Science.gov

Sample records for mechanical loads

  1. Transfer Mechanisms for Heavy Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassisi, V.

    1986-01-01

    Soft hydraulic system gently maneuvers loads. Upper and lower load-transfer mechanisms attach through mounting holes in vertical beam adjustable or gross positioning. Fine positioning of load accomplished by hydraulic cylinders that move trunnion support and trunnion clamp through short distances. Useful in transferring large loads in railroads, agriculture, shipping, manufacturing, and even precision assembly of large items.

  2. Load characteristics of mechanical pectoral fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Kato, Naomi; Suzumori, Koichi

    2008-05-01

    This paper describes the use of a three-motor driven mechanical pectoral fin as a new device for maneuvering and stabilizing an underwater vehicle. The mechanical pectoral fin consists of three servomotors generating feathering, rowing, and flapping motions. The load properties are analyzed experimentally. The mechanical pectoral fin can generate a control load in three dimensions. The effect of flexibility of the fin on the load is also investigated experimentally.

  3. Combined mechanical loading of composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derstine, Mark S.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Bowles, David E.

    1988-01-01

    An analytical/experimental investigation was performed to study the effect of material nonlinearities on the response of composite tubes subjected to combined axial and torsional loading. The effect of residual stresses on subsequent mechanical response was included in the investigation. Experiments were performed on P75/934 graphite-epoxy tubes with a stacking sequence of (15/0/ + or - 10/0/ -15), using pure torsion and combined axial/torsional loading. In the presence of residual stresses, the analytical model predicted a reduction in the initial shear modulus. Experimentally, coupling between axial loading and shear strain was observed in laminated tubes under combined loading. The phenomenon was predicted by the nonlinear analytical model. The experimentally observed linear limit of the global shear response was found to correspond to the analytically predicted first ply failure. Further, the failure of the tubes was found to be path dependent above a critical load level.

  4. Mechanical Predictors of Discomfort during Load Carriage.

    PubMed

    Wettenschwiler, Patrick D; Lorenzetti, Silvio; Stämpfli, Rolf; Rossi, René M; Ferguson, Stephen J; Annaheim, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Discomfort during load carriage is a major issue for activities using backpacks (e.g. infantry maneuvers, children carrying school supplies, or outdoor sports). It is currently unclear which mechanical parameters are responsible for subjectively perceived discomfort. The aim of this study was to identify objectively measured mechanical predictors of discomfort during load carriage. We compared twelve different configurations of a typical load carriage system, a commercially available backpack with a hip belt. The pressure distribution under the hip belt and the shoulder strap, as well as the tensile force in the strap and the relative motion of the backpack were measured. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to investigate possible predictors of discomfort. The results demonstrate that static peak pressure, or alternatively, static strap force is a significant (p<0.001) predictor of discomfort during load carriage in the shoulder and hip region, accounting for 85% or more of the variation in discomfort. As an additional finding, we discovered that the regression coefficients of these predictors are significantly smaller for the hip than for the shoulder region. As static peak pressure is measured directly on the body, it is less dependent on the type of load carriage system than static strap force. Therefore, static peak pressure is well suited as a generally applicable, objective mechanical parameter for the optimization of load carriage system design. Alternatively, when limited to load carriage systems of the type backpack with hip belt, static strap force is the most valuable predictor of discomfort. The regionally differing regression coefficients of both predictors imply that the hip region is significantly more tolerant than the shoulder region. In order to minimize discomfort, users should be encouraged to shift load from the shoulders to the hip region wherever possible, at the same time likely decreasing the risk of low back pain or injury

  5. Mechanical Predictors of Discomfort during Load Carriage

    PubMed Central

    Wettenschwiler, Patrick D.; Lorenzetti, Silvio; Stämpfli, Rolf; Rossi, René M.; Ferguson, Stephen J.; Annaheim, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Discomfort during load carriage is a major issue for activities using backpacks (e.g. infantry maneuvers, children carrying school supplies, or outdoor sports). It is currently unclear which mechanical parameters are responsible for subjectively perceived discomfort. The aim of this study was to identify objectively measured mechanical predictors of discomfort during load carriage. We compared twelve different configurations of a typical load carriage system, a commercially available backpack with a hip belt. The pressure distribution under the hip belt and the shoulder strap, as well as the tensile force in the strap and the relative motion of the backpack were measured. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to investigate possible predictors of discomfort. The results demonstrate that static peak pressure, or alternatively, static strap force is a significant (p<0.001) predictor of discomfort during load carriage in the shoulder and hip region, accounting for 85% or more of the variation in discomfort. As an additional finding, we discovered that the regression coefficients of these predictors are significantly smaller for the hip than for the shoulder region. As static peak pressure is measured directly on the body, it is less dependent on the type of load carriage system than static strap force. Therefore, static peak pressure is well suited as a generally applicable, objective mechanical parameter for the optimization of load carriage system design. Alternatively, when limited to load carriage systems of the type backpack with hip belt, static strap force is the most valuable predictor of discomfort. The regionally differing regression coefficients of both predictors imply that the hip region is significantly more tolerant than the shoulder region. In order to minimize discomfort, users should be encouraged to shift load from the shoulders to the hip region wherever possible, at the same time likely decreasing the risk of low back pain or injury

  6. Mechanically loaded myotubes affect osteoclast formation.

    PubMed

    Juffer, Petra; Jaspers, Richard T; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke; Bakker, Astrid D

    2014-03-01

    In response to mechanical loading skeletal muscle produces numerous growth factors and cytokines that enter the circulation. We hypothesized that myotubes produce soluble factors that affect osteoclast formation and aimed to identify which osteoclastogenesis-modulating factors are differentially produced by mechanically stimulated myotubes. C2C12 myotubes were subjected to mechanical loading by cyclic strain for 1 h, and postincubated with or without cyclic strain for 24 h. The effect of cyclic strain on gene expression in myotubes was determined by PCR. Conditioned medium (CM) was collected from cultures of unloaded and loaded myotubes and from MLO-Y4 osteocytes. CM was added to mouse bone marrow cells containing osteoclast precursors, and after 6 days osteoclasts were counted. Compared to unconditioned medium, CM from unloaded osteocytes increased osteoclast formation, while CM from unloaded myotubes decreased osteoclast formation. Cyclic strain strongly enhanced IL-6 expression in myotubes. CM from cyclically strained myotubes increased osteoclast formation compared to CM from unloaded myotubes, but this effect did not occur in the presence of an IL-6 antibody. In conclusion, mechanically loaded myotubes secrete soluble factors, among others IL-6, which affect osteoclast formation. These results suggest that muscle could potentially affect bone homeostasis in vivo via production of growth factors and/or cytokines. PMID:24264813

  7. Apparatus for loading shape memory gripper mechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Benett, William J.; Schumann, Daniel L.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Fitch, Joseph P.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for loading deposit material, such as an embolic coil, into a shape memory polymer (SMP) gripping/release mechanism. The apparatus enables the application of uniform pressure to secure a grip by the SMP mechanism on the deposit material via differential pressure between, for example, vacuum within the SMP mechanism and hydrostatic water pressure on the exterior of the SMP mechanism. The SMP tubing material of the mechanism is heated to above the glass transformation temperature (Tg) while reshaping, and subsequently cooled to below Tg to freeze the shape. The heating and/or cooling may, for example, be provided by the same water applied for pressurization or the heating can be applied by optical fibers packaged to the SMP mechanism for directing a laser beam, for example, thereunto. At a point of use, the deposit material is released from the SMP mechanism by reheating the SMP material to above the temperature Tg whereby it returns to its initial shape. The reheating of the SM material may be carried out by injecting heated fluid (water) through an associated catheter or by optical fibers and an associated beam of laser light, for example.

  8. Load transfer mechanisms in anchored geosynthetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hryciw, Roman D.

    1990-12-01

    Success of an anchored geosynthetic system (AGS) depends on the satisfactory transfer of load between: the surface-deployed geosynthetic and anchors (typically ribbed reinforcing rods) driven into the slope; the geosynthetic and soil; and the anchors and soil. A study was performed to evaluate the load transfer mechanisms at these interfaces in an AGS. A mathematical model was developed for predicting the pullout resistance of plane ribbed inclusions. The model considered the contribution of both frictional and passive resistance components of pullout resistance. Optical observation of sand around the ribs was made to determine the behavior of soil around the moving ribs during pullout. A theoretical study disclosed that the optimum anchor orientation for stabilization of infinite slopes depends on several factors including slope angle and in-situ stresses. It typically ranges from 20 to 30 degree from the normal to the slope with the anchor driven upslope. An experimental study confirmed that the soil-geosynthetic interface friction angle may be correctly predicted from the residual or critical state friction angle of the sand. Equations were developed for load transfer at curved soil-fabric interfaces. An experimental study verified that the increases in soil stress with distance from the anchor may be predicted by the developed equations.

  9. Cellular accommodation and the response of bone to mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Schriefer, Jennifer L; Warden, Stuart J; Saxon, Leanne K; Robling, Alexander G; Turner, Charles H

    2005-09-01

    Several mathematical rules by which bone adapts to mechanical loading have been proposed. Previous work focused mainly on negative feedback models, e.g., bone adapts to increased loading after a minimum strain effective (MES) threshold has been reached. The MES algorithm has numerous caveats, so we propose a different model, according to which bone adapts to changes in its mechanical environment based on the principle of cellular accommodation. With the new algorithm we presume that strain history is integrated into cellular memory so that the reference state for adaptation is constantly changing. To test this algorithm, an experiment was performed in which the ulnae of Sprague-Dawley rats were loaded in axial compression. The animals received loading for 15 weeks with progressively decreasing loads, increasing loads, or a constant load. The results showed the largest increases in geometry in the decreasing load group, followed by the constant load group. Bone formation rates (BFRs) were significantly greater in the decreasing load group during the first 2 weeks of the study as compared to all other groups (P<0.05). After the first few weeks of mechanical loading, the BFR in the loaded ulnae returned to the values of the nonloaded ulnae. These experimental results closely fit the predicted results of the cellular accommodation algorithm. After the initial weeks of loading, bone stopped responding so the degree of adaptation was proportional to the initial peak load magnitude. PMID:16023471

  10. Biaxial load effects in fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, H.; Lee, J. D.; Eftis, J.

    1977-01-01

    It is found that the standard expressions for elastic stress and displacement in the crack-tip region (i.e., the so-called singular solution) cannot be considered to be approximations that are acceptable in a completely general sense. This conclusion is best illustrated by the instance of a biaxially loaded infinite sheet with a flat horizontal central crack, where the effect of load applied parallel to the plane of the crack appears entirely in the second terms of the series representations for local stresses and displacements. An elastoplastic finite-element analysis of the same biaxially loaded finite specimen geometry shows that the global energy release rate, the J-integral, the plastic stress and strain intensity factors (in the sense of Hilton and Hutchinson), and the size of the crack border region plastic yield, all have pronounced biaxial load dependence.

  11. Behavior of cracked cylinders under combined thermal and mechanical loading

    SciTech Connect

    Ignaccolo, S.

    1996-12-01

    Nuclear pressure vessels and pipings can be submitted in their life to severe mechanical and thermal loadings. Engineering methods easy to apply, but sufficiently accurate, are needed to assess the flaws. In the field of non-linear fracture mechanics a lot of work has been achieved for structures submitted to mechanical loadings. But for thermal loadings, and particularly for thermal gradients, only few contributions are available. The authors propose, here, to present the main results of a complete set of finite element computations, conducted in France by CEA, EDF and FRAMATOME, on cracked cylinders submitted to combined mechanical and thermal loads. The interaction between these two types of loads is analyzed in the cases of austenitic and ferritic structures. Moreover, these results are compared to the predictions obtained by simplified engineering methods (R6 procedure, J{sub SA16}, and J{sub EDF} approaches). Their domain of validity is also discussed.

  12. Honeycomb Core Permeability Under Mechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Raman, V. V.; Venkat, Venki S.; Sankaran, Sankara N.

    1997-01-01

    A method for characterizing the air permeability of sandwich core materials as a function of applied shear stress was developed. The core material for the test specimens was either Hexcel HRP-3/16-8.0 and or DuPont Korex-1/8-4.5 and was nominally one-half inch thick and six inches square. The facesheets where made of Hercules' AS4/8552 graphite/epoxy (Gr/Ep) composites and were nominally 0.059-in. thick. Cytec's Metalbond 1515-3M epoxy film adhesive was used for co-curing the facesheets to the core. The permeability of the specimens during both static (tension) and dynamic (reversed and non-reversed) shear loads were measured. The permeability was measured as the rate of air flow through the core from a circular 1-in2 area of the core exposed to an air pressure of 10.0 psig. In both the static and dynamic testing, the Korex core experienced sudden increases in core permeability corresponding to a core catastrophic failure, while the URP core experienced a gradual increase in the permeability prior to core failure. The Korex core failed at lower loads than the HRP core both in the transverse and ribbon directions.

  13. Dynamic performance of dissipative dielectric elastomers under alternating mechanical load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junshi; Chen, Hualing; Sheng, Junjie; Liu, Lei; Wang, Yongquan; Jia, Shuhai

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study about the effect of dissipation on the dynamic performance of a dielectric elastomer membrane subject to a combination of mechanical load and voltage. The thermodynamic dissipative model is given and the equation of motion is deduced by a free energy method. It is found that when the applied mechanical load and voltage are static, the membrane may reach a state of equilibrium after the viscoelastic relaxation. When the voltage is static but the mechanical load is sinusoidal, the membrane will resonate at multiple frequencies. The study result indicates that the viscoelasticity can reduce the natural frequency and increase the mean stretch of the dielectric elastomer. After the power source is cut off, the effect of current leakage on dynamic performance under alternating mechanical load is that the natural frequency increases and the mean stretch reduces.

  14. Influence of structural load-bearing scaffolds on mechanical load- and BMP-2-mediated bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Anna M; Mason, Devon E; Lin, Angela S P; Guldberg, Robert E; Boerckel, Joel D

    2016-09-01

    A common design constraint in functional tissue engineering is that scaffolds intended for use in load-bearing sites possess similar mechanical properties to the replaced tissue. Here, we tested the hypothesis that in vivo loading would enhance bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2)-mediated bone regeneration in the presence of a load-bearing PLDL scaffold, whose pores and central core were filled with BMP-2-releasing alginate hydrogel. First, we evaluated the effects of in vivo mechanical loading on bone regeneration in the structural scaffolds. Second, we compared scaffold-mediated bone regeneration, independent of mechanical loading, with alginate hydrogel constructs, without the structural scaffold, that have been shown previously to facilitate in vivo mechanical stimulation of bone formation. Contrary to our hypothesis, mechanical loading had no effect on bone formation, distribution, or biomechanical properties in structural scaffolds. Independent of loading, the structural scaffolds reduced bone formation compared to non-structural alginate, particularly in regions in which the scaffold was concentrated, resulting in impaired functional regeneration. This is attributable to a combination of stress shielding by the scaffold and inhibition of cellular infiltration and tissue ingrowth. Collectively, these data question the necessity of scaffold similarity to mature tissue at the time of implantation and emphasize development of an environment conducive to cellular activation of matrix production and ultimate functional regeneration. PMID:27208510

  15. HOW DO BONE CELLS SENSE MECHANICAL LOADING?

    PubMed Central

    Gusmão, Carlos Vinícius Buarque de; Belangero, William Dias

    2015-01-01

    Influenced by gravidity, bone tissue experiences stronger or lighter deformation according to the strength of the activities of daily life. Activities resulting in impact are particularly known to stimulate osteogenesis, thus reducing bone mass loss. Knowing how bone cells recognize the mechanical deformation imposed to the bone and trigger a series of biochemical chain reactions is of crucial importance for the development of therapeutic and preventive practices in orthopaedic activity. There is still a long way to run until we can understand the whole process, but current knowledge has shown a strong progression, with researches being conducted focused on therapies. For a mechanical sign to be transformed into a biological one (mechanotransduction), it must be amplified at cell level by the histological structure of bone tissue, producing tensions in cell membrane proteins (integrins) and changing their spatial structure. Such change activates bindings between these and the cytoskeleton, producing focal adhesions, where cytoplasmatic proteins are recruited to enable easier biochemical reactions. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is the most important one being self-activated when its structure is changed by integrins. Activated FAK triggers a cascade of reactions, resulting in the activation of ERK-1/2 and Akt, which are proteins that, together with FAK, regulate the production of bone mass. Osteocytes are believed to be the mechanosensor cells of the bone and to transmit the mechanical deformation to osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Ionic channels and gap junctions are considered as intercellular communication means for biochemical transmission of a mechanical stimulus. These events occur continuously on bone tissue and regulate bone remodeling. PMID:27022510

  16. Design and analysis of a novel mechanical loading machine for dynamic in vivo axial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macione, James; Nesbitt, Sterling; Pandit, Vaibhav; Kotha, Shiva

    2012-02-01

    This paper describes the construction of a loading machine for performing in vivo, dynamic mechanical loading of the rodent forearm. The loading machine utilizes a unique type of electromagnetic actuator with no mechanically resistive components (servotube), allowing highly accurate loads to be created. A regression analysis of the force created by the actuator with respect to the input voltage demonstrates high linear correlation (R2 = 1). When the linear correlation is used to create dynamic loading waveforms in the frequency (0.5-10 Hz) and load (1-50 N) range used for in vivo loading, less than 1% normalized root mean square error (NRMSE) is computed. Larger NRMSE is found at increased frequencies, with 5%-8% occurring at 40 Hz, and reasons are discussed. Amplifiers (strain gauge, linear voltage displacement transducer (LVDT), and load cell) are constructed, calibrated, and integrated, to allow well-resolved dynamic measurements to be recorded at each program cycle. Each of the amplifiers uses an active filter with cutoff frequency at the maximum in vivo loading frequencies (50 Hz) so that electronic noise generated by the servo drive and actuator are reduced. The LVDT and load cell amplifiers allow evaluation of stress-strain relationships to determine if in vivo bone damage is occurring. The strain gauge amplifier allows dynamic force to strain calibrations to occur for animals of different sex, age, and strain. Unique features are integrated into the loading system, including a weightless mode, which allows the limbs of anesthetized animals to be quickly positioned and removed. Although the device is constructed for in vivo axial bone loading, it can be used within constraints, as a general measurement instrument in a laboratory setting.

  17. MECHANICS OF CRACK BRIDGING UNDER DYNAMIC LOADS

    SciTech Connect

    N. SRIDHAR; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    A bridging law for fiber reinforced composites under dynamic crack propagation conditions has been derived. Inertial effects in the mechanism of fiber pullout during dynamic propagation of a bridged crack are critically examined for the first time. By reposing simple shear lag models of pullout as problems of dynamic wave propagation, the effect of the frictional coupling between the fibers and the matrix is accounted for in a fairly straightforward way. The solutions yield the time-dependent relationship between the crack opening displacement and the bridging traction. Engineering criteria and the role of material and geometrical parameters for significant inertial effects are identified.

  18. Role of Integrin in Mechanical Loading of Osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Ruth; Demsky, Caroline

    2000-01-01

    Mechanical forces generated by gravity, weightbearing, and muscle contraction play a key role in the genesis and maintenance of skeletal structure. The molecular mechanisms that mediate changes in osteoblast activity in response to altered patterns of skeletal loading are not known, and a better understanding of these processes may be essential for developing effective treatment strategies to prevent disuse osteoporosis. We have elucidated specific integrin/ECM (extracellular matrix) interactions that are required for osteoblast differentiation and survival and have developed a useful loading system to further explore the molecular basis of mechano-sensitivity of osteoblasts. The long term goal of our collaborative research is to understand how the ECM and cell adhesion proteins and integrins interaction to mediate the response of osteoblasts and their progenitors to mechanical loading. We suggest that integrin/ECM interactions are crucial for basic cellular processes, including differentiation and survival, as well as to participate in detecting and mediating cellular responses to mechanical stimuli.

  19. Mechanical response of ceramics to creep loading

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, W.R.

    1983-08-01

    The mechanical response of small, semi-elliptical, identification-induced surface cracks in fine-grain alumina was studied. The deformation behavior of the crack tip region was monitored using crack opening and surface displacements. Results indicate values of the secondary creep exponent, n, between 1.5 and 2 with a temperature dependence consistent with secondary creep data from the same material. Crack growth was measured at 1300 and 1400/sup 0/C and a narrow power-law growth regime was revealed. Again the power-law exponent and activation energy were very close to creep values. Asymptotic behavior was exhibited near both K/sub Ic/ and K/sub th/, the crack growth threshold. The threshold occurred near 0.4 K/sub Ic/, independent of temperature. Crack tip damage in the form of grain boundary cavities growing by diffusion was responsible for crack extension. The damage also exerts a strong influence on the displacement field as predicted by recent theories. The crack growth threshold is preceded by a transition in the size and distribution of damage. At K/sub I/ near K/sub Ic/ the damage is restricted to a few facets directly ahead of the crack tip. Near K/sub th/ damage concentrates in side-lobes far ahead of the crack tip and at angles between 20/sup 0/ to 60/sup 0/ from the plane of the crack. The transition between frontal and side-lobe damage is anticipated to be moderately dependent on grain size. 34 figures.

  20. Self locking coupling mechanism for engaging and moving a load

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Richard L.; Casamajor, Alan B.; Parsons, Richard E.

    1982-01-01

    Coupling mechanism (11) for engaging and lifting a load (12) has a housing (19) with a guide passage (18) for receiving a knob (13) which is secured to the load (12) through a neck (15) of smaller diameter. A hollow ball (23) in the housing (19) has an opening (27) which receives the knob (13) and the ball (23) is then turned to displace the opening (27) from the housing passage (18) and to cause the neck (15) to enter a slot (29) in the ball (23) thereby securing the load (12) to the coupling mechanism (11) as elements (49) of the housing (19) block travel of the neck (15) back into the opening (27) when the ball (23) is turned to the load holding orientation. As engagement of the load (12) and locking of the coupling mechanism are accomplished simultaneously by the same ball (23) motion, operation is simplified and reliability is greatly increased. The ball (23) is preferably turned by a motor (32) through worm gearing (36) and the coupling mechanism (11) may be controlled from a remote location. Among other uses, the coupling mechanism (11) is adaptable to the handling of spent nuclear reactor fuel elements (12).

  1. Self locking coupling mechanism for engaging and moving a load

    DOEpatents

    Wood, R.L.; Casamajor, A.B.; Parsons, R.E.

    1980-09-12

    A coupling mechanism for engaging and lifting a load has a housing with a guide passage for receiving a knob which is secured to the load through a neck of smaller diameter. A hollow ball in the housing has an opening which receives the knob and the ball is then turned to displace the opening from the housing passage and to cause the neck to enter a slot in the ball thereby securing the load to the coupling mechanism as elements of the housing block travel of the neck back into the opening when the ball is turned to the load holding orientation. As engagement of the load and locking of the coupling mechanism are accomplished simultaneously by the same ball motion, operation is simplified and reliability is greatly increased. The ball is preferably turned by a motor through worm gearing and the coupling mechanism may be controlled from a remote location. Among other uses, the coupling mechanism is adaptable to the handling of spent nuclear reactor fuel elements.

  2. Commercial solar/load management experiment: New mechanical engineering building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of load management heat recovery, thermal storage, and solar systems on energy usage and power demand profiles in the University of New Mexico's Mechanical Engineering Building are presented. Results were obtained from a year monitoring of the building's heating and cooling systems and recording of sensor signals by a computer based data acquisition system. A modified AXCESS Energy Analysis Program to simulate energy usage is detailed, and the development of perferred strategies for maximizing the building's load management capabilities is outlined.

  3. Mechanics and energetics of load carriage during human walking

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tzu-wei P.; Kuo, Arthur D.

    2014-01-01

    Although humans clearly expend more energy to walk with an extra load, it is unclear what biomechanical mechanisms contribute to that increase. One possible contribution is the mechanical work performed on the body center of mass (COM), which simple models predict should increase linearly with added mass. The work should be performed primarily by the lower extremity joints, although in unknown distribution, and cost a proportionate amount of metabolic energy. We therefore tested normal adults (N=8) walking at constant speed (1.25 m s−1) with varying backpack loads up to 40% of body weight. We measured mechanical work (both performed on the COM and joint work from inverse dynamics), as well as metabolic energy expenditure through respirometry. Both measures of work were found to increase approximately linearly with carried load, with COM work rate increasing by approximately 1.40 W for each 1 kg of additional load. The joints all contributed work, but the greatest increase in positive work was attributable to the ankle during push-off (45–60% of stride time) and the knee in the rebound after collision (12–30% stride). The hip performed increasing amounts of negative work, near the end of stance. Rate of metabolic energy expenditure also increased approximately linearly with load, by approximately 7.6 W for each 1 kg of additional load. The ratio of the increases in work and metabolic cost yielded a relatively constant efficiency of approximately 16%. The metabolic cost not explained by work appeared to be relatively constant with load and did not exhibit a particular trend. Most of the increasing cost for carrying a load appears to be explained by positive mechanical work, especially about the ankle and knee, with both work and metabolic cost increasing nearly linearly with added mass. PMID:24198268

  4. Mechanical annealing under low-amplitude cyclic loading in micropillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yi-nan; Liu, Zhan-li; Wang, Zhang-jie; Zhuang, Zhuo

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical annealing has been demonstrated to be an effective method for decreasing the overall dislocation density in submicron single crystal. However, simultaneously significant shape change always unexpectedly happens under extremely high monotonic loading to drive the pre-existing dislocations out of the free surfaces. In the present work, through in situ TEM experiments it is found that cyclic loading with low stress amplitude can drive most dislocations out of the submicron sample with virtually little change of the shape. The underlying dislocation mechanism is revealed by carrying out discrete dislocation dynamic (DDD) simulations. The simulation results indicate that the dislocation density decreases within cycles, while the accumulated plastic strain is small. By comparing the evolution of dislocation junction under monotonic, cyclic and relaxation deformation, the cumulative irreversible slip is found to be the key factor of promoting junction destruction and dislocation annihilation at free surface under low-amplitude cyclic loading condition. By introducing this mechanics into dislocation density evolution equations, the critical conditions for mechanical annealing under cyclic and monotonic loadings are discussed. Low-amplitude cyclic loading which strengthens the single crystal without seriously disturbing the structure has the potential applications in the manufacture of defect-free nano-devices.

  5. Microcracking in composite laminates under thermal and mechanical loading. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Maddocks, J.R.

    1995-05-01

    Composites used in space structures are exposed to both extremes in temperature and applied mechanical loads. Cracks in the matrix form, changing the laminate thermoelastic properties. The goal of the present investigation is to develop a predictive methodology to quantify microcracking in general composite laminates under both thermal and mechanical loading. This objective is successfully met through a combination of analytical modeling and experimental investigation. In the analysis, the stress and displacement distributions in the vicinity of a crack are determined using a shear lag model. These are incorporated into an energy based cracking criterion to determine the favorability of crack formation. A progressive damage algorithm allows the inclusion of material softening effects and temperature-dependent material properties. The analysis is implemented by a computer code which gives predicted crack density and degraded laminate properties as functions of any thermomechanical load history. Extensive experimentation provides verification of the analysis. AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy laminates are manufactured with three different layups to investigate ply thickness and orientation effects. Thermal specimens are cooled to progressively lower temperatures down to {minus}184 C. After conditioning the specimens to each temperature, cracks are counted on their edges using optical microscopy and in their interiors by sanding to incremental depths. Tensile coupons are loaded monotonically to progressively higher loads until failure. Cracks are counted on the coupon edges after each loading. A data fit to all available results provides input parameters for the analysis and shows them to be material properties, independent of geometry and loading. Correlation between experiment and analysis is generally very good under both thermal and mechanical loading, showing the methodology to be a powerful, unified tool.

  6. Features of structural response of mechanically loaded crystallites to irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Korchuganov, Aleksandr V.

    2015-10-27

    A molecular dynamics method is employed to investigate the origin and evolution of plastic deformation in elastically deformed iron and vanadium crystallites due to atomic displacement cascades. Elastic stress states of crystallites result from different degrees of specimen deformation. Crystallites are deformed under constant-volume conditions. Atomic displacement cascades with the primary knock-on atom energy up to 50 keV are generated in loaded specimens. It is shown that irradiation may cause not only the Frenkel pair formation but also large-scale structural rearrangements outside the irradiated area, which prove to be similar to rearrangements proceeding by the twinning mechanism in mechanically loaded specimens.

  7. Monitoring contractile dermal lymphatic activity following uniaxial mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Gray, R J; Worsley, P R; Voegeli, D; Bader, D L

    2016-09-01

    It is proposed that direct mechanical loading can impair dermal lymphatic function, contributing to the causal pathway of pressure ulcers. The present study aims to investigate the effects of loading on human dermal lymphatic vessels. Ten participants were recruited with ages ranging from 24 to 61 years. Participants had intradermal Indocyanine Green injections administrated between left finger digits. Fluorescence was imaged for 5min sequences with an infra-red camera prior to lymph vessel loading, immediately after axial loading (60mmHg) and following a recovery period. Image processing was employed to defined transient lymph packets and compare lymph function between each test phase. The results revealed that between 1-8 transient events (median=4) occurred at baseline, with a median velocity of 8.1mm/sec (range 4.1-20.1mm/sec). Immediately post-loading, there was a significant (p<0.05) reduction in velocity (median=6.4, range 2.2-13.5mm/sec), although the number of transient lymph packages varied between participants. During the recovery period the number (range 1-7) and velocity (recovery median=9.6mm/sec) of transient packets were largely restored to basal values. The present study revealed that some individuals present with impaired dermal lymphatic function immediately after uniaxial mechanical loading. More research is needed to investigate the effects of pressure and shear on lymphatic vessel patency. PMID:27245749

  8. Buckling and vibration of flexoelectric nanofilms subjected to mechanical loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xu; Yang, Wenjun; Hu, Shuling; Shen, Shengping

    2016-03-01

    Piezoelectric nanofilms (PNFs) are widely used in microelectromechanical systems, buckling commonly occurs when subjected to compressive mechanical loads in their applications. In this paper we comprehensively study the flexoelectric effect on the buckling and vibrational behaviors of PNFs. The results from the analytical solutions indicate the significance of the flexoelectricity. The critical buckling loads and natural frequency are enhanced by the flexoelectricity. Analytical results indicate that the critical buckling load is not only influenced by the thickness of the PNFs, but also by the in-plane aspect ratio. When the thickness of the PNFs is several micrometers, the critical buckling load predicted by the present model is much higher than the prediction by the classical piezoelectric plate model. And the natural frequency calculated by the current model is much higher than that obtained by the classical piezoelectricity plate theory when the thickness is several tens of nanometers.

  9. Mechanical loading, damping, and load-driven bone formation in mouse tibiae.

    PubMed

    Dodge, Todd; Wanis, Mina; Ayoub, Ramez; Zhao, Liming; Watts, Nelson B; Bhattacharya, Amit; Akkus, Ozan; Robling, Alexander; Yokota, Hiroki

    2012-10-01

    Mechanical loads play a pivotal role in the growth and maintenance of bone and joints. Although loading can activate anabolic genes and induce bone remodeling, damping is essential for preventing traumatic bone injury and fracture. In this study we investigated the damping capacity of bone, joint tissue, muscle, and skin using a mouse hindlimb model of enhanced loading in conjunction with finite element modeling to model bone curvature. Our hypothesis was that loads were primarily absorbed by the joints and muscle tissue, but that bone also contributed to damping through its compression and natural bending. To test this hypothesis, fresh mouse distal lower limb segments were cyclically loaded in axial compression in sequential bouts, with each subsequent bout having less surrounding tissue. A finite element model was generated to model effects of bone curvature in silico. Two damping-related parameters (phase shift angle and energy loss) were determined from the output of the loading experiments. Interestingly, the experimental results revealed that the knee joint contributed to the largest portion of the damping capacity of the limb, and bone itself accounted for approximately 38% of the total phase shift angle. Computational results showed that normal bone curvature enhanced the damping capacity of the bone by approximately 40%, and the damping effect grew at an accelerated pace as curvature was increased. Although structural curvature reduces critical loads for buckling in beam theory, evolution apparently favors maintaining curvature in the tibia. Histomorphometric analysis of the tibia revealed that in response to axial loading, bone formation was significantly enhanced in the regions that were predicted to receive a curvature-induced bending moment. These results suggest that in addition to bone's compressive damping capacity, surrounding tissues, as well as naturally-occurring bone curvature, also contribute to mechanical damping, which may ultimately affect

  10. Adaptive and injury response of bone to mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Sarah H; Silva, Matthew J

    2012-01-01

    Bone responds to supraphysiological mechanical loads by increasing bone formation. Depending on the applied strain magnitude (and other loading parameters) the response can be either adaptive (mostly lamellar bone) or injury (mostly woven bone). Seminal studies of Hert, Lanyon and Rubin originally established the basic 'rules' of bone mechanosensitivity. These were reinforced by subsequent studies using noninvasive rodent loading models, most notably by Turner et al. More recent works with these models have been able to explore the structural, transcriptional and molecular mechanisms which distinguish the two responses (lamellar vs woven). Wnt/Lrp signaling has emerged as a key mechanoresponsive pathway for lamellar bone. However, there is still much to study with regard to effects of ageing, osteocytes, other signaling pathways, and the molecular regulation that modulates lamellar vs woven bone formation. This review summarizes not only the historical findings but also the current data for these topics. PMID:23505338

  11. Mechanisms of Bone Mineralization and Effects of Mechanical Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babich, Michael

    1996-01-01

    The data suggest that PTH and PKC inhibit nodule formation, and that alternative energy sources are utilized by osteoblasts in the process of mineralization. The conditions and techniques to grow, fix, photograph, and measure bone mineralization in vitro were defined. The results are presently in preliminary form and require further assessment as follows; quantitate the surface area of nodules + treatments via computer-aided image analysis; use PTH + inhibitors of signaling pathways to determine the mechanism of nodule formation; determine how protein kinase C is involved as a promotor of nodule formation; cell proliferation vs. cell death affected by modulation of signal transduction (i.e., PTH, enzyme inhibitors and activators); identify mRNA induced or decreased in response to PTH and signaling modulators that encode proteins that regulate cell morphology, proliferation, and nodule formation. Therefore, several follow-up studies between the laboratories at NASA-Ames Research Center and my laboratory at the University of Illinois have been initiated.

  12. Fracture mechanics analysis for various fiber/matrix interface loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, R. A.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Fiber/matrix (F/M) cracking was analyzed to provide better understanding and guidance in developing F/M interface fracture toughness tests. Two configurations, corresponding to F/M cracking at a broken fiber and at the free edge, were investigated. The effects of mechanical loading, thermal cooldown, and friction were investigated. Each configuration was analyzed for two loadings: longitudinal and normal to the fiber. A nonlinear finite element analysis was performed to model friction and slip at the F/M interface. A new procedure for fitting a square-root singularity to calculated stresses was developed to determine stress intensity factors (K sub I and K sub II) for a bimaterial interface crack. For the case of F/M cracking at a broken fiber with longitudinal loading, crack tip conditions were strongly influenced by interface friction. As a result, an F/M interface toughness test based on this case was not recommended because nonlinear data analysis methods would be required. For the free edge crack configuration, both mechanical and thermal loading caused crack opening, thereby avoiding frictional effects. A F/M interface toughness test based on this configuration would provide data for K(sub I)/K(sub II) ratios of about 0.7 and 1.6 for fiber and radial normal loading, respectively. However, thermal effects must be accounted for in the data analysis.

  13. Fracture mechanics analysis for various fiber/matrix interface loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Rajiv A.; Crews, John H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Fiber/matrix (F/M) cracking was analyzed to provide better understanding and guidance in developing F/M interface fracture toughness tests. Two configurations, corresponding to F/M cracking at a broken fiber and at the free edge, were investigated. The effects of mechanical loading, thermal cooldown, and friction were investigated. Each configuration was analyzed for two loadings: longitudinal and normal to the fiber. A nonlinear finite element analysis was performed to model friction and slip at the F/M interface. A new procedure for fitting a square-root singularity to calculated stresses was developed to determine stress intensity factors (K sub I and K sub II) for a bimaterial interface crack. For the case of F/M cracking at a broken fiber with longitudinal loading, crack tip conditions were strongly influenced by interface friction. As a result, an F/M interface toughness test based on this case was not recommended because nonlinear data analysis methods would be required. For the free edge crack configuration, both mechanical and thermal loading caused crack opening, theory avoiding fractional effects. A F/M interface toughness test based on this configuration would provide data for K(sub I/K(sub II) ratios of about 0.7 and 1.6 for fiber and radial normal loading, respectively. However, thermal effects must be accounted for in the data analysis.

  14. Fracture mechanics analysis for various fiber/matrix interface loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, R. A.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Fiber/matrix (F/M) cracking was analyzed to provide better understanding and guidance in developing F/M interface fracture toughness tests. Two configurations, corresponding to F/M cracking at a broken fiber and at the free edge, were investigated. The effects of mechanical loading, thermal cooldown, and friction were investigated. Each configuration was analyzed for two loadings: longitudinal and normal to the fiber. A nonlinear finite element analysis was performed to model friction and slip at the F/M interface. A new procedure for fitting a square-root singularity to calculated stresses was developed to determine stress intensity factors (K sub I and K sub II) for a bimaterial interface crack. For the case of F/M cracking at a broken fiber with longitudinal loading, crack tip conditions were strongly influenced by interface friction. As a result, an F/M interface toughness test based on this case was not recommended because nonlinear data analysis methods would be required. For the free edge crack configuration, both mechanical and thermal loading caused crack opening, thereby avoiding frictional effects. An F/M interface toughness test based on this configuration would provide data for K(sub I)/K(sub II) ratios of about 0.7 and 1.6 for fiber and radial normal loading, respectively. However, thermal effects must be accounted for in the data analysis.

  15. Spectral response of multilayer optical structures to dynamic mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scripka, David; LeCroy, Garrett; Summers, Christopher J.; Thadhani, Naresh N.

    2015-05-01

    A computational study of Distributed Bragg Reflectors (DBR) and Optical Microcavities (OMC) was conducted to ascertain their potential as time-resolved mesoscale sensors due to their unique structure-driven spectral characteristics. Shock wave propagation simulations of polymer-based DBRs and glass/ceramic-based OMCs were coupled with spectral response calculations to demonstrate the combined dynamic mechanical and spectral response of the structures. Clear spectral shifts in both structures are predicted as a function of dynamic loading magnitude. Potential applications of the structures include high spatial and temporal resolution surface maps of material states, and in-situ probing of material interfaces during dynamic loading.

  16. Microcracking in composite laminates under thermal and mechanical loading. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddocks, Jason R.

    1995-01-01

    Composites used in space structures are exposed to both extremes in temperature and applied mechanical loads. Cracks in the matrix form, changing the laminate thermoelastic properties. The goal of the present investigation is to develop a predictive methodology to quantify microcracking in general composite laminates under both thermal and mechanical loading. This objective is successfully met through a combination of analytical modeling and experimental investigation. In the analysis, the stress and displacement distributions in the vicinity of a crack are determined using a shear lag model. These are incorporated into an energy based cracking criterion to determine the favorability of crack formation. A progressive damage algorithm allows the inclusion of material softening effects and temperature-dependent material properties. The analysis is implemented by a computer code which gives predicted crack density and degraded laminate properties as functions of any thermomechanical load history. Extensive experimentation provides verification of the analysis. AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy laminates are manufactured with three different layups to investigate ply thickness and orientation effects. Thermal specimens are cooled to progressively lower temperatures down to -184 C. After conditioning the specimens to each temperature, cracks are counted on their edges using optical microscopy and in their interiors by sanding to incremental depths. Tensile coupons are loaded monotonically to progressively higher loads until failure. Cracks are counted on the coupon edges after each loading. A data fit to all available results provides input parameters for the analysis and shows them to be material properties, independent of geometry and loading. Correlation between experiment and analysis is generally very good under both thermal and mechanical loading, showing the methodology to be a powerful, unified tool. Delayed crack initiation observed in a few cases is attributed to a

  17. Analysis of thermal conductivity of polymeric nanocomposites under mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Suyoung; Yang, Seunghwa; Cho, Maenghyo

    2013-12-01

    When the plastic deformation is applied to neat polymer, the polymer chains are aligned and the thermal conductivity of neat polymer increases linearly along the loading direction. However, the thermal conductivity change of nanocomposites consisting of polymer matrix and nanofillers during plastic deformation is not simple. The volume fraction and size of nanofillers scarcely affect the structural change of polymer chains during the plastic deformation. In this study, the structural change of polymeric materials according to the mechanical loading and its effect on the thermal transport properties are investigated through a molecular dynamics simulation. To investigate the effects of nanofiller, its volume fraction, and size on the thermal transport properties, the unit cells of neat amorphous nylon 6 and nanocomposites consisting of amorphous nylon 6 matrix and spherical silica particles are prepared. The molecular unit cells are uniaxially stretched by applying constant strain along the loading directions. Then, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are performed to estimate the thermal conductivities during plastic deformation. The alignment of polymer chains is analyzed by tracing the orientation correlation function of each polymer molecule and the free volume change during the mechanical loading is also analyzed.

  18. Thermo-Mechanical Analyses of Dynamically Loaded Rubber Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Chen, Tzi-Kang

    2002-01-01

    Thick rubber components are employed by the Army to carry large loads. In tanks, rubber covers road wheels and track systems to protect roadways. It is difficult for design engineers to simulate the details of the hysteretic heating for large strain viscoelastic deformations. In this study, an approximation to the viscoelastic energy dissipated per unit time is investigated for use in estimating mechanically induced viscoelastic heating. Coupled thermo-mechanical simulations of large cyclic deformations of rubber cylinders are presented. The cylinders are first compressed axially and then cyclically loaded about the compressed state. Details of the algorithm and some computational issues are discussed. The coupled analyses are conducted for tall and short rubber cylinders both with and without imbedded metal disks.

  19. Simulation of mechanical responses of fingertip to dynamic loading.

    PubMed

    Wu, J Z; Dong, R G; Rakheja, S; Schopper, A W

    2002-05-01

    Extended exposure to mechanical vibration has been related to many vascular, sensorineural and musculoskeletal disorders of the hand-arm system, frequently termed 'hand-arm vibration syndrome' (HAVS). A two-dimensional, nonlinear finite element model of a fingertip is developed to study the stress and strain fields of the soft tissue under dynamic loading, that may be encountered while grasping and operating a hand-held power tool. The model incorporates the most essential anatomical elements of a fingertip, such as soft tissue, bone, and nail. The finger is assumed to be in contact with a steel plate, simulating the interaction between the fingertip and a vibrating machine tool or handle. The soft tissue is assumed to be nonlinearly visco-elastic, while the nail, bone, and steel plate are considered to be linearly elastic. In order to study the time-dependent deformation behavior of the fingertip, the numerical simulations were performed under ramp-like loading with different ramping periods and sinusoidal vibrations of the contacting plate at three different frequencies (1, 10, and 31.5 Hz). Owing to relatively large deformations of the soft tissue under specified static and dynamic loading, Lagrangian large deformation theory was applied in the present analysis. The effects of the loading rate and the frequency of the sinusoidal vibration on the time-dependent strain/stress distributions in the different depth within the soft tissue of the fingertip are investigated numerically. Our simulations suggest that the soft tissue of the fingertip experiences high local stress and strain under dynamic loading and the fingertip may separate from the vibrating contact surface due to the viscous deformation behaviour of the soft tissue. For a given deformation, the high frequency loading produces a higher stress in the tissues compared to that obtained at a low frequency loading. The present model may serve as a useful tool to study the mechanism of tissue degeneration

  20. Load transfer mechanisms in cross-linked DWNT fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filleter, T.; Naraghi, M.; Moravsky, A.; Bernal, R.; Loutfy, R. O.; Espinosa, H. D.

    2011-03-01

    The application of carbon nanotubes (CNT) to macroscopic composite fibers has been limited by weak shear interfaces between adjacent CNT shells and composite matrix elements. A fundamental understanding of load transfer at multiple length-scales is needed to identify how the exceptional mechanical properties of CNTs can be scaled to produce high-performance fibers. Through in-situ electron microscopy tensile testing we have elucidated load transfer mechanisms across multiple scales of cross-linked double-walled nanotube (DWNT) fibers. A low density of polymer cross-links is found to increase the total energy dissipated at failure and ductility of fibers by 5 and 10X, respectively, without reducing strength. This mutiscale approach has identified a need to enhance shear interactions between individual DWNTs within the hierarchical DWNT fiber structures. Through in-situ TEM electron irradiation studies we have shown that load can be effectively transferred to inner DWNTs within bundles by covalently cross-linking the interfaces of adjacent DWNTs and shells. We have observed order of magnitude increases in strength and modulus and identified their dependence on irradiation dose. In future a combined approach of irradiation induced covalent and polymer cross-linking may lead to high-performance DWNT-based fibers and composites with tunable mechanical properties.

  1. Investigation of defect nucleation in titanium under mechanical loading

    SciTech Connect

    Zolnikov, Konstantin P. Kryzhevich, Dmitrij S.; Korchuganov, Aleksandr V.; Psakhie, Sergey G.

    2014-11-14

    The paper undertakes a study of plastic deformation in a titanium crystallite under mechanical loading (uniaxial tension and indentation) in terms of atomic mechanisms of its generation and development. The molecular dynamics method with many-body interatomic potentials is employed. It is shown that there is a threshold strain, at which a crystal reveals the generation of local structural transformations associated with changes in atomic configurations of the first and second coordination spheres. The onset of plastic deformation in a crystallite is accompanied by a stepwise decrease in potential energy. The effect of free surfaces and grain boundaries on the generation of local structural transformations in a titanium crystallite is investigated.

  2. Gene Expression Patterns in Bone Following Mechanical Loading

    PubMed Central

    Mantila Roosa, Sara M; Liu, Yunlong; Turner, Charles H

    2011-01-01

    The advent of high-throughput measurements of gene expression and bioinformatics analysis methods offers new ways to study gene expression patterns. The primary goal of this study was to determine the time sequence for gene expression in a bone subjected to mechanical loading during key periods of the bone-formation process, including expression of matrix-related genes, the appearance of active osteoblasts, and bone desensitization. A standard model for bone loading was employed in which the right forelimb was loaded axially for 3 minutes per day, whereas the left forearm served as a nonloaded contralateral control. We evaluated loading-induced gene expression over a time course of 4 hours to 32 days after the first loading session. Six distinct time-dependent patterns of gene expression were identified over the time course and were categorized into three primary clusters: genes upregulated early in the time course, genes upregulated during matrix formation, and genes downregulated during matrix formation. Genes then were grouped based on function and/or signaling pathways. Many gene groups known to be important in loading-induced bone formation were identified within the clusters, including AP-1-related genes in the early-response cluster, matrix-related genes in the upregulated gene clusters, and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway inhibitors in the downregulated gene clusters. Several novel gene groups were identified as well, including chemokine-related genes, which were upregulated early but downregulated later in the time course; solute carrier genes, which were both upregulated and downregulated; and muscle-related genes, which were primarily downregulated. © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:20658561

  3. Mechanical response of brain tissue under blast loading.

    PubMed

    Laksari, Kaveh; Sadeghipour, Keyanoush; Darvish, Kurosh

    2014-04-01

    In this study, a framework for understanding the propagation of stress waves in brain tissue under blast loading has been developed. It was shown that tissue nonlinearity and rate dependence are the key parameters in predicting the mechanical behavior under such loadings, as they determine whether traveling waves could become steeper and eventually evolve into shock discontinuities. To investigate this phenomenon, in the present study, brain tissue has been characterized as a quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) material and a nonlinear constitutive model has been developed for the tissue that spans from medium loading rates up to blast rates. It was shown that development of shock waves is possible inside the head in response to high rate compressive pressure waves. Finally, it was argued that injury to the nervous tissue at the microstructural level could be partly attributed to the high stress gradients with high rates generated at the shock front and this was proposed as a mechanism of injury in brain tissue. PMID:24457112

  4. Method for loading shape memory polymer gripper mechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Benett, William J.; Schumann, Daniel L.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Fitch, Joseph P.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for loading deposit material, such as an embolic coil, into a shape memory polymer (SMP) gripping/release mechanism. The apparatus enables the application of uniform pressure to secure a grip by the SMP mechanism on the deposit material via differential pressure between, for example, vacuum within the SMP mechanism and hydrostatic water pressure on the exterior of the SMP mechanism. The SMP tubing material of the mechanism is heated to above the glass transformation temperature (Tg) while reshaping, and subsequently cooled to below Tg to freeze the shape. The heating and/or cooling may, for example, be provided by the same water applied for pressurization or the heating can be applied by optical fibers packaged to the SMP mechanism for directing a laser beam, for example, thereunto. At a point of use, the deposit material is released from the SMP mechanism by reheating the SMP material to above the temperature Tg whereby it returns to its initial shape. The reheating of the SMP material may be carried out by injecting heated fluid (water) through an associated catheter or by optical fibers and an associated beam of laser light, for example.

  5. Cellular and molecular mechanisms for the bone response to mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, S. A.

    2001-01-01

    To define the cellular and molecular mechanisms for the osteogenic response of bone to increased loading, several key steps must be defined: sensing of the mechanical signal by cells in bone, transduction of the mechanical signal to a biochemical one, and transmission of that biochemical signal to effector cells. Osteocytes are likely to serve as sensors of loading, probably via interstitial fluid flow produced during loading. Evidence is presented for the role of integrins, the cell's actin cytoskeleton, G proteins, and various intracellular signaling pathways in transducing that mechanical signal to a biochemical one. Nitric oxide, prostaglandins, and insulin-like growth factors all play important roles in these pathways. There is growing evidence for modulation of these mechanotransduction steps by endocrine factors, particularly parathyroid hormone and estrogen. The efficiency of this process is also impaired in the aged animal, yet what remains undefined is at what step mechanotransduction is affected.

  6. Proteoglycan expression is influenced by mechanical load in TMJ discs.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Y; Konno-Nagasaka, M; Toriya, N; Arakawa, T; Kashio, H; Takuma, T; Mizoguchi, I

    2015-01-01

    The expression and assembly of the extracellular matrix are profoundly associated with adaptive and pathological responses of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). To better understand the adaptive responses of the TMJ disc to mechanical loading, we examined the expression of 2 modular proteoglycans and 10 small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) at the mRNA and protein levels and determined the contents of proteoglycan-related glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in rat TMJ discs in response to altered mechanical loading caused by an incisal bite plane. One hundred thirty 7-week-old male Wistar rats were assigned to control and bite plane groups. TMJ disc thickness and the intensity of toluidine blue staining of metachromasia increased in the posterior band after 2 weeks of wearing the bite plane. GAG content increased significantly in the bite plane group after 2 weeks. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) analysis indicated that biglycan and chondroadherin mRNA levels increased after 2 weeks and that the level of decorin mRNA increased at 4 weeks. Versican mRNA levels increased after 3 weeks, particularly for the V0 and V1 versican isoforms, which carry more GAG attachment sites than do the V2 and V3 isoforms. Western analysis demonstrated a corresponding increase in the levels of versican, biglycan, and decorin core proteins at 4 weeks in the bite plane group. These results indicate that mechanical loading differentially influences proteoglycan mRNA expression and protein accumulation in the TMJ disc. The change in proteoglycan mRNA and protein levels may lead to the modulation of matrix-matrix and cell-matrix interactions and has important biological significance for adaptation to complicated biomechanical requirements and for tissue maintenance in the TMJ disc. PMID:25348543

  7. Coupled Thermo-Mechanical Analyses of Dynamically Loaded Rubber Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Chen, Tzi-Kang

    2000-01-01

    A procedure that models coupled thermo-mechanical deformations of viscoelastic rubber cylinders by employing the ABAQUS finite element code is described. Computational simulations of hysteretic heating are presented for several tall and short rubber cylinders both with and without a steel disk at their centers. The cylinders are compressed axially and are then cyclically loaded about the compressed state. The non-uniform hysteretic heating of the rubber cylinders containing a steel disk is presented. The analyses performed suggest that the coupling procedure should be considered for further development as a design tool for rubber degradation studies.

  8. Modulation of mechanical and muscular load by footwear during catering.

    PubMed

    Kersting, U G; Janshen, L; Böhm, H; Morey-Klapsing, G M; Brüggemann, G-P

    2005-03-15

    The BGN (Berufsgenossenschaft Nahrungsmithl und Gaststätten) reports 70% of job induced days off work to be connected with traumas of the ankle joint or overloading of the leg, knee and lower back, with an increased incidence in service areas outdoors (R. Grieshaber, personal communication). Workspace environments usually contain narrow passages, slopes or stairs and sudden changes between different surfaces. The aim of this study was to investigate the biomechanical load on the lower extremity and the low back during catering service when wearing different types of footwear. Thus, the potential for altering mechanical stress experienced during catering by variations in footwear was explored. Sixteen experienced waiters followed a course typical for a combined indoor-outdoor service area. Three different types of footwear were investigated using pressure distribution measurements, rearfoot goniometry and electromyography. A discriminant analysis revealed that the factors subject, shoe and surface affect rear foot movement or pressure distribution in different ways. A MANOVA demonstrated significant differences in loading parameters between footwear types. In general, these differences increased in magnitude in critical situations, such as climbing stairs or crossing slippery surfaces. The results of this study demonstrate that manipulations to footwear offer a great potential for modulating loads experienced during catering. Based on the results, the effects of constructional features are discussed. The method proposed can be applied to evaluate shoe modifications under realistic workplace conditions. PMID:15804847

  9. Continuous damage parameter calculation under thermo-mechanical random loading

    PubMed Central

    Nagode, Marko

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a method on how the mean stress effect on fatigue damage can be taken into account under an arbitrary low cycle thermo-mechanical loading. From known stress, elastoplastic strain and temperature histories the cycle amplitudes and cycle mean values are extracted and the damage parameter is computed. In contrast to the existing methods the proposed method enables continuous damage parameter computation without the need of waiting for the cycles to close. The limitations of the standardized damage parameters are thus surpassed. The damage parameters derived initially for closed and isothermal cycles assuming that the elastoplastic stress–strain response follows the Masing and memory rules can now be used to take the mean stress effect into account under an arbitrary low cycle thermo-mechanical loading. The method includes:•stress and elastoplastic strain history transformation into the corresponding amplitude and mean values;•stress and elastoplastic strain amplitude and mean value transformation into the damage parameter amplitude history;•damage parameter amplitude history transformation into the damage parameter history. PMID:26150939

  10. Damage mechanisms in PBT-GF30 under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Schaaf, A. De Monte, M. Hoffmann, C.; Vormwald, M.; Quaresimin, M.

    2014-05-15

    The scope of this paper is the investigation of damage mechanisms at microscopic scale on a short glass fiber reinforced polybutylene terephthalate (PBT-GF30) under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. In addition the principal mechanisms are verified through micro mechanical FE models. In order to investigate the fatigue behavior of the material both isothermal strain controlled fatigue (ISCF) tests at three different temperatures and thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) tests were conducted on plain and notched specimens, manufactured by injection molding. The goal of the work is to determine the damage mechanisms occurring under TMF conditions and to compare them with the mechanisms occurring under ISCF. For this reason fracture surfaces of TMF and ISCF samples loaded at different temperature levels were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, specimens that failed under TMF were examined on microsections revealing insight into both crack initiation and crack propagation. The findings of this investigation give valuable information about the main damage mechanisms of PBT-GF30 under TMF loading and serve as basis for the development of a TMF life estimation methodology.

  11. Dynamics and mechanics of bed-load tracer particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. B.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the mechanics of bed load at the flood scale is necessary to link hydrology to landscape evolution. Here we report on observations of the transport of coarse sediment tracer particles in a cobble-bedded alluvial river and a step-pool bedrock tributary, at the individual flood and multi-annual timescales. Tracer particle data for each survey are composed of measured displacement lengths for individual particles, and the number of tagged particles mobilized. For single floods we find that measured tracer particle displacement lengths are exponentially distributed; the number of mobile particles increases linearly with peak flood Shields stress, indicating partial bed load transport for all observed floods; and modal displacement distances scale linearly with excess shear velocity. These findings provide quantitative field support for a recently proposed modeling framework based on momentum conservation at the grain scale. Tracer displacement is weakly negatively correlated with particle size at the individual flood scale; however cumulative travel distance begins to show a stronger inverse relation to grain size when measured over many transport events. The observed spatial sorting of tracers approaches that of the river bed, and is consistent with size-selective deposition models and laboratory experiments. Tracer displacement data for the bedrock and alluvial channels collapse onto a single curve - despite more than an order of magnitude difference in channel slope - when variations of critical Shields stress and flow resistance between the two are accounted for. Results show how bed load dynamics may be predicted from a record of river stage, providing a direct link between climate and sediment transport.

  12. Shock Loading of Granular Ni/Al Composites. Part 1. Mechanics of Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Cherukara, Mathew J.; Germann, Timothy C.; Kober, Edward M.; Strachan, Alejandro

    2014-10-16

    We present molecular dynamics simulations of the thermomechanical response under shock loading of a granular material consisting of laminated Ni/Al grains. We observe two regimes: At low piston velocities (up ≲ 1km/s), the shock wave is diffuse, and the width of the shock front decreases with increasing piston velocity. Beyond a critical shock strength, however, the width remains relatively constant at approximately the mean grain radius. This change in behavior follows from an evolution of the mechanism of compaction with increasing insult strength. Furthermore, the mechanism evolves from plastic deformation-mediated pore collapse for relatively weak shocks, to solid extrusion and fluid ejecta filling pores ahead of the shock front at intermediate strengths, and finally to atomic jetting into the pore for very strong shocks (up ≳ 2 km/s). High-energy fluid ejecta into pores leads to the formation of flow vorticity and can result in a large fraction of the input energy localizing into translational kinetic energy components including the formation of hot spots. This has implications for the mechanical mixing of Ni and Al in these reactive composites.

  13. Shock Loading of Granular Ni/Al Composites. Part 1. Mechanics of Loading

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cherukara, Mathew J.; Germann, Timothy C.; Kober, Edward M.; Strachan, Alejandro

    2014-10-16

    We present molecular dynamics simulations of the thermomechanical response under shock loading of a granular material consisting of laminated Ni/Al grains. We observe two regimes: At low piston velocities (up ≲ 1km/s), the shock wave is diffuse, and the width of the shock front decreases with increasing piston velocity. Beyond a critical shock strength, however, the width remains relatively constant at approximately the mean grain radius. This change in behavior follows from an evolution of the mechanism of compaction with increasing insult strength. Furthermore, the mechanism evolves from plastic deformation-mediated pore collapse for relatively weak shocks, to solid extrusion andmore » fluid ejecta filling pores ahead of the shock front at intermediate strengths, and finally to atomic jetting into the pore for very strong shocks (up ≳ 2 km/s). High-energy fluid ejecta into pores leads to the formation of flow vorticity and can result in a large fraction of the input energy localizing into translational kinetic energy components including the formation of hot spots. This has implications for the mechanical mixing of Ni and Al in these reactive composites.« less

  14. Earthquake nucleation mechanisms and periodic loading: Models, Experiments, and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, K.; Brinkman, B.; Tsekenis, G.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Uhl, J.

    2010-12-01

    The project has two main goals: (a) Improve the understanding of how earthquakes are nucleated ¬ with specific focus on seismic response to periodic stresses (such as tidal or seasonal variations) (b) Use the results of (a) to infer on the possible existence of precursory activity before large earthquakes. A number of mechanisms have been proposed for the nucleation of earthquakes, including frictional nucleation (Dieterich 1987) and fracture (Lockner 1999, Beeler 2003). We study the relation between the observed rates of triggered seismicity, the period and amplitude of cyclic loadings and whether the observed seismic activity in response to periodic stresses can be used to identify the correct nucleation mechanism (or combination of mechanisms). A generalized version of the Ben-Zion and Rice model for disordered fault zones and results from related recent studies on dislocation dynamics and magnetization avalanches in slowly magnetized materials are used in the analysis (Ben-Zion et al. 2010; Dahmen et al. 2009). The analysis makes predictions for the statistics of macroscopic failure events of sheared materials in the presence of added cyclic loading, as a function of the period, amplitude, and noise in the system. The employed tools include analytical methods from statistical physics, the theory of phase transitions, and numerical simulations. The results will be compared to laboratory experiments and observations. References: Beeler, N.M., D.A. Lockner (2003). Why earthquakes correlate weakly with the solid Earth tides: effects of periodic stress on the rate and probability of earthquake occurrence. J. Geophys. Res.-Solid Earth 108, 2391-2407. Ben-Zion, Y. (2008). Collective Behavior of Earthquakes and Faults: Continuum-Discrete Transitions, Evolutionary Changes and Corresponding Dynamic Regimes, Rev. Geophysics, 46, RG4006, doi:10.1029/2008RG000260. Ben-Zion, Y., Dahmen, K. A. and J. T. Uhl (2010). A unifying phase diagram for the dynamics of sheared solids

  15. Creatine Loading, Resistance Exercise Performance, and Muscle Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Scott W.; Dudley, Gary A.

    2001-01-01

    Examined whether creatine (CR) monohydrate loading would alter resistance exercise performance, isometric strength, or in vivo contractile properties of the quadriceps femoris muscle compared with placebo loading in resistance-trained athletes. Overall, CR loading did not provide an ergogenic benefit for the unilateral dynamic knee extension…

  16. Effects of Zoledronate and Mechanical Loading during Simulated Weightlessness on Bone Structure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. T.; Nalavadi, M. O.; Shirazi-Fard, Y.; Castillo, A. B.; Alwood, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    Space flight modulates bone remodeling to favor bone resorption. Current countermeasures include an anti-resorptive drug class, bisphosphonates (BP), and high-force loading regimens. Does the combination of anti-resorptives and high-force exercise during weightlessness have negative effects on the mechanical and structural properties of bone? In this study, we implemented an integrated model to mimic mechanical strain of exercise via cyclical loading (CL) in mice treated with the BP Zoledronate (ZOL) combined with hindlimb unloading (HU). Our working hypothesis is that CL combined with ZOL in the HU model induces additive structural and mechanical changes. Thirty-two C57BL6 mice (male,16 weeks old, n8group) were exposed to 3 weeks of either HU or normal ambulation (NA). Cohorts of mice received one subcutaneous injection of ZOL (45gkg), or saline vehicle, prior to experiment. The right tibia was axially loaded in vivo, 60xday to 9N in compression, repeated 3xweek during HU. During the application of compression, secant stiffness (SEC), a linear estimate of slope of the force displacement curve from rest (0.5N) to max load (9.0N), was calculated for each cycle once per week. Ex vivo CT was conducted on all subjects. For ex vivo mechanical properties, non-CL left femurs underwent 3-point bending. In the proximal tibial metaphysis, HU decreased, CL increased, and ZOL increased the cancellous bone volume to total volume ratio by -26, +21, and +33, respectively. Similar trends held for trabecular thickness and number. Ex vivo left femur mechanical properties revealed HU decreased stiffness (-37),and ZOL mitigated the HU stiffness losses (+78). Data on the ex vivo Ultimate Force followed similar trends. After 3 weeks, HU decreased in vivo SEC (-16). The combination of CL+HU appeared additive in bone structure and mechanical properties. However, when HU + CL + ZOL were combined, ZOL had no additional effect (p0.05) on in vivo SEC. Structural data followed this trend with

  17. The mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE loaded ALN after mechanical activation for joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Gong, Kemeng; Qu, Shuxin; Liu, Yumei; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Yongchao; Jiang, Chongxi; Shen, Ru

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) loaded with alendronate sodium (ALN) has tremendous potential as an orthopeadic biomaterial for joint replacements. However, poor mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE-ALN are still obstacle for further application. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of mechanical activation on mechanical and tribological properties of 1wt% ALN-loaded UHMWPE (UHMWPE-ALN-ma). In this study, tensile test, small punch test and reciprocating sliding wear test were applied to characterize the mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE-ALN-ma. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were employed to characterize UHMWPE-ALN-ma. Tensile test and small punch test showed that Young׳s modulus, tensile strength and work-to-failure (WTF) of UHMWPE-ALN-ma increased significantly compared to those of UHMWPE-ALN. The friction coefficients and wear factors of UHMWPE-ALN-ma both decreased significantly compared to those of UHMWPE-ALN. Mechanical activation obviously reduced type 1 (void) and type 2 (the disconnected and dislocated machining marks) fusion defects of UHMWPE-ALN-ma, which were revealed by SEM images of freeze fracture surfaces after etching and lateral surfaces of specimens after extension to fracture, respectively. It was attributed to peeled-off layers and chain scission of molecular chains of UHMWPE particles after mechanical activation, which were revealed by SEM images and FTIR spectra of UHMWPE-ALN-ma and UHMWPE-ALN, respectively. Moreover, EDS spectra revealed the more homogeneous distribution of ALN in UHMWPE-ALN-ma compared to that of UHMWPE-ALN. The present results showed that mechanical activation was a potential strategy to improve mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE-ALN-ma as an orthopeadic biomaterial for joint replacements. PMID:27104932

  18. Mechanisms underlying ICU muscle wasting and effects of passive mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Critically ill ICU patients commonly develop severe muscle wasting and impaired muscle function, leading to delayed recovery, with subsequent increased morbidity and financial costs, and decreased quality of life for survivors. Critical illness myopathy (CIM) is a frequently observed neuromuscular disorder in ICU patients. Sepsis, systemic corticosteroid hormone treatment and post-synaptic neuromuscular blockade have been forwarded as the dominating triggering factors. Recent experimental results from our group using a unique experimental rat ICU model show that the mechanical silencing associated with CIM is the primary triggering factor. This study aims to unravel the mechanisms underlying CIM, and to evaluate the effects of a specific intervention aiming at reducing mechanical silencing in sedated and mechanically ventilated ICU patients. Methods Muscle gene/protein expression, post-translational modifications (PTMs), muscle membrane excitability, muscle mass measurements, and contractile properties at the single muscle fiber level were explored in seven deeply sedated and mechanically ventilated ICU patients (not exposed to systemic corticosteroid hormone treatment, post-synaptic neuromuscular blockade or sepsis) subjected to unilateral passive mechanical loading for 10 hours per day (2.5 hours, four times) for 9 ± 1 days. Results These patients developed a phenotype considered pathognomonic of CIM; that is, severe muscle wasting and a preferential myosin loss (P < 0.001). In addition, myosin PTMs specific to the ICU condition were observed in parallel with an increased sarcolemmal expression and cytoplasmic translocation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Passive mechanical loading for 9 ± 1 days resulted in a 35% higher specific force (P < 0.001) compared with the unloaded leg, although it was not sufficient to prevent the loss of muscle mass. Conclusion Mechanical silencing is suggested to be a primary mechanism underlying CIM; that is

  19. Mechanism of DNA loading by the DNA repair helicase XPD.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu-Aruxandei, Diana; Petrovic-Stojanovska, Biljana; Penedo, J Carlos; White, Malcolm F; Naismith, James H

    2016-04-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) helicase is a component of the transcription factor IIH complex in eukaryotes and plays an essential role in DNA repair in the nucleotide excision repair pathway. XPD is a 5' to 3' helicase with an essential iron-sulfur cluster. Structural and biochemical studies of the monomeric archaeal XPD homologues have aided a mechanistic understanding of this important class of helicase, but several important questions remain open. In particular, the mechanism for DNA loading, which is assumed to require large protein conformational change, is not fully understood. Here, DNA binding by the archaeal XPD helicase fromThermoplasma acidophilumhas been investigated using a combination of crystallography, cross-linking, modified substrates and biochemical assays. The data are consistent with an initial tight binding of ssDNA to helicase domain 2, followed by transient opening of the interface between the Arch and 4FeS domains, allowing access to a second binding site on helicase domain 1 that directs DNA through the pore. A crystal structure of XPD fromSulfolobus acidocaldiariusthat lacks helicase domain 2 has an otherwise unperturbed structure, emphasizing the stability of the interface between the Arch and 4FeS domains in XPD. PMID:26896802

  20. Structural concerns in dynamic drop loads on transfer lock mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Moran, T.J.; Kulak, R.F.

    1997-07-01

    Drop loads are usually low probability events that can generate substantial loading to the impacted structures. When the impacted structure contains slender elements, the concern about dynamic buckling must be addressed. The problem of interest here is a structure is also under significant preload, which must be taken into account in the transient analysis. For complex structures, numerical simulations are the only viable option for assessing the transient response to short duration impactive loads. this paper addresses several analysis issues of preloaded structures with slender members subjected to drop loads. A three-dimensional beam element is validated for use in dynamic buckling analysis. the numerical algorithm used to solve the transient response of preloaded structures is discussed. The methodology is applied to an inter-compartment lock that is under significant preloads, and subjected to a drop load.

  1. Interfibrillar shear stress is the loading mechanism of collagen fibrils in tendon

    PubMed Central

    Szczesny, Spencer E.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the critical role tendons play in transmitting loads throughout the musculoskeletal system, little is known about the microstructural mechanisms underlying their mechanical function. Of particular interest is whether collagen fibrils in tendon fascicles bear load independently or if load is transferred between fibrils through interfibrillar shear forces. We conducted multiscale experimental testing and developed a microstructural shear lag model to explicitly test whether interfibrillar shear load transfer is indeed the fibrillar loading mechanism in tendon. Experimental correlations between fascicle macroscale mechanics and microscale interfibrillar sliding suggest that fibrils are discontinuous and share load. Moreover, for the first time, we demonstrate that a shear lag model can replicate the fascicle macroscale mechanics as well as predict the microscale fibrillar deformations. Since interfibrillar shear stress is the fundamental loading mechanism assumed in the model, this result provides strong evidence that load is transferred between fibrils in tendon and possibly other aligned collagenous tissues. Conclusively establishing this fibrillar loading mechanism and identifying the involved structural components should help develop repair strategies for tissue degeneration and guide the design of tissue engineered replacements. PMID:24530560

  2. A unified creep-plasticity model suitable for thermo-mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavik, D.; Sehitoglu, H.

    1988-01-01

    An experimentally based unified creep-plasticity constitutive model was implemented for 1070 steel. Accurate rate and temperature effects were obtained for isothermal and thermo-mechanical loading by incorporating deformation mechanisms into the constitutive equations in a simple way.

  3. Tissue transglutaminase is involved in mechanical load-induced osteogenic differentiation of human ligamentum flavum cells.

    PubMed

    Chao, Yuan-Hung; Huang, Shih-Yung; Yang, Ruei-Cheng; Sun, Jui-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical load-induced osteogenic differentiation might be the key cellular event in the calcification and ossification of ligamentum flavum. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of tissue transglutaminase (TGM2) on mechanical load-induced osteogenesis of ligamentum flavum cells. Human ligamentum flavum cells were obtained from 12 patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. Osteogenic phenotypes of ligamentum flavum cells, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Alizarin red-S stain, and gene expression of osteogenic makers were evaluated following the administration of mechanical load and BMP-2 treatment. The expression of TGM2 was evaluated by real-time PCR, Western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis. Our results showed that mechanical load in combination with BMP-2 enhanced calcium deposition and ALP activity. Mechanical load significantly increased ALP and OC gene expression on day 3, whereas BMP-2 significantly increased ALP, OPN, and Runx2 on day 7. Mechanical load significantly induced TGM2 gene expression and enzyme activity in human ligamentum flavum cells. Exogenous TGM2 increased ALP and OC gene expression; while, inhibited TG activity significantly attenuated mechanical load-induced and TGM2-induced ALP activity. In summary, mechanical load-induced TGM2 expression and enzyme activity is involved in the progression of the calcification of ligamentum flavum. PMID:27115725

  4. A procedure for combining acoustically induced and mechanically induced loads (first passage failure design criterion)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, D. R.; Henricks, W.

    1983-01-01

    The combined load statistics are developed by taking the acoustically induced load to be a random population, assumed to be stationary. Each element of this ensemble of acoustically induced loads is assumed to have the same power spectral density (PSD), obtained previously from a random response analysis employing the given acoustic field in the STS cargo bay as a stationary random excitation. The mechanically induced load is treated as either (1) a known deterministic transient, or (2) a nonstationary random variable of known first and second statistical moments which vary with time. A method is then shown for determining the probability that the combined load would, at any time, have a value equal to or less than a certain level. Having obtained a statistical representation of how the acoustic and mechanical loads are expected to combine, an analytical approximation for defining design levels for these loads is presented using the First Passage failure criterion.

  5. The interface of mechanical loading and biological variables as they pertain to the development of tendinosis.

    PubMed

    Thornton, G M; Hart, D A

    2011-06-01

    Different tendons are designed to withstand different mechanical loads in their individual environments. Variable physiologic loading ranges and correspondingly different injury thresholds lead to tendon heterogeneity. Also, tendon heterogeneity is evident when examining how different tendons regulate their response to changes in mechanical loading (over- and under-loading). The response of tendons to changes in mechanical loading plays an important role in the induction and progression of tendinosis which is tendon degeneration without inflammation. Tendon overuse injury is likely related to abnormal mechanical loading that deviates from normal mechanical loading in magnitude, frequency, duration and/or direction. Mechanical loading that results in tendon overuse injury can initiate a repair process but, after failed initial repair, non-resolving chronic attempted repair appears to lead to a "smoldering" fibrogenesis. Contributions of regulatory components, including minor components in the "nerve-mast cell-myofibroblast axis", are key features in the development and progression of tendinosis. Hormonal and genetic factors may also influence risk for tendinosis. Further understanding of how tendinosis induction is related to mechanical use/overuse, how tendinosis progression is related to abnormal regulation of attempted repair, and how induction and/or progression are modulated by other risk factors may lead to interventions that mitigate risk and enhance functional repair. PMID:21625046

  6. Mechanical load induces sarcoplasmic wounding and FGF release in differentiated human skeletal muscle cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, M. S.; Feeback, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    The transduction mechanism (or mechanisms) responsible for converting a mechanical load into a skeletal muscle growth response are unclear. In this study we have used a mechanically active tissue culture model of differentiated human skeletal muscle cells to investigate the relationship between mechanical load, sarcolemma wounding, fibroblast growth factor release, and skeletal muscle cell growth. Using the Flexcell Strain Unit we demonstrate that as mechanical load increases, so too does the amount of sarcolemma wounding. A similar relationship was also observed between the level of mechanical load inflicted on the cells and the amount of bFGF (FGF2) released into the surrounding medium. In addition, we demonstrate that the muscle cell growth response induced by chronic mechanical loading in culture can be inhibited by the presence of an antibody capable of neutralizing the biological activity of FGF. This study provides direct evidence that mechanically induced, sarcolemma wound-mediated FGF release is an important autocrine mechanism for transducing the stimulus of mechanical load into a skeletal muscle growth response.

  7. Structural Stability of a Stiffened Aluminum Fuselage Panel Subjected to Combined Mechanical and Internal Pressure Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, Marshall; Young, Richard D.; Gehrki, Ralph R.

    2003-01-01

    Results from an experimental and analytical study of a curved stiffened aluminum panel subjected to combined mechanical and internal pressure loads are presented. The panel loading conditions were simulated using a D-box test fixture. Analytical buckling load results calculated from a finite element analysis are presented and compared to experimental results. Buckling results presented indicate that the buckling load of the fuselage panel is significantly influenced by internal pressure loading. The experimental results suggest that the stress distribution is uniform in the panel prior to buckling. Nonlinear finite element analysis results correlates well with experimental results up to buckling.

  8. Mechanical behavior of a continuous fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composite subjected to transverse and thermal loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.; Leckie, F. A.

    1991-01-01

    The transverse properties of an aluminum alloy metal matrix composite reinforced by continuous alumina fibers were investigated. The composite is subjected to both mechanical and cyclic thermal loading. The results of an experimental program indicate that the shakedown concept of structural mechanics provides a means of describing the material behavior. When the loading conditions are within the shakedown region, the material finally responds in an elastic manner after initial plastic response, and for loading conditions outside the shakedown region, the material exhibits a rapid incremental plastic strain accumulation. The failure strain varies by an order of magnitude according to the operating conditions. Hence, for high mechanical and low thermal loading, the failure strains is small; for low mechanical and high thermal loading, the failure strain is large.

  9. Structural Mechanisms of Hexameric Helicase Loading, Assembly, and Unwinding

    PubMed Central

    Trakselis, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Hexameric helicases control both the initiation and the elongation phase of DNA replication. The toroidal structure of these enzymes provides an inherent challenge in the opening and loading onto DNA at origins, as well as the conformational changes required to exclude one strand from the central channel and activate DNA unwinding. Recently, high-resolution structures have not only revealed the architecture of various hexameric helicases but also detailed the interactions of DNA within the central channel, as well as conformational changes that occur during loading. This structural information coupled with advanced biochemical reconstitutions and biophysical methods have transformed our understanding of the dynamics of both the helicase structure and the DNA interactions required for efficient unwinding at the replisome. PMID:26918187

  10. Thick-walled composite tubes under mechanical and hygrothermal loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuetrich, C.

    1992-11-01

    The stresses in long thick-walled composite tubes were determined analytically for loading by internal and external pressure, longitudinal forces and twisting moments. Effects of thermal and hygrothermal expansion were also treated. The solution is restricted to tubes built up from one or more layers with macroscopically orthotropic properties. Such layers may be produced, for example, by filament winding or winding of textile reinforcements. It was shown how the elastic and hygrothermal parameters of the macroscopically orthotropic materials may be calculated by homogenization of the properties of uniaxially reinforced materials.

  11. Loading configurations and driving mechanisms for joints based on the Griffith energy-balance concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelder, Terry; Fischer, Mark P.

    1996-05-01

    Using the Griffith energy-balance concept to model joint propagation in the brittle crust, two laboratory loading configurations serve as appropriate analogs for in situ conditions: the dead-weight load and the fixed-grips load. The distinction between these loading configurations is based largely on whether or not a loaded boundary moves as a joint grows. During displacement of a loaded boundary, the energy necessary for joint propagation comes from work by the dead weight (i.e., a remote stress). When the loaded boundary remains stationary, as if held by rigid grips, the energy for joint propagation develops upon release of elastic strain energy within the rock mass. These two generic loading configurations serve as models for four common natural loading configurations: a joint-normal load; a thermoelastic load; a fluid load; and an axial load. Each loading configuration triggers a different joint-driving mechanism, each of which is the release of energy through elastic strain and/or work. The four mechanisms for energy release are joint-normal stretching, elastic contraction, poroelastic contraction under either a constant fluid drive or fluid decompression, and axial shortening, respectively. Geological circumstances favoring each of the joint-driving mechanisms are as follows. The release of work under joint-normal stretching occurs whenever layer-parallel extension keeps pace with slow or subcritical joint propagation. Under fixed grips, a substantial crack-normal tensile stress can accumulate by thermoelastic contraction until joint propagation is driven by the release of elastic strain energy. Within the Earth the rate of joint propagation dictates which of these two driving mechanisms operates, with faster propagation driven by release of strain energy. Like a dead-weight load acting to separate the joint walls, pore fluid exerts a traction on the interior of some joints. Joint propagation under fluid loading may be driven by a release of elastic strain

  12. Load speed regulation in compliant mechanical transmission systems using feedback and feedforward control actions.

    PubMed

    Raul, P R; Dwivedula, R V; Pagilla, P R

    2016-07-01

    The problem of controlling the load speed of a mechanical transmission system consisting of a belt-pulley and gear-pair is considered. The system is modeled as two inertia (motor and load) connected by a compliant transmission. If the transmission is assumed to be rigid, then using either the motor or load speed feedback provides the same result. However, with transmission compliance, due to belts or long shafts, the stability characteristics and performance of the closed-loop system are quite different when either motor or load speed feedback is employed. We investigate motor and load speed feedback schemes by utilizing the singular perturbation method. We propose and discuss a control scheme that utilizes both motor and load speed feedback, and design an adaptive feedforward action to reject load torque disturbances. The control algorithms are implemented on an experimental platform that is typically used in roll-to-roll manufacturing and results are shown and discussed. PMID:27126600

  13. Analyzing the effects of mechanical and osmotic loading on glycosaminoglycan synthesis rate in cartilaginous tissues.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Zhu, Qiaoqiao; Gu, Weiyong

    2015-02-26

    The glycosaminoglycan (GAG) plays an important role in cartilaginous tissues to support and transmit mechanical loads. Many extracellular biophysical stimuli could affect GAG synthesis by cells. It has been hypothesized that the change of cell volume is a primary mechanism for cells to perceive the stimuli. Experimental studies have shown that the maximum synthesis rate of GAG is achieved at an optimal cell volume, larger or smaller than this level the GAG synthesis rate decreases. Based on the hypothesis and experimental findings in the literature, we proposed a mathematical model to quantitatively describe the cell volume dependent GAG synthesis rate in the cartilaginous tissues. Using this model, we investigated the effects of osmotic loading and mechanical loading on GAG synthesis rate. It is found our proposed mathematical model is able to well describe the change of GAG synthesis rate in isolated cells or in cartilage with variations of the osmotic loading or mechanical loading. This model is important for evaluating the GAG synthesis activity within cartilaginous tissues as well as understanding the role of mechanical loading in tissue growth or degeneration. It is also important for designing a bioreactor system with proper extracellular environment or mechanical loading for growing tissue at the maximum synthesis rate of the extracellular matrix. PMID:25638034

  14. Reliability of piezoceramic patch sensors under cyclic mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thielicke, Bärbel; Gesang, Thomas; Wierach, Peter

    2003-12-01

    Piezoceramic patch sensors have to withstand the primary stresses and strains of a structure during operation. In the leading project 'Adaptronics' a lifespan of 106 cycles at 0.1% strain was required for sensors applied on components of steel and carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP). In order to test the reliability of the patches themselves and of their adhesion on the substrate, special four-point bending tests were carried out under quasistatic loading and under cyclic loading at different strain levels. The specimens consisted in sheets of steel and CFRP as substrates on which the newly developed patches with embedded piezoelectric foils and fibres were glued. In the quasistatic bending tests the performance of each sensor was characterized by measuring the sensor signal (charge) as a function of strain before and after cycling. Damage of the specimens would result in a decreasing slope of the charge-strain-curve after cycling. However, all the specimens tested survived 107 cycles up to 0.12% strain without marked loss of performance.

  15. Mechanical Model for Dynamic Behavior of Concrete Under Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuanxiang

    Concrete is a geo-material which is used substantively in the civil building and military safeguard. One coupled model of damage and plasticity to describe the complex behavior of concrete subjected to impact loading is proposed in this research work. The concrete is assumed as homogeneous continuum with pre-existing micro-cracks and micro-voids. Damage to concrete is caused due to micro-crack nucleation, growth and coalescence, and defined as the probability of fracture at a given crack density. It induces a decrease of strength and stiffness of concrete. Compaction of concrete is physically a collapse of the material voids. It produces the plastic strain in the concrete and, at the same time, an increase of the bulk modulus. In terms of crack growth model, micro-cracks are activated, and begin to propagate gradually. When crack density reaches a critical value, concrete takes place the smashing destroy. The model parameters for mortar are determined using plate impact experiment with uni-axial strain state. Comparison with the test results shows that the proposed model can give consistent prediction of the impact behavior of concrete. The proposed model may be used to design and analysis of concrete structures under impact and shock loading. This work is supported by State Key Laboratory of Explosion science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology (YBKT14-02).

  16. The Effects of Load Carriage and Muscle Fatigue on Lower-Extremity Joint Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, He; Frame, Jeff; Ozimek, Elicia; Leib, Daniel; Dugan, Eric L.

    2013-01-01

    Military personnel are commonly afflicted by lower-extremity overuse injuries. Load carriage and muscular fatigue are major stressors during military basic training. Purpose: To examine effects of load carriage and muscular fatigue on lower-extremity joint mechanics during walking. Method: Eighteen men performed the following tasks: unloaded…

  17. Mechanical response of unidirectional boron/aluminum under combined loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Wolfgang; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1987-01-01

    Three test methods were employed to characterize the response of unidirectional Boron/Aluminum metal matrix composite material under monotonic and cyclic loading conditions, namely, losipescu shear, off-axis tension and compression. The characterization of the elastic and plastic response includes the elastic material properties, yielding and subsequent hardening of the unidirectional composite under different stress ratios in the material principal coordinate system. Yield loci generated for different stress ratios are compared for the three different test methods, taking into account residual stresses and specimen geometry. Subsequently, the yield locus for in-plane shear is compared with the prediction of an analytical, micromechanical model. The influence of the scatter in the experimental data on the predicted yield surface is also analyzed. Lastly, the experimental material strengths in tension and compression are correlated with the maximum stress and the Tsai-Wu failure criterion.

  18. Skeletal adaptation to external loads optimizes mechanical properties: fact or fiction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. T.

    2001-01-01

    The skeleton adapts to a changing mechanical environment but the widely held concept that bone cells are programmed to respond to local mechanical loads to produce an optimal mechanical structure is not consistent with the high frequency of bone fractures. Instead, the author suggests that other important functions of bone compete with mechanical adaptation to determine structure. As a consequence of competing demands, bone architecture never achieves an optimal mechanical structure. c2001 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  19. Mechanics of cranial sutures during simulated cyclic loading.

    PubMed

    Jasinoski, S C; Reddy, B D

    2012-07-26

    Previous computational and experimental analyses revealed that cranial sutures, fibrous joints between the bones, can reduce the strain experienced by the surrounding skull bones during mastication. This damping effect reflects the importance of including sutures in finite element (FE) analyses of the skull. Using the FE method, the behaviour of three suture morphologies of increasing complexity (butt-ended, moderate interdigitated, and complex interdigitated) during static loading was recently investigated, and the sutures were assumed to have linear elastic properties. In the current study, viscoelastic properties, derived from published experimental results of the nasofrontal suture of young pigs (Sus scrofa), are applied to the three idealised bone-suture models. The effects of suture viscoelasticity on the stress, strain, and strain energy in the models were computed for three different frequencies (corresponding to periods of 1, 10, and 100s) and compared to the results of a static, linear elastic analysis. The range of applied frequencies broadly represents different physiological activities, with the highest frequency simulating mastication and the lowest frequency simulating growth and pressure of the surrounding tissues. Comparing across all three suture morphologies, strain energy and strain in the suture decreased with the increase in suture complexity. For each suture model, the magnitude of strain decreased with an increase in frequency, and the magnitudes were similar for both the elastic and 1s frequency analyses. In addition, a viscous response is less apparent in the higher frequency analyses, indicating that viscous properties are less important to the behaviour of the suture during those analyses. The FE results suggest that implementation of viscoelastic properties may not be necessary for computational studies of skull behaviour during masticatory loading but instead might be more relevant for studies examining lower frequency physiological

  20. Experimental investigation on mechanical damage characteristics of sandstone under triaxial cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Qi; Ranjith, P. G.; Huang, Yan-Hua; Yin, Peng-Fei; Jing, Hong-Wen; Gui, Yi-Lin; Yu, Qing-Lei

    2015-05-01

    The mechanical damage characteristics of sandstone subjected to cyclic loading is very significant to evaluate the stability and safety of deep excavation damage zones. However to date, there are very few triaxial experimental studies of sandstone under cyclic loading. Moreover, few X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) observations have been adopted to reveal the damage mechanism of sandstone under triaxial cyclic loading. Therefore, in this research, a series of triaxial cyclic loading tests and X-ray micro-CT observations were conducted to analyse the mechanical damage characteristics of sandstone with respect to different confining pressures. The results indicated that at lower confining pressures, the triaxial strength of sandstone specimens under cyclic loading is higher than that under monotonic loading; whereas at confining pressures above 20 MPa, the triaxial strength of sandstone under cyclic loading is approximately equal to that under monotonic loading. With the increase of cycle number, the crack damage threshold of sandstone first increases, and then significantly decreases and finally remains constant. Based on the damage evolution of irreversible deformation, it appears that the axial damage value of sandstone is all higher than the radial damage value before the peak strength; whereas the radial damage value is higher than the axial damage value after the peak strength. The evolution of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of sandstone can be characterized as having four stages: (i) Stage I: material strengthening; (ii) Stage II: material degradation; (iii) Stage III: material failure and (iv) Stage IV: structure slippage. X-ray micro-CT observations demonstrated that the CT scanning surface images of sandstone specimens are consistent with actual surface crack photographs. The analysis of the cross-sections of sandstone supports that the system of crack planes under triaxial cyclic loading is much more complicated than that under triaxial

  1. Mechanical Properties of a Metal Powder-Loaded Polyurethane Foam

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Neuschwanger; L. L. Whinnery; S. H. Goods

    1999-04-01

    Quasi-static compression tests have been performed on polyurethane foam specimens. The modulus of the foam exhibited a power-law dependence with respect to density of the form: E* {proportional_to} {rho}*{sup n}, where n = 1.7. The modulus data is well described by a simple geometric model (attributed to the work of Gibson and Ashby) for closed-cell foam in which the stiffness of the foam is governed by the flexure of the cell struts and cell walls. The compressive strength of the foam is also found to follow a power-law behavior with respect to foam density. In this instance, Euler buckling is used to rationalize the density dependence. The modulus of the polyurethane foam was modified by addition of a gas atomized, spherical aluminum powder. Additions of 30 and 50 weight percent of the powder significantly increased the foam modulus. However, there were only slight increases in modulus with 5 and 10 weight percent additions of the metal powder. Strength was also slightly increased at high loading fractions of powder. This increase in modulus and strength could be predicted by combining the above geometric model with a well-known model describing the effect on modulus of a rigid dispersoid in a compliant matrix.

  2. Macrocrack propagation in concrete specimens under sustained loading: Study of the physical mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Pierre Boulay, Claude; Tailhan, Jean-Louis; Martin, Eric; Desnoyers, Dominic

    2014-09-15

    This study presents a series of 4-point bending tests performed to describe the delayed behavior of unreinforced pre-cracked beams under low, moderate and high sustained loading levels. The deflection creep rate, the failure time and the load level were assessed. A linear relation, in a semi-log scale, was found for the deflection creep rate at high load levels. In addition, a linear relation, in a log–log scale, between the secondary deflection creep rate and failure time was observed. Besides, it was shown that the secondary creep deflection rate increases with the sustained loading level and the macrocrack propagation rate when macrocrack propagation occurs during the sustained loading. Physical mechanisms are proposed to explain these results and may be summarized as follows: the delayed behavior of an unreinforced cracked concrete specimen under sustained loading is mainly due to the cracking evolution, thus the creation of microcracks and/or the propagation of a macrocrack.

  3. The mouse fibula as a suitable bone for the study of functional adaptation to mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Alaa; Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Saxon, Leanne K.; Zaman, Gul; Sunters, Andrew; Armstrong, Victoria J.; Javaheri, Behzad; Lanyon, Lance E.; Price, Joanna S.

    2009-01-01

    Bones' functionally adaptive responses to mechanical loading can usefully be studied in the tibia by the application of loads between the knee and ankle in normal and genetically modified mice. Such loading also deforms the fibula. Our present study was designed to ascertain whether the fibula adapts to loading in a similar way to the tibia and could thus provide an additional bone in which to study functional adaptation. The right tibiae/fibulae in C57BL/6 mice were subjected to a single period of axial loading (40 cycles at 10 Hz with 10-second intervals between each cycle; approximately 7 min/day, 3 alternate days/week, 2 weeks). The left tibiae/fibulae were used as non-loaded, internal controls. Both left and right fibulae and tibiae were analyzed by micro-computed tomography at the levels of the mid-shaft of the fibula and 25% from its proximal and distal ends. We also investigated the effects of intermittent parathyroid hormone (iPTH) on the (re)modelling response to 2-weeks of loading and the effect of 2-consecutive days of loading on osteocytes' sclerostin expression. These in vivo experiments confirmed that the fibula showed similar loading-related (re)modelling responses to those previously documented in the tibia and similar synergistic increases in osteogenesis between loading and iPTH. The numbers of sclerostin-positive osteocytes at the proximal and middle fibulae were markedly decreased by loading. Collectively, these data suggest that the mouse fibula, as well as the tibia and ulna, is a useful bone in which to assess bone cells' early responses to mechanical loading and the adaptive (re)modelling that this engenders. PMID:19442626

  4. Mechanical properties of stanene under uniaxial and biaxial loading: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Mojumder, Satyajit; Amin, Abdullah Al; Islam, Md Mahbubul

    2015-09-28

    Stanene, a graphene like two dimensional honeycomb structure of tin has attractive features in electronics application. In this study, we performed molecular dynamics simulations using modified embedded atom method potential to investigate mechanical properties of stanene. We studied the effect of temperature and strain rate on mechanical properties of α-stanene for both uniaxial and biaxial loading conditions. Our study suggests that with the increasing temperature, both the fracture strength and strain of the stanene decrease. Uniaxial loading in zigzag direction shows higher fracture strength and strain compared to the armchair direction, while no noticeable variation in the mechanical properties is observed for biaxial loading. We also found at a higher loading rate, material exhibits higher fracture strength and strain. These results will aid further investigation of stanene as a potential nano-electronics substitute.

  5. Mechanical and transport properties of IBAD/EDDC-SmBCO coated conductor tapes during fatigue loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyung-Seop; Dedicatoria, Marlon J.

    2011-06-01

    In electrical devices like superconducting motor, generator and SMES, HTS coated conductor (CC) tapes will be subjected to alternating stress or strain during manufacturing and operation. The repeated loading will affect the mechanical integrity and eventually the electrical transport property of CC tapes. Therefore in such applications, electro-mechanical property of CC tapes should be evaluated. In this study, the endurance of an IBAD/EDDC-SmBCO CC tape under high-cycle fatigue loading has been evaluated. Applied maximum stress and fatigue life ( S-N) relation was obtained at 77 K. The mechanical properties and the critical current, I c, of the sample under fatigue loading were investigated at 77 K. Considering the practical operating environment, the effect of the stress ratio R, on the degradation behavior of I c under fatigue loading was also examined.

  6. Mechanical behavior of adhesive joints subjected to cyclic thermal loading

    SciTech Connect

    Humfeld, G.R.; Dillard, D.A.

    1996-12-31

    Stresses induced in bimaterial systems due to changing temperature has been the subject of much study since the publication of Timoshenko`s classic paper of 1925. An adhesive bond is one example of a bimaterial system in which thermal stress can play an important role. However, adhesives are viscoelastic in nature, and their mechanical behavior is dictated by the temperature- and time-dependence of their material properties; analytical solutions for elastic materials do not adequately describe their true behavior. The effect of the adhesive`s viscoelasticity on stress in an adhesive bond subjected to changing temperature is therefore of compelling interest and importance for the adhesives industry. The objective of this research is to develop an understanding of the viscoelastic effect in an adhesive bond subjected to cycling temperature, particularly when the temperature range spans a transition temperature of the adhesive. Numerical modeling of a simplified geometry was first undertaken to isolate the influence of viscoelasticity on the stress state from any particular specimen geometry effect. Finite element modeling was then undertaken to examine the mechanical behavior of the adhesive in a layered geometry. Both solution methods predicted development of residual tensile stresses in the adhesive. For the layered geometry this was found to correspond with residual tensile peel stresses, which are thought to be the cause of interfacial debonding.

  7. A Load-Based Multiple-Partial Unloading Micro-Indentation Technique for Mechanical Property Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    C. Feng; J.M. Tannenbaum; B.S. Kang; M.A. Alvin

    2009-07-23

    A load-based multiple-partial unloading microindentation technique has been developed for evaluating mechanical properties of materials. Comparing to the current prevailing nano/micro-indentation methods, which require precise measurements of the indentation depth and load, the proposed technique only measures indentation load and the overall indentation displacement (i.e. including displacement of the loading apparatus). Coupled with a multiple-partial unloading procedure during the indentation process, this technique results in a load-depth sensing indentation system capable of determining Young’s modulus of metallic alloys with flat, tubular, or curved architectures. Test results show consistent and correct elastic modulus values when performing indentation tests on standard alloys such as steel, aluminum, bronze, and single crystal superalloys. The proposed micro-indentation technique has led to the development of a portable loaddepth sensing indentation system capable of on-site, in-situ material property measurement.

  8. Bearing-Load Modeling and Analysis Study for Mechanically Connected Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Bearing-load response for a pin-loaded hole is studied within the context of two-dimensional finite element analyses. Pin-loaded-hole configurations are representative of mechanically connected structures, such as a stiffener fastened to a rib of an isogrid panel, that are idealized as part of a larger structural component. Within this context, the larger structural component may be idealized as a two-dimensional shell finite element model to identify load paths and high stress regions. Finite element modeling and analysis aspects of a pin-loaded hole are considered in the present paper including the use of linear and nonlinear springs to simulate the pin-bearing contact condition. Simulating pin-connected structures within a two-dimensional finite element analysis model using nonlinear spring or gap elements provides an effective way for accurate prediction of the local effective stress state and peak forces.

  9. Imaging-Based Methods for Non-invasive Assessment of Bone Properties Influenced by Mechanical Loading

    PubMed Central

    Lorbergs, Amanda L.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To describe the most common in vivo imaging-based research tools used to assess bone properties that are influenced by mechanical loading associated with exercise, habitual physical activity, or disease states. Bone is a complex metabolically active tissue that adapts to changes in mechanical loading by altering the amount and spatial organization of mineral. Method: Using a narrative review design, the authors provide an overview of bone biology and biomechanics to emphasize the importance of bone size scale, porosity, and degree of mineralization when interpreting measures acquired using quantitative ultrasound (QUS), dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and finite element analysis (FEA). For each imaging modality, basic imaging principles, typical outcome measures associated with changes in mechanical loading, and salient features for physiotherapists are described. Main Results: While each imaging modality has strengths and limitations, currently CT-based methods are best suited for determining the effects of mechanical loading on bone properties—particularly in the peripheral skeleton. Conclusions: Regardless of the imaging technology used, the physiotherapist must carefully consider the assumptions of the imaging-based method, the clinical context, the nature of the change in mechanical loading, and the expected time course for change in bone properties. PMID:23449969

  10. A micro-mechanical model to determine changes of collagen fibrils under cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Michelle L.; Susilo, Monica E.; Ruberti, Jeffrey A.; Nguyen, Thao D.

    Dynamic mechanical loading induces growth and remodeling in biological tissues. It can alter the degradation rate and intrinsic mechanical properties of collagen through cellular activity. Experiments showed that repeated cyclic loading of a dense collagen fibril substrate increased collagen stiffness and strength, lengthened the substrate, but did not significantly change the fibril areal fraction or fibril anisotropy (Susilo, et al. ``Collagen Network Hardening Following Cyclic Tensile Loading'', Interface Focus, submitted). We developed a model for the collagen fibril substrate (Tonge, et al. ``A micromechanical modeling study of the mechanical stabilization of enzymatic degradation of collagen tissues'', Biophys J, in press.) to probe whether changes in the fibril morphology and mechanical properties can explain the tissue-level properties observed during cyclic loading. The fibrils were modeled as a continuous distribution of wavy elastica, based on experimental measurements of fibril density and collagen anisotropy, and can experience damage after a critical stress threshold. Other mechanical properties in the model were fit to the stress response measured before and after the extended cyclic loading to determine changes in the strength and stiffness of collagen fibrils.

  11. Effects of Stiffening and Mechanical Load on Thermal Buckling of Stiffened Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Card, Michael F.

    1995-01-01

    A study of thermal buckling of stiffened cylindrical shells with the proportions of a preliminary supersonic transport fuselage design (1970) is presented. The buckling analysis is performed using an axisymmetric shell-of-revolution code, BOSOR4. The effects of combined mechanical (axial loading) and thermal loading (heated skins) are investigated. Results indicate that the location of longitudinal eccentric stiffening has a very large effect on the thermal buckling strength of longitudinally stiffened shells, and on longitudinally stiffened shells with rings.

  12. Intermittent PTH administration and mechanical loading are anabolic for periprosthetic cancellous bone

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, Matthew J.; Courtland, Hayden-William; Yang, Xu; Sutherland, James P.; Stoner, Kirsten; Nguyen, Joseph; Fahlgren, Anna; Ross, F. Patrick; van der Meulen, Marjolein C. H.; Bostrom, Mathias P.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the individual and combined effects on periprosthetic cancellous bone of intermittent PTH (iPTH) and mechanical loading at the cellular, molecular, and tissue levels. Porous titanium implants were inserted bilaterally on the cancellous bone of adult rabbits beneath a loading device attached to the distal lateral femur. The left femur received a sham loading device. The right femur was loaded daily, and half of the rabbits received daily PTH. Periprosthetic bone was evaluated up to 28 days for gene expression, histology, and µCT analysis. Loading and iPTH increased bone mass by a combination of two mechanisms: 1) altering cell populations in a pro-osteoblastic/anti-adipocytic direction, and 2) controlling bone turnover by modulating the RANKL-OPG ratio. At the tissue level, BV/TV increased with both loading (+53%, p<0.05) and iPTH (+54%, p<0.05). Combined treatment showed only small additional effects at the cellular and molecular levels that corresponded to a small additive effect on bone volume (+13% compared to iPTH alone, p>0.05). This study suggests that iPTH and loading are potential therapies for enhancing periprosthetic bone formation. The elucidation of the cellular and molecular response may help further enhance the combined therapy and related targeted treatment strategies. PMID:25408434

  13. Bolted Double-Lap Composite Joints Under Mechanical and Thermal Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kradinov, V.; Barut, A.; Madenci, E.; Walker, Sandra P. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This study concerns the determination of the contact stresses and contact region around bolt holes and the bolt load distribution in single- and double-lap joints of composite laminates with arbitrarily located bolts under general mechanical loading conditions and uniform temperature change. The unknown contact stress distribution and contact region between the bolt and laminates and the interaction among the bolts require the bolt load distribution, as well as the contact stresses, to be as part of the solution. The present method is based on the complex potential theory and the variational formulation in order to account for bolt stiffness, bolt-hole clearance, and finite geometry of the composite laminates.

  14. A Mechanism for the Loading-Unloading Substorm Cycle Missing in MHD Global Magnetospheric Simulation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimas, A. J.; Uritsky, V.; Vassiliadis, D.; Baker, D. N.

    2005-01-01

    Loading and consequent unloading of magnetic flux is an essential element of the substorm cycle in Earth's magnetotail. We are unaware of an available global MHD magnetospheric simulation model that includes a loading- unloading cycle in its behavior. Given the central role that MHD models presently play in the development of our understanding of magnetospheric dynamics, and given the present plans for the central role that these models will play in ongoing space weather prediction programs, it is clear that this failure must be corrected. A 2-dimensional numerical driven current-sheet model has been developed that incorporates an idealized current- driven instability with a resistive MHD system. Under steady loading, the model exhibits a global loading- unloading cycle. The specific mechanism for producing the loading-unloading cycle will be discussed. It will be shown that scale-free avalanching of electromagnetic energy through the model, from loading to unloading, is carried by repetitive bursts of localized reconnection. Each burst leads, somewhat later, to a field configuration that is capable of exciting a reconnection burst again. This process repeats itself in an intermittent manner while the total field energy in the system falls. At the end of an unloading interval, the total field energy is reduced to well below that necessary to initiate the next unloading event and, thus, a loading-unloading cycle results. It will be shown that, in this model, it is the topology of bursty localized reconnection that is responsible for the appearance of the loading-unloading cycle.

  15. Single-molecule Studies of Origin Licensing Reveal Mechanisms Ensuring Bidirectional Helicase Loading

    PubMed Central

    Ticau, Simina; Friedman, Larry J.; Ivica, Nikola A.; Gelles, Jeff; Bell, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Loading of the ring-shaped Mcm2-7 replicative helicase around DNA licenses eukaryotic origins of replication. During loading, Cdc6, Cdt1 and the origin-recognition complex (ORC) assemble two heterohexameric Mcm2-7 complexes into a head-to-head double hexamer that facilitates bidirectional replication initiation. Using multi-wavelength single-molecule fluorescence to monitor the events of helicase loading, we demonstrate that double-hexamer formation is the result of sequential loading of individual Mcm2-7 complexes. Loading of each Mcm2-7 molecule involves the ordered association and dissociation of distinct Cdc6 and Cdt1 proteins. In contrast, one ORC molecule directs loading of both helicases in each double hexamer. Based on single-molecule FRET, arrival of the second Mcm2-7 results in rapid double-hexamer formation that anticipates Cdc6 and Cdt1 release, suggesting Mcm-Mcm interactions recruit the second helicase. Our findings reveal the complex protein dynamics that coordinate helicase loading and indicate that distinct mechanisms load the oppositely oriented helicases that are central to bidirectional replication initiation. PMID:25892223

  16. A Magnetic Resonance-Compatible Loading Device for Dynamically Imaging Shortening and Lengthening Muscle Contraction Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Silder, Amy; Westphal, Christopher J.; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design and test a magnetic resonance (MR)-compatible device to induce either shortening or lengthening muscle contractions for use during dynamic MR imaging. The proposed device guides the knee through cyclic flexion-extension, while either elastic or inertial loads are imposed on the hamstrings. Ten subjects were tested in a motion capture laboratory to evaluate the repeatability of limb motion and imposed loads. Image data were subsequently obtained for all ten subjects using cine phase contrast imaging. Subjects achieved ~30 deg of knee joint motion, with individual subjects remaining within ~1 deg of their average motion across 56 repeated cycles. The maximum hamstring activity and loading occurred when the knee was flexed for the elastic loading condition (shortening contraction), and extended for the inertial loading condition (lengthening contraction). Repeat MR image acquisitions of the same loading condition resulted in similar tissue velocities, while spatial variations in velocity data were clearly different between loading conditions. The proposed device can enable dynamic imaging of the muscle under different types of loads, which has the potential to improve our understanding of basic muscle mechanics, identify potential causes of muscle injury, and provide a basis for quantitatively assessing injury effects at the tissue level. Slight modifications to the device design and/or subject positioning could allow for imaging of the quadriceps or the knee. PMID:24353749

  17. Static and cyclic mechanical loading of mesenchymal stem cells on elastomeric, electrospun polyurethane meshes.

    PubMed

    Cardwell, Robyn D; Kluge, Jonathan A; Thayer, Patrick S; Guelcher, Scott A; Dahlgren, Linda A; Kaplan, David L; Goldstein, Aaron S

    2015-07-01

    Biomaterial substrates composed of semi-aligned electrospun fibers are attractive supports for the regeneration of connective tissues because the fibers are durable under cyclic tensile loads and can guide cell adhesion, orientation, and gene expression. Previous studies on supported electrospun substrates have shown that both fiber diameter and mechanical deformation can independently influence cell morphology and gene expression. However, no studies have examined the effect of mechanical deformation and fiber diameter on unsupported meshes. Semi-aligned large (1.75 μm) and small (0.60 μm) diameter fiber meshes were prepared from degradable elastomeric poly(esterurethane urea) (PEUUR) meshes and characterized by tensile testing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Next, unsupported meshes were aligned between custom grips (with the stretch axis oriented parallel to axis of fiber alignment), seeded with C3H10T1/2 cells, and subjected to a static load (50 mN, adjusted daily), a cyclic load (4% strain at 0.25 Hz for 30 min, followed by a static tensile loading of 50 mN, daily), or no load. After 3 days of mechanical stimulation, confocal imaging was used to characterize cell shape, while measurements of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) content and messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression were used to characterize cell retention on unsupported meshes and expression of the connective tissue phenotype. Mechanical testing confirmed that these materials deform elastically to at least 10%. Cells adhered to unsupported meshes under all conditions and aligned with the direction of fiber orientation. Application of static and cyclic loads increased cell alignment. Cell density and mRNA expression of connective tissue proteins were not statistically different between experimental groups. However, on large diameter fiber meshes, static loading slightly elevated tenomodulin expression relative to the no load group, and tenascin-C and tenomodulin expression

  18. Kinetic modelling and bifurcation analysis of chemomechanically miniaturized gels under mechanical load.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengfei; Liu, Shaobao; Zhou, Jinxiong; Xu, Feng; Lu, Tianjian

    2013-09-01

    Chemomechanically responsive gels, with great potential applications in the fields of smart structures and biomedicines, present autonomously oscillatory deformation driven by the Belousov-Zhabotinsky chemical reaction. The dynamic behavior of the responsive gels is obviously affected by the external mechanical load. This approach proposed a kinetic model with an ordinary differential equation to describe the oscillatory deformation of the gels under the mechanical load. Then the periodic solutions and phase diagrams of the oscillation are obtained using the improved Runge-Kutta and shooting methods. The results demonstrated that bifurcations are typically existent in the system and the characters of the oscillatory deformation regularly depend on the mechanical load as well as the concentration of reactants and the stoichiometric coefficient of chemical reaction. This development is supposed to promote the practical applications of the chemomechanically responsive gels. PMID:24072466

  19. A Model to Study Articular Cartilage Mechanical and Biological Responses to Sliding Loads.

    PubMed

    Schätti, Oliver R; Gallo, Luigi M; Torzilli, Peter A

    2016-08-01

    In physiological conditions, joint function involves continuously moving contact areas over the tissue surface. Such moving contacts play an important role for the durability of the tissue. It is known that in pathological joints these motion paths and contact mechanics change. Nevertheless, limited information exists on the impact of such physiological and pathophysiological dynamic loads on cartilage mechanics and its subsequent biological response. We designed and validated a mechanical device capable of applying simultaneous compression and sliding forces onto cartilage explants to simulate moving joint contact. Tests with varying axial loads (1-4 kg) and sliding speeds (1-20 mm/s) were performed on mature viable bovine femoral condyles to investigate cartilage mechanobiological responses. High loads and slow sliding speeds resulted in highest cartilage deformations. Contact stress and effective cartilage moduli increased with increasing load and increasing speed. In a pilot study, changes in gene expression of extracellular matrix proteins were correlated with strain, contact stress and dynamic effective modulus. This study describes a mechanical test system to study the cartilage response to reciprocating sliding motion and will be helpful in identifying mechanical and biological mechanisms leading to the initiation and development of cartilage degeneration. PMID:26698580

  20. Launch Load Resistant Spacecraft Mechanism Bearings Made From NiTi Superelastic Intermetallic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Moore, Lewis E.

    2014-01-01

    Compared to conventional bearing materials (tool steel and ceramics), emerging Superelastic Intermetallic Materials (SIMs), such as 60NiTi, have significantly lower elastic modulus and enhanced strain capability. They are also immune to atmospheric corrosion (rusting). This offers the potential for increased resilience and superior ability to withstand static indentation load without damage. In this paper, the static load capacity of hardened 60NiTi 50mm bore ball-bearing races are measured to correlate existing flat-plate indentation load capacity data to an actual bearing geometry through the Hertz stress relations. The results confirmed the validity of using the Hertz stress relations to model 60NiTi contacts; 60NiTi exhibits a static stress capability (3.1GPa) between that of 440C (2.4GPa) and REX20 (3.8GPa) tool steel. When the reduced modulus and extended strain capability are taken into account, 60NiTi is shown to withstand higher loads than other bearing materials. To quantify this effect, a notional space mechanism, a 5kg mass reaction wheel, was modeled with respect to launch load capability when supported on 440C, 60NiTi and REX20 tool steel bearings. For this application, the use of REX20 bearings increased the static load capability of the mechanism by a factor of three while the use of 60NiTi bearings resulted in an order of magnitude improvement compared to the baseline 440C stainless steel bearings.

  1. Somatomedin C immunoreactivity in the Achilles tendon varies in a dynamic manner with the mechanical load.

    PubMed

    Hansson, H A; Engström, A M; Holm, S; Rosenqvist, A L

    1988-10-01

    Distribution of the trophic peptide somatomedin C (Sm-C; insulin-like growth factor I; IGF-I) immunoreactivity was mapped in normal Achilles and tibialis anterior tendons. The spindle-shaped tendon fibroblasts showed faint perinuclear staining. Fibroblasts in the paratenon mostly had a more intense IGF-I immunoreactivity, i.e. faint to moderate. When analysing either tendon in detail, areas with more intense IGF-I immunoreactivity could be recognized and seemed to correlate with areas of high mechanical stress. Increased mechanical load induced over 3 days elevated IGF-I immunoreactivity throughout the cytoplasm of tendon fibroblasts. Peak intensity was reached in 7 days, and thereafter the IGF-I immunoreactivity seemed to decrease irrespective of persistent high mechanical load. Training the animals on a treadmill for from 20 up to 60 min per day for 5 days induced after 3-5 days increased IGF-I immunoreactivity throughout the cytoplasm of the tendon and paratenon fibroblasts. Sudden curtailment of loading the Achilles tendon resulted in a marked reduction of the IGF-I immunoreactivity in most fibroblasts within 3 days. After a week only a small number of tendon fibroblasts showed any IGF-I immunoreactivity. The IGF-I immunoreactivity of tendon fibroblasts thus correlates to mechanical loading of the tendon. It is proposed that IGF-I may have a trophic influence on tendon and paratenon cells by autocrine and/or paracrine mechanisms. PMID:3067520

  2. Mechanical loading up-regulates early remodeling signals from osteocytes subjected to physical damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Wu, Michael; You, Lidan

    2015-12-16

    In the mineralized bone matrix, mechanical loading causes micrometer-sized cracks. These cracks trigger targeted remodeling along the micro-crack. Physical damage to osteocytes was shown to be involved in the initiation of this remodeling process. However, the role of subsequent mechanical loading osteocyte response to physical damage is unclear. In this study, we have designed and developed an in vitro cell model to study the impact of mechanical loading on osteocytes with physical damage. Specifically, a system was developed to create sub-cellular physical damage on MLO-Y4 osteocytes in vitro. This model re-created the spatial distribution of non-viable cells and VEGF expression around microdamage as reported in vivo. Using this system, the short term (24h) effects of fluid shear stress in regulation of osteocyte response to physical damage were investigated. We have observed that the mechanical stimuli had an additive effect in terms of COX-2, VEGF mRNA expressions, as well as PGE2, VEGF concentrations in the media. Interestingly, other inflammatory signals such as IL-6 and TNF-α did not change with these stimuli, at this time point. Moreover, fluid shear also had a modulating effect in regulation of osteoclast differentiation by osteocyte with physical damage. These results show that (1) subcellular physical damage upregulates remodeling signals in osteocytes at early time point, (2) mechanical loading substantially upregulates these signals for remodeling in osteocytes with physical damage. PMID:26596719

  3. Mechanically fastened composite laminates subjected to combined bearing-bypass and shear loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madenci, Erdogan

    1993-01-01

    Bolts and rivets provide a means of load transfer in the construction of aircraft. However, they give rise to stress concentrations and are often the source and location of static and fatigue failures. Furthermore, fastener holes are prone to cracks during take-off and landing. These cracks present the most common origin of structural failures in aircraft. Therefore, accurate determination of the contact stresses associated with such loaded holes in mechanically fastened joints is essential to reliable strength evaluation and failure prediction. As the laminate is subjected to loading, the contact region, whose extent is not known, develops between the fastener and the hole boundary through this contact region, which consists of slip and no-slip zones due to friction. The presence of the unknown contact stress distribution over the contact region between the pin and the composite laminate, material anisotropy, friction between the pin and the laminate, pin-hole clearance, combined bearing-bypass and shear loading, and finite geometry of the laminate result in a complex non-linear problem. In the case of bearing-bypass loading in compression, this non-linear problem is further complicated by the presence of dual contact regions. Previous research concerning the analysis of mechanical joints subjected to combined bearing-bypass and shear loading is non-existent. In the case of bearing-bypass loading only, except for the study conducted by Naik and Crews (1991), others employed the concept of superposition which is not valid for this non-linear problem. Naik and Crews applied a linear finite element analysis with conditions along the pin-hole contact region specified as displacement constraint equations. The major shortcoming of this method is that the variation of the contract region as a function of the applied load should be known a priori. Also, their analysis is limited to symmetric geometry and material systems, and frictionless boundary conditions. Since the

  4. Effect of Cyclic Thermo-Mechanical Loads on Fatigue Reliability in Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, A. R.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1996-01-01

    A methodology to compute probabilistic fatigue life of polymer matrix laminated composites has been developed and demonstrated. Matrix degradation effects caused by long term environmental exposure and mechanical/thermal cyclic loads are accounted for in the simulation process. A unified time-temperature-stress dependent multi-factor interaction relationship developed at NASA Lewis Research Center has been used to model the degradation/aging of material properties due to cyclic loads. The fast probability integration method is used to compute probabilistic distribution of response. Sensitivities of fatigue life reliability to uncertainties in the primitive random variables (e.g., constituent properties, fiber volume ratio, void volume ratio, ply thickness, etc.) computed and their significance in the reliability- based design for maximum life is discussed. The effect of variation in the thermal cyclic loads on the fatigue reliability for a (0/+/- 45/90)(sub s) graphite/epoxy laminate with a ply thickness of 0.127 mm, with respect to impending failure modes has been studied. The results show that, at low mechanical cyclic loads and low thermal cyclic amplitudes, fatigue life for 0.999 reliability is most sensitive to matrix compressive strength, matrix modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, and ply thickness. Whereas at high mechanical cyclic loads and high thermal cyclic amplitudes, fatigue life at 0.999 reliability is more sensitive to the shear strength of matrix, longitudinal fiber modulus, matrix modulus, and ply thickness.

  5. Load Regulates Bone Formation and Sclerostin Expression through a TGFβ-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Daniel; Alliston, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Bone continually adapts to meet changing physical and biological demands. Osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes cooperate to integrate these physical and biochemical cues to maintain bone homeostasis. Although TGFβ acts on all three of these cell types to maintain bone homeostasis, the extent to which it participates in the adaptation of bone to mechanical load is unknown. Here, we investigated the role of the TGFβ pathway in load-induced bone formation and the regulation of Sclerostin, a mechanosensitive antagonist of bone anabolism. We found that mechanical load rapidly represses the net activity of the TGFβ pathway in osteocytes, resulting in reduced phosphorylation and activity of key downstream effectors, Smad2 and Smad3. Loss of TGFβ sensitivity compromises the anabolic response of bone to mechanical load, demonstrating that the mechanosensitive regulation of TGFβ signaling is essential for load-induced bone formation. Furthermore, sensitivity to TGFβ is required for the mechanosensitive regulation of Sclerostin, which is induced by TGFβ in a Smad3-dependent manner. Together, our results show that physical cues maintain bone homeostasis through the TGFβ pathway to regulate Sclerostin expression and the deposition of new bone. PMID:23308287

  6. The pendular mechanism does not determine the optimal speed of loaded walking on gradients.

    PubMed

    Gomeñuka, Natalia Andrea; Bona, Renata Luisa; da Rosa, Rodrigo Gomes; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    The pendular mechanism does not act as a primary mechanism in uphill walking due to the monotonic behavior of the mechanical energies of the center of mass. Nevertheless, recent evidence shows that there is an important minimization of energy expenditure by the pendular mechanism during walking on uphill gradients. In this study, we analyzed the optimum speed (OPT) of loaded human walking and the pendulum-like determining variables (Recovery R, Instantaneous pendular re-conversion Rint, and Congruity percentage %Cong). Ten young men walked on a treadmill at five different speeds and at three different treadmill incline gradients (0, +7 and +15%), with and without a load carried in their backpacks. We used indirect calorimetry and 3D motion analysis, and all of the data were analyzed by computational algorithms. Rint increased at higher speeds and decreased with increasing gradient. R and %Cong decreased with increasing gradient and increased with speed, independent of load. Thus, energy conversion by the pendular mechanism during walking on a 15% gradient is supported, and although this mechanism can explain the maintenance of OPT at low walking speeds, the pendular mechanism does not fully explain the energy minimization at higher speeds. PMID:27017543

  7. In situ intracellular calcium oscillations in osteocytes in intact mouse long bones under dynamic mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Da; Baik, Andrew D.; Lu, X. Lucas; Zhou, Bin; Lai, Xiaohan; Wang, Liyun; Luo, Erping; Guo, X. Edward

    2014-01-01

    Osteocytes have been hypothesized to be the major mechanosensors in bone. How in situ osteocytes respond to mechanical stimuli is still unclear because of technical difficulties. In vitro studies have shown that osteocytes exhibited unique calcium (Ca2+) oscillations to fluid shear. However, whether this mechanotransduction phenomenon holds for in situ osteocytes embedded within a mineralized bone matrix under dynamic loading remains unknown. Using a novel synchronized loading/imaging technique, we successfully visualized in real time and quantified Ca2+ responses in osteocytes and bone surface cells in situ under controlled dynamic loading on intact mouse tibia. The resultant fluid-induced shear stress on the osteocyte in the lacunocanalicular system (LCS) was also quantified. Osteocytes, but not surface cells, displayed repetitive Ca2+ spikes in response to dynamic loading, with spike frequency and magnitude dependent on load magnitude, tissue strain, and shear stress in the LCS. The Ca2+ oscillations were significantly reduced by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) depletion and P2 purinergic receptor (P2R)/phospholipase C (PLC) inhibition. This study provides direct evidence that osteocytes respond to in situ mechanical loading by Ca2+ oscillations, which are dependent on the P2R/PLC/inositol trisphosphate/ER pathway. This study develops a novel approach in skeletal mechanobiology and also advances our fundamental knowledge of bone mechanotransduction.—Jing, D., Baik, A. D., Lu, X. L., Zhou, B., Lai, X., Wang, L., Luo, E., Guo, X. E. In situ intracellular calcium oscillations in osteocytes in intact mouse long bones under dynamic mechanical loading. PMID:24347610

  8. Mechanical effect of static loading on endodontically treated teeth restored with fiber-reinforced posts.

    PubMed

    Chieruzzi, Manila; Rallini, Marco; Pagano, Stefano; Eramo, Stefano; D'Errico, Potito; Torre, Luigi; Kenny, José M

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanical behavior of a dental system built up with fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) endodontic posts with different types of fibers and two cements (the first one used with a primer, the second one without it). Six FRC posts were used. Each system was characterized in terms of structural efficiency under external applied loads similar to masticatory forces. An oblique force was applied and stiffness and maximum load data were obtained. The same test was used for the dentine. The systems were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) to investigate the surface of the post and inner surface of root canal after failure. The mechanical tests showed that load values in dental systems depend on the post material and used cement. The highest load (281 ± 59 N) was observed for the conical glass fiber posts in the cement without primer. There was a 50 and 85% increase in the maximum load for two of the conical posts with glass fibers and a 229% increase for the carbon fiber posts in the cement without primer as compared with the cement with primer. Moreover, almost all the studied systems showed fracture resistances higher than the typical masticatory loads. The microscopic analysis underlined the good adhesion of the second cement at the interfaces between dentine and post. The mechanical tests confirmed that the strength of the dental systems subjected to masticatory loads was strictly related to the bond at the interface post/cement and cement/dentine. PMID:24000235

  9. Mechanics of load-drag-unload contact cleaning of gecko-inspired fibrillar adhesives.

    PubMed

    Abusomwan, Uyiosa A; Sitti, Metin

    2014-10-14

    Contact self-cleaning of gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives with mushroom-shaped tips has been demonstrated recently using load-drag-unload cleaning procedures similar to that of the natural animal. However, the underlying mechanics of contact cleaning has yet to be fully understood. In this work, we present a detailed experiment of contact self-cleaning that shows that rolling is the dominant mechanism of cleaning for spherical microparticle contaminants, during the load-drag-unload procedure. We also study the effect of dragging rate and normal load on the particle rolling friction. A model of spherical particle rolling on an elastomer fibrillar adhesive interface is developed and agrees well with the experimental results. This study takes us closer to determining design parameters for achieving self-cleaning fibrillar adhesives. PMID:25244526

  10. Effect of nanofillers on the physico-mechanical properties of load bearing bone implants.

    PubMed

    Michael, Feven Mattews; Khalid, Mohammad; Walvekar, Rashmi; Ratnam, Chantara Thevy; Ramarad, Suganti; Siddiqui, Humaira; Hoque, M Enamul

    2016-10-01

    Bones are nanocomposites consisting of a collagenous fibre network, embedded with calcium phosphates mainly hydroxyapatite (HA) nanocrystallites. As bones are subjected to continuous loading and unloading process every day, they often tend to become prone to fatigue and breakdown. Therefore, this review addresses the use of nanocomposites particularly polymers reinforced with nanoceramics that can be used as load bearing bone implants. Further, nanocomposite preparation and dispersion modification techniques have been highlighted along with thorough discussion on the influence that various nanofillers have on the physico-mechanical properties of nanocomposites in relation to that of natural bone properties. This review updates the nanocomposites that meet the physico-mechanical properties (strength and elasticity) as well as biocompatibility requirement of a load bearing bone implant and also attempts to highlight the gaps in the reported studies to address the fatigue and creep properties of the nanocomposites. PMID:27287178

  11. Role of mechanical loads in inducing in-cycle tensile stress in thermally grown oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, R.; Jansz, M.; Mossaddad, M.; Raghavan, S.; Okasinski, J.S.; Almer, J.D.; Perez, H.P.; Imbrie, P.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction results tracking the strain behavior of the various layers during a cycle, under thermo-mechanical conditions are presented in this work. The quantitative strain measurements here show that the thermally grown oxide briefly experiences in-plane tensile stress ({sigma}{sub 22} = +36.4 MPa) with increased mechanical loading during ramp-up in the thermal cycle. These findings are the first in situ experimental observations of these strains under thermo-mechanical conditions, envisaged to serve as a catalyst for crack initiation. The depth resolved measurements of strain taken during applied thermal and mechanical load in this work are a significant step towards achieving realistic testing conditions.

  12. Mechanical loading prevents the stimulating effect of IL-1β on osteocyte-modulated osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Rishikesh N; Bakker, Astrid D; Everts, Vincent; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke

    2012-03-30

    Inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis are often accompanied by higher plasma and synovial fluid levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and by increased bone resorption. Since osteocytes are known to regulate bone resorption in response to changes in mechanical stimuli, we investigated whether IL-1β affects osteocyte-modulated osteoclastogenesis in the presence or absence of mechanical loading of osteocytes. MLO-Y4 osteocytes were pre-incubated with IL-1β (0.1-1 ng/ml) for 24h. Cells were either or not subjected to mechanical loading by 1h pulsating fluid flow (PFF; 0.7 ± 0.3 Pa, 5 Hz) in the presence of IL-1β (0.1-1 ng/ml). Conditioned medium was collected after 1h PFF or static cultures. Subsequently mouse bone marrow cells were seeded on top of the IL-1β-treated osteocytes to determine osteoclastogenesis. Conditioned medium from mechanically loaded or static IL-1β-treated osteocytes was added to co-cultures of untreated osteocytes and mouse bone marrow cells. Gene expression of cysteine-rich protein 61 (CYR61/CCN1), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), and osteoprotegerin (OPG) by osteocytes was determined immediately after PFF. Incubation of osteocytes with IL-1β, as well as conditioned medium from static IL-1β-treated osteocytes increased the formation of osteoclasts. However, conditioned medium from mechanically loaded IL-1β-treated osteocytes prevented osteoclast formation. Incubation with IL-1β upregulated RANKL and downregulated OPG gene expression by static osteocytes. PFF upregulated CYR61, RANKL, and OPG gene expression by osteocytes. Our results suggest that IL-1β increases osteocyte-modulated osteoclastogenesis, and that mechanical loading of osteocytes may abolish IL-1β-induced osteoclastogenesis. PMID:22390927

  13. Cognitive-load approaches to detect deception: searching for cognitive mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Blandón-Gitlin, Iris; Fenn, Elise; Masip, Jaume; Yoo, Aspen H.

    2015-01-01

    A current focus in deception research is on developing cognitive-load approaches (CLAs) to detect deception. The aim is to improve lie detection with evidence-based and ecologically valid procedures. Although these approaches show great potential, research on cognitive processes or mechanisms explaining how they operate is lacking. Potential mechanisms underlying the most popular techniques advocated for field application are highlighted. Cognitive scientists are encouraged to conduct basic research that qualifies the ‘cognitive’ in these new approaches. PMID:25168448

  14. Cognitive-load approaches to detect deception: searching for cognitive mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Blandón-Gitlin, Iris; Fenn, Elise; Masip, Jaume; Yoo, Aspen H

    2014-09-01

    A current focus in deception research is on developing cognitive-load approaches (CLAs) to detect deception. The aim is to improve lie detection with evidence-based and ecologically valid procedures. Although these approaches show great potential, research on cognitive processes or mechanisms explaining how they operate is lacking. Potential mechanisms underlying the most popular techniques advocated for field application are highlighted. Cognitive scientists are encouraged to conduct basic research that qualifies the 'cognitive' in these new approaches. PMID:25168448

  15. Assessing Cognitive Load Theory to Improve Student Learning for Mechanical Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Impelluso, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    A computer programming class for students of mechanical engineering was redesigned and assessed: Cognitive Load Theory was used to redesign the content; online technologies were used to redesign the delivery. Student learning improved and the dropout rate was reduced. This article reports on both attitudinal and objective assessment: comparing…

  16. Mechanical Characterization of the Human Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Subjected to Impact Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamison, David, IV

    Low back pain is a large and costly problem in the United States. Several working populations, such as miners, construction workers, forklift operators, and military personnel, have an increased risk and prevalence of low back pain compared to the general population. This is due to exposure to repeated, transient impact shocks, particularly while operating vehicles or other machinery. These shocks typically do not cause acute injury, but rather lead to pain and injury over time. The major focus in low back pain is often the intervertebral disc, due to its role as the major primary load-bearing component along the spinal column. The formation of a reliable standard for human lumbar disc exposure to repeated transient shock could potentially reduce injury risk for these working populations. The objective of this project, therefore, is to characterize the mechanical response of the lumbar intervertebral disc subjected to sub-traumatic impact loading conditions using both cadaveric and computational models, and to investigate the possible implications of this type of loading environment for low back pain. Axial, compressive impact loading events on Naval high speed boats were simulated in the laboratory and applied to human cadaveric specimen. Disc stiffness was higher and hysteresis was lower than quasi-static loading conditions. This indicates a shift in mechanical response when the disc is under impact loads and this behavior could be contributing to long-term back pain. Interstitial fluid loss and disc height changes were shown to affect disc impact mechanics in a creep study. Neutral zone increased, while energy dissipation and low-strain region stiffness decreased. This suggests that the disc has greater clinical instability during impact loading with progressive creep and fluid loss, indicating that time of day should be considered for working populations subjected to impact loads. A finite element model was developed and validated against cadaver specimen

  17. Expression of muscle anabolic and metabolic factors in mechanically loaded MLO-Y4 osteocytes.

    PubMed

    Juffer, Petra; Jaspers, Richard T; Lips, Paul; Bakker, Astrid D; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke

    2012-02-15

    Lack of physical activity results in muscle atrophy and bone loss, which can be counteracted by mechanical loading. Similar molecular signaling pathways are involved in the adaptation of muscle and bone mass to mechanical loading. Whether anabolic and metabolic factors regulating muscle mass, i.e., insulin-like growth factor-I isoforms (IGF-I Ea), mechano growth factor (MGF), myostatin, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), are also produced by osteocytes in bone in response to mechanical loading is largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether mechanical loading by pulsating fluid flow (PFF) modulates the mRNA and/or protein levels of muscle anabolic and metabolic factors in MLO-Y4 osteocytes. Unloaded MLO-Y4 osteocytes expressed mRNA of VEGF, HGF, IGF-I Ea, and MGF, but not myostatin. PFF increased mRNA levels of IGF-I Ea (2.1-fold) and MGF (2.0-fold) at a peak shear stress rate of 44Pa/s, but not at 22Pa/s. PFF at 22 Pa/s increased VEGF mRNA levels (1.8- to 2.5-fold) and VEGF protein release (2.0- to 2.9-fold). Inhibition of nitric oxide production decreased (2.0-fold) PFF-induced VEGF protein release. PFF at 22 Pa/s decreased HGF mRNA levels (1.5-fold) but increased HGF protein release (2.3-fold). PFF-induced HGF protein release was nitric oxide dependent. Our data show that mechanically loaded MLO-Y4 osteocytes differentially express anabolic and metabolic factors involved in the adaptive response of muscle to mechanical loading (i.e., IGF-I Ea, MGF, VEGF, and HGF). Similarly to muscle fibers, mechanical loading enhanced expression levels of these growth factors in MLO-Y4 osteocytes. Although in MLO-Y4 osteocytes expression levels of IGF-I Ea and MGF of myostatin were very low or absent, it is known that the activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts is strongly affected by them. The abundant expression levels of these factors in muscle cells, in combination with low expression in MLO-Y4 osteocytes, provide a

  18. Surface damage of metallic implants due to mechanical loading and chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jaejoong

    The present study investigates interfacial damage mechanism of modular implants due to synergetic action of mechanical contact loading and corrosion. Modular implants are manufactured such that surfaces have a characteristic degree of roughness determined by tool tip size and motion of tool path or feeding speed. The central hypothesis for this work is that during contact loading of metallic implants, mechanisms of damage and dissolution are determined by contact loads, plastic deformation, residual stresses and environmental conditions at the nanoscale surface asperities; while during subsequent rest periods, mechanism of metallic dissolution is determined by the environmental conditions and residual stress field induced due to long range elastic interactions of the plastically deformed asperities. First part of the thesis is focused on investigating the mechanisms underlying surface roughness evolution due to stress-assisted dissolution during the rest period. The latter part is focused on investigating material removal mechanisms during single asperity contact of implant surfaces. Experimental study was performed to elucidate the roughness evolution mechanism by combined effect of multi-asperity contact and environmental corrosion. Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum specimen was subjected to either contact loading alone or alternating contact loading and exposure to reactive environment. Roughness of the specimen surface was monitored by optical profilometry and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) calculation was used to characterize the evolving behavior of roughness modes. Finite element analysis (FEA) was employed to identify influences of surface morphological configurations and contact pressures on the residual stress development. Analytical model of multi-asperity contact has been developed for prediction of residual stress field for different roughness configurations during varying magnitude of contact loads based on elastic inclusion theory. Experimental results

  19. The Contribution of Experimental in vivo Models to Understanding the Mechanisms of Adaptation to Mechanical Loading in Bone

    PubMed Central

    Meakin, Lee B.; Price, Joanna S.; Lanyon, Lance E.

    2014-01-01

    Changing loading regimens by natural means such as exercise, with or without interference such as osteotomy, has provided useful information on the structure:function relationship in bone tissue. However, the greatest precision in defining those aspects of the overall strain environment that influence modeling and remodeling behavior has been achieved by relating quantified changes in bone architecture to quantified changes in bones’ strain environment produced by direct, controlled artificial bone loading. Jiri Hert introduced the technique of artificial loading of bones in vivo with external devices in the 1960s using an electromechanical device to load rabbit tibiae through transfixing stainless steel pins. Quantifying natural bone strains during locomotion by attaching electrical resistance strain gages to bone surfaces was introduced by Lanyon, also in the 1960s. These studies in a variety of bones in a number of species demonstrated remarkable uniformity in the peak strains and maximum strain rates experienced. Experiments combining strain gage instrumentation with artificial loading in sheep, pigs, roosters, turkeys, rats, and mice has yielded significant insight into the control of strain-related adaptive (re)modeling. This diversity of approach has been largely superseded by non-invasive transcutaneous loading in rats and mice, which is now the model of choice for many studies. Together such studies have demonstrated that over the physiological strain range, bone’s mechanically adaptive processes are responsive to dynamic but not static strains; the size and nature of the adaptive response controlling bone mass is linearly related to the peak loads encountered; the strain-related response is preferentially sensitive to high strain rates and unresponsive to static ones; is most responsive to unusual strain distributions; is maximized by remarkably few strain cycles, and that these are most effective when interrupted by short periods of rest between them

  20. The Biomechanical Effect of Loading Speed on Metal-on-UHMWPE Contact Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Zdero, Radovan; Bagheri, Zahra S; Rezaey, Mojtaba; Schemitsch, Emil H; Bougherara, Habiba

    2014-01-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a material commonly used in total hip and knee joint replacements. Numerous studies have assessed the effect of its viscoelastic properties on phenomena such as creep, stress relaxation, and tensile stress. However, these investigations either use the complex 3D geometries of total hip and knee replacements or UHMWPE test objects on their own. No studies have directly measured the effect of vertical load application speed on the contact mechanics of a metal sphere indenting UHMWPE. To this end, a metal ball was used to apply vertical force to a series of UHMWPE flat plate specimens over a wide range of loading speeds, namely, 1, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, and 120 mm/min. Pressure sensitive Fujifilm was placed at the interface to measure contact area. Experimental results showed that maximum contact force ranged from 3596 to 4520 N and was logarithmically related (R2=0.96) to loading speed. Average contact area ranged from 76.5 to 79.9 mm2 and was linearly related (R2=0.56) to loading speed. Average contact stress ranged from 45.1 to 58.2 MPa and was logarithmically related (R2=0.95) to loading speed. All UHMWPE specimens displayed a circular area of permanent surface damage, which did not disappear with time. This study has practical implications for understanding the contact mechanics of hip and knee replacements for a variety of activities of daily living. PMID:24893849

  1. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties After Shock Wave Loading of Cast CrMnNi TRIP Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckner, Ralf; Krüger, L.; Ullrich, C.; Rafaja, D.; Schlothauer, T.; Heide, G.

    2016-08-01

    The mechanical response of shock wave-prestrained high-alloy Cr16-Mn7-Ni6 TRIP steel was investigated under compressive and tensile loading at room temperature. Previous shock wave loading was carried out using a flyer-plate assembly with different amounts of explosives in order to achieve shock pressures of 0.3, 0.6, 0.9, and 1.2 Mbar. A significant increase in hardness and strength was observed as compared with the initial as-cast condition. In contrast, a slight decrease in strain hardening rates was measured together with a decrease in fracture elongation in the tensile test. Microstructural analyses of the shock-loaded samples were performed by light optical and scanning electron microscopy. The microstructure revealed a high density of deformation bands consisting of separated stacking faults, ɛ-martensite, or twins. Significant amounts of deformation-induced α'-martensite were only present at the highest shock pressure of 1.2 Mbar. The thickness of the deformation bands and the number of martensite nuclei at their intersections increased with increasing shock pressure. In all shock-loaded specimens, pronounced phase transformation occurred during subsequent mechanical testing. Consequently, the amount of the deformation-induced α'-martensite in the shock-loaded specimens was higher than in the unshocked as-cast samples.

  2. Contact mechanics of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement under adverse edge loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John

    2014-10-17

    Edge loading can negatively impact the biomechanics and long-term performance of hip replacements. Although edge loading has been widely investigated for hard-on-hard articulations, limited work has been conducted for hard-on-soft combinations. The aim of the present study was to investigate edge loading and its effect on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR). A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing. Different cup inclination angles and head lateral microseparation were modelled and their effect on the contact mechanics of the modular MoP hip replacement were examined. The results showed that lateral microseparation caused loading of the head on the rim of the cup, which produced substantial increases in the maximum von Mises stress in the polyethylene liner and the maximum contact pressure on both the articulating surface and backside surface of the liner. Plastic deformation of the liner was observed under both standard conditions and microseparation conditions, however, the maximum equivalent plastic strain in the liner under microseparation conditions of 2000 µm was predicted to be approximately six times that under standard conditions. The study has indicated that correct positioning the components to avoid edge loading is likely to be important clinically even for hard-on-soft bearings for THR. PMID:25218504

  3. Remineralization of mechanical loaded resin-dentin interface: a transitional and synchronized multistep process.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Manuel; Aguilera, Fátima S; Cabello, Inmaculada; Osorio, Raquel

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluated the ability of different in vitro mechanical loading tests to promote new mineral formation at bonded dentin interfaces. This research demonstrated a sequential transition in the dentin remineralizing procedure through the analysis of the mineral and matrix gradients. Mechanical loading in phosphoric acid (PA)-treated samples promoted a generalized increases in relative presence of minerals, crystallinity, ratio of phosphate peaks and a decrease in the gradient of mineral content. The organic component showed, in general terms, an increase in crosslinking. [Formula: see text]-helices incremented in sine and square waveform loading. In EDTA + SB specimens, the relative mineral concentration incremented when loading in hold, in general. Nonuniform parameters of Bis-GMA and adhesive penetration were encountered in both groups. PA + SB promoted the highest dentin mineralization degree when loading in square, based on the increase in the relative presence of minerals and crystallinity. EDTA + SB produced any advance crystallographic maturity at the interface. High crosslinking parameters and conformational changes in proteins in PA-treated specimens indicated, indirectly, that the first remineralization is intrafibrillar. PMID:24671520

  4. Contact mechanics of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement under adverse edge loading conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John

    2014-01-01

    Edge loading can negatively impact the biomechanics and long-term performance of hip replacements. Although edge loading has been widely investigated for hard-on-hard articulations, limited work has been conducted for hard-on-soft combinations. The aim of the present study was to investigate edge loading and its effect on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR). A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing. Different cup inclination angles and head lateral microseparation were modelled and their effect on the contact mechanics of the modular MoP hip replacement were examined. The results showed that lateral microseparation caused loading of the head on the rim of the cup, which produced substantial increases in the maximum von Mises stress in the polyethylene liner and the maximum contact pressure on both the articulating surface and backside surface of the liner. Plastic deformation of the liner was observed under both standard conditions and microseparation conditions, however, the maximum equivalent plastic strain in the liner under microseparation conditions of 2000 µm was predicted to be approximately six times that under standard conditions. The study has indicated that correct positioning the components to avoid edge loading is likely to be important clinically even for hard-on-soft bearings for THR. PMID:25218504

  5. Closed-form analysis of fiber-matrix interface stresses under thermo-mechanical loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Rajiv A.; Crews, John H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Closed form techniques for calculating fiber matrix (FM) interface stresses, using repeating square and diamond regular arrays, were presented for a unidirectional composite under thermo-mechanical loadings. An Airy's stress function micromechanics approach from the literature, developed for calculating overall composite moduli, was extended in the present study to compute FM interface stresses for a unidirectional graphite/epoxy (AS4/3501-6) composite under thermal, longitudinal, transverse, transverse shear, and longitudinal shear loadings. Comparison with finite element results indicate excellent agreement of the FM interface stresses for the square array. Under thermal and longitudinal loading, the square array has the same FM peak stresses as the diamond array. The square array predicted higher stress concentrations under transverse normal and longitudinal shear loadings than the diamond array. Under transverse shear loading, the square array had a higher stress concentration while the diamond array had a higher radial stress concentration. Stress concentration factors under transverse shear and longitudinal shear loadings were very sensitive to fiber volume fraction. The present analysis provides a simple way to calculate accurate FM interface stresses for both the square and diamond array configurations.

  6. Mechanical loading prevents the stimulating effect of IL-1{beta} on osteocyte-modulated osteoclastogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Rishikesh N.; Bakker, Astrid D.; Everts, Vincent; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osteocyte incubation with IL-1{beta} stimulated osteocyte-modulated osteoclastogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditioned medium from IL-1{beta}-treated osteocytes increased osteoclastogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IL-1{beta} upregulated RANKL and downregulated OPG gene expression by osteocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CYR61 is upregulated in mechanically stimulated osteocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanical loading of osteocytes may abolish IL-1{beta}-induced osteoclastogenesis. -- Abstract: Inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis are often accompanied by higher plasma and synovial fluid levels of interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), and by increased bone resorption. Since osteocytes are known to regulate bone resorption in response to changes in mechanical stimuli, we investigated whether IL-1{beta} affects osteocyte-modulated osteoclastogenesis in the presence or absence of mechanical loading of osteocytes. MLO-Y4 osteocytes were pre-incubated with IL-1{beta} (0.1-1 ng/ml) for 24 h. Cells were either or not subjected to mechanical loading by 1 h pulsating fluid flow (PFF; 0.7 {+-} 0.3 Pa, 5 Hz) in the presence of IL-1{beta} (0.1-1 ng/ml). Conditioned medium was collected after 1 h PFF or static cultures. Subsequently mouse bone marrow cells were seeded on top of the IL-1{beta}-treated osteocytes to determine osteoclastogenesis. Conditioned medium from mechanically loaded or static IL-1{beta}-treated osteocytes was added to co-cultures of untreated osteocytes and mouse bone marrow cells. Gene expression of cysteine-rich protein 61 (CYR61/CCN1), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), and osteoprotegerin (OPG) by osteocytes was determined immediately after PFF. Incubation of osteocytes with IL-1{beta}, as well as conditioned medium from static IL-1{beta}-treated osteocytes increased the formation of osteoclasts. However, conditioned medium from mechanically loaded IL

  7. Load-bearing capacity of screw-retained CAD/CAM-produced titanium implant frameworks (I-Bridge®2) before and after cyclic mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    DITTMER, Marc Philipp; NENSA, Moritz; STIESCH, Meike; KOHORST, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Implant-supported screw-retained fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) produced by CAD/ CAM have been introduced in recent years for the rehabilitation of partial or total endentulous jaws. However, there is a lack of data about the long-term mechanical characteristics. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the failure mode and the influence of extended cyclic mechanical loading on the load-bearing capacity of these frameworks. Material and Methods Ten five-unit FDP frameworks simulating a free-end situation in the mandibular jaw were manufactured according to the I-Bridge®2-concept (I-Bridge®2, Biomain AB, Helsingborg, Sweden) and each was screw-retained on three differently angulated Astra Tech implants (30º buccal angulation/0º angulation/30º lingual angulation). One half of the specimens was tested for static load-bearing capacity without any further treatment (control), whereas the other half underwent five million cycles of mechanical loading with 100 N as the upper load limit (test). All specimens were loaded until failure in a universal testing machine with an occlusal force applied at the pontics. Load-displacement curves were recorded and the failure mode was macro- and microscopically analyzed. The statistical analysis was performed using a t-test (p=0.05). Results All the specimens survived cyclic mechanical loading and no obvious failure could be observed. Due to the cyclic mechanical loading, the load-bearing capacity decreased from 8,496 N±196 N (control) to 7,592 N±901 N (test). The cyclic mechanical loading did not significantly influence the load-bearing capacity (p=0.060). The failure mode was almost identical in all specimens: large deformations of the framework at the implant connection area were obvious. Conclusion The load-bearing capacity of the I-Bridge®2 frameworks is much higher than the clinically relevant occlusal forces, even with considerably angulated implants. However, the performance under functional loading in vivo

  8. Cyclic mechanical loading promotes bacterial penetration along composite restoration marginal gaps

    PubMed Central

    Khvostenko, D.; Salehi, S.; Naleway, S. E.; Hilton, T. J.; Ferracane, J. L.; Mitchell, J. C.; Kruzic, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Secondary caries is the most common reason for composite restoration replacement and usually forms between dentin and the filling. The objective of this study was to investigate the combined effect of cyclic loading and bacterial exposure on bacterial penetration into gaps at the interface between dentin and resin composite restorative material using a novel bioreactor system and test specimen design. Methods Human molars were machined into 3 mm thick disks with 2 mm deep × 5 mm diameter cavity preparations into which composite restorations were placed. A ∼15-30 micrometer (small) or ∼300 micrometer wide (large) dentin-restoration gap was introduced along half of the interface between the dentin and restoration. Streptococcus mutans UA 159 biofilms were grown on each sample prior to testing in a bioreactor both with and without cyclic loading. Both groups of samples were tested for 2 weeks and post-test biofilm viability was confirmed with a live-dead assay. Samples were fixed, mounted and cross-sectioned to reveal the gaps and observe the depth of bacterial penetration. Results It was shown that for large gap samples the bacteria easily penetrated to the full depth of the gap independent of loading or non-loading conditions. The results for all cyclically loaded small gap samples show a consistently deep bacterial penetration down 100% of the gap while the average penetration depth was only 67% for the non-loaded samples with only two of six samples reaching 100%. Significance A new bioreactor was developed that allows combining cyclic mechanical loading and bacterial exposure of restored teeth for bacterial biofilm and demineralization studies. Cyclic loading was shown to aid bacterial penetration into narrow marginal gaps, which could ultimately promote secondary caries formation. PMID:25900624

  9. Evaluation of Dynamic Mechanical Loading as an Accelerated Test Method for Ribbon Fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Bosco, Nick; Silverman, Timothy J.; Wohlgemuth, John; Kurtz, Sarah; Inoue, Masanao; Sakurai, Keiichiro; Shioda, Tsuyoshi; Zenkoh, Hirofumi; Hirota, Kusato; Miyashita, Masanori; Tadanori, Tanahashi; Suzuki, Soh; Chen, Yifeng; Verlinden, Pierre J.

    2014-12-31

    Dynamic Mechanical Loading (DML) of photovoltaic modules is explored as a route to quickly fatigue copper interconnect ribbons. Results indicate that most of the interconnect ribbons may be strained through module mechanical loading to a level that will result in failure in a few hundred to thousands of cycles. Considering the speed at which DML may be applied, this translates into a few hours of testing. To evaluate the equivalence of DML to thermal cycling, parallel tests were conducted with thermal cycling. Preliminary analysis suggests that one +/-1 kPa DML cycle is roughly equivalent to one standard accelerated thermal cycle and approximately 175 of these cycles are equivalent to a 25-year exposure in Golden Colorado for the mechanism of module ribbon fatigue.

  10. Evaluation of Dynamic Mechanical Loading as an Accelerated Test Method for Ribbon Fatigue: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bosco, N.; Silverman, T. J.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Kurtz, S.; Inoue, M.; Sakurai, K.; Shinoda, T.; Zenkoh, H.; Hirota, K.; Miyashita, M.; Tadanori, T.; Suzuki, S.

    2015-04-07

    Dynamic Mechanical Loading (DML) of photovoltaic modules is explored as a route to quickly fatigue copper interconnect ribbons. Results indicate that most of the interconnect ribbons may be strained through module mechanical loading to a level that will result in failure in a few hundred to thousands of cycles. Considering the speed at which DML may be applied, this translates into a few hours o testing. To evaluate the equivalence of DML to thermal cycling, parallel tests were conducted with thermal cycling. Preliminary analysis suggests that one +/-1 kPa DML cycle is roughly equivalent to one standard accelerated thermal cycle and approximately 175 of these cycles are equivalent to a 25-year exposure in Golden Colorado for the mechanism of module ribbon fatigue.

  11. Influence of external mechanical loadings (creep, fatigue) on oxygen diffusion during nickel oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Moulin, G.; Arevalo, P.; Salleo, A.

    1996-02-01

    This study deals with the influence of various mechanical loadings (fatigue, creep, creep-fatigue) on oxygen diffusion in a particular system, oxidizing nickel. A distinction between the behavior of the oxide layer and underlying nickel was noted during the first step of oxidation at 550{degrees}C, in P{sub O{sub 2}}= 1 atm. Mechanical loading causes a decrease of the oxygen mobility through the oxide scale (factor of 10{sup 3}). The oxide thicknesses on nickel undergoing mechanical loadings are different than for an unloaded sample, due to distinct contributions of the oxygen and nickel fluxes in the growing oxide. In the substrate, the ingress of oxygen becomes easier with a constant tensile load (creep). The intergranular-oxygen diffusion coefficient, D{sub i}, is increased by a factor of 10{sup 2} with respect to other samples. In creep, oxygen diffusion takes place along grain boundaries of a structure with smaller grains than in unstrained Ni. A short fatigue period during creep-fatigue decreases the sensitivity of nickel to intergranular-oxygen diffusion.

  12. Investigation of mechanical properties of twin gold crystal nanowires under uniaxial load by molecular dynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guo-Wei; Yang, Zai-Lin; Luo, Gang

    2016-08-01

    Twin gold crystal nanowires, whose loading direction is parallel to the twin boundary orientation, are simulated. We calculate the nanowires under tensile or compressive loads, different length nanowires, and different twin boundary nanowires respectively. The Young modulus of nanowires under compressive load is about twice that under tensile load. The compressive properties of twin gold nanowires are superior to their tensile properties. For different length nanowires, there is a critical value of length with respect to the mechanical properties. When the length of nanowire is greater than the critical value, its mechanical properties are sensitive to length. The twin boundary spacing hardly affects the mechanical properties. Project supported by the National Science and Technology Pillar Program, China (Grant No. 2015BAK17B06), the Earthquake Industry Special Science Research Foundation Project, China (Grant No. 201508026-02), the Natural Science Foundation of Heilongjiang Province, China (Grant No. A201310), and the Scientific Research Starting Foundation for Post Doctorate of Heilongjiang Province, China (Grant No. LBHQ13040).

  13. Hydraulic head response of a confined aquifer influenced by river stage fluctuations and mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, F. A. L.; Fallico, C.

    2015-12-01

    The response to river stage fluctuation of a drilled well penetrating a confined aquifer was simulated using a stream-aquifer interaction algorithm. Because the confined aquifer is overlaid by a water table aquifer, the algorithm was coupled with formulae used to correct the heads for mechanical loading. The coupling of stream-aquifer interaction and mechanical loading models was tried for the first time in this study. The test site was a drilled well installed on the Montalto Uffugo aquifer located at the Calabria University groundwater test field (Calabria region, south of Italy). This aquifer comprises a 44 m-thick sand bank bounded on bottom and top by clay layers and covered by a 7 m-thick sandy conglomerate, being adjacent to the Mavigliano River. Overall, the head changes caused by a river stage raise represented a contribution of 49.3-57.8% to the total head, while mechanical loading accounted for the remaining 50.7-32.2%. The loading was triggered by a sequence of short-spaced rainfall events lasting for a total of 167 days, which caused recharge to the unconfined aquifer thickening the water column by some 3.1 m.

  14. Combined exposure to big endothelin-1 and mechanical loading in bovine sternal cores promotes osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Luisa A; Johnson, Michael G; Cullen, Diane M; Vivanco, Juan F; Blank, Robert D; Ploeg, Heidi-Lynn; Smith, Everett L

    2016-04-01

    Increased bone formation resulting from mechanical loading is well documented; however, the interactions of the mechanotransduction pathways are less well understood. Endothelin-1, a ubiquitous autocrine/paracrine signaling molecule promotes osteogenesis in metastatic disease. In the present study, it was hypothesized that exposure to big endothelin-1 (big ET1) and/or mechanical loading would promote osteogenesis in ex vivo trabecular bone cores. In a 2×2 factorial trial of daily mechanical loading (-2000με, 120cycles daily, "jump" waveform) and big ET1 (25ng/mL), 48 bovine sternal trabecular bone cores were maintained in bioreactor chambers for 23days. The bone cores' response to the treatment stimuli was assessed with percent change in core apparent elastic modulus (ΔEapp), static and dynamic histomorphometry, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) secretion. Two-way ANOVA with a post hoc Fisher's LSD test found no significant treatment effects on ΔEapp (p=0.25 and 0.51 for load and big ET1, respectively). The ΔEapp in the "no load + big ET1" (CE, 13±12.2%, p=0.56), "load + no big ET1" (LC, 17±3.9%, p=0.14) and "load + big ET1" (LE, 19±4.2%, p=0.13) treatment groups were not statistically different than the control group (CC, 3.3%±8.6%). Mineralizing surface (MS/BS), mineral apposition (MAR) and bone formation rates (BFR/BS) were significantly greater in LE than CC (p=0.037, 0.0040 and 0.019, respectively). While the histological bone formation markers in LC trended to be greater than CC (p=0.055, 0.11 and 0.074, respectively) there was no difference between CE and CC (p=0.61, 0.50 and 0.72, respectively). Cores in LE and LC had more than 50% greater MS/BS (p=0.037, p=0.055 respectively) and MAR (p=0.0040, p=0.11 respectively) than CC. The BFR/BS was more than two times greater in LE (p=0.019) and LC (p=0.074) than CC. The PGE2 levels were elevated at 8days post-osteotomy in all groups and the treatment groups remained elevated compared to the CC group on days 15

  15. The Role of Adaptation in Body Load-Regulating Mechanisms During Locomotion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruttley, Tara; Holt, Christopher; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Body loading is a fundamental parameter that modulates motor output during locomotion, and is especially important for controlling the generation of stepping patterns, dynamic balance, and termination of locomotion. Load receptors that regulate and control posture and stance in locomotion include the Golgi tendon organs and muscle spindles at the hip, knee, and ankle joints, and the Ruffini endings and the Pacinian corpuscles in the soles of the feet. Increased body weight support (BWS) during locomotion results in an immediate reorganization of locomotor control, such as a reduction in stance and double support duration and decreased hip, ankle, and knee angles during the gait cycle. Previous studies on the effect during exposure to increased BWS while walking showed a reduction in lower limb joint angles and gait cycle timing that represents a reorganization of locomotor control. Until now, no studies have investigated how locomotor control responds after a period of exposure to adaptive modification in the body load sensing system. The goal of this research was to determine the adaptive properties of body load-regulating mechanisms in locomotor control during locomotion. We hypothesized that body load-regulating mechanisms contribute to locomotor control, and adaptive changes in these load-regulating mechanisms require reorganization to maintain forward locomotion. Head-torso coordination, lower limb movement patterns, and gait cycle timing were evaluated before and after a 30-minute adaptation session during which subjects walked on a treadmill at 5.4 km/hr with 40% body weight support (BWS). Before and after the adaptation period, head-torso and lower limb 3D kinematic data were obtained while performing a goal directed task during locomotion with 0% BWS using a video-based motion analysis system, and gait cycle timing parameters were collected by foot switches positioned under the heel and toe of the subjects shoes. Subjects showed adaptive modification in

  16. Photo-thermal polymerization of nanotube/polymer composites: Effects of load transfer and mechanical strength

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Peng; Loomis, James; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2012-01-01

    The authors report a method where in-situ photon assisted heating of multi-wall carbon nanotubes was utilized for enhanced polymerization of the nanotube/polydimethylsiloxane interface that resulted in significant load transfer and improved mechanical properties. Large Raman shifts (20 cm−1 wavenumbers) of the 2D bands were witnessed for near-infrared light polymerized samples, signifying increased load transfer to the nanotubes for up to ∼80% strains. An increase in elastic modulus of ∼130% for 1 wt. % composites is reported for photon assisted crosslinking. PMID:22509070

  17. Concurrent material-fabrication optimization of metal-matrix laminates under thermo-mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Morel, M. R.; Chamis, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is developed to tailor fabrication and material parameters of metal-matrix laminates for maximum loading capacity under thermomechanical loads. The stresses during the thermomechanical response are minimized subject to failure constrains and bounds on the laminate properties. The thermomechanical response of the laminate is simulated using nonlinear composite mechanics. Evaluations of the method on a graphite/copper symmetric cross-ply laminate were performed. The cross-ply laminate required different optimum fabrication procedures than a unidirectional composite. Also, the consideration of the thermomechanical cycle had a significant effect on the predicted optimal process.

  18. Mechanics of load transfer at the interface. [from matrix to fiber of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    The mechanism of load transfer from matrix to fiber though the interface and, as a consequence, the effects of the interface on composite structural integrity are discussed. Specifically, the present work deals with the role of interfacial bonding in composite strength, the dependence of fracture surface on interface bond strength, and methods of measuring and predicting the stress at the interface, the microresidual stress, and load condition effects on the interface bond. The possibility of designing composites with specified bond properties is examined. Many of these effects are illustrated graphically to indicate general trends and to illustrate significant points. The discussion is based on theoretical considerations and is supplemented with pertinent experimental data.

  19. Mechanics of energy transfer and failure of ductile microscale beams subjected to dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimberley, J.; Lambros, J.; Chasiotis, I.; Pulskamp, J.; Polcawich, R.; Dubey, M.

    2010-08-01

    The mechanical response of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) under impulse loading conditions has not been thoroughly studied to date, partially because of the lack of means to provide such extreme loading rates to miniature devices. However, the increasing use of MEMS-based sensors and actuators in adverse environments, which include extreme strain rate loading, has motivated the investigation of the response of MEMS components under these conditions. In this work, basic and mostly commonly employed Au MEMS components were subjected to impulse loads of 40 ns in duration, which were generated by a high power pulsed laser in order to achieve acceleration levels on the order of 10 9g. This allowed for the microdevice mechanical/structural response to be investigated at time scales that were of the order of wave transit times in the substrate and the devices. Basic microscale structures, such as cantilevers and fixed-fixed beams of uniform cross-section, were employed to facilitate comparisons with companion finite element simulations in order to gain insight into the mechanisms responsible for impulsive deformation at the microscale. The simulations investigated the effect of loading rate, boundary conditions, beam length, material constitutive response, and damping on the final deformed shapes of the beams. It was found that contact and momentum transfer mechanisms were responsible for the large permanent beam deflections which were measured postmortem. Additionally, the effects of both damping and material property rate dependence were found to be dominant in determining the final deformed shape of the beams. In fact, our observations suggest that the contributions of material rate dependence and damping are not simply additive, but rather involve a coupling between them that affects the final structure response.

  20. Preclinical models for in vitro mechanical loading of bone-derived cells

    PubMed Central

    Michael Delaine-Smith, Robin; Javaheri, Behzad; Helen Edwards, Jennifer; Vazquez, Marisol; Rumney, Robin Mark Howard

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that bone responds to mechanical stimuli whereby physical forces are translated into chemical signals between cells, via mechanotransduction. It is difficult however to study the precise cellular and molecular responses using in vivo systems. In vitro loading models, which aim to replicate forces found within the bone microenvironment, make the underlying processes of mechanotransduction accessible to the researcher. Direct measurements in vivo and predictive modeling have been used to define these forces in normal physiological and pathological states. The types of mechanical stimuli present in the bone include vibration, fluid shear, substrate deformation and compressive loading, which can all be applied in vitro to monolayer and three-dimensional (3D) cultures. In monolayer, vibration can be readily applied to cultures via a low-magnitude, high-frequency loading rig. Fluid shear can be applied to cultures in multiwell plates via a simple rocking platform to engender gravitational fluid movement or via a pump to cells attached to a slide within a parallel-plate flow chamber, which may be micropatterned for use with osteocytes. Substrate strain can be applied via the vacuum-driven FlexCell system or via a four-point loading jig. 3D cultures better replicate the bone microenvironment and can also be subjected to the same forms of mechanical stimuli as monolayer, including vibration, fluid shear via perfusion flow, strain or compression. 3D cocultures that more closely replicate the bone microenvironment can be used to study the collective response of several cell types to loading. This technical review summarizes the methods for applying mechanical stimuli to bone cells in vitro. PMID:26331007

  1. Preclinical models for in vitro mechanical loading of bone-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Michael Delaine-Smith, Robin; Javaheri, Behzad; Helen Edwards, Jennifer; Vazquez, Marisol; Rumney, Robin Mark Howard

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that bone responds to mechanical stimuli whereby physical forces are translated into chemical signals between cells, via mechanotransduction. It is difficult however to study the precise cellular and molecular responses using in vivo systems. In vitro loading models, which aim to replicate forces found within the bone microenvironment, make the underlying processes of mechanotransduction accessible to the researcher. Direct measurements in vivo and predictive modeling have been used to define these forces in normal physiological and pathological states. The types of mechanical stimuli present in the bone include vibration, fluid shear, substrate deformation and compressive loading, which can all be applied in vitro to monolayer and three-dimensional (3D) cultures. In monolayer, vibration can be readily applied to cultures via a low-magnitude, high-frequency loading rig. Fluid shear can be applied to cultures in multiwell plates via a simple rocking platform to engender gravitational fluid movement or via a pump to cells attached to a slide within a parallel-plate flow chamber, which may be micropatterned for use with osteocytes. Substrate strain can be applied via the vacuum-driven FlexCell system or via a four-point loading jig. 3D cultures better replicate the bone microenvironment and can also be subjected to the same forms of mechanical stimuli as monolayer, including vibration, fluid shear via perfusion flow, strain or compression. 3D cocultures that more closely replicate the bone microenvironment can be used to study the collective response of several cell types to loading. This technical review summarizes the methods for applying mechanical stimuli to bone cells in vitro. PMID:26331007

  2. Thermo-mechanical History of a Friction Stir Welded Plate; Influence of the Mechanical Loading on the Residual Stress Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paun, Florin; Azouzi, Alexandre

    2004-06-01

    The Friction Stir Welding is considered to be one of the most promising processing for aeronautics. The obtained welded joints (for the best welding parameters) seem to have better resistance than conventional joining techniques including riveting. To predict the best welding process conditions, current work aims to completely describe the thermo-mechanical history using computer simulation. In this paper, we will present the latest numerical results, thermal and stress-strain fields, obtained for a "virtual" welded plate. This numerical simulation introduces both thermal and mechanical loadings using a step by step advancing coupled method with SAMCEF code. Further works are proposed for the development of a FSW predictive numerical tool.

  3. In Vivo Mechanical Loading Rapidly Activates β–catenin Signaling in Osteocytes through a Prostaglandin Mediated Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Castillo, N; Kim-Weroha, NA; Kamel, MA; Javaheri, B; Ellies, DL; Krumlauf, RE; Thiagarajan, G; Johnson, ML

    2015-01-01

    The response of the skeleton to loading appears to be mediated through the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and osteocytes have long been postulated to be the primary mechanosensory cells in bone. To examine the kinetics of the mechanoresponse of bone and cell types involved in the in vivo, we performed forearm loading of 17-week-old female TOPGAL mice. β-catenin signaling was observed only in embedded osteocytes, not osteoblasts, at 1 hour post loading, spreading to additional osteocytes and finally to cells on the bone surface by 24 hrs. This early activation at 1 hour appeared to be independent of receptor (Lrp5/6) mediated activation as it occurred in the presence of the inhibitors sclerostin and/or Dkk1. The COX-2 inhibitor, Carprofen, blocked the activation of β-catenin signaling and decline in sclerostin positive osteocytes post-loading implying an important role for prostaglandin. In vitro, PI3K/Akt activation was shown to be required for β-catenin nuclear translocation downstream from prostaglandin in MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells supporting this mechanism. Downstream targets of β-catenin signaling, sclerostin and Dkk1, were also examined and found to be significantly down regulated in osteocytes in vivo at 24 hours post-loading. The pattern of initially activated osteocytes appeared random and in order to understand this heterogeneous expression, a novel finite element model of the strain field in the ulna was developed, which predicts highly variable local magnitudes of strain experienced by osteocytes. In summary, both in vivo and in vitro models show the rapid activation of β-catenin in response to load through the early release of prostaglandin and that strain fields in the bone are extremely heterogeneous resulting in heterogeneous activation of the β-catenin pathway in osteocytes in vivo. PMID:25836764

  4. In vivo mechanical loading rapidly activates β-catenin signaling in osteocytes through a prostaglandin mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lara-Castillo, N; Kim-Weroha, N A; Kamel, M A; Javaheri, B; Ellies, D L; Krumlauf, R E; Thiagarajan, G; Johnson, M L

    2015-07-01

    The response of the skeleton to loading appears to be mediated through the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and osteocytes have long been postulated to be the primary mechanosensory cells in bone. To examine the kinetics of the mechanoresponse of bone and cell types involved in vivo, we performed forearm loading of 17-week-old female TOPGAL mice. β-catenin signaling was observed only in embedded osteocytes, not osteoblasts, at 1h post-loading, spreading to additional osteocytes and finally to cells on the bone surface by 24h. This early activation at 1h appeared to be independent of receptor (Lrp5/6) mediated activation as it occurred in the presence of the inhibitors sclerostin and/or Dkk1. The COX-2 inhibitor, Carprofen, blocked the activation of β-catenin signaling and decline in sclerostin positive osteocytes post-loading implying an important role for prostaglandin. In vitro, PI3K/Akt activation was shown to be required for β-catenin nuclear translocation downstream from prostaglandin in MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells supporting this mechanism. Downstream targets of β-catenin signaling, sclerostin and Dkk1, were also examined and found to be significantly downregulated in osteocytes in vivo at 24h post-loading. The pattern of initially activated osteocytes appeared random and in order to understand this heterogeneous expression, a novel finite element model of the strain field in the ulna was developed, which predicts highly variable local magnitudes of strain experienced by osteocytes. In summary, both in vivo and in vitro models show the rapid activation of β-catenin in response to load through the early release of prostaglandin and that strain fields in the bone are extremely heterogeneous resulting in heterogeneous activation of the β-catenin pathway in osteocytes in vivo. PMID:25836764

  5. Computational modeling of dynamic mechanical properties of pure polycrystalline magnesium under high loading strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qizhen

    2015-09-01

    Computational simulations were performed to investigate the dynamic mechanical behavior of pure polycrystalline magnesium under different high loading strain rates with the values of 800, 1000, 2000, and 3600 s-1. The Johnson-Cook model was utilized in the simulations based on finite element modeling. The results showed that the simulations provided well-matched predictions of the material behavior such as the strain rate-time history, the stress-strain curve, and the temperature increase. Under high loading strain rates, the tested material experienced linear strain hardening at the early stage of plastic deformation, increased strain hardening at the intermediate plastic deformation region, and decreased strain hardening at the region before fracture. The strain hardening rates for the studied high loading strain rate cases do not vary much with the change of strain rates.

  6. Mechanical properties of methacrylate-based model dentin adhesives: effect of loading rate and moisture exposure.

    PubMed

    Singh, Viraj; Misra, Anil; Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Ye, Qiang; Park, Jonggu; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanical behavior of model methacrylate-based dentin adhesives under conditions that simulate the wet oral environment. A series of monotonic and creep experiments were performed on rectangular beam samples of dentin adhesive in three-point bending configuration under different moisture conditions. The monotonic test results show a significant effect of loading rate on the failure strength and the linear limit (yield point) of the stress-strain response. In addition, these tests show that the failure strength is low, and the failure occurs at a smaller deformation when the test is performed under continuously changing moisture conditions. The creep test results show that under constant moisture conditions, the model dentin adhesives can have a viscoelastic response under certain low loading levels. However, when the moisture conditions vary under the same low loading levels, the dentin adhesives have an anomalous creep response accompanied by large secondary creep and high strain accumulation. PMID:23744598

  7. Mechanical effects associated with surface loading of dry rock due to glaciation

    SciTech Connect

    Wahi, K.K.; Hunter, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Many scenarios of interest for a repository in the Pasco Basin begin with glaciation. Loading and unloading of joints and fractures due to the weight of ice sheets could affect the hydrologic properties of the host rock and surrounding units. Scoping calculations performed using two-dimensional numerical models with simplifying assumptions predict stress changes and uplift or subsidence caused by an advancing glacier. The magnitudes of surface uplift and subsidence predicted by the study agree well with previous independent predictions. Peak stress unloading near the repository horizon is a small fraction of the ambient stress. Any resultant aperture increase is likewise small. Based on the results of this study, mechanical loading caused by a glacier is expected to have a minimal effect on rock permeability, assuming that the excess compressive loads do not crush the rock. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Fibrin Networks Support Recurring Mechanical Loads by Adapting their Structure across Multiple Scales.

    PubMed

    Kurniawan, Nicholas A; Vos, Bart E; Biebricher, Andreas; Wuite, Gijs J L; Peterman, Erwin J G; Koenderink, Gijsje H

    2016-09-01

    Tissues and cells sustain recurring mechanical loads that span a wide range of loading amplitudes and timescales as a consequence of exposure to blood flow, muscle activity, and external impact. Both tissues and cells derive their mechanical strength from fibrous protein scaffolds, which typically have a complex hierarchical structure. In this study, we focus on a prototypical hierarchical biomaterial, fibrin, which is one of the most resilient naturally occurring biopolymers and forms the structural scaffold of blood clots. We show how fibrous networks composed of fibrin utilize irreversible changes in their hierarchical structure at different scales to maintain reversible stress stiffening up to large strains. To trace the origin of this paradoxical resilience, we systematically tuned the microstructural parameters of fibrin and used a combination of optical tweezers and fluorescence microscopy to measure the interactions of single fibrin fibers for the first time, to our knowledge. We demonstrate that fibrin networks adapt to moderate strains by remodeling at the network scale through the spontaneous formation of new bonds between fibers, whereas they adapt to high strains by plastic remodeling of the fibers themselves. This multiscale adaptation mechanism endows fibrin gels with the remarkable ability to sustain recurring loads due to shear flows and wound stretching. Our findings therefore reveal a microscopic mechanism by which tissues and cells can balance elastic nonlinearity and plasticity, and thus can provide microstructural insights into cell-driven remodeling of tissues. PMID:27602730

  9. Mechanism of augmented exercise hyperpnea in chronic heart failure and dead space loading

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Chi-Sang; Tin, Chung

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) suffer increased alveolar VD/VT (dead-space-to-tidal-volume ratio), yet they demonstrate augmented pulmonary ventilation such that arterial PCO2 (PaCO2) remains remarkably normal from rest to moderate exercise. This paradoxical effect suggests that the control law governing exercise hyperpnea is not merely determined by metabolic CO2 production (V̇CO2) per se but is responsive to an apparent (real-feel) metabolic CO2 load (V˙CO2o) that also incorporates the adverse effect of physiological VD/VT on pulmonary CO2 elimination. By contrast, healthy individuals subjected to dead space loading also experience augmented ventilation at rest and during exercise as with increased alveolar VD/VT in CHF, but the resultant response is hypercapnic instead of eucapnic, as with CO2 breathing. The ventilatory effects of dead space loading are therefore similar to those of increased alveolar VD/VT and CO2 breathing combined. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that the increased series VD/VT in dead space loading adds to V˙CO2o as with increased alveolar VD/VT in CHF, but this is through rebreathing of CO2 in dead space gas thus creating a virtual (illusory) airway CO2 load within each inspiration, as opposed to a true airway CO2 load during CO2 breathing that clogs the mechanism for CO2 elimination through pulmonary ventilation. Thus, the chemosensing mechanism at the respiratory controller may be responsive to putative drive signals mediated by within-breath PaCO2 oscillations independent of breath-to-breath fluctuations of the mean PaCO2 level. Skeletal muscle afferents feedback, while important for early-phase exercise cardioventilatory dynamics, appears inconsequential for late-phase exercise hyperpnea. PMID:23274121

  10. Launch Load Resistant Spacecraft Mechanism Bearings Made From NiTi Superelastic Intermetallic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Moore, Lewis E., III

    2014-01-01

    Compared to conventional bearing materials (tool steel and ceramics), emerging Superelastic Intermetallic Materials (SIMs), such as 60NiTi, have significantly lower elastic modulus and enhanced strain capability. They are also immune to atmospheric corrosion (rusting). This offers the potential for increased resilience and superior ability to withstand static indentation load without damage. In this paper, the static load capacity of hardened 60NiTi 50-mm-bore ball bearing races are measured to correlate existing flat-plate indentation load capacity data to an actual bearing geometry through the Hertz stress relations. The results confirmed the validity of using the Hertz stress relations to model 60NiTi contacts; 60NiTi exhibits a static stress capability (approximately 3.1 GPa) between that of 440C (2.4 GPa) and REX20 (3.8 GPa) tool steel. When the reduced modulus and extended strain capability are taken into account, 60NiTi is shown to withstand higher loads than other bearing materials. To quantify this effect, a notional space mechanism, a 5-kg mass reaction wheel, was modeled with respect to launch load capability when supported on standard (catalogue geometry) design 440C; 60NiTi and REX20 tool steel bearings. For this application, the use of REX20 bearings increased the static load capability of the mechanism by a factor of three while the use of 60NiTi bearings resulted in an order of magnitude improvement compared to the baseline 440C stainless steel bearings

  11. Mechanism of augmented exercise hyperpnea in chronic heart failure and dead space loading.

    PubMed

    Poon, Chi-Sang; Tin, Chung

    2013-03-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) suffer increased alveolar VD/VT (dead-space-to-tidal-volume ratio), yet they demonstrate augmented pulmonary ventilation such that arterial [Formula: see text] ( [Formula: see text] ) remains remarkably normal from rest to moderate exercise. This paradoxical effect suggests that the control law governing exercise hyperpnea is not merely determined by metabolic CO2 production ( [Formula: see text] ) per se but is responsive to an apparent (real-feel) metabolic CO2 load ( [Formula: see text] ) that also incorporates the adverse effect of physiological VD/VT on pulmonary CO2 elimination. By contrast, healthy individuals subjected to dead space loading also experience augmented ventilation at rest and during exercise as with increased alveolar VD/VT in CHF, but the resultant response is hypercapnic instead of eucapnic, as with CO2 breathing. The ventilatory effects of dead space loading are therefore similar to those of increased alveolar VD/VT and CO2 breathing combined. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that the increased series VD/VT in dead space loading adds to [Formula: see text] as with increased alveolar VD/VT in CHF, but this is through rebreathing of CO2 in dead space gas thus creating a virtual (illusory) airway CO2 load within each inspiration, as opposed to a true airway CO2 load during CO2 breathing that clogs the mechanism for CO2 elimination through pulmonary ventilation. Thus, the chemosensing mechanism at the respiratory controller may be responsive to putative drive signals mediated by within-breath [Formula: see text] oscillations independent of breath-to-breath fluctuations of the mean [Formula: see text] level. Skeletal muscle afferents feedback, while important for early-phase exercise cardioventilatory dynamics, appears inconsequential for late-phase exercise hyperpnea. PMID:23274121

  12. A new method to investigate how mechanical loading of osteocytes controls osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Marisol; Evans, Bronwen A J; Riccardi, Daniela; Evans, Sam L; Ralphs, Jim R; Dillingham, Christopher Mark; Mason, Deborah J

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical loading, a potent stimulator of bone formation, is governed by osteocyte regulation of osteoblasts. We developed a three-dimensional (3D) in vitro co-culture system to investigate the effect of loading on osteocyte-osteoblast interactions. MLO-Y4 cells were embedded in type I collagen gels and MC3T3-E1(14) or MG63 cells layered on top. Ethidium homodimer staining of 3D co-cultures showed 100% osteoblasts and 86% osteocytes were viable after 7 days. Microscopy revealed osteoblasts and osteocytes maintain their respective ovoid/pyriform and dendritic morphologies in 3D co-cultures. Reverse-transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) extracted separately from osteoblasts and osteocytes, showed that podoplanin (E11), osteocalcin, and runt-related transcription factor 2 mRNAs were expressed in both cell types. Type I collagen (Col1a1) mRNA expression was higher in osteoblasts (P < 0.001), whereas, alkaline phosphatase mRNA was higher in osteocytes (P = 0.001). Immunohistochemistry revealed osteoblasts and osteocytes express E11, type I pro-collagen, and connexin 43 proteins. In preliminary experiments to assess osteogenic responses, co-cultures were treated with human recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) or mechanical loading using a custom built loading device. BMP-2 treatment significantly increased osteoblast Col1a1 mRNA synthesis (P = 0.031) in MLO-Y4/MG63 co-cultures after 5 days treatment. A 16-well silicone plate, loaded (5 min, 10 Hz, 2.5 N) to induce 4000-4500 με cyclic compression within gels increased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release 0.5 h post-load in MLO-Y4 cells pre-cultured in 3D collagen gels for 48, 72 h, or 7 days. Mechanical loading of 3D co-cultures increased type I pro-collagen release 1 and 5 days later. These methods reveal a new osteocyte-osteoblast co-culture model that may be useful for investigating mechanically induced osteocyte

  13. A New Method to Investigate How Mechanical Loading of Osteocytes Controls Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Marisol; Evans, Bronwen A. J.; Riccardi, Daniela; Evans, Sam L.; Ralphs, Jim R.; Dillingham, Christopher Mark; Mason, Deborah J.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical loading, a potent stimulator of bone formation, is governed by osteocyte regulation of osteoblasts. We developed a three-dimensional (3D) in vitro co-culture system to investigate the effect of loading on osteocyte–osteoblast interactions. MLO-Y4 cells were embedded in type I collagen gels and MC3T3-E1(14) or MG63 cells layered on top. Ethidium homodimer staining of 3D co-cultures showed 100% osteoblasts and 86% osteocytes were viable after 7 days. Microscopy revealed osteoblasts and osteocytes maintain their respective ovoid/pyriform and dendritic morphologies in 3D co-cultures. Reverse-transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) extracted separately from osteoblasts and osteocytes, showed that podoplanin (E11), osteocalcin, and runt-related transcription factor 2 mRNAs were expressed in both cell types. Type I collagen (Col1a1) mRNA expression was higher in osteoblasts (P < 0.001), whereas, alkaline phosphatase mRNA was higher in osteocytes (P = 0.001). Immunohistochemistry revealed osteoblasts and osteocytes express E11, type I pro-collagen, and connexin 43 proteins. In preliminary experiments to assess osteogenic responses, co-cultures were treated with human recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) or mechanical loading using a custom built loading device. BMP-2 treatment significantly increased osteoblast Col1a1 mRNA synthesis (P = 0.031) in MLO-Y4/MG63 co-cultures after 5 days treatment. A 16-well silicone plate, loaded (5 min, 10 Hz, 2.5 N) to induce 4000–4500 με cyclic compression within gels increased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release 0.5 h post-load in MLO-Y4 cells pre-cultured in 3D collagen gels for 48, 72 h, or 7 days. Mechanical loading of 3D co-cultures increased type I pro-collagen release 1 and 5 days later. These methods reveal a new osteocyte–osteoblast co-culture model that may be useful for investigating mechanically induced

  14. Fatigue characteristics and microcosmic mechanism of Al-Si-Mg alloys under multiaxial proportional loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiao-Song; He, Guo-Qiu; Liu, Bing; Zhu, Zheng-Yu; Zhang, Wei-Hua

    2011-08-01

    With the increasing use of Al-Si-Mg alloys in the automotive industry, the fatigue performance of Al-Si-Mg alloy has become a major concern with regard to their reliability. The fatigue characteristics and microcosmic mechanism of an Al-Si-Mg alloy under multiaxial proportional loadings were investigated in this research. As low cycle fatigue life and material strengthening behavior are closely related, the effect of equivalent strain amplitude on the multiaxial fatigue properties was analyzed. Fatigue tests were conducted to determine the influence of equivalent strain amplitude on the multiaxial proportional fatigue properties. The fatigue life exhibits a stable behavior under multiaxial proportional loadings. The dislocation structures of the Al-Si-Mg alloy were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The dislocation structure evolution of the Al-Si-Mg alloy under multiaxial proportional loadings during low cycle fatigue develops step by step by increasing fatigue cycles. Simultaneously, the dislocation structure changes with the change in equivalent strain amplitude under multiaxial proportional loadings. The experimental evidence indicates that the multiaxial fatigue behavior and life are strongly dependent on the microstructure of the material, which is caused by multiaxial proportional loadings.

  15. An experimental system for high temperature X-ray diffraction studies with in situ mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Benjamin B.; Schuren, Jay C.; Pagan, Darren C.; Miller, Matthew P.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental system with in situ thermomechanical loading has been developed to enable high energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of crystalline materials. The system applies and maintains loads of up to 2250 N in uniaxial tension or compression at a frequency of up to 100 Hz. The furnace heats the specimen uniformly up to a maximum temperature of 1200 °C in a variety of atmospheres (oxidizing, inert, reducing) that, combined with in situ mechanical loading, can be used to mimic processing and operating conditions of engineering components. The loaded specimen is reoriented with respect to the incident beam of x-rays using two rotational axes to increase the number of crystal orientations interrogated. The system was used at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source to conduct experiments on single crystal silicon and polycrystalline Low Solvus High Refractory nickel-based superalloy. The data from these experiments provide new insights into how stresses evolve at the crystal scale during thermomechanical loading and complement the development of high-fidelity material models. PMID:23556825

  16. Antimicrobial, Mechanical and Thermal Studies of Silver Particle-Loaded Polyurethane

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Deepen; Paul, Sharmistha; Roohpour, Nima; Wilks, Mark; Vadgama, Pankaj

    2013-01-01

    Silver-particle-incorporated polyurethane films were evaluated for antimicrobial activity towards two different bacteria: Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Distributed silver particles sourced from silver nitrate, silver lactate and preformed silver nanoparticles were mixed with polyurethane (PU) and variously characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and contact angle measurement. Antibacterial activity against E.coli was confirmed for films loaded with 10% (w/w) AgNO3, 1% and 10% (w/w) Ag lactate and preformed Ag nanoparticles. All were active against S. aureus, but Ag nanoparticles loaded with PU had a minor effect. The apparent antibacterial performance of Ag lactate-loaded PU is better than other Ag ion-loaded films, revealed from the zone of inhibition study. The better performance of silver lactate-loaded PU was the likely result of a porous PU structure. FESEM and FTIR indicated direct interaction of silver with the PU backbone, and XRD patterns confirmed that face-centred cubic-type silver, representative of Ag metal, was present. Young’s modulus, tensile strength and the hardness of silver containing PU films were not adversely affected and possibly marginally increased with silver incorporation. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) indicated greater thermal stability. PMID:24956194

  17. Non-Invasive Investigation of Bone Adaptation in Humans to Mechanical Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, R.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental studies have identified peak cyclic forces, number of loading cycles, and loading rate as contributors to the regulation of bone metabolism. We have proposed a theoretical model that relates bone density to a mechanical stimulus derived from average daily cumulative peak cyclic 'effective' tissue stresses. In order to develop a non-invasive experimental model to test the theoretical model we need to: (1) monitor daily cumulative loading on a bone, (2) compute the internal stress state(s) resulting from the imposed loading, and (3) image volumetric bone density accurately, precisely, and reproducibly within small contiguous volumes throughout the bone. We have chosen the calcaneus (heel) as an experimental model bone site because it is loaded by ligament, tendon and joint contact forces in equilibrium with daily ground reaction forces that we can measure; it is a peripheral bone site and therefore more easily and accurately imaged with computed tomography; it is composed primarily of cancellous bone; and it is a relevant site for monitoring bone loss and adaptation in astronauts and the general population. This paper presents an overview of our recent advances in the areas of monitoring daily ground reaction forces, biomechanical modeling of the forces on the calcaneus during gait, mathematical modeling of calcaneal bone adaptation in response to cumulative daily activity, accurate and precise imaging of the calcaneus with quantitative computed tomography (QCT), and application to long duration space flight.

  18. Mechanical Assessment of the Drep Shield Subject to Vibratory Motion and Dynamic and Static Rock Loading

    SciTech Connect

    R.C. Quittmeyer

    2005-11-16

    The purpose of the drip shield (DS) is to divert water that may seep into emplacement drifts from contacting the waste packages, and to protect the waste packages from impact or static loading from rockfall. The objective of this document is to summarize, into one location, the results of a series of supporting engineering calculations that were developed to study the effect of static and dynamic loads on the mechanical performance of the DS. The potential DS loads are a result of: (1) Potential earthquake vibratory ground motion, and resulting interaction of the DS, waste package and pallet, and drift invert; (2) Dynamic impacts of rockfall resulting from emplacement drift damage as a result of earthquake vibratory motion; and (3) Static load of the caved rock rubble that may come to rest on the DS as a result of vibratory motion or from time-dependent yielding of the rock mass surrounding the emplacement drift. The potential mechanical failure mechanisms that may result from these loads include: (1) Overturning and/or separation of the interlocking DS segments; (2) Loss of structural integrity and stability of the DS, including excessive deformation or buckling; and (3) Localized damage to the top and side-wall plates of the DS. The scope of this document is limited to summarizing results presented in the supporting calculations in the areas of analysis of the potential for DS collapse, and determination of the damaged surface area of the DS plates. New calculations are presented to determine whether or not separation of DSs occur under vibratory motion.

  19. Immature articular cartilage and subchondral bone covered by menisci are potentially susceptive to mechanical load

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The differences of mechanical and histological properties between cartilage covered by menisci and uncovered by menisci may contribute to the osteoarthritis after meniscectomy and these differences are not fully understood. The purpose of this study is to investigate potential differences in the mechanical and histological properties, and in particular the collagen architecture, of the superficial cartilage layer and subchondral bone between regions covered and uncovered by menisci using immature knee. Methods Osteochondral plugs were obtained from porcine tibial cartilage that was either covered or uncovered by menisci. Investigation of the thickness, mechanical properties, histology, and water content of the cartilage as well as micro-computed tomography analysis of the subchondral bone was performed to compare these regions. Collagen architecture was also assessed by using scanning electron microscopy. Results Compared to the cartilage uncovered by menisci, that covered by menisci was thinner and showed a higher deformity to compression loading and higher water content. In the superficial layer of cartilage in the uncovered regions, collagen fibers showed high density, whereas they showed low density in covered regions. Furthermore, subchondral bone architecture varied between the 2 regions, and showed low bone density in covered regions. Conclusions Cartilage covered by menisci differed from that uncovered in both its mechanical and histological properties, especially with regards to the density of the superficial collagen layer. These regional differences may be related to local mechanical environment in normal condition and indicate that cartilage covered by menisci is tightly guarded by menisci from extreme mechanical loading. Our results indicate that immature cartilage degeneration and subchondral microfracture may occur easily to extreme direct mechanical loading in covered region after meniscectomy. PMID:24669849

  20. Shield mechanics and resultant load-vector studies. Report of Investigations/1986

    SciTech Connect

    Barczak, T.M.; Garson, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    The term resultant load vector is defined as the representation of the forces applied to a longwall roof-support element by strata activity through a single, quantifiable measure of support resistance. The relatively complex kinematics of the shield structure prohibit determination of support resistance simply from the summation of leg forces. In the research reported in the Bureau of Mines study, the mechanics of the shield structure were evaluated and a technique was developed whereby the resultant shield loading could be determined by instrumenting supports with pressure transducers and strain gages to measure leg, canopy capsule, and lemniscate link forces. The technique was laboratory tested in the Bureau's Mine Roof Simulator. Functional relationships among variables were assessed, and confidence intervals were established for prediction of the resultant load-vector parameters. Resultant load measurements were taken on five instrumented shields on an active longwall face in Colorado. Results were analyzed and found to be consistent with shield mechanics and anticipated roof behavior. Benefits to be derived from the research, future efforts, and long-range goals are discussed.

  1. A mathematical method for quantifying in vivo mechanical behaviour of heel pad under dynamic load.

    PubMed

    Naemi, Roozbeh; Chatzistergos, Panagiotis E; Chockalingam, Nachiappan

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical behaviour of the heel pad, as a shock attenuating interface during a foot strike, determines the loading on the musculoskeletal system during walking. The mathematical models that describe the force deformation relationship of the heel pad structure can determine the mechanical behaviour of heel pad under load. Hence, the purpose of this study was to propose a method of quantifying the heel pad stress-strain relationship using force-deformation data from an indentation test. The energy input and energy returned densities were calculated by numerically integrating the area below the stress-strain curve during loading and unloading, respectively. Elastic energy and energy absorbed densities were calculated as the sum of and the difference between energy input and energy returned densities, respectively. By fitting the energy function, derived from a nonlinear viscoelastic model, to the energy density-strain data, the elastic and viscous model parameters were quantified. The viscous and elastic exponent model parameters were significantly correlated with maximum strain, indicating the need to perform indentation tests at realistic maximum strains relevant to walking. The proposed method showed to be able to differentiate between the elastic and viscous components of the heel pad response to loading and to allow quantifying the corresponding stress-strain model parameters. PMID:26044551

  2. Characterization of active hair-bundle motility by a mechanical-load clamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, Joshua D.; Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid Ó.; Fabella, Brian A.; Tobin, Mélanie; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Active hair-bundle motility endows hair cells with several traits that augment auditory stimuli. The activity of a hair bundle might be controlled by adjusting its mechanical properties. Indeed, the mechanical properties of bundles vary between different organisms and along the tonotopic axis of a single auditory organ. Motivated by these biological differences and a dynamical model of hair-bundle motility, we explore how adjusting the mass, drag, stiffness, and offset force applied to a bundle control its dynamics and response to external perturbations. Utilizing a mechanical-load clamp, we systematically mapped the two-dimensional state diagram of a hair bundle. The clamp system used a real-time processor to tightly control each of the virtual mechanical elements. Increasing the stiffness of a hair bundle advances its operating point from a spontaneously oscillating regime into a quiescent regime. As predicted by a dynamical model of hair-bundle mechanics, this boundary constitutes a Hopf bifurcation.

  3. Assembly and Mechanical Properties of the Cargo-Free and Cargo-Loaded Bacterial Nanocompartment Encapsulin.

    PubMed

    Snijder, Joost; Kononova, Olga; Barbu, Ioana M; Uetrecht, Charlotte; Rurup, W Frederik; Burnley, Rebecca J; Koay, Melissa S T; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M; Roos, Wouter H; Barsegov, Valeri; Wuite, Gijs J L; Heck, Albert J R

    2016-08-01

    Prokaryotes mostly lack membranous compartments that are typical of eukaryotic cells, but instead, they have various protein-based organelles. These include bacterial microcompartments like the carboxysome and the virus-like nanocompartment encapsulin. Encapsulins have an adaptable mechanism for enzyme packaging, which makes it an attractive platform to carry a foreign protein cargo. Here we investigate the assembly pathways and mechanical properties of the cargo-free and cargo-loaded nanocompartments, using a combination of native mass spectrometry, atomic force microscopy and multiscale computational molecular modeling. We show that encapsulin dimers assemble into rigid single-enzyme bacterial containers. Moreover, we demonstrate that cargo encapsulation has a mechanical impact on the shell. The structural similarity of encapsulins to virus capsids is reflected in their mechanical properties. With these robust mechanical properties encapsulins provide a suitable platform for the development of nanotechnological applications. PMID:27355101

  4. Hydraulic mechanism to limit torsional loads between the IUS and space transportation system orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, James R.

    1986-01-01

    The Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) is a two-stage booster used by NASA and the Defense Department to insert payloads into geosynchronous orbit from low-Earth orbit. The hydraulic mechanism discussed here was designed to perform a specific dynamic and static interface function within the Space Transportation System's Orbiter. Requirements, configuration, and application of the hydraulic mechanism with emphasis on performance and methods of achieving zero external hydraulic leakage are discussed. The hydraulic load-leveler mechanism meets the established design requirements for operation in a low-Earth orbit. Considerable testing was conducted to demonstrate system performance and verification that external leakage had been reduced to zero. Following each flight use of an ASE, all hydraulic mechanism components are carefully inspected for leakage. The ASE, including the hydraulic mechanism, has performed without any anomalies during all IUS flights.

  5. Interactive evolution concept for analyzing a rock salt cavern under cyclic thermo-mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Diethard; Mahmoudi, Elham; Khaledi, Kavan; von Blumenthal, Achim; Schanz, Tom

    2016-04-01

    The excess electricity produced by renewable energy sources available during off-peak periods of consumption can be used e.g. to produce and compress hydrogen or to compress air. Afterwards the pressurized gas is stored in the rock salt cavities. During this process, thermo-mechanical cyclic loading is applied to the rock salt surrounding the cavern. Compared to the operation of conventional storage caverns in rock salt the frequencies of filling and discharging cycles and therefore the thermo-mechanical loading cycles are much higher, e.g. daily or weekly compared to seasonally or yearly. The stress strain behavior of rock salt as well as the deformation behavior and the stability of caverns in rock salt under such loading conditions are unknown. To overcome this, existing experimental studies have to be supplemented by exploring the behavior of rock salt under combined thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. Existing constitutive relations have to be extended to cover degradation of rock salt under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. At least the complex system of a cavern in rock salt under these loading conditions has to be analyzed by numerical modeling taking into account the uncertainties due to limited access in large depth to investigate material composition and properties. An interactive evolution concept is presented to link the different components of such a study - experimental modeling, constitutive modeling and numerical modeling. A triaxial experimental setup is designed to characterize the cyclic thermo-mechanical behavior of rock salt. The imposed boundary conditions in the experimental setup are assumed to be similar to the stress state obtained from a full-scale numerical simulation. The computational model relies primarily on the governing constitutive model for predicting the behavior of rock salt cavity. Hence, a sophisticated elasto-viscoplastic creep constitutive model is developed to take into account the dilatancy and damage progress, as well as

  6. Gravity-Off-loading System for Large-Displacement Ground Testing of Spacecraft Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Olyvia; Kienholz, David; Janzen, Paul; Kidney, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Gravity-off-loading of deployable spacecraft mechanisms during ground testing is a long-standing problem. Deployable structures which are usually too weak to support their own weight under gravity require a means of gravity-off-loading as they unfurl. Conventional solutions to this problem have been helium-filled balloons or mechanical pulley/counterweight systems. These approaches, however, suffer from the deleterious effects of added inertia or friction forces. The changing form factor of the deployable structure itself and the need to track the trajectory of the center of gravity also pose a challenge to these conventional technologies. This paper presents a novel testing apparatus for high-fidelity zero-gravity simulation for special application to deployable space structures such as solar arrays, magnetometer booms, and robotic arms in class 100,000 clean room environments

  7. Inverse thermoelastic analysis for thermal and mechanical loads identification using FBG data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Toshiya; Kamimura, Yukihiro; Igawa, Hirotaka; Morino, Yoshiki

    2014-12-01

    Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors have widely been used to monitor temperature and strain distributions as a part of the structural health monitoring system. Since FBG has the sensitivity to the variations in both temperature and strain, a compensation is required to separate the strain or temperature data from the sensor output which is the shift of the grating's Bragg wavelength. The present study develops a computational inverse thermoelastic analysis method to separately identify the thermal and mechanical boundary conditions (loads) from the output of the FBG sensor. Numerical study has been made for a corrugate-core sandwich integral thermal protection system (TPS) to examine the method. The discussion is focused on the computational stability. The results reveal that the identification of the mechanical load is less stable than that of the heat flux. It is also shown that the condition number of a coefficient matrix serves as the index of the stability of the inverse analysis.

  8. Detection of Micro-Leaks Through Complex Geometries Under Mechanical Load and at Cryogenic Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin; Sikora, J. G.; Sankaran, S. N.

    2001-01-01

    Polymer Matrix Composite (PMC) hydrogen tanks have been proposed as an enabling technology for reducing the weight of Single-Stage-to-Orbit reusable launch vehicles where structural mass has a large impact on vehicle performance. A key development issue of these lightweight structures is the leakage of hydrogen through the composite material. The rate of hydrogen leakage can be a function of the material used, method of 6 fabrication used to manufacture the tank, mechanical load the tank must react, internal damage-state of the material, and the temperatures at which the tank must operate. A method for measuring leakage through a geometrically complex structure at cryogenic temperature and under mechanical load was developed, calibrated and used to measure hydrogen leakage through complex X-33 liquid-hydrogen tank structure sections.

  9. The results of near-field thermal and mechanical calculations of thermal loading schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, J.F.

    1992-12-31

    Two waste emplacement schemes,borehole and in-drift are under evaluation as potential repository drift geometries for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Calculations were performed to examinethe systems implications of various thermal loadings on the near- and far-field repository environments. Ms paper reports the results of two-dimensional finite element analyses of the near-field thermal and structural response of the potential repository. Thermal calculations were run to 1000 years and mechanical calculations were run to 75 years. the time when the drifts will be backfilled. Local areal power densities (LAPDs) of 57, 80, and 100 kW/acre were used in the calculations. Both emplacement schemes meet current near-field thermal performance goals for all loadings examined. The mechanical calculations predict no intact rock failure, limited joint slippage around the drifts, and closure of apertures for vertical fractures above and below the drifts.

  10. Time-dependent combinatory effects of active mechanical loading and passive topographical cues on cell orientation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Huang, Hanyang; Wei, Kang; Zhao, Yi

    2016-10-01

    Mechanical stretching and topographical cues are both effective mechanical stimulations for regulating cell morphology, orientation, and behaviors. The competition of these two mechanical stimulations remains largely underexplored. Previous studies have suggested that a small cyclic mechanical strain is not able to reorient cells that have been pre-aligned by relatively large linear microstructures, but can reorient those pre-aligned by small linear micro/nanostructures if the characteristic dimension of these structures is below a certain threshold. Likewise, for micro/nanostructures with a given characteristic dimension, the strain must exceed a certain magnitude to overrule the topographic cues. There are however no in-depth investigations of such "thresholds" due to the lack of close examination of dynamic cell orientation during and shortly after the mechanical loading. In this study, the time-dependent combinatory effects of active and passive mechanical stimulations on cell orientation are investigated by developing a micromechanical stimulator. The results show that the cells pre-aligned by linear micro/nanostructures can be altered by cyclic in-plane strain, regardless of the structure size. During the loading, the micro/nanostructures can resist the reorientation effects by cyclic in-plane strain while the resistive capability (measured by the mean orientation angle change and the reorientation speed) increases with the increasing characteristic dimension. The micro/nanostructures also can recover the cell orientation after the cessation of cyclic in-plane strain, while the recovering capability increases with the characteristic dimension. The previously observed thresholds are largely dependent on the observation time points. In order to accurately evaluate the combinatory effects of the two mechanical stimulations, observations during the active loading with a short time interval or endpoint observations shortly after the loading are preferred. This

  11. Load transfer and deformation mechanisms in carbon nanotube-polystyrene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, D.; Dickey, E. C.; Andrews, R.; Rantell, T.

    2000-05-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes have been dispersed homogeneously throughout polystyrene matrices by a simple solution-evaporation method without destroying the integrity of the nanotubes. Tensile tests on composite films show that 1 wt % nanotube additions result in 36%-42% and ˜25% increases in elastic modulus and break stress, respectively, indicating significant load transfer across the nanotube-matrix interface. In situ transmission electron microscopy studies provided information regarding composite deformation mechanisms and interfacial bonding between the multiwall nanotubes and polymer matrix.

  12. The study on ``load relief`` mechanism of multiple cracks in thick-wall cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.H.; Huang, Z.Z.; Tan, Y.; Chen, L.Y.; Pan, B.Z.

    1995-11-01

    In this paper, the stress field on a given cross section in a thick-wall cylinder with single or multiple cracks is analyzed by means of 3-D photoelastic. Based on the study of the effect of crack on stress field, the concept of ``Additional Bending Moment`` is presented and the expression for non-dimensional ABM, M, is derived. The ``load relief`` mechanism of multiple cracks in a thick-wall cylinder is studied.

  13. Mechanical behaviour of Bioactive Glass granules and morselized cancellous bone allograft in load bearing defects.

    PubMed

    Hulsen, D J W; Geurts, J; van Gestel, N A P; van Rietbergen, B; Arts, J J

    2016-05-01

    Bioactive Glass (BAG) granules are osteoconductive and possess unique antibacterial properties for a synthetic biomaterial. To assess the applicability of BAG granules in load-bearing defects, the aim was to compare mechanical behaviour of graft layers consisting of BAG granules and morselized cancellous bone allograft in different volume mixtures under clinically relevant conditions. The graft layers were mechanically tested, using two mechanical testing modalities with simulated physiological loading conditions: highly controllable confined compression tests (CCT) and more clinically realistic in situ compression tests (ISCT) in cadaveric porcine bone defects. Graft layer impaction strain, residual strain, aggregate modulus, and creep strain were determined in CCT. Graft layer porosity was determined using micro computed tomography. The ISCT was used to determine graft layer subsidence in bone environment. ANOVA showed significant differences (p<0.001) between different graft layer compositions. True strains absolutely decreased for increasing BAG content: impaction strain -0.92 (allograft) to -0.39 (BAG), residual strain -0.12 to -0.01, and creep strain -0.09 to 0.00 respectively. Aggregate modulus increased with increasing BAG content from 116 to 653MPa. Porosity ranged from 66% (pure allograft) to 15% (pure BAG). Subsidence was highest for allograft, and remarkably low for a 1:1 BAG-allograft volume mixture. Both BAG granules and allograft morsels as stand-alone materials exhibit suboptimal mechanical behaviour for load-bearing purpose. BAG granules are difficult to handle and less porous, whereas allograft subsides and creeps. A 1:1 volume mixture of BAG and allograft is therefore proposed as the best graft material in load-bearing defects. PMID:26972764

  14. Mechanical response of thick laminated beams and plates subject to out-of-plane loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, C. C.; Brinson, . F.

    1989-01-01

    The use of simplified elasticity solutions to determine the mechanical response of thick laminated beams and plates subject to out-of-plane loading is demonstrated. Excellent results were obtained which compare favorably with theoretical, numerical and experimental analyses from other sources. The most important characteristic of the solution methodology presented is that it combines great mathematical precision with simplicity. This symbiosis has been needed for design with advanced composite materials.

  15. Mechanical load and mechanical integrity of lung cells - experimental mechanostimulation of epithelial cell- and fibroblast-monolayers.

    PubMed

    Gamerdinger, Katharina; Wernet, Florian; Smudde, Eva; Schneider, Matthias; Guttmann, Josef; Schumann, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Experimental mechanostimulation of soft biologic tissue is widely used to investigate cellular responses to mechanical stress or strain. Reactions on mechanostimulation are investigated in terms of morphological changes, inflammatory responses and apoptosis/necrosis induction on a cellular level. In this context, the analysis of the mechanical characteristics of cell-layers might allow to indicate patho-physiological changes in the cell-cell contacts. Recently, we described a device for experimental mechanostimulation that allows simultaneous measurement of the mechanical characteristics of cell-monolayers. Here, we investigated how cultivated lung epithelial cell- and fibroblast-monolayers behave mechanically under different amplitudes of biaxial distension. The cell monolayers were sinusoidally deflected to 5%, 10% or 20% surface gain and their mechanical properties during mechanostimulation were analyzed. With increasing stimulation amplitudes more pronounced reductions of cell junctions were observed. These findings were accompanied by a substantial loss of monolayer rigidity. Pulmonary fibroblast monolayers were initially stiffer but were stronger effected by the mechanostimulation compared to epithelial cell-monolayers. We conclude that, according to their biomechanical function within the pulmonary tissue, epithelial cells and fibroblasts differ with respect to their mechanical characteristics and tolerance of mechanical load. PMID:25241284

  16. The stiffness of bone marrow cell-knit composites is increased during mechanical load.

    PubMed

    Bruinink, A; Siragusano, D; Ettel, G; Brandsberg, T; Brandsberg, F; Petitmermet, M; Müller, B; Mayer, J; Wintermantel, E

    2001-12-01

    A novel device for mechanical stimulation of primary adult rat bone marrow cells cultured on three-dimensional knitted textiles has been prototyped. A method has been developed ensuring a well-defined, high-density, and reproducible cell seeding on the knitted fabric. After culturing for 18-52 days the cell-knit composites were subjected to uniaxial 2% stretching and relaxation. The frequency was altered between 0.1 Hz (196 min, loading phase) and 0.01 Hz (360 min, resting phase). Identically treated knits without cells exhibited a slight stiffness reduction, whereas the stiffness of knits with cells increased from cycle to cycle. The stiffness increase was found to depend on the duration of the culture period before mechanical loading. Our data suggest that the extracellular matrix deposited by the cells on the knit and intact microtubuli of living cells cause the observed stiffness increase. In comparison to the unstrained static cell-knit composites cell proliferation and bone cell differentiation were reduced by the mechanical load. PMID:11603589

  17. A Load-based Micro-indentation Technique for Mechanical Property and NDE Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce S. Kang; Chuanyu Feng; Jared M. Tannenbaum; M.A. Alvin

    2009-06-04

    A load-based micro-indentation technique has been developed for evaluating mechanical properties of materials. Instead of using measured indentation depth or contact area as a necessary parameter, the new technique is based on the indentation load, coupled with a multiple-partial unloading procedure for mechanical property evaluation. The proposed load-based micro-indentation method is capable of determining Young’s modulus of metals, superalloys, and single crystal matrices, and stiffness of coated material systems with flat, tubular, or curved architectures. This micro-indentation technique can be viewed as a viable non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique for determining as-manufactured and process-exposed metal, superalloy, single crystal, and TBC-coated material properties. Based on this technique, several bond coated substrates were tested at various stages of thermal cycles. The time-series evaluation of test material surface stiffness reveals the status of coating strength without any alternation of the coating surface, making it a true time-series NDE investigation. The microindentation test results show good correlation with post mortem microstructural analyses. This technique also shows promise for the development of a portable instrument for on-line, in-situ NDE and mechanical properties measurement of structural components.

  18. Aging and loading rate effects on the mechanical behavior of equine bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulin, Robb M.; Jiang, Fengchun; Vecchio, Kenneth S.

    2008-06-01

    Whether due to a sporting accident, high-speed impact, fall, or other catastrophic event, the majority of clinical bone fractures occur under dynamic loading conditions. However, although extensive research has been performed on the quasi-static fracture and mechanical behavior of bone to date, few high-quality studies on the fracture behavior of bone at high strain rates have been performed. Therefore, many questions remain regarding the material behavior, including not only the loading-rate-dependent response of bone, but also how this response varies with age. In this study, tests were performed on equine femoral bone taken post-mortem from donors 6 months to 28 years of age. Quasi-static and dynamic tests were performed to determine the fracture toughness and compressive mechanical behavior as a function of age at varying loading rates. Fracture paths were then analyzed using scanning confocal and scanning-electron microscopy techniques to assess the role of various microstructural features on toughening mechanisms.

  19. Recent Findings on the Mechanical Responses of Nanostructures to Extreme Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhen; Gan Yong; Shen Luming; Chen, J. K.

    2010-05-21

    A systematic investigation is being performed to understand the combined size, loading rate and thermal effects on the responses of nanostructures such as nanofilms and nanowires. This paper summarizes what has been found so far, and presents the recent molecular dynamics simulations of the mechanical behaviors of single crystal fcc nanowires and nanofilms under different temperatures and extremely high strain rates. Based on the model-based simulation results, the mechanism of the nanostructural responses will be explored and future research tasks will be discussed.

  20. Mechanisms involved in regulation of osteoclastic differentiation by mechanical stress-loaded osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneuji, Takeshi; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Okinaga, Toshinori; Toshinaga, Akihiro; Takahashi, Tetsu; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} Effect of compressive force on osteoblasts were examined. {yields} Compressive force induced OPG expression and suppressed osteoclastogenesis. {yields} This enhancement of OPG is dependent on Wnt/Ca2+ signal pathway. -- Abstract: Mechanical stress is known to be important for regulation of bone turnover, though the detailed mechanisms are not fully understood. In the present study, we examined the effect of mechanical stress on osteoblasts using a novel compression model. Mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were embedded in three-dimensional (3D) gels and cultured with continuous compressive force (0-10.0 g/cm{sup 2}) for 48 h, and the conditioned medium were collected. RAW264.7 cells were then incubated with the conditioned medium for various times in the presence of receptor activator of nuclear factor-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL). Conditioned medium was found to inhibit the differentiation of RAW264.7 cells into osteoclasts induced by RANKL via down-regulation of the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, and nuclear translocation of p50 and p65. Interestingly, the conditioned medium also had a high level of binding activity to RANKL and blocked the binding of RANK to RANKL. Furthermore, the binding activity of conditioned medium to RANKL was reduced when the 3D gel was supplemented with KN-93, an inhibitor of non-canonical Wnt/Ca{sup 2+} pathway. In addition, expression level of osteoprotegerin (OPG) mRNA was increased in time- and force-dependent manners, and remarkably suppressed by KN-93. These results indicate that osteoblastic cells subjected to mechanical stress produce OPG, which binds to RANKL. Furthermore, this binding activity strongly inhibited osteoclastogenesis through suppression of TRAF6 and the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) signaling pathway, suggesting that enhancement of OPG expression induced by mechanical stress is dependent on non-canonical Wnt

  1. Theoretical study of β-HMX decomposition mechanism of the solid phase under shock loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Guangfu; Ge, Nina; Chen, Xiangrong

    2015-06-01

    Study material properties under extreme conditions is a fundamental problem in the field of condensed matter physics. The decomposition mechanisms of energetic materials under the shock wave become a hot topic in recent years. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulations combined with multi-scale shock technology (MSST) are used to study the decomposition mechanism, shock sensitivity and electronic structure of β-HMX. First, the decomposition mechanism of β-HMX perfect crystal were studied at different shock speeds. We found that when the shock wave at a speed 8 km / s is loaded, the decomposition reaction start at N-NO2 bond breakage; when the shock wave at a speed of 10 km / s and 11 km / s is loaded, the the first decomposition reaction is CH bond breaking, and accompanied by the formation of five-membered ring and transfer of hydrogen ions. The simulation results also show that when the shock wave velocity is increased, the higher the pressure generated in the high-pressure N-NO2 bond cleavage was inhibited significantly. Secondly, the impact of its initial chemical reaction process along different crystal axis directions were studied, the results showed that along the a-axis and c-axis shock sensitivity is higher, and along the b-axis sensitivity is lower. We believe that the system of all sensitivity of direction is due to the rotation of the friction between the slip plane of crystals and molecules. Finally, we discussed the solid phase β-HMX electronic properties change under the shock wave loadings. We found that in the 11 km/s under the impact load, when the pressure reaches 130 GPa, zero bandgap is reached.

  2. Mechanical loading causes site-specific anabolic effects on bone following exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Shirazi-Fard, Yasaman; Alwood, Joshua S; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Castillo, Alesha B; Globus, Ruth K

    2015-12-01

    During spaceflight, astronauts will be exposed to a complex mixture of ionizing radiation that poses a risk to their health. Exposure of rodents to ionizing radiation on Earth causes bone loss and increases osteoclasts in cancellous tissue, but also may cause persistent damage to stem cells and osteoprogenitors. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation damages skeletal tissue despite a prolonged recovery period, and depletes the ability of cells in the osteoblast lineage to respond at a later time. The goal of the current study was to test if irradiation prevents bone accrual and bone formation induced by an anabolic mechanical stimulus. Tibial axial compression was used as an anabolic stimulus after irradiation with heavy ions. Mice (male, C57BL/6J, 16 weeks) were exposed to high atomic number, high energy (HZE) iron ions ((56)Fe, 2 Gy, 600 MeV/ion) (IR, n=5) or sham-irradiated (Sham, n=5). In vivo axial loading was initiated 5 months post-irradiation; right tibiae in anesthetized mice were subjected to an established protocol known to stimulate bone formation (cyclic 9N compressive pulse, 60 cycles/day, 3 day/wk for 4 weeks). In vivo data showed no difference due to irradiation in the apparent stiffness of the lower limb at the initiation of the axial loading regimen. Axial loading increased cancellous bone volume by microcomputed tomography and bone formation rate by histomorphometry in both sham and irradiated animals, with a main effect of axial loading determined by two-factor ANOVA with repeated measure. There were no effects of radiation in cancellous bone microarchitecture and indices of bone formation. At the tibia diaphysis, results also revealed a main effect of axial loading on structure. Furthermore, irradiation prevented axial loading-induced stimulation of bone formation rate at the periosteal surface of cortical tissue. In summary, axial loading stimulated the net accrual of cancellous and cortical mass and increased cancellous bone formation rate

  3. Experimental study of low amplitude, long-duration mechanical loading of reactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Urtiew, P A; Forbes, J W

    2000-10-03

    Studies of the low amplitude, long-duration mechanical loading of reactive materials rely very heavily on the experimental data in general and in particular on the data obtained from gauges placed within the experimental test sample to measure accurately the local changes of parameters of the investigated material. For a complete description of these changes taking place in a dynamically loaded material one would like to know both the spatial and the temporal resolution of pressure, temperature, volume, wave and mass velocity. However, temperature and volume are not easily attainable. Therefore, most of the in-situ work is limited to measurements of pressure and both wave and mass velocities. Various types of these gauges will be discussed and their records will be illustrated. Some of these gauges have limitations but are better suited for particular applications than others. These aspects will also be discussed. Main limitation of most in-situ gauges is that they are built for one-dimensional application. However, some work is being done to develop two-dimensional gauges. This work will also be briefly discussed. While these experiments are necessary to validate theoretical models of the phenomenon, they can also provide sufficient amount of data to yield complete information on material characteristics such as its equation of state (EOS), its phase change under certain loads and its sensitivity to shock loading. Processing of these data to get important information on the behavior of both reactive and non-reactive materials will also be demonstrated.

  4. Corner Wrinkling at a Square Membrane Due to Symmetric Mechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blandino, Joseph R.; Johnston, John D.; Dharamsi, Urmil K.; Brodeur, Stephen J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Thin-film membrane structures are under consideration for use in many future gossamer spacecraft systems. Examples include sunshields for large aperture telescopes, solar sails, and membrane optics. The development of capabilities for testing and analyzing pre-tensioned, thin film membrane structures is an important and challenging aspect of gossamer spacecraft technology development. This paper presents results from experimental and computational studies performed to characterize the wrinkling behavior of thin-fi[m membranes under mechanical loading. The test article is a 500 mm square membrane subjected to symmetric comer loads. Data is presented for loads ranging from 0.49 N to 4.91 N. The experimental results show that as the load increases the number of wrinkles increases, while the wrinkle amplitude decreases. The computational model uses a finite element implementation of Stein-Hedgepeth membrane wrinkling theory to predict the behavior of the membrane. Comparisons were made with experimental results for the wrinkle angle and wrinkled region. There was reasonably good agreement between the measured wrinkle angle and the predicted directions of the major principle stresses. The shape of the wrinkle region predicted by the finite element model matches that observed in the experiments; however, the size of the predicted region is smaller than that determined in the experiments.

  5. Mechanical Behavior of Tissue Simulants and Soft Tissues Under Extreme Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalcioglu, Zeynep Ilke

    Recent developments in computer-integrated surgery and in tissue-engineered constructs necessitate advances in experimental and analytical techniques in characterizing properties of mechanically compliant materials such as gels and soft tissues, particularly for small sample volumes. One goal of such developments is to quantitatively predict and mimic tissue deformation due to high rate impact events typical of industrial accidents and ballistic insults. This aim requires advances in mechanical characterization to establish tools and design principles for tissue simulant materials that can recapitulate the mechanical responses of hydrated soft tissues under dynamic contact-loading conditions. Given this motivation, this thesis studies the mechanical properties of compliant synthetic materials developed for tissue scaffold applications and of soft tissues, via modifying an established contact based technique for accurate, small scale characterization under fully hydrated conditions, and addresses some of the challenges in the implementation of this method. Two different engineered material systems composed of physically associating block copolymer gels, and chemically crosslinked networks including a solvent are presented as potential tissue simulants for ballistic applications, and compared directly to soft tissues from murine heart and liver. In addition to conventional quasistatic and dynamic bulk mechanical techniques that study macroscale elastic and viscoelastic properties, new methodologies are developed to study the small scale mechanical response of the aforementioned material systems to concentrated impact loading. The resistance to penetration and the energy dissipative constants are quantified in order to compare the deformation of soft tissues and mechanically optimized simulants, and to identify the underlying mechanisms by which the mechanical response of these tissue simulant candidates are modulated. Finally, given that soft tissues are biphasic in

  6. Dynamic mechanical response of magnesium single crystal under compression loading: Experiments, model, and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qizhen

    2011-05-01

    Magnesium single crystal samples are compressed at room temperature under quasistatic (˜0.001 s-1) loading in a universal testing machine and dynamic (430, 1000, and 1200 s-1) loading in a split Hopkinson pressure bar system. Stress-strain curves show that (a) the fracture strain slightly increases with the strain rate; and (b) the maximum strength and strain hardening rate increase significantly when the testing changes from quasistatic to dynamic, although they do not vary much when the strain rate for dynamic testing varies in the range of 430-1200 s-1. The operation of the secondary pyramidal slip system is the dominating deformation mechanism, which leads to a fracture surface with an angle of ˜42° with respect to the loading axial direction. A theoretical material model based on Johnson-Cook law is also derived. The model includes the strain hardening and strain rate hardening terms, and provides the stress-strain relations matching with the experimental results. Finite element simulations for the strain rates used in the experiments predict the mechanical responses of the material that agree well with the experimental data.

  7. Mechanical Behavior of Methane Infiltrated Coal: the Roles of Gas Desorption, Stress Level and Loading Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shugang; Elsworth, Derek; Liu, Jishan

    2013-09-01

    We report laboratory experiments to investigate the role of gas desorption, stress level and loading rate on the mechanical behavior of methane infiltrated coal. Two suites of experiments are carried out. The first suite of experiments is conducted on coal (Lower Kittanning seam, West Virginia) at a confining stress of 2 MPa and methane pore pressures in the fracture of 1 MPa to examine the role of gas desorption. These include three undrained (hydraulically closed) experiments with different pore pressure distributions in the coal, namely, overpressured, normally pressured and underpressured, and one specimen under drained condition. Based on the experimental results, we find quantitative evidence that gas desorption weakens coal through two mechanisms: (1) reducing effective stress controlled by the ratio of gas desorption rate over the drainage rate, and (2) crushing coal due to the internal gas energy release controlled by gas composition, pressure and content. The second suite of experiments is conducted on coal (Upper B seam, Colorado) at confining stresses of 2 and 4 MPa, with pore pressures of 1 and 3 MPa, under underpressured and drained condition with three different loading rates to study the role of stress level and loading rate. We find that the Biot coefficient of coal specimens is <1. Reducing effective confining stress decreases the elastic modulus and strength of coal. This study has important implications for the stability of underground coal seams.

  8. Characterization of interdigitated electrode piezoelectric fiber composites under high electrical and mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, John P.; Bent, Aaron A.; Hagood, Nesbitt W.

    1996-05-01

    The primary objective of this work is to develop a standard methodology for characterizing structural actuation systems intended for operation in high electrical and mechanical loading environments. The designed set of tests evaluates the performance of the active materials system under realistic operating conditions. The tests are also used to characterize piezoelectric fiber composites which have been developed as an alternative to monolithic piezoceramic wafers for structural actuation applications. The performance of this actuator system has been improved using an interdigitated electrode pattern, which orients the primary component of the electric field into the plane of the structure, enabling the use of the primary piezoelectric effect along the active fibers. One possible application of this technology is in the integral twist actuation of helicopter rotor blades for higher harmonic control. This application requires actuators which can withstand the harsh rotor blade operating environment. This includes large numbers of electrical and mechanical cycles with considerable centripetal and bending loads. The characterization tests include standard active material tests as well as application-driven tests which evaluate the performance of the actuators during simulated operation. Test results for several actuator configurations are provided, including S2 glass- reinforced and E-glass laminated actuators. The study concludes that the interdigitated electrode piezoelectric fiber composite actuator has great potential for high loading applications.

  9. CCL7 Is a Protective Factor Secreted by Mechanically Loaded Osteocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kitase, Y.; Lee, S.; Gluhak-Heinrich, J.; Johnson, M.L.; Harris, S.E.; Bonewald, L.F.

    2014-01-01

    In a search for factors up-regulated by mechanical strain in osteocytes, we discovered that chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 7 (CCL7), a chemotactic myokine, was highly expressed in MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells. Although MLO-Y4 cells secrete potent chemotactic factors for osteoclast precursors, CCL7 was not responsible for this activity. CCL7 was increased in osteocytes in response to tooth movement in vivo. Since mechanical loading plays a crucial role in maintaining osteocyte viability, CCL7 was tested for protective activity and found to be protective against cell death induced by dexamethasone and etoposide. CCL7 specific antibody partially, but in combination with indomethacin, completely abrogated the protective effects of fluid flow shear stress against dexamethasone-induced cell death. CCL7 activated the β-catenin pathway through phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3), suggesting that this pathway is responsible for the observed protective effects. A related cytokine, CCL2, also produced by MLO-Y4 cells but not regulated by mechanical loading, proved to be more potent and protected against cell death induced by not only dexamethasone, but also by Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNFα). Whereas osteocytes may produce CCL2 in constitutively low levels, a major function of mechanically induced CCL7 may be to selectively protect osteocytes in an autocrine manner against glucocorticoid-induced cell death. PMID:25274752

  10. CCL7 is a protective factor secreted by mechanically loaded osteocytes.

    PubMed

    Kitase, Y; Lee, S; Gluhak-Heinrich, J; Johnson, M L; Harris, S E; Bonewald, L F

    2014-11-01

    In a search for factors up-regulated by mechanical strain in osteocytes, we discovered that chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 7 (CCL7), a chemotactic myokine, was highly expressed in MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells. Although MLO-Y4 cells secrete potent chemotactic factors for osteoclast precursors, CCL7 was not responsible for this activity. CCL7 was increased in osteocytes in response to tooth movement in vivo. Since mechanical loading plays a crucial role in maintaining osteocyte viability, CCL7 was tested for protective activity and found to be protective against cell death induced by dexamethasone and etoposide. CCL7 specific antibody partially, but in combination with indomethacin, completely abrogated the protective effects of fluid flow shear stress against dexamethasone-induced cell death. CCL7 activated the β-catenin pathway through phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3), suggesting that this pathway is responsible for the observed protective effects. A related cytokine, CCL2, also produced by MLO-Y4 cells but not regulated by mechanical loading, proved to be more potent and protected against cell death induced by not only dexamethasone, but also by Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNFα). Whereas osteocytes may produce CCL2 in constitutively low levels, a major function of mechanically induced CCL7 may be to selectively protect osteocytes in an autocrine manner against glucocorticoid-induced cell death. PMID:25274752

  11. Mechanical loading regulates human MSC differentiation in a multi-layer hydrogel for osteochondral tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Neven J; Aisenbrey, Elizabeth A; Westbrook, Kristofer K; Qi, H Jerry; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2015-07-01

    A bioinspired multi-layer hydrogel was developed for the encapsulation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) as a platform for osteochondral tissue engineering. The spatial presentation of biochemical cues, via incorporation of extracellular matrix analogs, and mechanical cues, via both hydrogel crosslink density and externally applied mechanical loads, were characterized in each layer. A simple sequential photopolymerization method was employed to form stable poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogels with a soft cartilage-like layer of chondroitin sulfate and low RGD concentrations, a stiff bone-like layer with high RGD concentrations, and an intermediate interfacial layer. Under a compressive load, the variation in hydrogel stiffness within each layer produced high strains in the soft cartilage-like layer, low strains in the stiff bone-like layer, and moderate strains in the interfacial layer. When hMSC-laden hydrogels were cultured statically in osteochondral differentiation media, the local biochemical and matrix stiffness cues were not sufficient to spatially guide hMSC differentiation after 21 days. However dynamic mechanical stimulation led to differentially high expression of collagens with collagen II in the cartilage-like layer, collagen X in the interfacial layer and collagen I in the bone-like layer and mineral deposits localized to the bone layer. Overall, these findings point to external mechanical stimulation as a potent regulator of hMSC differentiation toward osteochondral cellular phenotypes. PMID:25900444

  12. Links between mechanical behavior of cancellous bone and its microstructural properties under dynamic loading.

    PubMed

    Prot, M; Saletti, D; Pattofatto, S; Bousson, V; Laporte, S

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies show that in vivo assessment of fracture risk can be achieved by identifying the relationships between microarchitecture description from clinical imaging and mechanical properties. This study demonstrates that results obtained at low strain rates can be extrapolated to loadings with an order of magnitude similar to trauma such as car crashes. Cancellous bovine bone specimens were compressed under dynamic loadings (with and without confinement) and the mechanical response properties were identified, such as Young׳s modulus, ultimate stress, ultimate strain, and ultimate strain energy. Specimens were previously scanned with pQCT, and architectural and structural microstructure properties were identified, such as parameters of geometry, topology, connectivity and anisotropy. The usefulness of micro-architecture description studied was in agreement with statistics laws. Finally, the differences between dynamic confined and non-confined tests were assessed by the bone marrow influence and the cancellous bone response to different boundary conditions. Results indicate that architectural parameters, such as the bone volume fraction (BV/TV), are as strong determinants of mechanical response parameters as ultimate stress at high strain rates (p-value<0.001). This study reveals that cancellous bone response at high strain rates, under different boundary conditions, can be predicted from the architectural parameters, and that these relations with mechanical properties can be used to make fracture risk prediction at a determined magnitude. PMID:25577437

  13. A New Mechanical Loading Configuration for Maximizing The Performance of Dielectric Elastomer Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shian, Samuel; Huang, Jiangshui; Suo, Zhigang; Clarke, David

    2013-03-01

    Electrical energy can be generated from mechanical deformations using dielectric elastomers but currently achieved energy densities and conversion efficiencies are still small. In this presentation, we demonstrate that significant improvements, an energy density over 500 mJ/g and up to 10% in efficiency, can be produced using VHB elastomers by altering the mechanical loading geometry. A major limitation is viscous losses in the VHB elastomer indicating that higher efficiencies with other elastomers will be attainable. The basic concept of mechanical energy harvesting with a dielectric elastomer sheet is a straightforward electromechanical cycle leading to a voltage step-up: a sheet is stretched, electrical charge at low voltage is placed on either side using compliant electrodes, the stretch is released causing the sheet's initial thickness and area to be recovered increasing the charge potential which can then be harvested. Integral to maximizing the energy conversion is the amount of mechanical energy that can be stored elastically and the amount of capacitance change in the elastomer sheet during stretching. We show that these factors can be maximized by equi-biaxial loading. Details of our dielectric elastomer generator will be described as well as the procedures we use for quantifying its performance.

  14. An experimental study of the mechanism of failure of rocks under borehole jack loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van, T. K.; Goodman, R. E.

    1971-01-01

    Laboratory and field tests with an experimental jack and an NX-borehole jack are reported. The following conclusions were made: Under borehole jack loading, a circular opening in a brittle solid fails by tensile fracturing when the bearing plate width is not too small. Two proposed contact stress distributions can explain the mechanism of tensile fracturing. The contact stress distribution factor is a material property which can be determined experimentally. The borehole tensile strength is larger than the rupture flexural strength. Knowing the magnitude and orientation of the in situ stress field, borehole jack test results can be used to determine the borehole tensile strength. Knowing the orientation of the in situ stress field and the flexural strength of the rock substance, the magnitude of the in situ stress components can be calculated. The detection of very small cracks is essential for the accurate determination of the failure loads which are used in the calculation of strengths and stress components.

  15. The Effect of Asymmetric Mechanical and Thermal Loading on Membrane Wrinkling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blandino, Joseph R.; Johnston, John D.; Miles, Jonathan J.; Dharamsi, Urmil K.; Brodeur, Stephen J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Large, tensioned membranes are being considered for future gossamer spacecraft systems. Examples include sunshields, solar sails, and membrane optics. In many. cases a relatively flat membrane with minimal wrinkling is desired. Developing methods to predict and measure membrane wrinkling is important to the future development of gossamer spacecraft. Numerical and experimental data are presented for a 0.5 m square, tensioned membrane. The membrane is subjected to symmetric and asymmetric mechanical loading. Data are also presented for a symmetrically loaded membrane subjected to spot heating in the center. The numerical model shows good agreement with the experiment for wrinkle angle data. There is. also reasonable agreement for the wrinkled area for both isothermal and elevated temperature tests.

  16. Developing a New Appliance to Dissipate Mechanical Load on Teeth and Improve Limitation of Vertical Mouth

    PubMed Central

    Satomi, Takashi; Kobayashi, Takehito; Iino, Mituyoshi

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The principle of leverage to superpose the convex surfaces of two shells was applied to develop a device for treating limitation of mouth opening and called it the "shell-shaped mouth opener" and analyzed pressure on the teeth with the TheraBite® appliance and the shell-shaped mouth opening appliance. Material and Methods To compare the TheraBite® appliance and the shell-shaped mouth opening appliance, pressure on the teeth in the dentition model with both devices was analyzed using the Inastomer® flexible conductive sensor. Results The load was better dispersed to each tooth in the shell-shaped mouth opening appliance in the all quadrants compared to the TheraBite® appliance. Conclusions The present study revealed that the shell-shaped mouth opening appliance which was originally invented in our lab, dissipated the mechanical load on teeth more evenly than the TheraBite® appliance. PMID:24422037

  17. Failure mechanisms of notched laminated composites under compressive loading at room and elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Jung Hyun

    1999-10-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of failure of composite structures and developing mechanism based failure criteria are important considerations in designing structures made of composite materials. The compressive response of composite materials and structures has received considerable attention due to their significance in the aerospace industry and the complexity associated with compressive failure. Several competing failure mechanisms such as fiber instability, fiber/matrix interfacial failure, fiber microbuckling/kinking, delamination initiation and delamination buckling may become active in compressive loading. Environmental effect such as an elevated temperature can alter and affect these failure mechanisms. In this thesis, a micromechanics based finite element predictive model for notched strength of multidirectional laminates is presented. The in-situ shear response of the matrix, the fiber mechanical properties, the lay-up (stacking sequence) and fiber volume fraction serve as input to the model. The prediction of the model is found to match favorably with experimental data. The effect of ply angle and its influence on the failure mechanism are quantified and compared with a set of available experimental data. The present work is the first development of a non-empirical mechanics based failure prediction methodology for notched compressive strength of composite laminates. Both an experimental and an analytical study are presented herein.

  18. Voltage generation from individual BaTiO(3) nanowires under periodic tensile mechanical load.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoyu; Hu, Jie; Suryavanshi, Abhijit P; Yum, Kyungsuk; Yu, Min-Feng

    2007-10-01

    Direct tensile mechanical loading of an individual single-crystal BaTiO(3) nanowire was realized to reveal the direct piezoelectric effect in the nanowire. Periodic voltage generation from the nanowire was produced by a periodically varying tensile mechanical strain applied with a precision mechanical testing stage. The measured voltage generation from the nanowire was found to be directly proportional to the applied strain rate and was successfully modeled through the consideration of an equivalent circuit for a piezoelectric nanowire under low-frequency operation. The study, besides demonstrating a controlled experimental method for the study of direct piezoelectric effect in nanostructures, implies also the use of such perovskite piezoelectric nanowires for efficient energy-harvesting applications. PMID:17894515

  19. Subcritical crack-growth behavior of borosilicate glass under cyclic loads: Evidence of a mechanical fatigue effect

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, S.J.; Dauskardt, R.H.; Bennison, S.J.

    1997-03-01

    Amorphous glasses are generally considered immune to mechanical fatigue effects associated with cyclic loading. In this study surprising new evidence is presented for a mechanical fatigue effect in borosilicate glass, in both moist air and dry nitrogen environments. The fatigue effect occurs at near threshold subcritical crack-growth rates (da/dt < 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} m/s) as the crack extension per cycle approaches the dimensions of the borosilicate glass network. While subcritical crack growth under cyclic loads at higher load levels is entirely consistent with environmentally assisted crack growth, lower growth rates actually exceed those measured under monotonic loads. This suggests a mechanical fatigue effect which accelerates subcritical crack-growth rates. Likely mechanisms for the mechanical fatigue effect are presented.

  20. Study of the Anisotropic Properties of Argillite Under Moisture and Mechanical Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Diansen; Chanchole, Serge; Valli, Pierre; Chen, Liufeng

    2013-03-01

    Due to various factors, such as sedimentation, layered morphology of clay minerals, in situ stress, etc., argillite rocks often exhibit anisotropic behavior. In order to study the anisotropic properties of the Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) argillite of the Meuse-Haute-Marne site in France considered as a possible host rock for high-level radioactive nuclear waste repository, a series of tests including uniaxial compression and dehydration and hydration at different constant applied stress levels are carried out. In this study, a specific setup combining moisture and mechanical loading with optical observation is used and it allows to continuously capture surface images from which the full-field strains are determined by using Digital Image Correlation techniques. The results show evidence of the mechanical and hydric anisotropy of the material. The anisotropy parameters are identified, assuming the studied argillite as transversely isotropic. The shrinkage and swelling depend on the applied stress and the angle with respect to the vertical direction of the mechanical load and the stratification plane, and this dependence is quantified. The non-linearity and the hysteresis observed during dehydration and hydration cycles are discussed.

  1. Dynamic mechanical behavior and the constitutive model of concrete subjected to impact loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Jianguo; Liu, Haifeng; Shang, Lin

    2008-11-01

    Based on the theory of consecutive damage mechanics, micro-mechanics, statistics and the visco-plastic constitutive equation of Perzyna, a coupled model of damage and plasticity is developed to describe the complex behavior of concrete subjected to impact loadings. In this model, some suppositions about deformation of the material and evolution of the damage are made. First, concrete is macroscopically assumed to be homogeneous and consecutive, while it is microscopically filled with large amounts of micro-crack and micro-void defects. Second, the damage evolution of the micro-cracks is caused by the nucleation, growth and coalescence of the micro-cracks due to the interior tensile stress in concrete, which leads to a degradation in the strength and stiffness of concrete. Third, compaction of concrete is physically a collapse of the material micro-void. It produces irreversible plastic strains in the material and, at the same time, an increase in the bulk modulus. Fourth, there is no interaction between the micro-crack and the micro-void. Last, when the damage reaches a critical value, the concrete may fail totally. The model parameters for concrete are determined by plate impact experiments. The model predictions fit the experimental results well. So the model can be used to simulate the dynamic mechanical behavior of concrete under impact loadings.

  2. Using the Enhanced Daily Load Stimulus Model to Quantify the Mechanical Load and Bone Mineral Density Changes Experienced by Crew Members on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genc, K. O.; Gopalakrishnan, R.; Kuklis, M. M.; Maender, C. C.; Rice, A. J.; Cavanagh, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the use of exercise countermeasures during long-duration space missions, bone mineral density (BMD) and predicted bone strength of astronauts continue to show decreases in the lower extremities and spine. This site-specific bone adaptation is most likely caused by the effects of microgravity on the mechanical loading environment of the crew member. There is, therefore, a need to quantify the mechanical loading experienced on Earth and on-orbit to define the effect of a given "dose" of loading on bone homeostasis. Gene et al. recently proposed an enhanced DLS (EDLS) model that, when used with entire days of in-shoe forces, takes into account recently developed theories on the importance of factors such as saturation, recovery, and standing and their effects on the osteogenic response of bone to daily physical activity. This algorithm can also quantify the tinting and type of activity (sit/unload, stand, walk, run or other loaded activity) performed throughout the day. The purpose of the current study was to use in-shoe force measurements from entire typical work days on Earth and on-orbit in order to quantify the type and amount of loading experienced by crew members. The specific aim was to use these measurements as inputs into the EDLS model to determine activity timing/type and the mechanical "dose" imparted on the musculoskeletal system of crew members and relate this dose to changes in bone homeostasis.

  3. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of Subsurface Defects in Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Joggles Subjected to Thermo-Mechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Song, Kyongchan

    2011-01-01

    Coating spallation events have been observed along the slip-side joggle region of the Space Shuttle Orbiter wing-leading-edge panels. One potential contributor to the spallation event is a pressure build up within subsurface voids or defects due to volatiles or water vapor entrapped during fabrication, refurbishment, or normal operational use. The influence of entrapped pressure on the thermo-mechanical fracture-mechanics response of reinforced carbon-carbon with subsurface defects is studied. Plane-strain simulations with embedded subsurface defects are performed to characterize the fracture mechanics response for a given defect length when subjected to combined elevated-temperature and subsurface-defect pressure loadings to simulate the unvented defect condition. Various subsurface defect locations of a fixed-length substrate defect are examined for elevated temperature conditions. Fracture mechanics results suggest that entrapped pressure combined with local elevated temperatures have the potential to cause subsurface defect growth and possibly contribute to further material separation or even spallation. For this anomaly to occur, several unusual circumstances would be required making such an outcome unlikely but plausible.

  4. Partial Reductions in Mechanical Loading Yield Proportional Changes in Bone Density, Bone Architecture, and Muscle Mass

    PubMed Central

    Ellman, Rachel; Spatz, Jordan; Cloutier, Alison; Palme, Rupert; Christiansen, Blaine A; Bouxsein, Mary L

    2014-01-01

    Although the musculoskeletal system is known to be sensitive to changes in its mechanical environment, the relationship between functional adaptation and below-normal mechanical stimuli is not well defined. We investigated bone and muscle adaptation to a range of reduced loading using the partial weight suspension (PWS) system, in which a two-point harness is used to offload a tunable amount of body weight while maintaining quadrupedal locomotion. Skeletally mature female C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to partial weight bearing at 20%, 40%, 70%, or 100% of body weight for 21 days. A hindlimb unloaded (HLU) group was included for comparison in addition to age-matched controls in normal housing. Gait kinematics was measured across the full range of weight bearing, and some minor alterations in gait from PWS were identified. With PWS, bone and muscle changes were generally proportional to the degree of unloading. Specifically, total body and hindlimb bone mineral density, calf muscle mass, trabecular bone volume of the distal femur, and cortical area of the femur midshaft were all linearly related to the degree of unloading. Even a load reduction to 70% of normal weight bearing was associated with significant bone deterioration and muscle atrophy. Weight bearing at 20% did not lead to better bone outcomes than HLU despite less muscle atrophy and presumably greater mechanical stimulus, requiring further investigation. These data confirm that the PWS model is highly effective in applying controllable, reduced, long-term loading that produces predictable, discrete adaptive changes in muscle and bone of the hindlimb. PMID:23165526

  5. Effects of hydromechanical loading history and antecedent soil mechanical damage on shallow landslide triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Linfeng; Lehmann, Peter; Or, Dani

    2015-10-01

    Evidence suggests that the sudden triggering of rainfall-induced shallow landslides is preceded by accumulation of local internal failures in the soil mantle before their abrupt coalescence into a landslide failure plane. The mechanical status of a hillslope at any given time reflects competition between local damage accumulated during antecedent rainfall events and rates of mechanical healing (e.g., rebonding of microcracks and root regrowth). This dynamic interplay between damage accumulation and healing rates determines the initial mechanical state for landslide modeling. We evaluated the roles of these dynamic processes on landslide characteristics and patterns using a hydromechanical landslide-triggering model for a sequence of rainfall scenarios. The progressive nature of soil failure was represented by the fiber bundle model formalism that considers threshold strength of mechanical bonds linking adjacent soil columns and bedrock. The antecedent damage induced by prior rainfall events was expressed by the fraction of broken fibers that gradually regain strength or mechanically heal at rates specific to soil and roots. Results indicate that antecedent damage accelerates landslide initiation relative to pristine (undamaged) hillslopes. The volumes of first triggered landslides increase with increasing antecedent damage; however, for heavily damaged hillslopes, landslide volumes tend to decrease. Elapsed time between rainfall events allows mechanical healing that reduces the effects of antecedent damage. This study proposed a quantitative framework for systematically incorporating hydromechanical loading history and information on precursor events (e.g., such as recorded by acoustic emissions) into shallow landslide hazard assessment.

  6. Initiation and progression of mechanical damage in the intervertebral disc under cyclic loading using continuum damage mechanics methodology: A finite element study

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Muhammad; Natarajan, Raghu N.; An, Howard S.; Andersson, Gunnar B.J.

    2013-01-01

    It is difficult to study the breakdown of disc tissue over several years of exposure to bending and lifting by experimental methods. There is also no finite element model that elucidates the failure mechanism due to repetitive loading of the lumbar motion segment. The aim of this study was to refine an already validated poro-elastic finite element model of lumbar motion segment to investigate the initiation and progression of mechanical damage in the disc under simple and complex cyclic loading conditions. Continuum damage mechanics methodology was incorporated into the finite element model to track the damage accumulation in the annulus in response to the repetitive loading. The analyses showed that the damage initiated at the posterior inner annulus adjacent to the endplates and propagated outwards towards its periphery under all loading conditions simulated. The damage accumulated preferentially in the posterior region of the annulus. The analyses also showed that the disc failure is unlikely to happen with repetitive bending in the absence of compressive load. Compressive cyclic loading with low peak load magnitude also did not create the failure of the disc. The finite element model results were consistent with the experimental and clinical observations in terms of the region of failure, magnitude of applied loads and the number of load cycles survived. PMID:22682891

  7. Initiation and progression of mechanical damage in the intervertebral disc under cyclic loading using continuum damage mechanics methodology: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Muhammad; Natarajan, Raghu N; An, Howard S; Andersson, Gunnar B J

    2012-07-26

    It is difficult to study the breakdown of disc tissue over several years of exposure to bending and lifting by experimental methods. There is also no finite element model that elucidates the failure mechanism due to repetitive loading of the lumbar motion segment. The aim of this study was to refine an already validated poro-elastic finite element model of lumbar motion segment to investigate the initiation and progression of mechanical damage in the disc under simple and complex cyclic loading conditions. Continuum damage mechanics methodology was incorporated into the finite element model to track the damage accumulation in the annulus in response to the repetitive loading. The analyses showed that the damage initiated at the posterior inner annulus adjacent to the endplates and propagated outwards towards its periphery under all loading conditions simulated. The damage accumulated preferentially in the posterior region of the annulus. The analyses also showed that the disc failure is unlikely to happen with repetitive bending in the absence of compressive load. Compressive cyclic loading with low peak load magnitude also did not create the failure of the disc. The finite element model results were consistent with the experimental and clinical observations in terms of the region of failure, magnitude of applied loads and the number of load cycles survived. PMID:22682891

  8. Mechanical properties and in vivo healing evaluation of a novel Centella asiatica-loaded hydrocolloid wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sung Giu; Kim, Kyung Soo; Yousaf, Abid Mehmood; Kim, Dong Wuk; Jang, Sun Woo; Son, Mi-Won; Kim, Young Hun; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh; Choi, Han-Gon

    2015-07-25

    To develop a novel sodium alginate based Centella asiatica (CA)-loaded hydrocolloid wound dressing (HCD) providing excellent mechanical properties and improved wound healing, numerous CA-loaded HCDs were prepared with various ingredients using the hot melting method. The effect of sodium alginate, styrene-isoprene-styrene copolymer (SIS) and petroleum hydrocarbon resin (PHR) on the mechanical properties of CA-loaded HCDs was investigated. The effect of disintegrants on swelling and drug release was assessed. Moreover, the in vivo wound healing potentials of the selected CA-loaded HCD in various wound models such as abrasion, excision and infection were evaluated in comparison with the commercial product. Polyisobutylene and SIS hardly affected the mechanical properties, but PHR improved the tensile strength and elongation at break. Disintegrants such as croscarmellose sodium, sodium starch glycolate and crospovidone improved the swelling ratio of the CA-loaded HCD. Furthermore, the CA-loaded HCD without croscarmellose sodium poorly released the drug, but that with 2% croscarmellose sodium showed about 27% drug release in 24h. In particular, the CA-loaded HCD composed of CA/polyisobutylene/SIS/PHR/liquid paraffin/sodium alginate/croscarmellose sodium at the weight ratio of 1/8/25/25/12/27/2 furnished excellent mechanical properties and drug release. As compared with the commercial product, it offered improved healing effects in excision, infection and abrasion type wounds in rats. Thus, this novel CA-loaded HCD could be a potential candidate for the treatment of various wounds. PMID:26024819

  9. Oxidative stress and protective mechanisms in erythrocytes in relation to Plasmodium vinckei load.

    PubMed Central

    Stocker, R; Hunt, N H; Buffinton, G D; Weidemann, M J; Lewis-Hughes, P H; Clark, I A

    1985-01-01

    The protection of mouse erythrocytes (RBC) parasitized with Plasmodium vinckei vinckei against activated oxygen species was examined in relation to the intraerythrocytic parasite load. RBC from highly infected animals were separated by density gradient centrifugation into six bands with increasing parasite content and with parasitemias ranging from 17% to 100%. Increase in parasite load was accompanied by a decrease in the activities of the enzymes superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1), catalase (EC 1.11.1.6), glutathione peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.9), glutathione reductase [NAD(P)H] (EC 1.6.4.2), and NADH-methemoglobin reductase (EC 1.6.2.2; NADH:ferricytochrome b5 oxidoreductase) in the RBC lysates. In contrast, the total amount of reduced glutathione increased in the highly parasitized bands. Furthermore, the vitamin E content of all RBC bands, including the one that contained mainly nonparasitized erythrocytes, was 3- to 5-fold higher than that of control noninfected RBC. Increasing parasite load was accompanied by an increase in the production of malonyldialdehyde, indicating enhanced lipid peroxidation. Our results indicate that oxidative stress is experienced by all RBC during a malarial infection and is accompanied by a variety of changes in the antioxidant defense mechanisms of the host and the parasite. Furthermore, it appears that the plasma membrane of the host cell is better protected against oxidative injury than are the membranes surrounding the parasite. PMID:3855565

  10. Analysis of Curved Sandwich Panels Subjected to Combined Temperature Gradient and Mechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1998-01-01

    The results of a detailed study of the nonlinear response of curved sandwich panels with composite face sheets and subjected to a temperature gradient through-the-thickness combined with mechanical loadings are presented. The analysis is based on a first-order shear-deformation Sanders-Budiansky type theory with the effects of large displacements, moderate rotations, transverse shear deformation and laminated anisotropic material behavior included. A mixed formulation is used with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the generalized displacements and the stress resultants of the panel. The nonlinear displacements, strain energy, principal strains, transverse shear stresses, transverse shear strain energy density, and their hierarchical sensitivity coefficients are evaluated. The hierarchical sensitivity coefficients measure the sensitivity of the nonlinear response to variations in the panel parameters, the effective properties of the face sheet layers and the core, and the micromechanical parameters. Numerical results are presented for cylindrical panels subjected to combined pressure loading, edge shortening or extension, edge shear and a temperature gradient through the thickness. The results show the effects of variations in the loading and the panel aspect ratio, on the nonlinear response and its sensitivity to changes in the various panel, effective layer and micromechanical parameters.

  11. Computational Simulation of Damage Progression of Composite Thin Shells Subjected to Mechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, P. K.; Chamis, C. C.; Minnetyan, L.

    1996-01-01

    Defect-free and defected composite thin shells with ply orientation (90/0/+/-75) made of graphite/epoxy are simulated for damage progression and fracture due to internal pressure and axial loading. The thin shells have a cylindrical geometry with one end fixed and the other free. The applied load consists of an internal pressure in conjunction with an axial load at the free end, the cure temperature was 177 C (350 F) and the operational temperature was 21 C (70 F). The residual stresses due to the processing are taken into account. Shells with defect and without defects were examined by using CODSTRAN an integrated computer code that couples composite mechanics, finite element and account for all possible failure modes inherent in composites. CODSTRAN traces damage initiation, growth, accumulation, damage propagation and the final fracture of the structure. The results show that damage initiation started with matrix failure while damage/fracture progression occurred due to additional matrix failure and fiber fracture. The burst pressure of the (90/0/+/- 75) defected shell was 0.092% of that of the free defect. Finally the results of the damage progression of the (90/0/+/- 75), defective composite shell was compared with the (90/0/+/- theta, where theta = 45 and 60, layup configurations. It was shown that the examined laminate (90/0/+/- 75) has the least damage tolerant of the two compared defective shells with the (90/0/+/- theta), theta = 45 and 60 laminates.

  12. Simple solutions of the free-edge stresses in composite laminates under thermal and mechanical loads

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Wan-Lee )

    1994-01-01

    Intense and localized interlaminar stresses generally occur in a narrow boundary region near the free edge of a multilayered anisotropic laminate under mechanical and temperature loads. Quantitative measures of interlaminar action across interfaces may be readily obtained through purely algebraic operations, even if nonlinear and inelastic material behavior becomes significant in the boundary region due to severe strain concentration. These measures are the limiting values of the Lekhnitskii stress functions F and Psi (and of the normal derivative of F) along interfaces and toward the interior region of the laminate. In the present work, they are used as the basis of an exceedingly simple and efficient method of interlaminar stress analysis that is potentially applicable to free-edge problems involving nonlinear thermoelastic constitutive relations. Example solutions are obtained for symmetric, four-layer, cross-ply, and angle-ply laminates under a temperature load and two different types of strain loads, and the results are found to be in reasonable agreement with the existing numerical and analytical solutions based on elaborate analysis methods. 13 refs.

  13. Bone's responses to mechanical loading are impaired in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Ashutosh; Liu, Chao; Li, Wen; Gu, Xiaoyu; Lai, Xiaohan; Pei, Shaopeng; Price, Christopher; You, Lidan; Lu, X Lucas; Wang, Liyun

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes adversely impacts many organ systems including the skeleton. Clinical trials have revealed a startling elevation in fracture risk in diabetic patients. Bone fractures can be life threatening: nearly 1 in 6 hip fracture patients die within one year. Because physical exercise is proven to improve bone properties and reduce fracture risk in non-diabetic subjects, we tested its efficacy in type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized that diabetic bone's response to anabolic mechanical loading would be attenuated, partially due to impaired mechanosensing of osteocytes under hyperglycemia. Heterozygous C57BL/6-Ins2(Akita)/J (Akita) male and female diabetic mice and their age- and gender-matched wild-type (WT) C57BL/6J controls (7-month-old, N=5-7 mice/group) were subjected to unilateral axial ulnar loading with a peak strain of 3500 με at 2 Hz and 3 min/day for 5 days. The Akita female mice, which exhibited a relatively normal body weight and a mild 40% elevation of blood glucose level, responded with increased bone formation (+6.5% in Ct.B.Ar, and 4 to 36-fold increase in Ec.BFR/BS and Ps.BFR/BS), and the loading effects, in terms of changes of static and dynamic indices, did not differ between Akita and WT females (p ≥ 0.1). However, loading-induced anabolic effects were greatly diminished in Akita males, which exhibited reduced body weight, severe hyperglycemia (+230%), diminished bone formation (ΔCt.B.Ar: 0.003 vs. 0.030 mm(2), p=0.005), and suppressed periosteal bone appositions (ΔPs.BFR/BS, p=0.02). Hyperglycemia (25 mM glucose) was further found to impair the flow-induced intracellular calcium signaling in MLO-Y4 osteocytes, and significantly inhibited the flow-induced downstream responses including reduction in apoptosis and sRANKL secretion and PGE2 release. These results, along with previous findings showing adverse effects of hyperglycemia on osteoblasts and mesenchymal stem cells, suggest that failure to maintain normal glucose levels may impair bone

  14. Outperforming hummingbirds’ load-lifting capability with a lightweight hummingbird-like flapping-wing mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Reynaerts, Dominiek; Vandepitte, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The stroke-cam flapping mechanism presented in this paper closely mimics the wing motion of a hovering Rufous hummingbird. It is the only lightweight hummingbird-sized flapping mechanism which generates a harmonic wing stroke with both a high flapping frequency and a large stroke amplitude. Experiments on a lightweight prototype of this stroke-cam mechanism on a 50 mm-long wing demonstrate that a harmonic stroke motion is generated with a peak-to-peak stroke amplitude of 175° at a flapping frequency of 40 Hz. It generated a mass lifting capability of 5.1 g, which is largely sufficient to lift the prototype's mass of 3.39 g and larger than the mass-lifting capability of a Rufous hummingbird. The motor mass of a hummingbird-like robot which drives the stroke-cam mechanism is considerably larger (about five times) than the muscle mass of a hummingbird with comparable load-lifting capability. This paper presents a flapping wing nano aerial vehicle which is designed to possess the same lift- and thrust-generating principles of the Rufous hummingbird. The application is indoor flight. We give an overview of the wing kinematics and some specifications which should be met to develop an artificial wing, and also describe the applications of these in the mechanism which has been developed in this work. PMID:27444790

  15. Outperforming hummingbirds' load-lifting capability with a lightweight hummingbird-like flapping-wing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Leys, Frederik; Reynaerts, Dominiek; Vandepitte, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The stroke-cam flapping mechanism presented in this paper closely mimics the wing motion of a hovering Rufous hummingbird. It is the only lightweight hummingbird-sized flapping mechanism which generates a harmonic wing stroke with both a high flapping frequency and a large stroke amplitude. Experiments on a lightweight prototype of this stroke-cam mechanism on a 50 mm-long wing demonstrate that a harmonic stroke motion is generated with a peak-to-peak stroke amplitude of 175° at a flapping frequency of 40 Hz. It generated a mass lifting capability of 5.1 g, which is largely sufficient to lift the prototype's mass of 3.39 g and larger than the mass-lifting capability of a Rufous hummingbird. The motor mass of a hummingbird-like robot which drives the stroke-cam mechanism is considerably larger (about five times) than the muscle mass of a hummingbird with comparable load-lifting capability. This paper presents a flapping wing nano aerial vehicle which is designed to possess the same lift- and thrust-generating principles of the Rufous hummingbird. The application is indoor flight. We give an overview of the wing kinematics and some specifications which should be met to develop an artificial wing, and also describe the applications of these in the mechanism which has been developed in this work. PMID:27444790

  16. Size and Geometry Effects on the Mechanical Properties of Carrara Marble Under Dynamic Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chunjiang; Wong, Louis Ngai Yuen

    2016-05-01

    The effects of specimen size and geometry on the dynamic mechanical properties of Carrara marble including compressive strength, failure strain and elastic modulus are investigated in this research. Four different groups of specimens of different sizes and cross-sectional geometries are loaded under a wide range of strain rates by the split Hopkinson pressure bar setup. The experimental results indicate that all these mechanical properties are significantly influenced by the specimen size and geometry to different extent, hence highlighting the importance of taking into account of the specimen size and geometry in dynamic tests on rock materials. In addition, the transmission coefficient and the determination of strain rate under dynamic tests are discussed in detail.

  17. X-ray tomography system to investigate granular materials during mechanical loading

    SciTech Connect

    Athanassiadis, Athanasios G.; La Rivière, Patrick J.; Sidky, Emil; Pan, Xiaochuan; Pelizzari, Charles; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2014-08-15

    We integrate a small and portable medical x-ray device with mechanical testing equipment to enable in situ, non-invasive measurements of a granular material's response to mechanical loading. We employ an orthopedic C-arm as the x-ray source and detector to image samples mounted in the materials tester. We discuss the design of a custom rotation stage, which allows for sample rotation and tomographic reconstruction under applied compressive stress. We then discuss the calibration of the system for 3D computed tomography, as well as the subsequent image reconstruction process. Using this system to reconstruct packings of 3D-printed particles, we resolve packing features with 0.52 mm resolution in a (60 mm){sup 3} field of view. By analyzing the performance bounds of the system, we demonstrate that the reconstructions exhibit only moderate noise.

  18. X-ray tomography system to investigate granular materials during mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassiadis, Athanasios G.; La Rivière, Patrick J.; Sidky, Emil; Pelizzari, Charles; Pan, Xiaochuan; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2014-08-01

    We integrate a small and portable medical x-ray device with mechanical testing equipment to enable in situ, non-invasive measurements of a granular material's response to mechanical loading. We employ an orthopedic C-arm as the x-ray source and detector to image samples mounted in the materials tester. We discuss the design of a custom rotation stage, which allows for sample rotation and tomographic reconstruction under applied compressive stress. We then discuss the calibration of the system for 3D computed tomography, as well as the subsequent image reconstruction process. Using this system to reconstruct packings of 3D-printed particles, we resolve packing features with 0.52 mm resolution in a (60 mm)3 field of view. By analyzing the performance bounds of the system, we demonstrate that the reconstructions exhibit only moderate noise.

  19. X-ray tomography system to investigate granular materials during mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Athanassiadis, Athanasios G; La Rivière, Patrick J; Sidky, Emil; Pelizzari, Charles; Pan, Xiaochuan; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2014-08-01

    We integrate a small and portable medical x-ray device with mechanical testing equipment to enable in situ, non-invasive measurements of a granular material's response to mechanical loading. We employ an orthopedic C-arm as the x-ray source and detector to image samples mounted in the materials tester. We discuss the design of a custom rotation stage, which allows for sample rotation and tomographic reconstruction under applied compressive stress. We then discuss the calibration of the system for 3D computed tomography, as well as the subsequent image reconstruction process. Using this system to reconstruct packings of 3D-printed particles, we resolve packing features with 0.52 mm resolution in a (60 mm)(3) field of view. By analyzing the performance bounds of the system, we demonstrate that the reconstructions exhibit only moderate noise. PMID:25173277

  20. Numerical Modeling of Long Bone Adaptation due to Mechanical Loading: Correlation with Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Natarajan Chennimalai; Dantzig, Jonathan A.; Jasiuk, Iwona M.; Robling, Alex G.; Turner, Charles H.

    2011-01-01

    The process of external bone adaptation in cortical bone is modeled mathematically using finite element (FE) stress analysis coupled with an evolution model, in which adaptation response is triggered by mechanical stimulus represented by strain energy density. The model is applied to experiments in which a rat ulna is subjected to cyclic loading, and the results demonstrate the ability of the model to predict the bone adaptation response. The FE mesh is generated from micro-computed tomography (μCT) images of the rat ulna, and the stress analysis is carried out using boundary and loading conditions on the rat ulna obtained from the experiments [Robling, A. G., F. M. Hinant, D. B. Burr, and C. H. Turner. J. Bone Miner. Res. 17:1545–1554, 2002]. The external adaptation process is implemented in the model by moving the surface nodes of the FE mesh based on an evolution law characterized by two parameters: one that captures the rate of the adaptation process (referred to as gain); and the other characterizing the threshold value of the mechanical stimulus required for adaptation (referred to as threshold-sensitivity). A parametric study is carried out to evaluate the effect of these two parameters on the adaptation response. We show, following comparison of results from the simulations to the experimental observations of Robling et al. (J. Bone Miner. Res. 17:1545–1554, 2002), that splitting the loading cycles into different number of bouts affects the threshold-sensitivity but not the rate of adaptation. We also show that the threshold-sensitivity parameter can quantify the mechanosensitivity of the osteocytes. PMID:20013156

  1. Thermo-mechanical modelling of salt caverns due to fluctuating loading conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, N.

    2015-12-01

    This work summarizes the development and application of a numerical model for the thermo-mechanical behaviour of salt caverns during cyclic gas storage. Artificial salt caverns are used for short term energy storage, such as power-to-gas or compressed air energy storage. Those applications are characterized by highly fluctuating operation pressures due to the unsteady power levels of power plants based on renewable energy. Compression and expansion of the storage gases during loading and unloading stages lead to rapidly changing temperatures in the host rock of the caverns. This affects the material behaviour of the host rock within a zone that extends several meters into the rock mass adjacent to the cavern wall, and induces thermo-mechanical stresses and alters the creep response.The proposed model features the thermodynamic behaviour of the storage medium, conductive heat transport in the host rock, as well as temperature dependent material properties of rock salt using different thermo-viscoplastic material models. The utilized constitutive models are well known and state-of-the-art in various salt mechanics applications. The model has been implemented into the open-source software platform OpenGeoSys. Thermal and mechanical processes are solved using a finite element approach, coupled via a staggered coupling scheme. The simulation results allow the conclusion, that the cavern convergence rate (and thus the efficiency of the cavern) is highly influenced by the loading cycle frequency and the resulting gas temperatures. The model therefore allows to analyse the influence of operation modes on the cavern host rock or on neighbouring facilities.

  2. Effects of Mechanical Loading on the Dynamics of Hair-Cell Stereociliary Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredrickson, Lea

    Hearing is remarkably sensitive and still not entirely understood. Hair cells of the inner ear are the mechano-electrical transducers of sound and understanding how they function is essential to the understanding of hearing in general. Spontaneous oscillations exhibited by stereociliary bundles of the bullfrog sacculus provide a useful probe for the study of the hair cells' internal dynamic state. In this work we study the effects of mechanical loading on these hair-cell bundles in order to study their dynamics. When applying stiffness loads, we find that the spontaneous oscillation profile changes from multimode to single mode with light loading, and decreases in amplitude and increases in frequency with stiffer loads. We also find that tuning decreases with increasing load such that at loads comparable to in vivo conditions the tuning is flat. We further explore loading via deflections to hair cell bundles, both in the form of steady-state offsets and slow ramps. We find that steady state offsets lead to significant modulation of the characteristic frequency of response, decreasing the frequency in the channels closed direction (negative) and increasing it in the channels open direction (positive). Attachment to the overlying membrane was found, in vitro, to affect bundle offset position in hair cells of the bullfrog sacculus. Application of similar offsets on free-standing, spontaneously oscillating hair bundles shows modulation of their dynamic state, i.e. oscillation profile, characteristic frequency, and response to stimulus. Large offsets are found to arrest spontaneous oscillations, which recover upon reversal of the stimulus. The dynamical state of the hair bundle is dependent on both the history and direction of the offset stimulus. Oscillation suppression occurs much more readily in the negative direction and the bundle behavior approaching quiescence is distinct from that in the positive direction. With the change in spontaneous oscillation frequency

  3. An Autoregulatory Mechanism Governing Mucociliary Transport Is Sensitive to Mucus Load

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Linbo; Shastry, Suresh; Byan-Parker, Suzanne; Houser, Grace; K. Chu, Kengyeh; Birket, Susan E.; Fernandez, Courtney M.; Gardecki, Joseph A.; Grizzle, William E.; Wilsterman, Eric J.; Sorscher, Eric J.; Rowe, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Mucociliary clearance, characterized by mucus secretion and its conveyance by ciliary action, is a fundamental physiological process that plays an important role in host defense. Although it is known that ciliary activity changes with chemical and mechanical stimuli, the autoregulatory mechanisms that govern ciliary activity and mucus transport in response to normal and pathophysiological variations in mucus are not clear. We have developed a high-speed, 1-μm-resolution, cross-sectional imaging modality, termed micro-optical coherence tomography (μOCT), which provides the first integrated view of the functional microanatomy of the epithelial surface. We monitored invasion of the periciliary liquid (PCL) layer by mucus in fully differentiated human bronchial epithelial cultures and full thickness swine trachea using μOCT. We further monitored mucociliary transport (MCT) and intracellular calcium concentration simultaneously during invasion of the PCL layer by mucus using colocalized μOCT and confocal fluorescence microscopy in cell cultures. Ciliary beating and mucus transport are up-regulated via a calcium-dependent pathway when mucus causes a reduction in the PCL layer and cilia height. When the load exceeds a physiological limit of approximately 2 μm, this gravity-independent autoregulatory mechanism can no longer compensate, resulting in diminished ciliary motion and abrogation of stimulated MCT. A fundamental integrated mechanism with specific operating limits governs MCT in the lung and fails when periciliary layer compression and mucus viscosity exceeds normal physiologic limits. PMID:24937762

  4. DEFORMATION CHARACTERISTICS OF CRUSHED-STONE LAYER UNDER CYCLIC IMPACT LOADING FROM MICRO-MECHANICAL VIEW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Akiko; Matsushima, Takashi

    'Hanging sleepers', which have gaps between sleepers and ballast layer are often found in the neighborhood of rail joints or rugged surface rails. This suggests that differential settlement of the ballast layer is due to impact loading generated by the contact between running wheel and rugged surface rail. Then cyclic loading tests were performed on crushed-stone layer with two loading patterns, the one is a cyclic impact loading and the other one is cyclic 'standard' loading controlled at 1/10 loading velocity of the impact loading. It was shown that the crashed-stone layer deforms with volumetric expansion during every off-loading processes under the cyclic impact loading. This phenomena prevents crushed stone layer from forming stable grain columns, then the residual settlement under the cyclic impact loading is larger than that under the cyclic 'standard' loading. A simple mass-spring model simulates that two masses move in the opposite direction with increased frequency of harmonic excitation.

  5. Runx1 Activities in Superficial Zone Chondrocytes, Osteoarthritic Chondrocyte Clones and Response to Mechanical Loading

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Kimberly T.; Walcott, Marie E.; Gaur, Tripti; O’Connell, Shannon L.; Basil, Kirti; Tadiri, Christina P.; Mason-Savas, April; Silva, Jason A.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S; Ayers, David C.; Lian, Jane B.; Fanning, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Runx1, the hematopoietic lineage determining transcription factor, is present in perichondrium and chondrocytes. Here we addressed Runx1 functions, by examining expression in cartilage during mouse and human osteoarthritis (OA) progression and in response to mechanical loading. Methods Spared and diseased compartments in knees of OA patients and in mice with surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus were examined for changes in expression of Runx1 mRNA (Q-PCR) and protein (immunoblot, immunohistochemistry). Runx1 levels were quantified in response to static mechanical compression of bovine articular cartilage. Runx1 function was assessed by cell proliferation (Ki67, PCNA) and cell type phenotypic markers. Results Runx1 is enriched in superficial zone (SZ) chondrocytes of normal bovine, mouse, and human tissues. Increasing loading conditions in bovine cartilage revealed a positive correlation with a significant elevation of Runx1. Runx1 becomes highly expressed at the periphery of mouse OA lesions and in human OA chondrocyte ‘clones’ where Runx1 co-localizes with Vcam1, the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) marker and lubricin (Prg4), a cartilage chondroprotective protein. These OA induced cells represent a proliferative cell population, Runx1 depletion in MPCs decreases cell growth, supporting Runx1 contribution to cell expansion. Conclusion The highest Runx1 levels in SZC of normal cartilage suggest a function that supports the unique phenotype of articular chondrocytes, reflected by upregulation under conditions of compression. We propose Runx1 co-expression with Vcam1 and lubricin in murine cell clusters and human ‘clones’ of OA cartilage, participate in a cooperative mechanism for a compensatory anabolic function. PMID:25078095

  6. Induction of hypertrophy in vitro by mechanical loading in adult rabbit myocardium.

    PubMed

    Bupha-Intr, Tepmanas; Holmes, Jeffrey W; Janssen, Paul M L

    2007-12-01

    To study myocardial hypertrophy under in vitro conditions, we developed an experimental system and protocol in which mechanical conditions of isolated multicellular myocardium can be controlled while function can be continuously assessed. This in vitro culture system now allows us to investigate how mechanical overload impacts on cardiac hypertrophy in the absence of systemic factors. In this system, small right ventricular rabbit trabeculae were subjected to different modes of mechanical load, while being electrically stimulated to contract at 1 Hz at 37 degrees C. Muscles subjected to prolonged isometric contractions at high, but physiological, pre- and afterload showed a rapid induction of cardiac hypertrophy; overall muscle diameter increased by 4.3 +/- 1.4 and 17.9 +/- 4.0% after 24 and 48 h, respectively. This finding was confirmed at the cellular level; individual myocyte width significantly increased after 24 and 48 h. In muscles subjected to a low preload, or in the absence of afterload, this hypertrophic response was absent. Functionally, after 24 h of isometric contractions at high load, active developed tension had gradually increased to 168 +/- 22% of starting values. Proteomic analysis of this cultured myocardium demonstrated reproducible changes in the protein expression pattern and included an upregulation of myofilament proteins, myosin light chain isoforms, alpha-b crystalline, and breast cancer 1 protein, and a downregulation of myoglobin. We conclude that multicellular myocardium can be stressed to undergo rapid hypertrophy in vitro, and changes in function and protein expression can be investigated during the transition from healthy myocardium to early hypertrophy. PMID:17933962

  7. Mechanical behaviors of multi-filament twist superconducting strand under tensile and cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Li, Yingxu; Gao, Yuanwen

    2016-01-01

    The superconducting strand, serving as the basic unit cell of the cable-in-conduit-conductors (CICCs), is a typical multi-filament twist composite which is always subjected to a cyclic loading under the operating condition. Meanwhile, the superconducting material Nb3Sn in the strand is sensitive to strain frequently relating to the performance degradation of the superconductivity. Therefore, a comprehensive study on the mechanical behavior of the strand helps understanding the superconducting performance of the strained Nb3Sn strands. To address this issue, taking the LMI (internal tin) strand as an example, a three-dimensional structural finite element model, named as the Multi-filament twist model, of the strand with the real configuration of the LMI strand is built to study the influences of the plasticity of the component materials, the twist of the filament bundle, the initial thermal residual stress and the breakage and its evolution of the filaments on the mechanical behaviors of the strand. The effective properties of superconducting filament bundle with random filament breakage and its evolution versus strain are obtained based on the damage theory of fiber-reinforced composite materials proposed by Curtin and Zhou. From the calculation results of this model, we find that the occurrence of the hysteresis loop in the cyclic loading curve is determined by the reverse yielding of the elastic-plastic materials in the strand. Both the initial thermal residual stress in the strand and the pitch length of the filaments have significant impacts on the axial and hysteretic behaviors of the strand. The damage of the filaments also affects the axial mechanical behavior of the strand remarkably at large axial strain. The critical current of the strand is calculated by the scaling law with the results of the Multi-filament twist model. The predicted results of the Multi-filament twist model show an acceptable agreement with the experiment.

  8. Performance of nanoscale metallic multilayer systems under mechanical and thermal loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economy, David Ross

    Reports of nanoscale metallic multilayers (NMM) performance show a relatively high strength and radiation damage resistance when compared their monolithic components. Hardness of NMMs has been shown to increase with increasing interfacial density (i.e. decreasing layer thickness). This interface density-dependent behavior within NMMs has been shown to deviate from Hall-Petch strengthening, leading to higher measured strengths during normal loading than those predicted by a rule of mixtures. To fully understand why this occurs, other researchers have looked at the influence of the crystal structures of the component layers, orientations, and compositions on deformation processes. Additionally, a limited number of studies have focused on the structural stability and possible performance variation between as-deposited systems and those exposed to mechanical and thermal loading. This dissertation identified how NMM as-deposited structures and performance are altered by mechanical loading (sliding/wear contact) and/or thermal (such as diffusion, relaxation) loading. These objectives were pursued by tracking hardness evolution during sliding wear and after thermal loading to as-deposited stress and mechanical properties. Residual stress progression was also examined during thermal loading and supporting data was collected to detail structural and chemical changes. All of these experimental observations were conducted using Cu/Nb NMMs with 2 nm, 20 nm, or 100 nm thick individual layers deposited with either 1 microm or 10 microm total thicknesses with two geometries (Cu/Nb and Nb/Cu) on (100) Si. Wear boxes were performed on Cu/Nb NMM using a nanoindentation system with a 1 microm conical diamond counterface. After nano-wear deformation, the hardness of the deformed regions significantly rose with respect to as-deposited measurements, which further increased with greater wear loads. Additionally, NMMs with thinner layers showed less volume loss as measured by laser

  9. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    2001-01-01

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs which can be combined to determine any one of the six general load components.

  10. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, B.L.

    1998-12-15

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs, each directly proportional to one of the six general load components. 16 figs.

  11. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    1998-01-01

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs, each directly proportional to one of the six general load components.

  12. Evaluation of the Kinematic Responses and Potential Injury Mechanisms of the Jejunum during Seatbelt Loading.

    PubMed

    Howes, Meghan K; Hardy, Warren N; Agnew, Amanda M; Hallman, Jason J

    2015-11-01

    High-speed biplane x-ray was used to research the kinematics of the small intestine in response to seatbelt loading. Six driver-side 3-point seatbelt simulations were conducted with the lap belt routed superior to the pelvis of six unembalmed human cadavers. Testing was conducted with each cadaver perfused, ventilated, and positioned in a fixed-back configuration with the spine angled 30° from the vertical axis. Four tests were conducted with the cadavers in an inverted position, and two tests were conducted with the cadavers upright. The jejunum was instrumented with radiopaque markers using a minimally-invasive, intraluminal approach without inducing preparation-related damage to the small intestine. Tests were conducted at a target peak lap belt speed of 3 m/s, resulting in peak lap belt loads ranging from 5.4-7.9 kN. Displacement of the radiopaque markers was recorded using high-speed x-ray from two perspectives. Marker trajectories were tracked using motion analysis software and projected into calibrated three-dimensional coordinates to quantify the seatbelt and jejunum kinematics for each test. Five of the six tests resulted in jejunum damage. Based on the autopsy findings and the assessment of the belt and jejunum kinematics, it is likely that direct abdominal interactions with the seatbelt resulting in compression and stretch of the jejunum are components of the mechanisms of crash-induced jejunum injuries. In addition, the presence of fluid or air in the portion of the jejunum in the load path appears to be necessary to create jejunum damage in the cadaver model. Overall, the kinematics and damage data generated in this study may be useful for future restraint system development. PMID:26660746

  13. Experimental Support of Statistical Mechanics Theory of Bed Load Sediment Motions Using High-Speed Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathel, S. L.; Furbish, D. J.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    Bed load particles move as a complex mixture of rolling, sliding, and small saltating motions on the stream bed. We track particle motions from start to stop using high speed imagery of coarse sand particles in flume experiments. This work utilizes a rich data set to provide foundational support for a statistical mechanics approach to bed load transport. The streamwise and cross-stream particle accelerations form Laplacian-like distributions, centered on zero, such that the positive and negative accelerations are balanced, which is consistent with equilibrium transport conditions wherein the mean particle acceleration must equal zero. Measurements from the imagery are censored by the window size and the sampling time, wherein particle `hops' are only measured if they both start and stop in the field of view (spatial censorship) and during the analyzed period of time (temporal censorship). We focus on the former, by considering data from complete particle hops in different sampling windows. Although all hop data are censored, we find that with a decreasing window size, longer hop distances and travel times are preferentially censored from the data. Furthermore, this suggests the streamwise hop distances scale with travel times to the second power, rather than previous estimates of a 5/3 power relationship. Data from a new experiment, with a higher particle activity, suggest similar forms of the instantaneous velocities and hops compared to lower activity data. Furthermore, the relationship between the streamwise hop distance and travel times appears to scale with the second power. Data from this new experiment will provide further insight concerning the nature of bed load transport from coupled measurements of particle transport and near-bed fluid velocities, which will ultimately inform statistically expected sediment behaviors.

  14. Trabecular bone response to mechanical loading in ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rats depends on baseline bone quantity.

    PubMed

    Ko, Chang-Yong; Jung, Young Jin; Park, Ji Hyung; Seo, Donghyun; Han, Paul; Bae, Kiho; Schreiber, Jürgen; Kim, Han Sung

    2012-07-26

    Mechanical loading is one of the determining factors for bone modulation, and is therefore frequently used to treat or prevent bone loss; however, there appears to be no data on the effects of baseline bone quantity on this response. This study aimed to verify whether baseline bone quantity affects osteoporotic trabecular bone adaptive response to mechanical stimulation. Twenty-four female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were ovariectomized (OVX). After 3 weeks of OVX, rats were divided into a high bone quantity and a low bone quantity group, and rats in each group were then subdivided into 4 groups that were exposed to different loading strategies. In the loading groups, tibiae were stimulated through axial loading at 2000με of strain, for 1500 cycles each of 75s, 150s, or 250s. The sham treatment groups received no loading. Changes in BV/TV for trabecular bone in the tibia were measured at the baseline (before loading), and at 3 weeks and 6 weeks after loading. BV/TVs in loading groups of the low baseline bone quantity group were significantly increased at 6 weeks, compared with those in the no-loading groups (p<0.05), while those in the high quantity groups were not increased (p>0.05). A significant negative correlation was observed between baseline BV/TV and its relative variations at 3 weeks or 6 weeks (p<0.05). These results indicate that adaptive responses of osteoporotic trabecular bone to mechanical loading depend on baseline bone quantity. PMID:22663762

  15. Fracture Mechanisms of Zirconium Diboride Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics under Pulse Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnyak, Vladimir V.; Bragov, Anatolii M.; Skripnyak, Vladimir A.; Lomunov, Andrei K.; Skripnyak, Evgeniya G.; Vaganova, Irina K.

    2015-06-01

    Mechanisms of failure in ultra-high temperature ceramics (UHTC) based on zirconium diboride under pulse loading were studied experimentally by the method of SHPB and theoretically using the multiscale simulation method. The obtained experimental and numerical data are evidence of the quasi-brittle fracture character of nanostructured zirconium diboride ceramics under compression and tension at high strain rates and the room temperatures. Damage of nanostructured porous zirconium diboride -based UHTC can be formed under stress pulse amplitude below the Hugoniot elastic limit. Fracture of nanostructured ultra-high temperature ceramics under pulse and shock-wave loadings is provided by fast processes of intercrystalline brittle fracture and relatively slow processes of quasi-brittle failure via growth and coalescence of microcracks. A decrease of the shear strength can be caused by nano-voids clusters in vicinity of triple junctions between ceramic matrix grains and ultrafine-grained ceramics. This research was supported by grants from ``The Tomsk State University Academic D.I. Mendeleev Fund Program'' and also N. I. Lobachevski State University of Nizhny Novgorod (Grant of post graduate mobility).

  16. Mechanical response of metals under dynamic loading off the principal Hugoniot and isentrope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seagle, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    Controlled dynamic loading of materials on phase-space paths off the principal Hugoniot and isentrope provide a stringent test of equation of state models in regions not typically experimentally constrained. Maturation of hardware design and pulse-shaping capabilities for shock-ramp experiments at Sandia's Z Machine have been exploited to test the mechanical response of a wide range of metals on ramp compression initiated from a well-defined Hugoniot state. A range of 1-8 km/s impact velocities are possible before initiating a ramp wave in a test sample. Capabilities and challenges of this type of experiment will be presented along with recent data on platinum, tin, cerium, and tantalum. Results of these experiments will be discussed in relation to existing equation of state data and models, and the future outlook for experimental constraints on material response on controlled off-principal loading paths. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Integrity of the osteocyte bone cell network in osteoporotic fracture: Implications for mechanical load adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuliwaba, J. S.; Truong, L.; Codrington, J. D.; Fazzalari, N. L.

    2010-06-01

    The human skeleton has the ability to modify its material composition and structure to accommodate loads through adaptive modelling and remodelling. The osteocyte cell network is now considered to be central to the regulation of skeletal homeostasis; however, very little is known of the integrity of the osteocyte cell network in osteoporotic fragility fracture. This study was designed to characterise osteocyte morphology, the extent of osteocyte cell apoptosis and expression of sclerostin protein (a negative regulator of bone formation) in trabecular bone from the intertrochanteric region of the proximal femur, for postmenopausal women with fragility hip fracture compared to age-matched women who had not sustained fragility fracture. Osteocyte morphology (osteocyte, empty lacunar, and total lacunar densities) and the degree of osteocyte apoptosis (percent caspase-3 positive osteocyte lacunae) were similar between the fracture patients and non-fracture women. The fragility hip fracture patients had a lower proportion of sclerostin-positive osteocyte lacunae in comparison to sclerostin-negative osteocyte lacunae, in contrast to similar percent sclerostin-positive/sclerostin-negative lacunae for non-fracture women. The unexpected finding of decreased sclerostin expression in trabecular bone osteocytes from fracture cases may be indicative of elevated bone turnover and under-mineralisation, characteristic of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Further, altered osteocytic expression of sclerostin may be involved in the mechano-responsiveness of bone. Optimal function of the osteocyte cell network is likely to be a critical determinant of bone strength, acting via mechanical load adaptation, and thus contributing to osteoporotic fracture risk.

  18. The Mechanical and Optical Response of Polychlorotrifluoroethylene to One-Dimensional Shock Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millett, Jeremy C. F.; Lowe, Michael R.; Appleby-Thomas, Gareth; Roberts, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    A series of plate impact experiments have been performed to probe the shock behavior of polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE), in terms of its optical and mechanical response. Interfacial velocity measurements using interferometric techniques have shown differences between measured and actual velocities, and been used to determine changes in refractive index due to shock-induced density increases. These have further been used to determine an optical correction factor, and allow the possibility of PCTFE being used as an optical window in future shock loading experiments. The shear strength of shock loaded PCTFE has also been shown to be near-constant behind the shock front, in common with other fluorinated polymers, although the strength variation with impact stress is greater than other similar materials. It has been suggested that the presence of a larger chlorine atom replacing a fluorine allows for a degree of tacticity between polymer chains, with local variations of charge density along the chain (due to the presence of the chlorine atom) also having an effect.

  19. Evaluating the effects of loading parameters on single-crystal slip in tantalum using molecular mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alleman, Coleman; Ghosh, Somnath; Luscher, D. J.; Bronkhorst, Curt A.

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed at developing a physics-based crystal plasticity finite element model for body-centred cubic (BCC) metals, through the introduction of atomic-level deformation information from molecular dynamics (MD) investigations of dislocation motion at the onset of plastic flow. In this study, three critical variables governing crystal plasticity mediated by dislocation motion are considered. MD simulations are first performed across a range of finite temperatures up to 600K to quantify the temperature dependence of critical stress required for slip initiation. An important feature of slip in BCC metals is that it is not solely dependent on the Schmid law measure of resolved shear stress, commonly employed in crystal plasticity models. The configuration of a screw dislocation and its subsequent motion is studied under different load orientations to quantify these non-Schmid effects. Finally, the influence of strain rates on thermal activation is studied by inducing higher stresses during activation at higher applied strain rates. Functional dependence of the critical resolved shear stress on temperature, loading orientation and strain rate is determined from the MD simulation results. The functional forms are derived from the thermal activation mechanisms that govern the plastic behaviour and quantification of relevant deformation variables. The resulting physics-based rate-dependent crystal plasticity model is implemented in a crystal plasticity finite element code. Uniaxial simulations reveal orientation-dependent tension-compression asymmetry of yield that more accurately represents single-crystal experimental results than standard models.

  20. Mechanisms of Active Aerodynamic Load Reduction on a Rotorcraft Fuselage With Rotor Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffler, Norman W.; Allan, Brian G.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Bartram, Scott M.; Mace, W. Derry; Wong, Oliver D.; Tanner, Philip E.

    2016-01-01

    The reduction of the aerodynamic load that acts on a generic rotorcraft fuselage by the application of active flow control was investigated in a wind tunnel test conducted on an approximately 1/3-scale powered rotorcraft model simulating forward flight. The aerodynamic mechanisms that make these reductions, in both the drag and the download, possible were examined in detail through the use of the measured surface pressure distribution on the fuselage, velocity field measurements made in the wake directly behind the ramp of the fuselage and computational simulations. The fuselage tested was the ROBIN-mod7, which was equipped with a series of eight slots located on the ramp section through which flow control excitation was introduced. These slots were arranged in a U-shaped pattern located slightly downstream of the baseline separation line and parallel to it. The flow control excitation took the form of either synthetic jets, also known as zero-net-mass-flux blowing, and steady blowing. The same set of slots were used for both types of excitation. The differences between the two excitation types and between flow control excitation from different combinations of slots were examined. The flow control is shown to alter the size of the wake and its trajectory relative to the ramp and the tailboom and it is these changes to the wake that result in a reduction in the aerodynamic load.

  1. [Load and stress of musculature. Some considerations from the mechanical viewpoint].

    PubMed

    Denoth, J; Stacoff, A

    1991-03-01

    Injuries in the musculature belong to the most frequent injuries in sports. However, the various explanations regarding the reasons which lead to these problems differ considerably. In this work the muscle is simplified from a mechanical point of view and then explanations are derived in respect to possible origins of muscle injuries. The terms stress and distribution of stress are important in material science to describe the strength of a material. The same is true for the human body, for a muscle fibre or for an entire muscle. Due to its anatomical construction, the distribution of stress in the muscle is very inhomogeneous. It can be very large, even if the acting load is quite small. The most critical movements which lead to muscle injuries are fast, passive elongations of a muscle. The larger the rate of this elongation, the higher the risk of injury. These theoretical conclusions can also be supported by observations in everyday life. For example, muscle pain after exercise occurs almost exclusively after excentric loading. PMID:2057869

  2. FEA Based Tool Life Quantity Estimation of Hot Forging Dies Under Cyclic Thermo-Mechanical Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, B.-A.; Bouguecha, A.; Schäfer, F.; Hadifi, T.

    2011-01-01

    Hot forging dies are exposed during service to a combination of cyclic thermo-mechanical, tribological and chemical loads. Besides abrasive and adhesive wear on the die surface, fatigue crack initiation with subsequent fracture is one of the most frequent causes of failure. In order to extend the tool life, the finite element analysis (FEA) may serve as a means for process design and process optimisation. So far the FEA based estimation of the production cycles until initial cracking is limited as tool material behaviour due to repeated loading is not captured with the required accuracy. Material models which are able to account for cyclic effects are not verified for the fatigue life predictions of forging dies. Furthermore fatigue properties from strain controlled fatigue tests of relevant hot work steels are to date not available to allow for a close-to-reality fatigue life prediction. Two industrial forging processes, where clear fatigue crack initiation has been observed are considered for a fatigue analysis. For this purpose the relevant tool components are modelled with elasto-plastic material behaviour. The predicted sites, where crack initiation occurs, agree with the ones observed on the real die component.

  3. Simulated-Physiological Loading Conditions Preserve Biological and Mechanical Properties of Caprine Lumbar Intervertebral Discs in Ex Vivo Culture

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Cornelis P. L.; Zuiderbaan, Hendrik A.; Zandieh Doulabi, Behrouz; van der Veen, Albert J.; van de Ven, Peter M.; Smit, Theo H.; Helder, Marco N.; van Royen, Barend J.; Mullender, Margriet G.

    2012-01-01

    Low-back pain (LBP) is a common medical complaint and associated with high societal costs. Degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD) is assumed to be an important causal factor of LBP. IVDs are continuously mechanically loaded and both positive and negative effects have been attributed to different loading conditions. In order to study mechanical loading effects, degeneration-associated processes and/or potential regenerative therapies in IVDs, it is imperative to maintain the IVDs' structural integrity. While in vivo models provide comprehensive insight in IVD biology, an accompanying organ culture model can focus on a single factor, such as loading and may serve as a prescreening model to reduce life animal testing. In the current study we examined the feasibility of organ culture of caprine lumbar discs, with the hypothesis that a simulated-physiological load will optimally preserve IVD properties. Lumbar caprine IVDs (n = 175) were cultured in a bioreactor up to 21 days either without load, low dynamic load (LDL), or with simulated-physiological load (SPL). IVD stiffness was calculated from measurements of IVD loading and displacement. IVD nucleus, inner- and outer annulus were assessed for cell viability, cell density and gene expression. The extracellular matrix (ECM) was analyzed for water, glycosaminoglycan and total collagen content. IVD biomechanical properties did not change significantly with loading conditions. With SPL, cell viability, cell density and gene expression were preserved up to 21 days. Both unloaded and LDL resulted in decreased cell viability, cell density and significant changes in gene expression, yet no differences in ECM content were observed in any group. In conclusion, simulated-physiological loading preserved the native properties of caprine IVDs during a 21-day culture period. The characterization of caprine IVD response to culture in the LDCS under SPL conditions paves the way for controlled analysis of degeneration- and

  4. Control of a hair bundle’s mechanosensory function by its mechanical load

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Joshua D.; Ó Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid; Fabella, Brian A.; Tobin, Mélanie; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells, the sensory receptors of the internal ear, subserve different functions in various receptor organs: they detect oscillatory stimuli in the auditory system, but transduce constant and step stimuli in the vestibular and lateral-line systems. We show that a hair cell's function can be controlled experimentally by adjusting its mechanical load. By making bundles from a single organ operate as any of four distinct types of signal detector, we demonstrate that altering only a few key parameters can fundamentally change a sensory cell’s role. The motions of a single hair bundle can resemble those of a bundle from the amphibian vestibular system, the reptilian auditory system, or the mammalian auditory system, demonstrating an essential similarity of bundles across species and receptor organs. PMID:25691749

  5. Particle removal in a novel sequential mechanical filter system loaded with blackwater.

    PubMed

    Todt, Daniel; Jenssen, Petter D

    2015-01-01

    A novel sequential mechanical filter system was developed as an alternative primary treatment method for onsite wastewater treatment. The filter combines traditional screening with a novel type of counter-flow filter using wood-shavings as a biodegradable filter matrix. This study tested the system in a batch loading regime simulating high frequency toilet flushing using blackwater from a student dormitory. The filter removed 78-85% of suspended solids, 60-80% of chemical oxygen demand, and 42-57% of total-P in blackwater, giving a retentate with a dry matter content of 13-20%. Data analysis clearly indicated a tendency towards higher removal performance with high inlet concentrations, hence, the system seems to be most applicable to blackwater or other types of wastewater with a high content of suspended solids. PMID:25945859

  6. Dynamics of mechanical feedback-type hydraulic servomotors under inertia loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, Harold; Otto, Edward W; Ransom, Victor L

    1953-01-01

    An analysis of the dynamics of mechanical feedback-type hydraulic servomotors under inertia loads is developed and experimental verification is presented. The analysis, which is developed in terms of two physical parameters, yields direct expressions for the following dynamic responses: (1) the transient response to a step input and the maximum cylinder pressure during the transient and (2) the variation of amplitude attenuation and phase shift with the frequency of a sinusoidally varying input. The validity of the analysis is demonstrated by means of recorded transient and frequency responses obtained on two servomotors. The calculated responses are in close agreement with the measured responses. The relations presented are readily applicable to the design as well as to the analysis of hydraulic servomotors.

  7. Gene expression of atrial natriuretic peptide in rat papillary muscle. Rapid induction by mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Jarygin, C; Hänze, J; Lang, R E

    1994-06-13

    The effect of mechanical stretch on protein synthesis and the expression of the gene for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was examined in electrically paced, isolated papillary muscles from rat heart. Incorporation of [3H]phenylalanine into protein increased only in stretched but not in unloaded muscles. Five hours of stretching increased ANP mRNA levels more than threefold as compared to freshly excised papillary muscles. A drastic fall in ANP mRNA levels was observed in unloaded muscles over this time. These data indicate that papillary muscles similar to other ventricular tissue are capable of activating ANP gene expression in response to increased load. The effect occurs in vitro and does not depend on circulating or nervous factors. The unexpected rapid induction of ANP gene expression in such a particular structure of the heart raises the possibility of local actions of ventricular ANP. PMID:8013631

  8. The effect of material heterogeneity and random loading on the mechanics of fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivatsan, T. S.; Sambandham, M.; Bharucha-Reid, A. T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews experimental work on the influence of variable amplitude or random loads on the mechanics and micromechanisms of fatigue crack growth. Implications are discussed in terms of the crack driving force, local plasticity, crack closure, crack blunting, and microstructure. Due to heterogeneity in the material's microstructure, the crack growth rate varies with crack tip position. Using the weakest link theory, an expression for crack growth rate is obtained as the expectation of a random variable. This expression is used to predict the crack growth rates for aluminum alloys, a titanium alloy, and a nickel steel in the mid-range region. It is observed, using the present theory, that the crack growth rate obeys the power law for small stress intensity factor range, and that the power is a function of a material constant.

  9. Secondary orientation effects in a single crystal superalloy under mechanical and thermal loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    The nickel-base single crystal superalloy PWA 1480 is a candidate blading material for the advanced turbopump development program of the SSME. In order to improve thermal fatigue resistance of the turbine blades, the single crystal superalloy PWA 1480 is grown along the low modulus zone axes (001) crystal orientation by a directional solidification process. Since cubic single crystal materials such as PWA 1480 exhibit anisotropic elastic behavior, the stresses developed within the single crystal superalloy due to mechanical and thermal loads are likely to be affected by the exact orientation of the secondary crystallographic direction with respect to the geometry of the turbine blade. The effects of secondary crystal orientation on the elastic response of single crystal PWA 1480 superalloy were investigated.

  10. Simple solutions of the free-edge effects in composite laminates under thermal and mechanical loads

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, W.

    1993-01-01

    Intense and localized interlaminar stresses generally occur in a narrow boundary region near the free edge of a multilayered anisotropic laminate under mechanical and temperature loads. Quantitative measures of interlaminar action across interfaces may be readily obtained, through purely algebraic operations, even if nonlinear and inelastic material behavior becomes significant in the boundary region due to severe strain concentration. These measures are the limiting values of the Lekhnitskii stress functions F and psi (and of the normal derivative of F) along interfaces and toward the interior region of the laminate. In the present work, they are used as the basis of an exceedingly simple and efficient method of interlaminar stress analysis that is potentially applicable to free-edge problems involving nonlinear thermoelastic constitutive relations. 11 refs.

  11. Transcriptional profiling of cortical versus cancellous bone from mechanically-loaded murine tibiae reveals differential gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Natalie H; Schimenti, John C; Ross, F Patrick; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical loading is an anabolic stimulus that increases bone mass, and thus a promising method to counteract osteoporosis-related bone loss. The mechanism of this anabolism remains unclear, and needs to be established for both cortical and cancellous envelopes individually. We hypothesized that cortical and cancellous bone display different gene expression profiles at baseline and in response to mechanical loading. To test this hypothesis, the left tibiae of 10-week-old female C57Bl/6 mice were subjected to one session of axial tibial compression (9N, 1200cycles, 4Hz triangle waveform) and euthanized 3 and 24h following loading. The right limb served as the contralateral control. We performed RNA-seq on marrow-free metaphyseal samples from the cortical shell and the cancellous core to determine differential gene expression at baseline (control limb) and in response to load. Differential expression was verified with qPCR. Cortical and cancellous bone exhibited distinctly different transcriptional profiles basally and in response to mechanical loading. More genes were differentially expressed with loading at 24h with more genes downregulated at 24h than at 3h in both tissues. Enhanced Wnt signaling dominated the response in cortical bone at 3 and 24h, but in cancellous bone only at 3h. In cancellous bone at 24h many muscle-related genes were downregulated. These findings reveal key differences between cortical and cancellous genetic regulation in response to mechanical loading. Future studies at different time points and multiple loading sessions will add to our knowledge of cortical and cancellous mechanotransduction with the potential to identify new targets for mouse genetic knockout studies and drugs to treat osteoporosis. PMID:26876048

  12. Mechanical analysis of a rodent segmental bone defect model: the effects of internal fixation and implant stiffness on load transfer.

    PubMed

    Yavari, S Amin; van der Stok, J; Ahmadi, S M; Wauthle, R; Schrooten, J; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2014-08-22

    Segmental bone defect animal models are often used for evaluating the bone regeneration performance of bone substituting biomaterials. Since bone regeneration is dependent on mechanical loading, it is important to determine mechanical load transfer after stabilization of the defect and to study the effects of biomaterial stiffness on the transmitted load. In this study, we assess the mechanical load transmitted over a 6mm femur defect that is stabilized with an internal PEEK fixation plate. Subsequently, three types of selective laser melted porous titanium implants with different stiffness values were used to graft the defect (five specimens per group). In one additional group, the defect was left empty. Micro strain gauges were used to measure strain values at four different locations of the fixation plate during external loading on the femoral head. The load sharing between the fixation plate and titanium implant was highly variable with standard deviations of measured strain values between 31 and 93% of the mean values. As a consequence, no significant differences were measured between the forces transmitted through the titanium implants with different elastic moduli. Only some non-significant trends were observed in the mean strain values that, consistent with the results of a previous finite element study, implied the force transmitted through the implant increases with the implant stiffness. The applied internal fixation method does not standardize mechanical loading over the defect to enable detecting small differences in bone regeneration performances of bone substituting biomaterials. In conclusion, the fixation method requires further optimization to reduce the effects of the operative procedure and make the mechanical loading more consistent and improve the overall sensitivity of this rat femur defect model. PMID:24882739

  13. The relevance of leukotrienes for bone resorption induced by mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Moura, A P; Taddei, S R A; Queiroz-Junior, C M; Madeira, M F M; Rodrigues, L F D; Garlet, G P; Souza, D G; Machado, F S; Andrade, I; Teixeira, M M; Silva, T A

    2014-12-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) metabolites are important pro-inflammatory lipid mediators. However, much still remains to be understood about the role of such mediators in bone remodeling. This study aimed to investigate the effect of 5-LO metabolites, LTB4 and CysLTs, in a model of mechanical loading-induced bone remodeling. Strain-induced tooth movement and consequently alveolar bone resorption/apposition was achieved by using a coil spring placed on molar and attached to incisors of C57BL6 (wild-type-WT), 5-LO deficient mice (5-LO(-/-)) and mice treated with 5-LO inhibitor (zileuton-ZN) or with antagonist of CysLTs receptor (montelukast-MT). The amount of bone resorption and the number of osteoclasts were determined morphometrically. The expression of inflammatory and bone remodeling markers in periodontium was analyzed by qPCR. Osteoclast differentiation and TNF-α production were evaluated in vitro using RAW 264.7 cells treated with LTB4 or LTD4. Bone resorption, TRAP(+) cells and expression of Tnfa, Il10 and Runx2 were significantly diminished in 5-LO(-/-), ZN- and MT-treated mice. The expression of Rank was also reduced in 5-LO(-/-) and MT-treated mice. Accordingly, LTB4 and LTD4 in association with RANKL promoted osteoclast differentiation and increased TNF-α release in vitro. These data demonstrate that the absence of 5-LO metabolites, LTB4 and CysLTs reduces osteoclast recruitment and differentiation, consequently diminishing bone resorption induced by mechanical loading. Thus, 5-LO might be a potential target for controlling bone resorption in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25270168

  14. Effects of mechanical and thermal load cycling on micro tensile bond strength of clearfil SE bond to superficial dentin

    PubMed Central

    Daneshkazemi, Ali Reza; Davari, Abdol Rahim; Ataei, Ebrahim; Dastjerdi, Fariba; Hajighasemi, Ehsan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Certain studies have been conducted on the effects of mechanical and thermal load cycling on the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of composites to dentin, but the results were different. The authors therefore decided to evaluate these effects on the bonding of Clearfil SE bond to superficial dentin. Materials and Methods: Flat dentinal surface of 42 molar teeth were bonded to Filtek-Z250 resin composite by Clearfil SE bond. The teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups and exposed to different mechanical and thermal load cycling. Thermocycling was at 5-55°C and mechanical load cycling was created with a force of 125 N and 0.5 Hz. Then, the teeth were sectioned and shaped to hour glass form and subjected to microTBS testing at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results were statistically analyzed by computer with three-way analysis of variance and T-test at P < 0.05 significant. To evaluate the location and mode of failure, the specimens were observed under the stereomicroscope. Then, one of the specimens in each group was evaluated under Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for mode of failure. Results: All of the study groups had a significantly lower microTBS as compared to the control group (P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between mechanical cycling with 50K (kilo = 1000) cycles, and 50K mechanical cycles plus 1K thermal cycles. Most of the fractures in the control group were of adhesive type and this type of fracture increased after exposure to mechanical and thermal load cycling. Conclusion: Thermal and mechanical load cycling had significant negative effects on microTBS and the significant effects of mechanical load cycling started to be significant at 100K cycles. PMID:23946737

  15. Evaluation of thermal and mechanical loading effects on the structural behavior of a SiC/titanium composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    1990-01-01

    Composite specimens of titanium-15-3 matrix reinforced with continuous SCS-6 silicon carbide fibers were tested under a variety of thermal and mechanical loadings. A combined experimental/finite element approach was used to estimate the effective in-situ modulus of the matrix material and to evaluate changes in modulus due to the applied loads. Several fiber orientations were tested. Results indicate that the effect of the thermal loads on composite stiffness varies with fiber orientation. Applications of this method to test specimens damaged by uniaxial tension, thermal cycling, and isothermal fatigue loadings are used to illustrate that by monitoring overall structural behavior, changes in stiffness caused by thermomechanical loading can be detected.

  16. Elastic-Plastic Nonlinear Response of a Space Shuttle External Tank Stringer. Part 2; Thermal and Mechanical Loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Warren, Jerry E.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Song, Kyongchan; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2012-01-01

    Elastic-plastic, large-deflection nonlinear thermo-mechanical stress analyses are performed for the Space Shuttle external tank s intertank stringers. Detailed threedimensional finite element models are developed and used to investigate the stringer s elastic-plastic response for different thermal and mechanical loading events from assembly through flight. Assembly strains caused by initial installation on an intertank panel are accounted for in the analyses. Thermal loading due to tanking was determined to be the bounding loading event. The cryogenic shrinkage caused by tanking resulted in a rotation of the intertank chord flange towards the center of the intertank, which in turn loaded the intertank stringer feet. The analyses suggest that the strain levels near the first three fasteners remain sufficiently high that a failure may occur. The analyses also confirmed that the installation of radius blocks on the stringer feet ends results in an increase in the stringer capability.

  17. Mechanical Impedance of the Non-loaded Lower Leg with Relaxed Muscles in the Transverse Plane

    PubMed Central

    Ficanha, Evandro Maicon; Ribeiro, Guilherme Aramizo; Rastgaar, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the protocols and results of the experiments for the estimation of the mechanical impedance of the humans’ lower leg in the External–Internal direction in the transverse plane under non-load bearing condition and with relaxed muscles. The objectives of the estimation of the lower leg’s mechanical impedance are to facilitate the design of passive and active prostheses with mechanical characteristics similar to the humans’ lower leg, and to define a reference that can be compared to the values from the patients suffering from spasticity. The experiments were performed with 10 unimpaired male subjects using a lower extremity rehabilitation robot (Anklebot, Interactive Motion Technologies, Inc.) capable of applying torque perturbations to the foot. The subjects were in a seated position, and the Anklebot recorded the applied torques and the resulting angular movement of the lower leg. In this configuration, the recorded dynamics are due mainly to the rotations of the ankle’s talocrural and the subtalar joints, and any contribution of the tibiofibular joints and knee joint. The dynamic mechanical impedance of the lower leg was estimated in the frequency domain with an average coherence of 0.92 within the frequency range of 0–30 Hz, showing a linear correlation between the displacement and the torques within this frequency range under the conditions of the experiment. The mean magnitude of the stiffness of the lower leg (the impedance magnitude averaged in the range of 0–1 Hz) was determined as 4.9 ± 0.74 Nm/rad. The direct estimation of the quasi-static stiffness of the lower leg results in the mean value of 5.8 ± 0.81 Nm/rad. An analysis of variance shows that the estimated values for the stiffness from the two experiments are not statistically different. PMID:26697424

  18. Effect of the application of a mechanical load on the oxide-layer microstructure and on the oxidation mechanism of Ni-20Cr foils

    SciTech Connect

    Calvarin-Amiri, G.; Molins, R.; Huntz, A.M.

    2000-04-01

    The effect of a tensile load on the oxidation kinetics and mechanism of Ni-20Cr was studied by comparison of the oxidation behavior of Ni-20Cr thin strips in air under classical conditions, i.e., without any applied mechanical load and under tensile creep at temperatures between 500 and 900 C. The study was performed mainly by comparisons of cross sections of oxidized samples observed by SEM. The results obtained clearly indicate that applying a tensile load induces an increase in the oxidation rate, does not modify the oxide-film morphology, but promotes the formation of internal oxidation at low temperatures, 500--600 C, and notably increases the thickness of the intermediate NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} layer at 900 C. This is related to the acceleration of anionic diffusion when a tensile load is applied, due to the formation of fast-diffusion by short-circuit paths.

  19. Stress-intensity factors of r-cracks in fiber-reinforced composites under thermal and mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, W. H.; Schmauder, S.

    1993-02-01

    The plane stress/plane strain problem of radial matrix cracking in fiber-reinforced composites, due to thermal mismatch and externally applied stress is solved numerically in the framework of linear elasticity, using Erdogan's integral equation technique. It is shown that, in order to obtain the results of the combined loading case, the solutions of purely thermal and purely mechanical loading can simply be superimposed. Stress-intensity factors are calculated for various lengths and distances of the crack from the interface for each of these loading conditions.

  20. Elution kinetics, antimicrobial activity, and mechanical properties of 11 different antibiotic loaded acrylic bone cement.

    PubMed

    Gálvez-López, Ruben; Peña-Monje, Alejandro; Antelo-Lorenzo, Ramón; Guardia-Olmedo, Juan; Moliz, Juan; Hernández-Quero, José; Parra-Ruiz, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic-loaded acrylic bone cements (ALABC) spacers are routinely used in the treatment of prosthetic joint infections. The objectives of our study were to evaluate different ALABC for elution kinetics, thermal stability, and mechanical properties. A 10 or 20% mixture (w/w) beads of medium viscosity bone cement (DePuy, Inc) and vancomycin (VAN), gentamycin (GM), daptomycin (DAP), moxifloxacin (MOX), rifampicin (RIF), cefotaxime (CTX), cefepime (FEP), amoxicillin clavulanate (AmC), ampicillin (AMP), meropenem (MER), and ertapenem (ERT) were formed and placed into wells filled with phosphate-buffered saline. Antibiotic concentrations were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. Antimicrobial activity was tested against Micrococcus luteus ATCC 9341 or Escherichia coli ATCC 25922. AmC, AMP, and FEP concentration rapidly decreased after day 2, being almost undetectable at day 4. Sustained and high elution rates were observed with VAN, GM, MOX, and RIF for the 30-day duration of the experiment. DAP, MER, ERT, and CTX elution rates constantly decreased from day 4. All antibiotics tested retained antimicrobial activity proving thermal stability. Mechanical properties of ALABC were maintained except when RIF was used. PMID:24231380

  1. Optimum design of bolted composite lap joints under mechanical and thermal loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kradinov, Vladimir Yurievich

    A new approach is developed for the analysis and design of mechanically fastened composite lap joints under mechanical and thermal loading. Based on the combined complex potential and variational formulation, the solution method satisfies the equilibrium equations exactly while the boundary conditions are satisfied by minimizing the total potential. This approach is capable of modeling finite laminate planform dimensions, uniform and variable laminate thickness, laminate lay-up, interaction among bolts, bolt torque, bolt flexibility, bolt size, bolt-hole clearance and interference, insert dimensions and insert material properties. Comparing to the finite element analysis, the robustness of the method does not decrease when modeling the interaction of many bolts; also, the method is more suitable for parametric study and design optimization. The Genetic Algorithm (GA), a powerful optimization technique for multiple extrema functions in multiple dimensions search spaces, is applied in conjunction with the complex potential and variational formulation to achieve optimum designs of bolted composite lap joints. The objective of the optimization is to acquire such a design that ensures the highest strength of the joint. The fitness function for the GA optimization is based on the average stress failure criterion predicting net-section, shear-out, and bearing failure modes in bolted lap joints. The criterion accounts for the stress distribution in the thickness direction at the bolt location by applying an approach utilizing a beam on an elastic foundation formulation.

  2. Daunorubicin-Loaded DNA Origami Nanostructures Circumvent Drug-Resistance Mechanisms in a Leukemia Model.

    PubMed

    Halley, Patrick D; Lucas, Christopher R; McWilliams, Emily M; Webber, Matthew J; Patton, Randy A; Kural, Comert; Lucas, David M; Byrd, John C; Castro, Carlos E

    2016-01-20

    Many cancers show primary or acquired drug resistance due to the overexpression of efflux pumps. A novel mechanism to circumvent this is to integrate drugs, such as anthracycline antibiotics, with nanoparticle delivery vehicles that can bypass intrinsic tumor drug-resistance mechanisms. DNA nanoparticles serve as an efficient binding platform for intercalating drugs (e.g., anthracyclines doxorubicin and daunorubicin, which are widely used to treat acute leukemias) and enable precise structure design and chemical modifications, for example, for incorporating targeting capabilities. Here, DNA nanostructures are utilized to circumvent daunorubicin drug resistance at clinically relevant doses in a leukemia cell line model. The fabrication of a rod-like DNA origami drug carrier is reported that can be controllably loaded with daunorubicin. It is further directly verified that nanostructure-mediated daunorubicin delivery leads to increased drug entry and retention in cells relative to free daunorubicin at equal concentrations, which yields significantly enhanced drug efficacy. Our results indicate that DNA origami nanostructures can circumvent efflux-pump-mediated drug resistance in leukemia cells at clinically relevant drug concentrations and provide a robust DNA nanostructure design that could be implemented in a wide range of cellular applications due to its remarkably fast self-assembly (≈5 min) and excellent stability in cell culture conditions. PMID:26583570

  3. Injury mechanisms of the ligamentous cervical C2-C3 Functional Spinal Unit to complex loading modes: Finite Element study.

    PubMed

    Mustafy, Tanvir; Moglo, Kodjo; Adeeb, Samer; El-Rich, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    The cervical spine sustains high rate complex loading modes during Motor Vehicle Crashes (MVCs) which may produce severe injuries accompanied with soft and/or hard tissue failure. Although previous numerical and experimental studies have provided insights on the cervical spine behavior under various loading scenarios, its response to complex impact loads and the resulting injury mechanisms are not fully understood. A validated Finite Element (FE) model of the ligamentous cervical C2-C3 Functional Spinal Unit (FSU) was utilized to assess the spinal response to six combined impact loading modes; flexion-extension combined with compression and distraction, and lateral bending and axial rotation combined with distraction. The FE model used time and rate-dependent material laws which permit assessing bone fracture and ligament failure. Spinal load-sharing, stresses in the spinal components, intradiscal pressure (IDP) change in the nucleus as well as contact pressure in the facet joints were predicted. Bone and ligaments failure occurrence and initiation instants were investigated. Results showed that spinal load-sharing varied with loading modes. Lateral bending combined with distraction was the most critical loading mode as it increased stresses and strains significantly and produced failure in most of the spinal components compared to other modes. The facet joints and surrounding cancellous bone as well as ligaments particularly the capsular (CL) and flavum (FL) ligaments were the most vulnerable structures to rapid flexion-extension, axial rotation and lateral bending combined with distraction or compression. The excessive stress and strain resulted from these loading modes produced rupture of the CL and FL ligaments and failure in the cancellous bone. The detection of failure initiation as well as fracture assessment demonstrated the vulnerability of ligaments to tensile combined loads and the major contribution of the bony structures in resisting compressive

  4. The contact mechanics and occurrence of edge loading in modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement during daily activities.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John

    2016-06-01

    The occurrence of edge loading in hip joint replacement has been associated with many factors such as prosthetic design, component malposition and activities of daily living. The present study aimed to quantify the occurrence of edge loading/contact at the articulating surface and to evaluate the effect of cup angles and edge loading on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR) during different daily activities. A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing system. Different cup inclination and anteversion angles were modelled and six daily activities were considered. The results showed that edge loading was predicted during normal walking, ascending and descending stairs activities under steep cup inclination conditions (≥55°) while no edge loading was observed during standing up, sitting down and knee bending activities. The duration of edge loading increased with increased cup inclination angles and was affected by the cup anteversion angles. Edge loading caused elevated contact pressure at the articulating surface and substantially increased equivalent plastic strain of the polyethylene liner. The present study suggested that correct positioning the component to avoid edge loading that may occur during daily activities is important for MoP THR in clinical practice. PMID:27056255

  5. Quantitative comparison between the degree of domain orientation and nonlinear properties of a PZT ceramic during electrical and mechanical loading

    SciTech Connect

    Marsilius, Mie; Granzow, Torsten; Jones, Jacob L.

    2011-10-26

    The macroscopic electromechanical coupling properties of ferroelectric polycrystals are composed of linear and nonlinear contributions. The nonlinear contribution is typically associated with the extrinsic effects related to the creation and motion of domain walls. To quantitatively compare the macroscopic nonlinear properties of a lead zirconate titanate ceramic and the degree of domain orientation, in-situ neutron and high-energy x-ray diffraction experiments are performed and they provide the domain orientation density as a function of the external electric field and mechanical compression. Furthermore, the macroscopic strain under the application of external electrical and mechanical loads is measured and the nonlinear strain is calculated by means of the linear intrinsic piezoelectric effect and the linear intrinsic elasticity. The domain orientation density and the nonlinear strain show the same dependence on the external load. The scaling factor that relates to the two values is constant and is the same for both electrical and mechanical loadings.

  6. Microscale failure mechanisms leading to internal short circuit in Li-ion batteries under complex loading scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahraei, Elham; Bosco, Emanuela; Dixon, Brandy; Lai, Benjamin

    2016-07-01

    One of the least understood mechanisms of Li-ion batteries is the development of internal short circuits under mechanical loads. In this study, a micro mechanical model is developed and subjected to various loading scenarios to understand the sequence of failure in the multi-layer, multi-material structure of a Li-ion battery jellyroll. The constitutive response of each component of the electrode stack is obtained by comprehensive experimental tests using uniaxial and biaxial tensile and compressive loads. The homogenized response of the model is recovered through the computational homogenization theory. The model is validated by comparing the results of a macroscale simulation against experimental data. The study focuses next on the development of a failure criterion for the electrode stack based on the microstructural observations. Results show distinct failure mechanisms when the loading is predominantly tensile versus when it is compressive or combined tensile/compressive. A failure locus is plotted from the results of the simulations as a criterion to detect the onset of short circuit under complex multi-axial loading scenarios.

  7. Mechanical Loading of Stem Cells for Improvement of Transplantation Outcome in a Model of Acute Myocardial Infarction: The Role of Loading History

    PubMed Central

    Cassino, Theresa R.; Drowley, Lauren; Okada, Masaho; Beckman, Sarah A.; Keller, Bradley; Tobita, Kimimasa; LeDuc, Philip R.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell therapy for tissue repair is a rapidly evolving field and the factors that dictate the physiological responsiveness of stem cells remain under intense investigation. In this study we hypothesized that the mechanical loading history of muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) would significantly impact MDSC survival, host tissue angiogenesis, and myocardial function after MDSC transplantation into acutely infarcted myocardium. Mice with acute myocardial infarction by permanent left coronary artery ligation were injected with either nonstimulated (NS) or mechanically stimulated (MS) MDSCs. Mechanical stimulation consisted of stretching the cells with equibiaxial stretch with a magnitude of 10% and frequency of 0.5 Hz. MS cell-transplanted hearts showed improved cardiac contractility, increased numbers of host CD31+ cells, and decreased fibrosis, in the peri-infarct region, compared to the hearts treated with NS MDSCs. MS MDSCs displayed higher vascular endothelial growth factor expression than NS cells in vitro. These findings highlight an important role for cyclic mechanical loading preconditioning of donor MDSCs in optimizing MDSC transplantation for myocardial repair. PMID:22280442

  8. Risedronate does not reduce mechanical loading-related increases in cortical and trabecular bone mass in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Meakin, Lee B.; Galea, Gabriel L.; Jackson, Brendan F.; Lanyon, Lance E.; Ebetino, Frank H.; Russell, R. Graham G.; Price, Joanna S.

    2011-01-01

    To establish whether the combination of anti-resorptive therapy with mechanical loading has a negative, additive or synergistic effect on bone structure, we assessed the separate and combined effects of risedronate and non-invasive dynamic loading on trabecular and cortical bone. Seventeen-week-old female C57BL/6 mice were given daily subcutaneous injections of vehicle (n = 20) or risedronate at a dose of 0.15, 1.5, 15 or 150 μg/kg/day (n = 10 in each) for 17 days. From the fourth day of treatment, the right tibiae were subjected to a single period of axial loading (40 cycles/day) for three alternate days per week for two weeks. The left tibiae were used as internal controls. Trabecular and cortical sites in the tibiae were analyzed by high-resolution micro-computed tomography and imaging of fluorochrome labels. In the non-loaded tibiae, treatment with the higher doses of risedronate at 15 or 150 μg/kg/day resulted in higher trabecular bone volume and trabecular number than in vehicle-treated controls, whereas such treatment was associated with no differences in cortical bone volume at any dose. In the loaded tibiae, loading induced increases in trabecular and cortical bone volume compared with contra-lateral controls primarily through increased trabecular thickness and periosteal expansion, respectively, independently of risedronate treatment. In conclusion, the response to mechanical loading in both trabecular and cortical bone in mice is therefore not impaired by short-term treatment with risedronate, even over a 1000-fold dose range. In considering the optimization of treatments for osteoporosis, it is reassuring that anti-resorptive therapy and mechanical loading can exert independent beneficial effects. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Bisphosphonates. PMID:21497678

  9. Thermomechanical loading applied on the cladding tube during the pellet cladding mechanical interaction phase of a rapid reactivity initiated accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellouin de Menibus, Arthur; Sercombe, Jerome; Auzoux, Quentin; Poussard, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    Calculations of the CABRI REP-Na5 pulse were performed with the ALCYONE code in order to determine the evolution of the thermomechanical loading applied on the cladding tube during the Pellet-Cladding Mechanical Interaction (PCMI) phase of a rapid Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) initiated at 280 °C that lasted 8.8 ms. The evolution of the following parameters are reported: the cladding temperature, heating rate, strain rate and loading biaxiality. The impact of these parameters on the cladding mechanical behavior and fracture are then briefly reviewed.

  10. Evaluation of Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Biochemical and Mechanical Properties of Trypsin-Treated Intervertebral Discs Under Physiological Compression Loading

    PubMed Central

    Mwale, Fackson; Demers, Caroline N.; Michalek, Arthur J.; Beaudoin, Gilles; Goswami, Tapas; Beckman, Lorne; Iatridis, James C.; Antoniou, John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the influence of targeted trypsin digestion and 16 hours compression loading on MR parameters and the mechanical and biochemical properties of bovine disc segments. Materials and Methods Twenty-two 3-disc bovine coccygeal segments underwent compression loading for 16 hours after the nucleus pulposus (NP) of each disc was injected with a solution of trypsin or buffer. The properties of the NP and annulus fibrosus (AF) tissues of each disc were analyzed by quantitative MRI, biochemical tests, and confined compression tests. Results Loading had a significant effect on the MR properties (T1, T2, T1ρ, MTR, ADC) of both the NP and AF tissues. Loading had a greater effect on the MR parameters and biochemical composition of the NP than trypsin. In contrast, trypsin had a larger effect on the mechanical properties. Our data also indicated that localized trypsin injection predominantly affected the NP. T1ρ was sensitive to loading and correlated with the water content of the NP and AF but not with their proteoglycan content. Conclusion Our studies indicate that physiological loading is an important parameter to consider and that T1ρ contributes new information in efforts to develop quantitative MRI as a noninvasive diagnostic tool to detect changes in early disc degeneration. PMID:18219615

  11. Mechanism of heat generation from loading gaseous hydrogen isotopes into palladium nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriyeva, Olga

    I have carried out the study of hydrogen isotope reactions in the presence of palladium nanoparticles impregnated into oxide powder. My goal was to explain the mechanisms of heat generation in those systems as a result of exposure to deuterium gas. Some researchers have associated this heating with a nuclear reaction in the Pd lattice. While some earlier experiments showed a correlation between the generation of excess heat and helium production as possible evidence of a nuclear reaction, the results of that research have not been replicated by the other groups and the search for radiation was unsuccessful. Therefore, the unknown origin of the excess heat produced by these systems is of great interest. I synthesized different types of Pd and Pt-impregnated oxide samples similar to those used by other research groups. I used different characterization techniques to confirm that the fabrication method I used is capable of producing Pd nanoparticles on the surface of alumina support. I used a custom built gas-loading system to pressurize the material with hydrogen and deuterium gas while measuring heat output as a result of these pressurizations. My initial study confirmed the excess heat generation in the presence of deuterium. However, the in-situ radiometry and alpha-particle measurements did not show any abnormal increase in counts above the background level. In the absence of nuclear reaction products, I decided to look for a conventional chemical process that could account for the excess heat generation. It was earlier suggested that Pd in its nanoparticle form catalyzes hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions in the material. To prove the chemical nature of the observed phenomena I demonstrated that the reaction can be either exo- or endothermic based on the water isotope trapped in the material and the type of gas provided to the system. The H/D exchange was confirmed by RGA, NMR and FTIR analysis. I quantified the amount of energy that can be released due

  12. Prediction of contact mechanics in metal-on-metal Total Hip Replacement for parametrically comprehensive designs and loads.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Finn E; Nyman, Edward; Coburn, James C

    2015-07-16

    Manufacturers and investigators of Total Hip Replacement (THR) bearings require tools to predict the contact mechanics resulting from diverse design and loading parameters. This study provides contact mechanics solutions for metal-on-metal (MoM) bearings that encompass the current design space and could aid pre-clinical design optimization and evaluation. Stochastic finite element (FE) simulation was used to calculate the head-on-cup contact mechanics for five thousand combinations of design and loading parameters. FE results were used to train a Random Forest (RF) surrogate model to rapidly predict the contact patch dimensions, contact area, pressures and plastic deformations for arbitrary designs and loading. In addition to widely observed polar and edge contact, FE results included ring-polar, asymmetric-polar, and transitional categories which have previously received limited attention. Combinations of design and load parameters associated with each contact category were identified. Polar contact pressures were predicted in the range of 0-200 MPa with no permanent deformation. Edge loading (with subluxation) was associated with pressures greater than 500 MPa and induced permanent deformation in 83% of cases. Transitional-edge contact (with little subluxation) was associated with intermediate pressures and permanent deformation in most cases, indicating that, even with ideal anatomical alignment, bearings may face extreme wear challenges. Surrogate models were able to accurately predict contact mechanics 18,000 times faster than FE analyses. The developed surrogate models enable rapid prediction of MoM bearing contact mechanics across the most comprehensive range of loading and designs to date, and may be useful to those performing bearing design optimization or evaluation. PMID:25980556

  13. Mechanical behavior of an Ni-Ti shape memory alloy under axial-torsional proportional and nonproportional loading

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, T.J.; McDowell, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    Several biaxial proportional and nonproportional loading experiments are reported for thin-wall tubes of a pseudoelastic Ni-Ti shape memory alloy (SMA). In addition to the mechanical behavior, temperature was measured during the experiments. It is shown that the phase transformation exhibits asymmetrical behavior in the case of tension-compression cycling. The transformation strain rate is determined for selected histories by numerical differentiation of data. Under nonproportional loading, the rate of phase transformation does not follow a generalized J{sub 2}-J{sub 3} criteria based on results of micromechanical simulations for proportional loading. The role of simultaneous forward and reverse transformations on the nonproportional transformation response is examined using a simple micromechanical model, and the direction of the inelastic strain rate is adequately predicted. Load- and strain-controlled experiments at different strain rates, with and without hold times, are reported and coupled thermomechanical effects are studied.

  14. Dominant mechanism of load fluctuations on a wind turbine in a realistic atmosphere through Hybrid URANS-LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, Ganesh; Lavely, Adam; Jayaraman, Balaji; Craven, Brent; Brasseur, James

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric turbulence causes load fluctuations on a wind turbine through various forcing mechanisms across a wide span of time scales relative to the rotation time scale. We identify the dominant mechanisms of load fluctuation through blade-boundary-layer-resolved hybrid URANS-LES of a single rotating blade of the NREL-5MW turbine in a daytime moderately convective atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) on flat terrain with surface heating simulated with high-fidelity LES. We find that the integral scale motions in the atmosphere cause the largest fluctuations over multiple rotations of the turbine, while the rotation of the turbine through eddies in the ABL cause fluctuations at the rotation time scale. Blade-boundary-layer dynamics--separation, dynamic stall and rotational augmentation, cause further load fluctuations at time scales much smaller than the rotation time scale. At all time-scales, however, we find that the dominant mechanism underlying load fluctuation on the blade is from local spatio-temporal fluctuations in the angle of attack (AoA) associated with atmospheric eddy passage. By integrating fundamental kinematic analysis with high-resolution CFD, we describe the fundamental role of ABL-turbulence-forced AoA fluctuations on nonsteady wind turbine loadings. Supported by DOE and College of Engineering, Penn State. Computer resources by XSEDE.

  15. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles loading doxorubicin reverse multidrug resistance: performance and mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jianan; He, Qianjun; Gao, Yu; Shi, Jianlin; Li, Yaping

    2011-10-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is one of the major obstacles for successful chemotherapy in cancer. One of the effective approaches to overcome MDR is to use nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery to increase drug accumulation in drug resistant cancer cells. In this work, we first report that the performance and mechanism of an inorganic engineered delivery system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) loading doxorubicin (DMNs) to overcome the MDR of MCF-7/ADR (a DOX-resistant and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) over-expression cancer cell line). The experimental results showed that DMNs could enhance the cellular uptake of doxorubicin (DOX) and increase the cell proliferation suppression effect of DOX against MCF-7/ADR cells. The IC50 of DMNs against MCF-7/ADR cells was 8-fold lower than that of free DOX. However, an improved effect of DOX in DMNs against MCF-7 cells (a DOX-sensitive cancer cell line) was not found. The increased cellular uptake and nuclear accumulation of DOX delivered by DMNs in MCF-7/ADR cells was confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy, and could result from the down-regulation of P-gp and bypassing the efflux action by MSNs themselves. The cellular uptake mechanism of DMNs indicated that the macropinocytosis was one of the pathways for the uptake of DMNs by MCF-7/ADR cells. The in vivo biodistribution showed that DMNs induced a higher accumulation of DOX in drug resistant tumors than free DOX. These results suggested that MSNs could be an effective delivery system to overcome multidrug resistance.

  16. Mechanical behaviour of a friction stir spot welding lap under static loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbelot, C.; Hoang, T. Dang; Imad, A.; Benseddiq, N.

    2011-01-01

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is a recent welding method which takes advantage of being performed in the solid state and presents many benefits such as a lower heat-input, a reduction of residual stresses and an elimination of the solidification defects for example. The present study investigates, for fixed process parameters and tool geometry, the fracture and damage of a single-lap friction stir spot welding joints formed from thin sheets of aluminum alloy 6082 T6. An experimental approach was carried out in order to analyze the sequence of damage mechanisms using acoustic emission (A.E.) and measurement of fields by digital image correlation (D.I.C.) techniques simultaneously. The A.E. technique allows the monitoring of the evolution of acoustic activities by taking into account energy of the events. The D.I.C. technique confirms the damage scenarios after the treatment of strain field at any point near the fastener and especially between the exit hole and the shoulder footprint. The coupling of those two techniques allows to identify characteristic points and a breakdown of the load displacement curve in phases.

  17. Mechanical behavior of representative volume elements of lithium-ion battery modules under various loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wei-Jen; Ali, Mohammed Yusuf; Pan, Jwo

    2014-02-01

    Mechanical behavior of lithium-ion battery modules is investigated by conducting tensile tests of the module components, constrained compression tests of dry module representative volume element (RVE) specimens, and a constrained punch test of a small-scale dry module specimen. The results of tensile tests of the module components are used to characterize the tensile behavior of module specimens. The results in-plane constrained compression tests of module RVE specimens indicate that the load carrying capacity is characterized by the buckling of the module components and the final densification of the module components, and the nominal stress-strain curves appear to be independent of the specimen height. The results of different compressive nominal stress-strain curves in the in-plane and out-of-plane directions indicate the module RVE specimens are anisotropic. The results of a buckling analysis of the module RVE specimens under in-plane constrained compression are in agreement with the experimental results. The module RVE specimen is dominated by the buckling of the aluminum heat dissipater sheet under in-plane constrained compression. Finally, the results of a constrained punch test of a module specimen are in agreement with those of the corresponding finite element analyses based on a macroscopic homogenized foam material model.

  18. Frataxin and the molecular mechanism of mitochondrial iron-loading in Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Shannon; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Sahni, Sumit; Lane, Darius J R; Merlot, Angelica M; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Huang, Michael L-H; Richardson, Des R

    2016-06-01

    The mitochondrion is a major site for the metabolism of the transition metal, iron, which is necessary for metabolic processes critical for cell vitality. The enigmatic mitochondrial protein, frataxin, is known to play a significant role in both cellular and mitochondrial iron metabolism due to its iron-binding properties and its involvement in iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) and heme synthesis. The inherited neuro- and cardio-degenerative disease, Friedreich's ataxia (FA), is caused by the deficient expression of frataxin that leads to deleterious alterations in iron metabolism. These changes lead to the accumulation of inorganic iron aggregates in the mitochondrial matrix that are presumed to play a key role in the oxidative damage and subsequent degenerative features of this disease. Furthermore, the concurrent dys-regulation of cellular antioxidant defense, which coincides with frataxin deficiency, exacerbates oxidative stress. Hence, the pathogenesis of FA underscores the importance of the integrated homeostasis of cellular iron metabolism and the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial redox environments. This review focuses on describing the pathogenesis of the disease, the molecular mechanisms involved in mitochondrial iron-loading and the dys-regulation of cellular antioxidant defense due to frataxin deficiency. In turn, current and emerging therapeutic strategies are also discussed. PMID:27129098

  19. Mesoscopic simulation studies on the formation mechanism of drug loaded polymeric micelles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhu, Dan Dan; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Qi Lei; Zhang, Can Yang; Liu, Yue Jin; Wu, Zhi Min; Guo, Xin Dong

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the formation of polymeric micelles as drug delivery vehicles in an aqueous environment is investigated by dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. Doxorubicin (DOX) is selected as the model drug, whereas docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) conjugated His10Lys10 (DHA-His10Lys10) as the drug carrier. It is shown from DPD simulation that drug molecules and DHA-His10Lys10 molecules could aggregate and form micelles under a defined composition recipe; drug molecules are homogeneously distributed inside the carrier matrix, on whose surface the stabilizer lysine segments are absorbed. Under different compositions of drug and water, aggregate morphologies of polymeric micelles are observed as spherical, columnar, and lamellar structures. We finally proposed the formation mechanism of drug loaded polymeric micelles and apply it in practice by analyzing the simulated phenomena. All the results can effectively guide the experimental preparation of drug delivery system with desired properties or explore a novel polymeric micelle with high performance. PMID:26454543

  20. Microstructure evolution and mechanical behavior of a high strength dual-phase steel under monotonic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterova, E.V.; Bouvier, S.; Bacroix, B.

    2015-02-15

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) microstructures of a high-strength dual-phase steel DP800 have been examined after moderate plastic deformations in simple shear and uniaxial tension. Special attention has been paid to the effect of the intergranular hard phase (martensite) on the microstructure evolution in the near-grain boundary regions. Quantitative parameters of dislocation patterning have been determined and compared with the similar characteristics of previously examined single-phase steels. The dislocation patterning in the interiors of the ferrite grains in DP800 steel is found to be similar to that already observed in the single-phase IF (Interstitial Free) steel whereas the martensite-affected zones present a delay in patterning and display very high gradients of continuous (gradual) disorientations associated with local internal stresses. The above stresses are shown to control the work-hardening of dual-phase materials at moderate strains for monotonic loading and are assumed to influence their microstructure evolution and mechanical behavior under strain-path changes. - Highlights: • The microstructure evolution has been studied by TEM in a DP800 steel. • It is influenced by both martensite and dislocations in the initial state. • The DP800 steel presents a high work-hardening rate due to internal stresses.

  1. The effect of loading in mechanical response predictions of bone lengthening.

    PubMed

    Okyar, A Fethi; Bayoglu, Riza

    2012-11-01

    Intramedullary (IM) distractor nails have become a viable alternative in bone-distraction operations. Upon stabilization of the fractured/dissected limb via the nail, the resulting construct accommodates the load bearing function of the otherwise healthy limb. In establishing design performance targets for these devices, in vitro test conditions are widely accepted leaving the in vivo conditions aside. However, in vivo device failures due to distraction forces necessitate novel modeling considerations. It is especially important to simulate the loads in limb distraction, as this brings the bone-implant construct to a totally different regime than the hip-joint contact force (Point-Force Model, PFM). In this work we used a simplified approach to incorporate ligament stretching due to limb distraction via self-equilibrating spring elements in a finite-element setting (spring-force model, SFM). We compared the effect of loading type on load transmission paths through the locking pins, for these two distinct loading modes, namely, SFM and PFM. The two modes illustrate entirely different load transfer regimes around the bone/nail interface region. In order to avoid high contact stresses between the nail and the bone segments, it is advisable to keep the osteotomy away from the mid-range between the pin connections. It was also seen for both loading modes that including an additional pin at a load transfer location does not significantly alter the load carried by a single pin (the additional pin rather acts as a geometric stabilizer). PMID:22858057

  2. Intermittent applied mechanical loading induces subchondral bone thickening that may be intensified locally by contiguous articular cartilage lesions

    PubMed Central

    Poulet, B.; de Souza, R.; Kent, A.V.; Saxon, L.; Barker, O.; Wilson, A.; Chang, Y.-M.; Cake, M.; Pitsillides, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives Changes in subchondral bone (SCB) and cross-talk with articular cartilage (AC) have been linked to osteoarthritis (OA). Using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) this study: (1) examines changes in SCB architecture in a non-invasive loading mouse model in which focal AC lesions are induced selectively in the lateral femur, and (2) determines any modifications in the contralateral knee, linked to changes in gait, which might complicate use of this limb as an internal control. Methods Right knee joints of CBA mice were loaded: once with 2weeks of habitual use (n = 7), for 2weeks (n = 8) or for 5weeks (n = 5). Both left (contralateral) and right (loaded) knees were micro-CT scanned and the SCB and trabecular bone analysed. Gait analysis was also performed. Results These analyses showed a significant increase in SCB thickness in the lateral compartments in joints loaded for 5weeks, which was most marked in the lateral femur; the contralateral non-loaded knee also showed transient SCB thickening (loaded once and repetitively). Epiphyseal trabecular bone BV/TV and trabecular thickness were also increased in the lateral compartments after 5 weeks of loading, and in all joint compartments in the contralateral knee. Gait analysis showed that applied loading only affected gait in the contralateral himd-limb in all groups of mice from the second week after the first loading episode. Conclusions These data indicate a spatial link between SCB thickening and AC lesions following mechanical trauma, and the clear limitations associated with the use of contralateral joints as controls in such OA models, and perhaps in OA diagnosis. PMID:25655679

  3. Ceramic composites: Fabrication by rolling of highly loaded suspensions, and their mechanical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Mohan

    A novel technique for fabrication of dense, crack free ceramic composites by repeated rolling and folding of highly loaded suspensions has been developed. Coagulated suspensions of Alsb2Osb3 and CeOsb2 stabilized ZrOsb2 tetragonal polycrystals (Ce-TZP) were prepared. The rheology of the highly loaded suspensions were characterized. The suspensions were shear thinning and possessed a yield stress, which was a function of the salt concentration, confirming Lange and co-workers' studies. The Alsb2Osb3 and Ce-TZP suspensions were rolled to obtain tapes. Laminates were fabricated by repeated rolling and folding of these tapes. The flat interface separating suspensions with differing yield stress was found to be unstable under rolling, and was distorted to a wavy shape. When the perturbation was of the order of layer thickness the layered structure broke down into a cellular one, with the harder phase as the included one. The critical number of foldings at which the microstructural transition occurs was found to depend on the yield stress ratio of the constituent suspensions. Typically, it takes from 6 to 9 foldings of 50% thickness reduction to induce the microstructural transition. The rolled samples were dried and pressureless sintered in air to near full density regardless of the number of foldings. The shrinkage anisotropy (in direction parallel and perpendicular to rolling) in shrinkage was found to decrease with decreasing thickness and especially after the microstructural transition, with the cellular material showing no anisotropy. Sintering cracks were formed in some layers thicker than 60 mum and the crack spacing increased with increasing layer thickness. In the layers devoid of sintering cracks, thermal cracks formed during cooling in layers thicker than 50 mum and the crack spacing decreased with increasing layer thickness and saturated at 150 mum. The strength in three point flexure, R-curve behavior and indentation behavior of these composites were

  4. Report on Toyota/Prius Motor Torque-Capability, Torque-Property, No-Load Back EMF, and Mechanical Losses

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.

    2004-09-30

    In today's hybrid vehicle market, the Toyota Prius drive system is currently considered the leader in electrical, mechanical, and manufacturing innovations. It is significant that in today's marketplace, Toyota is able to manufacture and sell the vehicle for a profit. This project's objective is to test the torque capability of the 2004 Prius motor and to analyze the torque properties relating to the rotor structure. The tested values of no-load back electromotive force (emf) and mechanical losses are also presented.

  5. Mechanical analysis of wood-fiber cement sheets under constant and repeated loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Divino Eterno

    Inorganic-bonded panels have been successfully utilized for many years around the world. Cellulose materials are extensively used for cement-bonded particleboard (CBP) and for fiber-reinforced cement (FRC) composites worldwide. Particularly in Europe, this family of composites is used, among other applications, for building construction. Use of wood-fiber cement (WFC) composites in North America has been steadily increasing over the last 10 years. Problems encountered with resin-bonded wood products used in exterior environments have resulted in litigation and search for viable products. WFC sheets are currently filling this need and gaining market share by virtue of their own superior properties. This study was designed to provide basic information currently lacking in literature and important to the wise application of WFC sheets. Experimental autoclaved WFC flat sheets made with kraft Douglas fir fiber and with recycled old corrugated containers (OCC) fiber were manufactured and the results compared with an available commercial product. This experimental program was subdivided into three manuscripts. The first manuscript evaluates whether the actual mechanical properties of WFC sheets can be predicted using nondestructive parameters of the material by applying stress wave time techniques. The second manuscript deals with characterization of the WFC sheets. Physical and mechanical properties were evaluated and results discussed with the use of a scanning electronic microscopic (SEM) analysis. Manuscript three examines the viscoelastic behavior of the material at constant and repeated loading conditions. The nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of the material showed good correlation between dynamic and static modulus of elasticity (MOE). A multivariate linear regression analysis provided the strongest correlation (R = 0.828) for static MOE as a function of wave speed, density, and dynamic MOE. Results from Manuscript 2 revealed that WFC sheets manufactured with

  6. Three-Dimensional Mechanical Loading Modulates the Osteogenic Response of Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Tumor-Derived Soluble Signals.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Maureen E; Chiou, Aaron E; Lee, Min Joon; Marcott, Stephen C; Polamraju, Praveen V; Lee, Yeonkyung; Fischbach, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic mechanical loading is a strong anabolic signal in the skeleton, increasing osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and increasing the bone-forming activity of osteoblasts, but its role in bone metastatic cancer is relatively unknown. In this study, we integrated a hydroxyapatite-containing three-dimensional (3D) scaffold platform with controlled mechanical stimulation to investigate the effects of cyclic compression on the interplay between breast cancer cells and BM-MSCs as it pertains to bone metastasis. BM-MSCs cultured within mineral-containing 3D poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) scaffolds differentiated into mature osteoblasts, and exposure to tumor-derived soluble factors promoted this process. When BM-MSCs undergoing osteogenic differentiation were exposed to conditioned media collected from mechanically loaded breast cancer cells, their gene expression of osteopontin was increased. This was further enhanced when mechanical compression was simultaneously applied to BM-MSCs, leading to more uniformly deposited osteopontin within scaffold pores. These results suggest that mechanical loading of 3D scaffold-based culture models may be utilized to evaluate the role of physiologically relevant physical cues on bone metastatic breast cancer. Furthermore, our data imply that cyclic mechanical stimuli within the bone microenvironment modulate interactions between tumor cells and BM-MSCs that are relevant to bone metastasis. PMID:27401765

  7. Neurite, a Finite Difference Large Scale Parallel Program for the Simulation of Electrical Signal Propagation in Neurites under Mechanical Loading

    PubMed Central

    García-Grajales, Julián A.; Rucabado, Gabriel; García-Dopico, Antonio; Peña, José-María; Jérusalem, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    With the growing body of research on traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury, computational neuroscience has recently focused its modeling efforts on neuronal functional deficits following mechanical loading. However, in most of these efforts, cell damage is generally only characterized by purely mechanistic criteria, functions of quantities such as stress, strain or their corresponding rates. The modeling of functional deficits in neurites as a consequence of macroscopic mechanical insults has been rarely explored. In particular, a quantitative mechanically based model of electrophysiological impairment in neuronal cells, Neurite, has only very recently been proposed. In this paper, we present the implementation details of this model: a finite difference parallel program for simulating electrical signal propagation along neurites under mechanical loading. Following the application of a macroscopic strain at a given strain rate produced by a mechanical insult, Neurite is able to simulate the resulting neuronal electrical signal propagation, and thus the corresponding functional deficits. The simulation of the coupled mechanical and electrophysiological behaviors requires computational expensive calculations that increase in complexity as the network of the simulated cells grows. The solvers implemented in Neurite—explicit and implicit—were therefore parallelized using graphics processing units in order to reduce the burden of the simulation costs of large scale scenarios. Cable Theory and Hodgkin-Huxley models were implemented to account for the electrophysiological passive and active regions of a neurite, respectively, whereas a coupled mechanical model accounting for the neurite mechanical behavior within its surrounding medium was adopted as a link between electrophysiology and mechanics. This paper provides the details of the parallel implementation of Neurite, along with three different application examples: a long myelinated axon, a segmented

  8. Regulation of adult cardiocyte growth: effects of active and passive mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, M. L.; Janes, D. M.; Barclay, M. M.; Harger, L.; Decker, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    Fluctuations in hemodynamic load have been documented to modulate contractile protein turnover and myofibrillar structure in the heart; however, the relative importance of active and passive loading in regulating adult cardiocyte growth remains unresolved. To address this issue at the cellular level, adult feline cardiocytes were cultured either on Silastic membranes or plastic surfaces. Cardiocyte-laden membranes were stretched 10% of their rest length to enhance passive loading, whereas heart cells cultured on plastic or Silastic were field stimulated at 1 Hz to mimic active loading. Turnover of contractile proteins and structural integrity of the contractile-cytoskeletal apparatus were monitored for periods ranging from 4 to 72 h. Active and passive loading elevated contractile protein synthesis nearly equally (approximately 50%) and promoted the attachment of remodeled myofibrils to vinculin-positive focal contacts and/or costameres during the first 24 h of loading. Thereafter, rates of contractile protein synthesis returned to control values in passively stretched heart cells but remained elevated in field-stimulated cultures. The fractional rate of growth was increased significantly (approximately 8%/day) in electrically paced cells, whereas in passively stretched cardiocytes the growth rate rose only modestly (approximately 2%/day). Changes in the rate of myocyte growth appeared more closely correlated with the development of focal contacts and myofibril remodeling than with changes in myofibrillar protein turnover per se. 2,3-Butanedione monoxime, nifedipine, and, to a lesser extent, ryanodine blocked field-stimulated contractile protein synthesis and myofibrillar remodeling but had no impact on protein turnover or myofibril reassembly in passively loaded cardiocytes. The results of these experiments imply that both active and passive loading stimulate contractile protein turnover and myofibril remodeling, but the generation of active tension accelerates

  9. Effects of the Ambient Temperature and Load on the Wear Performances and Mechanisms of H13 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, M. X.; Wang, S. Q.; Zhao, Y. T.; Wang, F.

    2011-10-01

    The dry sliding wear tests of H13 steel were performed under atmospheric conditions under various ambient temperatures and loads; the wear performances and the wear mechanisms were studied. At room temperature (RT), the wear loss of the steel gradually increased with increasing the load. An adhesive wear prevailed with little tribo-oxides on the worn surfaces. Under the atmospheric conditions at 473 K (200 °C) and a load of 100 N or above, a mild oxidation wear prevailed with about 20- μm thickness of tribo-oxide layer forming on the asperities of worn surfaces. The wear loss first reduced and then slightly increased with increasing the load. Compared with the other ambient temperatures, the wear at 473 K (200 °C) retained the lowest wear loss due to the protection of the tribo-oxide layer. As the ambient temperature reached 673 K (400 °C), the wear loss increased with increasing load, leading to higher wear than those observed at RT and at 473 K (200 °C). The predominant wear mechanism at 673 K (400 °C) was oxidation wear, unlike mild oxidation wear, which dominated at 473 K (200 °C).

  10. DIFFERENCES IN THE MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF CORTICAL BONE BETWEEN COMPRESSION AND TENSION WHEN SUBJECTED TO PROGRESSIVE LOADING

    PubMed Central

    Nyman, Jeffry S.; Ling, Huijie; Dong, Xuanliang; Wang, Xiaodu

    2008-01-01

    The hierarchical arrangement of collagen and mineral into bone tissue presumabley maximizes fracture resistance with respect to the predominant strain mode in bone. Thus, the ability of cortical bone to dissipate energy may differ between compression and tension for the same anatomical site. To test this notion, we subjected bone specimens from the anterior quadrant of human cadaveric tibiae to a progressive loading scheme in either uniaxial tension or uniaxial compression. One tension (dog-bone shape) and one compression specimen (cylindrical shape) were collected each from tibiae of nine middle aged male donors. At each cycle of loading-dwell-unloading-dwell-reloading, we calculated maximum stress, permanent strain, modulus, stress relaxation, time constant, and 3 pathways of energy dissipation for both loading modes. In doing so, we found that bone dissipated greater energy through the mechanisms of permanent and viscoelastic deformation in compression than in tension. On the other hand, however, bone dissipated greater energy through the release of surface energy in tension than in compression. Moreover, differences in the plastic and viscoelastic properties after yielding were not reflected in the evolution of modulus loss (an indicator of damage accumulation), which was similar for both loading modes. A possible explanation is that differences in damage morphology between the two loading modes may favor the plastic and viscolelastic energy dissipation in compression, but facilitate the surface energy release in tension. Such detailed information about failure mechanisms of bone at the tissue-level would help explain the underlying causes of bone fractures. PMID:19716106

  11. Impact induced failure of cartilage-on-bone following creep loading: a microstructural and fracture mechanics study.

    PubMed

    Thambyah, Ashvin; Zhang, Geran; Kim, Woong; Broom, Neil D

    2012-10-01

    Cartilage-on-bone samples obtained from healthy bovine patellae, with or without prior static compression (i.e. creep) at 2MPa for 3h, were delivered a single impact via an instrumented pendulum indenter at a velocity of 1.13m/s and an energy of 2.2J. Mechanical data was obtained and microstructural assessment of the region of failure was carried out using differential interference contrast (DIC) optical imaging. In addition, a fibrillar-level structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was conducted on a control batch of non-impacted samples that were subjected to either creep or non-creep loading protocols. Arising from the impact event the deepest levels of crack penetration into the articular cartilage occurred in those samples subjected to prior creep loading. Further the crack depth was inversely proportional to the rebound velocity of the indenter. By contrast, those impacted samples not subjected to prior creep loading had only short obliquely patterned microcracks confined to the upper one-third of the full cartilage depth. Ultrastructurally the creep-loaded cartilage matrix exhibited a substantial radial collapse or compaction of the fibrillar network in its primary radial zone. The increase in crack length in the prior creep-loaded cartilage is consistent with a reduction in its dissipative properties as indicated by a reduction in rebound velocity. An interpretation is offered in terms of classical fracture mechanics theory. PMID:22784816

  12. Mechanical competence of ovariectomy-induced compromised bone after single or combined treatment with high-frequency loading and bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    Camargos G. V.; Bhattacharya P.; van Lenthe G. H.; Del Bel Cury A. A.; Naert I.; Duyck J.; Vandamme K.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis leads to increased bone fragility, thus effective approaches enhancing bone strength are needed. Hence, this study investigated the effect of single or combined application of high-frequency (HF) loading through whole body vibration (WBV) and alendronate (ALN) on the mechanical competence of ovariectomy-induced osteoporotic bone. Thirty-four female Wistar rats were ovariectomized (OVX) or sham-operated (shOVX) and divided into five groups: shOVX, OVX-shWBV, OVX-WBV, ALN-shWBV and ALN-WBV. (Sham)WBV loading was applied for 10 min/day (130 to 150 Hz at 0.3g) for 14 days and ALN at 2 mg/kg/dose was administered 3x/week. Finite element analysis based on micro-CT was employed to assess bone biomechanical properties, relative to bone micro-structural parameters. HF loading application to OVX resulted in an enlarged cortex, but it was not able to improve the biomechanical properties. ALN prevented trabecular bone deterioration and increased bone stiffness and bone strength of OVX bone. Finally, the combination of ALN with HF resulted in an increased cortical thickness in OVX rats when compared to single treatments. Compared to HF loading, ALN treatment is preferred for improving the compromised mechanical competence of OVX bone. In addition, the association of ALN with HF loading results in an additive effect on the cortical thickness. PMID:26027958

  13. Biaxial Mechanical Evaluation of Absorbable and Nonabsorbable Synthetic Surgical Meshes Used for Hernia Repair: Physiological Loads Modify Anisotropy Response.

    PubMed

    Cordero, A; Hernández-Gascón, B; Pascual, G; Bellón, J M; Calvo, B; Peña, E

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain information about the mechanical properties of six meshes commonly used for hernia repair (Surgipro(®), Optilene(®), Infinit(®), DynaMesh(®), Ultrapro™ and TIGR(®)) by planar biaxial tests. Stress-stretch behavior and equibiaxial stiffness were evaluated, and the anisotropy was determined by testing. In particular, equibiaxial test (equal simultaneous loading in both directions) and biaxial test (half of the load in one direction following the Laplace law) were selected as a representation of physiologically relevant loads. The majority of the meshes displayed values in the range of 8 and 18 (N/mm) in each direction for equibiaxial stiffness (tangent modulus under equibiaxial load state in both directions), while a few achieved 28 and 50 (N/mm) (Infinit (®) and TIGR (®)). Only the Surgipro (®) mesh exhibited planar isotropy, with similar mechanical properties regardless of the direction of loading, and an anisotropy ratio of 1.18. Optilene (®), DynaMesh (®), Ultrapro (®) and TIGR (®) exhibited moderate anisotropy with ratios of 1.82, 1.84, 2.17 and 1.47, respectively. The Infinit (®) scaffold exhibited very high anisotropy with a ratio of 3.37. These trends in material anisotropic response changed during the physiological state in the human abdominal wall, i.e. T:0.5T test, which the meshes were loaded in one direction with half the load used in the other direction. The Surgipro (®) mesh increased its anisotropic response (Anis[Formula: see text] = 0.478) and the materials that demonstrated moderate and high anisotropic responses during multiaxial testing presented a quasi-isotropic response, especially the Infinit(®) mesh that decreased its anisotropic response from 3.369 to 1.292. PMID:26620778

  14. Comparative study of mechanical properties of dental restorative materials and dental hard tissues in compressive loads.

    PubMed

    Chun, Keyoung Jin; Lee, Jong Yeop

    2014-01-01

    There are two objectives. One is to show the differences in the mechanical properties of various dental restorative materials compared to those of enamel and dentin. The other is to ascertain which dental restorative materials are more suitable for clinical treatments. Amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy were processed as dental restorative material specimens. The specimens (width, height, and length of 1.2, 1.2, and 3.0 mm, respectively) were compressed at a constant loading speed of 0.1 mm/min. The maximum stress (115.0 ± 40.6, 55.0 ± 24.8, 291.2 ± 45.3, 274.6 ± 52.2, 2206.0 ± 522.9, and 953.4 ± 132.1 MPa), maximum strain (7.8% ± 0.5%, 4.0% ± 0.1%, 12.7% ± 0.8%, 32.8% ± 0.5%, 63.5% ± 14.0%, and 45.3% ± 7.4%), and elastic modulus (1437.5 ± 507.2, 1548.4 ± 583.5, 2323.4 ± 322.4, 833.1 ± 92.4, 3895.2 ± 202.9, and 2222.7 ± 277.6 MPa) were evident for amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy, respectively. The reference hardness value of amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy was 90, 420, 130-135, 86.6-124.2, 1250, and 349, respectively. Since enamel grinds food, its abrasion resistance is important. Therefore, hardness value should be prioritized for enamel. Since dentin absorbs bite forces, mechanical properties should be prioritized for dentin. The results suggest that gold alloy simultaneously has a hardness value lower than enamel (74.8 ± 18.1), which is important in the wear of the opposing natural teeth, and higher maximum stress, maximum strain, and elastic modulus than dentin (193.7 ± 30.6 MPa, 11.9% ± 0.1%, 1653.7 ± 277.9 MPa, respectively), which are important considering the rigidity to absorb bite forces. PMID:25352921

  15. Comparative study of mechanical properties of dental restorative materials and dental hard tissues in compressive loads

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Yeop

    2014-01-01

    There are two objectives. One is to show the differences in the mechanical properties of various dental restorative materials compared to those of enamel and dentin. The other is to ascertain which dental restorative materials are more suitable for clinical treatments. Amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy were processed as dental restorative material specimens. The specimens (width, height, and length of 1.2, 1.2, and 3.0 mm, respectively) were compressed at a constant loading speed of 0.1 mm/min. The maximum stress (115.0 ± 40.6, 55.0 ± 24.8, 291.2 ± 45.3, 274.6 ± 52.2, 2206.0 ± 522.9, and 953.4 ± 132.1 MPa), maximum strain (7.8% ± 0.5%, 4.0% ± 0.1%, 12.7% ± 0.8%, 32.8% ± 0.5%, 63.5% ± 14.0%, and 45.3% ± 7.4%), and elastic modulus (1437.5 ± 507.2, 1548.4 ± 583.5, 2323.4 ± 322.4, 833.1 ± 92.4, 3895.2 ± 202.9, and 2222.7 ± 277.6 MPa) were evident for amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy, respectively. The reference hardness value of amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy was 90, 420, 130–135, 86.6–124.2, 1250, and 349, respectively. Since enamel grinds food, its abrasion resistance is important. Therefore, hardness value should be prioritized for enamel. Since dentin absorbs bite forces, mechanical properties should be prioritized for dentin. The results suggest that gold alloy simultaneously has a hardness value lower than enamel (74.8 ± 18.1), which is important in the wear of the opposing natural teeth, and higher maximum stress, maximum strain, and elastic modulus than dentin (193.7 ± 30.6 MPa, 11.9% ± 0.1%, 1653.7 ± 277.9 MPa, respectively), which are important considering the rigidity to absorb bite forces. PMID:25352921

  16. A new method for sudden mechanical perturbation with axial load, to assess postural control in sitting and standing.

    PubMed

    Claus, Andrew P; Verrel, Julius; Pounds, Paul E I; Shaw, Renee C; Brady, Niamh; Chew, Min T; Dekkers, Thomas A; Hodges, Paul W

    2016-05-01

    Sudden application of load along a sagittal or coronal axis has been used to study trunk stiffness, but not axial (vertical) load. This study introduces a new method for sudden-release axial load perturbation. Prima facie validity was supported by comparison with standard mechanical systems. We report the response of the human body to axial perturbation in sitting and standing and within-day repeatability of measures. Load of 20% of body weight was released from light contact onto the shoulders of 22 healthy participants (10 males). Force input was measured via force transducers at shoulders, output via a force plate below the participant, and kinematics via 3-D motion capture. System identification was used to fit data from the time of load release to time of peak load-displacement, fitting with a 2nd-order mass-spring-damper system with a delay term. At peak load-displacement, the mean (SD) effective stiffness measured with this device for participants in sitting was 12.0(3.4)N/mm, and in standing was 13.3(4.2)N/mm. Peak force output exceeded input by 44.8 (10.0)% in sitting and by 30.4(7.9)% in standing. Intra-class correlation coefficients for within-day repeatability of axial stiffness were 0.58 (CI: -0.03 to 0.83) in sitting and 0.82(0.57-0.93) in standing. Despite greater degrees of freedom in standing than sitting, standing involved lesser time, downward displacement, peak output force and was more repeatable in defending upright postural control against the same axial loads. This method provides a foundation for future studies of neuromuscular control with axial perturbation. PMID:26968087

  17. A servo-mechanical load frame for in situ, non-invasive, imaging of damage development

    SciTech Connect

    Breunig, T.M.; Nichols, M.C.; Gruver, J.S.; Kinney, J.H.; Haupt, D.L.

    1993-12-31

    The X-ray tomographic microscope (XTM) is a non-invasive X-ray imaging instrument for characterizing a material`s structure three-dimensionally with microscopic spatial resolution. The authors have designed a servomechanical load frame for use with the XTM which will allow imaging of samples under load. The load frame is capable of generating tensile or compressive forces up to 15.6 kN with a design system stiffness of 8.76 {times} 10{sup 8} N/m. The test specimen can be rotated through 360{degree}, without induced bending or torque. Torqueless motion is accomplished by synchronously rotating the grips on precision bearings with an accuracy of 0.01{degree}. With this load frame it will be possible, for the first time, to image the initiation and accumulation of internal damage (0.5 {mu}m detectability) formed in a 6 mm diameter specimen during the application of a monotonic or low frequency cyclic load. This is accomplished by interrupting the test and maintaining a fixed load (or displacement) during the non-invasive XTM data collection procedure. This paper describes the in situ load frame design and experimental capabilities. This system can be used to enhance the understanding of failure in composite materials.

  18. Influence of multiwall carbon nanotube functionality and loading on mechanical properties of PMMA/MWCNT bone cements.

    PubMed

    Ormsby, Ross; McNally, Tony; Mitchell, Christina; Dunne, Nicholas

    2010-08-01

    Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) bone cement-multi walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) nanocomposites with weight loadings ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 wt% were prepared. The MWCNTs investigated were unfunctionalised, carboxyl and amine functionalised MWCNTs. Mechanical properties of the resultant nanocomposite cements were characterised as per international standards for acrylic resin cements. These mechanical properties were influenced by the type and wt% loading of MWCNT used. The morphology and degree of dispersion of the MWCNTs in the PMMA matrix at different length scales were examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy. Improvements in mechanical properties were attributed to the MWCNTs arresting/retarding crack propagation through the cement by providing a bridging effect and hindering crack propagation. MWCNTs agglomerations were evident within the cement microstructure, the degree of these agglomerations was dependent on the weight fraction and functionality of MWCNTs incorporated into the cement. PMID:20091100

  19. Influence of increased mechanical loading by hypergravity on the microtubule cytoskeleton and prostaglandin E2 release in primary osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Searby, Nancy D.; Steele, Charles R.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2005-01-01

    Cells respond to a wide range of mechanical stimuli such as fluid shear and strain, although the contribution of gravity to cell structure and function is not understood. We hypothesized that bone-forming osteoblasts are sensitive to increased mechanical loading by hypergravity. A centrifuge suitable for cell culture was developed and validated, and then primary cultures of fetal rat calvarial osteoblasts at various stages of differentiation were mechanically loaded using hypergravity. We measured microtubule network morphology as well as release of the paracrine factor prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). In immature osteoblasts, a stimulus of 10x gravity (10 g) for 3 h increased PGE2 2.5-fold and decreased microtubule network height 1.12-fold without affecting cell viability. Hypergravity (3 h) caused dose-dependent (5-50 g) increases in PGE2 (5.3-fold at 50 g) and decreases (1.26-fold at 50 g) in microtubule network height. PGE2 release depended on duration but not orientation of the hypergravity load. As osteoblasts differentiated, sensitivity to hypergravity declined. We conclude that primary osteoblasts demonstrate dose- and duration-dependent sensitivity to gravitational loading, which appears to be blunted in mature osteoblasts.

  20. The effect of mechanical strains in soft tissues of the shoulder during load carriage.

    PubMed

    Hadid, Amir; Belzer, Noa; Shabshin, Nogah; Zeilig, Gabi; Gefen, Amit; Epstein, Yoram

    2015-11-26

    Soldiers and recreational backpackers are often required to carry heavy loads during military operations or hiking. Shoulder strain appears to be one of the limiting factors of load carriage due to skin and underlying soft tissue deformations, trapped nerves, or obstruction of blood vessels. The present study was aimed to determine relationships between backpack weights and the state of loads in the shoulder׳s inner tissues, with a special focus on the deformations in the brachial plexus. Open-MRI scans were used for developing and then verifying a three-dimensional, non-linear, large deformation, finite element model of the shoulder. Loads were applied at the strap-shoulder contact surfaces of the model by pulling the strap towards the shoulder until the desired load was reached. Increasing the strap tensile forces up to a load that represents 35kg backpack resulted in gradual increase in strains within the underlying soft tissues: the maximal tensile strain in the brachial plexus for a 25kg backpack was 12%, and while carrying 35kg, the maximal tensile strain increased to 16%. The lateral aspect of the brachial plexus was found to be more vulnerable to deformation-inflicted effects than the medial aspect. This is due to the anatomy of the clavicle that poorly shields the plexus from compressive loads applied during load carriage, while the neural tissue in the medial aspect of the shoulder is better protected by the clavicle. The newly developed model can serve as a tool to estimate soft tissue deformations in the brachial plexus for heavy backpack loads, up to 35kg. This method will allow further development of new strap structures and materials for alleviating the strains applied on the shoulder soft tissues. PMID:26542788

  1. Mechanical loading of peripheral nerves during remobilisation of the affected member after end-to-end anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Orf, G; Wüst, R

    1979-01-01

    Our study involved simulating end-to-end neurorrhaphy of the sciatic nerve in a number of rabbits and analysing in vivo the mechanical loads acting on the nerve while the affected member was being remobilised. We found both the suture and mobilisation loads to be related to the size of the nerve defect. In each case, traction force, strain, and stress were proportional. The effect which these experimental findings may have on the future use of flexing neighbouring joints as a "manipulative" measure to achieve a tension-free nerve suture will be discussed. PMID:525461

  2. Residual thermal stress control in composite reinforced metal structures. [by mechanical loading of metal component prior to bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, J. B.; June, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced composite materials, composed of boron or graphite fibers and a supporting matrix, make significant structural efficiency improvements available to aircraft and aerospace designers. Residual stress induced during bonding of composite reinforcement to metal structural elements can be reduced or eliminated through suitable modification to the manufacturing processes. The most successful method employed during this program used a steel tool capable of mechanically loading the metal component in compression prior to the adhesive bonding cycle. Compression loading combined with heating to 350 F during the bond cycle can result in creep deformation in aluminum components. The magnitude of the deformation increases with increasing stress level during exposure to 350 F.

  3. Mechanical Loading Synergistically Increases Trabecular Bone Volume and Improves Mechanical Properties in the Mouse when BMP Signaling Is Specifically Ablated in Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Iura, Ayaka; McNerny, Erin Gatenby; Zhang, Yanshuai; Kamiya, Nobuhiro; Tantillo, Margaret; Lynch, Michelle; Kohn, David H.; Mishina, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Bone homeostasis is affected by several factors, particularly mechanical loading and growth factor signaling pathways. There is overwhelming evidence to validate the importance of these signaling pathways, however, whether these signals work synergistically or independently to contribute to proper bone maintenance is poorly understood. Weight-bearing exercise increases mechanical load on the skeletal system and can improves bone quality. We previously reported that conditional knockout (cKO) of Bmpr1a, which encodes one of the type 1 receptors for Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs), in an osteoblast-specific manner increased trabecular bone mass by suppressing osteoclastogenesis. The cKO bones also showed increased cortical porosity, which is expected to impair bone mechanical properties. Here, we evaluated the impact of weight-bearing exercise on the cKO bone phenotype to understand interactions between mechanical loading and BMP signaling through BMPR1A. Male mice with disruption of Bmpr1a induced at 9 weeks of age, exercised 5 days per week on a motor-driven treadmill from 11 to 16 weeks of age. Trabecular bone volume in cKO tibia was further increased by exercise, whereas exercise did not affect the trabecular bone in the control genotype group. This finding was supported by decreased levels of osteoclasts in the cKO tibiae. The cortical porosity in the cKO bones showed a marginally significant decrease with exercise and approached normal levels. Exercise increased ductility and toughness in the cKO bones. Taken together, reduction in BMPR1A signaling may sensitize osteoblasts for mechanical loading to improve bone mechanical properties. PMID:26489086

  4. Analysis of shell-type structures subjected to time-dependent mechanical and thermal loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simitses, G. J.; Carlson, R. L.; Riff, R.

    1987-01-01

    A general mathematical model and solution methodologies are being developed for analyzing structural response of thin, metallic shell-type structures under large transient, cyclic, or static thermomechanical loads. Among the system responses, which were associated with these load conditions, were thermal buckling, creep buckling, and ratcheting. Thus, geometric as well as material-type nonlinearities (of high order) can be anticipated and must be considered in the development of the mathematical model. Furthermore, this must also be accommodated in the solution process.

  5. Analysis of shell-type structures subjected to time-dependent mechanical and thermal loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simitses, G. J.; Riff, R.

    1987-01-01

    A general mathematical model and solution methodologies for analyzing structural response of thin, metallic shell-type structures under large transient, cyclic, or static thermomechanical loads are developed. Among the system responses, which are associated with these load conditions, are thermal buckling, creep buckling and ratcheting. Thus, geometric as well as material type nonlinearities (of high order) can be anticipated and must be considered in the development of the mathematical model. Furthermore, this must also be accommodated in the solution procedures.

  6. Analysis of shell type structures subjected to time dependent mechanical and thermal loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simitses, G. J.; Carlson, R. L.; Riff, R.

    1985-01-01

    A general mathematical model and solution methodologies for analyzing structural response of thin, metallic shell-type structures under large transient, cyclic or static thermomechanical loads is considered. Among the system responses, which are associated with these load conditions, are thermal buckling, creep buckling and ratchetting. Thus, geometric as well as material-type nonlinearities (of high order) can be anticipated and must be considered in the development of the mathematical model.

  7. Research on equipment of micro-pressure measure and control in loading experiment of plant cell mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lian; Yu, Chengbo; Tao, Hongyan; Chen, Xuejun; Zhai, Feng

    2005-12-01

    The equipment is developed to measure and control micro-pressure in loading experiment of plant cell mechanics. The motivation for the development of this equipment was to maintain a stationary micro-pressure on the agar of culturing cells to keep cytoactive in biology experiments. A singlechip controls the stepping motor of this equipment to drive loading equipment in the system, in order to load between 50mN and 250mN under a constant voltage. The accuracy is estimated to be +/-0.4 mN. The structure and control system of this equipment is introduced and described in detail. The experimental results show that the equipment is capable of maintaining a constant, stationary micropressure in cell culturing application and is worth of extending and applying.

  8. The Reliability of Microalloyed Sn-Ag-Cu Solder Interconnections Under Cyclic Thermal and Mechanical Shock Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattila, Toni T.; Hokka, Jussi; Paulasto-Kröckel, Mervi

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the performance of three microalloyed Sn-Ag-Cu solder interconnection compositions (Sn-3.1Ag-0.52Cu, Sn-3.0Ag-0.52Cu-0.24Bi, and Sn-1.1Ag-0.52Cu-0.1Ni) was compared under mechanical shock loading (JESD22-B111 standard) and cyclic thermal loading (40 ± 125°C, 42 min cycle) conditions. In the drop tests, the component boards with the low-silver nickel-containing composition (Sn-Ag-Cu-Ni) showed the highest average number of drops-to-failure, while those with the bismuth-containing alloy (Sn-Ag-Cu-Bi) showed the lowest. Results of the thermal cycling tests showed that boards with Sn-Ag-Cu-Bi interconnections performed the best, while those with Sn-Ag-Cu-Ni performed the worst. Sn-Ag-Cu was placed in the middle in both tests. In this paper, we demonstrate that solder strength is an essential reliability factor and that higher strength can be beneficial for thermal cycling reliability but detrimental to drop reliability. We discuss these findings from the perspective of the microstructures and mechanical properties of the three solder interconnection compositions and, based on a comprehensive literature review, investigate how the differences in the solder compositions influence the mechanical properties of the interconnections and discuss how the differences are reflected in the failure mechanisms under both loading conditions.

  9. Mechanical properties, skin permeation and in vivo evaluations of dexibuprofen-loaded emulsion gel for topical delivery.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sung Giu; Yousaf, Abid Mehmood; Son, Mi Woon; Jang, Sun Woo; Kim, Dong Wuk; Kim, Jong Oh; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Choi, Han-Gon

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the gel properties, skin permeation and in vivo drug efficacy of a novel dexibuprofen-loaded emulsion gel for topical delivery. In this study, the dexibuprofen-loaded emulsion gel and ibuprofen-loaded emulsion gel were prepared with isopropanol, Tween 80, propylene glycol, isopropyl myristate and carbopol. Their mechanical properties such as hardness and adhesiveness were assessed. Moreover, their skin permeation, anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive efficacy were evaluated using Franz diffusion cell with the hairless mouse skin, the carrageenan-induced paw oedema test and paw pressure test in rat's hind paws compared with the commercial hydrogel, respectively. The dexibuprofen emulsion gel and ibuprofen emulsion gel provided significantly higher hardness and adhesiveness than the commercial hydrogel. The dexibuprofen emulsion gel enhanced skin permeability by about twofold and 3.5-fold without lag time compared to the ibuprofen emulsion gel and the commercial hydrogel, respectively, suggesting its faster skin permeation. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory efficacy and alleviation in carrageenan-induced inflammation was in the order of dexibuprofen emulsion gel > commercial hydrogel > ibuprofen emulsion gel. The dexibuprofen emulsion gel furnished significantly higher nociceptive thresholds than the ibuprofen emulsion gel and the commercial hydrogel, leading to the most improved anti-nociceptive efficacy. Thus, this dexibuprofen-loaded emulsion gel with good mechanical property, rapid skin permeation and excellent anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive efficacy would be a strong candidate for the topical delivery of anti-inflammatory dexibuprofen. PMID:24988989

  10. The functional role of the ischiopubic membrane for the mechanical loading of the pubis in the domestic fowl (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Fechner, Regina; Stratmann, Matthias; Gössling, Rainer; Sverdlova, Nina

    2013-03-01

    Soft tissues other than muscles are supposed to be of mechanical importance, yet they are rarely integrated into finite element models. Here, we investigate the functional role of the ischiopubic membrane for the loading of the pubis of the domestic fowl using 2D finite element analysis. For this purpose, a specimen of the domestic fowl was dissected and soft tissues attaching to the pubis were studied in great detail. Muscles were removed and measurements taken. For the 2D finite element model, the outline was taken from the dissected specimen. Two 2D finite element models were generated: one without and one with ischiopubic membrane. The same muscular loading based on own measurements and electromyographic data was applied to both models. The model without ischiopubic membrane shows anteroventral bending deformation of the scapus pubis, resulting in high compressive and tensile principal stresses at the level of ultimate bone stress values. The model with ischiopubic membrane shows low compressive principal stresses in the pubis consistent with the levels of steady state remodelling of bone. Based on these results, the ischiopubic membrane of the domestic fowl potentially establishes a physiological loading of the pubis and therefore might be of great mechanical significance for the loading of the bone. PMID:23171269

  11. The functional role of the ischiopubic membrane for the mechanical loading of the pubis in the domestic fowl (Gallus gallus)

    PubMed Central

    Fechner, Regina; Stratmann, Matthias; Gößling, Rainer; Sverdlova, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Soft tissues other than muscles are supposed to be of mechanical importance, yet they are rarely integrated into finite element models. Here, we investigate the functional role of the ischiopubic membrane for the loading of the pubis of the domestic fowl using 2D finite element analysis. For this purpose, a specimen of the domestic fowl was dissected and soft tissues attaching to the pubis were studied in great detail. Muscles were removed and measurements taken. For the 2D finite element model, the outline was taken from the dissected specimen. Two 2D finite element models were generated: one without and one with ischiopubic membrane. The same muscular loading based on own measurements and electromyographic data was applied to both models. The model without ischiopubic membrane shows anteroventral bending deformation of the scapus pubis, resulting in high compressive and tensile principal stresses at the level of ultimate bone stress values. The model with ischiopubic membrane shows low compressive principal stresses in the pubis consistent with the levels of steady state remodelling of bone. Based on these results, the ischiopubic membrane of the domestic fowl potentially establishes a physiological loading of the pubis and therefore might be of great mechanical significance for the loading of the bone. PMID:23171269

  12. The deformation and acoustic emission of aluminum-magnesium alloy under non-isothermal thermo-mechanical loading

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, S. V.; Plotnikov, V. A. Lysikov, M. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2015-10-27

    The following study investigates the deformation behavior and acoustic emission in aluminum-magnesium alloy under conditions of non-isothermal thermo-mechanical loading. The accumulation of deformation in the alloy, in conditions of change from room temperature to 500°C, occurs in two temperature intervals (I, II), characterized by different rates of deformation. The rate of deformation accumulation is correlated with acoustic emission. With load increasing in cycles from 40 to 200 MPa, the value of the boundary temperature (T{sub b}) between intervals I and II changes non-monotonically. In cycles with load up to 90 MPa, the T{sub b} value increases, while an increase up to 200 MPa makes T{sub b} shift toward lower temperatures. This suggests that the shift of boundaries in the region of low temperatures and the appearance of high-amplitude pulses of acoustic emission characterize the decrease of the magnitude of thermal fluctuations with increasing mechanical load, leading to the rupture of interatomic bonds in an elementary deformation act.

  13. Experimental studies on fatigue behavior of macro fiber composite (MFC) under mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Akash; Arockiarajan, A.

    2016-04-01

    Macro fiber Composite (MFC) finds its application in active control, vibration control and sensing elements. MFC can be laminated to surfaces or embedded in the structures to be used as an actuator and sensors. Due to its attractive properties and applications, it may be subjected to continuous loading, which leads to the deterioration of the properties. This study is focused on the fatigue lifetime of MFC under tensile and compressive loading at room temperature. Experiments were performed using 4 point bending setup, with MFC pasted at the center of the mild steel beam, to maintain constant bending stress along MFC. MFC is pasted using vacuum bagging technique. Sinusoidal loading is given to sample while maintaining R=0.13 (for tensile testing) and R=10 (for compressive testing). For d31 and d33 type of MFC, test was conducted for the strain values of 727 μ strain, 1400 μ strain, 1700 μ strain and 1900 μ strain for fatigue under tensile loading. For fatigue under compressive loading, both d33 and d31, was subjected to minimum strain of -2000 μ strain. Decrease in the slope of dielectric displacement vs. strain is the measure for the degradation. 10 percent decrease in the slope is set as the failure criteria. Experimental results show that MFC is very reliable below 1700 μ strain (R=0.13) at the room temperature.

  14. Mechanisms of diphylline release from dual-solute loaded poly(vinyl alcohol) matrices.

    PubMed

    Hasimi, Albana; Papadokostaki, Kyriaki G; Sanopoulou, Merope

    2014-01-01

    The release kinetics of the model hydrophilic drug, diphylline (DPL), from physically crosslinked poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) matrices, is studied in relation to the drug load and the presence of a second solute incorporated in the matrix. The second solute, a gadolinium (III) complex (Gd-DTPA), is a commonly used MRI contrast agent. The water uptake kinetics by the glassy PVA matrix was found to deviate from t(1/2) law and to occur on time scales comparable to those of diphylline release. The corresponding rate of diphylline release was found to be substantially stabilized as compared to a purely diffusion-controlled release process, in line with theoretical predictions under conditions of relaxation-controlled water uptake kinetics. The release rate of DPL was found (i) to increase with increasing DPL load and (ii) for a particular DPL load, to increase in the presence of Gd-DTPA, incorporated in the matrix. The results were interpreted on the basis of the diphylline-induced plasticization of the polymer (evidenced by the depression of Tg) and of the excess hydration of the matrix at high solute loads. The latter effect was found to be additive in the case of dual-solute loaded matrices. PMID:24268271

  15. Capturing the Energy Absorbing Mechanisms of Composite Structures under Crash Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Bonnie

    As fiber reinforced composite material systems become increasingly utilized in primary aircraft and automotive structures, the need to understand their contribution to the crashworthiness of the structure is of great interest to meet safety certification requirements. The energy absorbing behavior of a composite structure, however, is not easily predicted due to the great complexity of the failure mechanisms that occur within the material. Challenges arise both in the experimental characterization and in the numerical modeling of the material/structure combination. At present, there is no standardized test method to characterize the energy absorbing capability of composite materials to aide crashworthy structural design. In addition, although many commercial finite element analysis codes exist and offer a means to simulate composite failure initiation and propagation, these models are still under development and refinement. As more metallic structures are replaced by composite structures, the need for both experimental guidelines to characterize the energy absorbing capability of a composite structure, as well as guidelines for using numerical tools to simulate composite materials in crash conditions has become a critical matter. This body of research addresses both the experimental characterization of the energy absorption mechanisms occurring in composite materials during crushing, as well as the numerical simulation of composite materials undergoing crushing. In the experimental investigation, the specific energy absorption (SEA) of a composite material system is measured using a variety of test element geometries, such as corrugated plates and tubes. Results from several crush experiments reveal that SEA is not a constant material property for laminated composites, and varies significantly with the geometry of the test specimen used. The variation of SEA measured for a single material system requires that crush test data must be generated for a range of

  16. Mechanical Loads Test Report for the U.S. Department of Energy 1.5-Megawatt Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Rick; van Dam, Jeroen

    2015-07-16

    The objective of the test was to obtain a baseline characterization of the mechanical loads of the DOE 1.5 wind turbine located at NREL. The test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Specification, IEC 61400-13 Wind Turbine Generator Systems – Part 13: Measurement of mechanical loads; First Edition 2001-06 [1]. The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at NREL conducted this test in accordance with its quality system procedures so that the final test report meets the full requirements of its accreditation by the American Association for Laboratory Accreditation (A2LA). NREL’s quality system requires that all applicable requirements specified by A2LA and International Standards Organization/IEC 17025 be met or to note any exceptions in the test report.

  17. Non-Invasive Investigation of Bone Adaptation in Humans to Cumulative Daily Mechanical Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Robert; Cleek, Tammy; Sode, Miki

    2003-01-01

    The goal of our research is to better understand the functional relationship between cumulative daily skeletal loading generated by daily activity and the regulation of bone density and bone structure. We have proposed the calcaneus and tibia as useful model bone sites loaded by internal forces in equilibrium with the ground reaction force during gait. The daily history of the ground reaction force is a good relative measure of daily lower limb and calcaneal loading that can be compared to bone density and structure of the calcaneus and cross-sectional geometry of the tibia and fibula. Over the past several years, we have developed image-processing technologies to improve our ability to measure bone density and structure in the calcaneus and lower leg non-invasively with computed tomography and bone densitometry, or DXA. The objective of our current research effort is to determine the accuracy and precision of our CT and DXA image processing methods.

  18. Analysis of shell-type structures subjected to time-dependent mechanical and thermal loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simitses, G. J.; Riff, R.

    1988-01-01

    This research is performed to develop a general mathematical model and solution methodologies for analyzing structural response of thin, metallic shell-type structures under large transient, cyclic or static thermomechanical loads. Among the system responses, which are associated with these load conditions, are thermal buckling, creep buckling, and ratcheting. Thus, geometric as well as material-type nonlinearities (of high order) can be anticipated and must be considered in the development of the mathematical model. Furthermore, this must also be accommodated in the solution procedures.

  19. Analysis of shell-type structures subjected to time-dependent mechanical and thermal loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simitses, G. J.

    1989-01-01

    The objective is to develop a general mathematical model and solution methodologies for analyzing structural response of thin, metallic shell-type structures under large transient, cyclic, or static thermomechanical loads. Among the system responses, which are associated with these load conditions, are thermal buckling, creep buckling, and racheting. Thus, geometric as well as material-type nonlinearities (of high order) can be anticipated and must be considered in the development of the mathematical model. Furthermore, this must also be accommodated in the solution procedures.

  20. In vitro drug release mechanism and drug loading studies of cubic phase gels.

    PubMed

    Lara, Marilisa G; Bentley, M Vitória L B; Collett, John H

    2005-04-11

    Glyceryl monooleate/water cubic phase systems were investigated as drug delivery systems, using salicylic acid as a model drug. The liquid crystalline phases formed by the glyceryl monooleate (GMO)/water systems were characterized by polarizing microscopy. In vitro drug release studies were performed and the influences of initial water content, swelling and drug loading on the drug release properties were evaluated. Water uptake followed second-order swelling kinetics. In vitro release profiles showed Fickian diffusion control and were independent on the initial water content and drug loading, suggesting GMO cubic phase gels suitability for use as drug delivery system. PMID:15778062

  1. Analysis of shell-type structures subjected to time-dependent mechanical and thermal loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simitses, G. J.; Riff, R.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a general mathematical model and solution methodologies for analyzing structural response of thin, metallic shell-type structures under large transient, cyclic or static thermomechanical loads. Among the system responses, which are associated with these load conditions, are thermal buckling, creep buckling and racheting. Thus, geometric as well as material-type nonlinearities (of high order) can be anticipated and must be considered in the development of the mathematical model. Furthermore, this must also be accommodated in the solution procedures.

  2. Numerical simulation of effective mechanical properties of stochastic composites with consideration for structural evolution under intensive dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Karakulov, Valerii V.; Smolin, Igor Yu. E-mail: skrp@ftf.tsu.ru; Skripnyak, Vladimir A. E-mail: skrp@ftf.tsu.ru

    2014-11-14

    Mechanical behavior of stochastic metal-ceramic composites with the aluminum matrix under high-rate deformation at shock-wave loading is numerically simulated with consideration for structural evolution. Effective values of mechanical parameters of metal-ceramic composites AlB{sub 4}C, AlSiC, and AlAl{sub 2}O{sub 3} are evaluated depending on different concentration of ceramic inclusions.

  3. Dependence of Some Mechanical Properties of Elastic Bands on the Length and Load Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triana, C. A.; Fajardo, F.

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of the maximum stress supported by elastics bands of nitrile as a function of the natural length and the load time. The maximum tension of rupture and the corresponding variation in length were found by measuring the elongation of an elastic band when a mass is suspended from its free end until it reaches the breaking point. The…

  4. Antagonizing the αv β3 integrin inhibits angiogenesis and impairs woven but not lamellar bone formation induced by mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Ryan E; Schmieder, Anne H; Quirk, James D; Lanza, Gregory M; Silva, Matthew J

    2014-09-01

    Angiogenesis and osteogenesis are critically linked, although the role of angiogenesis is not well understood in osteogenic mechanical loading. In this study, either damaging or non-damaging cyclic axial compression was used to generate woven bone formation (WBF) or lamellar bone formation (LBF), respectively, at the mid-diaphysis of the adult rat forelimb. αv β3 integrin-targeted nanoparticles or vehicle was injected intravenously after mechanical loading. β3 integrin subunit expression on vasculature was maximal 7 days after damaging mechanical loading, but was still robustly expressed 14 days after loading. Accordingly, targeted nanoparticle delivery in WBF-loaded limbs was increased compared with non-loaded limbs. Vascularity was dramatically increased after WBF loading (+700% on day 14) and modestly increased after LBF loading (+50% on day 14). This increase in vascularity was inhibited by nanoparticle treatment in both WBF- and LBF-loaded limbs at days 7 and 14 after loading. Decreased vascularity led to diminished woven, but not lamellar, bone formation. Decreased woven bone formation resulted in impaired structural properties of the skeletal repair, particularly in post-yield behavior. These results demonstrate that αv β3 integrin-mediated angiogenesis is critical for recovering fracture resistance after bone injury but is not required for bone modeling after modest mechanical strain. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:24644077

  5. Antagonizing the αvβ3 Integrin Inhibits Angiogenesis and Impairs Woven but Not Lamellar Bone Formation Induced by Mechanical Loading

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, Ryan E.; Schmieder, Anne H.; Quirk, James D.; Lanza, Gregory M.; Silva, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis and osteogenesis are critically linked, though the role of angiogenesis is not well understood in osteogenic mechanical loading. In this study, either damaging or non-damaging cyclic axial compression was used to generate woven bone formation (WBF) or lamellar bone formation (LBF), respectively, at the mid-diaphysis of the adult rat forelimb. αvβ3 integrin targeted nanoparticles or vehicle was injected intravenously following mechanical loading. β3 integrin subunit expression on vasculature was maximal 7 days after damaging mechanical loading, but was still robustly expressed 14 days after loading. Accordingly, targeted nanoparticle delivery in WBF loaded limbs was increased compared to non-loaded limbs. Vascularity was dramatically increased after WBF loading (+700% on day 14) and modestly increased after LBF loading (+50% on day 14). This increase in vascularity was inhibited by nanoparticle treatment in both WBF and LBF loaded limbs at days 7 and 14 after loading. Decreased vascularity led to diminished woven, but not lamellar, bone formation. Decreased woven bone formation resulted in impaired structural properties of the skeletal repair, particularly in post-yield behavior. These results demonstrate that αvβ3 integrin mediated angiogenesis is critical for recovering fracture resistance following bone injury, but is not required for bone modeling after modest mechanical strain. PMID:24644077

  6. Augmented finite-element method for arbitrary cracking and crack interaction in solids under thermo-mechanical loadings.

    PubMed

    Jung, J; Do, B C; Yang, Q D

    2016-07-13

    In this paper, a thermal-mechanical augmented finite-element method (TM-AFEM) has been proposed, implemented and validated for steady-state and transient, coupled thermal-mechanical analyses of complex materials with explicit consideration of arbitrary evolving cracks. The method permits the derivation of explicit, fully condensed thermal-mechanical equilibrium equations which are of mathematical exactness in the piece-wise linear sense. The method has been implemented with a 4-node quadrilateral two-dimensional (2D) element and a 4-node tetrahedron three-dimensional (3D) element. It has been demonstrated, through several numerical examples that the new TM-AFEM can provide significantly improved numerical accuracy and efficiency when dealing with crack propagation problems in 2D and 3D solids under coupled thermal-mechanical loading conditions. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. PMID:27242303

  7. Mechanical properties of α-tricalcium phosphate-based bone cements incorporating regenerative biomaterials for filling bone defects exposed to low mechanical loads.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Reed; Criss, Zachary K; Feller, Lacie; Modi, Shan P; Hardy, John G; Schmidt, Christine E; Suggs, Laura J; Murphy, Matthew B

    2016-01-01

    Calcium phosphate-based cements with enhanced regenerative potential are promising biomaterials for the healing of bone defects in procedures such as percutaneous vertebroplasty. With a view to the use of such cements for low load bearing applications such as sinus augmentation or filling extraction sites. However, the inclusion of certain species into bone cement formulations has the potential to diminish the mechanical properties of the formulations and thereby reduce their prospects for clinical translation. Consequently, we have prepared α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP)-based bone cements including materials that we would expect to improve their regenerative potential, and describe the mechanical properties of the resulting formulations herein. Formulations incorporated α-TCP, hydroxyapatite, biopolymer-thickened wetting agents, sutures, and platelet poor plasma. The mechanical properties of the composites were composition dependent, and optimized formulations had clinically relevant mechanical properties. Such calcium phosphate-based cements have potential as replacements for cements such as those based on polymethylmethacrylate. PMID:25677680

  8. Lung stress, strain, and energy load: engineering concepts to understand the mechanism of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI).

    PubMed

    Nieman, Gary F; Satalin, Joshua; Andrews, Penny; Habashi, Nader M; Gatto, Louis A

    2016-12-01

    It was recently shown that acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mortality has not been reduced in over 15 years and remains ~40 %, even with protective low tidal volume (LVt) ventilation. Thus, there is a critical need to develop novel ventilation strategies that will protect the lung and reduce ARDS mortality. Protti et al. have begun to analyze the impact of mechanical ventilation on lung tissue using engineering methods in normal pigs ventilated for 54 h. They used these methods to assess the impact of a mechanical breath on dynamic and static global lung strain and energy load. Strain is the change in lung volume in response to an applied stress (i.e., Tidal Volume-Vt). This study has yielded a number of exciting new concepts including the following: (1) Individual mechanical breath parameters (e.g., Vt or Plateau Pressure) are not directly correlated with VILI but rather any combination of parameters that subject the lung to excessive dynamic strain and energy/power load will cause VILI; (2) all strain is not equal; dynamic strain resulting in a dynamic energy load (i.e., kinetic energy) is more damaging to lung tissue than static strain and energy load (i.e., potential energy); and (3) a critical consideration is not just the size of the Vt but the size of the lung that is being ventilated by this Vt. This key concept merits attention since our current protective ventilation strategies are fixated on the priority of keeping the Vt low. If the lung is fully inflated, a large Vt is not necessarily injurious. In conclusion, using engineering concepts to analyze the impact of the mechanical breath on the lung is a novel new approach to investigate VILI mechanisms and to help design the optimally protective breath. Data generated using these methods have challenged some of the current dogma surrounding the mechanisms of VILI and of the components in the mechanical breath necessary for lung protection. PMID:27316442

  9. Application of Fracture Mechanics to Specify the Proof Load Factor for Clamp Band Systems of Launch Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singaravelu, J.; Sundaresan, S.; Nageswara Rao, B.

    2013-04-01

    This article presents a methodology for evaluation of the proof load factor (PLF) for clamp band system (CBS) made of M250 Maraging steel following fracture mechanics principles.CBS is most widely used as a structural element and as a separation system. Using Taguchi's design of experiments and the response surface method (RSM) the compact tension specimens were tested to establish an empirical relation for the failure load ( P max) in terms of the ultimate strength, width, thickness, and initial crack length. The test results of P max closely matched with the developed RSM empirical relation. Crack growth rates of the maraging steel in different environments were examined. Fracture strength (σf) of center surface cracks and through-crack tension specimens are evaluated utilizing the fracture toughness ( K IC). Stress induced in merman band at flight loading conditions is evaluated to estimate the higher load factor and PLF. Statistical safety factor and reliability assessments were made for the specified flaw sizes useful in the development of fracture control plan for CBS of launch vehicles.

  10. Identification of genes regulated during mechanical load-induced cardiac hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnatty, S. E.; Dyck, J. R.; Michael, L. H.; Olson, E. N.; Abdellatif, M.; Schneider, M. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is associated with both adaptive and adverse changes in gene expression. To identify genes regulated by pressure overload, we performed suppressive subtractive hybridization between cDNA from the hearts of aortic-banded (7-day) and sham-operated mice. In parallel, we performed a subtraction between an adult and a neonatal heart, for the purpose of comparing different forms of cardiac hypertrophy. Sequencing more than 100 clones led to the identification of an array of functionally known (70%) and unknown genes (30%) that are upregulated during cardiac growth. At least nine of those genes were preferentially expressed in both the neonatal and pressure over-load hearts alike. Using Northern blot analysis to investigate whether some of the identified genes were upregulated in the load-independent calcineurin-induced cardiac hypertrophy mouse model, revealed its incomplete similarity with the former models of cardiac growth. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  11. A passively tunable mechanism for a dual bimorph energy harvester with variable tip stiffness and axial load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghan Niri, E.; Salamone, S.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a novel vibration-based piezoelectric energy harvester capable of passively tuning its resonant frequency to a wide range of frequencies. The device comprises a dual bimorph with a mass at its free end. A novel sliding mechanism, consisting of two oblique springs connected to the tip mass, is proposed to widen the resonance frequency of the device even to very low frequencies. The application of two oblique springs results in an additional stiffness and axial load that are introduced within the system, such that the resonance frequency of the device is now a function of both the stiffness and axial load associated with the spring forces. An operator can manually change the resonance frequency of the harvester just by small adjustments of the sliding mechanism. Further, the device allows one to tune the resonance frequency of the beam to match very low frequencies without the requirement of having a large proof mass. The analytical solution of an axially loaded cantilevered piezoelectric energy harvester with tip stiffness, using Euler-Bernoulli beam assumptions, is presented. A parametric case study is presented to demonstrate the performance of the device.

  12. Effects of Tangential Edge Constraints on the Postbuckling Behavior of Flat and Curved Panels Subjected to Thermal and Mechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, W.; Librescu, L.; Nemeth, M. P.; Starnes, J. H. , Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A parametric study of the effects of tangential edge constraints on the postbuckling response of flat and shallow curved panels subjected to thermal and mechanical loads is presented. The mechanical loads investigated are uniform compressive edge loads and transverse lateral pressure. The temperature fields considered are associated with spatially nonuniform heating over the panels, and a linear through-the-thickness temperature gradient. The structural model is based on a higher-order transverse-shear-deformation theory of shallow shells that incorporates the effects of geometric nonlinearities, initial geometric imperfections, and tangential edge motion constraints. Results are presented for three-layer sandwich panels made from transversely isotropic materials. Simply supported panels are considered in which the tangential motion of the unloaded edges is either unrestrained, partially restrained, or fully restrained. These results focus on the effects of the tangential edge restraint on the postbuckling response. The results of this study indicate that tangentially restraining the edges of a curved panel can make the panel insensitive to initial geometric imperfections in some cases.

  13. Mechanics of blast loading on the head models in the study of traumatic brain injury using experimental and computational approaches.

    PubMed

    Ganpule, S; Alai, A; Plougonven, E; Chandra, N

    2013-06-01

    Blast waves generated by improvised explosive devices can cause mild, moderate to severe traumatic brain injury in soldiers and civilians. To understand the interactions of blast waves on the head and brain and to identify the mechanisms of injury, compression-driven air shock tubes are extensively used in laboratory settings to simulate the field conditions. The overall goal of this effort is to understand the mechanics of blast wave-head interactions as the blast wave traverses the head/brain continuum. Toward this goal, surrogate head model is subjected to well-controlled blast wave profile in the shock tube environment, and the results are analyzed using combined experimental and numerical approaches. The validated numerical models are then used to investigate the spatiotemporal distribution of stresses and pressure in the human skull and brain. By detailing the results from a series of careful experiments and numerical simulations, this paper demonstrates that: (1) Geometry of the head governs the flow dynamics around the head which in turn determines the net mechanical load on the head. (2) Biomechanical loading of the brain is governed by direct wave transmission, structural deformations, and wave reflections from tissue-material interfaces. (3) Deformation and stress analysis of the skull and brain show that skull flexure and tissue cavitation are possible mechanisms of blast-induced traumatic brain injury. PMID:22832705

  14. The dynamic mechanical response of fiber-reinforced beams to large transverse loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, J. M.; Kolsky, H.

    THE PAPER describes the results of experiments on fiber-reinforced metal beams which have been subjected to dynamic transverse loading. The beams were fabricated by embedding sets of parallel steel wires in a matrix of lead-tin alloy, and were clamped at one end. The transverse dynamic loading was applied to the tip of the beam so that the problem was one of the transverse deformation of a composite cantilever. Two separate techniques were employed to load the specimens, one being to hit the end with a fast moving hammer in a "Hyge" Shock Testing Machine; the other was to detonate an explosive charge in contact with a small projectile close to the tip. The deformations were monitored by a number of different experimental techniques and the final plastic transverse deflection of the tip as well as the final position of the plastic wave front were compared with the theoretical predictions of Spencer, Jones and their co-workers. The agreement was found to be very satisfactory. In making these comparisons strain rate effects in the lead-tin matrix metal had to be allowed for and this was done with the help of a separate set of tests.

  15. Observations, models, and mechanisms of failure of surface rocks surrounding planetary surface loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, R. A.; Zuber, M. T.

    1994-01-01

    Geophysical models of flexural stresses in an elastic lithosphere due to an axisymmetric surface load typically predict a transition with increased distance from the center of the load of radial thrust faults to strike-slip faults to concentric normal faults. These model predictions are in conflict with the absence of annular zones of strike-slip faults around prominent loads such as lunar maria, Martian volcanoes, and the Martian Tharsis rise. We suggest that this paradox arises from difficulties in relating failure criteria for brittle rocks to the stress models. Indications that model stresses are inappropriate for use in fault-type prediction include (1) tensile principal stresses larger than realistic values of rock tensile strength, and/or (2) stress differences significantly larger than those allowed by rock-strength criteria. Predictions of surface faulting that are consistent with observations can be obtained instead by using tensile and shear failure criteria, along with calculated stress differences and trajectories, with model stress states not greatly in excess of the maximum allowed by rock fracture criteria.

  16. Transverse cable stiffness and mechanical losses associated with load cycles in ITER Nb3Sn and NbTi CICCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijhuis, A.; Ilyin, Y.

    2009-05-01

    The flexible nature of the cable bundles in the sizeable cable-in-conduit-conductors for ITER containing more than a thousand strands, in combination with a void fraction of around 30%, gives scope for significant cable compression and strand deflection. In particular, the transverse stiffness of the Nb3Sn type of cabled superconductors, being subjected to large electromagnetic forces, is critical for their long-term performance considering the impact of the strain variation on the transport properties. What is more, the compression of the cable bundle under load and the permanent deformation and relaxation in time or that associated with quenches, have an effect on the cooling and pressure drop along the turns of the windings and are valuable to account for in large magnets such as for ITER. The electromagnetic AC losses of ITER Nb3Sn and NbTi CICCs, related to changing magnetic field and in this manner important for their stability, were broadly studied and reported but the associated mechanical losses have received less attention so far. The lifetime characteristics in terms of cable compression, changes in transverse stiffness and mechanical losses are experimentally determined on several prototype ITER NbTi and Nb3Sn conductors in the Twente press and a summary of the results is given. The nonlinear stress-strain characteristics of the cable bundle and its moderate time-dependent nature can be considered as a viscoelastic-plastic phenomenon. The evolution of the stiffness and the mechanical loss depends on the peak load, void fraction, strand type and strand coating and changes with the number of load cycles. The dissipated heat from mechanical energy is not a critical issue for ITER magnet operation but is not negligible, in particular in the case of NbTi conductors.

  17. Liver-derived IGF-I regulates cortical bone mass but is dispensable for the osteogenic response to mechanical loading in female mice.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Johan; Windahl, Sara H; Saxon, Leanne; Sjögren, Klara; Koskela, Antti; Tuukkanen, Juha; Ohlsson, Claes

    2016-07-01

    Low circulating IGF-I is associated with increased fracture risk. Conditional depletion of IGF-I produced in osteoblasts or osteocytes inhibits the bone anabolic effect of mechanical loading. Here, we determined the role of endocrine IGF-I for the osteogenic response to mechanical loading in young adult and old female mice with adult, liver-specific IGF-I inactivation (LI-IGF-I(-/-) mice, serum IGF-I reduced by ≈70%) and control mice. The right tibia was subjected to short periods of axial cyclic compressive loading three times/wk for 2 wk, and measurements were performed using microcomputed tomography and mechanical testing by three-point bending. In the nonloaded left tibia, the LI-IGF-I(-/-) mice had lower cortical bone area and increased cortical porosity, resulting in reduced bone mechanical strength compared with the controls. Mechanical loading induced a similar response in LI-IGF-I(-/-) and control mice in terms of cortical bone area and trabecular bone volume fraction. In fact, mechanical loading produced a more marked increase in cortical bone mechanical strength, which was associated with a less marked increase in cortical porosity, in the LI-IGF-I(-/-) mice compared with the control mice. In conclusion, liver-derived IGF-I regulates cortical bone mass, cortical porosity, and mechanical strength under normal (nonloaded) conditions. However, despite an ∼70% reduction in circulating IGF-I, the osteogenic response to mechanical loading was not attenuated in the LI-IGF-I(-/-) mice. PMID:27221117

  18. Superior Mechanical Properties of AlCoCrFeNiTi x High-Entropy Alloys upon Dynamic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Z. M.; Ma, S. G.; Chu, M. Y.; Yang, H. J.; Wang, Z. H.; Zhang, Y.; Qiao, J. W.

    2016-02-01

    High-entropy alloys with composition of AlCoCrFeNiTi x ( x: molar ratio; x = 0, 0.2, 0.4) under quasi-static and dynamic compression exhibit excellent mechanical properties. A positive strain-rate sensitivity of yield strength and the strong work-hardening behavior during plastic flows dominate upon dynamic loading in the present alloy system. The constitutive relationships are extracted to model flow behaviors by employing the Johnson-Cook constitutive model. Upon dynamic loading, the ultimate strength and fracture strain of AlCoCrFeNiTi x alloys are superior to most of bulk metallic glasses and in situ metallic glass matrix composites.

  19. Influence of Impact-Oscillatory Loading upon the Mechanical Properties of the VT-22 Titanium Alloy Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chausov, M. G.; Pylypenko, A. P.; Berezin, V. B.; Markashova, L. I.; Kushnariova, O. S.; Hutsaylyuk, V. B.

    2016-06-01

    This study shows the effect of the specific impact-oscillatory loading (Dynamical nonequilibrium process) on the VT-22 titanium α+β-type alloy mechanical properties and microstructure. Experiments were conducted using modified universal testing machine. Physical research revealed that significant microstructural refinement of the alloy is observed after such type of loading, as the result of which the fine grains are formed with subgrain refinement which takes place within the basis of alloy. It was found that overall plastic deformation of this alloy can be increased by a factor 2.75 compared with its initial state without significant loss of strength. Also we show that such process can be used as a preliminary microstructure refinement method for such alloy.

  20. Experimental characterization and constitutive modeling of the mechanical behavior of molybdenum under electromagnetically applied compression-shear ramp loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. S.; Ding, J. L.; Asay, J. R.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetically applied pressure-shear (MAPS) is a new experimental technique that provides a platform for direct measurement of material strength at extreme pressures. The technique employs an imposed quasi-static magnetic field and a pulsed power generator that produces an intense current on a planar driver panel, which in turn generates high amplitude magnetically induced longitudinal compression and transverse shear waves into a planar sample mounted on the drive panel. In order to apply sufficiently high shear traction to the test sample, a high strength material must be used for the drive panel. Molybdenum is a potential driver material for the MAPS experiment because of its high yield strength and sufficient electrical conductivity. To properly interpret the results and gain useful information from the experiments, it is critical to have a good understanding and a predictive capability of the mechanical response of the driver. In this work, the inelastic behavior of molybdenum under uniaxial compression and biaxial compression-shear ramp loading conditions is experimentally characterized. It is observed that an imposed uniaxial magnetic field ramped to approximately 10 T through a period of approximately 2500 μs and held near the peak for about 250 μs before being tested appears to anneal the molybdenum panel. In order to provide a physical basis for model development, a general theoretical framework that incorporates electromagnetic loading and the coupling between the imposed field and the inelasticity of molybdenum was developed. Based on this framework, a multi-axial continuum model for molybdenum under electromagnetic loading is presented. The model reasonably captures all of the material characteristics displayed by the experimental data obtained from various experimental configurations. In addition, data generated from shear loading provide invaluable information not only for validating but also for guiding the development of the material model for

  1. Experimental characterization and constitutive modeling of the mechanical behavior of molybdenum under electromagnetically applied compression-shear ramp loading

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alexander, C. Scott; Ding, Jow -Lian; Asay, James Russell

    2016-03-09

    Magnetically applied pressure-shear (MAPS) is a new experimental technique that provides a platform for direct measurement of material strength at extreme pressures. The technique employs an imposed quasi-static magnetic field and a pulsed power generator that produces an intense current on a planar driver panel, which in turn generates high amplitude magnetically induced longitudinal compression and transverse shear waves into a planar sample mounted on the drive panel. In order to apply sufficiently high shear traction to the test sample, a high strength material must be used for the drive panel. Molybdenum is a potential driver material for the MAPSmore » experiment because of its high yield strength and sufficient electrical conductivity. To properly interpret the results and gain useful information from the experiments, it is critical to have a good understanding and a predictive capability of the mechanical response of the driver. In this work, the inelastic behavior of molybdenum under uniaxial compression and biaxial compression-shear ramp loading conditions is experimentally characterized. It is observed that an imposed uniaxial magnetic field ramped to approximately 10 T through a period of approximately 2500 μs and held near the peak for about 250 μs before being tested appears to anneal the molybdenum panel. In order to provide a physical basis for model development, a general theoretical framework that incorporates electromagnetic loading and the coupling between the imposed field and the inelasticity of molybdenum was developed. Based on this framework, a multi-axial continuum model for molybdenum under electromagnetic loading is presented. The model reasonably captures all of the material characteristics displayed by the experimental data obtained from various experimental configurations. Additionally, data generated from shear loading provide invaluable information not only for validating but also for guiding the development of the material

  2. Mechanical Loading of Cartilage Explants with Compression and Sliding Motion Modulates Gene Expression of Lubricin and Catabolic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Marková, Michala; Torzilli, Peter A.; Gallo, Luigi M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Translation of the contact zone in articulating joints is an important component of joint kinematics, yet rarely investigated in a biological context. This study was designed to investigate how sliding contact areas affect cartilage mechanobiology. We hypothesized that higher sliding speeds would lead to increased extracellular matrix mechanical stress and the expression of catabolic genes. Design A cylindrical Teflon indenter was used to apply 50 or 100 N normal forces at 10, 40, or 70 mm/s sliding speed. Mechanical parameters were correlated with gene expressions using a multiple linear regression model. Results In both loading groups there was no significant effect of sliding speed on any of the mechanical parameters (strain, stress, modulus, tangential force). However, an increase in vertical force (from 50 to 100 N) led to a significant increase in extracellular matrix strain and stress. For 100 N, significant correlations between gene expression and mechanical parameters were found for TIMP-3 (r2 = 0.89), ADAMTS-5 (r2 = 0.73), and lubricin (r2 = 0.73). Conclusions The sliding speeds applied do not have an effect on the mechanical response of the cartilage, this could be explained by a partial attainment of the “elastic limit” at and above a sliding speed of 10 mm/s. Nevertheless, we still found a relationship between sliding speed and gene expression when the tissue was loaded with 100 N normal force. Thus despite the absence of speed-dependent mechanical changes (strain, stress, modulus, tangential force), the sliding speed had an influence on gene expression. PMID:26175864

  3. Anatomical and photosynthetic acclimation to the light environment in species with differing mechanisms of phloem loading

    PubMed Central

    Amiard, Véronique; Mueh, Kristine E.; Demmig-Adams, Barbara; Ebbert, Volker; Turgeon, Robert; Adams, William W.

    2005-01-01

    Plants load sugars from photosynthesizing leaves into the phloem of exporting veins either “apoplastically” (by using H+/sucrose symporters) or “symplastically” (through plasmodesmata). The ability to regulate photosynthesis in response to the light environment was compared among apoplastic loaders (pea and spinach) and symplastic loaders (pumpkin and Verbascum phoeniceum). Plants were grown under low light (LL) or high light (HL) or transferred from LL to HL. Upon transfer, pea and spinach up-regulated photosynthesis to the level found in HL-acclimated plants, whereas up-regulation in pumpkin and V. phoeniceum was limited. The vein density of pea and spinach was the same in HL and LL. Although spinach did not exhibit anatomical or ultrastructural acclimation to the light environment, in pea, wall invaginations in minor vein companion (transfer) cells were more extensive in HL. Furthermore, upon transfer from LL to HL, these invaginations increased in mature pea leaves. Foliar starch levels in mature leaves of plants transferred from LL to HL were not greater than in HL-acclimated leaves of either apoplastically loading species. In the symplastic loaders, plasmodesmatal frequency per loading cell did not vary with treatment, but vein density and thus total plasmodesmatal frequency were higher in HL. Upon transfer of symplastic loaders, however, vein density remained low, and starch levels were higher than in HL; the incomplete acclimation of photosynthesis upon transfer is thus consistent with a carbon export capacity physically limited by an inability to increase vein and plasmodesmatal density in a mature leaf. PMID:16120679

  4. Stress-intensity factors of r-cracks in fiber-reinforced composites under thermal and mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, W. H.; Schmauder, S.

    1993-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of the calculation of stress-intensity factors at the tips of radial matrix cracks (r-cracks) in fiber-reinforced composites under thermal and/or transverse uniaxial or biaxial mechanical loading. The crack is either located in the immediate vicinity of a single fiber or it terminates at the interface between the fiber and the matrix. The problem is stated and solved numerically within the framework of linear elasticity using Erdogan's integral equation technique. It is shown that the solutions for purely thermal and purely mechanical loading can simply be superimposed in order to obtain the results of the combined loading case. Stress-intensity factors (SIFs) are calculated for various lengths and distances of the crack from the interface for each of these loading conditions. The behavior of the SIFs for cracks growing towards or away from the interface is examined. The role of the elastic mismatch between the fibers and the matrix is emphasized and studied extensively using the so-called Dundurs' parameters. It is shown that an r-crack, which is remotely located from the fiber, can either be stabilized or destabilized depending on both the elastic as well as the thermal mismatch of the fibrous composite. Furthermore, Dundurs' parameters are used to predict the exponent of the singularity of the crack tip elastic field and the behavior of the corresponding SIFs for cracks which terminate at the interface. An analytical solution for the SIFs is derived for all three loading conditions under the assumption that the elastic constants of the matrix and the fiber are equal. It is shown that the analytical solution is in good agreement with the corresponding numerical results. Moreover, another analytical solution from the literature, which is based upon Paris' equation for the calculation of stress-intensity factors, is compared with the numerical results and it is shown to be valid only for extremely short r-cracks touching the

  5. Analysis of shell-type structures subjected to time-dependent mechanical and thermal loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simitses, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    This report deals with the development of a general mathematical model and solution methodology for analyzing the structural response of thin, metallic shell-like structures under dynamic and/or static thermomechanical loads. In the mathematical model, geometric as well as the material-type of nonlinearities are considered. Traditional as well as novel approaches are reported and detailed applications are presented in the appendices. The emphasis for the mathematical model, the related solution schemes, and the applications, is on thermal viscoelastic and viscoplastic phenomena, which can predict creep and ratchetting.

  6. Analysis of shell-type structures subjected to time-dependent mechanical and thermal loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simitses, George J.

    1990-01-01

    The development of a general mathematical model and solution methodologies for analyzing structural response of thin, metallic shell-like structures under dynamic and/or static thermomechanical loads is examined. In the mathematical model, geometric as well as material-type of nonlinearities are considered. Traditional as well as novel approaches are reported and detailed applications are presented in the appendices. The emphasis for the mathematical model, the related solution schemes, and the applications, is on thermal viscoelastic and viscoplastic phenomena, which can predict creep and ratchetting.

  7. A geometrically nonlinear analysis of interlaminar stresses in unsymmetrically laminated plates subjected to inplane mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norwood, D. Scott; Shuart, Mark J.; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1991-01-01

    The present analysis of interlaminar stresses in unsymmetrically laminates plates gives attention to the linear elastic large-deflection response of square laminated composite plates subjected to either uniaxial tension or compression loading. The effects of Poisson-ratio and mutual-influence coefficient mismatching between adjacent layers is evaluated in both cross-ply and angle-ply, and symmetric and asymmetric laminates. A global/local analysis procedure is used to obtain improved free-edge depictions; the results obtained indicate that the out-of-plane deflections of the unsymmetric laminates reduce interlaminar shear stresses, while reducing interlaminar normal stresses in some laminates and increasing them in others.

  8. ANISAP: A three-dimensional finite element program for laminated composites subjected to mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, S. W.; Mathison, S.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    ANISAP is a 3-D finite element FORTRAN 77 computer code for linear elastic, small strain, analysis of laminated composites with arbitrary geometry including free edges and holes. Individual layers may be isotropic or transversely isotropic in material principal coordinates; individual layers may be rotated off-axis about a global z-axis. The laminate may be a hybrid. Three different isoparametric elements, variable order of gaussian integration, calculation of stresses at element boundaries, and loading by either nodal displacement of forces are included in the program capability. Post processing capability includes failure analysis using the tensor polynominal failure criterion.

  9. Mechanical responses, texture evolution, and yield loci of extruded AZ31 magnesium alloy under various loading conditions: Experiment and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabirian, Farhoud

    Mechanical responses and texture evolution of extruded AZ31 Mg are measured under uniaxial (tension-compression) and multiaxial (free-end torsion) loadings. Compression loading is carried out in three different directions at temperature and strain rate ranges of 77-423 K and 10-4 -3000 s -1, respectively. Texture evolution at different intermediate strains reveals that crystal reorientation is exhausted at smaller strains with increase in strain rate while increase in temperature retards twinning. In addition to the well-known tension-compression yield asymmetry, a strong anisotropy in strain hardening response is observed. Strain hardening during the compression experiment is intensified with decreasing and increasing temperature and strain rate, respectively. This complex behavior is explained through understanding the roles of deformation mechanisms using the Visco-Plastic Self Consistent (VPSC) model. In order to calibrate the VPSC model's constants as accurate as possible, a vast number of mechanical responses including stress-strain curves in tension, compression in three directions, and free-end torsion, texture evolution at different strains, lateral strains of compression samples, twin volume fraction, and axial strain during the torsion experiment. Modeling results show that depending on the number of measurements used for calibration, roles of different mechanisms in plastic deformation change significantly. In addition, a precise definition of yield is established for the extruded AZ31magnesium alloy after it is subjected to different loading conditions (uniaxial to multiaxial) at four different plastic strains. The yield response is measured in ?-? space. Several yield criteria are studied to predict yield response of extruded AZ31. This study proposes an asymmetrical fourth-order polynomial yield function. Material constants in this model can be directly calculated using mechanical measurements. Convexity of the proposed model is discussed, and

  10. The Effects of Partial Mechanical Loading and Ibandronate on Skeletal Tissues in the Adult Rat Hindquarter Suspension Model for Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultheis, Lester W.

    1999-01-01

    applied to bone is mechanical, a process based upon bone strain. Substantial evidence indicates that the specifics of dynamic loading i.e. time-varying forces are critical. Bone strain history is a predictor of the effect that mechanical conditions have on bone structure mass and strength. Using servo-controlled force plates on suspended rats with implanted strain gauges we manipulated impact forces of ambulation in the frequency (Fourier) domain. Our results indicate that high frequency components of impact forces are particularly potent in producing bone strain independent of the magnitude of the peak force or peak energy applied to the leg. Because a servo-system responds to forces produced by the rat's own muscle activity during ambulation, the direction of ground-reaction loads act on bone through the rat's own musculature. This is in distinction to passive vibration of the floor where forces reach bone through the natural filters of soft tissue and joints. Passive vibration may also be effective, but it may or may not increase bone in the appropriate architectural pattern to oppose the forces of normal ambulatory activity. Effectiveness of high frequency mechanical stimulation in producing regional (muscle directed) bone response will be limited by 1. the sensitivity of bone to a particular range of frequencies and 2. the inertia of the muscles, limiting their response to external forces by increasing tension along insertions. We have begun mathematical modeling of normal ambulatory activity. Effectiveness of high frequency mechanical stimulation in producing regional (muscle directed) bone response will be limited by 1. the sensitivity of bone to a particular range of frequencies and 2. the inertia of the muscles, limiting their response to external forces by increasing tension along insertions. We have begun mathematical modeling of the rat forelimb as a transfer function between impact force and bone strain to predict optimal dynamic loading conditions for this

  11. Influence of Bond Coat Roughness on Life Time of APS Thermal Barrier Coating Systems under Thermo-Mechanical Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Andreas; Aleksanoglu, Herman; Mao, Tongsheng; Scholz, Alfred; Berger, Christina

    The influence of the bond coat roughness on the life time of air plasma-sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs) was investigated under thermo-mechanical (TMF) load. The TBC system was applied on hollow cylindrical specimens made of the single crystal super alloy CMSX-4 in the orientation <001> with a MCrAlY-bond coat. Two different values of the bond coat roughness were investigated. In order to study the influence of the thicknesses of the thermally grown oxide layer (TGO), the specimens were isothermally oxidized at 1000 °C for a long term prior to the TMF experiments. The thermo-mechanical experiments show a higher number of cycles-to-failure for TBCs corresponding to an increase of the bond coat roughness. Furthermore, it could be demonstrated that a certain TGO thickness is needed to produce a total delamination of the top coat in the TMF experiments. This minimum thickness varies with the surface roughness of the bond coat and the TMF cycle's phase shift and strain range. Crack initiation and crack propagation were investigated by microscopical analyses, for example, SEM and EDX. Therefore most of the experiments were completed before a total delamination of the top coat occurred. On the basis of these investigations, crack initiation and crack propagation under thermo-mechanical load were described systematically.

  12. Microwave emission from lead zirconate titanate induced by impulsive mechanical load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aman, A.; Majcherek, S.; Hirsch, S.; Schmidt, B.

    2015-10-01

    This paper focuses on microwave emission from Lead zirconate titanate Pb [ZrxTi1-x] O3 (PZT) induced by mechanical stressing. The mechanical stress was initiated by impact of a sharp tungsten indenter on the upper surface of PZT ceramic. The sequences of microwave and current impulses, which flew from indenter to electric ground, were detected simultaneously. The voltage between the upper and lower surface of ceramic was measured to obtain the behavior of mechanical force acting on ceramic during the impact. It was found that the amplitude, form, and frequency of measured microwave impulses were different by compression and restitution phase of impact. Two different mechanisms of electron emission, responsible for microwave impulse generation, were proposed based on the dissimilar impulse behavior. The field emission from tungsten indenter is dominant during compression, whereas ferroemission dominates during restitution phase. Indeed, it was observed that the direction of the current flow, i.e., sign of current impulses is changed by transitions from compression to restitution phase of impact. The observed dissimilar behavior of microwave impulses, caused by increasing and decreasing applied force, can be used to calculate the contact time and behavior of mechanical force during mechanical impact on ceramic surface. It is shown that the generation of microwave impulses exhibits high reproducibility, impulse intensity, a low damping factor, and high mechanical failure resistance. Based on these microwave emission properties of PZT, the development of new type of stress sensor with spatial resolution of few microns becomes possible.

  13. Diffusion and bulk flow in phloem loading: a theoretical analysis of the polymer trap mechanism for sugar transport in plants.

    PubMed

    Dölger, Julia; Rademaker, Hanna; Liesche, Johannes; Schulz, Alexander; Bohr, Tomas

    2014-10-01

    Plants create sugar in the mesophyll cells of their leaves by photosynthesis. This sugar, mostly sucrose, has to be loaded via the bundle sheath into the phloem vascular system (the sieve elements), where it is distributed to growing parts of the plant. We analyze the feasibility of a particular loading mechanism, active symplasmic loading, also called the polymer trap mechanism, where sucrose is transformed into heavier sugars, such as raffinose and stachyose, in the intermediary-type companion cells bordering the sieve elements in the minor veins of the phloem. Keeping the heavier sugars from diffusing back requires that the plasmodesmata connecting the bundle sheath with the intermediary cell act as extremely precise filters, which are able to distinguish between molecules that differ by less than 20% in size. In our modeling, we take into account the coupled water and sugar movement across the relevant interfaces, without explicitly considering the chemical reactions transforming the sucrose into the heavier sugars. Based on the available data for plasmodesmata geometry, sugar concentrations, and flux rates, we conclude that this mechanism can in principle function, but that it requires pores of molecular sizes. Comparing with the somewhat uncertain experimental values for sugar export rates, we expect the pores to be only 5%-10% larger than the hydraulic radius of the sucrose molecules. We find that the water flow through the plasmodesmata, which has not been quantified before, contributes only 10%-20% to the sucrose flux into the intermediary cells, while the main part is transported by diffusion. On the other hand, the subsequent sugar translocation into the sieve elements would very likely be carried predominantly by bulk water flow through the plasmodesmata. Thus, in contrast to apoplasmic loaders, all the necessary water for phloem translocation would be supplied in this way with no need for additional water uptake across the plasma membranes of the

  14. Diffusion and bulk flow in phloem loading: A theoretical analysis of the polymer trap mechanism for sugar transport in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dölger, Julia; Rademaker, Hanna; Liesche, Johannes; Schulz, Alexander; Bohr, Tomas

    2014-10-01

    Plants create sugar in the mesophyll cells of their leaves by photosynthesis. This sugar, mostly sucrose, has to be loaded via the bundle sheath into the phloem vascular system (the sieve elements), where it is distributed to growing parts of the plant. We analyze the feasibility of a particular loading mechanism, active symplasmic loading, also called the polymer trap mechanism, where sucrose is transformed into heavier sugars, such as raffinose and stachyose, in the intermediary-type companion cells bordering the sieve elements in the minor veins of the phloem. Keeping the heavier sugars from diffusing back requires that the plasmodesmata connecting the bundle sheath with the intermediary cell act as extremely precise filters, which are able to distinguish between molecules that differ by less than 20% in size. In our modeling, we take into account the coupled water and sugar movement across the relevant interfaces, without explicitly considering the chemical reactions transforming the sucrose into the heavier sugars. Based on the available data for plasmodesmata geometry, sugar concentrations, and flux rates, we conclude that this mechanism can in principle function, but that it requires pores of molecular sizes. Comparing with the somewhat uncertain experimental values for sugar export rates, we expect the pores to be only 5%-10% larger than the hydraulic radius of the sucrose molecules. We find that the water flow through the plasmodesmata, which has not been quantified before, contributes only 10%-20% to the sucrose flux into the intermediary cells, while the main part is transported by diffusion. On the other hand, the subsequent sugar translocation into the sieve elements would very likely be carried predominantly by bulk water flow through the plasmodesmata. Thus, in contrast to apoplasmic loaders, all the necessary water for phloem translocation would be supplied in this way with no need for additional water uptake across the plasma membranes of the

  15. Dynamic Creep Buckling: Analysis of Shell Structures Subjected to Time-dependent Mechanical and Thermal Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simitses, G. J.; Carlson, R. L.; Riff, R.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the present research is to develop a general mathematical model and solution methodologies for analyzing the structural response of thin, metallic shell structures under large transient, cyclic, or static thermomechanical loads. Among the system responses associated with these loads and conditions are thermal buckling, creep buckling, and ratcheting. Thus geometric and material nonlinearities (of high order) can be anticipated and must be considered in developing the mathematical model. A complete, true ab-initio rate theory of kinematics and kinetics for continuum and curved thin structures, without any restriction on the magnitude of the strains or the deformations, was formulated. The time dependence and large strain behavior are incorporated through the introduction of the time rates of metric and curvature in two coordinate systems: fixed (spatial) and convected (material). The relations between the time derivative and the covariant derivative (gradient) were developed for curved space and motion, so the velocity components supply the connection between the equations of motion and the time rates of change of the metric and curvature tensors.

  16. Validation of two accelerometers to determine mechanical loading of physical activities in children.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Ursina; Ernst, Dominique; Schott, Silvia; Riera, Claudia; Hattendorf, Jan; Romkes, Jacqueline; Granacher, Urs; Göpfert, Beat; Kriemler, Susi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of accelerometers using force plates (i.e., ground reaction force (GRF)) during the performance of different tasks of daily physical activity in children. Thirteen children (10.1 (range 5.4-15.7) years, 3 girls) wore two accelerometers (ActiGraph GT3X+ (ACT), GENEA (GEN)) at the hip that provide raw acceleration signals at 100 Hz. Participants completed different tasks (walking, jogging, running, landings from boxes of different height, rope skipping, dancing) on a force plate. GRF was collected for one step per trial (10 trials) for ambulatory movements and for all landings (10 trials), rope skips and dance procedures. Accelerometer outputs as peak loading (g) per activity were averaged. ANOVA, correlation analyses and Bland-Altman plots were computed to determine validity of accelerometers using GRF. There was a main effect of task with increasing acceleration values in tasks with increasing locomotion speed and landing height (P < 0.001). Data from ACT and GEN correlated with GRF (r = 0.90 and 0.89, respectively) and between each other (r = 0.98), but both accelerometers consistently overestimated GRF. The new generation of accelerometer models that allow raw signal detection are reasonably accurate to measure impact loading of bone in children, although they systematically overestimate GRF. PMID:25620031

  17. Compression creep rupture of an E-glass/vinyl ester composite subjected to combined mechanical and fire loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Steven Earl

    Polymer matrix composites are seeing increasing use in structural systems (e.g. ships, bridges) and require a quantitative basis for describing their performance under combined mechanical load and fire. Although much work has been performed to characterize the flammability, fire resistance and toxicity of these composite systems, an understanding of the structural response of sandwich type structures and laminate panels under combined mechanical and thermal loads (simulating fire conditions) is still largely unavailable. Therefore a research effort to develop a model to describe the structural response of these glass/vinyl esters systems under fire loading conditions is relevant to the continuing and future application of polymer matrix composites aboard naval ships. The main goal of the effort presented here is to develop analytical models and finite element analysis methods and tools to predict limit states such as local compression failures due to micro-buckling, residual strength and times to failure for composite laminates at temperatures in the vicinity of the glass transition where failure is controlled by viscoelastic effects. Given the importance of compression loading to a structure subject to fire exposure, the goals of this work are succinctly stated as the: (a) Characterization of the non-linear viscoelastic and viscoplastic response of the E-glass/vinyl ester composite above Tg. (b) Description of the laminate compression mechanics as a function of stress and temperature including viscoelasticity. (c) Viscoelastic stress analysis of a laminated panel ([0/+45/90/-45/0] S) using classical lamination theory (CLT). Three manuscripts constitute this dissertation which is representative of the three steps listed above. First, a detailed characterization of the nonlinear thermoviscoelastic response of Vetrotex 324/Derakane 510A--40 through Tg was conducted using the Time--Temperature--Stress--Superposition Principle (TTSSP) and Zapas--Crissman model. Second

  18. Impact of Mechanized Farming on the Heavy Metals Load of an Ultisol Located in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebong, G. A.; Etuk, H. S.; Essien, J. P.

    Top soil samples from a mechanized farm located in Awot Uta, Akwa Ibom State in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria were analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometer for their Cr; Cd; Fe; Cu; Zn and Pb concentrations. Top soil samples were also collected from a local farm situated close to the study area and analyzed for their metal contents. The following mean concentrations were observed in the mechanized farm: 0.343±0.200 mg kg-1 for Cr; 0.012±0.006 mg kg-1 for Cd; 0.959±8.814 mg kg-1 for Fe; 0.031± 0.011 mg kg-1 for Cu; 0.169±0.041 mg kg-1 for Zn and 0.010±0.005 mg kg-1 for Pb. While the local farm recorded the following concentrations: 0.115±0.005 mg kg-1 for Cr; 0.001±0.001 mg kg-1 for Cd; 22.115±3.351 mg kg-1 for Fe; 0.015±0.004 mg kg-1 for Cu; 0.098±0.008 mg kg-1 for Zn and 0.001±0.001 mg kg-1 for Pb. Generally, the metal levels obtained in the mechanized farm were higher than their corresponding levels in the local farm. Although the metals loads were within the recommended standards for agricultural soils, the elevated loads obtained from the mechanized farmland is of serious health implications because of the attendant metals effects on the food chain. Coefficient of variations were also calculated for the metal concentrations in the mechanized farm and results obtained indicated Cr as having the highest CV value (58%) while Fe had the lowest (22%).

  19. Achieving reversibility of ultra-high mechanical stress by hydrogen loading of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, M.; Burlaka, V.; Wagner, S.; Pundt, A.

    2015-06-01

    Nano-materials are commonly stabilized by supports to maintain their desired shape and size. When these nano-materials take up interstitial atoms, this attachment to the support induces mechanical stresses. These stresses can be high when the support is rigid. High stress in the nano-material is typically released by delamination from the support or by the generation of defects, e.g., dislocations. As high mechanical stress can be beneficial for tuning the nano-materials properties, it is of general interest to deduce how real high mechanical stress can be gained. Here, we show that below a threshold nano-material size, dislocation formation can be completely suppressed and, when delamination is inhibited, even the ultrahigh stress values of the linear elastic limit can be reached. Specifically, for hydrogen solved in epitaxial niobium films on sapphire substrate supports a threshold film thickness of 6 nm was found and mechanical stress of up to (-10 ± 1) GPa was reached. This finding is of basic interest for hydrogen energy applications, as the hydride stability in metals itself is affected by mechanical stress. Thus, tuning of the mechanical stress-state in nano-materials may lead to improved storage properties of nano-sized materials.

  20. Achieving reversibility of ultra-high mechanical stress by hydrogen loading of thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, M.; Burlaka, V.; Wagner, S.; Pundt, A.

    2015-06-15

    Nano-materials are commonly stabilized by supports to maintain their desired shape and size. When these nano-materials take up interstitial atoms, this attachment to the support induces mechanical stresses. These stresses can be high when the support is rigid. High stress in the nano-material is typically released by delamination from the support or by the generation of defects, e.g., dislocations. As high mechanical stress can be beneficial for tuning the nano-materials properties, it is of general interest to deduce how real high mechanical stress can be gained. Here, we show that below a threshold nano-material size, dislocation formation can be completely suppressed and, when delamination is inhibited, even the ultrahigh stress values of the linear elastic limit can be reached. Specifically, for hydrogen solved in epitaxial niobium films on sapphire substrate supports a threshold film thickness of 6 nm was found and mechanical stress of up to (−10 ± 1) GPa was reached. This finding is of basic interest for hydrogen energy applications, as the hydride stability in metals itself is affected by mechanical stress. Thus, tuning of the mechanical stress-state in nano-materials may lead to improved storage properties of nano-sized materials.

  1. Fracture Mechanics of Thin, Cracked Plates Under Tension, Bending and Out-of-Plane Shear Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zehnder, Alan T.; Hui, C. Y.; Potdar, Yogesh; Zucchini, Alberto

    1999-01-01

    Cracks in the skin of aircraft fuselages or other shell structures can be subjected to very complex stress states, resulting in mixed-mode fracture conditions. For example, a crack running along a stringer in a pressurized fuselage will be subject to the usual in-plane tension stresses (Mode-I) along with out-of-plane tearing stresses (Mode-III like). Crack growth and initiation in this case is correlated not only with the tensile or Mode-I stress intensity factor, K(sub I), but depends on a combination of parameters and on the history of crack growth. The stresses at the tip of a crack in a plate or shell are typically described in terms of either the small deflection Kirchhoff plate theory. However, real applications involve large deflections. We show, using the von-Karman theory, that the crack tip stress field derived on the basis of the small deflection theory is still valid for large deflections. We then give examples demonstrating the exact calculation of energy release rates and stress intensity factors for cracked plates loaded to large deflections. The crack tip fields calculated using the plate theories are an approximation to the actual three dimensional fields. Using three dimensional finite element analyses we have explored the relationship between the three dimensional elasticity theory and two dimensional plate theory results. The results show that for out-of-plane shear loading the three dimensional and Kirchhoff theory results coincide at distance greater than h/2 from the crack tip, where h/2 is the plate thickness. Inside this region, the distribution of stresses through the thickness can be very different from the plate theory predictions. We have also explored how the energy release rate varies as a function of crack length to plate thickness using the different theories. This is important in the implementation of fracture prediction methods using finite element analysis. Our experiments show that under certain conditions, during fatigue crack

  2. Increased Expression of Matrix Extracellular Phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) in Cortical Bone of the Rat Tibia after Mechanical Loading: Identification by Oligonucleotide Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Reijnders, Christianne M. A.; van Essen, Huib W.; van Rens, Birgitte T. T. M.; van Beek, Johannes H. G. M.; Ylstra, Bauke; Blankenstein, Marinus A.; Lips, Paul; Bravenboer, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal integrity in humans and animals is maintained by daily mechanical loading. It has been widely accepted that osteocytes function as mechanosensors. Many biochemical signaling molecules are involved in the response of osteocytes to mechanical stimulation. The aim of this study was to identify genes involved in the translation of mechanical stimuli into bone formation. The four-point bending model was used to induce a single period of mechanical loading on the right tibia, while the contra lateral left tibia served as control. Six hours after loading, the effects of mechanical loading on gene-expression were determined with microarray analysis. Protein expression of differentially regulated genes was evaluated with immunohistochemistry. Nine genes were found to exhibit a significant differential gene expression in LOAD compared to control. MEPE, Garnl1, V2R2B, and QFG-TN1 olfactory receptor were up-regulated, and creatine kinase (muscle form), fibrinogen-B beta-polypeptide, monoamine oxidase A, troponin-C and kinesin light chain-C were down-regulated. Validation with real-time RT-PCR analysis confirmed the up-regulation of MEPE and the down-regulation of creatine kinase (muscle form) and troponin-C in the loaded tibia. Immunohistochemistry showed that the increase of MEPE protein expression was already detectable six hours after mechanical loading. In conclusion, these genes probably play a role during translation of mechanical stimuli six hours after mechanical loading. The modulation of MEPE expression may indicate a connection between bone mineralization and bone formation after mechanical stimulation. PMID:24255709

  3. Microwave emission from lead zirconate titanate induced by impulsive mechanical load

    SciTech Connect

    Aman, A.; Majcherek, S.; Hirsch, S.; Schmidt, B.

    2015-10-28

    This paper focuses on microwave emission from Lead zirconate titanate Pb [Zr{sub x}Ti{sub 1−x}] O{sub 3} (PZT) induced by mechanical stressing. The mechanical stress was initiated by impact of a sharp tungsten indenter on the upper surface of PZT ceramic. The sequences of microwave and current impulses, which flew from indenter to electric ground, were detected simultaneously. The voltage between the upper and lower surface of ceramic was measured to obtain the behavior of mechanical force acting on ceramic during the impact. It was found that the amplitude, form, and frequency of measured microwave impulses were different by compression and restitution phase of impact. Two different mechanisms of electron emission, responsible for microwave impulse generation, were proposed based on the dissimilar impulse behavior. The field emission from tungsten indenter is dominant during compression, whereas ferroemission dominates during restitution phase. Indeed, it was observed that the direction of the current flow, i.e., sign of current impulses is changed by transitions from compression to restitution phase of impact. The observed dissimilar behavior of microwave impulses, caused by increasing and decreasing applied force, can be used to calculate the contact time and behavior of mechanical force during mechanical impact on ceramic surface. It is shown that the generation of microwave impulses exhibits high reproducibility, impulse intensity, a low damping factor, and high mechanical failure resistance. Based on these microwave emission properties of PZT, the development of new type of stress sensor with spatial resolution of few microns becomes possible.

  4. Rockslides in Masada: thermally induced "ratchet" mechanism vs. response to seismic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakun-Mazor, D.; Hatzor, Y. H.

    2012-04-01

    Annual temperature fluctuations are responsible for generating irreversible displacements of removable rock blocks that are separated from the rock mass by the intersections of pre-existing discontinuities in the rock mass. A new mechanism, referred to as "ratchet" model, is proposed to explain how cyclic thermal oscillations induce intermittent expansion and contraction of the tension crack, thus causing seasonal translations of rock blocks. New evidence for thermally induced block displacements is presented using both climate and displacement data from a carefully monitored rock block in the West face of the Masada Mountain, a UNESCO World Heritage site, along with re-visited and re-analyzed monitoring data from the East face of mountain. The monitored deformation is explained here in terms of a weather-induced wedging failure that essentially operates as a "ratchet" mechanism involving the rock mass, tension crack, sliding block, and sliding surface. In order to validate the proposed mechanism the discrete element, numerical Discontinuous Deformation Analysis (DDA) method is employed to analyze the proposed "ratchet" model and to simulate the monitored block displacements in the field. The numerical analysis results provide a comparison between the thermal and the seismic driving mechanisms for a mapped block in the East slope of Masada, which climatically is situated in the Eastern part of the arid Judean Desert, and seismically is located on the western margins of the Dead Sea rift (DSR) valley. Based on the long-term climatic conditions and the seismic hazard assessment for the region, including topographical site effect on the mountain top, it is found that the thermal effect is the more dominant mechanism that drives the displacement of the analyzed block over time. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of the "ratchet" model, and identifying its potential in the field, can help mitigate rock slope stability risks in rock masses that are prone to such a

  5. The mechanical behavior of extruded powder aluminum subjected to biaxial loadings at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, T.O.; Berghaus, D.G.; Peacock, H.B.

    1990-12-31

    The goal of this investigation is to develop a description of the biaxial behavior of extruded powder aluminum at elevated temperature. Specimens made of extruded 101 ALCOA (Aluminum Company of America) powder aluminum and specimens made from 1100 commercial aluminum rod are tested biaxially in tension-torsion and compression-torsion loadings at the extrusion temperature. The powder aluminum is examined microscopically and stereological methods are used to give a quantified description of the material behavior in terms of changes in the laminar powder material structure. A model for the biaxial (tension-torsion) behavior of extruded powder aluminum is developed. This description is consistent with a previous analysis of behavior in pure tension.

  6. The mechanical behavior of extruded powder aluminum subjected to biaxial loadings at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, T.O.; Berghaus, D.G. ); Peacock, H.B. )

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this investigation is to develop a description of the biaxial behavior of extruded powder aluminum at elevated temperature. Specimens made of extruded 101 ALCOA (Aluminum Company of America) powder aluminum and specimens made from 1100 commercial aluminum rod are tested biaxially in tension-torsion and compression-torsion loadings at the extrusion temperature. The powder aluminum is examined microscopically and stereological methods are used to give a quantified description of the material behavior in terms of changes in the laminar powder material structure. A model for the biaxial (tension-torsion) behavior of extruded powder aluminum is developed. This description is consistent with a previous analysis of behavior in pure tension.

  7. Dynamic response of a tunable phononic crystal under applied mechanical and magnetic loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, Alireza; Gordaninejad, Faramarz

    2015-06-01

    The dynamic response of a tunable phononic crystal consisting of a porous hyperelastic magnetoelastic elastomer subjected to a macroscopic deformation and an external magnetic field is theoretically investigated. Finite deformations and magnetic induction influence phononic characteristics of the periodic structure through geometrical pattern transformation and material properties. A magnetoelastic energy function is proposed to develop constitutive laws considering large deformations and magnetic induction in the periodic structure. Analytical and finite element methods are utilized to compute the dispersion relation and band structure of the phononic crystal for different cases of deformation and magnetic loadings. It is demonstrated that magnetic induction not only controls the band diagram of the structure but also has a strong effect on preferential directions of wave propagation.

  8. High-Tip-Speed, Low-Loading Transonic Fan Stage. Part 1: Aerodynamic and Mechanical Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, L. C.; Vitale, N. G.; Ware, T. C.; Erwin, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    A high-tip-speed, low-loading transonic fan stage was designed to deliver an overall pressure ratio of 1.5 with an adiabatic efficiency of 86 percent. The design flow per unit annulus area is 42.0 pounds per square foot. The fan features a hub/tip ratio of 0.46, a tip diameter of 28.74 in. and operates at a design tip speed of 1600 fps. For these design conditions, the rotor blade tip region operates with supersonic inlet and supersonic discharge relative velocities. A sophisticated quasi-three-dimensional characteristic section design procedure was used for the all-supersonic sections and the inlet of the midspan transonic sections. For regions where the relative outlet velocities are supersonic, the blade operates with weak oblique shocks only.

  9. On the mechanical characterization and modeling of polymer gel brain substitute under dynamic rotational loading.

    PubMed

    Fontenier, B; Hault-Dubrulle, A; Drazetic, P; Fontaine, C; Naceur, H

    2016-10-01

    The use of highly sensitive soft materials has become increasingly apparent in the last few years in numerous industrial fields, due to their viscous and damping nature. Unfortunately these materials remain difficult to characterize using conventional techniques, mainly because of the very low internal forces supported by these materials especially under high strain-rates of deformation. The aim of this work is to investigate the dynamic response of a polymer gel brain analog material under specific rotational-impact experiments. The selected polymer gel commercially known as Sylgard 527 has been studied using a specific procedure for its experimental characterization and numerical modeling. At first an indentation experiment was conducted at several loading rates to study the strain rate sensitivity of the Sylgard 527 gel. During the unloading several relaxation tests were performed after indentation, to assess the viscous behavior of the material. A specific numerical procedure based on moving least square approximation and response surface method was then performed to determine adequate robust material parameters of the Sylgard 527 gel. A sensitivity analysis was assessed to confirm the robustness of the obtained material parameters. For the validation of the obtained material model, a second experiment was conducted using a dynamic rotational loading apparatus. It consists of a metallic cylindrical cup filled with the polymer gel and subjected to an eccentric transient rotational impact. Complete kinematics of the cup and the large strains induced in the Sylgard 527 gel, have been recorded at several patterns by means of optical measurement. The whole apparatus was modeled by the Finite Element Method using explicit dynamic time integration available within Ls-dyna(®) software. Comparison between the physical and the numerical models of the Sylgard 527 gel behavior under rotational choc shows excellent agreements. PMID:27341290

  10. Role of loads and prosthesis material properties on the mechanics of the proximal femur after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Cheal, E J; Spector, M; Hayes, W C

    1992-05-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the role of loads and prosthesis material properties on the mechanics of the proximal femur after total hip arthroplasty. We developed a three-dimensional finite element model of an intact human femur and the same femur with a conventional collared straight-stem femoral component. Using published data, we defined two sets of loading conditions: one that represented three phases of gait, and one that represented four different extreme loads. The four extreme loads were based on the peak joint contact forces that occur during stair ascent and isometric contraction of various muscle groups. The model was analyzed with three different material properties for the prosthesis, including cobalt-chromium alloy, titanium alloy, and a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminate. We assumed that the implant was stable, with rigid bonding, collar contact, and no cement. To address femoral component loosening, we examined the shear stresses at the implant-bone interface; to address adaptive bone remodeling, we examined the principal stresses in the supporting cortical bone relative to those in the intact femur. Our analyses of the various loading conditions demonstrated large out-of-plane bending movements and torsional moments, especially for the load representing stair ascent. Based on stepwise multiple regressions, the maximum shear stresses at the implant-bone interface in the distal region were dependent on the total applied axial force and torsion; the maximum shear stresses in the proximal region were dependent on the axial component of the joint contact force alone. Reduction in the prosthesis stiffness, by substitution of the CFRP material properties, resulted in lower interface shear stresses at the distal end of the stem and higher interface shear stresses at the more proximal sections, consistent with the findings of others. We fit equations, based on composite beam theory, to the maximum implant-bone interface shear

  11. Development and Validation of a Bioreactor System for Dynamic Loading and Mechanical Characterization of Whole Human Intervertebral Discs in Organ Culture

    PubMed Central

    Walter, BA; Illien-Junger, S; Nasser, P; Hecht, AC; Iatridis, JC

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is a common cause of back pain, and attempts to develop therapies are frustrated by lack of model systems that mimic the human condition. Human IVD organ culture models can address this gap, yet current models are limited since vertebral endplates are removed to maintain cell viability, physiological loading is not applied, and mechanical behaviors are not measured. This study aimed to (i) establish a method for isolating human IVDs from autopsy with intact vertebral endplates, and (ii) develop and validate an organ culture loading system for human or bovine IVDs. Human IVDs with intact endplates were isolated from cadavers within 48 hours of death and cultured for up to 21 days. IVDs remained viable with ~80% cell viability in nucleus and annulus regions. A dynamic loading system was designed and built with the capacity to culture 9 bovine or 6 human IVDs simultaneously while applying simulated physiologic loads (maximum force: 4kN) and measuring IVD mechanical behaviors. The loading system accurately applied dynamic loading regimes (RMS error <2.5N and total harmonic distortion <2.45%), and precisely evaluated mechanical behavior of rubber and bovine IVDs. Bovine IVDs maintained their mechanical behavior and retained >85% viable cells throughout the 3 week culture period. This organ culture loading system can closely mimic physiological conditions and be used to investigate response of living human and bovine IVDs to mechanical and chemical challenges and to screen therapeutic repair techniques. PMID:24725441

  12. Work-in-progress presented at the Army symposium on solid mechanics, 1980, designing for extremes: Environment, loading, and structural behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-09-01

    Work-in-Progress was presented at the Army Symposium on solid Mechanics, 1980. Designing for Extremes: Environment, Loading, and Structural Behavior, held at Bass River (Cape Cod), Massachusetts, 29 September through 2 October 1980 were presented.

  13. The influence of preset frequency, loading condition, and exercise type on the mechanical behavior of a novel vibratory bar.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Jiménez, Sergio; Benitez, Adolfo; García González, Miguel A; Feliu, Gerard M; Maffiuletti, Nicola A

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to analyze the influence of different vibration frequencies, loading conditions, and exercise types on the mechanical behavior of a novel vibratory bar (VB). Fourteen healthy men were asked to hold the VB during lying row (pulling) and bench press (pushing) static exercise as steadily as possible for 10 seconds with loads of 20, 50, and 80% of the maximum sustained load (MSL) and at preset vibration frequencies (f(in)) of 20, 35, and 50 Hz. Root mean square vibration acceleration (a(RMS)), peak-to-peak displacement (D), and frequency (f(out)) were gained from a 3-dimensional accelerometer fixed to the VB. Increasing vibration frequency (from 20 to 50 Hz) resulted in a progressive and sizeable increase in VB a(RMS) and f(out) (both p ≤ 0.001) with smaller variations of D (≤5.9%, p ≤ 0.001). Adding weight to the VB (progressive overload from 20 to 80% MSL) did not affect D and minimally altered a(RMS) (<4.2%, p = 0.014) and f(out) (<1.7%, p = 0.002). Altering the type of exercise (pulling vs. pushing) did not affect VB a(RMS), D, and f(out). In conclusion, this study establishes the validity of a novel VB and legitimates its use for effective and safe upper-body static exercise with a wide range of vibration frequencies and loading conditions in the context of physical training or rehabilitation. PMID:23838974

  14. Characterisation of the Mechanical Loads and Metabolic Intensity of the CAPO Kids Exercise Intervention for Healthy Primary School Children

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Rossana C.; Weeks, Benjamin K.; Beck, Belinda R.

    2015-01-01

    Sedentarism is associated with obesity and other chronic diseases at all ages. Increasing physical activity with in-school interventions, focusing on energy expenditure and bone loading reduces risk of a number of costly chronic diseases. The aim of the current study was to characterise the metabolic and musculoskeletal load intensity of the recent successful CAPO Kids exercise intervention. Pre and early pubertal children (10.4 ± 0.5 years old) from the CAPO Kids trial wore an armband sensor to estimate energy expenditure during a 10-minute CAPO Kids session. Eleven participants performed manoeuvres from the session on a force platform to determine vertical ground reaction forces. In total, 28 boys and 20 girls had armband measures and 11 boys and girls undertook GRF testing. The energy expenditure associated with the 10-minute session was 39.7 ± 9.3 kcal, with an average of 4 kcal·min-1. The intensity of physical activity was ‘vigorous’ to ‘very vigorous’ for 34% of the session. Vertical ground reaction forces of the CAPO Kids manoeuvres ranged from 1.3 ± 0.2 BW (cartwheels) to 5.4 ± 2.3 BW (360° jump). CAPO Kids generates adequate load intensity to stimulate positive health adaptations in both metabolic and musculoskeletal systems of pre and early pubertal children. Key points Energy expenditure of a single bout of CAPO Kids yields 39.7±9.3 kcal and includes activities performed at a vigorous and very vigorous intensity. Mechanical loads associated with CAPO Kids surpass five times bodyweight and more than 140 bodyweights per second. CAPO Kids intervention represents a viable approach to stimulate musculoskeletal and metabolic adaptation in children. PMID:26336343

  15. Characterisation of the Mechanical Loads and Metabolic Intensity of the CAPO Kids Exercise Intervention for Healthy Primary School Children.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Rossana C; Weeks, Benjamin K; Beck, Belinda R

    2015-09-01

    Sedentarism is associated with obesity and other chronic diseases at all ages. Increasing physical activity with in-school interventions, focusing on energy expenditure and bone loading reduces risk of a number of costly chronic diseases. The aim of the current study was to characterise the metabolic and musculoskeletal load intensity of the recent successful CAPO Kids exercise intervention. Pre and early pubertal children (10.4 ± 0.5 years old) from the CAPO Kids trial wore an armband sensor to estimate energy expenditure during a 10-minute CAPO Kids session. Eleven participants performed manoeuvres from the session on a force platform to determine vertical ground reaction forces. In total, 28 boys and 20 girls had armband measures and 11 boys and girls undertook GRF testing. The energy expenditure associated with the 10-minute session was 39.7 ± 9.3 kcal, with an average of 4 kcal·min-1. The intensity of physical activity was 'vigorous' to 'very vigorous' for 34% of the session. Vertical ground reaction forces of the CAPO Kids manoeuvres ranged from 1.3 ± 0.2 BW (cartwheels) to 5.4 ± 2.3 BW (360° jump). CAPO Kids generates adequate load intensity to stimulate positive health adaptations in both metabolic and musculoskeletal systems of pre and early pubertal children. Key pointsEnergy expenditure of a single bout of CAPO Kids yields 39.7±9.3 kcal and includes activities performed at a vigorous and very vigorous intensity.Mechanical loads associated with CAPO Kids surpass five times bodyweight and more than 140 bodyweights per second.CAPO Kids intervention represents a viable approach to stimulate musculoskeletal and metabolic adaptation in children. PMID:26336343

  16. On the mechanical modeling of the extreme softening/stiffening response of axially loaded tensegrity prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraternali, Fernando; Carpentieri, Gerardo; Amendola, Ada

    2015-01-01

    We study the geometrically nonlinear behavior of uniformly compressed tensegrity prisms through fully elastic and rigid-elastic models. The given models predict a variety of mechanical behaviors in the regime of large displacements, including an extreme stiffening-type response, already known in the literature, and a newly discovered, extreme softening behavior. The latter may lead to a snap buckling event producing an axial collapse of the structure. The switching from one mechanical regime to another depends on the aspect ratio of the structure, the magnitude of the applied prestress, and the material properties of the constituent elements. We discuss potential mechanical and acoustic applications of such behaviors, which are related to the design and manufacture of tensegrity lattices and innovative metamaterials.

  17. Anti-glioma activity and the mechanism of cellular uptake of asiatic acid-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Garanti, Tanem; Stasik, Aneta; Burrow, Andrea Julie; Alhnan, Mohamed A; Wan, Ka-Wai

    2016-03-16

    Asiatic acid (AA), a pentacyclic triterpene found in Centella Asiatica, has shown neuroprotective and anti-cancer activity against glioma. However, owing to its poor aqueous solubility, effective delivery and absorption across biological barriers, in particular the blood brain barrier (BBB), are challenging. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have shown a promising potential as a drug delivery system to carry lipophilic drugs across the BBB, a major obstacle in brain cancer therapy. Nevertheless, limited information is available about the cytotoxic mechanisms of nano-lipidic carriers with AA on normal and glioma cells. This study assessed the anti-cancer efficacy of AA-loaded SLNs against glioblastoma and their cellular uptake mechanism in comparison with SVG P12 (human foetal glial) cells. SLNs were systematically investigated for three different solid lipids; glyceryl monostearate (MS), glyceryl distearate (DS) and glyceryl tristearate (TS). The non-drug containing MS-SLNs (E-MS-SLNs) did not show any apparent toxicity towards normal SVG P12 cells, whilst the AA-loaded MS-SLNs (AA-MS-SLNs) displayed a more favourable drug release profile and higher cytotoxicity towards U87 MG cells. Therefore, MS-SLNs were chosen for further in vitro studies. Cytotoxicity studies of SLNs (± AA) were performed using MTT assay where AA-SLNs showed significantly higher cytotoxicity towards U87 MG cells than SVG P12 normal cells, as confirmed by flow cell cytometry. Cellular uptake of SLNs also appeared to be preferentially facilitated by energy-dependent endocytosis as evidenced by fluorescence imaging and flow cell cytometry. Using the Annexin V-PI double staining technique, it was found that these AA-MS-SLNs displayed concentration-dependent apoptotic activity on glioma cells, which further confirms the potential of exploiting these AA-loaded MS-SLNs for brain cancer therapy. PMID:26775062

  18. Effects of load-bearing exercise on skeletal structure and mechanics differ between outbred populations of mice.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Ian J; Judex, Stefan; Demes, Brigitte

    2015-03-01

    Effects of load-bearing exercise on skeletal structure and mechanical properties can vary between inbred strains of mice. Here, we examine whether such variation also exists at the population level. An experiment was performed with two outbred mouse stocks that have been reproductively isolated for >120 generations (Hsd:ICR, Crl:CD1). Growing females from each stock were either treated with a treadmill-running regimen for 1 month or served as controls. Limb forces were recorded with a force plate and cage activity monitored to verify that they were similar between stocks. After the experiment, femoral cortical and trabecular bone structure were quantified with micro-CT in the mid-diaphysis and distal metaphysis, respectively, and diaphyseal structural strength was determined with mechanical testing. Among Hsd:ICR mice, running led to significant improvements in diaphyseal bone quantity, structural geometry, and mechanical properties, as well as enhanced trabecular morphology. In contrast, among Crl:CD1 mice, the same running regimen had little effect on cortical and trabecular structure and significantly reduced diaphyseal resistance to fracture. In neither stock was body mass, muscle mass, or cage activity level different between runners and controls. Given that most environmental variables were controlled in this study, the differential effects of exercise on Hsd:ICR and Crl:CD1 bones were likely due to genetic differences between stocks. These results suggest that the benefits of loading for bone may vary between human populations (e.g., ethnic groups), in which case exercise programs and technologies designed to promote bone health with mechanical signals may be more advantageous to certain populations than others. PMID:25460574

  19. The mechanisms of plastic strain accommodation and post critical behavior of heterogeneous reactive composites subject to dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olney, Karl L.

    The dynamic behavior of granular/porous and laminate reactive materials is of interest due to their practical applications; reactive structural components, reactive fragments, etc. The mesostructural properties control meso- and macro-scale dynamic behavior of these heterogeneous composites including the behavior during the post-critical stage of deformation. They heavily influence mechanisms of fragment generation and the in situ development of local hot spots, which act as sites of ignition in these materials. This dissertation concentrates on understanding the mechanisms of plastic strain accommodation in two representative reactive material systems with different heterogeneous mesostructrues: Aluminum-Tungsten granular/porous and Nickel-Aluminum laminate composites. The main focus is on the interpretation of results of the following dynamic experiments conducted at different strain and strain rates: drop weight tests, explosively expanded ring experiments, and explosively collapsed thick walled cylinder experiments. Due to the natural limitations in the evaluation of the mesoscale behavior of these materials experimentally and the large variation in the size scales between the mesostructural level and the sample, it is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to examine the mesoscale behavior in situ. Therefore, numerical simulations of the corresponding experiments are used as the main tool to explore material behavior at the mesoscale. Numerical models were developed to elucidate the mechanisms of plastic strain accommodation and post critical behavior in these heterogeneous composites subjected to dynamic loading. These simulations were able to reproduce the qualitative and quantitative features that were observable in the experiments and provided insight into the evolution of the mechanisms of plastic strain accommodation and post critical behavior in these materials with complex mesotructure. Additionally, these simulations provided a framework to examine

  20. Effect of load, area of contact, and contact stress on the wear mechanisms of a bonded solid lubricant film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    A pin on disk type of friction and wear apparatus was used to study the effect of load, contact stress and rider area of contact on the friction and wear properties of polyimide bonded graphite fluoride films. Different rider area contacts were obtained by initially generating flats (with areas of 0.0035, 0.0071, 0.0145, and 0.0240 cm) on 0.476-cm radius hemispherically tipped riders. Different projected contact stresses were obtained by applying loads of 2.5- to 58.8-N to the flats. Two film wear mechanisms were observed. The first was found to be a linear function of contact stress and was independent of rider area of contact. The second was found to increase exponentially as the stress increased. The second also appeared to be a function of rider contact area. Wear equations for each mechanism were empirically derived from the experimental data. In general, friction coefficients increased with increasing rider contact area and with sliding duration. This was related to the build up of thick rider transfer films.

  1. Modeling of Nonlinear Mechanical Behavior for 3D Needled C/C-SiC Composites Under Tensile Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Junbo; Fang, Guodong; Chen, Zhen; Liang, Jun

    2016-04-01

    This paper established a macroscopic constitutive model to describe the nonlinear stress-strain behavior of 3D needled C/C-SiC composites under tensile load. Extensive on- and off-axis tensile tests were performed to investigate the macroscopic mechanical behavior and damage characteristics of the composites. The nonlinear mechanical behavior of the material was mainly induced by matrix tensile cracking and fiber/matrix debonding. Permanent deformations and secant modulus degradation were observed in cyclic loading-unloading tests. The nonlinear stress-strain relationship of the material could be described macroscopically by plasticity deformation and stiffness degradation. In the proposed model, we employed a plasticity theory with associated plastic flow rule to describe the evolution of plastic strains. A novel damage variable was also introduced to characterize the stiffness degradation of the material. The damage evolution law was derived from the statistical distribution of material strength. Parameters of the proposed model can be determined from off-axis tensile tests. Stress-strain curves predicted by this model showed reasonable agreement with experimental results.

  2. Modeling of Nonlinear Mechanical Behavior for 3D Needled C/C-SiC Composites Under Tensile Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Junbo; Fang, Guodong; Chen, Zhen; Liang, Jun

    2016-08-01

    This paper established a macroscopic constitutive model to describe the nonlinear stress-strain behavior of 3D needled C/C-SiC composites under tensile load. Extensive on- and off-axis tensile tests were performed to investigate the macroscopic mechanical behavior and damage characteristics of the composites. The nonlinear mechanical behavior of the material was mainly induced by matrix tensile cracking and fiber/matrix debonding. Permanent deformations and secant modulus degradation were observed in cyclic loading-unloading tests. The nonlinear stress-strain relationship of the material could be described macroscopically by plasticity deformation and stiffness degradation. In the proposed model, we employed a plasticity theory with associated plastic flow rule to describe the evolution of plastic strains. A novel damage variable was also introduced to characterize the stiffness degradation of the material. The damage evolution law was derived from the statistical distribution of material strength. Parameters of the proposed model can be determined from off-axis tensile tests. Stress-strain curves predicted by this model showed reasonable agreement with experimental results.

  3. PECVD silicon-rich nitride and low stress nitride films mechanical characterization using membrane point load deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagolini, Alvise; Picciotto, Antonino; Crivellari, Michele; Conci, Paolo; Bellutti, Pierluigi

    2016-02-01

    An analysis of the mechanical properties of plasma enhanced chemical vapor (PECVD) silicon nitrides is presented, using micro fabricated silicon nitride membranes under point load deflection. The membranes are made of PECVD silicon-rich nitride and low stress nitride films. The mechanical performance of the bended membranes is examined both with analytical models and finite element simulation in order to extract the elastic modulus and residual stress values. The elastic modulus of low stress silicon nitride is calculated using stress free analytical models, while for silicon-rich silicon nitride and annealed low stress silicon nitride it is estimated with a pre-stressed model of point-load deflection. The effect of annealing both in nitrogen and hydrogen atmosphere is evaluated in terms of residual stress, refractive index and thickness variation. It is demonstrated that a hydrogen rich annealing atmosphere induces very little change in low stress silicon nitride. Nitrogen annealing effects are measured and shown to be much higher in silicon-rich nitride than in low stress silicon nitride. An estimate of PECVD silicon-rich nitride elastic modulus is obtained in the range between 240-320 GPa for deposited samples and 390 GPa for samples annealed in nitrogen atmosphere. PECVD low stress silicon nitride elastic modulus is estimated to be 88 GPa as deposited and 320 GPa after nitrogen annealing.

  4. Deformation Microstructures and Creep Mechanisms in Advanced ZR-Based Cladding Under Biazal Loading

    SciTech Connect

    K. Linga Murty

    2008-08-11

    Investigate creep behavior of Zr-based cladding tubes with attention to basic creep mechanisms and transitions in them at low stresses and/or temperatures and study the dislocation microstructures of deformed samples for correlation with the underlying micromechanism of creep

  5. Friction Stir Weld Failure Mechanisms in Aluminum-Armor Structures Under Ballistic Impact Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Pandurangan, B.; Arakere, A.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2013-01-01

    A critical assessment is carried out of the microstructural changes in respect of the associated reductions in material mechanical properties and of the attendant ballistic-impact failure mechanisms in prototypical friction stir welding (FSW) joints found in armor structures made of high-performance aluminum alloys (including solution-strengthened and age-hardenable aluminum alloy grades). It is argued that due to the large width of FSW joints found in thick aluminum-armor weldments, the overall ballistic performance of the armor is controlled by the ballistic limits of its weld zones (e.g., heat-affected zone, the thermomechanically affected zone, the nugget, etc.). Thus, in order to assess the overall ballistic survivability of an armor weldment, one must predict/identify welding-induced changes in the material microstructure and properties, and the operative failure mechanisms in different regions of the weld. Toward this end, a procedure is proposed in the present study which combines the results of the FSW process modeling, basic physical-metallurgy principles concerning microstructure/property relations, and the fracture mechanics concepts related to the key blast/ballistic-impact failure modes. The utility of this procedure is demonstrated using the case of a solid-solution strengthened and cold-worked aluminum alloy armor FSW-weld test structure.

  6. Mode interaction in stiffened composite shells under combined mechanical and thermal loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, Srinivasan

    1992-01-01

    Stiffened shells of various configurations fabricated out of composite materials find extensive applications in aircraft structures. Two distinctive modes of buckling dominate structural response of stiffened panels, viz. the short-wave local mode in which the shell skin buckles essentially between the stiffeners and the long-wave overall mode in which the shell skin buckles carrying the stiffeners with it. In optimized designs, the critical stresses corresponding to these modes of buckling would be close to each other. This leads to a nonlinear mode interaction which is recognized to be the principal cause of the failure of stiffened structures. If the structure is subjected to through-the-thickness thermal gradients, then large-wave bending effects would begin to occur well below the overall critical load and these would play the role of overall imperfections. The load carrying capacity would be significantly diminished as a result of interaction of local buckling with overall thermal distortions. The analysis of this problem using standard finite element techniques can be shown to be prohibitively expensive for design iterations. A concept which would greatly facilitate the analysis of mode interaction is advanced. We note that the local buckling occurs in a more or less periodic pattern in a structure having regular spacings of stiffeners. Thus it is a relatively simple matter to analyze the local buckling and the second order effects (which are essential for modeling postbuckling phenomena) using a unit cell of the structure. Once analyzed, these dormations are embedded in a shell element. Thus, a shell element could span several half-waves of local buckling and still be able to depict local buckling effects with requisite accuracy. A major consequence of the interaction of overall buckling/bending is the slow variation of the local buckling amplitude across the structure - the phenomenon of 'amplitude modulation' - and this is accounted for in the present

  7. The Effects of Partial Mechanical Loading and Ibandronate on Skeletal Tissues in the Adult Rat Hindquarter Suspension Model for Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultheis, Lester W.

    1999-01-01

    applied to bone is mechanical, a process based upon bone strain. Substantial evidence indicates that the specifics of dynamic loading i.e. time-varying forces are critical. Bone strain history is a predictor of the effect that mechanical conditions have on bone structure mass and strength. Using servo-controlled force plates on suspended rats with implanted strain gauges we manipulated impact forces of ambulation in the frequency (Fourier) domain. Our results indicate that high frequency components of impact forces are particularly potent in producing bone strain independent of the magnitude of the peak force or peak energy applied to the leg. Because a servo-system responds to forces produced by the rat's own muscle activity during ambulation, the direction of ground-reaction loads act on bone through the rat's own musculature. This is in distinction to passive vibration of the floor where forces reach bone through the natural filters of soft tissue and joints. Passive vibration may also be effective, but it may or may not increase bone in the appropriate architectural pattern to oppose the forces of normal ambulatory activity. Effectiveness of high frequency mechanical stimulation in producing regional (muscle directed) bone response will be limited by 1. the sensitivity of bone to a particular range of frequencies and 2. the inertia of the muscles, limiting their response to external forces by increasing tension along insertions. We have begun mathematical modeling of normal ambulatory activity. Effectiveness of high frequency mechanical stimulation in producing regional (muscle directed) bone response will be limited by 1. the sensitivity of bone to a particular range of frequencies and 2. the inertia of the muscles, limiting their response to external forces by increasing tension along insertions. We have begun mathematical modeling of the rat forelimb as a transfer function between impact force and bone strain to predict optimal dynamic loading conditions for this

  8. Mechanical Properties of Lead-Free Solder Joints Under High-Speed Shear Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Van Luong; Kim, Ho-Kyung

    2014-09-01

    In this study we expanded on recently reported research by using a modified miniature Charpy impact-testing system to investigate the shear deformation behavior of Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu lead-free solder joints at high strain rates ranging from 1.1 × 103 s-1 to 5.5 × 103 s-1. The experimental results revealed that the maximum shear strength of the solder joint decreased with increasing load speed in the ranges tested in this study. For solder joints tested at a shear speed exceeding 1 m/s, corresponding to an approximate strain rate that exceeds 1950 s-1, the brittle fracture mode is the main failure mode, whereas lower strain rates result in a ductile-to-brittle transition in the fracture surfaces of solder joints. In addition, the mode II stress intensity factor (K II) used to evaluate the fracture toughness (K C) of an interfacial intermetallic compound layer between Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu solder and the toughness of copper substrate was found to decrease from 1.63 MPa m0.5 to 0.97 MPa m0.5 in the speed range tested here.

  9. Mechanical Properties of Lead-Free Solder Joints Under High-Speed Shear Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Van Luong; Kim, Ho-Kyung

    2014-11-01

    In this study we expanded on recently reported research by using a modified miniature Charpy impact-testing system to investigate the shear deformation behavior of Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu lead-free solder joints at high strain rates ranging from 1.1 × 103 s-1 to 5.5 × 103 s-1. The experimental results revealed that the maximum shear strength of the solder joint decreased with increasing load speed in the ranges tested in this study. For solder joints tested at a shear speed exceeding 1 m/s, corresponding to an approximate strain rate that exceeds 1950 s-1, the brittle fracture mode is the main failure mode, whereas lower strain rates result in a ductile-to-brittle transition in the fracture surfaces of solder joints. In addition, the mode II stress intensity factor ( K II) used to evaluate the fracture toughness ( K C) of an interfacial intermetallic compound layer between Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu solder and the toughness of copper substrate was found to decrease from 1.63 MPa m0.5 to 0.97 MPa m0.5 in the speed range tested here.

  10. SMC condensin entraps chromosomal DNA by an ATP hydrolysis dependent loading mechanism in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Larissa; Bürmann, Frank; Minnen, Anita; Shin, Ho-Chul; Toseland, Christopher P; Oh, Byung-Ha; Gruber, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Smc–ScpAB forms elongated, annular structures that promote chromosome segregation, presumably by compacting and resolving sister DNA molecules. The mechanistic basis for its action, however, is only poorly understood. Here, we have established a physical assay to determine whether the binding of condensin to native chromosomes in Bacillus subtilis involves entrapment of DNA by the Smc–ScpAB ring. To do so, we have chemically cross-linked the three ring interfaces in Smc–ScpAB and thereafter isolated intact chromosomes under protein denaturing conditions. Exclusively species of Smc–ScpA, which were previously cross-linked into covalent rings, remained associated with chromosomal DNA. DNA entrapment is abolished by mutations that interfere with the Smc ATPase cycle and strongly reduced when the recruitment factor ParB is deleted, implying that most Smc–ScpAB is loaded onto the chromosome at parS sites near the replication origin. We furthermore report a physical interaction between native Smc–ScpAB and chromosomal DNA fragments. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06659.001 PMID:25951515

  11. Experimental study of the mechanical behaviour of pin reinforced foam core sandwich materials under shear load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimassi, M. A.; Brauner, C.; Herrmann, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Sandwich structures with a lightweight closed cell hard foam core have the potential to be used in primary structures of commercial aircrafts. Compared to honeycomb core sandwich, the closed cell foam core sandwich overcomes the issue of moisture take up and makes the manufacturing of low priced and highly integrated structures possible. However, lightweight foam core sandwich materials are prone to failure by localised external loads like low velocity impacts. Invisible cracks could grow in the foam core and threaten the integrity of the structure. In order to enhance the out-of-plane properties of foam core sandwich structures and to improve the damage tolerance (DT) dry fibre bundles are inserted in the foam core. The pins are infused with resin and co-cured with the dry fabric face sheets in an out-of-autoclave process. This study presents the results obtained from shear tests following DIN 53294-standard, on flat sandwich panels. All panels were manufactured with pin-reinforcement manufactured with the Tied Foam Core Technology (TFC) developed by Airbus. The effects of pin material (CFRP and GFRP) and pin volume fraction on the shear properties of the sandwich structure and the crack propagation were investigated and compared to a not pinned reference. It has been concluded that the pin volume fraction has a remarkable effect on the shear properties and damage tolerance of the observed structure. Increasing the pin volume fraction makes the effect of crack redirection more obvious and conserves the integrity of the structure after crack occurrence.

  12. Mechanical strength of sutured block copolymers films for load bearing medical applications.

    PubMed

    Stasiak, Joanna; Nair, Sukumaran; Moggridge, Geoff D

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of three styrenic thermoplastic block copolymer elastomers with applied surgical sutures was studied by uniaxial tensile testing. The materials exhibited oriented cylindrical microstructure. Distinct macroscopic deformation mechanisms have been observed upon stretching of samples with vertical and horizontal orientation. Deformation progressed along the axis of the suture in samples with parallel orientation (P), while it in case of normal orientation (N) the whole sample responded to the applied force. Also the analysis of the stress-strain curves showed a significant difference between samples P and N. Greater stress at break was observed for samples P, while samples N showed the capability to tolerate higher strain. The influence of morphology on the tear-out shape has been also observed. The thread made a vertical tear out in samples P while for samples N ripping off the bottom was observed. PMID:24211940

  13. Complete catalytic cycle of cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase involves a spring-loaded mechanism.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, Amlan; Kundu, Anirban; Bose, Madhuparna; Gujar, Akanksha; Mukherjee, Somnath; Das, Amit Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase (iPGM), an important enzyme in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, catalyses the isomerization of 2- and 3-phosphoglycerates by an Mn(2+)-dependent phospho-transfer mechanism via a phospho-enzyme intermediate. Crystal structures of bi-domain iPGM from Staphylococcus aureus, together with substrate-bound forms, have revealed a new conformation of the enzyme, representing an intermediate state of domain movement. The substrate-binding site and the catalytic site are present in two distinct domains in the intermediate form. X-ray crystallography complemented by simulated dynamics has enabled delineation of the complete catalytic cycle, which includes binding of the substrate, followed by its positioning into the catalytic site, phospho-transfer and finally product release. The present work describes a novel mechanism of domain movement controlled by a hydrophobic patch that is exposed on domain closure and acts like a spring to keep the protein in open conformation. Domain closing occurs after substrate binding, and is essential for phospho-transfer, whereas the open conformation is a prerequisite for efficient substrate binding and product dissociation. A new model of catalysis has been proposed by correlating the hinge-bending motion with the phospho-transfer mechanism. PMID:25611430

  14. Substrate stiffness and oxygen availability as regulators of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation within a mechanically loaded bone chamber.

    PubMed

    Burke, Darren Paul; Khayyeri, Hanifeh; Kelly, Daniel John

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stimuli such as tissue deformation and fluid flow are often implicated as regulators of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation during regenerative events in vivo. However, in vitro studies have identified several other physical and biochemical environmental cues, such as substrate stiffness and oxygen availability, as key regulators of stem cell fate. Hypotheses for how MSC differentiation is regulated in vivo can be either corroborated or rejected based on the ability of in silico models to accurately predict spatial and temporal patterns of tissue differentiation observed experimentally. The goal of this study was to employ a previously developed computational framework to test the hypothesis that substrate stiffness and oxygen availability regulate stem cell differentiation during tissue regeneration within an implanted bone chamber. To enable a prediction of the oxygen levels within the bone chamber, a lattice model of angiogenesis was implemented where blood vessel progression was dependent on the local mechanical environment. The model successfully predicted key aspects of MSC differentiation, including the correct spatial development of bone, marrow and fibrous tissue within the unloaded bone chamber. The model also successfully predicted chondrogenesis within the chamber upon the application of mechanical loading. This study provides further support for the hypothesis that substrate stiffness and oxygen availability regulate stem cell differentiation in vivo. These simulations also highlight the indirect role that mechanics may play in regulating MSC fate by inhibiting blood vessel progression and hence disrupting oxygen availability within regenerating tissues. PMID:24832965

  15. Mechanical effects of surgical procedures on osteochondral grafts elucidated by osmotic loading and real-time ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Osteochondral grafts have become popular for treating small, isolated and full-thickness cartilage lesions. It is recommended that a slightly oversized, rather than an exact-sized, osteochondral plug is transplanted to achieve a tight fit. Consequently, impacting forces are required to insert the osteochondral plug into the recipient site. However, it remains controversial whether these impacting forces affect the biomechanical condition of the grafted articular cartilage. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanical effects of osteochondral plug implantation using osmotic loading and real-time ultrasound. Methods A full-thickness cylindrical osteochondral defect (diameter, 3.5 mm; depth, 5 mm) was created in the lateral lower quarter of the patella. Using graft-harvesting instruments, an osteochondral plug (diameter, 3.5 mm as exact-size or 4.5 mm as oversize; depth, 5 mm) was harvested from the lateral upper quarter of the patella and transplanted into the defect. Intact patella was used as a control. The samples were monitored by real-time ultrasound during sequential changes of the bathing solution from 0.15 M to 2 M saline (shrinkage phase) and back to 0.15 M saline (swelling phase). For cartilage sample assessment, three indices were selected, namely the change in amplitude from the cartilage surface (amplitude recovery rate: ARR) and the maximum echo shifts from the cartilage surface and the cartilage-bone interface. Results The ARR is closely related to the cartilage surface integrity, while the echo shifts from the cartilage surface and the cartilage-bone interface are closely related to tissue deformation and NaCl diffusion, respectively. The ARR values of the oversized plugs were significantly lower than those of the control and exact-sized plugs. Regarding the maximum echo shifts from the cartilage surface and the cartilage-bone interface, no significant differences were observed among the three groups. Conclusions These findings

  16. Some growth factors stimulate cultured adult rabbit ventricular myocyte hypertrophy in the absence of mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R. S.; Cook, M. G.; Behnke-Barclay, M.; Decker, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    Cultured adult rabbit cardiac myocytes treated with recombinant growth factors display enhanced rates of protein accumulation (ie, growth) in response to insulin and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), but epidermal growth factor, acidic or basic fibroblast growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor failed to increase contractile protein synthesis or growth of the heart cells. Insulin and IGF-1 increased growth rates by stimulating anabolic while simultaneously inhibiting catabolic pathways, whereas IGF-2 elevated growth modestly by apparently inhibiting lysosomal proteolysis. Neutralizing antibodies directed against either IGF-1 or IGF-2 or IGF binding protein 3 blocked protein accumulation. A monoclonal antibody directed against the IGF-1 receptor also inhibited changes in protein turnover provoked by recombinant human IGF-1 but not IGF-2. Of the other growth factors tested, only transforming growth factor-beta 1 increased the fractional rate of myosin heavy chain (MHC) synthesis, with beta-MHC synthesis being elevated and alpha-MHC synthesis being suppressed. However, the other growth factors were able to modestly stimulate the rate of DNA synthesis in this preparation. Bromodeoxyuridine labeling revealed that these growth factors increased DNA synthesis in myocytes and nonmyocytes alike, but the heart cells displayed neither karyokinesis or cytokinesis. In contrast, cocultures of cardiac myocytes and nonmyocytes and nonmyocyte-conditioned culture medium failed to enhance the rate of cardiac MHC synthesis or its accumulation, implying that quiescent heart cells do not respond to "conditioning" by cardiac nonmyocytes. These findings demonstrated that insulin and the IGFs promote passively loaded cultured adult rabbit heart cells to hypertrophy but suggest that other growth factors tested may be limited in this regard.

  17. A hypothesis on the mechanism of trauma of lung tissue subjected to impact load.

    PubMed

    Fung, Y C; Yen, R T; Tao, Z L; Liu, S Q

    1988-02-01

    When a compressive impact load is applied on the chest, as in automobile crash or bomb explosion, the lung may be injured and show evidences of edema and hemorrhage. Since soft tissues have good strength in compression, why does a compression wave cause edema? Our hypothesis is that tensile and shear stresses are induced in the alveolar wall on rebound from compression, and that the maximum principal stress (tensile) may exceed critical values for increased permeability of the epithelium to small solutes, or even fracture. Furthermore, small airways may collapse and trap gas in alveoli at a critical strain, causing traumatic atelectasis. The collapsed airways reopen at a higher strain after the wave passes, during which the expansion of the trapped gas will induce additional tension in the alveolar wall. To test this hypothesis, we made three new experiments: (1), measuring the effect of transient overstretch of the alveolar membrane on the rate of lung weight increase; (2) determining the critical pressure for reopening collapsed airways of rabbit lung subjected to cyclic compression and expansion; (3) cyclic compression of lung with trachea closed. We found that in isolated rabbit lung overstretching increases the rate of edema fluid formation, that the critical strain for airway reopening is higher than that for closing, and that these critical strains are strain-rate dependent, but independent of the state of the trachea, whether it is open or closed. Furthermore, a theoretical analysis is presented to show that the maximum principal (tensile) stress is of the same order of magnitude as the maximum initial compressive stress at certain localities of the lung.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3279269

  18. Region-dependent aggrecan degradation patterns in the rat intervertebral disc are affected by mechanical loading in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Iatridis, James C.; Godburn, Karolyn; Wuertz, Karin; Alini, Mauro; Roughley, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Structured Abstract Study Design Immunoblotting study to evaluate aggrecan degradation patterns in rat intervertebral discs(IVDs) subjected to mechanical overload. Objective To evaluate the effects of in vivo dynamic compression overloading on aggrecan degradation products associated with matrix metalloproteinase(MMP) and aggrecanase activity in different regions of the IVD. Summary of Background Data Aggrecan cleavage at the MMP and aggrecanase sites are important events in human IVD aging, with distinct cleavage patterns in the annulus and nucleus regions. No such information is available on regional variations in rat IVDs, nor on how such cleavage is affected by mechanical loading. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were instrumented with an Ilizarov-type device and subjected to dynamic compression (1 MPa and 1 Hz for 8 hours per day for 8 weeks). Control, sham, and overloaded IVDs were separated by disc region and analyzed for aggrecan degradation products using immunoblotting techniques with antibodies specific for the aggrecanase and MMP cleavage sites in the interglobular domain of aggrecan. Results Control IVDs exhibited strong regional variation in aggrecan degradation patterns with minimal degradation products being present in the nucleus pulposus(NP), degradation products associated with aggrecanase cleavage predominating in the inner annulus fibrosus(AF), and degradation products associated with MMP cleavage predominating in the outer annulus fibrosus. Dynamic compression overloading increased the amount of aggrecan degradation products associated with MMP cleavage particularly in the AF but also in the NP. Degradation profiles of sham IVDs were similar to control. Conclusions Aggrecan G1 regions resulting from proteolysis were found to have a strong regionally-specific pattern in the rat IVD, which was altered under excessive loading. The shift from aggrecanase to MMP-induced degradation products with dynamic compression overloading suggests that protein

  19. Cargo-shell and cargo-cargo couplings govern the mechanics of artificially loaded virus-derived cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llauró, Aida; Luque, Daniel; Edwards, Ethan; Trus, Benes L.; Avera, John; Reguera, David; Douglas, Trevor; Pablo, Pedro J. De; Castón, José R.

    2016-04-01

    Nucleic acids are the natural cargo of viruses and key determinants that affect viral shell stability. In some cases the genome structurally reinforces the shell, whereas in others genome packaging causes internal pressure that can induce destabilization. Although it is possible to pack heterologous cargoes inside virus-derived shells, little is known about the physical determinants of these artificial nanocontainers' stability. Atomic force and three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy provided mechanical and structural information about the physical mechanisms of viral cage stabilization beyond the mere presence/absence of cargos. We analyzed the effects of cargo-shell and cargo-cargo interactions on shell stability after encapsulating two types of proteinaceous payloads. While bound cargo to the inner capsid surface mechanically reinforced the capsid in a structural manner, unbound cargo diffusing freely within the shell cavity pressurized the cages up to ~30 atm due to steric effects. Strong cargo-cargo coupling reduces the resilience of these nanocompartments in ~20% when bound to the shell. Understanding the stability of artificially loaded nanocages will help to design more robust and durable molecular nanocontainers.Nucleic acids are the natural cargo of viruses and key determinants that affect viral shell stability. In some cases the genome structurally reinforces the shell, whereas in others genome packaging causes internal pressure that can induce destabilization. Although it is possible to pack heterologous cargoes inside virus-derived shells, little is known about the physical determinants of these artificial nanocontainers' stability. Atomic force and three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy provided mechanical and structural information about the physical mechanisms of viral cage stabilization beyond the mere presence/absence of cargos. We analyzed the effects of cargo-shell and cargo-cargo interactions on shell stability after encapsulating two

  20. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) Pathway Is Induced by Mechanical Load and Reduces the Activity of Hedgehog Signaling in Chondrogenic Micromass Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Juhász, Tamás; Szentléleky, Eszter; Szűcs Somogyi, Csilla; Takács, Roland; Dobrosi, Nóra; Engler, Máté; Tamás, Andrea; Reglődi, Dóra; Zákány, Róza

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neurohormone exerting protective function during various stress conditions either in mature or developing tissues. Previously we proved the presence of PACAP signaling elements in chicken limb bud-derived chondrogenic cells in micromass cell cultures. Since no data can be found if PACAP signaling is playing any role during mechanical stress in any tissues, we aimed to investigate its contribution in mechanotransduction during chondrogenesis. Expressions of the mRNAs of PACAP and its major receptor, PAC1 increased, while that of other receptors, VPAC1, VPAC2 decreased upon mechanical stimulus. Mechanical load enhanced the expression of collagen type X, a marker of hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and PACAP addition attenuated this elevation. Moreover, exogenous PACAP also prevented the mechanical load evoked activation of hedgehog signaling: protein levels of Sonic and Indian Hedgehogs and Gli1 transcription factor were lowered while expressions of Gli2 and Gli3 were elevated by PACAP application during mechanical load. Our results suggest that mechanical load activates PACAP signaling and exogenous PACAP acts against the hypertrophy inducing effect of mechanical load. PMID:26230691

  1. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) Pathway Is Induced by Mechanical Load and Reduces the Activity of Hedgehog Signaling in Chondrogenic Micromass Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Juhász, Tamás; Szentléleky, Eszter; Somogyi, Csilla Szűcs; Takács, Roland; Dobrosi, Nóra; Engler, Máté; Tamás, Andrea; Reglődi, Dóra; Zákány, Róza

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neurohormone exerting protective function during various stress conditions either in mature or developing tissues. Previously we proved the presence of PACAP signaling elements in chicken limb bud-derived chondrogenic cells in micromass cell cultures. Since no data can be found if PACAP signaling is playing any role during mechanical stress in any tissues, we aimed to investigate its contribution in mechanotransduction during chondrogenesis. Expressions of the mRNAs of PACAP and its major receptor, PAC1 increased, while that of other receptors, VPAC1, VPAC2 decreased upon mechanical stimulus. Mechanical load enhanced the expression of collagen type X, a marker of hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and PACAP addition attenuated this elevation. Moreover, exogenous PACAP also prevented the mechanical load evoked activation of hedgehog signaling: protein levels of Sonic and Indian Hedgehogs and Gli1 transcription factor were lowered while expressions of Gli2 and Gli3 were elevated by PACAP application during mechanical load. Our results suggest that mechanical load activates PACAP signaling and exogenous PACAP acts against the hypertrophy inducing effect of mechanical load. PMID:26230691

  2. Fracture mechanics analyses of ceramic/veneer interface under mixed-mode loading.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaoqi; Zhang, Song; Bian, Cuirong; Kong, Hui

    2014-11-01

    Few studies have focused on the interface fracture performance of zirconia/veneer bilayered structure, which plays an important role in dental all-ceramic restorations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture mechanics performance of zirconia/veneer interface in a wide range of mode-mixities (at phase angles ranging from 0° to 90°), and to examine the effect of mechanical properties of the materials and the interface on the fracture initiation and crack path of an interfacial crack. A modified sandwich test configuration with an oblique interfacial crack was proposed and calibrated to choose the appropriate geometry dimensions by means of finite element analysis. The specimens with different interface inclination angles were tested to failure under three-point bending configuration. Interface fracture parameters were obtained with finite element analyses. Based on the interfacial fracture mechanics, three fracture criteria for crack kinking were used to predict crack initiation and propagation. In addition, the effects of residual stresses due to coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between zirconia and veneer on the crack behavior were evaluated. The crack initiation and propagation were well predicted by the three fracture criteria. For specimens at phase angle of 0, the cracks propagated in the interface; whereas for all the other specimens the cracks kinked into the veneer. Compressive residual stresses in the veneer can improve the toughness of the interface structure. The results suggest that, in zirconia/veneer bilayered structure the veneer is weaker than the interface, which can be used to explain the clinical phenomenon that veneer chipping rate is larger than interface delamination rate. Consequently, a veneer material with larger fracture toughness is needed to decrease the failure rate of all-ceramic restorations. And the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch of the substrates can be larger to produce larger compressive

  3. Multi-scale structural and tensile mechanical response of annulus fibrosus to osmotic loading.

    PubMed

    Han, Woojin M; Nerurkar, Nandan L; Smith, Lachlan J; Jacobs, Nathan T; Mauck, Robert L; Elliott, Dawn M

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates differential multi-scale structure and function relationships of the outer and inner annulus fibrosus (AF) to osmotic swelling in different buffer solutions by quantifying tensile mechanics, glycoasamino-glycan(GAG) content, water content and tissue swelling, and collagen fibril ultrastructure. In the outer AF, the tensile modulus decreased by over 70% with 0.15 M PBS treatment but was unchanged with 2 M PBS treatment. Moreover, the modulus loss following 0.15 M PBS treatment was reversed when followed by 2 M PBS treatment, potentially from increased interfibrillar and interlamellar shearing associated with fibril swelling. In contrast, the inner AF tensile modulus was unchanged by 0.15 M PBS treatment and increased following 2 M treatment. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the mean collagen fibril diameters of the untreated outer and inner AF were 87.8 ± 27.9 and 71.0 ± 26.9 nm, respectively. In the outer AF, collagen fibril swelling was observed with both 0.15 M and 2 M PBS treatments, but inherently low GAG content remained unchanged. In the inner AF, 2 M PBS treatment caused fibril swelling and GAG loss, suggesting that GAG plays a role in maintaining the structure of collagen fibrils leading to modulation of the native tissue mechanical properties. These results demonstrate important regional variations in structure and composition, and their influence on the heterogeneous mechanics of the AF. Moreover, because the composition and structure is altered as a consequence of progressive disk degeneration, quantification of these interactions is critical for study of the AF pathogenesis of degeneration and tissue engineering PMID:22314837

  4. Multi-scale Structural and Tensile Mechanical Response of Annulus Fibrosus to Osmotic Loading

    PubMed Central

    Han, Woojin M.; Nerurkar, Nandan L.; Smith, Lachlan J.; Jacobs, Nathan T.; Mauck, Robert L.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates differential multi-scale structure and function relationships of the outer and inner annulus fibrosus (AF) to osmotic swelling in different buffer solutions by quantifying tensile mechanics, GAG content, water content and tissue swelling, and collagen fibril ultrastructure. In the outer AF, the tensile modulus decreased by over 70% with 0.15M PBS treatment but was unchanged with 2M PBS treatment. Moreover, the modulus loss following 0.15M PBS treatment was reversed when followed by 2M PBS treatment, potentially from increased interfibrillar and interlamellar shearing associated with fibril swelling. In contrast, the inner AF tensile modulus was unchanged by 0.15M PBS treatment and increased following 2M treatment. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the mean collagen fibril diameters of the untreated outer and inner AF were 87.8 ± 27.9 and 71.0 ± 26.9 nm, respectively. In the outer AF, collagen fibril swelling was observed with both 0.15M and 2M PBS treatments, but inherently low GAG content remained unchanged. In the inner AF, 2M PBS treatment caused fibril swelling and GAG loss, suggesting that GAG plays a role in maintaining the structure of collagen fibrils leading to modulation of the native tissue mechanical properties. These results demonstrate important regional variations in structure and composition, and their influence on the heterogeneous mechanics of the AF. Moreover, because the composition and structure is altered as a consequence of progressive disc degeneration, quantification of these interactions is critical for study of the AF pathogenesis of degeneration and tissue engineering. PMID:22314837

  5. Delamination onset in polymeric composite laminates under thermal and mechanical loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.

    1991-01-01

    A fracture mechanics damage methodology to predict edge delamination is described. The methodology accounts for residual thermal stresses, cyclic thermal stresses, and cyclic mechanical stresses. The modeling is based on the classical lamination theory and a sublaminate theory. The prediction methodology determines the strain energy release rate, G, at the edge of a laminate and compares it with the fatigue and fracture toughness of the composite. To verify the methodology, isothermal static tests at 23, 125, and 175 C and tension-tension fatigue tests at 23 and 175 C were conducted on laminates. The material system used was a carbon/bismaleimide, IM7/5260. Two quasi-isotropic layups were used. Also, 24 ply unidirectional double cantilever beam specimens were tested to determine the fatigue and fracture toughness of the composite at different temperatures. Raising the temperature had the effect of increasing the value of G at the edge for these layups and also to lower the fatigue and fracture toughness of the composite. The static stress to edge delamination was not affected by temperature but the number of cycles to edge delamination decreased.

  6. Metal resistance or tolerance? Acidophiles confront high metal loads via both abiotic and biotic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dopson, Mark; Ossandon, Francisco J.; Lövgren, Lars; Holmes, David S.

    2014-01-01

    All metals are toxic at high concentrations and consequently their intracellular concentrations must be regulated. Extremely acidophilic microorganisms have an optimum growth of pH <3 and proliferate in natural and anthropogenic low pH environments. Some acidophiles are involved in the catalysis of sulfide mineral dissolution, resulting in high concentrations of metals in solution. Acidophiles are often described as highly metal resistant via mechanisms such as multiple and/or more efficient active resistance systems than are present in neutrophiles. However, this is not the case for all acidophiles and we contend that their growth in high metal concentrations is partially due to an intrinsic tolerance as a consequence of the environment in which they live. In this perspective, we highlight metal tolerance via complexation of free metals by sulfate ions and passive tolerance to metal influx via an internal positive cytoplasmic transmembrane potential. These tolerance mechanisms have been largely ignored in past studies of acidophile growth in the presence of metals and should be taken into account. PMID:24782845

  7. Metal resistance or tolerance? Acidophiles confront high metal loads via both abiotic and biotic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dopson, Mark; Ossandon, Francisco J; Lövgren, Lars; Holmes, David S

    2014-01-01

    All metals are toxic at high concentrations and consequently their intracellular concentrations must be regulated. Extremely acidophilic microorganisms have an optimum growth of pH <3 and proliferate in natural and anthropogenic low pH environments. Some acidophiles are involved in the catalysis of sulfide mineral dissolution, resulting in high concentrations of metals in solution. Acidophiles are often described as highly metal resistant via mechanisms such as multiple and/or more efficient active resistance systems than are present in neutrophiles. However, this is not the case for all acidophiles and we contend that their growth in high metal concentrations is partially due to an intrinsic tolerance as a consequence of the environment in which they live. In this perspective, we highlight metal tolerance via complexation of free metals by sulfate ions and passive tolerance to metal influx via an internal positive cytoplasmic transmembrane potential. These tolerance mechanisms have been largely ignored in past studies of acidophile growth in the presence of metals and should be taken into account. PMID:24782845

  8. Evaluation of silicon tuning fork resonators under mechanical loads and space-relevant radiation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandi, Tobias; Baborowski, Jacek; Dommann, Alex; Shea, Herbert R.; Cardot, Francis; Neels, Antonia

    2014-10-01

    This work reports on mechanical tests and irradiations made on silicon bulk-acoustic wave resonators. The resonators were based on a tuning fork geometry and actuated by a piezoelectric aluminum nitride layer. They had a resonance frequency of 150 kHz and a quality factor of about 20,000 under vacuum. The susceptibility of the devices to radiation-induced degradation was investigated using Co60 γ-rays and 50 MeV protons with space-relevant doses of up to 170 krad. The performance of the devices after irradiation indicated a high tolerance to both ionizing damage and displacement damage effects. In addition, the device characteristics were evaluated after mechanical shock and vibration tests and only small effects on the devices were observed. In all experiments, no significant changes of the resonance characteristics were observed within the experimental uncertainty, which was below 100 ppm for the resonance frequency. The results support the efforts toward design and fabrication of highly reliable MEMS devices for space applications.

  9. Cleavage Fracture Modeling of Pressure Vessels under Transient Thermo-Mechanical Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Xudong; Dodds, Robert; Yin, Shengjun; Bass, Bennett Richard

    2008-02-01

    The next generation of fracture assessment procedures for nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) will combine nonlinear analyses of crack-front response with stochastic treatments of crack size, shape, orientation, location, material properties and thermal-pressure transients. The projected computational demands needed to support stochastic approaches with detailed 3-D, nonlinear stress analyses of vessels containing defects appear well beyond current and near-term capabilities. In the interim, 2-D models become appealing to approximate certain classes of critical flaws in RPVs, and have computational demands within reach for stochastic frameworks. The present work focuses on the capability of 2-D models to provide values for the Weibull stress fracture parameter with accuracy comparable to those from very detailed 3-D models. Weibull stress approaches provide one route to connect nonlinear vessel response with fracture toughness values measured using small laboratory specimens. The embedded axial flaw located in the RPV wall near the cladding-vessel interface emerges from current linear-elastic, stochastic investigations as a critical contributor to the conditional probability of initiation. Three different types of 2-D models reflecting this configuration are subjected to a thermal-pressure transient characteristic of a critical pressurized thermal shock event. The plane-strain, 2-D models include: the modified boundary layer (MBL) model, the middle tension (M(T)) model, and the 2-D RPV model. The 2-D MBL model provides a high quality estimate for the Weibull stress but only in crack-front regions with a positive T-stress. For crack-front locations with low constraint (T-stress < 0), the M(T) specimen provides very accurate Weibull stress values but only for pressure load acting alone on the RPV. For RPVs under a combined thermal-pressure transient, Weibull stresses computed from the 2-D RPV model demonstrate close agreement with those computed from the

  10. Mechanisms of basin-scale nitrogen load reductions under intensified irrigated agriculture.

    PubMed

    Törnqvist, Rebecka; Jarsjö, Jerker; Thorslund, Josefin; Rao, P Suresh C; Basu, Nandita B; Destouni, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    Irrigated agriculture can modify the cycling and transport of nitrogen (N), due to associated water diversions, water losses, and changes in transport flow-paths. We investigate dominant processes behind observed long-term changes in dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations and loads of the extensive (465,000 km2) semi-arid Amu Darya River basin (ADRB) in Central Asia. We specifically considered a 40-year period (1960-2000) of large irrigation expansion, reduced river water flows, increased fertilizer application and net increase of N input into the soil-water system. Results showed that observed decreases in riverine DIN concentration near the Aral Sea outlet of ADRB primarily were due to increased recirculation of irrigation water, which extends the flow-path lengths and enhances N attenuation. The observed DIN concentrations matched a developed analytical relation between concentration attenuation and recirculation ratio, showing that a fourfold increase in basin-scale recirculation can increase DIN attenuation from 85 to 99%. Such effects have previously only been observed at small scales, in laboratory experiments and at individual agricultural plots. These results imply that increased recirculation can have contributed to observed increases in N attenuation in agriculturally dominated drainage basins in different parts of the world. Additionally, it can be important for basin scale attenuation of other pollutants, including phosphorous, metals and organic matter. A six-fold lower DIN export from ADRB during the period 1981-2000, compared to the period 1960-1980, was due to the combined result of drastic river flow reduction of almost 70%, and decreased DIN concentrations at the basin outlet. Several arid and semi-arid regions around the world are projected to undergo similar reductions in discharge as the ADRB due to climate change and agricultural intensification, and may therefore undergo comparable shifts in DIN export as shown here for the ADRB

  11. Mechanisms of Basin-Scale Nitrogen Load Reductions under Intensified Irrigated Agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Törnqvist, Rebecka; Jarsjö, Jerker; Thorslund, Josefin; Rao, P. Suresh C.; Basu, Nandita B.; Destouni, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    Irrigated agriculture can modify the cycling and transport of nitrogen (N), due to associated water diversions, water losses, and changes in transport flow-paths. We investigate dominant processes behind observed long-term changes in dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations and loads of the extensive (465,000 km2) semi-arid Amu Darya River basin (ADRB) in Central Asia. We specifically considered a 40-year period (1960–2000) of large irrigation expansion, reduced river water flows, increased fertilizer application and net increase of N input into the soil-water system. Results showed that observed decreases in riverine DIN concentration near the Aral Sea outlet of ADRB primarily were due to increased recirculation of irrigation water, which extends the flow-path lengths and enhances N attenuation. The observed DIN concentrations matched a developed analytical relation between concentration attenuation and recirculation ratio, showing that a fourfold increase in basin-scale recirculation can increase DIN attenuation from 85 to 99%. Such effects have previously only been observed at small scales, in laboratory experiments and at individual agricultural plots. These results imply that increased recirculation can have contributed to observed increases in N attenuation in agriculturally dominated drainage basins in different parts of the world. Additionally, it can be important for basin scale attenuation of other pollutants, including phosphorous, metals and organic matter. A six-fold lower DIN export from ADRB during the period 1981–2000, compared to the period 1960–1980, was due to the combined result of drastic river flow reduction of almost 70%, and decreased DIN concentrations at the basin outlet. Several arid and semi-arid regions around the world are projected to undergo similar reductions in discharge as the ADRB due to climate change and agricultural intensification, and may therefore undergo comparable shifts in DIN export as shown here for the

  12. Methods of Assessing Human Tendon Metabolism and Tissue Properties in Response to Changes in Mechanical Loading.

    PubMed

    Heinemeier, Katja M; Kjaer, Michael; Magnusson, S Peter

    2016-01-01

    In recent years a number of methodological developments have improved the opportunities to study human tendon. Microdialysis enables sampling of interstitial fluid in the peritendon tissue, while sampling of human tendon biopsies allows direct analysis of tendon tissue for gene- and protein expression as well as protein synthesis rate. Further the (14)C bomb-pulse method has provided data on long-term tissue turnover in human tendon. Non-invasive techniques allow measurement of tendon metabolism (positron emission tomography (PET)), tendon morphology (magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)), and tendon mechanical properties (ultrasonography combined with force measurement during movement). Finally, 3D cell cultures of human tendon cells provide the opportunity to investigate cell-matrix interactions in response to various interventions. PMID:27535251

  13. [Electrochemical properties of biocompatible material hardness modifications on titanium and steel under mechanical loads].

    PubMed

    Braun, W; Walter, U; Holbein, R; Thull, R

    2005-04-01

    Friction corrosion may appear between different implant components or between implant and hard tissue. The sliding micro movements induce fretting wear corrosion and have been recently reported as a cause of joint prostheses failure. A surface coating is desirable, that retains the mechanical properties of the substrate, offers good biocompatibility and improves the fretting corrosion resistance. In this study it could be demonstrated that tantalum and niobium coatings fulfill the requirements. On titanium substrates the coating decreases the abrasion against PMMA, an orthopedic relevant material. Furthermore, in the case of medical steel substrates the biocompatibility and the corrosion properties are improved. The better abrasion-resistance is minimizing the release of allergological critical particles like nickel and chromium. PMID:15884706

  14. Mechanical properties of a structural polyurethane foam and the effect of particulate loading

    SciTech Connect

    Goods, S.H.; Neuschwanger, C.L.; Whinnery, L.L.

    1998-04-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of a closed-cell, polyurethane encapsulant foam have been measured as a function of foam density. Tests were performed on both unfilled and filler reinforced specimens. Over the range of densities examined, the modulus of the unloaded foam could be described by a power-law relationship with respect to density. This power-law relationship could be explained in terms of the elastic compliance of the cellular structure of the foam using a simple geometric model found in the literature. The collapse stress of the foam was also found to exhibit a power-law relationship with respect to density. Additions of an aluminum powder filler increased the modulus relative to the unfilled foam.

  15. How Osteoblasts Sense their Environment: Integrin-Extracellular Matrix Interactions and Mechanical Loading of Bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Ruth K.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Osteoblasts are the cells responsible for forming and replacing bone throughout life. We know that mechanical stimulation through weight-bearing at I gravity on Earth is needed to maintain healthy bone, and that osteoblasts play a critical role in that process. Over the last 9 years in my laboratory at NASA ARC, we have studied the regulation of osteoblast function by interactions between the extracellular matrix and die cell. Using a cell culture approach, we defined the repertoire of adhesion receptors, called integrins, which are expressed on the osteoblast surface, as well as specific extracellular matrix proteins, which are needed for cellular differentiation and survival. We are now extending these observations to determine if integrin signaling is involved in the skeletal responses to disuse and recovery from disuse using the rodent model of hindlimb unloading by tail suspension. Together, our cell culture and animal studies are providing new insight into the regulation of osteoblast function in bone.

  16. Mechanical behaviour of the T91 martensitic steel under monotonic and cyclic loadings in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, J.-B.; Verleene, A.; Serre, I.; Legris, A.

    2004-11-01

    The paper deals with the mechanical properties in liquid metals of the T91 martensitic steel, a candidate material for the window of an accelerating driven system (ADS). Two main questions are examined, the risk of liquid metal embrittlement and the accelerated fatigue damage by a liquid metal. It is found that the transition from ductile to brittle behaviour induced by a liquid metal is possible as a result of a decrease in surface energy caused by the adsorbed liquid metal. The embrittlement can occur only with a hard microstructure and a nucleation of very sharp defects inside the liquid metal. Under cycling straining, the fatigue resistance of the standard T91 steel is decreased by a factor of about 2 in the liquid metal as compared to air. It is proposed that short crack growth is promoted by the liquid metal which weakens the microstructural grain boundary barriers and skip the microcrack coalescence stage.

  17. Explicit finite element modelling of heel pad mechanics in running: inclusion of body dynamics and application of physiological impact loads.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ming; Lee, Peter Vee-Sin

    2015-01-01

    Many heel pathologies including plantar heel pain may result from micro tears/trauma in the subcutaneous tissues, in which internal tissue deformation/stresses within the heel pad play an important role. Previously, many finite element models have been proposed to evaluate stresses inside the heel pad, but the majority of these models only focus on static loading boundary conditions. This study explored a dynamics modelling approach to the heel pad subjected to realistic impact loads during running. In this model, the inertial property and action of the body are described by a lumped parameter model, while the heel/shoe interactions are modelled using a viscoelastic heel pad model with contact properties. The impact force pattern, dynamic heel pad deformation and stress states predicted by the model were compared with published experimental data. Further parametrical studies revealed the model responses, in terms of internal stresses in the skin and fatty tissue, change nonlinearly when body dynamics changes. A reduction in foot's touchdown velocity resulted in a less severe impact landing and stress relief inside the heel pad, for example peak von-Mises stress in fatty tissue, was reduced by 11.3%. Applications of the model may be extendable to perform iterative analyses to further understand the complex relationships between body dynamics and stress distributions in the soft tissue of heel pad during running. This may open new opportunities to study the mechanical aetiology of plantar heel pain in runners. PMID:24980181

  18. Cargo-shell and cargo-cargo couplings govern the mechanics of artificially loaded virus-derived cages.

    PubMed

    Llauró, Aida; Luque, Daniel; Edwards, Ethan; Trus, Benes L; Avera, John; Reguera, David; Douglas, Trevor; Pablo, Pedro J de; Castón, José R

    2016-04-28

    Nucleic acids are the natural cargo of viruses and key determinants that affect viral shell stability. In some cases the genome structurally reinforces the shell, whereas in others genome packaging causes internal pressure that can induce destabilization. Although it is possible to pack heterologous cargoes inside virus-derived shells, little is known about the physical determinants of these artificial nanocontainers' stability. Atomic force and three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy provided mechanical and structural information about the physical mechanisms of viral cage stabilization beyond the mere presence/absence of cargos. We analyzed the effects of cargo-shell and cargo-cargo interactions on shell stability after encapsulating two types of proteinaceous payloads. While bound cargo to the inner capsid surface mechanically reinforced the capsid in a structural manner, unbound cargo diffusing freely within the shell cavity pressurized the cages up to ∼30 atm due to steric effects. Strong cargo-cargo coupling reduces the resilience of these nanocompartments in ∼20% when bound to the shell. Understanding the stability of artificially loaded nanocages will help to design more robust and durable molecular nanocontainers. PMID:27091107

  19. Enhanced mechanical performance and biological evaluation of a PLGA coated β-TCP composite scaffold for load-bearing applications

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yunqing; Scully, Allison; Young, Daniel A; Kim, Sungwoo; Tsao, Helen; Sen, Milan; Yang, Yunzhi

    2011-01-01

    Porous β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) has been used for bone repair and replacement in clinics due to its excellent biocompatibility, osteoconductivity, and biodegradability. However, the application of β-TCP has been limited by its brittleness. Here, we demonstrated that an interconnected porous β-TCP scaffold infiltrated with a thin layer of poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymer showed improved mechanical performance compared to an uncoated β-TCP scaffold while retaining its excellent interconnectivity and biocompatibility. The infiltration of PLGA significantly increased the compressive strength of β-TCP scaffolds from 2.90 MPa to 4.19 MPa, bending strength from 1.46 MPa to 2.41 MPa, and toughness from 0.17 MPa to 1.44 MPa, while retaining an interconnected porous structure with a porosity of 80.65%. These remarkable improvements in the mechanical properties of PLGA-coated β-TCP scaffolds are due to the combination of the systematic coating of struts, interpenetrating structural characteristics, and crack bridging. The in vitro biological evaluation demonstrated that rat bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) adhered well, proliferated, and expressed alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity on both the PLGA-coated β-TCP and the β-TCP. These results suggest a new strategy for fabricating interconnected macroporous scaffolds with significantly enhanced mechanical strength for potential load-bearing bone tissue regeneration. PMID:21892228

  20. Prediction of fracture healing under axial loading, shear loading and bending is possible using distortional and dilatational strains as determining mechanical stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Malte; Claes, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita; Niemeyer, Frank; Simon, Ulrich; Wehner, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Numerical models of secondary fracture healing are based on mechanoregulatory algorithms that use distortional strain alone or in combination with either dilatational strain or fluid velocity as determining stimuli for tissue differentiation and development. Comparison of these algorithms has previously suggested that healing processes under torsional rotational loading can only be properly simulated by considering fluid velocity and deviatoric strain as the regulatory stimuli. We hypothesize that sufficient calibration on uncertain input parameters will enhance our existing model, which uses distortional and dilatational strains as determining stimuli, to properly simulate fracture healing under various loading conditions including also torsional rotation. Therefore, we minimized the difference between numerically simulated and experimentally measured courses of interfragmentary movements of two axial compressive cases and two shear load cases (torsional and translational) by varying several input parameter values within their predefined bounds. The calibrated model was then qualitatively evaluated on the ability to predict physiological changes of spatial and temporal tissue distributions, based on respective in vivo data. Finally, we corroborated the model on five additional axial compressive and one asymmetrical bending load case. We conclude that our model, using distortional and dilatational strains as determining stimuli, is able to simulate fracture-healing processes not only under axial compression and torsional rotation but also under translational shear and asymmetrical bending loading conditions. PMID:23825112

  1. Prediction of fracture healing under axial loading, shear loading and bending is possible using distortional and dilatational strains as determining mechanical stimuli.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Malte; Claes, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita; Niemeyer, Frank; Simon, Ulrich; Wehner, Tim

    2013-09-01

    Numerical models of secondary fracture healing are based on mechanoregulatory algorithms that use distortional strain alone or in combination with either dilatational strain or fluid velocity as determining stimuli for tissue differentiation and development. Comparison of these algorithms has previously suggested that healing processes under torsional rotational loading can only be properly simulated by considering fluid velocity and deviatoric strain as the regulatory stimuli. We hypothesize that sufficient calibration on uncertain input parameters will enhance our existing model, which uses distortional and dilatational strains as determining stimuli, to properly simulate fracture healing under various loading conditions including also torsional rotation. Therefore, we minimized the difference between numerically simulated and experimentally measured courses of interfragmentary movements of two axial compressive cases and two shear load cases (torsional and translational) by varying several input parameter values within their predefined bounds. The calibrated model was then qualitatively evaluated on the ability to predict physiological changes of spatial and temporal tissue distributions, based on respective in vivo data. Finally, we corroborated the model on five additional axial compressive and one asymmetrical bending load case. We conclude that our model, using distortional and dilatational strains as determining stimuli, is able to simulate fracture-healing processes not only under axial compression and torsional rotation but also under translational shear and asymmetrical bending loading conditions. PMID:23825112

  2. Simulation of High Density Lipoprotein Behavior on a Few Layer Graphene Undergoing Non-Uniform Mechanical Load.

    PubMed

    Glukhova, Olga E; Prytkova, Tatiana R; Savostyanov, George V

    2016-04-21

    Effect of a nonuniform external mechanical load on high density lipoprotein (HDL) in aqueous medium was investigated using course-grained molecular dynamics simulations. The nonuniform load was achieved by a few layer graphene on one side and closed single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) (7, 7) on the opposite side of lipoprotein. The tube had a diameter of 1 nm and was oriented perpendicularly to the graphene. HDL was located between them. The tube was approaching to HDL on graphene deforming it. We considered two cases of the tube movement with velocities of 20 and 5 m/s. Coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics with application of the MARTINI force field for HDL and coarse-grained model with an all-atom (AA)/CG mapping ratio of 1.5 for carbon nanotube (CNT) (each CG bead was modeled by the 4-site CG benzene) were used. Coarse-grained model of HDL was received by method of self-assembly. HDL was static but not fixed that gave the possibility to compensate its external influence in some way. It was established that in water medium HDL interacted with graphene substrate. It was established that in water HDL interacts with graphene substrate, slightly flattening but retaining its shape of the whole. It was also observed that during the calculations HDL partially dodged nanotube. Lipoprotein belts unfolded on the graphene substrate in the way of the best compensation for the impact of nanotubes. Finally, we observed that the approaching tube has passed through the less dense medium of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and its pressure on the macromolecule decreased. Inhomogeneity of the external exposure deformed HDL at approximately 10-50%. The character of deformation demonstrated that lipoprotein has viscoelastic properties similar to a fluid. The discovered ability of lipoprotein may help to establish mechanism of interaction of lipoproteins with arterial walls and dynamic behavior of lipoproteins in arterial intima. PMID:27046673

  3. Computational Simulation of the Mechanical Response of Brain Tissue under Blast Loading

    PubMed Central

    Laksari, Kaveh; Assari, Soroush; Seibold, Benjamin; Sadeghipour, Keya; Darvish, Kurosh

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, numerical simulations of nonlinear wave propagation and shock formation in brain tissue have been presented and a new mechanism of injury for Blast-Induced Neurotrauma (BINT) is proposed. A quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV) constitutive material model was used that encompasses the nonlinearity as well as the rate dependence of the tissue relevant to BINT modeling. A one-dimensional model was implemented using the discontinuous Galerkin -finite element method and studied with displacement-input and pressure-input boundary conditions. The model was validated against LS-DYNA finite element code and theoretical results for speci c conditions that resulted in shock wave formation. It was shown that a continuous wave can become a shock wave as it propagates in the QLV brain tissue when the initial changes in acceleration are beyond a certain limit. The high spatial gradient of stress and strain at the shock front cause large relative motions at the cellular scale at high temporal rates even when the maximum stresses and strains are relatively low. This gradient-induced local deformation may occur away from the boundary and is proposed as a contributing factor to the diffuse nature of BINT. PMID:25205088

  4. [In vitro studies of the mechanical load capability of resorbable monofilament suture materials].

    PubMed

    Bremer, Felicia; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Stiesch, Meike

    2009-01-01

    In a vast spectrum of wound closures there is an indication for resorbable suture materials. For surgeons detailed knowledge of the physicochemical properties is important in order to find the right suture for each indication. For this purpose, various new monofilament polymers were employed. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of hydrolysis and gamma-irradiation on the linear strength. The final analysis of all tested suture materials concluded that gamma-irradiation had no effects on linear strength. However, the analysis showed significant discrepancies between individual polymers with regard to loss of tensile strength associated with hydrolysis. Polydioxanone- and caprolactone-lactid-based resorbable suture materials both displayed adequate tensile strength after a five-week period of hydrolysis. In comparison the triblock-copolymer is subject to rapid degradation. Polydioxanone- and caprolactone-lactid-based resorbable suture materials are indicated for use in tissues which require mechanical support over a longer period. Monosyn is more suitable for short-term wound support. PMID:19852206

  5. Computational simulation of the mechanical response of brain tissue under blast loading.

    PubMed

    Laksari, Kaveh; Assari, Soroush; Seibold, Benjamin; Sadeghipour, Keya; Darvish, Kurosh

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, numerical simulations of nonlinear wave propagation and shock formation in brain tissue have been presented and a new mechanism of injury for blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT) is proposed. A quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV) constitutive material model was used that encompasses the nonlinearity as well as the rate dependence of the tissue relevant to BINT modeling. A one-dimensional model was implemented using the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method and studied with displacement- and pressure-input boundary conditions. The model was validated against LS-DYNA finite element code and theoretical results for specific conditions that resulted in shock wave formation. It was shown that a continuous wave can become a shock wave as it propagates in the QLV brain tissue when the initial changes in acceleration are beyond a certain limit. The high spatial gradient of stress and strain at the shock front cause large relative motions at the cellular scale at high temporal rates even when the maximum stresses and strains are relatively low. This gradient-induced local deformation may occur away from the boundary and is proposed as a contributing factor to the diffuse nature of BINT. PMID:25205088

  6. Equation of state and mechanical response of NiTi during one-dimensional shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meziere, Y. J. E.; Millett, J. C. F.; Bourne, N. K.

    2006-08-01

    The equation of state and the mechanical response (dynamic tensile strength and dynamic shear strength) of the shape memory alloy NiTi have been investigated using plate impact. The Hugoniot has been extended with additional data and a nonlinear behavior of the Hugoniot (shock velocity-particle velocity) has been noted. A bilinear representation has been proposed for the trend. These two behaviors were attributed to the shock-induced phase transformation from B2 to monoclinic. However, this phase transformation seems to have no influence on the dynamic tensile strength. A minimum impact stress value was found necessary to create the spallation in NiTi but the pull back stress remains near constant above this value. A negative strain-rate dependency was also noted on the spallation. The shear strength (τ ) of NiTi appears to increase continuously with the impact stress. The evolution of τ behind the shock front seems to be linked to the phase transformation observed in determination of the Hugoniot. Indeed, It was observed that there was no change of τ until an impact stress value corresponding to the inflection point on the Hugoniot, followed by increase behind the shock front above this value.

  7. Deformation mechanisms and damage in α-alumina under hypervelocity impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Branicio, Paulo S.

    2008-04-01

    Deformation mechanisms in α-alumina under hypervelocity impact are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations containing 540×106 atoms. A cylindrical projectile impacting normal to the (0001) surface at 18km/s generates large temperature and pressure gradients around the impact face, and consequently local amorphization of the substrate in a surrounding hemispherical region is produced. Away from the impact face, a wide range of deformations emerge and disappear as a function of time under the influence of local stress fields, e.g., basal and pyramidal slips and basal and rhombohedral twins, all of which show good agreement with the experimental and theoretical results. New deformation modes are observed, such as twins along {01¯11}, which propagate at a roughly constant speed of 8km/s and nucleate a large amount of defects where subsequent fractures initiate. The relation between deformation patterns and local stress levels is investigated. During unloading, we observe that microcracks nucleate extensively at the intersections of previous deformations within an hourglass-shaped volume that connects top and bottom free surfaces. From the simulation, the fracture toughness of alumina is estimated to be 2.0±0.5MPa√m. The substrate eventually fails along the surface of the hourglass region during spallation when clusters of substrate material are ejected from both free surfaces.

  8. Analysis of Load Transfer Mechanism in Cu Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes Fabricated by Powder Metallurgy Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarpour, Mohammad Reza

    2016-05-01

    In this research, ductile and high-strength Cu-carbon nanotube (Cu-CNT) composites with different volume fractions of CNTs were fabricated using powder metallurgy route including mechanical milling and hot pressing and microstructure and tensile properties of the resulting materials were studied. Microstructural characterization through scanning electron microscope and quantifying the CNT agglomeration revealed that uniform dispersion of CNTs in Cu matrix decreases with increasing CNT volume fraction. In case of the higher volume fraction of CNTs (i.e., 8 vol.%), ~ 40% of CNTs were observed as agglomerates in the microstructure. Compared to unreinforced Cu, the yield and ultimate tensile strengths increased considerably (about 33% and 12%, respectively) with incorporation of CNTs up to 4 vol.%, but remained constant afterward. Meanwhile, the elongation decreased from 15.6% for Cu to 6.9% for Cu with 8 vol.% CNT. The relationship between the change in yield strength of the composite and the microstructure was investigated using analytical models. The results showed good consistency between calculated and measured data when the negative effect of CNT agglomerates in the models were taken into account.

  9. Analysis of Load Transfer Mechanism in Cu Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes Fabricated by Powder Metallurgy Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarpour, Mohammad Reza

    2016-04-01

    Abstract: In this research, ductile and high-strength Cu-carbon nanotube (Cu-CNT) composites with different volume fractions of CNTs were fabricated using powder metallurgy route including mechanical milling and hot pressing and microstructure and tensile properties of the resulting materials were studied. Microstructural characterization through scanning electron microscope and quantifying the CNT agglomeration revealed that uniform dispersion of CNTs in Cu matrix decreases with increasing CNT volume fraction. In case of the higher volume fraction of CNTs (i.e., 8 vol.%), ~ 40% of CNTs were observed as agglomerates in the microstructure. Compared to unreinforced Cu, the yield and ultimate tensile strengths increased considerably (about 33% and 12%, respectively) with incorporation of CNTs up to 4 vol.%, but remained constant afterward. Meanwhile, the elongation decreased from 15.6% for Cu to 6.9% for Cu with 8 vol.% CNT. The relationship between the change in yield strength of the composite and the microstructure was investigated using analytical models. The results showed good consistency between calculated and measured data when the negative effect of CNT agglomerates in the models were taken into account.

  10. Assessment of mechanical properties of porcine aortas under physiological loading conditions using vascular elastography.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Edgar J S; Peters, Mathijs F J; Nijs, Jan; Rutten, Marcel C M; van de Vosse, Frans N; Lopata, Richard G P

    2016-06-01

    Non-invasive assessment of the elastic properties of the arterial wall is often performed with ultrasound (US) imaging. The purpose of this study is to estimate mechanical properties of the vascular wall using in vitro inflation testing on biological tissue and two-dimensional (2-D) US elastography, and investigate the performance of the proposed methodology for physiological conditions. An inflation experiment was performed on 12 porcine aortas for (a) a large pressure range (0-140mmHg); and (b) physiological pressures (70-130mmHg) to mimic in vivo hemodynamic conditions. Two-dimensional radiofrequency (RF) data were acquired for one longitudinal and two transverse cross-sections for both experiments, and were analyzed to obtain the geometry and diameter-time behavior. The shear modulus (G) was estimated from these data for each pressure range applied. In addition, an incremental study based on the static data was performed to (1) investigate the changes in G for increasing mean arterial pressure (MAP) for a certain pressure difference (30, 40, 50 and 60mmHg); (2) compare the results with those from the dynamic experiment, for the same pressure range. The resulting stress-strain curves and shear moduli G (94±16kPa) for the static experimentare in agreement with literature and previous work. A linear dependency on MAP was found for G, yet the effect of the pulse pressure difference was negligible. The dynamic data revealed a G of 250±20kPa, whereas the incremental shear modulus (Ginc) was 240±39kPa. For all experiments, no significant differences in the values of G were found between different image planes. This study shows that 2-D US elastography of aortas during inflation testing is feasible and reproducible under controlled and physiological circumstances. In future studies, the in vivo, dynamic experiment should be repeated for a range of MAPs, and pathological vessels should be examined. PMID:26766329

  11. Effect of exposing two commercial manufacturers' second surface silver/glass mirrors to elevated temperature, mechanical loading, and high-humidity environments

    SciTech Connect

    Dake, L.S.; Lind, M.A.

    1982-04-01

    A preliminary examination of the effect of three accelerated exposure parameters on second surface silver/glass mirrors was performed. The variables studied were temperature (elevated and sub-zero), humidity and mechanical loading. One test consisted of exposing mirror coupons to dry heat (80/sup 0/C) and heat plus water vapor (80/sup 0/C, approx. 100% RH) environments. Another test consisted of subjecting mechanically loaded mirror strips to sub-zero temperature (-20/sup 0/C), dry heat (80/sup 0/C), and heat plus water vapor. Samples were evaluated qualitatively using dark field microscopy (1X and 100X). Quantitative determination of the effects of exposure testing on the mirrors was done with spectrophotometer spectral hemispherical and diffuse reflectance measurements. Degradation that was progressive with time was observed for mirrors exposed to dry heat and heat plus water vapor. The degradation did not have the same visual appearance for the two environments. Mechanical loading at -20/sup 0/C produced no degradation after three months' exposure time. Mechanical loading in dry heat and heat plus water vapor environments resulted in mirror degradation that was the same as that found in unloaded mirrors exposed to the same temperature and humidity. These preliminary tests indicate that the dry heat and heat plus water vapor accelerated tests may provide useful information about mirror degradation, while the mechanical load tests do not. The microscopy and spectrophotometer reflectance measurements were both useful techniques for determining the extent of degradation.

  12. Design and validation of a novel bioreactor principle to combine online micro-computed tomography monitoring and mechanical loading in bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagenmüller, Henri; Hitz, Marco; Merkle, Hans P.; Meinel, Lorenz; Müller, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical loading plays an important role in bone remodeling in vivo and, therefore, has been suggested as a key parameter in stem cell-based engineering of bone-like tissue in vitro. However, the optimization of loading protocols during stem cell differentiation and subsequent bone-like tissue formation is challenged by multiple input factors, which are difficult to control and validate. These include the variable cellular performance of cells harvested from different patients, nonstandardized culture media components, the choice of the biomaterial forming the scaffold, and its morphology, impacting a broader validity of mechanical stimulation regimens. To standardize the cell culture of bone-like tissue constructs, we suggest the involvement of time-lapsed feedback loops. For this purpose we present a prototype bioreactor that combines online, nondestructive monitoring using micro-computed tomography and direct mechanical loading of three-dimensional tissue engineering constructs. Validation of this system showed displacement steps down to 1 μm and cyclic sinusoidal loadings of up to 10 Hz. Load detection resolution was 0.01 N, and micro-computed tomography data were of high quality. For the first time, the developed bioreactor links time-lapsed, nondestructive, and dynamic imaging with mechanical stimulation, designed for cell culture under sterile conditions. This system is believed to substantially improve today's experimental options to study and optimize osteogenic stem cell culture and differentiation at the interface with mechanical stimulation.

  13. Effect of Mechanical Loads on Stability of Nanodomains in Ferroelectric Ultrathin Films: Towards Flexible Erasing of the Non-Volatile Memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. J.; Zheng, Yue; Xiong, W. M.; Feng, Xue; Wang, Biao; Wang, Ying

    2014-06-01

    Intensive investigations have been drawn on nanoscale ferroelectrics for their prospective applications such as developing memory devices. In contrast with the commonly used electrical means to process (i.e., read, write or erase) the information carried by ferroelectric domains, at present, mechanisms of non-electrical processing ferroelectric domains are relatively lacking. Here we make a systematical investigation on the stability of 180° cylindrical domains in ferroelectric nanofilms subjected to macroscopic mechanical loads, and explore the possibility of mechanical erasing. Effects of domain size, film thickness, temperature and different mechanical loads, including uniform strain, cylindrical bending and wavy bending, have been revealed. It is found that the stability of a cylindrical domain depends on its radius, temperature and film thickness. More importantly, mechanical loads have great controllability on the stability of cylindrical domains, with the critical radius nonlinearly sensitive to both strain and strain gradient. This indicates that erasing cylindrical domain can be achieved by changing the strain state of nanofilm. Based on the calculated phase diagrams, we successfully simulate several mechanical erasing processes on 4 × 4 bits memory devices. Our study sheds light on prospective device applications of ferroelectrics involving mechanical loads, such as flexible memory devices and other micro-electromechanical systems.

  14. A two-dimensional theory of coupled electro-magneto-mechanical plates as an application to load-bearing antenna structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santapuri, S.; Bechtel, S. E.

    2011-04-01

    Multifunctional materials and structures possess the ability to perform multiple tasks by combining structural integrity with sensing and actuating capabilities. Recent progress in the development of such materials/structures has made concepts like load-bearing antennas or load-bearing batteries feasible and formed new research possibilities. Load-bearing antenna structures are multifunctional sensing and actuating devices integrated with a load-bearing structure, i.e. they can simultaneously function as a mechanical structure and an electromagnetic antenna. Such an antenna structure is subjected to mechanical forces, temperature gradients, and electromagnetic fields, giving rise to highly-coupled nonlinear thermo-electro-magneto-mechanical (TEMM) behavior. The current research focuses on modeling and characterizing the nonlinear 3-D coupled behavior of TEMM materials, consistent with first principles. This theoretical framework is specifically aimed at modeling and analysis of load-bearing antenna structures. In this paper we demonstrate the development of analytical techniques and computational tools for multiscale, multi-physics modeling of load-bearing antenna structures. The mathematical model, based predominantly on first principles, employs the thermomechanical governing equations coupled with Maxwell's equations. Our modeling has identified 92 nondimensional numbers which quantify the competition between physical effects in the operation of load-bearing antenna. A fixed relative ordering of all competing effects determines a regime of antenna/environment interaction. In this work, we demonstrate a comprehensive framework to derive the 3-D governing equations for a given regime. For thin geometries, these equations are further reduced to 2-D model, using series expansion and perturbation techniques. Mathematical modeling of thin electro-magneto-mechanical plates can have applications like design and optimization of load-bearing antennas structures. This

  15. Effects of Thermal and Mechanical Load Cycling on the Dentin Microtensile Bond Strength of Single Bond-2

    PubMed Central

    Daneshkazemi, Alireza; Davari, Abdolrahim; Akbari, Mohammad Javad; Davoudi, Amin; Badrian, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Different studies have shown the uncertain effects of thermal cycling (TC) and mechanical load cycling (MC) on the dentin microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of composites. This study designed to investigate the effects of TC and MC on the dentin µTBS of single bond-2. Materials and Methods: Flat dentinal surface was prepared on 48 sound extracted human third molar teeth, and were bonded by single bond-2 adhesive and Z250 resin composite. The teeth were randomly divided into eight equal groups, according to the thermal/mechanical protocol. TC and MC were proceeded at 5-55°C and 90 N with 0.5 Hz. Then restorations were sectioned to shape the hour-glass form and subjected to µTBS testing at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. To evaluate the bonding failure, the specimens were observed under the scanning electron microscope. The results were statistically analyzed with analysis of variance, t-test, Tukey HSD and post-hoc by using SPSS software version 17 at a significant level of 0.05. Results: µTBS of all groups were significantly lower than the control group (P < 0.001). Adhesive failure was predominant in all groups and increased with TC and MC. Conclusions: TC and MC had an adverse effect on µTBS of the tested adhesive resin to dentin. PMID:26464532

  16. Application of iron and zinc isotopes to track the sources and mechanisms of metal loading in a mountain watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borrok, D.M.; Wanty, R.B.; Ian, Ridley W.; Lamothe, P.J.; Kimball, B.A.; Verplanck, P.L.; Runkel, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Here the hydrogeochemical constraints of a tracer dilution study are combined with Fe and Zn isotopic measurements to pinpoint metal loading sources and attenuation mechanisms in an alpine watershed impacted by acid mine drainage. In the tested mountain catchment, ??56Fe and ??66Zn isotopic signatures of filtered stream water samples varied by ???3.5??? and 0.4???, respectively. The inherent differences in the aqueous geochemistry of Fe and Zn provided complimentary isotopic information. For example, variations in ??56Fe were linked to redox and precipitation reactions occurring in the stream, while changes in ??66Zn were indicative of conservative mixing of different Zn sources. Fen environments contributed distinctively light dissolved Fe (<-2.0???) and isotopically heavy suspended Fe precipitates to the watershed, while Zn from the fen was isotopically heavy (>+0.4???). Acidic drainage from mine wastes contributed heavier dissolved Fe (???+0.5???) and lighter Zn (???+0.2???) isotopes relative to the fen. Upwelling of Fe-rich groundwater near the mouth of the catchment was the major source of Fe (??56Fe ??? 0???) leaving the watershed in surface flow, while runoff from mining wastes was the major source of Zn. The results suggest that given a strong framework for interpretation, Fe and Zn isotopes are useful tools for identifying and tracking metal sources and attenuation mechanisms in mountain watersheds. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Numerical modeling of inelastic structures at loading of steady state rolling. Thermo-mechanical asphalt pavement computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollny, Ines; Hartung, Felix; Kaliske, Michael

    2016-05-01

    In order to gain a deeper knowledge of the interactions in the coupled tire-pavement-system, e.g. for the future design of durable pavement structures, the paper presents recent results of research in the field of theoretical-numerical asphalt pavement modeling at material and structural level, whereby the focus is on a realistic and numerically efficient computation of pavements under rolling tire load by using the finite element method based on an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation. Inelastic material descriptions are included into the ALE frame efficiently by a recently developed unsplit history update procedure. New is also the implementation of a viscoelastic cohesive zone model into the ALE pavement formulation to describe the interaction of the single pavement layers. The viscoelastic cohesive zone model is further extended to account for the normal pressure dependent shear behavior of the bonding layer. Another novelty is that thermo-mechanical effects are taken into account by a coupling of the mechanical ALE pavement computation to a transient thermal computation of the pavement cross-section to obtain the varying temperature distributions of the pavement due to climatic impact. Then, each ALE pavement simulation considers the temperature dependent asphalt material model that includes elastic, viscous and plastic behavior at finite strains and the temperature dependent viscoelastic cohesive zone formulation. The temperature dependent material parameters of the asphalt layers and the interfacial layers are fitted to experimental data. Results of coupled tire-pavement computations are presented to demonstrate potential fields of application.

  18. The Impact of Posture on the Mechanical Properties of a Functional Spinal Unit During Cyclic Compressive Loading.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Jeff M; Gooyers, Chad E; Karakolis, Thomas; Callaghan, Jack P

    2016-08-01

    To assess how posture affects the transmission of mechanical energy up the spinal column during vibration, 18 porcine functional spinal units (FSUs) were exposed to a sinusoidal force (1500 ± 1200 N) at 5 Hz for 120 min in either a flexed, extended, or neutral posture. Force and FSU height were measured continuously throughout the collection. From these data, specimen height loss, dynamic stiffness, hysteresis, and parameters from a standard linear solid (SLS) model were determined and analyzed for differences between postures. Posture had an influence on all of these parameters. In extension, the FSU had higher dynamic stiffness values than when neutral or flexed (p < 0.0001). In flexion, the FSU had higher hysteresis than both an extended or neutral posture (p < 0.0001). Height loss was greatest in a flexed posture and smallest in an extended posture (p < 0.0001). In extension, the series spring element in the SLS model had a stiffness value higher than both flexed and neutral posture conditions, whereas the stiffness in the parallel spring was the same between extension and neutral (p < 0.01), both higher than in flexion. Viscosity coefficients were highest in extension compared to both flexed and neutral (p < 0.01). Based on these results, it was determined that posture had a significant influence in determining the mechanical properties of the spine when exposed to cyclic compressive loading. PMID:27322199

  19. The Behavior of Water in Collagen and Hydroxyapatite Sites of Cortical Bone: Fracture, Mechanical Wear, and Load Bearing Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gul-E-Noor, Farhana; Singh, Chandan; Papaioannou, Antonios; Sinha, Neeraj; Boutis, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of cortical bone, which is largely comprised of collagen, hydroxyapatite, and water, are known to hinge on hydration. Recently, the characteristics of water in bone have drawn attention as potential markers of bone quality. We report on the dynamics, diffusion, population, and exchange of water in cortical bone by NMR relaxation and diffusion methodologies. Relaxation measurements over timescales ranging from 0.001 to 4.2 s reveal two distinguishable water environments. Systematic exposure to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or collagenase reveals one peak in our 2D relaxation map belonging to water present in the hydroxyapatite rich environment, and a second peak with shorter relaxation times arising from a collagen rich site. Diffusion-T2 measurements allowed for direct measurement of the diffusion coefficient of water in all observable reservoirs. Further, deuterium relaxation methods were applied to study cortical bone under an applied force, following mechanical wear or fracture. The tumbling correlation times of water reduce in all three cases, indicating that water dynamics may be used as a probe of bone quality. Lastly, changes in the relative populations and correlation times of water in bone under an applied force suggest that load bearing occurs largely in the collagen rich environment and is reversible. PMID:26659838

  20. Mechanisms of high temperature deformation and rupture under multiaxial loading conditions. Final progress report, July 1, 1996--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Earthman, J.C.; Mohamed, F.A.

    1997-10-01

    This research program is concerned with the mechanisms that control high temperature fracture processes in specimens subjected to multiaxial loading conditions. The experimental program has consisted of detailed studies of the influence of multiaxial stress states on high temperature damage development which determine the life of the specimens. The objective of the work is to achieve new insight into the predominant failure mechanisms and to develop novel methods for predicting the failure of high temperature components. The principal developments for this reporting period were from investigations of the multiaxial high temperature fracture behavior of two materials: 7075 Al, in which grain boundary sliding is known to occur, and fully-lamellar titanium aluminide, in which grain boundary sliding is inhibited. A detailed description of the research on 7075 Al is presented in Section II.A of the present report. A detailed description of the study of fully lamellar titanium aluminide is presented in Section II.B of the present report. This section is followed by a listing of the publications, presentations and dissertations resulting from the program; a listing of the graduate research assistants; and a listing of other research support.

  1. Analysis on the Load Carrying Mechanism Integrated as Heterogeneous Co-operative Manipulator in a Walking Wheelchair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajay Vedaraj, I. S.; Jain, Ritika; Rao, B. V. A.

    2014-07-01

    used for climbing stairs with three leg design and anlaysis were also done on the mechanism integrated to the system. Kinematics of the legs are analysed separately and the legs are designed to carry a maximum of 175kgs, which is sustained by the center leg and shared by the dual wing legs equally during the walking phase. In the proposed design, screwjack mechanism is used as the central leg to share the load and thus the analysis on the load sharing capability of the whole system is analysed and concluded in terms of failure modes.

  2. In vitro drug release behavior, mechanism and antimicrobial activity of rifampicin loaded low molecular weight PLGA-PEG-PLGA triblock copolymeric nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Gajendiran, M; Divakar, S; Raaman, N; Balasubramanian, S

    2013-12-01

    Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA (92:8)) and a series of PLGA-PEG-PLGA tri block copolymers were synthesized by direct melt polycondensation. The copolymers were characterized by FTIR, and 1HNMR spectroscopic techniques, viscosity, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and powder x-ray diffraction (XRD). The rifampicin (RIF) loaded polymeric nanospheres (NPs) were prepared by ultrasonication-W/O emulsification technique. The NPs have been characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), TEM, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), UVvisible spectroscopy and DLS measurements. The drug loaded triblock copolymeric NPs have five folds higher drug content and drug loading efficiency than that of PLGA microspheres (MPs). The in vitro drug release study shows that the drug loaded NPs showed an initial burst release after that sustained release up to 72 h. All the triblock copolymeric NPs follow anomalous drug diffusion mechanism while the PLGA MPs follow non-Fickian super case-II mechanism up to 12 h. The overall in-vitro release follows second order polynomial kinetics up to 72 h. The antimicrobial activity of the RIF loaded polymer NPs was compared with that of pure RIF and tetracycline (TA). The RIF loaded triblock copolymeric NPs inhibited the bacterial growth more effectively than the pure RIF and TA. PMID:23701139

  3. Effect of fiber distribution and realignment on the nonlinear and inhomogeneous mechanical properties of human supraspinatus tendon under longitudinal tensile loading

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Spencer P.; Miller, Kristin S.; Elliott, Dawn M.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    Tendon exhibits nonlinear stress-strain behavior that may be due, in part, to movement of collagen fibers through the extracellular matrix. While a few techniques have been developed to evaluate the fiber architecture of other soft tissues, the organizational behavior of tendon under load has not been determined. The supraspinatus tendon (SST) of the rotator cuff is of particular interest for investigation due to its complex mechanical environment and corresponding inhomogeneity. In addition, SST injury occurs frequently with limited success in treatment strategies, illustrating the need for a better understanding of SST properties. Therefore, the objective of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the inhomogeneous tensile mechanical properties, fiber organization and fiber realignment under load of human SST utilizing a novel polarized light technique. Fiber distributions were found to become more aligned under load, particularly during the low stiffness toe-region, suggesting that fiber realignment may be partly responsible for observed nonlinear behavior. Fiber alignment was found to correlate significantly with mechanical parameters, providing evidence for strong structure-function relationships in tendon. Human SST exhibits complex, inhomogeneous mechanical properties and fiber distributions, perhaps due to its complex loading environment. Surprisingly, histological grade of degeneration did not correlate with mechanical properties. PMID:19544524

  4. Optimizing the performance of Ice-storage Systems in Electricity Load Management through a credit mechanism. An analytical work for Jiangsu, China

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yafeng; Shen, Bo; Hu, Huajin; Fan, Fei

    2015-01-12

    Ice-storage air-conditioning is a technique that uses ice for thermal energy storage. Replacing existing air conditioning systems with ice storage has the advantage of shifting the load from on-peak times to off-peak times that often have excess generation. However, increasing the use of ice-storage faces significant challenges in China. One major barrier is the inefficiency in the current electricity tariff structure. There is a lack of effective incentive mechanism that induces ice-storage systems from achieving optimal load-shifting results. This study presents an analysis that compares the potential impacts of ice-storage systems on load-shifting under a new credit-based incentive scheme and the existing incentive arrangement in Jiangsu, China. The study indicates that by changing how ice-storage systems are incentivized in Jiangsu, load-shifting results can be improved.

  5. Optimizing the performance of Ice-storage Systems in Electricity Load Management through a credit mechanism. An analytical work for Jiangsu, China

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Han, Yafeng; Shen, Bo; Hu, Huajin; Fan, Fei

    2015-01-12

    Ice-storage air-conditioning is a technique that uses ice for thermal energy storage. Replacing existing air conditioning systems with ice storage has the advantage of shifting the load from on-peak times to off-peak times that often have excess generation. However, increasing the use of ice-storage faces significant challenges in China. One major barrier is the inefficiency in the current electricity tariff structure. There is a lack of effective incentive mechanism that induces ice-storage systems from achieving optimal load-shifting results. This study presents an analysis that compares the potential impacts of ice-storage systems on load-shifting under a new credit-based incentive scheme andmore » the existing incentive arrangement in Jiangsu, China. The study indicates that by changing how ice-storage systems are incentivized in Jiangsu, load-shifting results can be improved.« less

  6. Hyaluronic Acid Suppresses the Expression of Metalloproteinases in Osteoarthritic Cartilage Stimulated Simultaneously by Interleukin 1β and Mechanical Load

    PubMed Central

    Pohlig, Florian; Guell, Florian; Lenze, Ulrich; Lenze, Florian W.; Mühlhofer, Heinrich M. L.; Schauwecker, Johannes; Toepfer, Andreas; Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Rüdiger; Burgkart, Rainer; Salzmann, Gian M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In patients with osteoarthritis (OA), intraarticular injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) frequently results in reduced pain and improved function for prolonged periods of time, i.e. more than 6 months. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully understood. Our underlying hypothesis is that HA modifies the enzymatic breakdown of joint tissues. Methods To test this hypothesis, we examined osteochondral cylinders from 12 OA patients. In a bioreactor, these samples were stimulated by interleukin 1β (Il1ß) (2 ng/ml) plus mechanical load (2.0 Mpa at 0.5 Hz horizontal and 0.1 Hz vertical rotation), thus the experimental setup recapitulated both catabolic and anabolic clues of the OA joint. Results Upon addition of HA at either 1 or 3 mg/ml, we observed a significant suppression of expression of metalloproteinase (MMP)-13. A more detailed analysis based on the Kellgren and Lawrence (K&L) OA grade, showed a much greater degree of suppression of MMP-13 expression in grade IV as compared to grade II OA. In contrast to the observed MMP-13 suppression, treatment with HA resulted in a suppression of MMP-1 expression only at 1 mg/ml HA, while MMP-2 expression was not significantly affected by either HA concentration. Conclusion Together, these data suggest that under concurrent catabolic and anabolic stimulation, HA exhibits a pronounced suppressive effect on MMP-13. In the long-run these findings may benefit the development of treatment strategies aimed at blocking tissue degradation in OA patients. PMID:26934732

  7. Mechanics of slope walking in the cat: quantification of muscle load, length change, and ankle extensor EMG patterns.

    PubMed

    Gregor, Robert J; Smith, D Webb; Prilutsky, Boris I

    2006-03-01

    Unexpected changes in flexor-extensor muscle activation synergies during slope walking in the cat have been explained previously by 1) a reorganization of circuitry in the central pattern generator or 2) altered muscle and cutaneous afferent inputs to motoneurons that modulate their activity. The aim of this study was to quantify muscle length changes, muscle loads, and ground reaction forces during downslope, level, and upslope walking in the cat. These mechanical variables are related to feedback from muscle length and force, and paw pad cutaneous afferents, and differences in these variables between the slope walking conditions could provide additional insight into possible mechanisms of the muscle control. Kinematics, ground reaction forces, and EMG were recorded while cats walked on a walkway in three conditions: downslope (-26.6 deg), level (0 deg), and upslope (26.6 deg). The resultant joint moments were calculated using inverse dynamics analysis; length and velocity of major hindlimb muscle-tendon units (MTUs) were calculated using a geometric model and calculated joint angles. It was found that during stance in downslope walking, the MTU stretch of ankle and knee extensors and MTU peak stretch velocities of ankle extensors were significantly greater than those in level or upslope conditions, whereas forces applied to the paw pad and peaks of ankle and hip extensor moments were significantly smaller. The opposite was true for upslope walking. It was suggested that these differences between upslope and downslope walking might affect motion-dependent feedback, resulting in muscle activity changes recorded here or reported in the literature. PMID:16207777

  8. Thermoelastic Analysis of a Functionally Graded Rotating Thick-Walled Tube Subjected to Mechanical and Thermal Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Libiao; Yang, Shengyou; Ma, Baoyu; Dui, Guansuo

    2015-11-01

    A thermoelastic solution for the functionally graded rotating thick-walled tube subjected to axisymmetric mechanical and thermal loads is given in terms of volume fractions of constituents. We assume that the tube consists of two linear elastic constituents and the volume fraction of one phase is a power function varied in the radial direction. By using the assumption of a uniform strain field within the representative volume element, the theoretical solutions of the displacement and the stresses are presented. Based on the relation of the volume average stresses of constituents and the macroscopic stresses of the composite material in micromechanics, the present method can avoid the assumption of the distribution regularities of unknown overall material parameters appeared in existing papers, such as Young's modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal conductivity, and density. The effects of the angular velocity, the volume fraction, the ratio of two thermal expansion coefficients, the ratio of two thermal conductivities, and the ratio of two densities on the displacement and stresses are systematically studied, which should help structural engineers and material scientists optimally design thick-walled tube comprised inhomogeneous materials.

  9. Rate effect on mechanical properties of hydraulic concrete flexural-tensile specimens under low loading rates using acoustic emission technique.

    PubMed

    Su, Huaizhi; Hu, Jiang; Tong, Jianjie; Wen, Zhiping

    2012-09-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) waveform is generated by dislocation, microcracking and other irreversible changes in a concrete material. Based on the AE technique (AET), this paper focuses on strain rate effect on physical mechanisms of hydraulic concrete specimens during the entire fracture process of three point bending (TPB) flexural tests at quasi-static levels. More emphasis is placed on the influence of strain rate on AE hit rate and AE source location around peak stress. Under low strain rates, namely 0.77×10(-7)s(-1), 1×10(-7)s(-1) to 1×10(-6)s(-1) respectively, the results show that the tensile strength increases as the strain rate increases while the peak AE hit rate decreases. Meanwhile, the specimen under a relatively higher strain rate shows a relatively wider intrinsic process zone in a more diffuser manner, lots of distributed microcracks relatively decrease stress intensity, thus delay both microcracking localization and macrocrack propagation. These phenomena can be attributed to Stéfan effect. In addition, further tests, namely the combination of AE monitoring and strain measuring systems was designed to understand the correlation between AE event activity and microfracture (i.e., microcracking and microcracking localization). The relative variation trend of cumulative AE events accords well with that of the load-deformation curve. PMID:22534061

  10. Mechanical Behavior of Brittle Rock-Like Specimens with Pre-existing Fissures Under Uniaxial Loading: Experimental Studies and Particle Mechanics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ri-hong; Cao, Ping; Lin, Hang; Pu, Cheng-zhi; Ou, Ke

    2016-03-01

    Joints and fissures with similar orientation or characteristics are common in natural rocks; the inclination and density of the fissures affect the mechanical properties and failure mechanism of the rock mass. However, the strength, crack coalescence pattern, and failure mode of rock specimens containing multi-fissures have not been studied comprehensively. In this paper, combining similar material testing and discrete element numerical method (PFC2D), the peak strength and failure characteristics of rock-like materials with multi-fissures are explored. Rock-like specimens were made of cement and sand and pre-existing fissures created by inserting steel shims into cement mortar paste and removing them during curing. The peak strength of multi-fissure specimens depends on the fissure angle α (which is measured counterclockwise from horizontal) and fissure number ( N f). Under uniaxial compressional loading, the peak strength increased with increasing α. The material strength was lowest for α = 25°, and highest for α = 90°. The influence of N f on the peak strength depended on α. For α = 25° and 45°, N f had a strong effect on the peak strength, while for higher α values, especially for the 90° sample, there were no obvious changes in peak strength with different N f. Under uniaxial compression, the coalescence modes between the fissures can be classified into three categories: S-mode, T-mode, and M-mode. Moreover, the failure mode can be classified into four categories: mixed failure, shear failure, stepped path failure, and intact failure. The failure mode of the specimen depends on α and N f. The peak strength and failure modes in the numerically simulated and experimental results are in good agreement.

  11. Report on Toyota/Prius Motor Torque Capability, Torque Property, No-Load Back EMF, and Mechanical Losses, Revised May 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.; Ayers, C.W.; Coomer, C.L.; Wiles, R.H.; Burress, T.A.; Campbell, S.L.; Lowe, K.T.; Michelhaugh, R.T.

    2007-05-31

    In today's hybrid vehicle market, the Toyota/Prius drive system is currently considered the leader in electrical, mechanical, and manufacturing innovations. It is significant that in today's marketplace, Toyota is able to manufacture and sell the vehicle for a profit. This project's objective is to test the torque capability of the 2004 Prius motor and to analyze the torque properties relating to the rotor structure. The tested values of no-load back electromotive force (emf) and mechanical losses are also presented.

  12. The Characterization of Mechanical Properties of a Rabbit Femur-Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Tibia Complex During Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Hidetaka; Han, Jungsoo; Ryu, Jaiyoung; Han, Changsoo

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cyclic loading, which produced the condition of ACLs during sports activities, on tensile properties of femur-ACL-tibia complexes (FATCs). Paired FATCs of 40 New Zealand white rabbits were tested on a materials testing machine. One specimen of each pair was designated as a control and loaded until failure. The contralateral specimen was loaded cyclically (1.4 Hz, 1 hr.) with 20%, 30%, 40%, or 50% of ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the control and then loaded until failure. The UTS and mode of failure were recorded after each test. Five specimens ruptured during cyclic loading in the 50% group. In the 40% group, the mean value of UTS of cycled specimens was significantly lower than that of controls. There was no statistically significant difference in UTS values between control and cycled specimens in the 20% and 30% groups. Cycled specimens had a significantly higher incidence of substance failure than controls. Our results demonstrated that FATCs have the strength to withstand cyclic loading within normal sports activity levels. However, FACTs can be damaged by cyclic loading under strenuous sports activity levels. We speculate that cyclic loading makes the ACL substance weaker than the insertion site.

  13. Contrasting the Microstructural and Mechanical Response to Shock Loading of Cold-Rolled Copper with Annealed Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Daniel L.; Pang, Bo; Millett, Jeremy C. F.; Whiteman, Glenn; Jones, Ian P.; Chiu, Yu-Lung

    2015-10-01

    The response of copper to shock loading and cold working is well documented. Both shock loaded and cold-worked annealed copper display a high dislocation density and increased yield strength. However, as of yet no work has been carried out on the microstructure of shock-loaded cold-worked copper. Both annealed and cold-worked copper have been tested using a gas gun to ascertain the effect of shock loading on cold-worked copper. The annealed copper was loaded to a peak pressure of 5 GPa and the cold-worked copper was loaded to peak pressures of 6 and 10 GPa. It was found that the shock-loaded cold-worked copper had a higher hardness than the shock-loaded annealed copper and that the hardness of the cold-worked copper increased with peak shock pressure. Each specimen analyzed displayed different variations on the classic shocked copper microstructure, which was ascribed to the different momentum trapping apparatus used.

  14. Micro-anatomical response of cartilage-on-bone to compression: mechanisms of deformation within and beyond the directly loaded matrix

    PubMed Central

    Thambyah, Ashvin; Broom, Neil

    2006-01-01

    The biomechanical function of articular cartilage relies crucially on its integration with both the subchondral bone and the wider continuum of cartilage beyond the directly loaded contact region. This study was aimed at visualizing, at the microanatomical level, the deformation response of cartilage including that of the non-directly loaded continuum. Cartilage-on-bone samples from bovine patellae were loaded in static compression until a near-equilibrium deformation was achieved, and then chemically fixed in this deformed state. Full-depth cartilage–bone sections, incorporating the indentation profile and beyond, were studied in their fully hydrated state using differential interference contrast microscopy. Morphometric measurements of the indented profile were used in combination with a force analysis of the tangential layer to investigate the extent to which the applied force is attenuated in moving away from the directly loaded region. This study provides microscopic evidence of a structure-related response in the transitional zone of the cartilage matrix. It is manifested as an intense chevron-type shear discontinuity arising from the constraints provided by both the strain-limiting articular surface and the osteochondral attachment. The discontinuity persists well into the non-directly loaded continuum of cartilage and is proposed as a force attenuation mechanism. The structural and biomechanical analyses presented in this study emphasize the important role of the complex microanatomy of cartilage, highlighting the interconnectivity and optimal recruitment of the load-bearing elements throughout the zonally differentiated cartilage depth. PMID:17062019

  15. Grain size dependence of dynamic mechanical behavior of AZ31B magnesium alloy sheet under compressive shock loading

    SciTech Connect

    Asgari, H.; Odeshi, A.G.; Szpunar, J.A.; Zeng, L.J.; Olsson, E.

    2015-08-15

    The effects of grain size on the dynamic deformation behavior of rolled AZ31B alloy at high strain rates were investigated. Rolled AZ31B alloy samples with grain sizes of 6, 18 and 37 μm, were subjected to shock loading tests using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar at room temperature and at a strain rate of 1100 s{sup −} {sup 1}. It was found that a double-peak basal texture formed in the shock loaded samples. The strength and ductility of the alloy under the high strain-rate compressive loading increased with decreasing grain size. However, twinning fraction and strain hardening rate were found to decrease with decreasing grain size. In addition, orientation imaging microscopy showed a higher contribution of double and contraction twins in the deformation process of the coarse-grained samples. Using transmission electron microscopy, pyramidal dislocations were detected in the shock loaded sample, proving the activation of pyramidal slip system under dynamic impact loading. - Highlights: • A double-peak basal texture developed in all shock loaded samples. • Both strength and ductility increased with decreasing grain size. • Twinning fraction and strain hardening rate decreased with decreasing grain size. • ‘g.b’ analysis confirmed the presence of dislocations in shock loaded alloy.

  16. Effect of thermal and mechanical loading on marginal adaptation and microtensile bond strength of a self-etching adhesive with caries-affected dentin

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Vivek; Singla, Mamta; Miglani, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluated the effect of thermal and mechanical loading on marginal adaptation and microtensile bond strength in total-etch versus self-etch adhesive systems in caries-affected dentin. Materials and Methods: Forty class II cavities were prepared on extracted proximally carious human mandibular first molars and were divided into two groups: Group I — self-etch adhesive system restorations and Group II — total-etch adhesive system restorations. Group I and II were further divided into sub-groups A (Without thermal and mechanical loading) and B (With thermal and mechanical loading of 5000 cycles, 5 ± 2°C to 55 ± 2°C, dwell time 30 seconds, and 150,000 cycles at 60N). The gingival margin of the proximal box was evaluated at 200X magnification for marginal adaptation in a low vacuum scanning electron microscope. The restorations were sectioned, perpendicular to the bonded surface, into 0.8 mm thick slabs. All the specimens were subjected to microtensile bond strength testing. The marginal adaptation was analyzed using descriptive studies, and the bond strength data was analyzed using the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Results and Conclusions: The total-etch system performed better under thermomechanical loading. PMID:21691507

  17. An investigation of the effects of history dependent damage in time dependent fracture mechanics; Phases I, II, and one half of Phase III - variable load conditions. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Brust, F.W.; Krishnaswamy, P.; Majumdar, B.S.

    1993-10-15

    The demands for structural systems to perform reliably under severe temperatures and load conditions continue to increase. These demands will continue with the development of advanced power generation methods, for aging nuclear and fossil fueled power plants, and for future aerospace applications. An understanding of the high-temperature creep crack growth process, which is a frequent failure mechanism in these structures, is important. Many investigations which have appeared to date are concerned with creep crack growth which occurs under a constant load and temperature. However, most structural components experience complicated load histories. The history of degradation and damage which accumulates at the crack tip is greatly influenced by these transients. This program aims at gaining an understanding of the history dependent high temperature failure process through a combined experimental and analytical effort. The development of a useful predictive methodology for characterizing this process is being undertaken.

  18. A Flexible Domain-Domain Hinge Promotes an Induced-fit Dominant Mechanism for the Loading of Guide-DNA into Argonaute Protein in Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lizhe; Jiang, Hanlun; Sheong, Fu Kit; Cui, Xuefeng; Gao, Xin; Wang, Yanli; Huang, Xuhui

    2016-03-17

    Argonaute proteins (Ago) are core components of the RNA Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) that load and utilize small guide nucleic acids to silence mRNAs or cleave foreign DNAs. Despite the essential role of Ago in gene regulation and defense against virus, the molecular mechanism of guide-strand loading into Ago remains unclear. We explore such a mechanism in the bacterium Thermus thermophilus Ago (TtAgo), via a computational approach combining molecular dynamics, bias-exchange metadynamics, and protein-DNA docking. We show that apo TtAgo adopts multiple closed states that are unable to accommodate guide-DNA. Conformations able to accommodate the guide are beyond the reach of thermal fluctuations from the closed states. These results suggest an induced-fit dominant mechanism for guide-strand loading in TtAgo, drastically different from the two-step mechanism for human Ago 2 (hAgo2) identified in our previous study. Such a difference between TtAgo and hAgo2 is found to mainly originate from the distinct rigidity of their L1-PAZ hinge. Further comparison among known Ago structures from various species indicates that the L1-PAZ hinge may be flexible in general for prokaryotic Ago's but rigid for eukaryotic Ago's. PMID:26908081

  19. Mechanical loading regulates the expression of tenascin-C in the myotendinous junction and tendon but does not induce de novo synthesis in the skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, Tero A H; Józsa, Lászlo; Kannus, Pekka; Järvinen, Teppo L N; Hurme, Timo; Kvist, Martti; Pelto-Huikko, Markku; Kalimo, Hannu; Järvinen, Markku

    2003-03-01

    Tenascin-C is a hexabrachion-shaped matricellular protein with a very restricted expression in normal musculoskeletal tissues, but it is expressed abundantly during regenerative processes of these tissues and embryogenesis. To examine the importance of mechanical stress for the regulation of tenascin-C expression in the muscle-tendon unit, the effects of various states of mechanical loading (inactivity by cast-immobilization and three-varying intensities of subsequent re-activity by treadmill running) on the expression of tenascin-C were studied using immunohistochemistry and mRNA in situ hybridization at the different locations of the muscle-tendon unit of the rat gastrocnemius muscle, the Achilles tendon complex. This muscle-tendon unit was selected as the study site, because the contracting activity of the gastrocnemius-soleus muscle complex, and thus the mechanical loading-induced stimulation, is easy to block by cast immobilization. Tenascin-C was expressed abundantly in the normal myotendinous and myofascial junctions, as well as around the cells and the collagen fibers of the Achilles tendon. Tenascin-C expression was not found in the normal skeletal muscle, although it was found in blood vessels within the muscle tissue. Following the removal of the mechanical loading-induced stimulation on the muscle-tendon unit by cast immobilization for 3 weeks, the immonoreactivity of tenascin-C substantially decreased or was completely absent in the regions expressing tenascin-C normally. Restitution of the mechanical loading by removing the cast and allowing free cage activity for 8 weeks resulted in an increase in tenascin-C expression, but it could not restore the expression of tenascin-C to the normal level (in healthy contralateral leg). In response to the application of a more strenuous mechanical loading stimulus after the removal of the cast (after 8 weeks of low- and high-intensity treadmill running), the expression of tenascin-C was markedly increased and

  20. Climbing performance of Harris' hawks (Parabuteo unicinctus) with added load: Implications for muscle mechanics and for radiotracking

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pennycuick, C.J.; Fuller, M.R.; McAllister, L.

    1989-01-01

    Two Harris' hawks were trained to fly along horizontal and climbing flight paths, while carrying loads of various masses, to provide data for estimating available muscle power during short flights. The body mass of both hawks was about 920 g, and they were able to carry loads up to 630 g in horizontal flight. The rate of climb decreased with increasing all-up mass, as also did the climbing power (product of weight and rate of climb). Various assumptions about the aerodynamic power in low-speed climbs led to estimates of the maximum power output of the flight muscles ranging from 41 to 46 W. This, in turn, would imply a stress during shortening of around 210 kPa. The effects of a radio package on a bird that is raising young should be considered in relation to the food load that the forager can normally carry, rather than in relation to its body mass.

  1. Formulation of the nonlinear analysis of shell-like structures, subjected to time-dependent mechanical and thermal loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simitses, George J.; Carlson, Robert L.; Riff, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The object of the research reported herein was to develop a general mathematical model and solution methodologies for analyzing the structural response of thin, metallic shell structures under large transient, cyclic, or static thermomechanical loads. Among the system responses associated with these loads and conditions are thermal buckling, creep buckling, and ratcheting. Thus geometric and material nonlinearities (of high order) can be anticipated and must be considered in developing the mathematical model. The methodology is demonstrated through different problems of extension, shear, and of planar curved beams. Moreover, importance of the inclusion of large strain is clearly demonstrated, through the chosen applications.

  2. Combined effects of moisture, temperature, fiber architecture, and sustained load on the mechanical and microstructural properties of notched and unnotched e-glass/vinyl ester composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Stephanie E.

    Structural composite materials are being investigated for use in applications which will require long-term durability in the presence of various environments and external loading conditions. Flaws may be created in these composite materials during manufacturing, machining, or use. Adverse use conditions may result in significantly reduced mechanical properties and changes in the microstructural properties and damage mechanisms of composites with seemingly minor flaws. E-glass/vinyl ester composite coupons, some with a preexisting flaw, have been conditioned in a wet environment for periods of up to nearly 8000 hours at several temperatures, mostly with a sustained tensile load, to determine the changes in the mechanical properties and damage mechanisms which occur with the introduction of a flaw. The fiber architectures used for the unnotched coupons were [0/90/+/-45]2s, [0/90/+/-45]3s, and [90/0]2s, all containing a chopped strand mat in each set, while those used for the notched coupons were [90/0]2s, [0] 16, [0/90]8, and [0/90]f8, with only the first containing the random mat. The combination of moisture and temperature was found to degrade the mechanical properties of the unnotched materials, particularly the tensile strength. The addition of a sustained load was found to further degrade these properties. During conditioning, the damage mechanisms were found to change from matrix microcracking, fiber damage, and occasional edge delaminations for unnotched specimens to the growth of a significant transverse crack from the notch tip and longitudinal tow debonding for notched specimens. Moisture and elevated temperature were found to affect the extent of damage, but not the dual nature of damage, in the vicinity of the notch tip, while the fiber architecture affected some of the patterns of damage. The unidirectional samples, not loaded during conditioning, were tested in load cycles to determine the strain energy release rates for increments of growth of

  3. Effects of mechanical loading on the expression of pleiotrophin and its receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta in a rat spinal deformity model.

    PubMed

    Kaspiris, Angelos; Chronopoulos, Efstathios; Grivas, Theodoros B; Vasiliadis, Elias; Khaldi, Lubna; Lamprou, Margarita; Lelovas, Pavlos P; Papaioannou, Nikolaos; Dontas, Ismene A; Papadimitriou, Evangelia

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical loading of the spine is a major causative factor of degenerative changes and causes molecular and structural changes in the intervertebral disc (IVD) and the vertebrae end plate (EP). Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a growth factor with a putative role in bone remodeling through its receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta (RPTPβ/ζ). The present study investigates the effects of strain on PTN and RPTPβ/ζ protein expression in vivo. Tails of eight weeks old Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to mechanical loading using a mini Ilizarov external apparatus. Rat tails untreated (control) or after 0 degrees of compression and 10°, 30° and 50° of angulation (groups 0, I, II and III respectively) were studied. PTN and RPTPβ/ζ expression were evaluated using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. In the control group, PTN was mostly expressed by the EP hypertrophic chondrocytes. In groups 0 to II, PTN expression was increased in the chondrocytes of hypertrophic and proliferating zones, as well as in osteocytes and osteoblast-like cells of the ossification zone. In group III, only limited PTN expression was observed in osteocytes. RPTPβ/ζ expression was increased mainly in group 0, but also in group I, in all types of cells. Low intensity RPTPβ/ζ immunostaining was observed in groups II and III. Collectively, PTN and RPTPβ/ζ are expressed in spinal deformities caused by mechanical loading, and their expression depends on the type and severity of the applied strain. PMID:26615567

  4. Experimental aspects and mechanical modeling paradigms for the prediction of degradation and failure in nanocomposite materials subjected to fatigue loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averett, Rodney D.

    2008-10-01

    The objective of the current research was to contribute to the area of mechanics of composite polymeric materials. This objective was reached by establishing a quantitative assessment of the fatigue strength and evolution of mechanical property changes during fatigue loading of nanocomposite fibers and films. Both experimental testing and mathematical modeling were used to gain a fundamental understanding of the fatigue behavior and material changes that occurred during fatigue loading. In addition, the objective of the study was to gain a qualitative and fundamental understanding of the failure mechanisms that occurred between the nanoagent and matrix in nanocomposite fibers. This objective was accomplished by examining scanning electron microscopy (SEM) fractographs. The results of this research can be used to better understand the behavior of nanocomposite materials in applications where degradation due to fatigue and instability of the composite under loading conditions may be a concern. These applications are typically encountered in automotive, aerospace, and civil engineering applications where fatigue and/or fracture are primary factors that contribute to failure.

  5. Effect of Compaction Load and Sintering Temperature on Tribological and Mechanical Behavior of Ni/SiC/MoS2 Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, T. Ram

    2016-04-01

    In the present investigation, the effects of compaction load and sintering temperature on the tribological and mechanical behavior of Ni/20%SiC/7%MoS2 hybrid composites was studied. The density, compression strength, and hardness of the composites were evaluated and compared. The wear properties of the composites were evaluated for the test condition of 1 m/s speed and 10 N load using a pin-on-disk tribometer. The braking performance of the composites was evaluated in a subscale dynamometer for the 500 kJ energy condition. The microstructure and wear surface morphology of the composites were analyzed by stereo, optical, and scanning electron microscopes. From the results, the following important conclusions are drawn: (1) the compaction load of 1400 kN and sintering temperature of 900 °C are optimum to obtain the best combination of tribological and mechanical properties; (2) the properties such as density, compression strength, hardness, wear, and friction increase up to a critical sintering temperature, and then decrease later; (3) the composition and thickness of the interface reaction product phases (Ni2Si, Ni3Si, and graphite) play a key role in deciding the strength of Ni/SiC interface that consequently affects the mechanical and tribological properties of the composites; (4) the abrasive wear is found to be the main wear mechanism in the highly densified composites, whereas the delamination wear and the third-body wear are major wear mechanisms in the poorly densified composites; and (5) the better braking performance of the highly densified composites is attributed to the absence of third-body wear, controlled flow of solid lubricant, and lower porosity.

  6. Effects of deletion of ER-alpha in osteoblast-lineage cells on bone mass and adaptation to mechanical loading differs in female and male mice

    PubMed Central

    Melville, Katherine M.; Kelly, Natalie H.; Surita, Gina; Buchalter, Daniel B.; Schimenti, John C.; Main, Russell P.; Ross, F. Patrick; van der Meulen, Marjolein C. H.

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) has been implicated in bone’s response to mechanical loading in both males and females. ERα in osteoblast lineage cells is important for determining bone mass, but results depend on animal sex and the cellular stage at which ERα is deleted. We demonstrated previously that when ERα is deleted from mature osteoblasts and osteocytes in mixed background female mice, bone mass and strength are decreased. However, few studies exist examining the skeletal response to loading in bone cell-specific ERαKO mice. Therefore, we crossed ERα floxed (ERαfl/fl) and osteocalcin-Cre (OC-Cre) mice to generate animals lacking ERα in mature osteoblasts and osteocytes (pOC-ERαKO) and littermate controls (LC). At 10 weeks of age the left tibia was loaded in vivo for two weeks. We analyzed bone mass through microCT, bone formation rate by dynamic histomorphometry, bone strength from mechanical testing, and osteoblast and osteoclast activity by serum chemistry and immunohistochemistry. ERα in mature osteoblasts differentially regulated bone mass in males and females. Compared to LC, female pOC-ERαKO mice had decreased cortical and cancellous bone mass, while male pOC-ERαKO mice had equal or greater bone mass than LC. Bone mass results correlated with decreased compressive strength in pOC-ERαKO female L5 vertebrae, and with increased maximum moment in pOC-ERαKO male femora. Female pOC-ERαKO mice responded more to mechanical loading, while the response of pOC-ERαKO male animals was similar to their littermate controls. PMID:25707500

  7. Microfluidic cell culture chip with multiplexed medium delivery and efficient cell/scaffold loading mechanisms for high-throughput perfusion 3-dimensional cell culture-based assays.

    PubMed

    Huang, Song-Bin; Wu, Min-Hsien; Wang, Shih-Siou; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2011-06-01

    This study reports a microfluidic cell culture chip consisting of 48 microbioreactors for high-throughput perfusion 3-dimensional (3-D) cell culture-based assays. Its advantages include the capability for multiplexed and backflow-free medium delivery, and both efficient and high-throughput micro-scale, 3-D cell culture construct loading. In this work, the microfluidic cell culture chip is fabricated using two major processes, specifically, a computer-numerical-controlled (CNC) mold machining process and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) replication process. The chip is composed of micropumps, microbioreactors, connecting microchannels and a cell/agarose scaffold loading mechanism. The performance of the new pneumatic micropumps and the cell/agarose scaffold loading mechanism has been experimentally evaluated. The experimental results show that this proposed multiplexed medium-pumping design is able to provide a uniform pumping rate ranging from 1.5 to 298.3 μl hr(-1) without any fluid backflow and the resultant medium contamination. In addition, the simple cell/agarose loading method has been proven to be able to load the 3-D cell culture construct uniformly and efficiently in all 48 microbioreactors investigated. Furthermore, a micro-scale, perfusion, 3-D cell culture-based assay has been successfully demonstrated using this proposed cell culture chip. The experimental results are also compared to a similar evaluation using a conventional static 3-D cell culture with a larger scale culture. It is concluded that the choice of a cell culture format can influence assay results. As a whole, because of the inherent advantages of a miniaturized perfusion 3-D cell culture assay, the cell culture chip not only can provide a stable, well-defined and more biologically-meaningful culture environment, but it also features a low consumption of research resources. Moreover, due to the integrated medium pumping mechanism and the simple cell/agarose loading method, this chip is

  8. Study of Mechanical Properties of Bone by Measuring Load Transfer via High-energy X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, Anjali

    Synchrotron high-energy X-ray scattering is used to investigate the in situ strains in hydroxyapatite (HAP) platelets and mineralized collagen fibrils in bovine cortical bone. Compressive load-unload tests at room temperature (27°C) and body temperature (37°C) show that the load transfer to the stiff nano-sized platelets from the surrounding compliant protein matrix does not vary significantly with temperature. This emphasizes that the stiffness of bone is controlled by the stiffness of the HAP phase, which remains unaffected by this change in temperature. Monotonic loading tests in compression and tension, conducted at 37°C, illustrate the spatial variation of properties within a single femur, which is correlated to the mineral content, porosity and microstructure of the samples. The average apparent modulus of HAP and fibrils (EappHAP and Eappfib, respectively), defined as the ratio of applied stress and phase strain, is obtained as 27.5 ± 6.6 and 18.5 ± 8.9 GPa, respectively, in compression. These values are significantly higher than the values of 20.0