is fairly good. On the other hand, within the context of this model, there are no significant differences in diffusion coefficient along the chosen folding coordinate, and the model cannot explain the large differences in folding rates between the proteins found experimentally. These results are nonetheless consistent with the expectations from the energy landscape perspective of protein folding: namely, that the folding mechanism is primarily determined by the native-like interactions present in the Gō-like model, with missing non-native interactions being required to explain the differences in “internal friction” seen in experiment. PMID:23947368

  7. Architecture and Folding Mechanism of the Azoarcus Group I Pre-tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Rangan,P.; Masquida, B.; Westhof, E.; Woodson, S.

    2004-01-01

    Self-splicing RNAs must evolve to function in their specific exon context. The conformation of a group I pre-tRNA{sup ile} from the bacterium Azoarcus was probed by ribonuclease T1 and hydroxyl radical cleavage, and by native gel electrophoresis. Biochemical data and three-dimensional models of the pre-tRNA showed that the tRNA is folded, and that the tRNA and intron sequences form separate tertiary domains. Models of the active site before steps 1 and 2 of the splicing reaction predict that exchange of the external G-cofactor and the 3{prime}-terminal G is accomplished by a slight conformational change in P9.0 of the Azoarcus group I intron. Kinetic assays showed that the pre-tRNA folds in minutes, much more slowly than the intron alone. The dependence of the folding kinetics on Mg{sup 2+} and the concentration of urea, and RNase T1 experiments showed that formation of native pre-tRNA is delayed by misfolding of P3-P9, including mispairing between residues in P9 and the tRNA. Thus, although the intron and tRNA sequences form separate domains in the native pre-tRNA, their folding is coupled via metastable non-native base-pairs. This could help prevent premature processing of the 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends of unspliced pre-tRNA.

  8. Reaction Mechanism Generator: Automatic construction of chemical kinetic mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Connie W.; Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H.; West, Richard H.

    2016-06-01

    Reaction Mechanism Generator (RMG) constructs kinetic models composed of elementary chemical reaction steps using a general understanding of how molecules react. Species thermochemistry is estimated through Benson group additivity and reaction rate coefficients are estimated using a database of known rate rules and reaction templates. At its core, RMG relies on two fundamental data structures: graphs and trees. Graphs are used to represent chemical structures, and trees are used to represent thermodynamic and kinetic data. Models are generated using a rate-based algorithm which excludes species from the model based on reaction fluxes. RMG can generate reaction mechanisms for species involving carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen. It also has capabilities for estimating transport and solvation properties, and it automatically computes pressure-dependent rate coefficients and identifies chemically-activated reaction paths. RMG is an object-oriented program written in Python, which provides a stable, robust programming architecture for developing an extensible and modular code base with a large suite of unit tests. Computationally intensive functions are cythonized for speed improvements.

  9. Mechanical Regulation of Three-Dimensional Epithelial Fold Pattern Formation in the Mouse Oviduct.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Hiroshi; Shi, Dongbo; Suzuki, Makoto; Ueno, Naoto; Uemura, Tadashi; Fujimori, Toshihiko

    2016-08-01

    Epithelia exhibit various three-dimensional morphologies linked to organ function in animals. However, the mechanisms of three-dimensional morphogenesis remain elusive. The luminal epithelium of the mouse oviduct forms well-aligned straight folds along the longitudinal direction of the tubes. Disruption of the Celsr1 gene, a planar cell polarity-related gene, causes ectopically branched folds. Here, we evaluated the mechanical contributions of the epithelium to the fold pattern formation. In the mutant oviduct, the epithelium was more intricate along the longitudinal direction than in the wild-type, suggesting a higher ratio of the longitudinal length of the epithelial layer to that of the surrounding smooth muscle (SM) layer (L-Epi/SM ratio). Our mathematical modeling and computational simulations suggested that the L-Epi/SM ratio could explain the differences in fold branching between the two genotypes. Longitudinal epithelial tensions were increased in well-aligned folds compared with those in disorganized folds both in the simulations and in experimental estimations. Artificially increasing the epithelial tensions suppressed the branching in simulations, suggesting that the epithelial tensions can regulate fold patterning. The epithelial tensions could be explained by the combination of line tensions along the epithelial cell-cell boundaries with the polarized cell arrays observed in vivo. These results suggest that the fold pattern is associated with the polarized cell array through the longitudinal epithelial tension. Further simulations indicated that the L-Epi/SM ratio could contribute to fold pattern diversity, suggesting that the L-Epi/SM ratio is a critical parameter in the fold patterning in tubular organs. PMID:27508448

  10. Mechanical versus kinematical shortening reconstructions of the Zagros High Folded Zone (Kurdistan Region of Iraq)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, M.; Reif, D.; Grasemann, B.

    2012-04-01

    Our study compares kinematical and mechanical techniques for the palinspastic reconstruction of folded cross-sections in collision orogens. The studied area and the reconstructed NE-SW-trending, 55.5 km long cross-section is located in the High Folded Zone of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. The present-day geometry of the cross-section has been constructed from field, as well as remote sensing data. In a first step, the structures and the stratigraphy are simplified and summarized in eight units trying to identify the main geometric and mechanical parameters. In a second step, the shortening is kinematically estimated using the dip-domain method to 11%-15%. Then the same cross-section is used in a numerical finite-element model to perform dynamical unfolding simulations taking various rheological parameters into account. The main factor allowing for an efficient dynamic unfolding is the presence of interfacial slip conditions between the mechanically strong units. Other factors, such as Newtonian vs. power-law viscous rheology or the presence of a basement affect the numerical simulations much less strongly. If interfacial slip is accounted for, fold amplitudes are reduced efficiently during the dynamical unfolding simulations, while welded layer interfaces lead to unrealistic shortening estimates. It is suggested that interfacial slip and decoupling of the deformation along detachment horizons is an important mechanical parameter that controlled the folding processes in the Zagros High Folded Zone.

  11. Mechanical versus kinematical shortening reconstructions of the Zagros High Folded Zone (Kurdistan region of Iraq)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel; Reif, Daniel; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2012-06-01

    This paper compares kinematical and mechanical techniques for the palinspastic reconstruction of folded cross sections in collision orogens. The studied area and the reconstructed NE-SW trending, 55.5 km long cross section is located in the High Folded Zone of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. The present-day geometry of the cross section has been constructed from field as well as remote sensing data. In a first step, the structures and the stratigraphy are simplified and summarized in eight units trying to identify the main geometric and mechanical parameters. In a second step, the shortening is kinematically estimated using the dip domain method to 11%-15%. Then the same cross section is used in a numerical finite element model to perform dynamical unfolding simulations taking various rheological parameters into account. The main factor allowing for an efficient dynamic unfolding is the presence of interfacial slip conditions between the mechanically strong units. Other factors, such as Newtonian versus power law viscous rheology or the presence of a basement, affect the numerical simulations much less strongly. If interfacial slip is accounted for, fold amplitudes are reduced efficiently during the dynamical unfolding simulations, while welded layer interfaces lead to unrealistic shortening estimates. It is suggested that interfacial slip and decoupling of the deformation along detachment horizons is an important mechanical parameter that controlled the folding processes in the Zagros High Folded Zone.

  12. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Nanosilver Oxysulfidation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingyu; Pennell, Kelly G.; Hurt, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Among the many new engineered nanomaterials, nanosilver is one of the highest priority cases for environmental risk assessment. Recent analysis of field samples from water treatment facilities suggests that silver is converted to silver sulfide, whose very low solubility may limit the bioavailability and adverse impact of silver in the environment. The present study demonstrates that silver nanoparticles react with dissolved sulfide species (HS−, S2−) under relevant but controlled laboratory conditions to produce silver sulfide nanostructures similar to those observed in the field. The reaction is tracked by time-resolved sulfide depletion measurements to yield quantitative reaction rates and stoichiometries. The reaction requires dissolved oxygen, and it is sensitive to pH and natural organic matter. Focusedion-beam analysis of surface films reveals an irregular coarse-grained sulfide phase that allows deep (> 1 μm) conversion of silver surfaces without passivation. At high sulfide concentrations, nanosilver oxysulfidation occurs by a direct particle-fluid reaction. At low sulfide concentration, quantitative kinetic analysis suggests a mechanistic switch to an oxidative dissolution/precipitation mechanism, in which the biologically active Ag+ ion is generated as an intermediate. The environmental transformation pathways for nanosilver will vary depending on the media-specific competing rates of oxidative dissolution and direct oxysulfidation. PMID:21770469

  13. Dependence of phonation threshold pressure on vocal tract acoustics and vocal fold tissue mechanics.

    PubMed

    Chan, Roger W; Titze, Ingo R

    2006-04-01

    Analytical and computer simulation studies have shown that the acoustic impedance of the vocal tract as well as the viscoelastic properties of vocal fold tissues are critical for determining the dynamics and the energy transfer mechanism of vocal fold oscillation. In the present study, a linear, small-amplitude oscillation theory was revised by taking into account the propagation of a mucosal wave and the inertive reactance (inertance) of the supraglottal vocal tract as the major energy transfer mechanisms for flow-induced self-oscillation of the vocal fold. Specifically, analytical results predicted that phonation threshold pressure (Pth) increases with the viscous shear properties of the vocal fold, but decreases with vocal tract inertance. This theory was empirically tested using a physical model of the larynx, where biological materials (fat, hyaluronic acid, and fibronectin) were implanted into the vocal fold cover to investigate the effect of vocal fold tissue viscoelasticity on Pth. A uniform-tube supraglottal vocal tract was also introduced to examine the effect of vocal tract inertance on Pth. Results showed that Pth decreased with the inertive impedance of the vocal tract and increased with the viscous shear modulus (G") or dynamic viscosity (eta') of the vocal fold cover, consistent with theoretical predictions. These findings supported the potential biomechanical benefits of hyaluronic acid as a surgical bioimplant for repairing voice disorders involving the superficial layer of the lamina propria, such as scarring, sulcus vocalis, atrophy, and Reinke's edema. PMID:16642848

  14. Understanding the Mechanism of Prosegment-catalyzed Folding by Solution NMR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shenlin; Horimoto, Yasumi; Dee, Derek R.; Yada, Rickey Y.

    2014-01-01

    Multidomain protein folding is often more complex than a two-state process, which leads to the spontaneous folding of the native state. Pepsin, a zymogen-derived enzyme, without its prosegment (PS), is irreversibly denatured and folds to a thermodynamically stable, non-native conformation, termed refolded pepsin, which is separated from native pepsin by a large activation barrier. While it is known that PS binds refolded pepsin and catalyzes its conversion to the native form, little structural details are known regarding this conversion. In this study, solution NMR was used to elucidate the PS-catalyzed folding mechanism by examining the key equilibrium states, e.g. native and refolded pepsin, both in the free and PS-bound states, and pepsinogen, the zymogen form of pepsin. Refolded pepsin was found to be partially structured and lacked the correct domain-domain structure and active-site cleft formed in the native state. Analysis of chemical shift data revealed that upon PS binding refolded pepsin folds into a state more similar to that of pepsinogen than to native pepsin. Comparison of pepsin folding by wild-type and mutant PSs, including a double mutant PS, indicated that hydrophobic interactions between residues of prosegment and refolded pepsin lower the folding activation barrier. A mechanism is proposed for the binding of PS to refolded pepsin and how the formation of the native structure is mediated. PMID:24265313

  15. Kinetic regulation mechanism of pbuE riboswitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Sha; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Wenbing

    2015-01-01

    Riboswitches are RNA residue segments located in untranslated regions of messenger RNAs. These folded segments directly bind ligands through shape complementarity and specific interactions in cells and alter the expression of genes at the transcriptional or translational level through conformation change. Using the recently developed systematic helix-based computational method to predict the cotranscription folding kinetics, we theoretically studied the cotranscription folding behavior of the Bacillus subtilis pbuE riboswitch in the absence and presence of the ligand. The ligand concentration, the transcription speed, and the transcription pausing are incorporated into the method. The results are in good agreement with the experimental results. We find that there are no obvious misfolded structures formed during the transcription and the formation of the ligand bound state is rate-limited by the association of the ligand and the RNA. For this kinetically driven riboswitch, the ligand concentration, the transcription speed, and the transcription pausing are coupled to perform regulatory activity.

  16. KINETICS AND MECHANISMS OF NOx - CHAR REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Suuberg, E.M.

    1998-06-19

    This study was undertaken in order to improve understanding of several aspects of the NO-carbon reaction. This reaction is of practical importance in combustion systems, but its close examination also provides some fundamental insight into oxidizing gas-carbon reactions. As part of this study, a comprehensive literature review of earlier work on this reaction has been published (Aarna and Suuberg, Fuel, 1997, 76, 475-491). It has been thought for some time that the kinetics of the NO-carbon reaction are unusual, in that they often show a two-regime Arrhenius behavior. It has, however, turned out during this work that NO is not alone in this regard. In this laboratory, we also uncovered evidence of two kinetic regime behavior in CO{sub 2} gasification. In another laboratory, a former colleague has identified the same behavior in N{sub 2}O. The low temperature reaction regime always shows an activation energy which is lower than that in the high temperature regime, leaving little doubt that a shift in mechanism, as opposed to transport limitations, dictates the behavior. The activation energy of the low temperature regime of these reactions is typically less than 100 kJ/mol, and the activation energy of the high temperature regime is generally considerably in excess of this value. In this study, we have resolved some apparent inconsistencies in the explanation of the low temperature regime, whose rate has generally been ascribed to desorption-controlled processes. Part of the problem in characterization of the different temperature regimes is that they overlap to a high degree. It is difficult to probe the low temperature regime experimentally, because of slow relaxation of the surface oxides in that regime. Using careful experimental techniques, we were able to demonstrate that the low temperature regime is indeed characterized by zero order in NO, as it must be. A separate study is being carried out to model the behavior in this regime in NO and in other gases, and

  17. Sequence and solvent effects on telomeric DNA bimolecular G-quadruplex folding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Adrien; Ferreira, Rubén; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki; Gabelica, Valérie

    2013-10-17

    Telomeric DNA sequences are particularly polymorphic: the adopted structure is exquisitely sensitive to the sequence and to the chemical environment, for example, solvation. Dehydrating conditions are known to stabilize G-quadruplex structures, but information on how solvation influences the individual rates of folding and unfolding of G-quadruplexes remains scarce. Here, we used electrospray mass spectrometry for the first time to monitor bimolecular G-quadruplex formation from 12-mer telomeric strands, in the presence of common organic cosolvents (methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, and acetonitrile). Based on the ammonium ion distribution, the total dimer signal was decomposed into contributions from the parallel and antiparallel structures to obtain individual reaction rates, and the antiparallel G-quadruplex structure was found to form faster than the parallel one. A dimeric reaction intermediate, in rapid equilibrium with the single strands, was also identified. Organic cosolvents increase the stability of the final structures mainly by increasing the folding rates. Our quantitative analysis of reaction rate dependence on cosolvent percentage shows that organic cosolvent molecules can be captured or released upon G-quadruplex formation, highlighting that they are not inert with DNA. In contrast to the folding rates, the G-quadruplex unfolding rates are almost insensitive to solvation effects, but are instead governed by the sequence and by the final structure: parallel dimers dissociate slower than antiparallel dimers only when thymine bases are present at the 5'-end. These results contribute unraveling the folding pathways of telomeric G-quadruplexes. The solvent effects revealed here enlighten that G-quadruplex structure in dehydrated, and molecularly crowded environments are modulated by the nature of cosolvent (e.g., methanol favors antiparallel structures) due to direct interactions, and by the time scale of the reaction, with >200-fold acceleration of

  18. EFFECTS OF PHOTOCHEMICAL KINETIC MECHANISMS ON OXIDANT MODEL PREDICTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The comparative effects of kinetic mechanisms on oxidant model predictions have been tested using two different mechanisms (the Carbon-Bond Mechanism II (CBM-II) and the Demerjian Photochemical Box Model (DPBM) mechanism) in three air quality models (the OZIPM/EKMA, the Urban Air...

  19. Comparison of the Folding Mechanism of Highly Homologous Proteins in the Lipid-binding Protein Family

    EPA Science Inventory

    The folding mechanism of two closely related proteins in the intracellular lipid binding protein family, human bile acid binding protein (hBABP) and rat bile acid binding protein (rBABP) were examined. These proteins are 77% identical (93% similar) in sequence Both of these singl...

  20. Surface folding in metals: a mechanism for delamination wear in sliding

    PubMed Central

    Mahato, Anirban; Guo, Yang; Sundaram, Narayan K.; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Using high-resolution, in situ imaging of a hard, wedge-shaped model asperity sliding against a metal surface, we demonstrate a new mechanism for particle formation and delamination wear. Damage to the residual surface is caused by the occurrence of folds on the free surface of the prow-shaped region ahead of the wedge. This damage manifests itself as shallow crack-like features and surface tears, which are inclined at very acute angles to the surface. The transformation of folds into cracks, tears and particles is directly captured. Notably, a single sliding pass is sufficient to damage the surface, and subsequent passes result in the generation of platelet-like wear particles. Tracking the folding process at every stage from surface bumps to folds to cracks/tears/particles ensures that there is no ambiguity in capturing the mechanism of wear. Because fold formation and consequent delamination are quite general, our findings have broad applicability beyond wear itself, including implications for design of surface generation and conditioning processes. PMID:25197251

  1. Spectroscopic Monitoring of Mechanical Forces during Protein Folding by using Molecular Force Probes.

    PubMed

    Stauch, Tim; Hoffmann, Marvin T; Dreuw, Andreas

    2016-05-18

    Detailed folding pathways of proteins are still largely unknown. Real-time monitoring of mechanical forces acting in proteins during structural transitions would provide deep insights into these highly complex processes. Here, we propose two molecular force probes that can be incorporated into the protein backbone to gain insight into the magnitude and direction of mechanical forces acting in proteins during natural folding and unfolding through their optical spectroscopic response. In fact, changes in the infrared and Raman spectra are proportional to the mechanical force deforming the force probes, and the relevant bands can be intensified and shifted to a transparent window in the protein spectrum by isotopic substitution. As a result, the proposed molecular force probes can act as "force rulers", allowing the spectroscopic observation and measurement of mechanical forces acting within the proteins under natural conditions without external perturbation. PMID:26928925

  2. Mechanical restoration of large-scale folded multilayers using the finite element method: Application to the Zagros Simply Folded Belt, N-Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel; Reif, Daniel; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    There are a large number of numerical finite element studies concerned with modeling the evolution of folded geological layers through time. This body of research includes many aspects of folding and many different approaches, such as two- and three-dimensional studies, single-layer folding, detachment folding, development of chevron folds, Newtonian, power-law viscous and more complex rheologies, influence of anisotropy, pure-shear, simple-shear and other boundary conditions and so forth. In recent years, studies of multilayer folding emerged, thanks to more advanced mesh generator software and increased computational power. Common to all of these studies is the fact that they consider a forward directed time evolution, as in nature. Very few studies use the finite element method for reverse-time simulations. In such studies, folded geological layers are taken as initial conditions for the numerical simulation. The folding process is reversed by changing the signs of the boundary conditions that supposedly drove the folding process. In such studies, the geometry of the geological layers before the folding process is searched and the amount of shortening necessary for the final folded geometry can be calculated. In contrast to a kinematic or geometric fold restoration procedure, the described approach takes the mechanical behavior of the geological layers into account, such as rheology and the relative strength of the individual layers. This approach is therefore called mechanical restoration of folds. In this study, the concept of mechanical restoration is applied to a two-dimensional 50km long NE-SW-cross-section through the Zagros Simply Folded Belt in Iraqi Kurdistan, NE from the city of Erbil. The Simply Folded Belt is dominated by gentle to open folding and faults are either absent or record only minor offset. Therefore, this region is ideal for testing the concept of mechanical restoration. The profile used is constructed from structural field measurements

  3. Simulation based estimation of dynamic mechanical properties for viscoelastic materials used for vocal fold models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupitsch, Stefan J.; Ilg, Jürgen; Sutor, Alexander; Lerch, Reinhard; Döllinger, Michael

    2011-08-01

    In order to obtain a deeper understanding of the human phonation process and the mechanisms generating sound, realistic setups are built up containing artificial vocal folds. Usually, these vocal folds consist of viscoelastic materials (e.g., polyurethane mixtures). Reliable simulation based studies on the setups require the mechanical properties of the utilized viscoelastic materials. The aim of this work is the identification of mechanical material parameters (Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and loss factor) for those materials. Therefore, we suggest a low-cost measurement setup, the so-called vibration transmission analyzer (VTA) enabling to analyze the transfer behavior of viscoelastic materials for propagating mechanical waves. With the aid of a mathematical Inverse Method, the material parameters are adjusted in a convenient way so that the simulation results coincide with the measurement results for the transfer behavior. Contrary to other works, we determine frequency dependent functions for the mechanical properties characterizing the viscoelastic material in the frequency range of human speech (100-250 Hz). The results for three different materials clearly show that the Poisson's ratio is close to 0.5 and that the Young's modulus increases with higher frequencies. For a frequency of 400 Hz, the Young's modulus of the investigated viscoelastic materials is approximately 80% higher than for the static case (0 Hz). We verify the identified mechanical properties with experiments on fabricated vocal fold models. Thereby, only small deviations between measurements and simulations occur.

  4. Nonadditivity in Conformational Entropy upon Molecular Rigidification Reveals a Universal Mechanism Affecting Folding Cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Vorov, Oleg K.; Livesay, Dennis R.; Jacobs, Donald J.

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we employed a Maxwell counting distance constraint model (McDCM) to describe α-helix formation in polypeptides. Unlike classical helix-coil transition theories, the folding mechanism derives from nonadditivity in conformational entropy caused by rigidification of molecular structure as intramolecular cross-linking interactions form along the backbone. For example, when a hydrogen bond forms within a flexible region, both energy and conformational entropy decrease. However, no conformational entropy is lost when the region is already rigid because atomic motions are not constrained further. Unlike classical zipper models, the same mechanism also describes a coil-to-β-hairpin transition. Special topological features of the helix and hairpin structures allow the McDCM to be solved exactly. Taking full advantage of the fact that Maxwell constraint counting is a mean field approximation applied to the distribution of cross-linking interactions, we present an exact transfer matrix method that does not require any special topological feature. Upon application of the model to proteins, cooperativity within the folding transition is yet again appropriately described. Notwithstanding other contributing factors such as the hydrophobic effect, this simple model identifies a universal mechanism for cooperativity within polypeptide and protein-folding transitions, and it elucidates scaling laws describing hydrogen-bond patterns observed in secondary structure. In particular, the native state should have roughly twice as many constraints as there are degrees of freedom in the coil state to ensure high fidelity in two-state folding cooperativity, which is empirically observed. PMID:21320459

  5. Kinetics and mechanism of olefin catalytic hydroalumination by organoaluminum compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koledina, K. F.; Gubaidullin, I. M.

    2016-05-01

    The complex reaction mechanism of α-olefin catalytic hydroalumination by alkylalanes is investigated via mathematical modeling that involves plotting the kinetic models for the individual reactions that make up a complex system and a separate study of their principles. Kinetic parameters of olefin catalytic hydroalumination are estimated. Activation energies of the possible steps of the schemes of complex reaction mechanisms are compared and possible reaction pathways are determined.

  6. Probing Protein Folding Kinetics with High-resolution, Stabilized Optical Tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wesley; Halvorsen, Ken

    2009-03-01

    Single-molecule techniques provide a powerful means of exploring molecular transitions such as the unfolding and refolding of a protein. However, the quantification of bi-directional transitions and near-equilibrium phenomena poses unique challenges, and is often limited by the detection resolution and long-term stability of the instrument. We have developed unique optical tweezers methods that address these problems, including an interference-based method for high-resolution 3D bead tracking (˜1 nm laterally, ˜0.3 nm vertically, at > 100 Hz), and a continuous autofocus system that stabilizes the trap height to within 1-2 nm longterm [1,2]. We have used our instruments to quantify the force-dependent unfolding and refolding kinetics of single protein domains (e.g. spectrin in collaboration with E. Evans). These single-molecule studies are presented, together with the accompanying probabilistic analysis that we have developed. References: 1. W.P. Wong, V. Heinrich, E. Evans, Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc., 790, P5.1-P5.10 (2004). 2. V. Heinrich, W.P. Wong, K. Halvorsen, E. Evans, Langmuir, 24, 1194-1203 (2008).

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulation for the Dynamics and Kinetics of Folding Peptides in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Litinas, Iraklis; Koutselos, Andreas D

    2015-12-31

    The conformations of flexible molecular species, such as oligomers and oligopeptides, and their interconversion in the gas phase have been probed by ion mobility spectrometry measurements. The ion motion is interpreted through the calculation of effective cross sections in the case of stable conformations of the macromolecules. However, when the molecular structures transform to each other as the ions collide with gas atoms during their flight through the drift tube, the introduction of an average cross section is required. To provide a direct way for the reproduction of the ion motion, we employ a nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation method and consider a molecular model that consists of two connected stiff cylindrical bodies interacting through an intramolecular model potential. With this procedure we have calculated the ion mobility as a function of temperature for a prototype peptide that converts between a helical and an extended globular form. The results are in good agreement with ion mobility spectrometry data confirming that an angular vibration coordinate can be used for the interpretation of the shifting of the drift-time distributions at high temperatures. The approach produces mean kinetic energies as well as various combined distributions of the ion degrees of freedom. It is easily applied to flexible macromolecular ions and can be extended to include additional degrees of freedom. PMID:26641107

  8. Conformational propensities of intrinsically disordered proteins influence the mechanism of binding and folding

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Munehito; Sugase, Kenji; Dyson, H. Jane; Wright, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) frequently function in protein interaction networks that regulate crucial cellular signaling pathways. Many IDPs undergo transitions from disordered conformational ensembles to folded structures upon binding to their cellular targets. Several possible binding mechanisms for coupled folding and binding have been identified: folding of the IDP after association with the target (“induced fit”), or binding of a prefolded state in the conformational ensemble of the IDP to the target protein (“conformational selection”), or some combination of these two extremes. The interaction of the intrinsically disordered phosphorylated kinase-inducible domain (pKID) of the cAMP-response element binding (CREB) protein with the KIX domain of a general transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP) provides an example of the induced-fit mechanism. Here we show by NMR relaxation dispersion experiments that a different intrinsically disordered ligand, the transactivation domain of the transcription factor c-Myb, interacts with KIX at the same site as pKID but via a different binding mechanism that involves elements of conformational selection and induced fit. In contrast to pKID, the c-Myb activation domain has a strong propensity for spontaneous helix formation in its N-terminal region, which binds to KIX in a predominantly folded conformation. The C-terminal region of c-Myb exhibits a much smaller helical propensity and likely folds via an induced-fit process after binding to KIX. We propose that the intrinsic secondary structure propensities of pKID and c-Myb determine their binding mechanisms, consistent with their functions as inducible and constitutive transcriptional activators. PMID:26195786

  9. A 3-fold "butterfly valve" in command of the encapsulation's kinetic stability. Molecular baskets at work.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Yu; Bao, Xiaoguang; Yan, Zhiqing; Maslak, Veselin; Hadad, Christopher M; Badjić, Jovica D

    2008-11-12

    Molecular basket 1, composed of a semirigid tris-norbornadiene framework and three revolving pyridine-based gates at the rim, has been built to "dynamically" enclose space and as such regulate molecular encapsulation. The gates were shown to fold via intramolecular hydrogen bonding and thereby form a C3nu symmetrical receptor: the 1H NMR resonance for the amide N-H protons of the pyridine gates appeared downfield (delta= 10.98 ppm), and the N-H vibrational stretch (IR) was observed at 3176 cm(-1). Accordingly, density functional theory (DFT, B3LYP) investigations revealed for the closed conformers of 1 to be energetically the most stable and dominant. The gearing of the pyridine "gates", about their axis, led to the interconversion of two dynamic enantiomers 1A and 1B comprising the clockwise and counterclockwise seam of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Dynamic 1H NMR spectroscopic measurements and line-shape simulations suggested that the energy barrier of 10.0 kcal/mol (DeltaG++(A/B), 298 K) is required for the 1A/B interconversion, when CCl4 occupies the cavity of 1. Likewise, the activation free energy for CCl4 departing the basket was found to be 13.1 kcal/mol (DeltaG++, 298 K), whereas the thermodynamic stability of 1:CCl4 complex was -2.7 kcal/mol (DeltaGdegrees, 298 K). In view of that, CCl4 (but also (CH3)3CBr) was proposed to escape from, and a molecule of solvent to enter, the basket when the gates rotate about their axis: the exit of CCl4 requires the activation energy of 12.7 kcal/mol (DeltaG++(A/B) + DeltaGdegrees), similar to the experimentally found 13.1 kcal/mol (DeltaG++). PMID:18937455

  10. Monochloramination of resorcinol: mechanism and kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Cimetiere, Nicolas; Dossier-Berne, Florence; De Laat, Joseph

    2009-12-15

    The kinetics of monochloramination of resorcinol, 4-chlororesorcinol, and 4,6-dichlororesorcinol have been investigated over the pH range of 5-12, at 23 +/- 2 degrees C. Monochloramine solutions were prepared with ammonia-to-chlorine ratios (N/Cl) ranging from 1.08 to 31 mol/mol. Under conditions that minimize free chlorine reactions (N/Cl > 2 mol/mol), the apparent second-order rate constants of monochloramination of resorcinol compounds show a maximum at pH values between 8.6 and 10.2. The intrinsic second-order rate constants for the reaction of monochloramine with the acid-base forms of the dihydroxybenzenes (Ar(OH)(2), Ar(OH)O(-), and Ar(O(-))(2)) were calculated from the apparent second-order rate constants. The stoichiometric coefficients for the formation of 4-chlororesorcinol by monochloramination of resorcinol and 4,6-dichlororesorcinol by monochloramination of 4-chlororesorcinol were found to be equal to 0.66 +/- 0.05 and 0.25 +/- 0.02 mol/mol, respectively at pH 8.6. A kinetic model that incorporates reactions of free chlorine and monochloramine with the different acid-base forms of resorcinol compounds simulated well the initial rates of degradation of resorcinol compounds and was useful to evaluate the contribution of free chlorine reactions to the overall rates of degradation of resorcinol at low N/Cl ratios. PMID:20000532

  11. Kinetic cooperativity of tyrosinase. A general mechanism.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Muñoz, Jose Luis; Garcia-Molina, Francisco; Varon, Ramón; Tudela, Jose; Garcia-Cánovas, Francisco; Rodríguez-López, Jose N

    2011-01-01

    Tyrosinase shows kinetic cooperativity in its action on o-diphenols, but not when it acts on monophenols, confirming that the slow step is the hydroxylation of monophenols to o-diphenols. This model can be generalised to a wide range of substrates; for example, type S(A) substrates, which give rise to a stable product as the o-quinone evolves by means of a first or pseudo first order reaction (α-methyl dopa, dopa methyl ester, dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylpropionic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, α-methyl-tyrosine, tyrosine methyl ester, tyramine, 4-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid), type S(B) substrates, which include those whose o-quinone evolves with no clear stoichiometry (catechol, 4-methylcatechol, phenol and p-cresol) and, lastly, type S(C) substrates, which give rise to stable o-quinones (4-tert-butylcatechol/4-tert-butylphenol). PMID:21887411

  12. Protein folding. Translational tuning optimizes nascent protein folding in cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Jung; Yoon, Jae Seok; Shishido, Hideki; Yang, Zhongying; Rooney, LeeAnn A; Barral, Jose M; Skach, William R

    2015-04-24

    In cells, biosynthetic machinery coordinates protein synthesis and folding to optimize efficiency and minimize off-pathway outcomes. However, it has been difficult to delineate experimentally the mechanisms responsible. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we studied cotranslational folding of the first nucleotide-binding domain from the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. During synthesis, folding occurred discretely via sequential compaction of N-terminal, α-helical, and α/β-core subdomains. Moreover, the timing of these events was critical; premature α-subdomain folding prevented subsequent core formation. This process was facilitated by modulating intrinsic folding propensity in three distinct ways: delaying α-subdomain compaction, facilitating β-strand intercalation, and optimizing translation kinetics via codon usage. Thus, de novo folding is translationally tuned by an integrated cellular response that shapes the cotranslational folding landscape at critical stages of synthesis. PMID:25908822

  13. Deformation mechanisms and strain history of a minor fold from the Appalachian Valley and Ridge Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spang, J. H.; Groshong, R. H.

    1981-02-01

    We have re-examined a minor fold in the Silurian McKenzie limestone, collected from the Cacapon Mountain anticline where the anticline crosses the Potomoc River. The fold was originally studied by James Conel (1962). We have determined the strain and deformation mechanisms in both the hinge and the limbs of one layer. The layer is towards the inner arc of a multilayer containing one other bed of comparable thickness and numerous thinner beds, all separated by thin shale beds and enclosed in shale. Intragranular deformation mechanisms related to folding include faults and replacement veins. The faults represent a complex interrelationship between shear displacement, pressure solution, and extension veins containing fibrous calcite. The faults are curved and have the effect of moving material into the inner arc of the hinge zone. The replacement veins occur normal to bedding on the outer arc of the hinge. Pressure solution zones normal to bedding are absent and so is cleavage. Intragranular strain is measured on twinned calcite using the least-squares strain gage technique. Based on all the data, the maximum compressive strain, ɛ 1, is everywhere subparallel to layering and approximately perpendicular to the fold axis. The maximum extension strain is everywhere subparallel to the fold axis. The largest ɛ 1 values (-12.7 and -11.0%) occur in the inner arc of the hinge; the smallest ɛ 1 (-2.1%) is in the outer arc of the hinge. The limbs have intermediate values of ɛ 1. Intragranular layer-parallel shear strain on the limbs is small and indicates a relative motion of material away from the hinge in the inner arc with respect to the outer arc.

  14. Distribution of pre-folding linear indicators of movement direction around the Spring Hill Synform, Vermont: significance for mechanism of folding in this portion of the Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, T. H.; Hickey, K. A.

    1997-06-01

    Three distinctly oriented sets of pre-folding, and one set of syn-folding, axes of curved inclusion trails are preserved in garnet porphyroblasts in 50 samples around the doubly plunging Spring Hill Synform in southeast Vermont. Over one third of the samples contain consistent changes in the trend of these axes from the core to rim. Since the core grew before the rim this enabled the relative timing of each set of axes to be determined, from the oldest to the youngest, as NE-SW, E-W, NNW-SSE and NNE-SSW. The youngest trend is parallel to the axial plane of the regional folds. Only those samples with the latter trend have their inclusion trails connected continuously to the matrix foliation. The three pre-folding sets of axes have the same orientation on both limbs. This consistency in orientation has significant implications for the processes operating during folding, and three mechanisms are presented that could potentially explain it. These involve the classic card deck model of shear folding, De Sitter's model of clay bricks shortening as they shear past one another, and the progressive bulk inhomogeneous shortening model. The relative merits of each of these models are discussed.

  15. Local Kinetic Measures of Macromolecular Structure Reveal Partitioning Among Multiple Parallel Pathways from the Earliest Steps in the Folding of a Large RNA Molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Laederach,A.; Shcherbakova, I.; Liang, M.; Brenowitz, M.; Altman, R.

    2006-01-01

    At the heart of the RNA folding problem is the number, structures, and relationships among the intermediates that populate the folding pathways of most large RNA molecules. Unique insight into the structural dynamics of these intermediates can be gleaned from the time-dependent changes in local probes of macromolecular conformation (e.g. reports on individual nucleotide solvent accessibility offered by hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) footprinting). Local measures distributed around a macromolecule individually illuminate the ensemble of separate changes that constitute a folding reaction. Folding pathway reconstruction from a multitude of these individual measures is daunting due to the combinatorial explosion of possible kinetic models as the number of independent local measures increases. Fortunately, clustering of time progress curves sufficiently reduces the dimensionality of the data so as to make reconstruction computationally tractable. The most likely folding topology and intermediates can then be identified by exhaustively enumerating all possible kinetic models on a super-computer grid. The folding pathways and measures of the relative flux through them were determined for Mg{sup 2+} and Na{sup +}-mediated folding of the Tetrahymena thermophila group I intron using this combined experimental and computational approach. The flux during Mg{sup 2+}-mediated folding is divided among numerous parallel pathways. In contrast, the flux during the Na{sup +}-mediated reaction is predominantly restricted through three pathways, one of which is without detectable passage through intermediates. Under both conditions, the folding reaction is highly parallel with no single pathway accounting for more than 50% of the molecular flux. This suggests that RNA folding is non-sequential under a variety of different experimental conditions even at the earliest stages of folding. This study provides a template for the systematic analysis of the time-evolution of RNA structure

  16. Optical measurements of vocal fold tensile properties: implications for phonatory mechanics.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Jordan E; Siegmund, Thomas; Chan, Roger W; Henslee, Erin A

    2011-06-01

    In voice research, in vitro tensile stretch experiments of vocal fold tissues are commonly employed to determine the tissue biomechanical properties. In the standard stretch-release protocol, tissue deformation is computed from displacements applied to sutures inserted through the thyroid and arytenoid cartilages, with the cartilages assumed to be rigid. Here, a non-contact optical method was employed to determine the actual tissue deformation of vocal fold lamina propria specimens from three excised human larynges in uniaxial tensile tests. Specimen deformation was found to consist not only of deformation of the tissue itself, but also deformation of the cartilages, as well as suture alignment and tightening. Stress-stretch curves of a representative load cycle were characterized by an incompressible Ogden model. The initial longitudinal elastic modulus was found to be considerably higher if determined based on optical displacement measurements than typical values reported in the literature. The present findings could change the understanding of the mechanics underlying vocal fold vibration. Given the high longitudinal elastic modulus the lamina propria appeared to demonstrate a substantial level of anisotropy. Consequently, transverse shear could play a significant role in vocal fold vibration, and fundamental frequencies of phonation should be predicted by beam theories accounting for such effects. PMID:21497355

  17. Ring Separation Highlights the Protein-Folding Mechanism Used by the Phage EL-Encoded Chaperonin.

    PubMed

    Molugu, Sudheer K; Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Morgan, David Gene; Sherman, Michael B; He, Lilin; Georgopoulos, Costa; Sernova, Natalia V; Kurochkina, Lidia P; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V; Miroshnikov, Konstantin A; Bernal, Ricardo A

    2016-04-01

    Chaperonins are ubiquitous, ATP-dependent protein-folding molecular machines that are essential for all forms of life. Bacteriophage φEL encodes its own chaperonin to presumably fold exceedingly large viral proteins via profoundly different nucleotide-binding conformations. Our structural investigations indicate that ATP likely binds to both rings simultaneously and that a misfolded substrate acts as the trigger for ATP hydrolysis. More importantly, the φEL complex dissociates into two single rings resulting from an evolutionarily altered residue in the highly conserved ATP-binding pocket. Conformational changes also more than double the volume of the single-ring internal chamber such that larger viral proteins are accommodated. This is illustrated by the fact that φEL is capable of folding β-galactosidase, a 116-kDa protein. Collectively, the architecture and protein-folding mechanism of the φEL chaperonin are significantly different from those observed in group I and II chaperonins. PMID:26996960

  18. Kinetics of α-Globin Binding to α-Hemoglobin Stabilizing Protein (AHSP) Indicate Preferential Stabilization of Hemichrome Folding Intermediate*

    PubMed Central

    Mollan, Todd L.; Khandros, Eugene; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Olson, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Human α-hemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) is a conserved mammalian erythroid protein that facilitates the production of Hemoglobin A by stabilizing free α-globin. AHSP rapidly binds to ferrous α with association (k′AHSP) and dissociation (kAHSP) rate constants of ≈10 μm−1 s−1 and 0.2 s−1, respectively, at pH 7.4 at 22 °C. A small slow phase was observed when AHSP binds to excess ferrous αCO. This slow phase appears to be due to cis to trans prolyl isomerization of the Asp29-Pro30 peptide bond in wild-type AHSP because it was absent when αCO was mixed with P30A and P30W AHSP, which are fixed in the trans conformation. This slow phase was also absent when met(Fe3+)-α reacted with wild-type AHSP, suggesting that met-α is capable of rapidly binding to either Pro30 conformer. Both wild-type and Pro30-substituted AHSPs drive the formation of a met-α hemichrome conformation following binding to either met- or oxy(Fe2+)-α. The dissociation rate of the met-α·AHSP complex (kAHSP ≈ 0.002 s−1) is ∼100-fold slower than that for ferrous α·AHSP complexes, resulting in a much higher affinity of AHSP for met-α. Thus, in vivo, AHSP acts as a molecular chaperone by rapidly binding and stabilizing met-α hemichrome folding intermediates. The low rate of met-α dissociation also allows AHSP to have a quality control function by kinetically trapping ferric α and preventing its incorporation into less stable mixed valence Hemoglobin A tetramers. Reduction of AHSP-bound met-α allows more rapid release to β subunits to form stable fully, reduced hemoglobin dimers and tetramers. PMID:22298770

  19. Chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for the combustion of propane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jachimowski, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for the combustion of propane is presented and discussed. The mechanism consists of 27 chemical species and 83 elementary chemical reactions. Ignition and combustion data as determined in shock tube studies were used to evaluate the mechanism. Numerical simulation of the shock tube experiments showed that the kinetic behavior predicted by the mechanism for stoichiometric mixtures is in good agrement with the experimental results over the entire temperature range examined (1150-2600K). Sensitivity and theoretical studies carried out using the mechanism revealed that hydrocarbon reactions which are involved in the formation of the HO2 radical and the H2O2 molecule are very important in the mechanism and that the observed nonlinear behavior of ignition delay time with decreasing temperature can be interpreted in terms of the increased importance of the HO2 and H2O2 reactions at the lower temperatures.

  20. Validation of theoretical models of phonation threshold pressure with data from a vocal fold mechanical replica.

    PubMed

    Lucero, Jorge C; Van Hirtum, Annemie; Ruty, Nicolas; Cisonni, Julien; Pelorson, Xavier

    2009-02-01

    This paper analyzes the capability of a mucosal wave model of the vocal fold to predict values of phonation threshold lung pressure. Equations derived from the model are fitted to pressure data collected from a mechanical replica of the vocal folds. The results show that a recent extension of the model to include an arbitrary delay of the mucosal wave in its travel along the glottal channel provides a better approximation to the data than the original version of the model, which assumed a small delay. They also show that modeling the vocal tract as a simple inertive load, as has been proposed in recent analytical studies of phonation, fails to capture the effect of the vocal tract on the phonation threshold pressure with reasonable accuracy. PMID:19206840

  1. Evidence for a Shared Mechanism in the Formation of Urea-Induced Kinetic and Equilibrium Intermediates of Horse Apomyoglobin from Ultrarapid Mixing Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Mizukami, Takuya; Abe, Yukiko; Maki, Kosuke

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the equivalence of the kinetic mechanisms of the formation of urea-induced kinetic folding intermediates and non-native equilibrium states was investigated in apomyoglobin. Despite having similar structural properties, equilibrium and kinetic intermediates accumulate under different conditions and via different mechanisms, and it remains unknown whether their formation involves shared or distinct kinetic mechanisms. To investigate the potential mechanisms of formation, the refolding and unfolding kinetics of horse apomyoglobin were measured by continuous- and stopped-flow fluorescence over a time range from approximately 100 μs to 10 s, along with equilibrium unfolding transitions, as a function of urea concentration at pH 6.0 and 8°C. The formation of a kinetic intermediate was observed over a wider range of urea concentrations (0–2.2 M) than the formation of the native state (0–1.6 M). Additionally, the kinetic intermediate remained populated as the predominant equilibrium state under conditions where the native and unfolded states were unstable (at ~0.7–2 M urea). A continuous shift from the kinetic to the equilibrium intermediate was observed as urea concentrations increased from 0 M to ~2 M, which indicates that these states share a common kinetic folding mechanism. This finding supports the conclusion that these intermediates are equivalent. Our results in turn suggest that the regions of the protein that resist denaturant perturbations form during the earlier stages of folding, which further supports the structural equivalence of transient and equilibrium intermediates. An additional folding intermediate accumulated within ~140 μs of refolding and an unfolding intermediate accumulated in <1 ms of unfolding. Finally, by using quantitative modeling, we showed that a five-state sequential scheme appropriately describes the folding mechanism of horse apomyoglobin. PMID:26244984

  2. The DNAJA2 substrate release mechanism is essential for chaperone-mediated folding.

    PubMed

    Baaklini, Imad; Wong, Michael J H; Hantouche, Christine; Patel, Yogita; Shrier, Alvin; Young, Jason C

    2012-12-01

    DNAJA1 (DJA1/Hdj2) and DNAJA2 (DJA2) are the major J domain partners of human Hsp70/Hsc70 chaperones. Although they have overall similarity with the well characterized type I co-chaperones from yeast and bacteria, they are biologically distinct, and their functional mechanisms are poorly characterized. We identified DJA2-specific activities in luciferase folding and repression of human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) trafficking that depended on its expression levels in cells. Mutations in different internal domains of DJA2 abolished these effects. Using purified proteins, we addressed the mechanistic defects. A mutant lacking the region between the zinc finger motifs (DJA2-Δm2) was able to bind substrate similar to wild type but was incapable of releasing substrate during its transfer to Hsc70. The equivalent mutation in DJA1 also abolished its substrate release. A DJA2 mutant (DJA-221), which had its C-terminal dimerization region replaced by that of DJA1, was inactive but retained its ability to release substrate. The release mechanism required the J domain and ATP hydrolysis by Hsc70, although the nucleotide dependence diverged between DJA2 and DJA1. Limited proteolysis suggested further conformational differences between the two wild-type co-chaperones and the mutants. Our results demonstrate an essential role of specific DJA domains in the folding mechanism of Hsc70. PMID:23091061

  3. The DNAJA2 Substrate Release Mechanism Is Essential for Chaperone-mediated Folding*

    PubMed Central

    Baaklini, Imad; Wong, Michael J. H.; Hantouche, Christine; Patel, Yogita; Shrier, Alvin; Young, Jason C.

    2012-01-01

    DNAJA1 (DJA1/Hdj2) and DNAJA2 (DJA2) are the major J domain partners of human Hsp70/Hsc70 chaperones. Although they have overall similarity with the well characterized type I co-chaperones from yeast and bacteria, they are biologically distinct, and their functional mechanisms are poorly characterized. We identified DJA2-specific activities in luciferase folding and repression of human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) trafficking that depended on its expression levels in cells. Mutations in different internal domains of DJA2 abolished these effects. Using purified proteins, we addressed the mechanistic defects. A mutant lacking the region between the zinc finger motifs (DJA2-Δm2) was able to bind substrate similar to wild type but was incapable of releasing substrate during its transfer to Hsc70. The equivalent mutation in DJA1 also abolished its substrate release. A DJA2 mutant (DJA-221), which had its C-terminal dimerization region replaced by that of DJA1, was inactive but retained its ability to release substrate. The release mechanism required the J domain and ATP hydrolysis by Hsc70, although the nucleotide dependence diverged between DJA2 and DJA1. Limited proteolysis suggested further conformational differences between the two wild-type co-chaperones and the mutants. Our results demonstrate an essential role of specific DJA domains in the folding mechanism of Hsc70. PMID:23091061

  4. Protein Folding Modulates the Swapped Dimerization Mechanism of Methyl-Accepting Chemotaxis Heme Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Marta A.; Lucas, Tânia G.; Salgueiro, Carlos A.; Gomes, Cláudio M.

    2012-01-01

    The periplasmic sensor domains GSU0582 and GSU0935 are part of methyl accepting chemotaxis proteins in the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. Both contain one c-type heme group and their crystal structures revealed that these domains form swapped dimers with a PAS fold formed from the two protein chains. The swapped dimerization of these sensors is related to the mechanism of signal transduction and the formation of the swapped dimer involves significant folding changes and conformational rearrangements within each monomeric component. However, the structural changes occurring during this process are poorly understood and lack a mechanistic framework. To address this issue, we have studied the folding and stability properties of two distinct heme-sensor PAS domains, using biophysical spectroscopies. We observed substantial differences in the thermodynamic stability (ΔG = 14.6 kJ.mol−1 for GSU0935 and ΔG = 26.3 kJ.mol−1 for GSU0582), and demonstrated that the heme moiety undergoes conformational changes that match those occurring at the global protein structure. This indicates that sensing by the heme cofactor induces conformational changes that rapidly propagate to the protein structure, an effect which is directly linked to the signal transduction mechanism. Interestingly, the two analyzed proteins have distinct levels of intrinsic disorder (25% for GSU0935 and 13% for GSU0582), which correlate with conformational stability differences. This provides evidence that the sensing threshold and intensity of the propagated allosteric effect is linked to the stability of the PAS-fold, as this property modulates domain swapping and dimerization. Analysis of the PAS-domain shows that disorder segments are found either at the hinge region that controls helix motions or in connecting segments of the β-sheet interface. The latter is known to be widely involved in both intra- and intermolecular interactions, supporting the view that it's folding and stability

  5. Kinetics and mechanism of cell membrane electrofusion.

    PubMed Central

    Abidor, I G; Sowers, A E

    1992-01-01

    A new quantitative approach to study cell membrane electrofusion has been developed. Erythrocyte ghosts were brought into close contact using dielectrophoresis and then treated with one square or even exponentially decaying fusogenic pulse. Individual fusion events were followed by lateral diffusion of the fluorescent lipid analogue 1,1'-dihexadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (Dil) from originally labeled to unlabeled adjacent ghosts. It was found that ghost fusion can be described as a first-order rate process with corresponding rate constants; a true fusion rate constant, k(f), for the square waveform pulse and an effective fusion rate constant, k(ef), for the exponential pulse. Compared with the fusion yield, the fusion rate constants are more fundamental characteristics of the fusion process and have implications for its mechanisms. Values of k(f) for rabbit and human erythrocyte ghosts were obtained at different electric field strength and temperatures. Arrhenius k(f) plots revealed that the activation energy of ghost electrofusion is in the range of 6-10 kT. Measurements were also made with the rabbit erythrocyte ghosts exposed to 42 degrees C for 10 min (to disrupt the spectrin network) or 0.1-1.0 mM uranyl acetate (to stabilize the bilayer lipid matrix of membranes). A correlation between the dependence of the fusion and previously published pore-formation rate constants for all experimental conditions suggests that the cell membrane electrofusion process involve pores formed during reversible electrical breakdown. A statistical analysis of fusion products (a) further supports the idea that electrofusion is a stochastic process and (b) shows that the probability of ghost electrofusion is independent of the presence of Dil as a label as well as the number of fused ghosts. PMID:1617138

  6. Spin Kinetic Models of Plasmas - Semiclassical and Quantum Mechanical Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Brodin, Gert; Marklund, Mattias; Zamanian, Jens

    2009-11-10

    In this work a recently published semiclassical spin kinetic model, generalizing those of previous authors are discussed. Some previously described properties are reviewed, and a new example illustrating the theory is presented. The generalization to a fully quantum mechanical description is discussed, and the main features of such a theory is outlined. Finally, the main conclusions are presented.

  7. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2007-09-17

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO2 production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

  8. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2007-09-20

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO{sub 2} production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

  9. Kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity of NADH peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1988-02-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide-dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed at pH 7.5 and support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. In the absence of hydrogen peroxide, both transhydrogenation between NADH and thioNAD, and isotope exchange between (/sup 14/C)NADH and NAD, have been demonstrated, although in both these experiments, the maximal velocity of nucleotide exchange was less than 1.5% the maximal velocity of the peroxidatic reaction. We propose that NADH binds tightly to both oxidized and two-electron reduced enzyme. NADH oxidation proceeds stereospecifically with the transfer of the 4S hydrogen to enzyme, and then, via exchange, to water. No primary tritium kinetic isotope effect was observed, and no statistically significant primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V/K were determined, although primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V were observed in the presence and absence of sodium acetate. NADH peroxidase thus shares with other flavoprotein reductases striking kinetic, spectroscopic, and stereochemical similarities. On this basis, we propose a chemical mechanism for the peroxide cleaving reaction catalyzed by NADH peroxidase which involves the obligate formation of a flavinperoxide, and peroxo bond cleavage by nucleophilic attack by enzymatic dithiols.

  10. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Calcite Reactions with Saline Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Piers; *Morse, John W.

    2010-11-15

    1. Objective The general objective of this research was to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of calcite reactions with saline waters over a wide range of saline water composition, carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2), and modest ranges of T and P. This would be done by studying both reaction rates and solubility from changes in solution chemistry. Also, nanoscale observations of calcite surface morphology and composition would be made to provide an understanding of rate controlling mechanisms.

  11. A three-dimensional statistical mechanical model of folding double-stranded chain molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenbing; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2001-05-01

    Based on a graphical representation of intrachain contacts, we have developed a new three-dimensional model for the statistical mechanics of double-stranded chain molecules. The theory has been tested and validated for the cubic lattice chain conformations. The statistical mechanical model can be applied to the equilibrium folding thermodynamics of a large class of chain molecules, including protein β-hairpin conformations and RNA secondary structures. The application of a previously developed two-dimensional model to RNA secondary structure folding thermodynamics generally overestimates the breadth of the melting curves [S-J. Chen and K. A. Dill, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 97, 646 (2000)], suggesting an underestimation for the sharpness of the conformational transitions. In this work, we show that the new three-dimensional model gives much sharper melting curves than the two-dimensional model. We believe that the new three-dimensional model may give much improved predictions for the thermodynamic properties of RNA conformational changes than the previous two-dimensional model.

  12. Folding to Curved Surfaces: A Generalized Design Method and Mechanics of Origami-based Cylindrical Structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Gong, Haoran; Chen, Xi; Chen, C Q

    2016-01-01

    Origami structures enrich the field of mechanical metamaterials with the ability to convert morphologically and systematically between two-dimensional (2D) thin sheets and three-dimensional (3D) spatial structures. In this study, an in-plane design method is proposed to approximate curved surfaces of interest with generalized Miura-ori units. Using this method, two combination types of crease lines are unified in one reprogrammable procedure, generating multiple types of cylindrical structures. Structural completeness conditions of the finite-thickness counterparts to the two types are also proposed. As an example of the design method, the kinematics and elastic properties of an origami-based circular cylindrical shell are analysed. The concept of Poisson's ratio is extended to the cylindrical structures, demonstrating their auxetic property. An analytical model of rigid plates linked by elastic hinges, consistent with numerical simulations, is employed to describe the mechanical response of the structures. Under particular load patterns, the circular shells display novel mechanical behaviour such as snap-through and limiting folding positions. By analysing the geometry and mechanics of the origami structures, we extend the design space of mechanical metamaterials and provide a basis for their practical applications in science and engineering. PMID:27624892

  13. Purification and kinetic mechanism of the major glutathione S-transferase from bovine brain.

    PubMed Central

    Young, P R; Briedis, A V

    1989-01-01

    The major glutathione S-transferase isoenzyme from bovine brain was isolated and purified approx. 500-fold. The enzyme has a pI of 7.39 +/- 0.02 and consists of two non-identical subunits having apparent Mr values of 22,000 and 24,000. The enzyme is uniformly distributed in brain, and kinetic data at pH 6.5 with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as substrate suggest a random rapid-equilibrium mechanism. The kinetics of inhibition by product, by GSH analogues and by NADH are consistent with the suggested mechanism and require inhibitor binding to several different enzyme forms. Long-chain fatty acids are excellent inhibitors of the enzyme, and values of 1nKi for hexanoic acid, octanoic acid, decanoic acid and lauric acid form a linear series when plotted as a function of alkyl chain length. A free-energy change of -1900 J/mol (-455 cal/mol) per CH2 unit is calculated for the contribution of hydrophobic binding energy to the inhibition constants. The turnover number of the purified enzyme dimer is approx. 3400/min. When compared with the second-order rate constant for the reaction between CDNB and GSH, the enzyme is providing a rate acceleration of about 1000-fold. The role of entropic contributions to this small rate acceleration is discussed. PMID:2930465

  14. Kinetic and thermodynamic framework for P4-P6 RNA reveals tertiary motif modularity and modulation of the folding preferred pathway.

    PubMed

    Bisaria, Namita; Greenfeld, Max; Limouse, Charles; Pavlichin, Dmitri S; Mabuchi, Hideo; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-08-23

    The past decade has seen a wealth of 3D structural information about complex structured RNAs and identification of functional intermediates. Nevertheless, developing a complete and predictive understanding of the folding and function of these RNAs in biology will require connection of individual rate and equilibrium constants to structural changes that occur in individual folding steps and further relating these steps to the properties and behavior of isolated, simplified systems. To accomplish these goals we used the considerable structural knowledge of the folded, unfolded, and intermediate states of P4-P6 RNA. We enumerated structural states and possible folding transitions and determined rate and equilibrium constants for the transitions between these states using single-molecule FRET with a series of mutant P4-P6 variants. Comparisons with simplified constructs containing an isolated tertiary contact suggest that a given tertiary interaction has a stereotyped rate for breaking that may help identify structural transitions within complex RNAs and simplify the prediction of folding kinetics and thermodynamics for structured RNAs from their parts. The preferred folding pathway involves initial formation of the proximal tertiary contact. However, this preference was only ∼10 fold and could be reversed by a single point mutation, indicating that a model akin to a protein-folding contact order model will not suffice to describe RNA folding. Instead, our results suggest a strong analogy with a modified RNA diffusion-collision model in which tertiary elements within preformed secondary structures collide, with the success of these collisions dependent on whether the tertiary elements are in their rare binding-competent conformations. PMID:27493222

  15. Reduced alphabet for protein folding prediction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jitao T; Wang, Titi; Huang, Shanran R; Li, Xin

    2015-04-01

    What are the key building blocks that would have been needed to construct complex protein folds? This is an important issue for understanding protein folding mechanism and guiding de novo protein design. Twenty naturally occurring amino acids and eight secondary structures consist of a 28-letter alphabet to determine folding kinetics and mechanism. Here we predict folding kinetic rates of proteins from many reduced alphabets. We find that a reduced alphabet of 10 letters achieves good correlation with folding rates, close to the one achieved by full 28-letter alphabet. Many other reduced alphabets are not significantly correlated to folding rates. The finding suggests that not all amino acids and secondary structures are equally important for protein folding. The foldable sequence of a protein could be designed using at least 10 folding units, which can either promote or inhibit protein folding. Reducing alphabet cardinality without losing key folding kinetic information opens the door to potentially faster machine learning and data mining applications in protein structure prediction, sequence alignment and protein design. PMID:25641420

  16. Mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedges Cohesive Coulomb theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlen, F. A.; Suppe, J.; Davis, D.

    1984-01-01

    A self-consistent theory for the mechanics of thin-skinned accretionary Coulomb wedges is developed and applied to the active fold-and-thrust belt of western Taiwan. The state of stress everywhere within a critical wedge is determined by solving the static equilibrium equations subject to the appropriate boundary conditions. The influence of wedge cohesion, which gives rise to a concave curvature of the critical topographic surface and affects the orientation of the principal stresses and Coulomb fracture within the wedge, is considered. The shape of the topographic surface and the angles at which thrust faults step up from the basal decollement in the Taiwanese belt is analyzed taking into account the extensive structural and fluid-pressure data available there. It is concluded that the gross geometry and structure of the Taiwan wedge are consistent with normal laboratory frictional and fracture strengths of sedimentary rocks.

  17. Mechanical cavopulmonary assist for the univentricular Fontan circulation using a novel folding propeller blood pump.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Amy L; Ballman, Kimberly K; Myers, Cynthia D; Litwak, Kenneth N; Frankel, Steven H; Rodefeld, Mark D

    2007-01-01

    A blood pump specifically designed to operate in the unique anatomic and physiologic conditions of a cavopulmonary connection has never been developed. Mechanical augmentation of cavopulmonary blood flow in a univentricular circulation would reduce systemic venous pressure, increase preload to the single ventricle, and temporarily reproduce a scenario analogous to the normal two-ventricle circulation. We hypothesize that a folding propeller blood pump would function optimally in this cavopulmonary circulation. The hydraulic performance of a two-bladed propeller prototype was characterized in an experimental flow loop using a blood analog fluid for 0.5-3.5 lpm at rotational speeds of 3,600-4,000 rpm. We also created five distinctive blood pump designs and evaluated their hydraulic performance using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The two-bladed prototype performed well over the design range of 0.5-3.5 lpm, producing physiologic pressure rises of 5-18 mm Hg. Building upon this proof-of-concept testing, the CFD analysis of the five numerical models predicted a physiologic pressure range of 5-40 mm Hg over 0.5-4 lpm for rotational speeds of 3,000-7,000 rpm. These preliminary propeller designs and the two-bladed prototype achieved the expected hydraulic performance. Optimization of these configurations will reduce fluid stress levels, remove regions of recirculation, and improve the hydraulic performance of the folding propeller. This propeller design produces the physiologic pressures and flows that are in the ideal range to mechanically support the cavopulmonary circulation and represents an exciting new therapeutic option for the support of a univentricular Fontan circulation. PMID:18043158

  18. Constraints on bed scale fracture chronology with a FEM mechanical model of folding: The case of Split Mountain (Utah, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassi, W.; Guiton, M. L. E.; Leroy, Y. M.; Daniel, J.-M.; Callot, J.-P.

    2012-11-01

    A technique is presented for improving the structural analysis of natural fractures development in large scale fold structures. A 3D restoration of a fold provides the external displacement loading conditions to solve, by the finite element method, the forward mechanical problem of an idealized rock material with a stress-strain relationship based on the activation of pervasive fracture sets. In this elasto-plasticity constitutive law, any activated fracture set contributes to the total plastic strain by either an opening or a sliding mode of rock failure. Inherited versus syn-folding fracture sets development can be studied using this mechanical model. The workflow of this methodology was applied to the Weber sandstone formation deformed by forced folding at Split Mountain Anticline, Utah for which the different fracture sets were created and developed successively during the Sevier and the syn-folding Laramide orogenic phases. The field observations at the top stratigraphic surface of the Weber sandstone lead to classify the fracture sets into a pre-fold WNW-ESE fracture set, and a NE-SW fracture set post-dating the former. The development and relative chronology of the fracture sets are discussed based on the geomechanical modeling results. Starting with a 3D restoration of the Split Mountain Anticline, three fold-fracture development models were generated, alternately assuming that the WNW-ESE fracture set is either present or absent prior to folding process. Depending on the initial fracture configuration, the calculated fracture patterns are markedly different, showing that assuming a WNW-ESE joint set to predate the fold best correlates with field observations. This study is a first step addressing the complex problem of identification of fold-related fracturing events using an elementary concept of rock mechanics. When tight to complementary field observations, including petrography, diagenesis and burial history, the approach can be used to better

  19. Kinetics and mechanisms of some atomic oxygen reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cvetanovic, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Mechanisms and kinetics of some reactions of the ground state of oxygen atoms, O(3P), are briefly summarized. Attention is given to reactions of oxygen atoms with several different types of organic and inorganic compounds such as alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, and some oxygen, nitrogen, halogen and sulfur derivatives of these compounds. References to some recent compilations and critical evaluations of reaction rate constants are given.

  20. The Knotted Protein UCH-L1 Exhibits Partially Unfolded Forms under Native Conditions that Share Common Structural Features with Its Kinetic Folding Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Lou, Shih-Chi; Wetzel, Svava; Zhang, Hongyu; Crone, Elizabeth W; Lee, Yun-Tzai; Jackson, Sophie E; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny

    2016-06-01

    The human ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase, UCH-L1, is an abundant neuronal deubiquitinase that is associated with Parkinson's disease. It contains a complex Gordian knot topology formed by the polypeptide chain alone. Using a combination of fluorescence-based kinetic measurements, we show that UCH-L1 has two distinct kinetic folding intermediates that are transiently populated on parallel pathways between the denatured and native states. NMR hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) experiments indicate the presence of partially unfolded forms (PUFs) of UCH-L1 under native conditions. HDX measurements as a function of urea concentration were used to establish the structure of the PUFs and pulse-labelled HDX NMR was used to show that the PUFs and the folding intermediates are likely the same species. In both cases, a similar stable core encompassing most of the central β-sheet is highly structured and α-helix 3, which is partially formed, packs against it. In contrast to the stable β-sheet core, the peripheral α-helices display significant local fluctuations leading to rapid exchange. The results also suggest that the main difference between the two kinetic intermediates is structure and packing of α-helices 3 and 7 and the degree of structure in β-strand 5. Together, the fluorescence and NMR results establish that UCH-L1 neither folds through a continuum of pathways nor by a single discrete pathway. Its folding is complex, the β-sheet core forms early and is present in both intermediate states, and the rate-limiting step which is likely to involve the threading of the chain to form the 52-knot occurs late on the folding pathway. PMID:27067109

  1. Mechanism and kinetics of peptide partitioning into membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmschneider, Martin; Killian, J Antoinette; Doux, Jacques P. F.; Smith, Jeremy C; Ulmschneider, Jakob

    2010-02-01

    Partitioning properties of transmembrane (TM) polypeptide segments directly determine membrane protein folding, stability, and function, and their understanding is vital for rational design of membrane active peptides. However, direct determination of water-to-bilayer transfer of TM peptides has proved difficult. Experimentally, sufficiently hydrophobic peptides tend to aggregate, while atomistic computer simulations at physiological temperatures cannot yet reach the long time scales required to capture partitioning. Elevating temperatures to accelerate the dynamics has been avoided, as this was thought to lead to rapid denaturing. However, we show here that model TM peptides (WALP) are exceptionally thermostable. Circular dichroism experiments reveal that the peptides remain inserted into the lipid bilayer and are fully helical, even at 90 C. At these temperatures, sampling is 50 500 times faster, sufficient to directly simulate spontaneous partitioning at atomic resolution. A folded insertion pathway is observed, consistent with three-stage partitioning theory. Elevated temperature simulation ensembles further allow the direct calculation of the insertion kinetics, which is found to be first-order for all systems. Insertion barriers are Hin = 15 kcal/mol for a general hydrophobic peptide and 23 kcal/mol for the tryptophan-flanked WALP peptides. The corresponding insertion times at room temperature range from 8.5 s to 163 ms. High-temperature simulations of experimentally validated thermostable systems suggest a new avenue for systematic exploration of peptide partitioning properties.

  2. The carbon-bond mechanism: a condensed kinetic mechanism for photochemical smog

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, G.Z.; Hog, H.; Killus, J.P.

    1980-06-01

    Efforts to develop a model that can simulate photochemical smog with kinetic mechanisms are discussed. The carbon-bond mechanism is a set of generalized reactions that can be used to model photochemical oxidant formation. The theoretical framework of carbon-bond mechanism is outlined. Chemical variables that are incorporated into the carbon-bond mechanism model are described. Further work that is needed on the carbon-bond mechanism model is considered. (1 diagram, 13 graphs, 30 references, 2 tables)

  3. Rapid three-dimensional microfluidic mixer for high viscosity solutions to unravel earlier folding kinetics of G-quadruplex under molecular crowding conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Li, Ying; Li, Yiwei; Chen, Peng; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2016-03-01

    Rapid mixing of highly viscous solutions is a great challenge, which helps to analyze the reaction kinetics in viscous liquid phase, particularly to discover the folding kinetics of macromolecules under molecular crowding conditions mimicking the conditions inside cells. Here, we demonstrated a novel microfluidic mixer based on Dean flows with three-dimensional (3D) microchannel configuration for fast mixing of high-viscosity fluids. The main structure contained three consecutive subunits, each consisting of a "U"-type channel followed by a chamber with different width and height. Thus, the two solutions injected from the two inlets would undergo a mixing in the first "U"-type channel due to the Dean flow effect, and simultaneous vortices expansions in both horizontal and vertical directions in the following chamber. Numerical simulations and experimental characterizations confirmed that the micromixer could achieve a mixing time of 122.4μs for solutions with viscosities about 33.6 times that of pure water. It was the fastest micromixer for high viscosity solutions compared with previous reports. With this highly efficient 3D microfluidic mixer, we further characterized the early folding kinetics of human telomere G-quadruplex under molecular crowding conditions, and unravelled a new folding process within 550μs. PMID:26717836

  4. Chorismatase Mechanisms Reveal Fundamentally Different Types of Reaction in a Single Conserved Protein Fold.

    PubMed

    Hubrich, Florian; Juneja, Puneet; Müller, Michael; Diederichs, Kay; Welte, Wolfram; Andexer, Jennifer N

    2015-09-01

    Chorismatases are a class of chorismate-converting enzymes involved in the biosynthetic pathways of different natural products, many of them with interesting pharmaceutical characteristics. So far, three subfamilies of chorismatases are described that convert chorismate into different (dihydro-)benzoate derivatives (CH-FkbO, CH-Hyg5, and CH-XanB2). Until now, the detailed enzyme mechanism and the molecular basis for the different reaction products were unknown. Here we show that the CH-FkbO and CH-Hyg5 subfamilies share the same protein fold, but employ fundamentally different reaction mechanisms. While the FkbO reaction is a typical hydrolysis, the Hyg5 reaction proceeds intramolecularly, most likely via an arene oxide intermediate. Two nonconserved active site residues were identified that are responsible for the different reaction mechanisms in CH-FkbO and CH-Hyg5. Further, we propose an additional amino acid residue to be responsible for the discrimination of the CH-XanB2 subfamily, which catalyzes the formation of two different hydroxybenzoate regioisomers, likely in a single active site. A multiple sequence alignment shows that these three crucial amino acid positions are located in conserved motifs and can therefore be used to assign unknown chorismatases to the corresponding subfamily. PMID:26247872

  5. Theoretical validation of chemical kinetic mechanisms : combustion of methanol.

    SciTech Connect

    Skodje, R. T.; Tomlin, A. S.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Harding, L. B.; Davis, M. J.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. of Colorado; Univ. of Leeds

    2010-08-19

    A new technique is proposed that uses theoretical methods to systematically improve the performance of chemical kinetic mechanisms. Using a screening method, the chemical reaction steps that most strongly influence a given kinetic observable are identified. The associated rate coefficients are then improved by high-level quantum chemistry and transition-state-theory calculations, which leads to new values for the coefficients and smaller uncertainty ranges. This updating process is continued as new reactions emerge as the most important steps in the target observable. The screening process employed is a global sensitivity analysis that involves Monte Carlo sampling of the full N-dimensional uncertainty space of rate coefficients, where N is the number of reaction steps. The method is applied to the methanol combustion mechanism of Li et al. (Int. J. Chem. Kinet. 2007, 39, 109.). It was found that the CH{sub 3}OH + HO{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}OH + O{sub 2} reactions were the most important steps in setting the ignition delay time, and the rate coefficients for these reactions were updated. The ignition time is significantly changed for a broad range of high-concentration methanol/oxygen mixtures in the updated mechanism.

  6. Biomineralization mechanisms: a kinetics and interfacial energy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nancollas, George H.; Wu, Wenju

    2000-04-01

    The calcium phosphates and oxalates are among the most frequently encountered biomineral phases and numerous kinetics studies have been made of their crystallization and dissolution in supersaturated and undersaturated solutions, respectively. These have focused mainly on parameters such as solution composition, ionic strength, pH, temperature, and solid surface characteristics. There is considerable interest in extending such studies to solutions more closely simulating the biological milieu. The constant composition method is especially useful for investigating the mechanisms of these reactions, and in the present work, the interfacial tensions between water and each of these surfaces have been calculated from measured contact angles using surface tension component theory. Values for the calcium phosphate phases such as dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), octacalcium phosphate (OCP), hydroxyapatite (HAP), and fluorapatite (FAP) may be compared with data calculated from dissolution kinetics experiments invoking different reaction mechanisms. Agreement between the directly measured interfacial energies and those calculated from the kinetics experiments provides valuable corroborative information about individual growth and dissolution mechanisms. For the calcium phosphates, the much smaller interfacial tensions of OCP and DCPD in contact with water as compared with those of HAP and FAP support the suggestion that the former phases are precursors in HAP and FAP biomineralization. The ability of a surface to nucleate mineral phases is closely related to the magnitude of the interfacial energies. Constant composition studies have also shown that HAP is an effective nucleator of calcium oxalate monohydrate, both of which are frequently observed in renal stones.

  7. Kinetic Mechanism of Protein N-terminal Methyltransferase 1*

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Stacie L.; Mao, Yunfei; Zhang, Gang; Hanjra, Pahul; Peterson, Darrell L.; Huang, Rong

    2015-01-01

    The protein N-terminal methyltransferase 1 (NTMT1) catalyzes the transfer of the methyl group from the S-adenosyl-l-methionine to the protein α-amine, resulting in formation of S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine and α-N-methylated proteins. NTMT1 is an interesting potential anticancer target because it is overexpressed in gastrointestinal cancers and plays an important role in cell mitosis. To gain insight into the biochemical mechanism of NTMT1, we have characterized the kinetic mechanism of recombinant NTMT1 using a fluorescence assay and mass spectrometry. The results of initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies indicate that methylation by NTMT1 proceeds via a random sequential Bi Bi mechanism. In addition, our processivity studies demonstrate that NTMT1 proceeds via a distributive mechanism for multiple methylations. Together, our studies provide new knowledge about the kinetic mechanism of NTMT1 and lay the foundation for the development of mechanism-based inhibitors. PMID:25771539

  8. Kinetic mechanism of protein N-terminal methyltransferase 1.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Stacie L; Mao, Yunfei; Zhang, Gang; Hanjra, Pahul; Peterson, Darrell L; Huang, Rong

    2015-05-01

    The protein N-terminal methyltransferase 1 (NTMT1) catalyzes the transfer of the methyl group from the S-adenosyl-l-methionine to the protein α-amine, resulting in formation of S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine and α-N-methylated proteins. NTMT1 is an interesting potential anticancer target because it is overexpressed in gastrointestinal cancers and plays an important role in cell mitosis. To gain insight into the biochemical mechanism of NTMT1, we have characterized the kinetic mechanism of recombinant NTMT1 using a fluorescence assay and mass spectrometry. The results of initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies indicate that methylation by NTMT1 proceeds via a random sequential Bi Bi mechanism. In addition, our processivity studies demonstrate that NTMT1 proceeds via a distributive mechanism for multiple methylations. Together, our studies provide new knowledge about the kinetic mechanism of NTMT1 and lay the foundation for the development of mechanism-based inhibitors. PMID:25771539

  9. Coalescence kinetics under the action of alternative grain growth mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Gubanov, P. Yu. Maksimov, I. L.

    2008-01-15

    The coalescence process is considered for the case where the prevailing grain growth mechanism is block-to-block diffusion, during which the motion of atoms in a solution occurs in the form of diffusion flux along the block boundaries. Numerical and analytical investigation of the coalescence kinetics in a homogeneous supersaturated solution is performed with allowance for the finite maximum grain size, and the time evolution of the size distribution function of new-phase grains is theoretically described. Possible transition regimes arising during coalescence at a change in the dominant grain growth mechanism are considered.

  10. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Mechanisms for Combustion of Oxygenated Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, E.M.; Pitz, W.J.; Curran, H.J.; Westbrook, C.K.

    2000-01-11

    Thermodynamic properties and detailed chemical kinetic models have been developed for the combustion of two oxygenates: methyl butanoate, a model compound for biodiesel fuels, and methyl formate, a related simpler molecule. Bond additivity methods and rules for estimating kinetic parameters were adopted from hydrocarbon combustion and extended. The resulting mechanisms have been tested against the limited combustion data available in the literature, which was obtained at low temperature, subatmospheric conditions in closed vessels, using pressure measurements as the main diagnostic. Some qualitative agreement was obtained, but the experimental data consistently indicated lower overall reactivities than the model, differing by factors of 10 to 50. This discrepancy, which occurs for species with well-established kinetic mechanisms as well as for methyl esters, is tentatively ascribed to the presence of wall reactions in the experiments. The model predicts a region of weak or negative dependence of overall reaction rate on temperature for each methyl ester. Examination of the reaction fluxes provides an explanation of this behavior, involving a temperature-dependent competition between chain-propagating unimolecular decomposition processes and chain-branching processes, similar to that accepted for hydrocarbons. There is an urgent need to obtain more complete experimental data under well-characterized conditions for thorough testing of the model.

  11. Mechanism and kinetics of autoxidation of calcium sulfite slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Pasluk-Bronlkowska, W.; Bronlkowski, T.; Ulejczyk, M. )

    1992-10-01

    The kinetics of Co-catalyzed autoxidation of calcium sulfite was studied to deepen knowledge of the mechanism of this chain reaction. Laboratory experiments were performed under heterogeneous conditions using two different reactors: a stirred tank with a plane gas-liquid (slurry) interface and an impinger. The reaction course was followed by monitoring the conductivity of the reacting solution and by quenching with iodine solution, respectively. Mechanistic judgments were derived from the influence of sulfite and catalyst concentrations, and the solid CaSO[sub 3] load on the kinetics of oxygen absorption. Appropriate reaction orders and rate constants were determined. Phenomena related to the solubility product law that imposed autoxidation rate limitations were analyzed. A soluble sulfate was shown to be a dual-action additive markedly accelerating the autoxidation due to increased sulfite and catalyst solubilities. The results are useful for designers of air pollution control processes. 20 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Network measures for protein folding state discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Menichetti, Giulia; Fariselli, Piero; Remondini, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Proteins fold using a two-state or multi-state kinetic mechanisms, but up to now there is not a first-principle model to explain this different behavior. We exploit the network properties of protein structures by introducing novel observables to address the problem of classifying the different types of folding kinetics. These observables display a plain physical meaning, in terms of vibrational modes, possible configurations compatible with the native protein structure, and folding cooperativity. The relevance of these observables is supported by a classification performance up to 90%, even with simple classifiers such as discriminant analysis. PMID:27464796

  13. Influence of Glu/Arg, Asp/Arg, and Glu/Lys Salt Bridges on α-Helical Stability and Folding Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Meuzelaar, Heleen; Vreede, Jocelyne; Woutersen, Sander

    2016-06-01

    Using a combination of ultraviolet circular dichroism, temperature-jump transient-infrared spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the effect of salt bridges between different types of charged amino-acid residue pairs on α-helix folding. We determine the stability and the folding and unfolding rates of 12 alanine-based α-helical peptides, each of which has a nearly identical composition containing three pairs of positively and negatively charged residues (either Glu(-)/Arg(+), Asp(-)/Arg(+), or Glu(-)/Lys(+)). Within each set of peptides, the distance and order of the oppositely charged residues in the peptide sequence differ, such that they have different capabilities of forming salt bridges. Our results indicate that stabilizing salt bridges (in which the interacting residues are spaced and ordered such that they favor helix formation) speed up α-helix formation by up to 50% and slow down the unfolding of the α-helix, whereas salt bridges with an unfavorable geometry have the opposite effect. Comparing the peptides with different types of charge pairs, we observe that salt bridges between side chains of Glu(-) and Arg(+) are most favorable for the speed of folding, probably because of the larger conformational space of the salt-bridging Glu(-)/Arg(+) rotamer pairs compared to Asp(-)/Arg(+) and Glu(-)/Lys(+). We speculate that the observed impact of salt bridges on the folding kinetics might explain why some proteins contain salt bridges that do not stabilize the final, folded conformation. PMID:27276251

  14. Mechanics of invagination and folding: Hybridized instabilities when one soft tissue grows on another

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallinen, Tuomas; Biggins, John S.

    2015-08-01

    We address the folding induced by differential growth in soft layered solids via an elementary model that consists of a soft growing neo-Hookean elastic layer adhered to a deep elastic substrate. As the layer-to-substrate modulus ratio is varied from above unity toward zero, we find a first transition from supercritical smooth folding followed by cusping of the valleys to direct subcritical cusped folding, then another to supercritical cusped folding. Beyond threshold, the high-amplitude fold spacing converges to about four layer thicknesses for many modulus ratios. In three dimensions, the instability gives rise to a wide variety of morphologies, including almost degenerate zigzag and triple-junction patterns that can coexist when the layer and substrate are of comparable softness. Our study unifies these results providing understanding for the complex and diverse fold morphologies found in biology, including the zigzag precursors to intestinal villi, and disordered zigzags and triple junctions in mammalian cortex.

  15. Simplified jet-A kinetic mechanism for combustor application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming; Kundu, Krishna; Ghorashi, Bahman

    1993-01-01

    Successful modeling of combustion and emissions in gas turbine engine combustors requires an adequate description of the reaction mechanism. For hydrocarbon oxidation, detailed mechanisms are only available for the simplest types of hydrocarbons such as methane, ethane, acetylene, and propane. These detailed mechanisms contain a large number of chemical species participating simultaneously in many elementary kinetic steps. Current computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models must include fuel vaporization, fuel-air mixing, chemical reactions, and complicated boundary geometries. To simulate these conditions a very sophisticated computer model is required, which requires large computer memory capacity and long run times. Therefore, gas turbine combustion modeling has frequently been simplified by using global reaction mechanisms, which can predict only the quantities of interest: heat release rates, flame temperature, and emissions. Jet fuels are wide-boiling-range hydrocarbons with ranges extending through those of gasoline and kerosene. These fuels are chemically complex, often containing more than 300 components. Jet fuel typically can be characterized as containing 70 vol pct paraffin compounds and 25 vol pct aromatic compounds. A five-step Jet-A fuel mechanism which involves pyrolysis and subsequent oxidation of paraffin and aromatic compounds is presented here. This mechanism is verified by comparing with Jet-A fuel ignition delay time experimental data, and species concentrations obtained from flametube experiments. This five-step mechanism appears to be better than the current one- and two-step mechanisms.

  16. High temperature heterogeneous reaction kinetics and mechanisms of tungsten oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabourin, Justin L.

    Tungsten, which is a material used in many high temperature applications, is limited by its susceptibility to oxidation at elevated temperatures. Although tungsten has the highest melting temperature of any metal, at much lower temperatures volatile oxides are formed during oxidation with oxygen containing species. This differs from many heterogeneous oxidation reactions involving metals since most reactions form very stable oxides that have higher melting or boiling points than the pure metal (e.g., aluminum, iron). Understanding heterogeneous oxidation and vaporization processes may allow for the expansion and improvement of high temperature tungsten applications. In order to increase understanding of the oxidation processes of tungsten, there is a need to develop reaction mechanisms and kinetics for oxidation processes involving oxidizers and environmental conditions of interest. Tungsten oxidation was thoroughly studied in the past, and today there is a good phenomenological understanding of these processes. However, as the design of large scale systems increasingly relies on computer modeling there becomes a need for improved descriptions of chemical reactions. With the increase in computing power over the last several decades, and the development of quantum chemistry and physics theories, heterogeneous systems can be modeled in detail at the molecular level. Thermochemical parameters that may not be measured experimentally may now be determined theoretically, a tool that was previously unavailable to scientists and engineers. Additionally, chemical kinetic modeling software is now available for both homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. This study takes advantage of these new theoretical tools, as well as a thermogravimetric (TG) flow reactor developed as part of this study to learn about mechanisms and kinetics of tungsten oxidation. Oxidizers of interest are oxygen (O2), carbon dioxide (CO 2), water (H2O), and other oxidizers present in combustion and

  17. Limited cooperativity in protein folding.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Victor; Campos, Luis A; Sadqi, Mourad

    2016-02-01

    Theory and simulations predict that the structural concert of protein folding reactions is relatively low. Experimentally, folding cooperativity has been difficult to study, but in recent years we have witnessed major advances. New analytical procedures in terms of conformational ensembles rather than discrete states, experimental techniques with improved time, structural, or single-molecule resolution, and combined thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of fast folding have contributed to demonstrate a general scenario of limited cooperativity in folding. Gradual structural disorder is already apparent on the unfolded and native states of slow, two-state folding proteins, and it greatly increases in magnitude for fast folding domains. These results demonstrate a direct link between how fast a single-domain protein folds and unfolds, and how cooperative (or structurally diverse) is its equilibrium unfolding process. Reducing cooperativity also destabilizes the native structure because it affects unfolding more than folding. We can thus define a continuous cooperativity scale that goes from the 'pliable' two-state character of slow folders to the gradual unfolding of one-state downhill, and eventually to intrinsically disordered proteins. The connection between gradual unfolding and intrinsic disorder is appealing because it suggests a conformational rheostat mechanism to explain the allosteric effects of folding coupled to binding. PMID:26845039

  18. Growth Kinetics and Mechanics of Hydrate Films by Interfacial Rheology.

    PubMed

    Leopércio, Bruna C; de Souza Mendes, Paulo R; Fuller, Gerald G

    2016-05-01

    A new approach to study and understand the kinetics and mechanical properties of hydrates by interfacial rheology is presented. This is made possible using a "double wall ring" interfacial rheology cell that has been designed to provide the necessary temperature control. Cyclopentane and water are used to form hydrates, and this model system forms these structures at ambient pressures. Different temperature and water/hydrocarbon contact protocols are explored. Of particular interest is the importance of first contacting the hydrocarbon against ice crystals in order to initiate hydrate formation. Indeed, this is found to be the case, even though the hydrates may be created at temperatures above the melting point of ice. Once hydrates completely populate the hydrocarbon/water interface, strain sweeps of the interfacial elastic and viscous moduli are conducted to interrogate the mechanical response and fragility of the hydrate films. The dependence on temperature, Tf, by the kinetics of formation and the mechanical properties is reported, and the cyclopentane hydrate dissociation temperature was found to be between 6 and 7 °C. The formation time (measured from the moment when cyclopentane first contacts ice crystals) as well as the elastic modulus and the yield strain increase as Tf increases. PMID:27076092

  19. Mechanism-based corrector combination restores ΔF508-CFTR folding and function.

    PubMed

    Okiyoneda, Tsukasa; Veit, Guido; Dekkers, Johanna F; Bagdany, Miklos; Soya, Naoto; Xu, Haijin; Roldan, Ariel; Verkman, Alan S; Kurth, Mark; Simon, Agnes; Hegedus, Tamas; Beekman, Jeffrey M; Lukacs, Gergely L

    2013-07-01

    The most common cystic fibrosis mutation, ΔF508 in nucleotide binding domain 1 (NBD1), impairs cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-coupled domain folding, plasma membrane expression, function and stability. VX-809, a promising investigational corrector of ΔF508-CFTR misprocessing, has limited clinical benefit and an incompletely understood mechanism, hampering drug development. Given the effect of second-site suppressor mutations, robust ΔF508-CFTR correction most likely requires stabilization of NBD1 energetics and the interface between membrane-spanning domains (MSDs) and NBD1, which are both established primary conformational defects. Here we elucidate the molecular targets of available correctors: class I stabilizes the NBD1-MSD1 and NBD1-MSD2 interfaces, and class II targets NBD2. Only chemical chaperones, surrogates of class III correctors, stabilize human ΔF508-NBD1. Although VX-809 can correct missense mutations primarily destabilizing the NBD1-MSD1/2 interface, functional plasma membrane expression of ΔF508-CFTR also requires compounds that counteract the NBD1 and NBD2 stability defects in cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells and intestinal organoids. Thus, the combination of structure-guided correctors represents an effective approach for cystic fibrosis therapy. PMID:23666117

  20. Structural insights into a unique cellulase fold and mechanism of cellulose hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Brás, Joana L. A.; Cartmell, Alan; Carvalho, Ana Luísa M.; Verzé, Genny; Bayer, Edward A.; Vazana, Yael; Correia, Márcia A. S.; Prates, José A. M.; Ratnaparkhe, Supriya; Boraston, Alisdair B.; Romão, Maria J.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.; Gilbert, Harry J.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a well-characterized cellulose-degrading microorganism. The genome sequence of C. thermocellum encodes a number of proteins that contain type I dockerin domains, which implies that they are components of the cellulose-degrading apparatus, but display no significant sequence similarity to known plant cell wall–degrading enzymes. Here, we report the biochemical properties and crystal structure of one of these proteins, designated CtCel124. The protein was shown to be an endo-acting cellulase that displays a single displacement mechanism and acts in synergy with Cel48S, the major cellulosomal exo-cellulase. The crystal structure of CtCel124 in complex with two cellotriose molecules, determined to 1.5 Å, displays a superhelical fold in which a constellation of α-helices encircle a central helix that houses the catalytic apparatus. The catalytic acid, Glu96, is located at the C-terminus of the central helix, but there is no candidate catalytic base. The substrate-binding cleft can be divided into two discrete topographical domains in which the bound cellotriose molecules display twisted and linear conformations, respectively, suggesting that the enzyme may target the interface between crystalline and disordered regions of cellulose. PMID:21393568

  1. Mechanism-based corrector combination restores ΔF508-CFTR folding and function

    PubMed Central

    Okiyoneda, Tsukasa; Veit, Guido; Dekkers, Johanna F.; Bagdany, Miklos; Soya, Naoto; Xu, Haijin; Roldan, Ariel; Verkman, Alan S.; Kurth, Mark; Simon, Agnes; Hegedus, Tamas; Beekman, Jeffrey M.; Lukacs, Gergely L.

    2013-01-01

    The most common cystic fibrosis (CF) mutation, ΔF508 in the nucleotide binding domain-1 (NBD1), impairs CFTR coupled-domain folding, plasma membrane (PM) expression, function and stability. VX-809, a promising investigational corrector of ΔF508-CFTR misprocessing, has limited clinical benefit and incompletely understood mechanism, hampering drug development. Based on the effect of second site suppressor mutations, robust ΔF508-CFTR correction likely requires stabilization of NBD1 and the membrane spanning domains (MSDs)-NBD1 interface, both established primary conformational defects. Here, we elucidated the molecular targets of available correctors; class-I stabilizes the NBD1-MSD1/2 interface, class-II targets NBD2, and only chemical chaperones, surrogates of class-III correctors, stabilize the human ΔF508-NBD1. While VX-809 can correct missense mutations primarily destabilizing the NBD1-MSD1/2 interface, functional PM expression of ΔF508-CFTR also requires compounds that counteract the NBD1 and NBD2 stability defects in CF bronchial epithelial cells and intestinal organoids. Thus, structure-guided corrector combination represents an effective approach for CF therapy. PMID:23666117

  2. Modeling the effect of codon translation rates on co-translational protein folding mechanisms of arbitrary complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caniparoli, Luca; O'Brien, Edward P.

    2015-04-01

    In a cell, the folding of a protein molecule into tertiary structure can begin while it is synthesized by the ribosome. The rate at which individual amino acids are incorporated into the elongating nascent chain has been shown to affect the likelihood that proteins will populate their folded state, indicating that co-translational protein folding is a far from equilibrium process. Developing a theoretical framework to accurately describe this process is, therefore, crucial for advancing our understanding of how proteins acquire their functional conformation in living cells. Current state-of-the-art computational approaches, such as molecular dynamics simulations, are very demanding in terms of the required computer resources, making the simulation of co-translational protein folding difficult. Here, we overcome this limitation by introducing an efficient approach that predicts the effects that variable codon translation rates have on co-translational folding pathways. Our approach is based on Markov chains. By using as an input a relatively small number of molecular dynamics simulations, it allows for the computation of the probability that a nascent protein is in any state as a function of the translation rate of individual codons along a mRNA's open reading frame. Due to its computational efficiency and favorable scalability with the complexity of the folding mechanism, this approach could enable proteome-wide computational studies of the influence of translation dynamics on co-translational folding.

  3. Modeling the effect of codon translation rates on co-translational protein folding mechanisms of arbitrary complexity.

    PubMed

    Caniparoli, Luca; O'Brien, Edward P

    2015-04-14

    In a cell, the folding of a protein molecule into tertiary structure can begin while it is synthesized by the ribosome. The rate at which individual amino acids are incorporated into the elongating nascent chain has been shown to affect the likelihood that proteins will populate their folded state, indicating that co-translational protein folding is a far from equilibrium process. Developing a theoretical framework to accurately describe this process is, therefore, crucial for advancing our understanding of how proteins acquire their functional conformation in living cells. Current state-of-the-art computational approaches, such as molecular dynamics simulations, are very demanding in terms of the required computer resources, making the simulation of co-translational protein folding difficult. Here, we overcome this limitation by introducing an efficient approach that predicts the effects that variable codon translation rates have on co-translational folding pathways. Our approach is based on Markov chains. By using as an input a relatively small number of molecular dynamics simulations, it allows for the computation of the probability that a nascent protein is in any state as a function of the translation rate of individual codons along a mRNA's open reading frame. Due to its computational efficiency and favorable scalability with the complexity of the folding mechanism, this approach could enable proteome-wide computational studies of the influence of translation dynamics on co-translational folding. PMID:25877595

  4. Kinetics and mechanism of N-chloromethylamine decomposition in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. V.; Vedenyapina, M. D.; Pleshchev, M. I.; Gashev, S. B.; Makhova, N. N.; Vedenyapin, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    Kinetics of N-chloromethylamine decomposition in an aqueous base medium and chloroform at different temperatures is studied. The decomposition of N-chloromethylamine is found to obey a second order equation in an aqueous base medium at an equimolar ratio of the reagents and a first order equation in chloroform with excess base. The activation energy of N-chloromethylamine decomposition in the both solvents is determined. A mechanism for the reaction is proposed. N-Chloromethylamine is shown to have approximately equal stability in these solvents within the studied temperature range.

  5. Mechanisms for Rescue of Correctable Folding Defects in CFTRΔF508

    PubMed Central

    Grove, Diane E.; Rosser, Meredith F.N.; Ren, Hong Yu; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.

    2009-01-01

    Premature degradation of CFTRΔF508 causes cystic fibrosis (CF). CFTRΔF508 folding defects are conditional and folding correctors are being developed as CF therapeutics. How the cellular environment impacts CFTRΔF508 folding efficiency and the identity of CFTRΔF508's correctable folding defects is unclear. We report that inactivation of the RMA1 or CHIP ubiquitin ligase permits a pool of CFTRΔF508 to escape the endoplasmic reticulum. Combined RMA1 or CHIP inactivation and Corr-4a treatment enhanced CFTRΔF508 folding to 3–7-fold greater levels than those elicited by Corr-4a. Some, but not all, folding defects in CFTRΔF508 are correctable. CHIP and RMA1 recognize different regions of CFTR and a large pool of nascent CFTRΔF508 is ubiquitinated by RMA1 before Corr-4a action. RMA1 recognizes defects in CFTRΔF508 related to misassembly of a complex that contains MSD1, NBD1, and the R-domain. Corr-4a acts on CFTRΔF508 after MSD2 synthesis and was ineffective at rescue of ΔF508 dependent folding defects in amino-terminal regions. In contrast, misfolding caused by the rare CF-causing mutation V232D in MSD1 was highly correctable by Corr-4a. Overall, correction of folding defects recognized by RMA1 and/or global modulation of ER quality control has the potential to increase CFTRΔF508 folding and provide a therapeutic approach for CF. PMID:19625452

  6. Methods for detecting formation mechanisms and determining a final strain value for different scales of folded structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, Fedor L.

    2012-03-01

    Linear folding, developing in fold and thrust belts, is treated as a hierarchic system, at each level of which objects are described by special kinematic models. Geometric parameters of natural folded structures are determined by a combination of various mechanisms incorporated in the model, and a value of finite strain. Several case studies demonstrate how such data enables one to solve structural and geodynamic problems for natural objects of different size. Shortening value of two morphological types of folds is determined based on the geometry of competent layers. Application of the method to analyze the folds of the Vorontsov nappe (Greater Caucasus) determines its gravitational origin. Structural cross-sections though several tectonic zones are subdivided into relatively small domains, the geometry of which, particularly in thin-bedded flysch deposits, making it possible to identify the mechanisms of formation of both local and large structures, and also to reconstruct the pre-folded state of each domain and of the entire cross-sections. By aggregation of tectonic domains into large modules and determination of the value of shortening, we have constructed for the first time a 3D model of the present-day structure of the northwestern Caucasus, which is balanced for the whole sedimentary cover. The geometry of large structures makes it possible to validate geodynamic models.

  7. Subtle differences in virus composition affect disinfection kinetics and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sigstam, Thérèse; Gannon, Greg; Cascella, Michele; Pecson, Brian M; Wigginton, Krista Rule; Kohn, Tamar

    2013-06-01

    Viral disinfection kinetics have been studied in depth, but the molecular-level inactivation mechanisms are not understood. Consequently, it is difficult to predict the disinfection behavior of nonculturable viruses, even when related, culturable viruses are available. The objective of this work was to determine how small differences in the composition of the viral genome and proteins impact disinfection. To this end, we investigated the inactivation of three related bacteriophages (MS2, fr, and GA) by UV254, singlet oxygen ((1)O2), free chlorine (FC), and chlorine dioxide (ClO2). Genome damage was quantified by PCR, and protein damage was assessed by quantitative matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. ClO2 caused great variability in the inactivation kinetics between viruses and was the only treatment that did not induce genome damage. The inactivation kinetics were similar for all viruses when treated with disinfectants possessing a genome-damaging component (FC, (1)O2, and UV254). On the protein level, UV254 subtly damaged MS2 and fr capsid proteins, whereas GA's capsid remained intact. (1)O2 oxidized a methionine residue in MS2 but did not affect the other two viruses. In contrast, FC and ClO2 rapidly degraded the capsid proteins of all three viruses. Protein composition alone could not explain the observed degradation trends; instead, molecular dynamics simulations indicated that degradation is dictated by the solvent-accessible surface area of individual amino acids. Finally, despite the similarities of the three viruses investigated, their mode of inactivation by a single disinfectant varied. This explains why closely related viruses can exhibit drastically different inactivation kinetics. PMID:23542618

  8. Can an electro-kinetic mechanism explain artificial earthquakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyr, Guillaume; Glover, Paul; Novikov, Victor

    2010-05-01

    Researchers of the Joint Institute for High Temperatures of the Russian Academy of Sciences have carried out a large number of current injection experiments using a 4.2 km long dipole at the Bishkek Research Station in the Chu valley area of the Kyrgyz mountains (northern Tien Shan). The current is generated using Pulsed Magneto-Hydrodynamic (MHD) generators that can produce 2800 amperes at 1350 volts for up to 12.1 seconds. They have found that the number of earthquakes in the region within 150 km of the injection site increased by over 10 standard deviations of the background seismicity. The probability of this occurring by chance is only one in every thousand million million (10^15) measurements. It is certain, therefore, that we can generate earthquakes by current injection. However, no satisfactory physical mechanism for it currently exists. Paul Glover has suggested that an electro-kinetic mechanism may be the missing causal link. In his theory the injected current creates a three-dimensional electric field in the subsurface. The electro-kinetic mechanism uses the electric field to move the pore fluid at depth. If the pore fluid flows into a fault zone it may accumulate and transiently raise the pore fluid pressure within the fault zone. It is known that increases of pore fluid pressure within fault zones more than a critical pressure of 0.05 MPa are sufficient to trigger an earthquake if the fault has sufficient accumulated strain. Earthquakes are therefore possible while the pore fluid pressure is over the critical pressure. While the electro-kinetic drive has been well studied around the world, it is uncertain if the mechanism can provide fluid pressures sufficient to trigger earthquakes up to 150 km from the injection point. In this work we present two dimensional numerical modelling of the proposed coupled mechanism using a finite element approach and using the software package Comsol Multiphysics. The initial results are promising and indicate that (i

  9. A Hooke׳s law-based approach to protein folding rate.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Prieto, Pablo J; Salgado, Jesús; García, Yamila; Sotomayor-Torres, Clivia M

    2015-01-01

    Kinetics is a key aspect of the renowned protein folding problem. Here, we propose a comprehensive approach to folding kinetics where a polypeptide chain is assumed to behave as an elastic material described by the Hooke׳s law. A novel parameter called elastic-folding constant results from our model and is suggested to distinguish between protein with two-state and multi-state folding pathways. A contact-free descriptor, named folding degree, is introduced as a suitable structural feature to study protein-folding kinetics. This approach generalizes the observed correlations between varieties of structural descriptors with the folding rate constant. Additionally several comparisons among structural classes and folding mechanisms were carried out showing the good performance of our model with proteins of different types. The present model constitutes a simple rationale for the structural and energetic factors involved in protein folding kinetics. PMID:25245368

  10. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.C.

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  11. Scanning Single-Molecule Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Enables Kinetics Study of DNA Hairpin Folding with a Time Window from Microseconds to Seconds.

    PubMed

    Bi, Huimin; Yin, Yandong; Pan, Bailong; Li, Geng; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2016-05-19

    Single-molecule fluorescence measurements have been widely used to explore kinetics and dynamics of biological systems. Among them, single-molecule imaging (SMI) is good at tracking processes slower than tens of milliseconds, whereas fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is good at probing processes faster than submilliseconds. However, there is still shortage of simple yet effective single-molecule fluorescence method to cover the time-scale between submilliseconds and tens of milliseconds. To effectively bridge this millisecond gap, we developed a single-molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (smFCS) method that works on surface-immobilized single molecules through surface scanning. We validated it by monitoring the classical DNA hairpin folding process. With a wide time window from microseconds to seconds, the experimental data are well fitted to the two-state folding model. All relevant molecular parameters, including the relative fluorescence brightness, equilibrium constant, and reaction rate constants, were uniquely determined. PMID:27140004

  12. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Calcite Reactions with Saline Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, Brian P

    2015-09-02

    Project Description: The general objective of the proposed research is to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of calcite reactions with saline waters over a wide range of saline water composition, pCO2, and modest ranges in T and P. This will be accomplished by studying both reaction rates and solubility from changes in solution chemistry, and making nanoscale observations of calcite precipitate surface morphology and composition at the micro-to-nano-scale to provide an understanding of controlling reaction mechanisms and pathways. The specific objectives necessary to reach the general objective are: a) determination of how pCO2, Ca2+, ionic strength and “foreign” ions influence reaction rates; and b) investigate the influence of these parameters on apparent kinetic solubility from dissolution and precipitation reactions. This information will clearly be central to the construction of reliable reaction-transport models to predict reservoir and formation response to increased CO2 in saline waters. This program was initially collaborative with John Morse at Texas A&M, however his passing shortly after the beginning of this program resulted in abbreviated research time and effort. Summary of Results: Early studies using electron microscopy and spectroscopy indicated that carbonate precipitation from natural seawater (NSW) conditions onto aragonite substrates was mediated by a surface amorphous calcium carbonate layer. It was hypothesized that this ACC layer (observed after < 5days reaction time) was responsible for the abnormal reaction kinetics and also served as a metastable seed layer for growth of epitaxial aragonite. Further studies of the ACC formation mechanism indicated a strong dependence on the Mg concentration in solution. Subsequent studies at shorter times (10 hrs) on calcite substrates and in a wide range of supersaturation conditions did not indicate any ACC layer. Instead, an epitaxial layer by layer

  13. Actin kinetics shapes cortical network structure and mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsche, Marco; Erlenkämper, Christoph; Moeendarbary, Emad; Charras, Guillaume; Kruse, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    The actin cortex of animal cells is the main determinant of cellular mechanics. The continuous turnover of cortical actin filaments enables cells to quickly respond to stimuli. Recent work has shown that most of the cortical actin is generated by only two actin nucleators, the Arp2/3 complex and the formin Diaph1. However, our understanding of their interplay, their kinetics, and the length distribution of the filaments that they nucleate within living cells is poor. Such knowledge is necessary for a thorough comprehension of cellular processes and cell mechanics from basic polymer physics principles. We determined cortical assembly rates in living cells by using single-molecule fluorescence imaging in combination with stochastic simulations. We find that formin-nucleated filaments are, on average, 10 times longer than Arp2/3-nucleated filaments. Although formin-generated filaments represent less than 10% of all actin filaments, mechanical measurements indicate that they are important determinants of cortical elasticity. Tuning the activity of actin nucleators to alter filament length distribution may thus be a mechanism allowing cells to adjust their macroscopic mechanical properties to their physiological needs. PMID:27152338

  14. Kinetic and Mechanical Analysis of Live Tube Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cheshire, Alan M.; Kerman, Bilal E.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Spector, Alexander A.; Andrew, Deborah J.

    2008-01-01

    Ribbon is a nuclear BTB-domain protein required for morphogenesis of the salivary gland and trachea. We recently showed that ribbon mutants exhibit decreased Crumbs and Rab11-coincident apical vesicles and increased apical Moesin activity and microvillar structure during tube elongation. To learn how these molecular and morphological changes affect the dynamics of tubulogenesis, we optimized an advanced two-photon microscope to enable high-resolution live imaging of the salivary gland and trachea. Live imaging revealed that ribbon mutant tissues exhibit slowed and incomplete lumenal morphogenesis, consistent with previously described apical defects. Since Moesin activity correlates with cortical stiffness, we hypothesize that ribbon mutants suffer from increased apical stiffness during morphogenesis. We develop this hypothesis through mechanical analysis, using the advantages of live imaging to construct computational elastic and analytical viscoelastic models of tube elongation, which suggest that ribbon mutant tubes exhibit three- to five-fold increased apical stiffness and two-fold increased effective apical viscosity. PMID:18816822

  15. Multipixel spectral imaging of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in COS-7 cells: folding kinetics and chromophore formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenbaum, Lior; Rothmann, Chana; Hanania, Judith; Malik, Zvi

    2000-12-01

    Spectrally resolved imaging of Green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressed in living COS-7 kidney cells distinguished the subcellular localization and demarcated the processes of protein folding and chromophore formation. COS-7 kidney cells were transfected by a plasmid pEGFP-N1 plasmid followed by incubation for 15 hours for gen expression. At different intervals the cells were examined by fluorescence microscopy and analyzed by a spectral imaging system. After 7 hours, GFP was detected in the cytoplasm, concentrated in a localized form. Spectra of the initial GFP evinced several components that belong both tot he typical fluorescent signal as well as to unspecific fingerprints. At 10 and 15 hours, GFP was seen spread in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus, and the specific spectra of the GFP were dominant at the later time. The typical GFP spectral fingerprint is the result of protein folding and chromophore formation following internal oxidation reactions. This folding and chromophore formation process, up to final conformation, was detected by spectral imaging as localized in the nucleus rather than in the cytosol. Thus, the method of fluorescence microscopy combined with multiplex spectral imaging demonstrates distinct biochemical pathways leading to GFP conformation.

  16. The experimental folding landscape of monomeric lactose repressor, a large two-domain protein, involves two kinetic intermediates.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Corey J; Das, Payel; Clementi, Cecilia; Matthews, Kathleen S; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2005-10-11

    To probe the experimental folding behavior of a large protein with complex topology, we created a monomeric variant of the lactose repressor protein (MLAc), a well characterized tetrameric protein that regulates transcription of the lac operon. Purified MLAc is folded, fully functional, and binds the inducer isopropyl beta-d-thiogalactoside with the same affinity as wild-type LacI. Equilibrium unfolding of MLAc induced by the chemical denaturant urea is a reversible, apparent two-state process (pH 7.5, 20 degrees C). However, time-resolved experiments demonstrate that unfolding is single-exponential, whereas refolding data indicate two transient intermediates. The data reveal the initial formation of a burst-phase (tau < ms) intermediate that corresponds to approximately 50% of the total secondary-structure content. This step is followed by a rearrangement reaction that is rate-limited by an unfolding process (tau approximately 3 s; pH 7.5, 20 degrees C) and results in a second intermediate. This MLAc intermediate converts to the native structure (tau approximately 30 s; pH 7.5, 20 degrees C). Remarkably, the experimental folding-energy landscape for MLAc is in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions using a simple topology-based C(alpha)-model as presented in a companion article in this issue. PMID:16203983

  17. A multipurpose reduced chemical-kinetic mechanism for methanol combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Tarrazo, Eduardo; Sánchez-Sanz, Mario; Sánchez, Antonio L.; Williams, Forman A.

    2016-07-01

    A multipurpose reduced chemical-kinetic mechanism for methanol combustion comprising 8 overall reactions and 11 reacting chemical species is presented. The development starts by investigating the minimum set of elementary reactions needed to describe methanol combustion with reasonable accuracy over a range of conditions of temperature, pressure, and composition of interest in combustion. Starting from a 27-step mechanism that has been previously tested and found to give accurate predictions of ignition processes for these conditions, it is determined that the addition of 11 elementary reactions taken from its basis (San Diego) mechanism extends the validity of the description to premixed-flame propagation, strain-induced extinction of non-premixed flames, and equilibrium composition and temperatures, giving results that compare favourably with experimental measurements and also with computations using the 247-step detailed San Diego mechanism involving 50 reactive species. Specifically, premixed-flame propagation velocities and extinction strain rates for non-premixed counterflow flames calculated with the 38-step mechanism show departures from experimental measurements and detailed-chemistry computations that are roughly on the order of 10%, comparable with expected experimental uncertainties. Similar accuracy is found in comparisons of autoignition times over the range considered, except at very high temperatures, under which conditions the computations tend to overpredict induction times for all of the chemistry descriptions tested. From this 38-step mechanism, the simplification is continued by introducing steady-state approximations for the intermediate species CH3, CH4, HCO, CH3O, CH2OH, and O, leading to an 8-step reduced mechanism that provides satisfactory accuracy for all conditions tested. The flame computations indicate that thermal diffusion has a negligible influence on methanol combustion in all cases considered and that a mixture-average species

  18. A small detailed chemical-kinetic mechanism for hydrocarbon combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, M.V.; Williams, F.A.

    2006-02-01

    A chemical-kinetic mechanism is presented that is designed to be used for autoignition, deflagrations, detonations, and diffusion flames of a number of different fuels. To keep the mechanism small, attention is restricted to pressures below about 100 atm, temperatures above about 1000 K, and equivalence ratios less than about 3 for the premixed systems, thereby excluding soot formation and low-temperature fuel-peroxide chemistry. Under these restrictions, hydrogen combustion is included with 21 steps among 8 chemical species, combustion of carbon monoxide with 30 steps among 11 species, methane, methanol, ethane, ethylene, and acetylene combustion with 134 steps among 30 species, and propane, propene, allene, and propyne combustion with 177 steps among 37 species. The mechanism has been extensively tested previously for all of these fuels except propane, propene, allene, and propyne. Tests are reported here for these last four fuels through comparisons with experiments and with predictions of other mechanisms for deflagration velocities and shock-tube ignition. (author)

  19. Significance of first-order faults in folding mechanically isotropic layers: evidence from the Sudbury Basin, Canada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Martin; Riller, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    The Sudbury Basin in Canada is a fold basin demarcated by the Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC). Folding of the SIC is particularly notable due to its petrographically distinct but mechanically similar layers that are hardly strained when compared to folded strata in other deformed terranes. The Sudbury Basin has three ranges, the North Range, the South Range, and the East Range. The East Range differs from the other ranges by inclosing a remarkably shorter SIC segment with a strong concave curvature. Lacking significant mechanical anisotropy and solid-state strain within the SIC brings to question how the SIC in the East Range acquired its curvature. To address this question, we analyzed the orientation of prominent km-scale faults and their slip vectors. These faults transect the SIC at low angles and mimic its plan view curvature suggesting that the faults were folded along with the SIC. We have developed a G.I.S.-based workflow to address this problem that harnesses high-resolution LiDAR data to generate near surface fault geometries, and combines these geometries with local fault-slip inversions of slickensides to identify slip vectors of prominent curved faults. Analysis of slip vectors along curved faults yields clusters of slip vectors with normal and reverse slip motion in the northern and southern fault segments, respectively. The variation in slip vectors is interpreted to be non-primary and thus shows a temporal relationship between faulting and folding of the SIC. Therefore, prominent curved faults in the East Range must have occurred as a pre-folding brittle response to horizontal shortening. These faults later assumed the role of mechanical anisotropic elements necessary for folding of the SIC layers to occur. This interpretation is corroborated by two sets of principal strain axes inferred from fault-slip inversions. The first set is characterized by its principal axis of shortening oriented NW-SE, comparable in orientation to regional shortening as

  20. Mechanisms and kinetics of granulated sewage sludge combustion.

    PubMed

    Kijo-Kleczkowska, Agnieszka; Środa, Katarzyna; Kosowska-Golachowska, Monika; Musiał, Tomasz; Wolski, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    This paper investigates sewage sludge disposal methods with particular emphasis on combustion as the priority disposal method. Sewage sludge incineration is an attractive option because it minimizes odour, significantly reduces the volume of the starting material and thermally destroys organic and toxic components of the off pads. Additionally, it is possible that ashes could be used. Currently, as many as 11 plants use sewage sludge as fuel in Poland; thus, this technology must be further developed in Poland while considering the benefits of co-combustion with other fuels. This paper presents the results of experimental studies aimed at determining the mechanisms (defining the fuel combustion region by studying the effects of process parameters, including the size of the fuel sample, temperature in the combustion chamber and air velocity, on combustion) and kinetics (measurement of fuel temperature and mass changes) of fuel combustion in an air stream under different thermal conditions and flow rates. The combustion of the sludge samples during air flow between temperatures of 800 and 900°C is a kinetic-diffusion process. This process determines the sample size, temperature of its environment, and air velocity. The adopted process parameters, the time and ignition temperature of the fuel by volatiles, combustion time of the volatiles, time to reach the maximum temperature of the fuel surface, maximum temperature of the fuel surface, char combustion time, and the total process time, had significant impacts. PMID:26306758

  1. Hydrolysis of iron and chromium fluorides: mechanism and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, José L; Dufour, Javier; Negro, Carlos; López-Mateos, Federico

    2008-06-15

    Fluoride complexes of metallic ions are one of the main problems when processing industrial effluents with high content of fluoride anion. The most important case is derived from pickling treatment of stainless steel, which is performed with HNO3/HF mixtures to remove oxides scale formed over the metal surface. Waste from this process, spent pickling liquor, must be treated for recovering metallic and acid content. Conventional treatments produce a final effluent with high quantity of fluoride complexes of iron and chromium. This work proposes a hydrolysis treatment of these solid metal fluorides by reacting them with a basic agent. Metal oxides are obtained, while fluoride is released to solution as a solved salt, which can be easily recovered as hydrofluoric acid. Solid iron and chromium fluorides, mainly K2FeF5(s) and CrF3(s), obtained in the UCM treatment process, were employed in this work. Optimal hydrolysis operating conditions were obtained by means of a factorial design: media must be basic but pH cannot be higher than 9.5, temperature from 40 to 70 degrees C and alkali concentration (potassium hydroxide) below 1.1 mol L(-1). Secondary reactions have been detected, which are probably due to fluoride adsorption onto obtained oxides surface. Mechanism of reaction consists of several stages, involving solid fluoride dissolution and complexes decomposition. Hydrolysis kinetics has been modeled with classical crystal dissolution kinetics, based on mass transfer phenomena. PMID:17988794

  2. Statistical mechanics of a correlated energy landscape model for protein folding funnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotkin, Steven S.; Wang, Jin; Wolynes, Peter G.

    1997-02-01

    In heteropolymers, energetic correlations exist due to polymeric constraints and the locality of interactions. Pair correlations in conjunction with the a priori specification of the existence of a particularly low energy state provide a method of introducing the aspect of minimal frustration to the energy landscapes of random heteropolymers. The resulting funneled landscape exhibits both a phase transition from a molten globule to a folded state, and the heteropolymeric glass transition in the globular state. We model the folding transition in the self-averaging regime, which together with a simple theory of collapse allows us to depict folding as a double-well free energy surface in terms of suitable reaction coordinates. Observed trends in barrier positions and heights with protein sequence length and thermodynamic conditions are discussed within the context of the model. We also discuss the new physics which arises from the introduction of explicitly cooperative many-body interactions, as might arise from sidechain packing and nonadditive hydrophobic forces.

  3. Structure of the beta 2 homodimer of bacterial luciferase from Vibrio harveyi: X-ray analysis of a kinetic protein folding trap.

    PubMed Central

    Thoden, J. B.; Holden, H. M.; Fisher, A. J.; Sinclair, J. F.; Wesenberg, G.; Baldwin, T. O.; Rayment, I.

    1997-01-01

    Luciferase, as isolated from Vibrio harveyi, is an alpha beta heterodimer. When allowed to fold in the absence of the alpha subunit, either in vitro or in vivo, the beta subunit of enzyme will form a kinetically stable homodimer that does not unfold even after prolonged incubation in 5 M urea at pH 7.0 and 18 degrees C. This form of the beta subunit, arising via kinetic partitioning on the folding pathway, appears to constitute a kinetically trapped alternative to the heterodimeric enzyme (Sinclair JF, Ziegler MM, Baldwin TO. 1994. Kinetic partitioning during protein folding yields multiple native states. Nature Struct Biol 1: 320-326). Here we describe the X-ray crystal structure of the beta 2 homodimer of luciferase from V. harveyi determined and refined at 1.95 A resolution. Crystals employed in the investigational belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with unit cell dimensions of a = 58.8 A, b = 62.0 A, and c = 218.2 A and contained one dimer per asymmetric unit. Like that observed in the functional luciferase alpha beta heterodimer, the major tertiary structural motif of each beta subunit consists of an (alpha/beta)8 barrel (Fisher AJ, Raushel FM, Baldwin TO, Rayment I. 1995. Three-dimensional structure of bacterial luciferase from Vibrio harveyi at 2.4 A resolution. Biochemistry 34: 6581-6586). The root-mean-square deviation of the alpha-carbon coordinates between the beta subunits of the hetero- and homodimers is 0.7 A. This high resolution X-ray analysis demonstrated that "domain" or "loop" swapping has not occurred upon formation of the beta 2 homodimer and thus the stability of the beta 2 species to denaturation cannot be explained in such simple terms. In fact, the subunit:subunit interfaces observed in both the beta 2 homodimer and alpha beta heterodimer are remarkably similar in hydrogen-bonding patterns and buried surface areas. PMID:9007973

  4. Kinetics, products, and mechanisms of secondary organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Ziemann, Paul J; Atkinson, Roger

    2012-10-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is formed in the atmosphere when volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from anthropogenic and biogenic sources are oxidized by reactions with OH radicals, O(3), NO(3) radicals, or Cl atoms to form less volatile products that subsequently partition into aerosol particles. Once in particles, these organic compounds can undergo heterogenous/multiphase reactions to form more highly oxidized or oligomeric products. SOA comprises a large fraction of atmospheric aerosol mass and can have significant effects on atmospheric chemistry, visibility, human health, and climate. Previous articles have reviewed the kinetics, products, and mechanisms of atmospheric VOC reactions and the general chemistry and physics involved in SOA formation. In this article we present a detailed review of VOC and heterogeneous/multiphase chemistry as they apply to SOA formation, with a focus on the effects of VOC molecular structure on the kinetics of initial reactions with the major atmospheric oxidants, the subsequent reactions of alkyl, alkyl peroxy, and alkoxy radical intermediates, and the composition of the resulting products. Structural features of reactants and products discussed include compound carbon number; linear, branched, and cyclic configurations; the presence of C[double bond, length as m-dash]C bonds and aromatic rings; and functional groups such as carbonyl, hydroxyl, ester, hydroxperoxy, carboxyl, peroxycarboxyl, nitrate, and peroxynitrate. The intention of this review is to provide atmospheric chemists with sufficient information to understand the dominant pathways by which the major classes of atmospheric VOCs react to form SOA products, and the further reactions of these products in particles. This will allow reasonable predictions to be made, based on molecular structure, about the kinetics, products, and mechanisms of VOC and heterogeneous/multiphase reactions, including the effects of important variables such as VOC, oxidant, and NO

  5. Three-dimensional geometry, strain rates and basement deformation mechanisms of thrust-bend folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibberley, Christopher A. J.

    1997-03-01

    Models for thrust-bend folding of an isotropic medium are used to predict initial basement thrust sheet geometries and sub-surface thrust fault shapes from final basement thrust sheet structure. Predicted strains and strain rates from these models are compared with data on deformation fabrics in an example of a basement thrustbend fold in order to characterise the deformation response to thrust-bend folding. The Glencoul thrust sheet in the Moine Thrust Zone of north-west Scotland is restored to an initial thrust sheet geometry. Spatial and orientation distribution data of syn-emplacement fractures and cataclastic fault zones from within the Glencoul thrust sheet are then compared with the strain and strain rate histories predicted by thrust-bend folding models. A different set of cataclastic fault seams is demonstrated to have been generated at each frontal thrust bend. Cataclastic failure is restricted to portions of the thrust sheet that have moved over frontal bends with smaller radii of curvature. From model thrust-bend geometries and an assumed slip rate of 1 x 10 -10 ms -1, estimated minimum (critical) strain rates required for fracture failure of the Lewisian basement are 10 -11 to 10 -14 s -1 for shear strain rates and 10 -12 to 10 -15 s -1 for extensional strain rates.

  6. Kinetic and Chemical Mechanisms of Homocitrate Synthase from Thermus thermophilus*

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vidya Prasanna; West, Ann H.; Cook, Paul F.

    2011-01-01

    The homocitrate synthase from Thermus thermophilus (TtHCS) is a metal-activated enzyme with either Mg2+ or Mn2+ capable of serving as the divalent cation. The enzyme exhibits a sequential kinetic mechanism. The mechanism is steady state ordered with α-ketoglutarate (α-Kg) binding prior to acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) with Mn2+, whereas it is steady state random with Mg2+, suggesting a difference in the competence of the E·Mn·α-Kg·AcCoA and E·Mg·α-Kg·AcCoA complexes. The mechanism is supported by product and dead-end inhibition studies. The primary isotope effect obtained with deuterioacetylCoA (AcCoA-d3) in the presence of Mg2+ is unity (value 1.0) at low concentrations of AcCoA, whereas it is 2 at high concentrations of AcCoA. Data suggest the presence of a slow conformational change induced by binding of AcCoA that accompanies deprotonation of the methyl group of AcCoA. The solvent kinetic deuterium isotope effect is also unity at low AcCoA, but is 1.7 at high AcCoA, consistent with the proposed slow conformational change. The maximum rate is pH independent with either Mg2+ or Mn2+ as the divalent metal ion, whereas V/Kα-Kg (with Mn2+) decreases at low and high pH giving pK values of about 6.5 and 8.0. Lysine is a competitive inhibitor that binds to the active site of TtHCS, and shares some of the same binding determinants as α-Kg. Lysine binding exhibits negative cooperativity, indicating cross-talk between the two monomers of the TtHCS dimer. Data are discussed in terms of the overall mechanism of TtHCS. PMID:21733842

  7. A Disorder-Induced Domino-Like Destabilization Mechanism Governs the Folding and Functional Dynamics of the Repeat Protein IκBα

    PubMed Central

    Sivanandan, Srinivasan; Naganathan, Athi N.

    2013-01-01

    The stability of the repeat protein IκBα, a transcriptional inhibitor in mammalian cells, is critical in the functioning of the NF-κB signaling module implicated in an array of cellular processes, including cell growth, disease, immunity and apoptosis. Structurally, IκBα is complex, with both ordered and disordered regions, thus posing a challenge to the available computational protocols to model its conformational behavior. Here, we introduce a simple procedure to model disorder in systems that undergo binding-induced folding that involves modulation of the contact map guided by equilibrium experimental observables in combination with an Ising-like Wako-Saitô-Muñoz-Eaton model. This one-step procedure alone is able to reproduce a variety of experimental observables, including ensemble thermodynamics (scanning calorimetry, pre-transitions, m-values) and kinetics (roll-over in chevron plot, intermediates and their identity), and is consistent with hydrogen-deuterium exchange measurements. We further capture the intricate distance-dynamics between the domains as measured by single-molecule FRET by combining the model predictions with simple polymer physics arguments. Our results reveal a unique mechanism at work in IκBα folding, wherein disorder in one domain initiates a domino-like effect partially destabilizing neighboring domains, thus highlighting the effect of symmetry-breaking at the level of primary sequences. The offshoot is a multi-state and a dynamic conformational landscape that is populated by increasingly partially folded ensembles upon destabilization. Our results provide, in a straightforward fashion, a rationale to the promiscuous binding and short intracellular half-life of IκBα evolutionarily engineered into it through repeats with variable stabilities and expand the functional repertoire of disordered regions in proteins. PMID:24367251

  8. Mechanisms, kinetics, impurities and defects: consequences in macromolecular crystallization

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Alexander; Kuznetsov, Yurii G.

    2014-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of protein, nucleic acid and virus crystals from solution are functions of underlying kinetic and thermodynamic parameters that govern the process, and these are all supersaturation-dependent. While the mechanisms of macromolecular crystal growth are essentially the same as for conventional crystals, the underlying parameters are vastly different, in some cases orders of magnitude lower, and this produces very different crystallization processes. Numerous physical features of macromolecular crystals are of serious interest to X-ray diffractionists; the resolution limit and mosaicity, for example, reflect the degree of molecular and lattice order. The defect structure of crystals has an impact on their response to flash-cooling, and terminal crystal size is dependent on impurity absorption and incorporation. The variety and extent of these issues are further unique to crystals of biological macromolecules. All of these features are amenable to study using atomic force microscopy, which provides direct images at the nanoscale level. Some of those images are presented here. PMID:24699728

  9. A kinetic proofreading mechanism for disentanglement of DNA by topoisomerases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jie; Magnasco, Marcelo O.; Marko, John

    2000-03-01

    Cells must remove all entanglements between their replicated chromosomal DNAs to segregate them during cell division. Entanglement removal is done by ATP-driven enzymes which pass DNA strands through one another, called type II topoisomerases (topos). In vitro some type II topos can reduce entanglements to a level much below that expected given the assumption that they pass DNA segments through one another at random. These type II topos (of less than 10 nm in diameter) thus use ATP hydrolysis to sense and remove entanglements spread along up to 3000 nm-long flexible DNAs. We propose a mechanism for this, based on the higher rate of collisions along DNAs which are entangled, relative to rates on disentangled DNAs. We show that if a type II topo requires an initial `activating' collision in advance of a second strand-passing collision, it can reduce the probability of entanglement to experimentally observed levels. This two-collision reaction is similar to `kinetic proofreading' models of molecular recognition. This talk will briefly review the experimental results, summurize the key points of our model, and report the rates of collisions of both entangled and disentangled DNAs obtained by Brownian Dynamical Simulation. We acknowledge support of the NSF, Research Corporation, the Petroleum Research Fund, and the Whitaker Foundation. MOM acknowledges support of the Sloan Foundation and the Mathers Foundation. Ref: JIE YAN, MARCELO O. MAGNASCO, and JOHN F. MARKO, Nature 401, 932-935 (1999).

  10. Kinetics, mechanism and thermodynamics of bisulfite-aldehyde adduct formation

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, T.M.; Boyce, S.D.; Hoffmann, M.R.

    1986-04-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of bisulfite addition to benzaldehyde were studied at low pH in order to assess the importance of this reaction in stabilizing S(IV) in fog-, cloud-, and rainwater. Previously, the authors established that appreciable concentrations of the formaldehyde-bisulfite adduct (HMSA) are often present in fogwater. Measured HMSA concentrations in fogwater often do not fully account for observed excess S(IV) concentrations, however, so that other S(IV)-aldehyde adducts may be present. Reaction rates were determined by monitoring the disappearance of benzaldehyde by U.V. spectrophotometry under pseudo-first order conditions, (S(IV))/sub T/ >>(phi-CHO)/sub T/, in the pH range 0 - 4.4 at 25/sup 0/C. The equilibrium constant was determined by dissolving the sodium salt of the addition compound in a solution adjusted to pH 3.9, and measuring the absorbance of the equilibrated solution at 250 nm. A literature value of the extinction coefficient for benzaldehyde was used to calculate the concentration of free benzaldehyde. All solutions were prepared under an N/sub 2/ atmosphere using deoxygenated, deionized water and ionic strength was maintained at 1.0 M with sodium chloride.

  11. Carbonyl reductase of dog liver: purification, properties, and kinetic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hara, A; Nakayama, T; Deyashiki, Y; Kariya, K; Sawada, H

    1986-01-01

    A carbonyl reductase has been extracted into 0.5 M KCl from dog liver and purified to apparent homogeneity by a three-step procedure consisting of chromatography on CM-Sephadex, Matrex green A, and Sephadex G-100 in high-ionic-strength buffers. The enzyme is a dimer composed of two identical subunits of molecular weight 27,000. The pH optimum is 5.5 and the isoelectric point of the enzyme is 9.3. The enzyme reduces aromatic ketones and aldehydes; the aromatic ketones with adjacent medium alkyl chains are the best substrates. Quinones, ketosteroids, prostaglandins, and aliphatic carbonyl compounds are poor or inactive substrates for the enzyme. As a cofactor the enzyme utilizes NADPH, the pro-S hydrogen atom of which is transferred to the substrate. Two moles of NADPH bind to one mole of the enzyme molecule, causing a blue shift and enhancement of the cofactor fluorescence. The reductase reaction is reversible and the equilibrium constant determined at pH 7.0 is 12.8. Steady-state kinetic measurements in both directions suggest that the reaction proceeds through a di-iso ordered bi-bi mechanism. PMID:3511844

  12. Analysis of repeat-protein folding using nearest-neighbor statistical mechanical models

    PubMed Central

    Aksel, Tural; Barrick, Doug

    2010-01-01

    The linear “Ising” model, which has been around for nearly a century, treats the behavior of linear arrays of repetitive, interacting subunits. Linear “repeat-proteins” have only been described in the last decade or so, and their folding energies have only been characterized very recently. Owing to their repetitive structures, linear repeat-proteins are particularly well suited for analysis by the nearest-neighbor Ising formalism. After briefly describing the historical origins and applications of the Ising model to biopolymers, and introducing repeat protein structure, this chapter will focus on the application of the linear Ising model to repeat proteins. When applied to homopolymers, the model can be represented and applied in a fairly simplified form. When applied to heteropolymers, where differences in energies among individual subunits (i.e. repeats) must be included, some (but not all) of this simplicity is lost. Derivations of the linear Ising model for both homopolymer and heteropolymer repeat-proteins will be presented. With the increased complexity required for analysis of heteropolymeric repeat proteins, the ability to resolve different energy terms from experimental data can be compromised. Thus, a simple matrix approach will be developed to help inform on the degree to which different thermodynamic parameters can be extracted from a particular set of unfolding curves. Finally, we will describe the application of these models to analyze repeat-protein folding equilibria, focusing on simplified repeat proteins based on “consensus” sequence information. PMID:19289204

  13. KINETICS AND MECHANISMS FOR TCE OXIDATION BY PERMANGANATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE) by permanganate was studied via a series of kinetic experiments. The goal in product identificationa dn parameterization of the oxidation kinetics was to assess the utility of this reaction as the basis for the in-situ remediation of grou...

  14. Three-Dimensional Domain Swapping Changes the Folding Mechanism of the Forkhead Domain of FoxP1.

    PubMed

    Medina, Exequiel; Córdova, Cristóbal; Villalobos, Pablo; Reyes, Javiera; Komives, Elizabeth A; Ramírez-Sarmiento, César A; Babul, Jorge

    2016-06-01

    The forkhead family of transcription factors (Fox) controls gene transcription during key processes such as regulation of metabolism, embryogenesis, and immunity. Structurally, Fox proteins feature a conserved DNA-binding domain known as forkhead. Interestingly, solved forkhead structures of members from the P subfamily (FoxP) show that they can oligomerize by three-dimensional domain swapping, whereby structural elements are exchanged between adjacent subunits, leading to an intertwined dimer. Recent evidence has largely stressed the biological relevance of domain swapping in FoxP, as several disease-causing mutations have been related to impairment of this process. Here, we explore the equilibrium folding and binding mechanism of the forkhead domain of wild-type FoxP1, and of two mutants that hinder DNA-binding (R53H) and domain swapping (A39P), using size-exclusion chromatography, circular dichroism, and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Our results show that domain swapping of FoxP1 occurs at micromolar protein concentrations within hours of incubation and is energetically favored, in contrast to classical domain-swapping proteins. Also, DNA-binding mutations do not significantly affect domain swapping. Remarkably, equilibrium unfolding of dimeric FoxP1 follows a three-state N2 ↔ 2I ↔ 2U folding mechanism in which dimer dissociation into a monomeric intermediate precedes protein unfolding, in contrast to the typical two-state model described for most domain-swapping proteins, whereas the A39P mutant follows a two-state N ↔ U folding mechanism consistent with the second transition observed for dimeric FoxP1. Also, the free-energy change of the N ↔ U in A39P FoxP1 is ∼2 kcal⋅mol(-1) larger than the I ↔ U transition of both wild-type and R53H FoxP1. Finally, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry reveals that the intermediate strongly resembles the native state. Our results suggest that domain swapping in FoxP1 is at least

  15. Role of folded anisotropic fabric in the failure mode of gneiss: new insights from mechanical, microseismic and microstructural laboratory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliardi, Federico; Vinciguerra, Sergio; Dobbs, Marcus R.; Zanchetta, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Fabric anisotropy is a key control of the mechanical behaviour of rocks in a variety of geological settings and on different timescales. However, the effects of inherited, tectonically folded anisotropic fabrics on the brittle strength and failure mode of foliated metamorphic rocks is yet to be fully understood. Data from laboratory uniaxial compression tests on folded gneiss (Agliardi et al., 2014, Tectonophysics) recently showed that the brittle failure mode of this rock type depends on the arrangement of two distinct anisotropies (i.e. foliation and fold axial plane anisotropy), and that rock strength correlates with failure mode. Here we investigate the effects of confining pressure on this behaviour by performing triaxial compression experiments with acoustic emission (AE) monitoring, and analyse resulting fracture mechanisms and their microfabric controls using high resolution microanalysis techniques. We tested the Monte Canale Gneiss (Austroalpine Bernina nappe, Central Italian Alps), characterized by low phyllosilicate content, compositional layering folded at the cm-scale, and absence of a well-developed axial plane foliation. We used a servo-controlled hydraulic loading system to test 19 air-dry cylindrical specimens (diameter: 54 mm) that were characterized both in terms of fold geometry and orientation of foliation and fold axial planes to the axial load direction. We instrumented the specimens with direct contact axial and circumferential strain gauges. We performed tests at confining pressures of 40 MPa and constant axial strain rates of 5*10-6 s-1, measuring acoustic emissions and P- and S-wave velocities by three wideband (350-1000 kHz) piezoelectric transceivers with 40 dB preamps, mounted in the compression platens. We carried out post-failure microscale observation of fracture mechanisms, microcrack patterns and related fabric controls on resin-impregnated samples, using X-ray MicroCT (resolution: 9 μm), optical microscopy and SEM. Samples

  16. Folding of proteins with diverse folds.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sandipan; Hansmann, Ulrich H E

    2006-11-15

    Using parallel tempering simulations with high statistics, we investigate the folding and thermodynamic properties of three small proteins with distinct native folds: the all-helical 1RIJ, the all-sheet beta3s, and BBA5, which has a mixed helix-sheet fold. In all three cases, simulations with our energy function find the native structures as global minima in free energy at experimentally relevant temperatures. However, the folding process strongly differs for the three molecules, indicating that the folding mechanism is correlated with the form of the native structure. PMID:16950845

  17. Self-oscillating Vocal Fold Model Mechanics: Healthy, Diseased, and Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiubler, Elizabeth P.; Pollok, Lucas F. E.; Apostoli, Adam G.; Hancock, Adrienne B.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2014-11-01

    Voice disorders have been estimated to have a substantial economic impact of 2.5 billion annually. Approximately 30% of people will suffer from a voice disorder at some point in their lives. Life-sized, self-oscillating, synthetic vocal fold (VF) models are fabricated to exhibit material properties representative of human VFs. These models are created both with and without a polyp-like structure, a pathology that has been shown to produce rich viscous flow structures not normally observed for healthy VFs during normal phonation. Pressure measurements are acquired upstream of the VFs and high-speed images are captured at varying flow rates during VF oscillation to facilitate an understanding of the characteristics of healthy and diseased VFs. The images are analyzed using a videokymography line-scan technique. Clinically-relevant parameters calculated from the volume-velocity output of a circumferentially-vented mask (Rothenberg mask) are compared to human data collected from two groups of males aged 18-30 and 60-80. This study extends the use of synthetic VF models by assessing their ability to replicate behaviors observed in human subject data to advance a means of investigating changes associated with normal, pathological, and the aging voice. Supported by the GWU Institute for Biomedical Engineering (GWIBE) and GWU Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  18. Divalent Metal Ion-Induced Folding Mechanism of RNase H1 from Extreme Halophilic Archaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1

    PubMed Central

    Tannous, Elias; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2014-01-01

    RNase H1 from Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 (Halo-RNase H1) is characterized by the abundance of acidic residues on the surface, including bi/quad-aspartate site residues. Halo-RNase H1 exists in partially folded (I) and native (N) states in low-salt and high-salt conditions respectively. Its folding is also induced by divalent metal ions. To understand this unique folding mechanism of Halo-RNase H1, the active site mutant (2A-RNase H1), the bi/quad-aspartate site mutant (6A-RNase H1), and the mutant at both sites (8A-RNase H1) were constructed. The far-UV CD spectra of these mutants suggest that 2A-RNase H1 mainly exists in the I state, 6A-RNase H1 exists both in the I and N states, and 8A-RNase H1 mainly exists in the N state in a low salt-condition. These results suggest that folding of Halo-RNase H1 is induced by binding of divalent metal ions to the bi/quad-aspartate site. To examine whether metal-induced folding is unique to Halo-RNase H1, RNase H2 from the same organism (Halo-RNase H2) was overproduced and purified. Halo-RNase H2 exists in the I and N states in low-salt and high-salt conditions respectively, as does Halo-RNase H1. However, this protein exists in the I state even in the presence of divalent metal ions. Halo-RNase H2 exhibits junction ribonuclease activity only in a high-salt condition. A tertiary model of this protein suggests that this protein does not have a quad-aspartate site. We propose that folding of Halo-RNase H1 is induced by binding of divalent metal ion to the quad-aspartate site in a low-salt condition. PMID:25268753

  19. Single-molecule Studies of Riboswitch Folding

    PubMed Central

    Savinov, Andrew; Perez, Christian F.; Block, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    The folding dynamics of riboswitches are central to their ability to modulate gene expression in response to environmental cues. In most cases, a structural competition between the formation of a ligand-binding aptamer and an expression platform (or some other competing off-state) determines the regulatory outcome. Here, we review single-molecule studies of riboswitch folding and function, predominantly carried out using single-molecule FRET or optical trapping approaches. Recent results have supplied new insights into riboswitch folding energy landscapes, the mechanisms of ligand binding, the roles played by divalent ions, the applicability of hierarchical folding models, and kinetic vs. thermodynamic control schemes. We anticipate that future work, based on improved data sets and potentially combining multiple experimental techniques, will enable the development of more complete models for complex RNA folding processes. PMID:24727093

  20. Energy Landscapes and Solved Protein Folding Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolynes, Peter

    2004-03-01

    Peter G. Wolynes Center for Theoretical Biological Physics Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Physics University of California, San Diego La Jolla, CA 92093-0371 Fifteen years ago, how proteins folded into organized structures on the basis of their sequence was a great mystery. By characterizing the energy landscapes of proteins with tools from the statistical mechanics of disordered systems like spin glasses, a "new view' of the folding process became possible. Energy landscape theory provided an incentive to pursue heroic new experiments and to carry out difficult computer simulations addressing protein folding mechanisms. Many aspects of folding kinetics revealed by these studies can be quantitatively understood using the simple idea that the topography of the energy landscape is that of a "rugged funnel". Energy landscape theory provided a quantitative means of characterizing which amino acid sequences can rapidly fold. Algorithms based on energy landscape theory have been used to successfully design novel sequences that fold to a given structure in the laboratory. Energy landscape ideas have begun to transform the prediction of protein structure from sequence data from being an art to being a science. The success of energy landscape- based algorithms in predicting protein structure from sequence will be highlighted. While there is still much to learn about folding mechanisms and much work to do achieving universally reliable structure prediction, many parts of what used to be called "the protein folding problem" can now be considered solved.

  1. Structural geometry, strain distribution, and mechanical evolution of eastern Umtanum Ridge and a comparison with other selected localities within Yakima fold structures, south-central Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Price, E.H.

    1982-01-01

    The Yakima fold system of south-central Washington and north-central Oregon is a series of megascopic anticlinal ridge of multilayered basalt. Cross-sectional strain analyses were performed at five localities within three anticlines. The analyses show that the strain is consistent both laterally along a fold and within different folds. Folding strain is localized layer-internal faulting, extensive shattering, and limited layer-parallel faulting. Most strain is cataclastic, but glassy flow tops appear to have been more ductile. The strain distributions and structural geometries accord well with a flexural flow buckle model; however, the internal cataclastic flow is not inherently penetrative and limited flexural slip has occurred. This fold model suggests that most strain in the fold is by simple shear and it took place above the topographic surface of adjacent synclinal valleys. Large reverse faults associated with the anticlines are interpreted to be folding strain required by the concentric folding and their displacement is interpreted to have reached the surface late in the folding process. Therefore, the observed strain and its distribution are interpreted to be not directly the result of regional plateau shortening, but of local stresses and resultant strains related to fold geometry. A mechanical analysis of the Umtanum structure termination geometry, combined with slickenside striae movement directions from the study areas suggests that the Palouse slope has behaved as a rigid buttress around which the basalt has rotated clockwise into the folds from the southeast. Compression-box clay modeling of the Yakima fold system within the Pasco Basin shows that the buttress edge orientations control the localization and orientations of buckle folds. Fold orientations and three-dimensional shapes remarkably resembling the Yakima fold system in the Pasco Basin were produced under north-south compression.

  2. Vortex stretching as a mechanism for quantum kinetic energy decay.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Robert M

    2011-06-01

    A pair of perturbed antiparallel quantum vortices, simulated using the three-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equations, is shown to be unstable to vortex stretching. This results in kinetic energy K(∇ψ) being converted into interaction energy E(I) and eventually local kinetic energy depletion that is similar to energy decay in a classical fluid, even though the governing equations are Hamiltonian and energy conserving. The intermediate stages include the generation of vortex waves, their deepening, multiple reconnections, the emission of vortex rings and phonons, and the creation of an approximately -5/3 kinetic energy spectrum at high wave numbers. All of the wave generation and reconnection steps follow from interactions between the two original vortices. A four vortex example is given to demonstrate that some of these steps might be general. PMID:21702604

  3. [Kinetics and mechanism of removing Microcystis aeruginosa using clay flocculation].

    PubMed

    Pan, Gang; Zhang, Mingming; Yan, Hai; Zou, Hua; Chen, Hao

    2003-09-01

    Twenty-six natural clays were studied for their kinetics of flocculating and removing algal cells of Microcystis aeruginosa. According to the 8 h equilibrium removal efficiencies and removal rates at a clay-loading of 0.7 g.L-1, all the 26 clays were classified into three categories. Type-I clay, which includes talc, ferric oxide, sepiolite, ferroferric oxide, and kaolinite, has an equilibrium removal efficiency greater than 90%, a t50 (time needed to remove 50% of the algae) of less than 30 min, and a t80 (time needed to remove 80% of the algae) of less than 2.5 h. Type-II clay, which includes argillanceous rocks, attapulgite, rectorite, illite, and argil, etc., has an equilibrium removal efficiency of 50%-80%, a t50 of less than 2.5 h, and a t80 of more than 5 h. Type-III clay consists of 14 minerals, including laterite, zeolite, mica, clinoptilolite, pumice, tripoli, feldspar and quartz, etc. with the removal efficiency less than 50%, and t50 > > 8 h. When the clay loading was decreased to 0.1-0.2 g.L-1, the 8 h equilibrium removal efficiencies for 25 clays declined to below 60%, except for sepiolite, a Type-I clay, which maintained around 90%. After the sepiolite was modified with Fe3+ to increase its surface charge (Zeta potential from -24.0 mV to +0.43 mV at pH 7.4), the initial removal rate was increased remarkably although its 8 h equilibrium removal efficiency was not improved substantially. As a comparison, the 8 h equilibrium removal efficiency of PAC was no greater than 40% at loadings of 0.02-0.2 g.L-1. Following the analysis of the flocculation mechanism it was concluded that the effect of bridging and netting may play a key role in the clay-algae flocculation processes, which may be important for selecting and modifying clays to improve significantly the removal efficiency. PMID:14719252

  4. An Engineered Kinetic Amplification Mechanism for Single Nucleotide Variant Discrimination by DNA Hybridization Probes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sherry Xi; Seelig, Georg

    2016-04-20

    Even a single-nucleotide difference between the sequences of two otherwise identical biological nucleic acids can have dramatic functional consequences. Here, we use model-guided reaction pathway engineering to quantitatively improve the performance of selective hybridization probes in recognizing single nucleotide variants (SNVs). Specifically, we build a detection system that combines discrimination by competition with DNA strand displacement-based catalytic amplification. We show, both mathematically and experimentally, that the single nucleotide selectivity of such a system in binding to single-stranded DNA and RNA is quadratically better than discrimination due to competitive hybridization alone. As an additional benefit the integrated circuit inherits the property of amplification and provides at least 10-fold better sensitivity than standard hybridization probes. Moreover, we demonstrate how the detection mechanism can be tuned such that the detection reaction is agnostic to the position of the SNV within the target sequence. in contrast, prior strand displacement-based probes designed for kinetic discrimination are highly sensitive to position effects. We apply our system to reliably discriminate between different members of the let-7 microRNA family that differ in only a single base position. Our results demonstrate the power of systematic reaction network design to quantitatively improve biotechnology. PMID:27010123

  5. The energy landscape for folding and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuchic, Jose

    2006-03-01

    Globally the energy landscape of a folding protein resembles a partially rough funnel. The local roughness of the funnel reflects transient trapping of the protein configurations in local free energy minima. The kinetics of folding is best considered as a progressive organization of an ensemble of partially folded structures through which the protein passes through on its way to the folded structure. The folding mechanisms for several fast-folding proteins can be described using an energy landscape theory to set up the correspondence with simulations of protein minimalist models. Using these simulations together with analytical theory, we can learn about good (minimally frustrated) folding sequences and non-folding (frustrated) sequences. An important idea that emerges from this theory is that subtle features of the protein landscape can profoundly affect the apparent mechanism of folding. Experiments on the dependence of the folding/unfolding times, and the stability of these proteins to denaturant concentration and site-directed mutagenesis, and on the early events of folding allow to infer the global characteristics of the landscape. In addition to need to minimize energetic frustration, the topology of the native fold also plays a major role in the folding mechanism. Some folding motifs are easier to design than others suggesting the possibility that evolution not only selected sequences with sufficiently small energetic frustration but also selected more easily designable native structures. Several proteins (such as CI2 and SH3) have sufficiently reduced energetic frustration) that much of the heterogeneity observed in their transition state ensemble (TSE) is determined by topology. Topological effects go beyond the structure of the TSE. The overall structure of the on-route and off-route (traps) intermediates for the folding of more complex proteins is also influenced by topology. Utilizing this theoretical framework, simulations of minimalist models and

  6. ANALYSIS OF FLOW-STRUCTURE COUPLING IN A MECHANICAL MODEL OF THE VOCAL FOLDS AND THE SUBGLOTTAL SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Howe, M. S.; McGowan, R. S.

    2009-01-01

    An analysis is made of the nonlinear interactions between flow in the subglottal vocal tract and glottis, sound waves in the subglottal system and a mechanical model of the vocal folds. The mean flow through the system is produced by a nominally steady contraction of the lungs, and mechanical experiments frequently involve a ‘lung cavity’ coupled to an experimental subglottal tube of arbitrary or ill-defined effective length L, on the basis that the actual value of L has little or no influence on excitation of the vocal folds. A simple, self-exciting single mass mathematical model of the vocal folds is used to investigate the sound generated within the subglottal domain and the unsteady volume flux from the glottis for experiments where it is required to suppress feedback of sound from the supraglottal vocal tract. In experiments where the assumed absorption of sound within the sponge-like interior of the lungs is small, the influence of changes in L can be very significant: when the subglottal tube behaves as an open-ended resonator (when L is as large as half the acoustic wavelength) there is predicted to be a mild increase in volume flux magnitude and a small change in waveform. However, the strong appearance of second harmonics of the acoustic field is predicted at intermediate lengths, when L is roughly one quarter of the acoustic wavelength. In cases of large lung damping, however, only modest changes in the volume flux are predicted to occur with variations in L. PMID:20161450

  7. A Comparison of Kinetic Energy and Momentum in Special Relativity and Classical Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic energy and momentum are indispensable dynamical quantities in both the special theory of relativity and in classical mechanics. Although momentum and kinetic energy are central to understanding dynamics, the differences between their relativistic and classical notions have not always received adequate treatment in undergraduate teaching.…

  8. Renormalizing the Kinetic Energy Operator in Elementary Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coutinho, F. A. B.; Amaku, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we consider solutions to the three-dimensional Schrodinger equation of the form [psi](r) = u(r)/r, where u(0) [is not equal to] 0. The expectation value of the kinetic energy operator for such wavefunctions diverges. We show that it is possible to introduce a potential energy with an expectation value that also diverges, exactly…

  9. Kinetic Mechanisms in Morpholino-DNA Surface Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yatao; Irving, Damion; Qiao, Wanqiong; Ge, Dongbiao

    2011-01-01

    Morpholinos (MOs) are DNA analogues whose uncharged nature can bring fundamental advantages to surface hybridization technologies such as DNA microarrays, by using MOs as the immobilized, or “probe”, species. Advancement of MO-based diagnostics, however, is challenged by limited understanding of the surface organization of MO molecules and of how this organization impacts hybridization kinetics and thermodynamics. The present study focuses on hybridization kinetics between monolayers of MO probes and DNA targets as a function of the instantaneous extent of hybridization (i.e. duplex coverage), total probe coverage, and ionic strength. Intriguingly, these experiments reveal distinct kinetic stages, none of which are consistent with Langmuir kinetics. The initial stage, in which duplex coverage remains relatively sparse, indicates confluence of two effects: blockage of target access to unhybridized probes by previously formed duplexes, and deactivation of the solid support due to consumption of probe molecules. This interpretation is consistent with a surface organization in which unhybridized MO probes localize near the solid support, underneath a layer of MO-DNA duplexes. As duplex coverage builds, provided saturation is not reached first, the initial stage can transition to an unusual regime characterized by near independence of hybridization rate on duplex coverage, followed by a prolonged approach to equilibrium. The possible origins of these more complex latter behaviors are discussed. Comparison with published data for DNA and peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes is carried out to look for universal trends in kinetics. This comparison reveals qualitative similarities when comparable surface organization of probes is expected. In addition, MO monolayers are found capable of a broad range of reactivities that span reported values for PNA and DNA probes. PMID:21699181

  10. Kinetic mechanisms in morpholino-DNA surface hybridization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yatao; Irving, Damion; Qiao, Wanqiong; Ge, Dongbiao; Levicky, Rastislav

    2011-08-01

    Morpholinos (MOs) are DNA analogues whose uncharged nature can bring fundamental advantages to surface hybridization technologies such as DNA microarrays, by using MOs as the immobilized, or "probe", species. Advancement of MO-based diagnostics, however, is challenged by limited understanding of the surface organization of MO molecules and of how this organization impacts hybridization kinetics and thermodynamics. The present study focuses on hybridization kinetics between monolayers of MO probes and DNA targets as a function of the instantaneous extent of hybridization (i.e., duplex coverage), total probe coverage, and ionic strength. Intriguingly, these experiments reveal distinct kinetic stages, none of which are consistent with Langmuir kinetics. The initial stage, in which duplex coverage remains relatively sparse, indicates confluence of two effects: blockage of target access to unhybridized probes by previously formed duplexes and deactivation of the solid support due to consumption of probe molecules. This interpretation is consistent with a surface organization in which unhybridized MO probes localize near the solid support, underneath a layer of MO-DNA duplexes. As duplex coverage builds, provided saturation is not reached first, the initial stage can transition to an unusual regime characterized by near independence of hybridization rate on duplex coverage, followed by a prolonged approach to equilibrium. The possible origins of these more complex latter behaviors are discussed. Comparison with published data for DNA and peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes is carried out to look for universal trends in kinetics. This comparison reveals qualitative similarities when comparable surface organization of probes is expected. In addition, MO monolayers are found capable of a broad range of reactivities that span reported values for PNA and DNA probes. PMID:21699181

  11. From Mechanism and Kinetics to Precise ATRP Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Laura; Golas, Patricia; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    Controlled/living radical polymerizations (CRP) give access to polymers with precisely controlled molecular weight, narrow molecular weight distribution, well-defined architecture and composition. CRP can be applied to a wide range of monomers and are tolerant to impurities and functional groups. Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) is one of the most widely used CRP techniques. The mechanistic and kinetic studies of ATRP are of fundamental importance since they give access to polymers with various functionalities, compositions, and topologies.

  12. Mechanisms affecting kinetic energies of laser-ablated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.R. |; Leboeuf, J.N.; Wood, R.F.; Geohegan, D.B.; Donato, J.M.; Liu, C.L.; Puretzky, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    Laser materials processing techniques are expected to have a dramatic impact on materials science and engineering in the near future and beyond. One of the main laser materials processing techniques is Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for thin film growth. While experimentalists search for optimal approaches for thin film growth with pulsed laser deposition (PLD), a systematic effort in theory and modeling of various processes during PLD is needed. The quality of film deposited depends critically on the range and profile of the kinetic energy and density of the ablated plume. While it is to the advantage of pulsed laser deposition to have high kinetic energy, plumes that are too energetic causes film damage. A dynamic source effect was found to accelerate the plume expansion velocity much higher than that from a conventional free expansion model. A self-similar theory and a hydrodynamic model are developed to study this effect, which may help to explain experimentally observed high front expansion velocity. Background gas can also affect the kinetic energies. High background gas may cause the ablated materials to go backward. Experimentally observed plume splitting is also discussed.

  13. Effects of Knots on Protein Folding Properties

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Miguel A.; Faísca, Patrícia F. N.

    2013-01-01

    This work explores the impact of knots, knot depth and motif of the threading terminus in protein folding properties (kinetics, thermodynamics and mechanism) via extensive Monte Carlo simulations of lattice models. A knotted backbone has no effect on protein thermodynamic stability but it may affect key aspects of folding kinetics. In this regard, we found clear evidence for a functional advantage of knots: knots enhance kinetic stability because a knotted protein unfolds at a distinctively slower rate than its unknotted counterpart. However, an increase in knot deepness does not necessarily lead to more effective changes in folding properties. In this regard, a terminus with a non-trivial conformation (e.g. hairpin) can have a more dramatic effect in enhancing kinetic stability than knot depth. Nevertheless, our results suggest that the probability of the denatured ensemble to keep knotted is higher for proteins with deeper knots, indicating that knot depth plays a role in determining the topology of the denatured state. Refolding simulations starting from denatured knotted conformations show that not every knot is able to nucleate folding and further indicate that the formation of the knotting loop is a key event in the folding of knotted trefoils. They also show that there are specific native contacts within the knotted core that are crucial to keep a native knotting loop in denatured conformations which otherwise have no detectable structure. The study of the knotting mechanism reveals that the threading of the knotting loop generally occurs towards late folding in conformations that exhibit a significant degree of structural consolidation. PMID:24023962

  14. Mechanisms of kinetic trapping in self-assembly and phase transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, Michael F.; Elrad, Oren M.; Jack, Robert L.

    2011-09-01

    In self-assembly processes, kinetic trapping effects often hinder the formation of thermodynamically stable ordered states. In a model of viral capsid assembly and in the phase transformation of a lattice gas, we show how simulations in a self-assembling steady state can be used to identify two distinct mechanisms of kinetic trapping. We argue that one of these mechanisms can be adequately captured by kinetic rate equations, while the other involves a breakdown of theories that rely on cluster size as a reaction coordinate. We discuss how these observations might be useful in designing and optimising self-assembly reactions.

  15. Protein folds and protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, R. Dustin; Daggett, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    The classification of protein folds is necessarily based on the structural elements that distinguish domains. Classification of protein domains consists of two problems: the partition of structures into domains and the classification of domains into sets of similar structures (or folds). Although similar topologies may arise by convergent evolution, the similarity of their respective folding pathways is unknown. The discovery and the characterization of the majority of protein folds will be followed by a similar enumeration of available protein folding pathways. Consequently, understanding the intricacies of structural domains is necessary to understanding their collective folding pathways. We review the current state of the art in the field of protein domain classification and discuss methods for the systematic and comprehensive study of protein folding across protein fold space via atomistic molecular dynamics simulation. Finally, we discuss our large-scale Dynameomics project, which includes simulations of representatives of all autonomous protein folds. PMID:21051320

  16. Solution growth kinetics and mechanism: Prismatic face of ADP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, A. A.; Rashkovich, L. N.; Mkrtchan, A. A.

    1986-01-01

    Laser Michelson interferometry has been applied to in situ study the (001) ADP growth kinetics in aqueous solution in the kinetic regime. The technique allows one to simultaneously measure the slope p of a growth hillock and normal growth rate R provided by this hillock. From these data, the average step growth rate v=R/p has been determined as a function of relative supersaturation σ. The dependencev(σ) is found to be linear, demonstrating the unimportance of surface and bulk diffusion. The direct incorporation at steps is characterized by the step kinetic coefficient βl=(5.1-6.4)X10-3 cm/s. The specific step free energy αl=(1.2-1.9) X10-6 erg/cm was determined from the measured linear dependence of the hillock slope on supersaturation for the hillock around presumably single elementary dislocation. For complex dislocation sources with large total Burgers vectors, the tendency to saturationin the hillock slope-supersaturation curves has been found. The curve perfectly fits the BCF expression which takes into account the perimeter 2L of the region occupied by the points in which the dislocation of the complex step source cross the growing face. For two dislocation sources,L=0.92 μm andL=0.31 μm and total Burgers vectors ⋍12h and 6h (h=7.53Å) have been found. The supersaturation dependence of activities for various complex dislocation sources have been directly demonstrated.

  17. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Incineration of Organophosphorus and Fluoro-Organophosphorus Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Glaude, P A; Melius, C; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2001-12-13

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism is developed to describe incineration of the chemical warfare nerve agent sarin (GB), based on commonly used principles of bond additivity and hierarchical reaction mechanisms. The mechanism is based on previous kinetic models of organophosphorus compounds such as TMP, DMMP and DIMP that are often used as surrogates to predict incineration of GB. Kinetic models of the three surrogates and GB are then used to predict their consumption in a perfectly stirred reactor fueled by natural gas to simulate incineration of these chemicals. Computed results indicate that DIMP is the only one of these surrogates that adequately describes combustion of GB under comparable conditions. The kinetic pathways responsible for these differences in reactivity are identified and discussed. The most important reaction in GB and DIMP that makes them more reactive than TMP or DMMP is found to be a six-center molecular elimination reaction producing propene.

  18. Chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of paraffinic hydrocarbons needed for primary reference fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J.

    1993-03-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism is described which simulates the oxidation of the primary reference fuels n-heptane and iso-octane. The high temperature subset of these mechanisms is identified, and the extensions to deal with low temperature conditions are also explained. The algorithms used to assign reaction rates to elementary steps in the reaction mechanism are described, and the means of identifying the different chemical species and the relevant reactions are outlined. Finally, we show how interested kinetic modeling researchers can obtain copies of this reaction mechanism.

  19. Kinetic Ballooning Instability as a Substorm Onset Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    C.Z.Cheng

    1999-10-01

    A new scenario of substorm onset and current disruption and the corresponding physical processes are presented based on the AMPTE/CCE spacecraft observation and a kinetic ballooning instability theory. During the growth phase of substorms the plasma beta is larger than unity (20 greater than or equal to beta greater than or equal to 1). Toward the end of the late growth phase the plasma beta increases from 20 to greater than or equal to 50 in approximately 3 minutes and a low-frequency instability with a wave period of 50 - 75 sec is excited and grows exponentially to a large amplitude at the current disruption onset. At the onset, higher-frequency instabilities are excited so that the plasma and electromagnetic field form a turbulent state. Plasma transport takes place to modify the ambient pressure profile so that the ambient magnetic field recovers from a tail-like geometry to a dipole-like geometry. A kinetic ballooning instability (KBI) theory is proposed to explain the low-frequency instability (frequency and growth rate) and its observed high beta threshold (beta subscript c is greater than or equal to 50). Based on the ideal-MHD theory beta subscript c, superscript MHD approximately equals 1 and the ballooning modes are predicted to be unstable during the growth phase, which is inconsistent with observation that no appreciable magnetic field fluctuation is observed. The enhancement beta subscript c over beta subscript c, superscript MHD is due to the kinetic effects of trapped electrons and finite ion-Larmor radii which provide a large stabilizing effect by producing a large parallel electric field and hence a parallel current that greatly enhances the stabilizing effect of field line tension. As a result, beta subscript c is greatly increased over beta subscript c, superscript MHD by a factor proportional to the ratio of the total electron density to the untrapped electron density (n subscript e divided by n subscript eu) which is greater than or equal to

  20. Sonolytic and sonophotolytic degradation of Carbamazepine: Kinetic and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Rao, Yongfang; Yang, Haisong; Xue, Dan; Guo, Yang; Qi, Fei; Ma, Jun

    2016-09-01

    An in-depth investigation on the ultrasonic decomposition of Carbamazepine (CBZ), one of the most regularly identified drugs in the environment, was conducted. The effects of diverse variables were evaluated, such as frequency, power, solution pH, initial CBZ concentration and varied inorganic anions. Reaction order was determined on the basis of analyzing reaction kinetics of CBZ degradation. The sonophotolysis and photolysis of CBZ was also examined in this contribution. The influence of water composition on the sonolytic and sonophotolytic elimination of CBZ was analyzed. Additionally, 21 intermediates were identified during sonolytic degradation of CBZ based on LC/ESI-MS/MS analysis, among which two escaped from the detection in previous studies. Possible decay pathways were proposed accordingly. The epoxidation, cleavage of double bond, hydration, hydroxylation, ring contraction and intramolecular cyclization were believed to be involved in sonochemical degradation of CBZ. PMID:27150783

  1. Reaction of OH with CINO: kinetics and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Finlayson-Pitts, B.J.; Ezell, M.J.; Wang, S.Z.; Grant, C.E.

    1987-04-23

    The kinetics and products of the gas-phase reaction of OH with CINO have been studied in a fast flow discharge system using the reaction of hydrogen atoms with NO/sub 2/ as the source of OH. The decay of OH in excess CINO at a total pressure of 1.05 +/- 0.05 Torr in He was followed by resonance fluorescence at 309.5 nm at temperatures from 262 to 373K. The stable products observed by mass spectrometry from 276 to 353 K and from 0.2 to 0.8 Torr total pressure were HOCl, HONO, and Cl/sub 2/. Molecular Cl/sub 2/ results from the reaction of Cl atoms with the excess CINO present. The ratio of the products HOCl/Cl/sub 2/ did not change significantly with temperature or total pressure. The Arrhenius expression for the rate constant k/sub 1/ (= k/sub 1a/ + k/sub 1b/) for the reaction of Oh with CINO is k/sub 1/ = (1.5/sub -0.1//sup +0.1/ x 10/sup -12/) exp(-(458 +/- 27)/T) cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, with k/sub 1/ = (3.2 +/- 0.5) x 10/sup -13/ cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ at 298 K, where all errors are two standard deviations. From these kinetic data, a typical tropospheric lifetime of CINO with respect to reaction with Oh is calculated to be approx.36 days, too slow to compete with CINO photolysis.

  2. Exact results in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics: Formalism and applications in chemical kinetics and single-molecule free energy estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adib, Artur B.

    In the last two decades or so, a collection of results in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics that departs from the traditional near-equilibrium framework introduced by Lars Onsager in 1931 has been derived, yielding new fundamental insights into far-from-equilibrium processes in general. Apart from offering a more quantitative statement of the second law of thermodynamics, some of these results---typified by the so-called "Jarzynski equality"---have also offered novel means of estimating equilibrium quantities from nonequilibrium processes, such as free energy differences from single-molecule "pulling" experiments. This thesis contributes to such efforts by offering three novel results in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics: (a) The entropic analog of the Jarzynski equality; (b) A methodology for estimating free energies from "clamp-and-release" nonequilibrium processes; and (c) A directly measurable symmetry relation in chemical kinetics similar to (but more general than) chemical detailed balance. These results share in common the feature of remaining valid outside Onsager's near-equilibrium regime, and bear direct applicability in protein folding kinetics as well as in single-molecule free energy estimation.

  3. Solid State Kinetic Parameters and Chemical Mechanism of the Dehydration of CoCl2.6H2O.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribas, Joan; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents an experimental example illustrating the most common methods for the determination of kinetic parameters. Discusses the different theories and equations to be applied and the mechanism derived from the kinetic results. (CW)

  4. Polymer principles and protein folding.

    PubMed Central

    Dill, K. A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper surveys the emerging role of statistical mechanics and polymer theory in protein folding. In the polymer perspective, the folding code is more a solvation code than a code of local phipsi propensities. The polymer perspective resolves two classic puzzles: (1) the Blind Watchmaker's Paradox that biological proteins could not have originated from random sequences, and (2) Levinthal's Paradox that the folded state of a protein cannot be found by random search. Both paradoxes are traditionally framed in terms of random unguided searches through vast spaces, and vastness is equated with impossibility. But both processes are partly guided. The searches are more akin to balls rolling down funnels than balls rolling aimlessly on flat surfaces. In both cases, the vastness of the search is largely irrelevant to the search time and success. These ideas are captured by energy and fitness landscapes. Energy landscapes give a language for bridging between microscopics and macroscopics, for relating folding kinetics to equilibrium fluctuations, and for developing new and faster computational search strategies. PMID:10386867

  5. GroEL/ES Chaperonin Modulates the Mechanism and Accelerates the Rate of TIM-Barrel Domain Folding

    PubMed Central

    Bracher, Andreas; Engen, John R.; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit; Hartl, F. Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The GroEL/ES chaperonin system functions as a protein folding cage. Many obligate substrates of GroEL share the (βα)8 TIM-barrel fold, but how the chaperonin promotes folding of these proteins is not known. Here we analyzed the folding of DapA at peptide resolution using hydrogen/deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry. During spontaneous folding, all elements of the DapA TIM-barrel acquire structure simultaneously, in a process associated with a long search time. In contrast, GroEL/ES accelerates folding more than 30-fold by catalyzing segmental structure formation in the TIM-barrel. Segmental structure formation is also observed during the fast spontaneous folding of a structural homolog of DapA from a bacterium that lacks GroEL/ES. Thus, chaperonin-independence correlates with folding properties otherwise enforced by protein confinement in the GroEL/ES cage. We suggest that folding catalysis by GroEL/ES is required by a set of proteins to reach native state at a biologically relevant time-scale, avoiding aggregation or degradation. PMID:24813614

  6. A Computer Generated Reduced Iso-Octane Chemical Kinetic Mechanism Applied to Simulation of HCCI Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Flowers, D; Smith, J R; Dibble, R; Chen, J Y

    2002-08-12

    This paper shows how a computer can systematically remove non-essential chemical reactions from a large chemical kinetic mechanism. The computer removes the reactions based upon a single solution using a detailed mechanism. The resulting reduced chemical mechanism produces similar numerical predictions significantly faster than predictions that use the detailed mechanism. Specifically, a reduced chemical kinetics mechanism for iso-octane has been derived from a detailed mechanism by eliminating unimportant reaction steps and species. The reduced mechanism has been developed for the specific purpose of fast and accurate prediction of ignition timing in an HCCI engine. The reduced mechanism contains 199 species and 383 reactions, while the detailed mechanism contains 859 species and 3606 reactions. Both mechanisms have been used in numerical simulation of HCCI combustion. The simulations show that the reduced mechanism predicts pressure traces and heat release with good accuracy, similar to the accuracy obtained with the detailed mechanism. As may be expected, emissions of hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide are not as well predicted with the reduced mechanism as with the detailed mechanism, since the reduced mechanism was targeted for predicting HCCI ignition and not HC and CO emissions. Considering that the reduced mechanism requires about 25 times less computational time than the detailed mechanism (2 hours vs. 2 days), the ability to automatically generate a problem specific reduced mechanism is an important new tool for combustion research in general.

  7. Comparison of solar wind driving mechanisms: ion cyclotron resonance versus kinetic suprathermal electron effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Sunny W. Y.; Chang, Tom

    2003-09-01

    The combined kinetic effects of two possible solar wind driving mechanisms, ion cyclotron resonance and suprathermal electrons, have been studied in the literature [1]. However, the individual contribution by these two mechanisms was unclear. We compare the two effects in the fast solar wind. Our basic model follows the global kinetic evolution of the solar wind under the influence of ion cyclotron resonance, while taking into account Coulomb collisions, and the ambipolar electric field that is consistent with the particle distributions themselves. The kinetic effects associated with the suprathermal electrons can be included in the model as an option. By comparing our results with and without this option, we conclude that, without considering any wave-particle interactions involving the electrons, the kinetic effects of the suprathermal electrons are relative insignificant in the presence of ion cyclotron resonance in terms of driving the solar wind.

  8. Biosynthesis reaction mechanism and kinetics of deoxynucleoside triphosphates, dATP and dGTP.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jie; Ryu, Dewey D Y

    2005-02-20

    The enzyme reaction mechanism and kinetics for biosyntheses of deoxyadenosine triphosphate (dATP) and deoxyguanosine triphosphate (dGTP) from the corresponding deoxyadenosine diphosphate (dADP) and deoxyguanosine diphosphate (dGDP) catalyzed by pyruvate kinase were studied. A kinetic model for this synthetic reaction was developed based on a Bi-Bi random rapid equilibrium mechanism. Kinetic constants involved in this pyruvate kinase catalyzed phosphorylation reactions of deoxynucleoside diphosphates including the maximum reaction velocity, Michaelis-Menten constants, and inhibition constants for dATP and dGTP biosyntheses were experimentally determined. These kinetic constants for dATP and dGTP biosyntheses are of the same order of magnitude but significantly different between the two reactions. Kinetic constants involved in ATP and GTP biosyntheses as reported in literature are about one order of magnitude different from those involved in dATP and dGTP biosyntheses. This enzyme reaction requires Mg2+ ion and the optimal Mg2+ concentration was also determined. The experimental results showed a very good agreement with the simulation results obtained from the kinetic model developed. This kinetic model can be applied to the practical application of a pyruvate kinase reaction system for production of dATP and dGTP. There is a significant advantage of using enzymatic biosyntheses of dATP and dGTP as compared to the chemical method that has been in commercial use. PMID:15643625

  9. Reduced and Validated Kinetic Mechanisms for Hydrogen-CO-sir Combustion in Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Yiguang Ju; Frederick Dryer

    2009-02-07

    Rigorous experimental, theoretical, and numerical investigation of various issues relevant to the development of reduced, validated kinetic mechanisms for synthetic gas combustion in gas turbines was carried out - including the construction of new radiation models for combusting flows, improvement of flame speed measurement techniques, measurements and chemical kinetic analysis of H{sub 2}/CO/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/diluent mixtures, revision of the H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} kinetic model to improve flame speed prediction capabilities, and development of a multi-time scale algorithm to improve computational efficiency in reacting flow simulations.

  10. Kinetics and mechanisms of creep crack growth in a creep-resisting steel

    SciTech Connect

    Vainshtok, V.A.; Baumshtein, M.V.; Makovetskaya, I.A.; Man'ko, V.D.

    1986-02-01

    This paper discusses the nature of kinetic diagrams of growth of fatigue cracks in the temperature range typical of operation of important components of power equipment and examines the proportion of the incubation period of crack growth in the total life. The relationship of the kinetic diagrams of crack growth with the fracture mechanisms are examined and the effect of running life on creep crack propagation is reviewed.