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Sample records for mechanical prosthetic valve

  1. Guide to prosthetic cardiac valves

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, D.; Steiner, R.M.; Fernandez, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The development of artificial heart valves: Introduction and historical perspective; The radiology of prosthetic heart valves; The evaluation of patients for prosthetic valve implantation; Pathology of cardiac valve replacement; and Bioengineering of mechanical and biological heart valve substitutes.

  2. Prosthetic valves or tissue valves--a vote for mechanical prostheses.

    PubMed

    Horstkotte, D

    1985-01-01

    Thirty years of effort to obtain better substitutes for destroyed human heart valves brought continuous improvement of the various designs and materials used for the prostheses. However, none of the mechanical or tissue valves currently available meet all the requirements of an ideal artificial heart valve. Accurate comparison of results after implantation of mechanical and tissue valves is difficult because there are no randomized studies and most of the published results are gathered from patient groups operated on in different centers and over different time frames. Reliable comparison therefore presumes criteria to assess the success of valve replacement. The late outcome of heart valve replacement can be determined by subjective improvement, improvement of functional capacity and central hemodynamics, normalization of impaired ventricular function and by the frequency of complications related to or induced by the prostheses. Subjective improvement and improvement of functional capacity is obviously dependent on the degree of postoperative normalization of the hemodynamics. The hemodynamic properties of modern mechanical prostheses are superior to those of tissue valves because of the significantly more favourable relation between total prosthetic valve area and effective prosthetic valve orifice area, conditioned by design. These unfavourable hemodynamics are manifest especially when prostheses of smaller sizes are implanted. The main disadvantage of biological valves is their limited durability due to calcification with tissue damage resulting in degeneration and dysfunction. In addition to the risk of re-operation of tissue valves, for some patients hemodynamical deterioration with consecutive decrease of their functional capacity must be expected a considerable time before a second operation is mandatory. When compared with tissue valves, the most important disadvantage of mechanical valves is their thrombogenicity with the need for life

  3. Perioperative anticoagulation for children with prosthetic mechanical valves.

    PubMed

    Rees, P; Grech, V

    2000-04-01

    The insertion of a mechanical heart valve predisposes to thrombosis and embolism, and for this reason, individuals with mechanical valves who undergo dental/surgical procedures must take special precautions. In this article, we illustrate a protocol for anticoagulation during such procedures in individuals with mechanical valves. PMID:22368581

  4. Maternal and Fetal Outcomes in Pregnant Women with a Prosthetic Mechanical Heart Valve

    PubMed Central

    Ayad, Sherif W.; Hassanein, Mahmoud M.; Mohamed, Elsayed A.; Gohar, Ahmed M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pregnancy is associated with several cardiocirculatory changes that can significantly impact underlying cardiac disease. These changes include an increase in cardiac output, sodium, and water retention leading to blood volume expansion, and reductions in systemic vascular resistance and systemic blood pressure. In addition, pregnancy results in a hypercoagulable state that increases the risk of thromboembolic complications. OBJECTIVES The aim of this study is to assess the maternal and fetal outcomes of pregnant women with mechanical prosthetic heart valves (PHVs). METHODS This is a prospective observational study that included 100 pregnant patients with cardiac mechanical valve prostheses on anticoagulant therapy. The main maternal outcomes included thromboembolic or hemorrhagic complications, prosthetic valve thrombosis, and acute decompensated heart failure. Fetal outcomes included miscarriage, fetal death, live birth, small-for-gestational age, and warfarin embryopathy. The relationship between the following were observed: – Maternal and fetal complications and the site of the replaced valve (mitral, aortic, or double)– Maternal and fetal complications and warfarin dosage (≤5 mg, >5 mg)– Maternal and fetal complications and the type of anticoagulation administered during the first trimester RESULTS This study included 60 patients (60%) with mitral valve replacement (MVR), 22 patients (22%) with aortic valve replacement (AVR), and 18 patients (18%) with double valve replacement (DVR). A total of 65 patients (65%) received >5 mg of oral anticoagulant (warfarin), 33 patients (33%) received ≤5 mg of warfarin, and 2 patients (2%) received low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH; enoxaparin sodium) throughout the pregnancy. A total of 17 patients (17%) received oral anticoagulant (warfarin) during the first trimester: 9 patients received a daily warfarin dose of >5 mg while the remaining 8 patients received a daily dose of ≤5 mg. Twenty

  5. Prosthetic Valve Thrombosis: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Garg, Jalaj; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Pinnamaneni, Sowmya; Sarungbam, Judy; Jain, Diwakar

    2016-01-01

    St. Jude mechanical prosthesis is the most commonly used prosthetic device with least valvular complications with excellent hemodynamics. However, prosthetic valve thrombosis is one of the serious complications, with rates between 0.03% and 0.13% per patient-year depending on the type of anticoagulation used and compliance to the therapy. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is the initial screening tool (class I) that would provide clues for the assessment of valvular hemodynamics. Fluoroscopy is an alternate imaging modality for the assessment of mechanical leaflet motion, especially in patients when prosthetic valves are difficult to image on TTE or transesophageal echocardiography. A complete fluoroscopic evaluation of a prosthetic valve includes assessment of valvular motion and structural integrity. Opening and closing angles can be measured fluoroscopically to determine whether a specific valve is functioning properly. We discuss a case of a 91-year-old man with thrombosis of bileaflet mechanical mitral prosthesis that was demonstrated on real-time fluoroscopy (not evident on TTE). An algorithmic approach to diagnosis and management of prosthetic heart valve thrombosis is outlined. PMID:25486519

  6. Prediction of thrombus-related mechanical prosthetic valve dysfunction using transesophageal echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. S.; Tiong, I. Y.; Asher, C. R.; Murphy, M. T.; Thomas, J. D.; Griffin, B. P.

    2000-01-01

    Identification of thrombus-related mechanical prosthetic valve dysfunction (MPVD) has important therapeutic implications. We sought to develop an algorithm, combining clinical and echocardiographic parameters, for prediction of thrombus-related MPVD in a series of 53 patients (24 men, age 52 +/- 16 years) who had intraoperative diagnosis of thrombus or pannus from 1992 to 1997. Clinical and echocardiographic parameters were analyzed to identify predictors of thrombus and pannus. Prevalence of thrombus and diagnostic yields relative to the number of predictors were determined. There were 22 patients with thrombus, 19 patients with pannus, and 12 patients with both. Forty-two of 53 masses were visualized using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), including 29 of 34 thrombi or both thrombi and panni and 13 of 19 isolated panni. Predictors of thrombus or mixed presentation include mobile mass (p = 0.009), attachment to occluder (p = 0.02), elevated gradients (p = 0.04), and an international normalized ratio of < or = 2.5 (p = 0.03). All 34 patients with thrombus or mixed presentation had > or = 1 predictor. The prevalence of thrombus in the presence of < or = 1, 2, and > or = 3 predictors is 14%, 69%, and 91%, respectively. Thus, TEE is sensitive in the identification of abnormal mass in the setting of MPVD. An algorithm based on clinical and transesophageal echocardiographic predictors may be useful to estimate the likelihood of thrombus in the setting of MPVD. In the presence of > or = 3 predictors, the probability of thrombus is high.

  7. Physiologically-based testing system for the mechanical characterization of prosthetic vein valves

    PubMed Central

    Rittgers, Stanley E; Oberdier, Matt T; Pottala, Sharath

    2007-01-01

    Due to the relatively limited amount of work done to date on developing prosthetic vein (as opposed to cardiac) valves, advances in this topic require progress in three distinct areas: 1) improved device design, 2) relevant device testing conditions, and, 3) appropriate parameters for evaluation of results. It is the purpose of this paper to address two of these issues (#2 and #3) by: 1) performing a study of normal volunteers to quantify the anatomy and hemodynamic features of healthy venous valves, 2) construction of a 2-step, in vitro testing procedure, which simulates both physiologic and postural conditions seen in the lower extremity venous system, and, 3) defining several modified and new parameters which quantify dynamic valve characteristics. PMID:17629916

  8. Brucella Endocarditis in Prosthetic Valves

    PubMed Central

    Mehanic, Snjezana; Mulabdic, Velida; Baljic, Rusmir; Hadzovic-Cengic, Meliha; Pinjo, Fikret; Hadziosmanovic, Vesna; Topalovic, Jasna

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY CONFLICT OF INTEREST: none declared. Introduction Brucella endocarditis (BE) is a rare but severe and potentially lethal manifestation of brucellosis. Pre-existing valves lesions and prosthetic valves (PV) are favorable for BE. Case report We represent the case of a 46-year-old man who was treated at the Clinic for Infectious Diseases, Clinical Center of Sarajevo University, as blood culture positive (Brucella melitensis) mitral and aortic PV endocarditis. He was treated with combined anti-brucella and cardiac therapy. Surgical intervention was postponed due to cardiac instability. Four months later he passed away. Surgery was not performed. PMID:24493988

  9. Echocardiographic assessment of prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Blauwet, Lori A; Miller, Fletcher A

    2014-01-01

    Valvular heart disease is a global health problem. It is estimated that more than 280,000 prosthetic heart valves are implanted worldwide each year. As the world's population is aging, the incidence of prosthetic heart valve implantation and the prevalence of prosthetic heart valves continue to increase. Assessing heart valve prosthesis function remains challenging, as prosthesis malfunction is unpredictable but not uncommon. Transthoracic two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography is the preferred method for assessing prosthetic valve function. Clinically useful Doppler-derived measures for assessing prosthetic valve hemodynamic profiles have been reported for aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valve prostheses, but echocardiographic data regarding pulmonary valve prostheses remain limited. Complete prosthetic valve evaluation by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is sometimes challenging due to acoustic shadowing and artifacts. In these cases, further imaging with transesophageal echocardiography, fluoroscopy and/or gated CT may be warranted, particularly if prosthetic valve dysfunction is suspected. Being able to differentiate pathologic versus functional obstruction of an individual prosthesis is extremely important, as this distinction affects management decisions. Transprosthetic and periprosthetic regurgitation may be difficult to visualize on TTE, so careful review of Doppler-derived data combined with a high index of suspicion is warranted, particularly in symptomatic patients. A baseline TTE soon after valve implantation is indicated in order to "fingerprint" the prosthesis hemodynamic profile. It remains unclear how frequently serial imaging should be performed in order to assess prosthetic valve function, as this issue has not been systematically studied. PMID:25081405

  10. Simulating Prosthetic Heart Valve Hemodynamics: Numerical Model Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Liang

    2005-11-01

    Since the first successful implantation of a prosthetic heart valve four decades ago, over 50 different designs have been developed including both mechanical and bio-prosthetic valves. Valve implants, however, are associated with increased risk of blood clotting, a trend which is believed to be linked to the complex hemodynamics induced by the prosthesis. To understand prosthetic valve hemodynamics under physiological conditions, we develop a numerical method capable of simulating flows in realistic prosthetic heart valves in anatomical geometries. The method employs a newly developed hybrid numerical technique that integrates the chimera overset grid approach with a Cartesian, sharp-interface immersed boundary methodology. The capabilities of the method are demonstrated by applying it to simulate pulsatile flow in both bileaflet and tri-leaflet valves moving with prescribed leaflet kinematics.

  11. [Surgical Treatment of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Kaminishi, Yuichiro; Akutsu, Hirohiko; Sugaya, Akira; Kurumisawa, Soki; Takazawa, Ippei; Sato, Hirotaka; Muraoka, Arata; Aizawa, Kei; Ohki, Shinichi; Saito, Tsutomu; Kawahito, Koji; Misawa, Yoshio

    2015-11-01

    Between 2003 and 2014, at Jichi Medical University Hospital, 11 patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) underwent re-operation. There was 1 in-hospital death and 2 late deaths. The cause of death was cirrhosis, heart failure and sepsis, respectively. Emergency surgery, previous double valve replacement (DVR) and Staphylococcus infection were common risk factors for all 3 cases. Two cases of patients that survived who underwent mitral valve replacement (MVR) and DVR for PVE after DVR were treated with multiple antibiotic courses for bacteremia associated with hemodialysis and colon cancer. One patient who underwent DVR after mitral valve plasty which was complicated with cerebral hemorrhage, had survived and was discharged. Of the aortic PVE patients, 2 cases of aortic valve replacement (AVR) using a mechanical valve, 1 case of aortic root replacement (ARR) using a mechanical valve, and 1 ARR using the homograft, were considered cured and never relapsed. A patient with aortic PVE, who underwent AVR after cesarean section for heart failure in birth period, has received ARR twice with the mechanical valve for recurrent pseudo-aneurysm of the left ventricular outflow tract. Since hemodialysis and colon cancer is a risk factor for recurrent PVE, it is necessary to consider the long-term administration of antibiotics after surgery. PMID:26469256

  12. Fungal Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis by Candida parapsilosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shokohi, Tahereh; Nouraei, Seyed Mahmood; Afsarian, Mohammad Hosein; Najafi, Narges; Mehdipour, Shirin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is rare but serious complication of valve replacement surgery. Candida species, particularly Candida albicans is the most common isolated pathogen in fungal PVE (1–6%of cases). Case Presentation: We describe a 35-year-old woman who underwent mechanical mitral valve replacement about 3 years ago. She was admitted with neurological symptoms and later with dyspnea and hypotension. Transesophageal echocardiography showed large and mobile prosthetic valve vegetation. She underwent mitral valve surgery. The explanted valve and vegetation revealed lots of budding yeasts and the isolated yeast was identified as C. parapsilosis. Amphotericin B and broad spectrum antibiotic were started immediately. Unfortunately, the patient died two days after surgery, due to sepsis probably related to the candidemia. Conclusions: Fungal endocarditis is uncommon infection, but it is a serious problem in patients with prosthetic valve. Fungal PVE can occur years after the surgery, thus long-term follow-up is essential. PMID:25147692

  13. Prosthetic valve endocarditis. Experience with porcine bioprostheses.

    PubMed

    Sett, S S; Hudon, M P; Jamieson, W R; Chow, A W

    1993-03-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis remains an infrequent but serious complication of cardiac valvular replacement. Prosthetic valve endocarditis was diagnosed in 56 (1.8%) of 3200 patients in whom one or more porcine bioprostheses were implanted between 1975 and 1988. Of the 56 patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis, there were 40 men and 16 women, with a mean age at initial implantation of 57 years (27 to 81 years). Of the 56 patients, 6 were initially treated for native valve endocarditis. There were 8 cases of early prosthetic valve endocarditis (defined as occurring less than 60 days after initial surgical intervention) and 48 cases of late prosthetic valve endocarditis (occurring after 60 days). The overall mortality rate of the 56 patients was 32% (18 patients). Of the 8 patients with early prosthetic valve endocarditis, 6 (75%) died. Of the 48 patients with late prosthetic valve endocarditis, 12 (25%) died. The predominant organisms were Staphylococcus epidermidis (12 cases), Streptococcus viridans (8 cases) and Staphylococcus aureus (7 cases). The presence of hemodynamic compromise, including congestive heart failure, septic embolism, persistent sepsis, and echocardiographic evidence of vegetations, dictated the mode and timing of the addition of surgical intervention to medical therapy. The survival rate for medically and surgically treated patients with late prosthetic valve endocarditis was 91% (20 patients); none of the patients with early prosthetic valve endocarditis survived (all had severe hemodynamic compromise). We analyzed 18 factors for the prediction of early and late death. The predictors of death by univariate analysis for both early and late prosthetic valve endocarditis were age, diagnosis time, renal status, sepsis, management mode, fever, dental procedures, and dental prophylaxis. The predictors by multivariate analysis were age, diagnosis time, renal status, and management mode for early prosthetic valve endocarditis, and only diagnosis

  14. Horseshoe thrombus in a patient with mechanical prosthetic mitral valve: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, Sanjay; Movahed, Assad; Espinoza, Carlos; Marcu, Constantin B

    2015-01-01

    Patients with prosthetic cardiac valves are at high risk for thromboembolic complications and need life long anticoagulation with warfarin, which can be associated with variable dose requirements and fluctuating level of systemic anticoagulation and may predispose to thromboembolic and or hemorrhagic complications. Prosthetic cardiac valve thrombosis is associated with high morbidity and mortality. A high index of suspicion is essential for prompt diagnosis. Transthoracic echocardiography, and if required transesophageal echocardiography are the main diagnostic imaging modalities. Medically stable patients can be managed with thrombolytic therapy and anticoagulation, while some patients may require surgical thrombectomy or valve replacement. We present a case report of a patient with prosthetic mitral valve and an unusually large left atrial thrombus with both thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications. PMID:26380832

  15. Intermittent Malfunction of a Prosthetic Valve-A Diagnostic Challenge.

    PubMed

    Fadel, Bahaa M; Alassas, Khadija; Dahdouh, Ziad; Pergola, Valeria; Galzerano, Domenico; Di Salvo, Giovanni

    2016-06-01

    Intermittent malfunction of a mechanical valve prosthesis is a rare condition that carries serious clinical implications. It results from the periodic entrapment of a prosthetic disk in either an open or closed position leading to transient intravalvular regurgitation or obstruction to flow. The intermittent nature of the malfunction poses a diagnostic challenge, particularly in the era of digital echocardiography. In this manuscript, we describe the Doppler and two-dimensional echocardiographic findings in a patient with intermittent prosthetic mitral valve malfunction. PMID:26992105

  16. Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis Caused by Bartonella quintana

    PubMed Central

    Klein, John L.; Nair, Sukumaran K.; Harrison, Tim G.; Hunt, Ian; Fry, Norman K.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the first case of Bartonella quintana endocarditis affecting a prosthetic valve in a person with no known risk factors for this infection. Bartonella should be considered as a cause of endocarditis in any clinical setting. PMID:11897074

  17. 21 CFR 870.3945 - Prosthetic heart valve sizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve sizer. 870.3945 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3945 Prosthetic heart valve sizer. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve sizer is a device used to measure the size of...

  18. 21 CFR 870.3945 - Prosthetic heart valve sizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve sizer. 870.3945 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3945 Prosthetic heart valve sizer. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve sizer is a device used to measure the size of...

  19. 21 CFR 870.3945 - Prosthetic heart valve sizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve sizer. 870.3945 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3945 Prosthetic heart valve sizer. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve sizer is a device used to measure the size of...

  20. 21 CFR 870.3945 - Prosthetic heart valve sizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve sizer. 870.3945 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3945 Prosthetic heart valve sizer. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve sizer is a device used to measure the size of...

  1. 21 CFR 870.3945 - Prosthetic heart valve sizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve sizer. 870.3945 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3945 Prosthetic heart valve sizer. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve sizer is a device used to measure the size of...

  2. T Cell Response in Patients with Implanted Biological and Mechanical Prosthetic Heart Valves

    PubMed Central

    Barbarash, L.; Kudryavtsev, I.; Rutkovskaya, N.; Golovkin, A.

    2016-01-01

    The study was aimed at assessing T cell subsets of peripheral blood from recipients of long-term functioning (more than 60 months) biological and mechanical heart valve prostheses. The absolute and relative number of CD4 and CD8 T cell subsets was analyzed: naïve (N, CD45RA+CD62L+), central memory (CM, CD45RA−CD62L+), effector memory (EM, CD45RA−CD62L−), and terminally differentiated CD45RA-positive effector memory (TEMRA, CD45RA+CD62L−) in 25 persons with biological and 7 with mechanical prosthesis compared with 48 apparently healthy volunteers. The relative and absolute number of central memory and naïve CD3+CD8+ in patients with biological prosthesis was decreased (p < 0.001). Meanwhile the number of CD45RA+CD62L−CD3+CD8+ and CD3+CD4+ was increased (p < 0.001). Patients with mechanical prosthesis had increased absolute and relative number of CD45RA+CD62L−CD3+CD8+ cells (p = 0.006). Also the relative number of CD3+CD4+ cells was reduced (p = 0.04). We assume that altered composition of T cell subsets points at development of xenograft rejection reaction against both mechanical and biological heart valve prostheses. PMID:26989331

  3. Recurrent prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Aspergillus delacroxii (formerly Aspergillus nidulans var. echinulatus)

    PubMed Central

    Uhrin, Gábor Balázs; Jensen, Rasmus Hare; Korup, Eva; Grønlund, Jens; Hjort, Ulla; Moser, Claus; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl

    2015-01-01

    We report Aspergillus delacroxii (formerly Aspergillus nidulans var. echinulatus) causing recurrent prosthetic valve endocarditis. The fungus was the sole agent detected during replacement of a mechanical aortic valve conduit due to abscess formation. Despite extensive surgery and anti-fungal treatment, the patient had a cerebral hemorrhage 4 months post-surgery prompting a diagnosis of recurrent prosthetic valve endocarditis and fungemia. PMID:26909244

  4. Geometry of aortic heart valves. [prosthetic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karara, H. M.

    1975-01-01

    Photogrammetric measurements of the surface topography of the aortic valves obtained from silicon rubber molds of freshly excised human aortic valves are presented. The data are part of an investigation into the design of a new prosthetic valve which will be a central-flow device, like the real valve and unlike previous central-occluding prostheses. Since the maximum stress on the heart valve is induced when the valve is closed and subject to diastolic back-pressure, it was decided to determine the valve geometry during diastole. That is, the molds were formed by pouring the rubber down the excised aortas, causing the valves to close. The molds were made under different pressures (20-120 torr); photogrammetry served as a vehicle for the assessment of the mold topography through the following outputs: digital models, surface profiles, and contour maps.

  5. Advances in catheter ablation: atrial fibrillation ablation in patients with mitral mechanical prosthetic valve.

    PubMed

    Santangeli, Pasquale; Di Biase, Luigi; Bai, Rong; Horton, Rodney; Burkhardt, J David; Sanchez, Javier; Price, Justin; Natale, Andrea

    2012-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is common in patients with mitral valve replacement (MVR). Treatment of AF in these subjects is challenging, as the arrhythmia is often refractory to antiarrhythmic drug therapy. Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is usually avoided or delayed in patients with MVR due to the higher perceived risks and difficulty of left atrial catheter manipulation in the presence of a mechanical valve. Over the last few years, several investigators have reported the feasibility and safety of RFCA of AF in patients with MVR. Five case-control studies have evaluated the feasibility and safety of RFCA of AF or perimitral flutter (PMFL) in patients with MVR. Overall, a total of 178 patients with MVR have been included (21 undergoing ablation of only PMFL), and have been compared with a matched control group of 285 patients. Total procedural duration (weighted mean difference [WMD] = +24.5 min, 95% confidence interval [CI] +10.2 min to +38.8 min, P = 0.001), and fluoroscopy time (WMD = +13.5 min, 95% CI +3.7 min to +23.4 min, P = 0.007) were longer in the MVR group. After a mean follow-up of 11.5 ± 8.6 months, 64 (36%) patients in the MVR group experienced recurrence of AF/PMFL, as compared to 73 (26%) patients in the control group, accounting for a trend toward an increased rate of recurrences in patients with MVR (odds ratio [OR] = 1.66, 95% CI 0.99 to 2.78, P = 0.053). Periprocedural complications occurred in 10 (5.6%) patients in the MVR group, and in 8 (2.8%) patients in the control group (OR = 2.01, 95% CI 0.56 to 7.15, P = 0.28). In conclusion, a quantitative analysis of the available evidence supports a trend toward a worse arrhythmia-free survival and a higher absolute rate of periprocedural complications in patients with MVR undergoing RFCA of AF or PMFL, as compared to a matched control group without mitral valve disease. These data would encourage the adoption of RFCA of AF in MVR patients mostly by more experienced Institutions. PMID:23003204

  6. Processing of Prosthetic Heart Valve Sounds from Anechoic Tank Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V; Meyer, A W

    2001-03-20

    People with serious cardiac problems have had their life span extended with the development of the prosthetic heart valve. However, the valves operate continuously at approximately 39 million cycles per year and are therefore subject to structural failures either by faulty design or material fatigue. The development of a non-invasive technique using an acoustic contact microphone and sophisticated signal processing techniques has been proposed and demonstrated on limited data sets. In this paper we discuss an extension of the techniques to perform the heart valve tests in an anechoic like. Here the objective is to extract a ''pure'' sound or equivalently the acoustical vibration response of the prosthetic valves in a quiet environment. The goal is to demonstrate that there clearly exist differences between values which have a specific mechanical defect known as single leg separation (SLS) and non-defective valves known as intact (INT). We discuss the signal processing and results of anechoic acoustic measurements on 50 prosthetic valves in the tank. Finally, we show the results of the individual runs for each valve, point out any of the meaningful features that could be used to distinguish the SLS from INT and summarize the experiments.

  7. 21 CFR 870.3935 - Prosthetic heart valve holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve holder. 870.3935 Section... heart valve holder. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve holder is a device used to hold a replacement heart valve while it is being sutured into place. (b) Classification. Class I. The device...

  8. 21 CFR 870.3935 - Prosthetic heart valve holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve holder. 870.3935 Section... heart valve holder. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve holder is a device used to hold a replacement heart valve while it is being sutured into place. (b) Classification. Class I. The device...

  9. 21 CFR 870.3935 - Prosthetic heart valve holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve holder. 870.3935 Section... heart valve holder. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve holder is a device used to hold a replacement heart valve while it is being sutured into place. (b) Classification. Class I. The device...

  10. 21 CFR 870.3935 - Prosthetic heart valve holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve holder. 870.3935 Section... heart valve holder. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve holder is a device used to hold a replacement heart valve while it is being sutured into place. (b) Classification. Class I. The device...

  11. 21 CFR 870.3935 - Prosthetic heart valve holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve holder. 870.3935 Section... heart valve holder. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve holder is a device used to hold a replacement heart valve while it is being sutured into place. (b) Classification. Class I. The device...

  12. Pannus-related prosthetic valve dysfunction. Case report

    PubMed Central

    MOLDOVAN, MARIA-SÎNZIANA; BEDELEANU, DANIELA; KOVACS, EMESE; CIUMĂRNEAN, LORENA; MOLNAR, ADRIAN

    2016-01-01

    Pannus-related prosthetic valve dysfunction, a complication of mechanical prosthetic valve replacement, is rare, with a slowly progressive evolution, but it can be acute, severe, requiring surgical reintervention. We present the case of a patient with a mechanical single disc aortic prosthesis, with moderate prosthesis-patient mismatch, minor pannus found on previous ultrasound examinations, who presented to our service with angina pain with a duration of 1 hour, subsequently interpreted as non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) syndrome. Coronarography showed normal epicardial coronary arteries, an ample movement of the prosthetic disc, without evidence of coronary thromboembolism, and Gated Single-Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT) with Technetium (Tc)-99m detected no perfusion defects. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) evidenced a dysfunctional prosthesis due to a subvalvular mass; transesophageal echocardiography (TOE) showed the interference of this mass, with a pannus appearance, with the closure of the prosthetic disc. Under conditions of repeated angina episodes, under anticoagulant treatment, surgery was performed, with the intraoperative confirmation of pannus and its removal. Postoperative evolution was favorable. This case reflects the diagnostic and therapeutic management problems of pannus-related prosthetic valve dysfunction. PMID:27004041

  13. Prosthetic heart valves: Objective Performance Criteria versus randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Grunkemeier, Gary L; Jin, Ruyun; Starr, Albert

    2006-09-01

    The current Food and Drug Administration (FDA) heart valve guidance document uses an objective performance criteria (OPC) methodology to evaluate the clinical performance of prosthetic heart valves. OPC are essentially historical controls, but they have turned out to be an adequate, and perhaps optimal, study design in this situation. Heart valves have a simple open-and-close mechanism, device effectiveness is easy to document, and the common complications (thromboembolism, thrombosis, bleeding, leak, and infection) are well known and easily detected. Thus, randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have not been deemed necessary for the regulatory approval of prosthetic heart valves. The OPC are derived from the average complication rates of all approved heart valves. Studies based on OPC have been shown to work well; many different valve models have gained FDA market approval based on this methodology. Although heart valve RCTs are not required by the FDA, they have been done to compare valves or treatment regimens after approval. Recently, the Artificial Valve Endocarditis Reduction Trial (AVERT) was designed to compare a new Silzone sewing ring, designed to reduce infection, with the Standard sewing ring on a St. Jude Medical heart valve. This was the largest heart valve RCT ever proposed (4,400 valve patients, followed for as long as 4 years), but it was stopped prematurely because of a high leak rate associated with the Silzone valve. Examining the results showed that a much smaller, OPC-based study with 800 patient-years would have been sufficient to disclose this complication of the Silzone valve. PMID:16928482

  14. Choice of prosthetic heart valve in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Shiv Kumar; Talwar, Sachin; Airan, Balram

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical prostheses and stented xenografts (bioprosthesis) are most commonly used substitutes for aortic and mitral valve replacement. The mechanical valves have the advantage of durability but are accompanied with the risk of thromboembolism, problems of long-term anticoagulation, and associated risk of bleeding. In contrast, bioprosthetic valves do not require long-term anticoagulation, but carry the risk of structural valve degeneration and re-operation. A mechanical valve is favoured in young patients (<40 years) if reliable anticoagulation is ensured. In elderly patients (>60 years), a bioprosthesis is a suitable substitute. In middle-aged patients (40–60 years), risk of re-operation in a bioprosthesis is equal to that of bleeding in a mechanical valve. Traditionally, a bioprosthesis is opted in patients with limited life expectancy. Calculation of life expectancy, based solely upon chronological age, is erroneous. In developing countries, the calculated life expectancy is much lower than that of Western population, hence age related Western cut-offs are not valid in developing countries. Besides age, cardiac condition of the patient, systemic illnesses, socio-economic status, gender and geographical location also decide the life expectancy of the patients. Selection of the prosthetic valve substitute should be based on: aspiration of the patient, life expectancy, socio-economic and educational background, occupation of the patient, availability, cost, monitoring of anti-coagulation, monitoring of valve function and other valve related complications, and possibility of re-operation. PMID:27326237

  15. Multimodality Imaging Assessment of Prosthetic Heart Valves.

    PubMed

    Suchá, Dominika; Symersky, Petr; Tanis, W; Mali, Willem P Th M; Leiner, Tim; van Herwerden, Lex A; Budde, Ricardo P J

    2015-09-01

    Echocardiography and fluoroscopy are the main techniques for prosthetic heart valve (PHV) evaluation, but because of specific limitations they may not identify the morphological substrate or the extent of PHV pathology. Cardiac computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have emerged as new potential imaging modalities for valve prostheses. We present an overview of the possibilities and pitfalls of CT and MRI for PHV assessment based on a systematic literature review of all experimental and patient studies. For this, a comprehensive systematic search was performed in PubMed and Embase on March 24, 2015, containing CT/MRI and PHV synonyms. Our final selection yielded 82 articles on surgical valves. CT allowed adequate assessment of most modern PHVs and complemented echocardiography in detecting the obstruction cause (pannus or thrombus), bioprosthesis calcifications, and endocarditis extent (valve dehiscence and pseudoaneurysms). No clear advantage over echocardiography was found for the detection of vegetations or periprosthetic regurgitation. Whereas MRI metal artifacts may preclude direct prosthesis analysis, MRI provided information on PHV-related flow patterns and velocities. MRI demonstrated abnormal asymmetrical flow patterns in PHV obstruction and allowed prosthetic regurgitation assessment. Hence, CT shows great clinical relevance as a complementary imaging tool for the diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected PHV obstruction and endocarditis. MRI shows potential for functional PHV assessment although more studies are required to provide diagnostic reference values to allow discrimination of normal from pathological conditions. PMID:26353926

  16. Processing of prosthetic heart valve sounds for classification. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Jones, H.E.

    1994-04-01

    People with serious heart conditions have had their expected life span extended considerably with the development of the prosthetic heart valve especially with the great strides made in valve design. Even though the designs are extremely reliable, the valves are mechanical and operating continuously over a long period, therefore, structural failures can occur due to fatigue. Measuring heart sounds non-invasively in a noisy environment puts more demands on the signal processing to extract the desired signals from the noise. In this paper the authors discuss acoustical signal processing techniques developed to process noisy heart valve sounds measured by a sensitive, surface contact microphone and used for the eventual classification of the valve.

  17. Rothia mucilaginosa Prosthetic Device Infections: a Case of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Tokarczyk, Mindy J.; Jungkind, Donald; DeSimone, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Rothia mucilaginosa is increasingly recognized as an emerging opportunistic pathogen associated with prosthetic device infections. Infective endocarditis is one of the most common clinical presentations. We report a case of R. mucilaginosa prosthetic valve endocarditis and review the literature of prosthetic device infections caused by this organism. PMID:23467598

  18. Acute massive mitral regurgitation from prosthetic valve dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, D K; Sturridge, M F

    1976-01-01

    Two cases of prosthetic valve dysfunction resulting in acute massive mitral regurgitation are reported; emergency operation was successful in both cases. Survival following complete dislodgement of the occluder of a disc valve, as occurred in one case, does not appear to have been reported before. The diffculty in diagnosis of sudden cardiac decompensation in patients with prosthetic valves is stressed, as is the need for urgent operation. Images PMID:973894

  19. Case report of Streptomyces endocarditis of a prosthetic aortic valve.

    PubMed Central

    Mossad, S B; Tomford, J W; Stewart, R; Ratliff, N B; Hall, G S

    1995-01-01

    We describe the first case of prosthetic valve endocarditis due to a Streptomyces sp. The patient presented with fever, cutaneous embolic lesions, and bacteremia 3 months after aortic valve replacement. Treatment required valve replacement and a long course of parenteral imipenem. PMID:8586732

  20. Hemolysis and infective endocarditis in a mitral prosthetic valve.

    PubMed

    Koç, Fatih; Bekar, Lütfi; Kadı, Hasan; Ceyhan, Köksal

    2010-09-01

    Traumatic intravascular hemolysis after heart valve replacement can be a serious problem. It is commonly associated with either structural deterioration or paravalvular leaks. A 63-year-old woman with a six-year history of surgery for mitral stenosis presented with complaints of weakness and dyspnea. She received treatment at other centers three times in the past six months for dyspnea and anemia requiring transfusion of red blood cells. Transthoracic echocardiography showed a normally functioning mitral mechanic prosthesis. Laboratory findings were abnormal for hemoglobin, hematocrit, white blood cell count, C-reactive protein, serum haptoglobin, and lactate dehydrogenase. Peripheral blood smear showed marked schistocytes, indicative of mechanical erythrocyte destruction. Transesophageal echocardiography demonstrated severe paravalvular leak and a large (9x13 mm) vegetation adhering to the prosthetic valve, protruding into the left atrium. Enterococcus faecalis was isolated from blood cultures. Surgery was planned because of large vegetation, repeated hemolysis, and severe paravalvular regurgitation, but the patient refused surgical treatment. PMID:21200125

  1. Corynebacterium CDC Group G Native and Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Sattar, Adil; Yu, Siegfried; Koirala, Janak

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of native and recurrent prosthetic valve endocarditis with Corynebacterium CDC group G, a rarely reported cause of infective endocarditis (IE). Previously, there have been only two cases reported for prosthetic valve IE caused by these organisms. A 69-year-old female with a known history of mitral valve regurgitation presented with a 3-day history of high-grade fever, pleuritic chest pain and cough. Echocardiography confirmed findings of mitral valve thickening consistent with endocarditis, which subsequently progressed to become large and mobile vegetations. Both sets of blood cultures taken on admission were positive for Corynebacterium CDC group G. Despite removal of a long-term venous access port, the patient’s presumed source of line associated bacteremia, mitral valve replacement, and aggressive antibiotic therapy, the patient had recurrence of vegetations on the prosthetic valve. She underwent replacement of her prosthetic mitral valve in the subsequent 2 weeks, before she progressed to disseminated intravascular coagulation and expired. Although they are typically considered contaminants, corynebacteria, in the appropriate clinical setting, should be recognized, identified, and treated as potentially life-threatening infections, particularly in the case of line-associated bacteremias, and native and prosthetic valve endocarditis. PMID:26500737

  2. Classification of prosthetic heart valve sounds. A parametric approach

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Jones, H.E. |

    1995-06-01

    People with heart problems have had their lives extended considerably with the development of the prosthetic heart valve. Great strides have been made in the development of the valves through the use of improved materials as well as efficient mechanical designs. However, since the valves operate continuously over a long period, structural failures can occur-even though they are relatively uncommon. Here the development of techniques to classify the valve either as having intact struts or as having a separated strut, commonly called single leg separation, is discussed. In this paper the signal processing techniques employed to extract the required signals/parameters are briefly reviewed and then it is shown how they can be used to simulate a synthetic heart valve database for eventual Monte Carlo testing. Next, the optimal classifier is developed under assumed conditions and its performance is compared to that of an adpative-type classifier implemented with a probabilistic neural network. Finally, the adaptive classifier is applied to a data set and its performance is analyzed. Based on synthetic data it is shown that excellent performance of the classifiers can be achieved implying a potentially robust solution to this classification problem. 21 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Pregnancy outcome in women with prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Hall, D R; Olivier, J; Rossouw, G J; Grové, D; Doubell, A F

    2001-03-01

    The pregnancy outcome of 59 pregnancies in 38 women with prosthetic heart valves, managed at a tertiary referral centre from 1989-98 were reviewed. Ten women underwent valve replacement during pregnancy. The main outcome measures were major maternal complications and perinatal outcome. The maternal mortality rate for pregnancies following valve replacement surgery was 6.1%, with a 21% pregnancy loss before viability and a perinatal loss of 8%. Major morbidity in this group was as follows: haemorrhage 29.8%, cardiac failure 12.8%, thromboembolism 8.5%, infective endocarditis 6.4% and valve thrombosis 4.3%. No maternal mortality occurred among those who underwent valve replacement during pregnancy but their perinatal loss was 25%. We conclude that although maternal mortality and morbidity rates in women with prosthetic heart valves who became pregnant were high, the perinatal outcome was good except for women who underwent valve replacement during pregnancy who experienced a high perinatal loss rate. PMID:12521884

  4. Anticoagulation during pregnancy in patients with a prosthetic heart valve.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Jose M; Narayan, Rajeev L; Vaishnava, Prashant; Fuster, Valentin

    2012-07-01

    Effective anticoagulation is mandatory for pregnant women with mechanical heart valves. Oral anticoagulants offer the best maternal protection against thrombosis, but their use might be associated with an appreciable risk of fetal malformations and pregnancy loss. By contrast, heparin derivatives are associated with a reduced risk of fetal damage, but an increased risk of valve thrombosis in the mother, even with appropriate dose adjustment and monitoring of therapeutic efficacy. Given the varying risks of available anticoagulation strategies, and the paucity of data to inform the optimal approach, no single accepted treatment option exists for pregnant women with mechanical prosthetic valves. Although low-molecular-weight heparin is considered more efficacious than unfractionated heparin, treatment failures, even at therapeutic levels of factor Xa inhibition, have been reported. The risk of warfarin-related embryopathy might be overstated, particularly at doses ≤ 5 mg daily. We advocate an individualized anticoagulation strategy that takes into account the patient's preferences, calls for the use of vitamin K antagonists throughout pregnancy (substituted with a heparin derivative only close to term) for those patients at the greatest risk of thromboembolism, and relies on close multidisciplinary collaboration between the cardiac and obstetric care teams. PMID:22584941

  5. Prosthetic heart valve obstruction: thrombolysis or surgical treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Lampropoulos, Konstantinos; Barbetseas, John

    2012-01-01

    Prosthetic valve thrombosis is a potentially life-threatening complication associated with high morbidity and mortality. Transthorasic and transoesophageal echocardiography play an important role to the diagnosis and provides incremental information about the optimal treatment strategy, while fluoroscopy and cardiac computed tomography may be of added value. Guidelines differ on whether surgical treatment or fibrinolysis should be the treatment of choice for the management of left-sided prosthetic valve thrombosis and these uncertainties underline the need for further prospective randomized controlled trials. Thrombus size, New York Heart Association functional class of the patient, the possible contraindications, the availability of each therapeutic option and the clinician’s experience are important determinants for the management of prosthetic valve thrombosis. PMID:24062899

  6. Effect of the sinus of valsalva on the closing motion of bileaflet prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Y; Kikuta, Y; Shimooka, T; Mitamura, Y; Yuhta, T; Dohi, T

    2000-04-01

    Conventional bileaflet prosthetic mechanical heart valves close passively with backflow. Naturally, the valve has problems associated with closure, such as backflow, water hammer effect, and fracture of the leaflet. On the other hand, in the case of the natural aortic valve, the vortex flow in the sinus of Valsalva pushes the leaflet to close, and the valve starts the closing motion earlier than the prosthetic valve as the forward flow decelerates. This closing mechanism is thought to decrease backflow at valve closure. In this study, we propose a new bileaflet mechanical valve resembling a drawbridge in shape, and the prototype valve was designed so that the leaflet closes with the help of the vortex flow in the sinus. The test valve was made of aluminum alloy, and its closing motion was compared to that of the CarboMedics (CM) valve. Both valves were driven by a computer controlled hydraulic mock circulator and were photographed at 648 frames/s by a high speed charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Each frame of the valve motion image was analyzed with a personal computer, and the opening angles were measured. The flow rate was set as 5.0 L/min. The system was pulsed with 70 bpm, and the systolic/diastolic ratio was 0.3. Glycerin water was used as the circulation fluid at room temperature, and polystyrene particles were used to visualize the streamline. The model of the sinus of Valsalva was made of transparent silicone rubber. As a result, high speed video analysis showed that the test valve started the closing motion 41 ms earlier than the CM valve, and streamline analysis showed that the test valve had a closing mechanism similar to the natural one with the effect of vortex flow. The structure of the test valve was thought to be effective for soft closure and could solve problems associated with closure. PMID:10816206

  7. Lactococcus garvieae Endocarditis on a Prosthetic Biological Aortic Valve.

    PubMed

    Tsur, A; Slutzki, T; Flusser, D

    2015-09-01

    Lactococcus garvieae (LG) endocarditis is a rare disease in humans. There are only about 16 reported cases in the world. We report a 76-year-old male patient with LG endocarditis. In depth interview with the patient revealed that 2 weeks prior to admission, he had eaten sushi containing raw fish. Unlike many of the other infections reported, which were on a native mitral valve, our patient's vegetation was on a prosthetic aortic valve. PMID:25295408

  8. Mechanical versus biological aortic valve replacement strategies.

    PubMed

    Reineke, D; Gisler, F; Englberger, L; Carrel, T

    2016-04-01

    Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the most frequently performed procedure in valve surgery. The controversy about the optimal choice of the prosthetic valve is as old as the technique itself. Currently there is no perfect valve substitute available. The main challenge is to choose between mechanical and biological prosthetic valves. Biological valves include pericardial (bovine, porcine or equine) and native porcine bioprostheses designed in stented, stentless and sutureless versions. Homografts and pulmonary autografts are reserved for special indications and will not be discussed in detail in this review. We will focus on the decision making between artificial biological and mechanical prostheses, respectively. The first part of this article reviews guideline recommendations concerning the choice of aortic prostheses in different clinical situations while the second part is focused on novel strategies in the treatment of patients with aortic valve pathology. PMID:26678683

  9. Heart valve surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Valve replacement; Valve repair; Heart valve prosthesis; Mechanical valves, Prosthetic valves ... place. The main types of new valves are: Mechanical -- made of man-made materials, such as metal ( ...

  10. Reynolds shear stress for textile prosthetic heart valves in relation to fabric design.

    PubMed

    Bark, David L; Yousefi, Atieh; Forleo, Marcio; Vaesken, Antoine; Heim, Frederic; Dasi, Lakshmi P

    2016-07-01

    The most widely implanted prosthetic heart valves are either mechanical or bioprosthetic. While the former suffers from thrombotic risks, the latter suffers from a lack of durability. Textile valves, alternatively, can be designed with durability and to exhibit hemodynamics similar to the native valve, lowering the risk for thrombosis. Deviations from native valve hemodynamics can result in an increased Reynolds Shear Stress (RSS), which has the potential to instigate hemolysis or shear-induced thrombosis. This study is aimed at characterizing flow in multiple textile valve designs with an aim of developing a low profile valve. Valves were created using a shaping process based on heating a textile membrane and placed within a left heart simulator. Turbulence and bulk hemodynamics were assessed through particle imaging velocimetry, along with flow and pressure measurements. Overall, RSS was reduced for low profile valves relative to high profile valves, but was otherwise similar among low profile valves involving different fabric designs. However, leakage was found in 3 of the 4 low profile valve designs driving the fabric design for low profile valves. Through textile design, low profile valves can be created with favorable hemodynamics. PMID:26919564

  11. Huge Left Atrium Accompanied by Normally Functioning Prosthetic Valve.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun

    2015-01-01

    Giant left atria are defined as those measuring larger than 8 cm and are typically found in patients who have rheumatic mitral valve disease with severe regurgitation. Enlargement of the left atrium may create compression of the surrounding structures such as the esophagus, pulmonary veins, respiratory tract, lung, inferior vena cava, recurrent laryngeal nerve, and thoracic vertebrae and lead to dysphagia, respiratory dysfunction, peripheral edema, hoarse voice, or back pain. However, a huge left atrium is usually associated with rheumatic mitral valve disease but is very rare in a normally functioning prosthetic mitral valve, as was the case in our patient. A 46-year-old woman with a past medical history of mitral valve replacement and chronic atrial fibrillation was admitted to our hospital with a chief complaint of cough and shortness of breath, worsened in the last month. Physical examination showed elevated jugular venous pressure, respiratory distress, cardiac cachexia, heart failure, hepatomegaly, and severe edema in the legs. Chest radiography revealed an inconceivably huge cardiac sell-out. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated a huge left atrium, associated with thrombosis, and normal function of the prosthetic mitral valve. Cardiac surgery with left atrial exploration for the extraction of the huge thrombosis and De Vega annuloplasty for tricuspid regurgitation were carried out. The postoperative course was eventful due to right ventricular failure and low cardiac output syndrome; and after two days, the patient expired with multiple organ failure. Thorough literature review showed that our case was the largest left atrium (20 × 22 cm) reported thus far in adults with a normal prosthetic mitral valve function. PMID:26157465

  12. Contemporary management of prosthetic valve endocarditis: principals and future outlook.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Cormac T; Kiernan, Thomas J

    2015-05-01

    Infective endocarditis involving prosthetic valves accounts for 20% of all endocarditis cases. Rising in prevalence due to increasing placement of valvular prostheses, prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is more difficult to diagnose by conventional methods, associated with more invasive infection and increased mortality. This report explores the existing literature in identifying a direct approach to the management of PVE; such as adjuncts to establishing a diagnosis (for instance positron emission tomography/computed tomography and radiolabeled leukocyte scintigraphy), the trends in specific pathogens associated with PVE and the recommended antimicrobials for each. The patterns of disease requiring surgical intervention are also highlighted and explored. In addition, a 5-year outlook offers consolidated knowledge on epidemiological trends of both culprit organisms and population subgroups suffering (and projected to suffer) from PVE. PMID:25865118

  13. Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis and Bloodstream Infection Due to Mycobacterium chimaera

    PubMed Central

    Achermann, Yvonne; Rössle, Matthias; Hoffmann, Matthias; Deggim, Vanessa; Kuster, Stefan; Zimmermann, Dieter R.; Hombach, Michael; Hasse, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) due to fast-growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been reported anecdotally. Reports of PVE with slowly growing NTM, however, are lacking. We present here one case of PVE and one case of bloodstream infection caused by Mycobacterium chimaera. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR indicated a relatedness of the two M. chimaera strains. Both patients had heart surgery 2 years apart from each other. A nosocomial link was not detected. PMID:23536407

  14. Curved butterfly bileaflet prosthetic cardiac valve

    DOEpatents

    McQueen, David M.; Peskin, Charles S.

    1991-06-25

    An annular valve body having a central passageway for the flow of blood therethrough with two curved leaflets each of which is pivotally supported on an accentric positioned axis in the central passageway for moving between a closed position and an open position. The leaflets are curved in a plane normal to the eccentric axis and positioned with the convex side of the leaflets facing each other when the leaflets are in the open position. Various parameters such as the curvature of the leaflets, the location of the eccentric axis, and the maximum opening angle of the leaflets are optimized according to the following performance criteria: maximize the minimum peak velocity through the valve, maximize the net stroke volume, and minimize the mean forward pressure difference, thereby reducing thrombosis and improving the hemodynamic performance.

  15. Tomographic PIV behind a prosthetic heart valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasler, D.; Landolt, A.; Obrist, D.

    2016-05-01

    The instantaneous three-dimensional velocity field past a bioprosthetic heart valve was measured using tomographic particle image velocimetry. Two digital cameras were used together with a mirror setup to record PIV images from four different angles. Measurements were conducted in a transparent silicone phantom with a simplified geometry of the aortic root. The refraction indices of the silicone phantom and the working fluid were matched to minimize optical distortion from the flow field to the cameras. The silicone phantom of the aorta was integrated in a flow loop driven by a piston pump. Measurements were conducted for steady and pulsatile flow conditions. Results of the instantaneous, ensemble and phase-averaged flow field are presented. The three-dimensional velocity field reveals a flow topology, which can be related to features of the aortic valve prosthesis.

  16. Curved butterfly bileaflet prosthetic cardiac valve

    SciTech Connect

    McQueen, D.M.; Peskin, C.S.

    1991-06-25

    An annular valve body having a central passageway for the flow of blood with two curved leaflets is described. Each of the leaflets is pivotally supported on an accentric positioned axis in the central passageway for moving between a closed position and an open position. The leaflets are curved in a plane normal to the eccentric axis and positioned with the convex side of the leaflets facing each other when the leaflets are in the open position. Various parameters such as the curvature of the leaflets, the location of the eccentric axis, and the maximum opening angle of the leaflets are optimized according to the following performance criteria: maximize the minimum peak velocity through the valve, maximize the net stroke volume, and minimize the mean forward pressure difference, thereby reducing thrombosis and improving the hemodynamic performance. 26 figures.

  17. Nuclear Medicine in Diagnosis of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Musso, Maria; Petrosillo, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades cardiovascular disease management has been substantially improved by the increasing introduction of medical devices as prosthetic valves. The yearly rate of infective endocarditis (IE) in patient with a prosthetic valve is approximately 3 cases per 1,000 patients. The fatality rate of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) remains stable over the years, in part due to the aging of the population. The diagnostic value of echocardiography in diagnosis is operator-dependent and its sensitivity can decrease in presence of intracardiac devices and valvular prosthesis. The modified Duke criteria are considered the gold standard for diagnosing IE; their sensibility is 80%, but in clinical practice their diagnostic accuracy in PVE is lower, resulting inconclusively in nearly 30% of cases. In the last years, these new imaging modalities have gained an increasing attention because they make it possible to diagnose an IE earlier than the structural alterations occurring. Several studies have been conducted in order to assess the diagnostic accuracy of various nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis of PVE. We performed a review of the literature to assess the available evidence on the role of nuclear medicine techniques in the diagnosis of PVE. PMID:25695043

  18. Brown-Pigmented Mycobacterium mageritense as a Cause of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis and Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    McMullen, Allison R.; Mattar, Caline; Kirmani, Nigar

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium spp. are a rare cause of endocarditis. Herein, we describe a case of Mycobacterium mageritense prosthetic valve endocarditis. This organism produced an unusual brown pigment on solid media. Cultures of valve tissue for acid-fast bacilli might be considered in some cases of apparently culture-negative prosthetic valve endocarditis. PMID:26063854

  19. Polymeric trileaflet prosthetic heart valves: evolution and path to clinical reality

    PubMed Central

    Claiborne, Thomas E; Slepian, Marvin J; Hossainy, Syed; Bluestein, Danny

    2013-01-01

    Present prosthetic heart valves, while hemodynamically effective, remain limited by progressive structural deterioration of tissue valves or the burden of chronic anticoagulation for mechanical valves. An idealized valve prosthesis would eliminate these limitations. Polymeric heart valves (PHVs), fabricated from advanced polymeric materials, offer the potential of durability and hemocompatibility. Unfortunately, the clinical realization of PHVs to date has been hampered by findings of in vivo calcification, degradation and thrombosis. Here, the authors review the evolution of PHVs, evaluate the state of the art of this technology and propose a pathway towards clinical reality. In particular, the authors discuss the development of a novel aortic PHV that may be deployed via transcatheter implantation, as well as its optimization via device thrombogenicity emulation. PMID:23249154

  20. Transcatheter, valve-in-valve transapical aortic and mitral valve implantation, in a high risk patient with aortic and mitral prosthetic valve stenoses

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Harish; DeValeria, Patrick A.; Sweeney, John P.; Mookaram, Farouk

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter valve implantation continues to grow worldwide and has been used principally for the nonsurgical management of native aortic valvular disease-as a potentially less invasive method of valve replacement in high-risk and inoperable patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Given the burden of valvular heart disease in the general population and the increasing numbers of patients who have had previous valve operations, we are now seeing a growing number of high-risk patients presenting with prosthetic valve stenosis, who are not potential surgical candidates. For this high-risk subset transcatheter valve delivery may be the only option. Here, we present an inoperable patient with severe, prosthetic valve aortic and mitral stenosis who was successfully treated with a trans catheter based approach, with a valve-in-valve implantation procedure of both aortic and mitral valves. PMID:25849702

  1. Topography of aortic heart valves. [applied to the development of a prosthetic heart valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karara, H. M.

    1974-01-01

    The cooperative effort towards the development of a tri-leaflet prosthetic heart valve is described. The photogrammetric studies were conducted on silicone rubber molds. Information on data acquisition and data reduction phases is given, and certain accuracy aspects of the project are explained. The various outputs which are discussed include digital models, profiles, and contour maps.

  2. Fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis with mycotic aneurysm: Case report.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Mariana; Almeida, Jorge; Ferraz, Rita; Santos, Lurdes; Pinho, Paulo; Casanova, Jorge

    2016-09-01

    Fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis is an extremely severe form of infective endocarditis, with poor prognosis and high mortality despite treatment. Candida albicans is the most common etiological agent for this rare but increasingly frequent condition. We present a case of fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis due to C. albicans following aortic and pulmonary valve replacement in a 38-year-old woman with a history of surgically corrected tetralogy of Fallot, prior infective endocarditis and acute renal failure with need for catheter-based hemodialysis. Antifungal therapy with liposomal amphotericin B was initiated prior to cardiac surgery, in which the bioprostheses were replaced by homografts, providing greater resistance to recurrent infection. During hospitalization, a mycotic aneurysm was diagnosed following an episode of acute arterial ischemia, requiring two vascular surgical interventions. Despite the complications, the patient's outcome was good and she was discharged on suppressive antifungal therapy with oral fluconazole for at least a year. The reported case illustrates multiple risk factors for fungal endocarditis, as well as complications and predictors of poor prognosis, demonstrating its complexity. PMID:27493128

  3. Lagrangian coherent structures and turbulence characteristics downstream of prosthetic aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Tullio, Marco D.

    2015-11-01

    The flowfield through prosthetic heart valves is investigated by means of direct numerical simulations, considering the fully coupled fluid-structure interaction problem. Two different aortic valve models are modeled: a bileaflet mechanical and a biological one. In order to reveal fluid flow structures and to better understand the transport mechanics, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) are used. LCS are distinguished material surfaces that can be identified as boundaries to regions with dynamically distinct behavior, and are revealed as hypersurfaces that locally maximize the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields. Post-processing the flow simulation data, first FTLE fields are calculated integrating dense meshes of Lagrangian particles backward in time, and then attracting LCS are extracted. A three-jet configuration is distinctive of bi-leaflet mechanical valves, with higher turbulent shear stresses immediately distal to the valve leaflets, while a jet-like flow emerges from the central orifice of bio-prosthetic valves, with high turbulent shear stresses occurring at the edge of the jet. Details of the numerical methodology along with a thorough analysis of the different flow structures developing during the cardiac cycle for the two configurations will be provided.

  4. Treatment of Prosthetic Valve Thrombosis: Current Evidence and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Biteker, Murat; Altun, Ibrahim; Basaran, Ozcan; Dogan, Volkan; Yildirim, Birdal; Ergun, Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic heart valve thrombosis (PVT) is a rare but serious complication with high morbidity and mortality. The optimal treatment of the PVT is controversial and depends on thrombus location and size, the patient’s functional class, the risk of surgery or thrombolysis, and the clinician’s experience. Although surgical therapy has been the traditional therapeutic approach, studies with low-dose and slow-infusion rates of thrombolytic agents have revealed excellent results. This article reviews the various treatment options in patient with PVT. PMID:26566406

  5. A 3D velocimetry study of the flow through prosthetic heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledesma, R.; Zenit, R.; Pulos, G.; Sanchez, E.; Juarez, A.

    2006-11-01

    Blood damage commonly appears in medical valve prothesis. It is a mayor concern for the designers and surgeons. It is well known that this damage and other complications result from the modified fluid dynamics through the replacement valve. To evaluate the performance of prosthetic heart valves, it is necessary to study the flow through them. To conduct this study , we have built a flow channel that emulates cardiac conditions and allows optical access such that a 3D-PIV velocimetry system could be used. The experiments are aimed to reconstruct the downstream structure of the flow through a mechanical and a bio-material tricuspid heart valve prothesis. Preliminary results show that the observed coherent structures can be related with haemolysis and trombosis, illnesses commonly found in valve prothesis recipients. The mean flow, the levels of strain rate and the turbulence intensity generated by the valves can also be directly related to blood damage. In general, bio-material made valves tend to reduce these complications.

  6. FFT Techniques for the Spectral Analysis of Prosthetic Heart Valve Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Durand, L.-G.; de Guise, J.; Guardo, R.

    1980-01-01

    Sounds produced by prosthetic heart valves are known to contain diagnostic information regarding the structural and functional integrity of their components. Analog techniques for processing prosthetic valve phonocardiograms have met with limited success in extracting this information, because of their poor spectral resolution and lack of versatility. Numerical methods of signal processing overcome most of these limitations, but the need for a computer to implement numerical methods raises the question of cost-effectiveness in many applications. Numerical analysis of prosthetic valve signals has therefore received very little attention outside the academic and laboratory context. Cost reductions in computer hardware arising from the use of micro-processors, make it possible to envisage dedicated clinical instruments for processing prosthetic valve sounds in view of assessing overall valve performance and detecting component degradation at an early stage. Basic spectral considerations for the design of such instruments are discusses in this paper.

  7. Prosthetic valve endocarditis due to Candida tropicalis complicated by multiple pseudoaneurysms.

    PubMed

    Zedtwitz-Liebenstein, K; Gabriel, H; Willinger, B; Ehringer, H; Polterauer, P; Graninger, W

    2001-01-01

    Candida endocarditis is an unusual but severe complication caused by Candida albicans or other fungal species. We describe a case of prosthetic valve endocarditis due to Candida tropicalis, complicated by multiple pseudoaneurysms. PMID:11440392

  8. The effect of warfarin dosage on maternal and fetal outcomes in pregnant women with prosthetic heart valves

    PubMed Central

    Soma-Pillay, P; Nene, Z; Mathivha, T M; Macdonald, A P

    2011-01-01

    There are several challenges in the management of pregnant women with mechanical heart valves. Pregnancy increases the risk of thromboembolism and there is currently no consensus on the safest anticoagulation method during pregnancy. The objective of the study was to determine the correlation between the warfarin dose and pregnancy outcome in pregnant women with prosthetic heart valves. Warfarin in pregnancy was associated with a low risk of valve thrombosis or maternal death. The risk for fetal abnormalities was not related to the maternal warfarin dosage. However, the risk for stillbirth was significantly increased with increasing doses of warfarin.

  9. Surgical treatment of infective endocarditis with special reference to prosthetic valve endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Westaby, S; Oakley, C; Sapsford, R N; Bentall, H H

    1983-01-01

    Patients with native valve endocarditis treated surgically between 1968 and 1978 (n = 15) and all patients presenting with prosthetic valve endocarditis during this period (n = 21) were followed up for at least four years. Five of the patients with native valve endocarditis required urgent early surgical intervention, of whom two died. The remaining 10 underwent valve replacement after a course of antibiotic treatment: all survived, though one required further valve replacement. The 21 patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis suffered 25 attacks. Nine were cured by medical treatment alone; two died before surgical intervention was possible; 11 required valve replacement, of whom three died; and two required valve replacement after a course of antibiotic treatment. The incidence of early prosthetic valve endocarditis--that occurring within two months of operation--was 0.67%, but that of late prosthetic valve endocarditis could not be determined. Medical treatment when started early should cure endocarditis in most patients, but vigilance should be maintained for the appearance of indications for surgery. When such indications exist surgery should not be delayed. PMID:6409290

  10. Towards Optimization of a Novel Trileaflet Polymeric Prosthetic Heart Valve Via Device Thrombogenicity Emulation (DTE)

    PubMed Central

    Claiborne, Thomas E.; Xenos, Michalis; Sheriff, Jawaad; Chiu, Wei-Che; Soares, Joao; Alemu, Yared; Gupta, Shikha; Judex, Stefan; Slepian, Marvin J.; Bluestein, Danny

    2013-01-01

    Aortic stenosis the is most prevalent and life threatening form of valvular heart disease. It is primarily treated via open-heart surgical valve replacement with either a tissue or mechanical prosthetic heart valve (PHV), each prone to degradation and thrombosis, respectively. Polymeric PHVs may be optimized to eliminate these complications, and they may be more suitable for the new transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedure and in devices like the Total Artificial Heart. However, the development of polymer PHVs has been hampered by persistent in vivo calcification, degradation, and thrombosis. To address these issues, we have developed a novel surgically implantable polymer PHV comprised of a new thermoset polyolefin called xSIBS, in which key parameters were optimized for superior functionality via our Device Thrombogenicity Emulation (DTE) methodology. In this parametric study, we compared our homogeneous optimized polymer PHV to a prior composite polymer PHV and to a benchmark tissue valve. Our results show significantly improved hemodynamics and reduced thrombogenicity in the optimized polymer PHV compared to the other valves. These results indicate that our new design may not require anticoagulants and may be more durable than its predecessor, and validates the improvement, towards optimization, of this novel polymeric PHV design. PMID:23644615

  11. Effect of the prosthetic mitral valve on vortex dynamics and turbulence of the left ventricular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querzoli, G.; Fortini, S.; Cenedese, A.

    2010-04-01

    Mechanical heart valves implanted in mitral position have a great effect on the ventricular flow. Changes include alteration of the dynamics of the vortical structures generated during the diastole and the onset of turbulence, possibly affecting the efficiency of the heart pump or causing blood cell damage. Modifications to the hemodynamics in the left ventricle, when the inflow through the mitral orifice is altered, were investigated in vitro using a silicone rubber, flexible ventricle model. Velocity fields were measured in space and time by means of an image analysis technique: feature tracking. Three series of experiments were performed: one with a top hat inflow velocity profile (schematically resembling physiological conditions), and two with mechanical prosthetic valves of different design, mounted in mitral position—one monoleaflet and the other bileaflet. In each series of runs, two different cardiac outputs have been examined by changing the stroke volume. The flow was investigated in terms of phase averaged velocity field and second order moments of turbulent fluctuations. Results show that the modifications in the transmitral flow change deeply the interaction between the coherent structures generated during the first phase of the diastole and the incoming jet during the second diastolic phase. Top hat inflow gives the coherent structures which are optimal, among the compared cases, for the systolic function. The flow generated by the bileaflet valve preserves most of the beneficial features of the top hat inflow, whereas the monoleaflet valve generates a strong jet which discourages the permanence of large coherent structures at the end of the diastole. Moreover, the average shear rate magnitudes induced by the smoother flow pattern of the case of top hat inflow are nearly halved in comparison with the values measured with the mechanical valves. Finally, analysis of the turbulence statistics shows that the monoleaflet valves yield higher turbulence

  12. Antithrombotic therapies in patients with prosthetic heart valves: guidelines translated for the clinician

    PubMed Central

    Leiria, Tiago L. L.; Lopes, Renato D.; Williams, Judson B.; Katz, Jason N.; Kalil, Renato A. K.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with prosthetic heart valves require chronic oral anticoagulation. In this clinical scenario, physicians must be mindful of the thromboembolic and bleeding risks related to chronic anticoagulant therapy. Currently, only vitamin K antagonists are approved for this indication. This paper reviews the main heart valve guidelines focusing on the use of oral anticoagulation in these patients. PMID:21327503

  13. Fibrinolytic Treatment after Transient Ischaemic Attack Caused by Prosthetic Mitral Valve Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Neuß, Michael; Tambor, Grit; Hölschermann, Frank; Butter, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Prosthetic valve thrombosis is one of the most severe complications after surgical valve replacement. There are many possible presentations: from asymptomatic to life-threatening complications. We report on a 61-year-old female patient with prosthetic replacement of the aortic and mitral valve in the in-house department of cardiac surgery 3 months ago. The patient was suffering from aphasia during 5 minutes in domesticity. After her presentation in the emergency room, the echocardiographic examination revealed a thrombotic formation of the prosthetic mitral valve. At presentation, the anticoagulation was outside the effective range (INR: 1.7). A successful thrombolytic therapy with the plasminogen activator urokinase was begun with complete resolution of the thrombus. PMID:27313908

  14. The Impact of Sinus in the Flow Dynamics around Prosthetic Venous Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Wei-Hsin; Chen, Henry Y.; Berwick, Zachary; Krieger, Joshua; Chambers, Sean; Dabiri, Dana; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2013-11-01

    The valves in the venous system are surrounded by a thinner but expandable vein section that forms a pocket region known as the sinus. The exact function of the sinus pocket for the venous valves is not fully understood. This is especially an issue for the bioprostheticvalve, since most of the prosthetic valves do not have a sinus pocket. To determine the impact of the sinus pocket on the flow dynamics to a prosthetic valve, an in-vitro experiment was setup at normal physiological flow conditions to simulate the flow inside a venous system. Two different valve designs were tested in glass tubes simulating the vein vessel with and without the sinus pocket profile using 2-D particle image velocimetry (PIV). Velocity measurements were made, and vorticity and flow shear were calculated. The results show that vortex structures near the valve leaflet tip were preserved better with the sinus present. The jet width at valve exit was found to be narrower with sinus than without sinus, and the effect was more significant with longer leaflet length. The results suggest that the sinus pocket alters the flow around the valve and functions as a flow regulator. For prosthetic valve without sinus, a shorter leaflet would provide similar effect of sinus and thus is more preferable.

  15. Fibrinolytic treatment of thrombus on prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed Central

    Witchitz, S; Veyrat, C; Moisson, P; Scheinman, N; Rozenstajn, L

    1980-01-01

    Fibrinolytic agents were administered for 13 episodes of thrombus formation on mitral or aortic valvar prostheses in 12 patients. The most common presenting features were pulmonary oedema (six cases) or arterial emboli (six cases). The diagnosis of thrombus formation was made by phonocardiography on the following criteria: (a) modifications of the prosthetic sounds (12 cases), (b) appearance of a valvar obstructive syndrome (10 cases). The treatment consisted of streptokinase (100 000 units/h after a loading dose, seven cases) or urokinase using either low doses (75 000 or 112 500 units/h, three cases) or moderate doses (150 000 units/h, three cases) for one to four days. Immediate complete regression of clinical and phonocardiographic anomalies was seen in eight cases. Incomplete improvement was seen in two patients, leading to operation: this was unsuccessful in one patient who had surgery on the third day, and was successful in the other on the 75th day. There were three failures leading to successful reoperative procedures in two patients and to an early death in the third patient suffering from acute myocardial infarction. One non-fatal haemopericardium was observed in a patient treated with streptokinase. No important side effect was noted during delivery in a pregnant woman. During subsequent follow-up, a recurrent episode of thrombus formation was observed in one patient, treated by fibrinolytic therapy with success. One patient had an operation for a valve replacement six months after fibrinolytic treatment because of non-thrombotic valvar dysfunction; the outcome was fatal. Six patients are alive and in good condition, with a follow-up of six months to five years. Images PMID:7437196

  16. Mechanical behavior of provisional implant prosthetic abutments

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Pastor, Blanca; Roig-Vanaclocha, Ana; Román-Rodriguez, Juan-Luis; Fons-Font, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Implant-supported prostheses have to overcome a major difficulty presented by the morphology and esthetics of peri-implant tissues in the anterior sector. Diverse therapeutic techniques are used for managing the mucosa adjacent to the implant and the most noteworthy is immediate/deferred fixed provisionalization. Objectives: In vitro testing of strength and deformation of implant prosthetic abutments made from different materials (Titanium/PEEK/methacrylate). Material and Methods: Forty Sweden&Martina® implant prosthetic abutments (n=40) were divided into five groups: Group MP: methacrylate provisional abutments with machined titanium base; Group PP: Poly ether ether ketone (PEEK) provisional abutments; Group TP: titanium provisional abutments; Group TAD: titanium anti-rotational definitive abutments; Group TRD: titanium rotational definitive abutments. Their mechanical behavior under static loading was analyzed. Samples were examined under a microscope to determine the type of fracture produced. Results and Conclusions: Definitive anti-rotational titanium abutments and definitive rotational titanium abutments achieved the best mean compression strength, while PEEK resin provisional abutments obtained the lowest. The group that showed the greatest elastic deformation was the group of titanium provisional abutments. Key words:Immediate loading, immediate provisionalization, implant prosthetic abutment, definitive implant prosthetic abutment. PMID:25129253

  17. Mechanical heart valve cavitation in patients with bileaflet valves.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Peter; Andersen, Tina S; Hasenkam, J Michael; Nygaard, Hans; Paulsen, Peter K

    2014-01-01

    Today, the quality of mechanical heart valves is quite high, and implantation has become a routine clinical procedure with a low operative mortality (< 5%). However, patients still face the risks of blood cell damage, thromboembolic events, and material failure of the prosthetic device. One mechanism found to be a possible contributor to these adverse effects is cavitation. In vitro, cavitation has been directly demonstrated by visualization and indirectly in vivo by registering of high frequency pressure fluctuations (HFPF). Tilting disc valves are thought of having higher cavitation potential than bileaflet valves due to higher closing velocities. However, the thromboembolic potential seems to be the same. Further studies are therefore needed to investigate the cavitation potential of bileaflet valves in vivo. The post processing of HFPF have shown difficulties when applied on bileaflet vavles due to asynchronous closure of the two leaflets. The aim of this study was therefore to isolate the pressure signature from each leaflet closure and perform cavitation analyses on each component. Six patients were included in the study (St. Jude Medical (n=3) and CarboMedics (n=3); all aortic bileaflet mechanical heart valves). HFPFs were recorded intraoperatively through a hydrophone at the aortic root. The pressure signature relating to the first and second leaflet closure was isolated and cavitation parameters were calculated (RMS after 50 kHz highpass filtering and signal energy). Data were averaged over 30 heart cycles. For all patients both the RMS value and signal energy of the second leaflet closure were higher than for the first leaflet closure. This indicates that the second leaflet closure is most prone to cause cavitation. Therefore, quantifying cavitation based on the HFPF related to the second leaflet closure may suggest that the cavitation potential for bileaflet valves in vivo may be higher than previous studies have suggested. PMID:25571278

  18. Dual Prosthetic Heart Valve Presented with Chest Pain: A Case Report of Coronary Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Siwamogsatham, Sarawut

    2015-01-01

    Coronary embolism from a prosthetic heart valve is a rare but remarkable cause of acute coronary syndrome. There is no definite management of an entity like this. Here we report a case of 54-year-old male with a history of rheumatic heart disease with dual prosthetic heart valve and atrial fibrillation who developed chest pain from acute myocardial infarction. The laboratory values showed inadequate anticoagulation. Cardiac catheterization and thrombectomy with the aspiration catheter were chosen to be the treatment for this patient, and it showed satisfactory outcome. PMID:25785203

  19. Mechanical valve obstruction: Review of diagnostic and treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Salamon, Jason; Munoz-Mendoza, Jerson; Liebelt, Jared J; Taub, Cynthia C

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic valve obstruction (PVO) is a rare but feared complication of mechanical valve replacement. Diagnostic evaluation should focus on differentiating prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT) from pannus formation, as their treatment options differ. History of sub-optimal anti-coagulation and post-op time course to development of PVO are useful clinical characteristics in differentiating thrombus from pannus formation. Treatment of PVT is influenced by the patient’s symptoms, valve location, degree of obstruction and thrombus size and may include thrombolysis or surgical intervention. Alternatively, pannus formation requires surgical intervention. The purpose of this article is to review the pathophysiology, epidemiology, diagnostic approach and treatment options for aortic and mitral valve PVO. PMID:26730292

  20. Systemic thrombolysis: cure for prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis in the comorbid, non-surgical candidate

    PubMed Central

    Beckord, Brian; Berkowitz, Robert; Espinoza, Cholene; Anand, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Severe haemolytic anaemia is a rare complication of prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT). Emergent surgical replacement of the affected valve is normally the treatment of choice unless contraindicated, such as in high surgical risk patients. Systemic thrombolysis is the alternative to surgical valve replacement. The purpose of this report is to highlight the unique case of an elderly man with New York Heart Association class IV heart failure, history of extensive cardiopulmonary surgeries and haemorrhagic stroke, who presented with severe haemolytic anaemia secondary to prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis. After weighing the risks and benefits, our decision was to use systemic thrombolytic therapy, even in light of the patient's previous intracranial haemorrhage. Pretreatment and post-treatment Doppler echocardiography showed markedly reduced regurgitant jetting that ultimately resolved completely, thereby eliminating the underlying cause of haemolysis and achieving symptom resolution. PMID:24879723

  1. [Aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis with aorto-left atrium fistula; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Junji; Naraoka, Shuichi; Maeda, Toshiyuki; Inoue, Satomi

    2013-12-01

    An 83-year-old man had undergone aortic valve replacement (AVR)[CEP Magna 21 mm] and coronary aortic bypass grafting (CABG)[left internal thoracic artery (LITA)-left anterier descending artery( LAD)] 2 years ago in our hospital. He was admitted for fever of unknown origin and developed a stroke to another hospital. The echocardiography and computerized tomography showed an abscessaround the aortic prosthetic valve. Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) was diagnosed, and he was transferred to our hospital for surgical treatment. Three days after admission, acute heart failure developed that led to an emergency operation. When the ascending aorta was dissected, an aorto-left atrium fistula and vegetation were recognized. Aortic valve replacement and patch plasty of the aorto-left atrium fistula were performed successfully. This case was diagnosed as PVE with aorto-left atrium fistula, which is quite a rare complication of PVE. PMID:24322361

  2. Modeling prosthetic heart valves for numerical analysis of blood flow in the heart

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, C.S.; McQueen, D.M.

    1980-08-01

    This paper extends our previous work on numerical analysis of blood flow in the heart. In that work the boundary forces were evaluated by solving a fixed-point problem, which we now reformulate as a problem in optimization. This optimization problem, which involves the energy function from which the boundary forces are derived, is solved by Murray's modification of Newton's method. The energy function turns out to be an extremely useful tool in modeling prosthetic heart valves. To enforce a constraint on the valve, we use an energy function which is zero when the constraint is satisfied and positive other wise. The energy function must be invariant under translation and rotation so that convervation of momentum and angular momentum will be satisfied. We use this technique to construct computer models of several prosthetic valves, and we study the flow patterns of these valves in our computer test chamber.

  3. Decision-making in aortic valve replacement: bileaflet mechanical valves versus stented bioprostheses

    PubMed Central

    Takkenberg, J.J.M.; Puvimanasinghe, J.P.A.; van Herwerden, L.A.; Eijkemans, M.J.C.; Steyerberg, E.W.; Habbema, J.D.F.; Bogers, A.J.J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Background Valve prosthesis selection for patients who require aortic valve replacement is dependent on several interrelated factors. Often, more than one valve type seems suitable for the individual patient and selection of a valve type may be difficult. Methods The application of an evidence-based microsimulation model as an objective tool to support the choice between a bileaflet mechanical prosthesis and a stented bioprosthesis in the individual patient is described. In addition, a pilot study investigating the effect of knowledge gained by this microsimulation model on prosthetic valve choice by cardiothoracic surgeons and cardiologists is presented for two hypothetical patients. Results After implantation of a mechanical valve, bleeding and thromboembolism are common, especially in the elderly. After implantation of a bioprosthesis, reoperation for structural failure is the most important valve-related complication, especially in younger patients. Life expectancy after aortic valve replacement is markedly reduced compared with the general Dutch age-matched population, regardless of the type of valve implanted. In the pilot study knowledge gained by the microsimulation model caused a shift in the preference towards a mechanical prosthesis in clinical experts. Conclusion Microsimulation incorporating current epidemiological data provides an objective tool to estimate prognosis for individual patients after aortic valve replacement with different valve prostheses. It may develop towards a useful clinical decision support system for valve prosthesis selection. ImagesFigure 6 PMID:25696138

  4. Functional annulus remodelling using a prosthetic ring in tricuspid aortic valve repair: mid-term results†

    PubMed Central

    Fattouch, Khalil; Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Murana, Giacomo; Nasso, Giuseppe; Guccione, Francesco; Dioguardi, Pietro; Salardino, Massimo; Bianco, Giuseppe; Speziale, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The functional aortic valve annulus (FAVA) is a complex unit with proximal (aorto-ventricular junction) and distal (sinotubular junction) components. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of the total FAVA remodelling, using a prosthetic ring, on mid-term clinical and echocardiographic results after aortic valve repair. METHODS Since February 2003, 250 patients with tricuspid aortic valve insufficiency (AI) underwent aortic valve repair. FAVA dilatation was treated by prosthetic ring in 52 patients, by isolated subcommissural plasty in 62, by subcommissural plasty plus ascending aortic replacement in 57 and by David's reimplantation procedure in 79. Survival rate and freedom from recurrent AI greater than or equal to moderate were evaluated by Kaplan–Meier. RESULTS Overall late survival was 90.4%. Late cardiac-related deaths occurred in 15 patients. At follow-up, 36 (16%) patients had recurrent AI greater than or equal to moderate because of cusp reprolapse and/or FAVA redilatation. Freedom from recurrent AI was significantly higher for patients who underwent David's procedure or FAVA remodelling by prosthetic ring than those who underwent isolated subcommissural plasty (P < 0.01) or subcommissural plasty plus ascending aortic replacement (P = 0.02). There was no statistical difference between David's procedure and prosthetic ring annuloplasty (P = 0.26). CONCLUSION FAVA remodelling using a prosthetic ring is a safe procedure in aortic valve repair surgery thanks to long-term annulus stabilization and it is a pliable alternative to David's procedure in selected patients. This technique may be used in all patients with slight root dilatation to avoid aggressive root reimplantation. We also recommended total FAVA annuloplasty in all patients who underwent aortic valve repair to improve long-term repair results. PMID:24065345

  5. Use of aspirin as the sole antiplatelet agent following prosthetic valve replacement in rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    John, S; Bashi, V V; John, C N; Ravikumar, E; Kumar, H P; Rao, S

    1994-01-01

    Aspirin was administered as the sole antiplatelet agent in 147 patients following valve replacement, who were at low risk for thromboembolism. Of these, 67 underwent mitral valve replacement (MVR), 61 aortic valve replacement (AVR) and 19 combined aortic and mitral valve replacement (DVR). The mean follow up period was 6.63 years (range 1-14 years). The incidence of thromboembolic episodes (TEE) in patients following MVR, AVR, and DVR was 0.41, 0.80 and nil respectively. The TEE free survival at the first year follow-up was 98.4%, 99.3% and 100% in patients following MVR, AVR and DVR respectively. Fatal intracranial haemorrhage was not encountered. Valve thrombosis in this patient population was not seen. In conclusion, aspirin as the sole antiplatelet agent appears to be safe and effective following prosthetic valve replacement in selected patients. Further studies involving larger number of patients are necessary to confirm these results. PMID:7797223

  6. [Use of sutureless prosthetic aortic valves in cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Santarpino, Giuseppe; Fischlein, Theodor

    2014-03-01

    In the last years, an increasing proportion of high-risk patients undergo surgical aortic valve replacement. In order to reduce the risk associated with cross-clamp time or cardioplegic ischemic time, sutureless aortic prostheses have been developed. These bioprosthetic valves are not hand sewn, and this technological advance translates into reduced implantation times, thus improving outcome of patients referred for aortic valve replacement. At present, three sutureless bioprostheses are available on the market: 3f Enable (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA), Perceval (Sorin Group, Saluggia, Italy) and Intuity (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, California, USA). This article provides an overview of the available literature on sutureless aortic valves with the aim to better define current role and future perspectives of sutureless aortic bioprostheses for the treatment of aortic valve stenosis. PMID:24770430

  7. Total prosthetic replacement of atrioventricular valves in the dog

    PubMed Central

    Den Otter, G.

    1968-01-01

    The free-floating cone and cage valve, described in a previous study as being successful as a substitute for the right atrioventricular valve, does not perform well when it is inserted in the mitral ostium. A tilting cone or disc was constructed and tested in a series of 15 dogs. This prosthesis gave excellent results in 12 animals. The reasons for its failure in the remaining three is discussed. The prosthesis presented has advantages over any ball and cage valve, mainly because of its smaller volume. Images PMID:5654076

  8. New electromagnetic methods for the evaluation of prosthetic heart valves (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udpa, Satish

    2002-05-01

    Prosthetic devices are being implanted at record levels as the nation "ages" and advances in prosthetic science are made. Devices that are implanted range from artificial limbs and hips to devices such as heart valves. Periodic evaluation of the state of the devices is of significant interest particularly in the case of prosthetics whose failure can be fatal. An example of such a device is the artificial heart valve. Heart valves are usually replaced when stenosis or incompetence is indicated. This article presents a selection of some new techniques that are being developed for the detection of outlet strut failures in Bjork-Shiley heart valves. Methods that show particular promise include a noninvasive electromagnetic method that relies on the excitation and measurement of the resonant vibration modes of the strut. An alternate approach involves the induction of currents in the outlet strut using a pair of external excitation coils. The field generated by the current induced in the strut perturbs the field generated by the excitation coils. The field perturbations are measured using a catheter-mounted gradiometer. Test results obtained using an experimental rig designed to demonstrate the proof-of-concept are presented.

  9. A method for real-time in vitro observation of cavitation on prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Zapanta, C M; Liszka, E G; Lamson, T C; Stinebring, D R; Deutsch, S; Geselowitz, D B; Tarbell, J M

    1994-11-01

    A method for real-time in vitro observation of cavitation on a prosthetic heart valve has been developed. Cavitation of four blood analog fluids (distilled water, aqueous glycerin, aqueous polyacrylamide, and aqueous xanthan gum) has been documented for a Medtronic/Hall prosthetic heart valve. This method employed a Penn State Electrical Ventricular Assist Device in a mock circulatory loop that was operated in a partial filling mode associated with reduced atrial filling pressure. The observations were made on a valve that was located in the mitral position, with the cavitation occurring on the inlet side after valve closure on every cycle. Stroboscopic videography was used to document the cavity life cycle. Bubble cavitation was observed on the valve occluder face. Vortex cavitation was observed at two locations in the vicinity of the valve occluder and housing. For each fluid, cavity growth and collapse occurred in less than one millisecond, which provides strong evidence that the cavitation is vaporous rather than gaseous. The cavity duration time was found to decrease with increasing atrial pressure at constant aortic pressure and beat rate. The area of cavitation was found to decrease with increasing delay time at a constant aortic pressure, atrial pressure, and beat rate. Cavitation was found to occur in each of the fluids, with the most cavitation seen in the Newtonian fluids (distilled water and aqueous glycerin). PMID:7869722

  10. Longest Event-Free Survival without Anticoagulation in a Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Salmane, Chadi; Pandya, Bhavi; Lafferty, Kristen; Patel, Nileshkumar J; McCord, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Sixty percent of the patients going for valve replacement opt for mechanical valves and the remaining 40% choose bioprosthetics. Mechanical valves are known to have a higher risk of thrombosis; this risk further varies depending on the type of valve, its position, and certain individual factors. According to current guidelines, long-term anticoagulation is indicated in patients with metallic prosthetic valve disease. We report two unique cases of patients who survived 27 and 37 years event free, respectively, after mechanical aortic valve replacement (AVR) without being on any form of anticoagulation. The latter case described the longest survival in a human with a prosthetic aortic valve without anticoagulation. A review of literature demonstrated few cases of prosthetic valves with no anticoagulation in the long term without significant embolic events reported as case reports. These cases have been summarized in this article. Some cases of long-term survival (in the absence of anticoagulation) were attributed to good luck, and others as the result of genetic variations. New mechanical prosthetic valves can be promising, such as microporus-surfaced valves that may be used without full anticoagulation. The use of dual antiplatelet agents alone can be currently recommended only when a patient cannot take oral anticoagulation after AVR, and it should be followed with measuring and monitoring of platelet reactivity. PMID:27053922

  11. Longest Event-Free Survival without Anticoagulation in a Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Salmane, Chadi; Pandya, Bhavi; Lafferty, Kristen; Patel, Nileshkumar J; McCord, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Sixty percent of the patients going for valve replacement opt for mechanical valves and the remaining 40% choose bioprosthetics. Mechanical valves are known to have a higher risk of thrombosis; this risk further varies depending on the type of valve, its position, and certain individual factors. According to current guidelines, long-term anticoagulation is indicated in patients with metallic prosthetic valve disease. We report two unique cases of patients who survived 27 and 37 years event free, respectively, after mechanical aortic valve replacement (AVR) without being on any form of anticoagulation. The latter case described the longest survival in a human with a prosthetic aortic valve without anticoagulation. A review of literature demonstrated few cases of prosthetic valves with no anticoagulation in the long term without significant embolic events reported as case reports. These cases have been summarized in this article. Some cases of long-term survival (in the absence of anticoagulation) were attributed to good luck, and others as the result of genetic variations. New mechanical prosthetic valves can be promising, such as microporus-surfaced valves that may be used without full anticoagulation. The use of dual antiplatelet agents alone can be currently recommended only when a patient cannot take oral anticoagulation after AVR, and it should be followed with measuring and monitoring of platelet reactivity. PMID:27053922

  12. Development and marketing of a prosthetic urinary control valve system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, J. B., Jr.; Rabinowitz, R.; Rogers, D. W.; Harrison, H. N.

    1983-01-01

    An implantable prosthetic for the control of urinary incontinence was developed and marketed. Three phases are presented: bench development studies, animal trials, and human clinical trials. This work was performed under the direction of a Research Team at Rochester General Hospital (RGH). Bench trials were completed on prototype hardware and provided early verification of the device's ability to withstand repeated cyclic testing. Configurational variants were evaluated and a preferred design concept was established. Silicone rubber (medical grade) was selected as the preferred material for the prosthesis.

  13. Potential Inherited Causes of Recurrent Prosthetic Mitral Valve Thrombosis in a Pregnant Patient Suffering from Recurrent Miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    Gursoy, M. Ozan; Karakoyun, Suleyman; Yesin, Mahmut; Astarcioglu, Mehmet Ali; Ozkan, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    An effective anticoagulation is critical in pregnant patients with prosthetic heart valves. Inherited disorders may interfere with the coagulation cascade and may be associated with obstetrical complications as well as with prosthetic valve-derived complications. The patient in the present case had a history of recurrent prosthetic heart valve thrombosis (PHVT) despite an effective anticoagulation. She underwent a thrombolysis with low-dose prolonged infusion of tissue-type plasminogen activator for the management of her recurrrent prosthetic valve thrombosis. The genetic testing showed homozygous mutations of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) A 1298 C and heterozygous mutations of β-fibrinogen 455 G-A. Inherited disorders such as MTHFR A 1298 C and fibrinogen 455G/A polymorphisms may be involved in the pathogenesis of recurrent PHVT and/or pregnancy loss. PMID:25089140

  14. Compact valve actuation mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brogdon, James William (Inventor); Gill, David Keith (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A valve actuation device. The device may include a free floating valve bridge movably supported within a cavity in the engine housing. The bridge may be provided with a cavity and an orifice arrangement for pumping gases entrained with lubricating fluid toward the piston stems as the bridge reciprocates back and forth. The device may also include a rocker arm that has a U-shaped cross-sectional shape for receiving at least a portion of the valve bridge, valve stem valve spring and spring retainer therein. The rocker arm may be provided with lubrication passages for directing lubrication to the point wherein it is pivotally affixed to the engine housing.

  15. Indium-111 labeled platelet survival time studies in patients with prosthetic heart valves

    SciTech Connect

    Martinovitch, U.; Carrick, P.; Lieberman, L.M.

    1985-05-01

    Platelet survival time (PST) studies are useful to demonstrate whether or not patients with prosthetic heart valves have normal or shortened PST. During treatment for recurrent TIAs the PST will signal whether the patient is returning towards a normal PST. Using Indium-111 labeled platelets (ILP) the authors studied 10 patients suffering recurrent TIAs after prosthetic valve surgery to determine whether low dose aspirin increased their PST toward normal and whether the treatment had a beneficial effect on their TIA episodes. The authors conclude that low dose aspirin therapy as studied by ILP has no beneficial effect on PST or in preventing recurrent TIA. ILP is an important technique that allows the physician to identify those patients with shortened PST and to determine response to therapy.

  16. Management of anticoagulant therapy during pregnancy in patients with prosthetic heart valves

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, B. Stephen; Braimbridge, Mark V.

    1971-01-01

    We describe two patients with Starr-Edwards mitral valve replacements who underwent pregnancy on oral anticoagulants and who were successfully delivered of live babies. The literature on pregnancy with prosthetic heart valves is reviewed. It is suggested that properly controlled oral anticoagulation should be continued until the onset of labour; the anticoagulant effect should then be reversed by an intravenous infusion of fresh-frozen plasma and the patient maintained on intravenous heparin injections six-hourly. Oral anticoagulants should be restarted immediately after delivery and the heparin withdrawn only when their effect has been re-established. PMID:5576538

  17. Mid-term results of 17-mm St. Jude Medical Regent prosthetic valves in elder patients with small aortic annuli: comparison with 19-mm bioprosthetic valves.

    PubMed

    Teshima, Hideki; Ikebuchi, Masahiko; Sano, Toshikazu; Tai, Ryuta; Horio, Naohiro; Irie, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to compare the mid-term outcomes after aortic valve replacement (AVR) between 17-mm mechanical heart valves (MV) and 19-mm bioprosthetic valves (BV) in elderly patients with small aortic annuli. Between 2000 and 2011, 127 consecutive patients (mean age 79 years; 87 % female) underwent AVR for aortic valve stenosis with a small aortic annulus. 19-mm BV (n = 67) was implanted. When the 19-mm BV did not fit the annulus, 17-mm St. Jude Medical Regent prosthetic mechanical valve (n = 60) was used instead of an aortic root-enlargement procedure. The follow-up rate was 94.0 % in the BV group, and 98.5 % in the MV group. No significant differences in survival rate and valve-related complications were found between the 2 groups. In-hospital mortality rates were 1.5 % (n = 1) in the BV group and 5.0 % (n = 3) in the MV group. Late mortality rates were 3.9 % per patient-years (p-y; n = 8) in the BV group, and 6.0 % per p-y (n = 10) in the MV group. Five-year Kaplan-Meier survival rates were 62 % in the BV group, and 72 % in the MV group (log-rank P = 0.280). Freedom from major adverse valve-related stroke and cerebral bleeding events was 92.5 and 98.5 % in the BV group, and 94.7 and 100 % in the MV group. AVR using 17-mm MV in elder patients with small aortic annuli provided equivalent mid-term clinical results to that with 19-mm BV. PMID:24878870

  18. Novel imaging strategies for the detection of prosthetic heart valve obstruction and endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Tanis, W; Budde, R P J; van der Bilt, I A C; Delemarre, B; Hoohenkerk, G; van Rooden, J-K; Scholtens, A M; Habets, J; Chamuleau, S

    2016-02-01

    Prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction remains difficult to recognise correctly by two-dimensional (2D) transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography (TTE/TEE). ECG-triggered multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT), 18-fluorine-fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission tomography including low-dose CT (FDG-PET) and three-dimensional transoesophageal echocardiography (3D-TEE) may have additional value. This paper reviews the role of these novel imaging tools in the field of PHV obstruction and endocarditis.For acquired PHV obstruction, MDCT is of additional value in mechanical PHVs to differentiate pannus from thrombus as well as to dynamically study leaflet motion and opening/closing angles. For biological PHV obstruction, additional imaging is not beneficial as it does not change patient management. When performed on top of 2D-TTE/TEE, MDCT has additional value for the detection of both vegetations and pseudoaneurysms/abscesses in PHV endocarditis. FDG-PET has no complementary value for the detection of vegetations; however, it appears more sensitive in the early detection of pseudoaneurysms/abscesses. Furthermore, FDG-PET enables the detection of metastatic and primary extra-cardiac infections. Evidence for the additional value of 3D-TEE is scarce.As clinical implications are major, clinicians should have a low threshold to perform additional MDCT in acquired mechanical PHV obstruction. For suspected PHV endocarditis, both FDG-PET and MDCT have complementary value. PMID:26744343

  19. Transvalvular mitral regurgitation following mitral valve replacement a diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, U. S. Dinesh; Nareppa, Umesh; Shetty, Shyam Prasad; Wali, Murugesh

    2015-01-01

    After mitral valve replacement with a prosthetic valve, the valve should be competent and there should not be any residual prosthetic valve regurgitation. Transvalvular residual prosthetic valve regurgitation are difficult to diagnose and quantify. we are reporting interesting TEE images as a diagnostic dilemma in a case of transvalvular mitral regurgitation following mitral valve replacement secondary to entrapment of sub-valvular apparatus in a Chitra mechanical heart valve. PMID:26440249

  20. Fatal association of mechanical valve thrombosis with dabigatran: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Atar, Shaul; Wishniak, Alice; Shturman, Alexander; Shtiwi, Sewaed; Brezins, Marc

    2013-07-01

    Several new oral anticoagulants have been approved for thromboembolism prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. However, they are not yet approved for anticoagulation use in patients with prosthetic mechanical valves, and no randomized data have been published so far on their safety of use in these patients. We present two cases of patients with prosthetic mechanical mitral valves who were switched from warfarin and acenocoumarol to dabigatran and within 1 month experienced severe valve complications resulting in death. One patient experienced stroke and later cardiogenic shock and death, and the other experienced pulmonary edema, cardiogenic shock, and subsequent death. PMID:23880682

  1. Hydrodynamic function of polyurethane prosthetic heart valves: influences of Young's modulus and leaflet thickness.

    PubMed

    Bernacca, Gillian M; O'Connor, Bernard; Williams, David F; Wheatley, David J

    2002-01-01

    The development of flexible polyurethane heart valves has been hindered by material degradation in vivo. Low modulus polyurethane leaflets are regarded as desirable to achieve good hydrodynamic function. However, low modulus materials may suffer high strain accumulation, hence poor durability. Higher modulus materials may improve durability, but may have poor hydrodynamic function. This study examines the hydrodynamic behaviour of biostable polyurethane valves, varying Young's modulus from 5 to 63.6 MPa and mean leaflet thickness from 48-238 microm. Parameters studied included mean pressure gradient, energy losses and regurgitation over 5 equivalent cardiac outputs (3.6, 4.9, 6.4, 8.0 and 9.61 min(-1)) At low cardiac output, modulus was not significantly correlated with any parameter of valve opening. At 9.61 min(-1), modulus significantly influenced mean pressure gradient (p = 0.033). Mean leaflet thickness significantly correlated with mean pressure gradient and energy losses during forward flow at all cardiac outputs (p<0.001). This study demonstrates that, over a wide range of moduli, valve hydrodynamic function is not affected significantly by the material modulus. Leaflet thickness is a highly significant factor. Higher modulus elastomers in a range up to 32.5 MPa may be useful in prosthetic heart valve leaflet manufacture, retaining good hydrodynamic function while potentially extending the lifetime of the valve. PMID:11762853

  2. Collagen tissue treated with chitosan solutions in carbonic acid for improved biological prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Gallyamov, Marat O; Chaschin, Ivan S; Khokhlova, Marina A; Grigorev, Timofey E; Bakuleva, Natalia P; Lyutova, Irina G; Kondratenko, Janna E; Badun, Gennadii A; Chernysheva, Maria G; Khokhlov, Alexei R

    2014-04-01

    Calcification of bovine pericardium dramatically shortens typical lifetimes of biological prosthetic heart valves and thus precludes their choice for younger patients. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate that the calcification is to be mitigated by means of treatment of bovine pericardium in solutions of chitosan in carbonic acid, i.e. water saturated with carbon dioxide at high pressure. This acidic aqueous fluid unusually combines antimicrobial properties with absolute biocompatibility as far as at normal pressure it decomposes spontaneously and completely into H2O and CO2. Yet, at high pressures it can protonate and dissolve chitosan materials with different degrees of acetylation (in the range of 16-33%, at least) without any further pretreatment. Even exposure of the bovine pericardium in pure carbonic acid solution without chitosan already favours certain reduction in calcification, somewhat improved mechanical properties, complete biocompatibility and evident antimicrobial activity of the treated collagen tissue. The reason may be due to high extraction ability of this peculiar compressed fluidic mixture. Moreover, exposure of the bovine pericardium in solutions of chitosan in carbonic acid introduces even better mechanical properties and highly pronounced antimicrobial activity of the modified collagen tissue against adherence and biofilm formation of relevant Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains. Yet, the most important achievement is the detected dramatic reduction in calcification for such modified collagen tissues in spite of the fact that the amount of the thus introduced chitosan is rather small (typically ca. 1wt.%), which has been reliably detected using original tritium labelling method. We believe that these improved properties are achieved due to particularly deep and uniform impregnation of the collagen matrix with chitosan from its pressurised solutions in carbonic acid. PMID:24582232

  3. FDA's requirements for in-vivo performance data for prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D M; Sapirstein, W

    1994-07-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has recently revised its "Replacement Heart Valve Guidance". That document lists the data FDA deems necessary to support the approval of new prosthetic heart valves of all designs, and which should be contained in Premarket Approval Applications for these devices. The guidance covers detailed data requirements for in vitro, animal, and clinical data. This paper is intended to briefly summarize FDA's requirements for in vivo and clinical data. The clinical study must establish that the device is both safe and effective, as compared to currently marketed replacement heart valves. It is possible to achieve this goal using hypothesis testing to compare the results of an observational study against a set of Objective Performance Criteria (OPC) which have been established by the FDA. The establishment of the OPCs was facilitated by a standardized set of definitions of complications published by the American Association of Thoracic Surgery and Society of Thoracic Surgeons (AATS/STS) in 1987/1988. Papers published in peer reviewed journals have utilized this set of definitions for data analysis, providing an ample pool of data from which to establish OPCs. The number of patients required to establish the safety and efficacy of a replacement heart valve, using this approach, is 800 valve years, 400 in the aortic and 400 in the mitral position. Advantages of this approach are reduction in the number of patients and duration of the study. PMID:7952304

  4. In-vitro Measurements of the Synoptic Velocity Generated by a Prosthetic Aortic Valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spellings, K.; Lourenco, L.

    1997-11-01

    The objective of this study is to provide a precise means of evaluating the hydrodynamic performance of prosthetic aortic and mitral valves. Particle Image Velocimetry is used to measure the in-plane velocity components in selected planes of the flow, from which the turbulent shear stress is derived. The experimental facility used in this study is made of plexiglas tube, and has a circular cross section with a diameter that matches that of the valve. To ensure optical access the test fluid used matches the refractive index of plexiglas and the test section incorporates a square housing filled with the same fluid. The fluid used in this experiment is a mixture of glycerol, water and sodium iodide. Pulsatile flow is achieved by means of a pump and monitored in real time by means of an electronic flowmeter. Dynamic similarity is ensured in these experiments as the viscosity of the fluid mixture closely approximates that of blood.

  5. Aortic root infection in a prosthetic valve demonstrated by gallium-67 citrate SPECT.

    PubMed

    Thomson, L E J; Goodman, M P; Naqvi, T Z; Feldman, R; Buchbinder, N A; Waxman, A; D'Agnolo, A

    2005-04-01

    A 70-year-old man presented with 6 weeks of worsening low back pain, fever, sweating, and weight loss with known severe lumbosacral osteoarthritis. His history included CABG in 1992, porcine aortic valve replacement, and permanent pacemaker implantation in 2002. CT of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis did not demonstrate a cause for the symptoms. Blood cultures grew penicillin-sensitive enterococcus and he was referred for evaluation of possible osteodiskitis or epidural abscess. Gallium planar imaging demonstrated increased activity in the lumbar spine, suspicious for the presence of infection, and activity was noted in the mid mediastinum as well. SPECT clearly showed increased Ga-67 activity in the region of the aortic root, suspicious for infection. A perivalvular aortic root abscess was subsequently demonstrated by transesophageal echo. This case illustrates the value of Ga-67 chest SPECT in patients with prosthetic valves for detection of endocarditis. PMID:15764887

  6. Valve surgery in a mucopolysaccharidosis type I patient: early prosthetic valve endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Rodolfo V; Alvarez, Rene J; Bermudez, Christian A

    2012-02-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) are rare genetic disorders, caused by enzymatic defects that lead to abnormal glycosaminoglycan metabolism and its accumulation. Hurler-Scheie syndrome (MPS I) is associated with a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme α-L-iduronidase. Enzymatic replacement with intravenous laronidase is a frequently utilized therapeutic option. In patients with MPS I, progressive glycosaminoglycan storage in the heart can lead to valvular abnormalities; however, few surgical heart valve interventions have been reported in MPS I patients. We present an unusual case of a double-valve replacement in an MPS I patient, complicated by early infective endocarditis requiring surgical reintervention. We also present a comprehensive literature review of valve surgery in patients with MPS I and a brief summary of the most relevant surgical considerations, including valve selection and infection prevention. PMID:21820914

  7. Prosthetic heart valves in pregnancy: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Advances in surgical technique, prosthetic heart valve design, and anticoagulation have contributed to an overall improvement in morbidity and mortality in women with heart valve prostheses as well as increased feasibility of pregnancy. Previous work investigating the pregnancies of women with prosthetic valves has been directed largely toward understanding the influence of anticoagulation regimen. There has been little investigation on maternal and infant outcomes. The objective of this systematic review will be to assess the outcomes of pregnancy in women with heart valve prostheses in contemporary populations. Methods/Design A systematic search of Medline, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and the Cochrane Library will be undertaken. Article titles and abstracts will be evaluated by two reviewers for potential relevance. Studies that include pregnancies occurring from 1995 onwards and where there are six or more pregnancies in women with heart valve prostheses included in the study population will be reviewed for potential inclusion. Primary outcomes of interest will be mortality (maternal and perinatal). Secondary outcomes will include other pregnancy outcomes. No language restrictions will be applied. Methodological quality and heterogeneity of studies will be assessed. Data extraction from identified articles will be undertaken by two independent reviewers using a uniform template. Meta-analyses will be performed to ascertain risk of adverse events and, where numbers are sufficient, by type of prosthesis and location as well as other subgroup analyses. Discussion Estimates of the risk of adverse events in recent pregnancies of women with heart valve prosthesis will provide better information for counselling and decision making. Given the improvements in prognosis of heart valve prosthesis recipients and the paucity of definitive data regarding optimal pregnancy management for these women, review of this

  8. Mechanics of the mitral valve

    PubMed Central

    Rausch, Manuel K.; Famaey, Nele; Shultz, Tyler O’Brien; Bothe, Wolfgang; Miller, D. Craig

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in mitral valve mechanics are classical indicators of valvular heart disease, such as mitral valve prolapse, mitral regurgitation, and mitral stenosis. Computational modeling is a powerful technique to quantify these alterations, to explore mitral valve physiology and pathology, and to classify the impact of novel treatment strategies. The selection of the appropriate constitutive model and the choice of its material parameters are paramount to the success of these models. However, the in vivo parameters values for these models are unknown. Here we identify the in vivo material parameters for three common hyperelastic models for mitral valve tissue, an isotropic one and two anisotropic ones, using an inverse finite element approach. We demonstrate that the two anisotropic models provide an excellent fit to the in vivo data, with local displacement errors in the sub-millimeter range. In a complementary sensitivity analysis, we show that the identified parameter values are highly sensitive to prestrain, with some parameters varying up to four orders of magnitude. For the coupled anisotropic model, the stiffness varied from 119,021kPa at 0% prestrain via 36kPa at 30% prestrain to 9kPa at 60% prestrain. These results may, at least in part, explain the discrepancy between previously reported ex vivo and in vivo measurements of mitral leaflet stiffness. We believe that our study provides valuable guidelines for modeling mitral valve mechanics, selecting appropriate constitutive models, and choosing physiologically meaningful parameter values. Future studies will be necessary to experimentally and computationally investigate prestrain, to verify its existence, to quantify its magnitude, and to clarify its role in mitral valve mechanics. PMID:23263365

  9. When a Mechanical Valve Goes Freestyle: A Patient Tailored Valve-In-Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    François, J; Cathenis, K; Hamerlijnck, R

    2015-01-01

    In case of a redo operation after a full root replacement there are two possible options: replacing the entire root or performing a more conservative valve-in-valve implantation. Regarding the relatively high morbidity and mortality of a redo root replacement, the valve-in-valve implantation is the preferred choice if technically feasible. We present the case of a valve-in-valve implantation with a St. Jude mechanical valve in a Medtronic bioprosthesis in a 57-year old man. Follow-up echocardiography after 1 month showed a mean gradient of 17 mmHg and no paravalvular leakage. The combination of a St. Jude bileaflet mechanical valve implanted in a Freestyle root prosthesis has not been described. This case shows that patient tailored treatment with a St. Jude bileaflet mechanical valve in a Freestyle aortic root valve can be safely performed and might be the preferred choice for younger patients, if technically feasible. PMID:26560005

  10. Dynamic tracking of prosthetic valve motion and deformation from bi-plane x-ray views: feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatt, Charles R.; Wagner, Martin; Raval, Amish N.; Speidel, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) requires navigation and deployment of a prosthetic valve within the aortic annulus under fluoroscopic guidance. To support improved device visualization in this procedure, this study investigates the feasibility of frame-by-frame 3D reconstruction of a moving and expanding prosthetic valve structure from simultaneous bi-plane x-ray views. In the proposed method, a dynamic 3D model of the valve is used in a 2D/3D registration framework to obtain a reconstruction of the valve. For each frame, valve model parameters describing position, orientation, expansion state, and deformation are iteratively adjusted until forward projections of the model match both bi-plane views. Simulated bi-plane imaging of a valve at different signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR) levels was performed to test the approach. 20 image sequences with 50 frames of valve deployment were simulated at each SDNR. The simulation achieved a target registration error (TRE) of the estimated valve model of 0.93 +/- 2.6 mm (mean +/- S.D.) for the lowest SDNR of 2. For higher SDNRs (5 to 50) a TRE of 0.04 mm +/- 0.23 mm was achieved. A tabletop phantom study was then conducted using a TAVR valve. The dynamic 3D model was constructed from high resolution CT scans and a simple expansion model. TRE was 1.22 +/- 0.35 mm for expansion states varying from undeployed to fully deployed, and for moderate amounts of inter-frame motion. Results indicate that it is feasible to use bi-plane imaging to recover the 3D structure of deformable catheter devices.

  11. FLUID MECHANICS OF ARTIFICIAL HEART VALVES

    PubMed Central

    Dasi, Lakshmi P; Simon, Helene A; Sucosky, Philippe; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY 1. Artificial heart valves have been in use for over five decades to replace diseased heart valves. Since the first heart valve replacement performed with a caged-ball valve, more than 50 valve designs have been developed, differing principally in valve geometry, number of leaflets and material. To date, all artificial heart valves are plagued with complications associated with haemolysis, coagulation for mechanical heart valves and leaflet tearing for tissue-based valve prosthesis. For mechanical heart valves, these complications are believed to be associated with non-physiological blood flow patterns. 2. In the present review, we provide a bird’s-eye view of fluid mechanics for the major artificial heart valve types and highlight how the engineering approach has shaped this rapidly diversifying area of research. 3. Mechanical heart valve designs have evolved significantly, with the most recent designs providing relatively superior haemodynamics with very low aerodynamic resistance. However, high shearing of blood cells and platelets still pose significant design challenges and patients must undergo life-long anticoagulation therapy. Bioprosthetic or tissue valves do not require anticoagulants due to their distinct similarity to the native valve geometry and haemodynamics, but many of these valves fail structurally within the first 10–15 years of implantation. 4. These shortcomings have directed present and future research in three main directions in attempts to design superior artificial valves: (i) engineering living tissue heart valves; (ii) development of advanced computational tools; and (iii) blood experiments to establish the link between flow and blood damage. PMID:19220329

  12. Choke valve mechanism for carburetor

    SciTech Connect

    Sejimo, Y.

    1988-09-13

    A choke valve mechanism is described for a carburetor having an air and fuel mixing passage supplied with fuel through main and idle jets from a diaphragm-controlled fuel chamber, and a throttle and choke valve in the mixing passage, that improvement in which a choke valve which comprises three contiguous plates mounted for pivot movement in the mixing passage on a choke control shaft including: (a) a first plate substantially coextensive with the passage having diametrically opposed peripheral openings, (b) a second plate formed of shape-memory alloy secured centrally to the first plate having outer portions dimensioned to overlie the peripheral openings of the first plate, the outer portions being movable in response to temperature to close the openings at low temperatures and open the openings at high temperatures, and (c) a third plate secured centrally to the second plate having end portions angled from the general plane of the plates away from the openings to limit the axially outwardly movement of the outer portions of the second plate under conditions of high temperature.

  13. Overview: Mechanism and Control of a Prosthetic Arm.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Tushar; Uddanwadiker, Rashmi

    2015-09-01

    Continuous growth in industrialization and lack of awareness in safety parameters the cases of amputations are growing. The search of safer, simpler and automated prosthetic arms for managing upper limbs is expected. Continuous efforts have been made to design and develop prosthetic arms ranging from simple harness actuated to automated mechanisms with various control options. However due the cost constraints, the automated prosthetic arms are still out of the reach of needy people. Recent data have shown that there is a wide scope to develop a low cost and light weight upper limb prosthesis. This review summarizes the various designs methodologies, mechanisms and control system developed by the researchers and the advances therein. Educating the patient to develop acceptability to prosthesis and using the same for the most basic desired functions of human hand, post amputation care and to improve patient's independent life is equally important. In conclusion it can be interpreted that there is a wide scope in design in an adaptive mechanism for opening and closing of the fingers using other methods of path and position synthesis. Simple mechanisms and less parts may optimize the cost factor. Reduction in the weight of the prosthesis may be achieved using polymers used for engineering applications. Control system will remain never ending challenge for the researchers, but it is essential to maintain the simplicity from the patients perspective. PMID:27281955

  14. Are anticoagulant independent mechanical valves within reach—fast prototype fabrication and in vitro testing of innovative bi-leaflet valve models

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Rolland

    2015-01-01

    Background Exploration for causes of prosthetic valve thrombogenicity has frequently focused on forward or post-closure flow detail. In prior laboratory studies, we uncovered high amplitude flow velocities of short duration close to valve closure implying potential for substantial shear stress with subsequent initiation of blood coagulation pathways. This may be relevant to widely accepted clinical disparity between mechanical and tissue valves vis-à-vis thrombogenicity. With a series of prototype bi-leaflet mechanical valves, we attempt reduction of closure related velocities with the objective of identifying a prototype valve with thrombogenic potential similar to our tissue valve control. This iterative design approach may find application in preclinical assessment of valves for anticoagulation independence. Methods Tested valves included: prototype mechanical bi-leaflet BVs (n=56), controls (n=2) and patented early prototype mechanicals (n=2) from other investigators. Pulsatile and quasi-steady flow systems were used for testing. Projected dynamic valve area (PDVA) was measured using previously described novel technology. Flow velocity over the open and closing periods was determined by volumetric flow rate/PDVA. For the closed valve interval, use was made of data obtained from quasi-steady back pressure/flow tests. Performance was ranked by a proposed thrombogenicity potential index (TPI) relative to tissue and mechanical control valves. Results Optimization of the prototype valve designs lead to a 3-D printed model (BV3D). For the mitral/aortic site, BV3D has lower TPI (1.10/1.47) relative to the control mechanical valve (3.44/3.93) and similar to the control tissue valve (ideal TPI ≤1.0). Conclusions Using unique technology, rapid prototyping and thrombogenicity ranking, optimization of experimental valves for reduced thrombogenic potential was expedited and simplified. Innovative mechanical valve configurations were identified that merit consideration

  15. Cost of vitamin K antagonist anticoagulant treatment in patients with metallic prosthetic valve in mitral position

    PubMed Central

    Ene, Gabriela; Garcia Raso, Aránzazu; Gonzalez-Dominguez Weber, Almudena; Hidalgo-Vega, Álvaro; Llamas, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The initiation of oral anticoagulation therapy after valve replacement surgery requires strict monitoring because these patients are at high risk for the development of thrombotic complications and present an increased risk of bleeding. Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the total healthcare costs of oral anticoagulant treatment with vitamin K antagonists in patients with metallic prosthetic valves in the mitral position. Methods: Data from clinical records were used in the study including international normalized ratio results, number of medical visits, type of anticoagulant, use of rescue medication and hospital admissions from related complications. The drug cost was calculated based on the official Spanish Ministry of Health price list. Monitoring expenses were included in the cost of the medical supplies used in the procedures. Hospitalization costs were calculated using the diagnosis-related group price for each case. Results: We collected data from 151 patients receiving oral anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K antagonist who were diagnosed with mitral prosthesis (n = 90), mitro-aortic prosthesis (n = 57), and mitral and tricuspid prosthesis (n = 4). The total direct healthcare cost was €15302.59, with a mean total cost per patient per year of €1558.15 (±2774.58) consisting of 44.38 (±42.30) for drug cost, €71.41 (±21.43) for international normalized ratio monitoring, €429.52 (±126.87) for medical visits, €26.31 (±28.38) for rescue medication and €986.53 (±2735.68) for related complications. Conclusion: Most direct healthcare costs associated with the sampled patients arose from the specialist-care monitoring required for treatment. Good monitoring is inversely related to direct healthcare costs. PMID:27579168

  16. Fifty cases of late prosthetic valve endocarditis: improvement in prognosis over a 15 year period.

    PubMed

    Leport, C; Vilde, J L; Bricaire, F; Cohen, A; Pangon, B; Gaudebout, C; Valere, P E

    1987-07-01

    The clinical course, prognostic factors, and management of 50 cases of late prosthetic valve endocarditis, occurring more than two months after valve replacement, were reviewed. Twenty nine cases that presented from 1971 to 1980 were compared with 21 cases that presented from 1981 to 1985. Apart from an appreciable decrease in the frequency of neurological complications between the first period (38%) and the second period (10%) no differences in clinical or bacteriological features were seen. Seventeen (59%) of the 29 cases in the earlier period and four (19%) of the 21 cases in the later period died. The rationale for antimicrobial treatment was similar during both periods. Cardiac surgery was performed in eight of 29 cases between 1971 and 1980 and in 11 of 21 between 1981 and 1985; the mean (SD) time between diagnosis of endocarditis and operation was 28 (19) days and 43 (44) days respectively. Six of the eight cases operated on in the first period died as did two of the 11 operated on in the second period. Twenty seven of the 29 cases presenting between 1971 and 1980 were treated with anticoagulants--either warfarin (15 of 27) or heparin sodium (12 of 27). Sixteen of the 21 cases presenting later were given anticoagulants and 15 of these cases were given heparin sodium. Control of anticoagulation was inadequate in nine of the 27 cases treated with anticoagulants during the first period and in only two of 16 treated during the second period. During the first treatment period neurological complications were more frequent when control of anticoagulation was inadequate. PMID:3620245

  17. Prolonged Use of Oritavancin for Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jennifer A.; Feeney, Eoin R.; Kubiak, David W.; Corey, G. Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Oritavancin is a novel lipoglycopeptide with activity against Gram-positive organisms including streptococci, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant S aureus (VRSA), and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) [1–3]. The US Food and Drug Administration approved oritavancin as a single intravenous dose of 1200 mg for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections on the basis of 2 clinical trials demonstrating noninferiority compared with vancomycin [4, 5]. There are limited options for treatment of serious VRE infections. Monotherapy with daptomycin or tigecycline or linezolid may be sufficient in some cases, but combination therapy is often indicated for severe or complicated infections such as endocarditis. Several antibiotic combinations have been used in isolated case reports with some efficacy, including the following: high-dose ampicillin with an aminoglycoside [6], ampicillin with ceftriaxone or imipenem [7, 8], high-dose daptomycin with ampicillin and gentamicin [9] or with gentamicin and rifampin [10], daptomycin with tigecycline [11, 12], quinupristin-dalfopristin with high-dose ampicillin [13] or doxycycline and rifampin [14], and linezolid with tigecycline [15]. The limited efficacy, limited susceptibility, and extensive toxicities with many of these agents and combinations present barriers to effective treatment. Additional treatment options for VRE endocarditis would be valuable. Although oritavancin has been shown to have in vitro activity against some isolates of VRE, clinical data are lacking. We describe the first use of a prolonged course of oritavancin in the treatment of a serious VRE infection, prosthetic valve endocarditis. PMID:26677455

  18. Prolonged Use of Oritavancin for Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jennifer A; Feeney, Eoin R; Kubiak, David W; Corey, G Ralph

    2015-12-01

    Oritavancin is a novel lipoglycopeptide with activity against Gram-positive organisms including streptococci, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant S aureus (VRSA), and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) [1-3]. The US Food and Drug Administration approved oritavancin as a single intravenous dose of 1200 mg for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections on the basis of 2 clinical trials demonstrating noninferiority compared with vancomycin [4, 5]. There are limited options for treatment of serious VRE infections. Monotherapy with daptomycin or tigecycline or linezolid may be sufficient in some cases, but combination therapy is often indicated for severe or complicated infections such as endocarditis. Several antibiotic combinations have been used in isolated case reports with some efficacy, including the following: high-dose ampicillin with an aminoglycoside [6], ampicillin with ceftriaxone or imipenem [7, 8], high-dose daptomycin with ampicillin and gentamicin [9] or with gentamicin and rifampin [10], daptomycin with tigecycline [11, 12], quinupristin-dalfopristin with high-dose ampicillin [13] or doxycycline and rifampin [14], and linezolid with tigecycline [15]. The limited efficacy, limited susceptibility, and extensive toxicities with many of these agents and combinations present barriers to effective treatment. Additional treatment options for VRE endocarditis would be valuable. Although oritavancin has been shown to have in vitro activity against some isolates of VRE, clinical data are lacking. We describe the first use of a prolonged course of oritavancin in the treatment of a serious VRE infection, prosthetic valve endocarditis. PMID:26677455

  19. A laboratory investigation of the flow in the left ventricle of a human heart with prosthetic, tilting-disk valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenedese, A.; del Prete, Z.; Miozzi, M.; Querzoli, G.

    2005-08-01

    The understanding of the phenomena involved in ventricular flow is becoming more and more important because of two main reasons: the continuous improvements in the field of diagnostic techniques and the increasing popularity of prosthetic devices. On one hand, more accurate investigation techniques gives the chance to better diagnose diseases before they become dangerous to the health of the patient. On the other hand, the diffusion of prosthetic devices requires very detailed assessment of the modifications that they introduce in the functioning of the heart. The present work is focussed on the experimental investigation of the flow in the left ventricle of the human heart with the presence of a tilting-disk valve in the mitral position, as this kind of valve is known to change deeply the structure of such a flow. A laboratory model has been built up, which consists of a cavity able to change its volume, representing the ventricle, on which two prosthetic valves are mounted. The facility is designed to be able to reproduce any arbitrarily assigned law of variation of the ventricular volume with time. In the present experiment, a physiologically shaped curve has been used. Velocity was measured using a feature-tracking (FT) algorithm; as a consequence, the particle trajectories are known. The flow has been studied by changing both the beat rate and the stroke volume. The flow was studied both kinematically, examining velocity and vorticity fields, and dynamically, evaluating turbulent and viscous shear stresses, and inertial forces exerted on fluid elements. The analysis of the results allows the identification of the main features of the ventricular flow, generated by a mitral, tilting-disk valve, during the whole cardiac cycle and its dependence on the frequency and the stroke volume.

  20. Electro-Mechanical Coaxial Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Paul R (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Coaxial valves usually contain only one moving part. It has not been easy, then, to provide for electric motor actuation. Many actuators being proposed involve designs which lead to bulky packages. The key facing those improving coaxial valves is the provision of suitable linear actuation. The valve herein indudes a valve housing with a flow channel there-through. Arranged in the flow channel is a closing body. In alignment with the closing body is a ball screw actuator which includes a ball nut and a cylindrical screw. The ball nut sounds a threaded portion of the cylindrical screw. The cylindrical screw is provided with a passageway there-through through which fluid flows. The cylindrical screw is disposed in the flow channel to become a control tube adapted to move toward and away from the valve seat. To rotate the ball nut an actuating drive is employed driven by a stepper motor.

  1. Direct Numerical Simulation of turbulent flow induced by prosthetic heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristallo, Antonio; Verzicco, Roberto

    2005-11-01

    The complex turbulent flow patterns downstream of mechanical bileaflet valves are to a large extend responsible for the thromboembolic complications that remain a major concern after surgery. To illuminate the detailed dynamics of flow in the vicinity of such valves we performed Direct Numerical Simulations in a simplified configuration. The selected shape and size of the leaflets roughly mimics the SJM Standard bi-leaflet. Also, the housing was a straight pipe with rigid walls which expands and then contracts to mimic the geometry of the aortic root. The overall set-up resembles the one commonly used in in-vitro experiments. The computation of the fluid structure interaction problem is performed using a fully coupled, embedded boundary formulation at physiologic flowrates. The valves open at the beginning of the systole and close before the start of the diastole. The interaction of vortices originating from the leaflets and the housing dominate the flow in the downstream proximal area and are responsible for most of the production of turbulent stress.

  2. Total Artificial Heart as Bridge to Transplantation for Severe Culture-Negative Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis due to Gemella haemolysans

    PubMed Central

    Ramchandani, Meena S.; Rakita, Robert M.; Freeman, Rosario V.; Levy, Wayne C.; Von Homeyer, Peter; Mokadam, Nahush A.

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of a patient with prosthetic valve endocarditis requiring implantation of a total artificial heart (TAH) as a bridge to heart transplantation. Gemella haemolysans, an unusual cause of PVE, was identified as the organism responsible only by 16s rRNA PCR analysis of surgical tissue samples. We also describe one of the first uses of combined TAH and veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy in the setting of severe respiratory and cardiac failure. Implantation of a TAH may be considered in situations where more traditional reconstructive methods are not feasible. PMID:24727539

  3. Redefining prosthetic ankle mechanics: non-anthropomorphic ankle design.

    PubMed

    LaPrè, Andrew K; Sup, Frank

    2013-06-01

    The moment transferred at the residual limb socket interface of transtibial amputees can be a limiting factor of the comfort and activity level of lower limb amputees. The high pressures seen can be a significant source of pain, as well as result in deep tissue damage. The compensation of the sound limbs causes an asymmetrical gait which can be a contributor of early onset osteoarthritis in the sound limbs. It has been shown that the moment transferred with conventional passive prostheses can be lowered in magnitude by aligning the tibia with ground reaction forces, but this limits the effectiveness of the device. With recent powered prosthetics designed to mimic the missing limb, power can be injected into the gait cycle, but can also be limited by this pressure threshold. This paper shows the results of calculations that suggest that altering the prosthetic ankle mechanism can reduce the socket interface moments by as much as 50%. This supports the development of an active non-anthropomorphic ankle prosthesis which reduces socket interface moments while still injecting substantial power levels into the gait cycle. PMID:24187257

  4. Prosthetic Aortic Valve Endocarditis with Left Main Coronary Artery Embolism: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan; Inayat, Faisal; Farooq, Salman; Ghani, Ali Raza; Mirrani, Ghazi A.; Athar, Muhammed Waqas

    2016-01-01

    Context: Coronary embolization is potentially a fatal sequela of endocarditis. Although the primary cause of acute coronary syndrome is atherosclerotic disease, it is imperative to consider septic embolism as an etiological factor. Case Report: Herein, we report a case of ventricular fibrillation and ST-segment depression myocardial infarction occurring in a patient who initially presented with fever and increased urinary frequency. Coronary angiography revealed new 99% occlusion of the left main coronary artery (LMCA). Transesophageal echocardiography showed bioprosthetic aortic valve with an abscess and vegetation. Histologic examination of the embolectomy specimen confirmed the presence of thrombus and Enterococcus faecalis bacteria. Subsequently, the patient was discharged to the skilled nursing facility in a stable condition where he completed 6 weeks of intravenous ampicillin. Conclusion: We present a rare case of LMCA embolism due to prosthetic valve endocarditis. The present report also highlights the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges associated with such patients. PMID:27500132

  5. Mitral valve disease—morphology and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Robert A.; Hagége, Albert A.; Judge, Daniel P.; Padala, Muralidhar; Dal-Bianco, Jacob P.; Aikawa, Elena; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Bischoff, Joyce; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Bruneval, Patrick; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Carpentier, Alain; Chaput, Miguel; Chester, Adrian H.; Clusel, Catherine; Delling, Francesca N.; Dietz, Harry C.; Dina, Christian; Durst, Ronen; Fernandez-Friera, Leticia; Handschumacher, Mark D.; Jensen, Morten O.; Jeunemaitre, Xavier P.; Le Marec, Hervé; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Markwald, Roger R.; Mérot, Jean; Messas, Emmanuel; Milan, David P.; Neri, Tui; Norris, Russell A.; Peal, David; Perrocheau, Maelle; Probst, Vincent; Pucéat, Michael; Rosenthal, Nadia; Solis, Jorge; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Schwammenthal, Ehud; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.; Song, Jae-Kwan; Yacoub, Magdi H.

    2016-01-01

    Mitral valve disease is a frequent cause of heart failure and death. Emerging evidence indicates that the mitral valve is not a passive structure, but—even in adult life—remains dynamic and accessible for treatment. This concept motivates efforts to reduce the clinical progression of mitral valve disease through early detection and modification of underlying mechanisms. Discoveries of genetic mutations causing mitral valve elongation and prolapse have revealed that growth factor signalling and cell migration pathways are regulated by structural molecules in ways that can be modified to limit progression from developmental defects to valve degeneration with clinical complications. Mitral valve enlargement can determine left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and might be stimulated by potentially modifiable biological valvular–ventricular interactions. Mitral valve plasticity also allows adaptive growth in response to ventricular remodelling. However, adverse cellular and mechanobiological processes create relative leaflet deficiency in the ischaemic setting, leading to mitral regurgitation with increased heart failure and mortality. Our approach, which bridges clinicians and basic scientists, enables the correlation of observed disease with cellular and molecular mechanisms, leading to the discovery of new opportunities for improving the natural history of mitral valve disease. PMID:26483167

  6. Mitral valve disease--morphology and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Levine, Robert A; Hagége, Albert A; Judge, Daniel P; Padala, Muralidhar; Dal-Bianco, Jacob P; Aikawa, Elena; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Bischoff, Joyce; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Bruneval, Patrick; Butcher, Jonathan T; Carpentier, Alain; Chaput, Miguel; Chester, Adrian H; Clusel, Catherine; Delling, Francesca N; Dietz, Harry C; Dina, Christian; Durst, Ronen; Fernandez-Friera, Leticia; Handschumacher, Mark D; Jensen, Morten O; Jeunemaitre, Xavier P; Le Marec, Hervé; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Markwald, Roger R; Mérot, Jean; Messas, Emmanuel; Milan, David P; Neri, Tui; Norris, Russell A; Peal, David; Perrocheau, Maelle; Probst, Vincent; Pucéat, Michael; Rosenthal, Nadia; Solis, Jorge; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Schwammenthal, Ehud; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A; Song, Jae-Kwan; Yacoub, Magdi H

    2015-12-01

    Mitral valve disease is a frequent cause of heart failure and death. Emerging evidence indicates that the mitral valve is not a passive structure, but--even in adult life--remains dynamic and accessible for treatment. This concept motivates efforts to reduce the clinical progression of mitral valve disease through early detection and modification of underlying mechanisms. Discoveries of genetic mutations causing mitral valve elongation and prolapse have revealed that growth factor signalling and cell migration pathways are regulated by structural molecules in ways that can be modified to limit progression from developmental defects to valve degeneration with clinical complications. Mitral valve enlargement can determine left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and might be stimulated by potentially modifiable biological valvular-ventricular interactions. Mitral valve plasticity also allows adaptive growth in response to ventricular remodelling. However, adverse cellular and mechanobiological processes create relative leaflet deficiency in the ischaemic setting, leading to mitral regurgitation with increased heart failure and mortality. Our approach, which bridges clinicians and basic scientists, enables the correlation of observed disease with cellular and molecular mechanisms, leading to the discovery of new opportunities for improving the natural history of mitral valve disease. PMID:26483167

  7. Gallium-SPECT in the detection of prosthetic valve endocarditis and aortic ring abscess

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, K.; Barnes, D.; Martin, R.H.; Rae, J.R. )

    1991-09-01

    A 52-yr-old man who had a bioprosthetic aortic valve developed Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Despite antibiotic therapy he had persistent pyrexia and developed new conduction system disturbances. Echocardiography did not demonstrate vegetations on the valve or an abscess, but gallium scintigraphy using SPECT clearly identified a focus of intense activity in the region of the aortic valve. The presence of valvular vegetations and a septal abscess was confirmed at autopsy. Gallium scintigraphy, using SPECT, provided a useful noninvasive method for the demonstration of endocarditis and the associated valve ring abscess.

  8. Design and Evaluation of a Prosthetic Knee Joint Using the Geared Five-Bar Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuanxi; Ge, Wenjie; Zheng, Jia; Dong, Dianbiao

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the mechanical design, dynamics analysis and ankle trajectory analysis of a prosthetic knee joint using the geared five-bar mechanism. Compared with traditional four-bar or six-bar mechanisms, the geared five-bar mechanism is better at performing diverse movements and is easy to control. This prosthetic knee joint with the geared five-bar mechanism is capable of fine-tuning its relative instantaneous center of rotation and ankle trajectory. The centrode of this prosthetic knee joint, which is mechanically optimized according to the centrode of human knee joint, is better in the bionic performance than that of a prosthetic knee joint using the four-bar mechanism. Additionally, the stability control of this prosthetic knee joint during the swing and stance phase is achieved by a motor. By adjusting the gear ratio of this prosthetic knee joint, the ankle trajectories of both unilateral and bilateral amputees show less deviations from expected than that of the four-bar knee joint. PMID:25675463

  9. Low-Dose Alteplase Infusion for the Treatment of Mechanical Aortic Valve Thrombosis: A Spotlight on the Importance of Medication Adherence.

    PubMed

    Isherwood, Manuel; Serra, Michael; Safirstein, Jordan; Shah, Neel; Rosenthal, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A rare, yet serious, complication of mechanical heart valves is symptomatic obstructive prosthetic valve thrombosis. The risk of valve thrombosis is magnified in patients who are nonadherent to prescribed anticoagulation. In this case report, we describe a 48-year-old male patient with a history of mechanical aortic valve replacement surgery, who stopped taking prescribed warfarin therapy 2 years before presentation and subsequently developed acute decompensated heart failure secondary to valvular dysfunction. Low-dose alteplase therapy was administered successfully with no bleeding complications and a complete return of valvular function. PMID:25774843

  10. Processing of prosthetic heart valve sounds for single leg separation classification

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Jones, H.E.

    1995-06-01

    Efforts are concentrated on the sounds corresponding to the heart valve opening cycle. Valve opening and closing acoustics present additional information about the outlet strut condition---the structural component implicated in valve failure. The importance of the opening sound for single leg separation detection/classification is based on the fact that as the valve opens, the disk passively hits the outlet strut. The opening sounds thus yield direct information about outlet strut condition with minimal amount of disturbance caused by the energy radiated from the disk. Hence the opening sound is a very desirable acoustic signal to extract. Unfortunately, the opening sounds have much lower signal levels relative to the closing sounds and therefore noise plays a more significant role than during the closing event. Because of this it is necessary to screen the sounds for outliers in order to insure a high sensitivity of classification. Because of the sharp resonances appearing in the corresponding spectrum, a parametric processing approach is developed based on an autoregressive model which was selected to characterize the sounds emitted by the Bjork--Shiley convexo--concave (BSCC) valve during opening cycle. First the basic signals and the extraction process used to create an ensemble of heart valve sounds are briefly discussed. Next, a {ital beat} {ital monitor} capable of rejecting beats that fail to meet an acceptance criteria based on their spectral content is developed. Various approaches that have been utilized to enhance the screened data and produce a reliable {ital heart} {ital valve} {ital spectrogram} which displays the individual sounds (power) as a function of beat number and temporal frequency are discussed. Once estimated, the spectrogram and associated parameters are used to develop features supplied to the various classification schemes. Finally, future work aimed at even further signal enhancement and improved classifier performance is discussed.

  11. Prosthetic Pulmonary Valve Stenosis: A Different Way to Solve the Problem.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, Thomas; Lurz, Philipp; Kiefer, Philipp; Wehbe, Mahmoud; Dähnert, Ingo

    2015-09-01

    To avoid a third major cardiovascular surgery in an 84-year-old man, a Melody Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve was implanted in a functionally stenotic bioprosthesis in the pulmonary position. The intervention was free of complications with good results. PMID:26354643

  12. A novel computational model for the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical valves in the opening phase.

    PubMed

    Jahandardoost, Mehdi; Fradet, Guy; Mohammadi, Hadi

    2015-03-01

    A powerful alternative means to study the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves is the computational fluid dynamics method. It is well recognized that computational fluid dynamics allows reliable physiological blood flow simulation and measurements of flow parameters. To date, in almost all of the modeling studies on the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves, a velocity (mass flow)-based boundary condition and an axisymmetric geometry for the aortic root have been assigned, which, to some extent, are erroneous. Also, there have been contradictory reports of the profile of velocity in downstream of leaflets, that is, in some studies, it is suggested that the maximum blood velocity occurs in the lateral orifice, and in some other studies, it is postulated that the maximum velocities in the main and lateral orifices are identical. The reported values for the peak velocities range from 1 to 3 m/s, which highly depend on the model assumptions. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the importance of the exact anatomical model of the aortic root and the realistic boundary conditions in the hemodynamics of the bileaflet mechanical heart valves. The model considered in this study is based on the St Jude Medical valve in a novel modeling platform. Through a more realistic geometrical model for the aortic root and the St Jude Medical valve, we have developed a new set of boundary conditions in order to be used for the assessment of the hemodynamics of aortic bileaflet mechanical heart valves. The results of this study are significant for the design improvement of conventional bileaflet mechanical heart valves and for the design of the next generation of prosthetic valves. PMID:25833999

  13. Relapse of enterococcal prosthetic valve endocarditis with aortic root abscess following treatment with daptomycin in a patient not fit for surgery.

    PubMed

    Enoch, D A; Phillimore, N; Karas, J A; Horswill, L; Mlangeni, D A

    2010-04-01

    Daptomycin is a novel lipopeptide with activity against Gram-positive organisms including enterococci. It is licensed for the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia and right-sided endocarditis, but not endocarditis due to Enterococcus spp. We report a case of enterococcal prosthetic valve endocarditis with an aortic root abscess in an elderly patient who was not fit for surgery. The patient's endocarditis relapsed 9 weeks after a 6 week course of daptomycin. PMID:20019148

  14. Impact of Early Valve Surgery on Outcome of Staphylococcus aureus Prosthetic Valve Infective Endocarditis: Analysis in the International Collaboration of Endocarditis–Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chirouze, Catherine; Alla, François; Fowler, Vance G.; Sexton, Daniel J.; Corey, G. Ralph; Chu, Vivian H.; Wang, Andrew; Erpelding, Marie-Line; Durante-Mangoni, Emanuele; Fernández-Hidalgo, Nuria; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Hannan, Margaret M.; Lejko-Zupanc, Tatjana; Miró, José M.; Muñoz, Patricia; Murdoch, David R.; Tattevin, Pierre; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Hoen, Bruno; Clara, Liliana; Sanchez, Marisa; Nacinovich, Francisco; Oses, Pablo Fernandez; Ronderos, Ricardo; Sucari, Adriana; Thierer, Jorge; Casabé, José; Cortes, Claudia; Altclas, Javier; Kogan, Silvia; Spelman, Denis; Athan, Eugene; Harris, Owen; Kennedy, Karina; Tan, Ren; Gordon, David; Papanicolas, Lito; Eisen, Damon; Grigg, Leeanne; Street, Alan; Korman, Tony; Kotsanas, Despina; Dever, Robyn; Jones, Phillip; Konecny, Pam; Lawrence, Richard; Rees, David; Ryan, Suzanne; Feneley, Michael P.; Harkness, John; Jones, Phillip; Ryan, Suzanne; Jones, Phillip; Ryan, Suzanne; Jones, Phillip; Post, Jeffrey; Reinbott, Porl; Ryan, Suzanne; Gattringer, Rainer; Wiesbauer, Franz; Andrade, Adriana Ribas; de Brito, Ana Cláudia Passos; Guimarães, Armenio Costa; Grinberg, Max; Mansur, Alfredo José; Siciliano, Rinaldo Focaccia; Strabelli, Tania Mara Varejao; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; de Medeiros Tranchesi, Regina Aparecida; Paiva, Marcelo Goulart; Fortes, Claudio Querido; de Oliveira Ramos, Auristela; Ferraiuoli, Giovanna; Golebiovski, Wilma; Lamas, Cristiane; Santos, Marisa; Weksler, Clara; Karlowsky, James A.; Keynan, Yoav; Morris, Andrew M.; Rubinstein, Ethan; Jones, Sandra Braun; Garcia, Patricia; Cereceda, M; Fica, Alberto; Mella, Rodrigo Montagna; Barsic, Bruno; Bukovski, Suzana; Krajinovic, Vladimir; Pangercic, Ana; Rudez, Igor; Vincelj, Josip; Freiberger, Tomas; Pol, Jiri; Zaloudikova, Barbora; Ashour, Zainab; El Kholy, Amani; Mishaal, Marwa; Rizk, Hussien; Aissa, Neijla; Alauzet, Corentine; Alla, Francois; Campagnac, Catherine; Doco-Lecompte, Thanh; Selton-Suty, Christine; Casalta, Jean-Paul; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Habib, Gilbert; Raoult, Didier; Thuny, Franck; Delahaye, François; Delahaye, Armelle; Vandenesch, Francois; Donal, Erwan; Donnio, Pierre Yves; Michelet, Christian; Revest, Matthieu; Tattevin, Pierre; Violette, Jérémie; Chevalier, Florent; Jeu, Antoine; Sorel, Claire; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Bernard, Yvette; Chirouze, Catherine; Hoen, Bruno; Leroy, Joel; Plesiat, Patrick; Naber, Christoph; Neuerburg, Carl; Mazaheri, Bahram; Naber, Christoph; Neuerburg, Carl; Athanasia, Sofia; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Mylona, Elena; Paniara, Olga; Papanicolaou, Konstantinos; Pyros, John; Skoutelis, Athanasios; Sharma, Gautam; Francis, Johnson; Nair, Lathi; Thomas, Vinod; Venugopal, Krishnan; Hannan, Margaret; Hurley, John; Gilon, Dan; Israel, Sarah; Korem, Maya; Strahilevitz, Jacob; Rubinstein, Ethan; Strahilevitz, Jacob; Casillo, Roberta; Cuccurullo, Susanna; Dialetto, Giovanni; Durante-Mangoni, Emanuele; Irene, Mattucci; Ragone, Enrico; Tripodi, Marie Françoise; Utili, Riccardo; Cecchi, Enrico; De Rosa, Francesco; Forno, Davide; Imazio, Massimo; Trinchero, Rita; Tebini, Alessandro; Grossi, Paolo; Lattanzio, Mariangela; Toniolo, Antonio; Goglio, Antonio; Raglio, Annibale; Ravasio, Veronica; Rizzi, Marco; Suter, Fredy; Carosi, Giampiero; Magri, Silvia; Signorini, Liana; Baban, Tania; Kanafani, Zeina; Kanj, Souha S.; Yasmine, Mohamad; Abidin, Imran; Tamin, Syahidah Syed; Martínez, Eduardo Rivera; Soto Nieto, Gabriel Israel; van der Meer, Jan T.M.; Chambers, Stephen; Holland, David; Morris, Arthur; Raymond, Nigel; Read, Kerry; Murdoch, David R.; Dragulescu, Stefan; Ionac, Adina; Mornos, Cristian; Butkevich, O.M.; Chipigina, Natalia; Kirill, Ozerecky; Vadim, Kulichenko; Vinogradova, Tatiana; Edathodu, Jameela; Halim, Magid; Lum, Luh-Nah; Tan, Ru-San; Lejko-Zupanc, Tatjana; Logar, Mateja; Mueller-Premru, Manica; Commerford, Patrick; Commerford, Anita; Deetlefs, Eduan; Hansa, Cass; Ntsekhe, Mpiko; Almela, Manuel; Armero, Yolanda; Azqueta, Manuel; Castañeda, Ximena; Cervera, Carlos; del Rio, Ana; Falces, Carlos; Garcia-de-la-Maria, Cristina; Fita, Guillermina; Gatell, Jose M.; Marco, Francesc; Mestres, Carlos A.; Miró, José M.; Moreno, Asuncion; Ninot, Salvador; Paré, Carlos; Pericas, Joan; Ramirez, Jose; Rovira, Irene; Sitges, Marta; Anguera, Ignasi; Font, Bernat; Guma, Joan Raimon; Bermejo, Javier; Bouza, Emilio; Fernández, Miguel Angel Garcia; Gonzalez-Ramallo, Victor; Marín, Mercedes; Muñoz, Patricia; Pedromingo, Miguel; Roda, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Background. The impact of early valve surgery (EVS) on the outcome of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) prosthetic valve infective endocarditis (PVIE) is unresolved. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between EVS, performed within the first 60 days of hospitalization, and outcome of SA PVIE within the International Collaboration on Endocarditis–Prospective Cohort Study. Methods. Participants were enrolled between June 2000 and December 2006. Cox proportional hazards modeling that included surgery as a time-dependent covariate and propensity adjustment for likelihood to receive cardiac surgery was used to evaluate the impact of EVS and 1-year all-cause mortality on patients with definite left-sided S. aureus PVIE and no history of injection drug use. Results. EVS was performed in 74 of the 168 (44.3%) patients. One-year mortality was significantly higher among patients with S. aureus PVIE than in patients with non–S. aureus PVIE (48.2% vs 32.9%; P = .003). Staphylococcus aureus PVIE patients who underwent EVS had a significantly lower 1-year mortality rate (33.8% vs 59.1%; P = .001). In multivariate, propensity-adjusted models, EVS was not associated with 1-year mortality (risk ratio, 0.67 [95% confidence interval, .39–1.15]; P = .15). Conclusions. In this prospective, multinational cohort of patients with S. aureus PVIE, EVS was not associated with reduced 1-year mortality. The decision to pursue EVS should be individualized for each patient, based upon infection-specific characteristics rather than solely upon the microbiology of the infection causing PVIE. PMID:25389255

  15. Diagnostic approach to assessment of valvular heart disease using magnetic resonance imaging, part II: a practical approach for native and prosthetic heart valve stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Chaothawee, Lertlak

    2012-01-01

    MRI is already an established diagnostic modality for assessing valvular stenosis although it is not usually used as the initial non-invasive test. The preferred diagnostic modality for valvular stenosis is currently echocardiography. However, MRI has been offered as a good alternative test in the event of inconclusive echocardiography results. During the course of valvular stenosis, the valve orifice area decreases and the pressure gradient across the diseased valve increases. Valvular orifice area is the major core indicator for valvular stenosis severity grading. Compared with valvular regurgitation, assessment with MRI for valvular stenosis is less complicated. The aim of this article is to detail the MRI techniques in assessing native and prosthetic heart valve stenosis.

  16. Mitigation of Shear-Induced Blood Damage of Mechanical Bileaflet Heart Valves using Embedded Vortex Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Pablo; Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit; Glezer, Ari

    2012-11-01

    The strong transitory shear stress generated during the time-periodic closing of the mechanical prosthetic bileaflet aortic heart valve, is considered to be one of the main factors responsible for complications, associated with thrombosis and thromboembolism. These flow transients are investigated using phase and time-averaged PIV in a low-volume (about 150 ml) test setup that simulates the pulsatile physiological conditions associated with a 23 mm St. Jude Medical valve. The PIV measurements are accompanied by continuous monitoring of the ventricular and aortic pressures and valve flow rate. Following the valve closure, the leakage flow between the valve leaflets is caused by the pressure buildup across the leaflets, leading to the formation of a regurgitation jet starting from the BMHV B-datum line. As in a typical starting jet, a counter-rotating vortex pair is formed along each leaflet edge and the vorticity sheet is associated with high shear stress that may be result in blood platelet activation. The present investigation demonstrates that the placement of arrays of mm-scale vortex generators near the edges of the leaflets diffuses the vortex sheet and suppresses the formation of these vortices, weakening the local velocity gradients and small-scale vortical structures. Supported by NIH and NSF.

  17. Right heart catheterisation may be cautiously performed through a mechanical valve prosthesis in the tricuspid position.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Stephen; Tsui, Steven; Parameshwar, Jayan

    2016-01-01

    Right heart catheterisation (RHC) may be performed through a mechanical valve prosthesis in the tricuspid position using a partially inflated pulmonary artery flotation catheter. Preprocedural preparation should include an ex vivo trial with an identical valve prosthesis and the type of catheter to be used for the procedure. The operator should expect immediate unloading of the right ventricle due to catheter-associated tricuspid regurgitation, but it is possible to estimate pulmonary vascular resistance using the Fick principle. The risk of catheter entrapment or damage to the prosthetic leaflets during the procedure is likely to be low. This risk may be acceptable to the clinician and the patient if pulmonary vascular resistance must be measured in order to determine eligibility for heart transplantation. PMID:27074812

  18. Combination of a Giant Dissected Ascending Aortic Aneurysm with Multiple Fistulae into the Cardiac Chambers Caused by Prosthetic Aortic Valve Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Faraji, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The combination of a dissected ascending aortic aneurysm (AA) with multiple fistulae to the periaortic root structures is a life-threatening complication that occurs rarely after infective endocarditis of the prosthetic aortic valve. Many risk factors are potentially associated with this complication, including aortic diameter, connective tissue disease of the aortic wall, hypertension and infection. We report a rare case of dissected ascending AA with fistulae to the left atrium and pulmonary artery and a paravalvular leak in a 47-year-old woman with a history of an aortic valve replacement. The patient had presented to the Imam Ali Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran, in January 2015 with clinical features of heart failure. After initially being treated for congestive heart failure, she underwent open-heart surgery via a classic Bentall procedure and double fistula closure. She was discharged 23 days after the operation in good condition. A six-month follow-up showed normal functioning of the composite conduit prosthetic valve and no fistulae recurrence. PMID:26909200

  19. Effect of heart rate on the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves' prostheses (St. Jude Medical) in the aortic position and in the opening phase: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Jahandardoost, Mehdi; Fradet, Guy; Mohammadi, Hadi

    2016-03-01

    To date, to the best of the authors' knowledge, in almost all of the studies performed around the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves, a heart rate of 70-72 beats/min has been considered. In fact, the heart rate of ~72 beats/min does not represent the entire normal physiological conditions under which the aortic or prosthetic valves function. The heart rates of 120 or 50 beats/min may lead to hemodynamic complications, such as plaque formation and/or thromboembolism in patients. In this study, the hemodynamic performance of the bileaflet mechanical heart valves in a wide range of normal and physiological heart rates, that is, 60-150 beats/min, was studied in the opening phase. The model considered in this study was a St. Jude Medical bileaflet mechanical heart valve with the inner diameter of 27 mm in the aortic position. The hemodynamics of the native valve and the St. Jude Medical valve were studied in a variety of heart rates in the opening phase and the results were carefully compared. The results indicate that peak values of the velocity profile downstream of the valve increase as heart rate increases, as well as the location of the maximum velocity changes with heart rate in the St. Jude Medical valve model. Also, the maximum values of shear stress and wall shear stresses downstream of the valve are proportional to heart rate in both models. Interestingly, the maximum shear stress and wall shear stress values in both models are in the same range when heart rate is <90 beats/min; however, these values significantly increase in the St. Jude Medical valve model when heart rate is >90 beats/min (up to ~40% growth compared to that of the native valve). The findings of this study may be of importance in the hemodynamic performance of bileaflet mechanical heart valves. They may also play an important role in design improvement of conventional prosthetic heart valves and the design of the next generation of prosthetic valves, such as

  20. Valve mechanism for an automotive engine

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, N.

    1988-02-16

    A valve mechanism for an automotive engine having a rocker arm comprising a rocker arm member rocked by a cam and an actuating arm member operatively engaged with the rocker arm member for operating a stem of a valve is described comprising: a sleeve rotatably and slidably mounted on a rocker-arm shaft and having splines on a periphery thereof and a cylindrical portion adjacent the splines. The rocker arm member has splines and slidably engaged with the splines of the sleeve. The actuating arm member has splines corresponding to the splines of the sleeve and slidably engaged with the cylindrical portion of the sleeve at a disengagement position. A piston is slidably mounted on the rocker-arm shaft adjacent the sleeve; and hydraulic means are for applying oil to the piston so as to shift the sleeve to an engagement position to engage the splines thereof with the actuating arm member. A spring is provided between the cylindrical portion and a shaft holder for shifting the sleeve from the engagement position to the disengagement position; and stopping means hold the sleeve at the disengagement position and the engagement position respectively.

  1. Prosthetic urinary sphincter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, C. R.; Smyly, H. M. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A pump/valve unit for controlling the inflation and deflation of a urethral collar in a prosthetic urinary sphincter device is described. A compressible bulb pump defining a reservoir was integrated with a valve unit for implantation. The valve unit includes a movable valve member operable by depression of a flexible portion of the valve unit housing for controlling fluid flow between the reservoir and collar; and a pressure sensing means which operates the valve member to relieve an excess pressure in the collar should too much pressure be applied by the patient.

  2. Culture-Negative Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis with Concomitant Septicemia Due to a Nontoxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae Biotype Gravis Isolate in a Patient with Multiple Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Clinton, Lani Kai; Shimasaki, Teppei; Sae-Ow, Wichit; Whelen, A. Christian; O'Connor, Norman; Kim, Wesley; Young, Royden

    2013-01-01

    A 54-year-old female with a prosthetic mitral valve presented with a 3-day history of dizziness, subjective fever, and chills. Blood cultures were positive for a pleomorphic Gram-positive rod. Initial phenotypic testing could only support the identification of a Corynebacterium species. Nucleic acid sequencing (16S rRNA) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) were conclusive for Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Definitive phenotypic testing classified the strain as nontoxigenic C. diphtheriae biotype Gravis. PMID:24006007

  3. Mid-Term Outcome of Mechanical Pulmonary Valve Prostheses: The Importance of Anticoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghpour, Anita; Kyavar, Majid; Javani, Bahareh; Bakhshandeh, Hooman; Maleki, Majid; Khajali, Zahra; Subrahmanyan, Lakshman

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) is being performed more commonly late after the correction of tetralogy of Fallot. Most valves are replaced with an allograft or xenograft, although reoperations are a common theme. Mechanical prostheses have a less favorable reputation due to the necessity of lifelong anticoagulation therapy and higher risk of thrombosis, but they are also less likely to require reoperation. There is a paucity of data on the use of prosthetic valves in the pulmonary position. We report the midterm outcomes of 38 cases of PVR with mechanical prostheses. Methods: One hundred twenty two patients who underwent PVR were studied. Thirty-eight patients, mean age 25 ± 8.4 years underwent PVR with mechanical prostheses based on the right ventricular function and the preferences of the patients and physicians. Median age of prosthesis was 1 year (range 3 months to 5 years). Results: Seven (18%) patients had malfunctioning pulmonary prostheses and two patients underwent redo PVR. Mean International Normalized Ratio (INR) in these seven patients was 2.1±0.8. Fibrinolytic therapy was tried and five of them responded to it well. There was no significant association between the severity of right ventricular dysfunction, patient’s age, prostheses valve size and age of the prosthesis in the patients with prosthesis malfunction. Conclusion: PVR with mechanical prostheses can be performed with promising midterm outcomes. Thrombosis on mechanical pulmonary valve prostheses remains a serious complication, but most prosthesis malfunction respond to fibrinolytic therapy, underscoring the need for adequate anticoagulation therapy. PMID:25320663

  4. Valves and other mechanical components and equipment: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The articles in this Compilation will be of interest to mechanical engineers, users and designers of machinery, and to those engineers and manufacturers specializing in fluid handling systems. Section 1 describes a number of valves and valve systems. Section 2 contains articles on machinery and mechanical devices that may have applications in a number of different areas.

  5. Mechanics of the pulmonary valve in the aortic position.

    PubMed

    Soares, A L F; van Geemen, D; van den Bogaerdt, A J; Oomens, C W J; Bouten, C V C; Baaijens, F P T

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models can provide valuable information to assess and evaluate the mechanical behavior and remodeling of native tissue. A relevant example when studying collagen remodeling is the Ross procedure because it involves placing the pulmonary autograft in the more demanding aortic valve mechanical environment. The objective of this study was therefore to assess and evaluate the mechanical differences between the aortic valve and pulmonary valve and the remodeling that may occur in the pulmonary valve when placed in the aortic position. The results from biaxial tensile tests of pairs of human aortic and pulmonary valves were compared and used to determine the parameters of a structurally based constitutive model. Finite element analyzes were then performed to simulate the mechanical response of both valves to the aortic diastolic load. Additionally, remodeling laws were applied to assess the remodeling of the pulmonary valve leaflet to the new environment. The pulmonary valve showed to be more extensible and less anisotropic than the aortic valve. When exposed to aortic pressure, the pulmonary leaflet appeared to remodel by increasing its thickness and reorganizing its collagen fibers, rotating them toward the circumferential direction. PMID:24035437

  6. Hemocompatibility of styrenic block copolymers for use in prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Brubert, Jacob; Krajewski, Stefanie; Wendel, Hans Peter; Nair, Sukumaran; Stasiak, Joanna; Moggridge, Geoff D

    2016-02-01

    Certain styrenic thermoplastic block copolymer elastomers can be processed to exhibit anisotropic mechanical properties which may be desirable for imitating biological tissues. The ex-vivo hemocompatibility of four triblock (hard-soft-hard) copolymers with polystyrene hard blocks and polyethylene, polypropylene, polyisoprene, polybutadiene or polyisobutylene soft blocks are tested using the modified Chandler loop method using fresh human blood and direct contact cell proliferation of fibroblasts upon the materials. The hemocompatibility and durability performance of a heparin coating is also evaluated. Measures of platelet and coagulation cascade activation indicate that the test materials are superior to polyester but inferior to expanded polytetrafluoroethylene and bovine pericardium reference materials. Against inflammatory measures the test materials are superior to polyester and bovine pericardium. The addition of a heparin coating results in reduced protein adsorption and ex-vivo hemocompatibility performance superior to all reference materials, in all measures. The tested styrenic thermoplastic block copolymers demonstrate adequate performance for blood contacting applications. PMID:26704549

  7. Computational simulations of flow dynamics and blood damage through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve scaled to pediatric size and flow.

    PubMed

    Yun, B Min; McElhinney, Doff B; Arjunon, Shiva; Mirabella, Lucia; Aidun, Cyrus K; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-09-22

    Despite pressing needs, there are currently no FDA approved prosthetic valves available for use in the pediatric population. This study is performed for predictive assessment of blood damage in bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) with pediatric sizing and flow conditions. A model of an adult-sized 23 mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) Regent(™) valve is selected for use in simulations, which is scaled in size for a 5-year old child and 6-month old infant. A previously validated lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to simulate pulsatile flow with thousands of suspended platelets for cases of adult, child, and infant BMHV flows. Adult BMHV flows demonstrate more disorganized small-scale flow features, but pediatric flows are associated with higher fluid shear stresses. Platelet damage in the pediatric cases is higher than in adult flow, highlighting thrombus complication dangers of pediatric BMHV flows. This does not necessarily suggest clinically important differences in thromboembolic potential. Highly damaged platelets in pediatric flows are primarily found far downstream of the valve, as there is less flow recirculation in pediatric flows. In addition, damage levels are well below expected thresholds for platelet activation. The extent of differences here documented between the pediatric and adult cases is of concern, demanding particular attention when pediatric valves are designed and manufactured. However, the differences between the pediatric and adult cases are not such that development of pediatric sized valves is untenable. This study may push for eventual approval of prosthetic valves resized for the pediatric population. Further studies will be necessary to determine the validity and potential thrombotic and clinical implications of these findings. PMID:25011622

  8. Molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of degenerative aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Hakuno, Daihiko; Kimura, Naritaka; Yoshioka, Masatoyo; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2009-01-01

    Morbidity from degenerative aortic valve disease is increasing worldwide, concomitant with the ageing of the general population and the habitual consumption of diets high in calories and cholesterol. Immunohistologic studies have suggested that the molecular mechanism occurring in the degenerate aortic valve resembles that of atherosclerosis, prompting the testing of HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) for the prevention of progression of native and bioprosthetic aortic valve degeneration. However, the effects of these therapies remain controversial. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of aortic valve degeneration are largely unknown, research in this area is advancing rapidly. The signaling components involved in embryonic valvulogenesis, such as Wnt, TGF-beta(1), BMP, and Notch, are also involved in the onset of aortic valve degeneration. Furthermore, investigations into extracellular matrix remodeling, angiogenesis, and osteogenesis in the aortic valve have been reported. Having noted avascularity of normal cardiac valves, we recently identified chondromodulin-I (chm-I) as a crucial anti-angiogenic factor. The expression of chm-I is restricted to cardiac valves from late embryogenesis to adulthood in the mouse, rat, and human. In human degenerate atherosclerotic valves, the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases and angiogenesis is observed in the area of chm-I downregulation. Gene targeting of chm-I resulted in VEGF expression, angiogenesis, and calcification in the aortic valves of aged mice, and aortic stenosis is detected by echocardiography, indicating that chm-I is a crucial factor for maintaining normal cardiac valvular function by preventing angiogenesis. The present review focuses on the animal models of aortic valve degeneration and recent studies on the molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of degenerative aortic valve disease. PMID:18766323

  9. Bioprosthetic versus mechanical prostheses for valve replacement in end-stage renal disease patients: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dong Fang; Zhou, Jessie J.; Karagaratnam, Aran; Phan, Steven; Yan, Tristan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) indicated for dialysis are increasingly requiring cardiac valve surgery. The choice of bioprosthetic or mechanic valve prosthesis for such patients requires careful risk assessment. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to assess current evidence available. Methods A comprehensive search from six electronic databases was performed from their inception to February 2015. Results from patients with ESRD undergoing cardiac surgery for bioprosthetic or mechanical valve replacement were identified. Results Sixteen studies with 8,483 patients with ESRD undergoing cardiac valve replacement surgery were included. No evidence of publication bias was detected. Prior angioplasty by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery was significantly higher in the bioprosthetic group compared to the mechanical group (16.0% vs. 12.0%, P=0.04); all other preoperative baseline patient characteristics were similar. There was no significant difference in 30-day mortality or all-cause mortality between the two comparisons. Compared with the mechanical group, the frequency of bleeding (5.2% vs. 6.4%, P=0.04) and risk of thromboembolism (2.7% vs. 12.8%, P=0.02) were significantly lower in the bioprosthetic group. There were similar rates of reoperation and valve endocarditis. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that patients with ESRD undergoing bioprosthetic or mechanical valve replacement had similar mid-long term survival. The bioprosthetic group had lower rates of bleeding and thromboembolism. Further studies are required to differentiate the impact of valve location. The presented results may be applicable for ESRD patients requiring prosthetic valve replacement. PMID:27162649

  10. A mechanical heart valve is the best choice

    PubMed Central

    Jaffer, Iqbal H; Whitlock, Richard P

    2016-01-01

    The choice of prosthesis type in patients with valvular heart disease should always be individualised. The treating heart team must weigh the concerns surrounding durability of bioprosthetic valves compared with mechanical valves and the need for lifelong anticoagulation required with mechanical valves. In general, guidelines recommend that patients under the age of 60 would benefit from a mechanical valve, and those over 70 would benefit from a bioprosthetic valve. We would argue, in this context, that the most appropriate choice for this patient would be undertaking a mitral valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. This recommendation is based on two considerations: first, there is a high likelihood of failure of a bioprosthesis within an unacceptably short period of time, which would then necessitate a higher risk reoperation. Second, there is high likelihood of needing long-term anticoagulation in a patient with severe mitral stenosis due to the development of atrial fibrillation. While we do acknowledge the difficulty in managing long-term anticoagulation of patients in rural settings, there have nonetheless been significant advancements in this realm with the use of pharmacist-led thrombosis clinics and point of care international normalised ratio (INR) devices in the treatment of rural patients in low-income and middle-income countries. For these reasons, therefore, we would strongly advocate for a mechanical valve in this 44-year-old patient from a rural setting. PMID:27326236

  11. Energy Expenditure and Activity of Transfemoral Amputees Using Mechanical and Microprocessor-Controlled Prosthetic Knees

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Kenton R.; Levine, James A.; Brey, Robert H.; McCrady, Shelly K.; Padgett, Denny J.; Joyner, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To quantify the energy efficiency of locomotion and free-living physical activity energy expenditure of transfemoral amputees using a mechanical and microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee. Design Repeated-measures design to evaluate comparative functional outcomes. Setting Exercise physiology laboratory and community free-living environment. Participants Subjects (N=15; 12 men, 3 women; age, 42±9y; range, 26 –57y) with transfemoral amputation. Intervention Research participants were long-term users of a mechanical prosthesis (20±10y as an amputee; range, 3–36y). They were fitted with a microprocessor-controlled knee prosthesis and allowed to acclimate (mean time, 18±8wk) before being retested. Main Outcome Measures Objective measurements of energy efficiency and total daily energy expenditure were obtained. The Prosthetic Evaluation Questionnaire was used to gather subjective feedback from the participants. Results Subjects demonstrated significantly increased physical activity–related energy expenditure levels in the participant’s free-living environment (P=.04) after wearing the microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joint. There was no significant difference in the energy efficiency of walking (P=.34). When using the microprocessor-controlled knee, the subjects expressed increased satisfaction in their daily lives (P=.02). Conclusions People ambulating with a microprocessor-controlled knee significantly increased their physical activity during daily life, outside the laboratory setting, and expressed an increased quality of life. PMID:18586142

  12. Detail view of steam chest and valve mechanisms for high ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of steam chest and valve mechanisms for high pressure stage of unit 40. - Burnsville Natural Gas Pumping Station, Saratoga Avenue between Little Kanawha River & C&O Railroad line, Burnsville, Braxton County, WV

  13. Detail view of valve mechanisms and goverenor on high pressure ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of valve mechanisms and goverenor on high pressure stage engine of unit 43. - Burnsville Natural Gas Pumping Station, Saratoga Avenue between Little Kanawha River & C&O Railroad line, Burnsville, Braxton County, WV

  14. Acute LVOT Obstruction with a Carbomedics Mechanical Valve Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Alsidawi, Said; Joyce, David L; Malouf, Joseph F; Nkomo, Vuyisile T

    2016-06-01

    A 62-year-old female with severe symptomatic rheumatic mitral stenosis was referred for mitral valve replacement. A 27-mm Carbomedics mechanical mitral valve was placed using everting sutures. As the patient was weaned off cardiopulmonary bypass, she became hemodynamically unstable. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiogram revealed a significant drop in left ventricular function along with severe LVOT obstruction. The Carbomedics prosthesis was replaced by a 27-mm St. Jude mechanical valve using noneverting sutures which relieved the LVOT obstruction. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12749 (J Card Surg 2016;31:376-379). PMID:27087635

  15. First-in-man treatment of a degenerated mitral surgical valve with the mechanical expanding Lotus™ valve.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Ulrich; Conradi, Lenard; Lubos, Edith; Deuschl, Florian; Schofer, Niklas; Treede, Hendrik; Schirmer, Johannes; Vogel, Beatrice; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Blankenberg, Stefan

    2016-07-20

    Percutaneous placement of transcatheter heart valves for treatment of degenerated surgical valves in the aortic and mitral position is an emerging therapy for selected high-risk patients. Here we describe in detail the first case in the literature of a patient (female, 72 years old, log EuroSCORE 22.9%) with a degenerated biological mitral prosthesis which was successfully treated by transapical implantation of a Lotus valve. The case described demonstrates the very controlled feasibility of valve-in-valve treatment for a degenerated mitral bioprosthesis with a mechanically expanding Lotus valve. PMID:26348679

  16. Arachnoid cyst slit valves: the mechanism for arachnoid cyst enlargement.

    PubMed

    Halani, Sameer H; Safain, Mina G; Heilman, Carl B

    2013-07-01

    Arachnoid cysts are common, accounting for approximately 1% of intracranial mass lesions. Most are congenital, clinically silent, and remain static in size. Occasionally, they increase in size and produce symptoms due to mass effect or obstruction. The mechanism of enlargement of arachnoid cysts is controversial. One-way slit valves are often hypothesized as the mechanism for enlargement. The authors present 4 cases of suprasellar prepontine arachnoid cysts in which a slit valve was identified. The patients presented with hydrocephalus due to enlargement of the cyst. The valve was located in the arachnoid wall of the cyst directly over the basilar artery. The authors believe this slit valve was responsible for the net influx of CSF into the cyst and for its enlargement. They also present 1 case of an arachnoid cyst in the middle cranial fossa that had a small circular opening but lacked a slit valve. This cyst did not enlarge but surgery was required because of rupture and the development of a subdural hygroma. One-way slit valves exist and are a possible mechanism of enlargement of suprasellar prepontine arachnoid cysts. The valve was located directly over the basilar artery in each of these cases. Caudad-to-cephalad CSF flow during the cardiac cycle increased the opening of the valve, whereas cephalad-to-caudad CSF flow during the remainder of the cardiac cycle pushed the slit opening against the basilar artery and decreased the size of the opening. Arachnoid cysts that communicate CSF via circular, nonslit valves are probably more likely to remain stable. PMID:23662935

  17. Continuous Locomotion-Mode Identification for Prosthetic Legs Based on Neuromuscular–Mechanical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Hargrove, Levi J.; Dou, Zhi; Rogers, Daniel R.; Englehart, Kevin B.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we developed an algorithm based on neuromuscular–mechanical fusion to continuously recognize a variety of locomotion modes performed by patients with transfemoral (TF) amputations. Electromyographic (EMG) signals recorded from gluteal and residual thigh muscles and ground reaction forces/moments measured from the prosthetic pylon were used as inputs to a phase-dependent pattern classifier for continuous locomotion-mode identification. The algorithm was evaluated using data collected from five patients with TF amputations. The results showed that neuromuscular–mechanical fusion outperformed methods that used only EMG signals or mechanical information. For continuous performance of one walking mode (i.e., static state), the interface based on neuromuscular–mechanical fusion and a support vector machine (SVM) algorithm produced 99% or higher accuracy in the stance phase and 95% accuracy in the swing phase for locomotion-mode recognition. During mode transitions, the fusion-based SVM method correctly recognized all transitions with a sufficient predication time. These promising results demonstrate the potential of the continuous locomotion-mode classifier based on neuromuscular–mechanical fusion for neural control of prosthetic legs. PMID:21768042

  18. A Study on the Mechanism for Cavitation in the Mechanical Heart Valves with an Electrohydraulic Total Artificial Heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwansung; Tsukiya, Tomonori; Homma, Akihiko; Kamimura, Tadayuki; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Kitamura, Soichiro

    It has been conceived that the mechanical heart valves mounted in an artificial heart close much faster than in vivo use, resulting in cavitation bubbles formation. In this study, the mechanisms for cavitation in mechanical heart valves (MHVs) is investigated with monoleaflet and bileaflet valves in the mitral position with an electrohydraulic total artificial heart (EHTAH). The valve-closing velocity and pressure-drop through the valve were done, and a high-speed video camera was employed to investigate the mechanism for MHVs cavitation. The valve-closing velocity and pressure-drop of the bileaflet valves were less than that of the monoleaflet valves. Most of the cavitation bubbles in the monoleaflet valves were observed next to the edge of the valve stop and the inner side of the leaflet. With the bileaflet valves, cavitation bubbles were concentrated along the leaflet tip. Also, the number density of cavitation bubbles in the bileaflet valves was less than that of the monoleaflet valves. The number density of cavitation bubbles increased with an increase in the valve-closing velocity and the valve stop area. It is established that squeeze flow holds the key to cavitation in the mechanical heart valve. In a viewpoint of squeeze flow, the bileaflet valve with slow valve-closing velocity and small valve stop area, is safer to prevent of blood cell damage than the monoleaflet valves.

  19. Motion analysis of mechanical heart valve prosthesis utilizing high-speed video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adlparvar, Payam; Guo, George; Kingsbury, Chris

    1993-01-01

    The Edwards-Duromedics (ED) mechanical heart valve prosthesis is of a bileaflet design, incorporating unique design features that distinguish its performance with respect to other mechanical valves of similar type. Leaflet motion of mechanical heart valves, particularly during closure, is related to valve durability, valve sounds and the efficiency of the cardiac output. Modifications to the ED valve have resulted in significant improvements with respect to leaflet motion. In this study a high-speed video system was used to monitor the leaflet motion of the valve, and to compare the performance of the Modified Specification to that of the Original Specification using a St. Jude Medical as a control valve.

  20. Effects of bileaflet mechanical heart valve orientation on coronary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haya, Laura; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2015-11-01

    The aortic sinus is approximately tri-radially symmetric, but bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs), which are commonly used to replace diseased aortic valves, are bilaterally symmetric. This mismatch in symmetry suggests that the orientation in which a BMHV is implanted within the aortic sinus affects the flow characteristics downstream of it. This study examines the effect of BMHV orientation on the flow in the coronary arteries, which originate in the aortic sinus and supply the heart tissue with blood. Planar particle image velocimetry measurements were made past a BMHV mounted at the inlet of an anatomical aorta model under physiological flow conditions. The complex interactions between the valve jets, the sinus vortex and the flow in the right coronary artery were elucidated for three valve orientations. The coronary flow rate was directly affected by the size, orientation, and time evolution of the vortex in the sinus, all of which were sensitive to the valve's orientation. The total flow through the artery was highest when the valve was oriented with its axis of symmetry intersecting the artery's opening. The findings of this research may assist surgeons in choosing the best orientation for BMHV implantation. The bileaflet valve was donated by St. Jude Medical. Financial support was provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  1. Valve disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Pessel, Cara; Bonanno, Clarissa

    2014-08-01

    Maternal cardiac disease is a major cause of non-obstetric morbidity and accounts for 10-25% of maternal mortality. Valvular heart disease may result from congenital abnormalities or acquired lesions, some of which may involve more than one valve. Maternal and fetal risks in pregnant patients with valve disease vary according to the type and severity of the valve lesion along with resulting abnormalities of functional capacity, left ventricular function, and pulmonary artery pressure. Certain high-risk conditions are considered contraindications to pregnancy, while others may be successfully managed with observation, medications, and, in refractory cases, surgical intervention. Communication between the patient׳s obstetrician, maternal-fetal medicine specialist, obstetrical anesthesiologist, and cardiologist is critical in managing a pregnancy with underlying maternal cardiac disease. The management of the various types of valve diseases in pregnancy will be reviewed here, along with a discussion of related complications including mechanical prosthetic valves and infective endocarditis. PMID:25037517

  2. Fluid Mechanics of Heart Valves and Their Replacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Le, Trung Bao; Gilmanov, Anvar

    2016-01-01

    As the pulsatile cardiac blood flow drives the heart valve leaflets to open and close, the flow in the vicinity of the valve resembles a pulsed jet through a nonaxisymmetric orifice with a dynamically changing area. As a result, three-dimensional vortex rings with intricate topology emerge that interact with the complex cardiac anatomy and give rise to shear layers, regions of recirculation, and flow instabilities that could ultimately lead to transition to turbulence. Such complex flow patterns, which are inherently valve- and patient-specific, lead to mechanical forces at scales that can cause blood cell damage and thrombosis, increasing the likelihood of stroke, and can trigger the pathogenesis of various life-threatening valvular heart diseases. We summarize the current understanding of flow phenomena induced by heart valves, discuss their linkage with disease pathways, and emphasize the research advances required to translate in-depth understanding of valvular hemodynamics into effective patient therapies.

  3. A Novel Technique for Experimental Flow Visualization of Mechanical Valves.

    PubMed

    Huang Zhang, Pablo S; Dalal, Alex R; Kresh, J Yasha; Laub, Glenn W

    2016-01-01

    The geometry of the hinge region in mechanical heart valves has been postulated to play an important role in the development of thromboembolic events (TEs). This study describes a novel technique developed to visualize washout characteristics in mechanical valve hinge areas. A dairy-based colloidal suspension (DBCS) was used as a high-contrast tracer. It was introduced directly into the hinge-containing sections of two commercially available valves mounted in laser-milled fluidic channels and subsequently washed out at several flow rates. Time-lapse images were analyzed to determine the average washout rate and generate intensity topography maps of the DBCS clearance. As flow increased, washout improved and clearance times were shorter in all cases. Significantly different washout rate time constants were observed between valves, average >40% faster clearance (p < 0.01). The topographic maps revealed that each valve had a characteristic pattern of washout. The technique proved reproducible with a maximum recorded standard error of mean (SEM) of ±3.9. Although the experimental washout dynamics have yet to be correlated with in vivo visualization studies, the methodology may help identify key flow features influencing TEs. This visualization methodology can be a useful tool to help evaluate stagnation zones in new and existing heart valve hinge designs. PMID:26554553

  4. Measurements of flow past a bileaflet mechanical heart valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haya, Laura; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2013-11-01

    A bileaflet mechanical heart valve has been inserted in an axisymmetric model of the aorta within a mock circulation apparatus with physiological pressure and flow variations. The velocity field behind the valve has been measured with laser Doppler velocimetry and particle image velocimetry. The results closely match those reported by similar studies. A triple jet emanated from the valve's orifices and regions of reverse flow formed in the sinus region. Velocity fluctuations were greatest in the shear layers of the jets. The average r.m.s. streamwise velocity fluctuation over the turbulent period was 0.22 m/s; its maximum value was 0.53 m/s and occurred at the onset of deceleration. Measurements with the valve inserted in an anatomical model of the aorta are planned for the near future. The present and future measurements will be compared to determine the effects of the aorta anatomy on the characteristics of flow through bileaflet valves. In particular, measurements of the viscous and turbulent shear stresses will be analyzed to identify possible locations of blood element damage, and regions of recirculation and stagnation will be identified as locations favourable to thrombus growth. The effects of flows in branching arteries and valve orientation will also be investigated. Supported by NSERC.

  5. Systematic variation of prosthetic foot spring affects center-of-mass mechanics and metabolic cost during walking

    PubMed Central

    Zelik, Karl E.; Collins, Steven H.; Adamczyk, Peter G.; Segal, Ava D.; Klute, Glenn K.; Morgenroth, David C.; Hahn, Michael E.; Orendurff, Michael S.; Czerniecki, Joseph M.; Kuo, Arthur D.

    2014-01-01

    Lower-limb amputees expend more energy to walk than non-amputees and have an elevated risk of secondary disabilities. Insufficient push-off by the prosthetic foot may be a contributing factor. We aimed to systematically study the effect of prosthetic foot mechanics on gait, to gain insight into fundamental prosthetic design principles. We varied a single parameter in isolation, the energy-storing spring in a prototype prosthetic foot, the Controlled Energy Storage and Return (CESR) foot, and observed the effect on gait. Subjects walked on the CESR foot with three different springs. We performed parallel studies on amputees and on non-amputees wearing prosthetic simulators. In both groups, spring characteristics similarly affected ankle and body center-of-mass (COM) mechanics and metabolic cost. Softer springs led to greater energy storage, energy return and prosthetic limb COM push-off work. But metabolic energy expenditure was lowest with a spring of intermediate stiffness, suggesting biomechanical disadvantages to the softest spring despite its greater push-off. Disadvantages of the softest spring may include excessive heel displacements and COM collision losses. We also observed some differences in joint kinetics between amputees and non-amputees walking on the prototype foot. During prosthetic push-off, amputees exhibited reduced energy transfer from the prosthesis to the COM along with increased hip work, perhaps due to greater energy dissipation at the knee. Nevertheless, the results indicate that spring compliance can contribute to push-off, but with biomechanical trade-offs that limit the degree to which greater push-off might improve walking economy. PMID:21708509

  6. Biomechanics of engineered heart valve tissues.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Michael S

    2006-01-01

    The vast majority of prosthetic valve designs are either mechanical prosthesis and bioprosthetic heart valves (BHV). Mechanical prostheses are fabricated from synthetic materials, mainly pyrolytic carbon leaflets mounted in a titanium frame. Tissue engineering (TE) offers the potential to create cardiac replacement structures containing living cells, which has the potential for growth and remodeling, overcoming the limitations of current pediatric heart valve devices. The purpose of this paper is to present a review of the structure-strength relationships for native and engineered heart valve tissues. PMID:17946864

  7. Testing of elastomeric liners used in limb prosthetics: classification of 15 products by mechanical performance.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Joan E; Nicholson, Brian S; Zachariah, Santosh G; Cassisi, Damon V; Karchin, Ari; Fergason, John R

    2004-03-01

    The mechanical properties of 15 elastomeric liner products used in limb prosthetics were evaluated under compressive, frictional, shear, and tensile loading conditions. All testing was conducted at load levels comparable to interface stress measurements reported on transtibial amputee subjects. For each test configuration, materials were classified into four groups based on the shapes of their response curves. For the 15 liners tested, there were 10 unique classification sets, indicating a wide range of unique materials. In general, silicone gel liners classified within the same groups thus were quite similar to each other. They were of lower compressive, shear, and tensile stiffness than the silicone elastomer products, consistent with their lightly cross-linked, high-fluid content structures. Silicone elastomer products better spanned the response groups than the gel liners, demonstrating a wide range of compressive, shear, and tensile stiffness values. Against a skin-like material, a urethane liner had the highest coefficient of friction of any liner tested, although coefficients of friction values for most of the materials were higher than interface shear:pressure ratios measured on amputee subjects using Pelite liners. The elastomeric liner material property data and response groupings provided here can potentially be useful to prosthetic fitting by providing quantitative information on similarities and differences among products. PMID:15558371

  8. Recommendations for the imaging assessment of prosthetic heart valves: a report from the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging endorsed by the Chinese Society of Echocardiography, the Inter-American Society of Echocardiography, and the Brazilian Department of Cardiovascular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Pibarot, Philippe; Chambers, John; Edvardsen, Thor; Delgado, Victoria; Dulgheru, Raluca; Pepi, Mauro; Cosyns, Bernard; Dweck, Mark R; Garbi, Madalina; Magne, Julien; Nieman, Koen; Rosenhek, Raphael; Bernard, Anne; Lowenstein, Jorge; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Rabischoffsky, Arnaldo; Vyhmeister, Rodrigo Hernández; Zhou, Xiao; Zhang, Yun; Zamorano, Jose-Luis; Habib, Gilbert

    2016-06-01

    Prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction is rare but potentially life-threatening. Although often challenging, establishing the exact cause of PHV dysfunction is essential to determine the appropriate treatment strategy. In clinical practice, a comprehensive approach that integrates several parameters of valve morphology and function assessed with 2D/3D transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography is a key to appropriately detect and quantitate PHV dysfunction. Cinefluoroscopy, multidetector computed tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and to a lesser extent, nuclear imaging are complementary tools for the diagnosis and management of PHV complications. The present document provides recommendations for the use of multimodality imaging in the assessment of PHVs. PMID:27143783

  9. Integrating bio-prosthetic valves in the Fontan operation - Novel treatment to control retrograde flow in caval veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukicevic, Marija; Conover, Timothy; Zhou, Jian; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Figliola, Richard

    2012-11-01

    For a child born with only one functional heart ventricle, the sequence of palliative surgeries typically culminates in the Fontan operation. This procedure is usually successful initially, but leads to later complications, for reasons not fully understood. Examples are respiratory-dependent retrograde flows in the caval and hepatic veins, and increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), hypothesized to be responsible for elevated pressure in the liver and disease of the liver and intestines. Here we study the parameters responsible for retrograde flows in the inferior vena cava (IVC) and hepatic vein (HV), and investigate two novel interventions to control retrograde flow: implanting either a Medtronic Contegra valved conduit or an Edwards lifescience pericardial aortic valve in the IVC or HV. We performed the experiments in a multi-scale, patient specific mock circuit, with normal and elevated PVR, towards the optimization of the Fontan circulation. The results show that both valves can significantly reduce retrograde flows in the veins, suggesting potential advantages in the treatment of the patients with congenital heart diseases. Fondation Leducq

  10. Mechanics of the mitral valve strut chordae insertion region.

    PubMed

    Padala, Muralidhar; Sacks, Michael S; Liou, Shasan W; Balachandran, Kartik; He, Zhaoming; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2010-08-01

    Interest in developing durable mitral valve repair methods is growing, underscoring the need to better understand the native mitral valve mechanics. In this study, the authors investigate the dynamic deformation of the mitral valve strut chordae-to-anterior leaflet transition zone using a novel stretch mapping method and report the complex mechanics of this region for the first time. Eight structurally normal porcine mitral valves were studied in a pulsatile left heart simulator under physiological hemodynamic conditions -120 mm peak transvalvular pressure, 5 l/min cardiac output at 70 bpm. The chordal insertion region was marked with a structured array of 31 miniature markers, and their motions throughout the cardiac cycle were tracked using two high speed cameras. 3D marker coordinates were calculated using direct linear transformation, and a second order continuous surface was fit to the marker cloud at each time frame. Average areal stretch, principal stretch magnitudes and directions, and stretch rates were computed, and temporal changes in each parameter were mapped over the insertion region. Stretch distribution was heterogeneous over the entire strut chordae insertion region, with the highest magnitudes along the edges of the chordal insertion region and the least along the axis of the strut chordae. At early systole, radial stretch was predominant, but by mid systole, significant stretch was observed in both radial and circumferential directions. The compressive stretches measured during systole indicate a strong coupling between the two principal directions, explaining the small magnitude of the systolic areal stretch. This study for the first time provides the dynamic kinematics of the strut chordae insertion region in the functioning mitral valve. A heterogeneous stretch pattern was measured, with the mechanics of this region governed by the complex underlying collagen architecture. The insertion region seemed to be under stretch during both systole and

  11. Causes and formation of cavitation in mechanical heart valves.

    PubMed

    Graf, T; Reul, H; Detlefs, C; Wilmes, R; Rau, G

    1994-04-01

    Cavitation may develop on mechanical valvular prostheses in the mitral position; it causes blood damage and, under particularly adverse conditions, it may result in sudden failure of the prosthesis. Therefore, with regard to future development of mechanical heart valves, the pattern of cavitation and its predisposing factors in different types of prostheses were investigated in in vitro studies, which focused on the analysis of valve closure dynamics and the influence of design parameters on the cavitation-inducing pressure drop at the artificial valve. It was found that cavitation is produced primarily by the deceleration of the closing body of the valve. At 900g, the measured deceleration of the closing bodies falls in the range of the decelerations determined in oscillation experiments for investigating cavitation-induced material erosion. The pressure drop produced thereby is overlapped by the pressure drop in accelerated or turbulent flow regions produced by design characteristics at outlet struts, stop faces or sealing lips during backflow through the closing disc. These phenomena exist particularly in regions of high flow velocity, i.e. at the instant of closure at the maximum distance from the bearing axis of the closing body (12 o'clock position). The onset of cavitation is additionally promoted in this position by a tight joint between the closing body and the ring. Oscillations of the closing body generally have a negligible effect on the cavitation behavior. From these relationships one can infer that cavitation can be avoided in future in mechanical heart valves by locally limited design measures. Especially, unsteadiness in the backflow through the closing valve is to be avoided. PMID:8061870

  12. Mechanism of noise generation by cavitation in hydraulic relief valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, K.; Miyamoto, Y.; Kataoka, T.; Takagi, S.; Kato, H.

    2015-12-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism of noise generation in a hydraulic relief valve, oil cavitating flows in a half cut model of the valve were observed by means of a high-speed camera and were simulated numerically. As the result of image analysis, the fluctuation of cavitation volume is corresponding to the pressure fluctuation of downstream, and the both fluctuations take peaks at frequencies from 1.5 to 2.5 kHz depending on the back pressure. In addition, as the back pressure increases, the frequency of the pressure fluctuation increases and the peak value decreases. These phenomena were also qualitatively reproduced in the numerical simulation.

  13. Percutaneous Transcatheter Aortic Disc Valve Prosthesis Implantation: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sochman, Jan

    2000-09-15

    Purpose: Over the past 30 years there have been experimental efforts at catheter-based management of aortic valve regurgitation with the idea of extending treatment to nonsurgical candidates. A new catheter-based aortic valve design is described.Methods: The new catheter-delivered valve consists of a stent-based valve cage with locking mechanism and a prosthetic flexible tilting valve disc. The valve cage is delivered first followed by deployment and locking of the disc. In acute experiments, valve implantation was done in four dogs.Results: Valve implantation was successful in all four animals. The implanted valve functioned well for the duration of the experiments (up to 3 hr).Conclusion: The study showed the implantation feasibility and short-term function of the tested catheter-based aortic disc valve. Further experimental studies are warranted.

  14. Calcific Aortic Valve Disease: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Lerman, Daniel Alejandro; Prasad, Sai; Alotti, Nasri

    2016-01-01

    Calcification occurs in atherosclerotic vascular lesions and In the aortic valve. Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a slow, progressive disorder that ranges from mild valve thickening without obstruction of blood flow, termed aortic sclerosis, to severe calcification with impaired leaflet motion, termed aortic stenosis. In the past, this process was thought to be ‘degenerative’ because of time-dependent wear and tear of the leaflets, with passive calcium deposition. The presence of osteoblasts in atherosclerotic vascular lesions and in CAVD implies that calcification is an active, regulated process akin to atherosclerosis, with lipoprotein deposition and chronic inflammation. If calcification is active, via pro-osteogenic pathways, one might expect that development and progression of calcification could be inhibited. The overlap in the clinical factors associated with calcific valve disease and atherosclerosis provides further support for a shared disease mechanism. In our recent research we used an in vitro porcine valve interstitial cell model to study spontaneous calcification and potential promoters and inhibitors. Using this model, we found that denosumab, a human monoclonal antibody targeting the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand may, at a working concentration of 50 μg/mL, inhibit induced calcium deposition to basal levels.

  15. Three-Dimensional Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valve Flow Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Rui; Lai, Yong G.; Chandran, Krishnan B.

    2005-01-01

    The wall shear stress induced by the leaflet motion during the valve-closing phase has been implicated with thrombus initiation with prosthetic valves. Detailed flow dynamic analysis in the vicinity of the leaflets and the housing during the valve-closure phase is of interest in understanding this relationship. A three-dimensional unsteady flow analysis past bileaflet valve prosthesis in the mitral position is presented incorporating a fluid-structure interaction algorithm for leaflet motion during the valve-closing phase. Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian method is employed for incorporating the leaflet motion. The forces exerted by the fluid on the leaflets are computed and applied to the leaflet equation of motion to predict the leaflet position. Relatively large velocities are computed in the valve clearance region between the valve housing and the leaflet edge with the resulting relatively large wall shear stresses at the leaflet edge during the impact-rebound duration. Negative pressure transients are computed on the surface of the leaflets on the atrial side of the valve, with larger magnitudes at the leaflet edge during the closing and rebound as well. Vortical flow development is observed on the inflow (atrial) side during the valve impact-rebound phase in a location central to the leaflet and away from the clearance region where cavitation bubbles have been visualized in previously reported experimental studies. PMID:15636108

  16. Transcatheter ACURATE-TA Aortic Valve Implantation in a Patient With a Previous Mechanical Mitral Valve.

    PubMed

    Bagur, Rodrigo; Kiaii, Bob; Teefy, Patrick J; Diamantouros, Pantelis; Harle, Christopher; Goela, Aashish; Chan, Ian; Chu, Michael W A

    2015-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in the presence of a mechanical mitral valve (MMV) prosthesis is still challenging because of the rigid mitral frame within the aortomitral curtain. Moreover, low-lying coronary ostia represent a hazardous problem of coronary obstruction, especially in narrow or porcelain aortic roots. The present case demonstrates the successful management of 2 challenging anatomical issues, the rigid cage of the MMV and the low-lying left main coronary ostium (LMCO), with the implantation of the ACURATE-TA bioprosthesis (Symetis SA, Ecublens, Switzerland). It also highlights the importance of having multiple TAVI devices in order to choose the ideal transcatheter aortic bioprosthesis to fit the unique anatomical presentation of the patient. PMID:26522576

  17. Intro to Valve Guide Reconditioning. Automotive Mechanics. Valves. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, W.

    This instructional package, one in a series of individualized instructional units on tools and techniques for repairing worn valve guides in motor vehicles, provides practical experience for students in working on cylinder heads. Covered in the module are reaming valve guides that are oversized to match a new oversized valve, reaming valve guides…

  18. Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Prosthetic Aortic Valves: Comparison between Immersed Boundary and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Techniques for the Mesh Representation

    PubMed Central

    Iannaccone, Francesco; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan; Segers, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the role of FSI (fluid-structure interaction) simulations in the analysis of the fluid-mechanics of heart valves is becoming more and more important, being able to capture the interaction between the blood and both the surrounding biological tissues and the valve itself. When setting up an FSI simulation, several choices have to be made to select the most suitable approach for the case of interest: in particular, to simulate flexible leaflet cardiac valves, the type of discretization of the fluid domain is crucial, which can be described with an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) or an Eulerian formulation. The majority of the reported 3D heart valve FSI simulations are performed with the Eulerian formulation, allowing for large deformations of the domains without compromising the quality of the fluid grid. Nevertheless, it is known that the ALE-FSI approach guarantees more accurate results at the interface between the solid and the fluid. The goal of this paper is to describe the same aortic valve model in the two cases, comparing the performances of an ALE-based FSI solution and an Eulerian-based FSI approach. After a first simplified 2D case, the aortic geometry was considered in a full 3D set-up. The model was kept as similar as possible in the two settings, to better compare the simulations’ outcomes. Although for the 2D case the differences were unsubstantial, in our experience the performance of a full 3D ALE-FSI simulation was significantly limited by the technical problems and requirements inherent to the ALE formulation, mainly related to the mesh motion and deformation of the fluid domain. As a secondary outcome of this work, it is important to point out that the choice of the solver also influenced the reliability of the final results. PMID:27128798

  19. Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Prosthetic Aortic Valves: Comparison between Immersed Boundary and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Techniques for the Mesh Representation.

    PubMed

    Bavo, Alessandra M; Rocatello, Giorgia; Iannaccone, Francesco; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan; Segers, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the role of FSI (fluid-structure interaction) simulations in the analysis of the fluid-mechanics of heart valves is becoming more and more important, being able to capture the interaction between the blood and both the surrounding biological tissues and the valve itself. When setting up an FSI simulation, several choices have to be made to select the most suitable approach for the case of interest: in particular, to simulate flexible leaflet cardiac valves, the type of discretization of the fluid domain is crucial, which can be described with an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) or an Eulerian formulation. The majority of the reported 3D heart valve FSI simulations are performed with the Eulerian formulation, allowing for large deformations of the domains without compromising the quality of the fluid grid. Nevertheless, it is known that the ALE-FSI approach guarantees more accurate results at the interface between the solid and the fluid. The goal of this paper is to describe the same aortic valve model in the two cases, comparing the performances of an ALE-based FSI solution and an Eulerian-based FSI approach. After a first simplified 2D case, the aortic geometry was considered in a full 3D set-up. The model was kept as similar as possible in the two settings, to better compare the simulations' outcomes. Although for the 2D case the differences were unsubstantial, in our experience the performance of a full 3D ALE-FSI simulation was significantly limited by the technical problems and requirements inherent to the ALE formulation, mainly related to the mesh motion and deformation of the fluid domain. As a secondary outcome of this work, it is important to point out that the choice of the solver also influenced the reliability of the final results. PMID:27128798

  20. CIEF-CZE-MS applying a mechanical valve.

    PubMed

    Hühner, Jens; Neusüß, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Separation and determination of proteins by capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) and mass spectrometry (MS) are essential and complementary techniques in the field of bioanalysis. The hyphenation of these two techniques is challenging due to the nonvolatile substances required for the CIEF separation. An additional separation step prior to MS enables the removal of the nonvolatile substances. However, it is complicated due to the small transfer volume and the required high voltages in the CIEF process. In order to remove nonvolatile substances and transfer the analytes toward the mass spectrometer, we applied a four-port valve to couple CIEF online to capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry. To demonstrate the power of this concept, hemoglobin and glycated hemoglobin with an isoelectric point difference of 0.037 were separated via isoelectric focusing and characterized by MS. In general, this setup guaranties interference-free mass spectra and will provide an information-rich and sensitive top down protein characterization. Graphical abstract Interference free coupling of capillary isoelectric focusing to mass spectrometry by applying a mechanical valve. The focused proteins were tranferred from the isoelectric focusing to capillary electrophoresis by a mechanical valve. Afterwards, the transferred protein was sepearated from ionization interfering substances in the capillary electrophoresis prior to the mass spectrometry detection. PMID:27052774

  1. On the Biaxial Mechanical Response of Porcine Tricuspid Valve Leaflets.

    PubMed

    Amini Khoiy, Keyvan; Amini, Rouzbeh

    2016-10-01

    Located on the right side of the heart, the tricuspid valve (TV) prevents blood backflow from the right ventricle to the right atrium. Similar to other cardiac valves, quantification of TV biaxial mechanical properties is essential in developing accurate computational models. In the current study, for the first time, the biaxial stress-strain behavior of porcine TV was measured ex vivo under different loading protocols using biaxial tensile testing equipment. The results showed a highly nonlinear response including a compliant region followed by a rapid transition to a stiff region for all of the TV leaflets both in the circumferential and in the radial directions. Based on the data analysis, all three leaflets were found to be anisotropic, and they were stiffer in the circumferential direction in comparison to the radial direction. It was also concluded that the posterior leaflet was the most anisotropic leaflet. PMID:27538260

  2. Novel differential mechanism enabling two DOF from a single actuator: application to a prosthetic hand.

    PubMed

    Belter, Joseph T; Dollar, Aaron M

    2013-06-01

    There will always be a drive to reduce the complexity, weight, and cost of mobile platforms while increasing their inherent capabilities. This paper presents a novel method of increasing the range of achievable grasp configurations of a mechatronic hand controlled by a single actuator. By utilizing the entire actuator space, the hand is able to perform four grasp types (lateral, precision, precision/power, and power) with a single input resulting in a potentially lighter and simpler hand design. We demonstrate this strategy in a prototype hand that is evaluated to determine the benefit of this method over the addition of a second actuator. Results show a decrease in weight but a 0.8 sec transition time between grasp types with the proposed method. The prototype hand can be controlled by a single EMG signal that can command a change in grasp type or an opening/closing of the hand. We discuss the potential of this mechanism to improve prosthetic hand design as compared to current myoelectric systems. PMID:24187259

  3. Valve

    DOEpatents

    Cho, Nakwon

    1980-01-01

    A positive acting valve suitable for operation in a corrosive environment is provided. The valve includes a hollow valve body defining an open-ended bore for receiving two, axially aligned, spaced-apart, cylindrical inserts. One insert, designated the seat insert, terminates inside the valve body in an annular face which lies within plane normal to the axis of the two inserts. An elastomeric O-ring seal is disposed in a groove extending about the annular face. The other insert, designated the wedge insert, terminates inside the valve body in at least two surfaces oppositely inclined with respect to each other and with respect to a plane normal to the axis of the two inserts. An elongated reciprocable gate, movable between the two inserts along a path normal to the axis of the two inserts, has a first flat face portion disposed adjacent and parallel to the annular face of the seat insert. The gate has a second face portion opposite to the first face portion provided with at least two oppositely inclined surfaces for mating with respective inclined surfaces of the wedge insert. An opening is provided through the gate which registers with a flow passage through the two inserts when the valve is open. Interaction of the respective inclined surfaces of the gate and wedge insert act to force the first flat face portion of the gate against the O-ring seal in the seat insert at the limits of gate displacement where it reaches its respective fully open and fully closed positions.

  4. Structural and mechanical characterisation of the peri-prosthetic tissue surrounding loosened hip prostheses. An explorative study.

    PubMed

    Moerman, Astrid; Zadpoor, Amir A; Oostlander, Angela; Schoeman, Monique; Rahnamay Moshtagh, Parisa; Pouran, Behdad; Valstar, Edward

    2016-09-01

    Very little is known about the structure and properties of peri-prosthetic fibrous tissue that is found around loose orthopaedic implants. We describe a method for characterizing the structural organisation (histology, confocal microscopy) as well as the nano- and micro-scale mechanical behaviour (atomic force microscopy, nanoindentation) of peri-prosthetic fibrous tissue. The tissue was collected from 11 patients undergoing revision surgery due to aseptic loosening. Sirius Red and Movat histological staining procedures indicated that the tissue mainly consists of collagen fibres and ground substance. However, large inter- and intra-patient variations in the relative proportions of these tissue components were found, as well as in collagen fibre orientation and possibly also maturation. The nano-scale Young׳s moduli ranged from 0-950kPa, but showed large inter-patient variability. When the results per sample were presented in a probability density function, we could roughly discriminate one peak in the 0-100kPa range and/or one peak in the 100-500Pa range. These nano-scale moduli seem to respectively present the mechanical properties of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen molecules. The majority of the micro-scale Young׳s moduli ranged between 0.5 and 2.0kPa for all samples. This explorative study provides new insights in (the variations of) structural organisation and mechanical properties of peri-prosthetic tissue. PMID:27281163

  5. Nuclear Technology. Course 30: Mechanical Inspection. Module 30-3, Valve Inspection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasil, Ed; Espy, John

    This third in a series of eight modules for a course titled Mechanical Inspection describes all the major types of valves utilized in a nuclear power plant and the purposes of the preinstallation and installation inspections; also describes the valve testing required for particular valves. The module follows a typical format that includes the…

  6. Recent advances in aortic valve disease: highlights from a bicuspid aortic valve to transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Augoustides, John G T; Wolfe, Yanika; Walsh, Elizabeth K; Szeto, Wilson Y

    2009-08-01

    There have been major advances in the management of aortic valve disease. Because bicuspid aortic valve is common and predicts an increased risk of adverse aortic events, these patients merit aortic surveillance and consideration for ascending aortic replacement when its diameter exceeds 4.0 cm. Serial quantitative echocardiographic analysis, as compared with traditional clinical markers, can result in better timing of surgical intervention for aortic regurgitation. Furthermore, echocardiographic analysis of aortic regurgitation can classify the mechanism based on cusp mobility to guide aortic valve repair. In aortic root replacement, aortic valve preservation with reimplantation is a mainstream surgical option in Marfan syndrome to offer freedom from valve-related anticoagulation. Prosthetic aortic root replacement has further alternatives with the introduction of the aortic neosinus design and acceptable clinical outcomes with the porcine xenograft. Because aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) may adversely affect patient outcome, its perioperative prevention is important. Furthermore, significant functional mitral regurgitation in association with aortic stenosis often resolves after aortic valve replacement. Echocardiographic assessment of the aortic valve must include valve area because the transaortic pressure gradient may be low in severe stenosis. Aortic valve replacement with partial sternotomy is safe and offers a reasonable less invasive alternative. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement, whether transfemoral or transapical, has revolutionized aortic valve replacement; it remains a major theme in the specialty for 2009 and beyond. PMID:19497768

  7. Fluid Dynamic Characterization of a Polymeric Heart Valve Prototype (Poli-Valve) tested under Continuous and Pulsatile Flow Conditions

    PubMed Central

    De Gaetano, Francesco; Serrani, Marta; Bagnoli, Paola; Brubert, Jacob; Stasiak, Joanna; Moggridge, Geoff D.; Costantino, Maria Laura

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Only mechanical and biological heart valve prostheses are currently commercially available. The former show longer durability but require anticoagulant therapy, the latter display better fluid dynamic behaviour but do not have adequate durability. New Polymeric Heart Valves (PHVs) could potentially combine the haemodynamic properties of biological valves with the durability of mechanical valves. This work presents a hydrodynamic evaluation of two groups of newly developed supra-annular tri-leaflet prosthetic heart valves made from styrenic block copolymers (SBC): Poli-Valves. Methods Two types of Poli-Valves made of SBC differing in polystyrene fraction content were tested under continuous and pulsatile flow conditions as prescribed by ISO 5840 Standard. An ad - hoc designed pulse duplicator allowed the valve prototypes to be tested at different flow rates and frequencies. Pressure and flow were recorded; pressure drops, effective orifice area (EOA), and regurgitant volume were computed to assess the valve’s behaviour. Results Both types Poli-Valves met the minimum requirements in terms of regurgitation and EOA as specified by ISO 5840 Standard. Results were compared with five mechanical heart valves (MHVs) and five tissue heart valves (THVs), currently available on the market. Conclusion Based on these results, polymeric heart valves based on styrenic block copolymers, as Poli-Valves are, can be considered as promising alternative for heart valve replacement in near future. PMID:26689146

  8. Mechanical testing of prosthetic feet utilized in low-income countries according to ISO-10328 standard.

    PubMed

    Jensen, J Steen; Treichl, Henning B

    2007-06-01

    This report summarizes the results from 1132 ISO-10328 standard tests performed on 21 different prosthetic foot models commonly utilized in the developing world. None of the tested feet passed the strictest ISO testing protocol. All but one failed at the initial Static Proof test, which simulates a single momentary overload, due to permanent forefoot deformation. In addition, all tested feet had significant internal failures that were visible when sectioned longitudinally. Static Proof testing revealed average permanent deformation of the forefoot of all feet that exceeded the optional 5 mm ISO requirement. Forefoot deformation for non-Jaipur rubber feet came closest to meeting the standard at 8.3+/-3.4 mm; deformation of the various types of rubber Jaipur feet was the greatest at 22.5+/-5.4 mm. Forefoot deformation for polyurethane (PU) feet was 13.6+/-5.5 mm. Forefoot deformation of the ethyl-vinyl-acetate (EVA) feet was slightly greater than the Jaipur feet at 22.8+/-5.7 mm. After the Static Strength test, which simulates a higher momentary overload, permanent deformation of the feet increased. The average maximum deformation for rubber SACH forefeet varied from 17 - 30 mm, and 11 - 26 mm for the heel; Jaipur forefeet 47 - 60 mm and heels 13 - 19 mm; PU forefeet 20 - 44 mm and heels 20 - 33 mm; and EVA forefeet 33 - 50 mm and heels 16 - 31 mm. After completion of the Cyclic Test the prosthetic feet were sawn in half and closely examined visually. All feet revealed internal derangements: (i) Deformation of rubber or PU foam under the keel of forefoot and/or heel: HCMC, VI, EB1, BAVI, HI Cambodia, Myanmar, Angola, TATCOT, Kingsley and CR; (ii) Delamination from the keel: Mozambique, PHN, and Pro-cirugia; and (iii) Delamination between foam layers: BMVSS, NISHA, MUKTI, and OM. The influence of the two environmental factors tested was minimal for rubber feet with respect to deformation and inconsistent for the polymer feet; in particular for the forefeet. Creep

  9. Wear and wear mechanism simulation of heavy-duty engine intake valve and seat inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.S.; Narasimhan, S.; Larson, J.M.; Schaefer, S.K.

    1998-02-01

    A silicon-chromium alloy frequently used for heavy-duty diesel engine intake valves was tested against eight different insert materials with a valve seat wear simulator. Wear resistance of these combinations was ranked. For each test, the valve seat temperature was controlled at approximately 510 C, the number of cycles was 864,000 (or 24 h), and the test load was 17,640 N. The combination of the silicon-chromium valve against a cast iron insert produced in the least valve seat wear, whereas a cobalt-base alloy insert produced the highest valve seat wear. In the overall valve seat recession ranking, however, the combination of the silicon-chromium valve and an iron-base chromium-nickel alloy insert had the least total seat recession, whereas the silicon-chromium valve against cobalt-base alloy, cast iron, and nickel-base alloy inserts had significant seat recession. Hardness and microstructure compatibility of valve and insert materials are believed to be significant factors in reducing valve and insert wear. The test results indicate that the mechanisms of valve seat and insert wear are a complex combination of adhesion and plastic deformation. Adhesion was confirmed by material transfer, while plastic deformation was verified by shear strain (or radial flow) and abrasion. The oxide films formed during testing also played a significant role. The prevented direct metal-to-metal contact and reduced the coefficient of friction on seat surfaces, thereby reducing adhesive and deformation-controlled wear.

  10. Candida parapsilosis prosthetic valve endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Pinto, André; Ferraz, Rita; Casanova, Jorge; Sarmento, António; Santos, Lurdes

    2015-01-01

    Candida endocarditis is a rare infection associated with high mortality and morbidity. There are still some controversies about Candida endocarditis treatment, especially about the treatment duration. We report a case of a Candida parapsilosis endocarditis that presented as a lower limb ischemia. The patient was surgically treated with a cryopreserved homograft aortic replacement. We used intravenous fluconazole 800 mg as initial treatment, followed with 12 months of 400 mg fluconazole per os. The patient outcome was good. PMID:26288749

  11. Fortune or misfortune: asymptomatic, delayed presentation of complete dehiscence of mechanical aortic valve conduit and pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kyung Taek; Derose, Joseph; Taub, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Complete dehiscence of a composite aortic valve graft with pseudoaneurysm formation is a rare complication following aortic root replacement. This complication often takes place in the setting of acute graft infection and accompanies symptoms of heart failure, valve insufficiency or sepsis. We present a delayed, asymptomatic presentation of this complication in a young man with distant history of aortic root replacement and medically treated prosthetic valve endocarditis a year postoperatively. He had been non-adherent to warfarin over 10 years, but otherwise maintained a healthy life. After being lost to follow-up, he re-presented 12 years after the initial operation with new-onset seizures. Echocardiogram revealed complete dehiscence of a composite valved conduit at the proximal anastomosis site with a resultant large pseudoaneurysm. The patient underwent an urgent re-operation with resection of the pseudoaneurysm and insertion of a tissue valved conduit. He had an uncomplicated postoperative recovery and promised close follow-up on discharge. PMID:27530875

  12. Check valve with poppet dashpot/frictional damping mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An inline check valve for a flow line where the valve element is guided for inline travel forward and rearward of a valve sealing member and is spring biased to a closed sealing condition is presented. One of the guides for the valve element includes a dashpot housing with a bore and plunger member to control the rate of travel of the valve element in either direction, providing a guiding function. The plunger member is arranged with a dashpot ring to frictionally contact the dashpot bore and has an interior tortuous flow path from one side to the other side of the dashpot ring. The dashpot housing is not anchored to the valve body so that the valve can be functional even if the dashpot ring becomes jammed in the dashpot housing.

  13. Enlargement of mitral valve ring in a young woman with severe prosthesis-patient mismatch.

    PubMed

    Attisani, Matteo; Pellegrini, Augusto; Sorrentino, Paolo; Rinaldi, Mauro

    2014-04-01

    Mechanical prosthesis is the first choice for valve replacement at the mitral position in children. Replacement of the original prosthesis because of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) is almost inevitable when prostheses are implanted in small children. The impact of PPM on long-term mortality becomes significant when the effective orifice area (EOA) is severely reduced. In these cases prosthesis replacement can be technically difficult, and it often requires extended enlargement of the mitral valve annulus ring. We report a case of a woman who underwent a mitral valve replacement with a 19-mm St. Jude mechanical prosthetic valve at the age of 3 years. At the age of 33 years, the patient underwent a successful minimally invasive mitral annulus ring enlargement and implantation of a 23-mm St. Jude mechanical prosthetic valve via a right minithoracotomy. PMID:24808442

  14. Prosthetic synovitis.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, N S; Doty, S B; Johnston, A D; Parisien, M V

    1985-01-01

    membrane, even though infiltrated with macrophages, did not respond uniformly to the presence of prosthetic debris. We advance a theory that the first step toward a distractive phenomenon at the interface is micromotion between the cement and bone. Micromotion may be caused by removal of subchondral plate during total hip replacement, leading to fatigue and loss of trabeculae and resultant increase motion, thus bone loss. Bone loss may be the direct result of mechanical injury, increased osteoclasis, or direct lysis of bone by various enzymes released by the interface membrane. PMID:3938450

  15. Retrograde Transcatheter Closure of Mitral Paravalvular Leak through a Mechanical Aortic Valve Prosthesis: 2 Successful Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Daxin; Pan, Wenzhi; Guan, Lihua; Qian, Juying

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis has been considered a contraindication to retrograde percutaneous closure of mitral paravalvular leaks, because passing a catheter through the mechanical aortic valve can affect the function of a mechanical valve and thereby lead to severe hemodynamic deterioration. We report what we believe are the first 2 cases of retrograde transcatheter closure of mitral paravalvular leaks through a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis without transseptal or transapical puncture. Our experience shows that retrograde transcatheter closure of mitral paravalvular leaks in this manner can be an optional approach for transcatheter closure of such leaks, especially when a transapical or transseptal puncture approach is not feasible. This technique might also be applied to other transcatheter procedures in which there is a need to pass a catheter through a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis. PMID:27127428

  16. A mechanical model of the human ankle in the transverse plane during straight walking: implications for prosthetic design.

    PubMed

    Glaister, Brian C; Schoen, Jason A; Orendurff, Michael S; Klute, Glenn K

    2009-03-01

    In order to protect sensitive residual limb soft tissues, lower limb prostheses need to control torsional loads during gait. To assist with the design of a torsional prosthesis, this paper used simple mechanical elements to model the behavior of the human ankle in the transverse plane during straight walking. Motion capture data were collected from ten able-bodied subjects walking straight ahead at self-selected walking speeds. Gait cycle data were separated into four distinct states, and passive torsional springs and dampers were chosen to model the behavior in each state. Since prosthetic design is facilitated by simplicity, it was desirable to investigate if elastic behavior could account for the physiological ankle moment and include viscous behavior only if necessary to account for the inadequacies of the spring model. In all four states, a springlike behavior was able to account for most of the physiological ankle moments, rendering the use of a damper unnecessary. In State 1, a quadratic torsional spring was chosen to model the behavior, while linear torsional springs were chosen for States 2-4. A prosthetic system that actively changes stiffness could be able to replicate the physiological behavior of the human ankle in the transverse plane. The results of this study will contribute to the mechanical design and control of a biomimetic torsional prosthesis for lower limb amputees. PMID:19154072

  17. Surgical treatment of early acute thrombosis of mechanical mitral prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shengli; Zhang, Tao; Ren, Chonglei; Wang, Yao

    2010-10-01

    Prosthetic valve thrombosis is a rare but life threatening complication of mechanical heart valve prosthesis. A 44-year-old woman diagnosed with rheumatic heart disease with severe mitral valve stenosis, moderate tricuspid valve insufficiency, and atrial fibrillation underwent transseptal mitral valve replacement and tricuspid valvuloplasty in our department. Heparin and warfarin were routinely used postoperatively. Although the international normalized ratio (INR), activated partial thromboplastin time ratio, and platelet count were satisfactory, the patient presented with severe dyspnea suddenly 10 days after discharge; echocardiogram showed that the prosthetic posterior leaflet was immobile. The patient suffered cardiac arrest suddenly during the examination and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was carried out successfully. Emergent surgery was performed, confirming the prosthetic valve thrombosis. The prosthetic valve was replaced with another mechanical prosthesis. The patient recovered smoothly and was discharged 14 days later with atrial fibrillation. During the 12-months follow-up period, her prosthetic valve and heart function were normal with INR around 3.0. This case highlights the need for awareness among clinicians for the possibility of valve thrombosis in the early postoperative period. PMID:20961833

  18. Development of a Photo-Fluidic Control Valve without Mechanical Moving Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, Tetsuya; Dohta, Shujiro

    An optical servo system is a new control system which can be used in hazardous environments; such as those with electromagnetic influence, radiation and so on. The purpose of our study is to develop such an optical control system. In our previous study, an optical servo valve in which the output differential pressure was proportional to input optical power had been developed. However, the dynamics of the valve depended on the time required to move the flapper membrane of a fluid booster amplifier using the lower flow rate from the photo-fluidic interface. In addition, the lifetime of the valve depends on that of the fluid booster amplifier that has mechanical moving parts. As a next step, we need to improve the dynamics and to get longer lifetime of the optical servo valve and try to develop another type of optical servo valve whose elements have no mechanical moving parts. In this paper, a photo-fluidic control valve which consists of the photo-fluidic interface and fluid amplifier only using fluidics is proposed. As a result, we found that the tested valve generated output differential pressure of + 80 kPa or -80 kPa according to applied optical power. By driving a pneumatic cylinder whose inner diameter is 16 mm with a stroke of 100 mm using the tested valve, we also confirmed that the tested valve has enough output fluid power to drive a small-sized pneumatic cylinder on the market.

  19. Bioprostethic mitral valve thrombosis due to oral contraceptive drug use and management with ultra-slow thrombolytic therapy.

    PubMed

    Yesin, Mahmut; Kalçik, Macit; Gündüz, Sabahattin; Astarcioğlu, Mehmet Ali; Gürsoy, Mustafa Ozan; Karakoyun, Süleyman; Özkan, Mehmet

    2016-03-01

    Prosthetic valve thrombosis is a severe complication, which usually occurs in inadequately anticoagulated patients. Mechanical valve thrombosis is more common than bioprosthetic valve thrombosis (BVT). Oral contraceptive drugs are associated with increased risk of thromboembolism in women. The possible association between oral contraceptive drug use and BVT has never been reported before. We present a case of obstructive BVT occurring after the use of an oral contraceptive drug and successful management with ultra-slow thrombolytic therapy. PMID:26378817

  20. Acoustical analysis of mechanical heart valve sounds for early detection of malfunction.

    PubMed

    Famaey, Nele; Defever, Korijn; Bielen, Paul; Flameng, Willem; Vander Sloten, Jos; Sas, Paul; Meuris, Bart

    2010-10-01

    Mechanical heart valves carry the disadvantage of lifelong antithrombotic therapy, due to the high risk of thrombus formation on the valve surface. Current diagnostic methods are incapable of detecting thrombus formation in an early stage. This article investigates a new diagnostic method, based on the analysis of the acoustic signal produced by the valve. This method should be capable of early detection of malfunction, thus permitting targeted medication and reducing valve-related complications and mortality. A measurement setup assuring optimal signal quality was developed, and a signal analysis program was implemented and validated on an in vitro mock circulatory loop. Next, four sheep were implanted with a bileaflet mechanical valve. The signals of their valves developing thrombosis were assessed on a weekly basis before explantation. Three sheep were sacrificed shortly after detection of malfunction according to the newly developed method. In each case, thrombus or membrane formation was detected on the leaflets upon explantation. In one sheep, no malfunction was found in the analysis, which was also confirmed by the condition of the valve upon explantation. These preliminary results indicate that acoustical analysis of mechanical heart valves permits early detection of valvular malfunction. Further research with more in vitro and animal testing is required to statistically validate these findings. PMID:20573536

  1. Mechanical energy profiles of the combined ankle-foot system in normal gait: insights for prosthetic designs.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kota Z; Stanhope, Steven J

    2013-09-01

    Over the last half-century, the field of prosthetic engineering has continuously evolved with much attention being dedicated to restoring the mechanical energy properties of ankle joint musculatures during gait. However, the contributions of 'distal foot structures' (e.g., foot muscles, plantar soft tissue) have been overlooked. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify the total mechanical energy profiles (e.g., power, work, and work-ratio) of the natural ankle-foot system (NAFS) by combining the contributions of the ankle joint and all distal foot structures during stance in level-ground steady state walking across various speeds (0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 statures/s). The results from eleven healthy subjects walking barefoot indicated ankle joint and distal foot structures generally performed opposing roles: the ankle joint performed net positive work that systematically increased its energy generation with faster walking speeds, while the distal foot performed net negative work that systematically increased its energy absorption with faster walking speeds. Accounting for these simultaneous effects, the combined ankle-foot system exhibited increased work-ratios with faster walking. Most notably, the work-ratio was not significantly greater than 1.0 during the normal walking speed of 0.8 statures/s. Therefore, a prosthetic design that strategically exploits passive-dynamic properties (e.g., elastic energy storage and return) has the potential to replicate the mechanical energy profiles of the NAFS during level-ground steady-state walking. PMID:23628408

  2. Fiber-reinforced hydrogel scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Maryam; Vrana, Nihal Engin; Zorlutuna, Pinar; Sant, Shilpa; Jung, Sungmi; Masoumi, Nafiseh; Khavari-Nejad, Ramazan Ali; Javadi, Gholamreza; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-09-01

    Heart valve-related disorders are among the major causes of death worldwide. Although prosthetic valves are widely used to treat this pathology, current prosthetic grafts cannot grow with the patient while maintaining normal valve mechanical and hemodynamic properties. Tissue engineering may provide a possible solution to this issue through using biodegradable scaffolds and patients' own cells. Despite their similarity to heart valve tissue, most hydrogel scaffolds are not mechanically suitable for the dynamic stresses of the heart valve microenvironment. In this study, we integrated electrospun poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS)-poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) microfiber scaffolds, which possess enhanced mechanical properties for heart valve engineering, within a hybrid hydrogel made from methacrylated hyaluronic acid and methacrylated gelatin. Sheep mitral valvular interstitial cells were encapsulated in the hydrogel and evaluated in hydrogel-only, PGS-PCL scaffold-only, and composite scaffold conditions. Although the cellular viability and metabolic activity were similar among all scaffold types, the presence of the hydrogel improved the three-dimensional distribution of mitral valvular interstitial cells. As seen by similar values in both the Young's modulus and the ultimate tensile strength between the PGS-PCL scaffolds and the composites, microfibrous scaffolds preserved their mechanical properties in the presence of the hydrogels. Compared to electrospun or hydrogel scaffolds alone, this combined system may provide a more suitable three-dimensional structure for generating scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering. PMID:24733776

  3. [Study of physical-mechanic characteristics of prosthetic construction after their adjustment with the use of laser welding and hot metal adding].

    PubMed

    Gvetadze, R Sh; Rusanov, F S; Mikhas'kov, S V

    2011-01-01

    Study of physical-mechanic characteristics of connecting joints of beam construction after laser welding and hot metal adding was performed. Increase of microhardness of joints as well as small reduction of bending strength of prosthetic constructions was established. PMID:21983619

  4. Intracardiac echocardiography to diagnose pannus formation after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshiya; Ohara, Takahiro; Funada, Akira; Takahama, Hiroyuki; Amaki, Makoto; Hasegawa, Takuya; Sugano, Yasuo; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Anzai, Toshihisa

    2016-03-01

    A 66-year-old female, under regular follow-up for 20 years after aortic valve replacement (19-mm Carbomedics), presented dyspnea on effort and hypotension during hemodialysis. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed elevation of transvalvular velocity up to 4 m/s, but the structure around the aortic prosthesis was difficult to observe due to artifacts. Fluoroscopy revealed normal motion of the leaflets of the mechanical valve. Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) revealed a pannus-like structure in the left ventricular outflow tract. Transesophageal echocardiogram also revealed this structure. ICE can visualize structural abnormalities around a prosthetic valve after cardiac surgery even in patients in whom conventional imaging modalities failed. PMID:26732266

  5. Achieved Anticoagulation vs Prosthesis Selection for Mitral Mechanical Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Le Tourneau, Thierry; Lim, Vanessa; Inamo, Jocelyn; Miller, Fletcher A.; Mahoney, Douglas W.; Schaff, Hartzell V.; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2009-01-01

    Background: Thromboembolic events (TEs) are frequent after mechanical mitral valve replacement (MVR), but their association to anticoagulation quality is unclear and has never been studied in a population-based setting with patients who have a complete anticoagulation record. Methods: We compiled a complete record of all residents of Olmsted County, MN, who underwent mechanical MVR between 1981 and 2004, for all TE, bleeding episodes, and international normalized ratios (INRs) measured from prosthesis implantation. Results: In the 112 residents (mean [± SD] age, 57 ± 16 years; 60% female residents) who underwent mechanical MVR, 19,647 INR samples were obtained. While INR averaged 3.02 ± 0.57, almost 40% of INRs were < 2 or > 4.5. Thirty-four TEs and 28 bleeding episodes occurred during a mean duration of 8.2 ± 6.1 years of follow-up. There was no trend of association of INR (average, SD, growth variance rate, or intensity-specific incidence of events) with TE. Previous cardiac surgery (p = 0.014) and ball prosthesis (hazard ratio [HR], 2.92; 95% CI, 1.43 to 5.94; p = 0.003) independently determined TE. With MVR using a ball prosthesis, despite higher anticoagulation intensity (p = 0.002), the 8-year rate of freedom from TE was considerably lower (50 ± 9% vs 81 ± 5%, respectively; p < 0.0001). Compared with expected stroke rates in the population, stroke risk was elevated with non-ball prosthesis MVR (HR 2.6; 95% CI, 1.3 to 5.2; p = 0.007) but was considerable with ball prosthesis MVR (HR 11.7; 95% CI, 7.5 to 18.4; p < 0.0001). INR variability (SD) was higher with a higher mean INR value (p < 0.0001). INR variability (HR 2.485; 95% CI, 1.11 to 5.55; p = 0.027) and cancer history (p < 0.0001) independently determined bleeding rates. Conclusion: This population-based comprehensive study of anticoagulation and TE post-MVR shows that, in these closely anticoagulated patients, anticoagulation intensity was highly variable and not associated with TE incidence post

  6. Management dilemmas in patients with mechanical heart valves and warfarin-induced major bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Panduranga, Prashanth; Al-Mukhaini, Mohammed; Al-Muslahi, Muhanna; Haque, Mohammed A; Shehab, Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    Management of warfarin-induced major bleeding in patients with mechanical heart valves is challenging. There is vast controversy and confusion in the type of treatment required to reverse anticoagulation and stop bleeding as well as the ideal time to restart warfarin therapy safely without recurrence of bleeding and/or thromboembolism. Presently, the treatments available to reverse warfarin-induced bleeding are vitamin K, fresh frozen plasma, prothrombin complex concentrates and recombinant activated factor VIIa. Currently, vitamin K and fresh frozen plasma are the recommended treatments in patients with mechanical heart valves and warfarin-induced major bleeding. The safe use of prothrombin complex concentrates and recombinant activated factor VIIa in patients with mechanical heart valves is controversial and needs well-designed clinical studies. With regard to restarting anticoagulation in patients with warfarin-induced major bleeding and mechanical heart valves, the safe period varies from 7-14 d after the onset of bleeding for patients with intracranial bleed and 48-72 h for patients with extra-cranial bleed. In this review article, we present relevant literature about these controversies and suggest recommendations for management of patients with warfarin-induced bleeding and a mechanical heart valve. Furthermore, there is an urgent need for separate specific guidelines from major associations/ professional societies with regard to mechanical heart valves and warfarin-induced bleeding. PMID:22451852

  7. Classification of heart valve condition using acoustic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G.

    1994-11-15

    Prosthetic heart valves and the many great strides in valve design have been responsible for extending the life spans of many people with serious heart conditions. Even though the prosthetic valves are extremely reliable, they are eventually susceptible to long-term fatigue and structural failure effects expected from mechanical devices operating over long periods of time. The purpose of our work is to classify the condition of in vivo Bjork-Shiley Convexo-Concave (BSCC) heart valves by processing acoustic measurements of heart valve sounds. The structural failures of interest for Bscc valves is called single leg separation (SLS). SLS can occur if the outlet strut cracks and separates from the main structure of the valve. We measure acoustic opening and closing sounds (waveforms) using high sensitivity contact microphones on the patient`s thorax. For our analysis, we focus our processing and classification efforts on the opening sounds because they yield direct information about outlet strut condition with minimal distortion caused by energy radiated from the valve disc.

  8. Mitral valve replacement in systemic lupus erythematosus associated Libman-Sacks endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Akhlaq, Anam; Ali, Taimur A; Fatimi, Saulat H

    2016-04-01

    Libman-Sacks endocarditis, first discovered in 1924, is a cardiac manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Valvular involvement has been associated with SLE and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Mitral valve, especially its posterior leaflet, is most commonly involved. We report a case of a 34 year old woman with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and SLE, who presented with mitral valve regurgitation. The patient underwent a prosthetic mitral valve replacement, with no followup complications. We suggest mechanical valve replacement employment in the management of mitral regurgitation in Libman-Sacks endocarditis, in view of the recent medical literature and our own case report. PMID:27053904

  9. A Newly Developed Tri-Leaflet Polymeric Heart Valve Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gaetano, Francesco De; Bagnoli, Paola; Zaffora, Adriano; Pandolfi, Anna; Serrani, Marta; Brubert, Jacob; Stasiak, Joanna; Moggridge, Geoff D.; Costantino, Maria Laura

    2016-01-01

    The potential of polymeric heart valves (PHV) prostheses is to combine the hemodynamic performances of biological valves with the durability of mechanical valves. The aim of this work is to design and develop a new tri-leaflet prosthetic heart valve (HV) made from styrenic block copolymers. A computational finite element model was implemented to optimize the thickness of the leaflets, to improve PHV mechanical and hydrodynamic performances. Based on the model outcomes, 8 prototypes of the designed valve were produced and tested in vitro under continuous and pulsatile flow conditions, as prescribed by ISO 5840 Standard. A specially designed pulse duplicator allowed testing the PHVs at different flow rates and frequency conditions. All the PHVs met the requirements specified in ISO 5840 Standard in terms of both regurgitation and effective orifice area (EOA), demonstrating their potential as HV prostheses. PMID:27274605

  10. Consequence of patient substitution of nattokinase for warfarin after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Elahi, Maqsood M.; Choi, Charles H.; Konda, Subbareddy

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a patient's self-substitution of nattokinase for the vitamin K antagonist warfarin after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. Nattokinase is an enzyme derived from a popular fermented soybean preparation in Japan (natto), which has fibrinolytic properties and is gaining popularity in nontraditional health journals and nonmedical health websites as an over-the-counter thrombolytic. After nearly a year of use of nattokinase without warfarin, the patient developed thrombus on the mechanical valve and underwent successful repeat valve replacement. We believe this is the first documented case of nattokinase being used as a substitute for warfarin after valve replacement, and we strongly discourage its use for this purpose. PMID:25552810

  11. Consequence of patient substitution of nattokinase for warfarin after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Maqsood M; Choi, Charles H; Konda, Subbareddy; Shake, Jay G

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a patient's self-substitution of nattokinase for the vitamin K antagonist warfarin after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. Nattokinase is an enzyme derived from a popular fermented soybean preparation in Japan (natto), which has fibrinolytic properties and is gaining popularity in nontraditional health journals and nonmedical health websites as an over-the-counter thrombolytic. After nearly a year of use of nattokinase without warfarin, the patient developed thrombus on the mechanical valve and underwent successful repeat valve replacement. We believe this is the first documented case of nattokinase being used as a substitute for warfarin after valve replacement, and we strongly discourage its use for this purpose. PMID:25552810

  12. Dissection of the atrial wall after mitral valve replacement.

    PubMed Central

    Lukács, L; Kassai, I; Lengyel, M

    1996-01-01

    We describe an unusual sequela of mitral valve replacement in a 50-year-old woman who had undergone a closed mitral commissurotomy in 1975. She was admitted to our hospital because of mitral restenosis in November 1993, at which time her mitral valve was replaced with a mechanical prosthesis. On the 8th postoperative day, the patient developed symptoms of heart failure; transesophageal echocardiography revealed dissection and rupture of the left atrial wall. At prompt reoperation, we found an interlayer dissection and rupture of the atrial wall into the left atrium. We repaired the ruptured atrial wall with a prosthetic patch. The postoperative course was uneventful, and postoperative transesophageal echocardiography showed normal prosthetic valve function and no dissection. Images PMID:8680278

  13. Thrombolytic Therapy for Right-Sided Mechanical Pulmonic and Tricuspid Valves: The Largest Survival Analysis to Date

    PubMed Central

    Taherkhani, Maryam; Hashemi, Seyed Reza; Hekmat, Manouchehr; Safi, Morteza; Taherkhani, Adineh

    2015-01-01

    Data regarding thrombolytic treatment of right-sided mechanical valve thrombosis are almost nonexistent, and all current guidelines arise from very small case series. We retrospectively studied the in-hospital and long-term outcome data of a larger series of patients who had received, from September 2005 through June 2012, thrombolytic therapy for right-sided mechanical pulmonary valve or tricuspid valve thrombosis. We identified 16 patients aged 8–67 years who had undergone thrombolytic therapy for definite thrombotic mechanical valve obstruction in the tricuspid or pulmonary valve position (8 in each position). All study patients except one had subtherapeutic international normalized ratios. The 8 patients with pulmonary mechanical valve thrombosis had a 100% response rate to thrombolytic therapy, and their in-hospital survival rate was also 100%. The 8 patients with tricuspid mechanical valve thrombosis had a 75% response rate to thrombolytic therapy, with an in-hospital survival rate of 87.5%. The one-year survival rate for mechanical valve thrombosis treated with thrombolytic therapy (whether pulmonary or tricuspid) was 87.5%. On the basis of our data, we recommend that thrombolytic therapy remain the first-line therapy for right-sided mechanical valve thrombosis in adults or children—including children with complex congenital heart disease and patients with mechanical pulmonary valve thrombosis. Surgery should be reserved for patients in whom this treatment fails. PMID:26664307

  14. Ultrasound-targeted transfection of tissue-type plasminogen activator gene carried by albumin nanoparticles to dog myocardium to prevent thrombosis after heart mechanical valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jun; Ji, Shang-Yi; Yang, Jian-An; He, Xia; Yang, Xiao-Han; Ling, Wen-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Ling

    2012-01-01

    Background There are more than 300,000 prosthetic heart valve replacements each year worldwide. These patients are faced with a higher risk of thromboembolic events after heart valve surgery and long-term or even life-long anticoagulative and antiplatelet therapies are necessary. Some severe complications such as hemorrhaging or rebound thrombosis can occur when the therapy ceases. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is a thrombolytic agent. One of the best strategies is gene therapy, which offers a local high expression of t-PA over a prolonged time period to avoid both systemic hemorrhaging and local rebound thrombosis. There are some issues with t-PA that need to be addressed: currently, there is no up-to-date report on how the t-PA gene targets the heart in vivo and the gene vector for t-PA needs to be determined. Aims To fabricate an albumin nano-t-PA gene ultrasound-targeted agent and investigate its targeting effect on prevention of thrombosis after heart mechanic valve replacement under therapeutic ultrasound. Methods A dog model of mechanical tricuspid valve replacement was constructed. A highly expressive t-PA gene plasmid was constructed and packaged by nanoparticles prepared with bovine serum albumin. This nanopackaged t-PA gene plasmid was further cross-linked to ultrasonic microbubbles prepared with sucrose and bovine serum albumin to form the ultrasonic-targeted agent for t-PA gene transfection. The agent was given intravenously followed by a therapeutic ultrasound treatment (1 MHz, 1.5 w/cm2, 10 minutes) of the heart soon after valve replacement had been performed. The expression of t-PA in myocardium was detected with multiclonal antibodies to t-PA by the indirect immunohistochemical method. Venous blood t-PA and D-dimer contents were tested before and 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks after the operation. Results The high expression of t-PA could be seen in myocardium with increases in blood t-PA and D-dimer contents and thrombosis was prevented 8 weeks

  15. Pitfalls and outcomes from accelerated wear testing of mechanical heart valves.

    PubMed

    Campbell, A; Baldwin, T; Peterson, G; Bryant, J; Ryder, K

    1996-06-01

    In 1990 Sorin Biomedica introduced a new bileaflet heart valve called the Bicarbon valve. This design was reported to eliminate wear in the hinge mechanism. Clinical quality Sorin Bicarbon, CarboMedics, St. Jude Medical, Duromedics and Jyros valves were obtained to test this claim and to compare the wear in the pivot of this new valve to other available heart valves. The valves were visually inspected then subjected to 4,000 cycles at a physiological beat rate in vitro. The valves were re-inspected then subjected to 400 million cycles in a Reul type accelerated wear tester. Scanning electron microscope photographs were taken of all contact areas at 40, 80, 120, 160, 200, 240, 280 and 400 million cycles. Wear marks on the inflow side of the Sorin, CarboMedics and St. Jude leaflets were measured and compared. Orifice wear was not quantified because of difficulty with measuring inside complex depressions. After 4,000 cycles of testing at a physiological beat rate the CarboFilmTM coating on the Sorin orifice showed signs of erosion. The other valve components only exhibited minor burnishing after 4,000 cycles. Following completion of 400 million cycles in an accelerated wear tester, approximately ten years in vivo, all valves showed significant wear. The inflow face of the pivot on the Sorin Bicarbon leaflets exhibited the deepest wear marks. The CarboFilm coating on the Sorin Bicarbon orifices was removed from most areas of leaflet contact. The transition between the remaining coating and the eroded areas created a rough edge. The tips of the Sorin leaflets contacted the bottom of the orifice pivot, in contrast to the St. Jude Medical and CarboMedics designs, which had minimal contact between the leaflet and the orifice. PMID:8803765

  16. [Valve-in-valve with Portico valve for a degenerative bioprosthetic surgical valve (Biocor)].

    PubMed

    Latini, Roberto Adriano; Testa, Luca; Brambilla, Nedy; Tusa, Maurizio; Bedogni, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    In the last years, a general shift toward the use of surgical bioprosthetic aortic valves rather than mechanical valves with subsequent less use of anticoagulant therapy has been observed. However, bioprosthetic valves have limited durability. Reoperation, the current standard of care for these patients, carries a high surgical risk, especially because patients are elderly and with numerous comorbidities. Recently, transcatheter aortic valve replacement within a failed bioprosthetic valve (valve-in-valve procedure) has proven feasible. We here describe a case of valve-in-valve procedure with a Portico valve placed in a purely insufficient bioprosthetic valve (Biocor). PMID:27093211

  17. Multi-scale mechanical characterization of scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Argento, G; Simonet, M; Oomens, C W J; Baaijens, F P T

    2012-11-15

    Electrospinning is a promising technology to produce scaffolds for cardiovascular tissue engineering. Each electrospun scaffold is characterized by a complex micro-scale structure that is responsible for its macroscopic mechanical behavior. In this study, we focus on the development and the validation of a computational micro-scale model that takes into account the structural features of the electrospun material, and is suitable for studying the multi-scale scaffold mechanics. We show that the computational tool developed is able to describe and predict the mechanical behavior of electrospun scaffolds characterized by different microstructures. Moreover, we explore the global mechanical properties of valve-shaped scaffolds with different microstructural features, and compare the deformation of these scaffolds when submitted to diastolic pressures with a tissue engineered and a native valve. It is shown that a pronounced degree of anisotropy is necessary to reproduce the deformation patterns observed in the native heart valve. PMID:22999107

  18. Utility of cardiac computed tomography for evaluation of pannus in mechanical aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Suh, Young Joo; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Sak; Hong, Yoo Jin; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Hur, Jin; Choi, Byoung Wook; Chang, Byung-Chul

    2015-08-01

    The clinical significance of pannus detected on computed tomography (CT) has not yet been investigated. The purposes of this study were to investigate the clinical significance of pannus detected on cardiac CT in patients who underwent aortic valve replacement (AVR) with mechanical valves, and to determine predictors for pannus severity. A total of 92 patients who underwent cardiac CT and TTE and who had undergone mechanical AVR were included. The geometric orifice area (GOA), the presence of limitation of motion (LOM) and pannus were evaluated on CT. The GOA, presence of LOM, and presence and severity of pannus were compared with echocardiographic parameters. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the predictors for pannus severity. The GOA on CT positively correlated with effective orifice area on TTE (r = 0.733, P < 0.0001). Pannus was found in 77.2% and LOM in 14.0%. With increasing pannus severity, mean transvalvular pressure gradient (PG) was significantly higher (P < 0.0001). Patients with elevated PG showed a smaller GOA, a higher incidence of pannus, more severe pannus and LOM than patients with normal PG (P < 0.05). Small valve size (≤19 mm), Carbomedics valve, rheumatic etiology, and young age at AVR (<48.8 years) were independent predictors of moderate to severe pannus (P < 0.05). Cardiac CT is helpful in the evaluation of pannus formation in patients with mechanical aortic valves. Moderate to severe pannus formation frequently occurred in patients with small mechanical valve size, Carbomedics valves, rheumatic heart disease and young age at AVR. PMID:25990093

  19. Heart valve surgery - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart valves are either natural (biologic) or artificial (mechanical). Natural valves are from human donors (cadavers), modified ... artificial valves will require anticoagulation. The advantage of mechanical valves is that they last longer-thus, the ...

  20. Percutaneous Transcatheter One-Step Mechanical Aortic Disc Valve Prosthesis Implantation: A Preliminary Feasibility Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Sochman, Jan Peregrin, Jan H.; Rocek, Miloslav; Timmermans, Hans A.; Pavcnik, Dusan; Roesch, Josef

    2006-02-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility of one-step implantation of a new type of stent-based mechanical aortic disc valve prosthesis (MADVP) above and across the native aortic valve and its short-term function in swine with both functional and dysfunctional native valves. Methods. The MADVP consisted of a folding disc valve made of silicone elastomer attached to either a nitinol Z-stent (Z model) or a nitinol cross-braided stent (SX model). Implantation of 10 MADVPs (6 Z and 4 SX models) was attempted in 10 swine: 4 (2 Z and 2 SX models) with a functional native valve and 6 (4 Z and 2 SX models) with aortic regurgitation induced either by intentional valve injury or by MADVP placement across the native valve. MADVP function was observed for up to 3 hr after implantation. Results. MADVP implantation was successful in 9 swine. One animal died of induced massive regurgitation prior to implantation. Four MADVPs implanted above functioning native valves exhibited good function. In 5 swine with regurgitation, MADVP implantation corrected the induced native valve dysfunction and the device's continuous good function was observed in 4 animals. One MADVP (SX model) placed across native valve gradually migrated into the left ventricle. Conclusion. The tested MADVP can be implanted above and across the native valve in a one-step procedure and can replace the function of the regurgitating native valve. Further technical development and testing are warranted, preferably with a manufactured MADVP.

  1. System and choke valve actuator mechanism for operating a plunger lift well

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, T.E.

    1986-10-21

    An actuator mechanism is described for selective positioning of a choke valve element relative to a valve seat within a piping flow tee for regulating the flow of gas and oil from a producing wellhead. The flow tee has an opening to receive and connect the actuator mechanism, an inlet opening for conducting gas and oil toward the choke valve seat and an outlet opening for conducting gas and oil beyond the choke valve seat: the actuator mechanism comprises a closed body member with a base end adapted for connection with the flow tee opening, a control shaft positioning collar housed within the body member and a cylinder member connected to the upper end of the body member. It also has a control piston housed within the cylinder member, a cap member connected to the upper end of the cylinder member, a control piston stop sleeve carried by the cap member and an elongated control shaft; the control shaft extending coaxially through the body member, the control shaft positioning collar, the cylinder member, the control piston, the cylinder cap member and the stop sleeve; the body member, the cylinder member and the stop sleeve each having a small diameter axial bore for rotatable and slidable mounting of the control shaft; and the control shaft having an upper end projecting above the stop sleeve and adapted for carrying a handwheel thereon and a lower end projecting below the body member and into the flow tee and adapted for carrying the choke valve element thereon.

  2. Mechanical behavior of single-layer ceramized zirconia abutments for dental implant prosthetic rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Melendo, Manuel; Llena-Blasco, Oriol; Bruguera, August; Llena-Blasco, Jaime; Yáñez-Vico, Rosa-María; García-Calderón, Manuel; Vaquero-Aguilar, Cristina; Velázquez-Cayón, Rocío; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José-Luis

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study was undertaken to characterize the mechanical response of bare (as-received) and single-layer ceramized zirconia abutments with both internal and external connections that have been developed to enhanced aesthetic restorations. Material and Methods: Sixteen zirconia implant abutments (ZiReal Post®, Biomet 3i, USA) with internal and external connections have been analyzed. Half of the specimens were coated with a 0.5mm-thick layer of a low-fusing fluroapatite ceramic. Mechanical tests were carried out under static (constant cross-head speed of 1mm/min until fracture) and dynamic (between 100 and 400N at a frequency of 1Hz) loading conditions. The failure location was identified by electron microscopy. The removal torque of the retaining screws after testing was also evaluated. Results: The average fracture strength was above 300N for all the abutments, regardless of connection geometry and coating. In most of the cases (94%), failure occurred by abutment fracture. No significant differences were observed either in fatigue behavior and removal torque between the different abutment groups. Conclusions: Mechanical behavior of Zireal zirconia abutments is independent of the type of internal/external connection and the presence/absence of ceramic coating. This may be clinically valuable in dental rehabilitation to improve the aesthetic outcome of zirconia-based dental implant systems. Key words:Dental implant, zirconia, ceramic structure, mechanical properties. PMID:25674313

  3. Mechanical characteristics of stability-bleed valves for a supersonic inlet. [for the YF-12 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neiner, G. H.; Dustin, M. O.; Cole, G. L.

    1977-01-01

    Mechanical characteristics of a set of direct-operated relief valves used in a throat-bypass stability-bleed system designed for the YF-12 aircraft inlet are described. A comparison of data taken before and after the windtunnel tests (at room temperature) showed that both the effective spring rate and the piston friction had decreased during the wind tunnel tests. In neither the effective spring rate nor the piston friction was the magnitude of change great enough to cause significant impairment of overall system effectiveness. No major valve mechanical problems were encountered in any of the tests. During high temperature bench tests, piston frictional drag increased. The friction returned to its initial room temperature value when the stability-bleed valve was disassembled and reassembled. The problem might be solved by using a different material for the piston sleeve bearing and the piston rings.

  4. Laser Doppler technique for nondestructive evaluation of mechanical heart valves kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigioni, Mauro; Daniele, Carla; Morbiducci, U.; Del Gaudio, C.; D'Avenio, Giuseppe; Di Meo, D.; Barbaro, Vincenzo

    2004-06-01

    Laser techniques for vibration measurement, due to their non-contact nature, represents an interesting alternative investigational tool to be tested in biomedical and clinic fields. A particular application could be as evaluation method in design and quality control of artificial organs. Aim of this study is to investigate the application of laser vibrometry to the study of mechanical heart valves in-vitro, with an ad hoc set-up. A heterodyne laser Doppler vibrometry system, which allows the measurement of both vibrational velocity and displacement was used. Three different approaches have been carried out, in order to stress the limits of the laser vibrometry technique for testing heart valve prostheses. Critical points and difficulties to build up experimental studies in this field were clearly pointed out. In the present study only one laser head was used, the aim of the authors being to test the feasibility of a simplified approach on mechanical cardiac valves. Starting from that analysis a comparison could be made to assess the capability to discriminate between normal and malfunctioning devices. The advantage of the proposed test bench is that it could provide a non-contact, non-destructive analysis of the valve under the same working conditions as those upon implantation. The proposed method could furnish a typical "fingerprint" characterizing each valve behavior in repeatable experimental conditions.

  5. Mechanical degradation of biological heart valve tissue induced by low diameter crimping: an early assessment.

    PubMed

    Khoffi, Foued; Heim, Frederic

    2015-04-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become today an increasingly attractive procedure to relieve patients from aortic valve disease. However, the procedure requires crimping biological tissue within a metallic stent for low diameter catheter insertion purpose. This step induces specific stress in the leaflets especially when the crimping diameter is small. One concern about crimping is the potential degradations undergone by the biological tissue, which may limit the durability of the valve once implanted. The purpose of the present work is to study the effect of low diameter crimping on the mechanical performances of pericardium valve prototypes. The prototypes were compressed to a diameter of 1mm within braided stents for 20 min. SEM observations performed on crimped material show that crimped leaflets undergo degradations characterized by apparent surface defects. Moreover mechanical extension tests were performed on pericardium strips before and after crimping. The strips (15 mm long, 5mm wide) were taken from both crimped and native leaflets considering 2 different valve diameters, 19 and 21 mm. In order to prevent the premature drying of the pericardium tissue during the procedure, the biological tissue was kept in contact with a formaldehyde solution. Results show that the ultimate strength value decreases nearly by up to 50%. The modifications observed in the material may jeopardize the long term durability of the device. However, further tests are necessary with a larger amount of samples to confirm these early results. PMID:25621851

  6. Mechanical and structural characterization of tibial prosthetic interfaces before and after aging under simulated service conditions.

    PubMed

    Cavaco, A; Ramalho, A; Pais, S; Durães, L

    2015-03-01

    Prosthesis interface is one of the most important components to promote individual׳s health and comfort, as it establishes direct contact with the skin and transfers loads generated during gait. The aim of this study was to mechanically characterize, three commercial interfaces (block copolymer, silicone gel and silicone elestomer), under static and dynamic conditions, before and after undergoing a process of chemical aging in synthetic sweat for periods up to 90 days. Static mechanical compression tests were performed on the materials, as well as fatigue tests to assess their static and dynamic mechanical behaviors, respectively. For the second, a sinusoidal load was applied with an appropriate range of deformation for each material. Several analytical techniques were also used to characterize the materials, namely Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and morphology characterization by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). All the tested materials have strong viscoelastic behavior, showing a linear response for small deformations, followed by a nonlinear behavior for higher deformation. The block copolymer and the silicone gel are affected by aging in synthetic sweat in a similar way, with a significant increase of their rigidity after 30 days, followed by a progressive reduction. The silicone elastomer displays a continuous increase of rigidity along the 90 days of storage, being the most sensitive to aging affects. It also exhibits the lowest stiffness value, being suitable for uses that require maximum comfort. All materials demonstrate chemical and structural stability under service simulated conditions. PMID:25554916

  7. Development of prosthetic skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilaru, Rohit

    The objective of this research was to embed tactile sensors in polyimides. This novel method could be utilized to realize prosthetic skin for sensing different kinds of mechanical stimuli. Tactile sensors have an increasing demand in medical sectors: upper and lower-limb prosthetics and in the industrial sectors: robot end-effectors, grippers and manipulators. The sensors developed are targeted for prosthetic arm tactile sensing applications. Current work presents piezoresistive differential pressure sensors fabricated on flexible polyimide film or substrate. A unique technique to bond a flexible superstrate polyimide layer to a MEMS tactile sensor array is presented in this thesis. The sensor is made of aluminium oxide membrane layer with nichrome piezoresistors as the half-Wheatstone bridge elements. Four different types of sensor designs have been characterized to obtain gauge factor of thin film nichrome. The sensor arrays with and without the superstrate film were simulated for obtaining the maximum stress, average strain and deflection of the membrane. The maximum change in output voltage was 0.8 mV. The gauge factors calculated for tactile sensor with superstrate range between 2.2 to 7.8 and without superstrate range 1.5 to 5.7.

  8. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis of maxillofacial prosthetic elastomers: the effect of different disinfecting aging procedures.

    PubMed

    Eleni, Panagiota N; Krokida, Magdalini K; Polyzois, Gregory L; Gettleman, Lawrence

    2014-05-01

    In this study, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis was used to evaluate the changes that occurred in maxillofacial elastomers subjected to different disinfecting regimens. A commercial polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) and an experimental chlorinated polyethylene (CPE) were treated with different disinfection procedures for a period that simulates 1 year of clinical service: microwave exposure (D1), hypochlorite solution (D2), neutral soap (D3), and a commercial disinfecting solution (D4). A fifth group was kept in dark storage as control. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis tests operated in a fixed frequency (1 Hz) over a range of temperatures (-130°C to 20°C for PDMS, -60°C to 120°C for CPE). Loss modulus (G″), storage modulus (G'), and loss factor (tanδ) were recorded as a function of temperature. The obtained glass transition temperature (Tg) values were subjected to statistical analysis. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis revealed changes in Tg values for both materials, which reflect the possible changes in their chemical and physical structure, after different disinfection procedures. The PDMS and CPE samples seem to have less dense structure maybe because of chain scission reaction that probably occurred during the disinfection procedures. According to statistical analysis, Tg values presented significant changes from the control samples among the different materials and disinfecting procedures. Microwave exposure and hypochlorite solution affect CPE significantly, whereas PDMS exhibited significant changes after being treated with a commercial antimicrobial agent, concerning changes that occurred in Tg. In all cases, Tg values were decreased compared with the untreated samples, which were stiffer, presenting higher Tg and G' values. PMID:24799103

  9. Gait Asymmetry of Transfemoral Amputees Using Mechanical and Microprocessor-Controlled Prosthetic Knees

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Kenton R.; Frittoli, Serena; Frigo, Carlo A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Amputees walk with an asymmetrical gait, which may lead to future musculoskeletal degenerative changes. The purpose of this study was to compare the gait asymmetry of active transfemoral amputees while using a passive mechanical knee joint or a microprocessor-controlled knee joint. Methods Objective 3D gait measurements were obtained in 15 subjects (12 men and 3 women; age 42, range 26–57). Research participants were longtime users of a mechanical prosthesis (mean 20 years, range 3–36 years). Joint symmetry was calculated using a novel method that includes the entire waveform throughout the gait cycle. Findings There was no significant difference in hip, knee and ankle kinematics symmetry when using the different knee prostheses. In contrast, the results demonstrated a significant improvement in lower extremity joint kinetics symmetry when using the microprocessor-controlled knee. Interpretation Use of the microprocessor-controlled knee joint resulted in improved gait symmetry. These improvements may lead to a reduction in the degenerative musculoskeletal changes often experienced by amputees. PMID:22221344

  10. Three-dimentional simulation of flow-induced platelet activation in artificial heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayat, Mohammadali; Asgharzadeh, Hafez; Borazjani, Iman

    2015-11-01

    Since the advent of heart valve, several valve types such as mechanical and bio-prosthetic valves have been designed. Mechanical Heart Valves (MHV) are durable but suffer from thromboembolic complications that caused by shear-induced platelet activation near the valve region. Bio-prosthetic Heart Valves (BHV) are known for better hemodynamics. However, they usually have a short average life time. Realistic simulations of heart valves in combination with platelet activation models can lead to a better understanding of the potential risk of thrombus formation in such devices. In this study, an Eulerian approach is developed to calculate the platelet activation in three-dimensional simulations of flow through MHV and BHV using a parallel overset-curvilinear immersed boundary technique. A curvilinear body-fitted grid is used for the flow simulation through the anatomic aorta, while the sharp-interface immersed boundary method is used for simulation of the Left Ventricle (LV) with prescribed motion. In addition, dynamics of valves were calculated numerically using under-relaxed strong-coupling algorithm. Finally, the platelet activation results for BMV and MHV are compared with each other.

  11. The Work by Giulio Ceradini in Explaining the Mechanism of Semilunar Cardiac Valve Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troiani, Diana; Manni, Ermanno

    2011-01-01

    Using an excised pig heart preparation with tubes, a manometer, and a visualizing apparatus, Giulio Ceradini, an Italian physiologist working in the years of 1871-1872 in Carl Ludwig's famous laboratory in Leipzig, Germany, illustrated the mechanism of closure of the semilunar valves. He was the first to conceive that the closure of the heart…

  12. Prothrombin complex concentrate for warfarin-induced bleeding in a patient with a mechanical aortic valve

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Rahul; Abel, Erik; Burcham, Pamela; Firstenberg, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Reversal of anticoagulation-induced bleeding in the perioperative period can be challenging, particularly with an unstable patient with a mechanical valve. We present a case of life-threatening bleeding successfully managed with a prothrombin complex concentrate as an alternative to fresh frozen plasma. PMID:23667067

  13. Euler force actuation mechanism for siphon valving in compact disk-like microfluidic chips.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yongbo; Fan, Jianhua; Zhou, Song; Zhou, Teng; Wu, Junfeng; Li, Yin; Liu, Zhenyu; Xuan, Ming; Wu, Yihui

    2014-03-01

    Based on the Euler force induced by the acceleration of compact disk (CD)-like microfluidic chip, this paper presents a novel actuation mechanism for siphon valving. At the preliminary stage of acceleration, the Euler force in the tangential direction of CD-like chip takes the primary place compared with the centrifugal force to function as the actuation of the flow, which fills the siphon and actuates the siphon valving. The Euler force actuation mechanism is demonstrated by the numerical solution of the phase-field based mathematical model for the flow in siphon valve. In addition, experimental validation is implemented in the polymethylmethacrylate-based CD-like microfluidic chip manufactured using CO2 laser engraving technique. To prove the application of the proposed Euler force actuation mechanism, whole blood separation and plasma extraction has been conducted using the Euler force actuated siphon valving. The newly introduced actuation mechanism overcomes the dependence on hydrophilic capillary filling of siphon by avoiding external manipulation or surface treatments of polymeric material. The sacrifice for highly integrated processing in pneumatic pumping technique is also prevented by excluding the volume-occupied compressed air chamber. PMID:24753736

  14. Euler force actuation mechanism for siphon valving in compact disk-like microfluidic chips

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yongbo; Fan, Jianhua; Zhou, Song; Zhou, Teng; Wu, Junfeng; Li, Yin; Liu, Zhenyu; Xuan, Ming; Wu, Yihui

    2014-01-01

    Based on the Euler force induced by the acceleration of compact disk (CD)-like microfluidic chip, this paper presents a novel actuation mechanism for siphon valving. At the preliminary stage of acceleration, the Euler force in the tangential direction of CD-like chip takes the primary place compared with the centrifugal force to function as the actuation of the flow, which fills the siphon and actuates the siphon valving. The Euler force actuation mechanism is demonstrated by the numerical solution of the phase-field based mathematical model for the flow in siphon valve. In addition, experimental validation is implemented in the polymethylmethacrylate-based CD-like microfluidic chip manufactured using CO2 laser engraving technique. To prove the application of the proposed Euler force actuation mechanism, whole blood separation and plasma extraction has been conducted using the Euler force actuated siphon valving. The newly introduced actuation mechanism overcomes the dependence on hydrophilic capillary filling of siphon by avoiding external manipulation or surface treatments of polymeric material. The sacrifice for highly integrated processing in pneumatic pumping technique is also prevented by excluding the volume-occupied compressed air chamber. PMID:24753736

  15. Mapping of mechanical specimens by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy method: Application to an engine valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Quintas, I.; Mateo, M. P.; Piñon, V.; Yañez, A.; Nicolas, G.

    2012-08-01

    In this work, an engine valve composed of different alloys has been analyzed by laser- induced breakdown spectroscopy to prove the capability of this technique to characterize mechanical parts which are complex in terms of shape and composition. With the acquired spectral data, 3D chemical maps have been plotted using a computer application for four representative elements: Fe, Cr, Ni and Mn. In addition, information about the in-depth distribution of Cr and Fe in different parts of the valve is shown. Results prove the potential of this technique to be implemented as an evaluation tool for quality control.

  16. Mathematical modeling and mechanical and histopathological testing of porous prosthetic pylon for direct skeletal attachment.

    PubMed

    Pitkin, Mark; Raykhtsaum, Grigory; Pilling, John; Shukeylo, Yuri; Moxson, Vladimir; Duz, Volodimir; Lewandowski, John; Connolly, Raymond; Kistenberg, Robert S; Dalton, John F; Prilutsky, Boris; Jacobson, Stewart

    2009-01-01

    This article presents recent results in the development of the skin and bone integrated pylon (SBIP) intended for direct skeletal attachment of limb prostheses. In our previous studies of the porous SBIP-1 and SBIP-2 prototypes, the bond site between the porous pylons and residuum bone and skin did not show the inflammation characteristically observed when solid pylons are used. At the same time, porosity diminished the strength of the pylon. To find a reasonable balance between the biological conductivity and the strength of the porous pylon, we developed a mathematical model of the composite permeable structure. A novel manufacturing process was implemented, and the new SBIP-3 prototype was tested mechanically. The minimal strength requirements established earlier for the SBIP were exceeded threefold. The first histopathological analysis of skin, bone, and the implanted SBIP-2 pylons was conducted on two rats and one cat. The histopathological analysis provided new evidence of inflammation-free, deep ingrowth of skin and bone cells throughout the SBIP structure. PMID:19675985

  17. Mathematical modeling and mechanical and histopathological testing of porous prosthetic pylon for direct skeletal attachment

    PubMed Central

    Pitkin, Mark; Raykhtsaum, Grigory; Pilling, John; Shukeylo, Yuri; Moxson, Vladimir; Duz, Volodimir; Lewandowski, John; Connolly, Raymond; Kistenberg, Robert S.; Dalton, John F.; Prilutsky, Boris; Jacobson, Stewart

    2010-01-01

    This article presents recent results in the development of the skin and bone integrated pylon (SBIP) intended for direct skeletal attachment of limb prostheses. In our previous studies of the porous SBIP-1 and SBIP-2 prototypes, the bond site between the porous pylons and residuum bone and skin did not show the inflammation characteristically observed when solid pylons are used. At the same time, porosity diminished the strength of the pylon. To find a reasonable balance between the biological conductivity and the strength of the porous pylon, we developed a mathematical model of the composite permeable structure. A novel manufacturing process was implemented, and the new SBIP-3 prototype was tested mechanically. The minimal strength requirements established earlier for the SBIP were exceeded threefold. The first histopathological analysis of skin, bone, and the implanted SBIP-2 pylons was conducted on two rats and one cat. The histopathological analysis provided new evidence of inflammation-free, deep ingrowth of skin and bone cells throughout the SBIP structure. PMID:19675985

  18. Automatic shutoff valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, S. F.; Overbey, C. W.

    1980-01-01

    Cellulose-sponge disk absorbs incoming water and expands with enough force to shut valve. When water recedes, valve opens by squeezing sponge dry to its original size. This direct mechanical action is considered more reliable than solenoid valve.

  19. Distant downstream steady-state flow studies of a mechanical heart valve: PIV study of secondary flow in a model aortic arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fix, Brandon R.; Popma, Christopher J.; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-11-01

    Each year, hundreds of thousands of aortic and mitral heart valves are replaced with prosthetic valves. In efforts to develop a valve that does not require lifelong anticoagulation therapy, previous experimental research has been devoted to analyzing the hemodynamics of various heart valve designs, limited to the flow up to only 2 diameters downstream of the valve. Two-component, two-dimensional (2C-2D) particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used in this study to examine secondary flow velocity fields in a curved tube modeling an aorta at five locations (0-, 45-, 90-, 135-, 180-degrees). A bileaflet valve, opened to 30-, 45-, and 59-degrees, and one (no-valve) baseline condition were examined under three steady flow inflows (Re = 218, 429, 634). In particular, variations in the two-dimensional turbulent shear stresses at each cross sectional plane were analyzed. The results suggest that bileaflet valves in the aortic model produce significant turbulence and vorticity up to 5.5 downstream diameters, i.e. up to the 90-degrees location. Expanding this research towards aortic heart valve hemodynamics highlights a need for additional studies extending beyond the typical few diameters downstream to fully characterize valvular function. Supported by the NSF Grant No. CBET- 0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  20. Current status of valve replacement in children.

    PubMed

    Schaff, H V; Danielson, G K

    1986-01-01

    Management of valve diseases in children demands an eclectic approach by the surgeon. Whenever possible, valve function should be restored by repair rather than prosthetic replacement. Recent evidence firmly demonstrates that there are accelerated calcification and degeneration of porcine heterografts in children, especially in the aortic and mitral positions. For this reason, we reserve the use of heterograft prostheses for the right atrioventricular position and for conduits from the right ventricle to the pulmonary artery. Such patients are observed carefully for signs of valve degeneration. Long-term followup of the Starr-Edwards prosthesis in children demonstrates excellent durability and a thromboembolic rate that is equal to or lower than that found in adult patients. Hemodynamic properties of the Starr-Edwards valve are adequate even in the smallest size used in infants and have allowed children to reach early adolescence at which time valve re-replacement with an adult-sized prosthesis is possible. Intermediate-term experience with the Bjork-Shiley valve in children has also been favorable. At present we continue to use systemic anticoagulation with warfarin in all children with mechanical prostheses. PMID:3742534

  1. Mechanism of Microbubble Growth at Mitral Mechanical Heart Valve (MHV) Closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambod, Edmond; Beizaie, Masoud; Shusser, Michael; Gharib, Morteza

    1999-11-01

    The growth mechanism of microbubbles at mitral MHV closure has been experimentally studied. In the heart, some of the tiny bubbles grow explosively and form larger and persistent bubbles. An experimental set-up was designed to allow the passage of micron-size bubbles through an 80 micron-wide slot, simulating a typical gap between the housing ring and the occluders in MHV. The bubbles were generated using an air-liquid dispenser and were delivered to the system via a 250 micron-diameter hypedermic needle positioned vertically near the slot. A solenoid valve was used to deliver a 10cc volume of liquid in 25ms time through the slot. High-speed imaging was used to study the impact of flow through the slot on bubble growth. The velocity of liquid through the slot was assessed to be in the range of 12-15 m/s. Our observations confirmed the rapid and drastic growth of microbubbles following their passage through the narrow slot, due to pressure drop. Vortices, which were induced by flow separation on the downstream of the slot, caused the grown bubbles to shatter and form more stable bubbles.

  2. A numerical investigation of blood damage in the hinge area of bileaflet mechanical heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Min; Wu, Jingshu; Simon, Helene; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Aidun, Cyrus; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2010-11-01

    Studies have shown that high shear stress and large recirculation regions have a strong impact on thromboembolic complications in Bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHV). This study quantitatively compares the hinge flow field and blood damage of the 23mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) regent with different hinge gap widths and the 23mm CarboMedics (CM) valves. The lattice-Boltzmann method with external boundary force (LBM-EBF) [Wu and Aidun, Int. J Num. Methods Fluids, 62, 7, 2009] was implemented to simulate the flow and capture the dynamics and the surface shear stress of the platelets with realistic geometry. The velocity boundary conditions for the small-scale hinge flow are obtained from previous 3D large-scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations [Simon et al, Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 38, 3, 2009]. The flow patterns of three hinges that were studied were similar during diastole. However, velocity magnitudes and shear stresses at the hinge gap were different, which may explain the higher blood damage index (BDI) value for the CM valve and lower BDI value for the SJM valve with a larger gap width. The multiscale computational method used to quantitatively measure the BDI during a full cardiac cycle will be discussed.

  3. Manipulation of the closing transients of bileaflet mechanical heart valves using passive, surface-mounted elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Helene

    2005-11-01

    The time-periodic closing of bileaflet mechanical heart valves is accompanied by a strong flow transient that is associated with the formation of a counter-rotating vortex pair near the b-datum line of leaflet edges. The strong transitory shear that is generated by these vortices may be damaging to blood elements and may result in platelet activation. In the present work, these flow transients are mitigated using miniature vortex generator arrays that are embedded on the surface of the leaflets. The closing transients in the absence and presence of the passive vortex generators are characterized using PIV measurements that are phase locked to the leaflet motion. The study utilizes a 25 mm St. Jude Medical valve placed in the aortic position of the Georgia Tech left heart simulator. The valve is subjected to physiological flow conditions: a heart rate of 70 bpm; a cardiac output of 5 l/min; and a mean aortic pressure of 90 mmHg. Measurements of the velocity field in the center plane of the leaflets demonstrate that the dynamics of the transient vortices that precede the formation of the leakage jets can be significantly altered and controlled by relatively simple passive modifications of existing valve designs.

  4. Time-Resolved Micro PIV in the Pivoting Area of the Triflo Mechanical Heart Valve.

    PubMed

    Vennemann, Bernhard M; Rösgen, Thomas; Carrel, Thierry P; Obrist, Dominik

    2016-09-01

    The Lapeyre-Triflo FURTIVA valve aims at combining the favorable hemodynamics of bioprosthetic heart valves with the durability of mechanical heart valves (MHVs). The pivoting region of MHVs is hemodynamically of special interest as it may be a region of high shear stresses, combined with areas of flow stagnation. Here, platelets can be activated and may form a thrombus which in the most severe case can compromise leaflet mobility. In this study we set up an experiment to replicate the pulsatile flow in the aortic root and to study the flow in the pivoting region under physiological hemodynamic conditions (CO = 4.5 L/min / CO = 3.0 L/min, f = 60 BPM). It was found that the flow velocity in the pivoting region could reach values close to that of the bulk flow during systole. At the onset of diastole the three valve leaflets closed in a very synchronous manner within an average closing time of 55 ms which is much slower than what has been measured for traditional bileaflet MHVs. Hot spots for elevated viscous shear stresses were found at the flanges of the housing and the tips of the leaflet ears. Systolic VSS was maximal during mid-systole and reached levels of up to 40 Pa. PMID:27177747

  5. Prosthetic failure in implant dentistry.

    PubMed

    Sadid-Zadeh, Ramtin; Kutkut, Ahmad; Kim, Hyeongil

    2015-01-01

    Although osseointegrated dental implants have become a predictable and effective modality for the treatment of single or multiple missing teeth, their use is associated with clinical complications. Such complications can be biologic, technical, mechanical, or esthetic and may compromise implant outcomes to various degrees. This article presents prosthetic complications accompanied with implant-supported single and partial fixed dental prostheses. PMID:25434566

  6. Development of prosthetic arm with pneumatic prosthetic hand and tendon-driven wrist.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Hiroyuki; Tsujiuchi, Nobutaka; Koizumi, Takayuki; Kan, Hiroto; Hirano, Masanori; Nakamura, Yoichiro

    2009-01-01

    Recently, various prosthetic arms have been developed, but few are both attractive and functional. Considering human coexistence, prosthetic arms must be both safe and flexible. In this research, we developed a novel prosthetic arm with a five-fingered prosthetic hand using our original pneumatic actuators and a slender tendon-driven wrist using a wire drive and two small motors. Because the prosthetic hand's driving source is comprised of small pneumatic actuators, the prosthetic hand is safe when it makes contact with people; it can also operate flexibly. In addition, the arm has a tendon-driven wrist to expand its motion space and to perform many operations. First, we explain the pneumatic hand's drive mechanism and its tendon-driven wrist. Next, we identify the characteristics of the hand and the wrist and construct a control system for this arm and verify its control performance. PMID:19964378

  7. Engineering tissue constructs to mimic native aortic and pulmonary valve leaflets' structures and mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Nafiseh

    There are several disadvantages correlated with current heart valve replacement, including anticoagulation therapy for patients with mechanical valves and the low durability of bioprosthetic valves. The non-viable nature of such devices is a critical drawback especially for pediatric cases due to the inability of the graft to grow in vivo with the patients. A tissue engineered heart valve (TEHV) with remodeling and growth ability, is conceptually appealing to use in the surgical repair and could serve as a permanent replacements when operating for pediatric valvular lesions. It is critical that scaffolds for functional heart valve tissue engineering, be capable of mimicking the native leaflet's structure and mechanical properties at the time of implantation. Meanwhile, the scaffolds should be able to support cellular proliferation and native-like tissue formation as the TEHV remodels toward a scaffold-free state. Our overall hypothesis is that an "ideal" engineered construct, designed based on native leaflet's structure and mechanics, will complement a native heart valve leaflet in providing benchmarks for use in the design of clinically-applicable TEHV. This hypothesis was addressed through several experiments conducted in the present study. To establish a functional biomimetic TEHV, we developed scaffolds capable of matching the anisotropic stiffness of native leaflet while promoting native-like cell and collagen content and supporting the ECM generation. Scaffolds with various polymer contents (e.g., poly (glycerol sebacate) (PGS) and poly (epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL)) and structural designs (e.g., microfabricated and microfibrous scaffolds), were fabricated based on native leaflet's structure and mechanics. It was found that the tri-layered scaffold, designed with assembly of microfabricated PGS and microfibrous PGS/PCL was a functional leaflet capable of promoting tissue formation. Furthermore, to investigate the effect of cyclic stress and flexure

  8. Cyclic fatigue and fracture in pyrolytic carbon-coated graphite mechanical heart-valve prostheses: role of small cracks in life prediction.

    PubMed

    Dauskardt, R H; Ritchie, R O; Takemoto, J K; Brendzel, A M

    1994-07-01

    A fracture-mechanics based study has performed to characterize the fracture toughness and rates of cyclic fatigue-crack growth of incipient flaws in prosthetic heart-valve components made of pyrolytic carbon-coated graphite. Such data are required to predict the safe structural lifetime of mechanical heart-valve prostheses using damage-tolerant analysis. Unlike previous studies where fatigue-crack propagation data were obtained using through-thickness, long cracks (approximately 2-20 mm long), growing in conventional (e.g., compact-tension) samples, experiments were performed on physically small cracks (approximately 100-600 microns long), initiated on the surface of the pyrolytic-carbon coating to simulate reality. Small-crack toughness results were found to agree closely with those measured conventionally with long cracks. However, similar to well-known observations in metal fatigue, it was found that based on the usual computations of the applied (far-field) driving force in terms of the maximum stress intensity, Kmax, small fatigue cracks grew at rates that exceeded those of long cracks at the same applied stress intensity, and displayed a negative dependency on Kmax; moreover, they grew at applied stress intensities less than the fatigue threshold value, below which long cracks are presumed dormant. To resolve this apparent discrepancy, it is shown that long and small crack results can be normalized, provided growth rates are characterized in terms of the total (near-tip) stress intensity (incorporating, for example, the effect of residual stress); with this achieved, in principle, either form of data can be used for life prediction of implant devices. Inspection of the long and small crack results reveals extensive scatter inherent in both forms of growth-rate data for the pyrolytic-carbon material. PMID:8083247

  9. Heart Valve Prostheses in Pregnancy: Outcomes for Women and Their Infants

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, Claire M.; Algert, Charles S.; Ford, Jane B.; Nippita, Tanya A.; Figtree, Gemma A.; Roberts, Christine L.

    2014-01-01

    Background As the prognosis of women with prosthetic heart valves improves, and increasing number are contemplating and undertaking pregnancy. Accurate knowledge of perinatal outcomes is essential, assisting counseling and guiding care. The aims of this study were to assess outcomes in a contemporary population of women with heart valve prostheses undertaking pregnancy and to compare outcomes for women with mechanical and bioprosthetic prostheses. Methods and Results Longitudinally linked population health data sets containing birth and hospital admissions data were obtained for all women giving birth in New South Wales, Australia, 2000–2011. This included information identifying presence of maternal prosthetic heart valve. Cardiovascular and birth outcomes were evaluated. Among 1 144 156 pregnancies, 136 involved women with a heart valve prosthesis (1 per 10 000). No maternal mortality was seen among these women, although the relative risk for an adverse event was higher than the general population, including severe maternal morbidity (139 versus 14 per 1000 births, rate ratio [RR]=9.96, 95% CI 6.32 to 15.7), major maternal cardiovascular event (44 versus 1 per 1000, RR 34.6, 95% CI 14.6 to 81.6), preterm birth (183 versus 66 per 1000, RR=2.77, 95% CI 1.88 to 4.07), and small‐for‐gestational‐age infants (193 versus 95 per 1000, RR=2.03, 95% CI 1.40 to 2.96). There was a trend toward increased maternal and perinatal morbidity in women with a mechanical valve compared with those with a bioprosthetic valve. Conclusions Pregnancies in women with a prosthetic heart valve demonstrate an increased risk of an adverse outcome, for both mothers and infants, compared with pregnancies in the absence of heart valve prostheses. In this contemporary population, the risk was lower than previously reported. PMID:24970269

  10. Lumped parameter model for computing the minimum pressure during mechanical heart valve closure.

    PubMed

    Maines, Brant H; Brennen, Christopher E

    2005-08-01

    The cavitation inception threshold of mechanical heart valves has been shown to be highly variable. This is in part due to the random distribution of the initial and final conditions that characterize leaflet closure. While numerous hypotheses exist explaining the mechanisms of inception, no consistent scaling laws have been developed to describe this phenomenon due to the complex nature of these dynamic conditions. Thus in order to isolate and assess the impact of these varied conditions and mechanisms on inception, a system of ordinary differential equations is developed to describe each system component and solved numerically to predict the minimum pressure generated during valve closure. In addition, an experiment was conducted in a mock circulatory loop using an optically transparent size 29 bileaflet valve over a range of conditions to calibrate and validate this model under physiological conditions. High-speed video and high-response pressure measurements were obtained simultaneously to characterize the relationship between the valve motion, fluid motion, and negative pressure transients during closure. The simulation model was calibrated using data from a single closure cycle and then compared to other experimental flow conditions and to results found in the literature. The simulation showed good agreement with the closing dynamics and with the minimum pressure trends in the current experiment. Additionally, the simulation suggests that the variability observed experimentally (when using dP/dt alone as the primary measure of cavitation inception) is predictable. Overall, results from the current form of this lumped parameter model indicate that it is a good engineering assessment tool. PMID:16121535

  11. Upper extremity myoelectric prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Uellendahl, J E

    2000-08-01

    Myoelectric control of upper limb prostheses has proven to be an effective and efficient means of controlling prosthetic components. This means of control has been used extensively for over 30 years, during which time these systems have become reliable and durable in most situations. Myoelectric control, or any other prosthetic control scheme, should not be considered as the optimal control for arm prostheses, but rather as one of the several effective ways of producing desired function. Advanced clinical practice calls for a blending of all control schemes, as appropriate, to allow the prosthesis to serve the intentions of the user efficiently and with little mental effort. Technology continues to change, bringing with it new and sometimes better ways of fitting amputees. Microprocessors and programmable controllers have opened new and exciting avenues for improvement in function. New, and as of yet unidentified, electronic and mechanical advances are certainly on the horizon. There is much work to be done before upper limb prostheses rightfully are called arm replacements. But progress is occurring and advances are being made toward the goal of replacing the function and appearance of that marvelous tool, the human arm. PMID:10989484

  12. Postpartum valve thrombosis: a happy ending thriller.

    PubMed

    Bollati, Mario; Moretti, Claudio; Sciuto, Filippo; Omedè, PierLuigi; Marra, Walter Grosso; Morello, Mara; Grimaldi, Roberto; Rabbia, Claudio; Zoccai, Giuseppe Biondi; Sheiban, Imad

    2015-01-01

    A 29-year-old woman with two mechanical valve prostheses was referred to our institution for sudden and self-resolved diplopia 2 weeks after childbirth. From the beginning of pregnancy, nadroparin was started instead of warfarin. The echocardiogram performed at hospital admission revealed a severe aortic prosthesis regurgitation due to incomplete leaflet apposition with a prosthetic aortic transvalvular gradient increase. Three-dimensional transoesophageal echocardiography revealed a thrombus located between the two prostheses, causing intermittent aortic valve malfunction. Intravenous heparin was started. Three days later, a second transoesophageal echocardiogram revealed a decreased aortic transvalvular gradient, but an oval thrombus adhered to the mitral prosthesis and fluctuating through the prosthetic valve was detected. Tissue plasminogen activator infusion was started. To reduce cerebral embolization, carotid filters used during artery angioplasty were placed in common carotid arteries, left and right. No complication occurred during and after the procedure. With thrombus absence at 30-min transoesophageal echocardiography, filters were removed. The patient continued intravenous heparin until achievement of a therapeutic international normalized ratio range and she was asymptomatic on discharge. PMID:21157367

  13. Pursuing prosthetic electronic skin.

    PubMed

    Chortos, Alex; Liu, Jia; Bao, Zhenan

    2016-09-01

    Skin plays an important role in mediating our interactions with the world. Recreating the properties of skin using electronic devices could have profound implications for prosthetics and medicine. The pursuit of artificial skin has inspired innovations in materials to imitate skin's unique characteristics, including mechanical durability and stretchability, biodegradability, and the ability to measure a diversity of complex sensations over large areas. New materials and fabrication strategies are being developed to make mechanically compliant and multifunctional skin-like electronics, and improve brain/machine interfaces that enable transmission of the skin's signals into the body. This Review will cover materials and devices designed for mimicking the skin's ability to sense and generate biomimetic signals. PMID:27376685

  14. Mitigation of Shear-Induced Blood Damage by Mechanical Bileaflet Heart Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharin, Boris; Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit; Glezer, Ari

    2010-11-01

    The strong transitory shear stress generated during the time-periodic closing of bileaflet mechanical heart valves that is associated with the formation of counter-rotating vortices near the leaflet edges may be damaging to blood elements and may result in platelet activation and therefore thrombosis and thromboembolism complications. These flow transients are investigated using fluorescent PIV in a new, low-volume test setup that reproduces the pulsatile physiological conditions associated with a 25 mm St. Jude Medical valve. The flow transients are partially suppressed and the platelet activation is minimized using miniature vortex generator arrays that are embedded on the surface of the leaflets. Measurements of the ensuing flow taken phase-locked to the leaflet motion demonstrate substantial modification of the transient vertical structures and concomitant reduction of Reynolds shear stresses. Human blood experiments validated the effectiveness of miniature vortex generators in reducing thrombus formation by over 42 percent.

  15. Age-Dependent Changes in Geometry, Tissue Composition and Mechanical Properties of Fetal to Adult Cryopreserved Human Heart Valves

    PubMed Central

    van Geemen, Daphne; Soares, Ana L. F.; Oomen, Pim J. A.; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Janssen-van den Broek, Marloes W. J. T.; van den Bogaerdt, Antoon J.; Bogers, Ad J. J. C.; Goumans, Marie-José T. H.; Baaijens, Frank P. T.; Bouten, Carlijn V. C.

    2016-01-01

    There is limited information about age-specific structural and functional properties of human heart valves, while this information is key to the development and evaluation of living valve replacements for pediatric and adolescent patients. Here, we present an extended data set of structure-function properties of cryopreserved human pulmonary and aortic heart valves, providing age-specific information for living valve replacements. Tissue composition, morphology, mechanical properties, and maturation of leaflets from 16 pairs of structurally unaffected aortic and pulmonary valves of human donors (fetal-53 years) were analyzed. Interestingly, no major differences were observed between the aortic and pulmonary valves. Valve annulus and leaflet dimensions increase throughout life. The typical three-layered leaflet structure is present before birth, but becomes more distinct with age. After birth, cell numbers decrease rapidly, while remaining cells obtain a quiescent phenotype and reside in the ventricularis and spongiosa. With age and maturation–but more pronounced in aortic valves–the matrix shows an increasing amount of collagen and collagen cross-links and a reduction in glycosaminoglycans. These matrix changes correlate with increasing leaflet stiffness with age. Our data provide a new and comprehensive overview of the changes of structure-function properties of fetal to adult human semilunar heart valves that can be used to evaluate and optimize future therapies, such as tissue engineering of heart valves. Changing hemodynamic conditions with age can explain initial changes in matrix composition and consequent mechanical properties, but cannot explain the ongoing changes in valve dimensions and matrix composition at older age. PMID:26867221

  16. An inverse modeling approach for semilunar heart valve leaflet mechanics: exploitation of tissue structure.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Ankush; Sacks, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    Determining the biomechanical behavior of heart valve leaflet tissues in a noninvasive manner remains an important clinical goal. While advances in 3D imaging modalities have made in vivo valve geometric data available, optimal methods to exploit such information in order to obtain functional information remain to be established. Herein we present and evaluate a novel leaflet shape-based framework to estimate the biomechanical behavior of heart valves from surface deformations by exploiting tissue structure. We determined accuracy levels using an "ideal" in vitro dataset, in which the leaflet geometry, strains, mechanical behavior, and fibrous structure were known to a high level of precision. By utilizing a simplified structural model for the leaflet mechanical behavior, we were able to limit the number of parameters to be determined per leaflet to only two. This approach allowed us to dramatically reduce the computational time and easily visualize the cost function to guide the minimization process. We determined that the image resolution and the number of available imaging frames were important components in the accuracy of our framework. Furthermore, our results suggest that it is possible to detect differences in fiber structure using our framework, thus allowing an opportunity to diagnose asymptomatic valve diseases and begin treatment at their early stages. Lastly, we observed good agreement of the final resulting stress-strain response when an averaged fiber architecture was used. This suggests that population-averaged fiber structural data may be sufficient for the application of the present framework to in vivo studies, although clearly much work remains to extend the present approach to in vivo problems. PMID:26449480

  17. Native Pulmonic Valve Endocarditis due to Mycobacterium fortuitum: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Mulhall, Aaron M.; Hebbeler-Clark, Renee S.

    2015-01-01

    Endocarditis secondary to Mycobacterium fortuitum is a rare entity often involving prosthetic valves and rarely native valves. Pulmonic valve endocarditis secondary to any organism is rare. We report the first case of native pulmonic valve endocarditis secondary to M. fortuitum and a literature review of native valve M. fortuitum endocarditis. PMID:26167313

  18. Experimental investigations on the fluid-mechanics of an electrospun heart valve by means of particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Del Gaudio, Costantino; Gasbarroni, Pier Luca; Romano, Giovanni Paolo

    2016-12-01

    End-stage failing heart valves are currently replaced by mechanical or biological prostheses. Both types positively contribute to restore the physiological function of native valves, but a number of drawbacks limits the expected performances. In order to improve the outcome, tissue engineering can offer an alternative approach to design and fabricate innovative heart valves capable to support the requested function and to promote the formation of a novel, viable and correctly operating physiological structure. This potential result is particularly critical if referred to the aortic valve, being the one mainly exposed to structural and functional degeneration. In this regard, the here proposed study presents the fabrication and in vitro characterization of a bioresorbable electrospun heart valve prosthesis using the particle image velocimetry technique either in physiological and pathological fluid dynamic conditions. The scaffold was designed to reproduce the aortic valve geometry, also mimicking the fibrous structure of the natural extracellular matrix. To evaluate its performances for possible implantation, the flow fields downstream the valve were accurately investigated and compared. The experimental results showed a correct functionality of the device, supported by the formation of vortex structures at the edge of the three cusps, with Reynolds stress values below the threshold for the risk of hemolysis (which can be comprised in the range 400-4000N/m(2) depending on the exposure period), and a good structural resistance to the mechanical loads generated by the driving pressure difference. PMID:27521817

  19. Bellows sealed plug valve

    DOEpatents

    Dukas, Jr., Stephen J.

    1990-01-01

    A bellows sealed plug valve includes a valve body having an inlet passage and an outlet passage, a valve chamber between the inlet and outlet passages. A valve plug has substantially the same shape as the valve chamber and is rotatably disposed therein. A shaft is movable linearly in response to a signal from a valve actuator. A bellows is sealingly disposed between the valve chamber and the valve actuator and means are located between the bellows and the valve plug for converting linear movement of the shaft connected to the valve actuator to rotational movement of the plug. Various means are disclosed including helical thread mechanism, clevis mechanism and rack and pinion mechanism, all for converting linear motion to rotational motion.

  20. Effect of vortex generators on the closing transient flow of bileaflet mechanical heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, David; Dasi, Lakshmi; Yoganathan, Ajit; Glezer, Ari

    2006-11-01

    The time-periodic closing of bileaflet mechanical heart valves is accompanied by a strong flow transient that is associated with the formation of a counter-rotating vortex pair near the b-datum line of leaflet edges. The strong transitory shear that is generated by these vortices may be damaging to blood elements and may result in platelet activation. In the present work, these flow transients are mitigated using miniature vortex generator arrays that are embedded on the surface of the leaflets. Two vortex generator designs were investigated: one design comprised staggered rectangular fins and the other one staggered hemispheres. The closing transients in the absence and presence of the passive vortex generators are characterized using phase locked PIV measurements. The study utilizes a 25 mm St. Jude Medical valve placed in the aortic position of the Georgia Tech left heart simulator. Measurements of the velocity field in the center plane of the leaflets demonstrate that the dynamics of the transient vortices that precede the formation of the leakage jets can be significantly altered and controlled by relatively simple passive modifications of existing valve designs. Human blood experiments validated the effectiveness of miniature vortex generators in reducing thrombus formation by over 42 percent.

  1. Time-frequency analysis of transient pressure signals for a mechanical heart valve cavitation study.

    PubMed

    Yu, A A; White, J A; Hwang, N H

    1998-01-01

    A series of transient pressure signals (TPSs) can be measured using a miniature pressure transducer mounted near the tip of the inflow side of a mechanical heart valve (MHV) occluder during closure. A relationship appears to exist between the intensity and pattern of the TPS and the cavitation potential of a MHV. To study the relationship between MHV cavitation and the TPSs, we installed an MHV in a valve testing chamber of a digitally controlled burst test loop. A charge coupled device (CCD) camera and a personal computer based image grabbing program was used to visualize cavitation bubbles appearing on or near the occluder surface. One bileaflet MHV was used as the model for this study. Cavitation bubbles were observed within 300 microsec of the leaflet/housing impact. The valve was tested at various driving pressures between 100 and 1,300 mmHg. MHV cavitation bubble intensities were qualitatively classified into three categories: 1) strong, 2) weak, and 3) none. Digital images of the MHV occluder inflow surface were recorded simultaneously with the TPSs. TPSs were studied by the time-frequency analysis method (spectrogram) and correlated to MHV cavitation potential. The intensity of the cavitation bubbles was found to be associated with burst test loop driving pressures during leaflet closure. PMID:9804476

  2. Detection of a prosthetic aortic valvular abscess with indium-111-labeled leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Oates, E.; Sarno, R.C.

    1988-10-01

    An unsuspected annular abscess at the base of a prosthetic aortic valve in a patient with endocarditis was identified by indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy alone. This highly sensitive and specific technique expediently demonstrated the surgically proven inflammatory focus.

  3. Aortic valve surgery - open

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are two main types of new valves: Mechanical, made of man-made materials, such as titanium ... Mechanical heart valves do not fail often. However, blood clots can develop on them. If a blood ...

  4. Mitral valve surgery - open

    MedlinePlus

    ... place. There are two types of mitral valves: Mechanical, made of man-made (synthetic) materials, such as ... Mechanical heart valves do not fail often. They last from 12 to 20 years. However, blood clots ...

  5. Prosthetic helping hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, Thomas W. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor); Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A prosthetic device for below-the-elbow amputees, having a C-shaped clamping mechanism for grasping cylindrical objects, is described. The clamping mechanism is pivotally mounted to a cuff that fits on the amputee's lower arm. The present invention is utilized by placing an arm that has been amputated below the elbow into the cuff. The clamping mechanism then serves as a hand whenever it becomes necessary for the amputee to grasp a cylindrical object such as a handle, a bar, a rod, etc. To grasp the cylindrical object, the object is jammed against the opening in the C-shaped spring, causing the spring to open, the object to pass to the center of the spring, and the spring to snap shut behind the object. Various sizes of clamping mechanisms can be provided and easily interchanged to accommodate a variety of diameters. With the extension that pivots and rotates, the clamping mechanism can be used in a variety of orientations. Thus, this invention provides the amputee with a clamping mechanism that can be used to perform a number of tasks.

  6. Tri-layered elastomeric scaffolds for engineering heart valve leaflets

    PubMed Central

    Masoumi, Nafiseh; Annabi, Nasim; Assmann, Alexander; Larson, Benjamin L.; Hjortnaes, Jesper; Alemdar, Neslihan; Kharaziha, Mahshid; Manning, Keefe B.; Mayer, John E.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineered heart valves (TEHVs) that can grow and remodel have the potential to serve as permanent replacements of the current non-viable prosthetic valves particularly for pediatric patients. A major challenge in designing functional TEHVs is to mimic both structural and anisotropic mechanical characteristics of the native valve leaflets. To establish a more biomimetic model of TEHV, we fabricated tri-layered scaffolds by combining electrospinning and microfabrication techniques. These constructs were fabricated by assembling microfabricated poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) and fibrous PGS/poly(-caprolactone) (PCL) electrospun sheets to develop elastic scaffolds with tunable anisotropic mechanical properties similar to the mechanical characteristics of the native heart valves. The engineered scaffolds supported valvular interstitial cells (VICs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) growth within the 3D structure and promoted the deposition of heart valve extracellular matrix (ECM). MSCs were also organized and aligned along the anisotropic axes of the engineered tri-layered scaffolds. In addition, the fabricated constructs opened and closed properly in an ex vivo model of porcine heart valve leaflet tissue replacement. The engineered tri-layered scaffolds have the potential for successful translation towards TEHV replacements. PMID:24947233

  7. Tri-layered elastomeric scaffolds for engineering heart valve leaflets.

    PubMed

    Masoumi, Nafiseh; Annabi, Nasim; Assmann, Alexander; Larson, Benjamin L; Hjortnaes, Jesper; Alemdar, Neslihan; Kharaziha, Mahshid; Manning, Keefe B; Mayer, John E; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-09-01

    Tissue engineered heart valves (TEHVs) that can grow and remodel have the potential to serve as permanent replacements of the current non-viable prosthetic valves particularly for pediatric patients. A major challenge in designing functional TEHVs is to mimic both structural and anisotropic mechanical characteristics of the native valve leaflets. To establish a more biomimetic model of TEHV, we fabricated tri-layered scaffolds by combining electrospinning and microfabrication techniques. These constructs were fabricated by assembling microfabricated poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) and fibrous PGS/poly(caprolactone) (PCL) electrospun sheets to develop elastic scaffolds with tunable anisotropic mechanical properties similar to the mechanical characteristics of the native heart valves. The engineered scaffolds supported the growth of valvular interstitial cells (VICs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) within the 3D structure and promoted the deposition of heart valve extracellular matrix (ECM). MSCs were also organized and aligned along the anisotropic axes of the engineered tri-layered scaffolds. In addition, the fabricated constructs opened and closed properly in an ex vivo model of porcine heart valve leaflet tissue replacement. The engineered tri-layered scaffolds have the potential for successful translation towards TEHV replacements. PMID:24947233

  8. The effect of implantation orientation of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve on kinematics and hemodynamics in an anatomic aorta.

    PubMed

    Borazjani, Iman; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2010-11-01

    We carry out three-dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve under physiologic pulsatile flow conditions implanted at different orientations in an anatomic aorta obtained from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of a volunteer. We use the extensively validated for heart valve flow curvilinear-immersed boundary (CURVIB) fluid-structure interaction (FSI) solver in which the empty aorta is discretized with a curvilinear, aorta-conforming grid while the valve is handled as an immersed boundary. The motion of the valve leaflets are calculated through a strongly coupled FSI algorithm implemented in conjunction with the Aitken convergence acceleration technique. We perform simulations for three valve orientations, which differ from each other by 45 deg and compare the results in terms of leaflet motion and flow field. We show that the valve implanted symmetrically relative to the symmetry plane of the ascending aorta curvature exhibits the smallest overall asymmetry in the motion of its two leaflets and lowest rebound during closure. Consequently, we hypothesize that this orientation is beneficial to reduce the chance of intermittent regurgitation. Furthermore, we find that the valve orientation does not significantly affect the shear stress distribution in the aortic lumen, which is in agreement with previous studies. PMID:21034146

  9. The Effect of Implantation Orientation of a Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valve on Kinematics and Hemodynamics in an Anatomic Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Borazjani, Iman; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2011-01-01

    We carry out three-dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve under physiologic pulsatile flow conditions implanted at different orientations in an anatomic aorta obtained from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of a volunteer. We use the extensively validated for heart valve flow curvilinear-immersed boundary (CURVIB) fluid-structure interaction (FSI) solver in which the empty aorta is discretized with a curvilinear, aorta-conforming grid while the valve is handled as an immersed boundary. The motion of the valve leaflets are calculated through a strongly coupled FSI algorithm implemented in conjunction with the Aitken convergence acceleration technique. We perform simulations for three valve orientations, which differ from each other by 45 deg and compare the results in terms of leaflet motion and flow field. We show that the valve implanted symmetrically relative to the symmetry plane of the ascending aorta curvature exhibits the smallest overall asymmetry in the motion of its two leaflets and lowest rebound during closure. Consequently, we hypothesize that this orientation is beneficial to reduce the chance of intermittent regurgitation. Furthermore, we find that the valve orientation does not significantly affect the shear stress distribution in the aortic lumen, which is in agreement with previous studies. PMID:21034146

  10. Implications of smart materials in advanced prosthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenoe, Edward M.; Radicic, William N.; Knapp, Michael S.

    1994-05-01

    This research reviews common implant materials and suggests smart materials that may be used as substitutes. Current prosthetic technology, including artificial limbs, joints, and soft and hard tissue, falls short in comprehensive characterization of the chemo-mechanics and materials relationships of the natural tissues and their prosthetic materials counterparts. Many of these unknown chemo-mechanical properties in natural tissue systems maintain cooperative function that allows for optimum efficiency in performance and healing. Traditional prosthetic devices have not taken into account the naturally occurring electro-chemo-mechanical stress- strain relationships that normally exist in a tissue system. Direct mechanical deformation of tissue and cell membrane as a possible use of smart materials may lead to improved prosthetic devices once the mechanosensory systems in living tissues are identified and understood. Smart materials may aid in avoiding interfacial atrophy which is a common cause of prosthetic failure. Finally, we note that advanced composite materials have not received sufficient attention, they should be more widely used in prosthetics. Their structural efficiency allows design and construction of truly efficient bionic devices.

  11. Rotational joint assembly for the prosthetic leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L. J.; Jones, W. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A rotational joint assembly for a prosthetic leg has been devised, which enables an artificial foot to rotate slightly when a person is walking, running or turning. The prosthetic leg includes upper and lower tubular members with the rotational joint assembly interposed between them. The assembly includes a restrainer mechanism which consists of a pivotably mounted paddle element. This device applies limiting force to control the rotation of the foot and also restores torque to return the foot back to its initial position.

  12. Indium-111 leukocyte localization in infected prosthetic graft

    SciTech Connect

    Purnell, G.L.; Walker, C.W.; Allison, J.W.; Dalrymple, G.V. )

    1990-08-01

    Infective endocarditis can be difficult to prove, even in the face of strong clinical suspicion. A case in which standard methods of diagnosis failed to demonstrate endocarditis in a patient with recurrent Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and porcine aortic valve is reported. An In-111 labelled leukocyte SPECT study demonstrated uptake in the aortic root and leaflets, and autopsy demonstrated vegetations on the leaflets. In-111 may prove useful in demonstrating endocarditis in patients with prosthetic valve infection.

  13. Biomechanical evaluation of the pathophysiologic developmental mechanisms of mitral valve prolapse: effect of valvular morphologic alteration.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ahnryul; McPherson, David D; Kim, Hyunggun

    2016-05-01

    Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) refers to an excessive billowing of the mitral valve (MV) leaflets across the mitral annular plane into the left atrium during the systolic portion of the cardiac cycle. The underlying mechanisms for the development of MVP and mitral regurgitation in association with MV tissue remodeling are still unclear. We performed computational MV simulations to investigate the pathophysiologic developmental mechanisms of MVP. A parametric MV geometry model was utilized for this study. Posterior leaflet enlargement and posterior chordal elongation models were created by adjusting the geometry of the posterior leaflet and chordae, respectively. Dynamic finite element simulations of MV function were performed over the complete cardiac cycle. Computational simulations demonstrated that enlarging posterior leaflet area increased large stress concentration in the posterior leaflets and chordae, and posterior chordal elongation decreased leaflet coaptation. When MVP was accompanied by both posterior leaflet enlargement and chordal elongation simultaneously, the posterior leaflet was exposed to extremely large prolapse with a substantial lack of leaflet coaptation. These data indicate that MVP development is closely related to tissue alterations of the leaflets and chordae. This biomechanical evaluation strategy can help us better understand the pathophysiologic developmental mechanisms of MVP. PMID:26307201

  14. A throat-bypass stability system for a YF-12 aircraft research inlet using self-acting mechanical valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, G. L.; Dustin, M. O.; Neiner, G. H.

    1975-01-01

    Results of a wind tunnel investigation are presented. The inlet was modified so that airflow can be removed through a porous cowl-bleed region in the vicinity of the throat. Bleed plenum exit flow area is controlled by relief type mechanical valves. Unlike valves in previous systems, these are made for use in a high Mach flight environment and include refinements so that the system could be tested on a NASA YF-12 aircraft. The valves were designed to provide their own reference pressure; hence, do not respond to slowly varying disturbances. However, the results show that the system can absorb internal-airflow-transients that are too fast for a conventional bypass door control system and that the two systems complement each other quite well. Increased tolerance to angle of attack and Mach number changes is indicated. The valves should provide sufficient time for the inlet control system to make geometry changes required to keep the inlet started.

  15. A throat-bypass stability system for a YF-12 aircraft research inlet using self-acting mechanical valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, G. L.; Dustin, M. O.; Neiner, G. H.

    1975-01-01

    Results of a wind tunnel investigation are presented. The inlet was modified so that airflow can be removed through a porous cowl-bleed region in the vicinity of the throat. Bleed plenum exit flow area is controlled by relief type mechanical valves. Unlike valves in previous systems, these are made for use in a high Mach flight environment and include refinements so that the system could be tested on a NASA YF-12 aircraft. The valves were designed to provide their own reference pressure. The results show that the system can absorb internal-airflow-transients that are too fast for a conventional bypass door control system and that the two systems complement each other quite well. Increased tolerance to angle of attack and Mach number changes is indicated. The valves should provide sufficient time for the inlet control system to make geometry changes required to keep the inlet started.

  16. Use of an Edwards Sapien S3 valve to replace a dysfunctional mechanical mitral valve in an 11-year old boy: another small step for surgical and interventional collaboration.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Michael; Austin, Conal; Bapat, Vinayak; Morgan, Gareth J

    2016-09-01

    An 11-year old boy, with complex left ventricular morphology in the setting of repaired double outlet right ventricle developed progressive mitral regurgitation leading to a repair which failed, necessitating replacement of the valve with a 21 mm St. Jude mechanical prosthesis. He represented 3 weeks later in extremis with signs of severe mitral stenosis. The valve was replaced via a hybrid technique with a 26 mm Edwards Sapien 3 valve mounted on a MEMO 3D annuloplasty ring. One year later, the valve is functioning well with no regurgitation or evidence of an inflow gradient. PMID:26994169

  17. Three-component laser Doppler velocimetry measurements in the vicinity of mechanical heart valves in a mock-circulatory loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Richard Scott

    Streakline flow visualization and three-component laser Doppler velocimetry were conducted in a mock-circulatory loop on four mechanical heart valve types in the mitral position. Measurements were conducted in the regurgitant flow region proximal to the valve. Results for the Bjork-Shiley Monostrutsp{TM} valve showed a highly non-uniform flow at valve closure, with very large velocities in the minor orifice region. These velocities were on the order of 15-20 mps and lasted less than one millisecond. Following closure, an interval of sustained regurgitant flow persisted for the duration of systole. Reynolds stresses were calculated from three-dimensional data, and yielded a maximum of 8,100 dyne/cmsp2. Values as high as 80,000 dyne/cmsp2 were calculated during the initial spike, but due to the intermittency of the spike, they are artificially high. Similar measurements were conducted in the minor orifice of the Medtronic-Hall valve, and maximum velocities of about 4 mps were measured during the sustained regurgitant flow. Maximum Reynolds shear stresses were about 7,000 dyne/cmsp2. The velocity spike at closing was noted with this valve also. Two-component measurements around the center hole in the occluder showed a sustained jet with maximum velocities of about 1 mps, and maximum Reynolds shear stresses of about 2,000 dyne/cmsp2. Measurements in the St. Jude Medical valve showed velocities and stresses to be very low. No closing spike was measured, and sustained velocities were observed in the hinge region of about 0.2 mps with maximum stresses of about 1,000 dyne/cmsp2. The CarboMedicssp{TM} valve showed a regurgitant jets emanating from the gap between the leaflet and valve housing ring, with velocities of 3.3 mps for the duration of systole, and calculated stresses of 8,100 dyne/cmsp2. No closing spike was noted. Differences between two and three-dimensional Reynolds shear stresses were significant only at locations where two-dimensional calculated values were

  18. Numerical Investigation of the Performance of Three Hinge Designs of Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valves

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Hélène A.; Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2010-01-01

    Thromboembolic complications (TECs) of bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) are believed to be due to the nonphysiologic mechanical stresses imposed on blood elements by the hinge flows. Relating hinge flow features to design features is, therefore, essential to ultimately design BMHVs with lower TEC rates. This study aims at simulating the pulsatile three-dimensional hinge flows of three BMHVs and estimating the TEC potential associated with each hinge design. Hinge geometries are constructed from micro-computed tomography scans of BMHVs. Simulations are conducted using a Cartesian sharp-interface immersed-boundary methodology combined with a second-order accurate fractional-step method. Leaflet motion and flow boundary conditions are extracted from fluid–structure-interaction simulations of BMHV bulk flow. The numerical results are analyzed using a particle-tracking approach coupled with existing blood damage models. The gap width and, more importantly, the shape of the recess and leaflet are found to impact the flow distribution and TEC potential. Smooth, streamlined surfaces appear to be more favorable than sharp corners or sudden shape transitions. The developed framework will enable pragmatic and cost-efficient preclinical evaluation of BMHV prototypes prior to valve manufacturing. Application to a wide range of hinges with varying design parameters will eventually help in determining the optimal hinge design. PMID:20571852

  19. Image-based mechanical analysis of stent deformation: concept and exemplary implementation for aortic valve stents.

    PubMed

    Gessat, Michael; Hopf, Raoul; Pollok, Thomas; Russ, Christoph; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Sündermann, Simon Harald; Hirsch, Sven; Mazza, Edoardo; Székely, Gábor; Falk, Volkmar

    2014-01-01

    An approach for extracting the radial force load on an implanted stent from medical images is proposed. To exemplify the approach, a system is presented which computes a radial force estimation from computer tomography images acquired from patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The deformed shape of the implanted valve prosthesis' Nitinol frame is extracted from the images. A set of displacement vectors is computed that parameterizes the observed deformation. An iterative relaxation algorithm is employed to adapt the information extracted from the images to a finite-element model of the stent, and the radial components of the interaction forces between the stent and the tissue are extracted. For the evaluation of the method, tests were run using the clinical data from 21 patients. Stent modeling and extraction of the radial forces were successful in 18 cases. Synthetic test cases were generated, in addition, for assessing the sensitivity to the measurement errors. In a sensitivity analysis, the geometric error of the stent reconstruction was below 0.3 mm, which is below the image resolution. The distribution of the radial forces was qualitatively and quantitatively reasonable. An uncertainty remains in the quantitative evaluation of the radial forces due to the uncertainty in defining a radial direction on the deformed stent. With our approach, the mechanical situation of TAVI stents after the implantation can be studied in vivo, which may help to understand the mechanisms that lead to the complications and improve stent design. PMID:24626769

  20. 21 CFR 870.3925 - Replacement heart valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Replacement heart valve. 870.3925 Section 870.3925...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3925 Replacement heart valve. (a) Identification. A replacement heart valve is a device intended to perform the function of...

  1. 21 CFR 870.3925 - Replacement heart valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Replacement heart valve. 870.3925 Section 870.3925...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3925 Replacement heart valve. (a) Identification. A replacement heart valve is a device intended to perform the function of...

  2. 21 CFR 870.3925 - Replacement heart valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Replacement heart valve. 870.3925 Section 870.3925...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3925 Replacement heart valve. (a) Identification. A replacement heart valve is a device intended to perform the function of...

  3. Tricuspid regurgitation after successful mitral valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Katsi, Vasiliki; Raftopoulos, Leonidas; Aggeli, Constantina; Vlasseros, Ioannis; Felekos, Ioannis; Tousoulis, Dimitrios; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Kallikazaros, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    The tricuspid valve (TV) is inseparably connected with the mitral valve (MV) in terms of function. Any pathophysiological condition concerning the MV is potentially a threat for the normal function of the TV as well. One of the most challenging cases is functional tricuspid regurgitation (TR) after surgical MV correction. In the past, TR was considered to progressively revert with time after left-sided valve restoration. Nevertheless, more recent studies showed that TR could develop and evolve postoperatively over time, as well as being closely associated with a poorer prognosis in terms of morbidity and mortality. Pressure and volume overload are usually the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms; structural alterations, like tricuspid annulus dilatation, increased leaflet tethering and right ventricular remodelling are almost always present when regurgitation develops. The most important risk factors associated with a higher probability of late TR development involve the elderly, female gender, larger left atrial size, atrial fibrillation, right chamber dilatation, higher pulmonary artery systolic pressures, longer times from the onset of MV disease to surgery, history of rheumatic heart disease, ischaemic heart disease and prosthetic valve malfunction. The time of TR manifestation can be up to 10 years or more after an MV surgery. Echocardiography, including the novel 3D Echo techniques, is crucial in the early diagnosis and prognosis of future TV disease development. Appropriate surgical technique and timing still need to be clarified. PMID:22457188

  4. Prosthetics and Related Technology

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Related Technology for Restoring Veterans’ Abilities DISCOVERY INNOVATION ADVANCEMENT PROSTHETICS AND RELATED TECHNOLOGY VA Research and ... technology to perform day-to-day activities. DISCOVERY INNOVATION ADVANCEMENT DISCOVERY INNOVATION ADVANCEMENT A Message to Our ...

  5. Prosthetic Care FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... and practice management. What is a Certified Prosthetist (CP)? ABC Certified Prosthetists are healthcare professionals that have ... a free searchable database of its Certified Prosthetists (CPs) and accredited orthotic and prosthetic facilities to assist ...

  6. Progressive upper limb prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Lake, Chris; Dodson, Robert

    2006-02-01

    The field of upper extremity prosthetics is a constantly changing arena as researchers and prosthetists strive to bridge the gap between prosthetic reality and upper limb physiology. With the further development of implantable neurologic sensing devices and targeted muscle innervation (discussed elsewhere in this issue), the challenge of limited input to control vast outputs promises to become a historical footnote in the future annals of upper limb prosthetics. Soon multidextrous terminal devices, such as that found in the iLimb system(Touch EMAS, Inc., Edinburgh, UK), will be a clinical reality (Fig. 22). Successful prosthetic care depends on good communication and cooperation among the surgeon, the amputee, the rehabilitation team, and the scientists harnessing the power of technology to solve real-life challenges. If the progress to date is any indication, amputees of the future will find their dreams limited only by their imagination. PMID:16517345

  7. Mechanical and biological complication rates of the modified lateral-screw-retained implant prosthesis in the posterior region: an alternative to the conventional Implant prosthetic system

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The modified lateral-screw-retained implant prosthesis (LSP) is designed to combine the advantages of screw- and cement-retained implant prostheses. This retrospective study evaluated the mechanical and biological complication rates of implant-supported single crowns (ISSCs) inserted with the modified LSP in the posterior region, and determined how these complication rates are affected by clinical factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS Mechanical complications (i.e., lateral screw loosening [LSL], abutment screw loosening, lateral screw fracture, and ceramic fracture) and biological complications (i.e., peri-implant mucositis [PM] and peri-implantitis) were identified from the patients' treatment records, clinical photographs, periapical radiographs, panoramic radiographs, and clinical indices. The correlations between complication rates and the following clinical factors were determined: gender, age, position in the jaw, placement location, functional duration, clinical crown-to-implant length ratio, crown height space, and the use of a submerged or nonsubmerged placement procedure. RESULTS Mechanical and biological complications were present in 25 of 73 ISSCs with the modified LSP. LSL (n=11) and PM (n=11) were the most common complications. The incidence of mechanical complications was significantly related to gender (P=.018). The other clinical factors were not significantly associated with mechanical and biological complication rates. CONCLUSION Within the limitations of this study, the incidence of mechanical and biological complications in the posterior region was similar for both modified LSP and conventional implant prosthetic systems. In addition, the modified LSP is amenable to maintenance care, which facilitates the prevention and treatment of mechanical and biological complications. PMID:27141260

  8. Supercharged two-cycle engines employing novel single element reciprocating shuttle inlet valve mechanisms and with a variable compression ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesen, Bernard (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    This invention relates to novel reciprocating shuttle inlet valves, effective with every type of two-cycle engine, from small high-speed single cylinder model engines, to large low-speed multiple cylinder engines, employing spark or compression ignition. Also permitting the elimination of out-of-phase piston arrangements to control scavenging and supercharging of opposed-piston engines. The reciprocating shuttle inlet valve (32) and its operating mechanism (34) is constructed as a single and simple uncomplicated member, in combination with the lost-motion abutments, (46) and (48), formed in a piston skirt, obviating the need for any complex mechanisms or auxiliary drives, unaffected by heat, friction, wear or inertial forces. The reciprocating shuttle inlet valve retains the simplicity and advantages of two-cycle engines, while permitting an increase in volumetric efficiency and performance, thereby increasing the range of usefulness of two-cycle engines into many areas that are now dominated by the four-cycle engine.

  9. Electrospun bioresorbable heart valve scaffold for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Del Gaudio, C; Grigioni, M; Bianco, A; De Angelis, G

    2008-01-01

    Currently marketed mechanical or biological prosthetic heart valves are regarded as valid substitutes for native heart valves suffering from degenerative pathologies. These devices require strict follow-up due to dysfunctions or post-surgical complications. Potential drawbacks of these medical devices are calcification, tearing of the cusps, thromboembolism and hemolysis. In this context, a tissue engineering approach offers a promising alternative scenario. In this paper, a trileaflet poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) heart valve scaffold prototype has been manufactured by electrospinning technique using a custom-made rotating target. Process parameters were selected in order to achieve suitable microstructure and mechanical performance. The electrospun heart valve prototype was functionally characterized by means of a pulse duplicator in order to evaluate the mechanical/hydraulic response to the imposed testing conditions. Leaflets synchronously opened in the ejection phase and the proper apposition of the leaflets prevented high leakage volumes in the diastolic phase. This preliminary study suggests a successful perspective for the proposed approach in designing a novel tissue engineered bioresorbable heart valve. PMID:18286457

  10. The Application of Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valves in the Polish Ventricular Assist Device: Physical and Numerical Study and First Clinical Usage.

    PubMed

    Malota, Zbigniew; Sadowski, Wojciech; Krzyskow, Marek; Stolarzewicz, Bogdan

    2016-03-01

    The Polish ventricular assist device (Polvad) has been used successfully in clinical contexts for many years. The device contains two single-disc valves, one at the inlet and one at the outlet connector of the pneumatic pump. Unfortunately, in recent years, a problem has occurred with the availability of single-disc valves. This article presents the possibility of using bileaflet mechanical heart valve prostheses in the Polvad to avoid a discontinuity in clinical use. The study is based on experimental and numerical simulations and comparison of the distribution of flow, pressure, and stress (wall, shear, and turbulent) inside the Polvad chamber and the inlet/outlet connectors fitted with Sorin Monodisc and Sorin Bicarbon Fitline valves. The type and orientation of the inlet valve affects valve performance and flow distribution inside the chamber. Near-wall flow is observed for single-disc valves. In the case of bileaflet valves, the main jet is directed more centrally, with lower shear stress but higher turbulent stress in comparison with single-disc valves. For clinical usage, a 45° orientation of the bileaflet inlet valve was chosen, as this achieves good washing of the inlet area near the membrane paste surface. The Polvad with bileaflet valves has now been used successfully in our clinic for over a year and will continue to be used until new assist devices for heart support are developed. PMID:26365391

  11. Bench Models for Assessing the Mechanics of Mitral Valve Repair and Percutaneous Surgery.

    PubMed

    Siefert, Andrew W; Siskey, Ryan L

    2015-06-01

    Rapid preclinical evaluations of mitral valve (MV) mechanics are currently best facilitated by bench models of the left ventricle (LV). This review aims to provide a comprehensive assessment of these models to aid interpretation of their resulting data, inform future experimental evaluations, and further the translation of results to procedure and device development. For this review, two types of experimental bench models were evaluated. Rigid LV models were characterized as fluid-mechanical systems capable of testing explanted MVs under static and or pulsatile left heart hemodynamics. Passive LV models were characterized as explanted hearts whose left side is placed in series with a static or pulsatile flow-loop. In both systems, MV function and mechanics can be quantitatively evaluated. Rigid and passive LV models were characterized and evaluated. The materials and methods involved in their construction, function, quantitative capabilities, and disease modeling were described. The advantages and disadvantages of each model are compared to aid the interpretation of their resulting data and inform future experimental evaluations. Repair and percutaneous studies completed in these models were additionally summarized with perspective on future advances discussed. Bench models of the LV provide excellent platforms for quantifying MV repair mechanics and function. While exceptional work has been reported, more research and development is necessary to improve techniques and devices for repair and percutaneous surgery. Continuing efforts in this field will significantly contribute to the further development of procedures and devices, predictions of long-term performance, and patient safety. PMID:26577235

  12. Mitral Valve Replacement with Half-and-Half Technique for Recurrent Mitral Paravalvular Leakage.

    PubMed

    Morisaki, Akimasa; Kato, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Yosuke; Shibata, Toshihiko

    2015-05-01

    Reoperation for paravalvular leakage can cause recurrent paravalvular leakage through severe damage to the mitral annulus. Previously, mitral valve replacement using a half-and-half technique for extensive mitral annular calcification was reported; here, application of the technique to treat recurrent paravalvular leakage is described. A 78-year-old male with three prior mitral valve replacements developed recurrent paravalvular leakage, for which he had undergone his third mitral valve replacement at the age of 69 years. On this occasion, a mechanical valve with circumferential equine pericardial patch reinforcement of the annulus had been used. Five years later, the patient developed hemolytic anemia and congestive heart failure due to recurrent paravalvular leakage. Intraoperatively, broad dehiscence was seen between the prosthetic valve and mitral annulus at two sites, the anterior and posterior commissures, without infection. A fourth mitral valve replacement was performed with a St. Jude Medical valve, using a half-and-half technique. This entailed the use of non-everting mattress sutures on the anterior half of the annulus, and everting mattress sutures on the left atrial wall around the posterior half of the annulus. Extensive annular defects required reinforcement of the posterior mitral annulus with a bovine pericardial patch. Postoperative echocardiography showed no paravalvular leakage. The half-and-half technique may be useful in treating recurrent paravalvular leakage of the mitral valve. PMID:26901904

  13. 21 CFR 874.3850 - Endolymphatic shunt tube with valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3850 Endolymphatic shunt... of a pressure-limiting valve associated with a tube intended to be implanted in the inner ear...

  14. 21 CFR 874.3850 - Endolymphatic shunt tube with valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3850 Endolymphatic shunt... of a pressure-limiting valve associated with a tube intended to be implanted in the inner ear...

  15. 21 CFR 874.3850 - Endolymphatic shunt tube with valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3850 Endolymphatic shunt... of a pressure-limiting valve associated with a tube intended to be implanted in the inner ear...

  16. 21 CFR 874.3850 - Endolymphatic shunt tube with valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3850 Endolymphatic shunt... of a pressure-limiting valve associated with a tube intended to be implanted in the inner ear...

  17. 21 CFR 874.3850 - Endolymphatic shunt tube with valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3850 Endolymphatic shunt... of a pressure-limiting valve associated with a tube intended to be implanted in the inner ear...

  18. Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J

    2013-11-19

    A mesofluidic powered robotic and/or prosthetic finger joint includes a first finger section having at least one mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a first actuator, a second mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a second actuator and a second prosthetic finger section pivotally connected to the first finger section by a joint pivot, wherein the first actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger to provide a first mechanical advantage relative to the joint point and wherein the second actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger section to provide a second mechanical advantage relative to the joint point.

  19. Cavitation phenomena in mechanical heart valves: studied by using a physical impinging rod system.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chi-Wen; Chen, Sheng-Fu; Li, Chi-Pei; Lu, Po-Chien

    2010-10-01

    When studying mechanical heart valve cavitation, a physical model allows direct flow field and pressure measurements that are difficult to perform with actual valves, as well as separate testing of water hammer and squeeze flow effects. Movable rods of 5 and 10 mm diameter impinged same-sized stationary rods to simulate squeeze flow. A 24 mm piston within a tube simulated water hammer. Adding a 5 mm stationary rod within the tube generated both effects simultaneously. Charged-coupled device (CCD) laser displacement sensors, strobe lighting technique, laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV), particle image velocimetry (PIV) and high fidelity piezoelectric pressure transducers measured impact velocities, cavitation images, squeeze flow velocities, vortices, and pressure changes at impact, respectively. The movable rods created cavitation at critical impact velocities of 1.6 and 1.2 m/s; squeeze flow velocities were 2.8 and 4.64 m/s. The isolated water hammer created cavitation at 1.3 m/s piston speed. The combined piston and stationary rod created cavitation at an impact speed of 0.9 m/s and squeeze flow of 3.2 m/s. These results show squeeze flow alone caused cavitation, notably at lower impact velocity as contact area increased. Water hammer alone also caused cavitation with faster displacement. Both effects together were additive. The pressure change at the vortex center was only 150 mmHg, which cannot generate the magnitude of pressure drop required for cavitation bubble formation. Cavitation occurred at 3-5 m/s squeeze flow, significantly different from the 14 m/s derived by Bernoulli's equation; the temporal acceleration of unsteady flow requires further study. PMID:20490686

  20. Dabigatran is Less Effective Than Warfarin at Attenuating Mechanical Heart Valve-Induced Thrombin Generation

    PubMed Central

    Jaffer, Iqbal H; Stafford, Alan R; Fredenburgh, James C; Whitlock, Richard P; Chan, Noel C; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with mechanical heart valves (MHV) require warfarin to prevent thromboembolism. Although dabigatran was as effective as warfarin for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation when compared with warfarin in patients with MHV, the study was stopped early because of more strokes and bleeding with dabigatran. To determine why dabigatran was less effective than warfarin, we compared their effects on thrombin generation induced by MHV. Methods and Results Thrombin generation in the absence or presence of valve leaflets or sewing ring segments (SRS) was quantified. Studies were done in control plasma, plasma depleted of factors (F) XII, XI, or VII, plasma containing varying concentrations of dabigatran, or plasma from patients on dabigatran or warfarin with varying dabigatran concentrations or international normalized ratio (INR) values. Mean endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) increased 1.2-, 1.5-, and 1.8-fold in the presence of leaflets, Teflon SRS, and Dacron SRS, respectively. Whereas ETP in FVII-depleted and control plasma was similar, ETP was reduced to background levels in FXII-depleted plasma and abrogated in FXI-depleted plasma. Dabigatran had little effect on ETP at concentrations below 400 ng/mL, whereas in plasma from warfarin-treated patients, ETP was suppressed with INR values over 1.5. Conclusions MHV induce thrombin generation via the intrinsic pathway and generate sufficient thrombin to overwhelm clinically relevant dabigatran concentrations. In contrast, warfarin is more effective than dabigatran at suppressing MHV-induced thrombin generation. These data explain why dabigatran failed in MHV patients and suggest that strategies targeting FXII or FXI may suppress the root cause of thrombosis in such patients. PMID:26304938

  1. Standing valve

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, S.B.

    1990-08-28

    This patent discusses an apparatus for removing fluids from a wellbore. It comprises a valve housing fixedly secured to a wellbore tubing string, the housing having perforations and a valve seating surface; a valve stem alignment guide secured to the valve housing; a valve stem adapted for movement in the valve stem alignment guide; and a valve seating device attached to the valve stem and capable of contacting the valve seating surface, thereby preventing fluid flow through the valve housing and past the valve seating surface when the seating device and valve seating surface are in contact.

  2. Mechanical-property characterization of an electroslag-cast valve body of CF8M composition

    SciTech Connect

    Hotsur, Y.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1983-11-01

    This initial investigation into electroslag casting involves the mechanical property study of a type 316 stainless steel (CF8M) valve body section (obtained from the University of British Columbia). The casting was subjected to tensile, creep, Charpy V-notch, and microhardness testing as well as an optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electrom microscopy. Tensile tests were conducted in the as-cast and solution-annealed conditions at room and elevated temperatures. Charpy impact testing was performed at room temperature on as-cast and solution-annealed specimens. Creep-deformation properties of the casting were obtianed at 649/sup 0/C (1200/sup 0/F) within a stress range from 90 to 170 MPa (13 to 25 ksi) in the as-cast state. Investigations into the creep behavior of this stainless steel electroslag casting are ongoing. Mechanical testing was conducted on specimens from three levels of the casting in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Comparisons made between the as-cast and solution-annealed specimens indicate that annealed specimens (in most cases) have better mechanical properties. This can be attributed to the dissolution of precipitated Fe-Cr-Mo microconstituents (sigma, chi, metal carbides, etc.) during the solution treatment. In general, though, preliminary results show that the electroslag castings have properties competitive with those of conventional sand castings.

  3. Surgical outcomes in native valve infectious endocarditis: the experience of the Cardiovascular Surgery Department – Cluj-Napoca Heart Institute

    PubMed Central

    MOLNAR, ADRIAN; MURESAN, IOAN; TRIFAN, CATALIN; POP, DANA; SACUI, DIANA

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims The introduction of Duke’s criteria and the improvement of imaging methods has lead to an earlier and a more accurate diagnosis of infectious endocarditis (IE). The options for the best therapeutic approach and the timing of surgery are still a matter of debate and require a close colaboration between the cardiologist, the infectionist and the cardiac surgeon. Methods We undertook a retrospective, descriptive study, spanning over a period of five years (from January 1st, 2007 to December 31st, 2012), on 100 patients who underwent surgery for native valve infectious endocarditis in our unit. Results The patients’ age varied between 13 and 77 years (with a mean of 54 years), of which 85 were males (85%). The main microorganisms responsible for IE were: Streptococcus Spp. (21 cases – 21%), Staphylococcus Spp. (15 cases – 15%), and Enterococcus Spp. (9 cases – 9%). The potential source of infection was identified in 26 patients (26%), with most cases being in the dental area (16 cases – 16%). The lesions caused by IE were situated in the left heart in 96 patients (96%), mostly on the aortic valve (50 cases – 50%). In most cases (82%) we found preexisting endocardial lesions which predisposed to the development of IE, most of them being degenerative valvular lesions (38 cases – 38%). We performed the following surgical procedures: surgery on a single valve - aortic valve replacement (40 cases), mitral valve replacement (19 cases), mitral valve repair (1 case), surgery on more than one valve – mitral and aortic valve replacement (20 cases), aortic and tricuspid valve replacement (1 case), aortic valve replacement with a mechanical valve associated with mitral valve repair (5 cases), aortic valve replacement with a biological valve associated with mitral valve repair (2 cases), and mitral valve replacement with a mechanical valve combined with De Vega procedure on the tricuspid valve (1 case). In 5 patients (5%) the bacteriological

  4. Challenging transfemoral valve-in-valve implantation in a degenerated stentless bioprosthetic aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Halapas, A; Chrissoheris, M; Spargias, Konstantinos

    2014-08-01

    Bioprosthetic heart valves are often preferred over mechanical valves as they may preclude the need for anticoagulation. Reoperation is the standard treatment for structural failure of bioprosthetic valves; however, it carries significant risk especially in inoperable elderly patients. Valve-in-valve (ViV) transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) seems to be an effective and promising procedure in patients with degenerated bioprosthetic aortic valves avoiding the risks associated with the use of cardioplegia and redo cardiac surgery. We report an interesting case of a high-risk 74-year-old patient with a degenerated Sorin Freedom Solo stentless valve treated successfully with ViV TAVR. PMID:25091103

  5. Characterization of small microfluidic valves for studies of mechanical 2 properties of bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Da; Greer, Clayton M.; Jones, Branndon; Jennings, Anna D; Mannik, Jaan

    2015-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip platforms present many new opportunities to study bacterial cells and cellular 19 assemblies. Here, the authors describe a new platform that allows us to apply uniaxial stress to 20 individual bacterial cells while observing the cell and its subcellular assemblies using a high 21 resolution optical microscope. The microfluidic chip consists of arrays of miniature pressure 22 actuated valves. By placing a bacterium under one of such valves and partially closing the valve 23 by externally applied pressure, the cell can be deformed. Although large pressure actuated 24 valves used in integrated fluidic circuits have been extensively studied previously, here the 25 authors downsize those microfluidic valves and use flow channels with rectangular cross- 26 sections to maintain the bacteria in contact with cell culture medium during the experiments. 27 The closure of these valves has not been characterized before. First, these valves are modeled 28 using finite element analysis, and then compared the modeling results with the actual closing 29 profiles of the valves, which is determined from absorption measurements. The measurements 30 and modeling show with good agreement that the deflection of valves is a linear function of 31 externally applied pressure and the deflection scales proportionally to the width of the flow 32 channel. In addition to characterizing the valve, the authors show at a proof-of-principle level 33 that it can be used to deform a bacterial cell at considerable magnitude. They found the largest 34 deformations in 5 lm wide channels where the bacterial width and length increase by 1.6 and 35 1.25 times, respectively. Narrower and broader channels are less optimal for these studies. The 36 platform presents a promising approach to probe, in a quantitative and systematic way, the me- 37 chanical properties of not only bacterial cells but possibly also yeast and other single-

  6. Characterization of small microfluidic valves for studies of mechanical 2 properties of bacteria

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Da; Greer, Clayton M.; Jones, Branndon; Jennings, Anna D; Mannik, Jaan

    2015-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip platforms present many new opportunities to study bacterial cells and cellular 19 assemblies. Here, the authors describe a new platform that allows us to apply uniaxial stress to 20 individual bacterial cells while observing the cell and its subcellular assemblies using a high 21 resolution optical microscope. The microfluidic chip consists of arrays of miniature pressure 22 actuated valves. By placing a bacterium under one of such valves and partially closing the valve 23 by externally applied pressure, the cell can be deformed. Although large pressure actuated 24 valves used in integrated fluidic circuits have been extensively studied previously,more » here the 25 authors downsize those microfluidic valves and use flow channels with rectangular cross- 26 sections to maintain the bacteria in contact with cell culture medium during the experiments. 27 The closure of these valves has not been characterized before. First, these valves are modeled 28 using finite element analysis, and then compared the modeling results with the actual closing 29 profiles of the valves, which is determined from absorption measurements. The measurements 30 and modeling show with good agreement that the deflection of valves is a linear function of 31 externally applied pressure and the deflection scales proportionally to the width of the flow 32 channel. In addition to characterizing the valve, the authors show at a proof-of-principle level 33 that it can be used to deform a bacterial cell at considerable magnitude. They found the largest 34 deformations in 5 lm wide channels where the bacterial width and length increase by 1.6 and 35 1.25 times, respectively. Narrower and broader channels are less optimal for these studies. The 36 platform presents a promising approach to probe, in a quantitative and systematic way, the me- 37 chanical properties of not only bacterial cells but possibly also yeast and other single-« less

  7. Characterization of three-dimensional anisotropic heart valve tissue mechanical properties using inverse finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Mostafa; Barakat, Mohammed S; Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Azadani, Ali N

    2016-09-01

    Computational modeling has an important role in design and assessment of medical devices. In computational simulations, considering accurate constitutive models is of the utmost importance to capture mechanical response of soft tissue and biomedical materials under physiological loading conditions. Lack of comprehensive three-dimensional constitutive models for soft tissue limits the effectiveness of computational modeling in research and development of medical devices. The aim of this study was to use inverse finite element (FE) analysis to determine three-dimensional mechanical properties of bovine pericardial leaflets of a surgical bioprosthesis under dynamic loading condition. Using inverse parameter estimation, 3D anisotropic Fung model parameters were estimated for the leaflets. The FE simulations were validated using experimental in-vitro measurements, and the impact of different constitutive material models was investigated on leaflet stress distribution. The results of this study showed that the anisotropic Fung model accurately simulated the leaflet deformation and coaptation during valve opening and closing. During systole, the peak stress reached to 3.17MPa at the leaflet boundary while during diastole high stress regions were primarily observed in the commissures with the peak stress of 1.17MPa. In addition, the Rayleigh damping coefficient that was introduced to FE simulations to simulate viscous damping effects of surrounding fluid was determined. PMID:27173827

  8. A Novel Left Heart Simulator for the Multi-modality Characterization of Native Mitral Valve Geometry and Fluid Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Rabbah, Jean-Pierre; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical models of the mitral valve have been used to elucidate mitral valve function and mechanics. These models have evolved from simple two-dimensional approximations to complex three-dimensional fully coupled fluid structure interaction models. However, to date these models lack direct one-to-one experimental validation. As computational solvers vary considerably, experimental benchmark data are critically important to ensure model accuracy. In this study, a novel left heart simulator was designed specifically for the validation of numerical mitral valve models. Several distinct experimental techniques were collectively performed to resolve mitral valve geometry and hemodynamics. In particular, micro-computed tomography was used to obtain accurate and high-resolution (39 µm voxel) native valvular anatomy, which included the mitral leaflets, chordae tendinae, and papillary muscles. Threedimensional echocardiography was used to obtain systolic leaflet geometry for direct comparison of resultant leaflet kinematics. Stereoscopic digital particle image velocimetry provided all three components of fluid velocity through the mitral valve, resolved every 25 ms in the cardiac cycle. A strong central filling jet was observed during peak systole, with minimal out-of-plane velocities (V~0.6m/s). In addition, physiologic hemodynamic boundary conditions were defined and all data were synchronously acquired through a central trigger. Finally, the simulator is a precisely controlled environment, in which flow conditions and geometry can be systematically prescribed and resultant valvular function and hemodynamics assessed. Thus, these data represent the first comprehensive database of high fidelity experimental data, critical for extensive validation of mitral valve fluid structure interaction simulations. PMID:22965640

  9. Safety valve

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Ulf C.

    1984-01-01

    The safety valve contains a resilient gland to be held between a valve seat and a valve member and is secured to the valve member by a sleeve surrounding the end of the valve member adjacent to the valve seat. The sleeve is movable relative to the valve member through a limited axial distance and a gap exists between said valve member and said sleeve.

  10. Cells, scaffolds and bioreactors for tissue-engineered heart valves: a journey from basic concepts to contemporary developmental innovations.

    PubMed

    Gandaglia, Alessandro; Bagno, Andrea; Naso, Filippo; Spina, Michele; Gerosa, Gino

    2011-04-01

    The development of viable and functional tissue-engineered heart valves (TEHVs) is a challenge that, for almost two decades, the scientific community has been committed to face to create life-lasting prosthetic devices for treating heart valve diseases. One of the main drawbacks of tissue-based commercial substitutes, xenografts and homografts, is their lack of viability, and hence failure to grow, repair, and remodel. In adults, the average bioprostheses life span is around 13 years, followed by structural valve degeneration, such as calcification; in pediatric, mechanical valves are commonly used instead of biological substitutes, as in young patients, the mobilization of calcium, due to bone remodeling, accelerates the calcification process. Moreover, neither mechanical nor bioprostheses are able to follow children's body growth. Cell seeding and repopulation of acellular heart valve scaffolds, biological and polymeric, appears as a promising way to create a living valve. Biomechanical stimuli have significant impact on cell behavior including in vitro differentiation, and physiological hemodynamic conditioning has been found to promote new tissue development. These concepts have led scientists to design bioreactors to mimic the in vivo environment of heart valves. Many different types of somatic and stem cells have been tested for colonizing both the surface and the core of the valve matrix but controversial results have been achieved so far. PMID:21163670

  11. Patterns of systolic stress distribution on mitral valve anterior leaflet chordal apparatus. A structural mechanical theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Nazari, S; Carli, F; Salvi, S; Banfi, C; Aluffi, A; Mourad, Z; Buniva, P; Rescigno, G

    2000-04-01

    Increasing diffusion and complexity of mitral valve repair procedures may prompt an interest in the evaluation of the patterns of stress distribution on the chords, which are, from the structural mechanical point of view, the weakest element of valve apparatus. This theoretical analysis concentrates in particular on the mitral valve anterior leaflet. As is known, the vast majority of the chordae are attached to the anterior leaflet within the coaptation area; during systole they are then necessarily parallel, aligned along the same plane as that of the leaflets' coaptation surface, to which they are attached; moreover the thickness of the chordae increases significantly from the marginal chordae to the more central ones. In normal conditions during systole the progressively wider coaptation surface causes the increasing stress to be supported by an increasing number of progressively thicker chords, which are substantially parallel and aligned on the coaptation surface plane in such a way that they can share the stress between them, according to their thickness; in other words chords form a multifilament functional unit which enrolls elements of increasing thickness in response to the mounting stress. The geometrical modifications of the valve apparatus architecture (annulus dilatation, leaflet retraction, chordal elongation or retraction) often associated with valve insufficiency due to chordal rupture, have the common result of causing, during systole, a radial disarrangement of the direction of most of the secondary chordae which are no longer parallel, aligned on the coaptation surface plane. Due to the negligible elastic module of the valve leaflet, in this new arrangement the various chordae cannot share the stress between themselves as they do in a normal physiological situation; on the contrary the thinner chordae nearer to the free margin are also loaded with the peak systolic stress, thus generating conditions favoring their rupture. It can, therefore, be

  12. Mechanical and thermal properties of hot pressed CoCrMo-porcelain composites developed for prosthetic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Henriques, B; Gasik, M; Souza, J C M; Nascimento, R M; Soares, D; Silva, F S

    2014-02-01

    In this study, mechanical and thermal properties of CoCrMo-porcelain composites for dental restorations have been evaluated. These metal-ceramic composites were produced by powder metallurgy and hot pressing techniques from the mixtures of metal and ceramic powders with different volume fractions. Young's moduli and the coefficient of thermal expansion of materials were evaluated by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and dilatometry (DIL) tests, respectively. The strength in flexion and shear was measured with a universal test machine and hardness with a respective tester. The microstructures and fracture surfaces were inspected by the means of optical microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). Shear strength, Flexural strength and Young' moduli of ceramic and metal-matrix composites were found to increase with higher metal particles content. The DMA tests performed at different frequencies showed no frequency-dependent features of the materials studied, indicating no viscoelastic behavior. The fracture surfaces analysis suggests the load-transfer mechanism be possibly responsible for this behavior, as the differences in CTE are low enough to cause significant thermal stresses in these materials. The results might be included in a materials properties database for further use for design and optimization of dental restorations. PMID:24269945

  13. Rotationally Actuated Prosthetic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Carden, James R.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand attached to end of remaining part of forearm and to upper arm just above elbow. Pincerlike fingers pushed apart to degree depending on rotation of forearm. Simpler in design, simpler to operate, weighs less, and takes up less space.

  14. [The structure and mechanical properties of the human pulmonary trunk and its valves].

    PubMed

    Antipas, D B; Milovanova, Z P; Zavalishin, N N

    1993-01-01

    The histological structure and mechanical properties of the pulmonary trunk and its valves were studied in 35 complexes of the pulmonary artery of man. The valvular apparatus of the pulmonary trunk is formed by anatomical elements with different morphological structures. In it there are elements which might be considered from standpoints of biomechanics as membranous (pulmonary trunk, sinuses, cusps) and shaft (fibrous ring, commissural shafts, arcuate crests) elements, the commissural shafts representing a combination of structures forming a closed spatial inter-related construction--a natural elastic framework of the pulmonary trunk root and the sheath elements are morphologically interrelated and fixed on this framework. The mechanical properties of these shaft elements are formed not only at the expense of inclusion of other formations in their structure but also at the expense of changes in the density of distribution and spatial orientation of main carrier structures of sheath elements attached to them. So, the strength and rigidity of the fibrous ring were associated not only with the presence of collagenous fibers and chondroid tissue n it, but also with the regular arrangement of collagenous fibers coming to it from the sinus. Similarly, the strength of arcuate crests was in many respects dependent on dense arrangement of longitudinally oriented smooth muscles. The amount of smooth muscles in the pulmonary trunk was 1.3 and 2 times higher than that of collagenous and elastic structures which allows the pulmonary trunk of man to be referred to arteries of muscular or mixed type. It points to the necessity to take into account the influence of muscle tone on mechanical behavior of the pulmonary trunk under physiological exercise. PMID:7889164

  15. Curative effect of mechanical heart valve replacement and anticoagulant therapy after surgery.

    PubMed

    Chuai, J B; Shi, L; Ma, X Y; Wu, D; Kang, K; Jiang, S L

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the curative effect of low-intensity anticoagulant therapy by observing the oral administration of warfarin (anticoagulant therapy) on patients who had undergone mechanical heart valve replacement (MHVR) surgery with subsequent anticoagulation complications. Fifty patients who underwent MHVR in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University and 52 patients in the Cardiovascular Surgery of Daqing Oilfield General Hospital between January 2013 and January 2016 were selected (63 males and 39 females, ages 26-77 years). They took warfarin after treatment and were followed-up by means of outpatient review and telephone after leaving the hospital. The effect of warfarin and the occurrence of anticoagulation complications were analyzed. The operations lasted 230±106 min, extracorporeal circulation for 110±50 min and aorta occlusion for 82±23 min. During post-operation 3 patients developed skin purpura and one patient died. During follow-up we found 3 cases of anemia caused by excessive menstruation, 4 cases of hematuresis, 3 cases of peated epistaxis, 1 case of gastrointestinal bleeding, 1 case of cerebral hemorrhage, 1 case of embolism in the lower limbs and 1 case of cerebral infarction, although they all improved or were totally cured. Therefore, the incidence of complications can be reduced significantly by the correct administration of warfarin as well as timely monitoring of interference factors after MHVR. PMID:27049085

  16. Imaging sensor for monitoring of the piston mechanism in cylindrical valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantiushina, Ekaterina N.; Gorbachev, Alexey A.

    2013-04-01

    Piston-cylinder assemblies are used in various actuator applications in all branches of industry, such as construction technology. It is often important for the operator to know the condition of the piston rod in the pressure-operated cylinder. A large number of operating cycles by this piston can lead to premature failure and breakage of the entire cylinder; this is conditioned by a high chance of splitting of the piston rod due to its elongation during the operating process. Therefore, it is necessary to know their operating lifetimes, for which purpose endurance tests are conducted. Since the pistons are located in hard-to-reach place, monitoring their operation via the contact method while there are in motion is not considered possible. In such situations, a non-contact method is used to monitor to moving parts, which is conducted on the basis of imaging sensors. The authors of this article have developed a new system for conducting endurance test on piston mechanism in a cylindrical valve. This system makes it possible to observe the shift of the reciprocating piston in real time, automate the process of recording data and promptly and accurately measure the parameters of the shift of the piston via a non-contact method and increase the reliability of the data received.

  17. Simulations of pulsatile suspension flow through bileaflet mechanical heart valves to quantify platelet damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Brian; Aidun, Cyrus; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2012-11-01

    Studies have shown that high shear stress and long exposure times on platelets have a strong impact on thromboembolic complications in bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs). This numerical study quantifies the platelet damage incurred in pulsatile flow through various BMHV designs. The lattice-Boltzmann method with external boundary force (LBM-EBF) was implemented to simulate pulsatile flow and capture the dynamics and surface shear stresses of modeled platelets with realistic geometry. The platelets are released in key regions of interest in the geometry as well as at various times of the cardiac cycle. The platelet damage is quantified using a linear shear stress-exposure time blood damage index (BDI) model. The multiscale computational method used to quantitatively measure the BDI during the pulsatile flow has been validated as being able to accurately capture bulk BMHV fluid flow and for accurately quantifying platelet damage in BMHV flows. These simulations will further knowledge of the geometric features and cardiac cycle times that most affect platelet damage. This study will ultimately lead to optimization of BMHV design in order to minimize thromboembolic complications.

  18. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Extracellular matrix tenascin-X in calcific aortic valves].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichi

    2015-05-01

    We previously disclosed a novel extracellular matrix tenascin-X (TNX) , the largest member of the tenascin family. So far, we have made efforts to elucidate the roles of TNX. TNX is involved in collagen deposition, collagen fibrillogenesis, and modulation of collagen stiffness. Homozygous mutations in TNXB, the gene encoding TNX, cause a classic-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) , a heritable connective tissue disorder, whereas haploinsufficiency of TNXB and heterozygous mutations in TNXB are associated with hypermobility-type EDS. Recently, we performed proteomic analyses of calcific aortic valves (CAVs) compared with relatively adjacent normal tissues to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms of dystrophic valvular calcification. Interestingly, we found that TNX was the protein with the greatest decrease in expression among the differentially expressed proteins and that expression levels of proteins modulating collagen structure and function, such as type I collagen and decorin, were also decreased in CAVs. In this review, I will discuss about the decreased level of collagen due to the reduction of expression levels of proteins that play regulatory roles in collagen functions such as fibril organization and fibrillogenesis in CAVs. PMID:25926574

  19. Aortic valve surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are two main types of new valves: Mechanical, made of man-made materials, such as titanium ... Mechanical heart valves do not fail often. However, blood clots can develop on them. If a blood ...

  20. Mitral valve surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are two main types of new valves: Mechanical, made of man-made materials, such as titanium ... Mechanical heart valves do not fail often. However, blood clots can develop on them. If a blood ...

  1. Experimental investigation of the flow field past a bileaflet mechanical heart valve in pulsatile flow within an anatomical aorta model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Laura; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2011-11-01

    A bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV) has been mounted at the inlet of an anatomical model of the human aorta, and placed within a mock circulation loop that simulates physiological flow conditions. The working fluid matches the refractive index of silicone, from which the aorta model and other parts of the test section are made, and the viscosity of blood. Flow characteristics past the BMHV are measured using stereoscopic and planar particle image velocimetry and laser Doppler velocimetry. In contrast to previous experiments, in which heart valves have been tested in simplified aortic geometries, this arrangement permits the study of the dependence of flow past the valve upon recirculation in the sinuses of Valsalva, the flow rate through the coronary arteries, and the aorta curvature. The effect of valve orientation will also be investigated with the objective to determine a hemodynamically optimal configuration with potential benefits to implantation procedures. The measured viscous shear stress distribution will be analyzed towards predicting the initiation of thrombosis in patients and identifying regions of stagnation, which could facilitate thrombus attachment.

  2. Advanced modeling strategy for the analysis of heart valve leaflet tissue mechanics using high-order finite element method.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Hadi; Bahramian, Fereshteh; Wan, Wankei

    2009-11-01

    Modeling soft tissue using the finite element method is one of the most challenging areas in the field of biomechanical engineering. To date, many models have been developed to describe heart valve leaflet tissue mechanics, which are accurate to some extent. Nevertheless, there is no comprehensive method to modeling soft tissue mechanics, This is because (1) the degree of anisotropy in the heart valve leaflet changes layer by layer due to a variety of collagen fiber densities and orientations that cannot be taken into account in the model and also (2) a constitutive material model fully describing the mechanical properties of the leaflet structure is not available in the literature. In this framework, we develop a new high-order element using p-type finite element formulation to create anisotropic material properties similar to those of the heart valve leaflet tissue in only one single element. This element also takes the nonlinearity of the leaflet tissue into consideration using a bilinear material model. This new element is composed a two-dimensional finite element in the principal directions of leaflet tissue and a p-type finite element in the direction of thickness. The proposed element is easy to implement, much more efficient than standard elements available in commercial finite element packages. This study is one step towards the modeling of soft tissue mechanics using a meshless finite element approach to be applied in real-time haptic feedback of soft-tissue models in virtual reality simulation. PMID:19773193

  3. Influence of prosthetic humeral head size and medial offset on the mechanics of the shoulder with cuff tear arthropathy: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, P O; Tétreault, P; Hagemeister, N; Nuño, N

    2013-02-22

    This numerical study assesses the influence of an oversized humeral hemiprosthesis with a larger medial offset on the mechanics of the shoulder with cuff tear arthropathy (CTA). Shoulder elevation in the scapular plane is performed, and a Seebauer Type IIa CTA is simulated: a massive rotator cuff tear, a proximal and static migration of the humeral head, and two contacts with friction (glenohumeral and acromiohumeral). The CTA model without a prosthesis (friction coefficient 0.3) is evaluated first as a reference model. Then, three humeral head prosthetic geometries (friction coefficient 0.15) are evaluated: anatomical head, oversized head, and oversized head with a large medial offset. The function of the middle deltoid (i.e. moment arm, applied force, and strength), the contact forces, and the range of motion are studied. The anatomical head, which reduces friction by half, decreases the middle deltoid force (25%) and the contact forces (glenoid 7%; acromion 25%), and increases the range of motion from 41 to 54°. The oversized head increases the moment arm (15%) and the middle deltoid strength (13%), which further decreases the deltoid force (7%) and the contact forces (glenoid 7%; acromion 17%), and increases the range of motion from 54° to 69°. The oversized head with a large medial offset enhances these effects: the moment arm increases by another 3.1%, the deltoid force decreases by another 5% and the acromiohumeral contact force by another 12%, and the range of motion increases from 69° to 84°. These results suggest that increasing the medial offset and oversizing the hemiprosthetic head improve the function of the deltoid, reduce acromial solicitation, and restore elevation to almost 90°. PMID:23219280

  4. [Acute Leaflet Arrest in St. Jude Medical Regent Mechanical Aortic Valve;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Morishima, Yuji; Arakaki, Katsuya

    2015-06-01

    A 61-year-old woman was diagnosed with combined valvular disease and atrial fibrillation, and was admitted for surgery. We performed double valve replacement, tricuspid annuloplasty and maze operation. At the operation, a 19 mm St. Jude Medical Regent valve was implanted with non-everting mattress sutures at the aortic supra-annular position after mitral valve replacement. Although pulling down of the prosthesis into the aortic annulus was easy, the leaflets were unable to open at all in a movability test. After removing several stitches on the mitral side of the hinges, the subvalvular tissue was seen bulging into the hinge, hindering the free movement. The prosthesis was removed and replaced with a 17 mm Regent valve by the same technique. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. We suggest it is necessary to pay special attention to the structural characteristics of the prosthesis. PMID:26066878

  5. Complex decision-making in stroke: preoperative mechanical thrombectomy of septic embolus for emergency cardiac valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Travis R; Davis, Brandon J; He, Lucy; Kirshner, Howard S; Froehler, Michael T; Mocco, J

    2015-12-01

    Stroke is a common and devastating embolic manifestation of infective endocarditis. We report a case of cardioembolic stroke in a patient with enterococcal endocarditis, with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 3. A middle-aged patient with bacterial endocarditis exhibited mild intermittent left hemiparesis and dysarthria in the setting of severe aortic insufficiency requiring urgent aortic valve replacement. Cerebrovascular imaging revealed a partially occlusive thrombus in the M1 segment of the right middle cerebral artery, which became symptomatic during relative hypotension. Given the expected hypotension during the urgently needed aortic valve replacement, there was a significant risk of infarction of most of the right hemisphere. Thus, mechanical thrombectomy was performed immediately prior to thoracotomy, and the patient awoke neurologically intact. This case demonstrates avoidance of a large stroke due to a subocclusive thrombus and anticipated intraoperative hypotension with preoperative mechanical thrombectomy. PMID:25422318

  6. Complex decision-making in stroke: preoperative mechanical thrombectomy of septic embolus for emergency cardiac valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Travis R; Davis, Brandon J; He, Lucy; Kirshner, Howard S; Froehler, Michael T; Mocco, J

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a common and devastating embolic manifestation of infective endocarditis. We report a case of cardioembolic stroke in a patient with enterococcal endocarditis, with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 3. A middle-aged patient with bacterial endocarditis exhibited mild intermittent left hemiparesis and dysarthria in the setting of severe aortic insufficiency requiring urgent aortic valve replacement. Cerebrovascular imaging revealed a partially occlusive thrombus in the M1 segment of the right middle cerebral artery, which became symptomatic during relative hypotension. Given the expected hypotension during the urgently needed aortic valve replacement, there was a significant risk of infarction of most of the right hemisphere. Thus, mechanical thrombectomy was performed immediately prior to thoracotomy, and the patient awoke neurologically intact. This case demonstrates avoidance of a large stroke due to a subocclusive thrombus and anticipated intraoperative hypotension with preoperative mechanical thrombectomy. PMID:25410029

  7. Stemless Ball Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Robert K.; Yakos, David; Walthall, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    This invention utilizes a new method of opening and closing a ball valve. Instead of rotating the ball with a perpendicular stem (as is the case with standard ball valves), the ball is rotated around a fixed axis by two guide pins. This innovation eliminates the leak point that is present in all standard ball valves due to the penetration of an actuation stem through the valve body. The VOST (Venturi Off-Set-Technology) valve has been developed for commercial applications. The standard version of the valve consists of an off-set venturi flow path through the valve. This path is split at the narrowest portion of the venturi, allowing the section upstream from the venturi to be rotated. As this rotation takes place, the venturi becomes restricted as one face rotates with respect to the other, eventually closing off the flow path. A spring-loaded seal made of resilient material is embedded in the upstream face of the valve, making a leak-proof seal between the faces; thus a valve is formed. The spring-loaded lip seal is the only seal that can provide a class six, or bubble-tight, seal against the opposite face of the valve. Tearing action of the seal by high-velocity gas on this early design required relocation of the seal to the downstream face of the valve. In the stemless embodiment of this valve, inner and outer magnetic cartridges are employed to transfer mechanical torque from the outside of the valve to the inside without the use of a stem. This eliminates the leak path caused by the valve stems in standard valves because the stems penetrate through the bodies of these valves.

  8. Estimation of torque on mechanical heart valves due to magnetic resonance imaging including an estimation of the significance of the Lenz effect using a computational model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Neil M.; Diaz-Gomez, Manuel; Condon, Barrie

    2000-12-01

    Mitral and aortic valve replacement is a procedure which is common in cardiac surgery. Some of these replacement valves are mechanical and contain moving metal parts. Should the patient in whom such a valve has been implanted be involved in magnetic resonance imaging, there is a possible dangerous interaction between the moving metal parts and the static magnetic field due to the Lenz effect. Mathematical models of two relatively common forms of single-leaflet valves have been derived and the magnitude of the torque which opposes the motion of the valve leaflet has been calculated for a valve disc of solid metal. In addition, a differential model of a ring-strengthener valve type has been considered to determine the likely significance of the Lenz effect in the context of the human heart. For common magnetic field strengths at present, i.e. 1 to 2 T, the effect is not particularly significant. However, there is a marked increase in back pressure as static magnetic field strength increases. There are concerns that, since field strengths in the range 3 to 4 T are increasingly being used, the Lenz effect could become significant. At 5 to 10 T the malfunction of the mechanical heart valve could cause the heart to behave as though it is diseased. For unhealthy or old patients this could possibly prove fatal.

  9. Relapsing tricuspid valve endocarditis by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 11 years: tricuspid valve replacement with an aortic valve homograft.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Seok; Chang, Hyoung Woo; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Kang, Dong Ki; Kim, Eui-Chong; Kim, Ki-Bong

    2015-01-01

    Eleven years ago, a 27-year-old non-drug abuser woman was admitted to the hospital due to a burn injury. During the treatment, she was diagnosed with tricuspid valve infective endocarditis caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). She underwent tricuspid valve replacement (TVR) using a bioprosthetic valve, followed by 6 weeks of meropenem antibiotic therapy. Ten years later, she was again diagnosed with prosthetic valve infective endocarditis caused by MDR P. aeruginosa. She underwent redo-TVR with a bioprosthetic valve and was treated with colistin and ciprofloxacin. Ten months later, she was again diagnosed with prosthetic valve infective endocarditis with MDR P. aeruginosa as a pathogen. She underwent a second redo-TVR with a tissue valve and was treated with colistin. Two months later, her fever recurred and she was again diagnosed with prosthetic valve infective endocarditis caused by MDR P. aeruginosa. She eventually underwent a third redo-TVR using an aortic valve homograft and was discharged from the hospital after additional 6 weeks' of antibiotic therapy. All the strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from each event of infective endocarditis were analyzed by repetitive deoxyribonucleic acid sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) strain typing to determine the correlation of isolates. All of the pathogens in 11 years were similar enough to be classified as the same strain, and this is the first case report of TVR using an aortic valve homograft to treat relapsing endocarditis. PMID:26051245

  10. Valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve implantation: the new playground for prosthesis-patient mismatch.

    PubMed

    Faerber, Gloria; Schleger, Simone; Diab, Mahmoud; Breuer, Martin; Figulla, Hans R; Eichinger, Walter B; Doenst, Torsten

    2014-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an established procedure for patients with aortic valve stenosis and significant comorbidities. One option offered by this technique is the implantation of a transcatheter valve inside a surgically implanted bioprosthesis. Many reports address the feasibility but also the pitfalls of these valve-in-valve (VIV) procedures. Review articles provide tables listing which valve sizes are appropriate based on the size of the initially implanted bioprosthesis. However, we previously argued that the hemodynamic performance of a prosthetic tissue valve is in large part a result of the dimensions of the bioprosthesis in relation to the patient's aortic outflow dimensions. Thus, the decision if a VIV TAVI procedure is likely to be associated with a favorable hemodynamic result cannot safely be made by looking at premade sizing tables that do not include patient dimensions and do not inquire about the primary cause for bioprosthetic valve stenosis. Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) may therefore be more frequent than expected after conventional aortic valve replacement. Importantly, it may be masked by a potentially flawed method assessing its relevance. Such PPM may therefore impact significantly on hemodynamic outcome after VIV TAVI. Fifteen percent of currently published VIV procedures show only a minimal reduction of pressure gradients. We will address potential pitfalls in the current determination of PPM, outline the missing links for reliable determination of PPM, and present a simplified algorithm to guide decision making for VIV TAVI. PMID:24612128

  11. Estimation of aortic valve leaflets from 3D CT images using local shape dictionaries and linear coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Liang; Martin, Caitlin; Wang, Qian; Sun, Wei; Duncan, James

    2016-03-01

    Aortic valve (AV) disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The preferred treatment modality for severe AV disease is surgical resection and replacement of the native valve with either a mechanical or tissue prosthetic. In order to develop effective and long-lasting treatment methods, computational analyses, e.g., structural finite element (FE) and computational fluid dynamic simulations, are very effective for studying valve biomechanics. These computational analyses are based on mesh models of the aortic valve, which are usually constructed from 3D CT images though many hours of manual annotation, and therefore an automatic valve shape reconstruction method is desired. In this paper, we present a method for estimating the aortic valve shape from 3D cardiac CT images, which is represented by triangle meshes. We propose a pipeline for aortic valve shape estimation which includes novel algorithms for building local shape dictionaries and for building landmark detectors and curve detectors using local shape dictionaries. The method is evaluated on real patient image dataset using a leave-one-out approach and achieves an average accuracy of 0.69 mm. The work will facilitate automatic patient-specific computational modeling of the aortic valve.

  12. Biological response to prosthetic debris

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Diana; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Joint arthroplasty had revolutionized the outcome of orthopaedic surgery. Extensive and collaborative work of many innovator surgeons had led to the development of durable bearing surfaces, yet no single material is considered absolutely perfect. Generation of wear debris from any part of the prosthesis is unavoidable. Implant loosening secondary to osteolysis is the most common mode of failure of arthroplasty. Osteolysis is the resultant of complex contribution of the generated wear debris and the mechanical instability of the prosthetic components. Roughly speaking, all orthopedic biomaterials may induce a universal biologic host response to generated wear débris with little specific characteristics for each material; but some debris has been shown to be more cytotoxic than others. Prosthetic wear debris induces an extensive biological cascade of adverse cellular responses, where macrophages are the main cellular type involved in this hostile inflammatory process. Macrophages cause osteolysis indirectly by releasing numerous chemotactic inflammatory mediators, and directly by resorbing bone with their membrane microstructures. The bio-reactivity of wear particles depends on two major elements: particle characteristics (size, concentration and composition) and host characteristics. While any particle type may enhance hostile cellular reaction, cytological examination demonstrated that more than 70% of the debris burden is constituted of polyethylene particles. Comprehensive understanding of the intricate process of osteolysis is of utmost importance for future development of therapeutic modalities that may delay or prevent the disease progression. PMID:25793158

  13. Biological response to prosthetic debris.

    PubMed

    Bitar, Diana; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-03-18

    Joint arthroplasty had revolutionized the outcome of orthopaedic surgery. Extensive and collaborative work of many innovator surgeons had led to the development of durable bearing surfaces, yet no single material is considered absolutely perfect. Generation of wear debris from any part of the prosthesis is unavoidable. Implant loosening secondary to osteolysis is the most common mode of failure of arthroplasty. Osteolysis is the resultant of complex contribution of the generated wear debris and the mechanical instability of the prosthetic components. Roughly speaking, all orthopedic biomaterials may induce a universal biologic host response to generated wear débris with little specific characteristics for each material; but some debris has been shown to be more cytotoxic than others. Prosthetic wear debris induces an extensive biological cascade of adverse cellular responses, where macrophages are the main cellular type involved in this hostile inflammatory process. Macrophages cause osteolysis indirectly by releasing numerous chemotactic inflammatory mediators, and directly by resorbing bone with their membrane microstructures. The bio-reactivity of wear particles depends on two major elements: particle characteristics (size, concentration and composition) and host characteristics. While any particle type may enhance hostile cellular reaction, cytological examination demonstrated that more than 70% of the debris burden is constituted of polyethylene particles. Comprehensive understanding of the intricate process of osteolysis is of utmost importance for future development of therapeutic modalities that may delay or prevent the disease progression. PMID:25793158

  14. Prosthetic Sphincter Controls Urination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenny, John B., Jr

    1986-01-01

    People who lost muscular control of urinary canal through disease or injury aided by prosthetic sphincter. Implanted so it surrounds uretha, sphincter deflated and inflated at will by wearer to start and stop urina tion. Operating pressure adjusted after implantation to accommodate growth or atrophy of urinary canal and prevent tissue damage from excess pressure. Principle adapted to other organs, such as colon, ureter, or ileum.

  15. Spin relaxation mechanism in graphene spin valves with Al2O3 and MgO tunnel barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amamou, Walid; Lin, Zhisheng; van Baren, Jeremiah; Shi, Jing; Kawakami, Roland

    Contact induced spin relaxation in graphene lateral spin valves is one of major limiting factors for obtaining long spin lifetimes in graphene. There are various spin relaxation mechanisms, including spin absorption, interfacial spin scattering, and fringe field effects, which may account for the observed short spin lifetimes. One possible solution is to introduce a tunnel barrier between graphene and the ferromagnetic electrode, which should reduce contact induced spin relaxation and allow for longer spin lifetimes. We study the spin relaxation mechanisms in our graphene spin valves with two different types of tunnel barriers, aluminum oxide and MgO/TiO2 using the standard non-local measurement geometry. To extract the spin lifetime from Hanle spin precession data, we perform fits based on Bloch equation models that include the effects of spin absorption into the magnetic contacts. We observe a strong dependence of the extracted spin lifetime on the resistance-area (RA) product of the contacts. To understand the role of spin absorption, we compare these results to fits obtained using Hanle models that do not take spin absorption into account. Analysis shows that spin absorption might not be the dominant source of contact induced spin relaxation for graphene spin valves with sputtered Al2O3 and MgO/TiO2 barriers. Interfacial spin-flip scattering or spin dephasing resulting from local magnetostatic fields due to contact roughness are likely to be more important. C-SPIN, ONR.

  16. What do you do with the antiplatelet agents in patients with drug eluting stents who then receive a mechanical valve?

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Michele; Serraino, Giuseppe Filiberto; Spadafora, Andrea; Renzulli, Attilio

    2012-01-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAT) with aspirin and clopidogrel is a cornerstone of treatment during and after percutaneous coronary interventions with drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation. Oral anticoagulation (OAC) is the recommended treatment for patients with mechanical heart valves. When patients with DES need a mechanical heart valve or vice versa, we face the difficult choice of their antithrombotic therapy. Different institutions empirically follow a combination of OAC and single or DAT, the so-called triple antithrombotic therapy (TT) aiming to find the best balance between the thrombotic and bleeding risk for this subset of patients. A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether there is an optimal antithrombotic management for patients with DES undergoing mechanical heart valve or vice versa. Altogether, more than 148 papers were found using the reported search, of which 16 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. We conclude that DES implantation in patients who could potentially need valve surgery in the future should be discouraged and bare-metal stent or an aortic bioprosthesis preferred. However, in high-risk patients with DES, the recommendation is to postpone elective surgery for 1 year and, if surgery cannot be deferred, continue aspirin during the perioperative period. Moreover, when OAC is given in combination with clopidogrel and/or low-dose aspirin, the target INR should be 2.0–2.5 (Class IIb, level of evidence C). As per the long-term management, antithrombotic management with DAT alone in mechanical aortic valve replacement might be possible, but there is not enough evidence to support it. The available evidence suggests that triple anticoagulation (OAC + DAT) is associated with the best

  17. Mechanical Versus Bioprosthetic Aortic Valve Replacement in Middle-Aged Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dong Fang; Seco, Michael; Wu, James J; Edelman, James B; Wilson, Michael K; Vallely, Michael P; Byrom, Michael J; Bannon, Paul G

    2016-07-01

    The choice of a bioprosthetic valve (BV) or mechanical valve (MV) in middle-aged adults undergoing aortic valve replacement is a complex decision that must account for numerous prosthesis and patient factors. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to compare long-term survival, major adverse prosthesis-related events, anticoagulant-related events, major bleeding, reoperation, and structural valve degeneration in middle-aged patients receiving a BV or MV. A comprehensive search from six electronic databases was performed from their inception to February 2016. Results from patients aged less than 70 years undergoing aortic valve replacement with a BV or MV were included. There were 12 studies involving 8,661 patients. Baseline characteristics were similar. There was no significant difference in long-term survival among patients aged 50 to 70 or 60 to 70 years. Compared with MVs, BVs had significantly fewer long-term anticoagulant-related events (hazard ratio [HR] 0.54, p = 0.006) and bleeding (HR 0.48, p < 0.00001) but significantly greater major adverse prosthesis-related events (HR 1.82, p = 0.02), including reoperation (HR 2.19, p < 0.00001). The present meta-analysis found no significant difference in survival between BVs and MVs in patients aged 50 to 70 or 60 to 70 years. Compared with MVs, BVs have reduced risk of major bleeding and anticoagulant-related events but increased risk of structural valve degeneration and reoperation. However, the mortality consequences of reoperation appear lower than that of major bleeding, and recent advances may further lower the reoperation rate for BV. Therefore, this review supports the current trend of using BVs in patients more than 60 years of age. PMID:26794881

  18. Prosthetic Hand With Two Gripping Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell B.; Vest, Thomas W.; Carden, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Prosthetic hand developed for amputee who retains significant portion of forearm. Outer end of device is end effector including two fingers, one moved by rotating remaining part of forearm about its longitudinal axis. Main body of end effector is end member supporting fingers, roller bearing assembly, and rack-and-pinion mechanism. Advantage of rack-and-pinion mechanism enables user to open or close gap between fingers with precision and force.

  19. Upper Extremity Amputations and Prosthetics

    PubMed Central

    Ovadia, Steven A.; Askari, Morad

    2015-01-01

    Upper extremity amputations are most frequently indicated by severe traumatic injuries. The location of the injury will determine the level of amputation. Preservation of extremity length is often a goal. The amputation site will have important implications on the functional status of the patient and options for prosthetic reconstruction. Advances in amputation techniques and prosthetic reconstructions promote improved quality of life. In this article, the authors review the principles of upper extremity amputation, including techniques, amputation sites, and prosthetic reconstructions. PMID:25685104

  20. The effects of a low international normalized ratio on thromboembolic and bleeding complications in patients with mechanical mitral valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mechanical heart valve replacement has an inherent risk of thromboembolic events (TEs). Current guidelines recommend an international normalized ratio (INR) of at least 2.5 after mechanical mitral valve replacement (MVR). This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a low INR (2.0–2.5) on thromboembolic and bleeding complications in patients with mechanical MVR on warfarin therapy. Methods One hundred and thirty-five patients who underwent mechanical MVR were enrolled in this study. The end points of this study were defined as TEs (valve thrombosis, transient ischemic attack, stroke) and bleeding (all minor and major bleeding) complications. Patients were followed up for a mean of 39.6 months and the mean INR of the patients was calculated. After data collection, patients were divided into 3 groups according to their mean INR, as follows: group 1 (n = 34), INR <2.0; group 2 (n = 49), INR 2.0–2.5; and group 3 (n = 52), INR >2.5. Results A total of 22 events (10 [7.4%] thromboembolic and 12 [8.8%] bleeding events) occurred in the follow-up period. The mean INR was an independent risk factor for the development of TEs. Mean INR and neurological dysfunction were independent risk factors for the development of bleeding events. A statistically significant positive correlation was found between the log mean INR and all bleeding events, and a negative correlation was found between the log mean INR and all TEs. The total number of events was significantly lower in group 2 than in groups 1 and 3 (P = 0.036). Conclusions This study showed that a target INRs of 2.0–2.5 are acceptable for preventing TEs and safe in terms of bleeding complications in patients with mechanical MVR. PMID:24885719

  1. Mechanical analysis of ovine and pediatric pulmonary artery for heart valve stent design.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, M S; Oomens, C W J; Bouten, C V C; Bogers, A J J C; Hoerstrup, S P; Baaijens, F P T

    2013-08-01

    Transcatheter heart valve replacement is an attractive and promising technique for congenital as well as acquired heart valve disease. In this procedure, the replacement valve is mounted in a stent that is expanded at the aimed valve position and fixated by clamping. However, for this technique to be appropriate for pediatric patients, the material properties of the host tissue need to be determined to design stents that can be optimized for this particular application. In this study we performed equibiaxial tensile tests on four adult ovine pulmonary artery walls and compared the outcomes with one pediatric pulmonary artery. Results show that the pediatric pulmonary artery was significantly thinner (1.06 ± 0.36 mm (mean ± SD)) than ovine tissue (2.85 ± 0.40 mm), considerably stiffer for strain values that exceed the physiological conditions (beyond 50% strain in the circumferential and 60% in the longitudinal direction), more anisotropic (with a significant difference in stiffness between the longitudinal and circumferential directions beyond 60% strain) and presented stronger non-linear stress-strain behavior at equivalent strains (beyond 26% strain) compared to ovine tissue. These discrepancies suggest that stents validated and optimized using the ovine pre-clinical model might not perform satisfactorily in pediatric patients. The material parameters derived from this study may be used to develop stent designs for both applications using computational models. PMID:23849135

  2. Flow control valves for analytical microfluidic chips without mechanical parts based on thermally responsive monolithic polymers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Cong; Mutlu, Senol; Selvaganapathy, Ponnambalam; Mastrangelo, Carlos H; Svec, Frantisek; Fréchet, Jean M J

    2003-04-15

    Monolithic plugs of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) cross-linked with 5% methylenebisacrylamide have been prepared by photoinitiated polymerization within the channel of a microfluidic device. The volume change associated with the polymer phase transition at its lower critical solution temperature of 32 degrees C allows both the rapid swelling and the deswelling of the monoliths enabling the polymer to close or open the channel as it functions as a nonmechanical valve. Thermoelectric elements capable of changing the temperature of the system between 17 and 57 degrees C were used to actuate the valve. Flow through the device was monitored by fluorescence measurements via the laser-triggered photobleaching of a dye contained in the liquid phase. Photobleaching occurs quickly once the flow is stopped, and the time required to open and close the valve was 3.5 and 5.0 s, respectively. No changes in function were observed even after 120 open-close cycles. Although the 2-mm-long valve was prepared from a polymerization mixture consisting of only a 5% aqueous solution of monomers, it resists pressures of up to 1.38 MPa (200 psi) without observable structural damage. PMID:12713057

  3. Blood damage through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve: a quantitative computational study using a multiscale suspension flow solver.

    PubMed

    Min Yun, B; Aidun, Cyrus K; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-10-01

    Bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) are among the most popular prostheses to replace defective native valves. However, complex flow phenomena caused by the prosthesis are thought to induce serious thromboembolic complications. This study aims at employing a novel multiscale numerical method that models realistic sized suspended platelets for assessing blood damage potential in flow through BMHVs. A previously validated lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to simulate pulsatile flow through a 23 mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) Regent™ valve in the aortic position at very high spatiotemporal resolution with the presence of thousands of suspended platelets. Platelet damage is modeled for both the systolic and diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle. No platelets exceed activation thresholds for any of the simulations. Platelet damage is determined to be particularly high for suspended elements trapped in recirculation zones, which suggests a shift of focus in blood damage studies away from instantaneous flow fields and toward high flow mixing regions. In the diastolic phase, leakage flow through the b-datum gap is shown to cause highest damage to platelets. This multiscale numerical method may be used as a generic solver for evaluating blood damage in other cardiovascular flows and devices. PMID:25070372

  4. A successful percutaneous mechanical vegetation debulking used as a bridge to surgery in acute tricuspid valve endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Makdisi, George; Casciani, Thomas; Wozniak, Thomas C.; Roe, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Timing of surgical management of acute infective endocarditis is a major challenge, with respect to surgical complications, risks of recurrences and optimal valve repair or replacement. We present a case of a 24-year-old male with a history of intravenous drug abuse, who was referred to our center after 10 days of medical management of acute infective endocarditis. Upon arrival he was in septic shock, multi-organ failure, and mobile vegetations on the tricuspid valve with severe tricuspid regurgitation. He also had bilateral pulmonary infarcts and an ischemic stroke in the right parietal lobe. A successful percutaneous transcatheter mechanical vegetation debulking was performed followed by surgical valve replacement seven days later. This case introduces a new option in the management of right-sided endocarditis in critically ill patient, and demonstrates the technical feasibility of a debulking procedure in this setting, which led subsequently to a significant improvement in patient’s condition, and he was ultimately able to undergo definitive surgery. PMID:26904243

  5. A successful percutaneous mechanical vegetation debulking used as a bridge to surgery in acute tricuspid valve endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Makdisi, George; Casciani, Thomas; Wozniak, Thomas C; Roe, David W; Hashmi, Zubair A

    2016-01-01

    Timing of surgical management of acute infective endocarditis is a major challenge, with respect to surgical complications, risks of recurrences and optimal valve repair or replacement. We present a case of a 24-year-old male with a history of intravenous drug abuse, who was referred to our center after 10 days of medical management of acute infective endocarditis. Upon arrival he was in septic shock, multi-organ failure, and mobile vegetations on the tricuspid valve with severe tricuspid regurgitation. He also had bilateral pulmonary infarcts and an ischemic stroke in the right parietal lobe. A successful percutaneous transcatheter mechanical vegetation debulking was performed followed by surgical valve replacement seven days later. This case introduces a new option in the management of right-sided endocarditis in critically ill patient, and demonstrates the technical feasibility of a debulking procedure in this setting, which led subsequently to a significant improvement in patient's condition, and he was ultimately able to undergo definitive surgery. PMID:26904243

  6. The Melody® valve and Ensemble® delivery system for transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    McElhinney, Doff B; Hennesen, Jill T

    2013-01-01

    The Melody® transcatheter pulmonary valve (TPV) is a percutaneous valve system designed for the treatment of obstruction and/or regurgitation of prosthetic conduits placed between the right ventricle and pulmonary arteries in patients with congenital heart disease. In 2000, Melody TPV became the first transcatheter valve implanted in a human; in 2006 it became the first transcatheter valve commercially available anywhere in the world; and in 2010 it was launched as the first commercially available transcatheter valve in the United States. In this review, we present the clinical background against which the Melody valve was developed and implemented, introduce the rationale for and challenges of transcatheter valve technology for this population, outline the history and technical details of its development and use, and summarize currently available data concerning the performance of the device. PMID:23834411

  7. ELECTROSTRICTION VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Kippenhan, D.O.

    1962-09-25

    An accurately controlled, pulse gas valve is designed capable of delivering output pulses which vary in length from one-tenth millisecond to one second or more, repeated at intervals of a few milliseconds or- more. The pulsed gas valve comprises a column formed of barium titanate discs mounted in stacked relation and electrically connected in parallel, with means for applying voltage across the discs to cause them to expand and effect a mechanical elongation axially of the column. The column is mounted within an enclosure having an inlet port and an outlet port with an internal seat in communication with the outlet port, such that a plug secured to the end of the column will engage the seat of the outlet port to close the outlet port in response to the application of voltage is regulated by a conventional electronic timing circuit connected to the column. (AEC)

  8. The Relation Between Collagen Fibril Kinematics and Mechanical Properties in the Mitral Valve Anterior Leaflet

    SciTech Connect

    Liao,J.; Yang, L.; Grashow, J.; Sacks, M.

    2007-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the mitral valve anterior leaflet (MVAL) exhibited minimal hysteresis, no strain rate sensitivity, stress relaxation but not creep (Grashow et al., 2006, Ann Biomed Eng., 34(2), pp. 315-325; Grashow et al., 2006, Ann Biomed. Eng., 34(10), pp. 1509-1518). However, the underlying structural basis for this unique quasi-elastic mechanical behavior is presently unknown. As collagen is the major structural component of the MVAL, we investigated the relation between collagen fibril kinematics (rotation and stretch) and tissue-level mechanical properties in the MVAL under biaxial loading using small angle X-ray scattering. A novel device was developed and utilized to perform simultaneous measurements of tissue level forces and strain under a planar biaxial loading state. Collagen fibril D-period strain ({epsilon}{sub D}) and the fibrillar angular distribution were measured under equibiaxial tension, creep, and stress relaxation to a peak tension of 90 N/m. Results indicated that, under equibiaxial tension, collagen fibril straining did not initiate until the end of the nonlinear region of the tissue-level stress-strain curve. At higher tissue tension levels, {epsilon}{sub D} increased linearly with increasing tension. Changes in the angular distribution of the collagen fibrils mainly occurred in the tissue toe region. Using {epsilon}{sub D}, the tangent modulus of collagen fibrils was estimated to be 95.5{+-}25.5 MPa, which was {approx}27 times higher than the tissue tensile tangent modulus of 3.58{+-}1.83 MPa. In creep tests performed at 90 N/m equibiaxial tension for 60 min, both tissue strain and D remained constant with no observable changes over the test length. In contrast, in stress relaxation tests performed for 90 min {epsilon}{sub D} was found to rapidly decrease in the first 10 min followed by a slower decay rate for the remainder of the test. Using a single exponential model, the time constant for the reduction in collagen

  9. Additional value of biplane transoesophageal imaging in assessment of mitral valve prostheses.

    PubMed Central

    Groundstroem, K; Rittoo, D; Hoffman, P; Bloomfield, P; Sutherland, G R

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine whether biplane transoesophageal imaging offers advantages in the evaluation of mitral prostheses when compared with standard single transverse plane imaging or the precordial approach in suspected prosthetic dysfunction. DESIGN--Prospective mitral valve prosthesis in situ using precordial and biplane transoesophageal ultrasonography. SETTING--Tertiary cardiac referral centre. SUBJECTS--67 consecutive patients with suspected dysfunction of a mitral valve prosthesis (16 had bioprostheses and 51 mechanical prostheses) who underwent precordial, transverse plane, and biplane transoesophageal echocardiography. Correlative invasive confirmation from surgery or angiography, or both, was available in 44 patients. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Number, type, and site of leak according to the three means of scanning. RESULTS--Transverse plane transoesophageal imaging alone identified all 31 medial/lateral paravalvar leaks but only 24/30 of the anterior/posterior leaks. Combining the information from both imaging planes confirmed that biplane scanning identified all paravalvar leaks. Five of the six patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis, all three with valvar thrombus or obstruction, and all three with mitral annulus rupture were diagnosed from transverse plane imaging alone. Longitudinal plane imaging alone enabled diagnosis of the remaining case of prosthetic endocarditis and a further case of subvalvar pannus formation. CONCLUSIONS--Transverse plane transoesophageal imaging was superior to the longitudinal imaging in identifying medial and lateral lesions around the sewing ring of a mitral valve prosthesis. Longitudinal plane imaging was superior in identifying anterior and posterior lesions. Biplane imaging is therefore an important development in the study of mitral prosthesis function. Images PMID:8398497

  10. Prosthetic elbow joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An artificial, manually positionable elbow joint for use in an upper extremity, above-elbow, prosthetic is described. The prosthesis provides a locking feature that is easily controlled by the wearer. The instant elbow joint is very strong and durable enough to withstand the repeated heavy loadings encountered by a wearer who works in an industrial, construction, farming, or similar environment. The elbow joint of the present invention comprises a turntable, a frame, a forearm, and a locking assembly. The frame generally includes a housing for the locking assembly and two protruding ears. The forearm includes an elongated beam having a cup-shaped cylindrical member at one end and a locking wheel having a plurality of holes along a circular arc on its other end with a central bore for pivotal attachment to the protruding ears of the frame. The locking assembly includes a collar having a central opening with a plurality of internal grooves, a plurality of internal cam members each having a chamfered surface at one end and a V-shaped slot at its other end; an elongated locking pin having a crown wheel with cam surfaces and locking lugs secured thereto; two coiled compression springs; and a flexible filament attached to one end of the elongated locking pin and extending from the locking assembly for extending and retracting the locking pin into the holes in the locking wheel to permit selective adjustment of the forearm relative to the frame. In use, the turntable is affixed to the upper arm part of the prosthetic in the conventional manner, and the cup-shaped cylindrical member on one end of the forearm is affixed to the forearm piece of the prosthetic in the conventional manner. The elbow joint is easily adjusted and locked between maximum flex and extended positions.

  11. Prosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tande, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a tremendous burden for individual patients as well as the global health care industry. While a small minority of joint arthroplasties will become infected, appropriate recognition and management are critical to preserve or restore adequate function and prevent excess morbidity. In this review, we describe the reported risk factors for and clinical manifestations of PJI. We discuss the pathogenesis of PJI and the numerous microorganisms that can cause this devastating infection. The recently proposed consensus definitions of PJI and approaches to accurate diagnosis are reviewed in detail. An overview of the treatment and prevention of this challenging condition is provided. PMID:24696437

  12. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Hans Henrik Møller

    2012-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was introduced experimentally in 1989, based on a newly developed heart valve prosthesis - the stentvalve. The valve was invented by a Danish cardiologist named Henning Rud Andersen. The new valve was revolutionary. It was foldable and could be inserted via a catheter through an artery in the groin, without the need for heart lung machine. This allowed for a new valve implantation technique, much less invasive than conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Surgical aortic valve replacement is safe and improves symptoms along with survival. However, up to 1/3 of patients with aortic valve stenosis cannot complete the procedure due to frailty. The catheter technique was hoped to provide a new treatment option for these patients. The first human case was in 2002, but more widespread clinical use did not begin until 2006-2010. Today, in 2011, more than 40,000 valves have been implanted worldwide. Initially, because of the experimental character of the procedure, TAVI was reserved for patients who could not undergo SAVR due to high risk. The results in this group of patients were promising. The procedural safety was acceptable, and the patients experienced significant improvements in their symptoms. Three of the papers in this PhD-thesis are based on the outcome of TAVI at Skejby Hospital, in this high-risk population [I, II and IV]. Along with other international publications, they support TAVI as being superior to standard medical treatment, despite a high risk of prosthetic regurgitation. These results only apply to high-risk patients, who cannot undergo SAVR. The main purpose of this PhD study has been to investigate the quality of TAVI compared to SAVR, in order to define the indications for this new procedure. The article attached [V] describes a prospective clinical randomised controlled trial, between TAVI to SAVR in surgically amenable patients over 75 years of age with isolated aortic valve stenosis

  13. Evaluation of mitral valve replacement anchoring in a phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, A. Jonathan; Moore, John; Lang, Pencilla; Bainbridge, Dan; Campbell, Gordon; Jones, Doug L.; Guiraudon, Gerard M.; Peters, Terry M.

    2012-02-01

    Conventional mitral valve replacement requires a median sternotomy and cardio-pulmonary bypass with aortic crossclamping and is associated with significant mortality and morbidity which could be reduced by performing the procedure off-pump. Replacing the mitral valve in the closed, off-pump, beating heart requires extensive development and validation of surgical and imaging techniques. Image guidance systems and surgical access for off-pump mitral valve replacement have been previously developed, allowing the prosthetic valve to be safely introduced into the left atrium and inserted into the mitral annulus. The major remaining challenge is to design a method of securely anchoring the prosthetic valve inside the beating heart. The development of anchoring techniques has been hampered by the expense and difficulty in conducting large animal studies. In this paper, we demonstrate how prosthetic valve anchoring may be evaluated in a dynamic phantom. The phantom provides a consistent testing environment where pressure measurements and Doppler ultrasound can be used to monitor and assess the valve anchoring procedures, detecting pararvalvular leak when valve anchoring is inadequate. Minimally invasive anchoring techniques may be directly compared to the current gold standard of valves sutured under direct vision, providing a useful tool for the validation of new surgical instruments.

  14. Primary and Secondary Lymphatic Valve Development: Molecular, Functional and Mechanical Insights

    PubMed Central

    Bazigou, Eleni; Wilson, John T.; Moore, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Fluid homeostasis in vertebrates critically relies on the lymphatic system forming a hierarchical network of lymphatic capillaries and collecting lymphatics, for the efficient drainage and transport of extravasated fluid back to the cardiovascular system. Blind–ended lymphatic capillaries employ specialized junctions and anchoring filaments to encourage a unidirectional flow of the interstitial fluid into the initial lymphatic vessels, whereas collecting lymphatics are responsible for the active propulsion of the lymph to the venous circulation via the combined action of lymphatic muscle cells and intraluminal valves. Here we describe recent findings on molecular and physical factors regulating the development and maturation of these two types of valves and examine their role in tissue-fluid homeostasis. PMID:25086182

  15. Primary and secondary lymphatic valve development: molecular, functional and mechanical insights.

    PubMed

    Bazigou, Eleni; Wilson, John T; Moore, James E

    2014-11-01

    Fluid homeostasis in vertebrates critically relies on the lymphatic system forming a hierarchical network of lymphatic capillaries and collecting lymphatics, for the efficient drainage and transport of extravasated fluid back to the cardiovascular system. Blind-ended lymphatic capillaries employ specialized junctions and anchoring filaments to encourage a unidirectional flow of the interstitial fluid into the initial lymphatic vessels, whereas collecting lymphatics are responsible for the active propulsion of the lymph to the venous circulation via the combined action of lymphatic muscle cells and intraluminal valves. Here we describe recent findings on molecular and physical factors regulating the development and maturation of these two types of valves and examine their role in tissue-fluid homeostasis. PMID:25086182

  16. Plug valve

    DOEpatents

    Wordin, John J.

    1989-01-01

    An improved plug valve wherein a novel shape for the valve plug and valve chamber provide mating surfaces for improved wear characteristics. The novel shape of the valve plug is a frustum of a body of revolution of a curved known as a tractrix, a solid shape otherwise known as a peudosphere.

  17. Bioprinting a cardiac valve.

    PubMed

    Jana, Soumen; Lerman, Amir

    2015-12-01

    Heart valve tissue engineering could be a possible solution for the limitations of mechanical and biological prostheses, which are commonly used for heart valve replacement. In tissue engineering, cells are seeded into a 3-dimensional platform, termed the scaffold, to make the engineered tissue construct. However, mimicking the mechanical and spatial heterogeneity of a heart valve structure in a fabricated scaffold with uniform cell distribution is daunting when approached conventionally. Bioprinting is an emerging technique that can produce biological products containing matrix and cells, together or separately with morphological, structural and mechanical diversity. This advance increases the possibility of fabricating the structure of a heart valve in vitro and using it as a functional tissue construct for implantation. This review describes the use of bioprinting technology in heart valve tissue engineering. PMID:26254880

  18. Computed Flow Through An Artificial Heart Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stewart E.; Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin; Chang, I-Dee

    1994-01-01

    Report discusses computations of blood flow through prosthetic tilting disk valve. Computational procedure developed in simulation used to design better artificial hearts and valves by reducing or eliminating following adverse flow characteristics: large pressure losses, which prevent hearts from working efficiently; separated and secondary flows, which causes clotting; and high turbulent shear stresses, which damages red blood cells. Report reiterates and expands upon part of NASA technical memorandum "Computed Flow Through an Artificial Heart and Valve" (ARC-12983). Also based partly on research described in "Numerical Simulation of Flow Through an Artificial Heart" (ARC-12478).

  19. 83. Interior of 42 valve house; the motor and valve ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    83. Interior of 4-2 valve house; the motor and valve mechanism is identical to that in the 4-1 valve house. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  20. Innovations in prosthetic interfaces for the upper extremity.

    PubMed

    Kung, Theodore A; Bueno, Reuben A; Alkhalefah, Ghadah K; Langhals, Nicholas B; Urbanchek, Melanie G; Cederna, Paul S

    2013-12-01

    Advancements in modern robotic technology have led to the development of highly sophisticated upper extremity prosthetic limbs. High-fidelity volitional control of these devices is dependent on the critical interface between the patient and the mechanical prosthesis. Recent innovations in prosthetic interfaces have focused on several control strategies. Targeted muscle reinnervation is currently the most immediately applicable prosthetic control strategy and is particularly indicated in proximal upper extremity amputations. Investigation into various brain interfaces has allowed acquisition of neuroelectric signals directly or indirectly from the central nervous system for prosthetic control. Peripheral nerve interfaces permit signal transduction from both motor and sensory nerves with a higher degree of selectivity. This article reviews the current developments in each of these interface systems and discusses the potential of these approaches to facilitate motor control and sensory feedback in upper extremity neuroprosthetic devices. PMID:24281580

  1. Cognitive Neural Prosthetics

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Richard A.; Hwang, Eun Jung; Mulliken, Grant H.

    2010-01-01

    The cognitive neural prosthetic (CNP) is a very versatile method for assisting paralyzed patients and patients with amputations. The CNP records the cognitive state of the subject, rather than signals strictly related to motor execution or sensation. We review a number of high-level cortical signals and their application for CNPs, including intention, motor imagery, decision making, forward estimation, executive function, attention, learning, and multi-effector movement planning. CNPs are defined by the cognitive function they extract, not the cortical region from which the signals are recorded. However, some cortical areas may be better than others for particular applications. Signals can also be extracted in parallel from multiple cortical areas using multiple implants, which in many circumstances can increase the range of applications of CNPs. The CNP approach relies on scientific understanding of the neural processes involved in cognition, and many of the decoding algorithms it uses also have parallels to underlying neural circuit functions. PMID:19575625

  2. Corynebacterium Prosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cazanave, Charles; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Hanssen, Arlen D.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of Corynebacterium species may be challenging. Corynebacterium species are occasional causes of prosthetic joint infection (PJI), but few data are available on the subject. Based on the literature, C. amycolatum, C. aurimucosum, C. jeikeium, and C. striatum are the most common Corynebacterium species that cause PJI. We designed a rapid PCR assay to detect the most common human Corynebacterium species, with a specific focus on PJI. A polyphosphate kinase gene identified using whole-genome sequence was targeted. The assay differentiates the antibiotic-resistant species C. jeikeium and C. urealyticum from other species in a single assay. The assay was applied to a collection of human Corynebacterium isolates from multiple clinical sources, and clinically relevant species were detected. The assay was then tested on Corynebacterium isolates specifically associated with PJI; all were detected. We also describe the first case of C. simulans PJI. PMID:22337986

  3. Wide range force feedback for catheter insertion mechanism for use in minimally invasive mitral valve repair surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Roozbeh; Sokhanvar, Saeed; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran; Dargahi, Javad

    2009-02-01

    Mitral valve regurgitation (MR) is a condition in which heart's mitral valve does not close tightly, which allows blood to leak back into the left atrium. Restoring the dimension of the mitral-valve annulus by percutaneous intervention surgery is a common choice to treat MR. Currently, this kind of open heart annuloplasty surgery is being performed through sternotomy with cardiomyopathy bypass. In order to reduce trauma to the patient and also to eliminate bypass surgery, robotic assisted minimally invasive surgery (MIS) procedure, which requires small keyhole incisions, has a great potential. To perform this surgery through MIS procedure, an accurate computer controlled catheter with wide-range force feedback capabilities is required. There are three types of tissues at the site of operation: mitral leaflet, mitral annulus and left atrium. The maximum allowable applied force to these three types of tissue is totally different. For instance, leaflet tissue is the most sensitive one with the lowest allowable force capacity. For this application, therefore, a wide-range force sensing is highly required. Most of the sensors that have been developed for use in MIS applications have a limited range of sensing. Therefore, they need to be calibrated for different types of tissue. The present work, reports on the design, modeling and simulation of a novel wide-range optical force sensor for measurement of contact pressure between catheter tip and heart tissue. The proposed sensor offers a wide input range with a high resolution and sensitivity over this range. Using Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) technology, this sensor can be microfabricated and integrated with commercially available catheters.

  4. Comparison of hinge microflow fields of bileaflet mechanical heart valves implanted in different sinus shape and downstream geometry.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yee Han; Kabinejadian, Foad; Nguyen, Vinh-Tan; Su, Boyang; Yoganathan, Ajit P; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of the bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) hinge microflow fields is a crucial step in heart valve engineering. Earlier in vitro studies of BMHV hinge flow at the aorta position in idealized straight pipes have shown that the aortic sinus shapes and sizes may have a direct impact on hinge microflow fields. In this paper, we used a numerical study to look at how different aortic sinus shapes, the downstream aortic arch geometry, and the location of the hinge recess can influence the flow fields in the hinge regions. Two geometric models for sinus were investigated: a simplified axisymmetric sinus and an idealized three-sinus aortic root model, with two different downstream geometries: a straight pipe and a simplified curved aortic arch. The flow fields of a 29-mm St Jude Medical BMHV with its four hinges were investigated. The simulations were performed throughout the entire cardiac cycle. At peak systole, recirculating flows were observed in curved downsteam aortic arch unlike in straight downstream pipe. Highly complex three-dimensional leakage flow through the hinge gap was observed in the simulation results during early diastole with the highest velocity at 4.7 m/s, whose intensity decreased toward late diastole. Also, elevated wall shear stresses were observed in the ventricular regions of the hinge recess with the highest recorded at 1.65 kPa. Different flow patterns were observed between the hinge regions in straight pipe and curved aortic arch models. We compared the four hinge regions at peak systole in an aortic arch downstream model and found that each individual hinge did not vary much in terms of the leakage flow rate through the valves. PMID:25343223

  5. Check valve

    SciTech Connect

    Upton, H.A.; Garcia, P.

    1999-08-24

    A check valve for use in a GDCS of a nuclear reactor and having a motor driven disk including a rotatable armature for rotating the check valve disk over its entire range of motion is described. In one embodiment, the check valve includes a valve body having a coolant flow channel extending therethrough. The coolant flow channel includes an inlet end and an outlet end. A valve body seat is located on an inner surface of the valve body. The check valve further includes a disk assembly, sometimes referred to as the motor driven disc, having a counterweight and a disk shaped valve. The disk valve includes a disk base having a seat for seating with the valve body seat. The disk assembly further includes a first hinge pin member which extends at least partially through the disk assembly and is engaged to the disk. The disk valve is rotatable relative to the first hinge pin member. The check valve also includes a motor having a stator frame with a stator bore therein. An armature is rotatably positioned within the stator bore and the armature is coupled to the disk valve to cause the disk valve to rotate about its full range of motion. 5 figs.

  6. Check valve

    DOEpatents

    Upton, Hubert Allen; Garcia, Pablo

    1999-08-24

    A check valve for use in a GDCS of a nuclear reactor and having a motor driven disk including a rotatable armature for rotating the check valve disk over its entire range of motion is described. In one embodiment, the check valve includes a valve body having a coolant flow channel extending therethrough. The coolant flow channel includes an inlet end and an outlet end. A valve body seat is located on an inner surface of the valve body. The check valve further includes a disk assembly, sometimes referred to as the motor driven disc, having a counterweight and a disk shaped valve. The disk valve includes a disk base having a seat for seating with the valve body seat. The disk assembly further includes a first hinge pin member which extends at least partially through the disk assembly and is engaged to the disk. The disk valve is rotatable relative to the first hinge pin member. The check valve also includes a motor having a stator frame with a stator bore therein. An armature is rotatably positioned within the stator bore and the armature is coupled to the disk valve to cause the disk valve to rotate about its full range of motion.

  7. Native Triple Valve Endocarditis as Complication of Post-Abortal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Maturu, Mohan Venkata Sumedha; Devasia, Tom; Kareem, Hashir

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a highly morbid condition in pregnancy which poses both maternal and fetal risk. In majority of cases, endocarditis occurs only on single valve and usually occurs on valve with structural disease or prosthetic valve. Multi-valvular involvement is not common and so we report a case of native triple valve endocarditis as a complication of post abortal sepsis which was successfully treated medically.

  8. A second-time percutaneous aortic-valve implantation for bioprosthetic failure

    PubMed Central

    Codner, Pablo; Assali, Abid; Vaknin Assa, Hana; Kornowski, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We report a case of an 84-year-old man with a history of surgical aortic-valve replacement for chronic aortic regurgitation (AR) who later developed severe prosthetic valve AR. Subsequent treatment with a Corevalve® was unsuccessful with severe AR seen at 3 years after the valve-in-valve procedure. The patient was then successfully treated with a second catheter-based Corevalve® implantation. PMID:26401281

  9. A Case of Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia after Myxoma Excision and Mitral Valve Repair Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young Joo; Kim, Sang Pil; Shin, Ho-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia occurs in a diverse group of disorders, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and prosthetic cardiac valves. Hemolytic anemia also occurs as a rare complication after mitral valve repair. In this report, we describe a case of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia following myxoma excision and mitral valve repair, which was presented as hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:27081450

  10. A Case of Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia after Myxoma Excision and Mitral Valve Repair Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Joo; Kim, Sang Pil; Shin, Ho-Jin; Choi, Jung Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia occurs in a diverse group of disorders, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and prosthetic cardiac valves. Hemolytic anemia also occurs as a rare complication after mitral valve repair. In this report, we describe a case of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia following myxoma excision and mitral valve repair, which was presented as hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:27081450

  11. Heart valve surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur, but this is rare. There is always a risk of infection. Talk to your doctor before having any type of medical procedure. The clicking of mechanical heart valves may be heard in the chest. This is normal.

  12. Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the need for heart valve surgery. Percutaneous Interventions Balloon valvuloplasty is a procedure that may be used ... procedure works on valves in the same way balloon angioplasty does on the arteries. Like angioplasty, it ...

  13. Heart valve health, disease, replacement, and repair: a 25-year cardiovascular pathology perspective.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Frederick J; Gotlieb, Avrum I

    2016-01-01

    The past several decades have witnessed major advances in the understanding of the structure, function, and biology of native valves and the pathobiology and clinical management of valvular heart disease. These improvements have enabled earlier and more precise diagnosis, assessment of the proper timing of surgical and interventional procedures, improved prosthetic and biologic valve replacements and repairs, recognition of postoperative complications and their management, and the introduction of minimally invasive approaches that have enabled definitive and durable treatment for patients who were previously considered inoperable. This review summarizes the current state of our understanding of the mechanisms of heart valve health and disease arrived at through innovative research on the cell and molecular biology of valves, clinical and pathological features of the most frequent intrinsic structural diseases that affect the valves, and the status and pathological considerations in the technological advances in valvular surgery and interventions. The contributions of many cardiovascular pathologists and other scientists, engineers, and clinicians are emphasized, and potentially fruitful areas for research are highlighted. PMID:27242130

  14. Flow in a mechanical bileaflet heart valve at laminar and near-peak systole flow rates: CFD simulations and experiments.

    PubMed

    Ge, Liang; Leo, Hwa-Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2005-10-01

    Time-accurate, fully 3D numerical simulations and particle image velocity laboratory experiments are carried out for flow through a fully open bileaflet mechanical heart valve under steady (nonpulsatile) inflow conditions. Flows at two different Reynolds numbers, one in the laminar regime and the other turbulent (near-peak systole flow rate), are investigated. A direct numerical simulation is carried out for the laminar flow case while the turbulent flow is investigated with two different unsteady statistical turbulence modeling approaches, unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) and detached-eddy simulation (DES) approach. For both the laminar and turbulent cases the computed mean velocity profiles are in good overall agreement with the measurements. For the turbulent simulations, however, the comparisons with the measurements demonstrate clearly the superiority of the DES approach and underscore its potential as a powerful modeling tool of cardiovascular flows at physiological conditions. The study reveals numerous previously unknown features of the flow. PMID:16248308

  15. Are the Current Doppler Echocardiography Criteria Able to Discriminate Mitral Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valve Malfunction? An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Evin, Morgane; Guivier-Curien, Carine; Pibarot, Philippe; Kadem, Lyes; Rieu, Régis

    2016-05-01

    Malfunction of bileaflet mechanical heart valves in the mitral position could either be due to patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) or leaflet obstruction. The aim of this article is to investigate the validity of current echocardiographic criteria used for diagnosis of mitral prosthesis malfunction, namely maximum velocity, mean transvalvular pressure gradient, effective orifice area, and Doppler velocity index. In vitro testing was performed on a double activation left heart duplicator. Both PPM and leaflet obstruction were investigated on a St. Jude Medical Master. PPM was studied by varying the St. Jude prosthesis size (21, 25, and 29 mm) and stroke volume (70 and 90 mL). Prosthesis leaflet obstruction was studied by partially or totally blocking the movement of one valve leaflet. Mitral flow conditions were altered in terms of E/A ratios (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5) to simulate physiologic panel of diastolic function. Maximum velocity, effective orifice area, and Doppler velocity index are shown to be insufficient to distinguish normal from malfunctioning St. Jude prostheses. Doppler velocity index and effective orifice area were 1.3 ± 0.49 and 1.83 ± 0.43 cm(2) for testing conditions with no malfunction below the 2.2 and 2 cm(2) thresholds (1.19 cm(2) for severe PPM and 1.23 cm(2) for fully blocked leaflet). The mean pressure gradient reached 5 mm Hg thresholds for several conditions of severe PPM only (6.9 mm Hg and mean maximum velocity value: 183.4 cm/s) whereas such value was never attained in the case of leaflet obstruction. In the case of leaflet obstruction, the maximum velocity averaged over the nine pulsed-wave Doppler locations increased by 38% for partial leaflet obstruction and 75% for a fully blocked leaflet when compared with normal conditions. Current echocardiographic criteria might be suboptimal for the detection of bileaflet mechanical heart valve malfunction. Further developments and investigations are required in order

  16. Stem clutch for motor driven valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, D. E.; Wiltens, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    Development of mechanical device to reduce possibility of damage to motor driven needle valve is discussed. Mechanical clutch is employed to allow slippage when needle valve reaches limit of travel. Operation of system for various conditions is described.

  17. [Prosthetic dental alloys. 1].

    PubMed

    Quintero Engelmbright, M A

    1990-11-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements. PMID:2132464

  18. [Prosthetic dental alloys (2)].

    PubMed

    Quintero Englembright, M A

    1990-12-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements. PMID:2132470

  19. Standardized endpoint definitions for transcatheter aortic valve implantation clinical trials: a consensus report from the Valve Academic Research Consortium†

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Martin B.; Piazza, Nicolo; Nikolsky, Eugenia; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Cutlip, Donald E.; Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Krucoff, Mitchell W.; Mack, Michael; Mehran, Roxana; Miller, Craig; Morel, Marie-angèle; Petersen, John; Popma, Jeffrey J.; Takkenberg, Johanna J.M.; Vahanian, Alec; van Es, Gerrit-Anne; Vranckx, Pascal; Webb, John G.; Windecker, Stephan; Serruys, Patrick W.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To propose standardized consensus definitions for important clinical endpoints in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), investigations in an effort to improve the quality of clinical research and to enable meaningful comparisons between clinical trials. To make these consensus definitions accessible to all stakeholders in TAVI clinical research through a peer reviewed publication, on behalf of the public health. Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation may provide a worthwhile less invasive treatment in many patients with severe aortic stenosis and since its introduction to the medical community in 2002, there has been an explosive growth in procedures. The integration of TAVI into daily clinical practice should be guided by academic activities, which requires a harmonized and structured process for data collection, interpretation, and reporting during well-conducted clinical trials. Methods and results The Valve Academic Research Consortium established an independent collaboration between Academic Research organizations and specialty societies (cardiology and cardiac surgery) in the USA and Europe. Two meetings, in San Francisco, California (September 2009) and in Amsterdam, the Netherlands (December 2009), including key physician experts, and representatives from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and device manufacturers, were focused on creating consistent endpoint definitions and consensus recommendations for implementation in TAVI clinical research programs. Important considerations in developing endpoint definitions included (i) respect for the historical legacy of surgical valve guidelines; (ii) identification of pathophysiological mechanisms associated with clinical events; (iii) emphasis on clinical relevance. Consensus criteria were developed for the following endpoints: mortality, myocardial infarction, stroke, bleeding, acute kidney injury, vascular complications, and prosthetic valve performance. Composite

  20. Fast valve

    DOEpatents

    Van Dyke, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing.

  1. Fast valve

    DOEpatents

    Van Dyke, W.J.

    1992-04-07

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing. 4 figs.

  2. [Fibrinolytic therapy in thrombosis of a mitral valve prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Viedt, C; Mereles, D; Kübler, W; Kreuzer, J

    2000-08-01

    A 48-year-old woman presented with progressive dyspnea due to thrombosis of a mitral valve prosthesis. The patient had undergone mitral valve replacement (St. Jude Medical) six years prior to admission because of mitral stenosis (Class III); three years later the prosthesis had to be replaced (St. Jude Medical) because of valve thrombosis. At admission, transesophageal echocardiography showed a thrombus on the atrial side of the fixed valve leaflet and a thrombus (2.4 x 1.6 cm) floating from the left atrial roof. Because of the previous thoracotomies, thrombolysis was initiated despite the mobile thrombus with the attendant risk of embolization. Urokinase was infused in a dose to maintain the fibrinogen level around 100 mg/dl. After 24 h, the mean pressure gradient across the prosthetic mitral valve (measured by doppler echocardiography) had decreased from 23 to 11 mmHg. After 13 days of this modified thrombolytic regimen, the clinical symptoms of the patient had resolved and echocardiography showed a normal function of the prosthetic mitral valve without evidence of residual thrombosis. This patient demonstrates that prolonged cautious thrombolysis can be effective for the treatment of prosthetic valve thrombosis in hemodynamically moderately compromised patients. PMID:11013975

  3. Multi-port valve assembly

    DOEpatents

    Guggenheim, S. Frederic

    1986-01-01

    A multi-port fluid valve apparatus is used to control the flow of fluids through a plurality of valves and includes a web, which preferably is a stainless steel endless belt. The belt has an aperture therethrough and is progressed, under motor drive and control, so that its aperture is moved from one valve mechanism to another. Each of the valve mechanisms comprises a pair of valve blocks which are held in fluid-tight relationship against the belt. Each valve block consists of a block having a bore through which the fluid flows, a first seal surrounding the bore and a second seal surrounding the first seal, with the distance between the first and second seals being greater than the size of the belt aperture. In order to open a valve, the motor progresses the belt aperture to where it is aligned with the two bores of a pair of valve blocks, such alignment permitting a flow of the fluid through the valve. The valve is closed by movement of the belt aperture and its replacement, within the pair of valve blocks, by a solid portion of the belt.

  4. A prosthetic knee using magnetorhelogical fluid damper for above-knee amputees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jinhyuk; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-04-01

    A prosthetic knee for above-knee (AK) amputees is categorized into two types; namely a passive and an active type. The passive prosthetic knee is generally made by elastic materials such as carbon fiber reinforced composite material, titanium and etc. The passive prosthetic knee easy to walk. But, it has disadvantages such that a knee joint motion is not similar to ordinary people. On the other hand, the active prosthetic knee can control the knee joint angle effectively because of mechanical actuator and microprocessor. The actuator should generate large damping force to support the weight of human body. But, generating the large torque using small actuator is difficult. To solve this problem, a semi-active type prosthetic knee has been researched. This paper proposes a semi-active prosthetic knee using a flow mode magneto-rheological (MR) damper for AK amputees. The proposed semi-active type prosthetic knee consists of the flow mode MR damper, hinge and prosthetic knee body. In order to support weight of human body, the required energy of MR damper is smaller than actuator of active prosthetic leg. And it can control the knee joint angle by inducing the magnetic field during the stance phase.

  5. Depressurization valve

    DOEpatents

    Skoda, G.I.

    1989-03-28

    A depressurization valve for use in relieving completely the pressure in a simplified boiling water reactor is disclosed. The normally closed and sealed valve is provided with a valve body defining a conduit from an outlet of a manifold from the reactor through a valve seat. A closing valve disk is configured for fitting to the valve seat to normally close the valve. The seat below the disk is provided with a radially extending annulus extending a short distance into the aperture defined by the seat. The disk is correspondingly provided with a longitudinally extending annulus that extends downwardly through the aperture defined by the seat towards the high pressure side of the valve body. A ring shaped membrane is endlessly welded to the seat annulus and to the disk annulus. The membrane is conformed over the confronted surface of the seat and disk in a C-sectioned configuration to seal the depressurization valve against the possibility of weeping. The disk is held to the closed position by an elongate stem extending away from the high pressure side of the valve body. The stem has a flange configured integrally to the stem for bias by two springs. The first spring acts from a portion of the housing overlying the disk on the stem flange adjacent the disk. This spring urges the stem and attached disk away from the seat and thus will cause the valve to open at any pressure. A second spring-preferably of the Belleville variety-acts on a latch plate surrounding and freely moving relative to the end of the stem. This second spring overcomes the bias of the first spring and any pressure acting upon the disk. This Belleville spring maintains through its spring force the valve in the closed position. At the same time, the latch plate with its freedom of movement relative to the stem allows the stem to thermally expand during valve temperature excursion.

  6. Advances in upper extremity prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Zlotolow, Dan A; Kozin, Scott H

    2012-11-01

    Until recently, upper extremity prostheses had changed little since World War II. In 2006, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency responded to an increasing number of military amputees with the Revolutionizing Prosthetics program. The program has yielded several breakthroughs both in the engineering of new prosthetic arms and in the control of those arms. Direct brain-wave control of a limb with 22° of freedom may be within reach. In the meantime, advances such as individually powered digits have opened the door to multifunctional full and partial hand prostheses. Restoring sensation to the prosthetic limb remains a major challenge to full integration of the limb into a patient's self-image. PMID:23101609

  7. Percutaneous balloon dilatation of the mitral valve: an analysis of echocardiographic variables related to outcome and the mechanism of dilatation.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, G T; Weyman, A E; Abascal, V M; Block, P C; Palacios, I F

    1988-01-01

    Twenty two patients (four men, 18 women, mean age 56 years, range 21 to 88 years) with a history of rheumatic mitral stenosis were studied by cross sectional echocardiography before and after balloon dilatation of the mitral valve. The appearance of the mitral valve on the pre-dilatation echocardiogram was scored for leaflet mobility, leaflet thickening, subvalvar thickening, and calcification. Mitral valve area, left atrial volume, transmitral pressure difference, pulmonary artery pressure, cardiac output, cardiac rhythm, New York Heart Association functional class, age, and sex were also studied. Because there was some increase in valve area in almost all patients the results were classified as optimal or suboptimal (final valve area less than 1.0 cm2, final left atrial pressure greater than 10 mm Hg, or final valve area less than 25% greater than the initial area). The best multiple logistic regression fit was found with the total echocardiographic score alone. A high score (advanced leaflet deformity) was associated with a suboptimal outcome while a low score (a mobile valve with limited thickening) was associated with an optimal outcome. No other haemodynamic or clinical variables emerged as predictors of outcome in this analysis. Examination of pre-dilatation and post-dilatation echocardiograms showed that balloon dilatation reliably resulted in cleavage of the commissural plane and thus an increase in valve area. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 6 PMID:3190958

  8. Pannus Formation Leads to Valve Malfunction in the Tricuspid Position 19 Years after Triple Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Alskaf, Ebraham; McConkey, Hannah; Laskar, Nabila; Kardos, Attila

    2016-01-01

    The Medtronic ATS Open Pivot mechanical valve has been successfully used in heart valve surgery for more than two decades. We present the case of a patient who, 19 years following a tricuspid valve replacement with an ATS prosthesis as part of a triple valve operation following infective endocarditis, developed severe tricuspid regurgitation due to pannus formation. PMID:27355145

  9. Rothia prosthetic knee joint infection.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Manish N; Malhotra, Prashant

    2015-08-01

    Rothia species - Gram-positive pleomorphic bacteria that are part of the normal oral and respiratory flora - are commonly associated with dental cavities and periodontal disease although systemic infections have been described. We describe a 53-year-old female with rheumatoid arthritis complicated by prosthetic knee joint infection due to Rothia species, which was successfully treated by surgical removal of prosthesis and prolonged antimicrobial therapy. The issue of antibiotic prophylaxis before dental procedures among patients with prosthetic joint replacements is discussed. PMID:23357608

  10. A Prosthetic Memory: An Application of the Prosthetic Environment Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Roy S., Jr.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    A set of artifical reminders'' are developed to compensate for a profound memory deficit in a young brain damaged male. The prosthetic memory techniques are described, and his increase in functional level is documented. A report of a 15-month follow-up is included. (Author)

  11. Performance characteristics of anthropomorphic prosthetic hands.

    PubMed

    Belter, Joseph T; Dollar, Aaron M

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we set forth a review of performance characteristics for both common commercial prosthetics as well as anthropomorphic research devices. Based on these specifications as well as surveyed results from prosthetic users, ranges of hand attributes are evaluated and discussed. End user information is used to describe the performance requirements for prosthetic hands for clinical use. PMID:22275674

  12. Biomechanical design considerations for transradial prosthetic interface: A review.

    PubMed

    Sang, Yuanjun; Li, Xiang; Luo, Yun

    2016-03-01

    Traditional function and comfort assessment of transradial prostheses pay scant attention to prosthetic interface. With better understanding of the biomechanics of prosthetic interface comes better efficiency and safety for interface design; in this way, amputees are more likely to accept prosthetic usage. This review attempts to provide design and selection criteria of transradial interface for prosthetists and clinicians. Various transradial socket types in the literature were chronologically reviewed. Biomechanical discussion of transradial prosthetic interface design from an engineering point of view was also done. Suspension control, range of motion, stability, as well as comfort and safety of socket designs have been considered in varying degrees in the literature. The human-machine interface design should change from traditional "socket design" to new "interface design." From anatomy and physiology to biomechanics of the transradial residual limb, the force and motion transfer, together with comfort and safety, are the two main aspects in prosthetic interface design. Load distribution and transmission should mainly rely on achieving additional skeletal control through targeted soft tissue relief. Biomechanics of the residual limb soft tissues should be studied to find the relationship between mechanical properties and the comfort and safety of soft tissues. PMID:26759485

  13. Valve system incorporating single failure protection logic

    DOEpatents

    Ryan, Rodger; Timmerman, Walter J. H.

    1980-01-01

    A valve system incorporating single failure protective logic. The system consists of a valve combination or composite valve which allows actuation or de-actuation of a device such as a hydraulic cylinder or other mechanism, integral with or separate from the valve assembly, by means of three independent input signals combined in a function commonly known as two-out-of-three logic. Using the input signals as independent and redundant actuation/de-actuation signals, a single signal failure, or failure of the corresponding valve or valve set, will neither prevent the desired action, nor cause the undesired action of the mechanism.

  14. THERMALLY OPERATED VAPOR VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Dorward, J.G. Jr.

    1959-02-10

    A valve is presented for use in a calutron to supply and control the vapor to be ionized. The invention provides a means readily operable from the exterior of the vacuum tank of the apparatuss without mechanical transmission of forces for the quick and accurate control of the ionizing arc by a corresponding control of gas flow theretos thereby producing an effective way of carefully regulating the operation of the calutron. The invention consists essentially of a tube member extending into the charge bottle of a calutron devices having a poppet type valve closing the lower end of the tube. An electrical heating means is provided in the valve stem to thermally vary the length of the stem to regulate the valve opening to control the flow of material from the charge bottle.

  15. Control method for prosthetic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A control system and method for prosthetic devices is provided. The control system comprises a transducer for receiving movement from a body part for generating a sensing signal associated with that movement. The sensing signal is processed by a linearizer for linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part. The linearized sensing signal is normalized to be a function of the entire range of body part movement from the no-shrug position of the moveable body part. The normalized signal is divided into a plurality of discrete command signals. The discrete command signals are used by typical converter devices which are in operational association with the prosthetic device. The converter device uses the discrete command signals for driving the moveable portions of the prosthetic device and its sub-prosthesis. The method for controlling a prosthetic device associated with the present invention comprises the steps of receiving the movement from the body part, generating a sensing signal in association with the movement of the body part, linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part, normalizing the linear signal to be a function of the entire range of the body part movement, dividing the normalized signal into a plurality of discrete command signals, and implementing the plurality of discrete command signals for driving the respective moveable prosthesis device and its sub-prosthesis.

  16. Prosthetic Hand Lifts Heavy Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, James R.; Norton, William; Belcher, Jewell G.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand designed to enable amputee to lift diverse heavy objects like rocks and logs. Has simple serrated end effector with no moving parts. Prosthesis held on forearm by system of flexible straps. Features include ruggedness, simplicity, and relatively low cost.

  17. Rotational joint for prosthetic leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. C.; Owens, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Device is installed in standard 30 millimeter tubing used for lower leg prosthetics. Unit allows proper rotation (about 3 degrees) of foot relative to the hip, during normal walking or running. Limited rotational movement with restoring force results in a more natural gait.

  18. Simulation of the three-dimensional hinge flow fields of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve under aortic conditions.

    PubMed

    Simon, Hélène A; Ge, Liang; Borazjani, Iman; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2010-03-01

    Thromboembolic complications of bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHV) are believed to be due to detrimental stresses imposed on blood elements by the hinge flows. Characterization of these flows is thus crucial to identify the underlying causes for complications. In this study, we conduct three-dimensional pulsatile flow simulations through the hinge of a BMHV under aortic conditions. Hinge and leaflet geometries are reconstructed from the Micro-Computed Tomography scans of a BMHV. Simulations are conducted using a Cartesian sharp-interface immersed-boundary methodology combined with a second-order accurate fractional-step method. Physiologic flow boundary conditions and leaflet motion are extracted from the Fluid-Structure Interaction simulations of the bulk of the flow through a BMHV. Calculations reveal the presence, throughout the cardiac cycle, of flow patterns known to be detrimental to blood elements. Flow fields are characterized by: (1) complex systolic flows, with rotating structures and slow reverse flow pattern, and (2) two strong diastolic leakage jets accompanied by fast reverse flow at the hinge bottom. Elevated shear stresses, up to 1920 dyn/cm2 during systole and 6115 dyn/cm2 during diastole, are reported. This study underscores the need to conduct three-dimensional simulations throughout the cardiac cycle to fully characterize the complexity and thromboembolic potential of the hinge flows. PMID:19960368

  19. Slow opening valve. [valve design for shuttle portable oxygen system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drapeau, D. F. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A valve control is described having a valve body with an actuator stem and a rotating handle connected to the actuator stem by a differential drive mechanism which, during uniform movement of the handle in one direction, initially opens the valve at a relatively slow rate and, thereafter, complete the valve movement at a substantially faster rate. A series of stop rings are received about the body in frictional abutting relationship and serially rotated by the handle to uniformly resist handle movement independently of the extent of handle movement.

  20. Depressurization valve

    DOEpatents

    Skoda, George I.

    1989-01-01

    A depressurization valve for use in relieving completely the pressure in a simplified boiling water reactor is disclosed. The normally closed and sealed valve is provided with a valve body defining a conduit from an outlet of a manifold from the reactor through a valve seat. A closing valve disk is configured for fitting to the valve seat to normally close the valve. The seat below the disk is provided with a radially extending annulus extending a short distance into the aperture defined by the seat. The disk is correspondingly provided with a longitudinally extending annulus that extends downwardly through the aperture defined by the seat towards the high pressure side of the valve body. A ring shaped membrane is endlessly welded to the seat annulus and to the disk annulus. The membrane is conformed over the confronted surface of the seat and disk in a C-sectioned configuration to seal the depressurization valve against the possibility of weeping. The disk is held to the closed position by an elongate stem extending away from the high pressure side of the valve body. The stem has a flange configured integrally to the stem for bias by two springs. The first spring acts from a portion of the housing overlying the disk on the stem flange adjacent the disk. This spring urges the stem and attached disk away from the seat and thus will cause the valve to open at any pressure. A second spring--preferably of the Belleville variety--acts on a latch plate surrounding and freely moving relative to the end of the stem. This second spring overcomes the bias of the first spring and any pressure acting upon the disk. This Belleville spring maintains through its spring force the valve in the closed position. At the same time, the latch plate with its freedom of movement relative to the stem allows the stem to thermally expand during valve temperature excursion. The latch plate in surrounding the stem is limited in its outward movement by a boss attached to the stem at the end of

  1. Compact prosthetic hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, W. A.; Wiker, G. A.

    1977-01-01

    Device combines tilt, wrist-rotation, and grasping mechanisms in single housing. Main body is about 15 centimeters long and 7.5 centimeters wide. Reduced weight and increased flexibility result from redesign and rearrangement of components.

  2. Effect of hinge gap width of a St. Jude medical bileaflet mechanical heart valve on blood damage potential--an in vitro micro particle image velocimetry study.

    PubMed

    Jun, Brian H; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Yun, B Min; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-09-01

    The hinge regions of the bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV) can cause blood element damage due to nonphysiological shear stress levels and regions of flow stasis. Recently, a micro particle image velocimetry (μPIV) system was developed to study whole flow fields within BMHV hinge regions with enhanced spatial resolution under steady leakage flow conditions. However, global velocity maps under pulsatile conditions are still necessary to fully understand the blood damage potential of these valves. The current study hypothesized that the hinge gap width will affect flow fields in the hinge region. Accordingly, the blood damage potential of three St. Jude Medical (SJM) BMHVs with different hinge gap widths was investigated under pulsatile flow conditions, using a μPIV system. The results demonstrated that the hinge gap width had a significant influence during the leakage flow phase in terms of washout and shear stress characteristics. During the leakage flow, the largest hinge gap generated the highest Reynolds shear stress (RSS) magnitudes (~1000 N/m²) among the three valves at the ventricular side of the hinge. At this location, all three valves indicated viscous shear stresses (VSS) greater than 30 N/m². The smallest hinge gap exhibited the lowest level of shear stress values, but had the poorest washout flow characteristics among the three valves, demonstrating propensity for flow stasis and associated activated platelet accumulation potential. The results from this study indicate that the hinge is a critical component of the BMHV design, which needs to be optimized to find the appropriate balance between reduction in fluid shear stresses and enhanced washout during leakage flow, to ensure minimal thrombotic complications. PMID:24976188

  3. The development of the Starr-Edwards heart valve.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, A M

    1998-01-01

    Development of the Starr-Edwards heart valve marked a new era in the treatment of valvular heart disease. Until the development of the Starr-Edwards valve, there were no published reports of patients who had lived longer than 3 months with a prosthetic valve in the mitral position. This valve was the result of a unique partnership between a young surgeon, Dr. Albert Starr, and an experienced engineer, Mr. Lowell Edwards. Working as a team, these 2 men developed and successfully implanted the 1st Starr-Edwards valve within less than 2 years of their 1st meeting. Their key to success was their willingness and ability to make repeated modifications to their design to solve each clinical problem as it arose. Their constant focus on the clinical goal aided the rapid transformation of their design from a leaflet valve to a shielded ball valve, and finally to an unshielded ball valve suitable for implantation in a human being. Along the way, they abandoned the idea of imitating the appearance of native valves, in favor of developing valves that would be clinically successful. Their work has provided help and hope for patients who otherwise would have died from the complications of rheumatic heart disease and other valvular disorders for which valve replacement is the only treatment. Images PMID:9885105

  4. Surge-damping vacuum valve

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, Jack C.; Kelly, Benjamin E.

    1980-01-01

    A valve having a mechanism for damping out flow surges in a vacuum system which utilizes a slotted spring-loaded disk positioned adjacent the valve's vacuum port. Under flow surge conditions, the differential pressure forces the disk into sealing engagement with the vacuum port, thereby restricting the flow path to the slots in the disk damping out the flow surge.

  5. Valve-"Health"-Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Scott L.; Drouant, George J.

    2009-01-01

    A system that includes sensors and data acquisition, wireless data-communication, and data-processing subsystems has been developed as a means of both real-time and historical tracking of information indicative of deterioration in the mechanical integrity and performance of a highgeared ball valve or a linearly actuated valve that operates at a temperature between cryogenic and ambient.

  6. Nuclear radiation actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Schively, Dixon P.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  7. Evolution of penile prosthetic devices

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Arthur L.

    2015-01-01

    Penile implant usage dates to the 16th century yet penile implants to treat erectile dysfunction did not occur until nearly four centuries later. The modern era of penile implants has progressed rapidly over the past 50 years as physicians' knowledge of effective materials for penile prostheses and surgical techniques has improved. Herein, we describe the history of penile prosthetics and the constant quest to improve the technology. Elements of the design from the first inflatable penile prosthesis by Scott and colleagues and the Small-Carrion malleable penile prosthesis are still found in present iterations of these devices. While there have been significant improvements in penile prosthesis design, the promise of an ideal prosthetic device remains elusive. As other erectile dysfunction therapies emerge, penile prostheses will have to continue to demonstrate a competitive advantage. A particular strength of penile prostheses is their efficacy regardless of etiology, thus allowing treatment of even the most refractory cases. PMID:25763121

  8. Evolution of penile prosthetic devices.

    PubMed

    Le, Brian; Burnett, Arthur L

    2015-03-01

    Penile implant usage dates to the 16th century yet penile implants to treat erectile dysfunction did not occur until nearly four centuries later. The modern era of penile implants has progressed rapidly over the past 50 years as physicians' knowledge of effective materials for penile prostheses and surgical techniques has improved. Herein, we describe the history of penile prosthetics and the constant quest to improve the technology. Elements of the design from the first inflatable penile prosthesis by Scott and colleagues and the Small-Carrion malleable penile prosthesis are still found in present iterations of these devices. While there have been significant improvements in penile prosthesis design, the promise of an ideal prosthetic device remains elusive. As other erectile dysfunction therapies emerge, penile prostheses will have to continue to demonstrate a competitive advantage. A particular strength of penile prostheses is their efficacy regardless of etiology, thus allowing treatment of even the most refractory cases. PMID:25763121

  9. Control System for Prosthetic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A control system and method for prosthetic devices is provided. The control system comprises a transducer for receiving movement from a body part for generating a sensing signal associated with that of movement. The sensing signal is processed by a linearizer for linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part. The linearized sensing signal is normalized to be a function of the entire range of body part movement from the no-shrug position of the moveable body part through the full-shrg position of the moveable body part. The normalized signal is divided into a plurality of discrete command signals. The discrete command signals are used by typical converter devices which are in operational association with the prosthetic device. The converter device uses the discrete command signals for driving the moveable portions of the prosthetic device and its sub-prosthesis. The method for controlling a prosthetic device associated with the present invention comprises the steps of receiving the movement from the body part, generating a sensing signal in association with the movement of the body part, linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part, normalizing the linear signal to be a function of the entire range of the body part movement, dividing the normalized signal into a plurality of discrete command signals, and implementing the plurality of discrete command signals for driving the respective moveable prosthesis device and its sub-prosthesis.

  10. Bar-holding prosthetic limb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, Thomas W. (Inventor); Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A prosthetic device for below-the-elbow amputees is disclosed. The device has a removable effector, which is attached to the end of an arm cuff. The effector is comprised of a pair of C-shaped members that are oriented so as to face each other. Working in concert, the C-shaped members are able to hold a bar such as a chainsaw handle. A flat spring is fitted around the C-shaped members to hold them together.

  11. Assessment of the influence of the compliant aortic root on aortic valve mechanics by means of a geometrical model.

    PubMed

    Redaelli, A; Di Martino, E; Gamba, A; Procopio, A M; Fumero, R

    1997-12-01

    In recent years several researchers have suggested that the changes in the geometry and angular dimensions of the aortic root which occur during the cardiac cycle are functional to the optimisation of aortic valve function, both in terms of diminishing leaflet stresses and of fluid-dynamic behaviour. The paper presents an analytical parametric model of the aortic valve which includes the aortic root movement. The indexes used to evaluate the valve behaviour are the circumferential membrane stress and the stress at the free edge of the leaflet, the index of bending strain, the bending of the leaflet at the line attachment in the radial and circumferential directions and the shape of the conduit formed by the leaflets during systole. In order to evaluate the role of geometric changes in valve performance, two control cases were considered, with different reference geometric configuration, where the movement of the aortic root was ignored. The results obtained appear consistent with physiological data, especially with regard to the late diastolic phase and the early ejection phase, and put in evidence the role of the aortic root movement in the improvement of valve behaviour. PMID:9450254

  12. SLM Produced Hermetically Sealed Isolation Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a valve concept to replace traditional pyrotechnic driven isolation valves. This paper will describe the valve design and development process. The valve design uses a stem/wedge to support a disk inside the valve. That disk hermetically seals the pressurized fluids. A release mechanism holds the stem/wedge and a large spring in place. When required to open, a solenoid is energized and pulls the release mechanism allowing the spring to pull the stem/wedge away from the disk. Now the disk is unsupported and the pressure ruptures the disk allowing flow to the outlet of the valve. This paper will provide details of this design, describe the development testing, and show the results from the valve level tests performed. Also, a trade study is presented to show the advantages of this design to a conventional pyrotechnic based valve.

  13. SLM Produced Hermetically Sealed Isolation Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James

    2014-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a valve concept to replace traditional pyrotechnic-driven isolation valves. This paper will describe the valve design and development process. The valve design uses a stem/wedge to support a disk inside the valve. That disk hermetically seals the pressurized fluids. A release mechanism holds the stem/wedge and a large spring in place. When required to open, a solenoid is energized and pulls the release mechanism allowing the spring to pull the stem/wedge away from the disk. Now the disk is unsupported and the pressure ruptures the disk allowing flow to the outlet of the valve. This paper will provide details of this design, describe the development testing, and show the results from the valve level tests performed. Also, a trade study is presented to show the advantages of this design to a conventional pyrotechnic-based valve.

  14. Implications of Using Different Methods to Characterise Anticoagulant Control in Patients with Second Generation Mechanical Heart Valve Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentino, Francesca; Rogers, Chris A.; Bryan, Alan J.; Angelini, Gianni D.; Reeves, Barnaby C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Characterisation of anticoagulant control is fundamental to investigations of its association with clinical outcome. Anticoagulant control depends on several factors. This paper aims to illustrate the implications of different methods for measuring and analysing anticoagulant control in patients with second generation mechanical heart valve prostheses. Methods International normalised ratio (INR) data collected during the 10-year follow-up of a randomised controlled trial were analysed. We considered the influence of: 3 different target INR ranges; anticoagulant control expressed as the proportion of INR readings (PoR) vs. anticoagulant control follow-up time (PoT); 3 ways of describing the profile of anticoagulant control over time. Results Different target INR ranges dramatically influenced derived measures of anticoagulant control; the PoT within the target range varied from 88% for the widest to 28% for narrowest range. Overall distributions of PoR and PoT observations were similar but differed by up to ±20% for individuals; PoT exceeded PoR when control was good but was less than PoR when control was poor. Classifying PoT outside the target range showed that widely varying combinations of PoT too high and too low are possible across individuals. Conclusions Researchers' choices about methods for measuring and quantifying anticoagulant control markedly influence the values derived from INR readings. The use of different methods across studies makes it difficult or impossible to compare findings and to establish an evidence base for clinical practice. Methods for quantifying anticoagulant control should be standardised. PMID:24988447

  15. Perioperative Anticoagulation in Patients with Mechanical Heart Valves Undergoing Elective Surgery: Results of a Survey Conducted among Korean Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sehyun; Lim, Chang Young; Lee, Jong Seok; Park, Seonyang; Garcia, David; Crowther, Mark A.; Ageno, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The optimal perioperative anticoagulation management in patients on warfarin therapy is poorly defined due to the lack of randomized trials. Because guidelines are heterogeneous, it was hypothesized that "treatment strategies are not uniform in clinical practice". Between February 2003 and May 2003, a questionnaire with 4 different clinical scenarios was distributed to physicians by e-mail, or direct contact was made by a survey monitor. Two scenarios described the cases of patients with a mechanical heart valve (MHV) in the mitral position, with additional risk factors for a systemic embolism; one undergoing major (scenario 1) and the other minor surgery (scenario 3). Two scenarios described patients with an aortic MHV; one undergoing major (scenario 2) and the other minor (scenario 4) surgery. Different preoperative and postoperative management options were offered. The treatment options for all scenarios were the same. Of the 90 questionnaires distributed, 52 (57.8%) were returned. Hospitalization for full-dose intravenous unfractionated heparin (IV UH) was the most commonly selected strategy in the preoperative phase for scenarios 1 (59%), 2 (42%) and 3 (44%). In scenario 4, 34% chose IV UH. Outpatient, full-dose, subcutaneous UH or low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) was the most selected option in the postoperative phase for all scenarios, with the exception of number 4 (52.9% in scenario 1, 34% in scenario 2, 32%, in scenario 3 and 28% in scenario 4). Even among expert clinicians, the management of perioperative anticoagulation is heterogeneous. In particular, the definition of risk categories and the optimal intensity of antithrombotic drugs need to be defined by well-designed prospective studies. PMID:15744807

  16. Strategies and outcomes of periprocedural bridging therapy with low-molecular-weight heparin in patients with mechanical heart valves.

    PubMed

    Schulman, Jacqueline M; Majeed, Ammar; Mattsson, Eva; Schulman, Sam; Holmström, Margareta; Ågren, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Patients with mechanical heart valves (MHV) undergoing invasive procedures often receive periprocedural bridging with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH). The bridging strategies used in real-life and the predictors for bleeding and thrombosis are not well studied. We retrospectively assessed patients with MHV that underwent invasive procedures requiring vitamin K antagonist interruption and LMWH bridging. Thromboembolic and bleeding events occurring up to 30 days after the procedures were recorded. Predictors of major bleeding events (MBEs) were analyzed with logistic regression. We evaluated 547 patients with MHV who underwent 275 procedures during a 6.5-year period. Bridging with LMWH was used in 185 procedures in a total of 117 patients. Combined pre- and post-operative bridging was the most frequently employed (63 %). Doses of LMWH were prophylactic in 96 (52 %) of the procedures and therapeutic in 89 (48 %). The procedure-related bleeding risk was evaluated as high in 70 (38 %) and low in 115 (62 %) of the procedures. There was a trend to more frequent use of prophylactic doses (61 %) in high-risk surgery, and more therapeutic doses (53 %) in low-risk ones. There were 36 bleeding episodes, 21 (11 % of procedures) of which were classified as MBEs, but there were no thromboembolic events. Most MBEs (n = 14; 67 %) occurred in surgeries with high bleeding risk. In the multivariate analysis, the bleeding risk of the surgery itself was the only independent predictor for MBEs. For patients with MHV receiving perioperative bridging with LMWH, the major predictor for MBE is the bleeding risk of the surgery. PMID:25868460

  17. Variable Valve Actuation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Gutterman; A. J. Lasley

    2008-08-31

    Many approaches exist to enable advanced mode, low temperature combustion systems for diesel engines - such as premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI), Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) or other HCCI-like combustion modes. The fuel properties and the quantity, distribution and temperature profile of air, fuel and residual fraction in the cylinder can have a marked effect on the heat release rate and combustion phasing. Figure 1 shows that a systems approach is required for HCCI-like combustion. While the exact requirements remain unclear (and will vary depending on fuel, engine size and application), some form of substantially variable valve actuation is a likely element in such a system. Variable valve actuation, for both intake and exhaust valve events, is a potent tool for controlling the parameters that are critical to HCCI-like combustion and expanding its operational range. Additionally, VVA can be used to optimize the combustion process as well as exhaust temperatures and impact the after treatment system requirements and its associated cost. Delphi Corporation has major manufacturing and product development and applied R&D expertise in the valve train area. Historical R&D experience includes the development of fully variable electro-hydraulic valve train on research engines as well as several generations of mechanical VVA for gasoline systems. This experience has enabled us to evaluate various implementations and determine the strengths and weaknesses of each. While a fully variable electro-hydraulic valve train system might be the 'ideal' solution technically for maximum flexibility in the timing and control of the valve events, its complexity, associated costs, and high power consumption make its implementation on low cost high volume applications unlikely. Conversely, a simple mechanical system might be a low cost solution but not deliver the flexibility required for HCCI operation. After modeling more than 200 variations of the

  18. Polarized spatial frequency domain imaging of heart valve fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goth, Will; Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Allen, Alicia; Sacks, Michael S.; Tunnell, James W.

    2016-03-01

    Our group previously introduced Polarized Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (PSFDI), a wide-field, reflectance imaging technique which we used to empirically map fiber direction in porcine pulmonary heart valve leaflets (PHVL) without optical clearing or physical sectioning of the sample. Presented is an extended analysis of our PSFDI results using an inverse Mueller matrix model of polarized light scattering that allows additional maps of fiber orientation distribution, along with instrumentation permitting increased imaging speed for dynamic PHVL fiber measurements. We imaged electrospun fiber phantoms with PSFDI, and then compared these measurements to SEM data collected for the same phantoms. PHVL was then imaged and compared to results of the same leaflets optically cleared and imaged with small angle light scattering (SALS). The static PHVL images showed distinct regional variance of fiber orientation distribution, matching our SALS results. We used our improved imaging speed to observe bovine tendon subjected to dynamic loading using a biaxial stretching device. Our dynamic imaging experiment showed trackable changes in the fiber microstructure of biological tissue under loading. Our new PSFDI analysis model and instrumentation allows characterization of fiber structure within heart valve tissues (as validated with SALS measurements), along with imaging of dynamic fiber remodeling. The experimental data will be used as inputs to our constitutive models of PHVL tissue to fully characterize these tissues' elastic behavior, and has immediate application in determining the mechanisms of structural and functional failure in PHVLs used as bio-prosthetic implants.

  19. Impact testing of the residual limb: System response to changes in prosthetic stiffness.

    PubMed

    Boutwell, Erin; Stine, Rebecca; Gard, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Currently, it is unknown whether changing prosthetic limb stiffness affects the total limb stiffness and influences the shock absorption of an individual with transtibial amputation. The hypotheses tested within this study are that a decrease in longitudinal prosthetic stiffness will produce (1) a reduced total limb stiffness, and (2) reduced magnitude of peak impact forces and increased time delay to peak force. Fourteen subjects with a transtibial amputation participated in this study. Prosthetic stiffness was modified by means of a shock-absorbing pylon that provides reduced longitudinal stiffness through compression of a helical spring within the pylon. A sudden loading evaluation device was built to examine changes in limb loading mechanics during a sudden impact event. No significant change was found in the peak force magnitude or timing of the peak force between prosthetic limb stiffness conditions. Total limb stiffness estimates ranged from 14.9 to 17.9 kN/m but were not significantly different between conditions. Thus, the prosthetic-side total limb stiffness was unaffected by changes in prosthetic limb stiffness. The insensitivity of the total limb stiffness to prosthetic stiffness may be explained by the mechanical characteristics (i.e., stiffness and damping) of the anatomical tissue within the residual limb. PMID:27272982

  20. Carbon based prosthetic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T.; Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P.; Cook, S.D.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

  1. Mechanisms of Heart Block after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement – Cardiac Anatomy, Clinical Predictors and Mechanical Factors that Contribute to Permanent Pacemaker Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Young Lee, Mark; Chilakamarri Yeshwant, Srinath; Chava, Sreedivya; Lawrence Lustgarten, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a valuable, minimally invasive treatment option in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis at prohibitive or increased risk for conventional surgical replacement. Consequently, patients undergoing TAVR are prone to peri-procedural complications including cardiac conduction disturbances, which is the focus of this review. Atrioventricular conduction disturbances and arrhythmias before, during or after TAVR remain a matter of concern for this high-risk group of patients, as they have important consequences on hospital duration, short- and long-term medical management and finally on decisions of device-based treatment strategies (pacemaker or defibrillator implantation). We discuss the mechanisms of atrioventricular disturbances and characterise predisposing factors. Using validated clinical predictors, we discuss strategies to minimise the likelihood of creating permanent high-grade heart block, and identify factors to expedite the decision to implant a permanent pacemaker when the latter is unavoidable. We also discuss optimal pacing strategies to mitigate the possibility of pacing-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:26835105

  2. Circuit For Control Of Electromechanical Prosthetic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed circuit for control of electromechanical prosthetic hand derives electrical control signals from shoulder movements. Updated, electronic version of prosthesis, that includes two hooklike fingers actuated via cables from shoulder harness. Circuit built around favored shoulder harness, provides more dexterous movement, without incurring complexity of computer-controlled "bionic" or hydraulically actuated devices. Additional harness and potentiometer connected to similar control circuit mounted on other shoulder. Used to control stepping motor rotating hand about prosthetic wrist to one of number of angles consistent with number of digital outputs. Finger-control signals developed by circuit connected to first shoulder harness transmitted to prosthetic hand via sliprings at prosthetic wrist joint.

  3. [Heart valves after 22 years - good long-term function of aortic homograft, advanced impairment in function of atrioventricular valves].

    PubMed

    Michalski, Błazej; Chrzanowski, Lukasz; Krzemińska-Pakula, Maria; Kasprzak, Jarosław D

    2010-03-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old female patient with a history of aortic valve replacement, who was admitted to our hospital with symptoms and signs of decompensated heart failure (NYHA class III). Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed mitral valve and tricuspid valve regurgitation (III grade) with normal function of aortic valve homograft implanted 22 years ago. The patient underwent cardiosurgical mitral valve replacement and tricuspid valve annuloplasty with very good result. An aortic valve homograft may be the best alternative to a mechanical valves for a young female patients. PMID:20411462

  4. Development of a Prototype Over-Actuated Biomimetic Prosthetic Hand

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Matthew R.; Walter, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    The loss of a hand can greatly affect quality of life. A prosthetic device that can mimic normal hand function is very important to physical and mental recuperation after hand amputation, but the currently available prosthetics do not fully meet the needs of the amputee community. Most prosthetic hands are not dexterous enough to grasp a variety of shaped objects, and those that are tend to be heavy, leading to discomfort while wearing the device. In order to attempt to better simulate human hand function, a dexterous hand was developed that uses an over-actuated mechanism to form grasp shape using intrinsic joint mounted motors in addition to a finger tendon to produce large flexion force for a tight grip. This novel actuation method allows the hand to use small actuators for grip shape formation, and the tendon to produce high grip strength. The hand was capable of producing fingertip flexion force suitable for most activities of daily living. In addition, it was able to produce a range of grasp shapes with natural, independent finger motion, and appearance similar to that of a human hand. The hand also had a mass distribution more similar to a natural forearm and hand compared to contemporary prosthetics due to the more proximal location of the heavier components of the system. This paper describes the design of the hand and controller, as well as the test results. PMID:25790306

  5. Cinematics and sticking of heart valves in pulsatile flow test.

    PubMed

    Köhler, J; Wirtz, R

    1991-05-01

    The aim of the project was to develop laboratory test devices for studies of the cinematics and sticking behaviour of technical valve protheses. The second step includes testing technical valves of different types and sizes under static and dynamic conditions. A force-deflection balance was developed in order to load valve rims by static radial forces until sticking or loss of a disc (sticking- and clamping-mould point) with computer-controlled force deflection curves. A second deflection device was developed and used for prosthetic valves in the aortic position of a pulsatile mock circulation loop with simultaneous video-cinematography. The stiffness of technical valve rims varied between 0.20 (St. Jude) and about 1.0 N/micron (metal rim valves). The stiffness decreased significantly with increasing valve size. Sticking under pulsatile flow conditions was in good agreement with the static deflection measurements. Hence, valve sticking with increasing danger of thrombus formation is more likely with a less stiff valve rim. In the case of forces acting perpendicularly to the pendulum axis, the clamping mould-point of the valve can be reached, followed by disc dislodgement. PMID:1864654

  6. Pregnancy-induced remodeling of heart valves.

    PubMed

    Pierlot, Caitlin M; Moeller, Andrew D; Lee, J Michael; Wells, Sarah M

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated remodeling of aortic and mitral valves leaflets under the volume loading and cardiac expansion of pregnancy. Those valves' leaflets enlarge with altered collagen fiber architecture, content, and cross-linking and biphasic changes (decreases, then increases) in extensibility during gestation. This study extends our analyses to right-sided valves, with additional compositional measurements for all valves. Valve leaflets were harvested from nonpregnant heifers and pregnant cows. Leaflet structure was characterized by leaflet dimensions, and ECM composition was determined using standard biochemical assays. Histological studies assessed changes in cellular and ECM components. Leaflet mechanical properties were assessed using equibiaxial mechanical testing. Collagen thermal stability and cross-linking were assessed using denaturation and hydrothermal isometric tension tests. Pulmonary and tricuspid leaflet areas increased during pregnancy by 35 and 55%, respectively. Leaflet thickness increased by 20% only in the pulmonary valve and largely in the fibrosa (30% thickening). Collagen crimp length was reduced in both the tricuspid (61%) and pulmonary (42%) valves, with loss of crimped area in the pulmonary valve. Thermomechanics showed decreased collagen thermal stability with surprisingly maintained cross-link maturity. The pulmonary leaflet exhibited the biphasic change in extensibility seen in left side valves, whereas the tricuspid leaflet mechanics remained largely unchanged throughout pregnancy. The tricuspid valve exhibits a remodeling response during pregnancy that is significantly diminished from the other three valves. All valves of the heart remodel in pregnancy in a manner distinct from cardiac pathology, with much similarity valve to valve, but with interesting valve-specific responses in the aortic and tricuspid valves. PMID:26371175

  7. Role of vortices in cavitation formation in the flow at the closure of a bileaflet mitral mechanical heart valve.

    PubMed

    Li, Chi-Pei; Chen, Sheng-Fu; Lo, Chi-Wen; Lu, Po-Chien

    2012-03-01

    Bubble cavitation occurs in the flow field when local pressure drops below vapor pressure. One hypothesis states that low-pressure regions in vortices created by instantaneous valve closure and occluder rebound promote bubble formation. To quantitatively analyze the role of vortices in cavitation, we applied particle image velocimetry (PIV) to reduce the instantaneous fields into plane flow that contains information about vortex core radius, maximum tangential velocity, circulation strength, and pressure drop. Assuming symmetrical flow along the center of the St. Jude Medical 25-mm valve, flow fields downstream of the closing valve were measured using PIV in the mitral position of a circulatory mock loop. Flow measurements were made during successive time phases immediately following the impact of the occluder with the housing (O/H impact) at valve closing. The velocity profile near the vortex core clearly shows a typical Rankine vortex. The vortex strength reaches maximum immediately after closure and rapidly decreases at about 10 ms, indicating viscous dissipation; vortex strength also intensifies with rising pulse rate. The maximum pressure drop at the vortex center is approximately 20 mmHg, an insignificant drop relative to atmospheric vapor pressures, which implies vortices play a minor role in cavitation formation. PMID:22015913

  8. CFD simulation of a novel bileaflet mechanical heart valve prosthesis: an estimation of the Venturi passage formed by the leaflets.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Y; Medart, D; Hormes, M; Schmitz, C; Hamilton, K; Kwant, P B; Takatani, S; Schmitz-Rode, T; Steinseifer, U

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the flow characteristics of the novel Helmholtz-Institute Aachen Bileaflet (HIA-BL) heart valve prosthesis. The curved leaflets of the HIA-BL valve form a Venturi passage between the leaflets at peak systole. By narrowing the cross section the flow accelerates and the static pressure at the central passage decreases according to the Venturi effect. The low-pressure zone between the leaflets is expected to stabilize the leaflets in fully open position at peak systole. To investigate the Venturi passage, the flow fields of two valve geometries were investigated by CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics): one geometry exhibits curved leaflets resulting in a Venturi passage; the other geometry features straight leaflets. The flow profiles, pressure distribution and resulting torque of both passages were compared and investigated. Although flow profiles downstream of both valves were similar, the flow passages between the leaflets were different for the investigated leaflet geometries. The straight leaflet passage showed a large boundary layer separation zone near the leaflets and the lowest pressure at the leading edge of the leaflet. The Venturi passage showed a reduction of the boundary layer separation zones and the lowest pressure between the leaflets could be found in the narrowest flow cross section of the Venturi passage. Additionally, the resulting torque showed that the Venturi passage produced an opening momentum. The results demonstrate that the Venturi passage stabilizes the leaflets in open position at peak systole. PMID:17219353

  9. The Impact of Fluid Inertia on In Vivo Estimation of Mitral Valve Leaflet Constitutive Properties and Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Bark, David L; Dasi, Lakshmi P

    2016-05-01

    We examine the influence of the added mass effect (fluid inertia) on mitral valve leaflet stress during isovolumetric phases. To study this effect, oscillating flow is applied to a flexible membrane at various frequencies to control inertia. Resulting membrane strain is calculated through a three-dimensional reconstruction of markers from stereo images. To investigate the effect in vivo, the analysis is repeated on a published dataset for an ovine mitral valve (Journal of Biomechanics 42(16): 2697-2701). The membrane experiment demonstrates that the relationship between pressure and strain must be corrected with a fluid inertia term if the ratio of inertia to pressure differential approaches 1. In the mitral valve, this ratio reaches 0.7 during isovolumetric contraction for an acceleration of 6 m/s(2). Acceleration is reduced by 72% during isovolumetric relaxation. Fluid acceleration also varies along the leaflet during isovolumetric phases, resulting in spatial variations in stress. These results demonstrate that fluid inertia may be the source of the temporally and spatially varying stiffness measurements previously seen through inverse finite element analysis of in vivo data during isovolumetric phases. This study demonstrates that there is a need to account for added mass effects when analyzing in vivo constitutive relationships of heart valves. PMID:26416720

  10. Biomimetic actuators in prosthetic and rehabilitation applications.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, D G; Tsagarakis, N

    2002-01-01

    Where humans and mechanical systems operate in close proximity there is a need to provide drive systems that combine the positive attributes of conventional actuator design with a 'softer' safer interaction capacity. This is achieved by natural muscle, and engineering emulation of this functionality could have a significant benefits in many areas, but particularly the medical domain. This work will study the use of compliance regulated and controlled pairs of antagonistic pneumatic Muscle Actuators (pMAs) in two medical scenarios; i) The construction of dexterous prosthetic hands having a high power and low mass potential, ii) The construction of a power assist device that can be used to augment the strength of those suffering from degenerative muscle wasting diseases. PMID:12082215

  11. Modularity of Prosthetic Implants.

    PubMed

    Barrack

    1994-01-01

    The vast majority of total-joint-replacement components currently utilized are modular to some degree. Modularity reduces inventory and increases the surgeon's options in both primary and revision total-joint arthroplasty. Use of a modular interface, however, increases the risk of fretting, wear debris, and dissociation and mismatching of components. The use of modular heads in total hip replacement is firmly established. The occurrence of corrosion and fretting has been recognized, and most manufacturers have improved the quality of the interface to minimize these problems. Modular polyethylene liners also offer advantages, particularly in revision procedures, where the option of additional screw fixation remains important. Many uncemented acetabular components are inserted without screws, which may generate renewed interest in one-piece factory-preassembled components. The conformity, locking mechanism, and nonarticular interface of modular acetabular components have all been studied and improved. Modular tibial components offer additional flexibility in the performance of total knee replacement but introduce the risk of dissociation and increased polyethylene wear; in revision procedures, modularity provides a valuable option for dealing with bone loss and an additional method of fixation by means of press-fit stems. Modular humeral components offer a significant advantage with limited apparent risk; however, longer clinical experience is required to assess potential problems. PMID:10708990

  12. Problem: Heart Valve Regurgitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Problem: Heart Valve Regurgitation Updated:May 26,2016 What ... content was last reviewed May 2016. Heart Valve Problems and Disease • Home • About Heart Valves • Heart Valve ...

  13. Problem: Heart Valve Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Problem: Heart Valve Stenosis Updated:Aug 10,2016 About ... content was last reviewed May 2016. Heart Valve Problems and Disease • Home • About Heart Valves • Heart Valve ...

  14. [Mineralization of heart valves].

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, M; Pfitzner, R

    1992-01-01

    Mineralization (calcification) of heart valves (mitral, aortic and aortic bioprosthesis) have been analyzed using; histology, x-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning microscopy, atomic absorption and electron microprobe. Obtained results showed the presence of two type of mineralization. First type is represented by grains composed of hydroxyapatite containing admixture of carbonates. This mineralization is seen macroscopically. Second type of mineralization is possible to determine only using chemical methods. It is represented by biological structures containing amount of Ca, P and other elements higher then normal heart valves. This second type of the mineralization conducts to the changes of physical features of the tissue. Both types of calcification develops because of the defects of atomic structure of biological components of heart valves (mainly collagen). These defects show the presence of free atomic bindings i.e. electric potential. Because of this, they are able to react with surrounding free joints, starting calcification. Defects of biological structures of heart valves are the results of infections, mechanical destruction of the valves etc. Calcification may be stopped on different stages of its development: or as secret calcification or may pass to the stage seen as apatite grains. PMID:1342999

  15. Simpler valve for reciprocating engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akkerman, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Simpler design eliminating camshafts, cams, and mechanical springs should improve reliability of hydrazine powered reciprocating engines. Valve is expected to improve efficiency, and reduce weight of engines in range up to 50 horsepower.

  16. Novel Materials for Prosthetic Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragolta, Carolina I.; Morford, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Existing materials for prosthetic liners tend to be thick and airtight, causing perspiration to accumulate inside the liner and potentially causing infection and injury that reduce quality of life. The purpose of this project was to examine the suitability of aerogel for prosthetic liner applications. Three tests were performed on several types of aerogel to assess the properties of each material. Moisture vapor permeability was tested by incubating four aerogel varieties with an artificial sweat solution at 37.0 C and less than 20% relative humidity for 24 hours. Two aerogel varieties were eliminated from the study due to difficulties in handling the material, and further testing proceeded with Pyrogel in 2.0 and 6.0 mm thicknesses. Force distribution was tested by compressing samples under a load of 4448 N at a rate of 2.5 mm/min. Biofilm formation was tested in a high-shear CDC Biofilm Reactor. Results showed that 2.0 mm Pyrogel blanket allowed 55.7 plus or minus 28.7% of an artificial sweat solution to transpire, and 35.5 plus or minus 27.8% transpired through 6.0 mm Pyrogel blanket. Samples also outperformed the load-bearing capabilities of existing liner materials. No statistically significant difference was found between the two Pyrogel thicknesses for either moisture vapor permeability or force distribution. In addition, biofilm formation results showed no change between the two Pyrogel thicknesses. The breathability and load bearing properties of aerogel make it a suitable material for application to prosthetic liners.

  17. Rotationally actuated prosthetic helping hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G., Jr. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor); West, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A prosthetic device has been developed for below-the-elbow amputees. The device consists of a cuff, a stem, a housing, two hook-like fingers, an elastic band for holding the fingers together, and a brace. The fingers are pivotally mounted on a housing that is secured to the amputee's upper arm with the brace. The stem, which also contains a cam, is rotationally mounted within the housing and is secured to the cuff, which fits over the amputee's stump. By rotating the cammed stem between the fingers with the lower arm, the amputee can open and close the fingers.

  18. Compliant Prosthetic Or Robotic Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, James J.; Eklund, Wayne D.

    1989-01-01

    Rotation partly free and partly restrained by resilience and damping. Joint includes U-shaped x- and y-axis frames joined by cables that cross in at center piece. The y-axis frame rotates about y-axis on roller bearing within predetermined angular range. The y-axis frame rotates slightly farther when arm strikes stop, because cables can twist. This mimics compliant resistance of knee joint reaching limit of its forward or backward motion. Used in prosthetic device to replace diseased or damage human joint, or in robot linkage to limit movement and cushion overloads.

  19. Wear resistant valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Gerald S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A valve which is resistant to wear caused by particles trapped between the valve seat and the valve member or poppet when the valve closes, including an outlet for directing washing fluid at the valve seat and/or sealing face of the poppet and means for supplying pressured fluid to the outlet at the time when the valve is closing.

  20. Piezoelectric valve

    SciTech Connect

    Petrenko, Serhiy Fedorovich

    2013-01-15

    A motorized valve has a housing having an inlet and an outlet to be connected to a pipeline, a saddle connected with the housing, a turn plug having a rod, the turn plug cooperating with the saddle, and a drive for turning the valve body and formed as a piezoelectric drive, the piezoelectric drive including a piezoelectric generator of radially directed standing acoustic waves, which is connected with the housing and is connectable with a pulse current source, and a rotor operatively connected with the piezoelectric generator and kinematically connected with the rod of the turn plug so as to turn the turn plug when the rotor is actuated by the piezoelectric generator.

  1. 49 CFR 236.383 - Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. 236.383... Inspection and Tests § 236.383 Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. Valve locks on valves of the non-cut-off type shall be tested at least once every three months, and valves and valve magnets shall...

  2. 49 CFR 236.383 - Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. 236.383... Inspection and Tests § 236.383 Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. Valve locks on valves of the non-cut-off type shall be tested at least once every three months, and valves and valve magnets shall...

  3. 49 CFR 236.383 - Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. 236.383... Inspection and Tests § 236.383 Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. Valve locks on valves of the non-cut-off type shall be tested at least once every three months, and valves and valve magnets shall...

  4. 49 CFR 236.383 - Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. 236.383... Inspection and Tests § 236.383 Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. Valve locks on valves of the non-cut-off type shall be tested at least once every three months, and valves and valve magnets shall...

  5. 49 CFR 236.383 - Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. 236.383... Inspection and Tests § 236.383 Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. Valve locks on valves of the non-cut-off type shall be tested at least once every three months, and valves and valve magnets shall...

  6. Transluminal aortic valve placement. A feasibility study with a newly designed collapsible aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Moazami, N; Bessler, M; Argenziano, M; Choudhri, A F; Cabreriza, S E; Allendorf, J D; Rose, E A; Oz, M C

    1996-01-01

    Percutaneous stents are used in vascular applications in conjunction with angioplasty and in combination with graft material for repair of abdominal aneurysms. The authors have designed a collapsible bioprosthetic aortic valve for placement by a transluminal catheter technique. This trileaflet stent valve is composed of stainless steel and bovine pericardium. Stent valves, 23 and 29 mm, were tested in a pulse duplicator system with rigid rings from 21 to 31 mm in 2 mm increments. At a mean flow of 3.1 L/min (+/-0.7), normal systemic aortic pressure was generated with a transvalvular gradient of 14.9 +/- 7 mmHg (mean +/- SD). Regurgitation fraction ranged from 10 to 18% (mean 13.8 +/- 3%) in the best ring size. Valves with the best hemodynamic profile were used for implantation in three 70 kg pigs in an open chest model. The valve was collapsed in a 24 Fr catheter designed to allow slow, controlled release. After resection of the native leaflets, the new valve was placed in the subcoronary position. No additional sutures were used for securing the valve. Two animals were successfully weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass and maintained systemic pressures of 100/45 (+/-10) and 116/70 (+/-15) mmHg, respectively. Intraoperative color echocardiography revealed minimal regurgitation, central flow, full apposition of all leaflets, and no interference with coronary blood flow. Both animals were sacrificed after being off bypass for 2 hr. Postmortem examination revealed the valves to be securely anchored. The third animal was weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass but developed refractory ventricular fibrillation because of valve dislodgment due to structural failure. Although long term survival data are needed, development of a hemodynamically acceptable prosthetic aortic valve for transluminal placement is feasible. PMID:8944912

  7. Simulation of transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a patient-specific finite element approach.

    PubMed

    Auricchio, F; Conti, M; Morganti, S; Reali, A

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, heart valve failure has been treated adopting open-heart surgical techniques and cardiopulmonary bypass. However, over the last decade, minimally invasive procedures have been developed to avoid high risks associated with conventional open-chest valve replacement techniques. Such a recent and innovative procedure represents an optimal field for conducting investigations through virtual computer-based simulations: in fact, nowadays, computational engineering is widely used to unravel many problems in the biomedical field of cardiovascular mechanics and specifically, minimally invasive procedures. In this study, we investigate a balloon-expandable valve and we propose a novel simulation strategy to reproduce its implantation using computational tools. Focusing on the Edwards SAPIEN valve in particular, we simulate both stent crimping and deployment through balloon inflation. The developed procedure enabled us to obtain the entire prosthetic device virtually implanted in a patient-specific aortic root created by processing medical images; hence, it allows evaluation of postoperative prosthesis performance depending on different factors (e.g. device size and prosthesis placement site). Notably, prosthesis positioning in two different cases (distal and proximal) has been examined in terms of coaptation area, average stress on valve leaflets as well as impact on the aortic root wall. The coaptation area is significantly affected by the positioning strategy (- 24%, moving from the proximal to distal) as well as the stress distribution on both the leaflets (+13.5%, from proximal to distal) and the aortic wall (- 22%, from proximal to distal). No remarkable variations of the stress state on the stent struts have been obtained in the two investigated cases. PMID:23402555

  8. Expert statement: pneumothorax associated with endoscopic valve therapy for emphysema--potential mechanisms, treatment algorithm, and case examples.

    PubMed

    Valipour, Arschang; Slebos, Dirk-Jan; de Oliveira, Hugo G; Eberhardt, Ralf; Freitag, Lutz; Criner, Gerard J; Herth, Felix J F

    2014-01-01

    The use of endoscopically placed unidirectional valves for the treatment of emphysema is increasing. With better patient selection, there is also an increased likelihood of complications associated with the procedure, such as postprocedural pneumothorax. There is, however, little evidence of pneumothorax management in patients with severe COPD and emphysema. This report describes an expert recommendation that has been developed to outline pneumothorax management after valve placement to inform physicians and patients of the risk-benefit profile and to assist them in decision making. Skilled and aggressive pneumothorax management is necessary in this patient population, and by following these recommendations traumatic scenarios, prolonged drainage, extended hospitalizations, and/or surgery might be avoided in many cases. PMID:24777292

  9. Cochlear Implant Using Neural Prosthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shweta; Singh, Shashi kumar; Dubey, Pratik Kumar

    2012-10-01

    This research is based on neural prosthetic device. The oldest and most widely used of these electrical, and often computerized, devices is the cochlear implant, which has provided hearing to thousands of congenitally deaf people in this country. Recently, the use of the cochlear implant is expanding to the elderly, who frequently suffer major hearing loss. More cutting edge are artificial retinas, which are helping dozens of blind people see, and ìsmartî artificial arms and legs that amputees can maneuver by thoughts alone, and that feel more like real limbs.Research, which curiosity led to explore frog legs dancing during thunderstorms, a snail shapedorgan in the inner ear, and how various eye cells react to light, have fostered an understanding of how to ìtalkî to the nervous system. That understanding combined with the miniaturization of electronics and enhanced computer processing has enabled prosthetic devices that often can bridge the gap in nerve signaling that is caused by disease or injury.

  10. Wireless Microstimulators for Neural Prosthetics

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Mesut; Pikov, Victor

    2016-01-01

    One of the roadblocks in the field of neural prosthetics is the lack of microelectronic devices for neural stimulation that can last a lifetime in the central nervous system. Wireless multi-electrode arrays are being developed to improve the longevity of implants by eliminating the wire interconnects as well as the chronic tissue reactions due to the tethering forces generated by these wires. An area of research that has not been sufficiently investigated is a simple single-channel passive microstimulator that can collect the stimulus energy that is transmitted wirelessly through the tissue and immediately convert it into the stimulus pulse. For example, many neural prosthetic approaches to intraspinal microstimulation require only a few channels of stimulation. Wired spinal cord implants are not practical for human subjects because of the extensive flexions and rotations that the spinal cord experiences. Thus, intraspinal microstimulation may be a pioneering application that can benefit from submillimetersize floating stimulators. Possible means of energizing such a floating microstimulator, such as optical, acoustic, and electromagnetic waves, are discussed. PMID:21488815

  11. Reverse U aortotomy (Kırali incision) for aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Kırali, Kaan

    2016-06-01

    The presence of patent vein grafts on the proximal aorta may cause technical difficulties during reoperations for aortic valve replacement after previous coronary artery bypass surgery. A 65-year-old man underwent reoperation for aortic valve replacement two years after his first open heart surgery (valve-sparing aortic root replacement and aorta-right coronary artery saphenous vein graft). The aortotomy incision was started approximately 2 cm above the proximal anastomosis and continued down at both sides until the prosthetic graft. The reverse U aortotomy prevents unnecessary and risky manipulations of proximal anastomoses, provides perfect exposure, and can be used securely during reoperative aortic valve surgery. PMID:25759482

  12. Neural-Network Control Of Prosthetic And Robotic Hands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Theresa M.

    1991-01-01

    Electronic neural networks proposed for use in controlling robotic and prosthetic hands and exoskeletal or glovelike electromechanical devices aiding intact but nonfunctional hands. Specific to patient, who activates grasping motion by voice command, by mechanical switch, or by myoelectric impulse. Patient retains higher-level control, while lower-level control provided by neural network analogous to that of miniature brain. During training, patient teaches miniature brain to perform specialized, anthropomorphic movements unique to himself or herself.

  13. Excess flow shutoff valve

    DOEpatents

    Kiffer, Micah S.; Tentarelli, Stephen Clyde

    2016-02-09

    Excess flow shutoff valve comprising a valve body, a valve plug, a partition, and an activation component where the valve plug, the partition, and activation component are disposed within the valve body. A suitable flow restriction is provided to create a pressure difference between the upstream end of the valve plug and the downstream end of the valve plug when fluid flows through the valve body. The pressure difference exceeds a target pressure difference needed to activate the activation component when fluid flow through the valve body is higher than a desired rate, and thereby closes the valve.

  14. Floppy mitral valve/mitral valve prolapse/mitral valvular regurgitation: effects on the circulation.

    PubMed

    Boudoulas, H; Wooley, C F

    2001-01-01

    The floppy mitral valve prolapses into the left atrium in such a dynamic manner that the prolapsing floppy mitral valve becomes a space-occupying lesion within the left atrium. A significant result of the floppy mitral valve prolapsing into the left atrium during left ventricular systole is the development of a "third chamber" located between the mitral annulus and the prolapsing mitral valve leaflets. Since the blood in the third chamber does not contribute to forward stroke volume, the third chamber may have significant effects on stroke volume and cardiac output. The floppy mitral valve/mitral valve prolapse dynamics also affect left ventricular papillary muscle tension and traction, altering the patterns of left ventricular contraction and relaxation, activating papillary muscle and left ventricular stretch receptors, and contributing to the production of cardiac arrhythmias. Floppy mitral valve innervation patterns with distinct nerve terminals provide a neural basis for brain-heart interactions, augmented by mechanical stimuli from the prolapsing floppy mitral valve. With the onset of mitral valvular regurgitation, and gradual progression of the mitral valve regurgitation from mild, to moderate, to severe, alterations in left atrial and left ventricular chamber size and performance occur, resulting in left atrial and left ventricular myopathy. As a connective tissue disorder, floppy mitral valve/mitral valve prolapse may be associated with abnormal structural and elastic properties of the aorta, with resultant changes in aortic function. Progression of mitral valve regurgitation and the aging process also affect aortic function indices in an adverse manner. The phenomena associated with floppy mitral valve dysfunction, with prolapse of the mitral valve into the left atrium and the unique, resultant forms of mitral valve regurgitation, are dynamic in nature. As the long-term natural history of these interrelated phenomena is being clarified, it is apparent

  15. Rehand: Realistic electric prosthetic hand created with a 3D printer.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Sato, Ryo; Higashihara, Takanori; Ogasawara, Tsukasa; Kawashima, Noritaka

    2015-08-01

    Myoelectric prosthetic hands provide an appearance with five fingers and a grasping function to forearm amputees. However, they have problems in weight, appearance, and cost. This paper reports on the Rehand, a realistic electric prosthetic hand created with a 3D printer. It provides a realistic appearance that is same as the cosmetic prosthetic hand and a grasping function. A simple link mechanism with one linear actuator for grasping and 3D printed parts achieve low cost, light weight, and ease of maintenance. An operating system based on a distance sensor provides a natural operability equivalent to the myoelectric control system. A supporter socket allows them to wear the prosthetic hand easily. An evaluation using the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP) demonstrated that an amputee was able to operate various objects and do everyday activities with the Rehand. PMID:26736794

  16. Numerical simulation of the non-Newtonian blood flow through a mechanical aortic valve. Non-Newtonian blood flow in the aortic root

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vita, F.; de Tullio, M. D.; Verzicco, R.

    2016-04-01

    This work focuses on the comparison between Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood flows through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve in the aortic root. The blood, in fact, is a concentrated suspension of cells, mainly red blood cells, in a Newtonian matrix, the plasma, and consequently its overall behavior is that of a non-Newtonian fluid owing to the action of the cells' membrane on the fluid part. The common practice, however, assumes the blood in large vessels as a Newtonian fluid since the shear rate is generally high and the effective viscosity becomes independent of the former. In this paper, we show that this is not always the case even in the aorta, the largest artery of the systemic circulation, owing to the pulsatile and transitional nature of the flow. Unexpectedly, for most of the pulsating cycle and in a large part of the fluid volume, the shear rate is smaller than the threshold level for the blood to display a constant effective viscosity and its shear thinning character might affect the system dynamics. A direct inspection of the various flow features has shown that the valve dynamics, the transvalvular pressure drop and the large-scale features of the flow are very similar for the Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid models. On the other hand, the mechanical damage of the red blood cells (hemolysis), induced by the altered stress values in the flow, is larger for the non-Newtonian fluid model than for the Newtonian one.

  17. 42 CFR 414.228 - Prosthetic and orthotic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Prosthetic and orthotic devices. 414.228 Section... Payment for Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices, and Surgical Dressings § 414.228 Prosthetic and orthotic devices. (a) Payment rule. Payment is made on a lump-sum basis for prosthetic...

  18. 42 CFR 414.228 - Prosthetic and orthotic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Prosthetic and orthotic devices. 414.228 Section... Payment for Durable Medical Equipment and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.228 Prosthetic and orthotic devices. (a) Payment rule. Payment is made on a lump-sum basis for prosthetic and orthotic...

  19. 42 CFR 414.228 - Prosthetic and orthotic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Prosthetic and orthotic devices. 414.228 Section... Payment for Durable Medical Equipment and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.228 Prosthetic and orthotic devices. (a) Payment rule. Payment is made on a lump-sum basis for prosthetic and orthotic...

  20. 42 CFR 414.228 - Prosthetic and orthotic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prosthetic and orthotic devices. 414.228 Section... Durable Medical Equipment and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.228 Prosthetic and orthotic devices. (a) Payment rule. Payment is made on a lump-sum basis for prosthetic and orthotic devices subject...

  1. Toward patient-specific simulations of cardiac valves: state-of-the-art and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Votta, Emiliano; Le, Trung Bao; Stevanella, Marco; Fusini, Laura; Caiani, Enrico G; Redaelli, Alberto; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2012-01-01

    Recent computational methods enabling patient-specific simulations of native and prosthetic heart valves are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on two critical components of such methods: 1) anatomically realistic finite element models for simulating the structural dynamics of heart valves; and 2) fluid structure interaction methods for simulating the performance of heart valves in a patient specific beating left ventricle. It is shown that the significant progress achieved in both fronts paves the way toward clinically relevant computational models that can simulate the performance of a range of heart valves, native and prosthetic, in a patient-specific left heart environment. The significant algorithmic and model validation challenges that need to be tackled in the future to realize this goal are also discussed. PMID:23174421

  2. Self-cleaning skin-like prosthetic polymer surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, John T.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Shibata, Jason

    2012-03-27

    An external covering and method of making an external covering for hiding the internal endoskeleton of a mechanical (e.g., prosthetic) device that exhibits skin-like qualities is provided. The external covering generally comprises an internal bulk layer in contact with the endoskeleton of the prosthetic device and an external skin layer disposed about the internal bulk layer. The external skin layer is comprised of a polymer composite with carbon nanotubes embedded therein. The outer surface of the skin layer has multiple cone-shaped projections that provide the external skin layer with superhydrophobicity. The carbon nanotubes are preferably vertically aligned between the inner surface and outer surface of the external skin layer in order to provide the skin layer with the ability to transmit heat. Superhydrophobic powders may optionally be used as part of the polymer composite or applied as a coating to the surface of the skin layer to enhance superhydrophobicity.

  3. [Effect of prosthesis cleansing agent on the prosthetic base fungi].

    PubMed

    Temmer, K; Stipetić, D; Cekić-Arambasin, A; Kraljević, K

    1991-01-01

    Candida albicans and other fungi are frequently found in subjects wearing prostheses, especially in prostheses with poor hygiene, i.e. with accumulations of food, plaques and calculi. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of Corega extradent relative to fungi adhering to the prosthetic base. Results of the study showed the prosthesis hygiene to be substantially related to inflammation of palatal mucosa. The mean number of fungi per sq.cm of prosthetic base was 64 x 10(5). The number of fungi was redetermined after a two-day treatment with Corega extradent, with unchanged other habits of the prosthesis wearing and cleansing. The number of fungi decreased in all study subjects, the mean value of individual differences being 2238 times. In prostheses with a great number of fungi and extremely poor hygiene, the effect of Corega extradent was poorer, indicating the need of additional mechanical cleansing with a brush. PMID:1819938

  4. Smart prosthetics based on magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, J. David; Matthis, Wilfried; Toscano, James R.

    2001-06-01

    One of the most exciting new applications for magnetorheological fluid technology is that of real-time controlled dampers for use in advanced prosthetic devices. In such systems a small magnetorheological fluid damper is used to control, in real-time, the motion of an artificial limb based on inputs from a group of sensors. A 'smart' prosthetic knee system based on a controllable magnetorheological fluid damper was commercially introduced to the orthopedics and prosthetics market in 2000. The benefit of such an artificial knee is a more natural gait that automatically adapts to changing gait conditions.

  5. [The influence of hereditary thrombophilic mechanisms on the degree of permanent intravascular coagulation in patients with artificial heart valves].

    PubMed

    Vavilova, T V; Sirotkina, O V; Razorenov, G I; Razorenova, T S; Emanuél', V L; Gritsenko, V V; Orlovskiĭ, P I; Doĭnikov, D N; Sharafutdinov, V E; Karpov, S A; Kuznetsov, A A; Kadinskaia, M I

    2004-01-01

    The genotyping of 40 patients with artificial heart valves (AHV) was performed after prosthesis of the mitral and aotic valves with bicuspid AHV (Medinzh-2 and CarboMedics). The patients took phenylin and varfarin. The patients' genotype was estimated by the thrombophylic genes: factor V Leiden (FVL), prothrombin G20210A, methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase C677T, G/A--455FGB, 4G/5G PAI-1, PI A1/A2 GPIIIa. The genes determining the thrombocytic activity or the vascular wall state substantially influence the third degree of the intensity of the permanent intravascular coagulation (PIC-3) independent of the degree of correction of hemostasis of oral anticoagulants. The addition of anti-aggregants to therapy is the only that can normalize functional activity of thrombocytes in patients with AHV having such defects. The laboratory detection of the genetic defects is of great practical importance for the determination of risk groups of formation of PIC-3 and the strategy of antithrombotic protection of patients with AHV. PMID:15651704

  6. Self-Rupturing Hermetic Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Curtis E., Jr.; Sherrit, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    For commercial, military, and aerospace applications, low-cost, small, reliable, and lightweight gas and liquid hermetically sealed valves with post initiation on/off capability are highly desirable for pressurized systems. Applications include remote fire suppression, single-use system-pressurization systems, spacecraft propellant systems, and in situ instruments. Current pyrotechnic- activated rupture disk hermetic valves were designed for physically larger systems and are heavy and integrate poorly with portable equipment, aircraft, and small spacecraft and instrument systems. Additionally, current pyrotechnically activated systems impart high g-force shock loads to surrounding components and structures, which increase the risk of damage and can require additional mitigation. The disclosed mechanism addresses the need for producing a hermetically sealed micro-isolation valve for low and high pressure for commercial, aerospace, and spacecraft applications. High-precision electrical discharge machining (EDM) parts allow for the machining of mated parts with gaps less than a thousandth of an inch. These high-precision parts are used to support against pressure and extrusion, a thin hermetically welded diaphragm. This diaphragm ruptures from a pressure differential when the support is removed and/or when the plunger is forced against the diaphragm. With the addition of conventional seals to the plunger and a two-way actuator, a derivative of this design would allow nonhermetic use as an on/off or metering valve after the initial rupturing of the hermetic sealing disk. In addition, in a single-use hermetically sealed isolation valve, the valve can be activated without the use of potential leak-inducing valve body penetrations. One implementation of this technology is a high-pressure, high-flow-rate rupture valve that is self-rupturing, which is advantageous for high-pressure applications such as gas isolation valves. Once initiated, this technology is self

  7. Advanced upper limb prosthetic devices: implications for upper limb prosthetic rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Linda; Meucci, Marissa R; Lieberman-Klinger, Shana; Fantini, Christopher; Kelty, Debra L; Disla, Roxanne; Sasson, Nicole

    2012-04-01

    The number of catastrophic injuries caused by improvised explosive devices in the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars has increased public, legislative, and research attention to upper limb amputation. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has partnered with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and DEKA Integrated Solutions to optimize the function of an advanced prosthetic arm system that will enable greater independence and function. In this special communication, we examine current practices in prosthetic rehabilitation including trends in adoption and use of prosthetic devices, financial considerations, and the role of rehabilitation team members in light of our experiences with a prototype advanced upper limb prosthesis during a VA study to optimize the device. We discuss key challenges in the adoption of advanced prosthetic technology and make recommendations for service provision and use of advanced upper limb prosthetics. Rates of prosthetic rejection are high among upper limb amputees. However, these rates may be reduced with sufficient training by a highly specialized, multidisciplinary team of clinicians, and a focus on patient education and empowerment throughout the rehabilitation process. There are significant challenges emerging that are unique to implementing the use of advanced upper limb prosthetic technology, and a lack of evidence to establish clinical guidelines regarding prosthetic prescription and treatment. Finally, we make recommendations for future research to aid in the identification of best practices and development of policy decisions regarding insurance coverage of prosthetic rehabilitation. PMID:22464092

  8. Subvalvular pannus and thrombosis in a mitral valve prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gun Ha; Yang, Dong Hyun; Kang, Joon-Won; Kim, Dae-Hee; Jung, Sung-Ho; Lim, Tae-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old female underwent cardiac CT to evaluate prosthetic valve (PHV) dysfunction detected on echocardiography. A CT coronal and en face views of the mitral annular plane showed a low-density, mass-like lesion on the left atrial side of the PHV and a high-density, plate-like lesion on the left ventricular side of PHV. A repeat of the mitral valve replacement was performed, and preoperative CT findings of both the thrombus on the left atrial side and pannus formation on the LV side were confirmed in the operative findings. PMID:26452593

  9. Staying in dynamic balance on a prosthetic limb: A leg to stand on?

    PubMed

    Curtze, Carolin; Hof, At L; Postema, Klaas; Otten, Bert

    2016-06-01

    With the loss of a lower limb, amputees lack the active muscle empowered control of the ankle that is important for balance control. We examined single-leg stance on prosthesis vs. sound limb balancing on narrow ridges in transtibial amputees. When balancing on the prosthetic limb, the lateral displacement of the center of pressure was reduced and was compensated by an increase in counter-rotation. We show that single-leg stance on a prosthetic limb can be compared to balancing on a narrow ridge. Standing on a prosthetic limb involves the same balance mechanisms as balancing on narrow ridges of 40-mm to 20-mm width. Yet, the ability to balance on a narrow ridge with the sound limb was only a weak predictor for an amputee's ability to stand on the prosthetic limb. Balancing in single-leg stance on a prosthetic limb is not a common activity. The ability to compensate with the sound limb may therefore be functionally more important than the ability to stay in dynamic balance on the prosthetic limb. PMID:27052518

  10. Brain responses to acupuncture stimulation in the prosthetic hand of an amputee patient.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Seon; Jung, Won-Mo; Lee, Ye-Seul; Wallraven, Christian; Chae, Younbyoung

    2015-10-01

    This report describes the brain responses to acupuncture in an upper limb amputee patient. A 62-year-old male had previously undergone a lower left arm amputation following an electrical accident. Using functional MRI, we investigated brain responses to acupuncture stimulation in the aforementioned amputee under three conditions: (a) intact hand, (b) prosthetic hand (used by the patient), and (c) fake fabric hand. The patient described greater de qi sensation when he received acupuncture stimulation in his prosthetic hand compared to a fake hand, with both stimulations performed in a similar manner. We found enhanced brain activation in the insula and sensorimotor cortex in response to acupuncture stimulation in the amputee's prosthetic hand, while there was only minimal activation in the visual cortex in response to acupuncture stimulation in a fake hand. The enhanced brain responses to acupuncture stimulation of the patient's prosthetic hand might be derived from cortical reorganisation, as he has been using his prosthetic hand for over 40 years. Our findings suggest the possible use of acupuncture stimulation in a prosthetic hand as an enhanced sensory feedback mechanism, which may represent a new treatment approach for phantom limb pain. PMID:26033865

  11. Limb Loss in Children: Prosthetic Issues

    MedlinePlus

    ... Part 3 Prosthetic Issues for Children http://www.amputee-coalition.org/inmotion/may_jun_06/congenital_part3. ... 05/2009 Back to Top © Copyrighted by the Amputee Coalition . Local reproduction for use by Amputee Coalition ...

  12. Pregnancy in patients after valve replacement.

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, C; Doherty, P

    1976-01-01

    baby who died in the neonatal period. The baby born to the mother who did not receive anticoagulants has a hare-lip and talipes. Women with artificial valves can tolerate the haemodynamic load of pregnancy well, but there is an increased fetal wastage in patients taking oral anticoagulants. This is probably largely attributable to fetal haemorrhage but there is also a risk of malformation caused by a teratogenic effect of warfarin. Experience gained in non-pregnant patients suggests that withholding anticoagulatns in pregnant patients with prosthetic valves would usually be undersirable but warfarin should be avoided. The advantages of biological valves were apparent in this series. PMID:1008955

  13. Conical Seat Shut-Off Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farner, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    A moveable valve for controlling flow of a pressurized working fluid was designed. This valve consists of a hollow, moveable floating piston pressed against a stationary solid seat, and can use the working fluid to seal the valve. This open/closed, novel valve is able to use metal-to-metal seats, without requiring seat sliding action; therefore there are no associated damaging effects. During use, existing standard high-pressure ball valve seats tend to become damaged during rotation of the ball. Additionally, forces acting on the ball and stem create large amounts of friction. The combination of these effects can lead to system failure. In an attempt to reduce damaging effects and seat failures, soft seats in the ball valve have been eliminated; however, the sliding action of the ball across the highly loaded seat still tends to scratch the seat, causing failure. Also, in order to operate, ball valves require the use of large actuators. Positioning the metal-to-metal seats requires more loading, which tends to increase the size of the required actuator, and can also lead to other failures in other areas such as the stem and bearing mechanisms, thus increasing cost and maintenance. This novel non-sliding seat surface valve allows metal-to-metal seats without the damaging effects that can lead to failure, and enables large seating forces without damaging the valve. Additionally, this valve design, even when used with large, high-pressure applications, does not require large conventional valve actuators and the valve stem itself is eliminated. Actuation is achieved with the use of a small, simple solenoid valve. This design also eliminates the need for many seals used with existing ball valve and globe valve designs, which commonly cause failure, too. This, coupled with the elimination of the valve stem and conventional valve actuator, improves valve reliability and seat life. Other mechanical liftoff seats have been designed; however, they have only resulted in

  14. [Retromuscular prosthetic repair: experience from France].

    PubMed

    Flament, J B; Palot, J P; Lubrano, D; Levy-Chazal, N; Concé, J P; Marcus, C

    2002-10-01

    Large incisional hernias cannot be cured without prosthetic material. A large pore size prosthetic tissue seems to be the best alternative, since connective invasion of the mesh provides a very strong fixation of the prosthesis. In our view, the mesh should be placed in the rectus sheath, in a position we have described as "retromuscular prefascial". With this technique, a good result can be achieved in 98% of very large incisional hernias. PMID:12395165

  15. Prosthetic Tool For Holding Small Ferromagnetic Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Carden, James R.; Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    Tool attached to prosthetic hand or arm enables user to hold nails, screws, nuts, rivets, and other small ferromagnetic objects on small magnetic tip. Device adjusted to hold nail or screw at proper angle for hammering or for use of screwdriver, respectively. Includes base connector with threaded outer surface and lower male member inserted in standard spring-action, quick-connect/quick-disconnect wrist adapter on prosthetic hand or arm.

  16. Mitral Valve Prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Long Q-T Syndrome Marfan Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome Mitral Valve Prolapse Myocardial Bridge Myocarditis Obstructive Sleep Apnea Pericarditis ... Stroke Sudden Cardiac Arrest Valve Disease Vulnerable Plaque Mitral Valve Prolapse | Share Related terms: MVP, disease of the ...

  17. Mitral Valve Prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) occurs when one of your heart's valves doesn't work properly. The flaps of ... Migraine headaches Chest discomfort Most people who have mitral valve prolapse (MVP) don't need treatment because they ...

  18. Aortic Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Heart abnormalities that ... Disease Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Valve Disease Overview The human heart has ...

  19. Mitral Valve Prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problem: Pulmonary Valve Regurgitation Heart Valves and Infective Endocarditis • Risks, Signs and Symptoms • Accurate Diagnosis • Treatment Options • ... Surgery? Recovery Milestones Checklist | Spanish What Is Infective Endocarditis? | Spanish Interactive Treatment Guide Quiz yourself: Heart Valves ...

  20. Magnetically operated check valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G. (Inventor); Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A magnetically operated check valve is disclosed. The valve is comprised of a valve body and a movable poppet disposed therein. A magnet attracts the poppet to hold the valve shut until the force of fluid flow through the valve overcomes the magnetic attraction and moves the poppet to an unseated, open position. The poppet and magnet are configured and disposed to trap a magnetically attracted particulate and prevent it from flowing to a valve seating region.

  1. Pulmonary valve stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... valve pulmonary stenosis; Pulmonary stenosis; Stenosis - pulmonary valve; Balloon valvuloplasty - pulmonary ... water pills) Treat abnormal heartbeats and rhythms Percutaneous balloon pulmonary dilation (valvuloplasty) may be performed when no ...

  2. Fast-Acting Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojciechowski, Bogdan V. (Inventor); Pegg, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A fast-acting valve includes an annular valve seat that defines an annular valve orifice between the edges of the annular valve seat, an annular valve plug sized to cover the valve orifice when the valve is closed, and a valve-plug holder for moving the annular valve plug on and off the annular valve seat. The use of an annular orifice reduces the characteristic distance between the edges of the valve seat. Rather than this distance being equal to the diameter of the orifice, as it is for a conventional circular orifice, the characteristic distance equals the distance between the inner and outer radii (for a circular annulus). The reduced characteristic distance greatly reduces the gap required between the annular valve plug and the annular valve seat for the valve to be fully open, thereby greatly reducing the required stroke and corresponding speed and acceleration of the annular valve plug. The use of a valve-plug holder that is under independent control to move the annular valve plug between its open and closed positions is important for achieving controllable fast operation of the valve.

  3. Combined aortic and mitral valve replacement in an adult with Scheie's disease.

    PubMed

    Butman, S M; Karl, L; Copeland, J G

    1989-07-01

    Mitral, aortic, and coronary arterial disease have been described in the various mucopolysaccharidoses. We report the first successful combined aortic and mitral valve replacement in an adult female patient with severe aortic and mitral stenosis due to Scheie's syndrome, a mucopolysaccharide storage disease. Both annulae were of sufficient integrity for good prosthetic placement, and the patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery. PMID:2500310

  4. Perioperative management of patient with Bombay blood group undergoing mitral valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Priye, Shio; Sathyanarayan, J; Shivaprakash, S; Reddy, Durgaprasad

    2015-12-01

    Bombay red blood cell phenotype is an extremely rare blood type for which patients can receive only autologous or Bombay phenotype red blood cells. We report a case of stenotic mitral valve with Bombay phenotype who underwent minimal invasive right lateral thoracotomy for the replacement of the mitral valve. A male patient from Bangladesh presented to the hospital with New York Heart Association III symptoms. His medical evaluation revealed severe mitral valve stenosis and mild aortic valve regurgitation. The patient received erythropoietin, intravenous iron succinate and folic acid tablets. Autologous blood transfusion was carried out. The mitral valve was replaced with a prosthetic valve successfully. After weaning off from cardiopulmonary bypass, heparinisation was corrected with protamine. Post-operatively, the patient received autologous red blood cells. The patient recovered after 1-day of inotropic support with adrenaline and milrinone, and diuretics and was discharged on the 5(th) post-operative day. PMID:26903676

  5. Perioperative management of patient with Bombay blood group undergoing mitral valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Priye, Shio; Sathyanarayan, J; Shivaprakash, S; Reddy, Durgaprasad

    2015-01-01

    Bombay red blood cell phenotype is an extremely rare blood type for which patients can receive only autologous or Bombay phenotype red blood cells. We report a case of stenotic mitral valve with Bombay phenotype who underwent minimal invasive right lateral thoracotomy for the replacement of the mitral valve. A male patient from Bangladesh presented to the hospital with New York Heart Association III symptoms. His medical evaluation revealed severe mitral valve stenosis and mild aortic valve regurgitation. The patient received erythropoietin, intravenous iron succinate and folic acid tablets. Autologous blood transfusion was carried out. The mitral valve was replaced with a prosthetic valve successfully. After weaning off from cardiopulmonary bypass, heparinisation was corrected with protamine. Post-operatively, the patient received autologous red blood cells. The patient recovered after 1-day of inotropic support with adrenaline and milrinone, and diuretics and was discharged on the 5th post-operative day. PMID:26903676

  6. Peri-prosthetic fracture vibration testing

    SciTech Connect

    Cruce, Jesse R; Erwin, Jenny R; Remick, Kevin R; Cornwell, Phillip J; Menegini, R. Michael; Racanelli, Joe

    2010-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to establish a test setup and vibration analysis method to predict femoral stem seating and prevent bone fracture using accelerometer and force response data from an instrumented stem and impactor. This study builds upon earlier studies to identify a means to supplement a surgeon's tactile and auditory senses by using damage identification techniques normally used for civil and mechanical structures. Testing was conducted using foam cortical shell sawbones prepared for stems of different geometries. Each stem was instrumented with an accelerometer. Two impactor designs were compared: a monolithic impactor and a two-piece impactor, each with an integrated load cell and accelerometer. Acceleration and force measurements were taken in the direction of impaction. Comparisons between different methods of applying an impacting force were made, including a drop tower and a surgical hammer. The effect of varying compliance on the data was also investigated. The ultimate goal of this study was to assist in the design of an integrated portable data acquisition system capable of being used in future cadaveric testing. This paper will discuss the experimental setup and the subsequent results of the comparisons made between impactors, prosthetic geometries, compliances, and impact methods. The results of this study can be used for both future replicate testing as well as in a cadaveric environment.

  7. Flow-induced vibration of a steam control valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonezawa, Koichi; Ogawa, Ryohei; Ogi, Kanako; Takino, Tomofumi; Tsujimoto, Yoshinobu; Endo, Takahide; Tezuka, Kenichi; Morita, Ryo; Inada, Fumio

    2012-11-01

    Main steam control valves in power plants are required to operate underwide ranges of valve openings and pressure ratios. In the present paper, experimental and numerical investigations are conducted using rigid and flexible valve head supports to clarify the mechanisms of valve head vibrations that are caused by unsteady flows around the valve. The results obtained using the rigid support without valve head vibration show that the unsteady flow around the valve head causes pressure fluctuations on the valve head surface with random and impulsive wave forms. When using the flexible support, the valve head vibrates near the natural frequency of the valve head support system, and vibrations are excited around the operating conditions where the pressure fluctuation becomes greater when using the rigidly supported valve head. When the valve head vibration increases, the pressure fluctuation becomes periodic with the same frequency as the valve head vibration. The numerical results show that the response of the separated jet lags behind the valve head motion. As a result, the lateral fluid force adds negative damping on the vibration on the valve head.

  8. Artificial aortic valve dysfunction due to pannus and thrombus – different methods of cardiac surgical management

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkiewicz, Anna; Kośmider, Anna; Walczak, Andrzej; Zwoliński, Radosław; Jaszewski, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 60 000 prosthetic valves are implanted annually in the USA. The risk of prosthesis dysfunction ranges from 0.1% to 4% per year. Prosthesis valve dysfunction is usually caused by a thrombus obstructing the prosthetic discs. However, 10% of prosthetic valves are dysfunctional due to pannus formation, and 12% of prostheses are damaged by both fibrinous and thrombotic components. The authors present two patients with dysfunctional aortic prostheses who were referred for cardiac surgery. Different surgical solutions were used in the treatment of each case. Case study 1 The first patient was a 71-year-old woman whose medical history included arterial hypertension, stable coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and hypercholesterolemia; she had previously undergone left-sided mastectomy and radiotherapy. The patient was admitted to the Cardiac Surgery Department due to aortic prosthesis dysfunction. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed complete obstruction of one disc and a severe reduction in the mobility of the second. The mean transvalvular gradient was very high. During the operation, pannus covering the discs’ surface was found. A biological aortic prosthesis was reimplanted without complications. Case study 2 The second patient was an 87-year-old woman with arterial hypertension, persistent atrial fibrillation, and COPD, whose past medical history included gastric ulcer disease and ischemic stroke. As in the case of the first patient, she was admitted due to valvular prosthesis dysfunction. Preoperative transthoracic echocardiography revealed an obstruction of the posterior prosthetic disc and significant aortic regurgitation. Transesophageal echocardiography and fluoroscopy confirmed the prosthetic dysfunction. During the operation, a thrombus growing around a minor pannus was found. The thrombus and pannus were removed, and normal functionality of the prosthetic valve was restored

  9. BIOPROSTHETIC HEART VALVES OF THE FUTURE

    PubMed Central

    Manji, Rizwan A.; Ekser, Burcin; Menkis, Alan H.; Cooper, David K.C.

    2014-01-01

    Glutaraldehyde-fixed bioprosthetic heart valves (GBHVs), derived from pigs or cows, undergo structural valve deterioration (SVD) over time, with calcification and eventual failure. It is generally accepted that SVD is due to chemical processes between glutaraldehyde and free calcium ions in the blood. Valve companies have made significant progress in decreasing SVD from calcification through various valve chemical treatments. However, there are still groups of patients (e.g., children and young adults) that have accelerated SVD of GBHV. Unfortunately, these patients are not ideal patients for valve replacement with mechanical heart valve prostheses as they are at high long-term risk from complications of the mandatory anticoagulation that is required. Thus, there is no “ideal” heart valve replacement for children and young adults. GBHVs represent a form of xenotransplantation, and there is increasing evidence that SVD seen in these valves is at least in part associated with xenograft rejection. We review the evidence that suggests that xenograft rejection of GBHVs is occurring, and that calcification of the valve may be related to this rejection. Furthermore, we review recent research into the transplantation of live porcine organs in nonhuman primates that may be applicable to GBHVs, and consider the potential use of genetically-modified pigs as sources of bioprosthetic heart valves. PMID:24444036

  10. Miniature piezo electric vacuum inlet valve

    DOEpatents

    Keville, Robert F.; Dietrich, Daniel D.

    1998-03-24

    A miniature piezo electric vacuum inlet valve having a fast pulse rate and is battery operated with variable flow capability. The low power (<1.6 watts), high pulse rate (<2 milliseconds), variable flow inlet valve is utilized for mass spectroscopic applications or other applications where pulsed or continuous flow conditions are needed. The inlet valve also has a very minimal dead volume of less than 0.01 std/cc. The valve can utilize, for example, a 12 Vdc input/750 Vdc, 3 mA output power supply compared to conventional piezo electric valves which require preloading of the crystal drive mechanism and 120 Vac, thus the valve of the present invention is smaller by a factor of three.

  11. Miniature piezo electric vacuum inlet valve

    DOEpatents

    Keville, R.F.; Dietrich, D.D.

    1998-03-24

    A miniature piezo electric vacuum inlet valve having a fast pulse rate and is battery operated with variable flow capability is disclosed. The low power (<1.6 watts), high pulse rate (<2 milliseconds), variable flow inlet valve is utilized for mass spectroscopic applications or other applications where pulsed or continuous flow conditions are needed. The inlet valve also has a very minimal dead volume of less than 0.01 std/cc. The valve can utilize, for example, a 12 Vdc input/750 Vdc, 3 mA output power supply compared to conventional piezo electric valves which require preloading of the crystal drive mechanism and 120 Vac, thus the valve of the present invention is smaller by a factor of three. 6 figs.

  12. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  13. Microfluidic sieve valves

    SciTech Connect

    Quake, Stephen R; Marcus, Joshua S; Hansen, Carl L

    2015-01-13

    Sieve valves for use in microfluidic device are provided. The valves are useful for impeding the flow of particles, such as chromatography beads or cells, in a microfluidic channel while allowing liquid solution to pass through the valve. The valves find particular use in making microfluidic chromatography modules.

  14. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E.; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Kenneth J.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S.; Wilgen, John B.; Evans, Boyd Mccutchen

    2016-05-10

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  15. Liquid rocket valve components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A monograph on valves for use with liquid rocket propellant engines is presented. The configurations of the various types of valves are described and illustrated. Design criteria and recommended practices for the various valves are explained. Tables of data are included to show the chief features of valve components in use on operational vehicles.

  16. Rotary pneumatic valve

    DOEpatents

    Hardee, Harry C.

    1991-01-01

    A rotary pneumatic valve which is thrust balanced and the pneumatic pressure developed produces only radial loads on the valve cylinder producing negligible resistance and thus minimal torque on the bearings of the valve. The valve is multiplexed such that at least two complete switching cycles occur for each revolution of the cylinder spindle.

  17. SU-C-18C-02: Specifcation of X-Ray Projection Angles Which Are Aligned with the Aortic Valve Plane From a Planar Image of a Valvuloplasty Balloon Inflated Across the Aortic Valve

    SciTech Connect

    Fetterly, K; Mathew, V

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures provide a method to implant a prosthetic aortic valve via a minimallyinvasive, catheter-based procedure. TAVR procedures require use of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane to minimize prosthetic valve positioning error due to x-ray imaging parallax. The purpose of this work is to calculate the continuous range of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane from a single planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve. Methods: Computational methods to measure the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve were developed. Required inputs include a planar x-ray image of a known valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and specifications of x-ray imaging geometry from the DICOM header of the image. A-priori knowledge of the species-specific typical range of aortic orientation is required to specify the sign of the angle of the long axis of the balloon with respect to the x-ray beam. The methods were validated ex-vivo and in a live pig. Results: Ex-vivo experiments demonstrated that the angular orientation of a stationary inflated valvuloplasty balloon can be measured with precision less than 1 degree. In-vivo pig experiments demonstrated that cardiac motion contributed to measurement variability, with precision less than 3 degrees. Error in specification of x-ray geometry directly influences measurement accuracy. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve can be calculated precisely from a planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and known x-ray geometry. This method could be used to determine appropriate c-arm angular projections during TAVR procedures to minimize x-ray imaging parallax and thereby minimize prosthetic valve positioning errors.

  18. Usefulness of Cardiac Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Prosthetic Coronary Artery Graft with Interposition Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Wake, Ryotaro; Iwata, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Masashi; Doi, Atsushi; Sugioka, Kenichi; Otsuka, Ryo; Hozumi, Takeshi; Takemoto, Yasuhiko; Ehara, Shoichi; Hanatani, Akihisa; Muro, Takashi; Yoshiyama, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    An 80-year-old Japanese man was admitted with orthopnea and pitting edema of both lower legs. We diagnosed congestive heart failure (CHF) on the basis of a chest X-ray and an echocardiogram. An electrocardiogram showed a heart rate of 120 beats/min with atrial fibrillation rhythm (Af). The patient developed aortic valve failure and destruction of the base of right coronary artery (RCA) due to infectious endocarditis at 71 years of age. The patient underwent aortic valve replacement and coronary artery bypass grafting with an interposed graft with polyester vascular graft to RCA. The patient recovered from CHF after the 6 days of treatment with diuretics and verapamil. We confirmed the patency of coronary arteries and bypass grafts using a 64-slice cardiac computed tomography scan (CT) and diagnosed CHF due to Af. Here we describe the estimation of the prosthetic coronary artery graft patency with the interposition procedure using 64-slice cardiac CT. PMID:21079753

  19. Dual stage check valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, D. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A dual stage seat valve head arrangement is described which consists of a primary sealing point located between a fixed orifice seat and a valve poppet, and a secondary sealing point between an orifice poppet and a valve poppet. Upstream of the valve orifice is a flexible, convoluted metal diaphragm attached to the orifice poppet. Downstream of the valve orifice, a finger spring exerts a force against the valve poppet, tending to keep the valve in a closed position. The series arrangement of a double seat and poppet is able to tolerate small particle contamination while minimizing chatter by controlling throttling or metering across the secondary seat, thus preserving the primary sealing surface.

  20. Vacuum breaker valve assembly

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, J.L.; Upton, H.A.

    1999-04-27

    Breaker valve assemblies for a simplified boiling water nuclear reactor are described. The breaker valve assembly, in one form, includes a valve body and a breaker valve. The valve body includes an interior chamber, and an inlet passage extends from the chamber and through an inlet opening to facilitate transporting particles from outside of the valve body to the interior chamber. The breaker valve is positioned in the chamber and is configured to substantially seal the inlet opening. Particularly, the breaker valve includes a disk which is sized to cover the inlet opening. The disk is movably coupled to the valve body and is configured to move substantially concentrically with respect to the valve opening between a first position, where the disk completely covers the inlet opening, and a second position, where the disk does not completely cover the inlet opening. 1 fig.