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Sample records for mechanics fluids engineering

  1. Mechanical Engineering ME 3720 FLUID MECHANICS

    E-print Network

    Panchagnula, Mahesh

    Mechanical Engineering ME 3720 FLUID MECHANICS Pre-requisite: ME 2330 Co-requisite: ME 3210) to develop an understanding of the physical mechanisms and the mathematical models of fluid mechanics of fluid mechanics problems in engineering practice. The basic principles of fluid mechanics

  2. Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) Exam Fluid Mechanics Review

    E-print Network

    Provancher, William

    Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) Exam Fluid Mechanics Review Steven Burian Civil & Environmental Engineering March 22, 2013 #12;Morning (Fluid Mechanics) A. Flow measurement B. Fluid properties C. Fluid and mechanical energy balance B. Hydrostatic pressure C. Dimensionless numbers (e.g., Reynolds Number) D. Laminar

  3. MSME with depth in Fluid Mechanics The primary areas of fluid mechanics research at Michigan State University's Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Feeny, Brian

    MSME with depth in Fluid Mechanics The primary areas of fluid mechanics research at Michigan State Mechanics The MSME degree program for fluid mechanics is based around two graduate-level foundation courses offered through the Department of Mechanical Engineering (ME). These courses are ME 830 Fluid Mechanics I

  4. MSME with depth in Fluid Mechanics The primary areas of fluid mechanics research at Michigan State University's Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Feeny, Brian

    June 2006 MSME with depth in Fluid Mechanics The primary areas of fluid mechanics research Mechanics The MSME degree program for fluid mechanics is based around two graduate-level foundation courses offered through the Department of Mechanical Engineering (ME). These courses are ME 830 Fluid Mechanics I

  5. Washington State University Vancouver Mech 303 Fluid Mechanics Mechanical Engineering Fall 2013 Syllabus

    E-print Network

    Washington State University Vancouver Mech 303 Fluid Mechanics Mechanical Engineering Fall 2013 Syllabus 1 Fluid Mechanics Course: Mech 303, Fluid Mechanics, 3 Credits Prerequisite: Dynamics (Mech 212: VECS 105 Textbook: Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, 7 th Edition By Munson, Okiishi, Huebsch

  6. MSc in Mechanical Engineering Modelling Fluid Mechanics Specialization

    E-print Network

    Levente, Buttyn

    . Development of an axial fan of long throw. Visualisation of water coning in the model of an oil production SUBJECT DATA SHEET AND REQUIREMENTS last modified: 5th December 2013 FLOW MEASUREMENTS RAMLSTANI Mechanics Dr. Jen Mikls SUDA assistant professor Dept. of Fluid Mechanics Mrton BALCZ assistant research

  7. 6. Fluid mechanics: fluid statics; fluid dynamics

    E-print Network

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    1/96 6. Fluid mechanics: fluid statics; fluid dynamics (internal flows, external flows) Ron and Flow Engineering | 20500 Turku | Finland 2/96 6.1 Fluid statics bo Akademi University | Thermal and Flow Engineering | 20500 Turku | Finland #12;3/96 Fluid statics, static pressure /1 Two types

  8. Faculty of Engineering/LTH General syllabus for third-cycle studies in Fluid Mechanics

    E-print Network

    Faculty of Engineering/LTH General syllabus for third-cycle studies in Fluid Mechanics TEMMVFST amended 10 March 2014 (reg. no U 2014/214). 1. Subject description Fluid Mechanics includes theoretical (LIF), etc. Successful research within Fluid Mechanics requires good understanding of fundamental

  9. Centre Hydraulic Power Supply Unit University of Saskatchewan -Mechanical Engineering Fluid Power and Controls

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Centre Hydraulic Power Supply Unit University of Saskatchewan - Mechanical Engineering Fluid Power and Controls ID: FP0003 Rev: 001 Date: May 31, 2010 Page: 1 of 7 Centre Hydraulic Power Supply;Centre Hydraulic Power Supply Unit University of Saskatchewan - Mechanical Engineering Fluid Power

  10. Fluid Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  11. HYPower Hydraulic Power Supply Unit University of Saskatchewan -Mechanical Engineering Fluid Power and Controls

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    HYPower Hydraulic Power Supply Unit University of Saskatchewan - Mechanical Engineering Fluid Power and Controls ID: FP0002 Rev: 002 Date: May 31, 2010 Page: 1 of 7 Hydraulic Power Supply (HYPower-5462 Secondary Contact: #12;HYPower Hydraulic Power Supply Unit University of Saskatchewan - Mechanical

  12. East Hydraulic Power Supply Unit University of Saskatchewan -Mechanical Engineering Fluid Power and Controls

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    East Hydraulic Power Supply Unit University of Saskatchewan - Mechanical Engineering Fluid Power and Controls ID: FP0004 Rev: 001 Date: May 31, 2010 Page: 1 of 7 East Hydraulic Power Supply and Test Bench. Approved By: Primary Contact: Doug Bitner Rm: 1B15.1 966-5462 Secondary Contact: #12;East Hydraulic Power

  13. Non-Newtonian Granular Fluids: Simulation and Theory Engineering Mechanics Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Center for Advanced Scientific Research

    E-print Network

    Luding, Stefan

    Non-Newtonian Granular Fluids: Simulation and Theory M. Alam Engineering Mechanics Unit, Jawaharlal properties of granular fluids are probed via event-driven simulations of the inelastic hard-sphere model. We find that granular fluids support large normal stress differences for the whole range of densities

  14. NonNewtonian Granular Fluids: Simulation and Theory Engineering Mechanics Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Center for Advanced Scientific Research

    E-print Network

    Luding, Stefan

    NonNewtonian Granular Fluids: Simulation and Theory M. Alam Engineering Mechanics Unit, Jawaharlal properties of granular fluids are probed via eventdriven simulations of the inelastic hardsphere model. We find that granular fluids support large normal stress differences for the whole range of densities

  15. Fluid Mechanics The field of fluid mechanics, as it relates to preparation for the Ph.D. degree in Mechanical

    E-print Network

    Kim, John

    Fluid Mechanics The field of fluid mechanics, as it relates to preparation for the Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering or Aerospace Engineering, is concerned with the study of all aspects of fluid motion Requirements: Ph.D. minor field requirements in fluid mechanics may be satisfied by completion of MAE 250A

  16. MECH 386 INDUSTRIAL FLUID MECHANICS INDUSTRIAL FLUID MECHANICS

    E-print Network

    Phani, A. Srikantha

    MECH 386 INDUSTRIAL FLUID MECHANICS 1 INDUSTRIAL FLUID MECHANICS MECH 386 Contact information Dr This course is an introduction to industrial fluid mechanics. According to J. C. R. Hunt (a famous fluid mechanics specialist): "industrial fluid mechanics broadly covers those aspects of the design, manufacture

  17. Institute for Mechanical Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Institute of Mechanical Engineering has the objectives of supporting in Canada the following activities: improvement of vehicles, propulsion systems, and transportation-related facilities and services; improvements in the design and operation of maritime engineering works; protection of the environment; enhancement of energy flexibility; advancement of firms engaged in manufacturing and resource extraction; and related programs of other government departments and agencies. In 1990-91 the Institute, which had changed its name that year from the Division of Mechanical Engineering, consolidated its research activities from nine laboratories to six programs. Activities in these six programs are described: Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Coastal Zone Engineering, Cold Regions Engineering, Combustion and Fluids Engineering, Ground Transportation Technology, and Machinery and Engine Technology.

  18. School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-print Network

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    and BEng): Engineering Design, Manufacturing, Electronics, Dynamics, Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, Strength of Materials Aerospace Engineering (MEng and BEng): Aircraft Design, Aerodynamics, Flight Mechanics, Structures and Manufacturing Product Design Engineering (MEng and BEng): Materials, CAD

  19. STUDENTHANDBOOK Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    (Secondary): knowledge of attitude determination and control, space structures, orbital mechanics, and rocket2013-2014 STUDENTHANDBOOK Mechanical Engineering Aerospace Engineering Environmental Engineering Engineering Science #12;2 | P a g e Welcome to the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department

  20. Mechanics of granular-frictional-visco-plastic fluids in civil and mining engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alehossein, H.; Qin, Z.

    2013-10-01

    The shear stress generated in mine backfill slurries and fresh concrete contains both velocity gradient dependent and frictional terms, categorised as frictional viscous plastic fluids. This paper discusses application of the developed analytical solution for flow rate as a function of pressure and pressure gradient in discs, pipes and cones for such frictional Bingham-Herschel-Bulkley fluids. This paper discusses application of this continuum fluid model to industrial materials like mine and mineral slurries, backfills and fresh concrete tests.

  1. Lecture notes Introductory fluid mechanics

    E-print Network

    Malham, Simon J.A.

    Lecture notes Introductory fluid mechanics Simon J.A. Malham Simon J.A. Malham (15th September 2014 of fluid mechanics and along the way see lots of interesting applications. 2 Fluid flow, the Continuum are generally incompressible--a feature essential to all modern car braking mechanisms. Fluids can be further

  2. Enhancing the Connection to Undergraduate Engineering Students: A Hands-On and Team-Based Approach to Fluid Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Tie; Ford, Julie

    2015-01-01

    This article provides information about the integration of innovative hands-on activities within a sophomore-level Fluid Mechanics course at New Mexico Tech. The course introduces students to the fundamentals of fluid mechanics with emphasis on teaching key equations and methods of analysis for solving real-world problems. Strategies and examples

  3. Relativistic viscoelastic fluid mechanics

    E-print Network

    Masafumi Fukuma; Yuho Sakatani

    2011-09-01

    A detailed study is carried out for the relativistic theory of viscoelasticity which was recently constructed on the basis of Onsager's linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. After rederiving the theory using a local argument with the entropy current, we show that this theory universally reduces to the standard relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics in the long time limit. Since effects of elasticity are taken into account, the dynamics at short time scales is modified from that given by the Navier-Stokes equations, so that acausal problems intrinsic to relativistic Navier-Stokes fluids are significantly remedied. We in particular show that the wave equations for the propagation of disturbance around a hydrostatic equilibrium in Minkowski spacetime become symmetric hyperbolic for some range of parameters, so that the model is free of acausality problems. This observation suggests that the relativistic viscoelastic model with such parameters can be regarded as a causal completion of relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics. By adjusting parameters to various values, this theory can treat a wide variety of materials including elastic materials, Maxwell materials, Kelvin-Voigt materials, and (a nonlinearly generalized version of) simplified Israel-Stewart fluids, and thus we expect the theory to be the most universal description of single-component relativistic continuum materials. We also show that the presence of strains and the corresponding change in temperature are naturally unified through the Tolman law in a generally covariant description of continuum mechanics.

  4. Relativistic viscoelastic fluid mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2011-08-15

    A detailed study is carried out for the relativistic theory of viscoelasticity which was recently constructed on the basis of Onsager's linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. After rederiving the theory using a local argument with the entropy current, we show that this theory universally reduces to the standard relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics in the long time limit. Since effects of elasticity are taken into account, the dynamics at short time scales is modified from that given by the Navier-Stokes equations, so that acausal problems intrinsic to relativistic Navier-Stokes fluids are significantly remedied. We in particular show that the wave equations for the propagation of disturbance around a hydrostatic equilibrium in Minkowski space-time become symmetric hyperbolic for some range of parameters, so that the model is free of acausality problems. This observation suggests that the relativistic viscoelastic model with such parameters can be regarded as a causal completion of relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics. By adjusting parameters to various values, this theory can treat a wide variety of materials including elastic materials, Maxwell materials, Kelvin-Voigt materials, and (a nonlinearly generalized version of) simplified Israel-Stewart fluids, and thus we expect the theory to be the most universal description of single-component relativistic continuum materials. We also show that the presence of strains and the corresponding change in temperature are naturally unified through the Tolman law in a generally covariant description of continuum mechanics.

  5. Perspectives in Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Donald

    Distinguished authors discuss topics in physical oceanography, transonic aerodynamics, dynamics of vorticity, numerical simulation of turbulent flows, astrophysical jets, strange attractors, human-powered flight, and the fluid mechanics of the Old Faithful geyser and of the Mount St. Helens eruption of 1980. The authors deal with specific problems, but the emphasis is usually on the way that research is carried out at the edge of understanding, and often on the role of new techniques, instruments, and research strategies.

  6. Department of Mechanical Engineering The Application of Fluid Power to Meet the Needs of Surgical Robotics

    E-print Network

    Wu, Mingshen

    Robotics Devin R. Berg1, Perry Y. Li1, Arthur G. Erdman1, Tianhong Cui1, and Timothy P. Kinney2 1Department of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN Introduction Robotic surgery promises to produce continued development of a novel fluid powered robotic surgical platform. Unlike current robotic instruments in which a robot

  7. APSAPS--DFD09DFD09 Experimental Fluid Mechanics and

    E-print Network

    Wolberg, George

    APSAPS--DFD09DFD09 Experimental Fluid Mechanics and Aerodynamics Laboratory Department Experimental Fluid Mechanics and Aerodynamics Laboratory Department of Mechanical Engineering City College=dipole density D=E+P Matrix of piezoelectric coefficients #12;APSAPS--DFD09DFD09 Experimental Fluid Mechanics

  8. Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Mechatronics Engineering Minor

    E-print Network

    Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Mechatronics Engineering Minor Students pursuing a BSc in mechanical or manufacturing engineering have across the traditional engineering disciplines of manufacturing, mechanical, electrical

  9. & Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Chongwu

    as continuum and particulate uid mechanics, ight mechanics, propulsion, novel microelectromechanical systems > Develop new devices including satellites, aircraft and rocket components > Improve the safety of existing Materials Flight Mechanics & Propulsion Biomechanics Microscale Devices LEARN MORE: viterbi.usc.edu/ame #12

  10. Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Petroleum Engineering Minor

    E-print Network

    Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Petroleum Engineering Minor The Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering offers a minor in petroleum engineering within the mechanical engineering major the Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering are also open to students in the Department

  11. Selected topics of fluid mechanics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kindsvater, Carl E.

    1958-01-01

    The fundamental equations of fluid mechanics are specific expressions of the principles of motion which are ascribed to Isaac Newton. Thus, the equations which form the framework of applied fluid mechanics or hydraulics are, in addition to the equation of continuity, the Newtonian equations of energy and momentum. These basic relationships are also the foundations of river hydraulics. The fundamental equations are developed in this report with sufficient rigor to support critical examinations of their applicability to most problems met by hydraulic engineers of the Water Resources Division of the United States Geological Survey. Physical concepts are emphasized, and mathematical procedures are the simplest consistent with the specific requirements of the derivations. In lieu of numerical examples, analogies, and alternative procedures, this treatment stresses a brief methodical exposition of the essential principles. An important objective of this report is to prepare the user to read the literature of the science. Thus, it begins With a basic vocabulary of technical symbols, terms, and concepts. Throughout, emphasis is placed on the language of modern fluid mechanics as it pertains to hydraulic engineering. The basic differential and integral equations of simple fluid motion are derived, and these equations are, in turn, used to describe the essential characteristics of hydrostatics and piezometry. The one-dimensional equations of continuity and motion are defined and are used to derive the general discharge equation. The flow net is described as a means of demonstrating significant characteristics of two-dimensional irrotational flow patterns. A typical flow net is examined in detail. The influence of fluid viscosity is described as an obstacle to the derivation of general, integral equations of motion. It is observed that the part played by viscosity is one which is usually dependent on experimental evaluation. It follows that the dimensionless ratios known as the Euler, Froude, Reynolds, Weber, and Cauchy numbers are defined as essential tools for interpreting and using experimental data. The derivations of the energy and momentum equations are treated in detail. One-dimensional equations for steady nonuniform flow are developed, and the restrictions applicable to the equations are emphasized. Conditions of uniform and gradually varied flow are discussed, and the origin of the Chezy equation is examined in relation to both the energy and the momentum equations. The inadequacy of all uniform-flow equations as a means of describing gradually varied flow is explained. Thus, one of the definitive problems of river hydraulics is analyzed in the light of present knowledge. This report is the outgrowth of a series of short schools conducted during the spring and summer of 1953 for engineers of the Surface Water Branch, Water Resources Division, U. S. Geological Survey. The topics considered are essentially the same as the topics selected for inclusion in the schools. However, in order that they might serve better as a guide and outline for informal study, the arrangement of the writer's original lecture notes has been considerably altered. The purpose of the report, like the purpose of the schools which inspired it, is to build a simple but strong framework of the fundamentals of fluid mechanics. It is believed that this framework is capable of supporting a detailed analysis of most of the practical problems met by the engineers of the Geological Survey. It is hoped that the least accomplishment of this work will be to inspire the reader with the confidence and desire to read more of the recent and current technical literature of modern fluid mechanics.

  12. Quantitative, single shot, two-dimensional spontaneous Raman measurements for fluid mechanics and engine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyritsis, Dimitrios Constantinou

    Spontaneous Raman Scattering was used for quantitative, two-dimensional, single-shot measurements of species concentration in optically accessible confinements and in an experimental single-cylinder internal combustion engine. The study comprised three parts. In the first part, the technique was used for methane concentration measurements in a laminar jet issuing into compressed nitrogen (10 bar, 293 K). The injection Reynolds number was 550. Initial results showed unexpected structures in the acquired concentration profiles. Thus, the steadiness of the laminar flow was confirmed with high speed shadowgraph movies and laser induced fluorescence measurements. Eventually, it was proven that the structures were due to characteristics of the camera system. A technique was then devised for the proper acquisition and processing of data and spatial resolution of 500 mum was achieved. Methane number density equal to 12% of the number density of pure methane (0.247E+26 molecules/msp3) was then measured with a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 3. The measurements were compared with the results of direct numerical simulation of the flow field. In the second part, measurements in a laminar hydrogen jet were taken. Because of the reduced Raman signal of hydrogen, the incident laser power was increased by installing the pressurized chamber within the laser cavity. This yielded an increase in power by a factor of 2.5. For the measurement of the laser sheet intensity in the laser cavity, insertion of a fluorescent dye cell and Rayleigh scattering were used and evaluated comparatively. The precise location of the waist of the laser sheet was determined by trial and error. The spatial resolution of the measurements was 650 mum and a number density of 0.371E+26 hydrogen molecules/msp3 was measured with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The measurements were again compared with results of direct numerical simulation. In the third part, the feasibility of two-dimensional single-shot Spontaneous Raman measurements in an engine cylinder was established. Measurements of methane concentration after direct injection in the cylinder of an experimental single-cylinder engine were taken. The engine was not fired to avoid laser induced incandescence interference. The spatial resolution was limited to 800 mum by the thickness of the laser sheet. Fast mixing of the methane jet was documented but a precise evaluation of the equivalence ratio was beyond the resolution of this first attempt. Finally, existing hardware for data acquisition and algorithms for two dimensional data reduction were reviewed and recommendations were made for the extraction of quantitative information from two-dimensional, single-shot Spontaneous Raman signals which are weak and noisy.

  13. Applied Fluid Mechanics. Lecture Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Newton D.

    This set of lecture notes is used as a supplemental text for the teaching of fluid dynamics, as one component of a thermodynamics course for engineering technologists. The major text for the course covered basic fluids concepts such as pressure, mass flow, and specific weight. The objective of this document was to present additional fluids

  14. Respiratory fluid mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Grotberg, James B.

    2011-01-01

    This article covers several aspects of respiratory fluid mechanics that have been actively investigated by our group over the years. For the most part, the topics involve two-phase flows in the respiratory system with applications to normal and diseased lungs, as well as therapeutic interventions. Specifically, the topics include liquid plug flow in airways and at airway bifurcations as it relates to surfactant, drug, gene, or stem cell delivery into the lung; liquid plug rupture and its damaging effects on underlying airway epithelial cells as well as a source of crackling sounds in the lung; airway closure from capillary-elastic instabilities, as well as nonlinear stabilization from oscillatory core flow which we call the oscillating butter knife; liquid film, and surfactant dynamics in an oscillating alveolus and the steady streaming, and surfactant spreading on thin viscous films including our discovery of the GrotbergBorgasGaver shock. PMID:21403768

  15. Respiratory fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotberg, James B.

    2011-02-01

    This article covers several aspects of respiratory fluid mechanics that have been actively investigated by our group over the years. For the most part, the topics involve two-phase flows in the respiratory system with applications to normal and diseased lungs, as well as therapeutic interventions. Specifically, the topics include liquid plug flow in airways and at airway bifurcations as it relates to surfactant, drug, gene, or stem cell delivery into the lung; liquid plug rupture and its damaging effects on underlying airway epithelial cells as well as a source of crackling sounds in the lung; airway closure from "capillary-elastic instabilities," as well as nonlinear stabilization from oscillatory core flow which we call the "oscillating butter knife;" liquid film, and surfactant dynamics in an oscillating alveolus and the steady streaming, and surfactant spreading on thin viscous films including our discovery of the Grotberg-Borgas-Gaver shock.

  16. School of Engineering Mechanical, Aerospace & Nuclear Engineering

    E-print Network

    McLaughlin, Joyce R.

    School of Engineering Mechanical, Aerospace & Nuclear Engineering Undergraduate Handbook CLASS OF MECHANICAL, AEROSPACE AND NUCLEAR ENGINEERING (MANE) ................................................1 MANE .............................................................................................................................................................1 CAREERS IN ENGINEERING

  17. Start Up Research Effort in Fluid Mechanics. Advanced Methods for Acoustic and Thrust Benefits for Aircraft Engine Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Samuel G.; Gilinsky, Mikhail M.

    1997-01-01

    In accordance with the project plan for the report period in the proposal titled above, HU and FML teams investigated two sets of concepts for reduction of noise and improvement in efficiency for jet exhaust nozzles of aircraft engines and screws for mixers, fans, propellers and boats. The main achievements in the report period are: (a) Publication of the paper in the AIAA Journal, which described our concepts and some results. (b) The Award in the Civil Research and Development Foundation (CRDF) competition. This 2 year grant for Hampton University (HU) and Central AeroHydrodynamic Institute (TSAGI, Moscow, Russia) supports the research implementation under the current NASA FAR grant. (c) Selection for funding by NASA HQ review panel of the Partnership Awards Concept Paper. This two year grant also will support our current FAR grant. (d) Publication of a Mobius Strip concept in NASA Technical Briefs, June, 1996, and a great interest of many industrial companies in this invention. Successful experimental results with the Mobius shaped screw for mixers, which save more than 30% of the electric power by comparison with the standard screws. Creation of the scientific-popular video-film which can be used for commercial and educational purposes. (e) Organization work, joint meetings and discussions of the NASA LARC JNL Team and HU professors and administration for the solution of actual problems and effective work of the Fluid Mechanics Laboratory at Hampton University. In this report the main designs are enumerated. It also contains for both concept sets: (1) the statement of the problem for each design, some results, publications, inventions, patents, our vision for continuation of this research, and (2) present and expected problems in the future.

  18. Mechanical Engineering David Sumner

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    ME 251 Engineering Analysis I RCM 300 Effective Professional Communication #12;ME Program 3rd YearMechanical Engineering David Sumner david.sumner@usask.ca #12;Mechanical Engineering? Design, production and use of mechanical systems that control and transform energy Focused on engineering systems

  19. A Design-Oriented Approach to the Integration of Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, and Heat Transfer in the Undergraduate Mechanical Engineering Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whale, MacMurray D.; Cravalho, Ernest G.

    This paper describes two parallel efforts that attempt to implement a new approach to the teaching of thermal fluids engineering. In one setting, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the subject matter is integrated into a single year-long subject at the introductory level. In the second setting, at Victoria (British Columbia,

  20. On the fluid mechanics of fires

    SciTech Connect

    TIESZEN,SHELDON R.

    2000-02-29

    Fluid mechanics research related to fire is reviewed with focus on canonical flows, multiphysics coupling aspects, experimental and numerical techniques. Fire is a low-speed, chemically-reacting, flow in which buoyancy plans an important role. Fire research has focused on two canonical flows, the reacting boundary-layer and the reacting free plume. There is rich, multi-lateral, bi-directional, coupling among fluid mechanics and scalar transport, combustion, and radiation. There is only a limited experimental fluid-mechanics database for fire due to measurement difficulties in the harsh environment, and the focus within the fire community on thermal/chemical consequences. Increasingly, computational fluid dynamics techniques are being used to provide engineering guidance on thermal/chemical consequences and to study fire phenomenology.

  1. Physics of Mechanical, Gaseous, and Fluid Systems. A Study Guide of the Science and Engineering Technician Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Peggy; And Others

    This study guide is part of a program of studies entitled Science and Engineering Technician (SET) Curriculum. The SET Curriculum integrates elements from the disciplines of chemistry, physics, mathematics, mechanical technology, and electronic technology. The objective of this curriculum development project is to train technicians in the use of

  2. Nanoscale Fluid Mechanics and Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X; Xu, BX; Liu, L

    2014-05-29

    Under nanoconfinement, fluid molecules and ions exhibit radically different configurations, properties, and energetics from those of their bulk counterparts. These unique characteristics of nanoconfined fluids, along with the unconventional interactions with solids at the nanoscale, have provided many opportunities for engineering innovation. With properly designed nanoconfinement, several nanofluidic systems have been devised in our group in the past several years to achieve energy conversion functions with high efficiencies. This review is dedicated to elucidating the unique characteristics of nanofluidics, introducing several novel nanofluidic systems combining nanoporous materials with functional fluids, and to unveiling their working mechanisms. In all these systems, the ultra-large surface area available in nanoporous materials provides an ideal platform for seamlessly interfacing with nanoconfined fluids, and efficiently converting energy between the mechanical, thermal, and electrical forms. These systems have been demonstrated to have great potentials for applications including energy dissipation/absorption, energy trapping, actuation, and energy harvesting. Their efficiencies can be further enhanced by designing efforts based upon improved understanding of nanofluidics, which represents an important addition to classical fluid mechanics. Through the few systems exemplified in this review, the emerging research field of nanoscale fluid mechanics may promote more exciting nanofluidic phenomena and mechanisms, with increasing applications by encompassing aspects of mechanics, materials, physics, chemistry, biology, etc.

  3. Finite element computational fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Finite element analysis as applied to the broad spectrum of computational fluid mechanics is analyzed. The finite element solution methodology is derived, developed, and applied directly to the differential equation systems governing classes of problems in fluid mechanics. The heat conduction equation is used to reveal the essence and elegance of finite element theory, including higher order accuracy and convergence. The algorithm is extended to the pervasive nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations. A specific fluid mechanics problem class is analyzed with an even mix of theory and applications, including turbulence closure and the solution of turbulent flows.

  4. Printed in: ASCE Engineering Mechanics

    E-print Network

    Printed in: ASCE Engineering Mechanics 1977, pp. 295-297. Pore pressure effeats in ine~hich increments of fluid pore-pressure enter constitutive relations for elastic and inelastic response. The former constrained) equilibrium states has the form, gen- eralized from [1,2] to include pore-pressure effects, d

  5. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-print Network

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Strategic Plan 2014-2018 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology #12;Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Oklahoma State University was organized as Mechanical to the advancement of science and tech- nology on a national and international scale. And outreach through technology

  6. QUALITATIVE REASONING ABOUT FLUIDS AND MECHANICS

    E-print Network

    Forbus, Kenneth D.

    QUALITATIVE REASONING ABOUT FLUIDS AND MECHANICS Hyeonkyeong Kim November 1993 The Institute and North West Water, Institute Partners . #12;QUALITATIVE REASONING ABOUT FLUIDS AND MECHANICS #12;()Copyright by Hyeonkyeong Kim 1993 #12;QUALITATIVE REASONING ABOUT FLUIDS AND MECHANICS

  7. Fluid Mechanics Can Be Fun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanks, Robert F.

    1979-01-01

    A humanistic approach to teaching fluid mechanics is described which minimizes lecturing, increases professor-student interaction, uses group and individual problem solving sessions, and allows for student response. (BB)

  8. Supersymmetric Fluid Mechanics

    E-print Network

    R. Jackiw; A. P. Polychronakos

    2000-07-17

    When anticommuting Grassmann variables are introduced into a fluid dynamical model with irrotational velocity and no vorticity, the velocity acquires a nonvanishing curl and the resultant vorticity is described by Gaussian potentials formed from the Grassmann variables. Upon adding a further specific interaction with the Grassmann degrees of freedom, the model becomes supersymmetric.

  9. PREFACE: XXI Fluid Mechanics Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmyd, Janusz S.; Fornalik-Wajs, Elzbieta; Jaszczur, Marek

    2014-08-01

    This Conference Volume contains the papers presented at the 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference (XXI FMC) held at AGH - University of Science and Technology in Krakow, Poland, 15-18 June 2014, and accepted for Proceedings published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The Fluid Mechanics Conferences have been taking place every two years since 1974, a total of forty years. The 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference (XXI FMC) is being organized under the auspices of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Committee of Mechanics. The goal of this conference is to provide a forum for the exposure and exchange of ideas, methods and results in fluid mechanics. Conference topics include, but are not limited to Aerodynamics, Atmospheric Science, Bio-Fluids, Combustion and Reacting Flows, Computational Fluid Dynamics, Experimental Fluid Mechanics, Flow Machinery, General Fluid Dynamics, Hydromechanics, Heat and Fluid Flow, Measurement Techniques, Micro- and Nano- Flow, Multi-Phase Flow, Non-Newtonian Fluids, Rotating and Stratified Flows, Turbulence. Within the general subjects of this conference, the Professor Janusz W. Elsner Competition for the best fluid mechanics paper presented during the Conference is organized. Authors holding a M.Sc. or a Ph.D. degree and who are not older than 35 years of age may enter the Competition. Authors with a Ph.D. degree must present individual papers; authors with a M.Sc. degree may present papers with their supervisor as coauthor, including original results of experimental, numerical or analytic research. Six state-of-the-art keynote papers were delivered by world leading experts. All contributed papers were peer reviewed. Recommendations were received from the International Scientific Committee, reviewers and the advisory board. Accordingly, of the 163 eligible extended abstracts submitted, after a review process by the International Scientific Committee, 137 papers were selected for presentation at the 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference, 68 papers were accepted for Proceedings published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The total number of submitted and accepted papers for this year's conference represents a significant increase over previous Fluid Mechanics Conferences, and has expanded its initial national character and borders which speaks to the great vitality of fluid mechanics. We hope that these proceedings will be used not only as a document of the event but also to assess achievements and new paths to be taken in fluid mechanics research. Finally, we would like to congratulate the winners of the 2014 Professor Janusz W Elsner Competition Ruri Hidema from Japan, Fernando Tejero from Spain and Lukasz Laniewski-Wollk from Poland. Acknowledgements We would like to express grateful appreciation to our colleagues from the Polish Academy of Sciences, Committee of Mechanics, as well as to the International Scientific Committee i.e. Members and the Advisory Board. Their advice and efforts have helped us to overcome the problems normally associated with organising international meetings. Special thanks goes to the reviewers for their work in encouraging the submission of papers and the subsequent review of all papers. Their contribution cannot be overestimated. The 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference was organised by AGH University of Science and Technology, the Polish Academy of Sciences the Committee of Mechanics and the AGH-UST Foundation. Proceedings was published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The demanding work involved could not have been done without the contribution of so many individuals from all institutions as well as numerous external co-workers. Without their extremely valuable help such a meeting would have been impossible. Thank you all so much! Details of the committees are available in the PDF

  10. Wentworth Institute Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avakian, Harry; And Others

    This publication is a Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Manual designed to be used by technical institute students in Mechanical Engineering Technology Programs. The experiments are introductory in nature and embrace the fields of applied thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, refrigeration, heat transfer and basic instrumentation. There are 20

  11. Designing and Creating a Set of New Lab Experiments for a Traditional Fluid Mechanics Course in Civil Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budny, Dan

    2013-11-01

    Many fluids lab facilities and their associated student experiences were built back in the 1960-1970 time frames. They typically consisted of large facilities that included wind tunnels, flumes, wet wells, pump stations, etc. Today these labs are physically and pedagogically out dated and the need for lab space is forcing the closing of large scale labs. This is the same basic problem within the Swanson School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. Thus we have replaced all the old equipment and lab experiences with small bench top experiments with a focus on applying the large body of knowledge associate with better student learning experiences. This paper will describe the concepts behind the design of the new experiments and the learning improvements discovered as a result of moving from a few large experiments to a larger number of smaller scale experiments.

  12. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING What is Mechanical

    E-print Network

    , development, and manufacture of gas turbine and other aircraft engines; design and construction of electrical aircraft and automotive to consumer products and building equipment. In these jobs, mechanical engineers design products, machines, and processes for manufacturing. They analyze, test, and develop

  13. Building Wings Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Provancher, William

    Building Wings Mechanical Engineering Objective Introduce students to the theory of Conservation Description #12;Airplanes are engineered to generate lift. Lift is a mechanical force generated by a solid of a wing design before spending the money to create a full-size wing. This particular engineering lesson

  14. Numerical Study of Granular Scaffold Efficiency to Convert Fluid Flow into Mechanical Stimulation in Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Cruel, Magali; Bensidhoum, Morad; Nouguier-Lehon, Ccile; Dessombz, Olivier; Becquart, Pierre; Petite, Herv; Hoc, Thierry

    2015-09-01

    Controlling the mechanical environment in bioreactors represents a key element in the reactors' optimization. Positive effects of fluid flow in three-dimensional bioreactors have been observed, but local stresses at cell scale remain unknown. These effects led to the development of numerical tools to assess the micromechanical environment of cells in bioreactors. Recently, new possible scaffold geometry has emerged: granular packings. In the present study, the primary goal was to compare the efficiency of such a scaffold to the other ones from literature in terms of wall shear stress levels and distributions. To that aim, three different types of granular packings were generated through discrete element method, and computational fluid dynamics was used to simulate the flow within these packings. Shear stress levels and distributions were determined. A linear relationship between shear stress and inlet velocity was observed, and its slope was similar to published data. The distributions of normalized stress were independent of the inlet velocity and were highly comparable to those of widely used porous scaffolds. Granular packings present similar features to more classical porous scaffolds and have the advantage of being easy to manipulate and seed. The methods of this work are generalizable to the study of other granular packing configurations. PMID:25634115

  15. Energy Related Research Expertise Mechanical Engineering Department

    E-print Network

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    Energy Related Research Expertise Mechanical Engineering Department U. of Washington Life Cycle Assessment of BioFuels and Energy Technologies (Joyce Cooper) Multiphase Fluid Dynamics: liquid: marine renewable energy, tidal hydrokinetics, environmental effects. Y. (Steve) Shen: vibration

  16. EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN DEPARTMENT: Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN DEPARTMENT: Mechanical Engineering Thermo-Fluids and Heat Transfer Minimum Table of Contents: Fire, Fire Alarm and Other Emergencies, 2009 3 Evacuation Procedures for Fire, Fire Alarm and Other Emergencies Alarm will sound for more than

  17. Lecture notes Introductory incompressible fluid mechanics

    E-print Network

    Malham, Simon J.A.

    Lecture notes Introductory incompressible fluid mechanics Simon J.A. Malham Simon J.A. Malham (23rd of fluid mechanics and along the way see lots of interesting applications. 2 Fluid flow, the Continuum. Liquids are generally incompressible--a feature essential to all modern car braking mechanisms. Fluids can

  18. FLUID MECHANICS AND MATHEMATICAL STRUCTURES PHILIP BOYLAND

    E-print Network

    Boyland, Philip

    FLUID MECHANICS AND MATHEMATICAL STRUCTURES PHILIP BOYLAND Department of Mathematics University in the most basic models of fluid motion. 1. Introduction Fluid mechanics is the source of many of the ideas, Lagrange, . . .. Mathematicians have abstracted and vastly generalized ba- sic fluid mechanical concepts

  19. INTRODUCTION TO FLUID MECHANICS Spring 2011

    E-print Network

    Bahrami, Majid

    1 ENSC 283 INTRODUCTION TO FLUID MECHANICS Spring 2011 Instructor: Dr. Majid Bahrami 4372: This is an introductory course in fluid mechanics. The approach to the subject emphasizes the physical concepts of fluid mechanics and methods of analysis that begin from basic principles. Textbook: Fluid

  20. Ann Wagner, Mechanical Engineer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Betsy K.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a profile of Ann Wagner, a mechanical engineer at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland, and her job responsibilities there. Also includes a brief history of mechanical engineering as well as a sample graph and data activity sheet with answers. (AIM)

  1. Research in Applied Mathematics, Fluid Mechanics and Computer Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period October 1, 1998 through March 31, 1999.

  2. [Research activities in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period April 1, 1995 through September 30, 1995.

  3. Inserting Group Variables into Fluid Mechanics

    E-print Network

    R. Jackiw

    2004-10-28

    A fluid, like a quark-gluon plasma, may possess degrees of freedom indexed by a group variable, which retains its identity even in the fluid/continuum description. Conventional Eulerian fluid mechanics is extended to encompass this possibility.

  4. Fluid thrust control system. [for liquid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, W. L.; Jansen, H. B.; Lehmann, E. N. (inventors)

    1968-01-01

    A pure fluid thrust control system is described for a pump-fed, regeneratively cooled liquid propellant rocket engine. A proportional fluid amplifier and a bistable fluid amplifier control overshoot in the starting of the engine and take it to a predetermined thrust. An ejector type pump is provided in the line between the liquid hydrogen rocket nozzle heat exchanger and the turbine driving the fuel pump to aid in bringing the fluid at this point back into the regular system when it is not bypassed. The thrust control system is intended to function in environments too severe for mechanical controls.

  5. Fluid Mechanics Unit code: MATH20502

    E-print Network

    Sidorov, Nikita

    MATH20502 Fluid Mechanics Unit code: MATH20502 Credit Rating: 10 Unit level: Level 2 Teaching to continuum mechanics in general and theoretical fluid mechanics in particular. The material provides mathematics. Fluid mechanics is concerned with understanding, and hence predicting, the properties (pressure

  6. Basic Engineer Equipment Mechanic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by basic engineer equipment mechanics. Addressed in the four individual units of the course are the following topics: mechanics and their tools (mechanics, hand tools, and power

  7. Fluid Mechanics IB Lecturer: Dr Natalia Berloff

    E-print Network

    Fluid Mechanics IB Lecturer: Dr Natalia Berloff Office: CMS G1.02 E-mail: N Lighthill: An Informal Introduction to Theoretical Fluid Mechanics van Dyke: Album of Fluid Motion 1.G.Berloff@damtp.cam.ac.uk Class web page: www.damtp.cam.ac.uk/user/ngb23/FD/ 0. INTRODUCTION What is a fluid? By definition

  8. ME 521, Continuum Mechanics BE 521, Continuum Mechanics for Biomedical Engineers

    E-print Network

    approach to two classical branches of mechanics: the mechanics of fluids and the mechanics of solids courses devoted to problems in fluid mechanics (e.g. biotransport) and solid mechanics (e.g. cellularME 521, Continuum Mechanics BE 521, Continuum Mechanics for Biomedical Engineers Fall 2015, Tue

  9. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Department

    E-print Network

    Kim, John

    robot enjoy ice cream together. BACK COVER: UCLA Racing | Baja SAE Team takes honors in El Paso in the science and art of mechanical and aerospace engineering.Further,we seek to expand the frontiers of engineering science and to encourage technological innovation while fostering academic excellence

  10. Foundations of Fluid Mechanics Giovanni Gallavotti

    E-print Network

    Roma "La Sapienza", Universit di

    1 Foundations of Fluid Mechanics Giovanni Gallavotti 4 Roma 2000 20/novembre/2011; 22:03 #12, harmonic analysis, elasticity, general relativity or fluid mechanics and chaos in turbulence. So that when in 1988 I was made chair of Fluid Mechanics at the Universit`a La Sapienza, not to recognize work I did

  11. MECH 502: Fluid Mechanics Winter semester 2010

    E-print Network

    Phani, A. Srikantha

    MECH 502: Fluid Mechanics Winter semester 2010 Instructor: I.A. Frigaard Times: Tuesdays week of semester. Location: CHBE 103 Synopsis: This course will focus primarily on fluid mechanics will be to look at fluid mechanics fundamentals, and at the mathematical modeling & analysis of simplified flow

  12. Health Related Research Expertise Mechanical Engineering Department

    E-print Network

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    Health Related Research Expertise Mechanical Engineering Department U. of Washington Scanning-sensors and BioMEMS, artificial organs, nano-technology/nano-fluid/membrane science, tissue engineering and actuators for biomedical applications, electro optic polymers, conductive polymers, electro-optic and MEMS

  13. Engineer Equipment Mechanic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on engineer equipment mechanics is designed to advance the professional competence of privates through sergeants as equipment mechanics, Military Occupation Specialty 1341, and is adaptable for nonmilitary instruction. Introductory materials include

  14. The Master of Engineering in Mechanical Engineering Program Planning Sheet

    E-print Network

    Lin, Xi

    ME 740 Vision, Robotics, and Planning ME 742 Bio-Fluids and Structural Mechanics ME 755 Communication Student Signature Date #12;Mechanical Engineering Core Courses ME 501 Dynamic System 509 Computational Nanomechanics ME 510 Production Systems Analysis ME 514 Simulation ME 515 Vibration

  15. Paper Boats Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Provancher, William

    Paper Boats Mechanical Engineering Objective This lesson teaches students about the physics with designing boats? How can the best boat be constructed from butcher paper and duct tape? Time Required time) Testing the boats in the swimming pool (1 class period) Assessments Students will be graded

  16. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-print Network

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering seminar Plasma Actuators for Aerodynamic Flow Control Abstract Plasma actuators have become very popular in aerodynamic flow control research over the last in plasma actuators is motivated by the potential for simple construction, lack of moving parts, low power

  17. Department of Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Li, Teng

    Smart Materials and Structures Research Center inStRuctional diviSionS Design and Reliability of SystemsDepartment of Mechanical Engineering 2014 Fast Facts Faculty Based on 2013 statistics from Design Information Sciences Risk and Reliability Manufacturing Electronic Products and Systems

  18. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-print Network

    Strathclyde, University of

    ; and Naval Architecture & Marine Engineering. The Graduate School of Engineering has recently been formed: Architecture, Biomedical Engineering, Chemical & Process Engineering, Civil & Environmental Engineering; Design

  19. MAE Student Handbook MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

    E-print Network

    Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    of attitude determination and control, space structures, orbital mechanics, and rocket propulsion (AE14MAE Student Handbook 2015-2016 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AEROSPACE ENGINEERING ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING mae.ucsd.edu #12;2 | P a g e Welcome to the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department

  20. Stirling engine with air working fluid

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John A. (North Troy, NY)

    1985-01-01

    A Stirling engine capable of utilizing air as a working fluid which includes a compact heat exchange module which includes heating tube units, regenerator and cooler positioned about the combustion chamber. This arrangement has the purpose and effect of allowing the construction of an efficient, high-speed, high power-density engine without the use of difficult to seal light gases as working fluids.

  1. University Of California, Berkeley Department of Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Frenklach, Michael

    University Of California, Berkeley Department of Mechanical Engineering ME 151 - Advanced Heat Transfer [3 units] Elective Course Syllabus CATALOG DESCRIPTION Basic principles of heat transfer heat transfer of conduction, convection, and radiation, as well as fluid mechanics such as external

  2. Mechanical engineering COLLEGE of ENGINEERING

    E-print Network

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    as automotive, alternative energy, defense, medicine, patent law, manufacturing and aerospace. degree programs t Home to nation's first electric-drive vehicle engineering program and alternative energy technology

  3. Department of Mechanical Engineering 2015 Seminar Series

    E-print Network

    Bernstein, Joseph B.

    on emulsions in which the dispersed component has a lower boiling point than the carrier fluid. The unusual, Mechanical Engineering University of Minnesota BOILING OF DILUTE EMULSIONS: A NEW HEAT TRANSFER STRATEGY behavior of boiling dilute emulsions makes them potentially useful cooling of power electronics and other

  4. Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference Melbourne, Australia

    E-print Network

    19th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference Melbourne, Australia 8-11 December 2014 Use of an Air is examined as a method to reduce convective losses from a heated cavity. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD loss mechanisms all lower the thermal performance of the high-temperature cavity receiver. This study

  5. NASA Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research briefs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford (editor)

    1994-01-01

    The Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research program is presented in a series of research briefs. Nineteen projects covering aeronautical fluid mechanics and related areas are discussed and augmented with the publication and presentation output of the Branch for the period 1990-1993.

  6. Department of Mechanical Engineering FELLOWSHIPS

    E-print Network

    Barthelat, Francois

    Department of Mechanical Engineering FELLOWSHIPS INFORMATION SESSION 2011-2012 NSERC, FQRNT Graduate Fellowships #12;Department of Mechanical Engineering 2:00 2:05 Introduction 2:05 2:25 NSERC 2-Doctoral Rankings. #12;Department of Mechanical Engineering Why Apply for a Graduate Fellowship? It provides

  7. M. Bahrami Fluid Mechanics (S 09) Fluid statics 9 Archimedes's 1st

    E-print Network

    Bahrami, Majid

    M. Bahrami Fluid Mechanics (S 09) Fluid statics 9 Buoyancy Archimedes's 1st laws #12; M. Bahrami Fluid Mechanics (S 09) Fluid statics 10 Fig. 11: Archimedes second law. Bahrami Fluid Mechanics (S 09) Fluid statics 11 Pressure distribution in rigidbody motion Fluids

  8. Activities of the Institute for Mechanical Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Institute of Mechanical Engineering (IME) is part of Canada's National Research Council. Its mission is to undertake, support, promote, and disseminate research and development in the mechanical engineering aspects of three vital sectors of the Canadian economy: transportation, resource industries, and manufacturing. The IME achieves its mission by performing research and development in its own facilities; by developing, providing, and transferring expertise and knowledge; by making its research facilities available to collaborators and clients; and by participating in international liaison and collaborative research activities. Six research programs are conducted in the IME: Advanced Manufacturing Technology; Coastal Zone Engineering; Cold Regions Engineering; Combustion and Fluids Engineering; Ground Transportation Technology; and Machinery and Engine Technology. The rationale and major research thrusts of each program are described, and specific achievements in 1991-92 are reviewed. Lists of technical reports and papers presented by IME personnel are also included.

  9. Using Computers in Fluids Engineering Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1998-01-01

    Three approaches for using computers to improve basic fluids engineering education are presented. The use of computational fluid dynamics solutions to fundamental flow problems is discussed. The use of interactive, highly graphical software which operates on either a modern workstation or personal computer is highlighted. And finally, the development of 'textbooks' and teaching aids which are used and distributed on the World Wide Web is described. Arguments for and against this technology as applied to undergraduate education are also discussed.

  10. Instructor's Guide for Fluid Mechanics: A Modular Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, John S.

    This guide is designed to assist engineering teachers in developing an understanding of fluid mechanics in their students. The course is designed around a set of nine self-paced learning modules, each of which contains a discussion of the subject matter; incremental objectives; problem index, set and answers; resource materials; and a quiz with

  11. ME 702 Computational Fluid Mechanics Instructor: Prof. Sheryl Grace

    E-print Network

    1 ME 702 Computational Fluid Mechanics Instructor: Prof. Sheryl Grace Office location: Rm level fluids course, ME 542 Advanced Fluid Mechanics, or equivalent. Catalog description "Numerical Computation of Internal and External Flows, Volume 1: The Fundamentals of Computational Fluid Dynamics

  12. Analysis of Skylab fluid mechanics science demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegart, J. R.; Butz, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The results of the data reduction and analysis of the Skylab fluid mechanics demonstrations are presented. All the fluid mechanics data available from the Skylab missions were identified and surveyed. The significant fluid mechanics phenomena were identified and reduced to measurable quantities wherever possible. Data correlations were performed using existing theories. Among the phenomena analyzed were: static low-g interface shapes, oscillation frequency and damping of a liquid drop, coalescence, rotating drop, liquid films and low-g ice melting. A survey of the possible applications of the results was made and future experiments are recommended.

  13. Importance of mechanical testing of hydraulic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Reichel, J.

    1997-12-31

    Anti-wear properties of hydraulic fluids are important because hydraulic pump and motor wear is costly. Hydraulic fluid performance specifications represent minimum requirements. International hydraulic fluid performance standards are being developed by ISO/TC28/SC4 committee as draft (ISO DIS 11158 ``Specifications for Mineral Oil Hydraulic Fluids``). Performance specifications for non-mineral oil hydraulic fluids are also being developed. Typically, both the user and fluid manufacturer have insufficient information relating to the anti-wear properties of a new fluid to be used in hydraulic equipment, such as axial piston pumps, vane pumps or radial piston motors. Therefore, pump lubrication and operation requirements, preferably pre-existing in pump manufacturer`s specifications, must be determined. The required fluid lubrication properties may be determined by either laboratory pump tests or by a field trial, often at the expense of the customer. More preferably, the lubrication properties of the hydraulic fluid should be determined under mechanical conditions equivalent to field practice. In this paper, the use of both the vane pump test and the FZG Gear Test to predetermine the recommended hydraulic fluid lubrication performance will be discussed. In this way, fluid performance may be determined at significantly lower cost than more expensive large scale hydraulic pump and motor tests which are slower and more energy consuming.

  14. A Course in Fluid Mechanics of Suspensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Robert H.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a course focusing on fluid mechanics and physical chemistry of suspensions. Describes the main themes of the lectures and includes a list of course outlines. Possible textbooks and many journal articles are listed. (YP)

  15. Mechanics of couple-stress fluid coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waxman, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    The formal development of a theory of viscoelastic surface fluids with bending resistance - their kinematics, dynamics, and rheology are discussed. It is relevant to the mechanics of fluid drops and jets coated by a thin layer of immiscible fluid with rather general rheology. This approach unifies the hydrodynamics of two-dimensional fluids with the mechanics of an elastic shell in the spirit of a Cosserat continuum. There are three distinct facets to the formulation of surface continuum mechanics. Outlined are the important ideas and results associated with each: the kinematics of evolving surface geometries, the conservation laws governing the mechanics of surface continua, and the rheological equations of state governing the surface stress and moment tensors.

  16. Extra mass flux in fluid mechanics

    E-print Network

    Vn, Peter; Grmela, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Consequences of Galilean invariance and Hamiltonian structure of fluid mechanics on mass flux are investigated. The physics behind the possible appearance of self-diffusion is discussed in the context of weakly nonlocal extension of classical hydrodynamics.

  17. 2015 GRADUATE STUDIES ENVIRONMENTAL FLUID MECHANICS

    E-print Network

    , a recirculating saltwater flume, and a density-stratified towing tank. Each of the flumes is also equipped Measurements Coastal Structures Coastal Hazards Computational Fluid Mechanics Research is supported

  18. Daniel Attinger Iowa State University Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2025 Black, Ames, Iowa 50011-2161

    E-print Network

    Attinger, Daniel

    Annual Review in Fluid Mechanics Journal for Micromechanics and Microengineering Applied Physics Letters IMECE conferences Journal of Fluid Mechanics ASME Journal of Fluid Engineering Journal of Forensic6105 Transport Phenomena at the Microscale Fall 2010 MECE E3100 Introduction to Mechanics of Fluids

  19. Some connections between fluid mechanics and the solving of industrial and environmental fluid-flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, J. C. R.

    1981-05-01

    The ways in which advances in fluid mechanics have led to improvements in engineering design are discussed, with attention to the stimulation of fluid mechanics research by industrial and environmental problems. The development of many practical uses of fluid flow without the benefit of scientific study is also emphasized. Among the topics discussed are vortices and coherent structures in turbulent flows, lubrication, jet and multiphase flows, the control and exploitation of waves, the effect of unsteady forces on structures, and dispersion phenomena. Among the practical achievements covered are the use of bluff shields to control separated flow over truck bodies and reduce aerodynamic drag, ink-jet printing, hovercraft stability, fluidized-bed combustion, the fluid/solid instabilities caused by air flow around a computer memory floppy disc, and various wind turbines.

  20. Tracing Injection Fluids in Engineered Geothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, P. E.; Leecaster, K.; Mella, M.; Ayling, B.; Bartl, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    The reinjection of produced fluids is crucial to the effective management of geothermal reservoirs, since it provides a mechanism for maintaining reservoir pressures while allowing for the disposal of a toxic byproduct. Tracers are essential to the proper location of injection wells since they are the only known tool for reliably characterizing the flow patterns of recirculated fluids. If injection wells are placed too close to production wells, then reinjected fluids do not have sufficient residence time to extract heat from the reservoir and premature thermal breakthrough results. If injection wells are placed too far away, then the reservoir risks unacceptable pressure loss. Several thermally stable compounds from a family of very detectable fluorescent organic compounds (the naphthalene sulfonates) were characterized and found to be effective for use as geothermal tracers. Through batch-autoclave reactions, their Arrhenius pseudo-first-order decay-rate constants were determined. An analytical method was developed that allows for the laboratory determination of concentrations in the low parts-per-trillion range. Field experiments in numerous geothermal reservoirs throughout the world have confirmed the laboratory findings. Whereas conservative tracers such as the naphthalene sulfonates are effective tools for indicating interwell flow patterns and for measuring reservoir pore volumes, 'reactive' tracers can be used to constrain fracture surface area, which is the effective area for heat extraction. This is especially important for engineered geothermal system (EGS) wells, since reactive tracers can be used to measure fracture surface area immediately after drilling and while the well stimulation equipment is still on site. The reactive properties of these tracers that can be exploited to constrain fracture surface area are reversible sorption, contrasting diffusivity, and thermal decay. Laboratory batch- and flow-reactor experiments in combination with numerical simulation studies have served to identify candidate compounds for use as reactive tracers. An emerging class of materials that show promise for use as geothermal and EGS tracers are colloidal nanocrystals (quantum dots). These are semiconductor particles that fluoresce as a function of particle size. Preliminary laboratory experimentation has demonstrated that these thermally stable, water-soluble particles can serve as conservative tracers for geothermal applications. Likewise, they show promise as potential reactive tracers, since their surfaces can be modified to be reversibly sorptive and their diameters are sufficiently large to allow for contrasts in diffusivity with solute tracers.

  1. The Super-Higgs Mechanism in Fluids

    E-print Network

    Karim Benakli; Yaron Oz; Giuseppe Policastro

    2013-10-18

    Supersymmetry is spontaneously broken when the field theory stress-energy tensor has a non-zero vacuum expectation value. In local supersymmetric field theories the massless gravitino and goldstino combine via the super-Higgs mechanism to a massive gravitino. We study this mechanism in four-dimensional fluids, where the vacuum expectation value of the stress-energy tensor breaks spontaneously both supersymmetry and Lorentz symmetry. We consider both constant as well as space-time dependent ideal fluids. We derive a formula for the gravitino mass in terms of the fluid velocity, energy density and pressure. We discuss some of the phenomenological implications.

  2. Analogy between fluid cavitation and fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mullen, R. L.; Braun, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    When the stresses imposed on a fluid are sufficiently large, rupture or cavitation can occur. Such conditions can exist in many two-phase flow applications, such as the choked flows, which can occur in seals and bearings. Nonspherical bubbles with large aspect ratios have been observed in fluids under rapid acceleration and high shear fields. These bubbles are geometrically similar to fracture surface patterns (Griffith crack model) existing in solids. Analogies between crack growth in solid and fluid cavitation are proposed and supported by analysis and observation (photographs). Healing phenomena (void condensation), well accepted in fluid mechanics, have been observed in some polymers and hypothesized in solid mechanics. By drawing on the strengths of the theories of solid mechanics and cavitation, a more complete unified theory can be developed.

  3. Montana State University 1 Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    -- Industrial Engineering and Mechanical Engineering Options Admission Normally, applicants must presentMontana State University 1 Mechanical Engineering Degrees Offered M.S. In Mechanical Engineering (MSME) Master of Engineering in Mechanical Engineering (M.Eng. ME) Ph.D. in Engineering

  4. Integrated Mechanical & Electrical Engineering (IMEE)

    E-print Network

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    materials and manufacturing II Robotics and mechatronics Optional industrial placement Robotics engineering your career prospects with a one-year placement in industry n Gain an integrated view of engineering industries and research laboratories need graduates with Integrated Mechanical & Electrical Engineering

  5. Fluid control mechanisms in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, Carolyn S.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments performed on Space Shuttle flights have emphasized study of the earliest effects of the cephalad fluid shift resulting from microgravity. Analysis of one subject's urine collected during flight showed that a sharp increase in antidiuretic hormone occurred within 2 h of launch, followed by an increase in cortisol excretion. Although this subject had symptoms of the space adaptation syndrome (SAS), inflight data from Spacelab missions suggested that these transient changes were not caused by SAS. Unpaired t-tests and Mann-Whitney tests showed that before and after flight, plasma thyroxine and urine osmolality were significantly higher in Shuttle crewmembers who exhibited more severe symptoms of SAS than in asymptomatic crewmembers.

  6. Job Prospects for Mechanical Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1985-01-01

    Indicates that the healthy economy is providing multiple opportunities for graduating mechanical engineers (including more job offers and higher pay) and that greatly expanded funding of military-defense work and computer applications are contributing to this growth. Data on mechanical engineering degrees granted, salaries, and industry growth are

  7. Job Prospects for Mechanical Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the career outlook for mechanical engineers. Explains that the number of bachelor degrees awarded yearly has reached a plateau, but salaries continue to rise. Suggests that the largest increase in demand for mechanical engineers will come from industries involved in automation, particularly those developing robotics. (TW)

  8. Trigger mechanism for engines

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, L.R.

    1989-02-28

    A trigger mechanism is described for a blower-vacuum apparatus having a trigger mounted within a handle and a small engine comprising: a throttle; a ''L'' shaped lever having first and second legs mounted for rotation about an intermediate pivot within the handle when the trigger is depressed, interconnecting the trigger and the throttle, the second leg having first teeth defined therein, the lever further having idle, full throttle and stop positions; a normally raised latch means adapted to be rotated and axially depressed, the latch means having second teeth situated on a cam to engage the first teeth for holding the lever in an intermediate position between the idle and full throttle positions when the latch means is rotated. The latch means further are cam teeth into potential engagement with the lever teeth when the trigger is depressed, lever is biased to the stop position; and idle adjusting means means for intercepting the second leg for preventing the second leg from reaching the stop position when the latch means is raised.

  9. Conformal higher-order viscoelastic fluid mechanics

    E-print Network

    Masafumi Fukuma; Yuho Sakatani

    2012-05-28

    We present a generally covariant formulation of conformal higher-order viscoelastic fluid mechanics with strain allowed to take arbitrarily large values. We give a general prescription to determine the dynamics of a relativistic viscoelastic fluid in a way consistent with the hypothesis of local thermodynamic equilibrium and the second law of thermodynamics. We then elaborately study the transient time scales at which the strain almost relaxes and becomes proportional to the gradients of velocity. We particularly show that a conformal second-order fluid with all possible parameters in the constitutive equations can be obtained without breaking the hypothesis of local thermodynamic equilibrium, if the conformal fluid is defined as the long time limit of a conformal second-order viscoelastic system. We also discuss how local thermodynamic equilibrium could be understood in the context of the fluid/gravity correspondence.

  10. Fluid Mechanics of Blood Clot Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogelson, Aaron L.; Neeves, Keith B.

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular blood clots form in an environment in which hydrodynamic forces dominate and in which fluid-mediated transport is the primary means of moving material. The clotting system has evolved to exploit fluid dynamic mechanisms and to overcome fluid dynamic challenges to ensure that clots that preserve vascular integrity can form over the wide range of flow conditions found in the circulation. Fluid-mediated interactions between the many large deformable red blood cells and the few small rigid platelets lead to high platelet concentrations near vessel walls where platelets contribute to clotting. Receptor-ligand pairs with diverse kinetic and mechanical characteristics work synergistically to arrest rapidly flowing cells on an injured vessel. Variations in hydrodynamic stresses switch on and off the function of key clotting polymers. Protein transport to, from, and within a developing clot determines whether and how fast it grows. We review ongoing experimental and modeling research to understand these and related phenomena.

  11. On the Hamiltonian Description of Fluid Mechanics

    E-print Network

    I. Antoniou; G. P. Pronko

    2002-03-14

    We suggest the Hamiltonian approach for fluid mechanics based on the dynamics, formulated in terms of Lagrangian variables. The construction of the canonical variables of the fluid sheds a light of the origin of Clebsh variables, introduced in the previous century. The developed formalism permits to relate the circulation conservation (Tompson theorem) with the invariance of the theory with respect to special diffiomorphisms and establish also the new conservation laws. We discuss also the difference of the Eulerian and Lagrangian description, pointing out the incompleteness of the first. The constructed formalism is also applicable for ideal plasma. We conclude with several remarks on the quantization of the fluid.

  12. Journal of Fluid Mechanics A furtive stare at an

    E-print Network

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics Focus luids on F A furtive stare at an intra-cellular flow T. M. SQUIRES of the fluid flow within individual living cells, which agree quantitatively with their fluid mechanical model. Introduction Nature has long inspired researchers in fluid mechanics to explore the mechanical strategies used

  13. Relativistic fluid mechanics, Kahler manifolds and supersymmetry

    E-print Network

    T. S. Nyawelo; J. W. van Holten; S. Groot Nibbelink

    2003-09-11

    We propose an alternative for the Clebsch decomposition of currents in fluid mechanics, in terms of complex potentials taking values in a Kahler manifold. We reformulate classical relativistic fluid mechanics in terms of these complex potentials and rederive the existence of an infinite set of conserved currents. We perform a canonical analysis to find the explicit form of the algebra of conserved charges. The Kahler-space formulation of the theory has a natural supersymmetric extension in 4-D space-time. It contains a conserved current, but also a number of additional fields complicating the interpretation. Nevertheless, we show that an infinite set of conserved currents emerges in the vacuum sector of the additional fields. This sector can therefore be identified with a regime of supersymmetric fluid mechanics. Explicit expressions for the current and the density are obtained.

  14. Computational fluid mechanics and heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. A.; Tannehill, J. C.; Pletcher, R. H.

    This book is intended to serve as a text for introductory courses in computational fluid mechanics and heat transfer for advanced undergraduates and/or first-year graduate students. The first part of the book presents basic concepts and provides an introduction to the fundamentals of finite-difference methods, while the second part is devoted to applications involving the equations of fluid mechanics and heat transfer. A description is given of the application of finite-difference methods to selected model equations, taking into account the wave equation, heat equation, Laplace's equation, Burgers' equation (inviscid), and Burgers' equation (viscous). Numerical methods for inviscid flow equations are considered along with governing equations of fluid mechanics and heat transfer, numerical methods for boundary-layer type equations, numerical methods for the 'parabolized' Navier-Stokes equations, numerical methods for the Navier-Stokes equations, and aspects of grid generation.

  15. Diesel Engine Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foutes, William A.

    Written in student performance terms, this curriculum guide on diesel engine repair is divided into the following eight sections: an orientation to the occupational field and instructional program; instruction in operating principles; instruction in engine components; instruction in auxiliary systems; instruction in fuel systems; instruction in

  16. General noncommuting curvilinear coordinates and fluid Mechanics

    E-print Network

    S. A. Alavi

    2006-08-16

    We show that restricting the states of a charged particle to the lowest Landau level introduces noncommutativity between general curvilinear coordinate operators. The cartesian, circular cylindrical and spherical polar coordinates are three special cases of our quite general method. The connection between U(1) gauge fields defined on a general noncommuting curvilinear coordinates and fluid mechanics is explained. We also recognize the Seiberg-Witten map from general noncommuting to commuting variables as the quantum correspondence of the Lagrange to Euler map in fluid mechanics.

  17. Slip mechanisms in complex fluid flows.

    PubMed

    Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G

    2015-10-28

    The classical no-slip boundary condition of fluid mechanics is not always a valid assumption for the flow of several classes of complex fluids including polymer melts, their blends, polymer solutions, microgels, glasses, suspensions and pastes. In fact, it appears that slip effect in these systems is the rule and not the exemption. The occurrence of slip complicates the analysis of rheological data, although it provides new opportunities to understand their behavior in restricted environments delineating additional molecular mechanisms i.e. entropic restrictions due to limitations in the number of molecular conformations. This article discusses these complexities and provides future research opportunities. PMID:26345121

  18. Current research activities: Applied and numerical mathematics, fluid mechanics, experiments in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, fluid mechanics including fluid dynamics, acoustics, and combustion, aerodynamics, and computer science during the period 1 Apr. 1992 - 30 Sep. 1992 is summarized.

  19. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-print Network

    will conclude with comments on the role of engineering education, as viewed from industry. Dr. Steve Charlton gas recirculation (EGR), NOx catalysts and particulate filters. He provided leadership for the 2002

  20. Nonholonomic Mechanics and Fluid-Body Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Scott; Tallapragada, Phanindra

    2012-11-01

    Certain velocity constraints arising in idealized models for fluid-body interactions, including the Kutta condition classically applied at the trailing cusp of a Joukowski hydrofoil experiencing lift, are formally equivalent to nonintegrable constraints arising in the mechanics of finite-dimensional mechanical systems. This equivalence allows hydrodynamic problems involving vortex shedding and related phenomena to be framed in the context of geometric mechanics on manifolds, and for essential mechanisms of biomorphic aquatic propulsion to be interpreted in terms of symmetry-breaking and generalized momentum equations. We illustrate this perspective using simple examples that highlight parallels between the finite- and infinite-dimensional cases.

  1. CONTENT KNOWLEDGE (Declarative Knowledge and Technical Skills): Students will demonstrate a broad knowledge of fundamental and applied engineering subjects: fluid

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Department of OCEAN & MECHANICAL ENGINEERING B.S. OCEAN ENGINEERING #12;COMMUNICATION SKILLS: The students will demonstrate good oral and written communication skills which are required in engineering practice and teamwork knowledge of fundamental and applied engineering subjects: fluid and solid mechanics, dynamics, hydrostatics

  2. Lagrangian perfect fluids and black hole mechanics

    E-print Network

    Vivek Iyer

    1996-10-15

    The first law of black hole mechanics (in the form derived by Wald), is expressed in terms of integrals over surfaces, at the horizon and spatial infinity, of a stationary, axisymmetric black hole, in a diffeomorphism invariant Lagrangian theory of gravity. The original statement of the first law given by Bardeen, Carter and Hawking for an Einstein-perfect fluid system contained, in addition, volume integrals of the fluid fields, over a spacelike slice stretching between these two surfaces. When applied to the Einstein-perfect fluid system, however, Wald's methods yield restricted results. The reason is that the fluid fields in the Lagrangian of a gravitating perfect fluid are typically nonstationary. We therefore first derive a first law-like relation for an arbitrary Lagrangian metric theory of gravity coupled to arbitrary Lagrangian matter fields, requiring only that the metric field be stationary. This relation includes a volume integral of matter fields over a spacelike slice between the black hole horizon and spatial infinity, and reduces to the first law originally derived by Bardeen, Carter and Hawking when the theory is general relativity coupled to a perfect fluid. We also consider a specific Lagrangian formulation for an isentropic perfect fluid given by Carter, and directly apply Wald's analysis. The resulting first law contains only surface integrals at the black hole horizon and spatial infinity, but this relation is much more restrictive in its allowed fluid configurations and perturbations than that given by Bardeen, Carter and Hawking. In the Appendix, we use the symplectic structure of the Einstein-perfect fluid system to derive a conserved current for perturbations of this system: this current reduces to one derived ab initio for this system by Chandrasekhar and Ferrari.

  3. Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering

    E-print Network

    Daraio, Chiara

    Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering Master in Mechanical Engineering Qualification large international firms in manufacturing, automotive, aerospace, aircraft, and energy industries Profile of MSc ETH in Mechanical Engineering D-MAVT furthers the development of many emerging areas

  4. MAE 101A (4 units) Introductory Fluid Mechanics

    E-print Network

    Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    MAE 101A (4 units) Introductory Fluid Mechanics Class/Laboratory Schedule: 4 lecture hours per week Textbooks/Materials: Frank White, Fluid Mechanics, John Wiley and Sons. Catalog Description: Fluid statics #12;3.4 Students will demonstrate an ability to apply dimensional analysis to fluid mechanics Course

  5. Spring 2015 ENG BE 436 Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics

    E-print Network

    Vajda, Sandor

    Spring 2015 ENG BE 436 Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics Dimitrije Stamenovi (Instructor) Alicia Zollinger (TA), Daniel Reynolds (TA) Tue. & Thu., 2 4 pm Fluid mechanics is a discipline that studies motion of fluids (gasses and liquids) and forces that act on them. A sub discipline of fluid mechanics

  6. Mechanical Engineering Department Technical Review

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.B.; Denney, R.M.

    1981-07-01

    The Mechanical Engineering Department Technical Review is published to inform readers of various technical activities within the Department, promote exchange of ideas, and give credit to personnel who are achieving the results. The report is presented in two parts: technical achievements and publication abstracts. The first is divided into seven sections, each of which reports on an engineering division and its specific activities related to nuclear tests, nuclear explosives, weapons, energy systems, engineering sciences, magnetic fusion, and materials fabrication.

  7. Mechanical Engineering Department Seminar Series

    E-print Network

    Awtar, Shorya

    Mechanical Engineering Department Seminar Series The use of Virtual Prototyping and 3D Printing-based medical device design and manufacture linked up with 3D printing. The improvements will include patient

  8. MASTER OF SCIENCE MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

    E-print Network

    COMPRESSORS TO FOULING AT VARIOUS STAGES Jonathan D. Baker -Lieutenant, United States Coast Guard B.S., United States Coast Guard Academy, 1996 Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering-September 2002 Advisor: Knox

  9. MASTER OF SCIENCE MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

    E-print Network

    FOR SHIP-TO-SHIP CARGO TRANSFER Brian E. Higgins-Lieutenant, United States Coast Guard B.S., United States Coast Guard Academy, 1995 Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering-December 2002 Advisor: Fotis A

  10. Computational fluid mechanics utilizing the variational principle of modeling damping seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The pressure solution for incompressible flow was investigated in support of a computational fluid mechanics model which simulates the damping seals considered for use in the space shuttle main engine turbomachinery. Future work directions are discussed briefly.

  11. Computational fluid mechanics utilizing the variational principle of modeling damping seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernathy, J. M.; Farmer, R.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis for modeling damping seals for use in Space Shuttle main engine turbomachinery is being produced. Development of a computational fluid mechanics code for turbulent, incompressible flow is required.

  12. Sponsored by: Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-print Network

    Alabama in Huntsville, University of

    Sponsored by: Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Electrical & Computer Engineering Computer Science) June 1 August 7, 2015 LINKS: Overview Projects Autonomous Control Target Detection & Tracking of Huntsville, AL, known as the Rocket City (in Madison county). US Space and Rocket Center, an aerospace museum

  13. Mechanical Engineering Department Seminar Series

    E-print Network

    Papalambros, Panos

    , disease modeling and drug screening. A recent discovery in stem cell biology is that differentiated cells of microvessels and the development of vascular diseases, suggesting a general role of stem cells in vascularMechanical Engineering Department Seminar Series Engineering Stem Cells: From In Vitro to In situ

  14. Mechanical engineering Mechanical engineering is about solving problems, designing processes,

    E-print Network

    Waikato, University of

    , and making products to improve the quality of human life and shape the economy. Mechanical engineers apply on converting raw and commodity materials into valuable products required by manufacturers or the end consumer the principles of physics, mathematics, computing and practical skills to design mechanical systems and artefacts

  15. Mechanical Engineering Department technical abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-07-01

    The Mechanical Engineering Department publishes abstracts twice a year to inform readers of the broad range of technical activities in the Department, and to promote an exchange of ideas. Details of the work covered by an abstract may be obtained by contacting the author(s). General information about the current role and activities of each of the Department's seven divisions precedes the technical abstracts. Further information about a division's work may be obtained from the division leader, whose name is given at the end of each divisional summary. The Department's seven divisions are as follows: Nuclear Test Engineering Division, Nuclear Explosives Engineering Division, Weapons Engineering Division, Energy Systems Engineering Division, Engineering Sciences Division, Magnetic Fusion Engineering Division and Materials Fabrication Division.

  16. PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 24, 043102 (2012) A numerical investigation of the fluid mechanical

    E-print Network

    Audoly, Basile

    2012-01-01

    PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 24, 043102 (2012) A numerical investigation of the fluid mechanical sewing or jet of liquid falling onto a fixed surface is one of the simplest situations in fluid mechanics, yet by Chiu-Webster and Lister9 (henceforth CWL), who called it the "fluid mechanical sewing machine

  17. Neural Control Mechanisms and Body Fluid Homeostasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Alan Kim

    1998-01-01

    The goal of the proposed research was to study the nature of afferent signals to the brain that reflect the status of body fluid balance and to investigate the central neural mechanisms that process this information for the activation of response systems which restore body fluid homeostasis. That is, in the face of loss of fluids from intracellular or extracellular fluid compartments, animals seek and ingest water and ionic solutions (particularly Na(+) solutions) to restore the intracellular and extracellular spaces. Over recent years, our laboratory has generated a substantial body of information indicating that: (1) a fall in systemic arterial pressure facilitates the ingestion of rehydrating solutions and (2) that the actions of brain amine systems (e.g., norepinephrine; serotonin) are critical for precise correction of fluid losses. Because both acute and chronic dehydration are associated with physiological stresses, such as exercise and sustained exposure to microgravity, the present research will aid in achieving a better understanding of how vital information is handled by the nervous system for maintenance of the body's fluid matrix which is critical for health and well-being.

  18. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Department

    E-print Network

    Kim, John

    military electronics, their heat transfer capacity is very often limited by heat transfer crises.8 million award from the Defense Advanced Projects Research Agency (DARPA) to conduct innovative research (MSE, UCLA), and Massoud Kaviany (ME, University of Michigan); and engineers from Advanced Cooling

  19. Mechanical design problems associated with turbopump fluid film bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evces, Charles R.

    1990-01-01

    Most high speed cryogenic turbopumps for liquid propulsion rocket engines currently use ball or roller contact bearings for rotor support. The operating speeds, loads, clearances, and environments of these pumps combine to make bearing wear a limiting factor on turbopump life. An example is the high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) used in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Although the HPOTP design life is 27,000 seconds at 30,000 rpms, or approximately 50 missions, bearings must currently be replaced after 2 missions. One solution to the bearing wear problem in the HPOTP, as well as in future turbopump designs, is the utilization of fluid film bearings in lieu of continuous contact bearings. Hydrostatic, hydrodynamic, and damping seal bearings are all replacement candidates for contact bearings in rocket engine high speed turbomachinery. These three types of fluid film bearings have different operating characteristics, but they share a common set of mechanical design opportunities and difficulties. Results of research to define some of the mechanical design issues are given. Problems considered include transient strat/stop rub, non-operational rotor support, bearing wear inspection and measurement, and bearing fluid supply route. Emphasis is given to the HPOTP preburner pump (PBP) bearing, but the results are pertinent to high-speed cryogenic turbomachinery in general.

  20. Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group

    E-print Network

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    /electronics implementations One-time and extended life mechanisms Spacecraft structures Thermal control design of detector, payload, and spacecraft systems Mechanical static, dynamic, and thermal/optical integrated and thermal vacuum qualification testing of payloads. The LASP ME & Thermal Group is available to provide

  1. Fluid Mechanics, Drag Reduction and Advanced Configuration Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses Advanced Aircraft configurational approaches across the speed range, which are either enabled, or greatly enhanced, by clever Flow Control. Configurations considered include Channel Wings with circulation control for VTOL (but non-hovering) operation with high cruise speed, strut-braced CTOL transports with wingtip engines and extensive ('natural') laminar flow control, a midwing double fuselage CTOL approach utilizing several synergistic methods for drag-due-to-lift reduction, a supersonic strut-braced configuration with order of twice the L/D of current approaches and a very advanced, highly engine flow-path-integrated hypersonic cruise machine. This paper indicates both the promise of synergistic flow control approaches as enablers for 'Revolutions' in aircraft performance and fluid mechanic 'areas of ignorance' which impede their realization and provide 'target-rich' opportunities for Fluids Research.

  2. Annual review of fluid mechanics. Volume 19

    SciTech Connect

    Lumley, J.L.; Van dyke, M.; Reed, H.L.

    1987-01-01

    The present evaluation of the status of fluid mechanical research gives attention to confined vortices in flow machinery, turbulent secondary flows, upstream blocking and airflow over mountains, critical point concept descriptions of eddying motions and flow patterns, viscoelastic flows through contractions, the theory of solute transport by groundwater, tsunamis, turbulent premixed flame behavior, and viscous fingering in porous media. Also treated are the computation of flows with shocks, the use of spectral methods in fluid dynamics, the dynamics of tornadic thunderstorms, thermocapillary instabilities, the behavior of magnetic fluids, Von Karman swirling flows, the use of isolated eddy models in geophysics, recent developments in rapid distortion theory, and rarefaction waves in liquid and gas-liquid media.

  3. Fluid mechanical responses to nutrient depletion in fungi and biofilmsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Michael P.

    2014-10-01

    In both fungi and bacterial biofilms, when nutrients are depleted, the organisms cannot physically migrate to find a new source, but instead must develop adaptations that allow them to survive. This paper reviews our work attempting to discover design principles for these adaptations. We develop fluid mechanical models, and aim to understand whether these suggest organizing principles for the observed morphological diversity. Determining whether a proposed organizing principle explains extant biological designs is fraught with difficulty: simply because a design principle predicts characteristics similar to an organism's morphology could just as well be accidental as revealing. In each of the two sets of examples, we adopt different strategies to develop understanding in spite of this difficulty. Within the fungal phylum Ascomycota, we use the large observed diversity of different morphological solutions to the fundamental fluid mechanical problem to measure how far each solution is from a design optimum, thereby measuring how far the extant designs deviate from the hypothesized optimum. This allows comparing different design principles to each other. For biofilms, we use engineering principles to make qualitative predictions of what types of adaptations might exist given the physicochemical properties of the repertoire of proteins that bacteria can create, and then find evidence for these adaptations in experiments. While on the surface this paper addresses the particular adaptations used by the fungal phylum Ascomycota and bacterial biofilms, we also aim to motivate discussion of different approaches to using design principles, fluid mechanical or otherwise, to rationalize observed engineering solutions in biology.

  4. School of Engineering Mechanical, Aerospace & Nuclear Engineering

    E-print Network

    Linhardt, Robert J.

    .........................................................................................................................................................2 CAREERS IN AERONAUTICAL/AEROSPACE ENGINEERING ......................................................................................................................................6 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING .........................................................................................8 AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING COURSE PREREQUISITES

  5. A fluid mechanical explanation of dark matter

    E-print Network

    Carl H. Gibson

    1999-04-22

    Matter in the universe has become ``dark'' or ``missing'' through misconceptions about the fluid mechanics of gravitational structure formation. Gravitational condensation occurs on non-acoustic density nuclei at the largest Schwarz length scale L_{ST}, L_{SV}, L_{SM}, L_{SD} permitted by turbulence, viscous, or magnetic forces, or by the fluid diffusivity. Non-baryonic fluids have diffusivities larger (by factors of trillions or more) than baryonic (ordinary) fluids, and cannot condense to nucleate baryonic galaxy formation as is usually assumed. Baryonic fluids begin to condense in the plasma epoch at about 13,000 years after the big bang to form proto-superclusters, and form proto-galaxies by 300,000 years when the cooling plasma becomes neutral gas. Condensation occurs at small planetary masses to form ``primordial fog particles'' from nearly all of the primordial gas by the new theory, Gibson (1996), supporting the Schild (1996) conclusion from quasar Q0957+651A,B microlensing observations that the mass of the lens galaxy is dominated by ``rogue planets ... likely to be the missing mass''. Non-baryonic dark matter condenses on superclusters at scale L_{SD} to form massive super-halos.

  6. Computational Science and Engineering Certification for Mechanical Science and Engineering

    E-print Network

    Gao, Grace Xingxin

    Computational Science and Engineering Certification for Mechanical Science and Engineering The Computational Science and Engineering certificate program is designed to provide MechSE undergraduate students in "Computational Science and Engineering", students must complete the required courses listed below

  7. DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

    E-print Network

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING University review of kinetic processes in engineering materials that control the materials' structural and chemical in engineering materials that control the materials' structural and chemical characteristics in relation

  8. THE MASTER OF ENGINEERING IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM PLANNING SHEET

    E-print Network

    Lin, Xi

    1 from the approved list of "Engineering Management" courses on page 3/Semester/Grade ______________________________________________ 3. Engineering Management Requirement 8 credits (Selected from1 THE MASTER OF ENGINEERING IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM PLANNING

  9. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Department

    E-print Network

    Kim, John

    and organelles. With optical tweezers -- a scientific instrument that uses a focused laser beam to provide that understanding the forces and mechanisms that are responsible for maintaining the geometries of the organelles will help them uncover the crucial factors that lead to changes or malfunctions in organelles. "When cells

  10. Annual review of fluid mechanics. Volume 16

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, M.; Wehausen, J.V.; Lumley, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Selected topics in fluid mechanics are examined in reviews of recent theoretical and experimental research. Graphs, diagrams, drawings, and photographs taken from and/or summarizing the publications surveyed are provided. Topics discussed include wave action and wave/mean-flow interaction, numerical simulation of turbulent flows, nonlinear interactions in liquid He II, secondary flow in curved open channels, vortex shedding from oscillating bluff bodies, optical techniques, aeroacoustics of turbulent shear flows, supercritical-wing design, and perturbed free shear layers.

  11. Integrable Supersymmetric Fluid Mechanics from Superstrings

    E-print Network

    Y. Bergner; R. Jackiw

    2001-05-03

    Following the construction of a model for the planar supersymmetric Chaplygin gas, supersymmetric fluid mechanics in (1+1)-dimensions is obtained from the light-cone parametrized Nambu-Goto superstring in (2+1)-dimensions. The lineal model is completely integrable and can be formulated neatly using Riemann coordinates. Infinite towers of conserved charges and supercharges are exhibited. They form irreducible representations of a dynamical (hidden) SO(2,1) symmetry group.

  12. Ellad B. Tadmor Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics

    E-print Network

    Tadmor, Ellad B.

    Ellad B. Tadmor Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics University of Minnesota 107 Akerman Hall, 110 of Technology, Mechanical Engineering (cum laude), June 1987 M.Sc. Technion Israel Institute of Technology, Mechanical Engineering, June 1991 Ph.D. Brown University, Division of Engineering, Mechanics of Solids

  13. Majors in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-print Network

    . With internationally renowned faculty - Aerospace Design Team - Baja Racing Team - Concrete Canoe Team - Flight Testing - Electrical Engineering - Industrial Engineering - Mechanical Engineering - Advanced Manufacturing - Dynamic and aerospace engineers are key professionals in the invention, design and manu- facture of devices, vehicles

  14. Jim Wallace Ph.D. P.Eng. Professor, Dept. of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering

    E-print Network

    Sun, Yu

    photovoltaic Canada's largest solar plant #12;Transportation Turbofan engine Pratt & Whitney PW1000G FordJim Wallace Ph.D. P.Eng. Professor, Dept. of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering University Systems [MIE517] Fluid Mechanics II [MIE 418] Nuclear Engineering I [MIE 407] Nuclear Engineering II [MIE

  15. Hamiltonian mechanics limits microscopic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglin, James; Gilz, Lukas; Thesing, Eike

    2015-05-01

    We propose a definition of fully microscopic engines (micro-engines) in terms of pure mechanics, without reference to thermodynamics, equilibrium, or cycles imposed by external control, and without invoking ergodic theory. This definition is pragmatically based on the observation that what makes engines useful is energy transport across a large ratio of dynamical time scales. We then prove that classical and quantum mechanics set non-trivial limits-of different kinds-on how much of the energy that a micro-engine extracts from its fuel can be converted into work. Our results are not merely formal; they imply manageable design constraints on micro-engines. They also suggest the novel possibility that thermodynamics does not emerge from mechanics in macroscopic regimes, but rather represents the macroscopic limit of a generalized theory, valid on all scales, which governs the important phenomenon of energy transport across large time scale ratios. We propose experimental realizations of the dynamical mechanisms we identify, with trapped ions and in Bose-Einstein condensates (``motorized bright solitons'').

  16. 114 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING Department of Mechanical Engineering (MEE)

    E-print Network

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    education credit. The Department of Mechanical Engineering offers an upper- division curriculum which leads and laboratory courses. Computers are used extensively throughout the curriculum, with emphasis on interactive computer design/ computer aided manufacturing. The department also has a significant amount of equipment

  17. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 121 Department of Mechanical Engineering (MEE)

    E-print Network

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    education credit. The Department of Mechanical Engineering offers an upper- division curriculum which leads and laboratory courses. Computers are used extensively throughout the curriculum, with emphasis on interactive computer design/ computer aided manufacturing. The department also has a significant amount of equipment

  18. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal, N. HUTCHINS, H. C. H. NG, I. MARUSIC and M. S. CHONG Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 632 and boundary layer flows. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 632, pp 431442 doi:10.1017/S0022112009007423 Request

  19. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Marcus, Philip S.

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal of Fluid Mechanics: Email alerts: Click here Subscriptions: Click here Commercial reprints: Click here of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 706 / September 2012, pp 34 45 DOI: 10.1017/jfm.2012.176, Published online: 24

  20. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal, IVAN MARUSIC and A. E. PERRY Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 428 / February 2001, pp 1 27 DOI: 10 and structure of sinkflow turbulent boundary layers. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 428, pp 127 doi:10.1017/S

  1. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal pressure gradients A. E. PERRY, IVAN MARUSIC and M. B. JONES Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 461 / June pressure gradients. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 461, pp 6191 doi:10.1017/S002211200200825X Request

  2. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal boundary layers ROMAIN MATHIS, NICHOLAS HUTCHINS and IVAN MARUSIC Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 628 in turbulent boundary layers. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 628, pp 311337 doi:10.1017/S0022112009006946 Request

  3. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal. Hutchins, J. P. Monty, D. Chung and I. Marusic Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 712 / December 2012, pp (2012). Amplitude and frequency modulation in wall turbulence. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 712, pp 6191

  4. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal layer M. B. JONES, T. B. NICKELS and IVAN MARUSIC Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 616 / December turbulent boundary layer. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 616, pp 195203 doi:10.1017/S0022112008004205 Request

  5. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal in a turbulent boundary layer W. T. HAMBLETON, N. HUTCHINS and IVAN MARUSIC Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume measurements in a turbulent boundary layer. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 560, pp 5364 doi:10.1017/S

  6. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal Terms of use : Click here Unravelling turbulence near walls IVAN MARUSIC Journal of Fluid Mechanics (2009). Unravelling turbulence near walls. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 630, pp 14 doi:10.1017/S

  7. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Wang, Z. Jane

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal. PESAVENTO and Z. JANE WANG Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 541 / October 2005, pp 65 90 DOI: 10.1017/S aerodynamics of fluttering and tumbling plates. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 541, pp 6590 doi:10.1017/S

  8. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal. MARUSIC Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 662 / November 2010, pp 514 539 DOI: 10.1017/S motions in turbulence. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 662, pp 514539 doi:10.1017/S0022112010003381 Request

  9. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Martn, Pino

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal. Effect of Mach number L. DUAN, I. BEEKMAN and M. P. MARTN Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 672. Part 3. Effect of Mach number. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 672, pp 245267 doi:10.1017/S

  10. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal of transpiration James D. Woodcock, John E. Sader and Ivan Marusic Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 690: an analysis of transpiration. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 690, pp 366398 doi:10.1017/jfm.2011.441 Request

  11. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Martn, Pino

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal. Effect of high enthalpy L. Duan and M. P. Martn Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 684 / October 2011 of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers. Part 4. Effect of high enthalpy. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 684, pp

  12. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal MARUSIC, D. D. JOSEPH and KRISHNAN MAHESH Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 570 / January 2007, pp 467 and turbulent comparisons for channel flow and flow control. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 570, pp 467477 doi:10

  13. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Marcus, Philip S.

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal and simulation Pedram Hassanzadeh, Philip S. Marcus and Patrice Le Gal Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 706 stratified flows: theory and simulation. Journal of Fluid Mechanics,706, pp 4657 doi:10.1017/jfm.2012

  14. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal. SMITS, J. MONTY, M. HULTMARK, S. C. C. BAILEY, N. HUTCHINS and I. MARUSIC Journal of Fluid Mechanics for wallbounded turbulence measurements. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 676, pp 4153 doi:10.1017/jfm.2011.19 Request

  15. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal. NICKELS, I. MARUSIC and M. S. CHONG Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 635 / September 2009, pp 103 136 spatial resolution issues in wallbounded turbulence. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 635, pp 103136 doi:10

  16. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal. Extension of the attached eddy hypothesis A. E. Perry and Ivan Marušic Journal of Fluid Mechanics layers. Part 1. Extension of the attached eddy hypothesis. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 298, pp 361388

  17. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Nolan, David S.

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal circulations David S. Nolan Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 711 / November 2012, pp 61 100 DOI: 10 vortices with secondary circulations. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 711, pp 61100 doi:10.1017/jfm.2012

  18. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal. Further experimental support Ivan Marušic and A. E. Perry Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 298. Further experimental support. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 298, pp 389407 doi:10.1017/S0022112095003363

  19. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal D. WOODCOCK, JOHN E. SADER and IVAN MARUSIC Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 659 / September 2010 drag reduction due to added polymers in Poiseuille flow. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 659, pp 473483

  20. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal layer using an atmospheric flow GARY J. KUNKEL and IVAN MARUSIC Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 548 using an atmospheric flow. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 548, pp 375402 doi:10.1017/S0022112005007780

  1. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal in wallbounded flows ROMAIN MATHIS, NICHOLAS HUTCHINS and IVAN MARUSIC Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 681 statistics in wallbounded flows. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 681, pp 537566 doi:10.1017/jfm.2011.216 Request

  2. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal MARUSIC, GARY J. KUNKEL and FERNANDO PORTÉAGEL Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 446 / November study of wall boundary conditions for largeeddy simulation. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 446, pp 309320

  3. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal GANAPATHISUBRAMANI, ELLEN K. LONGMIRE and IVAN MARUSIC Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 478 / March 2003, pp 35). Characteristics of vortex packets in turbulent boundary layers. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 478, pp 3546 doi:10

  4. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal of a turbulent round jet and a turbulent boundary layer T. B. NICKELS and IVAN MARUSIC Journal of Fluid Mechanics to the spectra of a turbulent round jet and a turbulent boundary layer. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 448, pp

  5. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal of Fluid Mechanics: Email alerts: Click here Subscriptions: Click here Commercial reprints: Click here. Woodhouse and Raymond E. Goldstein Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 705 / August 2012, pp 165 175 DOI

  6. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal of Fluid Mechanics: Email alerts: Click here Subscriptions: Click here Commercial reprints: Click here. Paoletti and Harry L. Swinney Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 706 / September 2012, pp 571 583 DOI: 10

  7. 2 Geophysical Aspects of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics

    E-print Network

    Balmforth, Neil

    2 Geophysical Aspects of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics N.J. Balmforth1 and R.V. Craster2 1, London, SW7 2BZ, UK 2.1 Introduction Non-Newtonian fluid mechanics is a vast subject that has several journals partly, or primarily, dedicated to its investigation (Journal of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics

  8. "Audacity or Precision": The Paradoxes of Henri Villat's Fluid Mechanics

    E-print Network

    Aubin, David

    1 "Audacity or Precision": The Paradoxes of Henri Villat's Fluid Mechanics in Interwar France David researches on fluid mechanics. Most of his original work was done before the First Word War; it was highly on, he held the fluid mechanics chair established by the Air Ministry at the Sorbonne in Paris

  9. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Parau, Emilian I.

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal of Fluid Mechanics: Email alerts: Click here Subscriptions: Click here Commercial reprints: Click here and E. I. Parau Journal of Fluid Mechanics / Volume 688 / December 2011, pp 528 550 DOI: 10.1017/jfm

  10. Propulsion Mechanism of Catalytic Microjet Engines

    PubMed Central

    Fomin, Vladimir M.; Hippler, Markus; Magdanz, Veronika; Soler, Llus; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the propulsion mechanism of the catalytic microjet engines that are fabricated using rolled-up nanotech. Microjets have recently shown numerous potential applications in nanorobotics but currently there is a lack of an accurate theoretical model that describes the origin of the motion as well as the mechanism of self-propulsion. The geometric asymmetry of a tubular microjet leads to the development of a capillary force, which tends to propel a bubble toward the larger opening of the tube. Because of this motion in an asymmetric tube, there emerges a momentum transfer to the fluid. In order to compensate this momentum transfer, a jet force acting on the tube occurs. This force, which is counterbalanced by the linear drag force, enables tube velocities of the order of 100 ?m/s. This mechanism provides a fundamental explanation for the development of driving forces that are acting on bubbles in tubular microjets. PMID:25177214

  11. Choosing the right program The BEng program in Biomedical and Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    I Engineering Graphical Design Fluid Mechanics I Mechanics of Solids I Communication SkillsChoosing the right program The BEng program in Biomedical and Mechanical Engineering is fully accredited by the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board. When you graduate from this program, you

  12. Comparing fluid mechanics models with experimental data.

    PubMed Central

    Spedding, G R

    2003-01-01

    The art of modelling the physical world lies in the appropriate simplification and abstraction of the complete problem. In fluid mechanics, the Navier-Stokes equations provide a model that is valid under most circumstances germane to animal locomotion, but the complexity of solutions provides strong incentive for the development of further, more simplified practical models. When the flow organizes itself so that all shearing motions are collected into localized patches, then various mathematical vortex models have been very successful in predicting and furthering the physical understanding of many flows, particularly in aerodynamics. Experimental models have the significant added convenience that the fluid mechanics can be generated by a real fluid, not a model, provided the appropriate dimensionless groups have similar values. Then, analogous problems can be encountered in making intelligible but independent descriptions of the experimental results. Finally, model predictions and experimental results may be compared if, and only if, numerical estimates of the likely variations in the tested quantities are provided. Examples from recent experimental measurements of wakes behind a fixed wing and behind a bird in free flight are used to illustrate these principles. PMID:14561348

  13. Bellcrank mechanisms for Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect

    Senft, J.R.; Senft, V.J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes a family of linkage drive systems for Stirling engines containing several new members. These mechanisms are adaptable to all three configurations of Stirling engine, impose minimal side loads on pistons and displacer rods, and include compact forms suitable for pressurized high performance engines. This group of drive systems is generated by a simple common scheme. Near sinusoidal motion is taken from a crankshaft carrying a single crankpin by two connecting rods each driving a bellcrank. The stationary pivots of the bellcranks are located so that their oscillatory motion has the phase angle separation required between the piston and displacer. The bellcranks are further configured to bring the third pin motion to a location suitable for coupling with the piston or displacer of the engine in a way which minimizes side loading. The paper presents a number of new linkage drives from the dual bellcrank family and indicates how they are embodied in beta and alpha type Stirling engines. The paper includes a design for a small multipurpose engine incorporating one of the subject mechanisms.

  14. Mechanical Engineering Department Seminar Series

    E-print Network

    Awtar, Shorya

    of fuel cells and metal-air batteries. In my talk, I will first present a K-O2 battery that uses K+ ions part of my talk, I will present a hybrid device named "solar metal-air battery", which possessesMechanical Engineering Department Seminar Series Rechargeable K-Oxygen and Solar Batteries: From

  15. MASTER OF SCIENCE MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

    E-print Network

    was conducted to determine the effect of various parameters on the performance of InGaAs thermophotovoltaic spacing case. At close spacing, silicon carbide exceeds the performance of the refractory metals down;MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 70 REDUCTION OF MARINE GAS TURBINE EXHAUST INFRARED SIGNATURE Joseph D. Gombas

  16. Technische Universitt Mnchen Department of Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Engineering 149 Prof. Dr. Rudolf Neu Plasma Material Interaction Group 154 Prof. Wolfgang Polifke, PhTechnische Universitt Mnchen Department of Mechanical Engineering 2013-2014Annual ReportMechanical Engineering #12;Imprint Technische Universitt Mnchen Department of Mechanical Engineering Boltzmannstrae 15

  17. Thirteenth symposium on energy engineering sciences: Proceedings. Fluid/thermal processes, systems analysis and control

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of which Engineering Research is a component program, is responsible for the long-term mission-oriented research in the Department. Consistent with the DOE/BES mission, the Engineering Research Program is charged with the identification, initiation, and management of fundamental research on broad, generic topics addressing energy-related engineering problems. Its stated goals are: (1) to improve and extend the body of knowledge underlying current engineering practice so as to create new options for enhancing energy savings and production, for prolonging useful life of energy-related structures and equipment, and for developing advanced manufacturing technologies and materials processing with emphasis on reducing costs with improved industrial production and performance quality; and (2) to expand the store of fundamental concepts for solving anticipated and unforeseen engineering problems in the energy technologies. The meeting covered the following areas: (1) fluid mechanics 1--fundamental properties; (2) fluid mechanics 2--two phase flow; (3) thermal processes; (4) fluid mechanics 3; (5) process analysis and control; (6) fluid mechanics 4--turbulence; (7) fluid mechanics 5--chaos; (8) materials issues; and (9) plasma processes. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  18. Gray's paradox: A fluid mechanical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Rahul; Hao, Max; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Patel, Namrata; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2014-01-01

    Nearly eighty years ago, Gray reported that the drag power experienced by a dolphin was larger than the estimated muscle power this is termed as Gray's paradox. We provide a fluid mechanical perspective of this paradox. The viewpoint that swimmers necessarily spend muscle energy to overcome drag in the direction of swimming needs revision. For example, in undulatory swimming most of the muscle energy is directly expended to generate lateral undulations of the body, and the drag power is balanced not by the muscle power but by the thrust power. Depending on drag model utilized, the drag power may be greater than muscle power without being paradoxical. PMID:25082341

  19. On the invariant formulation of fluid mechanics

    E-print Network

    S. Piekarski

    2004-11-17

    It can be observed that the differential operators of fluid mechanics can be defined in terms of the complete derivative on the finite - dimensional affine space. It follows from the fact that all norms on the finite - dimensional vector space are equivalent and from the definition of the complete derivative on the normed affine spaces (see: L.Schwartz, Analyse Mathematique, Hermann, 1967). In particular, it is shown that the "substantial derivative" of the standard formulation is a directional derivative along the "non - relativistic four - velocity".

  20. Gray's paradox: A fluid mechanical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bale, Rahul; Hao, Max; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Patel, Namrata; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2014-07-01

    Nearly eighty years ago, Gray reported that the drag power experienced by a dolphin was larger than the estimated muscle power - this is termed as Gray's paradox. We provide a fluid mechanical perspective of this paradox. The viewpoint that swimmers necessarily spend muscle energy to overcome drag in the direction of swimming needs revision. For example, in undulatory swimming most of the muscle energy is directly expended to generate lateral undulations of the body, and the drag power is balanced not by the muscle power but by the thrust power. Depending on drag model utilized, the drag power may be greater than muscle power without being paradoxical.

  1. Statistical mechanics of simple fluids: beyond van der Waals

    E-print Network

    Lebowitz, Joel

    Statistical mechanics of simple fluids: beyond van der Waals Equilibrium properties of dense fluids, such as a fluid of "hard spheres," and to calculations on high-speed computers. Joel L. Lebowitz and Eduardo M. Waisman Dense fluids, defined to include both dense gases and liquids, have the repu- tation of being

  2. Department of Mechanical Engineering MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING

    E-print Network

    Lin, Xi

    Department of Mechanical Engineering MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING PROGRAM_____________________________ C. Manufacturing Management D. Engineered Materials ENG ME 502/MN 505 Intellectual Assets ENG ME both core and concentration. A. Manufacturing or Dynamic Systems Theory B. Design and Control

  3. Advanced Fluid Mechanics: Page 1 1 Governing equations of fluid motion

    E-print Network

    Hogg, Andrew

    specified by a unit normal n. It is thus given by FS(x, t, n)A. By Newton's third law, we must have FS(x, tAdvanced Fluid Mechanics: Page 1 1 Governing equations of fluid motion 1.1 Terminology fluids are water and air. A continuum model is used to describe the motion of fluids. This does

  4. Advanced Fluid Mechanics: Page 1 1 Governing equations of fluid motion

    E-print Network

    Hogg, Andrew

    of the surface, here specified by a unit normal n. It is thus given by F S (x, t, n)#A. By Newton's third law, weAdvanced Fluid Mechanics: Page 1 1 Governing equations of fluid motion 1.1 Terminology fluids are water and air. A continuum model is used to describe the motion of fluids. This does

  5. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM Additional services for Journal of Fluid Mechanics: Email alerts: Click here Subscriptions: Click here Commercial reprints: Click here boundary layer N. HUTCHINS, J. P. MONTY, B. GANAPATHISUBRAMANI, H. C. H. NG and I. MARUSIC Journal of Fluid

  6. The Subsurface Fluid Mechanics of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage

    E-print Network

    The Subsurface Fluid Mechanics of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage by Michael Lawrence Szulczewski S the fluid mechanics of CO2 storage, with the goal of informing two practical questions. The first question by . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Heidi M. Nepf Chair, Departmental Committee for Graduate Students #12;2 #12;The Subsurface Fluid

  7. Falsification of dark energy by fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded for the discovery from observations of increased supernovae dimness interpreted as distance, so that the Universe expansion rate has changed from a rate decreasing since the big bang to one that is now increasing, driven by anti-gravity forces of a mysterious dark energy material comprising 70% of the Universe mass-energy. Fluid mechanical considerations falsify both the accelerating expansion and dark energy concepts. Kinematic viscosity is neglected in current stan- dard models of self-gravitational structure formation, which rely on cold dark matter CDM condensations and clusterings that are also falsified by fluid mechanics. Weakly collisional CDM particles do not condense but diffuse away. Photon viscosity predicts su- perclustervoid fragmentation early in the plasma epoch and protogalaxies at the end. At the plasma-gas transition, the plasma fragments into Earth-mass gas planets in trillion planet clumps (proto-globular-star-cluster PGCs). The hydrogen planets freeze to form the dark matter of galaxies and merge to form their stars. Dark energy is a systematic dimming error for Supernovae Ia caused by dark matter planets near hot white dwarf stars at the Chandrasekhar carbon limit. Evaporated planet atmospheres may or may not scatter light from the events depending on the line of sight.

  8. Falsification of dark energy by fluid mechanics

    E-print Network

    Carl H. Gibson

    2012-03-23

    The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded for the discovery of accelerating supernovae dimness, suggesting a remarkable change in the expansion rate of the Universe from a decrease since the big bang to an increase, driven by anti-gravity forces of a mysterious dark energy material comprising 70% of the Universe mass-energy. Fluid mechanical considerations falsify both the accelerating expansion and dark energy concepts. Kinematic viscosity is neglected in current standard models of self-gravitational structure formation, which rely on cold dark matter CDM condensations and clusterings that are also falsified by fluid mechanics. Weakly collisional CDM particles do not condense but diffuse away. Photon viscosity predicts superclustervoid fragmentation early in the plasma epoch and protogalaxies at the end. At the plasma-gas transition, the plasma fragments into Earth-mass gas planets in trillion planet clumps (proto-globular-star-cluster PGCs). The hydrogen planets freeze to form the dark matter of galaxies and merge to form their stars. Dark energy is a systematic dimming error for Supernovae Ia caused by dark matter planets near hot white dwarf stars at the Chandrasekhar carbon limit. Evaporated planet atmospheres may or may not scatter light from the events depending on the line of sight.

  9. GRADUATE STUDENT INFORMATION MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    GRADUATE STUDENT INFORMATION MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 2013/2014 September..............................3 C. COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR A MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING AND OPERATIONS............................4 E. DUAL MASTER IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING AND OPERATIONS RESEARCH

  10. Montana State University 1 Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    ; manufacturing industries including highway vehicles, instruments, airplanes, rockets and engines, toys engineering is very broad, with practitioners employed in most areas of technological and industrial management endeavor. Examples of industrial employers which require mechanical engineering background are

  11. A cyber-physical approach to experimental fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackowski, Andrew Williams

    This Thesis documents the design, implementation, and use of a novel type of experimental apparatus, termed Cyber-Physical Fluid Dynamics (CPFD). Unlike traditional fluid mechanics experiments, CPFD is a general-purpose technique that allows one to impose arbitrary forces on an object submerged in a fluid. By combining fluid mechanics with robotics, we can perform experiments that would otherwise be incredibly difficult or time-consuming. More generally, CPFD allows a high degree of automation and control of the experimental process, allowing for much more efficient use of experimental facilities. Examples of CPFD's capabilites include imposing a gravitational force in the horizontal direction (allowing a test object to "fall" sideways in a water channel), simulating nonlinear springs for a vibrating fluid-structure system, or allowing a self-propelled body to move forward under its own force. Because experimental parameters (including forces and even the mass of the test object) are defined in software, one can define entire ensembles of experiments to run autonomously. CPFD additionally integrates related systems such as water channel speed control, LDV flow speed measurements, and PIV flowfield measurements. The end result is a general-purpose experimental system that opens the door to a vast array of fluid-structure interaction problems. We begin by describing the design and implementation of CPFD, the heart of which is a high-performance force-feedback control system. Precise measurement of time-varying forces (including removing effects of the test object's inertia) is more critical here than in typical robotic force-feedback applications. CPFD is based on an integration of ideas from control theory, fluid dynamics, computer science, electrical engineering, and solid mechanics. We also describe experiments using the CPFD experimental apparatus to study vortex-induced vibration (VIV) and oscillating-airfoil propulsion. We show how CPFD can be used to simulate a hypothetical VIV energy harvesting device. By replacing standard linear springs with nonlinear ones, we can broaden the system's frequency response. Next, we transition from bluff bodies to unsteady airfoils, where we begin by measuring the thrust and efficiency of an airfoil pitching about its quarter-chord point. Finally, we examine how the propulsive performance of an oscillating airfoil is improved by the addition of passive dynamics.

  12. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 2: Tabulated data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program in oscillating flow within a circular duct are presented. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re sub max, Re sub w, and A sub R, embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation, and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA's Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radial components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and its reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Volume 2 contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphics).

  13. Mechanical Engineering Department. Technical review

    SciTech Connect

    Simecka, W.B.; Condouris, R.A.; Talaber, C.

    1980-01-01

    The Mechanical Engineering Department Technical Review is published to (1) inform the readers of various technical activities within the Department, (2) promote exchange of ideas, and (3) give credit to the personnel who are achieving the results. The report is formatted into two parts: technical achievements and publication abstracts. The first is divided into eight sections, one for each Division in the Department providing the reader with the names of the personnel and the Division accomplishing the work.

  14. Mechanical Engineering Department technical abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, R.M.

    1982-07-01

    The Mechanical Engineering Department publishes listings of technical abstracts twice a year to inform readers of the broad range of technical activities in the Department, and to promote an exchange of ideas. Details of the work covered by an abstract may be obtained by contacting the author(s). Overall information about current activities of each of the Department's seven divisions precedes the technical abstracts.

  15. Mechanical engineering department technical review

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.B. Denney, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    The Mechanical Engineering Department Technical Review is published to: (1) inform the readers of various technical activities within the department, (2) promote exchange of ideas, and (3) give credit to the personnel who are achieving the results. The report is formatted into two parts: technical acievements and publication abstracts. The first is divided into eight sections, one for each division in the department providing the reader with the names of the personnel and the division accomplishing the work.

  16. The ramifications of diffusive volume transport in classical fluid mechanics

    E-print Network

    Bielenberg, James R. (James Ronald), 1976-

    2004-01-01

    The thesis that follows consists of a collection of work supporting and extending a novel reformulation of fluid mechanics, wherein the linear momentum per unit mass in a fluid continuum, m, is supposed equal to the volume ...

  17. MECHANICALENGINEERING The Department of Mechanical Engineering presents

    E-print Network

    MECHANICALENGINEERING The Department of Mechanical Engineering presents: The Master's Dissertation Defense of: Sunday Omodan Fire Behavior Modeling - Experiment on Surface Fire Transition to the Elevated live Fuel Master of Science, Graduate Program in Mechanical Engineering University of California

  18. Expose Mechanical Engineering Students to Biomechanics Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Hui

    2011-01-01

    To adapt the focus of engineering education to emerging new industries and technologies nationwide and in the local area, a biomechanics module has been developed and incorporated into a mechanical engineering technical elective course to expose mechanical engineering students at ONU (Ohio Northern University) to the biomedical engineering topics.

  19. Standardized Curriculum for Diesel Engine Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Office of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    Standardized curricula are provided for two courses for the secondary vocational education program in Mississippi: diesel engine mechanics I and II. The eight units in diesel engine mechanics I are as follows: orientation; shop safety; basic shop tools; fasteners; measurement; engine operating principles; engine components; and basic auxiliary

  20. University Of California, Berkeley Department of Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Frenklach, Michael

    , kinematics, and dynamics. Design consideration of ocean vehicles and systems. Drag and propulsion. Model-testing (Cont.) #12;of a marine vehicle and the associated engineering skills in model-testing that quantify MATERIAL Required skills: Introductory background in Fluid Mechanics and Dynamics of Rigid

  1. 16th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference Crown Plaza, Gold Coast, Australia

    E-print Network

    Longmire, Ellen K.

    16th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference Crown Plaza, Gold Coast, Australia 2-7 December 2007. Longmire Department of Aerospace Engineering & Mechanics University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, for a particular wall-normal distance, the vortical structure auto- generated secondary and tertiary hairpin

  2. CHSLT -NEST WPI Mechanical Engineering Department

    E-print Network

    Furlong, Cosme

    CHSLT - NEST WPI Mechanical Engineering Department Introduction: digital cameras 10 November 2014 #12;CHSLT - NEST WPI Mechanical Engineering Department The CCD/CMOS camera CCD charged-coupled device) #12;CHSLT - NEST WPI Mechanical Engineering Department The CCD/CMOS camera Detail section of a CCD

  3. AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH CENTER MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING

    E-print Network

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    for a compressor stage found in turbofan, turbojet engines. Thisurbojet engines. This reduces complexity of engine08/03/2007 16:39 1 AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH CENTER MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT Associate, ARC, MAE, UT Arlington Co-authors: Daniel T. H. New, Lecturer, Department of Engineering

  4. SMAP Instrument Mechanical System Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slimko, Eric; French, Richard; Riggs, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, scheduled for launch by the end of 2014, is being developed to measure the soil moisture and soil freeze/thaw state on a global scale over a three-year period. The accuracy, resolution, and global coverage of SMAP measurements are invaluable across many science and applications disciplines including hydrology, climate, carbon cycle, and the meteorological, environment, and ecology applications communities. The SMAP observatory is composed of a despun bus and a spinning instrument platform that includes both a deployable 6 meter aperture low structural frequency Astromesh reflector and a spin control system. The instrument section has engendered challenging mechanical system issues associated with the antenna deployment, flexible antenna pointing in the context of a multitude of disturbances, spun section mass properties, spin control system development, and overall integration with the flight system on both mechanical and control system levels. Moreover, the multitude of organizations involved, including two major vendors providing the spin subsystem and reflector boom assembly plus the flight system mechanical and guidance, navigation, and control teams, has led to several unique system engineering challenges. Capturing the key physics associated with the function of the flight system has been challenging due to the many different domains that are applicable. Key interfaces and operational concepts have led to complex negotiations because of the large number of organizations that integrate with the instrument mechanical system. Additionally, the verification and validation concerns associated with the mechanical system have had required far-reaching involvement from both the flight system and other subsystems. The SMAP instrument mechanical systems engineering issues and their solutions are described in this paper.

  5. The Status of Fluid Mechanics in Bioengineering Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Gerald E.; Hyman, William A.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the status of fluid mechanics courses in bioengineering curricula. A survey of institutions offering bioengineering degrees indicates that over half do not require fluid mechanics courses. Suggests increasing number of mechanics courses to increase the quality of bioengineering students and to prepare students for graduate work and more

  6. ADDRESSING ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING CHALLENGES WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the status and application of Computational Fluid Dynamics )CFD) models to address environmental engineering challenges for more detailed understanding of air pollutant source emissions, atmospheric dispersion and resulting human exposure. CFD simulations ...

  7. Application of wave mechanics theory to fluid dynamics problems: Fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krzywoblocki, M. Z. V.

    1974-01-01

    The application of the basic formalistic elements of wave mechanics theory is discussed. The theory is used to describe the physical phenomena on the microscopic level, the fluid dynamics of gases and liquids, and the analysis of physical phenomena on the macroscopic (visually observable) level. The practical advantages of relating the two fields of wave mechanics and fluid mechanics through the use of the Schroedinger equation constitute the approach to this relationship. Some of the subjects include: (1) fundamental aspects of wave mechanics theory, (2) laminarity of flow, (3) velocity potential, (4) disturbances in fluids, (5) introductory elements of the bifurcation theory, and (6) physiological aspects in fluid dynamics.

  8. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 1: Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program in oscillating flow within a circular duct are presented. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re(sub max), Re(sub w), and A(sub R), embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters which included operating points of all Stirling engines. Next, a case was studied with values of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA's Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radial components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms-velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and its reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Models of laminar and turbulent boundary layers were used to process the data into wall coordinates and to evaluate skin friction coefficients. Such data aids in validating computational models and is useful in comparing oscillatory flow characteristics to those of fully-developed steady flow. Data were taken with a contoured entry to each end of the test section and with flush square inlets so that the effects of test section inlet geometry on transition and turbulence are documented. Volume 1 contains the text of the report including figures and supporting appendices. Volume 2 contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphical presentation).

  9. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T.W.

    1992-03-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program is oscillating flow within a circular duct are present. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re{sub max}, Re{sub W}, and A{sub R}, embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters which included operating points of all Stirling engines. Next, a case was studied with values of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA`s Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radical components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms-velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and in reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Models of laminar and turbulent boundary layers were used to process the data into wall coordinates and to evaluate skin friction coefficients. Such data aids in validating computational models and is useful in comparing oscillatory flow characteristics to those of fully-developed steady flow. Data were taken with a contoured entry to each end of the test section and with flush square inlets so that the effects of test section inlet geometry on transition and turbulence are documented. The following is presented in two-volumes. Volume I contains the text of the report including figures and supporting appendices. Volume II contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphical presentation).

  10. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING MECHANICAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM

    E-print Network

    Awtar, Shorya

    Materials for Design Battery Systems and Controls Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Systems Hybrid VehiclesUNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING MECHANICAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM #12;U-M) has a top-ranked Mechanical Engineering (ME) Undergraduate Program. Our curriculum is built upon

  11. School of Mechanical Engineering Faculty of Engineering, Computing and Mathematics

    E-print Network

    School of Mechanical Engineering Faculty of Engineering, Computing and Mathematics UNIT OUTLINE.Eng Special Unit Unit Code: MECH2499 Unit Coordinator: A/Prof Nathan Scott School: Mechanical Engineering with communication skills is available on the Faculty website though http://www.ecm.uwa.edu.au/studentnet/exams . You

  12. Chapter 17 in Encyclopedia of Computational Mechanics, Volume 3: Fluids Finite Element Methods for Fluid Dynamics with

    E-print Network

    Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    Chapter 17 in Encyclopedia of Computational Mechanics, Volume 3: Fluids Finite Element Methods surfaces, two-fluid interfaces, fluidobject and fluidstructure in- teractions, and moving mechanical in Encyclopedia of Computational Mechanics, Volume 3: Fluids (eds. E. Stein, R. De Borst and T.J.R. Hughes), John

  13. DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

    E-print Network

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING University of Massachusetts, Amherst ChE/MIE 590L Spring 2011 INFORMATION SHEET Materials Science and Engineering Project with the instructors during the first eight weeks of the semester as required. Instructors: Materials Engineering

  14. Fluid mechanics aspects of magnetic drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Odenbach, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations using a flow phantom for magnetic drug targeting have been undertaken. The flow phantom is a half y-branched tube configuration where the main tube represents an artery from which a tumour-supplying artery, which is simulated by the side branch of the flow phantom, branches off. In the experiments a quantification of the amount of magnetic particles targeted towards the branch by a magnetic field applied via a permanent magnet is achieved by impedance measurement using sensor coils. Measuring the targeting efficiency, i.e. the relative amount of particles targeted to the side branch, for different field configurations one obtains targeting maps which combine the targeting efficiency with the magnetic force densities in characteristic points in the flow phantom. It could be shown that targeting efficiency depends strongly on the magnetic field configuration. A corresponding numerical model has been set up, which allows the simulation of targeting efficiency for variable field configuration. With this simulation good agreement of targeting efficiency with experimental data has been found. Thus, the basis has been laid for future calculations of optimal field configurations in clinical applications of magnetic drug targeting. Moreover, the numerical model allows the variation of additional parameters of the drug targeting process and thus an estimation of the influence, e.g. of the fluid properties on the targeting efficiency. Corresponding calculations have shown that the non-Newtonian behaviour of the fluid will significantly influence the targeting process, an aspect which has to be taken into account, especially recalling the fact that the viscosity of magnetic suspensions depends strongly on the magnetic field strength and the mechanical load. PMID:26415215

  15. Mechanical Engineering Department technical review

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.B.; Abrahamson, L.; Denney, R.M.; Dubois, B.E

    1982-01-01

    Technical achievements and publication abstracts related to research in the following Divisions of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are reported in this biannual review: Nuclear Fuel Engineering; Nuclear Explosives Engineering; Weapons Engineering; Energy Systems Engineering; Engineering Sciences; Magnetic Fusion Engineering; and Material Fabrication. (LCL)

  16. Fluid Mechanics of Cricket and Tennis Balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Rabindra D.

    2009-11-01

    Aerodynamics plays a prominent role in defining the flight of a ball that is struck or thrown through the air in almost all ball sports. The main interest is in the fact that the ball can often deviate from its initial straight path, resulting in a curved, or sometimes an unpredictable, flight path. It is particularly fascinating that that not all the parameters that affect the flight of a ball are always under human influence. Lateral deflection in flight, commonly known as swing, swerve or curve, is well recognized in cricket and tennis. In tennis, the lateral deflection is produced by spinning the ball about an axis perpendicular to the line of flight, which gives rise to what is commonly known as the Magnus effect. It is now well recognized that the aerodynamics of sports balls are strongly dependent on the detailed development and behavior of the boundary layer on the ball's surface. A side force, which makes a ball curve through the air, can also be generated in the absence of the Magnus effect. In one of the cricket deliveries, the ball is released with the seam angled, which trips the laminar boundary layer into a turbulent state on that side. The turbulent boundary layer separates relatively late compared to the laminar layer on the other side, thereby creating a pressure difference and hence side force. The fluid mechanics of a cricket ball become very interesting at the higher Reynolds numbers and this will be discussed in detail. Of all the round sports balls, a tennis ball has the highest drag coefficient. This will be explained in terms of the contribution of the ``fuzz" drag and how that changes with Reynolds number and ball surface wear. It is particularly fascinating that, purely through historical accidents, small disturbances on the ball surface, such as the stitching on cricket balls and the felt cover on tennis balls are all about the right size to affect boundary layer transition and development in the Reynolds numbers of interest. The fluid mechanics of cricket and tennis balls will be discussed in detail with the help of latest test data, analyses and video clips.

  17. Mehrdad Negahban, Associate Chair for Graduate Studies and Research Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Mechanics, Materials Engineering, Biomedical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Farritor, Shane

    Baesu Kevin Cole Yuris Dzenis Linxia Gu Carl NelsonBenjamin Terry Sangjin Ryu Joseph Turner Jung Yul Lim Kevin Cole Zhaoyan Zhang Yuris Dzenis Mehrdad Negahban Solomon To John Reid Linxia Gu Carl Nelson #12 Carl Nelson #12;Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Mechanics, Materials Engineering, Biomedical

  18. Chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering College of Engineering, Architecture & Computer Sciences

    E-print Network

    Frenklach, Michael

    Chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering College of Engineering, Architecture & Computer's College of Engineering, Architecture and Computer Sciences, Department of Mechanical Engineering invites

  19. Entropic Lattice Boltzmann Methods for Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikatamarla, Shyam; Boesch, Fabian; Sichau, David; Karlin, Ilya

    2013-11-01

    With its roots in statistical mechanics and kinetic theory, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is a paradigm-changing innovation, offering for the first time an intrinsically parallel CFD algorithm. Over the past two decades, LBM has achieved numerous results in the field of CFD and is now in a position to challenge state-of-the art CFD techniques. Our major restyling of LBM resulted in an unconditionally stable entropic LBM which restored Second Law (Boltzmann H theorem) in the LBM kinetics and thus enabled affordable direct simulations of fluid turbulence. We review here recent advances in ELBM as a practical, modeling-free tool for simulation of turbulent flows in complex geometries. We shall present recent simulations including turbulent channel flow, flow past a circular cylinder, knotted vortex tubes, and flow past a surface mounted cube. ELBM listed all admissible lattices supporting a discrete entropy function and has classified them in hierarchically increasing order of accuracy. Applications of these higher-order lattices to simulations of turbulence and thermal flows shall also be presented. This work was supported CSCS grant s437.

  20. Teaching Continuum Mechanics in a Mechanical Engineering Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yucheng

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a graduate course, continuum mechanics, which is designed for and taught to graduate students in a Mechanical Engineering (ME) program. The significance of continuum mechanics in engineering education is demonstrated and the course structure is described. Methods used in teaching this course such as topics, class

  1. AEROSPACE AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 365 FITZPATRICK HALL OF ENGINEERING

    E-print Network

    , tissue engineering, and microscale additive manufacturing. Details: Duration: 1 year appointment manufacturing; specific applications include high-throughput measurement of the mechanical properties of cells

  2. Small Engines and Outboard Marine Mechanics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of small engine and outboard marine mechanics programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan small engines and marine mechanics employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a mechanics program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the

  3. Technical abstracts: Mechanical engineering, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Broesius, J.Y.

    1991-03-01

    This document is a compilation of the published, unclassified abstracts produced by mechanical engineers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during the calendar year 1990. Many abstracts summarize work completed and published in report form. These are UCRL-JC series documents, which include the full text of articles to be published in journals and of papers to be presented at meetings, and UCID reports, which are informal documents. Not all UCIDs contain abstracts: short summaries were generated when abstracts were not included. Technical Abstracts also provides descriptions of those documents assigned to the UCRL-MI (miscellaneous) category. These are generally viewgraphs or photographs presented at meetings. An author index is provided at the back of this volume for cross referencing.

  4. Application of the principle of similarity fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Sengers, J. V.

    1979-01-01

    Possible applications of the principle of similarity to fluid mechanics is described and illustrated. In correlating thermophysical properties of fluids, the similarity principle transcends the traditional corresponding states principle. In fluid mechanics the similarity principle is useful in correlating flow processes that can be modeled adequately with one independent variable (i.e., one-dimensional flows). In this paper we explore the concept of transforming the conservation equations by combining similarity principles for thermophysical properties with those for fluid flow. We illustrate the usefulness of the procedure by applying such a transformation to calculate two phase critical mass flow through a nozzle.

  5. Mitchel Craun1 Mechanical Engineering,

    E-print Network

    Bamieh, Bassam

    Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 Optimal Periodic Control of an Ideal Stirling Engine Model We consider an optimal control problem for a model of a Stirling engine that is actively controlled through its displacer is available. [DOI: 10.1115/1.4029682] 1 Introduction Stirling engines are heat air engines that can operate

  6. Journal of Fluid Mechanics http://journals.cambridge.org/FLM

    E-print Network

    Martn, Pino

    -speed engine inlets, internal flowpaths of scramjets, over-expanded rocket engine nozzles and deflected control interaction Stephan Priebe1,2 and M. Pino Martn2 1 Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA 2 Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Maryland

  7. EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN DEPARTMENT: Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN DEPARTMENT: Mechanical Engineering Bio-Mechanics and Bio-Medical Minimum Table of Contents: Fire, Fire Alarm and Other Emergencies, 2009 3 Evacuation Procedures for Fire, Fire Alarm and Other Emergencies Alarm will sound for more than

  8. EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN DEPARTMENT: Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN DEPARTMENT: Mechanical Engineering Manufacturing, Applied Mechanics Authorization Authority Table of Contents: Fire, Fire Alarm and Other Emergencies, 2009 3 Evacuation Procedures for Fire, Fire Alarm and Other Emergencies Alarm will sound for more than

  9. Quantitative image processing in fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesselink, Lambertus; Helman, James; Ning, Paul

    1992-01-01

    The current status of digital image processing in fluid flow research is reviewed. In particular, attention is given to a comprehensive approach to the extraction of quantitative data from multivariate databases and examples of recent developments. The discussion covers numerical simulations and experiments, data processing, generation and dissemination of knowledge, traditional image processing, hybrid processing, fluid flow vector field topology, and isosurface analysis using Marching Cubes.

  10. 2015 GRADUATE STUDIES ENVIRONMENTAL FLUID MECHANICS

    E-print Network

    , a recirculating flume for cohesive sediment resuspen- sion, a recirculating saltwater flume, a density Hydrodynamics Coastal Sediment Transport Coastal Engineering Measurements Coastal Structures Coastal

  11. Mechanical Engineering BEng / BEng (Hons) Key details

    E-print Network

    Painter, Kevin

    Mechanical engineers play key roles in all industrial sectors, from aerospace and oil and gas, through food and transport, to the manufacturing, chemical and entertainment industries. Professional mechanical engineers belong to teams responsible for the design and manufacture of countless articles we take for granted

  12. MECHANICALENGINEERING The Department of Mechanical Engineering presents

    E-print Network

    -thermal Plasmas Doctor of Philosophy, Graduate Program in Mechanical Engineering University of CaliforniaMECHANICALENGINEERING The Department of Mechanical Engineering presents: The Ph.D. Dissertation, and wide particle size distribution. In this dissertation, non-thermal plasma technique is used to overcome

  13. Realization Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Systems Realization Laboratory Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering Modeling Design Concepts Realization Laboratory Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA Hybrid? CVT, 5spd Auto, or 6spd Auto? #12;Systems Realization Laboratory 4 Concepts as Sets

  14. Gasoline Engine Mechanics. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of South Florida, Tampa. Dept. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This vocational program guide is intended to assist in the organization, operation, and evaluation of a program in gasoline engine mechanics in school districts, area vocational centers, and community colleges. The following topics are covered: job duties of small-engine mechanics; program content (curriculum framework and student performance

  15. Mechanical Engineering Department "The Lindbergh Lectures"

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    withdrawing from the UW Mechanical Engineering Department to attend flight school, Charles A. Lindbergh, the youngest daughter of Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh, has accepted the ME Department's invitationMechanical Engineering Department "The Lindbergh Lectures" Thursday, October 16 th , 2014 12

  16. BSc in Mechanical Engineering Process Engineering spec.

    E-print Network

    Levente, Buttyn

    water. Wastewater sludge treatment techniques, sludge disposal. Part III. Treatment of gaseous knowledge in air pollution control, wastewater treatment and solid wastes management for mechanical problems in topics of air pollution control, wastewater and solid wastes management. Based

  17. A phenomenological study on establishing a mechanical model of an electrorheological fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhang Yong; Yi, Yu Jun; Hao Lin, Li; Yi, Gan; Sen, Kong Fan; Qiang, Zhang Jian

    2006-12-01

    An accurate mechanical model which characterizes quantitatively the behaviour of electrorheological (ER) fluid is critical for engineering application of ER technology. In this study, using a modified controlled-stress rheometer an ER fluid composed of polyaniline (PAn) powder in silicone oil is tested over a range of electric field strengths (0-2.8 kV mm-1) and shear rates (0-150 s-1) the constitutive equations are established with TA Instrument data analysis software; the phenomenological mechanical models are deduced by virtue of rheological theory, and the fitting curves of these models show satisfactory agreement with the experimental results. On the other hand, the similarities between the curves of the mechanical models and those of the constitutive equations also confirm that the mechanical models of ER fluid proposed in this study are reasonable.

  18. Application of the principle of similarity fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendericks, R. C.; Sengers, J. V.

    1979-01-01

    The principle of similarity applied to fluid mechanics is described and illustrated. The concept of transforming the conservation equations by combining similarity principles for thermophysical properties with those for fluid flow is examined. The usefulness of the procedure is illustrated by applying such a transformation to calculate two phase critical mass flow through a nozzle.

  19. SEGMENTING CROSSING FIBER GEOMETRIES USING FLUID MECHANICS TENSOR DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION TRACTOGRAPHY

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Paul

    SEGMENTING CROSSING FIBER GEOMETRIES USING FLUID MECHANICS TENSOR DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION introduce a fluid mechanics based tractography method that estimates the most likely connection path between using fluid mechanics based tractography has demonstrated superior performance vs. other competing

  20. EFFICIENT NONPARAMETRIC DENSITY ESTIMATION ON THE SPHERE WITH APPLICATIONS IN FLUID MECHANICS

    E-print Network

    Egecioglu, mer

    EFFICIENT NONPARAMETRIC DENSITY ESTIMATION ON THE SPHERE WITH APPLICATIONS IN FLUID MECHANICS OMER density, nonparametric estimation, fluid mechanics, convergence, kernel method, efficient algorithm AMS, an important application of nonparametric density estimation is in computational fluid mechanics. When the flow

  1. Vascular fluid mechanics, the arterial wall, and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nerem, R M

    1992-08-01

    Atherosclerosis, a disease of large- and medium-size arteries, is the chief cause of death in the United States and in most of the western world. Severe atherosclerosis interferes with blood flow; however, even in the early stages of the disease, i.e. during atherogenesis, there is believed to be an important relationship between the disease processes and the characteristics of the blood flow in the arteries. Atherogenesis involves complex cascades of interactions among many factors. Included in this are fluid mechanical factors which are believed to be a cause of the highly focal nature of the disease. From in vivo studies, there is evidence of hemodynamic influences on the endothelium, on intimal thickening, and on monocyte recruitment. In addition, cell culture studies have demonstrated the important effect of a cell's mechanical environment on structure and function. Most of this evidence is for the endothelial cell, which is believed to be a key mediator of any hemodynamic effect, and it is now well documented that cultured endothelial monolayers, in response to a fluid flow-imposed laminar shear stress, undergo a variety of changes in structure and function. In spite of the progress in recent years, there are many areas in which further work will provide important new information. One of these is in the engineering of the cell culture environment so as to make it more physiologic. Animal studies also are essential in our efforts to understand atherogenesis, and it is clear that we need better information on the pattern of the disease and its temporal development in humans and animal models, as well as the specific underlying biologic events.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1522720

  2. Diffuse-Interface Methods in Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. M.; McFadden, G. B.; Wheeler, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    The authors review the development of diffuse-interface models of hydrodynamics and their application to a wide variety of interfacial phenomena. The authors discuss the issues involved in formulating diffuse-interface models for single-component and binary fluids. Recent applications and computations using these models are discussed in each case. Further, the authors address issues including sharp-interface analyses that relate these models to the classical free-boundary problem, related computational approaches to describe interfacial phenomena, and related approaches describing fully-miscible fluids.

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Aerosol Transport and Deposition Mechanisms

    E-print Network

    Tang, Yingjie

    2012-07-16

    In this work, various aerosol particle transport and deposition mechanisms were studied through the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, including inertial impaction, gravitational effect, lift force, interception, and turbophoresis, within...

  4. Resource Letter MPF-1: Mechanical Properties of Fluids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography concerning the mechanical properties of fluids, including topics for use at elementary, secondary, undergraduate, and graduate levels. Indicates that the material can particularly help college physicists in improving course contents in specified fields of physics. (CC)

  5. Research in progress in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, fluid mechanics, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period October 1, 1993 through March 31, 1994. The major categories of the current ICASE research program are: (1) applied and numerical mathematics, including numerical analysis and algorithm development; (2) theoretical and computational research in fluid mechanics in selected areas of interest to LaRC, including acoustics and combustion; (3) experimental research in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics involving LaRC facilities and scientists; and (4) computer science.

  6. Chern-Simons Reduction and non-Abelian Fluid Mechanics

    E-print Network

    R. Jackiw; V. P. Nair; So-Young Pi

    2000-07-17

    We propose a non-Abelian generalization of the Clebsch parameterization for a vector in three dimensions. The construction is based on a group-theoretical reduction of the Chern-Simons form on a symmetric space. The formalism is then used to give a canonical (symplectic) discussion of non-Abelian fluid mechanics, analogous to the way the Abelian Clebsch parameterization allows a canonical description of conventional fluid mechanics.

  7. Liquid rocket engine fluid-cooled combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A monograph on the design and development of fluid cooled combustion chambers for liquid propellant rocket engines is presented. The subjects discussed are (1) regenerative cooling, (2) transpiration cooling, (3) film cooling, (4) structural analysis, (5) chamber reinforcement, and (6) operational problems.

  8. Preparation of nano fluids by mechanical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boopathy, J.; Pari, R.; Kavitha, M.; Angelo, P. C.

    2012-07-01

    Nanofluids are conventional heat transfer fluids that contain nano particles of metals, oxides, carbides, nitrides, or nanotubes. Nanofluids exhibit enhanced thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficients compared to the base fluids. This paper presents the procedure for preparing nanofluids consisting of Copper and Aluminium nano powders in base fluids. Copper and Aluminium nano powders were produced by planetary ball wet milling at 300rpm for 50hrs. Toluene was added to ensure wet milling. These powders were characterized in XRD and SEM for their purity, particle size and shape. The XRD results confirmed the final particle sizes of Copper and Aluminium in the nano range. Then the 0.01 gm of nano metal powders was added in 150 ml of double distilled water and magnetic stirring was done at 1500 rpm for 15 minutes. Sodium lauryl sulphate (0.05%) was added in water as surfactant to ensure the stability of the dispersion. Ultrasonication in the 3000 watts bath was done for 10 minutes to enhance the uniform dispersion of metal powders in water. The pH, dynamic viscosity, ionic conductivity and the stability of the fluids were determined for further usage of synthesized nanofluids as coolant during grinding operation.

  9. The fluid mechanics of dissolution trapping in

    E-print Network

    Bolster, Diogo

    supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) is injected into deep subsurface formations for long-term storage, the supercritical CO2 phase and the solid porous medium phase. This results in important dynamics associated). The density of supercritical CO2 is less than that of the resident fluid; thus buoyancy effects are important

  10. Bernoulli and Newton in Fluid Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Norman F.

    1972-01-01

    Bernoulli's theorem can be better understood with the aid of Newton's laws and the law of conservation of energy. Application of this theorem should involve only cases dealing with an interchange of velocity and pressure within a fluid under isentropic conditions. (DF)

  11. European Journal of Mechanics B/Fluids 23 (2004) 709726 Concise and accurate solutions to half-space binary-gas flow

    E-print Network

    Siewert, Charles E.

    2004-01-01

    European Journal of Mechanics B/Fluids 23 (2004) 709726 Concise and accurate solutions to half of Mechanics B/Fluids 23 (2004) 709726 calculations. Some of these parameters are deduced from modeling, while-8205, USA b Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Thessaly, Volos, 38334

  12. Electroresponsive aqueous silk protein as "smart" mechanical damping fluid.

    PubMed

    Jose, Rod R; Elia, Roberto; Tien, Lee W; Kaplan, David L

    2014-05-14

    Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of an electroresponsive aqueous silk protein polymer as a smart mechanical damping fluid. The aqueous polymer solution is liquid under ambient conditions, but is reversibly converted into a gel once subjected to an electric current, thereby increasing or decreasing in viscosity. This nontoxic, biodegradable, reversible, edible fluid also bonds to device surfaces and is demonstrated to reduce friction and provide striking wear protection. The friction and mechanical damping coefficients are shown to modulate with electric field exposure time and/or intensity. Damping coefficient can be modulated electrically, and then preserved without continued power for longer time scales than conventional "smart" fluid dampers. PMID:24750065

  13. Electroresponsive Aqueous Silk Protein As Smart Mechanical Damping Fluid

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of an electroresponsive aqueous silk protein polymer as a smart mechanical damping fluid. The aqueous polymer solution is liquid under ambient conditions, but is reversibly converted into a gel once subjected to an electric current, thereby increasing or decreasing in viscosity. This nontoxic, biodegradable, reversible, edible fluid also bonds to device surfaces and is demonstrated to reduce friction and provide striking wear protection. The friction and mechanical damping coefficients are shown to modulate with electric field exposure time and/or intensity. Damping coefficient can be modulated electrically, and then preserved without continued power for longer time scales than conventional smart fluid dampers. PMID:24750065

  14. Zero-G fluid mechanics in animal and man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandler, H.

    1986-01-01

    Significant cardiovascular change occurs with spaceflight. Loss of normal hydrostatic pressure gradients (head-to-foot), present while upright on earth, results in significant headward fluid shift of vascular and interstitial fluids. The resultant fluid change also shifts the hydrostatic indifference point for the circulation. The persistent distention of neck veins and change in upper body tissue compliance initiates steps to adapt to and compensate for the sensed excess fluid. These result in a loss of intravascular volume through neuro-humoral mechanisms and the presence of a smaller heart size, leading to a state where the subject has a reduced adaptive capacity to stress, particularly to fluid shifts to the lower body as occurs when once again returning to earth. This article reviews what is known about the weightlessness-induced headward fluid shift and its effects on cardiovascular function.

  15. Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Frenklach, Michael

    such as robotics and automation, MEMS and nano-scale applications, energy systems, and materials processing Engineering Department at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) invites applications for a faculty in the top 5 Best Engineering Schools in the U.S. Applications should include curriculum vitae, statements

  16. Defining the Australian Mechanical Engineer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Clive

    2006-01-01

    The attribute focus in engineering education now adopted by the engineering education accrediting bodies of the US, UK and Australia is based on meeting the assumed needs of professional practice. It is associated with an increasing expectation by employers of work-ready graduates rather than relying on subsequent work-based learning and

  17. Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #5-rz maj 2015 bo Akademi Univ -Chemical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    ://users.abo.fi/rzevenho/kursRZ.html#FPS Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #5- rz maj 2015 bo Akademi Univ - Chemical Engineering - Chemical Engineering Thermal and Flow Engineering - Biskopsgatan 8, 20500 Turku 3/70 Fluid flow around 2015 bo Akademi Univ - Chemical Engineering Thermal and Flow Engineering - Biskopsgatan 8, 20500 Turku

  18. Proceedings of IMECE06: International Mechanical Engineering Conference and Exposition 2006

    E-print Network

    Panchagnula, Mahesh

    November 5-13, 2006, Chicago, USA IMECE2006-14729 EULERIAN MULTI-FLUID MODEL OF AIR BLAST ATOMIZATION. of Mechanical Engineering, Tennessee Tech University ABSTRACT A fully Eulerian "multi-fluid" model of air blast as part of numerical solutions. In the current approach, discretization is made part of the model itself

  19. Fluid Mechanics, Arterial Disease, and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tarbell, John M.; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Dunn, Jessilyn; Jo, Hanjoong

    2014-01-01

    This review places modern research developments in vascular mechanobiology in the context of hemodynamic phenomena in the cardiovascular system and the discrete localization of vascular disease. The modern origins of this field are traced, beginning in the 1960s when associations between flow characteristics, particularly blood flowinduced wall shear stress, and the localization of atherosclerotic plaques were uncovered, and continuing to fluid shear stress effects on the vascular lining endothelial) cells (ECs), including their effects on EC morphology, biochemical production, and gene expression. The earliest single-gene studies and genome-wide analyses are considered. The final section moves from the ECs lining the vessel wall to the smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts within the wall that are fluid me chanically activated by interstitial flow that imposes shear stresses on their surfaces comparable with those of flowing blood on EC surfaces. Interstitial flow stimulates biochemical production and gene expression, much like blood flow on ECs. PMID:25360054

  20. Weakly nonlocal fluid mechanics - the Schrodinger equation

    E-print Network

    P. Van; T. Fulop

    2004-06-09

    A weakly nonlocal extension of ideal fluid dynamics is derived from the Second Law of thermodynamics. It is proved that in the reversible limit the additional pressure term can be derived from a potential. The requirement of the additivity of the specific entropy function determines the quantum potential uniquely. The relation to other known derivations of Schr\\"odinger equation (stochastic, Fisher information, exact uncertainty) is clarified.

  1. High temperature mechanically pumped fluid loop for space applications : working fluid selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, Anthony D.; Birur, Gajanana C.; Bhandari, Pradeep

    2004-01-01

    Mechanically pumped single-phase fluid loops are well suited for transporting and rejecting large amounts of waste heat from spacecraft electronics and power supplies. While past implementations of these loops on spacecraft have used moderate operating temperatures (less than 6OoC), higher operating temperatures would allow equivalent heat loads to be rejected by smaller and less massive radiators. A high temperature (100 to 15OOC) mechanically pumped fluid loop is currently being investigated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for use on future Mars missions. This paper details the trade study used to select the high temperature working fluid for the system and the initial development testing of loop components.

  2. Julia Borras Department of Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Haller, Gary L.

    reliable implementation of force control, increase the adaptability of the mechanism to external contacts balanced six degrees of freedom manipulator using legs formed by compliant parallelo- gram mechanismsJulia Borras Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yale University, New Haven

  3. Mod I automotive Stirling engine mechanical development

    SciTech Connect

    Simetkosky, M.

    1984-01-01

    The Mod I Stirling engine was the first automotive Stirling engine designed specifically for automotive application. Testing of these engines has revealed several deficiencies in engine mechanical integrity which have been corrected by redesign or upgrade. The main deficiencies uncovered during the Mod I program lie in the combustion, auxiliary, main seal, and heater head areas. This paper will address each of the major area deficiencies in detail, and describe the corrective actions taken as they apply to the Mod I and the next Stirling-engine design, the Upgraded Mod I (a redesign to incorporate new materials for cost/weight reduction and improved performance).

  4. UB DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING (MAE) BS in Mechanical Engineering (ME)

    E-print Network

    Krovi, Venkat

    of energy, me- chanics, and materials in "product engineering" to design and manufacture machines that use mechanics, ener- gy and heat, mathematics, design, and manufacturing. Mechanical engineers work sources? How can we improve the efficiency and decrease the noise of aircraft engines? Can we

  5. Problems in Microgravity Fluid Mechanics: G-Jitter Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homsy, G. M.

    2005-01-01

    This is the final report on our NASA grant, Problems in Microgravity Fluid Mechanics NAG3-2513: 12/14/2000 - 11/30/2003, extended through 11/30/2004. This grant was made to Stanford University and then transferred to the University of California at Santa Barbara when the PI relocated there in January 2001. Our main activity has been to conduct both experimental and theoretical studies of instabilities in fluids that are relevant to the microgravity environment, i.e. those that do not involve the action of buoyancy due to a steady gravitational field. Full details of the work accomplished under this grant are given below. Our work has focused on: (i) Theoretical and computational studies of the effect of g-jitter on instabilities of convective states where the convection is driven by forces other than buoyancy (ii) Experimental studies of instabilities during displacements of miscible fluid pairs in tubes, with a focus on the degree to which these mimic those found in immiscible fluids. (iii) Theoretical and experimental studies of the effect of time dependent electrohydrodynamic forces on chaotic advection in drops immersed in a second dielectric liquid. Our objectives are to acquire insight and understanding into microgravity fluid mechanics problems that bear on either fundamental issues or applications in fluid physics. We are interested in the response of fluids to either a fluctuating acceleration environment or to forces other than gravity that cause fluid mixing and convection. We have been active in several general areas.

  6. Fluid geochemistry applications in reservoir engineering (vapour-dominated systems)

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amore, F.; Celati, R.; Calore, C.

    1982-01-01

    Fluid geochemistry has proved to be a valid tool for analyzing the processes occurring in geothermal reservoirs. The major effort is now invested in developing conceptual and quantitative models for chemical and physical processes that could produce the observed variations in fluid composition. These models are an effective complement to the classical methods of reservoir engineering in field development and exploitation. The fields in which the geochemical methods seem to be most effective are listed. Previous work in the field, as well as current development of research conducted on gas composition, is discussed and reviewed.

  7. continuum mechanics inviscid fluids Height of a Sequoia

    E-print Network

    continuum mechanics inviscid fluids Height of a Sequoia The sequoias of California are the tallest could a sequoia be? Use the fact that the pressure at z = 0 should be atmospheric pressure: P0 105 Pa. (b) Obviously, sequoias must come up with a more clever mechanism. Now, let us see what would happen

  8. Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Fibigerstrde 16

    E-print Network

    Schwefel, Hans-Peter

    Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Fibigerstrde 16 9220 Aalborg Denmark, Associate Professor Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Denmark (Chairman) Anja M Supervisor: Thomas D. Brun, Associate Professor Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering

  9. System Dynamics and Vibration Lab Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Shaw, Steven W.

    and Vibration Lab Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Conclusions Nonlinear Component Mode Synthesis --Build ROMsSystem Dynamics and Vibration Lab Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Component Mode Synthesis Using Nonlinear Normal Modes Polarit Apiwattanalunggarn and Steven Shaw Department of Mechanical Engineering

  10. Yoram Halevi2 Mechanical Engineering Department,

    E-print Network

    Ray, Asok

    components in complex dynamicalprocesses like advanced aircraft, spacecraft, and autonomous manufacturing scenarios of ICCS. 1 Introduction Complex dynamical processes like advanced aircraft, spacecraftYoram Halevi2 Asok Ray Mem. ASME Mechanical Engineering Department, The Pennsylvania State

  11. Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Additive Manufacturing

    E-print Network

    Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Additive Manufacturing University of Kansas of additive manufacturing. Exceptional candidates with outstanding qualifications could be considered using additive manufacturing in applications such as, but not limited to the net shape manufacture of

  12. Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Name: ___________________________________

    E-print Network

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering FEDEX Form From Name) Packaging: ___Your Packaging ___FEDEX Envelope ___FEDEX Box ___FEDEX Pack Dimension: ___L ___ W ___ H to ensure your shipment complies with guidelines: http://www.fedex

  13. Wind Turbines Electrical and Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Provancher, William

    Wind Turbines Electrical and Mechanical Engineering Objective Introduce students to the concept of alternative energy. Explain the math and scientific principles behind engineering wind turbines. Standards and how it applies to wind energy About how surface area and shape effects wind turbine efficiency

  14. Aloke Kumar School of Mechanical Engineering,

    E-print Network

    Yip, Aaron Nung Kwan

    Aloke Kumar School of Mechanical Engineering, and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University Lafayette, IN 47907 Gil U. Lee School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, and Birck Nanotechnology Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 e-mail: wereley@purdue.edu Optical

  15. Michigan State University Department of Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Feeny, Brian

    for telemedicine, heart valves, left ventricle assist devices, and the whole range of medical devices. Research by biomechanical engineers includes studying the strength of bones and soft tissues, the motion of cellsMichigan State University Department of Mechanical Engineering BIOMECHANICAL CONCENTRATION (16

  16. Active Learning in Fluid Mechanics: Youtube Tube Flow and Puzzling Fluids Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrenya, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    Active-learning exercises appropriate for a course in undergraduate fluid mechanics are presented. The first exercise involves an experiment in gravity-driven tube flow, with small groups of students partaking in a contest to predict the experimental flow rates using the mechanical energy balance. The second exercise takes the form of an

  17. The quantum mechanics of perfect fluids

    E-print Network

    Solomon Endlich; Alberto Nicolis; Riccardo Rattazzi; Junpu Wang

    2010-11-29

    We consider the canonical quantization of an ordinary fluid. The resulting long-distance effective field theory is derivatively coupled, and therefore strongly coupled in the UV. The system however exhibits a number of peculiarities, associated with the vortex degrees of freedom. On the one hand, these have formally a vanishing strong-coupling energy scale, thus suggesting that the effective theory's regime of validity is vanishingly narrow. On the other hand, we prove an analog of Coleman's theorem, whereby the semiclassical vacuum has no quantum counterpart, thus suggesting that the vortex premature strong-coupling phenomenon stems from a bad identification of the ground state and of the perturbative degrees of freedom. Finally, vortices break the usual connection between short distances and high energies, thus potentially impairing the unitarity of the effective theory.

  18. The contact angle in inviscid fluid mechanics

    E-print Network

    P N Shankar; R Kidambi

    2005-08-17

    We show that in general, the specification of a contact angle condition at the contact line in inviscid fluid motions is incompatible with the classical field equations and boundary conditions generally applicable to them. The limited conditions under which such a specification is permissible are derived; however, these include cases where the static meniscus is not flat. In view of this situation, the status of the many `solutions' in the literature which prescribe a contact angle in potential flows comes into question. We suggest that these solutions which attempt to incorporate a phenomenological, but incompatible, condition are in some, imprecise sense `weak-type solutions'; they satisfy or are likely to satisfy, at least in the limit, the governing equations and boundary conditions everywhere except in the neighbourhood of the contact line. We discuss the implications of the result for the analysis of inviscid flows with free surfaces.

  19. Fluid Mechanical and Electrical Fluctuation Forces in Colloids

    E-print Network

    D. Drosdoff; A. Widom

    2004-10-06

    Fluctuations in fluid velocity and fluctuations in electric fields may both give rise to forces acting on small particles in colloidal suspensions. Such forces in part determine the thermodynamic stability of the colloid. At the classical statistical thermodynamic level, the fluid velocity and electric field contributions to the forces are comparable in magnitude. When quantum fluctuation effects are taken into account, the electric fluctuation induced van der Waals forces dominate those induced by purely fluid mechanical motions. The physical principles are applied in detail for the case of colloidal particle attraction to the walls of the suspension container and more briefly for the case of forces between colloidal particles.

  20. Circulating fluid bed technology within Combustion Engineering Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    Treff, P.J.; Maitland, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    As the worldwide trend for more flexible, cost-effective CFB technology continues as an alternative to pulverized coal and combined cycle steam generation, Combustion Engineering Inc. has drawn on original scientific work and the operating history of numerous BFBs and CFBs worldwide as reported in publicly available literature to introduce many product enhancements for its next generation of circulating fluid bed boilers. The issues of in-furnace surface versus external fluid bed heat exchanger applicability, cyclone and loop seal design, refractory system design and operating requirements, and the suitability of regenerative air heaters for CFB applications will be among the topics discussed in this paper as Combustion Engineering Inc. answers the challenge to continuously advance CFB steam generation.

  1. Mechanical Engineering "The Lindbergh Lectures"

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    compatibility, materials selection, and efficiency- generating technology for solar power systems and advanced demand for low-cost energy solutions drives research on advanced power conversion cycles. The Rankine cycle, based on steam engine technology, is used for the majority of electric power generation around

  2. Mechanical equivalent of quantum heat engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, Jacques; Chusseau, Laurent; Philippe, Fabrice

    2008-06-01

    Quantum heat engines employ as working agents multilevel systems instead of classical gases. We show that under some conditions quantum heat engines are equivalent to a series of reservoirs at different altitudes containing balls of various weights. A cycle consists of picking up at random a ball from one reservoir and carrying it to the next, thereby performing or absorbing some work. In particular, quantum heat engines, employing two-level atoms as working agents, are modeled by reservoirs containing balls of weight 0 or 1. The mechanical model helps us prove that the maximum efficiency of quantum heat engines is the Carnot efficiency. Heat pumps and negative temperatures are considered.

  3. Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #2 -rz maj 2015 bo Akademi Univ -Chemical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    .zevenhoven@abo.fi Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #2 - rz maj 2015 bo Akademi Univ - Chemical Engineering Dynamics 424512 E #2 - rz maj 2015 bo Akademi Univ - Chemical Engineering Thermal and Flow Engineering Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #2 - rz maj 2015 bo Akademi Univ - Chemical Engineering

  4. MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING REGISTRATION ADVISING FORM

    E-print Network

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    2312 Solid Mechanics MAE 3360 Engr Analysis MAE 3310 Thermodynamics I MAE 2360 Num. Anal. & Prog. PHYS MAE 3310 Thermodyn. I 2014-2015 MAE 2314 Fluid Mech. I MAE 3311 Thermodynamics II MAE 3242 Mech MAE 3344 Into. to Mfg. Eng. HIST 1312 U.S. History since 1865 * HIST 1302 HIST 1311 U.S. History

  5. Montana State University 1 Engineering Ph.D.

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    , fluid mechanics, thermal mechanics, geo- mechanics, and structures. Coordinating Departments: Chemical: solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, biomechanics, thermal sciences, structural mechanics. Civil Mechanics This option involves research in areas central to engineering mechanics including solid mechanics

  6. Department of Mechanical Engineering 2014 Seminar Series

    E-print Network

    Bernstein, Joseph B.

    City, NJ as a Program Manager focusing on the Rotorcraft Dam- age Tolerance/Health & Usage MonitoringDepartment of Mechanical Engineering 2014 Seminar Series Dy Le Mechanics Division Chief Vehicle integrates a wide range of technologies including the material "genome", damage precursors, self

  7. Bone tissue engineering: the role of interstitial fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillsley, M. V.; Frangos, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    It is well established that vascularization is required for effective bone healing. This implies that blood flow and interstitial fluid (ISF) flow are required for healing and maintenance of bone. The fact that changes in bone blood flow and ISF flow are associated with changes in bone remodeling and formation support this theory. ISF flow in bone results from transcortical pressure gradients produced by vascular and hydrostatic pressure, and mechanical loading. Conditions observed to alter flow rates include increases in venous pressure in hypertension, fluid shifts occurring in bedrest and microgravity, increases in vascularization during the injury-healing response, and mechanical compression and bending of bone during exercise. These conditions also induce changes in bone remodeling. Previously, we hypothesized that interstitial fluid flow in bone, and in particular fluid shear stress, serves to mediate signal transduction in mechanical loading- and injury-induced remodeling. In addition, we proposed that a lack or decrease of ISF flow results in the bone loss observed in disuse and microgravity. The purpose of this article is to review ISF flow in bone and its role in osteogenesis.

  8. The fluid mechanics of thrombus formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Experimental data are presented for the growth of thrombi (blood clots) in a stagnation point flow of fresh blood. Thrombus shape, size and structure are shown to depend on local flow conditions. The evolution of a thrombus is described in terms of a physical model that includes platelet diffusion, a platelet aggregation mechanism, and diffusion and convection of the chemical species responsible for aggregation. Diffusion-controlled and convection-controlled regimes are defined by flow parameters and thrombus location, and the characteristic growth pattern in each regime is explained. Quantitative comparisons with an approximate theoretical model are presented, and a more general model is formulated.

  9. Mechanical engineering aspects of TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Citrolo, J.C.

    1983-04-01

    This paper briefly presents the principles which characterize a tokamak and discusses the mechanical aspects of TFTR, particularly the toroidal field coils and the vacuum chamber, in the context of being key components common to all tokamaks. The mechanical loads on these items as well as other design requirements are considered and the solutions to these requirements as executed in TFTR are presented. Future technological developments beyond the scope of TFTR, which are necessary to bring the tokamak concept to a full fusion-power system, are also presented. Additional methods of plasma heating, current drive, and first wall designs are examples of items in this category.

  10. 46 CFR 12.15-13 - Deck engine mechanic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Deck engine mechanic. 12.15-13 Section 12.15-13 Shipping... ENDORSEMENTS Qualified Member of the Engine Department 12.15-13 Deck engine mechanic. (a) An applicant for an endorsement as deck engine mechanic shall be a person holding an MMC or MMD endorsed as junior engineer....

  11. 46 CFR 12.15-13 - Deck engine mechanic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Deck engine mechanic. 12.15-13 Section 12.15-13 Shipping... ENDORSEMENTS Qualified Member of the Engine Department 12.15-13 Deck engine mechanic. (a) An applicant for an endorsement as deck engine mechanic shall be a person holding an MMC or MMD endorsed as junior engineer....

  12. 46 CFR 12.15-13 - Deck engine mechanic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Deck engine mechanic. 12.15-13 Section 12.15-13 Shipping... ENDORSEMENTS Qualified Member of the Engine Department 12.15-13 Deck engine mechanic. (a) An applicant for an endorsement as deck engine mechanic shall be a person holding an MMC or MMD endorsed as junior engineer....

  13. 46 CFR 12.15-13 - Deck engine mechanic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Deck engine mechanic. 12.15-13 Section 12.15-13 Shipping... ENDORSEMENTS Qualified Member of the Engine Department 12.15-13 Deck engine mechanic. (a) An applicant for an endorsement as deck engine mechanic shall be a person holding an MMC or MMD endorsed as junior engineer....

  14. eFluids Video Gallery: a ``YouTube'' for Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, Alexander

    2008-11-01

    The research and educational value of videos of fluid mechanical phenomena cannot be overstated, yet there are literally hundreds of videos that, while posted on various websites, can be difficult to find. eFluids.com has launched a new video gallery website highlighting all aspects of fluid mechanics that will hopefully serve as a repository for this material. The gallery receives submissions using a user-friendly interface modeled on the popular YouTube site. Submissions can be in any format and any size up 50MB and up to 5 minutes long. The galleries are searchable and are classified in 23 categories, including subject-specific categories such as ``Laminar Flow,'' ``Turbulence,'' ``Vortices,'' ``Biological Flows,'' etc., as well as ``Recent Postings'' and links to fluids videos on other sites such as YouTube. The Video Gallery is integrated with the other Galleries on eFluids, including the long-established Gallery of Images, Gallery of Experiments, and Gallery of Problems. The presentation will show examples, demonstrate the submission interface, and the integration with the other galleries. In collaboration with George Homsy and Gordon McCreigh, www.eFluids.com.

  15. Internal fluid mechanics research on supercomputers for aerospace propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Brent A.; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Szuch, John R.

    1988-01-01

    The Internal Fluid Mechanics Division of the NASA Lewis Research Center is combining the key elements of computational fluid dynamics, aerothermodynamic experiments, and advanced computational technology to bring internal computational fluid mechanics (ICFM) to a state of practical application for aerospace propulsion systems. The strategies used to achieve this goal are to: (1) pursue an understanding of flow physics, surface heat transfer, and combustion via analysis and fundamental experiments, (2) incorporate improved understanding of these phenomena into verified 3-D CFD codes, and (3) utilize state-of-the-art computational technology to enhance experimental and CFD research. Presented is an overview of the ICFM program in high-speed propulsion, including work in inlets, turbomachinery, and chemical reacting flows. Ongoing efforts to integrate new computer technologies, such as parallel computing and artificial intelligence, into high-speed aeropropulsion research are described.

  16. UA Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Sept 19, 2014 2014-2015 Catalog

    E-print Network

    Wong, Pak Kin

    Thermo [1] AME 442 HVAC System Design [2] AME 444 Applied Thermodynamics AME 445 Renewable Energy Sys[1 Mechanics of Solids or 3 AME 324BS Engineering Component Design 3 AME 331 Principles & Applications of Fluid Senior Mechanical Laboratory 2 ENGR 498BS Cross-Disciplinary Design 3 ENGR498AF Cross Disciplinary Design

  17. Washington State University Vancouver Mech 515 Advanced Heat Transfer Mechanical Engineering Fall 2012 Syllabus

    E-print Network

    Washington State University Vancouver Mech 515 Advanced Heat Transfer Mechanical Engineering Fall 2012 Syllabus 1 Advanced Heat Transfer Course: Mech 515, Advanced Heat Transfer, 3 Credits Prerequisite: Graduate standing Heat Transfer (Mech 404 or equivalent) recommended Advanced Fluid Mechanics (Mech 521

  18. The Educational Needs of Graduate Mechanical Engineers in New Zealand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deans, J.

    1999-01-01

    Surveys graduate and undergraduate mechanical engineering students at the University of Auckland. Shows that the dominant work activities of New Zealand mechanical engineers include design and consultancy and that graduate engineers rapidly migrate into management. (Author/CCM)

  19. NOTES ON THE KIVA-II SOFTWARE AND CHEMICALLY REACTIVE FLUID MECHANICS

    E-print Network

    Holst, Michael J.

    NOTES ON THE KIVA-II SOFTWARE AND CHEMICALLY REACTIVE FLUID MECHANICS MICHAEL J. HOLST Numerical, California #12;NOTES ON THE KIVA-II SOFTWARE AND CHEMICALLY REACTIVE FLUID MECHANICS Michael J. Holst intro- duction to continuum mechanics, to fluid mechanics, and to the mechanics of chemically reactive

  20. ME 542: Advanced Fluid Mechanics MW 4-6 PM PHO 210

    E-print Network

    ME 542: Advanced Fluid Mechanics MW 4-6 PM PHO 210 Instructor: Dr. Tyrone M. Porter Office: ENG 319.K. An Introduction to Fluid Dynamics, Cambridge University Press. Landau, L.D. and Lifshitz, E.M. Fluid Mechanics laws/fundamental equations in fluid mechanics: continuity equation, momentum equation (Navier

  1. Section de Gnie Mcanique Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics

    E-print Network

    Psaltis, Demetri

    Section de Gnie Mcanique Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics and Instabilities Piezoelectric energy harvesting from the flutter motion of a flexible plate : linear analysis Local approach In the local approach small amounts of energy, functioning independently from the network and with low environmental impact

  2. Leonhard Euler and his contributions to fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, M. D.

    1988-01-01

    The career of Leonhard Euler, one of the world's most gifted scientists, is reviewed. The paper focuses on Euler's contributions to fluid mechanics and gives a perspective of how this science was born. A bibliography is included to provide the history enthusiast with a starting point for further study.

  3. continuum mechanics viscous fluids Circulatory System as a Circuit

    E-print Network

    continuum mechanics viscous fluids Circulatory System as a Circuit The flow of blood inside of an animal comprises its circulatory system. The hydrodynamics of blood is a very tricky subject to study is to argue that some aspects of the circulatory system can be modeled by electrical circuits. After that, we

  4. FINITE ELEMENT METHOD IN FLUID MECHANICS & HEAT TRANSFER

    E-print Network

    Camci, Cengiz

    FINITE ELEMENT METHOD IN FLUID MECHANICS & HEAT TRANSFER AERSP-560 Department : Aerospace commercially available codes based on the finite element method. PLEASE CONTACT CENGIZ CAMCI IF YOU HAVE INTEREST IN THIS COURSE #12;TYPICAL SEQUENCE OF LECTURES Introduction to finite element method

  5. continuum mechanics inviscid fluids Efficiency of a Wind Turbine

    E-print Network

    continuum mechanics inviscid fluids Efficiency of a Wind Turbine In this problem, we will determine the maximal possible power that can be extracted from a wind turbine. We imagine the following setup. Consider a tube of cross-sectional area A, with incident gas velocity v. We place some turbine

  6. Fluid Mechanics of Wing Adaptation for Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Wilder, M. C.; Carr, L. W.; Davis, Sanford S. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The unsteady fluid mechanics associated with use of a dynamically deforming leading edge airfoil for achieving compressible flow separation control has been experimentally studied. Changing the leading edge curvature at rapid rates dramatically alters the flow vorticity dynamics which is responsible for the many effects observed in the flow.

  7. Micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) for mechanical engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A. P., LLNL

    1996-11-18

    The ongoing advances in Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) are providing man-kind the freedom to travel to dimensional spaces never before conceivable. Advances include new fabrication processes, new materials, tailored modeling tools, new fabrication machines, systems integration, and more detailed studies of physics and surface chemistry as applied to the micro scale. In the ten years since its inauguration, MEMS technology is penetrating industries of automobile, healthcare, biotechnology, sports/entertainment, measurement systems, data storage, photonics/optics, computer, aerospace, precision instruments/robotics, and environment monitoring. It is projected that by the turn of the century, MEMS will impact every individual in the industrial world, totaling sales up to $14 billion (source: System Planning Corp.). MEMS programs in major universities have spawned up all over the United States, preparing the brain-power and expertise for the next wave of MEMS breakthroughs. It should be pointed out that although MEMS has been initiated by electrical engineering researchers through the involvement of IC fabrication techniques, today it has evolved such that it requires a totally multi-disciplinary team to develop useful devices. Mechanical engineers are especially crucial to the success of MEMS development, since 90% of the physical realm involved is mechanical. Mechanical engineers are needed for the design of MEMS, the analysis of the mechanical system, the design of testing apparatus, the implementation of analytical tools, and the packaging process. Every single aspect of mechanical engineering is being utilized in the MEMS field today, however, the impact could be more substantial if more mechanical engineers are involved in the systems level designing. In this paper, an attempt is made to create the pathways for a mechanical engineer to enter in the MEMS field. Examples of application in optics and medical devices will be used to illustrate how mechanical engineers made impact. Through a basic understanding of the history of MEMS, the background physics and scaling in micromechanical systems, and an introduction to baseline MEMS processes, a mechanical engineer should be well on his way to Alice's wonderland in the ever-exciting playground of MEMS.

  8. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Postgraduate Student

    E-print Network

    Strathclyde, University of

    & Aerospace Engineering and Naval Architecture, Ocean& Marine Engineering. The Graduate School of Engineering engineering areas: Architecture, Biomedical Engineering, Chemical & Process Engineering, Civil & Environmental

  9. Ming-Chia Daniel LAI Mechanical Engineering Department

    E-print Network

    Yu, Sheng-Tao

    of Mechanical Engineering (ASME), Fellow Technical Associate of Internal Combustion Engine Division (ICED Engineering, Engine Combustion, Energy Conversion, Alternative Energy Technology; Optical diagnostics) Combustion and Fuel committee, International Gas Turbine Institute. (IGTI) American Institute of Aeronautics

  10. Yielding to Stress: Recent Developments in Viscoplastic Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmforth, Neil J.; Frigaard, Ian A.; Ovarlez, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    The archetypal feature of a viscoplastic fluid is its yield stress: If the material is not sufficiently stressed, it behaves like a solid, but once the yield stress is exceeded, the material flows like a fluid. Such behavior characterizes materials common in industries such as petroleum and chemical processing, cosmetics, and food processing and in geophysical fluid dynamics. The most common idealization of a viscoplastic fluid is the Bingham model, which has been widely used to rationalize experimental data, even though it is a crude oversimplification of true rheological behavior. The popularity of the model is in its apparent simplicity. Despite this, the sudden transition between solid-like behavior and flow introduces significant complications into the dynamics, which, as a result, has resisted much analysis. Over recent decades, theoretical developments, both analytical and computational, have provided a better understanding of the effect of the yield stress. Simultaneously, greater insight into the material behavior of real fluids has been afforded by advances in rheometry. These developments have primed us for a better understanding of the various applications in the natural and engineering sciences.

  11. Mechanical engineering capstone senior design textbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Rolin Farrar, Jr.

    This textbook is intended to bridge the gap between mechanical engineering equations and mechanical engineering design. To that end, real-world examples are used throughout the book. Also, the material is presented in an order that follows the chronological sequence of coursework that must be performed by a student in the typical capstone senior design course in mechanical engineering. In the process of writing this book, the author surveyed the fifty largest engineering schools (as ranked by the American Society of Engineering Education, or ASEE) to determine what engineering instructors are looking for in a textbook. The survey results revealed a clear need for a textbook written expressly for the capstone senior design course as taught throughout the nation. This book is designed to meet that need. This text was written using an organizational method that the author calls the General Topics Format. The format gives the student reader rapid access to the information contained in the text. All manufacturing methods, and some other material presented in this text, have been presented using the General Topics Format. The text uses examples to explain the importance of understanding the environment in which the product will be used and to discuss product abuse. The safety content contained in this text is unique. The Safety chapter teaches engineering ethics and includes a step-by-step guide to resolving ethical conflicts. The chapter includes explanations of rules, recommendations, standards, consensus standards, key safety concepts, and the legal implications of product failure. Key design principles have been listed and explained. The text provides easy-to-follow design steps, helpful for both the student and new engineer. Prototyping is presented as consisting of three phases: organization, building, and refining. A chapter on common manufacturing methods is included for reference.

  12. Application of computational fluid mechanics to atmospheric pollution problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.; Smith, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most noticeable effects of air pollution on the properties of the atmosphere is the reduction in visibility. This paper reports the results of investigations of the fluid dynamical and microphysical processes involved in the formation of advection fog on aerosols from combustion-related pollutants, as condensation nuclei. The effects of a polydisperse aerosol distribution, on the condensation/nucleation processes which cause the reduction in visibility are studied. This study demonstrates how computational fluid mechanics and heat transfer modeling can be applied to simulate the life cycle of the atmosphereic pollution problems.

  13. Rotor noise due to atmospheric turbulence ingestion. I - Fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.; Greitzer, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    In the present analytical procedure for the prediction of helicopter rotor noise generation due to the ingestion of atmospheric turbulence, different models for turbulence fluid mechanics and the ingestion process are combined. The mean flow and turbulence statistics associated with the atmospheric boundary layer are modeled with attention to the effects of atmospheric stability length, windspeed, and altitude. The turbulence field can be modeled as isotropic, locally stationary, and homogeneous. For large mean flow contraction ratios, accurate predictions of turbulence vorticity components at the rotor face requires the incorporation of the differential drift of fluid particles on adjacent streamlines.

  14. Fluid mechanics mechanisms in the stall process of helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Recent experimental results from airfoils in the Mach number, Reynolds number, or reduced frequency ranges typical of helicopter rotor blades have identified the most influential flow mechanisms in the dynamic stall process. The importance of secondary shed vortices, downstream wake action, and the flow in the separated region is generally acknowledged but poorly understood. By means of surface pressure cross-correlations and flow field measurements in static stall, several new hypotheses have been generated. It is proposed that vortex shedding may be caused by acoustic disturbances propagating forward in the lower (pressure) surface boundary layer, that wake closure is a misnomer, and that the shed vortex leaves a trail of vorticity that forms a turbulent free shear layer. The known dynamic stall flow mechanisms are reviewed and the potential importance of recently proposed and hypothetical flow phenomena with respect to helicopter blade aeroelastic response are assessed.

  15. Fluid mechanics mechanisms in the stall process of airfoils for helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Phenomena that control the flow during the stall portion of a dynamic stall cycle are analyzed, and their effect on blade motion is outlined. Four mechanisms by which dynamic stall may be initiated are identified: (1) bursting of the separation bubble, (2) flow reversal in the turbulent boundary layer on the airfoil upper surface, (3) shock wave-boundary layer interaction behind the airfoil crest, and (4) acoustic wave propagation below the airfoil. The fluid mechanics that contribute to the identified flow phenomena are summarized, and the usefulness of a model that incorporates the required fluid mechanics mechanisms is discussed.

  16. MECHANICALENGINEERING The Department of Mechanical Engineering presents

    E-print Network

    Program in Mechanical Engineering University of California, Riverside, March 2015 Dr. Javier Garay management difficulties. Thermal management continues to be one of the major challenges in the development of standard photoluminescent (PL) host materials limits the overall power output and/or duty cycle

  17. Plagiarism Policy Department of Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Feeny, Brian

    Plagiarism Policy Department of Mechanical Engineering Plagiarism is not tolerated of the University. For the purpose of this policy, Plagiarism means presenting as one's own the words, work, or opinions of someone else. A. You commit plagiarism if you submit as your own work: 1. Part or all

  18. Gasoline Engine Mechanics. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Marion

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of five terminal objectives presented in this curriculum guide for a basic gasoline engine mechanics course at the secondary level. (For the intermediate course guide see CE 010 946.) The materials were developed for a two semester (2 hours daily)

  19. Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-print Network

    for its Ithaca campus. One of these positions is in the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace, and design and manufacturing. ORIE faculty interests include probability, optimization, statistics, transportation systems, health care, financial engineering, service systems and network science. Please apply

  20. Mechanical Engineering Department 05 November 2014

    E-print Network

    Furlong, Cosme

    temporal & Good spatial coherence Poor temporal & Good spatial coherence Good temporal & Poor spatial coherence Electric fields of focused laser beams #12;Mechanical Engineering Department Lenses Snell's law Lenses Snell's law & total internal reflection Angle of incidence and internal reflections: Fiber optics

  1. Gasoline Engine Mechanics. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Marion

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of six terminal objectives presented in this curriculum guide for an intermediate gasoline engine mechanics course at the secondary level. (For the beginning course guide see CE 010 947.) The materials were developed for a two-semester (2 hour

  2. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering University at Buffalo

    E-print Network

    Krovi, Venkat

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering University at Buffalo S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y o f N e w Y o r k MAE Seminar Series Nanoengineered Surfaces for Efficiency Enhancements in Energy and Water Energy, Water, Agriculture, Transportation, Electronics Cooling, Buildings, etc. Over the years

  3. Thermodynamic Optimization of Flow Geometry in Mechanical and Civil Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejan, Adrian; Lorente, Sylvie

    2001-12-01

    Recent developments in thermodynamic optimization are reviewed by focusing on the generation of optimal geometric form (shape, structure, topology) in flow systems. The flow configuration is free to vary. The principle that generates geometric form is the pursuit of maximum global performance (e.g., minimum flow resistance, minimum irreversibility) subject to global finiteness constraints (volume, weight, time). The resulting structures constructed in this manner have been named constructal designs. The thought that the same objective and constraints principle accounts for the optimally shaped flow paths that occur in natural systems (animate and inanimate) has been named constructal theory. Examples of large classes of applications are drawn from various sectors of mechanical and civil engineering: the distribution of heat transfer area in power plants, optimal sizing and shaping of flow channels and fins, optimal aspect ratios of heat exchanger core structures, aerodynamic and hydrodynamic shapes, tree-shaped assemblies of convective fins, treeshaped networks for fluid flow and other currents, optimal configurations for streams that undergo bifurcation or pairing, insulated pipe networks for the distribution of hot water and exergy over a fixed territory, and distribution networks for virtually everything that moves in society (goods, currency, information). The principle-based generation of flow geometry unites the thermodynamic optimization developments known in mechanical engineering with lesser known applications in civil engineering and social organization. This review extends thermodynamics, because it shows how thermodynamic principles of design optimization account for the development of optimal configurations in civil engineering and social organization.

  4. Mechanical Engineering Department engineering research: Annual report, FY 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, R.M.; Essary, K.L.; Genin, M.S.; Highstone, H.H.; Hymer, J.D.; Taft, S.O.

    1986-12-01

    This report provides information on the five areas of research interest in LLNL's Mechanical Engineering Department. In Computer Code Development, a solid geometric modeling program is described. In Dynamic Systems and Control, structure control and structure dynamics are discussed. Fabrication technology involves machine cutting, interferometry, and automated optical component manufacturing. Materials engineering reports on composite material research and measurement of molten metal surface properties. In Nondestructive Evaluation, NMR, CAT, and ultrasound machines are applied to manufacturing processes. A model for underground collapse is developed. Finally, an alternative heat exchanger is investigated for use in a fusion power plant. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the 13 reports in this publication. (JDH)

  5. Stanley Corrsin Award Talk: Fluid Mechanics of Fungi and Slime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Michael

    2013-11-01

    There are interesting fluid mechanics problems everywhere, even in the most lowly and hidden corners of forest floors. Here I discuss some questions we have been working on in recent years involving fungi and slime. A critical issue for the ecology of fungi and slime is nutrient availability: nutrient sources are highly heterogeneous, and strategies are necessary to find food when it runs out. In the fungal phylum Ascomycota, spore dispersal is the primary mechanism for finding new food sources. The defining feature of this phylum is the ascus, a fluid filled sac from which spores are ejected, through a build up in osmotic pressure. We outline the (largely fluid mechanical) design constraints on this ejection strategy, and demonstrate how it provides strong constraints for the diverse morphologies of spores and asci found in nature. The core of the argument revisits a classical problem in elastohydrodynamic lubrication from a different perspective. A completely different strategy for finding new nutrient is found by slime molds and fungi that stretch out - as a single organism- over enormous areas (up to hectares) over forest floors. As a model problem we study the slime mold Physarum polycephalum, which forages with a large network of connected tubes on the forest floors. Localized regions in the network find nutrient sources and then pump the nutrients throughout the entire organism. We discuss fluid mechanical mechanisms for coordinating this transport, which generalize peristalsis to pumping in a heterogeneous network. We give a preliminary discussion to how physarum can detect a nutrient source and pump the nutrient throughout the organism.

  6. Department of Mechanical Engineering The FAMU-FSU College of Engineering

    E-print Network

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Department of Mechanical Engineering The FAMU-FSU College of Engineering Florida A&M University and Florida State University By-Laws March 2014 (Adopted by the Faculty of the Department of Mechanical Engineering

  7. Experimental Fluid Mechanics of Pulsatile Artificial Blood Pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutsch, Steven; Tarbell, John M.; Manning, Keefe B.; Rosenberg, Gerson; Fontaine, Arnold A.

    2006-01-01

    The fluid mechanics of artificial blood pumps has been studied since the early 1970s in an attempt to understand and mitigate hemolysis and thrombus formation by the device. Pulsatile pumps are characterized by inlet jets that set up a rotational "washing" pattern during filling. Strong regurgitant jets through the closed artificial heart valves have Reynolds stresses on the order of 10,000 dynes/cm2 and are the most likely cause of red blood cell damage and platelet activation. Although the flow in the pump chamber appears benign, low wall shear stresses throughout the pump cycle can lead to thrombus formation at the wall of the smaller pumps (10 50 cc). The local fluid mechanics is critical. There is a need to rapidly measure or calculate the wall shear stress throughout the device so that the results may be easily incorporated into the design process.

  8. Effect of Chamber Backpressure on Swirl Injector Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy; Hulka, James R.; Moser, Marlow D.; Rhys, Noah O.

    2008-01-01

    A common propellant combination used for high thrust generation is GH2/LOX. Historical GH2/LOX injection elements have been of the shear-coaxial type. Element type has a large heritage of research work to aid in element design. The swirl-coaxial element, despite its many performance benefits, has a relatively small amount of historical, LRE-oriented work to draw from. Design features of interest are grounded in the fluid mechanics of the liquid swirl process itself, are based on data from low-pressure, low mass flow rate experiments. There is a need to investigate how high ambient pressures and mass flow rates influence internal and external swirl features. The objective of this research is to determine influence of varying liquid mass flow rate and ambient chamber pressure on the intact-length fluid mechanics of a liquid swirl element.

  9. Fluid mechanics and solidification investigations in low-gravity environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtl, G. H.; Lundquist, C. A.; Naumann, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Fluid mechanics of gases and liquids and solidification processes were investigated under microgravity conditions during Skylab and Apollo-Soyuz missions. Electromagnetic, acoustic, and aerodynamic levitation devices, drop tubes, aircraft parabolic flight trajectories, and vertical sounding rockets were developed for low-g simulation. The Spacelab 3 mission will be carried out in a gravity gradient flight attitude; analyses of sources of vehicle dynamic accelerations with associated g-levels and angular rates will produce results for future specific experiments.

  10. Aeropropulsion 1987. Session 3: Internal Fluid Mechanics Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Internal fluid mechanics research at Lewis is directed toward an improved understanding of the important flow physics affecting aerospace propulsion systems, and applying this improved understanding to formulate accurate predictive codes. To this end, research is conducted involving detailed experimentation and analysis. The presentations in this session summarize ongoing work and indicated future emphasis in three major research thrusts: namely, inlets, ducts, and nozzles; turbomachinery; and chemical reacting flows.

  11. Oscillatory Fluid Flow Influences Primary Cilia and Microtubule Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Espinha, Lina C.; Hoey, David A.; Fernandes, Paulo R.; Rodrigues, Hlder C.; Jacobs, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    Many tissues are sensitive to mechanical stimuli; however, the mechanotransduction mechanism used by cells remains unknown in many cases. The primary cilium is a solitary, immotile microtubule-based extension present on nearly every mammalian cell which extends from the basal body. The cilium is a mechanosensitive organelle and has been shown to transduce fluid flow-induced shear stress in tissues such as the kidney and bone. The majority of microtubules assemble from the mother centriole (basal body), contributing significantly to the anchoring of the primary cilium. Several studies have attempted to quantify the number of microtubules emanating from the basal body and the results vary depending on the cell type. It has also been shown that cellular response to shear stress depends on microtubular integrity. This study hypothesizes that changing the microtubule attachment of primary cilia in response to a mechanical stimulus could change primary cilia mechanics and, possibly, mechanosensitivity. Oscillatory fluid flow was applied to two different cell types and the microtubule attachment to the ciliary base was quantified. For the first time, an increase in microtubules around primary cilia both with time and shear rate in response to oscillatory fluid flow stimulation was demonstrated. Moreover, it is presented that the primary cilium is required for this loading-induced cellular response. This study has demonstrated a new role for the cilium in regulating alterations in the cytoplasmic microtubule network in response to mechanical stimulation, and therefore provides a new insight into how cilia may regulate its mechanics and thus the cells mechanosensitivity. PMID:25044764

  12. The fluid mechanics of the inner-ear disorder BPPV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, Michael; Squires, Todd; Stone, Howard

    2001-11-01

    The inner ear of mammals contains fluid-filled semi-circular canals with a flexible sensory membrane (called a cupula) which detects rotational acceleration. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most common disorders of this system diagnosed today, and is characterized by symptoms of dizziness and nausea brought on by sudden changes in head orientation. BPPV is believed to have a mechanical (rather than nervous) origin, in which dense particles called otoconia settle into the canals and trigger false sensations of rotational acceleration. Several qualitative mechanisms have been proposed by the medical community, which we examine from a fluid mechanical standpoint. Traditionally, the semicircular canal and the cupula are modeled as an over-damped torsional pendulum with a driving force provided by rotational acceleration. We extend this model to include the time-dependent mechanical response owing to sedimentation of the otoconia. We make qualitative and quantitative predictions associated with the proposed mechanisms, with an eye towards differentiating between them and perhaps towards more effective diagnostic and therapeutic methods.

  13. Mechanical Behavior of Grain Boundary Engineered Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, S B; Hodge, A M

    2006-08-08

    A grain boundary engineered copper sample previously characterized by Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) has been selected for nanoindentation tests. Given the fact that grain boundaries have thicknesses in the order of 1 micron or less, it is essential to use nanomechanics to test the properties of individual grain boundaries. The Hysitron nanoindenter was selected over the MTS nanoindenter due to its superior optical capabilities that aid the selection and identification of the areas to be tested. An area of 2mm by 2mm with an average grain size of 50 microns has been selected for the study. Given the EBSD mapping, grains and grain boundaries with similar orientations are tested and the hardness and modulus are compared. These results will give a relationship between the mechanical properties and the engineered grain boundaries. This will provide for the first time a correlation between grain boundary orientation and the mechanical behavior of the sample at the nanoscale.

  14. ME 303: Fluid Mechanics MW 2-4 PM KCB 106

    E-print Network

    ME 303: Fluid Mechanics MW 2-4 PM KCB 106 Instructor: Dr. Tyrone M. Porter Office: ENG 319 Office: Munson, Young, Okiishi, Heubsch. Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., custom.wiley.com/he-bcs/Books?action=index&itemId=0470262842&bcsId=4532 Supplemental Textbook Cenegal, Cimbala. Fluid Mechanics: Fundamentals and Applications

  15. ME 303: Fluid Mechanics MW 10 AM-12 PM EPC 205

    E-print Network

    ME 303: Fluid Mechanics MW 10 AM-12 PM EPC 205 Discussion A2 Tuesday 9-10 AM PHO 202 Discussion A3 Textbook: Munson, Young, Okiishi, Heubsch. Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 7thId=7240 Supplemental Textbook: Cenegal, Cimbala. Fluid Mechanics: Fundamentals and Applications Mc

  16. On models for viscoelastic fluid-like materials that are mechanically incompressible and

    E-print Network

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    On models for viscoelastic fluid-like materials that are mechanically incompressible and thermally of the full NavierStokesFourier system. J. Math. Fluid Mech., 11:274302, 2009 Mechanically incompressible;Viscoelastic fluids Maxwell model F l lsld m m Mechanical analogue: Spring energy storage. Dashpot

  17. FLUID MECHANICS IN THE NEXT CENTURY Mohamed Gad-el-Hak and Mihir Sen

    E-print Network

    Gad-el-Hak, Mohamed

    1 FLUID MECHANICS IN THE NEXT CENTURY Mohamed Gad-el-Hak and Mihir Sen Department of Aerospace fluid mechanics, appear to be at this stage. In a letter addressed to George G. Stokes dated 20 December for the rest of this perspective. As a teaching and research discipline, will fluid mechanics be around during

  18. Mechanical Engineering Instructional Laboratory and Student Shop Safety Guidelines

    E-print Network

    Frenklach, Michael

    Mechanical Engineering Instructional Laboratory and Student Shop Safety Guidelines To insure safe practices in our laboratories the Department of Mechanical Engineering has adopted the following guidelines immediately. Keep aisles clear and maintain unobstructed access to all exits, fire extinguishers, electrical

  19. Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Water Conservation in Industrial Processes

    E-print Network

    Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Water Conservation in Industrial Processes University of Kansas The Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Kansas is seeking applications in industrial processes. Exceptional candidates with outstanding qualifications could be considered

  20. DepartmentofMechanical EngineeringColloquium The Department of

    E-print Network

    given biological engineers new insights into the role of genetic circuits in nature and the designDepartmentofMechanical EngineeringColloquium The Department of Mechanical Engineering PRESENTS the use of concepts from systems and control engineering as applied to the analysis and design

  1. Fluid mechanics in crystal growth - The 1982 Freeman scholar lecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, S.

    1983-01-01

    An attempt is made to unify the current state of knowledge in crystal growth techniques and fluid mechanics. After identifying important fluid dynamic problems for such representative crystal growth processes as closed tube vapor transport, open reactor vapor deposition, and the Czochralski and floating zone melt growth techniques, research results obtained to date are presented. It is noted that the major effort to date has been directed to the description of the nature and extent of bulk transport under realistic conditions, where bulk flow determines the heat and solute transport which strongly influence the temperature and concentration fields in the vicinity of the growth interface. Proper treatment of near field, or interface, problems cannot be given until the far field, or global flow, involved in a given crystal growth technique has been adequately described.

  2. On the Use of Computers for Teaching Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    Several approaches for improving the teaching of basic fluid mechanics using computers are presented. There are two objectives to these approaches: to increase the involvement of the student in the learning process and to present information to the student in a variety of forms. Items discussed include: the preparation of educational videos using the results of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations, the analysis of CFD flow solutions using workstation based post-processing graphics packages, and the development of workstation or personal computer based simulators which behave like desk top wind tunnels. Examples of these approaches are presented along with observations from working with undergraduate co-ops. Possible problems in the implementation of these approaches as well as solutions to these problems are also discussed.

  3. Computational Science and Engineering

    E-print Network

    Giger, Christine

    Computational Science and Engineering Research Profile The Computational Science and Engineering and Process Engineering Computational Science and Engineering Laboratory Prof. Dr. Petros Koumoutsakos petros in complex liquids Nanoscale heat transfer + Nanoscale Fluid Mechanics + High Performance Computing

  4. 46 CFR 12.15-13 - Deck engine mechanic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 false Deck engine mechanic. 12.15-13 Section 12.15-13...Department 12.15-13 Deck engine mechanic. (a) An applicant for an endorsement as deck engine mechanic shall be a person holding an MMC...

  5. 46 CFR 12.15-13 - Deck engine mechanic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Deck engine mechanic. 12.15-13 Section 12.15-13...Department 12.15-13 Deck engine mechanic. (a) An applicant for an endorsement as deck engine mechanic shall be a person holding an MMC...

  6. 46 CFR 12.15-13 - Deck engine mechanic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 false Deck engine mechanic. 12.15-13 Section 12.15-13...Department 12.15-13 Deck engine mechanic. (a) An applicant for an endorsement as deck engine mechanic shall be a person holding an MMC...

  7. 46 CFR 12.15-13 - Deck engine mechanic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 false Deck engine mechanic. 12.15-13 Section 12.15-13...Department 12.15-13 Deck engine mechanic. (a) An applicant for an endorsement as deck engine mechanic shall be a person holding an MMC...

  8. Victoria Timchenko, Sungchul Baek School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering,

    E-print Network

    New South Wales, University of

    Victoria Timchenko, Sungchul Baek School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, UNSW Email: v Timchenko is a senior lecturer in the School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering at The University, 12:00 pm 1:00 pm ME101, School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, building J17. All

  9. Selective Guide to Literature on Mechanical Engineering. Engineering Literature Guides, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Hugh Lockwood, Comp.

    Mechanical engineering has become highly interdisciplinary. It would not be possible to single out particular reference sources that are uniquely applicable to mechanical engineering. For the purpose of this guide, mechanical engineering deals with the generation, transmission and utilization of heat and mechanical power and with the production of

  10. Review of coaxial flow gas core nuclear rocket fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, H.

    1976-01-01

    Almost all of the fluid mechanics research associated with the coaxial flow gas core reactor ended abruptly with the interruption of NASA's space nuclear program because of policy and budgetary considerations in 1973. An overview of program accomplishments is presented through a review of the experiments conducted and the analyses performed. Areas are indicated where additional research is required for a fuller understanding of cavity flow and of the factors which influence cold and hot flow containment. A bibliography is included with graphic material.

  11. SIERRA --A Computational Framework for Engineering Mechanics Applications

    E-print Network

    Bejerano, Gill

    dynamics Lagrangian solid mechanics JAS Quasi-static solid mechanics COYOTE Thermal mechanics COYOTE Thermal mechanics with chemistry GOMA Incompressible fluid mechanics with free surface SALINAS (GOMA) CALORE (COYOTE) ADAGIO (JAS) PRESTO (PRONTO) ANDANTE VIPAR DAKOTA #12;7 Outline SIERRA concepts

  12. Large rotating AdS black holes from fluid mechanics

    E-print Network

    Sayantani Bhattacharyya; Subhaneil Lahiri; R. Loganayagam; Shiraz Minwalla

    2008-07-25

    We use the AdS/CFT correspondence to argue that large rotating black holes in global AdS(D) spaces are dual to stationary solutions of the relativistic Navier-Stokes equations on S**(D-2). Reading off the equation of state of this fluid from the thermodynamics of non-rotating black holes, we proceed to construct the nonlinear spinning solutions of fluid mechanics that are dual to rotating black holes. In all known examples, the thermodynamics and the local stress tensor of our solutions are in precise agreement with the thermodynamics and boundary stress tensor of the spinning black holes. Our fluid dynamical description applies to large non-extremal black holes as well as a class of large non-supersymmetric extremal black holes, but is never valid for supersymmetric black holes. Our results yield predictions for the thermodynamics of all large black holes in all theories of gravity on AdS spaces, for example, string theory on AdS(5) x S**5 and M theory on AdS(4) x S**7 and AdS(7) x S**4.

  13. Vug waves: A mechanism for coupled rock deformation and fluid migration

    E-print Network

    Holtzman, Ben

    Vug waves: A mechanism for coupled rock deformation and fluid migration Jason Phipps Morgan-migration mechanism in which a rock deforms by the movement of a penny-shaped, fluid-filled crack dislocation across, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA (holtz007@tc.umn.edu) [1] Vug waves are a joint deformation/fluid

  14. Mechanism and kinetic characteristic of intelligent magnetic fluid acceleration sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Dong; Liu, Guixiong; Chen, Taobo

    2006-11-01

    Traditional cantilever accelerometer generally has the problems of mechanical friction and the distort invalidation of elements which the magnetic fluid (MF) acceleration sensor presented in this paper utilizing a moving magnet fully suspended in MF could solve. This MF sensor is simple in the mechanism with controllable measurement range and precision. The moving magnet was balanced by the repulsive force of magnet in axial and MF second-order buoyancy in radial respectively. Its sensor model was brought forward and simplified to obtain its mathematical model. The MF magnetoviscous property that can realize the controllability of viscosity was discussed. The relations of sensor kinetic characteristic to various parameters including MF viscosity, acceleration and magnetic field energy were analyzed. The results show the moving trend is uniform under different acceleration. Through adjusting the magnetic field intensity to modify MF viscosity, it will get good astringency and keep balance time within 0.2s.

  15. Stirling engine control mechanism and method

    DOEpatents

    Dineen, John J. (Durham, NH)

    1983-01-01

    A reciprocating-to-rotating motion conversion and power control device for a Stirling engine includes a hub mounted on an offset portion of the output shaft for rotation relative to the shaft and for sliding motion therealong which causes the hub to tilt relative to the axis of rotation of the shaft. This changes the angle of inclination of the hub relative to the shaft axis and changes the axial stroke of a set of arms connected to the hub and nutating therewith. A hydraulic actuating mechanism is connected to the hub for moving its axial position along the shaft. A balancing wheel is linked to the hub and changes its angle of inclination as the angle of inclination of the hub changes to maintain the mechanism in perfect balance throughout its range of motion.

  16. The interior working mechanism and temperature characteristics of a fluid based micro-vibration isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Zhao, Shougen; Wu, Dafang; Jing, Xingjian

    2016-01-01

    Micro-vibration isolation is a hot topic in spacecraft vibration control, and fluid based vibration isolators alternatively provide a good and reliable solution to this challenging issue. In this paper, a novel fluid based micro-vibration isolator (FBMVI) is investigated. According to its inherent working principle and deformation pattern, the generation mechanisms of the damping and stiffness characteristics are derived, which are nonlinear functions of the environmental temperature. Then a lumped parameter model which is expressed by the physical design parameters (PDPs) is constructed, and the corresponding performance objective indices (POIs) are also obtained by applying the equivalence of mechanical impedance. Based on the finite element analysis of the internal damping component, a single variable method is further adopted to carry out the parametric study, and the influences of each PDP on the POIs are analyzed in details. Finally, experiments are conducted to identify the variation of fluid bulk modulus with the outside environmental temperature, and to validate the performance of the isolator under different temperature environments. The tested results show great consistence compared with the predicted tendencies of the parametric study. The results of this study can provide a very useful insight into and/or an important guidance for the design and application of this type of FBMVIs in engineering practice.

  17. Least squares based finite element formulations and their applications in fluid mechanics

    E-print Network

    Prabhakar, Vivek

    2009-05-15

    In this research, least-squares based finite element formulations and their applications in fluid mechanics are presented. Least-squares formulations offer several computational and theoretical advantages for Newtonian as well as non-Newtonian fluid...

  18. Computational thermal, chemical, fluid, and solid mechanics for geosystems management.

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, Scott; Alger, Nicholas; Turner, Daniel Zack; Subia, Samuel Ramirez; Carnes, Brian; Martinez, Mario J.; Notz, Patrick K.; Klise, Katherine A.; Stone, Charles Michael; Field, Richard V., Jr.; Newell, Pania; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Red-Horse, John Robert; Bishop, Joseph E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Hopkins, Polly L.; Mesh, Mikhail; Bean, James E.; Moffat, Harry K.; Yoon, Hongkyu

    2011-09-01

    This document summarizes research performed under the SNL LDRD entitled - Computational Mechanics for Geosystems Management to Support the Energy and Natural Resources Mission. The main accomplishment was development of a foundational SNL capability for computational thermal, chemical, fluid, and solid mechanics analysis of geosystems. The code was developed within the SNL Sierra software system. This report summarizes the capabilities of the simulation code and the supporting research and development conducted under this LDRD. The main goal of this project was the development of a foundational capability for coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, chemical (THMC) simulation of heterogeneous geosystems utilizing massively parallel processing. To solve these complex issues, this project integrated research in numerical mathematics and algorithms for chemically reactive multiphase systems with computer science research in adaptive coupled solution control and framework architecture. This report summarizes and demonstrates the capabilities that were developed together with the supporting research underlying the models. Key accomplishments are: (1) General capability for modeling nonisothermal, multiphase, multicomponent flow in heterogeneous porous geologic materials; (2) General capability to model multiphase reactive transport of species in heterogeneous porous media; (3) Constitutive models for describing real, general geomaterials under multiphase conditions utilizing laboratory data; (4) General capability to couple nonisothermal reactive flow with geomechanics (THMC); (5) Phase behavior thermodynamics for the CO2-H2O-NaCl system. General implementation enables modeling of other fluid mixtures. Adaptive look-up tables enable thermodynamic capability to other simulators; (6) Capability for statistical modeling of heterogeneity in geologic materials; and (7) Simulator utilizes unstructured grids on parallel processing computers.

  19. Towards a statistical mechanical theory of active fluids

    E-print Network

    Umberto Marini Bettolo Marconi; Claudio Maggi

    2015-11-02

    We present a stochastic description of a model of N mutually repelling active spheres in the presence of external fields and characterize its steady state behavior. To reproduce the effects of the experimentally observed persistence of the trajectories of the active particles we consider a Gaussian forcing having a non vanishing correlation time $\\tau$, whose finiteness is a measure of the activity of the system. With these ingredients we show that it is possible to develop a statistical mechanical approach similar to the one employed in the study of equilibrium liquids and to obtain the explicit form of the many-particle distribution function by means of the multidimensional unified colored noise approximation. Such a distribution plays a role analogous to the Gibbs distribution in equilibrium statistical mechanics and provides a complete information about the microscopic state of the system. From here we develop a method to determine the one and two-particle distribution functions in the spirit of the Born-Green-Yvon (BGY) equations of equilibrium statistical mechanics. The resulting equations which contain extra-correlations induced by the activity allow to determine the stationary density profiles in the presence of external fields, the pair correlations and the pressure of active fluids. In the low density regime we obtain the effective pair potential $\\phi(r)$ acting between two isolated particles separated by a distance, $r$, showing the existence an effective attraction between them induced by activity. Based on these results, in the second half of the paper we propose a mean field theory as an approach simpler than the BGY hierarchy and use it to derive a van der Waals expression of the equation of state, which can serve as the basis to understand the phase behavior of active fluids.

  20. Learning outcomes for BSc in Mechanical Engineering. BSc in Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Karlsson, Brynjar

    , differential analysis of simple structures and applications of Finite Element Methods to complex structure in a control volume as well as in differential form to practical engineering problems. Analysis of simple including the design, analysis, operation and maintenance of mechanical systems. The student must have

  1. Computational fluid dynamic design of rocket engine pump components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wei-Chung; Prueger, George H.; Chan, Daniel C.; Eastland, Anthony H.

    1992-01-01

    Integration of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for design and analysis of turbomachinery components is needed as the requirements of pump performance and reliability become more stringent for the new generation of rocket engine. A fast grid generator, designed specially for centrifugal pump impeller, which allows a turbomachinery designer to use CFD to optimize the component design will be presented. The CFD grid is directly generated from the impeller blade G-H blade coordinates. The grid points are first generated on the meridional plane with the desired clustering near the end walls. This is followed by the marching of grid points from the pressure side of one blade to the suction side of a neighboring blade. This fast grid generator has been used to optimize the consortium pump impeller design. A grid dependency study has been conducted for the consortium pump impeller. Two different grid sizes, one with 10,000 grid points and one with 80,000 grid points were used for the grid dependency study. The effects of grid resolution on the turnaround time, including the grid generation and completion of the CFD analysis, is discussed. The impeller overall mass average performance is compared for different designs. Optimum design is achieved through systematic change of the design parameters. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that CFD can be effectively used not only for flow analysis but also for design and optimization of turbomachinery components.

  2. Automated Mechanism Design for Large Instances of Federated Search Engines

    E-print Network

    Gatti, Nicola

    Automated Mechanism Design for Large Instances of Federated Search Engines Francesco Trov in a search engine web page. In particular, Federated Search Engine auctions are challenging with respect setting named Federated Search Engines (FSE), since it is particularly challenging on the MD point of view

  3. 2.5 CONTINUUM MECHANICS (FLUIDS) Let us consider a fluid medium and use Cartesian tensors to derive the mathematical equations that

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    282 §2.5 CONTINUUM MECHANICS (FLUIDS) Let us consider a fluid medium and use Cartesian tensors to derive the mathematical equations that describe how a fluid behaves. A fluid continuum, like a solid, is the density of the fluid, ij is the stress tensor and bj is an external force per unit mass. In the cgs system

  4. 2.5 CONTINUUM MECHANICS (FLUIDS) Let us consider a fluid medium and use Cartesian tensors to derive the mathematical equations that

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    282 §2.5 CONTINUUM MECHANICS (FLUIDS) Let us consider a fluid medium and use Cartesian tensors to derive the mathematical equations that describe how a fluid behaves. A fluid continuum, like a solid , i = 1, 2, 3 is a velocity field, # is the density of the fluid, # ij is the stress tensor and b j

  5. Proceedings in Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, 8 April 2008 Locomotion based on the control of the shape of magnetic fluid surfaces

    E-print Network

    Grohs, Philipp

    Proceedings in Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, 8 April 2008 Locomotion based on the control of the shape of magnetic fluid surfaces and of magnetizable media K. Zimmermann1 , V.A. Naletova 2,3 , I. Zeidis1 , V.A. Turkov3 , V. B¨ohm1 , E. Kolev1 , and J. Popp1 1 Faculty of Mechanical Engineering

  6. Serious Fun: Using Toys to Demonstrate Fluid Mechanics Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saviz, Camilla M.; Shakerin, Said

    2014-01-01

    Many students have owned or seen fluids toys in which two immiscible fluids within a closed container can be tilted to generate waves. These types of inexpensive and readily available toys are fun to play with, but they are also useful for provoking student learning about fluid properties or complex fluid behavior, including drop formation and

  7. Synthesis and Engineering Materials Properties of Fluid Phase Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Young Joon; Westman, Matthew P.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Chun, Jaehun; Ronnebro, Ewa

    2015-09-01

    Among candidates for chemical hydrogen storage in PEM fuel cell automotive applications, ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) is considered to be one of the most promising materials due to its high practical hydrogen content of 14-16 wt%. This material is selected as a surrogate chemical for a hydrogen storage system. For easier transition to the existing infrastructure, a fluid phase hydrogen storage material is very attractive and thus, we investigated the engineering materials properties of AB in liquid carriers for a chemical hydrogen storage slurry system. Slurries composed of AB and high temperature liquids were prepared by mechanical milling and sonication in order to obtain stable and fluidic properties. Volumetric gas burette system was adopted to observe the kinetics of the H2 release reactions of the AB slurry and neat AB. Viscometry and microscopy were employed to further characterize slurries engineering properties. Using a tip-sonication method we have produced AB/silicone fluid slurries at solid loadings up to 40wt% (6.5wt% H2) with viscosities less than 500cP at 25C.

  8. Fluid Mechanics of Biological Surfaces and their Technological Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechert, D. W.; Bruse, M.; Hage, W.; Meyer, R.

    A survey is given on fluid-dynamic effects caused by the structure and properties of biological surfaces. It is demonstrated that the results of investigations aiming at technological applications can also provide insights into biophysical phenomena. Techniques are described both for reducing wall shear stresses and for controlling boundary-layer separation. (a) Wall shear stress reduction was investigated experimentally for various riblet surfaces including a shark skin replica. The latter consists of 800 plastic model scales with compliant anchoring. Hairy surfaces are also considered, and surfaces in which the no-slip condition is modified. Self-cleaning surfaces such as that of lotus leaves represent an interesting option to avoid fluid-dynamic deterioration by the agglomeration of dirt. An example of technological implementation is discussed for riblets in long-range commercial aircraft. (b) Separation control is also an important issue in biology. After a few brief comments on vortex generators, the mechanism of separation control by bird feathers is described in detail. Self-activated movable flaps (=artificial bird feathers) represent a high-lift system enhancing the maximum lift of airfoils by about 20%. This is achieved without perceivable deleterious effects under cruise conditions. Finally, flight experiments on an aircraft with laminar wing and movable flaps are presented.

  9. FRONT DETAIL OF RIGHT ENGINE AND WING. MECHANICS CHECK METAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FRONT DETAIL OF RIGHT ENGINE AND WING. MECHANICS CHECK METAL CHIP DETECTOR ON RIGHT ENGINE. THE LEADING EDGE FLAPS ON THE RIGHT WING ARE DOWN PRIOR TO LUBRICATION. - Greater Buffalo International Airport, Maintenance Hangar, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  10. DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL & INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING SAFETY COMMITTEE MEETING

    E-print Network

    Sun, Yu

    DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL & INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING SAFETY COMMITTEE MEETING JULY 12, 2004 ATTENDEES, Joe indicated that the ventilation system (including fume hoods) will be re-engineered over the next

  11. Fluid mechanics relevant to flow through pretreatment of cellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Archambault-Lger, Vronique; Lynd, Lee R

    2014-04-01

    The present study investigates fluid mechanical properties of cellulosic feedstocks relevant to flow through (FT) pretreatment for biological conversion of cellulosic biomass. The results inform identifying conditions for which FT pretreatment can be implemented in a practical context. Measurements of pressure drop across packed beds, viscous compaction and water absorption are reported for milled and not milled sugarcane bagasse, switchgrass and poplar, and important factors impacting viscous flow are deduced. Using biomass knife-milled to pass through a 2mm sieve, the observed pressure drop was highest for bagasse, intermediate for switchgrass and lowest for poplar. The highest pressure drop was associated with the presence of more fine particles, greater viscous compaction and the degree of water absorption. Using bagasse without particle size reduction, the instability of the reactor during pretreatment above 140kg/m(3) sets an upper bound on the allowable concentration for continuous stable flow. PMID:24566286

  12. An explicit example of Hopf bifurcation in fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kloeden, P.; Wells, R.

    1983-01-01

    It is observed that a complete and explicit example of Hopf bifurcation appears not to be known in fluid mechanics. Such an example is presented for the rotating Benard problem with free boundary conditions on the upper and lower faces, and horizontally periodic solutions. Normal modes are found for the linearization, and the Veronis computation of the wave numbers is modified to take into account the imposed horizontal periodicity. An invariant subspace of the phase space is found in which the hypotheses of the Joseph-Sattinger theorem are verified, thus demonstrating the Hopf bifurcation. The criticality calculations are carried through to demonstrate rigorously, that the bifurcation is subcritical for certain cases, and to demonstrate numerically that it is subcritical for all the cases in the paper.

  13. An intelligent data acquisition system for fluid mechanics research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, E. R.; Zilliac, G.; Fukunishi, Y.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a novel data acquisition system for use with wind-tunnel probe-based measurements, which incorporates a degree of specific fluid dynamics knowledge into a simple expert system-like control program. The concept was developed with a rudimentary expert system coupled to a probe positioning mechanism operating in a small-scale research wind tunnel. The software consisted of two basic elements, a general-purpose data acquisition system and the rulebased control element to take and analyze data and supplying decisions as to where to measure, how many data points to take, and when to stop. The system was validated in an experiment involving a vortical flow field, showing that it was possible to increase the resolution of the experiment or, alternatively, reduce the total number of data points required, to achieve parity with the results of most conventional data acquisition approaches.

  14. European Journal of Mechanics B/Fluids 25 (2006) 536553 Long time interaction of envelope solitons

    E-print Network

    Clamond, Didier

    2006-01-01

    European Journal of Mechanics B/Fluids 25 (2006) 536553 Long time interaction of envelope solitons of Mechanics B/Fluids 25 (2006) 536553 537 1. Introduction In recent years, an increasing number of damages-Optics Group, P.O. Box 96864, 2509 JG The Hague, The Netherlands c Mechanics Division, Department

  15. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Statistical mechanics of twodimensional

    E-print Network

    Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Statistical mechanics of two vortices. The justification of statistical mechanics based on ideal twodimensional fluid equations is open at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 USA. (Received 11 March 2005) A statistical mechanical description

  16. Introduction to the internal fluid mechanics research session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Brent A.; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1990-01-01

    Internal fluid mechanics research at LeRC is directed toward an improved understanding of the important flow physics affecting aerospace propulsion systems, and applying this improved understanding to formulate accurate predictive codes. To this end, research is conducted involving detailed experimentation and analysis. The following three papers summarize ongoing work and indicate future emphasis in three major research thrusts: inlets, ducts, and nozzles; turbomachinery; and chemical reacting flows. The underlying goal of the research in each of these areas is to bring internal computational fluid mechanic to a state of practical application for aerospace propulsion systems. Achievement of this goal requires that carefully planned and executed experiments be conducted in order to develop and validate useful codes. It is critical that numerical code development work and experimental work be closely coupled. The insights gained are represented by mathematical models that form the basis for code development. The resultant codes are then tested by comparing them with appropriate experiments in order to ensure their validity and determine their applicable range. The ultimate user community must be a part of this process to assure relevancy of the work and to hasten its practical application. Propulsion systems are characterized by highly complex and dynamic internal flows. Many complex, 3-D flow phenomena may be present, including unsteadiness, shocks, and chemical reactions. By focusing on specific portions of a propulsion system, it is often possible to identify the dominant phenomena that must be understood and modeled for obtaining accurate predictive capability. The three major research thrusts serve as a focus leading to greater understanding of the relevant physics and to an improvement in analytic tools. This in turn will hasten continued advancements in propulsion system performance and capability.

  17. Fast Prediction of HCCI Combustion with an Artificial Neural Network Linked to a Fluid Mechanics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L; Chen, J; Babaimopoulos, A

    2006-08-29

    We have developed an artificial neural network (ANN) based combustion model and have integrated it into a fluid mechanics code (KIVA3V) to produce a new analysis tool (titled KIVA3V-ANN) that can yield accurate HCCI predictions at very low computational cost. The neural network predicts ignition delay as a function of operating parameters (temperature, pressure, equivalence ratio and residual gas fraction). KIVA3V-ANN keeps track of the time history of the ignition delay during the engine cycle to evaluate the ignition integral and predict ignition for each computational cell. After a cell ignites, chemistry becomes active, and a two-step chemical kinetic mechanism predicts composition and heat generation in the ignited cells. KIVA3V-ANN has been validated by comparison with isooctane HCCI experiments in two different engines. The neural network provides reasonable predictions for HCCI combustion and emissions that, although typically not as good as obtained with the more physically representative multi-zone model, are obtained at a much reduced computational cost. KIVA3V-ANN can perform reasonably accurate HCCI calculations while requiring only 10% more computational effort than a motored KIVA3V run. It is therefore considered a valuable tool for evaluation of engine maps or other performance analysis tasks requiring multiple individual runs.

  18. Testing of the Multi-Fluid Evaporator Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Gregory; O'Connor, Ed; Riga, Ken; Anderson, Molly; Westheimer, David

    2007-01-01

    Hamilton Sundstrand is under contract with the NASA Johnson Space Center to develop a scalable, evaporative heat rejection system called the Multi-Fluid Evaporator (MFE). It is being designed to support the Orion Crew Module and to support future Constellation missions. The MFE would be used from Earth sea level conditions to the vacuum of space. The current Shuttle configuration utilizes an ammonia boiler and flash evaporator system to achieve cooling at all altitudes. The MFE system combines both functions into a single compact package with significant weight reduction and improved freeze-up protection. The heat exchanger core is designed so that radial flow of the evaporant provides increasing surface area to keep the back pressure low. The multiple layer construction of the core allows for efficient scale up to the desired heat rejection rate. The full scale MFE prototype will be constructed with four core sections that, combined with a novel control scheme, manage the risk of freezing the heat exchanger cores. A sub-scale MFE engineering development unit (EDU) has been built, and is identical to one of the four sections of a full scale prototype. The EDU has completed testing at Hamilton Sundstrand. The overall test objective was to determine the thermal performance of the EDU. The first set of tests simulated how each of the four sections of the prototype would perform by varying the chamber pressure, evaporant flow rate, coolant flow rate and coolant temperature. A second set of tests was conducted with an outlet steam header in place to verify that the outlet steam orifices prevent freeze-up in the core while also allowing the desired thermal turn-down ratio. This paper discusses the EDU tests and results.

  19. Department of Mechanical Engineering University of California at Berkeley

    E-print Network

    Frenklach, Michael

    Department of Mechanical Engineering University of California at Berkeley Tribology (ME226) SAMPLE chemical vapor deposition; RF sputtering; plasma spraying; cathodic vacuum arc deposition; laser surface

  20. DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL & INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING SAFETY COMMITTEE MEETING

    E-print Network

    Sun, Yu

    DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL & INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING SAFETY COMMITTEE MEETING APRIL 11, 2005 ATTENDEEST Building & Construction Services has dropped the job of designing and installing a new ventilation system

  1. Combustion research in the Internal Fluid Mechanics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, Edward J.

    1986-01-01

    The goal of this research is to bring computational fluid dynamics to a state of practical application for the aircraft engine industry. The approach is to have a strongly integrated computational and experimental program for all the disciplines associated with the gas turbine and other aeropropulsion systems by advancing the understanding of flow physics, heat transfer, and combustion processes. The computational and experimental research is integrated in the following way: the experiments that are performed provide an empirical data set so that physical models can be formulated to describe the processes that are occurring - for example, turbulence or chemical reaction. These experiments also form a data base for those who are doing code development by providing experimental data against which the codes can be verified and assesed. Models are generated as closure to some of the numerical codes, and they also provide physical insight for experiments. At the same time, codes which solve the complete Navier-Stokes equations can be used as a kind of numerical experiment from which far more extensive data can be obtained than ever could be obtained experimentally. This could provide physical insight into the complex processes that are taking place. These codes are also exercised against experimental data to assess the accuracy and applicability of models.

  2. Comment on ``Molecular simulation and continuum mechanics study of simple fluids in nonisothermal planar Couette flows''

    E-print Network

    thickening at high strain rates, while the TSB results demonstrate shear thinning as expected. The authorsCOMMENTS Comment on ``Molecular simulation and continuum mechanics study of simple fluids of planar Couette flow of simple fluids with and without a thermostat acting on the fluid. In particular

  3. Introducing Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics Computations with Mathematica in the Undergraduate Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binous, Housam

    2007-01-01

    We study four non-Newtonian fluid mechanics problems using Mathematica[R]. Constitutive equations describing the behavior of power-law, Bingham and Carreau models are recalled. The velocity profile is obtained for the horizontal flow of power-law fluids in pipes and annuli. For the vertical laminar film flow of a Bingham fluid we determine the

  4. GG 711: Theoretical Fluid Mechanics Instructor: Janet Becker (janetbec@hawaii.edu)

    E-print Network

    GG 711: Theoretical Fluid Mechanics Fall 2015 Instructor: Janet Becker (janetbec and Reid Additional References: 1. Lectures on Geophysical Fluid Dynamics by Rick Salmon 2. Perturbation reference and (2) as a fluids course where advanced mathematical tech- inques are used to solve problems

  5. The Fluid Mechanics of Arthropod Sniffing in Turbulent Odor Plumes M.A.R. Koehl

    E-print Network

    Koehl, Mimi

    The Fluid Mechanics of Arthropod Sniffing in Turbulent Odor Plumes M.A.R. Koehl Department on the speed at which they are moved through the surrounding fluid. Therefore, antennule flicking of a hair-bearing arthropod antennule with the surrounding fluid affects the temporal patterns of odor

  6. Astronomy 202: Astrophysical Gas Dynamics LL = Fluid Mechanics by Landau & Lifshitz

    E-print Network

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Astronomy 202: Astrophysical Gas Dynamics LL = Fluid Mechanics by Landau & Lifshitz PP = Plasma Fluid Dynamics by D. J. Tritton You should start by reading the Feynman Lectures Vol II, Ch 40 & 41 (Shu Ch. 1) 2. Equations of Gas Dynamics: neutral ideal fluids (LL Ch. 1; esp. 1,2,5,6,7,8,10; Shu Ch

  7. ,/: : A THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS 87-WA/AES-4 ! .,~,'~(345 E. 47 St., New York, N.Y. 10017 .,. *

    E-print Network

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    internal combustion engine and that uses a high-pressure (primary) fluid stream to compressor models and of heat pumps driven by internal combustion engines, accelerating the secondary stream, and (c,/: : A THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS 87-WA/AES-4 ! .,~,'~(345 E. 47 St., New York

  8. A systems approach to theoretical fluid mechanics: Fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anyiwo, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    A preliminary application of the underlying principles of the investigator's general system theory to the description and analyses of the fluid flow system is presented. An attempt is made to establish practical models, or elements of the general fluid flow system from the point of view of the general system theory fundamental principles. Results obtained are applied to a simple experimental fluid flow system, as test case, with particular emphasis on the understanding of fluid flow instability, transition and turbulence.

  9. The low temperature differential Stirling engine with working fluid operated on critical condition

    SciTech Connect

    Naso, V.; Dong, W.; Lucentini, M.; Capata, R.

    1998-07-01

    The research and development of low temperature differential Stirling engine has a great potential market since a lot of thermal energy at low temperature can supply it and the cost of this kind of engine is lower than general Stirling engine. The characteristics of low compression ratio and low differential temperature Stirling engine may be satisfied with working fluid compressed on critical conditions. By combining two phase heat transfer with forced convective flow in compression space and through the regenerator in the engine, a new heat transfer coefficient emerges capable of absorbing and releasing high heat fluxes without the corresponding low temperature increase. The current analysis focuses on the study of Stirling engines with working fluid compressed on critical conditions, thus at two-phase heat transfer in compression space and regenerator of the engine under forced convective flow conditions.

  10. Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering 365 Fitzpatrick Hall of Engineering

    E-print Network

    Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering 365 Fitzpatrick Hall of Engineering Notre Dame, IN 46556 The Department of Aerospace & Mechanical Engineering at the University of Notre Dame is seeking, turbo-machinery, hypersonic flows, atmospheric flows and wind energy, unsteady aerodynamics, plasma

  11. Towards a statistical mechanical theory of active fluids.

    PubMed

    Marini Bettolo Marconi, Umberto; Maggi, Claudio

    2015-11-11

    We present a stochastic description of a model of N mutually interacting active particles in the presence of external fields and characterize its steady state behavior in the absence of currents. To reproduce the effects of the experimentally observed persistence of the trajectories of the active particles we consider a Gaussian force having a non-vanishing correlation time ?, whose finiteness is a measure of the activity of the system. With these ingredients we show that it is possible to develop a statistical mechanical approach similar to the one employed in the study of equilibrium liquids and to obtain the explicit form of the many-particle distribution function by means of the multidimensional unified colored noise approximation. Such a distribution plays a role analogous to the Gibbs distribution in equilibrium statistical mechanics and provides complete information about the microscopic state of the system. From here we develop a method to determine the one- and two-particle distribution functions in the spirit of the Born-Green-Yvon (BGY) equations of equilibrium statistical mechanics. The resulting equations which contain extra-correlations induced by the activity allow us to determine the stationary density profiles in the presence of external fields, the pair correlations and the pressure of active fluids. In the low density regime we obtained the effective pair potential ?(r) acting between two isolated particles separated by a distance, r, showing the existence of an effective attraction between them induced by activity. Based on these results, in the second half of the paper we propose a mean field theory as an approach simpler than the BGY hierarchy and use it to derive a van der Waals expression of the equation of state. PMID:26387914

  12. 46 CFR 113.35-15 - Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Mechanical engine order telegraph...CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND... 113.35-15 Mechanical engine order telegraph...application. If a mechanical engine order...

  13. 46 CFR 113.35-9 - Mechanical engine order telegraph systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Mechanical engine order telegraph...CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND...Systems 113.35-9 Mechanical engine order telegraph systems. (a) Each mechanical engine order...

  14. Yuwen Zhang Department of Mechanical Engineering,

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Yuwen

    annulus conjugated with the forced convection of the transfer fluid. The temperature of the transfer fluid, melting or freezing occurred in the tube from the tube wall toward the center. For the melting process in a horizontal tube with natural convection in the liquid phase, there are two different models of melting: fixed

  15. Formulas for Modal Density and for Input Power from Mechanical and Fluid Point Sources in Fluid Filled Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnveden, S.

    1997-12-01

    Simple expressions for the modal density of fluid filled pipes and for the input power from mechanical and fluid point sources are derived. The derivations are based on a previously reported, simplified theory for the radial-axial motion of fluid filled pipes. These equations are recapitulated and criteria for their application are given. The accuracy of the resulting expressions for modal density and input power are verified with a spectral (frequency dependent) FE method. These FE calculations are based on the Arnold and Warburton theory for thin walled cylinder vibration and Helmholtz equation for fluid motion. The theory developed applies below half the ring-frequency and when higher order fluid modes are cut off. Thus, as an example, for a water filled steel pipe with a diameter of 300 mm, accurate predictions of modal density and input power are made for frequencies up to approximately 1 kHz.

  16. Fundamental Studies of Fluid Mechanics: Stability in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    George M. Homsy

    2005-04-28

    This work has been concerned with theoretical, computational and experimental studies of a variety of flow and transport problems that are of generic interest and applicability in energy-related and energy-intensive processes. These include the following. (1) Problems associated with oil recovery: the global economy continues to be dependent on the stable and predictable supply of oil and fossil fuels. This will remain the case for the near term, as current estimates are that world production of oil will peak between 2025 and 2100, depending on assumptions regarding growth. Most of these resources reside in porous rocks and other naturally occurring media. Studies of flow-induced instabilities are relevant to the areas of secondary and enhanced oil recovery. (2) Small scale and Stokes flows: flows in microgeometries and involving interfaces and surfactants are of interest in a myriad of energy-related contexts. These include: pore-level modeling of the fundamental processes by which oil held in porous materials is mobilized and produced; heating and cooling energy cycles involving significant expenditure of energy in conditioning of human environments, heat pipes, and compact heat exchangers; and energy efficiency in large scale separation processes such as distillation and absorption-processes that underlie the chemical process industries. (3) Coating flows: these are of interest in information technologies, including the manufacture of integrated circuits and data storage and retrieval devices. It is estimated that 50-70% of the starting raw materials and intermediate devices in information technology processes must be discarded as a result of imperfections and failure to meet specifications. These in turn are often the result of the inability to control fluid-mechanical processes and flow instabilities. Our work over the grant period is primarily fundamental in nature. We are interested in establishing general principles and behaviors that relate to a variety of processes in a variety of contexts. Our work has focused and will continue to focus on fluid mechanical phenomena that are of interest in energy-related technologies, with an emphasis on interfacial flows.

  17. Multidimensional Generalized Functions in Aeroacoustics and Fluid Mechanics. Part 1; Basic Concepts and Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, Fereidoun; Myers, Michael K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is the first part of a three part tutorial on multidimensional generalized functions (GFs) and their applications in aeroacoustics and fluid mechanics. The subject is highly fascinating and essential in many areas of science and, in particular, wave propagation problems. In this tutorial, we strive to present rigorously and clearly the basic concepts and the tools that are needed to use GFs in applications effectively and with ease. We give many examples to help the readers in understanding the mathematical ideas presented here. The first part of the tutorial is on the basic concepts of GFs. Here we define GFs, their properties and some common operations on them. We define the important concept of generalized differentiation and then give some interesting elementary and advanced examples on Green's functions and wave propagation problems. Here, the analytic power of GFs in applications is demonstrated with ease and elegance. Part 2 of this tutorial is on the diverse applications of generalized derivatives (GDs). Part 3 is on generalized Fourier transformations and some more advanced topics. One goal of writing this tutorial is to convince readers that, because of their powerful operational properties, GFs are absolutely essential and useful in engineering and physics, particularly in aeroacoustics and fluid mechanics.

  18. Comparing the mechanical properties of the porcine knee meniscus when hydrated in saline versus synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Lakes, Emily H; Kline, Courtney L; McFetridge, Peter S; Allen, Kyle D

    2015-12-16

    As research progresses to find a suitable knee meniscus replacement, accurate in vitro testing becomes critical for feasibility and comparison studies of mechanical integrity. Within the knee, the meniscus is bathed in synovial fluid, yet the most common hydration fluid in laboratory testing is phosphate buffered saline (PBS). PBS is a relatively simple salt solution, while synovial fluid is a complex non-Newtonian fluid with multiple lubricating factors. As such, PBS may interact with meniscal tissue differently than synovial fluid, and thus, the hydration fluid may be an important factor in obtaining accurate results during in vitro testing. To evaluate these effects, medial porcine menisci were used to evaluate tissue mechanics in tension (n=11) and compression (n=15). In all tests, two samples from the same meniscus were taken, where one sample was hydrated in PBS and the other was hydrated in synovial fluid. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences between the mean mechanical properties of samples tested in PBS compared to synovial fluid; however, compressive testing revealed the variability between samples was significantly reduced if samples were tested in synovial fluid. For example, the compressive Young?s Modulus was 12.697.49MPa in PBS versus 12.344.27MPa in synovial fluid. These results indicate testing meniscal tissue in PBS will largely not affect the mean value of the mechanical properties, but performing compression testing in synovial fluid may provide more consistent results between samples and assist in reducing sample numbers in some experiments. PMID:26592438

  19. What can I do with a degree in Mechanical Engineering?

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Mark

    engineer's role is design and the use of information technology. Mechanical Engineering. #12;ENGINEERING, or cultural groups. As more and more employers are developing jobs that are particular to their own school. To download the 'Best Preparation for University' information sheet go to www

  20. Materials Science and Technology Mechanical and Materials Engineering

    E-print Network

    Birmingham, University of

    Materials Science and Technology Metallurgy Mechanical and Materials Engineering Materials Science with Energy Engineering Materials Science with Business Management Course Prospectus School of Metallurgy Foreword 3 Materials science/engineering what is it? 4 Materials at Birmingham 6 Degree programmes 8

  1. University Of California, Berkeley Department of Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Frenklach, Michael

    , internal combustion engine, spray combustion, gas turbine combustor. CLASS/LABORATORY SCHEDULE Three hoursUniversity Of California, Berkeley Department of Mechanical Engineering ME 140: Combustion concurrently. TEXTBOOK(S) AND/OR OTHER REQUIRED MATERIAL Required text: "Combustion Engineering", G.L. Borman

  2. International Society for Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Briaud, Jean Louis

    6/11/2010 1 ISSMGE International Society for Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering www discount to members. 2. Access 18,000 + geotechnical engineers throughout the world with whom to do of geotechnical engineering at the international level 8. Find more information, check the ISSMGE web site at www

  3. Trends in the Education and Training of Professional Mechanical Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institution of Mechanical Engineers, London (England).

    Twelve papers discussing problems encountered and solutions to them were presented at a symposium which brought together persons concerned with the training of professional mechanical engineers. At Session I, papers covered the need for broadly-based training and engineering practice, training requirements for engineers in the process industries,

  4. An Innovative Improvement of Engineering Learning System Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, T. C.; Wang, S. K.; Tai, S. W.; Hung, C. T.

    2007-01-01

    An innovative concept of an electronic learning system has been established in an attempt to achieve a technology that provides engineering students with an instructive and affordable framework for learning engineering-related courses. This system utilizes an existing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) package, Active Server Pages programming,

  5. Biology: An Important Agricultural Engineering Mechanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    Describes the field of bioengineering with particular emphasis on agricultural engineering, and presents the results of a survey of schools that combine biology and engineering in their curricula. (JR)

  6. Neural Mechanisms of Interference Control in Working Memory: Effects of Interference Expectancy and Fluid

    E-print Network

    ) Neural Mechanisms of Interference Control in Working Memory: Effects of Interference Expectancy and FluidNeural Mechanisms of Interference Control in Working Memory: Effects of Interference Expectancy and Fluid Intelligence Gregory C. Burgess1 *, Todd S. Braver2 1 Institute of Cognitive Science, University

  7. Teaching Fluid Mechanics to the Beginning Graduate Student--An Objective-Oriented Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Henry

    A premature embarkation in specialized areas of fluid mechanics by the beginning graduate student, without having first thoroughly learned the basics, leads to learning difficulties and destroys zeal for learning. To avoid these problems, many schools in the U.S. offer beginning graduate courses in fluid mechanics (BGCFM). Because the success or

  8. Neural Mechanisms of Interference Control Underlie the Relationship Between Fluid Intelligence and Working Memory Span

    E-print Network

    Neural Mechanisms of Interference Control Underlie the Relationship Between Fluid Intelligence Andrew R. A. Conway Princeton University Todd S. Braver Washington University in St. Louis Fluid studies show that much of the variance in gF and WM span is shared, suggesting common neural mechanisms

  9. 7th World Conference on Experimental Heat Transfer, Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics

    E-print Network

    Abdou, Mohamed

    i #12;ExHFT-7 7th World Conference on Experimental Heat Transfer, Fluid Mechanics Conference on Experimental Heat Transfer, Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics 28 June 03 July 2009, Krakow FOR HUMANITY M. A. Abdou Center for Energy Science and Technology Advanced Research (CESTAR), Los Angeles, USA

  10. Proceedings of IMECE2004 2004 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress

    E-print Network

    Bobrow, James E.

    that is actuated by an induction motor via a planetary gear system [4]. ARTHuR has two linear motors and a two barProceedings of IMECE2004 2004 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress AnaheimDepartment of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering University of California, Irvine 2Brain Research Institute

  11. 2. Photographic copy of engineering drawing showing mechanical systems in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photographic copy of engineering drawing showing mechanical systems in plan and sections of Test Stand 'E,' including tunnel entrance. California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Plant Engineering 'Bldg. E-60 Mechanical, Solid Propellant Test Stand,' sheet E60/13-4, June 20, 1961. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand E, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. Academic Grievance Hearing Procedures for the Department of Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Feeny, Brian

    Academic Grievance Hearing Procedures for the Department of Mechanical Engineering Each right of violations of those rights through formal grievance hearings. In accordance with the AFR and the GSRR, the Department of Mechanical Engineering has established the following Hearing Board procedures for adjudicating

  13. Faculty Positions in Mechanical Engineering University of Utah

    E-print Network

    Frenklach, Michael

    Faculty Positions in Mechanical Engineering University of Utah The Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Utah (http://www.mech.utah.edu/) invites applications for five tenure track of Utah is a tier 1 research institution that has ranked in the top 5 nationally for start-up companies

  14. Wentworth Institute Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Manual. Laboratory Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avakian, Harry; And Others

    This publication is a laboratory study guide designed for mechanical engineering students. All of the experiments (with the exception of experiment No. 1) contained in the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Manual have been included in this guide. Brief theoretical backgrounds, examples and their solutions, charts, graphs, illustrations, and

  15. Mechanical Properties of Gels; Stress from Confined Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    George W. Scherer

    2009-12-01

    Abstract for Grant DE-FG02-97ER45642 Period: 1997-2002 Mechanical Properties of Gels 2002-2008 Stress from Confined Fluids Principal investigator: Prof. George W. Scherer Dept. Civil & Env. Eng./PRISM Eng. Quad. E-319 Princeton, NJ 08544 USA Recipient organization: Trustees of Princeton University 4 New South Princeton, NJ 08544 USA Abstract: The initial stage of this project, entitled Mechanical Properties of Gels, was dedicated to characterizing and explaining the properties of inorganic gels. Such materials, made by sol-gel processing, are of interest for fabrication of films, fibers, optical devices, advanced insulation and other uses. However, their poor mechanical properties are an impediment in some applications, so understanding the origin of these properties could lead to enhanced performance. Novel experimental methods were developed and applied to measure the stiffness and permeability of gels and aerogels. Numerical simulations were developed to reproduce the growth process of the gels, resulting in structures whose mechanical properties matched the measurements. The models showed that the gels are formed by the growth of relatively robust clusters of molecules that are joined by tenuous links whose compliance compromises the stiffness of the structure. Therefore, synthetic methods that enhance the links could significantly increase the rigidity of such gels. The next stage of the project focused on Stress from Confined Fluids. The first problem of interest was the enhanced thermal expansion coefficient of water that we measured in the nanometric pores of cement paste. This could have a deleterious effect on the resistance of concrete to rapid heating in fires, because the excessive thermal expansion of water in the pores of the concrete could lead to spalling and collapse. A series of experiments demonstrated that the expansion of water increases as the pore size decreases. To explain this behavior, we undertook a collaboration with Prof. Stephen Garofalini (Rutgers), who has developed the best simulations of water ever reported by use of molecular dynamics. Simulated heating of water in small pores provided quantitative agreement with experiments, and showed that the origin of the high expansion is the altered structure of water in the first two molecular layers adjacent to the pore wall. The final focus of the project was to understand the damage done by crystals growing in small pores. For example, the primary cause of damage to ancient monuments in the Mediterranean Basin is growth of salt crystals in the pores of the stone. Salt may enter stone as a result of capillary rise of groundwater, by leaching of mortar joints, deposition of marine spray, or reactions with atmospheric pollutants (such as oxides of nitrogen or sulfur). As the water evaporates, the salt solution becomes supersaturated and crystals precipitate. Stress results, because the salt usually repels the minerals in the pore walls. Our goal was to identify the factors contributing to the repulsion, so that we could develop a chemical treatment to reduce the repulsion and hence the stress. (We have recently demonstrated an effective treatment as part of a separately funded study.) In collaboration with Prof. Garofalini, molecular dynamics simulations have been done that correctly reproduce the structure of water around dissolved ions of sodium and chloride. We simulated the interaction between crystals of sodium chloride and quartz, and found that this particular system exhibits attractive forces, in agreement with experiment. The origin of the attraction is the orientation of dipolar water molecules near the surfaces of the crystals. Similar calculations now must be done in systems, such as potassium chloride and quartz, where the interaction is repulsive. This grant supported the education of two doctoral students, Hang-Shing Ma (Ph.D., 2002) and Melanie Webb (Ph.D. expected 2010), three post-doctoral researchers, Joachim Gross, Gudrun Reichenauer, and Shuangyan (Sonia) Xu, and five undergraduates (for senior theses or independent projects

  16. Cold dark matter cosmology conflicts with fluid mechanics and observations

    E-print Network

    Carl H. Gibson

    2006-10-23

    Cold dark matter hierarchical clustering (CDMHC) cosmology based on the Jeans 1902 criterion for gravitational instability gives predictions about the early universe contrary to fluid mechanics and observations. Jeans neglected viscosity, diffusivity, and turbulence: factors that determine gravitational structure formation and contradict small structures (CDM halos) forming from non-baryonic dark matter particle candidates. From hydro-gravitational-dynamics (HGD) cosmology, viscous-gravitational fragmentation produced supercluster (10^46 kg), cluster, and galaxy-mass (10^42 kg) clouds in the primordial plasma with the large fossil density turbulence (rho_o ~ 3x10-17 kg m-3) of the first fragmentation at 10^12 s, and a protogalaxy linear and spiral clump morphology reflecting maximum stretching near vortex lines of the plasma turbulence at the 10^13 s plasma-gas transition. Gas protogalaxies fragmented into proto-globular-star-cluster mass (10^36 kg) clumps of protoplanet gas clouds that are now frozen as earth-mass (10^24-^25 kg) Jovian planets of the baryonic dark matter, about 30,000,000 rogue planets per star. Observations contradict the CDMHCC prediction of large explosive Population III first stars at 10^16 s, but support the immediate gentle formation of small Population II first stars at 10^13 s in globular-star-clusters from HGD.

  17. Statistical mechanics of homogeneous partly pinned fluid systems

    E-print Network

    Vincent Krakoviack

    2010-12-05

    The homogeneous partly pinned fluid systems are simple models of a fluid confined in a disordered porous matrix obtained by arresting randomly chosen particles in a one-component bulk fluid or one of the two components of a binary mixture. In this paper, their configurational properties are investigated. It is shown that a peculiar complementarity exists between the mobile and immobile phases, which originates from the fact that the solid is prepared in presence of and in equilibrium with the adsorbed fluid. Simple identities follow, which connect different types of configurational averages, either relative to the fluid-matrix system or to the bulk fluid from which it is prepared. Crucial simplifications result for the computation of important structural quantities, both in computer simulations and in theoretical approaches. Finally, possible applications of the model in the field of dynamics in confinement or in strongly asymmetric mixtures are suggested.

  18. Serious Fun: Using Toys to Demonstrate Fluid Mechanics Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saviz, Camilla M.; Shakerin, Said

    2014-09-01

    Many students have owned or seen fluids toys in which two immiscible fluids within a closed container can be tilted to generate waves. These types of inexpensive and readily available toys are fun to play with, but they are also useful for provoking student learning about fluid properties or complex fluid behavior, including drop formation and coalescence. Including these toys in a class or lab with a companion exercise allows students to use observation and inductive reasoning to infer principlesall while having fun.

  19. European Journal of Mechanics B/Fluids 43 (2014) 202215 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-print Network

    Matthews, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    European Journal of Mechanics B/Fluids 43 (2014) 202215 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect European Journal of Mechanics B/Fluids journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/ejmflu Saturation front. This displacement can take place by one of two distinct mechanisms. One mechanism is when both fluids completely

  20. Karthik Ramani School of Mechanical Engineering,

    E-print Network

    Kim, Harrison

    of Environmental and Ecological Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2035 John Sutherland, Upton, NY 11973 Harrison Kim Deborah Thurston Department of Industrial and Enterprise Systems

  1. Shift mechanism for engine starting apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, J.A.; Colvill, R.G.; Smock, A.L.

    1986-04-01

    This patent describes a shift lever mechanism for translating axial movement of the plunger of a starter solenoid into axial movement of a pinion of an engine starting apparatus. This apparatus consists of, a starter solenoid having an axially shiftable plunger and a coil winding, a spring opposing pull-in movement of the plunger and a solenoid switch operated to a closed condition when the plunger is completely pulled-in, a shift lever actuator carried by the plunger for axial movement therewith. The actuator has a pair of spaced surfaces, a pivotally mounted shift lever one end of which is adapted to be coupled to the pinion. The opposite end of the shift lever has a pair of opposed shift lever surfaces that respectively engage the surfaces on the actuator. The actuator surfaces and the shift lever surfaces are substantially engaged when the shift lever is in an at rest postion. The surfaces on the shift lever are at different radial distances from the pivot point of the shift lever and are arranged relative to the surfaces on the actuator such that when the solenoid plunger pulls-in the surface on the shift lever that is at the greater radial distance from the pivot point is moved by a surface of the actuator and the other surface on the shift lever becomes separated by a predetermined amount from its cooperating surface on the actuator. The amount of separation is sufficient to allow the solenoid switch to be actuated to an open condition when the solenoid coil winding is deenergized and the spring shifts and plunger to reengage the separated surfaces.

  2. Coupled fluid and solid mechanics study for improved permeability estimation of fines' invaded porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabolghasemi, M.; Prodanovic, M.

    2012-12-01

    The problem of fine particle infiltration is seen in fields from subsurface transport, to drug delivery to industrial slurry flows. Sediment filtration and pathogen retention are well-known subsurface engineering problems that have been extensively studied through different macroscopic, microscopic and experimental modeling techniques Due to heterogeneity, standard constitutive relationships and models yield poor predictions for flow (e.g. permeability) and rock properties (e.g. elastic moduli) of the invaded (damaged) porous media. This severely reduces our ability to, for instance, predict retention, pressure build-up, newly formed flow pathways or porous medium mechanical behavior. We chose a coupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) - discrete element modeling (DEM) approach to simulate the particulate flow through porous media represented by sphere packings. In order to minimize the uncertainty involved in estimating the flow properties of porous media on Darcy scale and address the dynamic nature of filtration process, this microscopic approach is adapted as a robust method that can incorporate particle interaction physics as well as the heterogeneity of the porous medium.. The coupled simulation was done in open-source packages which has both CFD (openFOAM) and DEM components (LIGGGHTS). We ran several sensitivity analyses over different parameters such as particle/grain size ratio, fluid viscosity, flow rate and sphere packing porosity in order to investigate their effects on the depth of invasion and damaged porous medium permeability. The response of the system to the variation of different parameters is reflected through different clogging mechanism; for instance, bridging is the dominant mechanism of pore-throat clogging when larger particles penetrate into the packing, whereas, in case of fine particles which are much smaller than porous medium grains (1/20 in diameter), this mechanism is not very effective due to the frequent formation and destruction of particle bridges. Finally, depending on the material and fluids that penetrate into the porous medium, the ionic forces might play a significant role in the filtration process. We thus also report on influence of particle attachment (and detachment) on the type of clogging mechanisms. Pore scale simulations allow for visualization and understanding of fundamental processes, and, further, the velocity fields are integrated into a distinctly non-monotonic permeability-porosity/(depth of penetration) relationship.

  3. Mechanical properties of magnetorheological fluids under squeeze-shear mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong-yun; Zheng, Hui-qiang; Li, Yong-xian; Lu, Shuang

    2008-12-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) fluids is very promising intelligent materials and it can rapidly by changed from a liquid state to a solid state in a magnetic field. Various industries are full of potential MR fluids applications, but current MR fluids have the limitation that their yield stresses are not strong enough to meet some industrial requirements. The crucial problem is how to enhance the yield stress of MR fluids. Electrorheological (ER) fluids, similar to MR fluids, can be achieved high strength under squeeze mode, which proposed a method to achieve high-efficiency MR fluids by study of shear after compression. The performance of MR fluids under squeeze-shear mode was inveatigated. Magnetic fields being generated by two coils carrying different magnitudes of DC electrical current were applied on the MR fluids when shearing after compression were carried out on a self-constructed test system. For each trail the current in the coil and the compressive force were kept constant and the instantaneous yield stress was recorded. The relations of compression stress versus compression strain, yield stress versus compression stress were studied under different applied currents. The ploting of compressive stress against compressive strain has been observed to have three regions: the first and third regions has a linear relationship and the second region has a zero increasing. The slope of the curve was found to be larger when the applied current was larger. The SG MRF2035 without compression process has a yield stress about 53kPa at most even if increasing the applied current. But after compression, the yield stress increase with the increasing compressive stress under the different applied currents. And some promising results are obtained, for example, when the applied current is 2.5A and the compressive stress is 2.0MPa, the yield stress exceeds 1100kPa. It showed that the yield stress of MR fluids after compression was much stronger than that of uncompressed MR fluids under the same applied current. The enhanced yield stress of MR fluids can be utilized to design the MR clutch and brake for new structure and will make MR fluids technology attractive for many applications.

  4. Mechanics of Undulatory Swimming in a Frictional Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yang; Sharpe, Sarah S.; Masse, Andrew; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2012-01-01

    The sandfish lizard (Scincus scincus) swims within granular media (sand) using axial body undulations to propel itself without the use of limbs. In previous work we predicted average swimming speed by developing a numerical simulation that incorporated experimentally measured biological kinematics into a multibody sandfish model. The model was coupled to an experimentally validated soft sphere discrete element method simulation of the granular medium. In this paper, we use the simulation to study the detailed mechanics of undulatory swimming in a granular frictional fluid and compare the predictions to our previously developed resistive force theory (RFT) which models sand-swimming using empirically determined granular drag laws. The simulation reveals that the forward speed of the center of mass (CoM) oscillates about its average speed in antiphase with head drag. The coupling between overall body motion and body deformation results in a non-trivial pattern in the magnitude of lateral displacement of the segments along the body. The actuator torque and segment power are maximal near the center of the body and decrease to zero toward the head and the tail. Approximately 30% of the net swimming power is dissipated in head drag. The power consumption is proportional to the frequency in the biologically relevant range, which confirms that frictional forces dominate during sand-swimming by the sandfish. Comparison of the segmental forces measured in simulation with the force on a laterally oscillating rod reveals that a granular hysteresis effect causes the overestimation of the body thrust forces in the RFT. Our models provide detailed testable predictions for biological locomotion in a granular environment. PMID:23300407

  5. Analysis of sponge zones for computational fluid mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Bodony, Daniel J. . E-mail: bodony@stanford.edu

    2006-03-01

    The use of sponge regions, or sponge zones, which add the forcing term -{sigma}(q - q {sub ref}) to the right-hand-side of the governing equations in computational fluid mechanics as an ad hoc boundary treatment is widespread. They are used to absorb and minimize reflections from computational boundaries and as forcing sponges to introduce prescribed disturbances into a calculation. A less common usage is as a means of extending a calculation from a smaller domain into a larger one, such as in computing the far-field sound generated in a localized region. By analogy to the penalty method of finite elements, the method is placed on a solid foundation, complete with estimates of convergence. The analysis generalizes the work of Israeli and Orszag [M. Israeli, S.A. Orszag, Approximation of radiation boundary conditions, J. Comp. Phys. 41 (1981) 115-135] and confirms their findings when applied as a special case to one-dimensional wave propagation in an absorbing sponge. It is found that the rate of convergence of the actual solution to the target solution, with an appropriate norm, is inversely proportional to the sponge strength. A detailed analysis for acoustic wave propagation in one-dimension verifies the convergence rate given by the general theory. The exponential point-wise convergence derived by Israeli and Orszag in the high-frequency limit is recovered and found to hold over all frequencies. A weakly nonlinear analysis of the method when applied to Burgers' equation shows similar convergence properties. Three numerical examples are given to confirm the analysis: the acoustic extension of a two-dimensional time-harmonic point source, the acoustic extension of a three-dimensional initial-value problem of a sound pulse, and the introduction of unstable eigenmodes from linear stability theory into a two-dimensional shear layer.

  6. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING Calculus for Technology I

    E-print Network

    a system named ALEKS. The following website describes the exam, how to login and other details. Please read 1223 Manufacturing Process Grade Sem Fall & Spring GENT 1153 Engineering Graphics Grade Fall MET 1103 Department Head or Faculty or Director of Engineering Technology. A flexible study plan is designed to meet

  7. Realization Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    .95 0.96 0.97 0.98 0.99 1 200 250 300 350 400 Reliability Cost($) Valid Designs: Planetary Gear TrainFeasible Designs: Planetary Gear Train Feasible, but dominated. No engineer will choose these Model components? For a conventional architecture, what is the best engine technology (4-cyl. turbo, V6, etc.)? What is the best gear

  8. Healthcare Technology Management (HTM) of mechanical ventilators by clinical engineers.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Jun; Nakane, Masaki; Kawamae, Kaneyuki

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilator failures expose patients to unacceptable risks, and maintaining mechanical ventilator safety is an important issue. We examined the usefulness of maintaining mechanical ventilators by clinical engineers (CEs) using a specialized calibrator. These evaluations and the ability to make in-house repairs proved useful for obviating the need to rent ventilators which, in turn, might prove faulty themselves. The CEs' involvement in maintaining mechanical ventilators is desirable, ensures prompt service, and, most importantly, enhances safe management of mechanical ventilators. PMID:25520839

  9. Mechanical Engineering Education and Its Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ow, C. S.; Kanan, M. M.

    2015-09-01

    The paper addresses historical development in Engineering Education in the country, its evolution till present day efforts toward the formation of Professional Engineers (PE). Of particular interest is the proposed recognition of more than one pathways towards PE Certification amongst member countries of the International Engineering Alliance (IEA). However, Engineering Education of Gen Y poses challenges at maintaining relevant benchmarks at the basic degree level. The widespread use of sophisticated software for simulation work in any undergraduate programme has its sacrifices with respect to emphasis on depth of knowledge. A definite mismatch between what is perceived by the educators and the actual performance of graduates had been identified in a forum and an employment survey conducted by the Institution of Engineers Malaysia (IEM). Suggestions as to how this can be addressed include the setting up of a Board of Educators to regulate the education industry.

  10. Non-relativistic conformal symmetries in fluid mechanics

    E-print Network

    P. -M. Zhang; P. A. Horvathy

    2009-10-24

    The symmetries of a free incompressible fluid span the Galilei group, augmented with independent dilations of space and time. When the fluid is compressible, the symmetry is enlarged to the expanded Schroedinger group, which also involves, in addition, Schroedinger expansions. While incompressible fluid dynamics can be derived as an appropriate non-relativistic limit of a conformally-invariant relativistic theory, the recently discussed Conformal Galilei group, obtained by contraction from the relativistic conformal group, is not a symmetry. This is explained by the subtleties of the non-relativistic limit.

  11. Analysis of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Combustion with a Sequential Fluid Mechanics-Multizone Chemical Kinetics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L; Espinosa-Loza, F; Babajimopoulos, A; Assanis, D N

    2004-09-30

    We have developed a methodology for analysis of PCCI engines that applies to conditions in which there is some stratification in the air-fuel distribution inside the cylinder at the time of combustion. Our analysis methodology consists of two stages: first, a fluid mechanics code is used to determine temperature and equivalence ratio distributions as a function of crank angle, assuming motored conditions. The distribution information is then used for grouping the mass in the cylinder into a two-dimensional (temperature-equivalence ratio) array of zones. The zone information is then handed on to a detailed chemical kinetics model that calculates combustion, emissions and engine efficiency information. The methodology applies to situations where chemistry and fluid mechanics are weakly linked. The results of the multi-zone model have been compared to the results obtained from a fully integrated code, in which a chemical kinetics code is directly linked into a fluid mechanics code to calculate chemistry in every cell of the grid. The results show that the multi-zone model predicts burn duration and peak cylinder pressure with good accuracy. However, ignition timing predicted by the multi-zone model is sensitive to the transition angle between the fluid mechanics code and the chemical kinetics code. The paper explores the possibility of using three different criteria for determining the transition angle: fraction of heat release at the time of ignition, temperature of the hottest cell at the time of ignition, and a fixed crank angle of transition. The results show that the three criteria have some validity as transition criteria. Further research is necessary to investigate the effect of fuel properties and operating conditions on transition angle.

  12. Mechanical Engineering at KSC: 'How I spend My Hours from 9 to 5 and Draw a Paycheck'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randazzo, John; Steinrock. Todd (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of a senior mechanical engineer's role in designing and testing sensors to fly aboard the shuttle Discovery during STS-95 and STS-98. Topics covered include: software development tools, computation fluid dynamics, structural analysis, housing design, and systems integration.

  13. 2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics, Fall 2002

    E-print Network

    Sonin, A. A.

    Survey of principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua. Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows. Similarity and dimensional analysis. Lubrication theory. ...

  14. 2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics, Fall 2005

    E-print Network

    McKinley, Gareth

    This course surveys the principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Topics include mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua, the Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows, similarity and dimensional ...

  15. Salvador E. Menjivar Mechanical-Aerospace Engineering

    E-print Network

    Petta, Jason

    Unit Long Life Batteries DIE!!! #12;Electrostatic Electrolytic Electrochemical double layer capacitor, Manufacture, and Test an electric double layer capacitor Ultra capacitor is to be manufactured via pulsed laser and electronic fluid dispenser. Micro meter scale #12;Quick Charge Quick Discharge Quick Response

  16. Satish Kumar School of Mechanical Engineering,

    E-print Network

    Alam, Muhammad A.

    is not critical, low-cost organic TFTs on flexible, lightweight, plastic substrates 37 are emerging 200C and are therefore not suitable for plastic sub- strates. As a result, researchers are exploring on a temporary substrate and released into a carrier fluid, which is then spin coated onto arbitrary flexible

  17. MechanicalEngineering Colloquium The Department of

    E-print Network

    of locomotion, the swimming performance can either be increased, decreased or remain unaffected by the non Zenit Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico Locomotion extensively studied in the past. Most previous work focused on cell locomotion in simple (Newtonian) fluids

  18. ADDRESSING ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING CHALLENGES WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the field of environmental engineering, modeling tools are playing an ever larger role in addressing air quality issues, including source pollutant emissions, atmospheric dispersion and human exposure risks. More detailed modeling of environmental flows requires tools for c...

  19. 14 CFR 25.1182 - Nacelle areas behind firewalls, and engine pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01...firewalls, and engine pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid...25.1182 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION...and engine pod attaching structures containing flammable...

  20. 14 CFR 25.1182 - Nacelle areas behind firewalls, and engine pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01...firewalls, and engine pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid...25.1182 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION...and engine pod attaching structures containing flammable...

  1. Using Adobe Illustrator for mechanical engineering design

    E-print Network

    Zalatan, Kim (Kim E.)

    2011-01-01

    Sketching by hand is important in the creative process because it promotes reinterpretation through ambiguity. Adobe Illustrator is a valuable tool for an engineer to make professional-looking presentation drawings. The ...

  2. Realization Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering 1

    E-print Network

    ML Information Model Requirements, Architecture Models, Manufacturing Models, etc. Graph Patterns Design and analysis models Model integration for information consistency, traceability, & automated Activities & State Machines System Parametrics Simulations & Engineering Analyses CAD Models Cost Models

  3. Influence of Reduced Mass Flow Rate and Chamber Backpressure on Swirl Injector Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R Jeremy; Hulka, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Industry interest in variable-thrust liquid rocket engines places a demand on engine injector technology to operate over a wide range of liquid mass flow rates and chamber backpressures. One injection technology of current interest for variable thrust applications is an injector design with swirled fluids. Current swirl injector design methodologies do not take into account how swirl injector design parameters respond to elevated chamber backpressures at less than design mass flow rates. The current work was created to improve state-of-the-art swirl injector design methods in this area. The specific objective was to study the effects of elevated chamber backpressure and off-design mass flow rates on swirl injector fluid mechanics. Using a backpressure chamber with optical access, water was flowed through a swirl injector at various combinations of chamber backpressure and mass flow rates. The film thickness profile down the swirl injector nozzle section was measured through a transparent nozzle section of the injector. High speed video showed measurable increases in the film thickness profile with application of chamber backpressure and mass flow rates less than design. At prescribed combinations of chamber backpressure and injected mass flow rate, a discrete change in the film thickness profile was observed. Measured injector discharge coefficient values showed different trends with increasing chamber backpressure at low mass flow rates as opposed to near-design mass flow rates. Downstream spray angles showed classic changes in morphology as the mass flow rate was decreased below the design value. Increasing chamber backpressure decreased the spray angle at any injection mass flow rate. Experimental measurements and discussion of these results are reported in this paper.

  4. Montana State University 1 Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    processes, machining, welding, design for manufacturing and tooling, and quality assurance), mechanical of scientific endeavors into useful products and services. Students who choose a career in mechanical and product design, product and system evaluation, research laboratory experimental support, prototype

  5. MECHANICAL & INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING B. DOLUNAY,2006 VIRTUAL REALITY BASEDVIRTUAL REALITY BASED

    E-print Network

    Akgunduz, Ali

    MECHANICAL & INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING B. DOLUNAY,2006 VIRTUAL REALITY BASEDVIRTUAL REALITY BASED Testing & SupportTesting & Support #12;MECHANICAL & INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING B. DOLUNAY,2006 AIM OF RESEARCH PRESENTATION OUTLINEPRESENTATION OUTLINE #12;MECHANICAL & INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING B. DOLUNAY,2006

  6. Content Development Policy: Mechanical Aerospace & Civil Engineering 1 The University of Manchester Library

    E-print Network

    Abrahams, I. David

    Content Development Policy: Mechanical Aerospace & Civil Engineering 1 The University of Manchester Library Content Development Policy Mechanical Aerospace and Civil Engineering Monday, 30 April 2012 ...........................................................................................................18 #12;2 Content Development Policy: Mechanical Aerospace & Civil Engineering Introduction

  7. European Journal of Mechanics B/Fluids 25 (2006) 130136 A Legendre expansion and some exact solutions basic

    E-print Network

    Siewert, Charles E.

    2006-01-01

    European Journal of Mechanics B/Fluids 25 (2006) 130136 A Legendre expansion and some exact. doi:10.1016/j.euromechflu.2005.04.005 #12;C.E. Siewert / European Journal of Mechanics B/Fluids 252}(,c). (18) #12;132 C.E. Siewert / European Journal of Mechanics B/Fluids 25 (2006) 130136 2

  8. European Journal of Mechanics B/Fluids 24 (2005) 614620 A formulation of the linearized Boltzmann equations

    E-print Network

    Siewert, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    European Journal of Mechanics B/Fluids 24 (2005) 614620 A formulation of the linearized Boltzmann. / European Journal of Mechanics B/Fluids 24 (2005) 614620 615 is the Maxwellian distribution for n particles.D.M. Garcia et al. / European Journal of Mechanics B/Fluids 24 (2005) 614620 and in order to introduce

  9. Journal of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics 225 (2015) 5461 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-print Network

    Rothstein, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Journal of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics 225 (2015) 5461 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Journal of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/jnnfm Dynamic contact angle measurements of viscoelastic fluids Jeong-Hyun Kim, Jonathan P. Rothstein Department of Mechanical

  10. Kevin E. Lansey Department of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics

    E-print Network

    Scott, Christopher

    Distribution Systems Analysis Handbook for Engineers and Planners, MW Soft, Inc., 2nd edition, 2006. Lansey, K. Brooks, W. Ela, S. Stewart, and P. Wilson, "A General Water Resources Planning Model using Dynamic Supply System," submitted for possible publications in Water Resources Management, May, 2007. Chung, G

  11. Clock mechanisms and their effects, leads into steam engine

    E-print Network

    Dugan, David

    2004-08-17

    In a clock-makers shop, Simon Schaffer explains the great precision needed to make clocks, and the development of standardized parts. The feed-back mechanisms or governors are absolutely essential in the first stationary steam engines....

  12. University Of California, Berkeley Department of Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Frenklach, Michael

    of manufacturing processes (metal forming, forging, metal cutting, welding, joining, and casting); selection COVERED Mechanical properties of engineering materials; metal casting; forging; wire drawing; extrusion and composites; powder metallurgy; material removal basics; tool wear and tool life; cutting tool materials

  13. A common-sense reasoning system for mechanical engineering

    E-print Network

    Sokoloski, Aaron M

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes the Mechnet system, which was created to test an implementation of analogy-based reasoning about mechanical engineering, focusing on tools and machines that would be found in a shop. Mechnet uses ...

  14. 20. Photocopy of drawing (1961 mechanical drawing by Kaiser Engineers) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photocopy of drawing (1961 mechanical drawing by Kaiser Engineers) ELECTRICAL LAYOUTS FOR VEHICLE SUPPORT BUILDING, SHEET E-2 - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Vehicle Support Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  15. Averaging out Inhomogeneous Newtonian Cosmologies: I. Fluid Mechanics and the Navier-Stokes Equation

    E-print Network

    Roustam Zalaletdinov

    2002-12-18

    The basic concepts and equations of classical fluid mechanics are presented in the form necessary for the formulation of Newtonian cosmology and for derivation and analysis of a system of the averaged Navier-Stokes-Poisson equations. A special attention is paid to the analytic formulation of the definitions and equations of moving fluids and to their physical content.

  16. Fluid mechanics phenomena in microgravity; ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Anaheim, CA, Nov. 8-13, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siginer, Dennis A. (editor); Weislogel, Mark M. (editor)

    1992-01-01

    This paper is the first in a series of symposia presenting research activity in microgravity fluid mechanics. General topics addressed include two-phase flow and transport phenomena, thermo-capillary flow, and interfacial stability. Papers present mathmatical models of fluid dynamics in the microgravity environment. Applications suggested include space manufacturing and storage of liquids in low gravity.

  17. Revisiting Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics Using Computer Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, D. G.

    2006-01-01

    This article illustrates how a computer algebra system, such as Maple[R], can assist in the study of theoretical fluid mechanics, for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. The continuity equation, the stress equations of motion, the Navier-Stokes equations, and various constitutive equations are treated, using a full, but straightforward,

  18. The mechanical behavior of normally consolidated soils as a function of pore fluid salinity

    E-print Network

    Horan, Aiden James

    2012-01-01

    Pore fluid salinities in the Gulf of Mexico area can reach levels of 250 grams of salt per liter of pore fluid (g/1). It is now necessary to determine the effect that this salinity level can play on the mechanical behaviors ...

  19. Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering University of California, Irvine

    E-print Network

    Dabdub, Donald

    Sea-salt Aerosols and Their Potential Impact on Ozone." We thank the ARB staff for their helpful of Engineering Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Computational Environmental Sciences Laboratory and Their Potential Impact on Ozone FINAL REPORT Eladio M. Knipping and Donald Dabdub Prepared for the California Air

  20. Wiki-based Learning in the Mechanical Engineering Classroom

    E-print Network

    McGaughey, Alan

    Wiki-based Learning in the Mechanical Engineering Classroom Alan J. H. McGaughey Assistant is a Wiki? Wiki: a type of website that provides a framework for users to interactively and collaboratively Specialized wiki for domain-specific material and for teaching #12;3 American Society for Engineering

  1. University Of California, Berkeley Department of Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Frenklach, Michael

    University Of California, Berkeley Department of Mechanical Engineering ME 130: Design of Planar Machinery (3 units) Elective Course Syllabus CATALOG DESCRIPTION Synthesis, analysis, and design of planar, reciprocating engines, gear trains, and flywheels. COURSE PREREQUISITES ME 104. TEXTBOOK(S) AND/OR OTHER

  2. Formula Student as Part of a Mechanical Engineering Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Huw Charles

    2013-01-01

    Formula Student (FS) is a multi-university student design competition managed by the UK Institution of Mechanical Engineers. Students are required to demonstrate and prove their creativity and engineering skills through the design, manufacture and financing of a small formula style race car. This paper seeks to explore the educational value that

  3. Department of Mechanical Engineering National University of Singapore

    E-print Network

    Chen, Peter C.Y.

    with qualifications and experience. Job Requirements: Applicants should possess a PhD degree in the area of dynamicsDepartment of Mechanical Engineering National University of Singapore Blk EA, #07-08, 9 Engineering. Chen Associate Professor mpechenp@nus.edu.sg Job Description: Applications are invited for a Research

  4. Mechanics of Contact and Lubrication, ME5656 Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering

    E-print Network

    Mft, Sinan

    on the modern aircraft engines as the research object: labyrinth seals, brush seals and mechanical face seals and the aircraft engine sealing technology. 1 Introduction Labyrinth seals, brush seals and mechanical face. The structure of labyrinth seals is the #12; simplest advantag turbine p unavoida technolo brush sea service

  5. Mechanics of Contact and Lubrication, ME5656 Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering

    E-print Network

    Mft, Sinan

    Mechanics of Contact and Lubrication, ME5656 Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering Northeastern University Fall 2009 MECHANICS AND TRIBOLOGY OF THIN COATINGS (FILMS) Qian R. Sheng Northeastern University sheng.q@husky.neu.edu Abstract The investigation on mechanics and tribology of thin-film coatings

  6. Click to go to: SJTU Overview SJTU School of Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    's first-class level, such as communication and electronic system, naval architecture and ocean engineering: the schools of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, Mechanical & Power Engineering, Electronics

  7. Physical and numerical modeling of the external fluid mechanics of OTEC pilot plants

    E-print Network

    Singarella, Paul N.

    1982-01-01

    This study examined the near field external fluid mechanics of symmetrical OTEC pilot plant designs (20-80 MWe) under realistic deep water conditions. The objective was to assess the environmental impact of different plant ...

  8. THE MASTER OF ENGINEERING IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM PLANNING SHEET

    E-print Network

    Hybrid Systems ME 740* Vision, Robotics, & Planning ME 761 Mechanical Systems ME 520* Acoustics I ME 706 Acoustics & Aerodynamic Sound Dynamics ME 723 Waves in Random Media ME 761 Exp. Modal Analysis and System

  9. The role of computational fluid dynamics in aeronautical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Takuji; Uchida, Takashi

    1988-12-01

    Numerical analyses by solving Euler/Navier-Stokes Equations has been used in practical aeronautical engineerings. Here, the results of two dimensional Navier-Stokes analyses of a multiple slotted flap, and a three dimensional wing design problem using Euler analyses are shown.

  10. Liu UCD Phy9B 07 1 Ch 14. Fluid Mechanics

    E-print Network

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    Liu UCD Phy9B 07 1 Ch 14. Fluid Mechanics #12;Liu UCD Phy9B 07 2 14-1. Density Density =m/V - kg/m3;Liu UCD Phy9B 07 3 14-2. Pressure in a Fluid Pressure in a fluid of uniform density (Static Case) p2 - p1=-g(y2-y1) p=po+ gh Pressure is the same for any 2 points at the same level in the fluid. Gauge

  11. Linear elastic fracture mechanics in anisotropic solids : application to fluid-driven crack propagation

    E-print Network

    Laubie, Hadrien Hyacinthe

    2013-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is a field of continuum mechanics with the objective to predict how cracks initiate and propagate in solids. It has a wide domain of application. While aerospace engineers want to make sure a defect in ...

  12. Welcoming speech from Dean Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, UMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Zahari

    2012-09-01

    In the Name of Allah, the Most Beneficent, the Most Merciful. It is with great pleasure that I welcome the participants of the International Conference of Mechanical Engineering Research 2011. The Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) said 'Acquire knowledge and impart it to the people.' (Al Tirmidhi). The quest for knowledge has been from the beginning of time but knowledge only becomes valuable when it is disseminated and applied to benefit humankind. It is hoped that ICMER 2011 will be a platform to gather and disseminate the latest knowledge in mechanical engineering. Academicians, Scientist, Researchers and practitioners of mechanical engineering will be able to share and discuss new findings and applications of mechanical engineering. It is envisaged that the intellectual discourse will result in future collaborations between universities, research institutions and industry both locally and internationally. In particular it is expected that focus will be given to issues on environmental and energy sustainability. Researchers in the mechanical engineering faculty at UMP have a keen interest in technology to harness energy from the ocean. Lowering vehicle emissions has been a primary goal of researchers in the mechanical engineering faculty and the automotive engineering centre as well including developing vehicles using alternative fuels such as biodiesel and renewable sources such as solar driven electric vehicles. Finally I would like to congratulate the organizing committee for their tremendous efforts in organizing the conference. As I wrote this in the Holy Land of Makkah, I pray to Allah swt that the conference will be a success. Prof. Dr. Zahari Taha CEng, MIED, FASc Dean, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering Universiti Malaysia Pahang

  13. Natural Science Elective for Mechanical Engineering Majors The natural science elective for mechanical engineering majors can be

    E-print Network

    Lin, Xi

    - CAS ES 140 Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Other Natural Disasters - CAS ES 142Natural Science Elective for Mechanical Engineering Majors The natural science Mineralogy - CAS GE 101 Natural Environments: The Atmosphere - CAS GE 104 Natural

  14. 14 CFR 25.1182 - Nacelle areas behind firewalls, and engine pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid lines. 25.1182 Section 25.1182 Aeronautics and..., and engine pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid lines. (a) Each nacelle area... fluid lines, must meet each requirement of 25.1103(b), 25.1165 (d) and (e), 25.1183, 25.1185(c),...

  15. 14 CFR 25.1182 - Nacelle areas behind firewalls, and engine pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid lines. 25.1182 Section 25.1182 Aeronautics and..., and engine pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid lines. (a) Each nacelle area... fluid lines, must meet each requirement of 25.1103(b), 25.1165 (d) and (e), 25.1183, 25.1185(c),...

  16. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING Calculus for Technology I

    E-print Network

    an online examination using a system named ALEKS. The following website describes the exam, how to login Manufacturing Process Grade Sem "H" Elective Humanities _ _ _ 3 Grade 2 Sem CONT ELECTIVE Lower Division_ _ _ 2 of Engineering Technology. A flexible study plan is designed to meet each student's individual goals. Other

  17. Department of Mechanical Engineering Colorado State University

    E-print Network

    Connors, Daniel A.

    the fundamental concepts and laws of classical thermodynamics properties, i.e., pressure and temperature; energy, work, heat, and entropy; and the first law and second law of thermodynamics. 2. To learn how to apply Engineering Thermodynamics Class Time: 2-3: MWF Instructor: Professor Allan Kirkpatrick Office: A103F Email

  18. Realization Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Differential Left Drive Wheel Right Drive Wheel What is most preferred gear ratio? #12;Systems Realization/Generator Internal Combustion Engine Fuel Tank Assembly Differential Left Drive Wheel Right Drive Wheel Traditional Differential Left Drive Wheel Right Drive Wheel #12;Systems Realization Laboratory 3 Key Ideas Concepts

  19. Mathematical Building-Blocks in Engineering Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyajian, David M.

    2007-01-01

    A gamut of mathematical subjects and concepts are taught within a handful of courses formally required of the typical engineering student who so often questions the relevancy of being bound to certain lower-division prerequisites. Basic classes at the undergraduate level, in this context, include: Integral and Differential Calculus, Differential

  20. Marine Engine Mechanics. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Marion

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are presented for each of six terminal objectives for a two-semester course (2 hours daily) which provides training in the terminology, construction, and function of both two- and four-cycle fuel-air mixture internal combustion engines with emphasis on outboard marine