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Sample records for mechanical property estimations

  1. [Estimations of mechanical properties of bones using nanoindentation].

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Nanoindentation has been applied in recent years to measure the mechanical properties of bone tissues at a microscopic scale, overcoming the limitations of traditional mechanical testing techniques for small samples. This method is precise and accurate and appears well suited for measuring mechanical properties in bone. Dynamic nanoindentation is also a promising method of measuring the viscoelastic properties of bone tissues at smaller length and load scales than allowed by other testing methods, thus allowing individual constituents and local regions of inhomogeneous tissues to be characterized individually. This article describes our nanoindentation studies of bone tissues with recent studies. PMID:26728534

  2. Estimating Trabecular Bone Mechanical Properties From Non-Invasive Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Harry A.; Webster, Laurie

    1997-01-01

    An important component in developing countermeasures for maintaining musculoskeletal integrity during long-term space flight is an effective and meaningful method of monitoring skeletal condition. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an attractive non-invasive approach because it avoids the exposure to radiation associated with X-ray based imaging and also provides measures related to bone microstructure rather than just density. The purpose of the research for the 1996 Summer Faculty Fellowship period was to extend the usefulness of the MRI data to estimate the mechanical properties of trabecular bone. The main mechanical properties of interest are the elastic modulus and ultimate strength. Correlations are being investigated between these and fractal analysis parameters, MRI relaxation times, apparent densities, and bone mineral densities. Bone specimens from both human and equine donors have been studied initially to ensure high-quality MR images. Specimens were prepared and scanned from human proximal tibia bones as well as the equine distal radius. The quality of the images from the human bone appeared compromised due to freezing artifact, so only equine bone was included in subsequent procedures since these specimens could be acquired and imaged fresh before being frozen. MRI scans were made spanning a 3.6 cm length on each of 5 equine distal radius specimens. The images were then sent to Dr. Raj Acharya of the State University of New York at Buffalo for fractal analysis. Each piece was cut into 3 slabs approximately 1.2 cm thick and high-resolution contact radiographs were made to provide images for comparing fractal analysis with MR images. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans were also made of each slab for subsequent bone mineral density determination. Slabs were cut into cubes for mechanical using a slow-speed diamond blade wafering saw (Buehler Isomet). The dimensions and wet weights of each cube specimen were measured and recorded. Wet weights

  3. Estimation of mechanical properties of nanomaterials using artificial intelligence methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayaraghavan, V.; Garg, A.; Wong, C. H.; Tai, K.

    2014-09-01

    Computational modeling tools such as molecular dynamics (MD), ab initio, finite element modeling or continuum mechanics models have been extensively applied to study the properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) based on given input variables such as temperature, geometry and defects. Artificial intelligence techniques can be used to further complement the application of numerical methods in characterizing the properties of CNTs. In this paper, we have introduced the application of multi-gene genetic programming (MGGP) and support vector regression to formulate the mathematical relationship between the compressive strength of CNTs and input variables such as temperature and diameter. The predictions of compressive strength of CNTs made by these models are compared to those generated using MD simulations. The results indicate that MGGP method can be deployed as a powerful method for predicting the compressive strength of the carbon nanotubes.

  4. Non-invasive mechanical properties estimation of embedded objects using tactile imaging sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleheen, Firdous; Oleksyuk, Vira; Sahu, Amrita; Won, Chang-Hee

    2013-05-01

    Non-invasive mechanical property estimation of an embedded object (tumor) can be used in medicine for characterization between malignant and benign lesions. We developed a tactile imaging sensor which is capable of detecting mechanical properties of inclusions. Studies show that stiffness of tumor is a key physiological discerning parameter for malignancy. As our sensor compresses the tumor from the surface, the sensing probe deforms, and the light scatters. This forms the tactile image. Using the features of the image, we can estimate the mechanical properties such as size, depth, and elasticity of the embedded object. To test the performance of the method, a phantom study was performed. Silicone rubber balls were used as embedded objects inside the tissue mimicking substrate made of Polydimethylsiloxane. The average relative errors for size, depth, and elasticity were found to be 67.5%, 48.2%, and 69.1%, respectively. To test the feasibility of the sensor in estimating the elasticity of tumor, a pilot clinical study was performed on twenty breast cancer patients. The estimated elasticity was correlated with the biopsy results. Preliminary results show that the sensitivity of 67% and the specificity of 91.7% for elasticity. Results from the clinical study suggest that the tactile imaging sensor may be used as a tumor malignancy characterization tool.

  5. Estimation of mechanical properties of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.

    1991-10-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting Charpy- impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of aged cast stainless steels from known material information. The ``saturation`` impact strength and fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel, i.e., the minimum value that would be achieved for the material after long-term service, is estimated from the chemical composition of the steel. Mechanical properties as a function of time and temperature of reactor service are estimated from impact energy and flow stress of the unaged material and the kinetics of embrittlement, which are also determined from chemical composition. The J{sub IC} values are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented. A common ``lower-bound`` J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, ferrite content, and temperature.

  6. Rock mass mechanical property estimations for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.; Hardy, M.P.; Bauer, S.J.

    1993-06-01

    Rock mass mechanical properties are important in the design of drifts and ramps. These properties are used in evaluations of the impacts of thermomechanical loading of potential host rock within the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Representative intact rock and joint mechanical properties were selected for welded and nonwelded tuffs from the currently available data sources. Rock mass qualities were then estimated using both the Norwegian Geotechnical Institute (Q) and Geomechanics Rating (RMR) systems. Rock mass mechanical properties were developed based on estimates of rock mass quality, the current knowledge of intact properties, and fracture/joint characteristics. Empirical relationships developed to correlate the rock mass quality indices and the rock mass mechanical properties were then used to estimate the range of rock mass mechanical properties.

  7. Regression relations for estimating the mechanical properties of steels subjected to solid-solution hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protopopov, E. A.; Val'ter, A. I.; Protopopov, A. A.; Malenko, P. I.

    2015-07-01

    An approach is proposed to obtain regression relations to estimate the mechanical properties of steels subjected to solid-solution hardening. The applicability of the developed approach is shown for hot-rolled sheet austenitic iron-nickel and nickel alloys after quenching, toughened low-alloy structural steels with a sorbite structure in the case of full hardenabilty, sheet corrosion-resistant ferritic steels after softening heat treatment, and corrosion-resistant austenitic steels after austenitization. The derived regression relations serve as the basis for correcting the chemical composition of a metal melt to ensure the required level of the mechanical properties of ready products by controlling the degree of solid-solution hardening.

  8. Congruence of Imaging Estimators and Mechanical Measurements of Viscoelastic Properties of Soft Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Man; Castaneda, Benjamin; Wu, Zhe; Nigwekar, Priya; Joseph, Jean V.; Rubens, Deborah J.; Parker, Kevin J.

    2007-01-01

    Biomechanical properties of soft tissues are important for a wide range of medical applications, such as surgical simulation and planning and detection of lesions by elasticity imaging modalities. Currently, the data in the literature is limited and conflicting. Furthermore, to assess the biomechanical properties of living tissue in vivo, reliable imaging-based estimators must be developed and verified. For these reasons we developed and compared two independent quantitative methods – crawling wave estimator (CRE) and mechanical measurement (MM) for soft tissue characterization. The CRE method images shear wave interference patterns from which the shear wave velocity can be determined and hence the Young’s modulus can be obtained. The MM method provides the complex Young’s modulus of the soft tissue from which both elastic and viscous behavior can be extracted. This article presents the systematic comparison between these two techniques on the measurement of gelatin phantom, veal liver, thermal-treated veal liver, and human prostate. It was observed that the Young’s moduli of liver and prostate tissues slightly increase with frequency. The experimental results of the two methods are highly congruent, suggesting CRE and MM methods can be reliably used to investigate viscoelastic properties of other soft tissues, with CRE having the advantages of operating in nearly real time and in situ. PMID:17604902

  9. Evaluation of the mechanical behaviour and estimation of the elastic properties of porcine zonular fibres.

    PubMed

    Bocskai, Zoltán I; Sándor, Gábor L; Kiss, Zoltán; Bojtár, Imre; Nagy, Zoltán Z

    2014-10-17

    The mechanical behaviour of zonular fibres greatly affects the accommodation process in mammalian eyes. This paper introduces a detailed measurement procedure for the purpose of obtaining the force-displacement diagram necessary to evaluate the mechanical properties of porcine zonular fibres in situ. It is a complex technique, keeping the integrity of the zonular bundles between the crystalline lens and the ciliary muscle cells. We present a brief description of the measurement procedure both in theory and in practice, along with the force-displacement diagrams acquired from a porcine sample group. The strengths of this newly developed method are the unequivocal force transmission between the sample and the transducer, and the intact connection between the ciliary body and the crystalline lens via zonular fibres. With the aid of these measurements, we define an estimated material model for the zonular apparatus both analytically and using the finite element method. The two different evaluation methods show close agreement in the calculated Young's modulus for the zonular fibres. The range of the calculated elastic modulus is 200-250 kPa. This new measuring method is adaptable to human specimens. Despite its complexity, the entire procedure and the evaluation part are reproducible. The constitutive model aims to shed light on the mechanics of the accommodation process. PMID:25242131

  10. Simulation based estimation of dynamic mechanical properties for viscoelastic materials used for vocal fold models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupitsch, Stefan J.; Ilg, Jürgen; Sutor, Alexander; Lerch, Reinhard; Döllinger, Michael

    2011-08-01

    In order to obtain a deeper understanding of the human phonation process and the mechanisms generating sound, realistic setups are built up containing artificial vocal folds. Usually, these vocal folds consist of viscoelastic materials (e.g., polyurethane mixtures). Reliable simulation based studies on the setups require the mechanical properties of the utilized viscoelastic materials. The aim of this work is the identification of mechanical material parameters (Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and loss factor) for those materials. Therefore, we suggest a low-cost measurement setup, the so-called vibration transmission analyzer (VTA) enabling to analyze the transfer behavior of viscoelastic materials for propagating mechanical waves. With the aid of a mathematical Inverse Method, the material parameters are adjusted in a convenient way so that the simulation results coincide with the measurement results for the transfer behavior. Contrary to other works, we determine frequency dependent functions for the mechanical properties characterizing the viscoelastic material in the frequency range of human speech (100-250 Hz). The results for three different materials clearly show that the Poisson's ratio is close to 0.5 and that the Young's modulus increases with higher frequencies. For a frequency of 400 Hz, the Young's modulus of the investigated viscoelastic materials is approximately 80% higher than for the static case (0 Hz). We verify the identified mechanical properties with experiments on fabricated vocal fold models. Thereby, only small deviations between measurements and simulations occur.

  11. Estimation of mechanical properties of panels based on modal density and mean mobility measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elie, Benjamin; Gautier, François; David, Bertrand

    2013-11-01

    The mechanical characteristics of wood panels used by instrument makers are related to numerous factors, including the nature of the wood or characteristic of the wood sample (direction of fibers, micro-structure nature). This leads to variations in Young's modulus, the mass density, and the damping coefficients. Existing methods for estimating these parameters are not suitable for instrument makers, mainly because of the need of expensive experimental setups, or complicated protocols, which are not adapted to a daily practice in a workshop. In this paper, a method for estimating Young's modulus, the mass density, and the modal loss factors of flat panels, requiring a few measurement points and an affordable experimental setup, is presented. It is based on the estimation of two characteristic quantities: the modal density and the mean mobility. The modal density is computed from the values of the modal frequencies estimated by the subspace method ESPRIT (Estimation of Signal Parameters via Rotational Invariance Techniques), associated with the signal enumeration technique ESTER (ESTimation of ERror). This modal identification technique is proved to be robust in the low- and the mid-frequency domains, i.e. when the modal overlap factor does not exceed 1. The estimation of the modal parameters also enables the computation of the modal loss factor in the low- and the mid-frequency domains. An experimental fit with the theoretical expressions for the modal density and the mean mobility enables an accurate estimation of Young's modulus and the mass density of flat panels. A numerical and an experimental study show that the method is robust, and that it requires solely a few measurement points.

  12. Estimation of mechanical properties of gelatin using a microbubble under acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirota, Eriko; Ando, Keita

    2015-12-01

    This paper is concerned with observations of the translation of a microbubble (80 μm or 137 μm in radius) in a viscoelastic medium (3 w% gelatin), which is induced by acoustic radiation force originating from 1 MHz focused ultrasound. An optical system using a high-speed camera was designed to visualize the bubble translation and deformation. If the bubble remains its spherical shape under the sonication, the bubble translation we observed can be described by theory based on the Voigt model for linear viscoelastic solids; mechanical properties of the gelatin are calculated from measurements of the terminal displacement under the sonication.

  13. Ultrasonic Estimation of Mechanical Properties of Pulmonary Arterial Wall Under Normoxic and Hypoxic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Kendall R.; Mukdadi, Osama M.

    2005-04-01

    Secondary pediatric pulmonary hypertension is a disease that could benefit from improved ultrasonic diagnostic techniques. We perform high-frequency in vitro ultrasound measurements (25 MHz to 100 MHz) on fresh and fixed pulmonary arterial walls excised from normoxic and hypoxic Long-Evans rat models. Estimates of the elastic stiffness coefficients are determined from measurements of the speed of sound. Preliminary results indicate that hypoxia leads to up to increase of 20 % in stiffening of the pulmonary arterial wall.

  14. Estimation of mechanical properties of a viscoelastic medium using a laser-induced microbubble interrogated by an acoustic radiation force.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sangpil; Aglyamov, Salavat R; Karpiouk, Andrei B; Kim, Seungsoo; Emelianov, Stanislav Y

    2011-10-01

    An approach to assess the mechanical properties of a viscoelastic medium using laser-induced microbubbles is presented. To measure mechanical properties of the medium, dynamics of a laser-induced cavitation microbubble in viscoelastic medium under acoustic radiation force was investigated. An objective lens with a 1.13 numerical aperture and an 8.0 mm working distance was designed to focus a 532 nm wavelength nanosecond pulsed laser beam and to create a microbubble at the desired location. A 3.5 MHz ultrasound transducer was used to generate acoustic radiation force to excite a laser-induced microbubble. Motion of the microbubble was tracked using a 25 MHz imaging transducer. Agreement between a theoretical model of bubble motion in a viscoelastic medium and experimental measurements was demonstrated. Young's modulii reconstructed using the laser-induced microbubble approach were compared with those measured using a direct uniaxial method over the range from 0.8 to 13 kPa. The results indicate good agreement between methods. Thus, the proposed approach can be used to assess the mechanical properties of a viscoelastic medium. PMID:21973379

  15. Applying the digital image correlation method to estimate the mechanical properties of bacterial biofilms subjected to a wall shear stress.

    PubMed

    Mathias, J D; Stoodley, P

    2009-11-01

    A digital image correlation (DIC) method was applied to characterize the mechanical behavior of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in response to wall shear stress using digital video micrographs taken from biofilm flow cells. The appearance of the biofilm in the transmitted light photomicrographs presented a natural texture which was highly conducive to random encoding for DIC. The displacement fields were calculated for two biofilm specimens. The DIC method concurred with previous analysis showing that biofilms exhibit viscoelastic behavior, but had the advantage over simple length measurements of longitudinal strain that it could precisely measure local strains in length (x) and width (y) within biofilm clusters with a 2 mum resolution as a function of time and wall shear stress. It was concluded that DIC was more accurate at measuring elastic moduli than simple length measurements, but that time-lapse 3D images would enable even more accurate estimates to be performed. PMID:20183128

  16. Three-dimensional, extended field-of-view ultrasound method for estimating large strain mechanical properties of the cervix during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    House, Michael; Feltovich, Helen; Hall, Timothy J; Stack, Trevor; Patel, Atur; Socrate, Simona

    2012-01-01

    Cervical shortening and cervical insufficiency contribute to a significant number of preterm births. However, the deformation mechanisms that control how the cervix changes its shape from long and closed to short and dilated are not clear. Investigation of the biomechanical problem is limited by (1) lack of thorough characterization of the three-dimensional anatomical changes associated with cervical deformation and (2) difficulty measuring cervical tissue properties in vivo. The objective of the present study was to explore the feasibility of using three-dimensional ultrasound and fundal pressure to obtain anatomically-accurate numerical models of large-strain cervical deformation during pregnancy and enable noninvasive assessment of cervical-tissue compliance. Healthy subjects (n = 6) and one subject with acute cervical insufficiency in the midtrimester were studied. Extended field-of-view ultrasound images were obtained of the entire uterus and cervix. These images aided construction of anatomically accurate numerical models. Cervical loading was achieved with fundal pressure, which was quantified with a vaginal pressure catheter. In one subject, the anatomical response to fundal pressure was matched by a model-based simulation of the deformation response, thereby deriving the corresponding cervical mechanical properties and showing the feasibility of noninvasive assessment of compliance. The results of this pilot study demonstrate the feasibility of a biomechanical modeling framework for estimating cervical mechanical properties in vivo. An improved understanding of cervical biomechanical function will clarify the pathophysiology of cervical shortening. PMID:22655487

  17. A three-dimensional, extended field of view ultrasound method for estimating large strain mechanical properties of the cervix during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    House, Michael; Feltovich, Helen; Hall, Timothy J; Stack, Trevor; Patel, Atur; Socrate, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Cervical shortening and cervical insufficiency contribute to a significant number of preterm births. However, the deformation mechanisms that control how the cervix changes its shape from long and closed to short and dilated are not clear. Investigation of the biomechanical problem is limited by 1) lack of thorough characterization of the three-dimensional anatomical changes associated with cervical deformation and 2) difficulty measuring cervical tissue properties in vivo. The objective of the present study was to explore the feasibility of using three-dimensional ultrasound and fundal pressure to obtain anatomically accurate numerical models of large-strain cervical deformation during pregnancy and enable non-invasive assessment of cervical tissue compliance. Healthy subjects (n=6) and one subject with acute cervical insufficiency in the midtrimester were studied. Extended field of view ultrasound images were obtained of the entire uterus and cervix. These images aided construction of anatomically accurate numerical models. Cervical loading was achieved with fundal pressure, which was quantified with a vaginal pressure catheter. In one subject, the anatomical response to fundal pressure was matched by a model-based simulation of the deformation response, thereby deriving the corresponding cervical mechanical properties and showing the feasibility of non-invasive assessment of compliance. The results of this pilot study demonstrate the feasibility of a biomechanical modeling framework for estimating cervical mechanical properties in vivo. An improved understanding of cervical biomechanical function will clarify the pathophysiology of cervical shortening. PMID:22655487

  18. Experimental Validation of Strategy for the Inverse Estimation of Mechanical Properties and Coefficient of Friction in Flat Rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Vinod; Singh, Arbind Kumar; Dixit, Uday Shanker

    2016-06-01

    Flat rolling is one of the most widely used metal forming processes. For proper control and optimization of the process, modelling of the process is essential. Modelling of the process requires input data about material properties and friction. In batch production mode of rolling with newer materials, it may be difficult to determine the input parameters offline. In view of it, in the present work, a methodology to determine these parameters online by the measurement of exit temperature and slip is verified experimentally. It is observed that the inverse prediction of input parameters could be done with a reasonable accuracy. It was also assessed experimentally that there is a correlation between micro-hardness and flow stress of the material; however the correlation between surface roughness and reduction is not that obvious.

  19. Mechanical Properties of Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Robert; Becerril, Joseph; Jeevarajan, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Many physiologic and pathologic processes alter the biomechanical properties of the tissue they affect, and these changes may be manifest at the single cell level. The normal and abnormal mechanical properties of a given cell type can be established with the aid of an atomic force microscope (AFM), nonetheless, consistency in the area of the tip has been a mayor limitation of using the AFM for quantitative measurements of mechanical properties. This project attempts to overcome this limitation by using materials with a known elastic modulus, which resembles the one of the cell, to create force-deformation curves to calculate the area of indentation by means of Hooke s Law (sigma = E(epsilon)), which states that stress (sigma) is proportional to the strain (epsilon) where the constant of proportionality, E, is called the Young s modulus, also referred as the elastic modulus. Hook s Law can be rearranged to find the area of indentation (Area= Force/ E(epsilon)), where the indentation force is defined by the means of the added mass spring calibration method.

  20. Mechanical Properties of Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmenter, Kelly E.; Milstein, Frederick

    1995-01-01

    Aerogels are extremely low density solids that are characterized by a high porosity and pore sizes on the order of nanometers. Their low thermal conductivity and sometimes transparent appearance make them desirable for applications such as insulation in cryogenic vessels and between double paned glass in solar architecture. An understanding of the mechanical properties of aerogels is necessary before aerogels can be used in load bearing applications. In the present study, the mechanical behavior of various types of fiber-reinforced silica aerogels was investigated with hardness, compression, tension and shear tests. Particular attention was paid to the effects of processing parameters, testing conditions, storage environment, and age on the aerogels' mechanical response. The results indicate that the addition of fibers to the aerogel matrix generally resulted in softer, weaker materials with smaller elastic moduli. Furthermore, the testing environment significantly affected compression results. Tests in ethanol show an appreciable amount of scatter, and are not consistent with results for tests in air. In fact, the compression specimens appeared to crack and begin to dissolve upon exposure to the ethanol solution. This is consistent with the inherent hydrophobic nature of these aerogels. In addition, the aging process affected the aerogels' mechanical behavior by increasing their compressive strength and elastic moduli while decreasing their strain at fracture. However, desiccation of the specimens did not appreciably affect the mechanical properties, even though it reduced the aerogel density by removing trapped moisture. Finally, tension and shear test results indicate that the shear strength of the aerogels exceeds the tensile strength. This is consistent with the response of brittle materials. Future work should concentrate on mechanical testing at cryogenic temperatures, and should involve more extensive tensile tests. Moreover, before the mechanical response

  1. Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengle, Thomas (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Numerous topics in flight mechanics and estimation were discussed. Satellite attitude control, quaternion estimation, orbit and attitude determination, spacecraft maneuvers, spacecraft navigation, gyroscope calibration, spacecraft rendevous, and atmospheric drag model calculations for spacecraft lifetime prediction are among the topics covered.

  2. Psychometric Properties of IRT Proficiency Estimates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolen, Michael J.; Tong, Ye

    2010-01-01

    Psychometric properties of item response theory proficiency estimates are considered in this paper. Proficiency estimators based on summed scores and pattern scores include non-Bayes maximum likelihood and test characteristic curve estimators and Bayesian estimators. The psychometric properties investigated include reliability, conditional…

  3. Mechanical properties of nanophase materials

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, R.W.; Fougere, G.E.

    1993-11-01

    It has become possible in recent years to synthesize new materials under controlled conditions with constituent structures on a nanometer size scale (below 100 nm). These novel nanophase materials have grain-size dependent mechanical properties significantly different than those of their coarser-grained counterparts. For example, nanophase metals are much stronger and apparently less ductile than conventional metals, while nanophase ceramics are more ductile and more easily formed than conventional ceramics. The observed mechanical property changes are related to grain size limitations and/or the large percentage of atoms in grain boundary environments; they can also be affected by such features as flaw populations, strains and impurity levels that can result from differing synthesis and processing methods. An overview of what is presently known about the mechanical properties of nanophase materials, including both metals and ceramics, is presented. Some possible atomic mechanisms responsible for the observed behavior in these materials are considered in light of their unique structures.

  4. Estimation of Skidding Offered by Ackermann Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Are Padma; Venkatachalam, Rapur

    2016-04-01

    Steering for a four wheeler is being provided by Ackermann mechanism. Though it cannot always provide correct steering conditions, it is very popular because of its simple nature. A correct steering would avoid skidding of the tires, and thereby enhance their lives as the wear of the tires is reduced. In this paper it is intended to analyze Ackermann mechanism for its performance. A method of estimating skidding due to improper steering is proposed. Two parameters are identified using which the length of skidding can be estimated.

  5. Estimation of Fluid Properties and Phase Equilibria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herskowitz, M.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a course (given to junior/senior students with strong background in thermodynamics and transport phenomena) that covers the theoretical and practical aspects of properties estimation. An outline for the course is included. (JN)

  6. Mechanical Properties of Respiratory Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Sieck, Gary C.; Ferreira, Leonardo F.; Reid, Michael B.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2014-01-01

    Striated respiratory muscles are necessary for lung ventilation and to maintain the patency of the upper airway. The basic structural and functional properties of respiratory muscles are similar to those of other striated muscles (both skeletal and cardiac). The sarcomere is the fundamental organizational unit of striated muscles and sarcomeric proteins underlie the passive and active mechanical properties of muscle fibers. In this respect, the functional categorization of different fiber types provides a conceptual framework to understand the physiological properties of respiratory muscles. Within the sarcomere, the interaction between the thick and thin filaments at the level of cross-bridges provides the elementary unit of force generation and contraction. Key to an understanding of the unique functional differences across muscle fiber types are differences in cross-bridge recruitment and cycling that relate to the expression of different myosin heavy chain isoforms in the thick filament. The active mechanical properties of muscle fibers are characterized by the relationship between myoplasmic Ca2+ and cross-bridge recruitment, force generation and sarcomere length (also cross-bridge recruitment), external load and shortening velocity (cross-bridge cycling rate), and cross-bridge cycling rate and ATP consumption. Passive mechanical properties are also important reflecting viscoelastic elements within sarcomeres as well as the extracellular matrix. Conditions that affect respiratory muscle performance may have a range of underlying pathophysiological causes, but their manifestations will depend on their impact on these basic elemental structures. PMID:24265238

  7. Mechanical properties of nanocrystalline cobalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimpoor, Amir A.; Erb, Uwe

    2006-05-01

    Due to their excellent wear and corrosion properties, nanocrystalline cobalt and several cobalt alloys made by electrodeposition are currently being developed as environmentally benign replacement coatings for hard chromium electrodeposits. The focus of this study is on the mechanical properties of nanocrystalline cobalt, which are currently not well understood. A comparison is presented for hardness, tensile properties, Charpy impact properties and fracture surface analysis of both nanocrystalline (grain size: 12 nm) and conventional polycrystalline (grain size: 4.8 m) cobalt. It is shown that the hardness and tensile strength of nanocrystalline cobalt is 2-3 times higher than for polycrystalline cobalt. However, in contrast to other nanocrystalline materials tested previously, nanocrystalline cobalt retains considerable ductility with elongation to fracture values up to 7%.

  8. Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Kathy R. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This conference publication includes 41 papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics/ Estimation Theory Symposium on May 16-18, 1995. Sponsored by the Flight Dynamics Division of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination, and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  9. Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greatorex, Scott (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This conference publication includes 34 papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics/ Estimation Theory Symposium on May 14-16, 1996. Sponsored by the Flight Dynamics Division of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination, and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  10. Determinants of the mechanical properties of bones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. B.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanical properties of bones are governed by the same principles as those of man-made load-bearing structures, but the organism is able to adapt its bone structure to changes in skeletal loading. In this overview of the determinants of the strength and stiffness of bone, a continuum approach has been taken, in which the behavior of a macroscopic structure depends on its shape and size, and on the mechanical properties of the material within. The latter are assumed to depend on the composition (porosity and mineralization) and organization (trabecular or cortical bone architecture, collagen fiber orientation, fatigue damage) of the bone. The effects of each of these factors are reviewed. Also, the possible means of non-invasively estimating the strength or other mechanical properties of a bone are reviewed, including quantitative computed tomography, photon absorptiometry, and ultrasonic measurements. The best estimates of strength have been obtained with photon absorptiometry and computed tomography, which at best are capable of accounting for 90% of the strength variability in a simple in vitro test, but results from different laboratories have been highly variable.

  11. Tensile mechanical properties of human forearm tendons.

    PubMed

    Weber, J F; Agur, A M R; Fattah, A Y; Gordon, K D; Oliver, M L

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies of the mechanical properties of tendons in the upper limb have used embalmed specimens or sub-optimal methods of measurement. The aim of this study was to determine the biomechanical properties of all tendons from five fresh frozen cadaveric forearms using updated methodology. The cross-sectional area of tendons was accurately measured using a laser reflectance system. Tensile testing was done in a precision servo-hydraulic device with cryo-clamp fixation. We determined that the cross-sectional area of some tendons is variable and directly influences the calculated material properties; visual estimation of this is unreliable. Data trends illustrate that digital extensor tendons possess the greatest tensile strength and a higher Young's modulus than other tendon types. PMID:25940499

  12. Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengle, Thomas (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    This conference publication includes 32 papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium on May 22-25, 1990. Sponsored by the Flight Dynamics Division of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium features technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  13. Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium, 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Kathy R. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This conference publication includes 41 papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium on May 17-19, 1994. Sponsored by the Flight Dynamics Division of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  14. Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengle, Thomas (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    This conference publication includes 28 papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium on May 10 to 11, 1988. Sponsored by the Flight Dynamics Division of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium features technical papers on a wide range of issue related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  15. Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengle, Thomas H. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This conference publication includes 40 papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium on May 5-7, 1992. Sponsored by the Flight Dynamics Division of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination, and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  16. Thermal Property Parameter Estimation of TPS Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddren, Jesse

    1998-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the thermophysical properties of TPS (thermal protection system) materials is necessary for pre-flight design and post-flight data analysis. Thermal properties, such as thermal conductivity and the volumetric specific heat, can be estimated from transient temperature measurements using non-linear parameter estimation methods. Property values are derived by minimizing a functional of the differences between measured and calculated temperatures. High temperature thermal response testing of TPS materials is usually done in arc-jet or radiant heating facilities which provide a quasi one-dimensional heating environment. Last year, under the NASA-ASEE-Stanford Fellowship Program, my work focused on developing a radiant heating apparatus. This year, I have worked on increasing the fidelity of the experimental measurements, optimizing the experimental procedures and interpreting the data.

  17. Woven TPS Mechanical Property Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzales, Gregory Lewis; Kao, David Jan-Woei; Stackpoole, Margaret M.

    2013-01-01

    Woven Thermal Protection Systems (WTPS) is a relatively new program funded by the Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT). The WTPS approach to producing TPS architectures uses precisely engineered 3-D weaving techniques that allow tailoring material characteristics needed to meet specific mission requirements. A series of mechanical tests were performed to evaluate performance of different weave types, and get a better understanding of failure modes expected in these three-dimensional architectures. These properties will aid in material down selection and guide selection of the appropriate WTPS for a potential mission.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Niobium Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Matalevich, Joseph R.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical stability of bulk Nb cavity is an important aspect to be considered in relation to cavity material, geometry and treatments. Mechanical properties of Nb are typically obtained from uniaxial tensile tests of small samples. In this contribution we report the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and local strain along the contour of single-cell cavities made of ingot and fine-grain Nb of different purity subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. Measurements have been done on cavities subjected to different heat treatments. Good agreement between finite element analysis simulations and experimental data in the elastic regime was obtained with a single set of values of Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio. The experimental results indicate that the yield strength of medium-purity ingot Nb cavities is higher than that of fine-grain, high-purity Nb.

  19. Mechanical properties of metal dihydrides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schultz, Peter A.; Snow, Clark S.

    2016-02-04

    First-principles calculations are used to characterize the bulk elastic properties of cubic and tetragonal phase metal dihydrides,more » $$\\text{M}{{\\text{H}}_{2}}$$ {$$\\text{M}$$ = Sc, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, lanthanides} to gain insight into the mechanical properties that govern the aging behavior of rare-earth di-tritides as the constituent 3H, tritium, decays into 3He. As tritium decays, helium is inserted in the lattice, the helium migrates and collects into bubbles, that then can ultimately create sufficient internal pressure to rupture the material. The elastic properties of the materials are needed to construct effective mesoscale models of the process of bubble growth and fracture. Dihydrides of the scandium column and most of the rare-earths crystalize into a cubic phase, while dihydrides from the next column, Ti, Zr, and Hf, distort instead into the tetragonal phase, indicating incipient instabilities in the phase and potentially significant changes in elastic properties. We report the computed elastic properties of these dihydrides, and also investigate the off-stoichiometric phases as He or vacancies accumulate. As helium builds up in the cubic phase, the shear moduli greatly soften, converting to the tetragonal phase. Conversely, the tetragonal phases convert very quickly to cubic with the removal of H from the lattice, while the cubic phases show little change with removal of H. Finally, the source and magnitude of the numerical and physical uncertainties in the modeling are analyzed and quantified to establish the level of confidence that can be placed in the computational results, and this quantified confidence is used to justify using the results to augment and even supplant experimental measurements.« less

  20. Mechanical properties of metal dihydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Peter A.; Snow, Clark S.

    2016-03-01

    First-principles calculations are used to characterize the bulk elastic properties of cubic and tetragonal phase metal dihydrides, \\text{M}{{\\text{H}}2} {\\text{M}   =  Sc, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, lanthanides} to gain insight into the mechanical properties that govern the aging behavior of rare-earth di-tritides as the constituent 3H, tritium, decays into 3He. As tritium decays, helium is inserted in the lattice, the helium migrates and collects into bubbles, that then can ultimately create sufficient internal pressure to rupture the material. The elastic properties of the materials are needed to construct effective mesoscale models of the process of bubble growth and fracture. Dihydrides of the scandium column and most of the rare-earths crystalize into a cubic phase, while dihydrides from the next column, Ti, Zr, and Hf, distort instead into the tetragonal phase, indicating incipient instabilities in the phase and potentially significant changes in elastic properties. We report the computed elastic properties of these dihydrides, and also investigate the off-stoichiometric phases as He or vacancies accumulate. As helium builds up in the cubic phase, the shear moduli greatly soften, converting to the tetragonal phase. Conversely, the tetragonal phases convert very quickly to cubic with the removal of H from the lattice, while the cubic phases show little change with removal of H. The source and magnitude of the numerical and physical uncertainties in the modeling are analyzed and quantified to establish the level of confidence that can be placed in the computational results, and this quantified confidence is used to justify using the results to augment and even supplant experimental measurements.

  1. Mechanical Properties of Nanocrystal Supercrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, Enrico; Podsiadlo, Paul; Shevchenko, Elena; Ogletree, D. Frank; Delplancke-Ogletree, Marie-Paule; Ashby, Paul D.

    2009-12-30

    Colloidal nanocrystals attract significant interest due to their potential applications in electronic, magnetic, and optical devices. Nanocrystal supercrystals (NCSCs) are particularly appealing for their well ordered structure and homogeneity. The interactions between organic ligands that passivate the inorganic nanocrystal cores critically influence their self-organization into supercrystals, By investigating the mechanical properties of supercrystals, we can directly characterize the particle-particle interactions in a well-defined geometry, and gain insight into both the self-assembly process and the potential applications of nanocrystal supercrystals. Here we report nanoindentation studies of well ordered lead-sulfide (Pbs) nanocrystal supercrystals. Their modulus and hardness were found to be similar to soft polymers at 1.7 GPa and 70 MPa respectively and the fractures toughness was 39 KPa/m1/2, revealing the extremely brittle nature of these materials.

  2. Mechanical properties of titanium connectors.

    PubMed

    Neo, T K; Chai, J; Gilbert, J L; Wozniak, W T; Engelman, M J

    1996-01-01

    The tensile mechanical properties of welded titanium joints were studied, and intact titanium was used as controls. Welded joints were fabricated with either a stereographic laser-welding technique or a gas tungsten arc welding technique. The effect of heat treatment following a simulated porcelain application was also investigated. Heat-treated laser welds had significantly lower ultimate tensile strengths. Heat treatment had no effect on the modulus of elasticity or elongation, but generally significantly decreased the yield strength of the titanium specimens. The gas tungsten are welding specimens had significantly higher yield strengths and elastic moduli than the other two groups. The elongation of the control specimens was significantly greater than the elongation of the gas tungsten arc welding specimens, which was in turn significantly higher than that of the laser-welded specimens. PMID:8957877

  3. Cardiac output estimation using pulmonary mechanics in mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The application of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) in mechanically ventilated (MV) patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) decreases cardiac output (CO). Accurate measurement of CO is highly invasive and is not ideal for all MV critically ill patients. However, the link between the PEEP used in MV, and CO provides an opportunity to assess CO via MV therapy and other existing measurements, creating a CO measure without further invasiveness. This paper examines combining models of diffusion resistance and lung mechanics, to help predict CO changes due to PEEP. The CO estimator uses an initial measurement of pulmonary shunt, and estimations of shunt changes due to PEEP to predict CO at different levels of PEEP. Inputs to the cardiac model are the PV loops from the ventilator, as well as the oxygen saturation values using known respiratory inspired oxygen content. The outputs are estimates of pulmonary shunt and CO changes due to changes in applied PEEP. Data from two published studies are used to assess and initially validate this model. The model shows the effect on oxygenation due to decreased CO and decreased shunt, resulting from increased PEEP. It concludes that there is a trade off on oxygenation parameters. More clinically importantly, the model also examines how the rate of CO drop with increased PEEP can be used as a method to determine optimal PEEP, which may be used to optimise MV therapy with respect to the gas exchange achieved, as well as accounting for the impact on the cardiovascular system and its management. PMID:21108836

  4. Cardiac output estimation using pulmonary mechanics in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Ashwath; Chase, J Geoffrey; Hann, Christopher E; Shaw, Geoffrey M

    2010-01-01

    The application of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) in mechanically ventilated (MV) patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) decreases cardiac output (CO). Accurate measurement of CO is highly invasive and is not ideal for all MV critically ill patients. However, the link between the PEEP used in MV, and CO provides an opportunity to assess CO via MV therapy and other existing measurements, creating a CO measure without further invasiveness.This paper examines combining models of diffusion resistance and lung mechanics, to help predict CO changes due to PEEP. The CO estimator uses an initial measurement of pulmonary shunt, and estimations of shunt changes due to PEEP to predict CO at different levels of PEEP. Inputs to the cardiac model are the PV loops from the ventilator, as well as the oxygen saturation values using known respiratory inspired oxygen content. The outputs are estimates of pulmonary shunt and CO changes due to changes in applied PEEP. Data from two published studies are used to assess and initially validate this model.The model shows the effect on oxygenation due to decreased CO and decreased shunt, resulting from increased PEEP. It concludes that there is a trade off on oxygenation parameters. More clinically importantly, the model also examines how the rate of CO drop with increased PEEP can be used as a method to determine optimal PEEP, which may be used to optimise MV therapy with respect to the gas exchange achieved, as well as accounting for the impact on the cardiovascular system and its management. PMID:21108836

  5. Mechanical Properties of Primary Cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battle, Christopher; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that the primary cilium, long thought to be a vestigial cellular appendage with no function, is involved in a multitude of sensory functions. One example, interesting from both a biophysical and medical standpoint, is the primary cilium of kidney epithelial cells, which acts as a mechanosensitive flow sensor. Genetic defects in ciliary function can cause, e.g., polycystic kidney disease (PKD). The material properties of these non-motile, microtubule-based 9 +0 cilia, and the way they are anchored to the cell cytoskeleton, are important to know if one wants to understand the mechano-electrochemical response of these cells, which is mediated by their cilia. We have probed the mechanical properties, boundary conditions, and dynamics of the cilia of MDCK cells using optical traps and DIC/fluorescence microscopy. We found evidence for both elastic relaxation of the cilia themselves after bending and for compliance in the intracellular anchoring structures. Angular and positional fluctuations of the cilia reflect both thermal excitations and cellular driving forces.

  6. Aggregate of nanoparticles: rheological and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Wu, Xiaojun; Yang, Wei; Zhai, Yuanming; Xie, Banghu; Yang, Mingbo

    2011-12-01

    The understanding of the rheological and mechanical properties of nanoparticle aggregates is important for the application of nanofillers in nanocompoistes. In this work, we report a rheological study on the rheological and mechanical properties of nano-silica agglomerates in the form of gel network mainly constructed by hydrogen bonds. The elastic model for rubber is modified to analyze the elastic behavior of the agglomerates. By this modified elastic model, the size of the network mesh can be estimated by the elastic modulus of the network which can be easily obtained by rheology. The stress to destroy the aggregates, i.e., the yield stress ( σ y ), and the elastic modulus ( G') of the network are found to be depended on the concentration of nano-silica ( ϕ, wt.%) with the power of 4.02 and 3.83, respectively. Via this concentration dependent behavior, we can extrapolate two important mechanical parameters for the agglomerates in a dense packing state ( ϕ = 1): the shear modulus and the yield stress. Under large deformation (continuous shear flow), the network structure of the aggregates will experience destruction and reconstruction, which gives rise to fluctuations in the viscosity and a shear-thinning behavior.

  7. Machining as a mechanical property test revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David L.

    There is much need for data on mechanical behavior of metals at high strains and strain rates. This need is dictated by modeling of processes like forming and machining, wherein the material in the deformation zone is subjected to severe deformation conditions atypical of conventional material property tests such as tension and torsion. Accurate flow stress data is an essential input for robust prediction of process outputs. Similar requirements arise from applications in high speed ballistic penetration and design of materials for armor. Since the deformation zone in cutting of metals is characterized by unique and extreme combinations of strain, strain rate and temperature, an opportunity exists for using plane-strain cutting as a mechanical property test for measuring flow properties of metals. The feasibility of using plane-strain cutting to measure flow properties of metals is revisited in the light of recent data showing controllability of the deformation conditions in chip formation by systematic variation of process input parameters. A method is outlined as to how the deformation conditions can be varied by changing the process parameters. The method is applied to cutting of commercially pure copper (FCC), iron (BCC) and zinc (HCP). Forces and chip geometries are measured, in conjunction with particle image velocimetry characterization of the deformation using high speed image sequences. The flow stresses are estimated from these measurements. The measured flow stress and its dependence on strain are shown to agree well with prior measurements of these parameters using conventional tests, and flow stress inferred from hardness characterization. The method is also demonstrated to be able to measure properties of metals that recrystallize at room temperature (zinc), wherein quasi-static tests predict much lower strength. Sources of variability and uncertainty in the application of this measurement technique are discussed. Future work in the context of further

  8. Estimating cirrus cloud properties from MIPAS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendrok, J.; Schreier, F.; Höpfner, M.

    2007-04-01

    High resolution mid-infrared limb emission spectra observed by the spaceborne Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) showing evidence of cloud interference are analyzed. Using the new line-by-line multiple scattering [Approximate] Spherical Atmospheric Radiative Transfer code (SARTre), a sensitivity study with respect to cirrus cloud parameters, e.g., optical thickness and particle size distribution, is performed. Cirrus properties are estimated by fitting spectra in three distinct microwindows between 8 and 12 μm. For a cirrus with extremely low ice water path (IWP = 0.1 g/m2) and small effective particle size (D e = 10 μm) simulated spectra are in close agreement with observations in broadband signal and fine structures. We show that a multi-microwindow technique enhances reliability of MIPAS cirrus retrievals compared to single microwindow methods.

  9. Lithophysal Rock Mass Mechanical Properties of the Repository Host Horizon

    SciTech Connect

    D. Rigby

    2004-11-10

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop estimates of key mechanical properties for the lithophysal rock masses of the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) within the repository host horizon, including their uncertainties and spatial variability. The mechanical properties to be characterized include an elastic parameter, Young's modulus, and a strength parameter, uniaxial compressive strength. Since lithophysal porosity is used as a surrogate property to develop the distributions of the mechanical properties, an estimate of the distribution of lithophysal porosity is also developed. The resulting characterizations of rock parameters are important for supporting the subsurface design, developing the preclosure safety analysis, and assessing the postclosure performance of the repository (e.g., drift degradation and modeling of rockfall impacts on engineered barrier system components).

  10. Enhancement of mechanical properties of 123 superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    1995-01-01

    A composition and method of preparing YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x superconductor. Addition of tin oxide containing compounds to YBCO superconductors results in substantial improvement of fracture toughness and other mechanical properties without affect on T.sub.c. About 5-20% additions give rise to substantially improved mechanical properties.

  11. Enhancement of mechanical properties of 123 superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, U.

    1995-04-25

    A composition and method are disclosed of preparing YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} superconductor. Addition of tin oxide containing compounds to YBCO superconductors results in substantial improvement of fracture toughness and other mechanical properties without affect on T{sub c}. About 5-20% additions give rise to substantially improved mechanical properties.

  12. Trabecular Bone Mechanical Properties and Fractal Dimension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Harry A.

    1996-01-01

    Countermeasures for reducing bone loss and muscle atrophy due to extended exposure to the microgravity environment of space are continuing to be developed and improved. An important component of this effort is finite element modeling of the lower extremity and spinal column. These models will permit analysis and evaluation specific to each individual and thereby provide more efficient and effective exercise protocols. Inflight countermeasures and post-flight rehabilitation can then be customized and targeted on a case-by-case basis. Recent Summer Faculty Fellowship participants have focused upon finite element mesh generation, muscle force estimation, and fractal calculations of trabecular bone microstructure. Methods have been developed for generating the three-dimensional geometry of the femur from serial section magnetic resonance images (MRI). The use of MRI as an imaging modality avoids excessive exposure to radiation associated with X-ray based methods. These images can also detect trabecular bone microstructure and architecture. The goal of the current research is to determine the degree to which the fractal dimension of trabecular architecture can be used to predict the mechanical properties of trabecular bone tissue. The elastic modulus and the ultimate strength (or strain) can then be estimated from non-invasive, non-radiating imaging and incorporated into the finite element models to more accurately represent the bone tissue of each individual of interest. Trabecular bone specimens from the proximal tibia are being studied in this first phase of the work. Detailed protocols and procedures have been developed for carrying test specimens through all of the steps of a multi-faceted test program. The test program begins with MRI and X-ray imaging of the whole bones before excising a smaller workpiece from the proximal tibia region. High resolution MRI scans are then made and the piece further cut into slabs (roughly 1 cm thick). The slabs are X-rayed again

  13. A Computational Approach to Investigate Properties of Estimators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caudle, Kyle A.; Ruth, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Teaching undergraduates the basic properties of an estimator can be difficult. Most definitions are easy enough to comprehend, but difficulties often lie in gaining a "good feel" for these properties and why one property might be more desired as compared to another property. Simulations which involve visualization of these properties can…

  14. Microstructure and mechanical properties of sheep horn.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bing; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Jian

    2016-07-01

    The sheep horn presents outstanding mechanical properties of impact resistance and energy absorption, which suits the need of the vehicle bumper design, but the mechanism behind this phenomenon is less investigated. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the sheep horn of Small Tailed Han Sheep (Ovis aries) living in northeast China were investigated in this article. The effect of sampling position and orientation of the sheep horn sheath on mechanical properties were researched by tensile and compression tests. Meanwhile, the surface morphology and microstructure of the sheep horn were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The formation mechanism of the mechanical properties of the sheep horn was investigated by biological coupling analysis. The analytical results indicated that the outstanding mechanical properties of the sheep horn are determined by configuration, structure, surface morphology and material coupling elements. These biological coupling elements make the sheep horn possess super characteristics of crashworthiness and energy absorption through the internal coupling mechanism. We suppose that these findings would make a difference in vehicle bumper design. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:664-674, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27184115

  15. Mechanical property characterization of intraply hybrid composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of the mechanical properties of intraply hybrids made from graphite fiber/epoxy matrix hybridized with secondary S-glass or Kevlar 49 fiber composites is presented. The specimen stress-strain behavior was determined, showing that mechanical properties of intraply hybrid composites can be measured with available methods such as the ten-degree off-axis test for intralaminar shear, and conventional tests for tensile, flexure, and Izod impact properties. The results also showed that combinations of high modulus graphite/S-glass/epoxy matrix composites exist which yield intraply hybrid laminates with the best 'balanced' properties, and that the translation efficiency of mechanical properties from the constituent composites to intraply hybrids may be assessed with a simple equation.

  16. Mechanical properties of low tantalum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kortovich, C. S.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanical property behavior of equiaxed cast B-1900 + Hf alloy as a function of tantalum content was studied. Tensile and stress rupture characterization was conducted on cast to size test bars containing tantalum at the 4.3% (standard level), 2.2% and 0% levels. Casting parameters were selected to duplicate conditions used to prepare test specimens for master metal heat qualification. The mechanical property results as well as results of microstructural/phase analysis of failed test bars are presented.

  17. Estimating topological properties of weighted networks from limited information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielli, Andrea; Cimini, Giulio; Garlaschelli, Diego; Squartini, Angelo

    A typical problem met when studying complex systems is the limited information available on their topology, which hinders our understanding of their structural and dynamical properties. A paramount example is provided by financial networks, whose data are privacy protected. Yet, the estimation of systemic risk strongly depends on the detailed structure of the interbank network. The resulting challenge is that of using aggregate information to statistically reconstruct a network and correctly predict its higher-order properties. Standard approaches either generate unrealistically dense networks, or fail to reproduce the observed topology by assigning homogeneous link weights. Here we develop a reconstruction method, based on statistical mechanics concepts, that exploits the empirical link density in a highly non-trivial way. Technically, our approach consists in the preliminary estimation of node degrees from empirical node strengths and link density, followed by a maximum-entropy inference based on a combination of empirical strengths and estimated degrees. Our method is successfully tested on the international trade network and the interbank money market, and represents a valuable tool for gaining insights on privacy-protected or partially accessible systems. Acknoweledgement to ``Growthcom'' ICT - EC project (Grant No: 611272) and ``Crisislab'' Italian Project.

  18. Thigmomorphogenesis: on the mechanical properties of mechanically perturbed bean plants.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, M J; Telewski, F W; Cooke, P W

    1984-01-01

    The mechanical properties of control and mechanically perturbed (MP) bean stems (Phaseolus vulgaris L., cv. Cherokee wax) were compared. The rubbed plants were greatly hardened against mechanical rupture by previous MP. This hardening was due to a dramatic increase in the flexibility of the stems, but not in their stiffness. The MP-plants were able to bend more than 90 degree without breaking, whereas the control plants broke after just slight bending. A comparison with other work reveals that different species utilize different tactics for achieving similar resistance to rupture due to mechanical stress. PMID:11540788

  19. Estimating the biophysical properties of neurons with intracellular calcium dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jingxin; Rozdeba, Paul J.; Morone, Uriel I.; Daou, Arij; Abarbanel, Henry D. I.

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a conductance-based neuron model coupled to a model of intracellular calcium uptake and release by the endoplasmic reticulum. The intracellular calcium dynamics occur on a time scale that is orders of magnitude slower than voltage spiking behavior. Coupling these mechanisms sets the stage for the appearance of chaotic dynamics, which we observe within certain ranges of model parameter values. We then explore the question of whether one can, using observed voltage data alone, estimate the states and parameters of the voltage plus calcium (V+Ca) dynamics model. We find the answer is negative. Indeed, we show that voltage plus another observed quantity must be known to allow the estimation to be accurate. We show that observing both the voltage time course V (t) and the intracellular Ca time course will permit accurate estimation, and from the estimated model state, accurate prediction after observations are completed. This sets the stage for how one will be able to use a more detailed model of V+Ca dynamics in neuron activity in the analysis of experimental data on individual neurons as well as functional networks in which the nodes (neurons) have these biophysical properties.

  20. Mechanical properties of mesoporous ceria nanoarchitectures.

    PubMed

    Sayle, Thi X T; Inkson, Beverley J; Möbus, Günter; Parker, Stephen C; Seal, Sudipta; Sayle, Dean C

    2014-12-01

    Architectural constructs are engineered to impart desirable mechanical properties facilitating bridges spanning a thousand meters and buildings nearly 1 km in height. However, do the same 'engineering-rules' translate to the nanoscale, where the architectural features are less than 0.0001 mm in size? Here, we calculate the mechanical properties of a porous ceramic functional material, ceria, as a function of its nanoarchitecture using molecular dynamics simulation and predict its yield strength to be almost two orders of magnitude higher than the parent bulk material. In particular, we generate models of nanoporous ceria with either a hexagonal or cubic array of one-dimensional pores and simulate their responses to mechanical load. We find that the mechanical properties are critically dependent upon the orientation between the crystal structure (symmetry, direction) and the pore structure (symmetry, direction). PMID:25322448

  1. Primate dietary ecology in the context of food mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Coiner-Collier, Susan; Scott, Robert S; Chalk-Wilayto, Janine; Cheyne, Susan M; Constantino, Paul; Dominy, Nathaniel J; Elgart, Alison A; Glowacka, Halszka; Loyola, Laura C; Ossi-Lupo, Kerry; Raguet-Schofield, Melissa; Talebi, Mauricio G; Sala, Enrico A; Sieradzy, Pawel; Taylor, Andrea B; Vinyard, Christopher J; Wright, Barth W; Yamashita, Nayuta; Lucas, Peter W; Vogel, Erin R

    2016-09-01

    Substantial variation exists in the mechanical properties of foods consumed by primate species. This variation is known to influence food selection and ingestion among non-human primates, yet no large-scale comparative study has examined the relationships between food mechanical properties and feeding strategies. Here, we present comparative data on the Young's modulus and fracture toughness of natural foods in the diets of 31 primate species. We use these data to examine the relationships between food mechanical properties and dietary quality, body mass, and feeding time. We also examine the relationship between food mechanical properties and categorical concepts of diet that are often used to infer food mechanical properties. We found that traditional dietary categories, such as folivory and frugivory, did not faithfully track food mechanical properties. Additionally, our estimate of dietary quality was not significantly correlated with either toughness or Young's modulus. We found a complex relationship among food mechanical properties, body mass, and feeding time, with a potential interaction between median toughness and body mass. The relationship between mean toughness and feeding time is straightforward: feeding time increases as toughness increases. However, when considering median toughness, the relationship with feeding time may depend upon body mass, such that smaller primates increase their feeding time in response to an increase in median dietary toughness, whereas larger primates may feed for shorter periods of time as toughness increases. Our results emphasize the need for additional studies quantifying the mechanical and chemical properties of primate diets so that they may be meaningfully compared to research on feeding behavior and jaw morphology. PMID:27542555

  2. Mechanical properties of normal versus cancerous breast cells.

    PubMed

    Smelser, Amanda M; Macosko, Jed C; O'Dell, Adam P; Smyre, Scott; Bonin, Keith; Holzwarth, George

    2015-11-01

    A cell's mechanical properties are important in determining its adhesion, migration, and response to the mechanical properties of its microenvironment and may help explain behavioral differences between normal and cancerous cells. Using fluorescently labeled peroxisomes as microrheological probes, the interior mechanical properties of normal breast cells were compared to a metastatic breast cell line, MDA-MB-231. To estimate the mechanical properties of cell cytoplasms from the motions of their peroxisomes, it was necessary to reduce the contribution of active cytoskeletal motions to peroxisome motion. This was done by treating the cells with blebbistatin, to inhibit myosin II, or with sodium azide and 2-deoxy-D-glucose, to reduce intracellular ATP. Using either treatment, the peroxisomes exhibited normal diffusion or subdiffusion, and their mean squared displacements (MSDs) showed that the MDA-MB-231 cells were significantly softer than normal cells. For these two cell types, peroxisome MSDs in treated and untreated cells converged at high frequencies, indicating that cytoskeletal structure was not altered by the drug treatment. The MSDs from ATP-depleted cells were analyzed by the generalized Stokes-Einstein relation to estimate the interior viscoelastic modulus G* and its components, the elastic shear modulus G' and viscous shear modulus G", at angular frequencies between 0.126 and 628 rad/s. These moduli are the material coefficients that enter into stress-strain relations and relaxation times in quantitative mechanical models such as the poroelastic model of the interior regions of cancerous and non-cancerous cells. PMID:25929519

  3. ESTIMATION OF KOREAN PADDY FIELD SOIL PROPERTIES USING OPTICAL REFLECTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An optical sensing approach based on diffuse reflectance has shown potential for rapid and reliable on-site estimation of soil properties. Important sensing ranges and the resulting regression models useful for soil property estimation have been reported. In this study, a similar approach was applie...

  4. Estimation of Korean paddy field soil properties using optical reflectance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An optical sensing approach based on diffuse reflectance has shown potential for rapid and reliable on-site estimation of soil properties. Important sensing ranges and the resulting regression models useful for soil property estimation have been reported. In this study, a similar approach was applie...

  5. Estimation of environmental properties for inorganic compounds using LSER

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, James P.

    1999-01-01

    The Great Lakes Science Center has devised values for inorganic species for use in the environmental property- predictive quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) Linear Solvation Energy Relationship (LSER). Property estimation has been difficult for inorganic species. In this presentation aqueous solubility, bioconcentration and acute aquatic toxicity are estimated for inorganic compounds using existing LSER equations. The best estimations arise from the most accurate description of predominant solution species, many within an order of magnitude. The toxicities also depend on an estimation of the bioactive amount and configuration. A number of anion/cation combinations (salts) still resist accurate property estimation, and the reasons currently are not understood. These new variable values will greatly extend the application and utility of LSER for the estimation of environmental properties.

  6. The mechanical properties of FeAl

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, I.; George, E.P.

    1996-12-31

    Only in the last few years has progress been made in obtaining reproducible mechanical properties data for FeAl. Two sets of observations are the foundation of this progress. The first is that the large vacancy concentrations that exist in FeAl at high temperature are easily retained at low temperature and that these strongly affect the low-temperature mechanical properties. The second is that RT ductility is adversely affected by water vapor. Purpose of this paper is not to present a comprehensive overview of the mechanical properties of FeAl but rather to highlight our understanding of key phenomena and to show how an understanding of the factors which control the yield strength and fracture behavior has followed the discovery of the above two effects. 87 refs, 9 figs.

  7. Estimating topological properties of weighted networks from limited information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimini, Giulio; Squartini, Tiziano; Gabrielli, Andrea; Garlaschelli, Diego

    2015-10-01

    A problem typically encountered when studying complex systems is the limitedness of the information available on their topology, which hinders our understanding of their structure and of the dynamical processes taking place on them. A paramount example is provided by financial networks, whose data are privacy protected: Banks publicly disclose only their aggregate exposure towards other banks, keeping individual exposures towards each single bank secret. Yet, the estimation of systemic risk strongly depends on the detailed structure of the interbank network. The resulting challenge is that of using aggregate information to statistically reconstruct a network and correctly predict its higher-order properties. Standard approaches either generate unrealistically dense networks, or fail to reproduce the observed topology by assigning homogeneous link weights. Here, we develop a reconstruction method, based on statistical mechanics concepts, that makes use of the empirical link density in a highly nontrivial way. Technically, our approach consists in the preliminary estimation of node degrees from empirical node strengths and link density, followed by a maximum-entropy inference based on a combination of empirical strengths and estimated degrees. Our method is successfully tested on the international trade network and the interbank money market, and represents a valuable tool for gaining insights on privacy-protected or partially accessible systems.

  8. Estimating topological properties of weighted networks from limited information.

    PubMed

    Cimini, Giulio; Squartini, Tiziano; Gabrielli, Andrea; Garlaschelli, Diego

    2015-10-01

    A problem typically encountered when studying complex systems is the limitedness of the information available on their topology, which hinders our understanding of their structure and of the dynamical processes taking place on them. A paramount example is provided by financial networks, whose data are privacy protected: Banks publicly disclose only their aggregate exposure towards other banks, keeping individual exposures towards each single bank secret. Yet, the estimation of systemic risk strongly depends on the detailed structure of the interbank network. The resulting challenge is that of using aggregate information to statistically reconstruct a network and correctly predict its higher-order properties. Standard approaches either generate unrealistically dense networks, or fail to reproduce the observed topology by assigning homogeneous link weights. Here, we develop a reconstruction method, based on statistical mechanics concepts, that makes use of the empirical link density in a highly nontrivial way. Technically, our approach consists in the preliminary estimation of node degrees from empirical node strengths and link density, followed by a maximum-entropy inference based on a combination of empirical strengths and estimated degrees. Our method is successfully tested on the international trade network and the interbank money market, and represents a valuable tool for gaining insights on privacy-protected or partially accessible systems. PMID:26565153

  9. Stainless Steel Microstructure and Mechanical Properties Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Switzner, Nathan T

    2010-06-01

    A nitrogen strengthened 21-6-9 stainless steel plate was spinformed into hemispherical test shapes. A battery of laboratory tests was used to characterize the hemispheres. The laboratory tests show that near the pole (axis) of a spinformed hemisphere the yield strength is the lowest because this area endures the least “cold-work” strengthening, i.e., the least deformation. The characterization indicated that stress-relief annealing spinformed stainless steel hemispheres does not degrade mechanical properties. Stress-relief annealing reduces residual stresses while maintaining relatively high mechanical properties. Full annealing completely eliminates residual stresses, but reduces yield strength by about 30%.

  10. Mechanical Properties of Ingot Nb Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Kneisel, Peter; Mammosser, John; Matalevich, Joseph; Rao Myneni, Ganapati

    2014-07-01

    This contribution presents the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and of strain along the contour of a single-cell cavity made of ingot Nb subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. The data were used to infer mechanical properties of this material after cavity fabrication, by comparison with the results from simulation calculations done with ANSYS. The objective is to provide useful information about the mechanical properties of ingot Nb cavities which can be used in the design phase of SRF cavities intended to be built with this material.

  11. Mechanical properties of Silicon Carbide Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhateeb, Abdullah; Zhang, Daqing; McIlroy, David; Aston, David Eric

    2004-05-01

    Silicon carbide nanowires could be potentially useful for high strength materials which lead to the interest in understanding their mechanical properties. In this report we use the digital pulse force microscopy to analyze the mechanical properties of SiC nanowires .Stiffness and adhesion images of SiC nanowires on silicon grating were obtained and calibrated force-distance curves were plotted along the wire which spans on a 1.5 micron trench. Moreover, spring constant and Young's modules have been calculated from the linear part of the force-distance curves.

  12. Mechanical Properties Of Large Sodium Iodide Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Henry M.

    1988-01-01

    Report presents data on mechanical properties of large crystals of thallium-doped sodium iodide. Five specimens in shape of circular flat plates subjected to mechanical tests. Presents test results for each specimen as plots of differential pressure versus center displacement and differential pressure versus stress at center. Also tabulates raw data. Test program also developed procedure for screening candidate crystals for gamma-ray sensor. Procedure eliminates potentially weak crystals before installed and ensures material yielding kept to minimum.

  13. Mechanical properties of polygonal carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ling; Cao, Dapeng

    2012-08-01

    A group of polygonal carbon nanotubes (P-CNTs) have been designed and their mechanical behavior was investigated by classical molecular dynamics simulations. The research aimed at exploring the effects of structure, temperature, and strain rate on the mechanical properties. The results indicate that the Young's modulus of P-CNTs is lower than those of circumcircle carbon nanotubes (C-CNT). Moreover, with an increase in the number of sides to the polygons, the Young's modulus increases and is much closer to that of C-CNT. The effects of temperature and strain rate on the mechanical properties of P-CNTs show that the higher temperature and slower strain rate result in a lower critical strain and weaker tensile strength. In addition, it was found that the critical strains of P-CNTs are dependent on the tube size. Finally, we used the transition-state theory model to predict the critical strain of P-CNTs at given experimental conditions. It is expected that this work could provide feasible means to manipulate the mechanical properties of novel P-CNTs and facilitate the mechanical application of nanostructures as potential electronic devices.A group of polygonal carbon nanotubes (P-CNTs) have been designed and their mechanical behavior was investigated by classical molecular dynamics simulations. The research aimed at exploring the effects of structure, temperature, and strain rate on the mechanical properties. The results indicate that the Young's modulus of P-CNTs is lower than those of circumcircle carbon nanotubes (C-CNT). Moreover, with an increase in the number of sides to the polygons, the Young's modulus increases and is much closer to that of C-CNT. The effects of temperature and strain rate on the mechanical properties of P-CNTs show that the higher temperature and slower strain rate result in a lower critical strain and weaker tensile strength. In addition, it was found that the critical strains of P-CNTs are dependent on the tube size. Finally, we used the

  14. Finite Element Estimation of Meteorite Structural Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Kenneth Arthur

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the project titled Asteroid Threat Assessment at NASA Ames Research Center is to develop risk assessment tools. The expertise in atmospheric entry in the Entry Systems and Technology Division is being used to describe the complex physics of meteor breakup in the atmosphere. The breakup of a meteor is dependent on its structural properties, including homogeneity of the material. The present work describes an 11-week effort in which a literature survey was carried for structural properties of meteoritic material. In addition, the effect of scale on homogeneity isotropy was studied using a Monte Carlo approach in Nastran. The properties were then in a static structural response simulation of an irregularly-shape meteor (138-scale version of Asteroid Itokawa). Finally, an early plan was developed for doctoral research work at Georgia Tech. in the structural failure fragmentation of meteors.

  15. Laminar Tendon Composites with Enhanced Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Kyle A.; Sun, Jeong-Yun; Illeperuma, Widusha R.; Suo, Zhigang; Xu, Qiaobing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A strong isotropic material that is both biocompatible and biodegradable is desired for many biomedical applications, including rotator cuff repair, tendon and ligament repair, vascular grafting, among others. Recently, we developed a technique, called “bioskiving” to create novel 2D and 3D constructs from decellularized tendon, using a combination of mechanical sectioning, and layered stacking and rolling. The unidirectionally aligned collagen nanofibers (derived from sections of decellularized tendon) offer good mechanical properties to the constructs compared with those fabricated from reconstituted collagen. Methods In this paper, we studied the effect that several variables have on the mechanical properties of structures fabricated from tendon slices, including crosslinking density and the orientation in which the fibers are stacked. Results We observed that following stacking and crosslinking, the strength of the constructs is significantly improved, with crosslinked sections having an ultimate tens ile strength over 20 times greater than non-crosslinked samples, and a modulus nearly 50 times higher. The mechanism of the mechanical failure mode of the tendon constructs with or without crosslinking was also investigated. Conclusions The strength and fiber organization, combined with the ability to introduce transversely isotropic mechanical properties makes the laminar tendon composites a biocompatiable material that may find future use in a number of biomedical and tissue engineering applications. PMID:25691802

  16. Surface mechanical properties - effects of ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Herbert

    1981-05-01

    Ion implantation has been used to modify the mechanical properties of a wide range of metals and alloys. The affected properties which have been studied include friction and wear, erosion and fatigue. Both BCC and FCC systems have been examined, with the major effort being directed at the former, due to the strong influence of interstitial implantants on mechanical properties of BCC and because of the industrial utility of these alloys. In seeking the microstructural origins of these sometimes dramatic effects, researchers have employed numerous surface analysis techniques, including backscattering and electron spectroscopy, TEM, SEM, X-ray and Mössbauer analysis and internal friction measurements. The interactions of surface dislocation structures with implantation-induced imperfections, surface alloying, and precipitation phenomena are discussed. A review is given of the current status of activities as represented by a number of research groups.

  17. Mechanical Properties and Failure Mechanisms in Polycrystalline Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Joseph; Perriot, Romain; Oleynik, Ivan

    Large-scale growth of graphene using chemical vapor deposition produces polycrystalline material containing grain boundaries. Recent experiments demonstrate that polycrystalline graphene is nearly as strong as pristine. In this work, the mechanical properties of bi-crystal and polycrystalline graphene samples are investigated by simulating nano-indentation of a circular membrane using classical molecular dynamics and a novel Screened Environment Dependent Reactive Bond Order (SED-REBO) potential. The failure mechanisms and crack propagation in graphene samples containing grain boundaries are also discussed.

  18. Isotropic microscale mechanical properties of coral skeletons

    PubMed Central

    Pasquini, Luca; Molinari, Alan; Fantazzini, Paola; Dauphen, Yannicke; Cuif, Jean-Pierre; Levy, Oren; Dubinsky, Zvy; Caroselli, Erik; Prada, Fiorella; Goffredo, Stefano; Di Giosia, Matteo; Reggi, Michela; Falini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Scleractinian corals are a major source of biogenic calcium carbonate, yet the relationship between their skeletal microstructure and mechanical properties has been scarcely studied. In this work, the skeletons of two coral species: solitary Balanophyllia europaea and colonial Stylophora pistillata, were investigated by nanoindentation. The hardness HIT and Young's modulus EIT were determined from the analysis of several load–depth data on two perpendicular sections of the skeletons: longitudinal (parallel to the main growth axis) and transverse. Within the experimental and statistical uncertainty, the average values of the mechanical parameters are independent on the section's orientation. The hydration state of the skeletons did not affect the mechanical properties. The measured values, EIT in the 76–77 GPa range, and HIT in the 4.9–5.1 GPa range, are close to the ones expected for polycrystalline pure aragonite. Notably, a small difference in HIT is observed between the species. Different from corals, single-crystal aragonite and the nacreous layer of the seashell Atrina rigida exhibit clearly orientation-dependent mechanical properties. The homogeneous and isotropic mechanical behaviour of the coral skeletons at the microscale is correlated with the microstructure, observed by electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, and with the X-ray diffraction patterns of the longitudinal and transverse sections. PMID:25977958

  19. Improvement of mechanical properties of glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbay, Ismail Hakki Cengizhan; Budakoglu, Refika; Zayim, Esra Ozkan

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims to enhance the mechanical and optical properties of glass substrates with thin films by the sol-gel method. TiO2-SiO2 binary system and Ta2O5 were deposited on glass substrates with high transparency. Ring-on-ring flexure and scratch tests were the main mechanical characterization tests. Herein, we report that the thin films can be used to enhance the mechanical properties of the glass substrates efficiently and effectively. TiO2-SiO2 binary system shows more than two times and Ta2O5 thin films show nearly three times better ultimate strength in the ring-on-ring flexure test. Besides, Ta2O5 thin film samples show superior scratch resistance. Additionally, the finite element method was also used to check the conformity in the application of mechanical properties of composite materials. It is also worth noting that, the finite element method can be used to accurately analyze the mechanical stability of composite materials. The use of the finite element method can reduce the total number of experimental trials without losing reliability.

  20. A-posteriori error estimation for second order mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiner, Thomas; Fehr, Jörg; Haasdonk, Bernard; Eberhard, Peter

    2012-06-01

    One important issue for the simulation of flexible multibody systems is the reduction of the flexible bodies degrees of freedom. As far as safety questions are concerned knowledge about the error introduced by the reduction of the flexible degrees of freedom is helpful and very important. In this work, an a-posteriori error estimator for linear first order systems is extended for error estimation of mechanical second order systems. Due to the special second order structure of mechanical systems, an improvement of the a-posteriori error estimator is achieved. A major advantage of the a-posteriori error estimator is that the estimator is independent of the used reduction technique. Therefore, it can be used for moment-matching based, Gramian matrices based or modal based model reduction techniques. The capability of the proposed technique is demonstrated by the a-posteriori error estimation of a mechanical system, and a sensitivity analysis of the parameters involved in the error estimation process is conducted.

  1. Mechanical properties of additively manufactured octagonal honeycombs.

    PubMed

    Hedayati, R; Sadighi, M; Mohammadi-Aghdam, M; Zadpoor, A A

    2016-12-01

    Honeycomb structures have found numerous applications as structural and biomedical materials due to their favourable properties such as low weight, high stiffness, and porosity. Application of additive manufacturing and 3D printing techniques allows for manufacturing of honeycombs with arbitrary shape and wall thickness, opening the way for optimizing the mechanical and physical properties for specific applications. In this study, the mechanical properties of honeycomb structures with a new geometry, called octagonal honeycomb, were investigated using analytical, numerical, and experimental approaches. An additive manufacturing technique, namely fused deposition modelling, was used to fabricate the honeycomb from polylactic acid (PLA). The honeycombs structures were then mechanically tested under compression and the mechanical properties of the structures were determined. In addition, the Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam theories were used for deriving analytical relationships for elastic modulus, yield stress, Poisson's ratio, and buckling stress of this new design of honeycomb structures. Finite element models were also created to analyse the mechanical behaviour of the honeycombs computationally. The analytical solutions obtained using Timoshenko beam theory were close to computational results in terms of elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and yield stress, especially for relative densities smaller than 25%. The analytical solutions based on the Timoshenko analytical solution and the computational results were in good agreement with experimental observations. Finally, the elastic properties of the proposed honeycomb structure were compared to those of other honeycomb structures such as square, triangular, hexagonal, mixed, diamond, and Kagome. The octagonal honeycomb showed yield stress and elastic modulus values very close to those of regular hexagonal honeycombs and lower than the other considered honeycombs. PMID:27612831

  2. Mechanical Properties of Polymer Nano-composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Iti

    Thermoset polymer composites are increasingly important in high-performance engineering industries due to their light-weight and high specific strength, finding cutting-edge applications such as aircraft fuselage material and automobile parts. Epoxy is the most widely employed thermoset polymer, but is brittle due to extensive cross-linking and notch sensitivity, necessitating mechanical property studies especially fracture toughness and fatigue resistance, to ameliorate the low crack resistance. Towards this end, various nano and micro fillers have been used with epoxy to form composite materials. Particularly for nano-fillers, the 1-100 nm scale dimensions lead to fascinating mechanical properties, oftentimes proving superior to the epoxy matrix. The chemical nature, topology, mechanical properties and geometry of the nano-fillers have a profound influence on nano-composite behavior and hence are studied in the context of enhancing properties and understanding reinforcement mechanisms in polymer matrix nano-composites. Using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as polymer filler, uniquely results in both increased stiffness as well as toughness, leading to extensive research on their applications. Though CNTs-polymer nano-composites offer better mechanical properties, at high stress amplitude their fatigue resistance is lost. In this work covalent functionalization of CNTs has been found to have a profound impact on mechanical properties of the CNT-epoxy nano-composite. Amine treated CNTs were found to give rise to effective fatigue resistance throughout the whole range of stress intensity factor, in addition to significantly enhancing fracture toughness, ductility, Young's modulus and average hardness of the nano-composite by factors of 57%, 60%, 30% and 45% respectively over the matrix as a result of diminished localized cross-linking. Graphene, a one-atom-thick sheet of atoms is a carbon allotrope, which has garnered significant attention of the scientific community and is

  3. Food mechanical properties and dietary ecology.

    PubMed

    Berthaume, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Interdisciplinary research has benefitted the fields of anthropology and engineering for decades: a classic example being the application of material science to the field of feeding biomechanics. However, after decades of research, discordances have developed in how mechanical properties are defined, measured, calculated, and used due to disharmonies between and within fields. This is highlighted by "toughness," or energy release rate, the comparison of incomparable tests (i.e., the scissors and wedge tests), and the comparison of incomparable metrics (i.e., the stress and displacement-limited indices). Furthermore, while material scientists report on a myriad of mechanical properties, it is common for feeding biomechanics studies to report on just one (energy release rate) or two (energy release rate and Young's modulus), which may or may not be the most appropriate for understanding feeding mechanics. Here, I review portions of materials science important to feeding biomechanists, discussing some of the basic assumptions, tests, and measurements. Next, I provide an overview of what is mechanically important during feeding, and discuss the application of mechanical property tests to feeding biomechanics. I also explain how 1) toughness measures gathered with the scissors, wedge, razor, and/or punch and die tests on non-linearly elastic brittle materials are not mechanical properties, 2) scissors and wedge tests are not comparable and 3) the stress and displacement-limited indices are not comparable. Finally, I discuss what data gathered thus far can be best used for, and discuss the future of the field, urging researchers to challenge underlying assumptions in currently used methods to gain a better understanding between primate masticatory morphology and diet. PMID:26808100

  4. Thermochemical property estimation of hydrogenated silicon clusters.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Andrew J; Broadbelt, Linda J

    2011-08-18

    The thermochemical properties for selected hydrogenated silicon clusters (Si(x)H(y), x = 3-13, y = 0-18) were calculated using quantum chemical calculations and statistical thermodynamics. Standard enthalpy of formation at 298 K and standard entropy and constant pressure heat capacity at various temperatures, i.e., 298-6000 K, were calculated for 162 hydrogenated silicon clusters using G3//B3LYP. The hydrogenated silicon clusters contained ten to twenty fused Si-Si bonds, i.e., bonds participating in more than one three- to six-membered ring. The hydrogenated silicon clusters in this study involved different degrees of hydrogenation, i.e., the ratio of hydrogen to silicon atoms varied widely depending on the size of the cluster and/or degree of multifunctionality. A group additivity database composed of atom-centered groups and ring corrections, as well as bond-centered groups, was created to predict thermochemical properties most accurately. For the training set molecules, the average absolute deviation (AAD) comparing the G3//B3LYP values to the values obtained from the revised group additivity database for standard enthalpy of formation and entropy at 298 K and constant pressure heat capacity at 500, 1000, and 1500 K were 3.2%, 1.9%, 0.40%, 0.43%, and 0.53%, respectively. Sensitivity analysis of the revised group additivity parameter database revealed that the group parameters were able to predict the thermochemical properties of molecules that were not used in the training set within an AAD of 3.8% for standard enthalpy of formation at 298 K. PMID:21728331

  5. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Porous Mullite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiung, Chwan-Hai Harold

    Mullite (3 Al2O3 : 2 SiO2) is a technologically important ceramic due to its thermal stability, corrosion resistance, and mechanical robustness. One variant, porous acicular mullite (ACM), has a unique needle-like microstructure and is the material platform for The Dow Chemical Company's diesel particulate filter AERIFY(TM). The investigation described herein focuses on the microstructure-mechanical property relationships in acicular mullites as well as those with traditional porous microstructures with the goal of illuminating the critical factors in determining their modulus, strength, and toughness. Mullites with traditional pore morphologies were made to serve as references via slipcasting of a kaolinite-alumina-starch slurry. The starch was burned out to leave behind a pore network, and the calcined body was then reaction-sintered at 1600C to form mullite. The samples had porosities of approximately 60%. Pore size and shape were altered by using different starch templates, and pore size was found to influence the stiffness and toughness. The ACM microstructure was varied along three parameters: total porosity, pore size, and needle size. Total porosity was found to dominate the mechanical behavior of ACM, while increases in needle and pore size increased the toughness at lower porosities. ACM was found to have much improved (˜130%) mechanical properties relative to its non-acicular counterpart at the same porosity. A second set of investigations studied the role of the intergranular glassy phase which wets the needle intersections of ACM. Removal of the glassy phase via an HF etch reduced the mechanical properties by ˜30%, highlighting the intergranular phase's importance to the enhanced mechanical properties of ACM. The composition of the glassy phase was altered by doping the ACM precursor with magnesium and neodymium. Magnesium doping resulted in ACM with greatly reduced fracture strength and toughness. Studies showed that the mechanical properties of the

  6. ESTIMATION OF PHYSIOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BY SPARC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computer program SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC uses computational algorithms...

  7. Mechanical Properties of Fe-Ni Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberta, Mulford; El Dasher, B.

    2010-10-01

    Iron-nickel meteorites exhibit a unique lamellar microstructure, Widmanstatten patterns, consisting of small regions with steep-iron-nickel composition gradients.1,2 The microstructure arises as a result of extremely slow cooling in a planetary core or other large mass. Mechanical properties of these structures have been investigated using microindentation, x-ray fluorescence, and EBSD. Observation of local mechanical properties in these highly structured materials supplements bulk measurements, which can exhibit large variation in dynamic properties, even within a single sample. 3 Accurate mechanical properties for meteorites may enable better modeling of planetary cores, the likely origin of these objects. Appropriate values for strength are important in impact and crater modeling and in understanding the consequences of observed impacts on planetary crusts. Previous studies of the mechanical properties of a typical iron-nickel meteorite, a Diablo Canyon specimen, indicated that the strength of the composite was higher by almost an order of magnitude than values obtained from laboratory-prepared specimens.4 This was ascribed to the extreme work-hardening evident in the EBSD measurements. This particular specimen exhibited only residual Widmanstatten structures, and may have been heated and deformed during its traverse of the atmosphere. Additional specimens from the Canyon Diablo fall (type IAB, coarse octahedrite) and examples from the Muonionalusta meteorite and Gibeon fall ( both IVA, fine octahedrite), have been examined to establish a range of error on the previously measured yield, to determine the extent to which deformation upon re-entry contributes to yield, and to establish the degree to which the strength varies as a function of microstructure. 1. A. Christiansen, et.al., Physica Scripta, 29 94-96 (1984.) 2. Goldstein and Ogilvie, Geochim Cosmochim Acta, 29 893-925 (1965.) 3. M. D. Furnish, M.B. Boslough, G.T. Gray II, and J.L. Remo, Int. J. Impact Eng

  8. Mechanical properties of crosslinked polymer coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csernica, Jeffrey

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this experiment are to: fabricate and test thin films to explore relations between a polymer's structure and its mechanical properties; expose students to testing methods for hardness and impact energy that are simple to perform and which have results that are easy to comprehend; show importance of polymer properties in materials that students frequently encounter; illustrate a system which displays a tradeoff between strength and impact resistance, the combination of which would need to be optimized for a particular application; and to expose students to coatings technology and testing.

  9. Kinematic analysis of a spatial mechanism for estimating shaking effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, P. S. S.; Satyadevi, A.; Gopala Krishna, A.; Eswaraiah, K.

    2015-12-01

    Spatial mechanisms are the most general category of kinematic devices. They offer the greatest capability to accomplish any desired kinematic task. A mechanism exerts forces and moments on its supporting frame, which result in vibration. Besides of its effect on efficiency, reducing vibration has become inevitable in the current industrial environment where stern standards on noise and vibration prevail. Balancing of shaking forces and shaking moments in mechanisms is important in order to improve their dynamic performance and fatigue life by reducing vibration, noise and wear. The analysis and synthesis of spatial mechanisms which involves extensive vector mathematics and linear algebra is to be simplified to be taught to engineers in undergraduate education. In the present paper the kinematic analysis of a spatial four-link RSCR mechanism is done to get the velocities and accelerations of its various links which is necessary for the estimation of inertia forces in a mechanism.

  10. Mechanical properties of intra-ocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrmann, Klaus; Kim, Eon; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2008-02-01

    Cataract surgery usually involves the replacement of the natural crystalline lens with a rigid or foldable intraocular lens to restore clear vision for the patient. While great efforts have been placed on optimising the shape and optical characteristics of IOLs, little is know about the mechanical properties of these devices and how they interact with the capsular bag once implanted. Mechanical properties measurements were performed on 8 of the most commonly implanted IOLs using a custom build micro tensometer. Measurement data will be presented for the stiffness of the haptic elements, the buckling resistance of foldable IOLs, the dynamic behaviour of the different lens materials and the axial compressibility. The biggest difference between the lens types was found between one-piece and 3-piece lenses with respect to the flexibility of the haptic elements

  11. Rhenium Mechanical Properties and Joining Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.; Biaglow, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium (Ir/Re) provides thermal margin for high performance and long life radiation cooled rockets. Two issues that have arisen in the development of flight Ir/Re engines are the sparsity of rhenium (Re) mechanical property data (particularly at high temperatures) required for engineering design, and the inability to directly electron beam weld Re chambers to C103 nozzle skirts. To address these issues, a Re mechanical property database is being established and techniques for creating Re/C103 transition joints are being investigated. This paper discusses the tensile testing results of powder metallurgy Re samples at temperatures from 1370 to 2090 C. Also discussed is the evaluation of Re/C103 transition pieces joined by both, explosive and diffusion bonding. Finally, the evaluation of full size Re transition pieces, joined by inertia welding, as well as explosive and diffusion bonding, is detailed.

  12. Multi-Sensor Estimation of Claypan Soil Profile Properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large quantities of data are needed to solve land use and soil management problems, yet lab analysis of soil data is costly and time consuming. Soil property sensors on mobile platforms have the capability to estimate soil properties at many more locations than reference lab measurements. The fusion...

  13. Obtaining railpad properties via dynamic mechanical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oregui, M.; de Man, A.; Woldekidan, M. F.; Li, Z.; Dollevoet, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we propose combining dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and the time-temperature superposition principle to determine various railpad dynamic properties. Having accurate information regarding the dynamic properties of a railpad is a fundamental requirement for designing tracks and understanding track deterioration. By testing three different railpad types, we demonstrate that the dynamic behavior of railpads over a wide frequency range can be successfully obtained under different preloads and temperatures if time-temperature superposition can be applied. To investigate railpad aging, worn railpads taken from a mainline in the Netherlands are tested. In this case, worn railpads are softer and possess a lower damping capacity than new railpads. In addition to performing these measurements, a Prony series material model is proposed to reproduce the dynamic behavior of railpads. The Prony series model is in good agreement with the measurements. Measured railpad dynamic properties and the corresponding Prony series numerical model provide valuable information for track design and modeling.

  14. Database of Mechanical Properties of Textile Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delbrey, Jerry

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the approach followed to develop a database for mechanical properties of textile composites. The data in this database is assembled from NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) programs and from data in the public domain. This database meets the data documentation requirements of MIL-HDBK-17, Section 8.1.2, which describes in detail the type and amount of information needed to completely document composite material properties. The database focuses on mechanical properties of textile composite. Properties are available for a range of parameters such as direction, fiber architecture, materials, environmental condition, and failure mode. The composite materials in the database contain innovative textile architectures such as the braided, woven, and knitted materials evaluated under the NASA ACT programs. In summary, the database contains results for approximately 3500 coupon level tests, for ten different fiber/resin combinations, and seven different textile architectures. It also includes a limited amount of prepreg tape composites data from ACT programs where side-by-side comparisons were made.

  15. Mechanical properties of Gd123 superconducting bulks at 77 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, H.; Murakami, A.

    2012-05-01

    Mechanical properties of melt-grown GdBa2Cu3Ox (Gd123) large single-domain superconducting bulks with 10 wt% of Ag2O and 0.5 wt% of Pt have been evaluated at 77 K through flexural tests, on specimens cut from the samples, in order to estimate the mechanical properties of the Gd123 material without metal substrates, buffer layers or stabilization layers. The densified bulk was 46 mm in diameter and 25 mm in thickness, with low void density, and the standard bulk was around the same size, with voids. The results show that the mechanical properties of the densified Gd123 bulk with low void density are better than those of the standard Gd123 bulk with voids. We also compared the mechanical properties of as-grown bulks with those of annealed bulks. The relations between the microstructure and the flexural strength or the fracture toughness of the densified Gd123 bulk have been shown.

  16. Sixth Annual Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefferts, E. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    Methods of orbital position estimation were reviewed. The problem of accuracy in orbital mechanics is discussed and various techniques in current use are presented along with suggested improvements. Of special interest is the compensation for bias in satelliteborne instruments due to attitude instabilities. Image processing and correctional techniques are reported for geodetic measurements and mapping.

  17. Application of planetary analog mechanical properties to subsurface geological investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElShafie, A.; Chevrier, V. F.; Dennis, N.

    2012-12-01

    Investigations of the mechanical properties of planetary analog materials are of great importance to improve future mission success and to enhance our understanding of the history and evolution of planetary surfaces and subsurfaces. Determining the stratigraphy of the subsurface using drills and penetrometers implies knowing the mechanical properties of the regolith. Therefore, we investigated the mechanical properties of Martian regolith analogs (JSC Mars-1 and an unaltered basaltic soil from Mojave desert). Penetration force is dependent on the bearing capacity factor (Nq) and the angle of internal friction which is found to be function of the level of compaction and increases with relative density. The bearing capacity factor (Nq) showed an exponential trend with the angle of internal friction. For Mojave soil, (Nq) increased from 64 to 338 with φ increasing from 32 to 41.3° while (Nq) increased from 161 to 3347 with φ increasing from 39.4 to 54.7° for JSC Mars-1. Based on estimation of the bearing capacity factor and the angle of internal friction, we predicted the force of penetration under the Martian gravity using a 1.2 cm diameter penetrometer. Under a bulk density of 1240 and 1500 kg m-3 in JSC Mars-1 and Mojave soil, 460 and 200 N is the estimated force to reach a depth of about 20 cm deep. Based on this investigation, distinguishing between different regolith layers on the subsurface of Mars is possible and observable using penetration force.

  18. Rock Mechanical Properties from Logs Petrophysics : Concepts and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillot, Philippe; Crawford, Brian; Alramahi, Bashar; Karner, Steve

    2010-05-01

    The objective of the "geomechanics from logs" (GML) research project is to develop model-driven predictive software for determining rock mechanical properties (specifically rock strength, compressibility and fracability) from other, more easily measured, rock properties (e.g. lithology, porosity, clay volume, velocity) routinely derived from nuclear, resistivity and acoustic logging tools. To this end, geomechanics from logs seeks to increase fundamental understanding of the primary geologic controls on rock mechanical properties and to translate this new insight into novel predictive tools. In detail, GML predictors rely on (i) the generation of relational rock mechanical properties databases incorporating QC'd core-based laboratory measurements (both in-house and high-precision published data); (ii) the use of established rock physics models (e.g. friable sand, contact cement models) to investigate theoretical relationships between geologic processes, reservoir environment, rock microstructure and elastic, bulk and transport petrophysical attributes/properties; (iii) the subdivision of database rocks into generic lithotypes (e.g. sand, shaly sand, sandy shale, shale) with common petrophysical attributes/properties; (iv) the use of multivariate statistics to generate lithotype-dependent empirical predictive relationships between mechanical properties and log-derived petrophysical attributes/properties; (v) the estimation of uncertainties associated with predictive function parameters; (vi) the application and validation of mechanical properties predictive tools to well-documented case studies (e.g. sand strength for perforation stability, rock compressibility for reservoir simulation) to test overall performance and quantify uncertainty in predictions. This paper presents the results of various rock strength, rock compressibility and rock fracability case studies conducted in wells of different stratigraphic age and depositional environment. Overall, GML (i

  19. Mechanical and tribological properties of ion beam-processed surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodali, Padma

    A variety of surface modification and surface coating techniques are currently used in industry to modify the near-surface mechanical properties that influence the friction and wear behavior of metals, metallic alloys, ceramics, and polymers. Near-surface mechanical properties such as hardness and fracture toughness of a coating-substrate system can be tailored economically without changing the bulk properties of the system. The intent of this work was to broaden the applications of well-established surface modification techniques and to elucidate the various wear mechanisms that occur in sliding contact of ion-beam processed surfaces. The investigation included characterization and evaluation of coatings and modified surfaces synthesized by three surface engineering methods; namely, beam-line ion implantation, plasma-source ion implantation, and DC magnetron sputtering. Correlation among measured properties such as surface hardness, fracture toughness, and wear behavior was also examined. This dissertation focused on the following areas of research: (1) Investigating the mechanical and tribological properties of mixed implantation of carbon and nitrogen into single crystal silicon by beam-line implantation. (2) Characterizing the mechanical and tribological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings processed by plasma source ion implantation. (3) Developing and evaluating metastable boron-carbon-nitrogen (BCN) compound coatings for mechanical and tribological properties. The surface hardness of a mixed carbon-nitrogen implant sample improved significantly compared to the unimplanted sample. However, the enhancement in the wear factor of this sample was found to be less significant than carbon-implanted samples. The presence of nitrogen might be responsible for the degraded wear behavior since nitrogen-implantation alone resulted in no improvement in the wear factor. Wear mechanisms that occurred in implanted and unimplanted surfaces tested against AIS152100

  20. Different mechanical properties in Seldinger guide wires

    PubMed Central

    Schummer, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Most central venous catheters are placed using Seldinger guide wires. EN ISO 11070 is the guideline for testing guide wire flexing performance and tensile strength, and we can safely assume that guide wires in use meet these requirements. Unfortunately, EN ISO 11070 guidelines do not reflect the clinical requirements and we continue to see mechanical failures and their associated complications. Material and Methods: This in vitro study was performed in an accredited laboratory. With regard to flexing, we: (1) Established the minimum flexing performance needed to meet clinical requirements, (2) developed flexing performance tests which mimic clinical requirement, and (3) evaluated the mechanical properties of various guide wires relative to these requirements. With regard to tensile strength, we used the testing method prescribed in ISO 11070, but did not end the test at 5 Newton (N). We continued until the guide wire was damaged, or we reached maximum tractive force. We then did a wire-to-wire comparison. We examined two basic wire constructions, monofil and core and coil. Results: Tensile strength: All wires tested, except one, met EN ISO 11070 requirements for 5 N tensile strength. The mean of the wire types tested ranged from 15.06 N to 257.76 N. Flexing performance: None of the wires kinked. The monofil had no evidence of bending. Two core/coil wires displayed minor bending (angle 1.5°). All other wires displayed bending angles between 22.5° and 43.0°. Conclusion: We recommend that: (1) Clinicians use guide wires with high-end mechanical properties, (2) EN ISO 11070 incorporate our flexing test into their testing method, raise the flexing requirement to kink-proof, (3) and raise the tensile strength requirement to a minimum of 30 N, and (3) all manufacturers and suppliers be required to display mechanical properties of all guide wire, and guide wire kits sold. PMID:26702209

  1. Mechanical properties of stapedial annular ligament.

    PubMed

    Gan, Rong Z; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Xiangming; Nakmali, Don

    2011-04-01

    Stapedial annular ligament (SAL) provides a sealed but mobile boundary between the stapes footplate and oval window bony wall. Mechanical properties of the SAL affect the transmission of ossicular movement into the cochlea in sound conduction. However, the mechanical properties of this tissue have never been investigated due to its complexity. In this paper, we report measurement of the viscoelastic properties of SAL on human cadaver temporal bones using a micro-material testing system with digital image correlation analysis. The measured load-deformation relations of SAL samples were converted into shear stress-shear strain relationship, stress relaxation function, and ultimate shear stress and shear strain of the SAL. The hyperelastic Ogden model was used to describe constitutive behavior of the SAL and a 3D finite element model of the experimental setup with SAL was created for assessing the effects of loading variation and measurement errors on results. The study demonstrates that the human SAL is a typical viscoelastic material with hysteresis, nonlinear stress-strain relationship and stress relaxation function. The shear modulus changes from 3.6 to 220 kPa when the shear stress increases from 2 to 140 kPa. These results provide useful information on quasi-static behavior of the SAL. PMID:21112232

  2. Polymer nanocomposites: permeability, chain dynamics, mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Laxmi

    2005-03-01

    Polymer nanocomposites based on dispersion of surfactant treated expandable smectite clays such as montmorillonite layered silicates (MLS) have shown promise as organic-inorganic hybrids with the potential to improve barrier properties. Separately, flexible displays based on plastic substrates have reduced lifetimes tied to the low barrier properties. While there has been a general attribution of improved barrier properties to the tortuous path, this does not consider the influence the introduction of a secondary filler has on the morphology of the host polymer. Here we examine the influence of MLS nanoplatelets on the barrier properties and chain dynamics of polymers. We investigate the potential for host polymer modification by comparing two crystallizable polymers nylon and PET and resulting well dispersed nanocomposites. We study mechanical, cyclic fatigue and permeability of films. Permeability of the biaxially stretched film and when the film undergoes fatigue of 50 and 10000 cycles are also measured. Chain dynamics were modeled based on the Burger model fit to creep-recovery data. A systematic approach to predict the permeability considering amorphous, crystalline and MLS content and comparison with experimental values were done. We also conducted water absorption measurements to highlight the water absorption differences in the two polymers. Dimensional stability of PET was studied by measuring coefficient of thermal expansion of thin film on Si substrate by ellipsometry method.

  3. PICA Variants with Improved Mechanical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Jeremy; Ghandehari, Ehson M.; Fan, Wenhong; Stackpoole, Margaret; Chavez-Garcia, Jose

    2011-01-01

    Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) is a member of the family of Lightweight Ceramic Ablators (LCAs) and was developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a thermal protection system (TPS) material for the Stardust mission probe that entered the Earth s atmosphere faster than any other probe or vehicle to date. PICA, carbon fiberform base and phenolic polymer, shows excellent thermal insulative properties at heating rates from about 250 W/sq cm to 1000 W/sq cm. The density of standard PICA - 0.26 g/cu cm to 0.28 g/cu cm - can be changed by changing the concentration of the phenolic resin. By adding polymers to the phenolic resin before curing it is possible to significantly improve the mechanical properties of PICA without significantly increasing the density.

  4. Electrical and Mechanical Properties of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Wenzhong

    Graphene is an exciting new atomically-thin two-dimensional (2D) system of carbon atoms organized in a hexagonal lattice structure. This "wonder material" has been extensively studied in the last few years since it's first isolation in 2004. Its rapid rise to popularity in scientific and technological communities can be attributed to a number of its exceptional properties. In this thesis I will present several topics including fabrication of graphene devices, electrical and mechanical properties of graphene. I will start with a brief introduction of electronic transport in nanosclae system including quantum Hall effect, followed by a discussion of fundamental electrical and mechanical properties of graphene. Next I will describe how graphene devices are produced: from the famous "mechnical exfoliation" to our innovative "scratching exfoliation" method, together with the traditional lithography fabrication for graphene devices. We also developed a lithography-free technique for making electrical contacts to suspended graphene devices. Most of the suspended devices presented in this thesis are fabricated by this technique. Graphene has remarkable electrical properties thanks to its crystal and band structures. In Chapter 3, I will first focus on proximity-induced superconductivity in graphene Josephson transistors. In this section we investigate electronic transport in single layer graphene coupled to superconducting electrodes. We observe significant suppression in the critical current I c and large variation in the product IcR n in comparison to theoretic prediction; both phenomena can be satisfactorily accounted for by premature switching in underdamped Josephson junctions. Another focus of our studies is quantum Hall effect and many body physics in graphene in suspended bilayer and trilayer graphene. We demonstrate that symmetry breaking of the first 3 Landau levels and fractional quantum Hall states are observed in both bilayer and trilayer suspended graphene

  5. Brain Mechanical Property Measurement Using MRE with Intrinsic Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, Adam J.; McGarry, Matthew D.; Perreard, Irina M.; Swienckowski, Jessica G.; Eskey, Clifford J.; Lollis, S. Scott; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2013-01-01

    Problem Addressed Many pathologies alter the mechanical properties of tissue. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has been developed to noninvasively characterize these quantities in vivo. Typically, small vibrations are induced in the tissue of interest with an external mechanical actuator. The resulting displacements are measured with phase contrast sequences and are then used to estimate the underlying mechanical property distribution. Several MRE studies have quantified brain tissue properties. However, the cranium and meninges, especially the dura, are very effective at damping externally applied vibrations from penetrating deeply into the brain. Here, we report a method, termed ‘intrinsic activation’, that eliminates the requirement for external vibrations by measuring the motion generated by natural blood vessel pulsation. Methodology A retrospectively gated phase contrast MR angiography sequence was used to record the tissue velocity at eight phases of the cardiac cycle. The velocities were numerically integrated via the Fourier transform to produce the harmonic displacements at each position within the brain. The displacements were then reconstructed into images of the shear modulus based on both linear elastic and poroelastic models. Results, Significance and Potential Impact The mechanical properties produced fall within the range of brain tissue estimates reported in the literature and, equally important, the technique yielded highly reproducible results. The mean shear modulus was 8.1 kPa for linear elastic reconstructions and 2.4 kPa for poroelastic reconstructions where fluid pressure carries a portion of the stress. Gross structures of the brain were visualized, particularly in the poroelastic reconstructions. Intra-subject variability was significantly less than the inter-subject variability in a study of 6 asymptomatic individuals. Further, larger changes in mechanical properties were observed in individuals when examined over time than when

  6. Brain mechanical property measurement using MRE with intrinsic activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John B.; Pattison, Adam J.; McGarry, Matthew D.; Perreard, Irina M.; Swienckowski, Jessica G.; Eskey, Clifford J.; Lollis, S. Scott; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-11-01

    Many pathologies alter the mechanical properties of tissue. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has been developed to noninvasively characterize these quantities in vivo. Typically, small vibrations are induced in the tissue of interest with an external mechanical actuator. The resulting displacements are measured with phase contrast sequences and are then used to estimate the underlying mechanical property distribution. Several MRE studies have quantified brain tissue properties. However, the cranium and meninges, especially the dura, are very effective at damping externally applied vibrations from penetrating deeply into the brain. Here, we report a method, termed ‘intrinsic activation’, that eliminates the requirement for external vibrations by measuring the motion generated by natural blood vessel pulsation. A retrospectively gated phase contrast MR angiography sequence was used to record the tissue velocity at eight phases of the cardiac cycle. The velocities were numerically integrated via the Fourier transform to produce the harmonic displacements at each position within the brain. The displacements were then reconstructed into images of the shear modulus based on both linear elastic and poroelastic models. The mechanical properties produced fall within the range of brain tissue estimates reported in the literature and, equally important, the technique yielded highly reproducible results. The mean shear modulus was 8.1 kPa for linear elastic reconstructions and 2.4 kPa for poroelastic reconstructions where fluid pressure carries a portion of the stress. Gross structures of the brain were visualized, particularly in the poroelastic reconstructions. Intra-subject variability was significantly less than the inter-subject variability in a study of six asymptomatic individuals. Further, larger changes in mechanical properties were observed in individuals when examined over time than when the MRE procedures were repeated on the same day. Cardiac pulsation

  7. Mechanical Properties from PBX 9501 Pressing Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graff Thompson, Darla; Wright, Walter J.

    2004-07-01

    A PBX 9501 pressing study was conducted by researchers in ESA-WMM, LANL, to identify the hydrostatic pressing parameters most important in fabricating high-density parts with uniform density. In this study, 31 charges were pressed using a full permutation of six pressing parameters. Five charges from the set of 31 were selected for an evaluation of their mechanical properties, specifically uniaxial compression and tension. Charges were selected to 1) span the density range of the study, and 2) allow two direct comparisons of pressing parameters independent of bulk density (density has a well-established affect on some material properties). Three PBX 9501 charges pressed isostatically at Pantex Plant in Amarillo, TX were also included in the study. The tensile properties of the 8 charges varied significantly. Careful evaluation of the results suggests that an increase in pressing temperature may correlate with an increase in tensile stress (strength) and a decrease in strain (ductility). Trends in compression exist but are less pronounced. In an effort to explore the relationship between pressing temperature and tensile strength, four sheets of Estane polymer (a component of the PBX 9501 binder) were compression molded at 70, 90, 110 and 130°C. The tensile strength of Estane was observed to increase by a factor of nearly 20 when the molding temperature was increased from 70 to 90°C (strength increase was negligible beyond 90°C). We present an outline of ongoing work that will irrefutably quantify the mechanical property affects of both pressing temperature and dwell time on PBX 9501.(LA-UR 03-4842).

  8. Mechanical properties of Municipal Solid Waste by SDMT

    SciTech Connect

    Castelli, Francesco; Maugeri, Michele

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • The adoption of the SDMT for the measurements of MSW properties is proposed. • A comparison between SDMT results and laboratory tests was carried out. • A good reliability has been found in deriving waste properties by SDMT. • Results seems to be promising for the friction angle and Young’s modulus evaluation. - Abstract: In the paper the results of a geotechnical investigation carried on Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) materials retrieved from the “Cozzo Vuturo” landfill in the Enna area (Sicily, Italy) are reported and analyzed. Mechanical properties were determined both by in situ and laboratory large-scale one dimensional compression tests. While among in situ tests, Dilatomer Marchetti Tests (DMT) is used widely in measuring soil properties, the adoption of the DMT for the measurements of MSW properties has not often been documented in literature. To validate its applicability for the estimation of MSW properties, a comparison between the seismic dilatometer (SDMT) results and the waste properties evaluated by laboratory tests was carried out. Parameters for “fresh” and “degraded waste” have been evaluated. These preliminary results seems to be promising as concerns the assessment of the friction angle of waste and the evaluation of the S-wave in terms of shear wave velocity. Further studies are certainly required to obtain more representative values of the elastic parameters according to the SDMT measurements.

  9. Properties of the OLS estimator under numerous patterns of heteroskedasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamec, Václav

    2016-06-01

    Favourable properties of the Ordinary Least Squares estimator are known to depend upon compliance with a set of restrictive conditions, often referred to as classical assumptions. This paper discusses evidence from Monte Carlo simulation schemes aimed at verifying occurrence of bias and minimum variance property of OLS estimator in presence of various patterns of heteroskedasticity. Three independent MC simulation schemes were prepared to investigate consequences of error term variance changing with power of the proportionality factor or depending upon the variance multiplication constant applied to a subset of observations. Several finite sample properties of the OLS estimator were shown to vary according to the simulated form of the skedastic function, but to a much lesser scope with the sample size.

  10. Mechanical properties of low dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Deepika

    Recent advances in low dimensional materials (LDMs) have paved the way for unprecedented technological advancements. The drive to reduce the dimensions of electronics has compelled researchers to devise newer techniques to not only synthesize novel materials, but also tailor their properties. Although micro and nanomaterials have shown phenomenal electronic properties, their mechanical robustness and a thorough understanding of their structure-property relationship are critical for their use in practical applications. However, the challenges in probing these mechanical properties dramatically increase as their dimensions shrink, rendering the commonly used techniques inadequate. This dissertation focuses on developing techniques for accurate determination of elastic modulus of LDMs and their mechanical responses under tensile and shear stresses. Fibers with micron-sized diameters continuously undergo tensile and shear deformations through many phases of their processing and applications. Significant attention has been given to their tensile response and their structure-tensile properties relations are well understood, but the same cannot be said about their shear responses or the structure-shear properties. This is partly due to the lack of appropriate instruments that are capable of performing direct shear measurements. In an attempt to fill this void, this dissertation describes the design of an inexpensive tabletop instrument, referred to as the twister, which can measure the shear modulus (G) and other longitudinal shear properties of micron-sized individual fibers. An automated system applies a pre-determined twist to the fiber sample and measures the resulting torque using a sensitive optical detector. The accuracy of the instrument was verified by measuring G for high purity copper and tungsten fibers. Two industrially important fibers, IM7 carbon fiber and KevlarRTM 119, were found to have G = 17 and 2.4 GPa, respectively. In addition to measuring the shear

  11. Mechanical properties of phosphorene nanoribbons and oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Feng; Chen, Xi

    2015-12-21

    Mechanical properties of phosphorene nanoribbons and oxides are investigated by using density functional theory. It is found that the ideal strength of nanoribbon decreases in comparison with that of 2D phosphorene. The Young's modulus of armchair nanoribbon has a remarkable size effect because of the edge relaxations. The analysis of the stress-strain relation indicates that, owing to chemisorbed oxygen atoms, the ideal strength and Young's modulus of 2D phosphorene oxide are greatly reduced along the zigzag direction, especially upon high oxidation ratios. In addition, strain and oxidation have significant impacts on phonon dispersion.

  12. Linking properties to microstructure through multiresolution mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McVeigh, Cahal James

    The macroscale mechanical and physical properties of materials are inherently linked to the underlying microstructure. Traditional continuum mechanics theories have focused on approximating the heterogeneous microstructure as a continuum, which is conducive to a partial differential equation mathematical description. Although this makes large scale simulation of material much more efficient than modeling the detailed microstructure, the relationship between microstructure and macroscale properties becomes unclear. In order to perform computational materials design, material models must clearly relate the key underlying microstructural parameters (cause) to macroscale properties (effect). In this thesis, microstructure evolution and instability events are related to macroscale mechanical properties through a new multiresolution continuum analysis approach. The multiresolution nature of this theory allows prediction of the evolving magnitude and scale of deformation as a direct function of the changing microstructure. This is achieved via a two-pronged approach: (a) Constitutive models which track evolving microstructure are developed and calibrated to direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the microstructure. (b) The conventional homogenized continuum equations of motion are extended via a virtual power approach to include extra coupled microscale stresses and stress couples which are active at each characteristic length scale within the microstructure. The multiresolution approach is applied to model the fracture toughness of a cemented carbide, failure of a steel alloy under quasi-static loading conditions and the initiation and velocity of adiabatic shear bands under high speed dynamic loading. In each case the multiresolution analysis predicts the important scale effects which control the macroscale material response. The strain fields predicted in the multiresolution continuum analyses compare well to those observed in direct numerical simulations of the

  13. Spatial Bias in Field-Estimated Unsaturated Hydraulic Properties

    SciTech Connect

    HOLT,ROBERT M.; WILSON,JOHN L.; GLASS JR.,ROBERT J.

    2000-12-21

    Hydraulic property measurements often rely on non-linear inversion models whose errors vary between samples. In non-linear physical measurement systems, bias can be directly quantified and removed using calibration standards. In hydrologic systems, field calibration is often infeasible and bias must be quantified indirectly. We use a Monte Carlo error analysis to indirectly quantify spatial bias in the saturated hydraulic conductivity, K{sub s}, and the exponential relative permeability parameter, {alpha}, estimated using a tension infiltrometer. Two types of observation error are considered, along with one inversion-model error resulting from poor contact between the instrument and the medium. Estimates of spatial statistics, including the mean, variance, and variogram-model parameters, show significant bias across a parameter space representative of poorly- to well-sorted silty sand to very coarse sand. When only observation errors are present, spatial statistics for both parameters are best estimated in materials with high hydraulic conductivity, like very coarse sand. When simple contact errors are included, the nature of the bias changes dramatically. Spatial statistics are poorly estimated, even in highly conductive materials. Conditions that permit accurate estimation of the statistics for one of the parameters prevent accurate estimation for the other; accurate regions for the two parameters do not overlap in parameter space. False cross-correlation between estimated parameters is created because estimates of K{sub s} also depend on estimates of {alpha} and both parameters are estimated from the same data.

  14. Estimation of Soft Tissue Mechanical Parameters from Robotic Manipulation Data.

    PubMed

    Boonvisut, Pasu; Cavuşoğlu, M Cenk

    2013-10-01

    Robotic motion planning algorithms used for task automation in robotic surgical systems rely on availability of accurate models of target soft tissue's deformation. Relying on generic tissue parameters in constructing the tissue deformation models is problematic because, biological tissues are known to have very large (inter- and intra-subject) variability. A priori mechanical characterization (e.g., uniaxial bench test) of the target tissues before a surgical procedure is also not usually practical. In this paper, a method for estimating mechanical parameters of soft tissue from sensory data collected during robotic surgical manipulation is presented. The method uses force data collected from a multiaxial force sensor mounted on the robotic manipulator, and tissue deformation data collected from a stereo camera system. The tissue parameters are then estimated using an inverse finite element method. The effects of measurement and modeling uncertainties on the proposed method are analyzed in simulation. The results of experimental evaluation of the method are also presented. PMID:24031160

  15. Mechanism and estimation of Al(OH) 3 crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, Fatollah; Babaheidary, Masoud Bahrami

    2002-02-01

    Precipitation is an important stage of the Bayer process. For simulation of this section, growth-rate estimation of Al(OH) 3 crystals, is vital for the solution of population balance. Various published equations for linear growth rate of Al(OH) 3 are reviewed. In all of these equations, a square exponent was considered for supersaturation terms. In some of the previous works, it was believed that BCF model is the governing mechanism for surface growth of crystals. It is shown that polynuclear model is the most probable mechanism. Also, a modification of the best previous correlation is performed, which results in a considerable improvement of the growth-rate estimation over the available published experimental data.

  16. Material properties and fracture mechanics in relation to ceramic machining

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, L.V.

    1993-12-02

    Material removal rate, surface finish, and subsurface damage are largely governed by fracture mechanics and plastic deformation, when ceramics are machined using abrasive methods. A great deal of work was published on the fracture mechanics of ceramics in the late 1970s and early 1980s, although this work has never resulted in a comprehensive model of the fixed abrasive grinding process. However, a recently published model describes many of the most important features of the loose abrasive machining process, for example depth of damage, surface roughness, and material removal rate. Many of the relations in the loose abrasive machining model can be readily discerned from fracture mechanics models, in terms of material properties. By understanding the mechanisms of material removal, from a material properties perspective, we can better estimate how one material will machine in relation to another. Although the fracture mechanics models may have been developed for loose abrasive machining, the principles of crack initiation and propagation are equally valuable for fixed abrasive machining. This report provides a brief review of fracture in brittle materials, the stress distribution induced by abrasives, critical indenter loads, the extension of cracks, and the relation of the fracture process to material removal.

  17. Mechanical Properties of Nanoceramic Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojo, Ipidapo; Abunaemeh, Malek; Smith, Cydale; Muntele, Claudiu; Ila, Daryush

    2009-03-01

    Generation IV nuclear reactors will use the TRISO fuels, a type of micro fuel particle. It consists of a fuel kernel coated with four layers of isotropic material. One of the materials considered for these layers is silicon carbide ceramic. This lightweight material can maintain chemical and dimensional stability in adverse environments at very high temperatures up to 3000 C, and it is chemically inert. It is widely used as a semiconductor material in electronics because of its high thermo conductivity, high electric field break down strength, and high maximum current density, which makes it more desirable than silicon. Silicon carbide has a very low coefficient of thermal expansion and has no phase transition that would discontinue its thermal expansion. At the Center for Irradiation of Materials (C.I.M.) we are developing a new fabrication process for nanopowdered silicon carbide for TRISO fuel coating purposes. We also study the mechanical properties of the material produced. Among the different test being performed are particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) an Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). The mechanical properties of interest are hardness (measured by Vickers Hardness machine), toughness (measured by the Anstis equation, KIC= 1.6 x 10-2(E/H)^1/2(P/C0^3/2, where P=load, C0=crack length, E=Young's modulus and H=Vickers Hardness), tensile strength and flexural strength (measured by a three point bend test). Results will be presented during the meeting.

  18. Mechanical properties of 3D ceramic nanolattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, Lucas

    Developments in advanced nanoscale fabrication techniques have allowed for the creation of 3-dimensional hierarchical structural meta-materials that can be designed with arbitrary geometry. These structures can be made on length scales spanning multiple orders of magnitude, from tens of nanometers to hundreds of microns. The smallest features are controllable on length scales where materials have been shown to exhibit size effects in their mechanical properties. Combining novel nanoscale mechanical properties with a 3-dimensional architecture enables the creation of new classes of materials with tunable and unprecedented mechanical properties. We present the fabrication and mechanical deformation of hollow tube alumina nanolattices that were fabricated using two-photon lithography direct laser writing (DLW), atomic layer deposition (ALD), and oxygen plasma etching. Nanolattices were designed in a number of different geometries including octet-truss, octahedron, and 3D Kagome. Additionally, a number of structural parameters were varied including tube wall thickness (t) , tube major axis (a) , and unit cell size (L) . The resulting nanolattices had a range of densities from ρ = 4 to 250 mg/cm3. Uniaxial compression and cyclic loading tests were performed on the nanolattices to obtain the yield strength and modulus. In these tests, a marked change in the deformation response was observed when the wall thickness was reduced below 20nm; thick-walled nanolattices (t>20nm) underwent catastrophic, brittle failure, which transitioned to a gradual, ductile-like deformation as wall thickness was reduced. Thick-walled nanolattices also exhibited no recovery after compression, while thin-walled structures demonstrated notable recovery, with some recovering by 98% after compression to 50% strain and by 80% when compressed to 90% strain. Across all geometries, unit cell sizes, and wall thicknesses, we found a consistent power law relation between strength and modulus with

  19. Mechanical and tribological properties of ion beam-processed surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kodali, P.

    1998-01-01

    The intent of this work was to broaden the applications of well-established surface modification techniques and to elucidate the various wear mechanisms that occur in sliding contact of ion-beam processed surfaces. The investigation included characterization and evaluation of coatings and modified surfaces synthesized by three surface engineering methods; namely, beam-line ion implantation, plasma-source ion implantation, and DC magnetron sputtering. Correlation among measured properties such as surface hardness, fracture toughness, and wear behavior was also examined. This dissertation focused on the following areas of research: (1) investigating the mechanical and tribological properties of mixed implantation of carbon and nitrogen into single crystal silicon by beam-line implantation; (2) characterizing the mechanical and tribological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings processed by plasma source ion implantation; and (3) developing and evaluating metastable boron-carbon-nitrogen (BCN) compound coatings for mechanical and tribological properties. The surface hardness of a mixed carbon-nitrogen implant sample improved significantly compared to the unimplanted sample. However, the enhancement in the wear factor of this sample was found to be less significant than carbon-implanted samples. The presence of nitrogen might be responsible for the degraded wear behavior since nitrogen-implantation alone resulted in no improvement in the wear factor. DLC coatings have low friction, low wear factor, and high hardness. The fracture toughness of DLC coatings has been estimated for the first time. The wear mechanism in DLC coatings investigated with a ruby slider under a contact stress of 1 GPa was determined to be plastic deformation. The preliminary data on metastable BCN compound coatings indicated high friction, low wear factor, and high hardness.

  20. Mechanical properties of monolayer graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Suk, Ji Won; Piner, Richard D; An, Jinho; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2010-11-23

    Mechanical properties of ultrathin membranes consisting of one layer, two overlapped layers, and three overlapped layers of graphene oxide platelets were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging in contact mode. In order to evaluate both the elastic modulus and prestress of thin membranes, the AFM measurement was combined with the finite element method (FEM) in a new approach for evaluating the mechanics of ultrathin membranes. Monolayer graphene oxide was found to have a lower effective Young's modulus (207.6 ± 23.4 GPa when a thickness of 0.7 nm is used) as compared to the value reported for "pristine" graphene. The prestress (39.7-76.8 MPa) of the graphene oxide membranes obtained by solution-based deposition was found to be 1 order of magnitude lower than that obtained by others for mechanically cleaved graphene. The novel AFM imaging and FEM-based mapping methods presented here are of general utility for obtaining the elastic modulus and prestress of thin membranes. PMID:20942443

  1. Estimation of Hydraulic Property of an Unconfined Aquifer by GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qi; Sato, Motoyuki

    2007-06-01

    Controlled water productions were performed at a water source area of Ulaanbaatar city, Mongolia to evaluate the effectiveness of ground penetrating radar (GPR) for detecting and monitoring dynamic groundwater movements in the subsurface and for estimating the hydraulic properties of the aquifer. Field experiments in Ulaanbaatar were carried out in 2001 and 2002. GPR data were acquired using 100 MHz antennas. This paper reports the results of GPR methods to monitor the groundwater migration caused by the pumping operation and GPR’s potential ability to estimate hydraulic properties of the aquifer. The GPR data sets were acquired very carefully by locating the antenna position accurately. The residual trace shows a feature that is a combination of the water level reflections acquired at two different times in the pumping test. It helped to determine travel time and its effective reflection point from the top of the water saturated zone. The residual wavelet varies versus offset from the pumping well for a given residual image. Common midpoint (CMP) data and velocity analysis indicated the depth of the water table and the water content in the unsaturated and saturated zone. Combining hydrogeologic data with quantitative information yielded by GPR data, hydraulic properties of the aquifer could be estimated by assuming a hydraulic model. It was concluded that GPR can be successfully employed to monitor groundwater migration and to estimate hydraulic properties of the aquifer.

  2. Spectral Reflectance Estimates of Surface Soil Physical and Chemical Properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optical diffuse reflectance sensing in visible and near-infrared wavelength ranges is one approach to rapidly quantify soil properties for site-specific management. The objectives of this study were (1) to determine the accuracy of the reflectance approach for estimating physical and chemical proper...

  3. PROPERTY APPRAISAL PROVIDES CONTROL, INSURANCE BASIS, AND VALUE ESTIMATE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    THOMSON, JACK

    A COMPLETE PROPERTY APPRAISAL SERVES AS A BASIS FOR CONTROL, INSURANCE AND VALUE ESTIMATE. A PROFESSIONAL APPRAISAL FIRM SHOULD PERFORM THIS FUNCTION BECAUSE (1) IT IS FAMILIAR WITH PROPER METHODS, (2) IT CAN PREPARE THE REPORT WITH MINIMUM CONFUSION AND INTERRRUPTION OF THE COLLEGE OPERATION, (3) USE OF ITS PRICING LIBRARY REDUCES TIME NEEDED AND…

  4. Mechanical response tissue analyzer for estimating bone strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Steele, Charles; Mauriello, Anthony

    1991-01-01

    One of the major concerns for extended space flight is weakness of the long bones of the legs, composed primarily of cortical bone, that functions to provide mechanical support. The strength of cortical bone is due to its complex structure, described simplistically as cylinders of parallel osteons composed of layers of mineralized collagen. The reduced mechanical stresses during space flight or immobilization of bone on Earth reduces the mineral content, and changes the components of its matrix and structure so that its strength is reduced. Currently, the established clinical measures of bone strength are indirect. The measures are based on determinations of mineral density by means of radiography, photon absorptiometry, and quantitative computer tomography. While the mineral content of bone is essential to its strength, there is growing awareness of the limitations of the measurement as the sole predictor of fracture risk in metabolic bone diseases, especially limitations of the measurement as the sole predictor of fracture risk in metabolic bone diseases, especially osteoporosis. Other experimental methods in clinical trials that more directly evaluate the physical properties of bone, and do not require exposure to radiation, include ultrasound, acoustic emission, and low-frequency mechanical vibration. The last method can be considered a direct measure of the functional capacity of a long bone since it quantifies the mechanical response to a stimulus delivered directly to the bone. A low frequency vibration induces a response (impedance) curve with a minimum at the resonant frequency, that a few investigators use for the evaluation of the bone. An alternative approach, the method under consideration, is to use the response curve as the basis for determination of the bone bending stiffness EI (E is the intrinsic material property and I is the cross-sectional moment of inertia) and mass, fundamental mechanical properties of bone.

  5. Mechanical properties of several magnesium and aluminum composites. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tsangarakis, N.; Taleghani, B.

    1992-12-01

    Several composites of magnesium and aluminum alloys were tested in order to assess and evaluate their mechanical properties. The magnesium alloys were AZ91 C, ZE41 A, and commercially pure magnesium, reinforced with 40% by volume continuous graphite fiber. The tensile properties of these composites were not superior to those of unreinforced magnesium and estimates of their fracture toughness were low. The matrices of the aluminum composites were 2124-T6, 6061-T4, 2124-T4, and 2219-T4. The reinforcements were either particulate or whiskers of silicon carbide or boron carbide and their volume content was 15% to 30%. The aluminum composites which were reinforced with silicon carbide particulate exhibited improved yield and ultimate tensile stresses, as well as tensile elastic modulus over the unreinforced aluminum alloys. The 2124-T4/B4C/25p composite exhibited the highest ultimate tensile strength which was 511 MPa. The composite which was reinforced with whiskers of silicon carbide exhibited an endurance limit which was 20% higher than that of the matrix alloy. The compressive properties and fracture toughness of some of these aluminum composites were not improved over those of the unreinforced matrix alloy.... Composites, Mechanical properties.

  6. Environmental properties set cell mechanics and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janmey, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Many cell types are sensitive to mechanical signals that are produced either by application of exogenous force to their surfaces, or by the resistance that their surroundings place on forces generated by the cells themselves. Cell morphology, motility, proliferation, and protein expression all change in response to substrate stiffness. Changing the elastic moduli of substrates alters the formation of focal adhesions, the assembly of actin filaments into bundles, and the stability of intermediate filaments. The range of stiffness over which different primary cell types respond can vary over a wide range and generally reflects the elastic modulus of the tissue from which these cells were isolated. Mechanosensing depends on the type of adhesion receptor by which the cell binds, and therefore on both the molecular composition of the extracellular matrix and the nature of its link to the cytoskeleton. Many cell types can alter their own stiffness to match that of the substrate to which they adhere. The maximal elastic modulus that cells such as fibroblasts can attain is similar to that of crosslinked actin networks at the concentrations in the cell cortex. The precise mechanisms of mechanosensing are not well defined, but they presumably require an elastic connection between cell and substrate, mediated by transmembrane proteins. The viscoelastic properties of different extracellular matrices and cytoskeletal elements strongly influence the response of cells to mechanical signals, and the unusual non-linear elasticity of many biopolymer gels, characterized by strain-stiffening, leads to novel mechanisms by which cells alter their stiffness by engagement of molecular motors that produce internal stresses. Cell cortical elasticity is dominated by cytoskeletal polymer networks and can be modulated by internal tension. Simultaneous control of substrate stiffness and adhesive patterns suggests that stiffness sensing occurs on a length scale much larger than single molecular

  7. Prediction of mechanical properties of trabecular bone using quantitative MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammentausta, E.; Hakulinen, M. A.; Jurvelin, J. S.; Nieminen, M. T.

    2006-12-01

    Techniques for quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been developed for non-invasive estimation of the mineral density and structure of trabecular bone. The R*2 relaxation rate (i.e. 1/T*2) is sensitive to bone mineral density (BMD) via susceptibility differences between trabeculae and bone marrow, and by binarizing MRI images, structural variables, such as apparent bone volume fraction, can be assessed. In the present study, trabecular bone samples of human patellae were investigated in vitro at 1.5 T to determine the ability of MRI-derived variables (R*2 and bone volume fraction) to predict the mechanical properties (Young's modulus, yield stress and ultimate strength). Further, the MRI variables were correlated with reference measurements of volumetric BMD and bone area fraction as determined with a clinical pQCT system. The MRI variables correlated significantly (p < 0.01) with the mechanical variables (r = 0.32-0.46), BMD (r = 0.56) and bone structure (r = 0.51). A combination of R*2 and MRI-derived bone volume fraction further improved the prediction of yield stress and ultimate strength. Although pQCT showed a trend towards better prediction of the mechanical properties, current results demonstrate the feasibility of combined MR imaging of marrow susceptibility and bone volume fraction in predicting the mechanical strength of trabecular bone and bone mineral density.

  8. Evaluation of mechanical properties of esthetic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Umezaki, Eisaku; Komazawa, Daigo; Otsuka, Yuichiro; Suda, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    Plastic brackets, as well as ceramic brackets, are used in various cases since they have excellent esthetics. However, their mechanical properties remain uncertain. The purpose of this study was to determine how deformation and stress distribution in esthetic brackets differ among materials under the same wire load. Using the digital image correlation method, we discovered the following: (1) the strain of the wings of plastic brackets is within 0.2% and that of ceramic and metal brackets is negligible, (2) polycarbonate brackets having a stainless steel slot show significantly smaller displacement than other plastic brackets, and (3) there is a significant difference between plastic brackets and ceramic and stainless steel brackets in terms of the displacement of the bracket wing. PMID:25755677

  9. Mechanical properties of icosahedral virus capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vliegenthart, G. A.; Gompper, G.

    2007-12-01

    Virus capsids are self-assembled protein shells in the size range of 10 to 100 nanometers. The shells of DNA-viruses have to sustain large internal pressures while encapsulating and protecting the viral DNA. We employ computer simulations to study the mechanical properties of crystalline shells with icosahedral symmetry that serve as a model for virus capsids. The shells are positioned on a substrate and deformed by a uni-axial force excerted by a small bead. We predict the elastic response for small deformations, and the buckling transitions at large deformations. Both are found to depend strongly on the number N of elementary building blocks (capsomers), and the Föppl-von Kármán number γ which characterizes the relative importance of shear and bending elasticity.

  10. Tension-induced mechanical properties of stanene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Lele; Yang, Chuanghua; Wu, Liyuan; Han, Lihong; Song, Yuxin; Wang, Shumin; Lu, Pengfei

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, elastic properties of stanene under equiaxial or uniaxial tensions along armchair and zigzag directions are investigated by first-principles calculations. The stress-strain relation is calculated and the relaxation of the internal atom positions is analyzed. The high-order elastic constants are calculated by fitting the polynomial expressions. The Young’s modulus and Poisson ratio of the stanene is calculated to be 24.14 N/m and 0.39 N/m, respectively. The stanene exhibits lower Young’s modulus than those of the proceeding group IV elements, which is attributed to the smaller sp2-sp3 bond energy in stanene than those of silicene and germanene. Calculated values of ultimate stresses and strains, second-order elastic constants (SOCEs) and the in-plane Young’s modulus are all positive. It proves that stanene is mechanically stable.

  11. Mechanical Properties of Silicon Carbonitride Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiaofeng; Hu, Xingfang; Wang, Wei; Song, Lixin

    2003-02-01

    Silicon carbonitride thin films were synthesized by reactive rf sputtering a silicon carbide target in nitrogen and argon atmosphere, or sputtering a silicon nitride target in methane and argon atmosphere, respectively. The Nanoindentation technique (Nanoindenter XP system with a continuous stiffness measurement technique) was employed to measure the hardness and elastic modulus of thin films. The effects of sputtering power on the mechanical properties are different for the two SiCN thin films. With increasing sputtering power, the hardness and the elastic modulus decrease for the former but increase for the latter. The tendency is similar to the evolution trend of Si-C bonds in SiCN materials. This reflects that Si-C bonds provide greater hardness for SiCN thin films than Si-N and C-N bonds.

  12. Micro-mechanical properties of bio-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakiev, V.; Markovsky, A.; Aznakayev, E.; Zakiev, I.; Gursky, E.

    2005-09-01

    Investigation of physical-mechanical characteristics of stomatologic materials (ceramics for crowns, silver amalgam, cements and materials on a polymeric basis) properties by the modern methods and correspondence their physical-mechanical properties to the physical-mechanical properties of native teeth is represented. The universal device "Micron-Gamma" is built for this purpose. This device allows investigate the physical-mechanical characteristics of stomatologic materials (an elastic modulus, micro-hardness, destruction energy, resistance to scratching) by the methods of continuous indentation, scanning and pricking. A new effective method as well as its device application for the investigation of surface layers of materials and their physical-mechanical properties by means of the constant indenting of an indenter is realized. This method is based on the automatic registration of loading (P) on the indenter with the simultaneous measurement of its indentation depth (h). The results of investigations are presented on a loading diagram P=f(h) and as a digital imaging on the PC. This diagram allows get not only more diverse characteristics in the real time regime but also gives new information about the stomatologic material properties. Therefore, we can to investigate the wide range of the physical-mechanical properties of stomatologic materials. "Micron-alpha" is digital detection device for light imaging applications. It enables to detect the very low material surface relief heights and restoration of surface micro topography by a sequence data processing of interferential data of partially coherent light also. "Micron-alpha" allows: to build 2D and 3D imaging of a material surface; to estimate the quantitatively characteristics of a material surface; to observe the imaging interferential pictures both in the white and in the monochromatic light; to carry out the investigation of blood cells, microbes and biological macromolecules profiles. The method allows

  13. Rationally designing the mechanical properties of protein hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi

    Naturally occurring biomaterials possess diverse mechanical properties, which are critical to their unique biological functions. However, it remains challenging to rationally control the mechanical properties of synthetic biomaterials. Here we provide a bottom-up approach to rationally design the mechanical properties of protein-based hydrogels. We first use atomic fore microscope (AFM) based single-molecule force spectroscopy to characterize the mechanical stability of individual protein building blocks. We then rationally design the mechanical properties of hydrogels by selecting different combination of protein building blocks of known mechanical properties. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate the engineering of hydrogels of distinct extensibility and toughness. This simple combinatorial approach allows direct translation of the mechanical properties of proteins from the single molecule level to the macroscopic level and represents an important step towards rationally designing the mechanical properties of biomaterials.

  14. Estimating seabed scattering mechanisms via Bayesian model selection.

    PubMed

    Steininger, Gavin; Dosso, Stan E; Holland, Charles W; Dettmer, Jan

    2014-10-01

    A quantitative inversion procedure is developed and applied to determine the dominant scattering mechanism (surface roughness and/or volume scattering) from seabed scattering-strength data. The classification system is based on trans-dimensional Bayesian inversion with the deviance information criterion used to select the dominant scattering mechanism. Scattering is modeled using first-order perturbation theory as due to one of three mechanisms: Interface scattering from a rough seafloor, volume scattering from a heterogeneous sediment layer, or mixed scattering combining both interface and volume scattering. The classification system is applied to six simulated test cases where it correctly identifies the true dominant scattering mechanism as having greater support from the data in five cases; the remaining case is indecisive. The approach is also applied to measured backscatter-strength data where volume scattering is determined as the dominant scattering mechanism. Comparison of inversion results with core data indicates the method yields both a reasonable volume heterogeneity size distribution and a good estimate of the sub-bottom depths at which scatterers occur. PMID:25324059

  15. Study on monitoring and estimating soil physical properties using piezoceramic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruolin; Peng, Tongxiao; Zhu, Daopei; Wang, Ming L.

    2016-04-01

    Soil mechanical properties play the most important role for the structural safety. But soil itself develops with environment as climate, loading and even surrounding biochemical contents which will strongly change the soil mechanical properties and may bring drastic damage to structural foundation. In-time monitoring and estimating on soil mechanical properties is proposed. Two piezoceramic transducers are embedded in predetermined locations: one is used as the actuator and the other is used as a sensor. The active-sensing method is applied to excite a stress wave propagating between the transducers. Variation of the wave velocity along the wave propagation path can be read while the soil properties changing. In this paper, soil specimens with different dry density, moisture content and soil granite ratio are tested to investigate the wave propagation variation through the soil with different properties. A model of shear wave velocity with different soil properties is established. Experimental results demonstrate that piezoelectric response wave may be potentially used to estimate soil physical properties.

  16. An Estimate of Biofilm Properties using an Acoustic Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Good, Morris S.; Wend, Christopher F.; Bond, Leonard J.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Panetta, Paul D.; Ahmed, Salahuddin; Crawford, Susan L.; Daly, Don S.

    2006-09-01

    Noninvasive measurements over a biofilm, a three-dimensional community of microorganisms immobilized at a substratum, were made using an acoustic microscope operating at frequencies up to 70 MHz. Spatial variation of surface heterogeneity, thickness, interior structure, and biomass of a living biofilm was estimated over a 2.5-mm by 2.5-mm region. Ultrasound based estimates of thickness were corroborated using optical microscopy and the nominal biofilm thickness was 100 microns. Experimental data showed that the acoustic microscope combined with signal processing was capable of imaging and making quantitative estimates of the spatial distribution of biomass within the biofilm. The revealed surface topology and interior structure of the biofilm provide data for use in advanced biofilm mass transport models. The experimental acoustic and optical systems, methods to estimate of biofilm properties and potential applications for the resulting data are discussed.

  17. Biodegradable compounds: Rheological, mechanical and thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Lucia, G.; Santella, M.; Malinconico, M.; Cerruti, P.; Pantani, R.

    2015-12-01

    Recently great attention from industry has been focused on biodegradable polyesters derived from renewable resources. In particular, PLA has attracted great interest due to its high strength and high modulus and a good biocompatibility, however its brittleness and low heat distortion temperature (HDT) restrict its wide application. On the other hand, Poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) is a biodegradable polymer with a low tensile modulus but characterized by a high flexibility, excellent impact strength, good thermal and chemical resistance. In this work the two aliphatic biodegradable polyesters PBS and PLA were selected with the aim to obtain a biodegradable material for the industry of plastic cups and plates. PBS was also blended with a thermoplastic starch. Talc was also added to the compounds because of its low cost and its effectiveness in increasing the modulus and the HDT of polymers. The compounds were obtained by melt compounding in a single screw extruder and the rheological, mechanical and thermal properties were investigated. The properties of the two compounds were compared and it was found that the values of the tensile modulus and elongation at break measured for the PBS/PLA/Talc compound make it interesting for the production of disposable plates and cups. In terms of thermal resistance the compounds have HDTs high enough to contain hot food or beverages. The PLA/PBS/Talc compound can be, then, considered as biodegradable substitute for polystyrene for the production of disposable plates and cups for hot food and beverages.

  18. Modeling the mechanical properties of liver fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Xinyu; Chen, Siping; Shen, Yuanyuan; Song, Liang

    2016-06-14

    The progression of liver fibrosis changes the biomechanical properties of liver tissue. This study characterized and compared different liver fibrosis stages in rats in terms of viscoelasticity. Three viscoelastic models, the Voigt, Maxwell, and Zener models, were applied to experimental data from rheometer tests and then the elasticity and viscosity were estimated for each fibrosis stage. The study found that both elasticity and viscosity are correlated with the various stages of liver fibrosis. The study revealed that the Zener model is the optimal model for describing the mechanical properties of each fibrosis stage, but there is no significant difference between the Zener and Voigt models in their performance on liver fibrosis staging. Therefore the Voigt model can still be effectively used for liver fibrosis grading. PMID:27017300

  19. Photopatterning the mechanical properties of polydimethylsiloxane films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotton, D. P. J.; Popel, A.; Graz, I. M.; Lacour, S. P.

    2011-03-01

    Silicone rubber films with graded and localized mechanical properties are prepared using two-part polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer, photoinhibitor compounds and conventional photolithography. First the un-cross-linked PDMS is mixed with benzophenone. The resulting positive photosensitive material is then exposed through a mask to UV light from a conventional mask aligner. Cross-linking of the UV exposed elastomer is inhibited, leading to softer regions than the surrounding unexposed matrix. By empirically fitting the nonlinear, hyperelastic Mooney-Rivlin model to experimentally measured stress-strain curves we determine the equivalent tensile modulus (E) of the rubber film. We show the PDMS tensile modulus can then be adjusted in the 0.65-2.9 MPa range by decreasing the UV exposure dose (from 24 000 to 0 mJ cm-2). Further, using a patterned UV mask, we can locally define differential regions of tensile modulus within a single PDMS rubber film. We demonstrate that "hard islands" (E ≈ 2.9 MPa) of 100 μm minimum diameter can be patterned within a 100-μm-thick, single "soft" PDMS rubber membrane (E ≈ 0.65 MPa) cured at 150 °C for 24 h. Thin gold film conductors patterned directly onto the photopatterned PDMS are stretchable and withstand uniaxial cycling to tens of percent strain. The mechanically "pixellated" PDMS rubber film provides an improved substrate with built-in strain relief for stretchable electronics.

  20. Mechanical properties of materials at micro/nano scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei-Hua

    Mechanical properties of materials in small dimensions, including the depth-dependent hardness at the nano/micrometer scales, and the mechanical characterization of thin films and nanotubes, are reported. The surface effect on the depth-dependent nano/microhardness was studied and an apparent surface stress was introduced to represent the energy dissipated per unit area of a solid surface. A plastic bearing ratio model was proposed for the nanoindentation of rough surfaces. The energy dissipation occurring at the indented surface is among the factors that cause the Indentation Size Effect (ISE) at the micro/nanometer scales. Furthermore, an elastic-plastic bearing ratio model was developed for nanoindentation of rough surfaces with a flat indenter tip. The theoretical predictions agree with the experimental results and finite element simulations, from which the elastic constant and the surface hardness were extracted. The surface hardness exhibits an inverse ISE due to the interaction of asperities. The nanoindentation tests on Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) may lead to the formation of carbon tubes, which are rolled up by the delaminated graphite layers. The nanoindentation loading-unloading curves reveal single pop-in and multiple pop-in phenomena, which is induced by fracture of the graphite layers and/or by delamination between the layers. From the load at pop-in, the fracture strength of the layers and/or the bonding strength between the layers can be estimated by the elastic field model for Hertzian contact including sliding friction for transverse isotropy. Two novel methods were developed to estimate the mechanical properties of films, including the Raman spectra method for the estimation of residual stresses in thin ferroelectric films and the microbridge testing method for the mechanical characterization of trilayer thin films. Mechanical characterization was also carried out on Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) nanotubes with each being comprised of

  1. On Estimating End-to-End Network Path Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allman, Mark; Paxson, Vern

    1999-01-01

    The more information about current network conditions available to a transport protocol, the more efficiently it can use the network to transfer its data. In networks such as the Internet, the transport protocol must often form its own estimates of network properties based on measurements per-formed by the connection endpoints. We consider two basic transport estimation problems: determining the setting of the retransmission timer (RTO) for are reliable protocol, and estimating the bandwidth available to a connection as it begins. We look at both of these problems in the context of TCP, using a large TCP measurement set [Pax97b] for trace-driven simulations. For RTO estimation, we evaluate a number of different algorithms, finding that the performance of the estimators is dominated by their minimum values, and to a lesser extent, the timer granularity, while being virtually unaffected by how often round-trip time measurements are made or the settings of the parameters in the exponentially-weighted moving average estimators commonly used. For bandwidth estimation, we explore techniques previously sketched in the literature [Hoe96, AD98] and find that in practice they perform less well than anticipated. We then develop a receiver-side algorithm that performs significantly better.

  2. Adjustment of Sensor Locations During Thermal Property Parameter Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Marschall, Jochen; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The temperature dependent thermal properties of a material may be evaluated from transient temperature histories using nonlinear parameter estimation techniques. The usual approach is to minimize the sum of the squared errors between measured and calculated temperatures at specific locations in the body. Temperature measurements are usually made with thermocouples and it is customary to take thermocouple locations as known and fixed during parameter estimation computations. In fact, thermocouple locations are never known exactly. Location errors on the order of the thermocouple wire diameter are intrinsic to most common instrumentation procedures (e.g., inserting a thermocouple into a drilled hole) and additional errors can be expected for delicate materials, difficult installations, large thermocouple beads, etc.. Thermocouple location errors are especially significant when estimating thermal properties of low diffusively materials which can sustain large temperature gradients during testing. In the present work, a parameter estimation formulation is presented which allows for the direct inclusion of thermocouple positions into the primary parameter estimation procedure. It is straightforward to set bounds on thermocouple locations which exclude non-physical locations and are consistent with installation tolerances. Furthermore, bounds may be tightened to an extent consistent with any independent verification of thermocouple location, such as x-raying, and so the procedure is entirely consonant with experimental information. A mathematical outline of the procedure is given and its implementation is illustrated through numerical examples characteristic of light-weight, high-temperature ceramic insulation during transient heating. The efficacy and the errors associated with the procedure are discussed.

  3. Computing estimates of material properties from transmission eigenvalues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgi, Giovanni; Haddar, Houssem

    2012-05-01

    This work is motivated by inverse scattering problems, those problems where one is interested in reconstructing the shape and the material properties of an inclusion from electromagnetic farfield measurements. More precisely, we are interested in complementing the so-called sampling methods by providing an estimate of the material properties of the sought inclusion. We use for this purpose a measure of the first transmission eigenvalue. Our method is then based on computing the desired estimate by reformulating the so-called interior transmission eigenvalue problem as an eigenvalue problem for the material coefficients. We will restrict ourselves to the two-dimensional setting of the problem and treat the cases of both transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations. We present a number of numerical experiments that validate our methodology for homogeneous and inhomogeneous inclusions and backgrounds. We also treat the case of a background with absorption and the case of scatterers with multiple connected components of different refractive indices.

  4. Mechanical properties of thermal protection system materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, Robert Douglas; Bronowski, David R.; Lee, Moo Yul; Hofer, John H.

    2005-06-01

    An experimental study was conducted to measure the mechanical properties of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials used for the Space Shuttle. Three types of TPS materials (LI-900, LI-2200, and FRCI-12) were tested in 'in-plane' and 'out-of-plane' orientations. Four types of quasi-static mechanical tests (uniaxial tension, uniaxial compression, uniaxial strain, and shear) were performed under low (10{sup -4} to 10{sup -3}/s) and intermediate (1 to 10/s) strain rate conditions. In addition, split Hopkinson pressure bar tests were conducted to obtain the strength of the materials under a relatively higher strain rate ({approx}10{sup 2} to 10{sup 3}/s) condition. In general, TPS materials have higher strength and higher Young's modulus when tested in 'in-plane' than in 'through-the-thickness' orientation under compressive (unconfined and confined) and tensile stress conditions. In both stress conditions, the strength of the material increases as the strain rate increases. The rate of increase in LI-900 is relatively small compared to those for the other two TPS materials tested in this study. But, the Young's modulus appears to be insensitive to the different strain rates applied. The FRCI-12 material, designed to replace the heavier LI-2200, showed higher strengths under tensile and shear stress conditions. But, under a compressive stress condition, LI-2200 showed higher strength than FRCI-12. As far as the modulus is concerned, LI-2200 has higher Young's modulus both in compression and in tension. The shear modulus of FRCI-12 and LI-2200 fell in the same range.

  5. Mechanical Properties of Nb-1Zr Weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santella, Michael; McNabb, Jeffery; Frederick, Alan

    2005-02-01

    The objective of this work was to measure the mechanical properties of Nb-1Zr weldments, and, more specifically, to evaluate whether Charpy V-notch impact testing may be a more meaningful indication of weld deposit ductility than the slow bend testing. Manual gas-tungsten-arc welds were made in Mb-1Zr plates using 4 beads of filler wire from the same heat. The cold-rolled plates were recrystallized by heat treatment at 1773 K for 1 hour prior to welding. Welded plates were made in a stainless steel welding glove box backfilled with either argon or helium. Two plates were made with each gas, with one plate post-weld heat treated at 1373 K. Weld metal from each of the four welded plates was subjected to chemical analysis, tensile testing at room temperature, and Charpy V-notch testing at 93-473 K. Also, microhardness testing was used to evaluate property gradients in the weldments. Impurity concentrations in the weld deposits compared well with the base metal concentrations and were within the limits of the relevant ASTM specification, B393 Type 3. All specimens with one minor exception had yield strengths, tensile strengths, and ductilities that exceeded the ASTM specified minimums. The Charpy V-notch specimens from the as-welded He weld deposit, and from both post-weld-heat-treated weld deposits showed similar behavior with upper shelf energies of 9.7-10 J and ductile-brittle transition temperatures of 85-100 K. These Charpy V-notch properties were comparable to those of the unwelded plate. The as-welded Ar weld deposit had a slightly higher ductile-brittle transition temperature near 150 K. Microhardness testing indicated that in the as-welded conditions the average hardness of the weld deposit made in Ar was higher than that made in He. Post-weld heat treatment reduced the average hardnesses of base metal and weld metal. The range of hardnesses in the weld deposits was increased by the post weld heat treatment.

  6. Surface Estimation, Variable Selection, and the Nonparametric Oracle Property

    PubMed Central

    Storlie, Curtis B.; Bondell, Howard D.; Reich, Brian J.; Zhang, Hao Helen

    2010-01-01

    Variable selection for multivariate nonparametric regression is an important, yet challenging, problem due, in part, to the infinite dimensionality of the function space. An ideal selection procedure should be automatic, stable, easy to use, and have desirable asymptotic properties. In particular, we define a selection procedure to be nonparametric oracle (np-oracle) if it consistently selects the correct subset of predictors and at the same time estimates the smooth surface at the optimal nonparametric rate, as the sample size goes to infinity. In this paper, we propose a model selection procedure for nonparametric models, and explore the conditions under which the new method enjoys the aforementioned properties. Developed in the framework of smoothing spline ANOVA, our estimator is obtained via solving a regularization problem with a novel adaptive penalty on the sum of functional component norms. Theoretical properties of the new estimator are established. Additionally, numerous simulated and real examples further demonstrate that the new approach substantially outperforms other existing methods in the finite sample setting. PMID:21603586

  7. Estimation of aerosol optical properties considering hygroscopicity and light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Chang Hoon; Lee, Ji Yi; Kim, Yong Pyo

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the influences of water solubility and light absorption on the optical properties of organic aerosols were investigated. A size-resolved model for calculating optical properties was developed by combining thermodynamic hygroscopic growth and aerosol dynamics models. The internal mixtures based on the homogeneous and core-shell mixing were compared. The results showed that the radiative forcing (RF) of Water Soluble Organic Carbon (WSOC) aerosol can be estimated to range from -0.07 to -0.49 W/m2 for core-shell mixing and from -0.09 to -0.47 W/m2 for homogeneous mixing under the simulation conditions (RH = 60%). The light absorption properties of WSOC showed the mass absorption efficiency (MAE) of WSOC can be estimated 0.43-0.5 m2/g, which accounts for 5-10% of the MAE of elemental carbon (EC). The effect on MAE of increasing the imaginary refractive index of WSOC was also calculated, and it was found that increasing the imaginary refractive index by 0.001i enhanced WSOC aerosol absorption by approximately 0.02 m2/g. Finally, the sensitivity test results revealed that changes in the fine mode fraction (FMF) and in the geometric mean diameter of the accumulation mode play important roles in estimating RF during hygroscopic growth.

  8. Estimation of inherent optical properties from CZMIL lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minsu; Feygels, Viktor; Kopilevich, Yuri; Park, Joong Yong

    2014-11-01

    Bathymetric lidar has been widely used for ocean floor mapping. By identifying two distinctive return peaks, one from the water surface and the other from the bottom, the water depth can be estimated. In addition to bathymetry, it is also possible to estimate the optical properties of the water by analyzing the lidar return waveform. Only the few systems (e.g. Optech's SHOALS and CZMIL systems) that have good radiometric calibration demonstrate the capability to product the water's inherent optical properties and bottom reflectance. As the laser pulse propagates through the water, it is scattered by the water constituents. The directional distribution of scattered radiant power is determined by the volume scattering function. Only the backscattering within a very narrow solid angle around the 180° scattering angle travels back to the detector. During the two-way travel it experiences the same optical interaction (absorption and scattering) with the water constituents. Thus, the lidar return waveform between the surface and bottom peak contains information about the vertical distribution of the water attenuation coefficient and the backscattering coefficient in the form of the rate of change of the return power. One challenge is how to estimate the inherent attenuation from the apparent attenuation. In this research we propose a technique to estimate the true water attenuation coefficient from the total system attenuation. We use a lidar waveform simulator that solves the irradiance distribution on the beam cross-section using an analytical Fourier transform of the radiance based on a single-scattering approximation.

  9. Mechanical Properties of Nuclear Fuel Surrogates using Picosecond Laser Ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    David Hurley; Marat Khafizov; Farhad Farzbod; Eric Burgett

    2013-05-01

    Detailed understanding between microstructure evolution and mechanical properties is important for designing new high burnup nuclear fuels. In this presentation we discuss the use of picosecond ultrasonics to measure localize changes in mechanical properties of fuel surrogates. We develop measurement techniques that can be applied to investigate heterogeneous elastic properties caused by localize changes in chemistry, grain microstructure caused by recrystallization, and mechanical properties of small samples prepared using focused ion beam sample preparation. Emphasis is placed on understanding the relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties

  10. Tuning the mechanical properties of silica microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijuan; D'Acunzi, Maria; Kappl, Michael; Imhof, Arnout; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Graf, Robert; Vollmer, Doris

    2010-12-21

    Heat treatment is a standard method to increase the hardness of silica in various applications. Here, we tested the effect of high temperature annealing on the mechanical properties of silica microcapsules by force spectroscopy under point loads applied to the particle shell. The Young's modulus of the shells moderately increases after annealing at temperatures above 500 °C. Temperatures over 850 °C result in a much stronger increase and the Young's modulus is close to that of fused silica after annealing at 1100 °C. NMR analysis revealed that in untreated microcapsules synthesized by seeded growth using the Stöber method only 55% of the silicon atoms form siloxane bonds with four neighbors, whereas the remaining ones only form three or less siloxane bonds each and, thus, a large number of ethoxy and silanol groups still exist. During annealing at 500 °C, these are successively transformed into siloxane bonds through condensation reactions. This process correlates with only a moderate increase in Young's modulus. The strong increase at temperatures above 850 °C was associated with a densification which was associated by a decrease in capsule size and shell thickness while the shells remained homogenous and of spherical shape. The main strengthening of the shells is thus mainly due to compaction by sintering at length scales significantly larger than that of local siloxane bonds. PMID:20963236

  11. Nonlinear NDE of Concrete Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkolnik, Iosif E.

    2006-05-01

    Obtained theoretical relationship shows that the strength of concrete increases if the nonlinear parameter decreases. Experimental data proved that modulus of elasticity, ultrasound pulse velocity and nonlinear parameter are independent characteristics of concrete. Two nondestructive patent methods based on the measurement of resonant frequency shift and phase shift are described. These nonlinear nondestructive methods can be used when conventional acoustic methods are not applicable for evaluating strength of concrete. The relationship between static and dynamic modulus is obtained from the thermofluctuation theory and nonlinear equation of state of concrete. Corresponding relationship shows that the ratio of the static to the dynamic modulus of elasticity depends on the strength of concrete, its temperature, ratio and rate of loading, and that dynamic modulus is greater than static modulus of elasticity. Comparative study illustrates substantial agreement between obtained relationships and existing experimental results as well as general equations given in standards. Presented data illustrate the potential of the nonlinear approach, and indicate a new direction for nonlinear nondestructive methods of evaluating mechanical properties of concrete.

  12. Mechanical properties of lattice grid composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Hualin; Fang, Daining; Jin, Fengnian

    2008-08-01

    An equivalent continuum method only considering the stretching deformation of struts was used to study the in-plane stiffness and strength of planar lattice grid composite materials. The initial yield equations of lattices were deduced. Initial yield surfaces were depicted separately in different 3D and 2D stress spaces. The failure envelope is a polyhedron in 3D spaces and a polygon in 2D spaces. Each plane or line of the failure envelope is corresponding to the yield or buckling of a typical bar row. For lattices with more than three bar rows, subsequent yield of the other bar row after initial yield made the lattice achieve greater limit strength. The importance of the buckling strength of the grids was strengthened while the grids were relative sparse. The integration model of the method was used to study the nonlinear mechanical properties of strain hardening grids. It was shown that the integration equation could accurately model the complete stress-strain curves of the grids within small deformations.

  13. Fluid Mechanical Properties of Silkworm Fibroin Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Akira

    2005-11-01

    The aqueous solution behavior of silk fibroin is of interest due to the assembly and processing of this protein related to the spinning of protein fibers that exhibit remarkable mechanical properties. To gain insight into the origins of this functional feature, it is desired to determine how the protein behaves under a range of solution conditions. Pure fibroin at different concentrations in water was studied for surface tension, as a measure of surfactancy. In addition, shear induced changes on these solutions in terms of structure and morphology was also determined. Fibroin solutions exhibited shear rate-sensitive viscosity changes and precipitated at a critical shear rate where a dramatic increase of 75-150% of the initial value was observed along with a decrease in viscosity. In surface tension measurements, critical micelle concentrations were in the range of 3-4% w/v. The influence of additional factors, such as sericin protein, divalent and monovalent cations, and pH on the solution behavior in relation to structural and morphological features will also be described.

  14. Mechanical properties of hybrid polymer nanotube systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Jonathan N.; Cadek, Martin; Dalton, Alan B.; Munoz, Edgar; Razal, Joselito; Baughman, Ray H.; Blau, Werner J.

    2003-04-01

    In this work, mechanical properties of hybrid materials fabricated from nanotubes and commercially available polymers were investigated. It was found that, by adding various concentrations of arc discharge multiwall nanotubes, both Young"s modulus and hardness increased by factors of 1.8 and 1.6 at 1wt% in PVA and 2.8 and 2.0 at 8wt% in PVK, in reasonable agreement with the Halpin-Tsai theory. Furthermore, the presence of the nanotubes was found to nucleate crystallization of the PVA. This crystal growth is thought to enhance matrix-nanotube stress transfer. In addition, microscopy studies suggest extremely strong interfacial bonding in the PVA-based composite. This is manifested by the fracture of the polymer rather that the polymer-nanotube interface. The dependence of the polymer nanotube interfacial interaction on host polymer was studied by intercalating various polymers (PVA, PVP and PS) into single wall nanotube buckypaper. Even for short soak times, significant polymer intercalation into existing free volume was observed. Depending on the polymer and the level of intercalation tensile tests on intercalated sheets showed that the Young"s modulus, strength and toughness increased by factors of 3, 9 and 28, respectively. This indicates that the intercalated polymer enhances load transmission between nanotubes due the significant stress transfer. The level of stress transfer was observed to scale with polymer hydrophobicity as expected.

  15. Mechanical Properties of the Upper Airway

    PubMed Central

    Strohl, Kingman P.; Butler, James P.; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the upper airway (nose, pharynx, and larynx) in health and in the pathogenesis of sleep apnea, asthma, and other airway diseases, discussed elsewhere in the Comprehensive Physiology series, prompts this review of the biomechanical properties and functional aspects of the upper airway. There is a literature based on anatomic or structural descriptions in static circumstances, albeit studied in limited numbers of individuals in both health and disease. As for dynamic features, the literature is limited to studies of pressure and flow through all or parts of the upper airway and to the effects of muscle activation on such features; however, the links between structure and function through airway size, shape, and compliance remain a topic that is completely open for investigation, particularly through analyses using concepts of fluid and structural mechanics. Throughout are included both historically seminal references, as well as those serving as signposts or updated reviews. This article should be considered a resource for concepts needed for the application of biomechanical models of upper airway physiology, applicable to understanding the pathophysiology of disease and anticipated results of treatment interventions. PMID:23723026

  16. Evaluation of the Flexural Rigidity of Sandwich Structures Using Experimentally Obtained Mechanical Properties of the Constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarmi, F.; Coyle, T. W.; Mostaghimi, J.

    2010-01-01

    Prediction of mechanical performance of sandwich constructions is a difficult task due to the complex nonlinear and inelastic behavior of the constituent materials. This study tries to utilize an analytical model to estimate the mechanical performance of sandwich structure based on the mechanical properties of the constituents. To this end, the mechanical properties of the core and skin materials were examined separately. The mechanical behavior and deformation mechanism of Ni alloy foam structures have been studied using uniaxial compression testing. The mechanical properties of alloy 625 coating were determined using tensile testing. The flexural rigidity of sandwich structures were calculated using experimentally obtained elastic moduli of the alloy 625 coating and Ni alloy foam. The model was also used to calculate the flexural rigidity of sandwich samples with different skin thicknesses. This study also investigates the effect of post fabrication heat treatment on the mechanical performance of the sandwich structures.

  17. Cell Mechanosensitivity: Mechanical Properties and Interaction with Gravitational Field

    PubMed Central

    Ogneva, I. V.

    2013-01-01

    This paper addressed the possible mechanisms of primary reception of a mechanical stimulus by different cells. Data concerning the stiffness of muscle and nonmuscle cells as measured by atomic force microscopy are provided. The changes in the mechanical properties of cells that occur under changed external mechanical tension are presented, and the initial stages of mechanical signal transduction are considered. The possible mechanism of perception of different external mechanical signals by cells is suggested. PMID:23509748

  18. Auxetic oesophageal stents: structure and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Ali, Murtaza Najabat; Busfield, James J C; Rehman, Ihtesham U

    2014-02-01

    Oesophageal cancer is the ninth leading cause of malignant cancer death and its prognosis remains poor, ranking as the sixth most frequent cause of death in the world. This research work aims to adopt an Auxetic (rotating-squares) geometry device, that had previously been examined theoretically and analysed by Grima and Evans (J Mater Sci Lett 19(17):1563-1565, 2000), to produce a novel Auxetic oesophageal stent and stent-grafts relevant to the palliative treatment of oesophageal cancer and also for the prevention of dysphagia. This paper discusses the manufacture of a small diameter Auxetic oesophageal stent and stent-graft. The oral deployment of such an Auxetic stent would be simplest if a commercial balloon dilatational catheter was used as this obviates the need for an expensive dedicated delivery system. A novel manufacturing route was employed in this research to develop both Auxetic films and Auxetic oesophageal stents, which ranged from conventional subtractive techniques to a new additive manufacturing method. Polyurethane was selected as a material for the fabrication of Auxetic films and Auxetic oesophageal stents because of its good biocompatibility and non-toxicological properties. The Auxetic films were later used for the fabrication of seamed Auxetic oesophageal stents. The flexible polyurethane tubular grafts were also attached to the inner luminal side of the seamless Auxetic oesophageal stents, in order to prevent tumour in-growth. Scanning electron microscopy was used to conduct surface morphology study by using different Auxetic specimens developed from different conventional and new additive manufacturing techniques. Tensile testing of the Auxetic films was performed to characterise their mechanical properties. The stent expansion tests of the Auxetic stents were done to analyse the longitudinal extension and radial expansion of the Auxetic stent at a range of radial pressures applied by the balloon catheter, and to also identify the pressure

  19. Effects of Zoledronate and Mechanical Loading during Simulated Weightlessness on Bone Structure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. T.; Nalavadi, M. O.; Shirazi-Fard, Y.; Castillo, A. B.; Alwood, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    Space flight modulates bone remodeling to favor bone resorption. Current countermeasures include an anti-resorptive drug class, bisphosphonates (BP), and high-force loading regimens. Does the combination of anti-resorptives and high-force exercise during weightlessness have negative effects on the mechanical and structural properties of bone? In this study, we implemented an integrated model to mimic mechanical strain of exercise via cyclical loading (CL) in mice treated with the BP Zoledronate (ZOL) combined with hindlimb unloading (HU). Our working hypothesis is that CL combined with ZOL in the HU model induces additive structural and mechanical changes. Thirty-two C57BL6 mice (male,16 weeks old, n8group) were exposed to 3 weeks of either HU or normal ambulation (NA). Cohorts of mice received one subcutaneous injection of ZOL (45gkg), or saline vehicle, prior to experiment. The right tibia was axially loaded in vivo, 60xday to 9N in compression, repeated 3xweek during HU. During the application of compression, secant stiffness (SEC), a linear estimate of slope of the force displacement curve from rest (0.5N) to max load (9.0N), was calculated for each cycle once per week. Ex vivo CT was conducted on all subjects. For ex vivo mechanical properties, non-CL left femurs underwent 3-point bending. In the proximal tibial metaphysis, HU decreased, CL increased, and ZOL increased the cancellous bone volume to total volume ratio by -26, +21, and +33, respectively. Similar trends held for trabecular thickness and number. Ex vivo left femur mechanical properties revealed HU decreased stiffness (-37),and ZOL mitigated the HU stiffness losses (+78). Data on the ex vivo Ultimate Force followed similar trends. After 3 weeks, HU decreased in vivo SEC (-16). The combination of CL+HU appeared additive in bone structure and mechanical properties. However, when HU + CL + ZOL were combined, ZOL had no additional effect (p0.05) on in vivo SEC. Structural data followed this trend with

  20. Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation, microstructure, and mechanical property interrelations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1984-01-01

    Ultrasonic techniques for mechanical property characterizations are reviewed and conceptual models are advanced for explaining and interpreting the empirically based results. At present, the technology is generally empirically based and is emerging from the research laboratory. Advancement of the technology will require establishment of theoretical foundations for the experimentally observed interrelations among ultrasonic measurements, mechanical properties, and microstructure. Conceptual models are applied to ultrasonic assessment of fracture toughness to illustrate an approach for predicting correlations found among ultrasonic measurements, microstructure, and mechanical properties.

  1. Estimation Model for Magnetic Properties of Stamped Electrical Steel Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwara, Yoshiyuki; Fujimura, Hiroshi; Okamura, Kazuo; Imanishi, Kenji; Yashiki, Hiroyoshi

    Less deterioration in magnetic properties of electrical steel sheets in the process of stamping out iron-core are necessary in order to maintain its performance. First, the influence of plastic strain and stress on magnetic properties was studied by test pieces, in which plastic strain was added uniformly and residual stress was not induced. Because the influence of plastic strain was expressed by equivalent plastic strain, at each equivalent plastic strain state the influence of load stress was investigated. Secondly, elastic limit was determined about 60% of macroscopic yield point (MYP), and it was found to agree with stress limit inducing irreversible deterioration in magnetic properties. Therefore simulation models, where beyond elastic limit plastic deformation begins and magnetic properties are deteriorated steeply, are proposed. Besides considered points in the deformation analysis are strain-rate sensitivity of flow stress, anisotropy under deformation, and influence of stress triaxiality on fracture. Finally, proposed models have been shown to be valid, because magnetic properties of 5mm width rectangular sheets stamped out from non-oriented electrical steel sheet (35A250 JIS grade) can be estimated with good accuracy. It is concluded that the elastic limit must be taken into account in both stamping process simulation and magnetic field calculation.

  2. Estimation of aerosol optical properties from all-sky imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantzidis, Andreas; Tzoumanikas, Panagiotis; Salamalikis, Vasilios; Wilbert, Stefan; Prahl, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols are one of the most important constituents in the atmosphere that affect the incoming solar radiation, either directly through absorbing and scattering processes or indirectly by changing the optical properties and lifetime of clouds. Under clear skies, aerosols become the dominant factor that affect the intensity of solar irradiance reaching the ground. It has been shown that the variability in direct normal irradiance (DNI) due to aerosols is more important than the one induced in global horizontal irradiance (GHI), while the uncertainty in its calculation is dominated by uncertainties in the aerosol optical properties. In recent years, all-sky imagers are used for the detection of cloud coverage, type and velocity in a bouquet of applications including solar irradiance resource and forecasting. However, information about the optical properties of aerosols could be derived with the same instrumentation. In this study, the aerosol optical properties are estimated with the synergetic use of all-sky images, complementary data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and calculations from a radiative transfer model. The area of interest is Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA), Tabernas, Spain and data from a 5 month period are analyzed. The proposed methodology includes look-up-tables (LUTs) of diffuse sky radiance of Red (R), Green (G) and Blue (B) channels at several zenith and azimuth angles and for different atmospheric conditions (Angström α and β, single scattering albedo, precipitable water, solar zenith angle). Based on the LUTS, results from the CIMEL photometer at PSA were used to estimate the RGB radiances for the actual conditions at this site. The methodology is accompanied by a detailed evaluation of its robustness, the development and evaluation of the inversion algorithm (derive aerosol optical properties from RGB image values) and a sensitivity analysis about how the pre-mentioned atmospheric parameters affect the results.

  3. Model to Estimate Threshold Mechanical Stability of Lower Lateral Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, James Hakjune; Hamamoto, Ashley; Kiyohara, Nicole; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2015-01-01

    RELEVANCE This study presents a novel method of modeling anatomical structures and quantifying the mechanical properties of nasal cartilage. Quantifying these parameters is an important step in guiding surgical maneuvers performed in rhinoplasty. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 5. PMID:25927180

  4. Microstructure, mechanical properties, bio-corrosion properties and antibacterial properties of Ti-Ag sintered alloys.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mian; Zhang, Erlin; Zhang, Lan

    2016-05-01

    In this research, Ag element was selected as an antibacterial agent to develop an antibacterial Ti-Ag alloy by a powder metallurgy. The microstructure, phase constitution, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and antibacterial properties of the Ti-Ag sintered alloys have been systematically studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), compressive test, electrochemical measurements and antibacterial test. The effects of the Ag powder size and the Ag content on the antibacterial property and mechanical property as well as the anticorrosion property have been investigated. The microstructure results have shown that Ti-Ag phase, residual pure Ag and Ti were the mainly phases in Ti-Ag(S75) sintered alloy while Ti2Ag was synthesized in Ti-Ag(S10) sintered alloy. The mechanical test indicated that Ti-Ag sintered alloy showed a much higher hardness and the compressive yield strength than cp-Ti but the mechanical properties were slightly reduced with the increase of Ag content. Electrochemical results showed that Ag powder size had a significant effect on the corrosion resistance of Ti-Ag sintered alloy. Ag content increased the corrosion resistance in a dose dependent way under a homogeneous microstructure. Antibacterial tests have demonstrated that antibacterial Ti-Ag alloy was successfully prepared. It was also shown that the Ag powder particle size and the Ag content influenced the antibacterial activity seriously. The reduction in the Ag powder size was benefit to the improvement in the antibacterial property and the Ag content has to be at least 3wt.% in order to obtain a strong and stable antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The bacterial mechanism was thought to be related to the Ti2Ag and its distribution. PMID:26952433

  5. Robotic palpation and mechanical property characterization for abnormal tissue localization.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Bummo; Kim, Yeongjin; Oh, Cheol Kyu; Kim, Jung

    2012-09-01

    Palpation is an intuitive examination procedure in which the kinesthetic and tactile sensations of the physician are used. Although it has been widely used to detect and localize diseased tissues in many clinical fields, the procedure is subjective and dependent on the experience of the individual physician. Palpation results and biomechanics-based mechanical property characterization are possible solutions that can enable the acquisition of objective and quantitative information on abnormal tissue localization during diagnosis and surgery. This paper presents an integrated approach for robotic palpation combined with biomechanical soft tissue characterization. In particular, we propose a new palpation method that is inspired by the actual finger motions that occur during palpation procedures. To validate the proposed method, robotic palpation experiments on silicone soft tissue phantoms with embedded hard inclusions were performed and the force responses of the phantoms were measured using a robotic palpation system. Furthermore, we carried out a numerical analysis, simulating the experiments and estimating the objective and quantitative properties of the tissues. The results indicate that the proposed approach can differentiate diseased tissue from normal tissue and can characterize the mechanical information of diseased tissue, which means that this method can be applied as a means of abnormality localization to diagnose prostate cancers. PMID:22772733

  6. Statistical properties of Fourier-based time-lag estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epitropakis, A.; Papadakis, I. E.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The study of X-ray time-lag spectra in active galactic nuclei (AGN) is currently an active research area, since it has the potential to illuminate the physics and geometry of the innermost region (i.e. close to the putative super-massive black hole) in these objects. To obtain reliable information from these studies, the statistical properties of time-lags estimated from data must be known as accurately as possible. Aims: We investigated the statistical properties of Fourier-based time-lag estimates (i.e. based on the cross-periodogram), using evenly sampled time series with no missing points. Our aim is to provide practical "guidelines" on estimating time-lags that are minimally biased (i.e. whose mean is close to their intrinsic value) and have known errors. Methods: Our investigation is based on both analytical work and extensive numerical simulations. The latter consisted of generating artificial time series with various signal-to-noise ratios and sampling patterns/durations similar to those offered by AGN observations with present and past X-ray satellites. We also considered a range of different model time-lag spectra commonly assumed in X-ray analyses of compact accreting systems. Results: Discrete sampling, binning and finite light curve duration cause the mean of the time-lag estimates to have a smaller magnitude than their intrinsic values. Smoothing (i.e. binning over consecutive frequencies) of the cross-periodogram can add extra bias at low frequencies. The use of light curves with low signal-to-noise ratio reduces the intrinsic coherence, and can introduce a bias to the sample coherence, time-lag estimates, and their predicted error. Conclusions: Our results have direct implications for X-ray time-lag studies in AGN, but can also be applied to similar studies in other research fields. We find that: a) time-lags should be estimated at frequencies lower than ≈ 1/2 the Nyquist frequency to minimise the effects of discrete binning of the

  7. Oxygen transport properties estimation by DSMC-CT simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, Domenico; Frezzotti, Aldo; Ghiroldi, Gian Pietro

    2014-12-09

    Coupling DSMC simulations with classical trajectories calculations is emerging as a powerful tool to improve predictive capabilities of computational rarefied gas dynamics. The considerable increase of computational effort outlined in the early application of the method (Koura,1997) can be compensated by running simulations on massively parallel computers. In particular, GPU acceleration has been found quite effective in reducing computing time (Ferrigni,2012; Norman et al.,2013) of DSMC-CT simulations. The aim of the present work is to study rarefied Oxygen flows by modeling binary collisions through an accurate potential energy surface, obtained by molecular beams scattering (Aquilanti, et al.,1999). The accuracy of the method is assessed by calculating molecular Oxygen shear viscosity and heat conductivity following three different DSMC-CT simulation methods. In the first one, transport properties are obtained from DSMC-CT simulations of spontaneous fluctuation of an equilibrium state (Bruno et al, Phys. Fluids, 23, 093104, 2011). In the second method, the collision trajectory calculation is incorporated in a Monte Carlo integration procedure to evaluate the Taxman’s expressions for the transport properties of polyatomic gases (Taxman,1959). In the third, non-equilibrium zero and one-dimensional rarefied gas dynamic simulations are adopted and the transport properties are computed from the non-equilibrium fluxes of momentum and energy. The three methods provide close values of the transport properties, their estimated statistical error not exceeding 3%. The experimental values are slightly underestimated, the percentage deviation being, again, few percent.

  8. Wave-Mechanical Properties of Stationary States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Alan

    This monograph is a review of the quantum mechanical concepts presented in two other monographs, "The Nature of Atoms" and "Bonds Between Atoms," by the same author. It is assumed the reader is familiar with these ideas. The monograph sketches only those aspects of quantum mechanics that are of most direct use in picturing and calculating the…

  9. Mechanical Properties of Degraded PMR-15 Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuji, Luis C.; McManus, Hugh L.; Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1998-01-01

    Thermo-oxidative aging produces a non-uniform degradation state in PMR-15 resin. A surface layer, usually attributed to oxidative degradation, forms. This surface layer has different properties from the inner material. A set of material tests was designed to separate the properties of the oxidized surface layer from the properties of interior material. Test specimens were aged at 316 C in either air or nitrogen, for durations of up to 800 hours. The thickness of the oxidized surface layer in air aged specimens, and the shrinkage and Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE) of nitrogen aged specimens were measured directly. Four-point-bend tests were performed to determine modulus of both the oxidized surface layer and the interior material. Bimaterial strip specimens consisting of oxidized surface material and unoxidized interior material were constructed and used to determine surface layer shrinkage and CTE. Results confirm that the surface layer and core materials have substantially different properties.

  10. Estimation of ADME properties with substructure pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Cheng, Feixiong; Xu, You; Li, Weihua; Tang, Yun

    2010-06-28

    Over the past decade, absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) property evaluation has become one of the most important issues in the process of drug discovery and development. Since in vivo and in vitro evaluations are costly and laborious, in silico techniques had been widely used to estimate ADME properties of chemical compounds. Traditional prediction methods usually try to build a functional relationship between a set of molecular descriptors and a given ADME property. Although traditional methods have been successfully used in many cases, the accuracy and efficiency of molecular descriptors must be concerned. Herein, we report a new classification method based on substructure pattern recognition, in which each molecule is represented as a substructure pattern fingerprint based on a predefined substructure dictionary, and then a support vector machine (SVM) algorithm is applied to build the prediction model. Therefore, a direct connection between substructures and molecular properties is built. The most important substructure patterns can be identified via the information gain analysis, which could help to interpret the models from a medicinal chemistry perspective. Afterward, this method was verified with two data sets, one for blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration and the other for human intestinal absorption (HIA). The results demonstrated that the overall predictive accuracies of the best HIA model for the training and test sets were 98.5 and 98.8%, and the overall predictive accuracies of the best BBB model for the training and test sets were 98.8 and 98.4%, which confirmed the reliability of our method. In the additional validations, the predictive accuracies were 94 and 69.5% for the HIA and the BBB models, respectively. Moreover, some of the representative key substructure patterns which significantly correlated with the HIA and BBB penetration properties were also presented. PMID:20578727

  11. Mechanical properties of UV irradiated rat tail tendon (RTT) collagen.

    PubMed

    Sionkowska, Alina; Wess, Tim

    2004-04-01

    The mechanical properties of RTT collagen tendon before and after UV irradiation have been investigated by mechanical testing (Instron). Air-dried tendon were submitted to treatment with UV irradiation (wavelength 254 nm) for different time intervals. The changes in such mechanical properties as breaking strength and percentage elongation have been investigated. The results have shown, that the mechanical properties of the tendon were greatly affected by time of UV irradiation. Ultimate tensile strength and ultimate percentage elongation decreased after UV irradiation of the tendon. Increasing UV irradiation leads to a decrease in Young's modulus of the tendon. PMID:15178003

  12. Group-contribution based property estimation and uncertainty analysis for flammability-related properties.

    PubMed

    Frutiger, Jérôme; Marcarie, Camille; Abildskov, Jens; Sin, Gürkan

    2016-11-15

    This study presents new group contribution (GC) models for the prediction of Lower and Upper Flammability Limits (LFL and UFL), Flash Point (FP) and Auto Ignition Temperature (AIT) of organic chemicals applying the Marrero/Gani (MG) method. Advanced methods for parameter estimation using robust regression and outlier treatment have been applied to achieve high accuracy. Furthermore, linear error propagation based on covariance matrix of estimated parameters was performed. Therefore, every estimated property value of the flammability-related properties is reported together with its corresponding 95%-confidence interval of the prediction. Compared to existing models the developed ones have a higher accuracy, are simple to apply and provide uncertainty information on the calculated prediction. The average relative error and correlation coefficient are 11.5% and 0.99 for LFL, 15.9% and 0.91 for UFL, 2.0% and 0.99 for FP as well as 6.4% and 0.76 for AIT. Moreover, the temperature-dependence of LFL property was studied. A compound specific proportionality constant (K(LFL)) between LFL and temperature is introduced and an MG GC model to estimate K(LFL) is developed. Overall the ability to predict flammability-related properties including the corresponding uncertainty of the prediction can provide important information for a qualitative and quantitative safety-related risk assessment studies. PMID:27453258

  13. Mechanical and physical properties of plasma-sprayed stabilized zirconia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siemers, P. A.; Mehan, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Physical and mechanical properties were determined for plasma-sprayed MgO- or Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 thermal barrier coatings. Properties were determined for the ceramic coating in both the freestanding condition and as-bonded to a metal substrate. The properties of the NiCrAlY bond coating were also investigated.

  14. Phonon spectrum, mechanical and thermophysical properties of thorium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Daroca, D.; Jaroszewicz, S.; Llois, A. M.; Mosca, H. O.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we study, by means of density functional perturbation theory and the pseudopotential method, mechanical and thermophysical properties of thorium carbide. These properties are derived from the lattice dynamics in the quasi-harmonic approximation. The phonon spectrum of ThC presented in this article, to the best authors' knowledge, have not been studied, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. We compare mechanical properties, volume thermal expansion and molar specific capacities with previous results and find a very good agreement.

  15. Mechanical Properties of Degraded PMR-15 Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuji, Luis C.

    2000-01-01

    Thermo-oxidative aging produces a nonuniform degradation state in PMR-15 resin. A surface layer, usually attributed to oxidative degradation, forms. This surface layer has different properties from the inner material. A set of material tests was designed to separate the properties of the oxidized surface layer from the properties of interior material. Test specimens were aged at 316 C in either air or nitrogen, for durations of up to 800 hr. The thickness of the oxidized surface layer in air aged specimens, and the shrinkage and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of nitrogen aged specimens were measured directly. The nitrogen-aged specimens were assumed to have the same properties as the interior material in the air-aged specimens. Four-point-bend tests were performed to determine modulus of both the oxidized surface layer and the interior material. Bimaterial strip specimens consisting of oxidized surface material and unoxidized interior material were constructed and used to determine surface layer shrinkage and CTE. Results confirm that the surface layer and core materials have substantially different properties.

  16. Soil mechanical properties at the Apollo 14 site.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. K.; Bromwell, L. G.; Carrier, W. D., III; Costes, N. C.; Scott, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 14 lunar landing provided a greater amount of information on the mechanical properties of the lunar soil than previous missions. Measurements on core-tube samples and the results of transporter track analyses indicate that the average density of the soil in the Fra Mauro region is in the range from 1.45 to 1.60 g/cu cm. The soil strength appears to be higher in the vicinity of the site of the Apollo 14 lunar surface experiments package, and trench data suggest that strength increases with depth. Lower-bound estimates of soil cohesion give values of 0.03 to 0.10 kN/sq m, which are lower than values of 0.35 to 0.70 kN/sq m estimated for soils encountered in previous missions. The in situ modulus of elasticity, deduced from the measured seismic-wave velocity, is compatible with that to be expected for a terrestrial silty fine sand in the lunar gravitational field.

  17. Lunar soil properties and soil mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. K.; Houston, W. N.

    1974-01-01

    The long-range objectives were to develop methods of experimentation and analysis for the determination of the physical properties and engineering behavior of lunar surface materials under in situ environmental conditions. Data for this purpose were obtained from on-site manned investigations, orbiting and softlanded spacecraft, and terrestrial simulation studies. Knowledge of lunar surface material properties are reported for the development of models for several types of lunar studies and for the investigation of lunar processes. The results have direct engineering application for manned missions to the moon.

  18. Physical and mechanical properties of icebergs

    SciTech Connect

    Gammon, P.H.; Bobby, W.; Gagnon, R.E.; Russell, W.E.

    1983-05-01

    Physical and mechanical characteristics of iceberg ice were studied from samples collected near the shores of eastern Newfoundland. Although the physical characteristics show considerable diversity, iceberg ice has some common features and is generally porous, lacks significant concentrations of dissolved materials, contains internal cracks and has an irregular interlocking grain structure. A review of mechanical testing of ice was carried out and an experimental setup was devised to reduce effects of improper contact between specimen and loading apparatus. Uniaxial compressive strength for iceberg ice was determined and compared with that for lake ice. The strength of iceberg ice was higher than that of lake ice but Young's Modulus for lake ice was higher.

  19. Structure and mechanical properties of the welded joints of large-diameter pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khotinov, V. A.; Arabei, A. B.; Pyshmintsev, I. Yu.; Farber, V. M.

    2013-05-01

    The structure and mechanical properties of the technological welded joints of large-diameter pipes of strength class K60 produced by two companies are studied. Along with standard mechanical properties (σ0.2, σu, δ, ψ), specific work of deformation a (tensile toughness) and true rupture strength S f are estimated from an analysis of the stress-strain diagrams constructed in true coordinates. The mechanical behavior is found to be different for samples cut from different zones of a welded joint (central weld, heat-affected zone, and base metal). The mutual correlation between parameters a, S f, and impact toughness KCV is considered.

  20. Estimation of soil hydraulic properties with microwave techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneill, P. E.; Gurney, R. J.; Camillo, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    Useful quantitative information about soil properties may be obtained by calibrating energy and moisture balance models with remotely sensed data. A soil physics model solves heat and moisture flux equations in the soil profile and is driven by the surface energy balance. Model generated surface temperature and soil moisture and temperature profiles are then used in a microwave emission model to predict the soil brightness temperature. The model hydraulic parameters are varied until the predicted temperatures agree with the remotely sensed values. This method is used to estimate values for saturated hydraulic conductivity, saturated matrix potential, and a soil texture parameter. The conductivity agreed well with a value measured with an infiltration ring and the other parameters agreed with values in the literature.

  1. Supramolecular Polymer Nanocomposites - Improvement of Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinricher, Jesse; Neikirk, Colin; Priestley, Rodney

    2015-03-01

    Supramolecular polymers differ from traditional polymers in that their repeat units are connected by hydrogen bonds that can reversibly break and form under various stimuli. They can be more easily recycled than conventional materials, and their highly temperature dependent viscosities result in reduced energy consumption and processing costs. Furthermore, judicious selection of supramolecular polymer architecture and functionality allows the design of advanced materials including shape memory and self-healing materials. Supramolecular polymers have yet to see widespread use because they can't support much weight due to their inherent mechanical weakness. In order to address this issue, the mechanical strength of supramolecular polymer nanocomposites based on ureidopyrmidinone (UPy) telechelic poly(caprolactone) doped with surface activated silica nanoparticles was investigated by tensile testing and dynamic mechanical analysis. The effects of varying amounts and types of nanofiller surface functionality were investigated to glean insight into the contributions of filler-filler and filler-matrix interactions to mechanical reinforcement in supramolecular polymer nanocomposites. MRSEC NSF DMR 0819860 (PI: Prof. N. Phuan Ong) REU Site Grant: NSF DMR-1156422 (PI: Prof. Mikko Haataja)

  2. Composite propellant technology research: Mechanical property characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, Mark V.

    1991-01-01

    Proof for the existence of a single Poisson's ratio function in isotropic linear viscoelastic materials is presented. An in-depth discussion is given of three dimensional viscoelastic material properties and their relationships to linear isotropic and orthotropic viscoelastic materials. A discussion of the alternate invariant definition as used by Abaqus and how it relates to the form used by Dr. S. Peng is presented.

  3. Mechanical properties of intermediate filament proteins

    PubMed Central

    Charrier, Elisabeth E.; Janmey, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Purified intermediate filament proteins can be reassembled in vitro to produce polymers closely resembling those found in cells, and these filament form viscoelastic gels. The crosslinks holding IFs together in the network include specific bonds between polypeptides extending from the filament surface and ionic interactions mediated by divalent cations. IF networks exhibit striking non-linear elasticity with stiffness, as quantified by shear modulus, increasing an order of magnitude as the networks are deformed to large stains resembling those that soft tissues undergo in vivo. Individual Ifs can be stretched to more than 2 or 3 times their resting length without breaking. At least ten different rheometric methods have been used to quantify the viscoelasticity of IF networks over a wide range of timescales and strain magnitudes. The mechanical roles of different classes of IF on mesenchymal and epithelial cells in culture have also been studied by an even wider range of microrheological methods. These studies have documented the effects on cell mechanics when IFs are genetically or pharmacologically disrupted or when normal or mutant IF proteins are exogenously expressed in cells. Consistent with in vitro rheology, the mechanical role of IFs is more apparent as cells are subjected to larger and more frequent deformations. PMID:26795466

  4. Mechanical Properties of Intermediate Filament Proteins.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Elisabeth E; Janmey, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Purified intermediate filament (IF) proteins can be reassembled in vitro to produce polymers closely resembling those found in cells, and these filaments form viscoelastic gels. The cross-links holding IFs together in the network include specific bonds between polypeptides extending from the filament surface and ionic interactions mediated by divalent cations. IF networks exhibit striking nonlinear elasticity with stiffness, as quantified by shear modulus, increasing an order of magnitude as the networks are deformed to large strains resembling those that soft tissues undergo in vivo. Individual IFs can be stretched to more than two or three times their resting length without breaking. At least 10 different rheometric methods have been used to quantify the viscoelasticity of IF networks over a wide range of timescales and strain magnitudes. The mechanical roles of different classes of cytoplasmic IFs on mesenchymal and epithelial cells in culture have also been studied by an even wider range of microrheological methods. These studies have documented the effects on cell mechanics when IFs are genetically or pharmacologically disrupted or when normal or mutant IF proteins are exogenously expressed in cells. Consistent with in vitro rheology, the mechanical role of IFs is more apparent as cells are subjected to larger and more frequent deformations. PMID:26795466

  5. Mechanical properties and morphology of polymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliozberg, Yelena; Sirk, Timothy; Brennan, John; Andzelm, Jan; Mrozek, Randy; Lenhart, Joseph

    2012-02-01

    Understanding morphology and mechanical response of polymeric gels is of particular importance to design materials with required energy dissipation characteristics. We will present our latest results for polymer gels based on 1) self-assembled block copolymers and 2) chemically cross-linked polymers. The dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) was used to predict morphology in good agreement with atomic force microscopy. We have performed DPD non-equilibrium oscillatory shear calculations predicting elastic modulus of unentangled gels that correlates well with experimental rheology data. However, this methodology fails to predict mechanics of entangled polymer networks due to unphysical chain crossing brought by the soft potentials used in DPD simulations. Recently, we have introduced an improved segmental repulsion potential that removes the bond crossing allowing for reptation dynamics. The improved DPD method was used in simulations for entangled gels to explore impact of branched architecture of solvent on the mechanical response to the tensile deformation. Novel architectures of solvent resulting in a dramatic increase of the elastic modulus were identified. The topological analysis was applied to understand contributions of chemical cross-links and entanglements to the stress.

  6. Mechanical properties of alumina porcelain during heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šín, Peter; Podoba, Rudolf; ŠtubÅa, Igor; Trník, Anton

    2014-11-01

    The mechanical strength and Young's modulus of green alumina porcelain (50 wt. % of kaolin, 25 wt. % of Al2O3, and 25 wt. % of feldspar) were measured during heating up to 900 °C and 1100 °C, respectively. To this end, we used the three point-bending method and modulated force thermomechanical analysis (mf-TMA). The loss liberation - of the physically bound water (20 - 250 °C) strengthens the sample and Young's modulus increases its values significantly. The dehydroxylation that takes place in the range of 400 - 650 °C causes a slight decrease in Young's modulus. On the other hand, the mechanical strength slightly increases in this temperature range, although it has a sudden drop at 420 °C. Beyond the dehydroxylation range, above 650 °C, both Young's modulus and mechanical strength increase. Above 950 °C, a sharp increase of Young's modulus is caused by the solid-state sintering and the new structure created by the high-temperature reactions in metakaolinite.

  7. Mechanical Properties of the Frog Sarcolemma

    PubMed Central

    Fields, R. Wayne

    1970-01-01

    The elastic properties of cylindrical segments of sarcolemma were studied in single striated fibers of the frog semitendinosus muscle. All measurements were made on membranes of retraction zones, cell segments from which the sarcoplasm had retracted. Quantitative morphological studies indicated that three deforming forces interact with the intrinsic elastic properties of the sarcolemma to determine membrane configuration in retraction zone segments. The three deforming forces, namely intrazone pressure, axial fiber loads, and radial stresses introduced by retracted cell contents, could all be experimentally removed, permitting determination of the “undeformed” configuration of the sarcolemma. Analysis of these results indicated that membrane of intact fibers at rest length is about four times as wide and two-thirds as long as undeformed membrane. Membrane geometry was also studied as a function of internal hydrostatic pressure and axial loading to permit calculation of the circumferential and longitudinal tension-strain (T-S) diagrams. The sarcolemma exhibited nonlinear T-S properties concave to the tension axis in both directions. Circumferential T-S slopes (measures of membrane stiffness) ranged from 1500 to greater than 50,000 dynes/cm over the range of deformations investigated, while longitudinal T-S slopes varied from 23,000 to 225,000 dynes/cm. Thus, the membrane is anisotropic, being much stiffer in the longitudinal direction. Certain ramifications of the present results are discussed in relation to previous biomechanical studies of the sarcolemma and of other tissues. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:5439320

  8. Thermophysical and mechanical properties of Fe-(8-9)%Cr reduced activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Robertson, J.P.; Klueh, R.L.

    1998-09-01

    The key thermophysical and mechanical properties for 8--9%Cr reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels are summarized, including temperature-dependent tensile properties in the unirradiated and irradiated conditions, stress-rupture behavior, elastic constants, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, specific heat, and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. The estimated lower and upper temperatures limits for structural applications are 250 and 550 C due to radiation hardening/embrittlement and thermal creep considerations, respectively.

  9. The mechanical and strength properties of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Diamond is an exciting material with many outstanding properties; see, for example Field J E (ed) 1979 The Properties of Diamond (London: Academic) and Field J E (ed) 1992 The Properties of Natural and Synthetic Diamond (London: Academic). It is pre-eminent as a gemstone, an industrial tool and as a material for solid state research. Since natural diamonds grew deep below the Earth's surface before their ejection to mineable levels, they also contain valuable information for geologists. The key to many of diamond's properties is the rigidity of its structure which explains, for example, its exceptional hardness and its high thermal conductivity. Since 1953, it has been possible to grow synthetic diamond. Before then, it was effectively only possible to have natural diamond, with a small number of these found in the vicinity of meteorite impacts. Techniques are now available to grow gem quality synthetic diamonds greater than 1 carat (0.2 g) using high temperatures and pressures (HTHP) similar to those found in nature. However, the costs are high, and the largest commercially available industrial diamonds are about 0.01 carat in weight or about 1 mm in linear dimension. The bulk of synthetic diamonds used industrially are 600 µm or less. Over 75% of diamond used for industrial purposes today is synthetic material. In recent years, there have been two significant developments. The first is the production of composites based on diamond; these materials have a significantly greater toughness than diamond while still maintaining very high hardness and reasonable thermal conductivity. The second is the production at low pressures by metastable growth using chemical vapour deposition techniques. Deposition onto non-diamond substrates was first demonstrated by Spitsyn et al 1981 J. Cryst. Growth 52 219-26 and confirmed by Matsumoto et al 1982 Japan J. Appl. Phys. 21 L183-5. These developments have added further to the versatility of diamond. Two other groups of materials

  10. The mechanical and strength properties of diamond.

    PubMed

    Field, J E

    2012-12-01

    Diamond is an exciting material with many outstanding properties; see, for example Field J E (ed) 1979 The Properties of Diamond (London: Academic) and Field J E (ed) 1992 The Properties of Natural and Synthetic Diamond (London: Academic). It is pre-eminent as a gemstone, an industrial tool and as a material for solid state research. Since natural diamonds grew deep below the Earth's surface before their ejection to mineable levels, they also contain valuable information for geologists. The key to many of diamond's properties is the rigidity of its structure which explains, for example, its exceptional hardness and its high thermal conductivity. Since 1953, it has been possible to grow synthetic diamond. Before then, it was effectively only possible to have natural diamond, with a small number of these found in the vicinity of meteorite impacts. Techniques are now available to grow gem quality synthetic diamonds greater than 1 carat (0.2 g) using high temperatures and pressures (HTHP) similar to those found in nature. However, the costs are high, and the largest commercially available industrial diamonds are about 0.01 carat in weight or about 1 mm in linear dimension. The bulk of synthetic diamonds used industrially are 600 µm or less. Over 75% of diamond used for industrial purposes today is synthetic material. In recent years, there have been two significant developments. The first is the production of composites based on diamond; these materials have a significantly greater toughness than diamond while still maintaining very high hardness and reasonable thermal conductivity. The second is the production at low pressures by metastable growth using chemical vapour deposition techniques. Deposition onto non-diamond substrates was first demonstrated by Spitsyn et al 1981 J. Cryst. Growth 52 219-26 and confirmed by Matsumoto et al 1982 Japan J. Appl. Phys. 21 L183-5. These developments have added further to the versatility of diamond. Two other groups of

  11. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands. PMID:26601037

  12. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands. PMID:26601037

  13. Mechanical property characterization of polymeric composites reinforced by continuous microfibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubayar, Ali

    Innumerable experimental works have been conducted to study the effect of polymerization on the potential properties of the composites. Experimental techniques are employed to understand the effects of various fibers, their volume fractions and matrix properties in polymer composites. However, these experiments require fabrication of various composites which are time consuming and cost prohibitive. Advances in computational micromechanics allow us to study the various polymer based composites by using finite element simulations. The mechanical properties of continuous fiber composite strands are directional. In traditional continuous fiber laminated composites, all fibers lie in the same plane. This provides very desirable increases in the in-plane mechanical properties, but little in the transverse mechanical properties. The effect of different fiber/matrix combinations with various orientations is also available. Overall mechanical properties of different micro continuous fiber reinforced composites with orthogonal geometry are still unavailable in the contemporary research field. In this research, the mechanical properties of advanced polymeric composite reinforced by continuous micro fiber will be characterized based on analytical investigation and FE computational modeling. Initially, we have chosen IM7/PEEK, Carbon Fiber/Nylon 6, and Carbon Fiber/Epoxy as three different case study materials for analysis. To obtain the equivalent properties of the micro-hetero structures, a concept of micro-scale representative volume elements (RVEs) is introduced. Five types of micro scale RVEs (3 square and 2 hexagonal) containing a continuous micro fiber in the polymer matrix were designed. Uniaxial tensile, lateral expansion and transverse shear tests on each RVE were designed and conducted by the finite element computer modeling software ANSYS. The formulae based on elasticity theory were derived for extracting the equivalent mechanical properties (Young's moduli, shear

  14. Quantifying tissue mechanical properties using photoplethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Tony J.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2014-01-01

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) is a non-invasive optical method that can be used to detect blood volume changes in the microvascular bed of tissue. The PPG signal comprises two components; a pulsatile waveform (AC) attributed to changes in the interrogated blood volume with each heartbeat, and a slowly varying baseline (DC) combining low frequency fluctuations mainly due to respiration and sympathetic nervous system activity. In this report, we investigate the AC pulsatile waveform of the PPG pulse for ultimate use in extracting information regarding the biomechanical properties of tissue and vasculature. By analyzing the rise time of the pulse in the diastole period, we show that PPG is capable of measuring changes in the Young’s Modulus of tissue mimicking phantoms with a resolution of 4 KPa in the range of 12 to 61 KPa. In addition, the shape of the pulse can potentially be used to diagnose vascular complications by differentiating upstream from downstream complications. A Windkessel model was used to model changes in the biomechanical properties of the circulation and to test the proposed concept. The modeling data confirmed the response seen in vitro and showed the same trends in the PPG rise and fall times with changes in compliance and vascular resistance. PMID:25071970

  15. Quantifying tissue mechanical properties using photoplethysmography

    SciTech Connect

    Akl, Tony; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Cote, Gerard L.

    2014-01-01

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) is a non-invasive optical method that can be used to detect blood volume changes in the microvascular bed of tissue. The PPG signal comprises two components; a pulsatile waveform (AC) attributed to changes in the interrogated blood volume with each heartbeat, and a slowly varying baseline (DC) combining low frequency fluctuations mainly due to respiration and sympathetic nervous system activity. In this report, we investigate the AC pulsatile waveform of the PPG pulse for ultimate use in extracting information regarding the biomechanical properties of tissue and vasculature. By analyzing the rise time of the pulse in the diastole period, we show that PPG is capable of measuring changes in the Young s Modulus of tissue mimicking phantoms with a resolution of 4 KPa in the range of 12 to 61 KPa. In addition, the shape of the pulse can potentially be used to diagnose vascular complications by differentiating upstream from downstream complications. A Windkessel model was used to model changes in the biomechanical properties of the circulation and to test the proposed concept. The modeling data confirmed the response seen in vitro and showed the same trends in the PPG rise and fall times with changes in compliance and vascular resistance.

  16. Quantifying tissue mechanical properties using photoplethysmography.

    PubMed

    Akl, Tony J; Wilson, Mark A; Ericson, M Nance; Coté, Gerard L

    2014-07-01

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) is a non-invasive optical method that can be used to detect blood volume changes in the microvascular bed of tissue. The PPG signal comprises two components; a pulsatile waveform (AC) attributed to changes in the interrogated blood volume with each heartbeat, and a slowly varying baseline (DC) combining low frequency fluctuations mainly due to respiration and sympathetic nervous system activity. In this report, we investigate the AC pulsatile waveform of the PPG pulse for ultimate use in extracting information regarding the biomechanical properties of tissue and vasculature. By analyzing the rise time of the pulse in the diastole period, we show that PPG is capable of measuring changes in the Young's Modulus of tissue mimicking phantoms with a resolution of 4 KPa in the range of 12 to 61 KPa. In addition, the shape of the pulse can potentially be used to diagnose vascular complications by differentiating upstream from downstream complications. A Windkessel model was used to model changes in the biomechanical properties of the circulation and to test the proposed concept. The modeling data confirmed the response seen in vitro and showed the same trends in the PPG rise and fall times with changes in compliance and vascular resistance. PMID:25071970

  17. Porosity and mechanical properties of zirconium ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Kalatur, Ekaterina Narikovich, Anton; Buyakova, Svetlana E-mail: kulkov@ispms.tsc.ru; Kulkov, Sergey E-mail: kulkov@ispms.tsc.ru

    2014-11-14

    The article studies the porous ceramics consisting of ultra-fine ZrO{sub 2} powders. The porosity of ceramic samples varied from 15% to 80%. The structure of the ceramic materials had a cellular configuration. The distinctive feature of all experimentally obtained strain diagrams is their nonlinearity at low deformations characterized by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformations shown in strain diagrams is due to the mechanical instability of cellular elements of the ceramic framework.

  18. Interfaces with Tunable Mechanical and Radiosensitizing Properties.

    PubMed

    Berg, Nora G; Pearce, Brady L; Snyder, Patrick J; Rohrbaugh, Nathaniel; Nolan, Michael W; Adhikari, Prajesh; Khan, Saad A; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2016-08-31

    We report the fabrication of a composite containing nanostructured GaOOH and Matrigel with tunable radiosensitizing and stiffness properties. Composite characterization was done with microscopy and rheology. The utility of the interface was tested in vitro using fibroblasts. Cell viability and reactive oxygen species assays quantified the effects of radiation dosages and GaOOH concentrations. Fibroblasts' viability decreased with increasing concentration of GaOOH and composite stiffness. During ionizing radiation experiments the presence of the scintillating GaOOH triggered a different cellular response. Reactive oxygen species data demonstrated that one can reduce the amount of radiation needed to modulate the behavior of cells on interfaces with different stiffness containing a radiosensitizing material. PMID:26882455

  19. Characterising Mechanical Properties of Braided and Woven Textile Composite Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauda, Benjamin; Oyadiji, S. Olutunde; Potluri, Prasad

    2009-02-01

    The focus of this paper is on the manufacture of textile composite beams and on the determination of their mechanical properties. This includes investigating the effects of fibre orientation on the mechanical properties of braided and woven textile composites. Composites were manufactured from nominally identical constituents and identical consolidation processes, leaving as the only variables, variations caused by the different fibre architecture of the preform. The repeatability and, hence, reliability of this approach is demonstrated. Results obtained show that fibre architecture affects composite strength and extensibility. Composites with woven preforms are practically linear up to catastrophic failure while composites with braided preforms exhibit non-linearity prior to failure. Also the mechanical properties of the textile composite beams were determined. Results show that by tailoring the braid angle and pick density of braided and woven composite performs, the mechanical properties of the composite beams can be controlled to suit end-use requirement.

  20. Tailoring of mechanical properties of hydroformed aluminum tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Sung-tae; Lavender, Curt A.

    2007-07-06

    Tailoring of the mechanical properties of hydroformed aluminum 6063-T4 tubes to those of aluminum 6063-T6 was performed by heat treatment. Quasi-static tensile tests and a SEM analysis were conducted to evaluate the change of the mechanical properties. The experimental results of the hydroformed tubes in T4 condition (before the heat treatment) show significant variations of the mechanical properties along the length due to the different extents of work hardening by hydroforming. The experimental results of the hydroformed tubes in T6 condition (after the heat treatment) show that the precipitation hardening successfully removed the effects of the non-uniform work hardening and resulted in the uniform mechanical properties in the tube.

  1. Processing effects on the mechanical properties of tungsten heavy alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kishi, Toshihito; German, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Tungsten heavy alloys exhibit significant mechanical property sensitivities to the fabrication variables. These sensitivities are illustrated in this examination of vacuum sintering and the effects of composition, sintering temperature, and sintering time on the mechanical properties of tungsten heavy alloys. Measurements were conducted to assess the density, strength, hardness, and elongation dependencies. A detrimental aspect of vacuum sintering is matrix phase evaporation, although vacuum sintering does eliminate the need for postsintering heat treatments.

  2. Structure, mechanical properties, and fracture of 20GL cast steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schastlivtsev, V. M.; Tabatchikova, T. I.; Yakovleva, I. L.; Klyueva, S. Yu.

    2014-04-01

    The structure and mechanical properties of 20GL steel are studied. It is shown that a significant decrease in the ductility and impact toughness of the steel is caused by intercrystalline fracture, which is induced by a weakening of the intercrystallite bonds due to the existence of coarse lamellar pearlite and nonmetallic inclusions, namely, film inclusions and eutectic-type oxysulfides, at the boundaries of primary crystals. Annealing from a temperature in the intercritical range is found to improve the mechanical properties.

  3. Mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite/mica composite.

    PubMed

    Nordström, E G; Herø, H; Jørgensen, R B

    1994-01-01

    Bend specimens of the inorganic synthetic materials hydroxyapatite (HA) and a composite of hydroxyapatite/muscovite mica have been prepared and tested mechanically. Sintering followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) without encapsulation gave an increased strength for HA alone, but no significant increase in strength compared with sintering alone for HA/mica composites. The bend strength of the HA/mica composite was inferior to that of HA alone, the reason being inadequate bonding between HA and mica. HIP in glass capsules and an increased cold compaction pressure tended to improve the bend strength of the composite. Corrosion in tris for 7 d did not affect the bend strength of the investigated materials significantly. PMID:7950878

  4. Mechanical Properties of Shock-Damaged Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Hongliang; Ahrens, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    Stress-strain tests were performed both on shock-damaged gabbro and limestone. The effective Young's modulus decreases with increasing initial damage parameter value, and an apparent work-softening process occurs prior to failure. To further characterize shock-induced microcracks, the longitudinal elastic wave velocity behavior of shock-damaged gabbro in the direction of compression up to failure was measured using an acoustic transmission technique under uniaxial loading. A dramatic increase in velocity was observed for the static compressive stress range of 0-50 MPa. Above that stress range, the velocity behavior of lightly damaged (D(sub 0) less than 0.1) gabbro is almost equal to unshocked gabbro. The failure strength of heavily-damaged (D(sub 0) greater than 0.1) gabbro is approx. 100-150 MPa, much lower than that of lightly damaged and unshocked gabbros (approx. 230-260 MPa). Following Nur's theory, the crack shape distribution was analyzed. The shock-induced cracks in gabbro appear to be largely thin penny-shaped cracks with c/a values below 5 x 10(exp -4). Moreover, the applicability of Ashby and Sammis's theory relating failure strength and damage parameter of shock-damaged rocks was examined and was found to yield a good estimate of the relation of shock-induced deficit in elastic modulus with the deficit in compressive strength.

  5. Optical properties of intact leaves for estimating chlorophyll concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Gregory A.; Spiering, Bruce A.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in leaf chlorophyll content can serve as relative indicators of plant vigor and environmental quality. This study identified reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance wavebands and band ratios within the 400- to 850-nm range for intact leaves that could be used to estimate extracted leaf chlorophyll per unit leaf area (areal concentration) with minimal error. Leaf optical properties along with chlorophyll a, b, and a + b concentrations were measured for the planar-leaved sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.), red maple (Acer rubrum L.), wild grape (Vitis rotundifolia Michx.), and switchcane [Arundinaria gigantea (Walter) Muhl.], and for needles of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Miller). Generally, reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance corresponded most precisely with chlorophyll concentrations at wavelengths near 700 nm, although regressions were also strong in the 550- to 625-nm range. A power function was superior to a simple linear function in yielding low standard deviations of the estimate (s). When data were combined among the planar-leaved species, s values were low at approximately 50 mumol/m2 out of a 940 mumol/m2 range in chlorophyll a + b at best-fit wavelengths of 707 to 709 nm. Minimal s values for chlorophyll a + b ranged from 32 to 62 mumol/m2 across species when band ratios having numerator wavelengths of 693 to 720 nm were used with the application of a power function. Optimal denominator wavelengths for the band ratios were 850 nm for reflectance and transmittance and 400 nm for absorptance. This information can be applied in designing field portable chlorophyll meters and in the landscape-scale remote sensing of plant responses to the environment.

  6. In Vitro Tissue Differentiation using Dynamics of Tissue Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Chiang; Phillips, Paul J.

    2002-03-01

    Dynamics of tissue mechanical properties of various human tissue types were studied at macroscopic as well as microscopic level in vitro. This study was conducted to enable the development of a feedback system based on dynamics of tissue mechanical properties for intraoperative guidance for tumor treatment (e.g., RF ablation of liver tumor) and noninvasive tumor localization. Human liver tissues, including normal, cancerous, and cirrhotic tissues, were obtained from patients receiving liver transplant or tumor resection at Vanderbilt University Medical Center with the approval of the Vanderbilt Institutional Review Board. Tissue samples, once resected from the patients, were snap-frozen using liquid nitrogen and stored at -70 oC. Measurements of the mechanical properties of these tissue samples were conducted at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. Dynamics of tissue mechanical properties were measured from both native and thermally coagulated tissue samples at macroscopic and microscopic level. Preliminary results suggest the dynamics of mechanical properties of normal liver tissues are very different from those of cancerous liver tissues. The correlation between the dynamics of mechanical properties at macroscopic level and those at microscopic level is currently under investigation.

  7. Alterations in mechanical properties are associated with prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuejian; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Yingxi; Zong, Huafeng; Che, Xiangyu; Zheng, Wei; Chen, Feng; Zhu, Zheng; Yang, Deyong; Song, Xishuang

    2014-03-01

    Cancer progression and metastasis have been shown to be accompanied by alterations in the mechanical properties of tissues, but the relationship between the mechanical properties and malignant behavior in prostate cancer (Pca) is less clear. The aims of this study were to detect the mechanical properties of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and Pca tissues on both the macro- and micro-scales, to explore the relationships between mechanical properties and malignant behavior and, finally, to identify the important molecules in the mechanotransduction signaling pathway. We demonstrated that the strain index of Pca tissue was significantly higher than that of BPH tissue on the macro-scale but the Young's modulus of the Pca tissues, especially in advanced Pca, was lower than that of BPH tissues on the micro-scale. These two seemingly contradictory results can be explained by the excessive proliferation of tumor cells (Ki-67) and the degradation of scaffold proteins (collagens). These data indicate that alterations of the macro- and micro-mechanical properties of Pca tissues with malignant behavior are contradictory. The mechanical properties of tissues might be useful as a new risk factor for malignancy and metastasis in Pca. Furthermore, collagens, matrix metalloproteinase, fibronectin, and integrins might be the important molecules in the mechanotransduction signaling pathway. PMID:24504844

  8. Understanding and Tailoring the Mechanical Properties of LIGA Fabricated Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, T.E.; Christenson, T.R.; Lavan, D.A.; Schmale, D.T.

    1999-01-25

    LIGA fabricated materials and components exhibit several processing issues affecting their metallurgical and mechanical properties, potentially limiting their usefulness for MEMS applications. For example, LIGA processing by metal electrodeposition is very sensitive to deposition conditions which causes significant processing lot variations of mechanical and metallurgical properties. Furthermore, the process produces a material with a highly textured lenticular rnicrostructural morphology suggesting an anisotropic material response. Understanding and controlling out-of-plane anisotropy is desirable for LIGA components designed for out-of-plane flexures. Previous work by the current authors focused on results from a miniature servo-hydraulic mechanical test frame constructed for characterizing LIGA materials. Those results demonstrated microstructural and mechanical properties dependencies with plating bath current density in LIGA fabricated nickel (LIGA Ni). This presentation builds on that work and fosters a methodology for controlling the properties of LIGA fabricated materials through processing. New results include measurement of mechanical properties of LIGA fabricated copper (LIGA Cu), out-of-plane and localized mechanical property measurements using compression testing and nanoindentation of LIGA Ni and LIGA Cu.

  9. Thermophysical and mechanical properties of SiC/SiC composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Snead, L.L.

    1998-09-01

    The key thermophysical and mechanical properties for SiC/SiC composites are summarized, including temperature-dependent tensile properties, elastic constants, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, and specific heat. The effects of neutron irradiation on the thermal conductivity and dimensional stability (volumetric swelling, creep) of SiC is discussed. The estimated lower and upper temperatures limits for structural applications in high power density fusion applications are 400 and 1000 C due to thermal conductivity degradation and void swelling considerations, respectively. Further data are needed to more accurately determine these estimated temperature limits.

  10. Mechanical properties of branched actin filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razbin, Mohammadhosein; Falcke, Martin; Benetatos, Panayotis; Zippelius, Annette

    2015-07-01

    Cells moving on a two dimensional substrate generate motion by polymerizing actin filament networks inside a flat membrane protrusion. New filaments are generated by branching off existing ones, giving rise to branched network structures. We investigate the force-extension relation of branched filaments, grafted on an elastic structure at one end and pushing with the free ends against the leading edge cell membrane. Single filaments are modeled as worm-like chains, whose thermal bending fluctuations are restricted by the leading edge cell membrane, resulting in an effective force. Branching can increase the stiffness considerably; however the effect depends on branch point position and filament orientation, being most pronounced for intermediate tilt angles and intermediate branch point positions. We describe filament networks without cross-linkers to focus on the effect of branching. We use randomly positioned branch points, as generated in the process of treadmilling, and orientation distributions as measured in lamellipodia. These networks reproduce both the weak and strong force response of lamellipodia as measured in force-velocity experiments. We compare properties of branched and unbranched networks. The ratio of the network average of the force per branched filament to the average force per unbranched filament depends on the orientation distribution of the filaments. The ratio exhibits compression dependence and may go up to about 4.5 in networks with a narrow orientation distribution. With orientation distributions measured in lamellipodia, it is about two and essentially independent from network compression, graft elasticity and filament persistence length.

  11. Mechanical properties of iron-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Sikka, V.K.

    1993-07-01

    Tensile and impact tests have been conducted on specimens for a series of five heats of iron-aluminum alloys. These results have been compared to data for the iron aluminide alloy FA-129. The first of the new alloys was a simple ternary alloy with iron, aluminum, and chromium contents that matched the FA-129 composition. The second was similar but with additions of zirconium and carbon. Three heats were produced with reduced aluminum contents so that a disordered body-centered cubic structure would be present. Additions of titanium or yttrium were included. The ductile-to brittle transition temperatures of all of the Fe{sub 3}Al alloys were similar, but the simple ternary alloy had a much higher upper-shelf energy levels than the Fe{sub 3}Al type alloys. The reduced aluminum alloy with the yttrium addition showed excellent tensile properties, with a room temperature total elongation of over 40%, and a very high upper-shelf energy level. Despite the high tensile ductility at room temperature, the transition temperature of the yttrium-containing alloy was still about 150{degrees}C, compared to approximately 300{degrees}C for FA-129.

  12. Mechanical properties of porcine intralobar pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed

    Ohtaka, H; Hogg, J C; Moreno, R H; Paré, P D; Schellenberg, R R

    1988-04-01

    The isobaric and isovolumetric properties of intrapulmonary arteries were evaluated by placing a highly compliant balloon inside arterial segments. The passive pressure-volume (P-V) curve was obtained by changing volume (0.004 ml/s) and measuring pressure. The isobaric active volume change (delta V) or isovolumetric active pressure change (delta P) generated by submaximal histamine was measured at four different transmural pressures (Ptm's) reached by balloon inflation. The maximal delta P = 11.2 +/- 0.6 cmH2O (mean +/- SE) was achieved at 30.8 +/- 1.2 cmH2O Ptm and maximal delta V = 0.20 +/- 0.02 ml at 16.7 +/- 1.7 cmH2O Ptm. The P-V relationships were similar when volume was increased after either isobaric or isovolumetric contraction. The calculated length-tension (L-T) relationship showed that the active tension curve was relatively flat and that the passive tension at the optimal length was 149 +/- 11% of maximal active tension. These data show that 1) a large elastic component operates in parallel with the smooth muscle in intralobar pulmonary arteries, and 2) the change in resistance associated with vascular expansion of the proximal arteries is independent of the type of contraction that occurs in the more distal arterial segments. PMID:3378988

  13. Mechanical properties of branched actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Razbin, Mohammadhosein; Falcke, Martin; Benetatos, Panayotis; Zippelius, Annette

    2015-07-01

    Cells moving on a two dimensional substrate generate motion by polymerizing actin filament networks inside a flat membrane protrusion. New filaments are generated by branching off existing ones, giving rise to branched network structures. We investigate the force-extension relation of branched filaments, grafted on an elastic structure at one end and pushing with the free ends against the leading edge cell membrane. Single filaments are modeled as worm-like chains, whose thermal bending fluctuations are restricted by the leading edge cell membrane, resulting in an effective force. Branching can increase the stiffness considerably; however the effect depends on branch point position and filament orientation, being most pronounced for intermediate tilt angles and intermediate branch point positions. We describe filament networks without cross-linkers to focus on the effect of branching. We use randomly positioned branch points, as generated in the process of treadmilling, and orientation distributions as measured in lamellipodia. These networks reproduce both the weak and strong force response of lamellipodia as measured in force-velocity experiments. We compare properties of branched and unbranched networks. The ratio of the network average of the force per branched filament to the average force per unbranched filament depends on the orientation distribution of the filaments. The ratio exhibits compression dependence and may go up to about 4.5 in networks with a narrow orientation distribution. With orientation distributions measured in lamellipodia, it is about two and essentially independent from network compression, graft elasticity and filament persistence length. PMID:26040560

  14. STARCH FILLED TERNARY POLYMER COMPOSITES I: DYNAMIC MECHANICAL PROPERTIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been shown that the dynamic mechanical properties of starch filled blends of polyethylene (PE) and poly (hydroxy ester ether) (PHEE) are strongly dependent on the properties and distribution of the minor component of the blend (PHEE). The effect of this minor component on the viscoelastic pr...

  15. Estimating on-orbit optical properties for GNSS satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Solano, M. Sc. Carlos Javier; Hugentobler, Urs; Steigenberger, Peter

    One of the major uncertainty sources affecting GNSS satellite orbits is the direct solar radiation pressure. Other important though smaller effects are caused by deviations of the satellite from nominal attitude, Earth radiation pressure and thermal re-radiation forces. To compensate such effects, the IGS Analysis Centers usually estimate empirical parameters which fit best the tracking data obtained from a global network of GNSS ground stations to compute orbits at an accuracy level of 2.5 cm for GPS and of 5 cm for GLONASS. On the other hand, there are also accurate physical models for the above mentioned non-conservative forces affecting the GNSS satellites such as the ROCK models for GPS satellites. However, current models fail to predict the real orbit behaviour with sufficient accuracy, mainly due to deviations from nominal attitude, from inaccurately known optical properties, or from aging of the satellite surfaces. In this context an analytical box-wing model has been derived based on the physical interaction between the direct solar radiation and a satellite consisting of a bus (box shape) and solar panels. Furthermore some of the parameters of the box-wing model can be adjusted to fit the GNSS tracking data, namely the fraction of reflected photons of the corresponding satellite surfaces. For this study GNSS orbits are generated based on one year of tracking data from the global IGS network and involving the box-wing model implemented into the Bernese GPS Software. The processing scheme was derived from the one used at the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE). The resulting satellite orbits are compared with CODE Final Orbits and validated using SLR (Satellite Laser Ranging) tracking data. Additionally, in the case of GPS satellites, the box-wing model and the obtained optical properties are compared directly with a priori models (e.g. ROCK), which deal with the direct solar radiation impacting the satellites.

  16. Porosity and mechanical properties of zirconium ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyakova, S.; Sablina, T.; Kulkov, S.

    2015-11-01

    Has been studied a porous ceramics obtained from ultra-fine powders. Porous ceramic ZrO2(MgO), ZrO2(Y2O3) powder was prepared by pressing and subsequent sintering of compacts homologous temperatures ranging from 0.63 to 0.56 during the isothermal holding duration of 1 to 5 hours. The porosity of ceramic samples was from 15 to 80%. The structure of the ceramic materials produced from plasma-sprayed ZrO2 powder was represented as a system of cell and rod structure elements. Cellular structure formed by stacking hollow powder particles can be easily seen at the images of fracture surfaces of obtained ceramics. There were three types of pores in ceramics: large cellular hollow spaces, small interparticle pores which are not filled with powder particles and the smallest pores in the shells of cells. The cells generally did not have regular shapes. The size of the interior of the cells many times exceeded the thickness of the walls which was a single-layer packing of ZrO2 grains. A distinctive feature of all deformation diagrams obtained in the experiment was their nonlinearity at low deformations which was described by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformation on deformation diagrams is due to mechanical instability of the cellular elements in the ceramic carcass.

  17. Porosity and mechanical properties of zirconium ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Buyakova, S. Kulkov, S.; Sablina, T.

    2015-11-17

    Has been studied a porous ceramics obtained from ultra-fine powders. Porous ceramic ZrO{sub 2}(MgO), ZrO{sub 2}(Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) powder was prepared by pressing and subsequent sintering of compacts homologous temperatures ranging from 0.63 to 0.56 during the isothermal holding duration of 1 to 5 hours. The porosity of ceramic samples was from 15 to 80%. The structure of the ceramic materials produced from plasma-sprayed ZrO{sub 2} powder was represented as a system of cell and rod structure elements. Cellular structure formed by stacking hollow powder particles can be easily seen at the images of fracture surfaces of obtained ceramics. There were three types of pores in ceramics: large cellular hollow spaces, small interparticle pores which are not filled with powder particles and the smallest pores in the shells of cells. The cells generally did not have regular shapes. The size of the interior of the cells many times exceeded the thickness of the walls which was a single-layer packing of ZrO{sub 2} grains. A distinctive feature of all deformation diagrams obtained in the experiment was their nonlinearity at low deformations which was described by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformation on deformation diagrams is due to mechanical instability of the cellular elements in the ceramic carcass.

  18. Mechanical properties of lanthanum and yttrium chromites

    SciTech Connect

    Paulik, S.W.; Armstrong, T.R.

    1996-12-31

    In an operating high-temperature (1000{degrees}C) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the interconnect separates the fuel (P(O{sub 2}){approx}10{sup -16} atm) and the oxidant (P(O2){approx}10{sup 0.2} atm), while being electrically conductive and connecting the cells in series. Such severe atmospheric and thermal demands greatly reduce the number of viable candidate materials. Only two materials, acceptor substituted lanthanum chromite and yttrium chromite, meet these severe requirements. In acceptor substituted chromites (Sr{sup 2+} or Ca{sup 2+} for La{sup 3+}), charge compensation is primarily electronic in oxidizing conditions (through the formation of Cr{sup 4+}). Under reducing conditions, ionic charge compensation becomes significant as the lattice becomes oxygen deficient. The formation of oxygen vacancies is accompanied by the reduction of Cr{sup 4+} ions to Cr{sup 3+} and a resultant lattice expansion. The lattice expansion observed in large chemical potential gradients is not desirable and has been found to result in greatly reduced mechanical strength.

  19. Mechanical and Thermophysical Properties of Cerium Monopnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Vyoma; Singh, Devraj; Jain, S. K.

    2016-03-01

    The ultrasonic attenuation due to phonon-phonon interaction, thermoelastic relaxation and dislocation damping mechanisms has been investigated in cerium monopnictides CeX (X: N, P, As, Sb and Bi) for longitudinal and shear waves along {< }100{rangle }, {< }110{rangle } and {< }111{rangle } directions. The second- and third-order elastic constants of CeX have also been computed in the temperature range 0 K to 500 K using Coulomb and Born-Mayer potential upto second nearest neighbours. The computed values of these elastic constants have been applied to find out Young's moduli, bulk moduli, Breazeale's non-linearity parameters, Zener anisotropy, ultrasonic velocity, ultrasonic Grüneisen parameter, thermal relaxation time, acoustic coupling constants and ultrasonic attenuation. The fracture/toughness ratio is less than 1.75, which shows that the chosen materials are brittle in nature as found for other monopnictides. The drag coefficient acting on the motion of screw and edge dislocations due to shear and compressional phonon viscosities of the lattice have also been evaluated for both the longitudinal and shear waves. The thermoelastic loss and dislocation damping loss are negligible in comparison to loss due to Akhieser damping (phonon-phonon interaction). The obtained results for CeX are in qualitative agreement with other semi-metallic monopnictides.

  20. Measuring the mechanical properties of molecular conformers

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, S. P.; Taylor, S.; Baran, J. D.; Champness, N. R.; Larsson, J. A.; Moriarty, P.

    2015-01-01

    Scanning probe-actuated single molecule manipulation has proven to be an exceptionally powerful tool for the systematic atomic-scale interrogation of molecular adsorbates. To date, however, the extent to which molecular conformation affects the force required to push or pull a single molecule has not been explored. Here we probe the mechanochemical response of two tetra(4-bromophenyl)porphyrin conformers using non-contact atomic force microscopy where we find a large difference between the lateral forces required for manipulation. Remarkably, despite sharing very similar adsorption characteristics, variations in the potential energy surface are capable of prohibiting probe-induced positioning of one conformer, while simultaneously permitting manipulation of the alternative conformational form. Our results are interpreted in the context of dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations which reveal significant differences in the diffusion barriers for each conformer. These results demonstrate that conformational variation significantly modifies the mechanical response of even simple porpyhrins, potentially affecting many other flexible molecules. PMID:26388232

  1. Fluid mechanical properties of flames in enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.A.; Pindera, M.Z.; Oppenheim, A.K.

    1988-07-01

    In an enclosure where the reacting medium is initially at rest, the flame first generates a flowfield that then gets stretched, i.e., its front is pulled along the surface by the flowfield in which it then finds itself residing. A methodology developed for numerical modeling of such fields is described. Of key significance in this respect is the zero Mach number model/endash/a reasonable idealization in view of the relatively high temperature, and hence sound speed, that exists, concomitantly with a comparatively low particle velocity, in the confinement of a combustion chamber. According to this model, the density gradient in the field is nullified, while across the flame front it approaches infinity. One has thus two regimes: one of the unburned medium and the other of the burned gas, each of spatially uniform density, separated by a flame front interface. The latter is endowed with four properties, of which the first two are purely kinematic and the others dynamic in nature, namely: 1) it is advected at the local velocity of flow; 2) it self-advances at the normal burning speed, the eigenvalue of the system; 3) it acts as the velocity source due to the exothermicity of the combustion process; and 4) it acts as the vorticity source due to the baroclinic effect generated by the pressure gradient along its surface and the density gradient across it. A solution obtained for a flame propagating in an oblong rectangular enclosure demonstrates that the latter has a significant influence upon the formation of the well known tulip shape. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Microalloying and the mechanical properties of amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, H. George E.; Moshe, Michael; Procaccia, Itamar; Samwer, Konrad

    2016-05-01

    The mechanical properties of amorphous solids like metallic glasses can be dramatically changed by adding small concentrations (as low as 0.1%) of foreign elements. The glass-forming-ability, the ductility, the yield stress and the elastic moduli can all be greatly effected. This paper presents theoretical considerations with the aim of explaining the magnitude of these changes in light of the small concentrations involved. The theory is built around the experimental evidence that the microalloying elements organise around them a neighbourhood that differs from both the crystalline and the glassy phases of the material in the absence of the additional elements. These regions act as isotropic defects that in unstressed systems modify the shear moduli. When strained, these defects interact with the incipient plastic responses which are quadrupolar in nature. It will be shown that this interaction interferes with the creation of system-spanning shear bands and increases the yield strain. We offer experimentally testable estimates of the lengths of nano-shear bands in the presence of the additional elements.

  3. Mechanical and biological properties of keratose biomaterials.

    PubMed

    de Guzman, Roche C; Merrill, Michelle R; Richter, Jillian R; Hamzi, Rawad I; Greengauz-Roberts, Olga K; Van Dyke, Mark E

    2011-11-01

    The oxidized form of extractable human hair keratin proteins, commonly referred to as keratose, is gaining interest as a biomaterial for multiple tissue engineering studies including those directed toward peripheral nerve, spinal cord, skin, and bone regeneration. Unlike its disulfide cross-linked counterpart, kerateine, keratose does not possess a covalently cross-linked network structure and consequently displays substantially different characteristics. In order to understand its mode(s) of action and potential for clinical translatability, detailed characterization of the composition, physical properties, and biological responses of keratose biomaterials are needed. Keratose was obtained from end-cut human hair fibers by peracetic acid treatment, followed by base extraction, and subsequent dialysis. Analysis of lyophilized keratose powder determined that it contains 99% proteins by mass with amino acid content similar to human hair cortex. Metallic elements were also found in minute quantities. Protein oxidation led to disulfide bond cleavage and drastic reduction of free thiols due to conversion of sulfhydryl to sulfonic acid, chain fragmentation, and amino acid modifications. Mass spectrometry identified the major protein constituents as a heterogeneous mixture of 15 hair keratins (type I: K31-35 and K37-39, and type II: K81-86) with small amounts of epithelial keratins which exist in monomeric, dimeric, multimeric, and even degraded forms. Re-hydration with PBS enabled molecular assembly into an elastic solid-like hydrogel. Highly-porous scaffolds formed by lyophilization of the gel had the compression behavior of a cellular foam material and reverted back to gel upon wetting. Cytotoxicity assays showed that the EC50 for various cell lines were attained at 8-10 mg/mL keratose, indicating the non-toxic nature of the material. Implantation in mouse subcutaneous tissue pockets demonstrated that keratose resorption follows a rectangular hyperbolic regression

  4. Dynamic monitoring of cell mechanical properties using profile microindentation

    PubMed Central

    Guillou, L.; Babataheri, A.; Puech, P.-H.; Barakat, A. I.; Husson, J.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a simple and relatively inexpensive system to visualize adherent cells in profile while measuring their mechanical properties using microindentation. The setup allows simultaneous control of cell microenvironment by introducing a micropipette for the delivery of soluble factors or other cell types. We validate this technique against atomic force microscopy measurements and, as a proof of concept, measure the viscoelastic properties of vascular endothelial cells in terms of an apparent stiffness and a dimensionless parameter that describes stress relaxation. Furthermore, we use this technique to monitor the time evolution of these mechanical properties as the cells’ actin is depolymerized using cytochalasin-D. PMID:26857265

  5. Mechanical Properties of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Zirconium Diboride Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuffle, Kevin; Creegan, Peter; Nowell, Steven; Bull, Jeffrey D.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Continuous fiber reinforced zirconium diboride matrix composites, SCS-9a-(RBSiCZrB2)matrix, are being developed for leading edge, rocket nozzle and turbine engine applications. Recently, the composite materials have been characterized for tensile properties to 1250 C, the highest temperature tested. The tensile properties are fiber dominated as the matrix is microcracked on fabrication, but favorable failure characteristic are observed. Compression and shear mechanical testing results will be reported if completed. The effects of fiber volume fraction and matrix density on mechanical properties will be discussed. The target applications of the materials will be discussed. Specific testing being performed towards qualification for these applications will be included.

  6. Dynamic monitoring of cell mechanical properties using profile microindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillou, L.; Babataheri, A.; Puech, P.-H.; Barakat, A. I.; Husson, J.

    2016-02-01

    We have developed a simple and relatively inexpensive system to visualize adherent cells in profile while measuring their mechanical properties using microindentation. The setup allows simultaneous control of cell microenvironment by introducing a micropipette for the delivery of soluble factors or other cell types. We validate this technique against atomic force microscopy measurements and, as a proof of concept, measure the viscoelastic properties of vascular endothelial cells in terms of an apparent stiffness and a dimensionless parameter that describes stress relaxation. Furthermore, we use this technique to monitor the time evolution of these mechanical properties as the cells’ actin is depolymerized using cytochalasin-D.

  7. Dynamic monitoring of cell mechanical properties using profile microindentation.

    PubMed

    Guillou, L; Babataheri, A; Puech, P-H; Barakat, A I; Husson, J

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a simple and relatively inexpensive system to visualize adherent cells in profile while measuring their mechanical properties using microindentation. The setup allows simultaneous control of cell microenvironment by introducing a micropipette for the delivery of soluble factors or other cell types. We validate this technique against atomic force microscopy measurements and, as a proof of concept, measure the viscoelastic properties of vascular endothelial cells in terms of an apparent stiffness and a dimensionless parameter that describes stress relaxation. Furthermore, we use this technique to monitor the time evolution of these mechanical properties as the cells' actin is depolymerized using cytochalasin-D. PMID:26857265

  8. Effective Mechanical Properties of Lattice Material Fabricated by Material Extrusion Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sang-In; Choi, Seung-kyum; Rosen, David W; Duty, Chad E

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a two-step homogenization method is proposed and implemented for evaluating effective mechanical properties of lattice structured material fabricated by the material extrusion additive manufacturing process. In order to consider the characteristics of the additive manufacturing process in estimation procedures, the levels of scale for homogenization are divided into three stages the levels of layer deposition, structural element, and lattice structure. The method consists of two transformations among stages. In the first step, the transformation between layer deposition and structural element levels is proposed to find the geometrical and material effective properties of structural elements in the lattice structure. In the second step, the method to estimate effective mechanical properties of lattice material is presented, which uses a unit cell and is based on the discretized homogenization method for periodic structure. The method is implemented for cubic lattice structure and compared to experimental results for validation purposes.

  9. Mechanical Properties and Durability of "Waterless Concrete"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toutanji, Houssam; Grugel, Richard N.

    2008-01-01

    Waterless concrete consists of molten elementary sulfur and aggregate. The aggregates in lunar environment will be lunar rocks and soil. Sulfur is present on the Moon in Troilite soil (FeS) and by oxidation soil iron and sulfur can be produced. Iron can be used to reinforce the sulfur concrete. Sulfur concrete specimens were cycled between liquid nitrogen (approximately 191 C) and room temperature (approximately 21 C) to simulate exposure to a lunar environment. Cycled and control specimens were subsequently tested in compression at room temperatures (approximately 21 C) and approximately 101 C. Test results showed that due to temperature cycling, compressive strength of cycled specimens was 20% of those non-cycled. Microscopic examination of the fracture surfaces from the cycled samples showed clear de-bonding of the sulfur from the aggregate material whereas it was seen well bonded in those non-cycled. This reduction in strength can be attributed to the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion of the materials constituting the concrete which promoted cracking. Similar sulfur concrete mixtures were strengthened with short and long glass fibers. The glass fibers from lunar regolith simulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt-Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600 C for times of 30 min to 1 hour. Glass fibers were cast from the melt into graphite crucibles and were annealed for a couple of hours at 600 C. Glass fibers and small rods were pulled from the melt. The glass melt wets the ceramic rod and long continuous glass fibers were easily hand drawn. The glass fibers were immediately coated with a protective polymer to maintain the mechanical strength. The glass fibers were used to reinforce sulfur concrete plated to improve the flexural strength of the sulfur concrete. Prisms beams strengthened with glass fibers were tested in 4-point bending test. Beams strengthened with glass fiber showed to

  10. Mechanical properties of metallic thin films: theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuong, Duong Dai; Hoa, Nguyen Thi; Van Hung, Vu; Khoa, Doan Quoc; Hieu, Ho Khac

    2016-03-01

    The statistical moment method in statistical mechanics was developed to investigate the mechanical properties of free-standing metallic thin films at ambient conditions including the anharmonicity effects of thermal lattice vibrations. Analytical expressions of isothermal areal modulus B T , Young's modulus E and shear modulus G were derived in terms of the power moments of the atomic displacements. Numerical calculations have been performed for metallic Ni, Au and Al thin films, and compared with those of bulk metals. This method is physically transparent and it successfully described the temperature effects on mechanical properties of metallic thin films.

  11. Mechanisms of fault gouge evolution and physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davatzes, N. C.; Swyer, M.; Lockner, D. A.; Solum, J. G.; Anyamele, N.

    2010-12-01

    Mineralogy is a primary control on the frictional strength, μ, and permeability, k, of fault zones. Recent quantitative studies of the impact of mineral mixtures such as quartz, illite, and smectite on these properties generally show behaviors intermediate between monolithic mineral end-members. However, the mechanisms governing the natural development of fault rocks into such mixtures, or segregation into end-members during gouge and slip surface formation are less well understood. These mechanisms are investigated through detailed mapping of fault zone structures in the Moab Fault, Utah and associated elemental chemistry, mineralogy, μ and k at seven sites ranging in throw from 1 to 960 m and gouge thickness from 7 cm to 1.7 m. k measurements of an intact sample of clay-rich gouge associated with 960m of throw exhibit a μ of 0.37 and a k of 3E-20 m^2. This k reflects both the mechanical alignment of clays and authigenesis of clay in and adjacent to the slip surface. XRF analyses reveal chemical alteration through solution mass transfer within the fault core and alteration within the damage zone. SEM images of the primary natural slip surfaces are characterized by zones completely comprised of clay a few tens of microns thick. These analyses suggest a minimal influence of mechanical mixing of the different protolithic components in gouge generation resulting in distinct quartz-rich and clay-rich gouges. Thirty measurements of μ and k of gouges evolved from (1) disaggregated host rock, (2) damage zone materials, and (3) the naturally generated gouges in the fault’s core, were measured during trixial deformation experiments. SEM images of clay-rich samples reveal intact sand grains enveloped within clay even at high sand grain concentration, axial displacement up to 10mm, and at effective normal stresses of 30 MPa (compatible with in situ stresses estimated from burial depth during active faulting). Even at high incidence angles among grains, clay sheaths and

  12. A simple auxetic tubular structure with tuneable mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xin; Shen, Jianhu; Ghaedizadeh, Arash; Tian, Hongqi; Xie, Yi Min

    2016-06-01

    Auxetic materials and structures are increasingly used in various fields because of their unusual properties. Auxetic tubular structures have been fabricated and studied due to their potential to be adopted as oesophageal stents where only tensile auxetic performance is required. However, studies on compressive mechanical properties of auxetic tubular structures are limited in the current literature. In this paper, we developed a simple tubular structure which exhibits auxetic behaviour in both compression and tension. This was achieved by extending a design concept recently proposed by the authors for generating 3D metallic auxetic metamaterials. Both compressive and tensile mechanical properties of the auxetic tubular structure were investigated. It was found that the methodology for generating 3D auxetic metamaterials could be effectively used to create auxetic tubular structures as well. By properly adjusting certain parameters, the mechanical properties of the designed auxetic tubular structure could be easily tuned.

  13. Mechanical properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Arash, B; Wang, Q; Varadan, V K

    2014-01-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes, such as high elastic modulus and tensile strength, make them the most ideal and promising reinforcements in substantially enhancing the mechanical properties of resulting polymer/carbon nanotube composites. It is acknowledged that the mechanical properties of the composites are significantly influenced by interfacial interactions between nanotubes and polymer matrices. The current challenge of the application of nanotubes in the composites is hence to determine the mechanical properties of the interfacial region, which is critical for improving and manufacturing the nanocomposites. In this work, a new method for evaluating the elastic properties of the interfacial region is developed by examining the fracture behavior of carbon nanotube reinforced poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix composites under tension using molecular dynamics simulations. The effects of the aspect ratio of carbon nanotube reinforcements on the elastic properties, i.e. Young's modulus and yield strength, of the interfacial region and the nanotube/polymer composites are investigated. The feasibility of a three-phase micromechanical model in predicting the elastic properties of the nanocomposites is also developed based on the understanding of the interfacial region. PMID:25270167

  14. Mechanical properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.; Varadan, V. K.

    2014-10-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes, such as high elastic modulus and tensile strength, make them the most ideal and promising reinforcements in substantially enhancing the mechanical properties of resulting polymer/carbon nanotube composites. It is acknowledged that the mechanical properties of the composites are significantly influenced by interfacial interactions between nanotubes and polymer matrices. The current challenge of the application of nanotubes in the composites is hence to determine the mechanical properties of the interfacial region, which is critical for improving and manufacturing the nanocomposites. In this work, a new method for evaluating the elastic properties of the interfacial region is developed by examining the fracture behavior of carbon nanotube reinforced poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix composites under tension using molecular dynamics simulations. The effects of the aspect ratio of carbon nanotube reinforcements on the elastic properties, i.e. Young's modulus and yield strength, of the interfacial region and the nanotube/polymer composites are investigated. The feasibility of a three-phase micromechanical model in predicting the elastic properties of the nanocomposites is also developed based on the understanding of the interfacial region.

  15. Mechanical properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites

    PubMed Central

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.; Varadan, V. K.

    2014-01-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes, such as high elastic modulus and tensile strength, make them the most ideal and promising reinforcements in substantially enhancing the mechanical properties of resulting polymer/carbon nanotube composites. It is acknowledged that the mechanical properties of the composites are significantly influenced by interfacial interactions between nanotubes and polymer matrices. The current challenge of the application of nanotubes in the composites is hence to determine the mechanical properties of the interfacial region, which is critical for improving and manufacturing the nanocomposites. In this work, a new method for evaluating the elastic properties of the interfacial region is developed by examining the fracture behavior of carbon nanotube reinforced poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix composites under tension using molecular dynamics simulations. The effects of the aspect ratio of carbon nanotube reinforcements on the elastic properties, i.e. Young's modulus and yield strength, of the interfacial region and the nanotube/polymer composites are investigated. The feasibility of a three-phase micromechanical model in predicting the elastic properties of the nanocomposites is also developed based on the understanding of the interfacial region. PMID:25270167

  16. Mechanical Properties Comparing Composite Fiber Length to Amalgam

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.; Liu, Perng-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Photocure fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) with varying chopped quartz-fiber lengths were incorporated into a dental photocure zirconia-silicate particulate-filled composite (PFC) for mechanical test comparisons with a popular commercial spherical-particle amalgam. FRC lengths included 0.5-mm, 1.0 mm, 2.0 mm, and 3.0 mm all at a constant 28.2 volume percent. Four-point fully articulated fixtures were used according to American Standards Test Methods with sample dimensions of 2×2×50 mm3 across a 40 mm span to provide sufficient Euler flexural bending and prevent top-load compressive shear error. Mechanical properties for flexural strength, modulus, yield strength, resilience, work of fracture, critical strain energy release, critical stress intensity factor, and strain were obtained for comparison. Fiber length subsequently correlated with increasing all mechanical properties, p < 1.1×10−5. Although the modulus was significantly statistically higher for amalgam than all composites, all FRCs and even the PFC had higher values than amalgam for all other mechanical properties. Because amalgams provide increased longevity during clinical use compared to the standard PFCs, modulus would appear to be a mechanical property that might sufficiently reduce margin interlaminar shear stress and strain-related microcracking that could reduce failure rates. Also, since FRCs were tested with all mechanical properties that statistically significantly increased over the PFC, new avenues for future development could be provided toward surpassing amalgam in clinical longevity.

  17. Mechanics of intraply hybrid composites - Properties, analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    A mechanics theory is developed for predicting the physical thermal, hygral and mechanical properties (including various strengths) of unidirectional intraply hybrid composites (UIHC) based on unidirectional properties of the constituent composites. Procedures are described which can use this theory in conjunction with composite mechanics computer codes and general purpose structural analysis finite element programs for the analysis/design of structural components made from intraply hybrid angleplied laminates (IHAL). Comparisons with limited data show that this theory predicts mechanical properties of UIHC and flexural stiffnesses of IHAL which are in good agreement with experimental data. The theory developed herein makes it possible to design and optimize structural components from IHAL based on a large class of available constituent fibers.

  18. Processing, texture and mechanical properties of sintered silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landfermann, H.; Hausner, H.

    1988-01-01

    With regard to its favorable properties, in particular those shown at high temperatures, silicon carbide is of great interest for applications related to the construction of engines and turbines. Thus, silicon carbide could replace heat-resisting alloys with the objective to achieve a further increase in operational temperature. The present investigation is concerned with approaches which can provide silicon carbide material with suitable properties for the intended applications, taking into account the relations between characteristics of the raw material, material composition, sinter conditions, and results of the sintering process. The effects of density and texture formation on the mechanical properties are studied. It is found that a dense material with a fine-grained microstructure provides optimal mechanical properties, while any deviation from this ideal condition can lead to a considerable deterioration with respect to the material properties.

  19. Mechanical properties of jennite: A theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Juhyuk; Yoon, Seyoon; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2015-05-15

    The objective of this study is to determine the mechanical properties of jennite. To date, several hypotheses have been proposed to predict the structural properties of jennite. For the first time as reported herein, the isothermal bulk modulus of jennite was measured experimentally. Synchrotron-based high-pressure x-ray diffraction experiments were performed to observe the variation of lattice parameters under pressure. First-principles calculations were applied to compare with the experimental results and predict additional structural properties. Accurately measured isothermal bulk modulus herein (K{sub 0} = 64(2) GPa) and the statistical assessment on experimental and theoretical results suggest reliable mechanical properties of shear and Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and elastic tensor coefficients. Determination of these fundamental structural properties is the first step toward greater understanding of calcium–silicate–hydrate, as well as provides a sound foundation for forthcoming atomic level simulations.

  20. The estimation of antistress properties of peat degradation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorna, V. I.; Lyanna, O. L.

    2009-04-01

    Introduction. It is known that polyphenol preparations, produced from peat, represent adaptogens, immunomodulators and can participate in regulation of genetic informational realization as triggers of nonspecific nature. These compounds promote launching of protein-synthesizing system that is very important under unfavorable influence on organism. The experimental data of last years confirmed doth therapeutic value of humic acids as adaptogenes and their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimutogenic, radioprotective and other properties. Lysosomes take the key positions in many physiological and pathological processes of organism owing to their unique structural-functional properties, reactivity and plasticity. These organelles take especial meaning in increased functional activity under stress factors influence. In this way lysosomes become modulators of intracellular processes. It is known that under chronic stress, the systems of neurohumoral regulation and adaptation gradually run out, the function of brain cellular membrane structures disturbs. Understanding of stress developing mechanisms is necessary condition for means development of operative avoiding of the harmful consequences. Purpose. The aim of the work was to investigate corrective influence of hydrohumates on compartmentalization changing of lysosomal cysteine cathepsin H (EC 3.4.22.16) in different rat brain structures. The experiment was held on Wistar's rats (160-200 g weight) which were divided into 4 groups: 1 - the control group; 2 - the animals which were received the hydrohumate with water (10 mg hydrohumate (0,1% solution) per 1 kg of weight) during 3 weeks; 3 - the group of stressed rats (test "forced swimming" for 2 hours); 4 - the stressed rats which received the hydrohumate. The activity of lysosomal cysteine cathepsin H was determined spectrophotometerically by hydrolysis of 2-naphthyl-amid L-leucine (Koch-Light Lab., England). It was found out that intracellular compartmentalization

  1. Improved Rosetta Pedotransfer Estimation of Hydraulic Properties and Their Covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Schaap, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative knowledge of the soil hydraulic properties is necessary for most studies involving water flow and solute transport in the vadose zone. However, it is always expensive, difficult, and time consuming to measure hydraulic properties directly. Pedotransfer functions (PTFs) have been widely used to forecast soil hydraulic parameters. Rosetta is is one of many PTFs and based on artificial neural network analysis coupled with the bootstrap sampling method. The model provides hierarchical PTFs for different levels of input data for Rosetta (H1-H5 models, with higher order models requiring more input variables). The original Rosetta model consists of separate PTFs for the four "van Genuchten" (VG) water retention parameters and saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) because different numbers of samples were available for these characteristics. In this study, we present an improved Rosetta pedotransfer function that uses a single model for all five parameters combined; these parameters are weighed for each sample individually using the covariance matrix obtained from the curve-fit of the VG parameters to the primary data. The optimal number of hidden nodes, weights for saturated hydraulic conductivity and water retention parameters in the neural network and bootstrap realization were selected. Results show that root mean square error (RMSE) for water retention decreased from 0.076 to 0.072 cm3/cm3 for the H2 model and decreased from 0.044 to 0.039 cm3/cm3 for the H5 model. Mean errors which indicate variable matric potential-dependent bias were also reduced significantly in the new model. The RMSE for Ks increased slightly (H2: 0.717 to 0.722; H5: 0.581 to 0.594); this increase is minimal and a result of using a single model for water retention and Ks. Despite this small increase the new model is recommended because of its improved estimation of water retention, and because it is now possible to calculate the full covariance matrix of soil water retention

  2. Error decomposition and estimation of inherent optical properties.

    PubMed

    Salama, Mhd Suhyb; Stein, Alfred

    2009-09-10

    We describe a methodology to quantify and separate the errors of inherent optical properties (IOPs) derived from ocean-color model inversion. Their total error is decomposed into three different sources, namely, model approximations and inversion, sensor noise, and atmospheric correction. Prior information on plausible ranges of observation, sensor noise, and inversion goodness-of-fit are employed to derive the posterior probability distribution of the IOPs. The relative contribution of each error component to the total error budget of the IOPs, all being of stochastic nature, is then quantified. The method is validated with the International Ocean Colour Coordinating Group (IOCCG) data set and the NASA bio-Optical Marine Algorithm Data set (NOMAD). The derived errors are close to the known values with correlation coefficients of 60-90% and 67-90% for IOCCG and NOMAD data sets, respectively. Model-induced errors inherent to the derived IOPs are between 10% and 57% of the total error, whereas atmospheric-induced errors are in general above 43% and up to 90% for both data sets. The proposed method is applied to synthesized and in situ measured populations of IOPs. The mean relative errors of the derived values are between 2% and 20%. A specific error table to the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) sensor is constructed. It serves as a benchmark to evaluate the performance of the atmospheric correction method and to compute atmospheric-induced errors. Our method has a better performance and is more appropriate to estimate actual errors of ocean-color derived products than the previously suggested methods. Moreover, it is generic and can be applied to quantify the error of any derived biogeophysical parameter regardless of the used derivation. PMID:19745859

  3. Mechanical properties and in vitro degradation of bioresorbable knitted stents.

    PubMed

    Nuutinen, Juha-Pekka; Välimaa, Tero; Clerc, Claude; Törmälä, Pertti

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the mechanical properties and in vitro degradation of bioresorbable knitted stents. Each stent was knitted using a single self-reinforced fibre made out of either PLLA or 96L/4D PLA or 80L/20G PLGA. The mechanical and physical properties of the fibres and stents were measured before and after gamma sterilization, as well as during in vitro degradation. The mechanical properties of the knitted stents made out of bioresorbable fibres were similar to those of commercially available metallic stents. The knitting geometry (loop height) had a marked effect on the mechanical properties of the stents. The rate of in vitro degradation in mechanical and physical properties for the PLLA and 96L/4D PLA stents was similar and significantly lower than that of the 80L/20G PLGA stents. The 80L/20G PLGA stents lost about 35% of their initial weight at 11 weeks. At this time, they had lost all their compression resistance strength. These data can be used as a guideline in planning further studies in vivo. PMID:12555898

  4. Deformation behavior and mechanical properties of amyloid protein nanowires.

    PubMed

    Solar, Max; Buehler, Markus J

    2013-03-01

    Amyloid fibrils are most often associated with their pathological role in diseases like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, but they are now increasingly being considered for uses in functional engineering materials. They are among the stiffest protein fibers known but they are also rather brittle, and it is unclear how this combination of properties affects the behavior of amyloid structures at larger length scales, such as in films, wires or plaques. Using a coarse-grained model for amyloid fibrils, we study the mechanical response of amyloid nanowires and examine fundamental mechanical properties, including mechanisms of deformation and failure under tensile loading. We also explore the effect of varying the breaking strain and adhesion strength of the constituent amyloid fibrils on the properties of the larger structure. We find that deformation in the nanowires is controlled by a combination of fibril sliding and fibril failure and that there exists a transition from brittle to ductile behavior by either increasing the fibril failure strain or decreasing the strength of adhesion between fibrils. Furthermore, our results reveal that the mechanical properties of the nanowires are quite sensitive to changes in the properties of the individual fibrils, and the larger scale structures are found to be more mechanically robust than the constituent fibrils, for all cases considered. More broadly, this work demonstrates the promise of utilizing self-assembled biological building blocks in the development of hierarchical nanomaterials. PMID:23290516

  5. Measurements and Characterizations of Mechanical Properties of Human Skins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Han Wook; Park, Yon Kyu

    A skin is an indispensible organ for humans because it contributes to metabolism using its own biochemical functions and protects the human body from external stimuli. Recently, mechanical properties such as a thickness, a friction and an elastic coefficient have been used as a decision index in the skin physiology and in the skin care market due to the increased awareness of wellbeing issues. In addition, the use of mechanical properties is known to have good discrimination ability in the classification of human constitutions, which are used in the field of an alternative medicine. In this study, a system that measures mechanical properties such as a friction and an elastic coefficient is designed. The equipment consists of a load cell type (manufactured by the authors) for the measurements of a friction coefficient, a decompression tube for the measurement of an elastic coefficient. Using the proposed system, the mechanical properties of human skins from different constitutions were compared, and the relative repeatability error for measurements of mechanical properties was determined to be less than 2%. Combining the inspection results of medical doctors in the field of an alternative medicine, we could conclude that the proposed system might be applicable to a quantitative constitutional diagnosis between human constitutions within an acceptable level of uncertainty.

  6. Metal Additive Manufacturing: A Review of Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, John J.; Seifi, Mohsen

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews published data on the mechanical properties of additively manufactured metallic materials. The additive manufacturing techniques utilized to generate samples covered in this review include powder bed fusion (e.g., EBM, SLM, DMLS) and directed energy deposition (e.g., LENS, EBF3). Although only a limited number of metallic alloy systems are currently available for additive manufacturing (e.g., Ti-6Al-4V, TiAl, stainless steel, Inconel 625/718, and Al-Si-10Mg), the bulk of the published mechanical properties information has been generated on Ti-6Al-4V. However, summary tables for published mechanical properties and/or key figures are included for each of the alloys listed above, grouped by the additive technique used to generate the data. Published values for mechanical properties obtained from hardness, tension/compression, fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth, and high cycle fatigue are included for as-built, heat-treated, and/or HIP conditions, when available. The effects of test orientation/build direction on properties, when available, are also provided, along with discussion of the potential source(s) (e.g., texture, microstructure changes, defects) of anisotropy in properties. Recommendations for additional work are also provided.

  7. Mechanical properties of sintered meso-porous silicon: a numerical model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Because of its optical and electrical properties, large surfaces, and compatibility with standard silicon processes, porous silicon is a very interesting material in photovoltaic and microelectromechanical systems technology. In some applications, porous silicon is annealed at high temperature and, consequently, the cylindrical pores that are generated by anodization or stain etching reorganize into randomly distributed closed sphere-like pores. Although the design of devices which involve this material needs an accurate evaluation of its mechanical properties, only few researchers have studied the mechanical properties of porous silicon, and no data are nowadays available on the mechanical properties of sintered porous silicon. In this work we propose a finite element model to estimate the mechanical properties of sintered meso-porous silicon. The model has been employed to study the dependence of the Young’s modulus and the shear modulus (upper and lower bounds) on the porosity for porosities between 0% to 40%. Interpolation functions for the Young’s modulus and shear modulus have been obtained, and the results show good agreement with the data reported for other porous media. A Monte Carlo simulation has also been employed to study the effect of the actual microstructure on the mechanical properties. PMID:23107474

  8. Microstructural influences on the mechanical properties of solder

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.W. Jr.; Goldstein, J.L.F.; Mei, Z.

    1993-04-01

    Intent of this book is to review analytic methods for predicting behavior of solder joints, based on continuum mechanics. The solder is treated as a continuous, homogeneous body, or composite of such bodies, whose mechanical behavior is uniform and governed by simple constitutive equations. The microstructure of a solder joint influences its mechanical properties in 3 ways: it governs deformation and failure; common solders deform inhomogeneously; and common solders are microstructurally unstable. The variety of microstructures often found in solder joints are briefly reviewed, and some of the ways are discussed in which the microstructure influences the common types of high-temperature mechanical behavior. 25 figs, 40 refs.

  9. Effect of air post contamination on mechanical properties of amorphous carbon nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejeune, M.; Benlahsen, M.; Lemoine, P.

    2005-08-01

    We report in this study the mechanical, structural and compositional characteristics of amorphous carbon nitride films (a-CN x) deposited on Si(100) using RF magnetron sputtering of graphite targets in pure nitrogen and under different RF powers. The properties of the films were determined in their as deposited state using nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), elastic recoil detection (ERDA), infrared (IR) absorption and Raman spectroscopy. The mechanical properties were obtained combining nanoindentation and residual stress measurements. The presence of various types of C-N bonds, as well as the post-deposition contamination of the deposited films by oxygen and water (voids) is revealed. The measured hardness and Young modulus were 0.9-2.03 and 23-27 GPa, respectively. These results have been analysed in term of the matrix flexibility which results from the nitrogen content and the porous character of the films, which can affect deeply the estimation of the physical-mechanical properties of the films.

  10. Estimating large-scale fractured rock properties from radon data collected in a ventilated tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Unger, Andre; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2003-05-12

    To address regulatory issues regarding worker safety, radon gas concentrations have been monitored as part of the operation of a deep tunnel excavated from a highly fractured tuff formation. The objective of this study was to examine the potential use of the radon data to estimate large-scale formation properties of fractured rock. An iTOUGH2 model was developed to predict radon concentrations for prescribed ventilation rates. The numerical model was used (1) to estimate the permeability and porosity of the fractured formation at the length scale of the tunnel and extending tens of meters into the surrounding rock, and (2) to understand the mechanism leading to radon concentrations that potentially exceed the regulatory limit. The mechanism controlling radon concentrations in the tunnel is a function of atmospheric barometric fluctuations propagated down the tunnel. In addition, a slight suction is induced by the ventilation system. The pressure fluctuations are dampened in the fractured formation according to its permeability and porosity. Consequently, as the barometric pressure in the tunnel drops, formation gases from the rock are pulled into the opening, resulting in high radon concentrations. Model calibration to both radon concentration data measured in the tunnel and gas phase pressure fluctuations observed in the formation yielded independent estimates of effective, large-scale fracture permeability and porosity. The calibrated model was then used as a design tool to predict the effect of adjusting the ventilation-system operation strategy for reducing the probability that radon gas concentrations will exceed the regulatory limit.