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Sample records for medial rectus weakness

  1. Bilateral superior rectus transposition for congenital exotropia associated with anomalous medial rectus muscles.

    PubMed

    Kodsi, Sylvia R

    2015-10-01

    Superior rectus transposition to the lateral rectus insertion without inferior rectus transposition has been used to correct esotropic deviations secondary to Duane syndrome and abducens nerve palsy. This is usually combined with an augmented posterior fixation suture of the superior rectus muscle to the lateral rectus muscle and ipsilateral medial rectus recession. We report a child with a large-angle congenital exotropia who was found to have anomalous medial rectus muscles bilaterally. Bilateral superior rectus transposition to the medial rectus insertion with bilateral lateral rectus recessions achieved good ocular alignment in primary position. PMID:26486030

  2. Superior rectus transposition combined with medial rectus recession for Duane syndrome and sixth nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Mehendale, Reshma A.; Dagi, Linda R.; Wu, Carolyn; Ledoux, Danielle; Johnston, Suzanne; Hunter, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Vertical rectus transposition (VRT) is used to treat abduction limitation, but new vertical deviations and anterior segment ischemia are concerns. Johnston and Crouch described superior rectus transposition (SRT), a procedure in which only the superior rectus muscle is transposed temporally. We describe our results using augmented temporal SRT with adjustable medial rectus muscle recession (MRc) for treatment of Duane syndrome I (DS) and sixth nerve palsy. Methods Retrospective surgical case review of patients undergoing the SRT procedure. Pre- and post-operative orthoptic measurements were recorded. Minimum follow-up was 6 weeks. Main outcome measures included angle of esotropia in primary position and the angle of head turn. Secondary outcomes included duction limitation, stereopsis, and new vertical deviations. Results The review identified seventeen patients (10 with DS and 7 with sixth nerve palsy). SRT+MRc improved esotropia [from 44 PD to 10.1 PD (p< 0.0001)], reduced abduction limitation [from −4.3 to −2.7 (p<0.0001)] and improved compensatory head posture [from 28°to 4° (p<0.0001)]. Stereopsis was recovered in eight patients (p=0.03). Three patients required a reoperation; one for overcorrection and 2 for undercorrection. A new primary position vertical deviation was observed in 2/7 patients with complex sixth nerve palsy and 0/10 DS patients. No patient described torsional diplopia. Conclusions SRT allows for the option of simultaneous medial rectus recession in patients with severe abduction imitation who require transposition surgery. SRT+MRc improved esotropia, head position, abduction limitation, and stereopsis without inducing torsional diplopia. PMID:22332212

  3. Consecutive exotropia: why does it happen, and can medial rectus advancement correct it?

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Bhambi Gesite-de; Demer, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether consecutive exotropia following medial rectus muscle recession is associated with muscle slippage and to assess the effectiveness of treating the condition with medial rectus advancement. Methods The records of patients with consecutive exotropia after medial rectus recession were reviewed to determine medial rectus muscle insertion location at the time of advancement surgery. Measurements before and after medial rectus advancement were compared. Success was defined as alignment within 10Δ of orthotropia. The dose effect of medial rectus advancement was determined by nonlinear regression. Results A total of 20 patients were included. The mean age (± standard deviation) at time of surgery was 19 ± 19 years (range, 1.1–65.4). The mean preoperative exotropia was 28Δ ± 16Δ (range, 12Δ–60Δ). Medial rectus slippage of 2.5 ± 1.7 mm (range, 1.0–5.0 mm) was found in 14 patients (36%) who had previously undergone medial rectus recession. Surgery corrected about 4Δ of exotropia per mm total medial rectus advancement. Although 95% of patients were aligned successfully immediately after surgery, averaging 2Δ ± 4Δ esotropia, there was significant late exodrift, averaging 17Δ at final follow-up. At final follow-up, 1.6 ± 1.8 (range, 0.10–6.2) years after surgery, 50% of patients maintained alignment within 10Δ of orthotropia (mean, 3Δ ± 4Δ exotropia); the rest experienced recurrent exotropia of 25Δ ± 8Δ. Conclusions Medial rectus slippage is common in consecutive exotropia. Medial rectus advancement effectively treated consecutive exotropia, whether or not there was muscle slippage. It is however, associated with late exodrift; hence patients should be warned about potential for further XT recurrence. PMID:25454022

  4. Iatrogenic Injury to Medial Rectus After Endoscopic Sinus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Bipasha; Priyadarshini, Omega; Ramasubramanian, Srikanth; Agarkar, Sumita

    2015-12-01

    Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) is the mainstay of the treatment in sinus disorders, to re-establish the drainage of the affected sinus. The close proximity of the orbital structures to paranasal sinuses makes them vulnerable to inadvertent injury during the sinus surgery. Medial rectus (MR) muscle is the most commonly injured extraocular muscle during ESS due to its anatomic proximity to the thin medial wall of the orbit. This is a non-comparative, retrospective, interventional case series of six patients presenting with MR injury after ESS. We discuss the management, outcome and review the published literature. A total of six patients met the inclusion criteria. The presenting complaints were diplopia, squinting and limitation of ocular movements. Two patients underwent surgical exploration of the MR muscle and reattachment of the muscle along with injection botulinum to the antagonist lateral rectus muscle. Two patients who had small angle strabismus and who were able to fuse were advised orthoptic exercises and prisms as management. Remaining two patients were advised surgical intervention to correct strabismus but they declined further surgical intervention. Management of MR injury following ESS is complex, often resulting in suboptimal outcomes. Since early intervention is associated with better outcomes, early referral by otolaryngologists to ophthalmologists would result in better outcome. PMID:26693458

  5. Situational Restriction of Elevation in Adduction Relieved by Faden on the Medial Rectus

    PubMed Central

    Muralidhar, R.; Vijayalakshmi, P.; Sujatha, K.; Shetty, Shashikanth; Malay, K.; Rosenberg, Steve

    2016-01-01

    We describe a patient with situational restriction of elevation in adduction in his left eye. Clinical examination pointed to instability of the left medial rectus pulley. This was corrected by Faden on the medial rectus. The importance of this relatively new concept in identifying and treating orbital pulley instability is discussed. PMID:27162460

  6. Missing lateral rectus force and absence of medial rectus co-contraction in ocular convergence.

    PubMed

    Miller, Joel M; Bockisch, Christopher J; Pavlovski, Dmitri S

    2002-05-01

    For a given position of the eye in the orbit, most abducens motoneurons (LRMNs) fire at higher rates in converged gaze than when convergence is relaxed, implying that lateral rectus (LR) muscle force will be higher for a given eye position in convergence. If medial rectus (MR) muscle force balances LR force, it too would be higher in convergence, that is, LRMN recording studies predict horizontal rectus co-contraction in convergence. Three trained rhesus monkeys with binocular eye coils and custom muscle force transducers (MFTs) on LR and MR of one eye alternately fixated near (approximately 7 cm) and far (200 cm) targets with vergence movements of 20-30 degrees. Tonic muscle forces were also measured during conjugate fixation of far targets over a 30 x 30 degrees field. MFT characteristics and effects on oculomotility were assessed. Contrary to predictions, we found small (<1 g) decreases in both LR and MR forces in convergence, for those gaze positions that were used in the brain stem recording studies. This missing LR force paradox (higher LRMN firing rates in convergence but lower LR forces) suggests that motoneurons or muscle fibers contribute differently to oculorotary forces in converged and unconverged states, violating the final common path hypothesis. The absence of MR co-contraction is consistent with, and supports, the missing LR force finding. Resolution of the missing LR force paradox might involve nonlinear interactions among muscle fibers, mechanical specialization of muscle fibers and other articulations of the peripheral oculomotor apparatus, or extranuclear contributions to muscle innervation. PMID:11976379

  7. Vertical Rectus Muscles Transposition in Large Exotropia with Medial Rectus Muscle Transection Following Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoonae A.; Rah, Sang Hoon; Kim, Myung Mi

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of transposition procedures on the vertical rectus muscle (VRM) in the patients who underwent a medial rectus muscle (MR) transection after endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). Methods In 4 patients with exotropia (XT) and a lack of adduction after ESS, orbital CT or MRI revealed a complete transection of the midportion of the MR. Full-tendon VRM transposition was performed within 3 months after injury (early surgery) in 2 patients with 40Δ XT. Two patients with 70Δ and 85Δ XT underwent an X-type augmented Hümmelsheim procedure, which involved pulling each half-tendon and crossing it through the undersurface of the severed MR to the other end of the MR insertion, concurrently with an ipsilateral lateral rectus (LR) recession 11 months and 36 months after ESS, respectively. The adduction deficits were divided into -1 through to -8. The patients were followed up for more than than 1.5 years. Results Postoperatively, 3 patients showed orthophoria and no diplopia in the primary position. The adduction deficits improved to -3.5 or -4. One patient who underwent an X-type augmented Hümmelsheim procedure showed a residual XT of 25Δ. Conclusions VRM transposition is effective in correcting a large XT secondary to a MR transection after ESS. When a longstanding large-angle XT with severe contracture of the ipsilateral LR and massive scarring of the adjacent tissues is present, the X-type augmented Hümmelsheim procedure coupled with an ipsilateral LR recession had an augmenting effect. PMID:18612228

  8. Isolated Medial Rectus Nuclear Palsy as a Rare Presentation of Midbrain Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sofiani, Mohammed; Kwen, Peterkin Lee

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 83 Final Diagnosis: Midbrain infarction Symptoms: Diplopia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Computed tomography of the head and magnetic resonance image of the brain Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: Diplopia is a common subjective complaint that can be the first manifestation of a serious pathology. Here, we report a rare case of midbrain infarction involving the lateral subnucleus of the oculomotor nuclear complex presenting as diplopia, with no other stroke manifestations. Case Report: An 83-year-old right-handed white man with past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and coronary artery disease presented to the emergency department (ED) with diplopia and unsteadiness. Two days prior to admission, the patient woke up with constant horizontal diplopia and unsteadiness, which limited his daily activities and led to a fall at home. He denied any weakness, clumsiness, nausea, vomiting, photophobia, fever, or chills. Ocular exam showed a disconjugate gaze at rest, weakness of the left medial rectus muscle, impaired convergence test, and bilateral 3-mm reactive pupils. The diplopia resolved by closing either eye. The remaining extraocular muscles and other cranial nerves were normal. There was no nystagmus, ptosis, or visual field deficit. Sensation, muscle tone, and strength were normal in all extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed a tiny focus of restricted diffusion in the left posterior lateral midbrain. Conclusions: A thorough history and physical examination is essential to diagnose and manage diplopia. Isolated extraocular palsy is usually thought to be caused by orbital lesions or muscular diseases. Here, we report a case of mid-brain infarction manifested as isolated medial rectus palsy. PMID:26447784

  9. Medial transposition of split lateral rectus augmented with fixation sutures in cases of complete third nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Rohit; Sharma, Medha; Singh, Digvijay; Dhiman, Rebika; Sharma, Pradeep

    2016-05-01

    Surgical management of complete third nerve paralysis is a challenge. While several techniques have been described over the years, they result in less than satisfactory outcomes with residual deviations in primary gaze or postoperative drifts. One of the described techniques for management of oculomotor palsy has been medial transposition of the lateral rectus muscle which provides a good surgical alternative but often can result in undercorrection. We describe a modification of the existing technique of medial transposition of the split lateral rectus by force augmentation through the use of equatorial fixation sutures resulting in an improved outcome in primary gaze alignment. The modified technique involves splitting of the lateral rectus into two halves followed by transposing the superior half from below the superior oblique and superior rectus and inferior half from below the inferior oblique and inferior rectus to attach them at the superior and inferior edge of the medial rectus insertion, respectively. This is followed by placing non-absorbable sutures to fix each split belly of the transposed muscles to the sclera at the equator adjacent to the medial rectus such that the split muscles lie nearly parallel to the medial rectus till the equator before reflecting away. These sutures augment the force of the transposed muscles by redirecting the force vectors in the direction of action of the medial rectus. Satisfactory postoperative primary gaze alignment was achieved in three cases of complete third nerve paralysis. PMID:26758537

  10. The Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin Treatment for Children with a Persistent Esotropia Following Bilateral Medial Rectus Recessions and Lateral Rectus Resections

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Scott R.; Shainberg, Marla J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose To report on the outcomes of treating children with a persistent esotropia with an injection of botulinum toxin in a medial rectus muscle. Patients and Methods The medical records of all children at one institution with a persistent esotropia after bilateral medial rectus recessions and bilateral lateral rectus resections who were then treated with a botulinum toxin injection were reviewed. Results Five patients with a mean preoperative esotropia of 37 PD (range, 25-50 PD) underwent bilateral medial rectus recessions and then bilateral lateral rectus resections. Their residual esotropia (mean, 25 PD; range, 18-35) was then treated with a single injection of 3- 5 units of botulinum toxin into one medial rectus muscle. The patients were then followed for a mean of 34 months (range, 14 to 79 months). At last follow-up, 2 patients had an esotropia <10 PD. The other 3 patients had no long-term improvement in their ocular alignment. Two of these patients then underwent additional strabismus surgery. In both cases, they then developed a consecutive exotropia. Conclusion Treatment with a single injection of botulinum toxin was beneficial in 2 of 5 children. Botulinum toxin treatment alone did not result in a consecutive exotropia in any patients treated. PMID:24260804

  11. Adaptability of the Immature Ocular Motor Control System: Unilateral IGF-1 Medial Rectus Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, Christy L.; Fleuriet, Jérome; Walton, Mark M.; Mustari, Michael J.; McLoon, Linda K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Unilateral treatment with sustained release IGF-1 to one medial rectus muscle in infant monkeys was performed to test the hypothesis that strabismus would develop as a result of changes in extraocular muscles during the critical period of development of binocularity. Methods. Sustained release IGF-1 pellets were implanted unilaterally on one medial rectus muscle in normal infant monkeys during the first 2 weeks of life. Eye position was monitored using standard photographic methods. After 3 months of treatment, myofiber and neuromuscular size, myosin composition, and innervation density were quantified in all rectus muscles and compared to those in age-matched controls. Results. Sustained unilateral IGF-1 treatments resulted in strabismus for all treated subjects; 3 of the 4 subjects had a clinically significant strabismus of more than 10°. Both the treated medial rectus and the untreated ipsilateral antagonist lateral rectus muscles had significantly larger myofibers. No adaptation in myofiber size occurred in the contralateral functionally yoked lateral rectus or in myosin composition, neuromuscular junction size, or nerve density. Conclusions. Sustained unilateral IGF-1 treatment to extraocular muscles during the sensitive period of development of orthotropic eye alignment and binocularity was sufficient to disturb ocular motor development, resulting in strabismus in infant monkeys. This could be due to altering fusion of gaze during the early sensitive period. Serial measurements of eye alignment suggested the IGF-1-treated infants received insufficient coordinated binocular experience, preventing the establishment of normal eye alignment. Our results uniquely suggest that abnormal signaling by the extraocular muscles may be a cause of strabismus. PMID:26030103

  12. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma presenting as an acute orbital mass in the medial rectus muscle.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Justis P; Penne, Robert B; Eagle, Ralph C; Carrasco, Jacqueline R

    2007-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common pediatric primary neoplasm in the orbit, often presenting with rapid proptosis and orbital symptoms. We describe a 15-year-old girl who presented with an acute mass in her medial rectus muscle that was subsequently diagnosed as widely disseminated alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. To our knowledge, this represents the first reported case in which an enlarged extraocular muscle was the initial manifestation of disseminated alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. PMID:17413634

  13. Surgical Responses of Medial Rectus Muscle Recession in Thyroid Eye Disease-Related Esotropia.

    PubMed

    Lyu, In Jeong; Lee, Ju-Yeun; Kong, Mingui; Park, Kyung-Ah; Oh, Sei Yeul

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the surgical outcomes and surgical responses of medial rectus muscle (MR) recession patients with thyroid eye disease (TED)-related esotropia (ET). The surgical dose-response curves 1 week postoperatively and at the final visit were analyzed. Univariable and multivariable linear regression analyses were applied to investigate factors influencing surgical dose-response. A total of 43 patients with TED-related ET that underwent MR recession were included. The final success rate was 86.0% and the rate of undercorrection was 14.0%. The surgical dose-response curves of TED-related ET showed a gentle slope compared with those of standard surgical tables. In the univariable model, simultaneous vertical rectus muscle recession was the only significant factor influencing surgical dose-response of MR recession in TED-related ET (β = -0.397, P = 0.044). In a model adjusted for age, sex, type of surgery, and preoperative horizontal angle of deviation, simultaneous vertical rectus muscle recession showed marginal significance (β = -0.389, P = 0.064). The surgical dose-response curve of TED-related ET was unique. Simultaneous vertical rectus muscle recession was associated with increased surgical dose-response in TED-related ET. PMID:26796354

  14. Surgical Responses of Medial Rectus Muscle Recession in Thyroid Eye Disease-Related Esotropia

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, In Jeong; Lee, Ju-Yeun; Kong, Mingui; Park, Kyung-Ah; Oh, Sei Yeul

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the surgical outcomes and surgical responses of medial rectus muscle (MR) recession patients with thyroid eye disease (TED)-related esotropia (ET). The surgical dose-response curves 1 week postoperatively and at the final visit were analyzed. Univariable and multivariable linear regression analyses were applied to investigate factors influencing surgical dose-response. A total of 43 patients with TED-related ET that underwent MR recession were included. The final success rate was 86.0% and the rate of undercorrection was 14.0%. The surgical dose-response curves of TED-related ET showed a gentle slope compared with those of standard surgical tables. In the univariable model, simultaneous vertical rectus muscle recession was the only significant factor influencing surgical dose-response of MR recession in TED-related ET (β = -0.397, P = 0.044). In a model adjusted for age, sex, type of surgery, and preoperative horizontal angle of deviation, simultaneous vertical rectus muscle recession showed marginal significance (β = -0.389, P = 0.064). The surgical dose-response curve of TED-related ET was unique. Simultaneous vertical rectus muscle recession was associated with increased surgical dose-response in TED-related ET. PMID:26796354

  15. Use of topical mitomycin C in myoplasty of the medial rectus muscle of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Mamede, Fabrício V; Laus, José L; Cabral, Vânia P; Vicenti, Felipe A M; Barbieri-Neto, José

    2004-01-01

    To possibly reduce postoperative adhesions that occur after ocular myoplasties, we investigated the topical effects of 0.04% mitomycin C on the repaired areas of the medial rectus muscle using an equine renal capsule preserved in 98% glycerin for reinforcement of the sutures. Twenty-four rabbits, divided into two groups of 12 animals each [untreated (control) and treated group (MMC)], were submitted to surgical rupture of the medial rectus muscle of one eye and repair of the defect 24 h later with sutures and an equine renal capsule. Post-operative prophylactic treatment of the two groups consisted of the administration of eye drops containing neomycin, polymyxin B and dexamethasone at regular 6-h intervals for eight consecutive days and daily rinsing with physiological saline. MMC animals received additional treatment with topical 0.04% mitomycin C every 6 h for 14 consecutive days. Slit lamp biomicroscopy showed greater irritation of the ocular surface in MMC animals during the first days post operatively. Adhesions were observed at 15 and 30 days of assessment in the two groups, but were more extensive in control animals at 60 days. Histopathology revealed inflammatory exudation in both groups, which was greater in MMC animals. Mitomycin C (0.04%) instilled at 6-h intervals for 14 consecutive days reduced the occurrence of fibrosis in the myoplastic areas. However, the equine renal capsule was found to be of little benefit for the reinforcement of myoplasties. PMID:15310293

  16. A case series of laparoscopic components separation and rectus medialization with laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Malik, Kashif; Bowers, Steven P; Smith, C Daniel; Asbun, Horacio; Preissler, Susanne

    2009-10-01

    Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair has been shown to offer improved patient recovery, when compared to open repair. It has also been shown to offer a lower complication rate. However, in patients with high body-mass index and large defects, the intraperitoneal on-lay technique of laparoscopic repair is criticized for an increased incidence of failure. In 1990, a study introduced the technique of open-component separation, hence enabling the medialization of the rectus muscle and decreasing the incidence of recurrence associated with primary repair. Open-component separation is associated with increased wound problems due to extensive dissection. Different laparoscopic and endoscopic modifications to the open-component-separation technique have been tried to minimize wound problems. In this article, we present our case series of 4 patients involving the laparoscopic component-separation technique of rectus medialization and, laparoscopic ventral hernia combined. This is one of the first series ever reported to involve both modalities of hernia repair in using an exclusive laparoscopic technique. PMID:19694565

  17. Surgical Outcome of Medial Rectus Resection in Recurrent Exotropia: A Novel Surgical Formula

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Abbie Sheung-Wan; Yam, Jason Cheuk-Sing; Lau, Henry Hing-Wai; Yip, Wilson Wai-Kuen; Young, Alvin Lerrmann

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the surgical outcomes of unilateral or bilateral medial rectus (MR) muscle resection for recurrent exotropia after bilateral lateral rectus (BLR) muscle recession based on a novel surgical formula. Methods. Forty-one consecutive patients with unilateral or bilateral MR muscle resection for recurrent exotropia after BLR muscle recession were included in this retrospective study. All surgeries were performed according to the formula: 1.0 mm MR muscle resection for every 5 prism dioptres (PD) of exotropia, with an addition of 0.5 mm to each MR muscle operated on. Results. The mean recurrent exotropia distant deviation was 28 PD ± 11.2 (range 14 to 55 PD). Overall at postoperative 1 month, 36 (88%) achieved successful outcomes, 4 (10%) had undercorrection, and 1 (2%) had overcorrection. At postoperative 6 months, 29 (71%) achieved successful outcomes, 12 (29%) had undercorrection, and none had overcorrection. Subgroup analysis showed no statistically significant difference in success rates between unilateral and bilateral MR groups. Conclusion. Unilateral or bilateral MR muscle resection using our surgical formula is a safe and effective method for calculating the amount of MR resection in moderate to large angle recurrent exotropia, with a low overcorrection rate. PMID:25866673

  18. INTERNAL ORGANIZATION OF MEDIAL RECTUS AND INFERIOR RECTUS MUSCLE NEURONS IN THE C-GROUP OF THE OCULOMOTOR NUCLEUS IN MONKEY

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaofang; Büttner-Ennever, Jean A.; Mustari, Michael J.; Horn, Anja K. E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mammalian extraocular muscles contain singly-innervated twitch muscle fibers (SIF) and multiply-innervated non-twitch muscle fibers (MIF). In monkey, MIF motoneurons lie around the periphery of oculomotor nuclei and have different premotor inputs from the motoneurons inside the nuclei. The most prominent MIF motoneuron group is the C-group, which innervates the medial rectus (MR) and inferior rectus (IR) muscle. To explore the organization of both cell groups within the C-group we performed small injections of choleratoxin subunit B into the myotendinous junction of MR or IR in monkeys. In three animals the IR and MR myotendinous junction of one eye was injected simultaneously with different tracers (choleratoxin subunit B and wheatgerm agglutinin). It revealed that both muscles were supplied by two different non-overlapping populations in the C-group. The IR neurons lie adjacent to the dorsomedial border of the oculomotor nucleus, whereas MR neurons are located further medially. A striking feature was the differing pattern of dendrite distribution of both cell groups. Whereas the dendrites of IR neurons spread into the supraoculomotor area bilaterally, those of the MR neurons were restricted to the ipsilateral side and sent a focussed bundle dorsally to the preganglionic neurons of the Edinger-Westphal nucleus, which are involved in the ‘near response’. In conclusion, MR and IR are innervated by independent neuron populations from the C-group. Their dendritic branching pattern within the supraoculomotor area indicates a participation in the near response providing vergence, but also reflects their differing functional roles. PMID:25684641

  19. Surgical results of the slipped medial rectus muscle after hang back recession surgery

    PubMed Central

    Duranoglu, Yasar; Ilhan, Hatice Deniz; Guler Alis, Meryem

    2014-01-01

    AIM To analyze the surgical results of a slipped medial rectus muscle (MRM) after hang back recession surgery for esotropia. METHODS Twenty-one patients who underwent re-exploration for diagnosed slipped muscle after hang back recession surgery were included in this retrospective study. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging was performed to identify the location of the slipped muscle. Ocular motility was evaluated with assessment with prism and cover test in gaze at cardinal positions. The operations were performed by the same consultant. Intraoperative forced duction test was performed under general anesthesia. The empty sheath of the slipped MRM was resected and the muscle was advanced to the original insertion site in all patients. RESULTS The average age of 21 patients who had consecutive exotropia with a slipped MRM at the time of presentation was 17.4±5.4y (5-50y). The average duration between the first operation and the diagnosis of the slipped muscle was 25mo (12 to 36mo). The mean follow up after the corrective surgery was 28mo. The mean preoperative adduction limitation in the field of action of the slipped muscle was -2.26 (ranging from -1 to -4). All patients had full adduction postoperatively. CONCLUSION The diagnosis of the slipped muscle should be confirmed during the strabismus surgery. The slipped muscle may be caused due to insufficient suture and excessive rubbing of the eye. When divergent strabismus is observed after the recession of the MRM, a slipped muscle should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:25540761

  20. Simulated recruitment of medial rectus motoneurons by abducens internuclear neurons: synaptic specificity vs. intrinsic motoneuron properties.

    PubMed

    Dean, P

    1997-09-01

    Ocular motoneuron firing rate is linearly related to conjugate eye position with slope K above recruitment threshold theta. Within the population of ocular motoneurons K increases as theta increases. These differences in firing rate between motoneurons might be determined either by the intrinsic properties of the motoneurons, or by differences in synaptic input to them, or by a combination of the two. This question was investigated by simulating the input signal to medial rectus motoneurons (MR-MNs) from internuclear neurons of the abducens nucleus (INNs). INNs were represented as input nodes in a two-layer neural net, each with weighted connections to every output node representing an MR-MN. Individual simulated MR-MNs were assigned parameters corresponding to an intrinsic current threshold I(R) and an intrinsic frequency-current (f-I) slope gamma. Their firing rates were calculated from these parameters, together with the effective synaptic current produced by their synaptically weighted INN inputs, with the use of assumptions employed in computer simulations of spinal motoneuron pools. The experimentally observed firing rates of MR-MNs served as training data for the net. The following two training conditions were used: 1) synaptic weights were fixed and the intrinsic parameters of the MR-MNs were allowed to vary, corresponding to the situation in which each MR-MN receives a common synaptic drive and 2) intrinsic MR-MN properties were fixed and synaptic weights were allowed to vary. In each case, the varying quantities were trained with a form of gradient descent error reduction. The simulations revealed the following three problems with the common-drive model: 1) the recruitment of INNs produced nonlinear responses in MR-MNs with low thetas; 2) the range of I(R)s required to reproduce the observed range of theta were generally larger than those measured experimentally for cat ocular motoneurons; and 3) the intrinsic f-I slope gamma increased with I

  1. Articular geometry of the medial tarsometatarsal joint in the foot: comparison of metatarsus primus adductus and metatarsus primus rectus.

    PubMed

    Dykyj, D; Ateshian, G A; Trepal, M J; MacDonald, L R

    2001-01-01

    The three-dimensional surface geometry of the medial tarsometatarsal joint ("first metatarsocuneiform") of the first ray was analyzed to determine if the shape of the joint is distinct in the medially deviated first metatarsal with metatarsus primus adductus (MPA). Clinical evaluation of 29 cadaver feet identified 13 feet with MPA and 16 with metatarsus primus rectus (MPR). Three-dimensional (3D) coordinates x, y, z of the first metatarsal and medial cuneiform joint facets of the feet were digitized on a Coordinate Measuring Machine (accuracy = 0.01 mm) and the data fitted with B-spline surfaces from which 3D curvature maps were generated. Comparison of means of surface-averaged maximum and minimum principal curvatures and root-mean-square curvatures showed significant (p < .0005) differences between the MPA and MPR subsets, male and female subsets, and metatarsal and cuneiform subsets. These results show that the articular shape of the medial tarsometatarsal joint in feet with MPA is significantly less contoured, or is flatter, than the same joint in normal or MPR feet. Results also showed that the female joints are more curved than male joints, and that metatarsal and cuneiform facets closely conform in shape to each other. These preliminary results may be related to questions concerning the anatomical and functional basis for the first metatarsal deviation, for radiographic presentation of the joint and surgical options in correcting related forefoot deformities. PMID:11777231

  2. Avoiding Complications in Abdominal Wall Surgery: A Mathematical Model to Predict the Course of the Motor Innervation of the Rectus Abdominis.

    PubMed

    Tessone, Ariel; Nava, Maurizio; Blondeel, Phillip; Spano, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    Ever since its introduction, the transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap has become the mainstay of autologous breast reconstruction. However, concerns regarding donor site morbidity due to the breach of abdominal wall musculature integrity soon followed. Muscle-sparing techniques, eventually eliminating the muscle from the flap all-together with the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap, did not eliminate the problem of abdominal wall weakness. This led to the conclusion that motor innervation might be at fault. Studies have shown that even in the presence of an intact rectus abdominis muscle, and an intact anterior rectus sheath, denervation of the rectus abdominis muscle results in significant abdominal wall weakness leading to superior and inferior abdominal bulges, and abdominal herniation. Our aim was to establish a mathematical model to predict the location of the motor innervation to the rectus abdominis muscle, and thus provide surgeons with a tool that will allow them to reduce abdominal morbidity during deep inferior epigastric artery perforator and free muscle-sparing transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous surgery. We dissected 42 cadaveric hemiabdomens and mapped the course of the thoracolumbar nerves. We then standardized and analyzed our findings and presented them as a relative map which can be adjusted to body type and dimensions. Our dissections show that the motor innervation is closely related to the lateral vascular supply. Thus, when possible, we support the preferred utilization of the medial vascular supply, and the preservation of the lateral supply and motor innervation. PMID:26756600

  3. [Severed musculus rectus internus caused by a dog bite].

    PubMed

    Reese, P D; Judisch, G F

    1988-11-01

    A four-year-old girl sustained facial injuries from multiple dog bites. Although the globe exhibited slight adduction saccades the medial rectus muscle appeared to be intact when examined by computer tomography. However, on surgical exploration of the orbit the muscle parenchyma was found to have been completely severed. PMID:3210647

  4. Differential Lateral Rectus Compartmental Contraction during Ocular Counter-Rolling

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Robert A.; Demer, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The lateral rectus (LR) and medial rectus (MR) extraocular muscles (EOMs) have largely nonoverlapping superior and inferior innervation territories, suggesting functional compartmental specialization. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in humans to investigate differential compartmental activity in the rectus EOMs during head tilt, which evokes ocular counter-rolling, a torsional vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). Methods. MRI in quasi-coronal planes was analyzed during target-controlled central gaze in 90° right and left head tilts in 12 normal adults. Cross sections and posterior partial volumes of the transverse portions of the four rectus EOMs were compared in contiguous image planes 2 mm thick spanning the orbit from origins to globe equator, and used as indicators of contractility. Results. Horizontal rectus EOMs had significantly greater posterior volumes and maximum cross sections in their inferior compartments (P < 10−8). In orbit tilt up (extorted) compared with orbit tilt down (intorted) head tilts, contractile changes in LR maximum cross section (P < 0.0001) and posterior partial volume (P < 0.05) were significantly greater in the inferior but not in the superior compartment. These changes were not explainable by horizontal or vertical eye position changes. A weaker compartmental effect was suggested for MR. The vertical rectus EOMs did not exhibit significant compartmental contractile changes during head tilt. Mechanical modeling suggests that differential LR contraction may contribute to physiological cyclovertical effects. Conclusions. Selective activation of the two LR, and possibly MR, compartments correlates with newly recognized segregation of intramuscular innervation into distinct compartments, and probably contributes to noncommutative torsion during the VOR. PMID:22427572

  5. Weakness

    MedlinePlus

    Lack of strength; Muscle weakness ... feel weak but have no real loss of strength. This is called subjective weakness. It may be ... flu. Or, you may have a loss of strength that can be noted on a physical exam. ...

  6. Traumatic transection of the lateral rectus muscle with chorioretinitis sclopetaria.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Kelly; Verity, David; Ali, Nadeem

    2015-01-01

    A man, aged 67 years, sustained monocular trauma to the left eye while gardening, presenting with light perception, complete absence of abduction, and chorioretinitis sclopetaria. At surgery, the lateral rectus was found to be transected at the equator of the globe, with an area of locally abraded sclera. A few posterior muscle fibers were identified and sutured to the residual anterior fibers. With a partial improvement of the esodeviation, after a further 6 months he proceeded to lateral transposition of the superior and inferior recti to healthy sclera 4 mm from the limbus, with adjunctive medial rectus botulinum toxin. Six months later, the angle of primary deviation remained stable at 4 prism diopters base out with improved abduction. Vision in the eye remained reduced at 20/200 (with eccentric fixation) due to macular changes secondary to the sclopetaria. In conclusion, this case describes a rare example of complete traumatic transection of the lateral rectus with chorioretinitis sclopetaria, due to orbital injury. With appropriate surgery, the angle of deviation can be considerably improved despite complete muscle transection and scleral injury. PMID:25790075

  7. Rectus sheath hematoma: three case reports

    PubMed Central

    Kapan, Selin; Turhan, Ahmet N; Alis, Halil; Kalayci, Mustafa U; Hatipoglu, Sinan; Yigitbas, Hakan; Aygun, Ersan

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Rectus sheath hematoma is an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. It is an accumulation of blood in the sheath of the rectus abdominis, secondary to rupture of an epigastric vessel or muscle tear. It could occur spontaneously or after trauma. They are usually located infraumblically and often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen, inflammatory diseases or tumours of the abdomen. Case presentation We reported three cases of rectus sheath hematoma presenting with a mass in the abdomen and diagnosed by computerized tomography. The patients recovered uneventfully after bed rest, intravenous fluid replacement, blood transfusion and analgesic treatment. Conclusion Rectus sheath hematoma is a rarely seen pathology often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen that may lead to unnecessary laparotomies. Computerized tomography must be chosen for definitive diagnosis since ultrasonography is subject to error due to misinterpretation of the images. Main therapy is conservative management. PMID:18221529

  8. Rectus abdominis muscle strains in tennis players.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier; Ghisi, Juan P; Kokalj, Antonio M

    2007-11-01

    Rectus abdominis muscle strains are common and debilitating injuries among competitive tennis players. Eccentric overload, followed by forced contraction of the non-dominant rectus abdominis during the cocking phase of the service motion is the accepted injury mechanism. A tennis-specific rehabilitation program emphasising eccentrics and plyometric strengthening of the abdominal wall muscles, contributes to the complete functional recovery in tennis players, and could help reduce recurrences. PMID:17957025

  9. Rectus abdominis muscle strains in tennis players

    PubMed Central

    Maquirriain, Javier; Ghisi, Juan P; Kokalj, Antonio M

    2007-01-01

    Rectus abdominis muscle strains are common and debilitating injuries among competitive tennis players. Eccentric overload, followed by forced contraction of the non‐dominant rectus abdominis during the cocking phase of the service motion is the accepted injury mechanism. A tennis‐specific rehabilitation program emphasising eccentrics and plyometric strengthening of the abdominal wall muscles, contributes to the complete functional recovery in tennis players, and could help reduce recurrences. PMID:17957025

  10. Orbital Imaging to Identify a "Lost" Lateral Rectus Muscle.

    PubMed

    Waite, Christopher; Dai, Shuan

    2016-01-01

    A 36-year-old man presented with a large-angle esotropia and limited abduction of the right eye. A computed tomography scan of his orbits showed an absent lateral rectus muscle. At the time of surgery, a normal-appearing lateral rectus muscle was found. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging showed a present but atrophic lateral rectus muscle. PMID:27383383

  11. Function of transected or avulsed rectus muscles following recovery using an anterior orbitotomy approach

    PubMed Central

    Pineles, Stacy L.; Laursen, Jessica; Goldberg, Robert A.; Demer, Joseph L.; Velez, Federico G.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess the function of muscles retrieved from a retrobulbar location using an anterior orbitotomy approach and to identify the prognostic factors favoring a good outcome. METHODS The records of all patients undergoing anterior orbitotomy for the retrieval of a transected or avulsed muscle in a retrobulbar location were reviewed. Ocular motility, before and after retrieval (with ductions scaled from −4 to +4), was evaluated. RESULTS Record review identified 11 patients who had suffered trauma to 12 muscles (5 inferior, 6 medial, and 1 lateral rectus muscle). Ductions improved from −4 ± 0.4 preoperatively to −2.7 ± 0.9 postoperatively (P = 0.002); mean primary position deviation improved from 34Δ ± 14Δ-15Δ ± 9Δ (P < 0.001), and mean deviation in the field of action improved from 47Δ ± 20Δ-20Δ ± 22Δ (P = 0.02). Ductions improved by at least two units in three patients, all of whom had medial rectus trauma. Single binocular vision in primary gaze was achieved in 6 patients. Patients with medial rectus muscle injury and patients injured by sinus surgery had the lowest likelihood of recovering single binocular vision. CONCLUSIONS Our results are similar to historical series in which muscles were not retrieved and transpositions performed; however, muscle retrieval avoids risks associated with transposition surgeries such as anterior segment ischemia. Muscle recovery via the anterior orbitotomy approach may be reasonable to consider in those cases with a reasonable possibility of having active force generation postoperatively. PMID:22835914

  12. A novel technique for inferior rectus recession

    PubMed Central

    Gokyigit, Birsen; Akar, Serpil; Yilmaz, Omer Faruk

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To introduce a novel technique of inferior rectus recession operation to allow larger amounts of recession without causing lower lid retraction and to compare this method with the results obtained in standard inferior rectus recession. Material and methods This study included 20 patients operated on in the authors’ clinic. The median age of the patients was 24.5±18.6 (4–73) years and the median follow-up was 9.3±11.8 (3–43) months. Ten patients operated on with the standard method were labeled Group 1 and ten patients operated on with the new method were labeled Group 2. Without exceeding 4 mm, inferior rectus recession to the whole muscle was performed in Group 1 patients. Inferior rectus recession was also performed on patients in Group 2 following the new method. Using a spatula, approximately 10% of the muscle surface fibers were detached intact as a thin layer, and the remaining 90% of deeper fibers were recessed 4–8 mm as planned. Patients’ preoperative deviations and lower lid positions were recorded. The same parameters were checked in the first and third month postoperatively. Both groups were evaluated retrospectively by screening their files, and the Mann–Whitney U test was used for statistical evaluation. Results Lower lid retraction was seen in four patients of Group 1. There was no retraction in Group 2. While there was a need to perform additional vertical muscle procedures for vertical deviations and lower lid retractions in Group 1, it was observed that there was no need for additional procedures in Group 2 patients. There was a statistically meaningful difference between the two procedures (P<0.05). Conclusion This novel technique was found to be an effective surgical method for permitting more recession without the risk of lower lid retraction. PMID:24492531

  13. [Spontaneous hematoma of the musculus rectus sheath].

    PubMed

    Mandarano, R; Sereni, P; Ceccherini, E; Ciccone, A

    1990-10-31

    Spontaneous haematoma of the musculus rectus is a rare event and can lead to a clinical picture comparable to what is seen in acute abdomen, thus posing a differential diagnosis problem. Three personally observed cases are reported, stress being laid on the fact that echography, in the light of clinical and laboratory data, made correct diagnosis possible. On the basis of clinical and echographic findings, one patient was subjected to surgical treatment and the others to conservative medical treatment because of the small dimensions of haematoma. PMID:2150543

  14. Lateral rectus palsy following coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Luke; Jones, Ruth; Hughes, David S

    2014-01-01

    We present a rare case of unilateral lateral rectus palsy following an elective coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention in a 78-year-oldwoman. Ophthalmoplegia following coronary angiography is extremely rare and this is the first case of a unilateral lateral rectus palsy following the procedure. PMID:24536054

  15. Imaging of rectus femoris proximal tendinopathies.

    PubMed

    Pesquer, Lionel; Poussange, Nicolas; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Graveleau, Nicolas; Meyer, Philippe; Dallaudiere, Benjamin; Feldis, Matthieu

    2016-07-01

    The rectus femoris is the most commonly injured muscle of the anterior thigh among athletes, especially soccer players. Although the injury pattern of the muscle belly is well documented, less is known about the anatomy and specific lesions of the proximal tendons. For each head, three distinctive patterns may be encountered according to the location of the injury, which can be at the enthesis, within the tendon, or at the musculotendinous junction. In children, injuries correspond most commonly to avulsion of the anteroinferior iliac spine from the direct head and can lead to subspine impingement. Calcific tendinitis and traumatic tears may be encountered in adults. Recent studies have shown that traumatic injuries of the indirect head may be underdiagnosed and that injuries of both heads may have a surgical issue. Finally, in the case of tears, functional outcome and treatment may vary if the rupture involves one or both tendons and if the tear is partial or complete. Thus, it is mandatory for the radiologist to know the different ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns of these lesions in order to provide accurate diagnosis and treatment. The purpose of this article is to recall the anatomy of the two heads of rectus femoris, describe a reliable method of assessment with ultrasound and MRI and know the main injury patterns, through our own experience and literature review. PMID:26956398

  16. Three cases of severe invasive infections caused by Campylobacter rectus and first report of fatal C. rectus infection.

    PubMed

    Lam, Jimmy Y W; Wu, Alan K L; Ngai, Dickson C; Teng, Jade L L; Wong, Elsa S Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Lee, Rodney A; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2011-04-01

    We report the first fatal case of Campylobacter rectus infection due to a subdural empyema and ruptured mycotic intracranial aneurysm and two cases of limb-threatening C. rectus necrotizing soft tissue and bone infection and empyema thoracis that responded to amoxicillin-clavulanate and surgical debridement and drainage. All three strains were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. PMID:21270212

  17. Three Cases of Severe Invasive Infections Caused by Campylobacter rectus and First Report of Fatal C. rectus Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Jimmy Y. W.; Wu, Alan K. L.; Ngai, Dickson C.; Teng, Jade L. L.; Wong, Elsa S. Y.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Lee, Rodney A.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2011-01-01

    We report the first fatal case of Campylobacter rectus infection due to a subdural empyema and ruptured mycotic intracranial aneurysm and two cases of limb-threatening C. rectus necrotizing soft tissue and bone infection and empyema thoracis that responded to amoxicillin-clavulanate and surgical debridement and drainage. All three strains were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. PMID:21270212

  18. Spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma in a patient treated with apixaban

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Halil; Inci, Sinan; Dogan, Pinar; Izgu, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Summary Apixaban, a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants, is a Factor Xa inhibitor that is prescribed for the treatment of non valvular atrial fibrillation. Rectus sheath hematoma is a rare but significant complication of oral anticoagulant treatment. The important causes of rectus sheath hematoma include treatment with anticoagulants, hematologic diseases, trauma, intense physical activity, coughing, sneezing and pregnancy. In this report, we describe case of a 71-year-old woman undergoing apixaban treatment for non valvular atrial fibrillation who presented with spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma. PMID:26989650

  19. Spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma in a patient treated with apixaban.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Halil; Inci, Sinan; Dogan, Pinar; Izgu, Ibrahim

    2016-02-01

    Apixaban, a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants, is a Factor Xa inhibitor that is prescribed for the treatment of non valvular atrial fibrillation. Rectus sheath hematoma is a rare but significant complication of oral anticoagulant treatment. The important causes of rectus sheath hematoma include treatment with anticoagulants, hematologic diseases, trauma, intense physical activity, coughing, sneezing and pregnancy. In this report, we describe case of a 71-year-old woman undergoing apixaban treatment for non valvular atrial fibrillation who presented with spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma. PMID:26989650

  20. Surgery for Complete Vertical Rectus Paralysis Combined with Horizontal Strabismus

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Leilei; Liu, Rui; Liu, Yan; Lin, Jing; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Aims. To report outcomes of the simultaneous surgical correction of vertical rectus paralysis combined with moderate-to-large angle horizontal strabismus. Methods. If a preoperative forced duction test was positive, antagonist muscle weakening surgery was performed, and then augmented partial rectus muscle transposition (APRMT) + partial horizontal rectus recession-resection was performed 2 months later. If a preoperative forced duction test was negative, APRMT + partial horizontal rectus recession-resection was performed. Antagonistic muscle weakening surgery and/or conventional recession-resection of the horizontal and/or vertical muscles of the contralateral eye was performed 2 months later, as needed. Results. Ten patients with a mean age of 22.3 ± 13.0 years were included and mean follow-up was 7.1 months. The mean vertical deviation that APRMT corrected was 21.4 ± 3.7 PD (prism diopter). The absolute deviation in horizontal significantly decreased from a preoperative value of 48.5 ± 27.4 PD to a value of 3.0 ± 2.3 PD 6 months postoperatively. The movement score decreased from a value of −5 ± 0 preoperatively to a value of −2.7 ± 0.8 at 6 months postoperatively. Conclusion. For patients with complete vertical rectus paralysis combined with a moderate- to-large angle of horizontal strabismus, combined APRMT and partial horizontal rectus recession-resection is safe and effective for correcting vertical and horizontal strabismus. PMID:24883204

  1. Compartmentalized Innervation of Primate Lateral Rectus Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Michelle; Poukens, Vadims; da Silva Costa, Roberta Martins; Yoo, Lawrence; Tychsen, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Skeletal and craniofacial muscles are frequently composed of multiple neuromuscular compartments that serve different physiological functions. Evidence of possible regional selectivity in LR intramuscular innervation was sought in a study of the anatomic potential of lateral rectus (LR) muscle compartmentalization. Methods. Whole orbits of two humans and five macaque monkeys were serially sectioned at 10-μm thickness and stained with Masson trichrome. The abducens nerve (CN6) was traced anteriorly from the deep orbit as it branched to enter the LR and arborized among extraocular muscle (EOM) fibers. Three-dimensional reconstruction was performed in human and monkey orbits. Results. Findings were in concordance in the monkey and human orbits. External to the LR global surface, CN6 bifurcated into approximately equal-sized trunks before entering the global layer. Subsequent arborization showed a systematic topography, entering a well-defined inferior zone 0.4 to 2.5 mm more posteriorly than branches entering the largely nonoverlapping superior zone. Zonal innervation remained segregated anteriorly and laterally within the LR. Conclusions. Consistent segregation of intramuscular CN6 arborization in humans and monkeys suggests functionally distinct superior and inferior zones for the LR. Since the LR is shaped as a broad vertical strap, segregated control of the two zones could activate them separately, potentially mediating previously unappreciated but substantial torsional and vertical oculorotary LR actions. PMID:20435590

  2. Nylon versus polydioxanone in the correction of rectus diastasis.

    PubMed

    Nahas, F X; Augusto, S M; Ghelfond, C

    2001-03-01

    Nylon and polydioxanone are two sutures commonly used to correct rectus diastasis. Polydioxanone, as an absorbable suture, has the advantage of not being palpable in thin patients. Because several forces act against the plication, an absorbable suture would not be efficient in these cases. In this study, two groups of 10 patients each were studied. These patients underwent abdominoplasty and correction of rectus diastasis. In the control group, 2-0 nylon was used to plicate the anterior aponeurosis and 0-polydioxanone was used in the experimental group. The tension of the abdominal wall was measured with a dynamometer in both groups. The width of rectus diastasis was measured 3 cm above and 2 cm below the umbilicus, using a computed tomography (CT) scan before the operation and 3 weeks and 6 months after surgery. The width of rectus diastasis was measured intraoperatively at the same levels. The data were analyzed by Student's t test. Both groups had similar abdominal wall tension on both levels. The diastasis recti was completely corrected at both levels, as confirmed by the 3-week postoperative CT scan and the 6-month CT scan. At the superior level, the width of the rectus diastasis on the preoperative CT scan (2.6 +/- 0.7 cm) was similar to the values obtained intraoperatively (2.7 +/- 0.6 cm), showing no significant statistical difference. At the inferior level, the largest difference between the preoperative CT scan and the intraoperative finding was 0.3 cm. In conclusion, the correction of rectus diastasis with 2-0 nylon and 0-polydioxanone was achieved and maintained after 6 months. CT scans are an accurate method for studying rectus diastasis and other muscles of the abdominal wall. PMID:11304594

  3. Rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap for primary vaginal reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Carlson, J W; Soisson, A P; Fowler, J M; Carter, J R; Twiggs, L B; Carson, L F

    1993-12-01

    Reconstructive procedures are being performed with increasing frequency in conjunction with pelvic exenterations and other radical gynecologic surgeries. The most common reconstructive procedures include continent urinary diversion, rectosigmoid anastomosis, and vaginal reconstruction. Historically, the gracilis myocutaneous flap has been the procedure of choice for vaginal reconstruction. However, the gracilis myocutaneous flap has a history of partial to severe necrosis, a propensity to prolapse, and leaves ipsilateral donor scars on the thigh. In contrast, neovaginal reconstruction using a relatively new procedure, the distally based rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps, has the advantage of using a large, single flap that can be incorporated into the primary incision. This flap is mobilized on a long vascular pedicle, the rectus muscle. In relation to the underlying rectus muscle, the orientation of the cutaneous portion of this flap may be customized to accommodate the pelvic defect or the surgeon's preference. Depending on their primary orientation, they are referred to as either a vertical or transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap. The versatility and reliability of the rectus flap is demonstrated here through the presentation of a small pilot series of seven patients. The technique was used for vaginal reconstruction, primarily in conjunction with pelvic exenteration. The flaps were mobilized from the supraumbilical area and had a flap viability of 100% for the 2 years that they have been followed. There were no postoperative incisional or flap infections. There was one infraumbilical fascial dehiscence. The advantages of primary pelvic reconstruction along with the description of the operative techniques are presented. PMID:8112640

  4. Bilateral Rectus Sheath Hematoma in Kidney Transplant Patient: Case Study and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Feizzadeh Kerigh, Behzad; Maddah, Ghodratolah

    2013-01-01

    Rectus sheath hematoma usually occurs unilateral but rare cases of bilateral hematoma have been reported. Herein we report the first case of spontaneous bilateral Rectus Sheath Hematoma in the kidney transplanted patient. PMID:24350093

  5. A difficult surgical approach for primary orbital hydatid cyst: transconjunctival medial orbitotomy.

    PubMed

    Sendul, Selam Yekta; Ucgul, Cemile; Dirim, Burcu; Demir, Mehmet; Acar, Zeynep; Guven, Dilek

    2015-01-01

    Hydatid cysts rarely appear isolated in the orbital cavity without involvement of other organs. The cysts are usually located in the retrobulbar region, and may be extraconal or intraconal. Herein we present a case of primary orbital cyst hydatid that is adjacent to the medial rectus muscle and optic nerve in the intraconal space and the difficulties during the surgical and medical treatment period. PMID:26655075

  6. A difficult surgical approach for primary orbital hydatid cyst: transconjunctival medial orbitotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sendul, Selam Yekta; Ucgul, Cemile; Dirim, Burcu; Demir, Mehmet; Acar, Zeynep; Guven, Dilek

    2015-01-01

    Hydatid cysts rarely appear isolated in the orbital cavity without involvement of other organs. The cysts are usually located in the retrobulbar region, and may be extraconal or intraconal. Herein we present a case of primary orbital cyst hydatid that is adjacent to the medial rectus muscle and optic nerve in the intraconal space and the difficulties during the surgical and medical treatment period. PMID:26655075

  7. Gynecologic reconstruction with a rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap: an update.

    PubMed

    Carlson, J W; Carter, J R; Saltzman, A K; Carson, L F; Fowler, J M; Twiggs, L B

    1996-06-01

    This series reports the outcomes and significant complications associated with the rectus myocutaneous flap when used for pelvic or inguinal reconstruction in patients with gynecologic cancers. Perioperative variables were retrospectively reviewed to identify social and medical risk factors as well as intraoperative and postoperative complications that predisposed to rectus flap failure. Fifteen patients with gynecologic malignancies underwent reconstructive procedures using a vertically oriented rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap for either vaginal (n = 14) or inguinal (n = 1) reconstruction. The patients' primary cancers were cervical (n = 11), rectal (n = 1), ovarian (n = 1), vulvar (n = 1), and vaginal (n = 1). The median age was 50 years. The median follow-up was 17 months. All flaps were mobilized in conjunction with a radical salvage operation. There were no cases of vaginal prolapse and no abdominal wound infections. However, 4 patients (27%) had major postoperative morbidity in this small series. There was one wound dehiscence and three episodes of necrosis of the subcutaneous and cutaneous portions of the flap. All 4 of these patients required additional operative intervention or debridement. Eleven patients had complete healing of the flap. The rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap is a valuable option for gynecologic reconstructive procedures. Perioperative strategies for improving flap viability include the identification of risk factors that may compromise flap perfusions such as prior abdominal incisions, peripheral vascular disease, and obesity. Meticulous surgical technique is required to preserve the vascular pedicle. These strategies may be useful in preoperative counseling, the perioperative evaluation, and the intraoperative management. PMID:8641616

  8. Traumatic longitudinal splitting of the inferior rectus muscle.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Jessica; Demer, Joseph L

    2011-04-01

    Orbital floor fractures and associated injuries can cause strabismus. We present the case of a 34-year-old man with incomitant strabismus after orbital reconstruction following a high-impact baseball injury. Multipositional, high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging revealed extensive longitudinal splitting of the inferior rectus muscle by an orbital floor implant that separated its orbital and global layers. PMID:21463958

  9. Two Cases of Rectus Sternalis Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Swapna; Mayilswamy, Mahendran

    2016-01-01

    The sternalis muscle, an uncommon anatomical variant of the chest wall musculature, though perhaps well known to anatomists, is quite unfamiliar to clinicians and radiologists despite attempts to highlight its clinical importance in recent years. During routine dissection for undergraduate medical teaching, in the department of anatomy, we came across two cases of sternalis muscle. The first was a unique case of unilateral right sternalis with contralateral insertion on the left sternocleidomastoid, and the second case where bilateral presence of the muscle was noted with ipsilateral insertion. The former was supplied by medial pectoral nerve and the latter by lower intercostal nerves. Usually present between the pectoral and superficial fasciae, wide ranging prevalence and morphology have been attributed to this muscular variant. Opinions differ on its development and nerve supply. Its presence can be misdiagnosed as a wide range of benign and malignant anterior chest wall lesions and tumours, but it is also of great use as a pedicle flap or flap microvascular anastomosis in reconstructive surgeries of anterior chest wall, head and neck and breast. In this paper, two cases of sternalis muscle which presented very differently from each other are discussed. PMID:26894052

  10. Long-term postoperative outcomes of bilateral lateral rectus recession vs unilateral recession-resection for intermittent exotropia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xian; Man, Teng-Teng; Tian, Qiao-Xia; Zhao, Gui-Qiu; Kong, Qing-Lan; Meng, Yan; Gao, Yan; Ning, Mei-Zhen

    2014-01-01

    AIM To discuss the long-term postoperative results of bilateral lateral rectus recession (BLR) and unilateral lateral rectus recession-medial rectus resection (RR) in therapy of intermittent exotropia. METHODS We retrospectively analyzed 213 cases of intermittent exotropia who underwent surgery between 2008 and 2010. The patients were grouped into BLR group and RR group. Motor outcomes were divided into three groups on the basis of the angle of deviation after surgery: overcorrection (esotropia/phoria >5Δ), orthophoria (esotropia/phoria ≤5Δ to exotropia/phoria ≤10Δ), and undercorrection/recurrence (exotropia/phoria >10Δ). Titmus test was used to evaluate stereoacuity, the stereoacuity <800s of arc meaned the patients had stereopsis. Surgical outcome including motor criteria and sensory status were compared at postoperative 6, 12, 24mo and at 36mo examination between groups. RESULTS At 12, 24mo after surgery, the motor outcomes had no difference (P>0.05) between groups. However, the motor outcomes at 6, 36mo were signally different in each group, indicating the success rate in RR group at 6mo was higher than that in BLR group (83.02% vs 82.24%, P<0.05) but the result was contrary at the 3y examination (60.75% vs 43.40%, P<0.05). No statistical significance were found in the sensory outcomes between the groups at mean of 3.7y follow-up. CONCLUSION The motor outcomes in RR group were better than in BLR group at 6mo after surgery, while the 3y outcomes were better in BLR group. This may be due to the recurrence rate of the BLR was lower than the RR group's. PMID:25540763

  11. Discoid medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Yomei; Yamazaki, Yuji; Ninomiya, Setsuo

    2003-09-01

    A discoid medial meniscus is an extremely rare anomaly. We present 4 cases of symptomatic discoid medial meniscus. Furthermore, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the unaffected knee was obtained in 3 cases, and 1 patient had bilateral discoid medial menisci as well as a unilateral discoid lateral meniscus proven by MRI. Another patient had bilateral discoid medial menisci. In one of the other 2 cases, an MRI of the unaffected knee was not obtained. However, in the involved knees of both cases, medial and lateral menisci were discoid. The incidence of bilateral discoid medial menisci is unknown. In the past, the diagnosis of a discoid meniscus was made with an arthrogram or at arthrotomy. Therefore, whether some of the unilateral cases reported in the literature might have been bilateral is unknown. The reported prevalence of bilateral discoid medial menisci will probably increase, because when a discoid medial meniscus is encountered currently, an MRI is used to find knee disorders, including in the contralateral knee. Axial multiplanar gradient-recalled-echo imaging could provide images of the discoid meniscus, depicted in its entirety in one section. This would make the recognition of a discoid meniscus simple. PMID:12966402

  12. Spontaneous intraperitoneal rupture of a postpartum rectus sheath haematoma.

    PubMed

    Elmoghrabi, Adel; Mohamed, Mohamed; McCann, Michael; Sachwani-Daswani, Gul

    2016-01-01

    A 35-year-old woman presented to the emergency department (ED) with acute severe abdominal pain at 4 days postpartum. CT of the abdomen revealed a type II rectus sheath haematoma for which she was initially treated conservatively and discharged. A few hours later, she returned to the ED with a picture suggestive of peritonitis. Exploratory laparoscopy was performed and revealed haemoperitoneum and a ruptured area on the posterior rectus sheath. Approximately 2 L of blood was aspirated. Haemostatic control was achieved and closed suction drains secured in position. The patient was discharged in stable condition on postadmission day 6. She continued to follow-up on an outpatient basis and was doing well 3 months postoperatively. PMID:26961567

  13. Isolated inferior rectus muscle rupture after blunt orbital trauma

    PubMed Central

    Tomasetti, Patrick; Metzler, Philipp; Jacobsen, Christine

    2013-01-01

    A 44-year-old man was referred to our department with diplopia, periorbital swelling and haematoma of the left eye after orbital trauma due to a punch. During the examination, mild enophthalmos, hypertropia and a total absence of infraduction were observed. An orbital computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated a left orbital floor blow-out fracture, with caudal herniation of periorbital fat and rectus inferior muscle. Repair was performed under total anaesthesia with placement of a Titan mesh. The following days were marked by the persistence of diplopia without improvement of infraduction. A postoperative, 0.5 mm CT scan highlighted a complete rupture of the inferior rectus muscle, not seen before operation, by a 1.0 mm-sliced CT. In this case, orthoptic therapy was undertaken with good results after 6 months and without need of a second repair. PMID:24963904

  14. Acute Calcific Tendinitis of the Rectus Femoris: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    IKobayashi, Hideo; Kaneko, Haruka; Homma, Yasuhiro; Baba, Tomonori; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Periarticular calcific tendinitis is a common cause of Orthopedic outpatient referral. Calcific tendinitis of the rectus femoris, however, is very rare and not well known. Due to its rarity, correct diagnosis and prompt treatment are not fully understood. Case Report: Two females (38 and 40 years old) of acute calcific tendinitis of the rectus femoris with the good clinical course without any operative treatment were presented. The pain was managed with oral non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs and/or local steroid injection. Interval radiographic assessment showed complete resorption of the calcification. Conclusion: Establishing the correct diagnosis and initiating prompt treatment are shown to be important in achieving resolution of symptoms and in avoiding unnecessary investigations. PMID:27299063

  15. Robotic Total Pelvic Exenteration with Laparoscopic Rectus Flap: Initial Experience

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Brian R.; Mann, Gary N.; Louie, Otway; Wright, Jonathan L.

    2015-01-01

    Total pelvic exenteration is a highly morbid procedure performed for locally advanced pelvic malignancies. We describe our experience with three patients who underwent robotic total pelvic exenteration with laparoscopic rectus flap and compare perioperative characteristics to our open experience. Demographic, tumor, operative, and perioperative factors were examined with descriptive statistics reported. Mean operative times were similar between the two groups. When compared to open total pelvic exenteration cases (n = 9), median estimated blood loss, ICU stay, and hospital stay were all decreased. These data show robotic pelvic exenteration with laparoscopic rectus flap is technically feasible. The surgery was well tolerated with low blood loss and comparable operative times to the open surgery. Further study is needed to confirm the oncologic efficacy and the suggested improvement in surgical morbidity. PMID:25960911

  16. Evaluation of Risk Factors for Rectus Sheath Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Heena S; Kumar, Rohit; DiNella, Jeannine; Janov, Cheryl; Kaldas, Hoda; Smith, Roy E

    2016-04-01

    Rectus sheath hematoma (RSH) develops due to rupture of epigastric arteries or the rectus muscle. Although RSH incidence rate is low, it poses a significant diagnostic dilemma. We evaluated the risk factors for RSH, its presentation, management, and outcomes for 115 patients hospitalized with confirmed RSH by computed tomography scan between January 2005 and June 2009. More than three-fourth (77.4%) of the patients were on anticoagulation therapy, 58.3% patients had chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage ≥3, 51.3% had abdominal injections, 41.7% were on steroids/immunosuppressant therapy, 37.4% had abdominal surgery/trauma, 33.9% had cough, femoral puncture was performed in 31.3% of patients, and 29.5% were on antiplatelet therapy. Rectus sheath hematoma was not an attributable cause in any of the 17 deaths. Mortality was significantly higher in patients with CKD stage ≥3 (P = .03) or who required transfusion (P = .007). Better understanding of RSH risk factors will facilitate early diagnoses and improve management. PMID:25294636

  17. Electromyography study of the portions of the abdominal rectus muscle.

    PubMed

    Negrao Filho, R de F; Bérzin, F; Souza, G da C

    1997-01-01

    This study objective was to verify the behavior of three portions of the abdominal rectus muscle through a quantitative analysis of the electromyographic signal in different types of abdominal exercises. Ten young male between 16 and 27 years old were studied and they had no previous history of muscle and joint illness. They were well-trained and did seven abdominal exercises chosen considering the types of contraction (isotonic and isometric) as well as the muscle fixation points. The electric activity of the superior, medium (above umbilicus) and inferior (below umbilicus) portions at the left side of the abdominal rectus muscle was taken using Beckman type surface mini-electrodes. The registers were collected from computerized 8-channel Nicholet electromyography equipment, model Viking II. The signals were quantified using the MVA (Maximum Volunteer Activity) software, being considered for analysis the values of RMS (Root Mean Square). The obtained data were submitted to a parametric analysis using the variance analysis (F test) and also the Tukey test, besides a descriptive graphic analysis starting from the average RMS values of each muscle portion. This study results suggest that for the majority of the subjects, the functional activities of the abdominal rectus muscle are performed with electric activity differences among their portions, showing a tendency of producing more electric activity in the superior portion than in the medium and inferior portions. The experiment also demonstrated an absence of a common behavior pattern in the three portions of the ten tested subjects. PMID:9444489

  18. Chuave Medial Verbs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurman, Robert C.

    1975-01-01

    This article discusses two syntactic processes known as chaining and linkage, insofar as they are relevant to Chuave, a Papuan language spoken in the East New Guinea Highlands. These processes are discussed in relation to Chuave medial verbs. (CLK)

  19. Correction of Excyclotropia by Surgery on the Inferior Rectus Muscle in Patients with Thyroid Eye Disease: A Retrospective, Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Kitaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Nakakura, Shunsuke; Mito, Hidenori; Kimura, Akiko; Kakizaki, Hirohiko

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the characteristics of excyclotropia correction through surgery on the inferior rectus muscle in patients with thyroid eye disease. Methods This was a retrospective, observational study at a single institution. We reviewed 36 patients who had undergone unilateral inferior rectus muscle recession, with or without nasal inferior rectus muscle transposition. The following factors were investigated as possibly influencing excyclotropia correction: inferior rectus muscle thickness, degree of adipose change in the inferior rectus muscle, smoking status, history of orbital radiotherapy, and the amount of inferior rectus muscle recession. Using T1-weighted coronal magnetic resonance imaging, we measured the cross-sectional area of the inferior rectus muscle at its largest point, as well as the bright-signal area of the inferior rectus muscle, which reflects intermuscular adipose change. We then calculated the percentage internal bright-signal area at the point of the largest inferior rectus muscle cross-sectional area. The history of orbital radiotherapy was graded using a binary system. We evaluated correlations among excyclotropia correction, the amount of nasal inferior rectus muscle transposition, and the possible influencing factors listed, using stepwise multiple regression analyses. Results The multiple regression model demonstrated a significant relationship among excyclotropia correction, amount of nasal inferior rectus muscle transposition, and the amount of inferior rectus muscle recession (YCORRECTION = 8.546XTENDON WIDTH + 0.405XRECESSION− 0.908; r = 0.844; adjusted r2 = 0.695; P < 0.001). Conclusions Excyclotropia correction was correlated with the amount of nasal inferior rectus muscle transposition and the amount of inferior rectus muscle recession, but not with the other factors. The regression model presented in this study will enable us to determine more precisely the amount of nasal inferior rectus muscle transposition in patients

  20. Avulsion fracture of the straight and reflected heads of rectus femoris.

    PubMed

    Deehan, D J; Beattie, T F; Knight, D; Jongschaap, H

    1992-09-01

    We present a rare case of avulsion fracture of the reflected head of rectus femoris. This occurred in a 13-year-old male footballer. Diagnosis was made with pelvic radiology and treatment was bed rest and analgesia. PMID:1449579

  1. Clinical and Radiologic Characteristics of Inferior Rectus Muscle Sheath Entrapment in Orbital Blowout Fracture.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Abbas; Tavakoli, Mehdi; Khosravifard, Keivan; Yazdani, Shahin

    2015-10-01

    Blowout fracture is a common condition in the oculoplastics clinic. One of the indications for its repair is entrapment of the inferior rectus muscle within the fracture site. Herein, the authors present 3 patients of inferior rectus muscle sheath entrapment without entrapment of the muscle itself. The outcome of treatment was excellent in all patients. The aim of this report is to present the special clinical and radiologic findings in such patients. PMID:26413961

  2. Rectus abdominis overuse injury in a tennis athlete treated with traumeel

    PubMed Central

    Natsis, Konstantinos; Lyrtzis, Christos; Papathanasiou, Efthymia; Anastasopoulos, Nikos

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Rectus abdominis injuries are common in tennis players at all levels of competition. Traumeel® injection can be used for treatment of muscle strains and hematomas. Case Report: A 21-year-old female tennis athlete was injured on the non-dominant rectus abdominis during the cocking phase of the service motion. She suffered from pain and tenderness. One week later, during a serve, she experienced severe pain on the contralateral side of her abdomen. Conservative treatment was performed by the team physician with rest, ice therapy and analgesics for 20 days, but she had recurrent injuries. The ultrasonography and MRI showed hematoma of the rectus abdominis muscle. She was treated with 2 injections of Traumeel® on the 2nd, 4th, 6th post-traumatic day and received 1 injection on the 10th post-traumatic day. She also modified her serve technique. On the fourth post-treatment week the athlete had pain-free function and both the MRI appearance and the size of rectus abdominal muscle were normal. She returned to her sport activities. There is no recurrence of her injury 2 years later. Conclusions: Rectus abdominis hematoma must be diagnosed early. Traumeel® injections are effective, safe and well-tolerated for the treatment of overuse injury of the rectus abdominis following strain. PMID:23569472

  3. Variation in Tendinous Intersections of Rectus Abdominis Muscle in North Indian Population with Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Mahboobul; Gupta, Amrita; Nasar, Areeba

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study Incisions through the abdominal wall are based on anatomical principles and Rectus abdominis muscle provides an excellent myocutaneous flap. The present work was proposed to identify variations in numbers and location of tendinous intersections of the Rectus Abdominis muscle in the cadavers as a guide to the surgical procedures. Materials and Methods The study was conducted on 54 cadavers of North Indian origin allotted to undergraduate medical student for Anatomy dissection classes. Manual dissection was done to identify tendinous intersections of the Rectus Abdominis muscle with reference to number and location. Results In the present study one cadaver had five tendinous intersections (1.85%), one cadaver had four tendinous intersections (1.85%) and 52 cadavers had three tendinous intersections (96.29%). Conclusion The present study is an effort to provide data about the anatomical variation in numbers and location of tendinous intersections of the Rectus Abdomini muscles. Rectus abdominis muscle provides an excellent myocutaneous flap because the muscle belly is separated from surrounding tissue within the rectus sheath. This study is representative of a small study of the human population and only serves to illustrate the variations in the anatomy of the tendinous intersections. More extensive studies are required to establish a definitive pattern among local populations to serve as a guide for surgical procedures. PMID:26266107

  4. Rectus abdominis muscle endometriosis after cesarean section--case report.

    PubMed

    Dordević, Momcilo; Jovanović, Bozidar; Mitrović, Slobodanka; Dordević, Gordana; Radovanović, Dragce; Sazdanović, Predrag

    2009-09-01

    Endometriosis is defined by the presence of functional endometrial tissue outside the uterus, where it is normally located. Endometriosis is one of the most common gynecologic entities affecting 8%-18% of menstrual women. Endometriosis can occur at intra- and extrapelvic localizations. The most common intrapelvic localizations are those involving the ovaries, Douglas' area, pelvic peritoneum, uterus, bladder and rectum. Abdominal endometriosis is the most common localization of extrapelvic endometriosis and usually develops in connective tissue. Extra-pelvic implantation of endometrial tissue may develop in any organ including the skin, lungs, liver, extremities, brain and stomach. Three years after cesarean section, a 35-year-old female was operated on for suspected anterior abdominal hernia at the site of previous section. An egg-sized tumor was removed from the rectus abdominis muscle and referred for histopathologic and immunohistochemical analyses. The results showed endometriosis of the muscle with positive estrogen and progesterone receptors. A year after the procedure, treatment with gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs was continued due to recurrent pain in the scar area, along with ultrasonography and biochemical marker (carbohydrate antigen 125) follow-up. Clinical diagnosis of scar endometriosis can be made by thorough history and physical, ultrasonography and biochemical examinations. Scar endometriosis should always be considered when the symptoms occur in a cyclic and hormone-dependent pattern, mostly after gynecologic operations, and worsening during menstruation. Definitive diagnosis is based on histopathologic analysis. PMID:20405641

  5. Myositis Ossificans of Rectus Femoris: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Srikanth, I Muni; Vishal, Amar; Kiran, K Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Myositis ossificans (MO), heterotopic ossification, occurs in muscles and soft tissue. This lesion contains actively proliferating fibroblasts and osteoblasts. It commonly affects vigorous young men and more so among athletes. It occurs as a result of trauma, either acute or chronic and can also arise near joints in neurological disorders. By time of presentation, ossification is extensive and the benign nature of the lesion is usually evident on radiological studies. Most common muscles involved in MO are the flexor muscles of the arm, the hamstrings and quadriceps femoris. Case Report: We present a case of MO with isolated involvement of rectus femoris in mid-thigh and sparing of other three muscles of quadriceps femoris, with no improvement following physiotherapy and medical management requiring surgical excision for better prognosis with no recurrence. Conclusion: MO, a benign lesion, is known to affect the flexors of the arm, the hamstrings, and quadriceps femoris; it must be noted that even individual muscle can also be affected as shown in the above case presentation without involving whole group of muscles. Surgical excision is indicated if non-operative measures are not successful. PMID:27299083

  6. Use of the rectus abdominis muscle and fascia flap in reconstruction of epispadias/exstrophy.

    PubMed

    Horton, C E; Sadove, R C; Jordan, G H; Sagher, U

    1988-07-01

    Inferiorly based rectus abdominis muscle flaps and fascial flaps have been used to construct a firm abdominal wall without hernias and to provide coverage of the bladder, bladder neck, and proximal urethra in the secondary reconstruction of patients with epispadias/exstrophy complex. They have also been used to produce an elevation of the mons area, which is lacking in the typical exstrophy patient. Rectus fascial flaps have been the mainstay of abdominal closure when wide diastasis of the rectal muscles is present and when the lower abdomen lacks fascial support. We are pleased with the results of utilizing either the rectus muscle or rectus fascia in this complex condition. We have been using fascial flaps for over 10 years in our epispadias/exstrophy closures and abdominal wall strengthening procedures. We have been using bone grafts and the rectus muscle for the construction of a mons for the past 5 years. Although the rectus muscle procedure to cover the bladder and the bladder neck has been in use for only 2 years, we have seen patients with incontinence restored to a continent state; these patients have not been plagued with fistula problems when a neourethra has to be constructed to elongate the phallus. Previous attempts at urethral repair in this area have been successful in the main, but an occasional fistula at the junction between the penile skin and the abdominopubic skin has resulted. Since using the rectus muscle to cover the bladder and bladder neck area, we have not had this problem. Patients with epispadias/exstrophy remain such difficult problems that every advance in technique should be used to improve results.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3391008

  7. The Trapped Medial Meniscus Tear

    PubMed Central

    Herschmiller, Thomas A.; Anderson, John A.; Garrett, William E.; Taylor, Dean C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Numerous clinical examination maneuvers have been developed to identify meniscus tears of the knee. While meniscus injuries vary significantly in type and severity, no maneuvers have been developed that help to distinguish particular tear characteristics. Purpose: This nonconsecutive case series highlights a distinctive clinical finding that correlates with inferiorly displaced flap tears of the medial meniscus that become trapped in the medial gutter of the knee, as identified through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopy. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Eight patients with trapped medial meniscus tears were identified from a single surgeon’s academic orthopaedic sports medicine practice between January 2009 and January 2012. Each patient underwent clinical evaluation, MRI, and arthroscopic treatment for meniscus injury. Clinical notes, MRI images, radiology reports, and operative findings were reviewed and compared in a descriptive fashion. Results: Each patient displayed a positive clinical examination finding of medial knee pain inferior to the joint line with flexion and the application of valgus stress in the setting of a torn medial meniscus and intact medial collateral ligament (MCL). Preoperative MRI revealed a distinctive flap tear of the medial meniscus flipped inferiorly to lay trapped between the tibia and deep fibers of the MCL. On arthroscopy, flap tears were found displaced inferiorly and trapped in the medial gutter in 6 of the 8 patients. Displaced meniscal fragments in the remaining 2 patients were found within the medial compartment. Conclusion: Inferiorly displaced flap tears of the meniscus that have been displaced to the medial gutter can be localized through a careful examination technique. Clinical Relevance: Early identification of this injury pattern may help reduce the likelihood that the trapped fragment will be missed during arthroscopy. PMID:26675499

  8. Cloning and Characterization of Two Bistructural S-Layer-RTX Proteins from Campylobacter rectus

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Martin; Kuhnert, Peter; Nicolet, Jacques; Burnens, André P.; Frey, Joachim

    1999-01-01

    Campylobacter rectus is an important periodontal pathogen in humans. A surface-layer (S-layer) protein and a cytotoxic activity have been characterized and are thought to be its major virulence factors. The cytotoxic activity was suggested to be due to a pore-forming protein toxin belonging to the RTX (repeats in the structural toxins) family. In the present work, two closely related genes, csxA and csxB (for C. rectus S-layer and RTX protein) were cloned from C. rectus and characterized. The Csx proteins appear to be bifunctional and possess two structurally different domains. The N-terminal part shows similarity with S-layer protein, especially SapA and SapB of C. fetus and Crs of C. rectus. The C-terminal part comprising most of CsxA and CsxB is a domain with 48 and 59 glycine-rich canonical nonapeptide repeats, respectively, arranged in three blocks. Purified recombinant Csx peptides bind Ca2+. These are characteristic traits of RTX toxin proteins. The S-layer and RTX domains of Csx are separated by a proline-rich stretch of 48 amino acids. All C. rectus isolates studied contained copies of either the csxA or csxB gene or both; csx genes were absent from all other Campylobacter and Helicobacter species examined. Serum of a patient with acute gingivitis showed a strong reaction to recombinant Csx protein on immunoblots. PMID:10198015

  9. Free rectus femoris muscle transfer for one-stage reconstruction of established facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Koshima, I; Moriguchi, T; Soeda, S; Hamanaka, T; Tanaka, H; Ohta, S

    1994-09-01

    The free vascularized rectus femoris muscle graft with a long motor nerve was used for reconstruction of unilateral established facial paralysis in one stage. The pedicle vessels were anastomosed to the recipient vessels in the ipsilateral face, and the motor nerve of the muscle, which was led through the upper lip, was sutured to the contralateral facial nerve. The advantages of this one-stage reconstruction as compared with surgery involving second-stage reconstruction are that the reconstruction can be completed in one stage and that the period required for muscle refunctioning after surgery is short. The vascular supply of the rectus femoris muscle can emanate mainly from the lateral circumflex femoral artery. In our cadaveric study, five types of variation were found for origination of a nutrient artery of the muscle. The most common type was one in which the artery derived from the descending branch of the lateral circumflex femoral artery (39 percent). The motor nerve of the rectus femoris muscle is derived from the femoral nerve under the inguinal ligament and runs downward through the intermuscular space between the sartorius muscle and the iliopsoas muscle before entering the posteromedial part of the upper third of the rectus muscle. The advantages of using the rectus muscle are as follows: (1) safety and simplicity exist with one main large arterial supply for arterial anastomosis; (2) the length of the femoral nerve (more than 20 cm) is adequate for reaching the contralateral facial nerve for suturing; (3) a simultaneous operation by two teams is possible with the patient in the supine position; (4) the force and distance of contraction are appropriate to reanimate the face; (5) the rectus muscle can be separated as a segment with appropriate lengths, size, and power for replacing lost muscles in the face; (6) the tendinous fascia in both ends provides a reliable point for anchoring sutures, which provides firmer attachment; and (7) no loss of donor

  10. Intraoperative monitoring of torsion to prevent vertical deviations during augmented vertical rectus transposition surgery

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Jonathan M.; Hatt, Sarah R.; Leske, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Total transposition of the superior and inferior rectus muscle laterally, with augmentation sutures, may be complicated by induction of an undesirable vertical deviation. Induced vertical misalignment may be associated with changes in torsion. We have developed a simple method to monitor intraoperative torsion that may reduce the incidence of vertical deviations. Methods We reviewed consecutive cases of total abducens palsy or esotropic Duane syndrome treated with augmented lateral transposition of the superior and inferior rectus muscles, where the 12 o’clock and 6 o’clock intraoperative positions were initially marked with a dot at the limbus using a surgical pen. The location of the marks was monitored during tying of the augmentation sutures; changes in torsion were monitored intraoperatively. Results Records of 9 cases of augmented vertical rectus transposition were reviewed. Based on intraoperative assessment of torsion by observing the position of the preplaced limbal dots, the inferior rectus augmentation suture was tied less tightly than the superior rectus suture, leaving a gap of 1–3 mm between the inferior and lateral rectus muscles in 8 of 9 cases. The augmentation suture was totally removed in 1 case. Following these intraoperative adjustments, there was no induced intraoperative torsion, whereas further tightening of the inferior suture induced extorsion. Six weeks postoperatively, 8 of 9 patients did not experience a symptomatic vertical deviation. Conclusions When performing augmented transposition procedures, intraoperative monitoring of torsion may reduce the incidence of inadvertent vertical deviations and torsion. This technique may also be useful in other cases where correction or avoidance of torsion is needed. PMID:22525168

  11. Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... often occur among active teens, especially athletes. A torn medial collateral ligament (MCL) — a ligament that helps ... the more serious injuries. Teens who have a torn MCL tend to play contact sports, like football ...

  12. Correlation between the Limbus-Insertion Distance of the Lateral Rectus Muscle and Lateral Rectus Recession Surgery in Intermittent Exotropia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Yeun; Lee, Eun Jung; Park, Kyung-Ah; Oh, Sei Yeul

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the limbus-insertion distance (LID) of the lateral rectus (LR) muscle can be a useful indicator for predicting the surgical effect of recession surgery in intermittent exotropia (IXT). Patients who underwent unilateral or bilateral LR recession for the basic type of IXT were included. The distance between the corneal limbus and the posterior edge of the insertion of LR muscle (limbus-insertion distance) was measured intraoperatively using surgical calipers (graded with 0.25 mm precision). We calculated the actual dose-response effect as the difference between the angle of preoperative deviation and the angle of postoperative deviation, and then divided the figure by the total amount of recession at postoperative months 1, 3, and 6. The correlation between the limbus-insertion distance (LID) of LR muscle and each dose-response effect was statistically analyzed. A total of 60 subjects were enrolled in this study. The mean LID of LR muscle was 5.8±0.7 mm. The dose-response effect was 3.2±1.0 prism diopters (PD)/mm at postoperative month 1, 3.4±1.0 PD/mm at postoperative month 3, and 3.4±1.1 PD/mm at postoperative month 6. The LID of the LR muscle was significantly correlated with dose-response effects in cases of unilateral and bilateral LR recession at postoperative months 3 and 6 (P = 0.01, <0.01, 0.04 and <0.01 respectively). As the LID of the LR muscle increased by 1 mm, the dose-response effect increased by 0.2PD/mm in unilateral LR recession, and by 0.4 PD/mm in bilateral LR recession at postoperative month 6. In conclusion, the LID of the LR muscle can be used as one predictor of the recession effect to assist in surgical planning for IXT. Moreover, undercorrection at the time of LR recession might be considered in patients with long LID of the LR muscle. PMID:27463100

  13. Avulsion fracture of the straight and reflected heads of rectus femoris.

    PubMed Central

    Deehan, D J; Beattie, T F; Knight, D; Jongschaap, H

    1992-01-01

    We present a rare case of avulsion fracture of the reflected head of rectus femoris. This occurred in a 13-year-old male footballer. Diagnosis was made with pelvic radiology and treatment was bed rest and analgesia. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:1449579

  14. The Significance of Rectus Femoris for the Favorable Functional Outcome After Total Femur Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Takayuki; Shimoji, Takashi; Ae, Keisuke; Tanizawa, Taisuke; Gokita, Tabu

    2016-01-01

    Background: In treatment of tumors, we usually reconstruct after resection of the entire femur using only metallic modular endoprostheses among many procedures and defined it as a total femur replacement. We studied the interrelation between the preservation of rectus femoris and the functional outcome after total femur replacement. Methods: We rated the functional outcomes of 21 patients who underwent total femur replacement. We categorized the subjects into 2 groups: group A (rectus femoris preserved) and group B (rectus femoris unpreserved). We examined them based on the Mann-Whitney U test between the 2 groups in average through the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society functional scores. Results: The average score of group A was 20 of 25 (11–25; 80%), whereas the average score of group B was 10 of 25 (4–13; 40%). There was significant difference between the groups (P = 0.00168877). Conclusion: We found that the preservation of rectus femoris is imperative for achieving the favorable functional outcome in total femur replacement.

  15. Early Results of Slanted Recession of the Lateral Rectus Muscle for Intermittent Exotropia with Convergence Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kyung Min

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of slanted recession of the lateral rectus muscle for intermittent exotropia with convergence insufficiency. This prospective study included 31 patients who underwent slanted lateral rectus recession for intermittent exotropia with convergence insufficiency between June 2010 and June 2012. Following parameters were recorded and analyzed: patient sex, age, preoperative and postoperative near and distance ocular alignment, and changes in stereopsis. The mean age of the patients was 9.2 years. The preoperative mean deviation angle was 32.4 PD at distance and 43.4 PD at near. After 6 months, slanted lateral rectus recession reduced the deviation angles to 2 PD at distance and 3.4 PD at near. In addition, the mean difference between distance and near deviation angles was significantly reduced from 11 PD to 1.4 PD at 6 months postoperatively. Slanted lateral rectus recession for intermittent exotropia with convergence insufficiency in children successfully reduced the distance and near exodeviations and the near-distance difference without increasing the risk of long-term postoperative esotropia or diplopia. PMID:25688298

  16. Breast reconstruction with a turbocharged transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap on the contralateral perforator.

    PubMed

    Sbalchiero, Juliano Carlos; de Albuquerque Leal, Paulo Roberto; dos Santos, César Cabello

    2014-11-01

    Seventeen patients were submitted to delayed unilateral breast reconstruction using pedicled, muscle-sparing turbocharged transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap based on the contralateral perforator vessels. The lateral portion of the rectus abdominis muscle on the pedicled side was preserved in 12 patients. Zones II and IV were included in the flap in all cases. Mean duration of surgery was 7 hours and 15 minutes. Four complications developed in the abdominal donor site: contralateral abdominal bulging (n=1), minor suture dehiscence (n=2), and epidermolysis at the border of the abdominal flap and umbilical scar (n=1). Three partial losses (10%-30%) occurred in the reconstructed breast (17.64% of cases), whereas 2 cases of fat necrosis were associated with partial losses. One patient developed deep vein thrombosis with pulmonary embolism; however, outcome was favorable. This proved a viable alternative for breast reconstruction, with satisfactory results in most patients and acceptable morbidity and surgical time. PMID:24625511

  17. Transient increase of higher-order aberrations after lateral rectus recession in children.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kyoung Yul; Hong, Samin; Song, Won Kyoung; Chung, Seung Ah; Lee, Jong Bok

    2011-05-01

    The changes of higher-order aberrations (HOAs) after bilateral lateral rectus muscle recession were evaluated. Forty eyes of 20 children were enrolled and their wavefront information was assessed until postoperative 3 months. Even though the root mean square (RMS) of total aberration was not changed, the RMS of HOA was transiently increased at postoperative 1 week and returned to baseline level after 1 month. Among individual Zernike coefficient, secondary astigmatism, quadrafoil, secondary coma, secondary trefoil, and pentafoil showed similar tendency with the RMS of HOA. However, coma, trefoil, and spherical aberration were not changed. Regarding recession amount, it did not correlate with any Zernike coefficient. In summary, our data imply that the HOAs are transiently increased after lateral rectus recession surgery. These results are in collusion with previous reports that strabismus surgery induced transient corneal astigmatism. PMID:21488198

  18. Patterns of attachment of the myodural bridge by the rectus capitis posterior minor muscle.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao-Ying; Yu, Sheng-Bo; Li, Yun-Fei; Chi, Yan-Yan; Zheng, Nan; Gao, Hai-Bin; Luan, Bing-Yi; Zhang, Zhao-Xi; Sui, Hong-Jin

    2016-03-01

    The myodural bridge was first described by Hack in 1995 and was thought to be related to chronic cervicogenic headaches. For a long time, few studies revealed the patterns of the myodural bridge considering the rectus capitis posterior minor muscle. In this study, P45 plastination technology and anatomical dissection were performed on head specimens, and four different terminal region types of the rectus capitis posterior minor muscle were observed, including the posterior atlanto-occipital interspace, posterior arch of the atlas and posterior atlanto-axial interspace. We propose that the myodural complex structures in the posterior atlanto-occipital and posterior atlanto-axial interspace have cooperative effects on cerebrospinal fluid and work together. This force might be an important source for the circulation of cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:25859757

  19. Free anterolateral thigh flap raised on musculocutaneous perforators of rectus femoris muscle.

    PubMed

    Ehtesham-ul-Haq; Aslam, Ayesha; Hameed, Shahid; Ahmad, Rao Saood; Majid, Abdul; Waqas, Muhammad

    2011-08-01

    The anterolateral thigh flap (ALTF) has been in wide clinical use for the last two decades, its major disadvantage has been its variable anatomy. We are presenting a case in which no substantial perforators were found to be arising from either the lateral septum of thigh or Vastus Laterlis muscle. In this case, instead of raising another flap, we used the same skin paddle raised on the musculocutaneous perforators of rectus femoris muscle. PMID:21798144

  20. Herpes Zoster in a Free Transverse Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous Flap After Delayed Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Hui; Ahn, Hee Chang; Chung, Min Sung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In concert with advances in surgical reconstruction techniques and improved survival after breast cancer, both the aesthetic and functional outcomes, especially sensory recovery, of breast reconstruction have been addressed. Most studies on sensory recovery in reconstructed breasts have utilized patients’ subjective responses to touch, pain, temperature, and pressure. In contrast, this report describes a case of herpes zoster that developed in a free transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap, which provides objective evidence of spontaneous reinnervation after breast reconstruction. PMID:25974118

  1. Mechanical characterisation of porcine rectus sheath under uniaxial and biaxial tension.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Mathew; Winter, Des C; Simms, Ciaran K

    2014-06-01

    Incisional hernia development is a significant complication after laparoscopic abdominal surgery. Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) is known to initiate the extrusion of intestines through the abdominal wall, but there is limited data on the mechanics of IAP generation and the structural properties of rectus sheath. This paper presents an explanation of the mechanics of IAP development, a study of the uniaxial and biaxial tensile properties of porcine rectus sheath, and a simple computational investigation of the tissue. Analysis using Laplace׳s law showed a circumferential stress in the abdominal wall of approx. 1.1MPa due to an IAP of 11kPa, commonly seen during coughing. Uniaxial and biaxial tensile tests were conducted on samples of porcine rectus sheath to characterise the stress-stretch responses of the tissue. Under uniaxial tension, fibre direction samples failed on average at a stress of 4.5MPa at a stretch of 1.07 while cross-fibre samples failed at a stress of 1.6MPa under a stretch of 1.29. Under equi-biaxial tension, failure occurred at 1.6MPa with the fibre direction stretching to only 1.02 while the cross-fibre direction stretched to 1.13. Uniaxial and biaxial stress-stretch plots are presented allowing detailed modelling of the tissue either in silico or in a surrogate material. An FeBio computational model of the tissue is presented using a combination of an Ogden and an exponential power law model to represent the matrix and fibres respectively. The structural properties of porcine rectus sheath have been characterised and add to the small set of human data in the literature with which it may be possible to develop methods to reduce the incidence of incisional hernia development. PMID:24725440

  2. Large Asymmetric Hypertrophy of Rectus Abdominis Muscle in Professional Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Sanchis-Moysi, Joaquin; Idoate, Fernando; Dorado, Cecilia; Alayón, Santiago; Calbet, Jose A. L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine the volume and degree of asymmetry of the musculus rectus abdominis (RA) in professional tennis players. Methods The volume of the RA was determined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 8 professional male tennis players and 6 non-active male control subjects. Results Tennis players had 58% greater RA volume than controls (P = 0.01), due to hypertrophy of both the dominant (34% greater volume, P = 0.02) and non-dominant (82% greater volume, P = 0.01) sides, after accounting for age, the length of the RA muscle and body mass index (BMI) as covariates. In tennis players, there was a marked asymmetry in the development of the RA, which volume was 35% greater in the non-dominant compared to the dominant side (P<0.001). In contrast, no side-to-side difference in RA volume was observed in the controls (P = 0.75). The degree of side-to-side asymmetry increased linearly from the first lumbar disc to the pubic symphysis (r = 0.97, P<0.001). Conclusions Professional tennis is associated with marked hypertrophy of the musculus rectus abdominis, which achieves a volume that is 58% greater than in non-active controls. Rectus abdominis hypertrophy is more marked in the non-dominant than in the dominant side, particularly in the more distal regions. Our study supports the concept that humans can differentially recruit both rectus abdominis but also the upper and lower regions of each muscle. It remains to be determined if this disequilibrium raises the risk of injury. PMID:21209832

  3. Longitudinal tear of the inferior rectus muscle in orbital floor fracture.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Tomoyuki; Akiyama, Hideo; Kishi, Shoji

    2012-06-01

    We report a case of longitudinal avulsion of the inferior rectus muscle following orbital floor fracture and describe its clinical presentation, computed tomography (CT) features and management. A 53-year-old man felt vertical diplopia in all gaze immediately after the trauma. Orthoptic assessment showed left over right hypertropia of 20 prism diopters and left exotropia of 10 prism diopters in primary position. The left orbital floor fracture and the prolapse of orbital contents into the maxillary sinus were presented by CT. Exploration of the orbit was performed under general anesthesia. The displaced bone fragment was elevated and repositioned below the slastic implant. Diplopia continued in all directions of gaze, although the impairment of depression was reduced postoperatively. A residual left hypertropia of 10 prism diopters and exotropia of 10 prism diopters was present in primary position 1 month after surgery, though there were no enopthalmos or worsening of hypesthesia. Repeated CT revealed the muscle avulsion of inferior rectus at the lateral portion of the belly. The avulsion of a small segment of the inferior rectus and its herniation into maxillary sinus in more posterior views was detected by review of the preoperative images. Muscle avulsion should be considered in the management of orbital fracture if orbital tissue entrapment and nerve paresis are excluded as causes of reduction in ocular motility. A thorough review of the imaging studies for possible muscle injury is required before surgery in all cases of orbital fracture. PMID:22551369

  4. Rectus abdominis muscle injuries in elite handball players: management and rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Balius, Ramon; Pedret, Carles; Pacheco, Laura; Gutierrez, Josep Antoni; Vives, Joan; Escoda, Jaume

    2011-01-01

    Muscle injuries generally occur in two-joint muscles with a high percentage of type II fibers during the performance of eccentric activity. Some muscle injuries, such as those located in the adductor longus, a monoarticular muscle, as well as rectus abdominis do not fully comply with these requirements. This study examines five cases of elite handball players with ruptured rectus abdominals. Sonographically, lesions in rectus abdominis are shown as a disruption of the fibrillar pattern with a hematic suffusion that invades the entire lesion. In some of the cases, the ultrasound study was complemented with a MRI. A unified rehabilitation protocol was applied and the return to play time of each handball player ranged between 16 and 22 days, with an average of 18.2 days. Follow-up at 15 months showed no evidence of re-injury or residual discomfort and all of them are playing at their highest level. The aim of this study was to illustrate a feature of handball injury that, as in tennis and volleyball, is uncommon and so far has not been specifically reported. The phenomenon of contralateral abdominal hypertrophy in handball appears in the dominant arm as in tennis and volleyball. PMID:24198573

  5. [Free rectus abdominis muscle perforating artery flaps for reconstruction of the head and neck defects].

    PubMed

    Koshima, I; Handa, T; Satoh, Y; Akisada, K; Orita, Y; Yamamoto, H

    1995-01-01

    During the past eight years, tissue defects of the head and neck region in a total of 45 patients were repaired with free rectus abdominis muscle perforating artery flaps. These flaps are subclassified into (1) reduced musculocutaneous flaps, (2) thin reduced musculocutaneous flaps, (3) paraumbilical perforator-based flaps, and (4) thin paraumbilical perforator-based flaps. The advantages of these flaps are as follows. Since the flaps involve no or only a small portion of the rectus abdominis muscle, (1) the muscle can be left intact on the abdominal wall, and (2) a thin flap can be easily created by simple defatting of the flap. These flaps overcome the major disadvantages of the conventional rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap, i.e., bulkiness of the flap and frequent postoperative abdominal herniation. The territory of the thin flaps is within 10 cm around the perforator. These flaps are suitable for defects in the head and neck region, because simultaneous flap elevation is possible at the time of tumor resection. Paraumbilical perforator-based flaps are suitable for young females and elderly patients. PMID:7897566

  6. Bilateral discoid medial menisci: a rare phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Puspak; Bhagwat, Kishan; Panigrahi, Tapas; Gopinathan, Nirmalraj

    2014-01-01

    Discoid medial meniscus is a relatively rare pathology of the knee joint, with bilateral cases even rarer. Herein, we report the case of a 25-year-old man diagnosed with discoid medial meniscus in the right knee with a horizontal tear. Increased cupping of the medial condyle of the tibia, widening of the medial joint space and the presence of discoid meniscus in the right knee prompted investigation of the asymptomatic left knee with magnetic resonance imaging. The contralateral asymptomatic knee also showed evidence of discoid medial meniscus. The symptomatic knee was successfully treated by arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, with excellent functional outcome. PMID:25273941

  7. Acute Medial Plantar Fascia Tear.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Stephanie C; Mazzola, Timothy J

    2016-06-01

    A 32-year-old man who participated in competitive soccer came to physical therapy via direct access for a chief complaint of plantar foot pain. The clinical examination findings and mechanism of injury raised a concern for a plantar fascia tear, so the patient was referred to the physician and magnetic resonance imaging was obtained. The magnetic resonance image confirmed a high-grade, partial-thickness, proximal plantar fascia tear with localized edema at the location of the medial band. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(6):495. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0409. PMID:27245491

  8. Weak Interactions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lee, T. D.

    1957-06-01

    Experimental results on the non-conservation of parity and charge conservation in weak interactions are reviewed. The two-component theory of the neutrino is discussed. Lepton reactions are examined under the assumption of the law of conservation of leptons and that the neutrino is described by a two- component theory. From the results of this examination, the universal Fermi interactions are analyzed. Although reactions involving the neutrino can be described, the same is not true of reactions which do not involve the lepton, as the discussion of the decay of K mesons and hyperons shows. The question of the invariance of time reversal is next examined. (J.S.R.)

  9. Does the rectus femoris nerve block improve knee recurvatum in adult stroke patients? A kinematic and electromyographic study.

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Delporte, L; Arsenault, L; Revol, P; Lefevre, M; Clevenot, D; Boisson, D; Mertens, P; Rossetti, Y; Luauté, J

    2014-02-01

    Knee recurvatum (KR) during gait is common in hemiplegic patients. Quadriceps spasticity has been postulated as a cause of KR in this population. The aim of this study was to assess the role of rectus femoris spasticity in KR by using selective motor nerve blocks of the rectus femoris nerve in hemiparetic stroke patients. The data from six adult, post-stroke hemiplegic patients who underwent a rectus femoris nerve block for a stiff-knee gait were retrospectively analyzed. An extensive clinical and functional evaluation was performed and gait was assessed by motion analysis (kinematic, kinetic and electromyographic parameters) before and during the block realized using 2% lidocaine injected under a neurostimulation and ultrasonographic targeting procedure. The main outcome measures were the peak knee extension in stance and peak knee extensor moment obtained during gait analysis. No serious adverse effect of the nerve block was observed. The block allowed a reduction of rectus femoris overactivity in all patients. Peak knee extension and extensor moment in stance did not improve in any patient, but peak knee flexion during the swing phase was significantly higher after block (mean: 31.2° post, 26.4 pre, p < 0.05). Our results provide arguments against the hypothesis that the spasticity of the rectus femoris contributes to KR. PMID:24286615

  10. Minimally invasive medial hip approach.

    PubMed

    Chiron, P; Murgier, J; Cavaignac, E; Pailhé, R; Reina, N

    2014-10-01

    The medial approach to the hip via the adductors, as described by Ludloff or Ferguson, provides restricted visualization and incurs a risk of neurovascular lesion. We describe a minimally invasive medial hip approach providing broader exposure of extra- and intra-articular elements in a space free of neurovascular structures. With the lower limb in a "frog-leg" position, the skin incision follows the adductor longus for 6cm and then the aponeurosis is incised. A slide plane between all the adductors and the aponeurosis is easily released by blunt dissection, with no interposed neurovascular elements. This gives access to the lesser trochanter, psoas tendon and inferior sides of the femoral neck and head, anterior wall of the acetabulum and labrum. We report a series of 56 cases, with no major complications: this approach allows treatment of iliopsoas muscle lesions and resection or filling of benign tumors of the cervical region and enables intra-articular surgery (arthrolysis, resection of osteophytes or foreign bodies, labral suture). PMID:25164350

  11. Scrub Typhus Presenting with Bilateral Lateral Rectus Palsy in A Female

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Jaya; Barman, Bhupen; Mondal, Sumantro; Sivam, Rondeep Kumar Nath

    2016-01-01

    Scrub typhus, a rickettsial disease is endemic in several parts of India usually presenting with acute symptoms. Fever, maculopapular rash, eschar, history of tick exposure and supportive diagnostic tests usually leads to diagnosis. Scrub typhus should be included in the differential diagnosis in occasions when a patient presents with fever with or without eschar and isolated cranial nerve palsy. Here we are reporting a case of Scrub typhus who presented with fever and altered sensorium of short duration, eschar formation and bilateral lateral rectus palsy. Patient was treated with doxycycline with complete reversal of neurodeficit. PMID:27190871

  12. Scrub Typhus Presenting with Bilateral Lateral Rectus Palsy in A Female.

    PubMed

    Ete, Tony; Mishra, Jaya; Barman, Bhupen; Mondal, Sumantro; Sivam, Rondeep Kumar Nath

    2016-04-01

    Scrub typhus, a rickettsial disease is endemic in several parts of India usually presenting with acute symptoms. Fever, maculopapular rash, eschar, history of tick exposure and supportive diagnostic tests usually leads to diagnosis. Scrub typhus should be included in the differential diagnosis in occasions when a patient presents with fever with or without eschar and isolated cranial nerve palsy. Here we are reporting a case of Scrub typhus who presented with fever and altered sensorium of short duration, eschar formation and bilateral lateral rectus palsy. Patient was treated with doxycycline with complete reversal of neurodeficit. PMID:27190871

  13. Hepatocellular carcinoma with extension to the diaphragm, falciform ligament, rectus abdominis and paraumbilical vein

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, R; Abdullah, BJJ; Rajasingam, V

    2008-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common primary tumour of the liver. The most common extrahepatic metastatic sites are the lung, lymph nodes, bones and adrenal glands. All forms of HCC demonstrate a tendency for vascular invasion, producing extensive intrahepatic metastases and, occasionally, portal vein or inferior vena cava extension with spread into the right atrium in extreme cases. Tumour spread of abdominal diseases via hepatic ligaments has also been previously reported. We report a rare case of hepatocellular carcinoma with extension into the falciform ligament, overlying rectus sheath and adjacent diaphragm with concomitant infiltration into the recanalised paraumbilical vein. PMID:21611019

  14. Reconstruction of full-thickness chest wall defects using rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap: A report of fifteen cases

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Y.; Hattori, T.; Niimoto, M.; Toge, T. )

    1986-02-01

    In 15 patients chest walls were excised because of recurrent breast cancer, radiation ulcer, or rib tumor. In most cases the full-thickness defect of the chest wall was about 10 x 10 cm. Reconstruction was performed using only a rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap. No patient developed circulation problems in the flap or severe flail chest, and we had successful results in all our cases. These results show that the rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap is quite effective and safe to use in the reconstruction of chest wall defects.

  15. Spontaneous Rectus Sheath Hematoma in the Elderly: An Unusual Case and Update on Proper Management

    PubMed Central

    Galyfos, George; Karantzikos, Georgios; Palogos, Konstantinos; Sianou, Argiri; Filis, Konstantinos; Kavouras, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma (SRSH) is an uncommon medical emergency in the elderly. We present a case of SRSH with an atypical clinical presentation and discuss literature regarding diagnosis and proper management. A 75-year-old female patient was transferred to the emergency department due to acute dyspnoea and confusion. Her medical history revealed a viral infection of the upper respiratory tract, and no coughing or use of anticoagulants. The clinical examination showed tenderness of the left lower abdomen, although palpation was misleading due to patient's obesity. Laboratory investigations showed light anaemia. Ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed a large rectus sheath hematoma of the left abdominal wall. Despite further deterioration of the patient, conservative management including bed rest, fluid replacement, blood products transfusion, and proper analgesia was successful. No surgical intervention was needed. Prompt diagnosis and management of SRSH plays significant role in the prognosis, especially in elder patients. Independently of size and severity, conservative management remains the first therapeutic choice. Only by failure of supportive management, progressive and large hematoma or uncontrollable hemodynamic patients, interventional management including surgery or less invasive newer techniques is indicated. PMID:24839570

  16. Quantitative end qualitative analysis of the electrical activity of rectus abdominis muscle portions.

    PubMed

    Negrão Filho, R de Faria; Bérzin, F; Souza, G da Cunha

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the electrical behavior pattern of the Rectus abdominis muscle by qualitative and quantitative analysis of the electromyographic signal obtained from its superior, medium and inferior portions during dynamic and static activities. Ten voluntaries (aged X = 17.8 years, SD = 1.6) athletic males were studied without history of muscle skeletal disfunction. For the quantitative analysis the RMS (Root Mean Square) values obtained in the electromyographic signal during the isometric exercises were normalized and expressed in maximum voluntary isometric contraction percentages. For the qualitative analysis of the dynamic activity the electromyographic signal was processed by full-wave rectification, linear envelope and normalization (amplitude and time), so that the resulting curve of the processed signal was submitted to descriptive graphic analysis. The results of the quantitative study show that there is not a statistically significant difference among the portions of the muscle. Qualitative analysis demonstrated two aspects: the presence of a common activation electric pattern in the portions of Rectus abdominis muscle and the absence of significant difference in the inclination angles in the electrical activity curve during the isotonic exercises. PMID:12964259

  17. Pedicled TRAM Flap in Presence of Desmoid Tumor of the Rectus Sheath; a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Khater, Ashraf

    2015-12-01

    Creating TRAM flap in obese patient is a challenging issue with a hazard of flap ischemia and breast envelope loss or sepsis. In this case we show our experience in doing an interval TRAM flap in markedly obese patient (BMI index 39) in the presence of Desmoid tumor of the anterior abdominal wall on top of previous mesh hernioplasty in the contralateral side of the tumor. Interval TRAM was decided with achieving of a complete vascular delay in the same sitting with skin sparing mastectomy. On doing abdominal ultrasonography for perforator mapping a desmoid tumor was encountered in the contralateral side. The decision was to elevate the flap together with excision of the desmoid tumor with the flap to be sutured in situ at the end of operation and after 5 days to transfer the flap to the mastectomy site. There was no major complications apart from mild wound sepsis of the breast pocket that was controlled medically. According to our proposed aesthetical score, our patient expressed the outcome as good (8/10 points). Pedicled TRAM flap creation in markedly obese patients is hazardous and we recommend this new concept of interval TRAM for this situation. Moreover the presence of desmoid tumor in the rectus sheath is not a contraindication to this flap elevation. The presence of abdominal desmoid tumor is not a contraindication for TRAM flap provided that it can be resected with sparing of perforators on one side of the rectus sheath. PMID:27065672

  18. A cadaver knee simulator to evaluate the biomechanics of rectus femoris transfer.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Michael C; Brown, Nicholas A T; Bachus, Kent N; Macwilliams, Bruce A

    2009-07-01

    A cadaver knee simulator has been developed to model surgical transfer of the rectus femoris. The simulator allows knee specimens six degrees of freedom and is capable of modeling both the swing and stance phases of human gait. Experiments were conducted using a mechanical hinge analog of the knee to verify that time, flexion angle, and knee extension force measurements recorded when using the simulator were not influenced by its design or operation. A ballistic double pendulum model was used to model the swing phase of gait, and the contributions of hip and ankle torques and hamstrings cocontraction were included when modeling the stance phase of gait. When modeling swing, range of motion and time to peak knee flexion in swing for the hinge knee were similar to those of in vivo test subjects. Measurements of hinge knee extension force when modeling stance under various biomechanical conditions matched those predicted using an analytical model. Future studies using cadaver knee specimens will apply techniques described in this paper to further our understanding of changes in knee biomechanics caused by rectus femoris transfer surgery. PMID:19403312

  19. Medial Patella Subluxation: Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Mark A.; Bollier, Mathew J.

    2015-01-01

    Medial patella subluxation is a disabling condition typically associated with previous patellofemoral instability surgery. Patients often describe achy pain with painful popping episodes. They often report that the patella shifts laterally, which occurs as the medial subluxed patella dramatically shifts into the trochlear groove during early knee flexion. Physical examination is diagnostic with a positive medial subluxation test. Nonoperative treatment, such as focused physical therapy and patellofemoral stabilizing brace, is often unsuccessful. Primary surgical options include lateral retinacular repair/imbrication or lateral reconstruction. Prevention is key to avoid medial patella subluxation. When considering patellofemoral surgery, important factors include appropriate lateral release indications, consideration of lateral retinacular lengthening vs release, correct MPFL graft placement and tension, and avoiding excessive medialization during tubercle transfer. This review article will analyze patient symptoms, diagnostic exam findings and appropriate treatment options, as well as pearls to avoid this painful clinical entity. PMID:26361441

  20. Reconstruction of large composite oromandibulomaxillary defects with free vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps.

    PubMed

    Butler, Charles E; Lewin, Jan S

    2004-02-01

    Large composite oromandibulomaxillary defects resulting from oncologic resection can be challenging to reconstruct with a single flap, and functional outcomes remain anecdotal. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the authors' surgical experience and scientifically analyze and describe the functional outcomes associated with the use of the vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap for reconstruction of these defects. The records of seven patients (mean age, 62 years) who underwent composite resection including hemimandibulectomy, partial maxillectomy, partial pharyngectomy, and floor-of-mouth resection followed by immediate free vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap reconstruction at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center (1998 to 2002) were retrospectively reviewed. The tumor type was squamous cell carcinoma in all seven cases; four patients had T4 primary lesions and three had local recurrences. Radiotherapy was used preoperatively in each of the three recurrent cases (mean dose, 70.6 Gy) and postoperatively in three of the four patients with primary tumors (mean dose, 63.0 Gy). The mean length of hospitalization was 8.7 days. There were no major flap complications, fistulas, or donor-site complications. Partial flap necrosis (4 percent of flap area) occurred in one patient and dehiscence of the neck incision occurred in another. Both cases were managed with surgical débridement and closure. A third patient developed a 0.75-cm superficial suture line abscess that healed with dressing changes. The mean postoperative follow-up was 15 months. Six of the seven patients remained tube dependent for their nutrition despite some swallowing improvement; one patient returned to full oral intake. The most common swallowing deficit was impaired laryngeal excursion, which occurred in all six patients evaluated with videofluoroscopic examination and resulted in risk for aspiration in patients and frank aspiration in 83 percent. Speech was

  1. Insertional tendinopathy of the adductors and rectus abdominis in athletes: a review.

    PubMed

    Valent, Alessandro; Frizziero, Antonio; Bressan, Stefano; Zanella, Elena; Giannotti, Erika; Masiero, Stefano

    2012-04-01

    Insertional tendinopathy of the adductors and rectus abdominis is common in male athletes, especially in soccer players. It may be worsened by physical activity and it usually limits sport performance. The management goal in the acute phase consists of analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs and physical rehabilitation. In the early stages of rehabilitation, strengthening exercises of adductors and abdominal muscles, such as postural exercises, have been suggested. In the sub-acute phase, muscular strength is targeted by overload training in the gym or aquatherapy; core stability exercises seem to be useful in this phase. Finally, specific sport actions are introduced by increasingly complex exercises along with a preventive program to limit pain recurrences. PMID:23738289

  2. Insertional tendinopathy of the adductors and rectus abdominis in athletes: a review

    PubMed Central

    Valent, Alessandro; Frizziero, Antonio; Bressan, Stefano; Zanella, Elena; Giannotti, Erika; Masiero, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Summary Insertional tendinopathy of the adductors and rectus abdominis is common in male athletes, especially in soccer players. It may be worsened by physical activity and it usually limits sport performance. The management goal in the acute phase consists of analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs and physical rehabilitation. In the early stages of rehabilitation, strengthening exercises of adductors and abdominal muscles, such as postural exercises, have been suggested. In the sub-acute phase, muscular strength is targeted by overload training in the gym or aquatherapy; core stability exercises seem to be useful in this phase. Finally, specific sport actions are introduced by increasingly complex exercises along with a preventive program to limit pain recurrences. PMID:23738289

  3. A panel data set on harvest and perfusion decellularization of porcine rectus abdominis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Cheng, Wen Yue; Hu, Zhi Qian; Turner, Neill J; Zhang, Li; Wang, Qiang; Badylak, Stephen F

    2016-06-01

    In this dataset, we particularly depicted the harvest and perfusion decellularization of porcine rectus abdominis (RA), accompanied with displaying of the retained vascular trees within the perfusion-decellularized skeletal muscle matrix (pM-ECM) using vascular corrosion casting. In addition, several important tips for successful pM-ECM preparation were emphasized, which including using anatomically isolated skeletal muscle as tissue source with all main feeding and draining vessels perfused, preserving the internal microcirculation availability, aseptic technique and pyrogen free in all steps, sequential perfusion via artery or vein, and longtime washing after decellularization. The data are supplemental to our original research article describing detailed associations of pM-ECM as a clinically relevant scale, three-dimensional scaffold with a vascular network template for tissue-specific regeneration, "Perfusion-decellularized skeletal muscle as a three-dimensional scaffold with a vascular network template" Zhang et al. (2016) [1]. PMID:27158653

  4. A panel data set on harvest and perfusion decellularization of porcine rectus abdominis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Cheng, Wen Yue; Hu, Zhi Qian; Turner, Neill J.; Zhang, Li; Wang, Qiang; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    In this dataset, we particularly depicted the harvest and perfusion decellularization of porcine rectus abdominis (RA), accompanied with displaying of the retained vascular trees within the perfusion-decellularized skeletal muscle matrix (pM-ECM) using vascular corrosion casting. In addition, several important tips for successful pM-ECM preparation were emphasized, which including using anatomically isolated skeletal muscle as tissue source with all main feeding and draining vessels perfused, preserving the internal microcirculation availability, aseptic technique and pyrogen free in all steps, sequential perfusion via artery or vein, and longtime washing after decellularization. The data are supplemental to our original research article describing detailed associations of pM-ECM as a clinically relevant scale, three-dimensional scaffold with a vascular network template for tissue-specific regeneration, “Perfusion-decellularized skeletal muscle as a three-dimensional scaffold with a vascular network template” Zhang et al. (2016) [1]. PMID:27158653

  5. Abdominal wall competence after free transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap harvest: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Suominen, S; Asko-Seljavaara, S; Kinnunen, J; Sainio, P; Alaranta, H

    1997-09-01

    A prospective study was designed to evaluate the possible changes in abdominal wall strength following free transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap surgery for breast reconstruction. Twenty-two patients were examined 1 day before surgery, and at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Trunk muscle strength was measured by the same physiotherapist using an isokinetic dynamometer (Lido Multi Joint II, Loredan Biomedical Inc., Davies, CA). The peak torque and average torque for both flexion and extension at 60 degrees per second angular velocity were recorded from the curves obtained. There was a significant reduction in trunk flexion strength at 3 months postoperatively (peak torque mean, 92% of the preoperative value; p = 0.04), but this was corrected by 6 months (mean, 96%), and improved to 98% by 12 months. The patient's ability to do curled trunk sit-ups was evaluated by the same physiotherapist and graded on a scale from 1 to 6. In 9 of 19 patients the operation had no effect on sit-up performance during follow-up. In 10 of 19 patients there was a reduction of one or two grades at 3 months that did not improve by 12 months. Magnetic resonance imaging of the abdominal wall was performed on 9 patients. The mean area of the upper third of both rectus muscles was measured on the axial images. At 3 months postoperatively the mean area of the upper third of the donor muscle was significantly larger than the contralateral (p = 0.03). There was no difference in size at 6 months, and by 12 months the donor side was smaller. This prospective study shows that harvesting of a free TRAM flap can cause a subclinical reduction in abdominal strength, although this was not noticed by the patients themselves. PMID:9326701

  6. The medial habenula: still neglected.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Humsini; Carter, Asasia Q; Baldwin, Philip R; Molfese, David L; Salas, Ramiro

    2013-01-01

    The habenula is a small, bilateral brain structure located at the dorsal end of the diencephalon. This structure sends projections to the dopaminergic striatum and receives inputs from the limbic forebrain, making the habenula a unique modulator of cross-talk between these brain regions. Despite strong interest in the habenula during the seventies and eighties (Herkenham and Nauta, 1977; Beckstead, 1979; Beckstead et al., 1979; Herkenham and Nauta, 1979; Caldecott-Hazard et al., 1988), interest waned due to lack of a clearly identifiable functional role. Following Matsumoto and Hikosaka's seminal work on the lateral habenula as a predictor of negative reward in monkeys, the habenula has undergone a resurgence of scientific interest. Matsumoto and Hikosaka demonstrated an increase in habenular neuron firing when monkeys did not receive an expected juice reward (Matsumoto and Hikosaka, 2007). Studies have shown that increased habenular activity inactivates dopaminergic cells in the Rostromedial Tegmental Nucleus (RMTg) through GABAergic mechanisms (Jhou et al., 2009a,b). Additional studies link habenular activity to the regulation of serotonin and norepinephrine, suggesting the habenula modulates multiple brain systems (Strecker and Rosengren, 1989; Amat et al., 2001). These discoveries ushered in a series of new studies that have refocused attention on the lateral habenula and the importance of this small brain structure (Bianco and Wilson, 2009; Jhou et al., 2009a; Matsumoto and Hikosaka, 2009; Sartorius et al., 2010; Savitz et al., 2011). Recently, Geisler and Trimble reviewed this renewed interest in: The Lateral Habenula: No Longer Neglected (Geisler and Trimble, 2008). While the lateral habenula (LHb) has been extensively studied, the anatomically and histochemically distinct medial habenula (MHb) remains largely understudied. This short review argues that the MHb is functionally important and should be studied more aggressively. PMID:24478666

  7. The medial habenula: still neglected

    PubMed Central

    Viswanath, Humsini; Carter, Asasia Q.; Baldwin, Philip R.; Molfese, David L.; Salas, Ramiro

    2013-01-01

    The habenula is a small, bilateral brain structure located at the dorsal end of the diencephalon. This structure sends projections to the dopaminergic striatum and receives inputs from the limbic forebrain, making the habenula a unique modulator of cross-talk between these brain regions. Despite strong interest in the habenula during the seventies and eighties (Herkenham and Nauta, 1977; Beckstead, 1979; Beckstead et al., 1979; Herkenham and Nauta, 1979; Caldecott-Hazard et al., 1988), interest waned due to lack of a clearly identifiable functional role. Following Matsumoto and Hikosaka's seminal work on the lateral habenula as a predictor of negative reward in monkeys, the habenula has undergone a resurgence of scientific interest. Matsumoto and Hikosaka demonstrated an increase in habenular neuron firing when monkeys did not receive an expected juice reward (Matsumoto and Hikosaka, 2007). Studies have shown that increased habenular activity inactivates dopaminergic cells in the Rostromedial Tegmental Nucleus (RMTg) through GABAergic mechanisms (Jhou et al., 2009a,b). Additional studies link habenular activity to the regulation of serotonin and norepinephrine, suggesting the habenula modulates multiple brain systems (Strecker and Rosengren, 1989; Amat et al., 2001). These discoveries ushered in a series of new studies that have refocused attention on the lateral habenula and the importance of this small brain structure (Bianco and Wilson, 2009; Jhou et al., 2009a; Matsumoto and Hikosaka, 2009; Sartorius et al., 2010; Savitz et al., 2011). Recently, Geisler and Trimble reviewed this renewed interest in: The Lateral Habenula: No Longer Neglected (Geisler and Trimble, 2008). While the lateral habenula (LHb) has been extensively studied, the anatomically and histochemically distinct medial habenula (MHb) remains largely understudied. This short review argues that the MHb is functionally important and should be studied more aggressively. PMID:24478666

  8. Clinical and Radiological Characteristics of Lumbosacral Lateral Disc Herniation in Comparison With Those of Medial Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lateral disc herniation (foraminal and extra foraminal) has clinical characteristics that are different from those of medial disc herniation (central and subarticular), including older age, more frequent radicular pain, and neurologic deficits. This is supposedly because lateral disc herniation mechanically irritates or compresses the exiting nerve root or dorsal root ganglion inside of a narrow canal more directly than medial disc herniation. The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and radiological characteristics of lateral disc herniation in comparison with medial disc herniation. The 352 subjects diagnosed with localized lumbosacral disc herniation and followed up for at least 12 months after completion of treatment were included and divided into medial and lateral disc herniation groups, according to the anatomical location of the herniated disc in axial plain of magnetic resonance image. Clinical and radiological data were obtained and compared between the two groups. The lateral group included 74 (21%) patients and the medial group included 278 (79%). Mean age of the lateral group was significantly higher than that in the medial group. The lateral group showed a significantly larger proportion of patients with radiating leg pain and multiple levels of disc herniations than the medial group. No significant differences were found in terms of gender, duration of pain, pretreatment numeric rating scale, severity of disc herniation (protrusion and extrusion), and presence of weakness in leg muscles. The proportion of patients who underwent surgery was not significantly different between the 2 groups. However, the proportion of patients who accomplished successful pain reduction after treatment was significantly smaller in the lateral than in the medial group. In conclusion, patients with lateral disc herniation were older and had larger proportion of radiating leg pain than those with medial disc herniation. Lateral disc herniation was more

  9. Clinical and Radiological Characteristics of Lumbosacral Lateral Disc Herniation in Comparison With Those of Medial Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-02-01

    Lateral disc herniation (foraminal and extra foraminal) has clinical characteristics that are different from those of medial disc herniation (central and subarticular), including older age, more frequent radicular pain, and neurologic deficits. This is supposedly because lateral disc herniation mechanically irritates or compresses the exiting nerve root or dorsal root ganglion inside of a narrow canal more directly than medial disc herniation. The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and radiological characteristics of lateral disc herniation in comparison with medial disc herniation. The 352 subjects diagnosed with localized lumbosacral disc herniation and followed up for at least 12 months after completion of treatment were included and divided into medial and lateral disc herniation groups, according to the anatomical location of the herniated disc in axial plain of magnetic resonance image. Clinical and radiological data were obtained and compared between the two groups. The lateral group included 74 (21%) patients and the medial group included 278 (79%). Mean age of the lateral group was significantly higher than that in the medial group. The lateral group showed a significantly larger proportion of patients with radiating leg pain and multiple levels of disc herniations than the medial group. No significant differences were found in terms of gender, duration of pain, pretreatment numeric rating scale, severity of disc herniation (protrusion and extrusion), and presence of weakness in leg muscles. The proportion of patients who underwent surgery was not significantly different between the 2 groups. However, the proportion of patients who accomplished successful pain reduction after treatment was significantly smaller in the lateral than in the medial group. In conclusion, patients with lateral disc herniation were older and had larger proportion of radiating leg pain than those with medial disc herniation. Lateral disc herniation was more

  10. Successful application of endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy to orbital floor trapdoor fracture in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yasunori; Sakaida, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko

    2016-10-01

    Although surgical treatment of orbital floor fractures can be performed by many different approaches, the application of endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy (EMMM) for this condition has rarely been described in the literature. We report on a case of a 7-year-old boy with a trapdoor orbital floor fracture successfully treated with the application of EMMM. The patient suffered trauma to the right orbit floor and the inferior rectus was entrapped at the orbital floor. Initially, surgical repair via endoscopic endonasal approach was attempted. However, we were unable to adequately access the orbital floor through the maxillary ostium. Therefore, an alternative route of access to the orbital floor was established by EMMM. With sufficient visualization and operating space, the involved orbital content was completely released from the entrapment site and reduced into the orbit. To facilitate wound healing, the orbital floor was supported with a water-inflated urethral balloon catheter for 8 days. At follow-up 8 months later, there was no gaze restriction or complications associated with the EMMM. This case illustrates the efficacy and safety of EMMM in endoscopic endonasal repair of orbital floor fracture, particularly for cases with a narrow nasal cavity such as in pediatric patients. PMID:26926254

  11. Initial experience with breast reconstruction using the transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap: a study of 45 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, E.; Bond, J.; Dolan, S.; Kirk, S.

    1999-01-01

    Breast conserving surgery for breast cancer has led to an increased interest in reconstruction following mastectomy. The transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap has been proven to give good results in terms of restoration of body symmetry with near normal contour and consistency. Furthermore, immediate reconstruction has the advantage of a single procedure with less psychological morbidity, and reduction in hospital stay and overall complication rate. The aim of this study was to review our experience with the transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap procedure an initial series of 45 patients. The overall complication rate of 27% is similar to that reported in the literature, with no total flap loss and nine patients with partial flap loss. There was no delay in commencement of adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy and we believe our ability to detect local recurrence has not been compromised. We consider that immediate breast reconstruction is now an integral part of the surgical treatment of breast cancer. PMID:10489808

  12. Medial thighplasty: Current concepts and practices.

    PubMed

    Bertheuil, N; Carloni, R; De Runz, A; Herlin, C; Girard, P; Watier, E; Chaput, B

    2016-02-01

    Medial thighplasty, also known as medial thigh lift, is a procedure that has been carried out for five decades. The original "Lewis" technique has undergone many changes, and thereby been rendered widely available to plastic surgeons. Given the increasingly high number of surgical reconstructions after massive weight loss, this technique is now an integral part of a surgeon's therapeutic arsenal as he strives to meet the evolving demands of patients. The objective of this article, which is based on a comprehensive review of the literature, is to summarize current knowledge on medial thighplasty and thereby allow plastic surgeons to adopt the operating technique best suited to the deformations presented by their patients and to the overall context. The different techniques, outcomes and complications are successively discussed. PMID:26433317

  13. Clinical utility of the Duncan-Ely test for rectus femoris dysfunction during the swing phase of gait.

    PubMed

    Marks, M C; Alexander, J; Sutherland, D H; Chambers, H G

    2003-11-01

    The Ely Test (or Duncan-Ely test) has been accepted as a clinical tool to assess rectus femoris spasticity by passively flexing the knee rapidly while the patient lies prone in a relaxed state. In this retrospective review, patients' dynamic knee range of motion (ROM) during gait and an electromyogram (EMG) were compared with the results of the Ely test. Data for 70 patients (44 males, 26 females; 104 limbs) were included. Mean age of patients was 13 years, SD 9 years, range 4 years 5 months to 54 years. All patients were diagnosed with cerebral palsy (spastic diplegia, n = 42; spastic quadriplegia, n = 15, and hemiplegia, n = 13). All patients were ambulatory (50 independent, 20 with assistive devices). A standard matrix was used to calculate sensitivity and specificity of the Ely test as well as its positive and negative predictive value. For the gait variables examined (decreased dynamic knee ROM, timing of peak knee flexion, and abnormal EMG in swing) the sensitivity of the Ely test ranged from 56 to 59% and the specificity ranged from 64 to 85%. For the same variables the positive predictive value ranged from 91 to 98% and the negative predictive value ranged from 4 to 19%. The Ely test was shown to have a good positive predictive value (i.e. the certainty about the presence of rectus spasticity in patients with a positive Ely test result) for rectus femoris dysfunction during gait. PMID:14580132

  14. Peculiar indications for the pedicled or free rectus abdominis flap in reconstructive surgery. A review of our experience.

    PubMed

    Sinsel, N K; Guelinckx, P J

    1995-01-01

    Among all known flaps, the rectus abdominis muscle flap possesses an unique diversity in flap designs due to the special vascular supply of the abdominal wall. The axial vascularization of the rectus abdominis muscle gives ofF several musculocutaneous perforators, which are mainly located in the periumbilical region. Abdominal wall skin perfusion is guaranteed by spoke-wheel like vessels arising from these perforators. Subsequently several designs (muscle, myocutaneous and myosubcutaneous) are possible, by varying the included tissue and the position of the skin island. We described 7 cases where the rectus abdominis muscle was used as a muscle or myocutaneous flap for reconstruction of large defects. In most cases a pedicled transfer was necessary, possible and sufficient to reconstruct the difficult defects in various body regions. Great amounts of well perfused tissue can be transferred with still possible primary closure of the donor site. Due to its rich perfusion and constancy of vascular pattern, it represents an excellent and safe pedicled reconstructive procedure for large defects of the thorax, the abdomen, the forearm or the hip and pelvis where free tissue transfers are impossible or contraindicated. No other local transposition would have achieved this goal, due to the lack of volume and mobility. Moreover the flap is ideal for reconstruction of contour deficiencies due to the abundance of fat, as for example in breast or buttock reconstruction. However the flap is not the first choice for traumatic and infected wounds where fat tissue is not desired. PMID:8571724

  15. Surface electromyography activity of the rectus abdominis, internal oblique, and external oblique muscles during forced expiration in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kenichi; Nonaka, Koji; Ogaya, Shinya; Ogi, Atsushi; Matsunaka, Chiaki; Horie, Jun

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to characterize rectus abdominis, internal oblique, and external oblique muscle activity in healthy adults under expiratory resistance using surface electromyography. We randomly assigned 42 healthy adult subjects to 3 groups: 30%, 20%, and 10% maximal expiratory intraoral pressure (PEmax). After measuring 100% PEmax and muscle activity during 100% PEmax, the activity and maximum voluntary contraction of each muscle during the assigned experimental condition were measured. At 100% PEmax, the external oblique (p<0.01) and internal oblique (p<0.01) showed significantly elevated activity compared with the rectus abdominis muscle. Furthermore, at 20% and 30% PEmax, the external oblique (p<0.05 and<0.01, respectively) and the internal oblique (p<0.05 and<0.01, respectively) showed significantly elevated activity compared with the rectus abdominis muscle. At 10% PEmax, no significant differences were observed in muscle activity. Although we observed no significant difference between 10% and 20% PEmax, activity during 30% PEmax was significantly greater than during 20% PEmax (external oblique: p<0.05; internal oblique: p<0.01). The abdominal oblique muscles are the most active during forced expiration. Moreover, 30% PEmax is the minimum intensity required to achieve significant, albeit very slight, muscle activity during expiratory resistance. PMID:27077819

  16. Arthroscopic Labrum Reconstruction in the Hip Using the Indirect Head of Rectus Femoris as a Local Graft: Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Sharfman, Zachary T; Amar, Eyal; Sampson, Thomas; Rath, Ehud

    2016-04-01

    The importance of the acetabular labrum has been well documented for the health and function of the hip joint. Labral reconstruction has proven effective but often requires the use of a cadaveric allograft or auto graft from the fascia lata or gracilis. The indirect head of the rectus femoris is in close proximity with the anterior superior acetabulum, which is the most common site of labral tears. Using the indirect head of the rectus femoris as a local graft minimizes surgical invasiveness by mitigating the need to harvest the graft from a different location, in case of an autograft, and by minimizing donor site morbidity and damage to local tissues. The graft is harvested and fixed to the acetabular rim through the same arthroscopic portals. Hip labral reconstruction using the reflected head of the rectus femoris tendon is a minimally invasive surgical procedure that restores stability to the hip joint, is applicable in all patients undergoing hip labral reconstruction, and offers decreased tissue morbidity compared with other grafting techniques. PMID:27462534

  17. Complications and oncologic outcomes of pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Somintara, Ongart; Lertsithichai, Panuwat; Kongdan, Youwanush; Supsamutchai, Chairat; Sukpanich, Rupporn

    2016-01-01

    Background There are several techniques for harvesting the pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap after mastectomy in breast cancer patients. We examined the whole muscle with partial sheath sparing technique and determined factors associated with its complications and oncological outcomes. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the results of 168 TRAM flaps performed between January 2003 and December 2010, focusing on complications and oncologic outcomes. Results Among the 168 pedicled TRAM flap procedures in 158 patients, flap complications occurred in 34%. Most of the flap complications included some degree of fat necrosis. There was no total flap loss. Flap complications were associated with elderly patients and the presence of major donor site complications. Abdominal bulging and hernia occurred in 12% of patients. The bi-pedicled TRAM flap and higher body mass index (BMI) were significant factors associated with increased donor site complications. Seven patients (4%) developed loco-regional recurrence. Within a median follow-up of 27 months, distant metastasis and death occurred in 6% and 4% of patients, respectively. Conclusions The pedicled TRAM flap using the whole muscle with partial sheath sparing technique in the present study is consistent with the results from previous studies in flap complication rates and oncological outcomes. PMID:27563562

  18. Association Between Rectus Abdominis Denervation and Ventilation Dysfunction in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua-Gang; Zhang, Shuo; Xu, Ying-Sheng; Zhang, Nan; Fan, Dong-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spontaneous potentials in electromyography (EMG) of paraspinal muscles are associated with diaphragm denervation and, therefore, poor respiratory function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is understandable. EMG changes in the rectus abdominis (RA) display an effect similar to those in paraspinal muscles with respect to the function of lower motor neurons in the thoracic spinal cord. The RA denervation was examined to determine its association with ventilation dysfunction in ALS. Methods: We collected the clinical data of 128 patients with sporadic ALS in Department of Neurology of Peking University Third Hospital from 2009 to 2013. EMG, Revised ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were performed in all patients and the differences in the EMG changes in RA between those with and without FVC ≥ 80% were analysed. Results: The mean FVC value was 83.4% ± 17.1% (range: 45%–131%) of the predicted value. A total of 79 patients displayed FVC ≥80%, and 49 patients displayed FVC <80%. Compared with the patients displaying a normal FVC (60/79, 75.9%), spontaneous activity in RA was significantly different among those patients displaying an FVC <80% (47/49, 95.9%). In addition, spontaneous potentials in RA were more frequently detected in patients exhibiting dyspnea (32/33, 97.0%) than in patients without dyspnea (75/95, 78.9%). Conclusion: Spontaneous potentials in RA are associated with ventilation dysfunction and dyspnea in ALS patients. PMID:27569232

  19. Functional Improvement Following Diastasis Rectus Abdominus Repair in an Active Duty Navy Female.

    PubMed

    Gallus, Katerina M; Golberg, Kathy F; Field, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Return to physical activity following childbirth can be a difficult process complicated by structural changes during pregnancy. A common problem is the development of a diastasis of the rectus abdominus (DRA), defined as a horizontal separation of the abdominus muscles at the linea alba. Recent data indicate that the greater the distance of separation of the muscle, the worse the functional ability. We describe a 24-year-old active duty U.S. Navy female G1P2 with a diagnosis of DRA. At 2 months postpartum, she was referred to physical therapy because of back pain and inability to meet baseline activities of daily living. After 4 months of physical therapy, she was unable to complete curl ups as required by U.S. Navy physical fitness standards. Abdominoplasty with imbrication of the abdominal wall diastasis was performed followed by additional physical therapy, after which she returned to baseline functioning. The restoration of functional ability postoperatively suggests there is a therapeutic indication for surgical correction of DRA. In high-functioning military patients with DRA who fail to return to baseline level of activity following a trial of physical therapy, surgical intervention should be considered to obtain the optimal functional ability. PMID:27483541

  20. Cortical motor representation of the rectus femoris does not differ between the left and right hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Ward, Sarah; Bryant, Adam L; Pietrosimone, Brian; Bennell, Kim L; Clark, Ross; Pearce, Alan J

    2016-06-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) involves non-invasive magnetic stimulation of the brain, and can be used to explore the corticomotor excitability and motor representations of skeletal muscles. However there is a lack of motor mapping studies in the lower limb and few conducted in healthy cohorts. The cortical motor representations of muscles can vary between individuals in terms of center position and area despite having a general localized region within the motor cortex. It is important to characterize the normal range for these variables in healthy cohorts to be able to evaluate changes in clinical populations. TMS was used in this cross-sectional study to assess the active motor threshold (AMT) and cortical representation area for rectus femoris in 15 healthy individuals (11M/4F 27.3±5.9years). No differences were found between hemispheres (Left vs. Right P=0.130) for AMT. In terms of y-axis center position no differences were found between hemispheres (Left vs. Right P=0.539), or for the x-axis center position (Left vs. Right P=0.076). Similarly, no differences in calculated area of the motor representation were found (Left vs. Right P=0.699) indicating symmetry between hemispheres. PMID:26999234

  1. Closure and augmentation of bladder exstrophy using rectus abdominis musculo-peritoneal flap

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of the rectus abdominis myo-peritoneal flap (RAMP) technique for the closure and augmentation of small, non-elastic, non-compliant bladder exstrophies. Materials and Methods: The RAMP technique was used in three boys with bladder exstrophy who presented late with small, non-elastic, non-compliant bladder. The clinical outcome, imaging, cystoscopy, biochemical and microbiological studies were assessed during a follow-up of 36 months. Results: Bladder closure and augmentation was achieved in all patients without any complications. There were no urinary tract infections, metabolic problems or electrolyte disturbances and the kidney function remained normal in all patients. Radiography confirmed intact function and anatomy of the urinary tract and cystoscopy showed complete coverage of the inner peritoneal layer of RAMP with uroepithelium. No stone formation or mucous production was detected. Conclusions: The RAMP technique is a good alternative for closing bladder exstrophies and achieves an increase in bladder capacity and compliance. The technique is indicated in the closure of large bladder defects, bladder exstrophies with small, inelastic, non-compliant bladder remnants and failed primary closures. PMID:22279277

  2. Using the traditional model to evaluate the active force of the human lateral rectus muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, ZhiPeng; Chen, WeiYi; Jing, Lin; Feng, PengFei; Wu, XiaoGang; Guo, HongMei

    2014-05-01

    The information on the force of extraocular muscles (EOMs) is beneficial for strabismus diagnosis and surgical planning, and a direct and simple method is important for surgeons to obtain these forces. Based on the traditional model, a numerical simulation method was proposed to achieve this aim, and then the active force of the lateral rectus (LR) muscle was successfully simulated when the eye rotated every angle from 0° to 30° in the horizontal plane from the nasal to the temporal side. In order to verify these simulations, the results were compared with the previous experimental data. The comparison shows that the simulation results diverged much more than the experimental data in the range of 0°-10°. The errors were corrected to make the simulation results closer to the experimental data. Finally, a general empirical equation was proposed to evaluate the active force of the LR muscle by fitting these data, which represent the relationship between the simulation forces and the contractive amounts of the LR muscle.

  3. Anatomic and physiological characteristics of the ferret lateral rectus muscle and abducens nucleus.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Keith N; McClung, J Ross; Goldberg, Stephen J; Shall, Mary S

    2007-11-01

    The ferret has become a popular model for physiological and neurodevelopmental research in the visual system. We believed it important, therefore, to study extraocular whole muscle as well as single motor unit physiology in the ferret. Using extracellular stimulation, 62 individual motor units in the ferret abducens nucleus were evaluated for their contractile characteristics. Of these motor units, 56 innervated the lateral rectus (LR) muscle alone, while 6 were split between the LR and retractor bulbi (RB) muscle slips. In addition to individual motor units, the whole LR muscle was evaluated for twitch, tetanic peak force, and fatigue. The abducens nucleus motor units showed a twitch contraction time of 15.4 ms, a mean twitch tension of 30.2 mg, and an average fusion frequency of 154 Hz. Single-unit fatigue index averaged 0.634. Whole muscle twitch contraction time was 16.7 ms with a mean twitch tension of 3.32 g. The average fatigue index of whole muscle was 0.408. The abducens nucleus was examined with horseradish peroxidase conjugated with the subunit B of cholera toxin histochemistry and found to contain an average of 183 motoneurons. Samples of LR were found to contain an average of 4,687 fibers, indicating an LR innervation ratio of 25.6:1. Compared with cat and squirrel monkeys, the ferret LR motor units contract more slowly yet more powerfully. The functional visual requirements of the ferret may explain these fundamental differences. PMID:17717110

  4. Ultrasound Assessment of the Rectus Femoris Cross-Sectional Area: Subject Position Implications.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Eileen Danaher; Peters, Tara; Garkova, Miglena

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasonic measurement of the rectus femoris (RF) is a novel, proxy measure for muscle strength. The impact of hip flexion/head of bed positioning on RF cross-sectional area (CSA) has not been fully explored. This study describes and compares differences in RF CSA across four degrees of hip flexion. This repeated-measures, comparative study enrolled healthy, pre-menopausal women (n = 20). RF CSA of the dominant leg was measured using the SonoSite M-Turbo ultrasound system with the head of bed at 0°, 20°, 30°, and 60°. One-way repeated measures indicated significant differences in RF CSA, F(3, 17) = 14.18, p < .001, with variation in hip flexion/head of bed elevation and significant RF CSA differences between: (a) 0° and 20°, (b) 0° and 30°, (c) 0° and 60°, and (d) 20° and 60°. Standardizing patient positioning when conducting ultrasonic measurement of RF CSA is vital for researchers who assess muscle mass. PMID:27090872

  5. Influence of angular velocity on vastus lateralis and rectus femoris oxygenation dynamics during knee extension exercises.

    PubMed

    Denis, Romain; Wilkinson, Jennifer; De Vito, Giuseppe

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether changes in angular velocity would alter vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) oxygenation status during maximal isokinetic knee extension exercises. Eleven recreationally active male participants randomly performed ten maximal knee extensions at 30, 60, 120 and 240° s(-1). Tissue oxygenation index (TOI) and total haemoglobin concentration ([tHb]) were acquired from the VL and RF muscles by means of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Breath-by-breath pulmonary oxygen consumption (VO(2p)) was recorded throughout the tests. Peak torque and VO(2p) significantly decreased as a function of velocity (P<0·05). Interestingly, RF and VL TOI significantly increased as a function of velocity (P<0·05), whereas [tHb] significantly decreased as a function of velocity (P<0·05). A greater number of muscle fibre recruited at slow velocity, where the torque and VO(2p) were the highest, might explain the lower VL and RF TOI observed herein. Furthermore, the increase in local blood flow (suggested by [tHb] changes) during isokinetic knee extension exercises performed at slow angular velocity might have been induced by a higher intramuscular pressure during the contraction phases as well as a greater microcirculatory vasodilatation during relaxation phases. Implementing slow-velocity isokinetic exercises in rehabilitation or other training programmes could delay the short-term anoxia generated by such exercises and result in muscle metabolism enhancement. PMID:21771253

  6. DOES RECTUS FEMORIS TRANSFER INCREASE KNEE FLEXION DURING STANCE PHASE IN CEREBRAL PALSY?

    PubMed Central

    de Morais, Mauro César; Blumetti, Francesco Camara; Kawamura, Cátia Miyuki; Lopes, José Augusto Fernandes; Neves, Daniella Lins; Cardoso, Michelle de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate whether distal rectus femoris transfer (DRFT) is related to postoperative increase of knee flexion during the stance phase in cerebral palsy (CP). Methods: The inclusion criteria were Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I-III, kinematic criteria for stiff-knee gait at baseline, and individuals who underwent orthopaedic surgery and had gait analyses performed before and after intervention. The patients included were divided into the following two groups: NO-DRFT (133 patients), which included patients who underwent orthopaedic surgery without DRFT, and DRFT (83 patients), which included patients who underwent orthopaedic surgery that included DRFT. The primary outcome was to evaluate in each group if minimum knee flexion in stance phase (FMJFA) changed after treatment. Results: The mean FMJFA increased from 13.19° to 16.74° (p=0.003) and from 10.60° to 14.80° (p=0.001) in Groups NO-DRFT and DRFT, respectively. The post-operative FMJFA was similar between groups NO-DRFT and DRFT (p=0.534). The increase of FMJFA during the second exam (from 13.01° to 22.51°) was higher among the GMFCS III patients in the DRFT group (p<0.001). Conclusion: In this study, DRFT did not generate additional increase of knee flexion during stance phase when compared to the control group. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective Comparative Study. PMID:26997910

  7. Effects of implant stiffness, shape, and medialization depth on the acoustic outcomes of medialization laryngoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaoyan; Chhetri, Dinesh K.; Bergeron, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Medialization laryngoplasty is commonly used to treat glottic insufficiency. In this study, we investigated the effects of implant stiffness (Young’s modulus), medialization depth, and implant medial surface shape on acoustic outcomes. Study Design Basic science study using ex vivo laryngeal phonation model. Methods In an ex vivo human larynx phonation model, bilateral medialization laryngoplasties were performed with implants of varying stiffness, medial surface shape (rectangular, divergent and convergent), and varying depths of medialization. The subglottal pressure, the flow rate, and the outside sound were measured as the implant parameters were varied. Results Medialization through the use of implants generally improved the harmonic-to-noise ratio (HNR) and the number of harmonics excited in the outside sound spectra. The degree of acoustic improvement depended on the implant insertion depth, stiffness, and to a lesser degree implant shape. Varying implant insertion depth led to large variations in phonation for stiff implants, but had much smaller effects for soft implants. Conclusions Implants with stiffness comparable to vocal folds provided more consistent improvement in acoustic outcomes across different implant conditions. Further investigations are required to better understand the underlying mechanisms. PMID:25499519

  8. Freestyle perforator-based propeller flap of medial arm for medial elbow reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zang, Mengqing; Yu, Shengji; Xu, Libin; Zhao, Zhenguo; Ding, Qiang; Guo, Lingling; Liu, Yuanbo

    2015-07-01

    Elbow reconstruction is challenging for reconstructive surgeons. The purpose of this report is to present the results of the use of freestyle perforator-based propeller flap designed from the medial arm region for elbow reconstruction. The defects following soft tissue sarcoma resection at the medial and posterior elbow were repaired in two patients. The dimensions of the defects were 11 × 7 cm(2) and 10 × 7 cm(2). Two perforators were identified in each case using Doppler ultrasound probe in the medial arm, adjacent to the defect. The perforator with visible pulsation was chosen as the pedicle vessel, which was 12-cm and 7-cm proximal to the medial epicondyle. An elliptical flap, extending almost the full length of arm, was raised and rotated 180° to repair medial elbow defects. The sizes of the flaps were 17 × 8 cm(2) and 11 × 7 cm(2). The donor sites were closed directly. Both flaps survived; temporary venous congestion occurred in one case. There were no other postoperative complications. These cases illustrated that the medial arm flap might be used for reconstruction of medial elbow defects with this freestyle perforator-based propeller flap design. PMID:25417774

  9. Medial elbow injury in young throwing athletes

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Bonnie; Nyland, John

    2013-01-01

    Summary This report reviews the anatomy, overhead throwing biomechanics, injury mechanism and incidence, physical examination and diagnosis, diagnostic imaging and conservative treatment of medial elbow injuries in young throwing athletes. Based on the information a clinical management decision-making algorithm is presented. PMID:23888291

  10. Empty Consonants in Root-Medial Position.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlett, Stephen A.

    This analysis of verb morphology in Seri finds evidence that empty consonants occur in root-medial position. Analysis focuses on the parallel conjugation patterns of the verbs for "know" and "give," finding an empty consonant slot in the middle of each. This position is never preceded by a consonant, so it never appears as a geminated consonant,…

  11. [Arthritis of the Medial Knee Joint Compartment].

    PubMed

    Matziolis, G; Röhner, E

    2015-10-01

    23 % of all persons older than 65 years suffer from osteoarthritis of the medial compartment of the knee joint, a very common situation in orthopaedic practice 1. As a result of the demographic trend the number of patients is expected to increase in the future. Based on specific joint biomechanics and kinematics the medial knee joint compartment is more frequently affected than the lateral. Only an understanding of the functional anatomy and underlying pathology allows a critical evaluation of different available conservative and operative treatment options. This article gives an overview of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies of osteoarthritis of the medial knee joint. Frequently performed surgeries, e.g. high tibial osteotomy (HTO), unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) will be presented in a comparative manner. The actual scientific evidence will be given with the goal of an evidence based therapy that is adopted to stage and pathology of osteoarthritis of the medial compartment of the knee joint. PMID:26451864

  12. Femoral neck version affects medial femorotibial loading.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, T A; Digas, Georgios; Bikos, Ch; Karamoulas, V; Magnissalis, E A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a preliminary evaluation of the possible effect that femoral version may have on the bearing equilibrium conditions developed on the medial tibiofemoral compartment. A digital 3D solid model of the left physiological adult femur was used to create morphological variations of different neck-shaft angles (varus 115, normal 125, and valgus 135 degrees) and version angles (-10, 0, and +10 degrees). By means of finite element modeling and analysis techniques (FEM-FEA), a virtual experiment was executed with the femoral models aligned in a neutral upright position, distally supported on a fully congruent tibial tray and proximally loaded with a vertical only hip joint load of 2800 N. Equivalent stresses and their distribution on the medial compartment were computed and comparatively evaluated. Within our context, the neck-shaft angle proved to be of rather indifferent influence. Reduction of femoral version, however, appeared as the most influencing parameter regarding the tendency of the medial compartment to establish its bearing equilibrium towards posteromedial directions, as a consequence of the corresponding anteroposterior changes of the hip centre over the horizontal tibiofemoral plane. We found a correlation between femoral anteversion and medial tibiofemoral compartment contact pressure. Our findings will be further elucidated by more sophisticated FEM-FEA and by clinical studies that are currently planned. PMID:24959355

  13. Affective Aprosodia from a Medial Frontal Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilman, Kenneth M.; Leon, Susan A.; Rosenbek, John C.

    2004-01-01

    Background and objectives: Whereas injury to the left hemisphere induces aphasia, injury to the right hemisphere's perisylvian region induces an impairment of emotional speech prosody (affective aprosodia). Left-sided medial frontal lesions are associated with reduced verbal fluency with relatively intact comprehension and repetition…

  14. Medial and lateral discoid menisci: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Lubis, Andri Mt

    2010-01-01

    Discoid menisci on both medial and lateral tibial plateau are very rare abnormalities. We report a 44-year-old woman with bilateral medial and lateral discoid menisci. She also had anomalous insertion of discoid medial meniscus to anterior cruciate ligament, and pathologic medial patellar plica on the right knee. Meniscectomies has been performed for her torn discoid menisci with satisfactory result on the latest follow-up. PMID:20731824

  15. Medial and lateral discoid menisci: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Discoid menisci on both medial and lateral tibial plateau are very rare abnormalities. We report a 44-year-old woman with bilateral medial and lateral discoid menisci. She also had anomalous insertion of discoid medial meniscus to anterior cruciate ligament, and pathologic medial patellar plica on the right knee. Meniscectomies has been performed for her torn discoid menisci with satisfactory result on the latest follow-up. PMID:20731824

  16. Avulsion of the direct head of rectus femoris following arthroscopic subspine impingement resection: a case report.

    PubMed

    Devitt, Brian M; Smith, Bjorn; Stapf, Robert; O'Donnell, John M

    2016-04-01

    Arthroscopic resection of the anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) for subspine impingement has become a relatively common procedure. The AIIS is the origin of the direct head of rectus femoris (dhRF). Previous studies have reported that removal of the contributing portion of the AIIS causing impingement is unlikely to weaken the attachment of the dhRF. The purpose of this article is to report a case of avulsion of the dhRF, following revision hip arthroscopy for the treatment of subspine impingement. A 23-year-old professional footballer underwent revision left hip arthroscopy for the treatment of subspine impingement. 5-mm of bone was resected inferior to the AIIS. Two-weeks post-operatively, he presented with sudden onset, severe left anterior thigh pain following a fall and hyperextension of his left hip. The patient felt a pop over the anterior aspect of his hip. He noticed immediate swelling, severe pain and stiffness. Examination revealed diffuse swelling, 4/5-power on straight-leg-raise, focal tenderness over the AIIS but no palpable gap. MRI confirmed the clinical suspicion of a dhRF avulsion. Given the minimal loss of power and the lack of significant retraction, the patient was treated conservatively. He was instructed to avoid excessive hip extension. He returned to full participation at 3-months. This article highlights a case of avulsion of the dhRF due to a hyperextension injury of the hip following arthroscopic resection of subspinal impingement, a previously unreported complication. Resection of soft and bone from the AIIS may weaken the insertion of the dhRF. Care should be taken during post-operative rehabilitation to avoid trauma and excessive forces on the dhRF tendon, which may lead to rupture. Rehabilitation should be focused on range of motion of the hip. PMID:27026819

  17. Proteasome activities in the rectus abdominis muscle of young and older individuals.

    PubMed

    Bossola, Maurizio; Pacelli, Fabio; Costelli, Paola; Tortorelli, Antonio; Rosa, Fausto; Doglietto, Giovan Battista

    2008-08-01

    Sarcopenia is one of the most striking effects of age, the causes and the pathogenic mechanisms being largely unknown. Unfortunately, there is limited information on the effect of aging on muscle protein breakdown in basal conditions. The present study aimed at investigating if skeletal muscle ubiquitn mRNA levels and proteasome activities vary with age in healthy individuals. Ub mRNA levels were measured by northern blot analysis whereas proteasome activities were determined by evaluating the cleavage of specific fluorogenic substrates in the rectus abdominis muscle of 14 healthy male individuals. Patients were divided in three groups according to the age: (1) 20-30 years (N = 3); (2) 31-64 years (N = 5); (3) > or = 65 years (N = 6). Quantitation of the ubiquitin mRNA levels (expressed in arbitrary units) (mean (SD) showed no differences among the three groups of age (20-30 years: 1352 +/- 441; 31-64 years: 1324 +/- 439; > or = 65 years: 884 +/- 400; P = 0.33). The correlation between age and muscle ubiquitin mRNA levels was not statistically significant (r = -0.4, P = 0.26). The three proteasome activities, chymotrypsin-like (CTL), trypsin-like (TL) and peptidyl-gutamyl-peptidase (PGP), expressed as nkatal x 10(-3)/mg protein, were similar in the three groups of patients stratified according to the age. There was no correlation between age with either CTL (r = 0.22, P = 0.4), PGP (r = 0.002, P = 0.9), and TL (r = 0.28, P = 0.33) activities. In conclusion, the present study shows that the skeletal muscle proteasome activities do not differ with age in healthy male individuals. PMID:18330717

  18. Predictive Factors Affecting Long-Term Outcome of Unilateral Lateral Rectus Recession

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee Kyung; Kim, Mi-Jin; Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Background There are few long-term outcome reports of unilateral lateral rectus (LR) recession for exotropia including a large number of subjects. Previous reports on unilateral LR recession commonly show extremely low rates of initial overcorrection and large exodrifts after surgery suggesting that the surgical dose may be increased. However, little is known of the long-term outcome of a large unilateral LR recession for exotropia. Objectives To determine long-term outcomes and predictive factors of recurrence after a large unilateral LR recession in patients with exotropia. Data Extraction Retrospective analysis was performed on 92 patients aged 3 to 17 years who underwent 10 mm unilateral LR recession for exotropia of ≤ 25 prism diopters (Δ) with prism and alternate cover testing and were followed up for more than 2 years after surgery. Final success rates within 10Δ of exophoria/tropia and 5Δ of esophoria/tropia at distance in the primary position, improvement in stereopsis and the predictive factors for recurrence were evaluated. Results At 24 months after surgery, 54% of patients had ocular alignment meeting the defined criteria of success, 45% had recurrence and 1% had overcorrection. After a mean follow-up of 39 months, 36% showed success, 63% showed recurrence and 1% resulted in overcorrection. The average time of recurrence was 23.4±14.7 months (range, 1–60 months) and the rate of recurrence per person-year was 23% after unilateral LR recession. Predictive factors of recurrence were a larger preoperative near angle of deviation (>16Δ) and larger initial postoperative exodeviation (>5Δ) at distance. Conclusions Long-term outcome of unilateral LR recession for exotropia showed low success rates with high recurrence, thus should be reserved for patients with a small preoperative near angle of exodeviation. PMID:26418819

  19. Retrospective study of recession of four horizontal rectus muscle in periodic alternating nystagmus

    PubMed Central

    Mimura, Osamu; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Kimura, Naoki; Kimura, Akiko; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Periodic alternating nystagmus (PAN) is a spontaneous horizontal nystagmus observed in disorders of the central nervous system. Patients with congenital PAN complain of oscillating vision at high rates. Medication is the first-choice treatment for PAN; however, clinicians still seek better therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate outcomes of recession of four horizontal rectus muscle (R-FHR) in patients with congenital PAN. Patients and methods This study reports a retrospective case series of ten patients (seven males and three females; mean age 24.4±10.9) with congenital PAN who underwent R-FHR between 2007 and 2012, which was performed by the same surgeon at the Hyogo College of Medicine. Patients were evaluated for complications, recession amount, deviation angle, eye movements including a nystagmus amplitude, and visual acuity during pre- and post-operative periods. Results Pre-operatively, patients complained of oscillating vision, abnormal head posture, esotropia, and congenital superior oblique palsy. Post-operatively, changes from the previous observations of nystagmus amplitudes and abnormal head posture demonstrated a complete reversal in all patients. In addition, visual acuity determined with a Snellen chart improved in two patients. However, esotropia occurred in three patients who underwent additional strabismus surgery 2 days after R-FHR. R-FHR was particularly effective in eight patients who pre-operatively had periodic oscillating vision with a regular pattern of periodic nystagmus. Conclusion We demonstrated that ten patients with congenital PAN had improved vision following R-FHR, indicating that R-FHR was an effective procedure, especially in patients suffering PAN with periodic oscillating vision. PMID:25525330

  20. Predictive Factors in the Outcome of Surgical Repair of Abdominal Rectus Diastasis

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Leonard; Stark, Birgit; Gunnarsson, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to define the indicators predicting improved abdominal wall function after surgical repair of abdominal rectus diastasis (ARD). Preoperative subjective assessment quantified by the validated Ventral Hernia Pain Questionnaire (VHPQ) was related to relative postoperative functional improvement in abdominal muscle strength. Methods: Fifty-seven patients undergoing surgery for ARD completed the VHPQ before surgery. Preoperative pain assessment results were compared with the relative improvement in muscle strength measured with the BioDex system 4. Results: There was a correlation between the relative improvement in muscle strength measured by the BioDex System 4 for flexion at 30 degrees (P = 0.046) and 60 degrees per second (P = 0.004) and the preoperative question, “Do you find it painful to sit for more than 30 minutes?” There was also a correlation between BioDex improvement for flexion at 30 degrees (P = 0.022) and for isometric work load (P = 0.038) and the preoperative question, “Has abdominal pain limited your ability to perform sports activities?” The VHPQ responses also formed a pattern with a fairly good correlation between other BioDex modalities (with the exception of extension at 60 degrees per second) and the response to the question regarding complaints when performing sports. Postoperative visual analog scale ratings of abdominal wall stability correlated to the questions regarding complaints when sitting (P = 0.040) and standing (P = 0.047). No other correlation was seen. Conclusion: VHPQ ratings concerning pain while being seated for more than 30 minutes and pain limiting the ability to perform sports are promising indicators in the identification of patients likely to benefit from surgical correction of their ARD. PMID:27579227

  1. Avulsion of the direct head of rectus femoris following arthroscopic subspine impingement resection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Devitt, Brian M.; Smith, Bjorn; Stapf, Robert; O’Donnell, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic resection of the anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) for subspine impingement has become a relatively common procedure. The AIIS is the origin of the direct head of rectus femoris (dhRF). Previous studies have reported that removal of the contributing portion of the AIIS causing impingement is unlikely to weaken the attachment of the dhRF. The purpose of this article is to report a case of avulsion of the dhRF, following revision hip arthroscopy for the treatment of subspine impingement. A 23-year-old professional footballer underwent revision left hip arthroscopy for the treatment of subspine impingement. 5-mm of bone was resected inferior to the AIIS. Two-weeks post-operatively, he presented with sudden onset, severe left anterior thigh pain following a fall and hyperextension of his left hip. The patient felt a pop over the anterior aspect of his hip. He noticed immediate swelling, severe pain and stiffness. Examination revealed diffuse swelling, 4/5-power on straight-leg-raise, focal tenderness over the AIIS but no palpable gap. MRI confirmed the clinical suspicion of a dhRF avulsion. Given the minimal loss of power and the lack of significant retraction, the patient was treated conservatively. He was instructed to avoid excessive hip extension. He returned to full participation at 3-months. This article highlights a case of avulsion of the dhRF due to a hyperextension injury of the hip following arthroscopic resection of subspinal impingement, a previously unreported complication. Resection of soft and bone from the AIIS may weaken the insertion of the dhRF. Care should be taken during post-operative rehabilitation to avoid trauma and excessive forces on the dhRF tendon, which may lead to rupture. Rehabilitation should be focused on range of motion of the hip. PMID:27026819

  2. Contributions to enhanced activity in rectus femoris in response to Lokomat-applied resistance.

    PubMed

    Klarner, Taryn; Blouin, J-S; Carpenter, M G; Lam, T

    2013-03-01

    The application of resistance during the swing phase of locomotion is a viable approach to enhance activity in the rectus femoris (RF) in patients with neurological damage. Increased muscle activity is also accompanied by changes in joint angle and stride frequency, consequently influencing joint angular velocity, making it difficult to attribute neuromuscular changes in RF to resistance. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of resistance on RF activity while constraining joint trajectories. Participants walked in three resistance conditions; 0 % (no resistance), 5 and 10 % of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Visual and auditory biofeedback was provided to help participants maintain the same knee joint angle and stride frequency as during baseline walking. Lower limb joint trajectories and RF activity were recorded. Increasing the resistance, while keeping joint trajectories constant with biofeedback, independently enhanced swing phase RF activity. Therefore, the observed effects in RF are related to resistance, independent of any changes in joint angle. Considering resistance also affects stride frequency, a second experiment was conducted to evaluate the independent effects of resistance and stride frequency on RF activity. Participants walked in four combinations of resistance at 0 and 10 %MVC and natural and slow stride frequency conditions. We observed significant increases in RF activity with increased resistance and decreased stride frequency, confirming the independent contribution of resistance on RF activity as well as the independent effect of stride frequency. Resistance and stride frequency may be key parameters in gait rehabilitation strategies where either of these may be manipulated to enhance swing phase flexor muscle activity in order to maximize rehabilitation outcomes. PMID:23183638

  3. Discoid medial meniscus. Varied presentation of 3 knees.

    PubMed

    Vidyadhara, S; Rao, Sharath K; Rao, Sripathi

    2006-06-01

    Discoid medial meniscus is a rarity. We present 2 cases, one with bilateral discoid medial menisci, and the other with both medial and lateral discoid menisci in the same knee. The radiological, MRI and arthroscopic findings in these knees and their association with various synovial plicae have been described. Both patients had good results after arthroscopic subtotal meniscectomy. PMID:16758058

  4. Reduced dopamine function within the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens enhances latent inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, A.J.D.; Thur, K.E.; Horsley, R.R.; Spicer, C.; Marsden, C.A.; Cassaday, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Latent inhibition (LI) manifests as poorer conditioning to a CS that has previously been presented without consequence. There is some evidence that LI can be potentiated by reduced mesoaccumbal dopamine (DA) function but the locus within the nucleus accumbens of this effect is as yet not firmly established. Experiment 1 tested whether 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced lesions of DA terminals within the core and medial shell subregions of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) would enhance LI under conditions that normally disrupt LI in controls (weak pre-exposure). LI was measured in a thirst motivated conditioned emotional response procedure with 10 pre-exposures (to a noise CS) and 2 conditioning trials. The vehicle-injected and core-lesioned animals did not show LI and conditioned to the pre-exposed CS at comparable levels to the non-pre-exposed controls. 6-OHDA lesions to the medial shell, however, produced potentiation of LI, demonstrated across two extinction tests. In a subsequent experiment, haloperidol microinjected into the medial shell prior to conditioning similarly enhanced LI. These results underscore the dissociable roles of core and shell subregions of the NAc in mediating the expression of LI and indicate that reduced DA function within the medial shell leads to enhanced LI. PMID:21146557

  5. Speed cells in the medial entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kropff, Emilio; Carmichael, James E; Moser, May-Britt; Moser, Edvard I

    2015-07-23

    Grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex have spatial firing fields that repeat periodically in a hexagonal pattern. When animals move, activity is translated between grid cells in accordance with the animal's displacement in the environment. For this translation to occur, grid cells must have continuous access to information about instantaneous running speed. However, a powerful entorhinal speed signal has not been identified. Here we show that running speed is represented in the firing rate of a ubiquitous but functionally dedicated population of entorhinal neurons distinct from other cell populations of the local circuit, such as grid, head-direction and border cells. These 'speed cells' are characterized by a context-invariant positive, linear response to running speed, and share with grid cells a prospective bias of ∼50-80 ms. Our observations point to speed cells as a key component of the dynamic representation of self-location in the medial entorhinal cortex. PMID:26176924

  6. Mechanoreceptors in the human medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Zimny, M L; Albright, D J; Dabezies, E

    1988-01-01

    Medial menisci, obtained at autopsy, were sectioned into radial segments which were stained in bulk using a modified gold chloride method following pretreatment with Triton X-100. Segments were then sectioned on a sliding microtome at 100 microns, mounted on slides, dehydrated and coverslipped. Axons were seen penetrating from the perimeniscal tissue into the outer third of the meniscus with a heavier concentration at the horns. Neural elements were identified in the perimeniscal tissue and in the outer and middle thirds of the meniscus, but not in the inner third. The medial meniscus is capable of afferent input to the central nervous system of importance to the biomechanical function of the joint. PMID:3213403

  7. Medial epicondyle fractures in the pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Hilton P; Eisner, Eric; Hosalkar, Harish S

    2012-04-01

    Humeral medial epicondyle fractures in the pediatric population account for up to 20% of elbow fractures, 60% of which are associated with elbow dislocation. Isolated injuries can occur from either direct trauma or avulsion. Medial epicondyle fractures also occur in combination with elbow dislocations. Traditional management by cast immobilization increasingly is being replaced with early fixation and mobilization. Relative indications for surgical fixation include ulnar nerve entrapment, gross elbow instability, and fractures in athletic or other patients who require high-demand upper extremity function. Absolute indications for surgical intervention are an incarcerated fragment in the joint or open fractures. Radiographic assessment of these injuries and their true degree of displacement remain controversial. PMID:22474092

  8. [SECOT consensus on medial femorotibial osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Moreno, A; Silvestre, A; Carpintero, P

    2013-01-01

    A consensus, prepared by SECOT, is presented on the management of medial knee compartment osteoarthritis, in order to establish clinical criteria and recommendations directed at unifying the criteria in its management, dealing with the factors involved in the pathogenesis of medial femorotibial knee osteoarthritis, the usefulness of diagnostic imaging techniques, and the usefulness of arthroscopy. Conservative and surgical treatments are also analysed. The experts consulted showed a consensus (agreed or disagreed) in 65.8% of the items considered, leaving 14items where no consensus was found, which included the aetiopathogenesis of the osteoarthritis, the value of NMR in degenerative disease, the usefulness of COX-2 and the chondroprotective drugs, as well as on the ideal valgus tibial osteotomy technique. PMID:24169227

  9. Medial Cochlear Efferent Function: A Theoretical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountain, David C.

    2011-11-01

    Since the discovery of the cochlear efferent system, many hypotheses have been put forth for its function. These hypotheses for its function range from protecting the cochlea from over stimulation to improving the detection of sounds in noise. It is known that the medial efferent system innervates the outer hair cells and that stimulation of this system reduces basilar membrane and auditory nerve sensitivity which suggests that this system acts to decrease the gain of the cochlear amplifier. Here I present modeling results as well as analysis of published experimental data that suggest that the function of the medial efferent reflex is to decrease the cochlear amplifier gain by just the right amount so that the nonlinearity in the basilar membrane response lines up perfectly with the inner hair cell nonlinear transduction process to produce a hair cell receptor potential that is proportional to the logarithm of the sound pressure level.

  10. Stress fracture of the medial malleolus.

    PubMed

    Orava, S; Karpakka, J; Taimela, S; Hulkko, A; Permi, J; Kujala, U

    1995-03-01

    We studied eight patients who had a stress fracture of the medial malleolus. The main symptom was localized pain on the medial side of the ankle. The initial radiographs revealed the lesion for only three patients; for the other patients, the diagnosis was made with the use of isotope scans and was confirmed with computerized tomography scans, magnetic resonance images, or subsequent plain radiographs. One vertical fracture was treated initially with compression with AO screws. On the basis of our experience with stress fractures in other bones, drilling was performed to enhance the formation of bone in two patients who had delayed healing and who had had symptoms for eight and twelve months. The fractures healed four and five months after the drilling. The five patients who were managed non-operatively had to avoid running and jumping for at least three months (average, four months) so that healing could take place. All five of these fractures healed within five months. PMID:7890784

  11. Usefulness of the Medial Portal during Hip Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chan; Hwang, Jung-Mo; Park, Eugene J.

    2015-01-01

    The current conventional portals for hip arthroscopic surgery are the anterior, anterolateral, and posterolateral portals. For lesions in the medial anteroinferior or posteroinferior portion of the hip, these portals provide insufficient access to the lesion and consequently lead to incomplete treatment. Thus, in such a situation, a medial portal approach might be helpful. However, operators have avoided this procedure because of the risk of injury to the obturator, femoral neurovascular structures, and the medial femoral circumflex artery. Thus, to overcome the disadvantages of the conventional method for medial lesions of the hip, we performed a cadaveric study to evaluate the technique, usefulness, and risk of the medial portal technique. PMID:26330964

  12. Weak Value Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Shikano, Yutaka

    2011-03-28

    I show that the weak value theory is useful from the viewpoints of the experimentally verifiability, consistency, capacity for explanation as to many quantum paradoxes, and practical advantages. As an example, the initial state in the Hardy paradox can be experimentally verified using the weak value via the weak measurement.

  13. Extensive dural sinus thrombosis and bilateral lateral rectus palsy as an uncommon complication of chronic suppurative otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Anusha; Mohamad, Irfan; Sidek, Dinsuhaimi

    2013-01-01

    Dural venous sinus thrombosis, especially of the sigmoid sinus, is a known but uncommon intracranial extradural complication of chronic suppurative otitis media. Even rarer is the simultaneous occurrence of bilateral abducens palsy in the same patient. We report the case of an adolescent male who presented with signs of raised intracranial pressure, diplopia and bilateral lateral rectus palsy associated with a history of left ear discharge and neck swelling. Extensive dural sinus thrombosis extending right up to the left internal jugular vein was confirmed on CT imaging. The patient was successfully treated with thrombolytic agents and antibiotic therapy. The pathophysiology of the concurrent complications is discussed. PMID:23355565

  14. Blocking the rectus sheath guided by ultrasound in an 8-year-old patient with cystic fibrosis: reporting a case

    PubMed Central

    Encarnación-Martínez, Juan; Barberá-Alacreu, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a severe disease that is transmitted with an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern, and is the commonest disease among Caucasian populations (1/2,500). There are many clinical manifestations that derive from its multiorgan dysfunctions, mainly in the respiratory and digestive tract. In addition, lung disease injury is principally responsible for morbidity and mortality in CF patients. Blocking the rectus sheath, first described by Schleich in 1899, is a loco-regional technique that provides adequate analgesia in those surgical procedures with midline or umbilical incisions. PMID:26733116

  15. [Perineal soft-tissue reconstruction with vertical rectus abdominis myocutan (VRAM) flap following extended abdomino-perineal resection for cancer].

    PubMed

    Bognár, Gábor; Novák, András; István, Gábor; Lóderer, Zoltán; Ledniczky, György; Ondrejka, Pál

    2012-10-01

    Perineal wound healing problems following extended abdomino-perineal resection of ano-rectal cancer represent a great challenge to the surgeon. Perineal soft-tissue reconstruction with a myocutan flap was thought to reduce surgical wound healing complications. A review of the relevant literature was carried out on perineal soft-tissue reconstruction with rectus abdominis myocutan (VRAM) flap following extended abdomino-perineal rectal resection for cancer. The more commonly used neoadjuvant chemo- and radiotherapy as well as extended surgical radicality resulted in increased perioperative risks, therefore combined procedures between the colorectal and plastic surgical teams are inevitable. This case report illustrates the above trend. PMID:23086826

  16. Anomalous insertion of the medial menisci.

    PubMed

    Jung, Y B; Yum, J K; Bae, Y J; Song, K S

    1998-01-01

    Many types of meniscal anomalies have been reported. The authors encountered two cases of anomalous insertion of the anterior horn of the medial menisci to the lateral femoral condyle, which ran up along the course of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), but was independent of the ACL. These anomalies were noted during arthroscopic examination and surgery of the ipsilateral knee for a torn discoid meniscus and a patellar fracture. A 34-year-old woman had a horizontal tear of the lateral discoid meniscus. We performed arthroscopic partial meniscectomy of the inner torn portion of the lateral discoid meniscus and contoured it to resemble a normal meniscus. An anomalous insertion of the medial meniscus was found on examination of the joint during surgery. A 32-year-old man had a patellar fracture and we performed reduction under arthroscopy and internal fixation with cannulated screws. The same anomalous insertion of the medial meniscus was also found on examination of the joint during surgery. We report the cases with a review of the literature. PMID:9681544

  17. Episodic weakness and vacuolar myopathy in hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Basali, Diana; Prayson, Richard A

    2015-11-01

    We report a 50-year-old woman who presented with a 20 year history of gradually progressive lower extremity weakness, characterized by knee buckling with occasional falls and foot dragging. She also experienced difficulty in lifting her arms above her shoulders. The primary periodic paralyses are rare disorders caused by dysfunctional ion channels in skeletal muscle. The hypokalemic type is generally an autosomal dominant condition, due to missense mutations in the alpha subunits of the skeletal muscle L-type calcium channel genes, CACN1AS, or the skeletal muscle sodium channel gene, SCN4A. The affected patients typically present with episodic weakness. For our patient, the consumption of foods high in carbohydrates seemed to precipitate the episodes of weakness. Her family history was significant for six blood relatives, including three sons and three relatives on the paternal side, who had experienced similar symptoms. A biopsy of the left rectus femoralis muscle showed vacuolar myopathic changes in the scattered muscle fibers, accompanied by occasional degenerating and regenerating muscle fibers. There was no evidence of inflammation on the biopsy. The vacuoles were often associated with increased acid phosphatase staining. An electron microscopic examination showed that the vacuolar changes were due to T-tubule dilation, a characteristic of hypokalemic periodic paralysis. Other metabolic etiologies of vacuolar myopathy, such as acid phosphatase (lysosomal) associated acid maltase deficiency (a glycogen storage disease), need to be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26190219

  18. Application of Additional Medial Plate in Treatment of Proximal Humeral Fractures With Unstable Medial Column

    PubMed Central

    He, Yu; He, Jiliang; Wang, Fu; Zhou, Dongsheng; Wang, Yan; Wang, Bomin; Xu, Shihong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to use finite element analysis to compare the biomechanical characteristics after lateral locking plate (LLP) or LLP with a medial anatomical locking plate (LLP-MLP) fixation of proximal humeral fractures with an unstable medial column. First, a 3-dimensional, finite element analysis model was developed. Next, LLP and LLP-MLP implants were instrumented into the proximal humeral fracture models. Compressive and rotational loads were then applied to the humerus model to determine the biomechanical characteristics. Both normal and osteoporotic proximal humerus fractures were simulated using 2 internal fixation methods each under 7 loading conditions. To assess the biomechanical characteristics, the construct stiffness, fracture micromotion, and stress distribution on the implants were recorded and compared. The LLP-MLP method provided both lateral and medial support that reduced the stress on the LLP and the amount of displacement in the fracture region. In contrast, the LLP method resulted in more instability in the medial column and larger magnitudes of stress. In osteoporotic bone, the LLP was more inclined to fail than LLP-MLP. The LLP-MLP method provides a strong support for the medial column and increases the stability of the region surrounding the fracture. PMID:26469918

  19. Arthroscopic Medial Meniscus Posterior Root Fixation Using a Modified Mason-Allen Stitch.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyu Sung; Ha, Jeong Ku; Ra, Ho Jong; Kim, Jin Goo

    2016-02-01

    A complete radial tear of the meniscus posterior root, which can effectively cause a state of total meniscectomy via loss of hoop tension, requires that the torn root be repaired. Several methods have been used to repair medial meniscus posterior root tears, most of which are based on a simple stitch technique that is known to have stitch-holding strength. We applied a modified version of the Mason-Allen stitch technique, which is recognized as a method for rotator cuff repair surgery because its locking effect overcomes the potential weakness of simple stitches. This article introduces the medial meniscus posterior root tears repair procedure based on a modified Mason-Allen stitch technique in which 2 strands (i.e., 1 simple horizontal and 1 simple vertical stitch) are used. PMID:27073778

  20. Arthroscopic Medial Meniscus Posterior Root Fixation Using a Modified Mason-Allen Stitch

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyu Sung; Ha, Jeong Ku; Ra, Ho Jong; Kim, Jin Goo

    2016-01-01

    A complete radial tear of the meniscus posterior root, which can effectively cause a state of total meniscectomy via loss of hoop tension, requires that the torn root be repaired. Several methods have been used to repair medial meniscus posterior root tears, most of which are based on a simple stitch technique that is known to have stitch-holding strength. We applied a modified version of the Mason-Allen stitch technique, which is recognized as a method for rotator cuff repair surgery because its locking effect overcomes the potential weakness of simple stitches. This article introduces the medial meniscus posterior root tears repair procedure based on a modified Mason-Allen stitch technique in which 2 strands (i.e., 1 simple horizontal and 1 simple vertical stitch) are used. PMID:27073778

  1. Enthesitis of the direct tendon of the rectus femoris muscle in a professional volleyball player: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Bortolotto, C.; Coscia, D.R.; Ferrozzi, G.

    2011-01-01

    Enthesitis of the direct tendon of the rectus femoris muscle is a rare pathology which mainly affects professional athletes, and it is caused by overuse and repetitive microtrauma. Athletic jumping and kicking exert a great stress on the direct tendon of the rectus femoris muscle, and volleyball and football players are therefore most frequently affected. Enthesitis may occur suddenly causing pain and functional impairment possibly associated with partial or complete tendon injuries, or it may be a chronic condition causing non-specific clinical symptoms. We present the case of a professional volleyball player who felt a sudden pain in the left side of the groin area during a training session although she had suffered no accidental injury. The pain was associated with impaired ipsilateral limb function. Tendon rupture was suspected, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed. MRI showed a lesion at the myotendinous junction associated with marked inhomogeneity of the direct tendon. Ultrasound (US) examination confirmed the presence of both lesions and allowed a more detailed study of the pathology. This is a typical case of enthesitis which confirms that MRI should be considered the examination of choice in hip pain, particularly when the patient is a professional athlete, thanks to its panoramic visualization. However, also US is an ideal imaging technique for evaluating tendon injuries thanks to its high spatial resolution, and it can therefore be used effectively as a second line of investigation. PMID:23396666

  2. Discoid medial meniscus completely coalesced with the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Deepak; Jain, Vineet; Goyal, Ankit; Bahl, Vibhu; Chaudhary, Deepak

    2013-11-01

    Discoid meniscus is an abnormality of the knee in which the meniscus is discoid rather than semilunar in shape. Medial discoid menisci are rare, and no specific associated symptoms suggest this condition. Several medial meniscus anomalies, including discoid variants, have been reported in the literature. This article describes a rare case of medial discoid meniscus completely coalesced with the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A 22-year-old man presented with intermittent right knee pain of 6 months' duration. Physical examination revealed mild wasting of the quadriceps with medial joint line tenderness but no effusion. Radiographically, hypoplasia of the lateral tibial spine, increased medial joint space, and increased concavity of the medial tibial condyle were noted in both knees. Arthroscopic examination revealed a complete discoid medial meniscus that was contiguous with the ACL. On probing, a horizontal tear in the medial meniscus was noted. A meniscectomy was performed, and deep longitudinal furrows with exposed subchondral bone were noted underlying the posteromedial tibial condyle. At the patient's 6-month follow-up visit, he had no knee symptoms and had returned to his daily activities, which included jogging. Discoid medial meniscus is a rare anomaly, and this case represents only the second reported in the literature of discoid medial meniscus completely coalesced with ACL. This case supports the theory that the ACL and menisci can be differentiated from 1 mesenchyme. PMID:24200455

  3. Aperiodic Weak Topological Superconductors.

    PubMed

    Fulga, I C; Pikulin, D I; Loring, T A

    2016-06-24

    Weak topological phases are usually described in terms of protection by the lattice translation symmetry. Their characterization explicitly relies on periodicity since weak invariants are expressed in terms of the momentum-space torus. We prove the compatibility of weak topological superconductors with aperiodic systems, such as quasicrystals. We go beyond usual descriptions of weak topological phases and introduce a novel, real-space formulation of the weak invariant, based on the Clifford pseudospectrum. A nontrivial value of this index implies a nontrivial bulk phase, which is robust against disorder and hosts localized zero-energy modes at the edge. Our recipe for determining the weak invariant is directly applicable to any finite-sized system, including disordered lattice models. This direct method enables a quantitative analysis of the level of disorder the topological protection can withstand. PMID:27391744

  4. Aperiodic Weak Topological Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulga, I. C.; Pikulin, D. I.; Loring, T. A.

    2016-06-01

    Weak topological phases are usually described in terms of protection by the lattice translation symmetry. Their characterization explicitly relies on periodicity since weak invariants are expressed in terms of the momentum-space torus. We prove the compatibility of weak topological superconductors with aperiodic systems, such as quasicrystals. We go beyond usual descriptions of weak topological phases and introduce a novel, real-space formulation of the weak invariant, based on the Clifford pseudospectrum. A nontrivial value of this index implies a nontrivial bulk phase, which is robust against disorder and hosts localized zero-energy modes at the edge. Our recipe for determining the weak invariant is directly applicable to any finite-sized system, including disordered lattice models. This direct method enables a quantitative analysis of the level of disorder the topological protection can withstand.

  5. Medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction in patellar instability

    PubMed Central

    Krishna Kumar, MS; Renganathan, Sankarram; Joseph, Clement J; Easwar, TR; Rajan, David V

    2014-01-01

    Background: Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is one of the major static medial stabilising structures of the patella. MPFL is most often damaged in patients with patellar instability. Reconstruction of MPFL is becoming a common surgical procedure in treating patellar instability. We hypothesised that MPFL reconstruction was adequate to treat patients with patellar instability if the tibial tubercle and the centre of the trochlear groove (TT-TG) value was less than 20 mm and without a dysplastic trochlea. Materials and Methods: 30 patients matching our inclusion criteria and operated between April 2009 and May 2011 were included in the study. MPFL reconstruction was performed using gracilis tendon fixed with endobutton on the patellar side and bio absorbable interference screw or staple on the femoral side. Patients were followed up with subjective criteria, Kujala score and Lysholm score. Results: The mean duration of followup was 25 months (range 14-38 months). The mean preoperative Kujala score was 47.5 and Lysholm score was 44.7. The mean postoperative Kujala score was 87 and Lysholm score was 88.06. None of the patients had redislocation. Conclusion: MPFL reconstruction using gracilis tendon gives excellent results in patients with patellar instability with no redislocations. Some patients may have persistence of apprehension. PMID:25298558

  6. An interesting case of bilateral bifid insertion of superior rectus muscle as an intra-operative finding in a patient with oculocutaneous albinism.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rashmi; Hertle, Richard W

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of bilateral bifid insertion of superior rectus muscles, in a patient with oculocutaneous albinism as an incidental intraoperative finding during eye muscle surgery. The muscle was successfully operated on and the patient did well postoperatively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this anomaly. PMID:23975092

  7. Combined Reconstruction of the Medial Patellofemoral Ligament With Quadricipital Tendon and the Medial Patellotibial Ligament With Patellar Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Hinckel, Betina Bremer; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2016-01-01

    Although the medial patellotibial ligament (MPTL) has been neglected regarding its function in patellar stability, recently, its importance in terminal extension and during flexion has been recognized. Indications for reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament combined with the MPTL are extension subluxation, flexion instability, children with anatomic risk factors for patellar instability, and knee hyperextension associated with generalized laxity. We describe a combined reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament with quadricipital tendon and reconstruction of the MPTL with patellar tendon autografts. PMID:27073782

  8. DIFFERENT DISTRIBUTIONS OF CALBINDIN AND CALRETININ IMMUNOSTAINING ACROSS THE MEDIAL AND DORSAL DIVISIONS OF THE MOUSE MEDIAL GENICULATE BODY

    PubMed Central

    LU, E.; LLANO, D.A.; SHERMAN, S. M.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the distributions of calretinin and calbindin immunoreactivity in subdivisions of the mouse medial geniculate body and the adjacent paralaminar nuclei. We found that the vast majority of labeled cells in the dorsal division of the medial geniculate body were immunoreactive for calbindin only, whereas most of the remaining labeled cells were double-labeled. Very few calretinin+ only cells were observed. By contrast, we observed significant proportions of calbindin+ only, calretinin+ only and double-labeled cells in the medial division of the medial geniculate body. Further, the distributions of calbindin-only, calretinin-only and double-labeled cells did not differ between the medial division of the medial geniculate body, the suprageniculate nucleus, the peripeduncular nucleus and the posterior intralaminar nucleus. We found essentially no somatic staining for either calbindin or calretinin in the ventral division of the medial geniculate body. These data suggest that there are distinct neurochemical differences between the two nonlemniscal auditory thalamic nuclei. In addition, these data extend previous observations that the medial division of the medial geniculate body shares many properties with the paralaminar group of nuclei. PMID:19643174

  9. Medial perirhinal cortex disambiguates confusable objects

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Lorraine K.; Monsch, Andreas U.; Taylor, Kirsten I.

    2012-01-01

    Our brain disambiguates the objects in our cluttered visual world seemingly effortlessly, enabling us to understand their significance and to act appropriately. The role of anteromedial temporal structures in this process, particularly the perirhinal cortex, is highly controversial. In some accounts, the perirhinal cortex is necessary for differentiating between perceptually and semantically confusable objects. Other models claim that the perirhinal cortex neither disambiguates perceptually confusable objects nor plays a unique role in semantic processing. One major hurdle to resolving this central debate is the fact that brain damage in human patients typically encompasses large portions of the anteromedial temporal lobe, such that the identification of individual substructures and precise neuroanatomical locus of the functional impairments has been difficult. We tested these competing accounts in patients with Alzheimer’s disease with varying degrees of atrophy in anteromedial structures, including the perirhinal cortex. To assess the functional contribution of each anteromedial temporal region separately, we used a detailed region of interest approach. From each participant, we obtained magnetic resonance imaging scans and behavioural data from a picture naming task that contrasted naming performance with living and non-living things as a way of manipulating perceptual and semantic confusability; living things are more similar to one another than non-living things, which have more distinctive features. We manually traced neuroanatomical regions of interest on native-space cortical surface reconstructions to obtain mean thickness estimates for the lateral and medial perirhinal cortex and entorhinal cortex. Mean cortical thickness in each region of interest, and hippocampal volume, were submitted to regression analyses predicting naming performance. Importantly, atrophy of the medial perirhinal cortex, but not lateral perirhinal cortex, entorhinal cortex or

  10. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-June

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that in the majority of patellar dislocation cases, the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is disrupted with a high recurrence rate especially in female patients. Although MPFL tear is not the primary cause of instability, MPFL reconstruction is effective for stabilizing the knee and may alone prevent lateral patellar dislocation. There is limited but growing evidence that MPFL reconstruction for patellofemoral instability leads to excellent functional outcomes. Growing awareness of the biomechanical contribution of the MPFL has led to an upsurge in the publication of techniques and trials dealing with reconstructive techniques, warranting a review that includes the most recent evidence. The aim of this article was to review and summarize the recent literatures concerning MPFL reconstruction and provide a comprehensive review of previous studies ranging from basic science to current surgical techniques and results. PMID:26389065

  11. Medial septum regulates the hippocampal spatial representation

    PubMed Central

    Mamad, Omar; McNamara, Harold M.; Reilly, Richard B.; Tsanov, Marian

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal circuitry undergoes attentional modulation by the cholinergic medial septum. However, it is unclear how septal activation regulates the spatial properties of hippocampal neurons. We investigated here what is the functional effect of selective-cholinergic and non-selective septal stimulation on septo-hippocampal system. We show for the first time selective activation of cholinergic cells and their differential network effect in medial septum of freely-behaving transgenic rats. Our data show that depolarization of cholinergic septal neurons evokes frequency-dependent response from the non-cholinergic septal neurons and hippocampal interneurons. Our findings provide vital evidence that cholinergic effect on septo-hippocampal axis is behavior-dependent. During the active behavioral state the activation of septal cholinergic projections is insufficient to evoke significant change in the spiking of the hippocampal neurons. The efficiency of septo-hippocampal processing during active exploration relates to the firing patterns of the non-cholinergic theta-bursting cells. Non-selective septal theta-burst stimulation resets the spiking of hippocampal theta cells, increases theta synchronization, entrains the spiking of hippocampal place cells, and tunes the spatial properties in a timing-dependent manner. The spatial properties are augmented only when the stimulation is applied in the periphery of the place field or 400–650 ms before the animals approached the center of the field. In summary, our data show that selective cholinergic activation triggers a robust network effect in the septo-hippocampal system during inactive behavioral state, whereas the non-cholinergic septal activation regulates hippocampal functional properties during explorative behavior. Together, our findings uncover fast septal modulation on hippocampal network and reveal how septal inputs up-regulate and down-regulate the encoding of spatial representation. PMID:26175674

  12. History of Weak Interactions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lee, T. D.

    1970-07-01

    While the phenomenon of beta-decay was discovered near the end of the last century, the notion that the weak interaction forms a separate field of physical forces evolved rather gradually. This became clear only after the experimental discoveries of other weak reactions such as muon-decay, muon-capture, etc., and the theoretical observation that all these reactions can be described by approximately the same coupling constant, thus giving rise to the notion of a universal weak interaction. Only then did one slowly recognize that the weak interaction force forms an independent field, perhaps on the same footing as the gravitational force, the electromagnetic force, and the strong nuclear and sub-nuclear forces.

  13. A simple, safe and reliable surgical landmark for medial epicondylectomy

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Philip S; Clark, Damian; Amirfeyz, Rouin

    2014-01-01

    Background Various surgical strategies have been described for the treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome, including medial epicondylectomy. This aims to decompress the ulnar nerve and allow a ‘mini anterior transposition’. The major concern over medial epicondylectomy is the potential for postoperative iatrogenic valgus instability. Methods We utilized a surgical landmark for medial epicondylectomy based on the medial aspect of the ulnar nerve with the elbow in 90° of flexion in 12 cadaveric upper limbs. The size of the resultant fragment was measured and, subsequently, the medial collateral ligament was dissected and the elbow stressed to assess its integrity. Results This technique resulted in the excision of a fragment of mean width 8 mm (range 6 mm to 11 mm) and allowed the ulnar nerve to smoothly translate anteriorly in flexion. The anterior band of the ulnar collateral ligament was macroscopically preserved in all cases and there was no valgus instability. Conclusions The medial border of the ulnar nerve is a simple, safe and reliable surgical landmark for medial epicondylectomy. This technique offers advantages over other described methods of assessing the location at which to perform a medial epicondylectomy.

  14. Medial Meniscal Allograft Transplantation: The Bone Plug Technique.

    PubMed

    Dean, Chase S; Olivetto, Javier; Chahla, Jorge; Serra Cruz, Raphael; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-04-01

    The medial meniscus is crucial for knee homeostasis. Treating patients who have undergone a subtotal or total meniscectomy, or equivalent irreparable tear pattern, can be extremely challenging, especially in young, active patients. The importance of meniscal preservation has been reported by several authors. Meniscal repair is now widely accepted as the first surgical option for treating medial meniscal tears. Moreover, current guidelines recommend preserving as much meniscal tissue as possible. Treating a symptomatic medial meniscectomized knee is challenging because of limited surgical options. In this context, medial meniscal allograft transplantation arises as the preferred procedure. The purpose of this article was to detail the arthroscopic medial meniscal allograft transplantation technique with the use of 2 bone plugs. PMID:27330948

  15. Precaruncular approach for the reconstruction of medial orbital wall fractures.

    PubMed

    You, Hi-Jin; Kim, Deok-Woo; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Yoon, Eul-Sik

    2014-01-01

    To reconstruct medial orbital wall fractures with a clear, least dissection, an alternative method, precaruncular approach, has been performed. We reviewed 36 patients with medial blowout fractures treated with this technique. The incision was made between the caruncle and medial canthal skin at the mucocutaneous junction, and was continued along the conjunctival fornix superiorly and inferiorly. An extended conjunctival incision was carried for additional access to the orbit floor. The dissection continued medially and proceeded along the preseptal plane. The clinical results were assessed by postoperative computed tomographic scan and by reviewing postoperative complications. Postoperatively, computed tomographic scans demonstrated adequate reduction of soft tissues and correct positioning of the inserted implant without surgical complications. In most cases, the edema resolved within 24 to 48 hours after surgery. The precaruncular approach is a good option in reconstructing medial orbital wall fractures because it provides satisfactory exposure with superior cosmetic result. PMID:23241800

  16. Weak bond screening system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, S. Y.; Chang, F. H.; Bell, J. R.

    Consideration is given to the development of a weak bond screening system which is based on the utilization of a high power ultrasonic (HPU) technique. The instrumentation of the prototype bond strength screening system is described, and the adhesively bonded specimens used in the system developmental effort are detailed. Test results obtained from these specimens are presented in terms of bond strength and level of high power ultrasound irradiation. The following observations were made: (1) for Al/Al specimens, 2.6 sec of HPU irradiation will screen weak bond conditions due to improper preparation of bonding surfaces; (2) for composite/composite specimens, 2.0 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to under-cured conditions; (3) for Al honeycomb core with composite skin structure, 3.5 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to bad adhesive or oils contamination of bonding surfaces; and (4) for Nomex honeycomb with Al skin structure, 1.3 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to bad adhesive.

  17. Weak bump quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, B. J.; Mcdowell, J.

    1994-01-01

    Research into the optical, ultraviolet and infrared continuum emission from quasars and their host galaxies was carried out. The main results were the discovery of quasars with unusually weak infrared emission and the construction of a quantitative estimate of the dispersion in quasar continuum properties. One of the major uncertainties in the measurement of quasar continuum strength is the contribution to the continuum of the quasar host galaxy as a function of wavelength. Continuum templates were constructed for different types of host galaxy and individual estimates made of the decomposed quasar and host continua based on existing observations of the target quasars. The results are that host galaxy contamination is worse than previously suspected, and some apparent weak bump quasars are really normal quasars with strong host galaxies. However, the existence of true weak bump quasars such as PHL 909 was confirmed. The study of the link between the bump strength and other wavebands was continued by comparing with IRAS data. There is evidence that excess far infrared radiation is correlated with weaker ultraviolet bumps. This argues against an orientation effect and implies a probable link with the host galaxy environment, for instance the presence of a luminous starburst. However, the evidence still favors the idea that reddening is not important in those objects with ultraviolet weak bumps. The same work has led to the discovery of a class of infrared weak quasars. Pushing another part of the envelope of quasar continuum parameter space, the IR-weak quasars have implications for understanding the effects of reddening internal to the quasars, the reality of ultraviolet turnovers, and may allow further tests of the Phinney dust model for the IR continuum. They will also be important objects for studying the claimed IR to x-ray continuum correlation.

  18. Weak bump quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdowell, Jonathan C.; Elvis, Martin; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Willner, Steven P.; Oey, M. S.

    1989-01-01

    The recent emphasis on big bumps dominating the UV continuum of quasars has obscured the facts that bump properties vary widely and that there are objects in which no such component is evident. As part of a survey of quasar continuum spectra, a class of quasars is identified in which the optical-UV continuum big bump feature appears to be weak or absent, relative to both IR and X-ray. These weak bump quasars are otherwise normal objects and constitute a few percent of the quasar population.

  19. Infrared weak quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdowell, J. C.; Elvis, M.; Wilkes, B. J.

    1992-01-01

    Examples of quasars with anomalously weak IR emission are presented, and the effects of starlight subtraction on estimates of the UV and IR component strengths are discussed. Inferred model parameters are very sensitive to the position of the peak of the UV energy distribution. In many low redshift objects the peak is not seen; even in those objects where the turnover is clear, the turnover may not be intrinsic but instead due to reddening within the quasar host galaxy. The small number of unusual quasars with weak IR emission will be of utility as a probe of the quasar phenomenon in the absence of dominant dust reprocessing.

  20. Weak shock reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, John K.; Brio, Moysey

    2000-05-01

    We present numerical solutions of a two-dimensional inviscid Burgers equation which provides an asymptotic description of the Mach reflection of weak shocks. In our numerical solutions, the incident, reflected, and Mach shocks meet at a triple point, and there is a supersonic patch behind the triple point, as proposed by Guderley for steady weak-shock reflection. A theoretical analysis indicates that there is an expansion fan at the triple point, in addition to the three shocks. The supersonic patch is extremely small, and this work is the first time it has been resolved.

  1. Behavior of the Linea Alba During a Curl-up Task in Diastasis Rectus Abdominis: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Diane; Hodges, Paul W

    2016-07-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional repeated measures. Background Rehabilitation of diastasis rectus abdominis (DRA) generally aims to reduce the inter-rectus distance (IRD). We tested the hypothesis that activation of the transversus abdominis (TrA) before a curl-up would reduce IRD narrowing, with less linea alba (LA) distortion/deformation, which may allow better force transfer between sides of the abdominal wall. Objectives This study investigated behavior of the LA and IRD during curl-ups performed naturally and with preactivation of the TrA. Methods Curl-ups were performed by 26 women with DRA and 17 healthy control participants using a natural strategy (automatic curl-up) and with TrA preactivation (TrA curl-up). Ultrasound images were recorded at 2 points above the umbilicus (U point and UX point). Ultrasound measures of IRD and a novel measure of LA distortion (distortion index: average deviation of the LA from the shortest path between the recti) were compared between 3 tasks (rest, automatic curl-up, TrA curl-up), between groups, and between measurement points (analysis of variance). Results Automatic curl-up by women with DRA narrowed the IRD from resting values (mean U-point between-task difference, -1.19 cm; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -1.45, -0.93; P<.001 and mean UX-point between-task difference, -0.51 cm; 95% CI: -0.69, -0.34; P<.001), but LA distortion increased (mean U-point between-task difference, 0.018; 95% CI: 0.0003, 0.041; P = .046 and mean UX-point between-task difference, 0.025; 95% CI: 0.004, 0.045; P = .02). Although TrA curl-up induced no narrowing or less IRD narrowing than automatic curl-up (mean U-point difference between TrA curl-up versus rest, -0.56 cm; 95% CI: -0.82, -0.31; P<.001 and mean UX-point between-task difference, 0.02 cm; 95% CI: -0.22, 0.19; P = .86), LA distortion was less (mean U-point between-task difference, -0.025; 95% CI: -0.037, -0.012; P<.001 and mean UX-point between-task difference, -0.021; 95% CI: -0.038, -0

  2. A dysexecutive syndrome of the medial thalamus.

    PubMed

    Liebermann, Daniela; Ploner, Christoph J; Kraft, Antje; Kopp, Ute A; Ostendorf, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Thalamic stroke is associated with neurological and cognitive sequelae. Resulting neuropsychological deficits vary with the vascular territory involved. Whereas sensory, motor and memory deficits following thalamic stroke are comparatively well characterized, the exact relationship between executive dysfunction and thalamic damage remains more ambiguous. To assess the pattern of executive-cognitive deficits following thalamic stroke and its possible association with distinct thalamic nuclei, 19 patients with focal thalamic lesions were examined with high-resolution structural imaging and neuropsychological testing. Twenty healthy individuals served as controls. Patient MRIs were co-registered to an atlas of the human thalamus. Lesion overlap and subtraction analyses were used for lesion-to-symptom mapping. In eight patients (42.1%), neuropsychological assessment demonstrated a disproportionate deficit in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), while other executive and memory functions were much less affected. Subtraction analysis revealed an area in the left medial thalamus, mainly consisting of the centromedian and parafascicular nuclei (CM-Pf complex) that was damaged in these patients and spared in patients with normal WCST performance. Thus, damage to the CM-Pf complex may yield a distinct dysexecutive syndrome in which deficient maintenance and shifting between cognitive sets predominates. We hypothesize that the CM-Pf complex may contribute to maintenance and shifting of cognitive sets by virtue of its dense connections with the striatum. The pattern of executive dysfunction following thalamic stroke may vary considerably with lesion location. PMID:22172979

  3. Optogenetic dissection of medial prefrontal cortex circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Riga, Danai; Matos, Mariana R.; Glas, Annet; Smit, August B.; Spijker, Sabine; Van den Oever, Michel C.

    2014-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is critically involved in numerous cognitive functions, including attention, inhibitory control, habit formation, working memory and long-term memory. Moreover, through its dense interconnectivity with subcortical regions (e.g., thalamus, striatum, amygdala and hippocampus), the mPFC is thought to exert top-down executive control over the processing of aversive and appetitive stimuli. Because the mPFC has been implicated in the processing of a wide range of cognitive and emotional stimuli, it is thought to function as a central hub in the brain circuitry mediating symptoms of psychiatric disorders. New optogenetics technology enables anatomical and functional dissection of mPFC circuitry with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. This provides important novel insights in the contribution of specific neuronal subpopulations and their connectivity to mPFC function in health and disease states. In this review, we present the current knowledge obtained with optogenetic methods concerning mPFC function and dysfunction and integrate this with findings from traditional intervention approaches used to investigate the mPFC circuitry in animal models of cognitive processing and psychiatric disorders. PMID:25538574

  4. Subspecialization in the human posterior medial cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bzdok, Danilo; Heeger, Adrian; Langner, Robert; Laird, Angela R.; Fox, Peter T.; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Vogt, Brent A.; Zilles, Karl; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2014-01-01

    The posterior medial cortex (PMC) is particularly poorly understood. Its neural activity changes have been related to highly disparate mental processes. We therefore investigated PMC properties with a data-driven exploratory approach. First, we subdivided the PMC by whole-brain coactivation profiles. Second, functional connectivity of the ensuing PMC regions was compared by task-constrained meta-analytic coactivation mapping (MACM) and task-unconstrained resting-state correlations (RSFC). Third, PMC regions were functionally described by forward/reverse functional inference. A precuneal cluster was mostly connected to the intraparietal sulcus, frontal eye fields, and right temporo-parietal junction; associated with attention and motor tasks. A ventral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) cluster was mostly connected to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and middle left inferior parietal cortex (IPC); associated with facial appraisal and language tasks. A dorsal PCC cluster was mostly connected to the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, anterior/posterior IPC, posterior midcingulate cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; associated with delay discounting. A cluster in the retrosplenial cortex was mostly connected to the anterior thalamus and hippocampus. Furthermore, all PMC clusters were congruently coupled with the default mode network according to task-constrained but not task-unconstrained connectivity. We thus identified distinct regions in the PMC and characterized their neural networks and functional implications. PMID:25462801

  5. Congenital absence of the medial meniscus associated with lipoma arborescens.

    PubMed

    Utkan, Ali; Ozkan, Güray; Köse, Cem Cüneyt; Ciliz, Deniz Sözmen; Albayrak, Ahmet Levent

    2010-06-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the medial meniscus are extremely rare and have been reported commonly with other deformities. We report an isolated aplasia of the medial meniscus. A 37-year-old man presented with a slow-growing painless swelling, accompanied by intermittent effusion of his left knee. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated frond-like proliferations of fatty synovium. He was initially diagnosed with synovial chondromatosis, but later found to have lipoma arborescens. While an arthroscopic synovectomy was being performed, congenital absence of the medial meniscus was discovered as an incidental finding. PMID:19766501

  6. In praise of weakness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Aephraim; Feizpour, Amir; Rozema; Mahler; Hayat

    2013-03-01

    Quantum physics is being transformed by a radical new conceptual and experimental approach known as weak measurement that can do everything from tackling basic quantum mysteries to mapping the trajectories of photons in a Young's double-slit experiment. Aephraim Steinberg, Amir Feizpour, Lee Rozema, Dylan Mahler and Alex Hayat unveil the power of this new technique.

  7. Weaknesses in Underperforming Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Grift, Wim; Houtveen, Thoni

    2007-01-01

    In some Dutch elementary schools, the average performance of students over several years is significantly below the level that could be expected of them. This phenomenon is known as "underperformance." The most important identifiable weaknesses that go along with this phenomenon are that (a) learning material offered at school is insufficient to…

  8. Weak Radial Artery Pulse

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, Poothirikovil; Sivakumar, Puthuval; Ardley, Robert G.; Oates, Crispian

    2012-01-01

    We present an 11year-old boy with a weak right radial pulse, and describe the successful application of vascular ultrasound to identify the ulnar artery dominance and a thin right radial artery with below normal Doppler flow velocity that could explain the discrepancy. The implications of identifying this anomaly are discussed. PMID:22375269

  9. Weak Lensing with LSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittman, David M.; Jain, B.; Jarvis, M.; Knox, L.; Margoniner, V.; Takada, M.; Tyson, J.; Zhan, H.; LSST Weak Lensing Science Collaboration

    2006-12-01

    Constraining dark energy parameters with weak lensing is one of the primary science goals of the LSST. The LSST Weak Lensing Science Collaboration has been formed with the goal of optimizing the weak lensing science by optimizing the survey cadence; working with Data Management to insure high-quality pipeline processing which will meet our needs; developing the necessary analysis tools well before the onset of data-taking; participating in high-fidelity simulations to test the system end-to-end; and analyzing the real dataset as it becomes available. We review the major weak lensing probes, the twoand three-point shear correlations, and how they constrain dark energy parameters. We also review the possibility of going beyond dark energy models and testing gravity with the LSST data. To realize the promise of the awesome LSST statistical precision, we must ensure that systematic errors are kept under control. We review the major sources of systematics and our plans for mitigation. We present data that demonstrate that these sources of systematics can be kept to a level smaller than the statistical error.

  10. Medial portion of the cavernous sinus: quantitative analysis of the medial wall.

    PubMed

    Yilmazlar, Selcuk; Kocaeli, Hasan; Aydiner, Fatma; Korfali, Ender

    2005-09-01

    Pituitary tumors invade the cavernous sinus via the medial wall. Researchers have speculated that this wall is composed of dura and that substances secreted by tumors might damage this barrier. In contrast to the lateral wall, little is known about the structure of the medial wall of the cavernous sinus (MWCS). This study provides the first detailed quantitative (thickness) and qualitative (histological) assessment of the MWCS. Eighteen sellar-parasellar tissue blocks were obtained from adult human autopsies. Ten specimens were used for microsurgical dissection and macroscopic anatomical description. Eight specimens were used for histopathological study and for recording computer measurements of MWCS thickness. Each of these eight specimens was divided into three approximately equal-sized pieces, with cuts made in the coronal plane from posterior to anterior starting at the anterior level of the pituitary stalk. Wall thicknesses were compared in the three different regions (posterior, middle, anterior), and also on the left vs. the right sides. The investigations showed that the MWCS is a distinct dural layer that forms a barrier between the medial venous space of the cavernous sinus and the pituitary gland. The mean thickness of the 48 total (left and right) MWCS observed in the 24 sections examined was 0.195 +/- 0.066 mm (range = 0.080-0.387 mm). This wall is composed of loosely arranged collagen fibers that comprise a specific layer known as "meningeal dura." The posterior third of the MWCS was significantly thinner than the middle third (P = 0.0014) or anterior third (P = 0.0001). No macro- or microscopic defects were observed in any of the MWCS in the 18 specimens. The thinness of the posterior MWCS suggests that this is the most likely path for extension of pituitary tumors into the cavernous sinus. PMID:16015624

  11. Medial Compartment Decompression by Fibular Osteotomy to Treat Medial Compartment Knee Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zong-You; Chen, Wei; Li, Cun-Xiang; Wang, Juan; Shao, De-Cheng; Hou, Zhi-Yong; Gao, Shi-Jun; Wang, Fei; Li, Ji-Dong; Hao, Jian-Dong; Chen, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2015-12-01

    Compared with high tibial osteotomy and total knee arthroplasty, the authors found a simpler surgical procedure, partial fibular osteotomy, could effectively relieve knee pain and also correct the varus deformity for patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA). From January 1996 to April 2012, a total of 156 patients with medial compartment OA were treated by proximal fibular osteotomy in the authors' hospital. A 2-cm-long section of fibula was resected 6 to 10 cm below the fibular head. A total of 110 patients with follow-up of more than 2 years were included in the study, including 34 males and 76 females with an average age of 59.2 years. Anteroposterior and lateral weight-bearing radiographs, the femorotibial angle (FTA) and lateral joint space, and the American Knee Society Score (KSS) and the visual analog scale (VAS) score of the knee joint were evaluated preoperatively and at final follow-up, respectively. At final follow-up, mean FTA and lateral joint space were 179.4°±1.8° and 6.9±0.7 mm, respectively, which were significantly smaller than those measured preoperatively (182.7°±2.0° and 12.2±1.1 mm, respectively; both P<.001). Mean KSS at final follow-up was 92.3±31.7, significantly higher than the mean preoperative score of 45.0±21.3 (P<.001). Mean VAS score and interquartile range were 2.0 and 2.0, significantly lower than the preoperative data (7 and 1.0, respectively; P<.001). The authors found that proximal fibular osteotomy can significantly improve both the radiographic appearance and function of the affected knee joint and also achieve long-term pain relief. This procedure may be an alternative treatment option for medial compartment OA. PMID:26652332

  12. New technical approach for the repair of an abdominal wall defect after a transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kaemmer, Daniel A; Conze, Joachim; Otto, Jens; Schumpelick, Volker

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Breast reconstruction with autologous tissue transfer is now a standard operation, but abnormalities of the abdominal wall contour represent a complication which has led surgeons to invent techniques to minimize the morbidity of the donor site. Case presentation We report the case of a woman who had bilateral transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap (TRAM-flap) breast reconstruction. The surgery led to the patient developing an enormous abdominal bulge that caused her disability in terms of abdominal wall and bowel function, pain and contour. In the absence of rectus muscle, the large defect was repaired using a combination of the abdominal wall component separation technique of Ramirez et al and additional mesh augmentation with a lightweight, large-pore polypropylene mesh (Ultrapro®). Conclusion The procedure of Ramirez et al is helpful in achieving a tension-free closure of large defects in the anterior abdominal wall. The additional mesh augmentation allows reinforcement of the thinned lateral abdominal wall. PMID:18416835

  13. Electromyography analysis of the rectus abdominis and external oblique muscles of children 8 to 10 years old.

    PubMed

    Moraes, A C; Bankoff, A D; Pellegrinotti, L L; Moreira, Z W; Galdi, E H

    1995-11-01

    The objective of this work was to study through in the electromyography the upper and lower umbilical rectus abdominis and the anterior and posterior parts of the external oblique muscles of children 8 to 10 years old. The children studied practice artistic and rhythmical gymnastic sports at the training and learning level and the study was made during abdominal exercise in the dorsal decubitus position on the ground and on a board. The children were divided into 2 groups: Group I - ten already trained children; Group II - nineteen learners. The participants in Group I practiced an average of 5 times a week and those in Group II practiced 2 times a week. The exercises analyzed were: on the ground, lifting the legs 30, 20 and 10 cm high with the knees flexed 90 degrees; flexing the trunk while maintaining the legs elevated and the knees flexed; flexing the trunk with homo and heterolateral rotation of the trunk while maintaining the legs elevated and the knees flexed. On the board, flexing the trunk with the knees flexed 90 degrees on top of the board inclined 30, 20 and 10 cm; flexing the trunk with rotation of the trunk homo and heterolateral with the knees flexed on the board inclined 30, 20 and 10 cm. The results showed that the superior umbilical part of the rectus abdominis muscle presented more intense action potential than the inferior-umbilical part; the more intense action potential occurred at the flexing of the trunk and at the flexing of the trunk with homo and heterolateral rotation. The anterior part of the external oblique muscle presented more intense action potential than the posterior part; the more intense action potential occurred at the flexing of the trunk and at the flexing of the trunk with heterolateral rotation. In both of the muscles the more intense action potential occurred between 45 and 60 degrees of flexing the trunk; the children in Group I presented more intense action potential than those in Group II; the exercise of lifting the

  14. Hypernuclear Weak Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itonaga, K.; Motoba, T.

    The recent theoretical studies of Lambda-hypernuclear weak decaysof the nonmesonic and pi-mesonic ones are developed with the aim to disclose the link between the experimental decay observables and the underlying basic weak decay interactions and the weak decay mechanisms. The expressions of the nonmesonic decay rates Gamma_{nm} and the decay asymmetry parameter alpha_1 of protons from the polarized hypernuclei are presented in the shell model framework. We then introduce the meson theoretical Lambda N -> NN interactions which include the one-meson exchanges, the correlated-2pi exchanges, and the chiral-pair-meson exchanges. The features of meson exchange potentials and their roles on the nonmesonic decays are discussed. With the adoption of the pi + 2pi/rho + 2pi/sigma + omega + K + rhopi/a_1 + sigmapi/a_1 exchange potentials, we have carried out the systematic calculations of the nonmesonic decay observables for light-to-heavy hypernuclei. The present model can account for the available experimental data of the decay rates, Gamma_n/Gamma_p ratios, and the intrinsic asymmetry parameters alpha_Lambda (alpha_Lambda is related to alpha_1) of emitted protons well and consistently within the error bars. The hypernuclear lifetimes are evaluated by converting the total weak decay rates Gamma_{tot} = Gamma_pi + Gamma_{nm} to tau, which exhibit saturation property for the hypernuclear mass A ≥ 30 and agree grossly well with experimental data for the mass range from light to heavy hypernuclei except for the very light ones. Future extensions of the model and the remaining problems are also mentioned. The pi-mesonic weak processes are briefly surveyed, and the calculations and predictions are compared and confirmed by the recent high precision FINUDA pi-mesonic decay data. This shows that the theoretical basis seems to be firmly grounded.

  15. Acute effects of anterior thigh foam rolling on hip angle, knee angle, and rectus femoris length in the modified Thomas test.

    PubMed

    Vigotsky, Andrew D; Lehman, Gregory J; Contreras, Bret; Beardsley, Chris; Chung, Bryan; Feser, Erin H

    2015-01-01

    Background. Foam rolling has been shown to acutely increase range of motion (ROM) during knee flexion and hip flexion with the experimenter applying an external force, yet no study to date has measured hip extensibility as a result of foam rolling with controlled knee flexion and hip extension moments. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of foam rolling on hip extension, knee flexion, and rectus femoris length during the modified Thomas test. Methods. Twenty-three healthy participants (male = 7; female = 16; age = 22 ± 3.3 years; height = 170 ± 9.18 cm; mass = 67.7 ± 14.9 kg) performed two, one-minute bouts of foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh. Hip extension and knee flexion were measured via motion capture before and after the foam rolling intervention, from which rectus femoris length was calculated. Results. Although the increase in hip extension (change = +1.86° (+0.11, +3.61); z(22) = 2.08; p = 0.0372; Pearson's r = 0.43 (0.02, 0.72)) was not due to chance alone, it cannot be said that the observed changes in knee flexion (change = -1.39° (-5.53, +2.75); t(22) = -0.70; p = 0.4933; Cohen's d = - 0.15 (-0.58, 0.29)) or rectus femoris length (change = -0.005 (-0.013, +0.003); t(22) = -1.30; p = 0.2070; Cohen's d = - 0.27 (-0.70, 0.16)) were not due to chance alone. Conclusions. Although a small change in hip extension was observed, no changes in knee flexion or rectus femoris length were observed. From these data, it appears unlikely that foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh will improve passive hip extension and knee flexion ROM, especially if performed in combination with a dynamic stretching protocol. PMID:26421244

  16. Evaluation of three-dimensional printing for internal fixation of unstable pelvic fracture from minimal invasive para-rectus abdominis approach: a preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Canjun; Xiao, Jidong; Wu, Zhanglin; Huang, Wenhua

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of three-dimensional printing (3D printing) assisted internal fixation of unstable pelvic fracture from minimal invasive para-rectus abdominis approach. Methods: A total of 38 patients with unstable pelvic fractures were analyzed retrospectively from August 2012 to February 2014. All cases were treated operatively with internal fixation assisted by three-dimensional printing from minimal invasive para-rectus abdominis approach. Both preoperative CT and three-dimensional reconstruction were performed. Pelvic model was created by 3D printing. Data including the best entry points, plate position and direction and length of screw were obtained from simulated operation based on 3D printing pelvic model. The diaplasis and internal fixation were performed by minimal invasive para-rectus abdominis approach according to the optimized dada in real surgical procedure. Matta and Majeed score were used to evaluate currative effects after operation. Results: According to the Matta standard, the outcome of the diaplasis achieved 97.37% with excellent and good. Majeed assessment showed 94.4% with excellent and good. The imageological examination showed consistency of internal fixation and simulated operation. The mean operation time was 110 minutes, mean intraoperative blood loss 320 ml, and mean incision length 6.5 cm. All patients have achieved clinical healing, with mean healing time of 8 weeks. Conclusion: Three-dimensional printing assisted internal fixation of unstable pelvic fracture from minimal invasive para-rectus abdominis approach is feasible and effective. This method has the advantages of trauma minimally, bleeding less, healing rapidly and satisfactory reduction, and worthwhile for spreading in clinical practice. PMID:26550226

  17. Weak Interactions and Instability Cascades.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Taku; McCann, Kevin S

    2015-01-01

    Food web theory states that a weak interactor which is positioned in the food web such that it tends to deflect, or mute, energy away from a potentially oscillating consumer-resource interaction often enhances community persistence and stability. Here we examine how adding other weak interactions (predation/harvesting) on the stabilizing weak interactor alters the stability of food web using a set of well-established food web models/modules. We show that such "weak on weak" interaction chains drive an indirect dynamic cascade that can rapidly ignite a distant consumer-resource oscillator. Nonetheless, we also show that the "weak on weak" interactions are still more stable than the food web without them, and so weak interactions still generally act to stabilize food webs. Rather, these results are best interpreted to say that the degree of the stabilizing effect of a given important weak interaction can be severely compromised by other weak interactions (including weak harvesting). PMID:26219561

  18. Spread patterns and effectiveness for surgery after ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block in adult day-case patients scheduled for umbilical hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Manassero, Alberto; Bossolasco, Matteo; Meineri, Maurizio; Ugues, Susanna; Liarou, Chrysoula; Bertolaccini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: We conducted a prospective study to examine the local anesthetic (LA) spread and the effectiveness for surgical anesthesia of ultrasound (US)-guided rectus sheath block (RSB) in adult patients undergoing umbilical hernia repair. Material and Methods: Thirty patients received at T-10 level a bilateral US-guided injection of 20 mL levobupivacaine 0.375% + epinephrine 5 μg/mL behind the rectus muscle to detach it from its sheath. Anesthetic spread into the rectus sheath was evaluated ultrasonographically at T-9 and T-11 levels and scored from 0 to 4. The RSB was defined effective for surgical anesthesia if it was able to guarantee an anesthetic level sufficient for surgery without any mepivacaine supplementation. Results: Overall, the block was effective for surgical anesthesia in 53.3% of patients (95% confidence interval, ±17.8). In the remaining patients, anesthesia supplementation was needed at cutaneous incision, whereas manipulation of the muscle and fascial planes was painless. No patients required general anesthesia. LA spreads as advocated (to T-9 and to T-11 bilaterally = spread score 4) in 8/30 patients (26.6%); in these cases, the block was 75% effective for surgery. The anesthetic spread was most negatively influenced by increased body mass index. Postoperative analgesia was excellent in 97% of patients. Conclusion: Use of RSB as an anesthetic management of umbilical herniorrhaphy is recommended only with anesthetic supplementation at the incision site. PMID:26330714

  19. Isolated medial meniscal tear in a Border Collie.

    PubMed

    Ridge, P A

    2006-01-01

    A three-year-old, female Border Collie was successfully treated for an isolated, torn, medial meniscus by arthroscopic meniscal tear resection. The dog returned to agility competition without recurrence of lameness. PMID:16810354

  20. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medial Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medial Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officers Quarters, Northeast Corner of West Harlow Avenue & North Seventh Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction for Patellar Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Nicola D.; Smith, Nicholas A.; Parsons, Nick; Spalding, Tim; Thompson, Peter; Sprowson, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: With improved understanding of the biomechanical importance of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL), its reconstruction for patellar dislocation has become increasingly popular. The aim of this systematic review was to critically determine the effectiveness of MPFL reconstruction for patellar dislocation. Hypothesis: MPFL reconstruction for patellar dislocation leads to a low redislocation rate with improved Kujala scores. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A literature search was performed using Embase and Medline (Ovid) databases. Inclusion criteria included first-time and recurrent patellar dislocation, subluxation, or persistent instability with a minimum follow-up of 12 months and documentation of postoperative redislocation rate or Kujala score. The studies were systematically appraised, and a meta-analysis was performed. Results: Twenty-two studies were included: 2 randomized controlled trials, 3 parallel case series, and 17 case series. There were a total of 655 knees in the review, with an age range at time of surgery from 11 to 52 years. The pooled postoperative redislocation rate from all 17 case series showed a mean of 2.44%. The pooled preoperative Kujala scores from 12 case series showed a mean of 51.6 (95% CI, 46.71-56.49). The pooled postoperative Kujala scores from 16 case series showed a mean of 87.77 (95% CI, 85.15-90.39). Conclusion: Although the studies were of low quality, the meta-analysis of 17 case series shows that MPFL reconstruction for recurrent patellar dislocation results in a significant improvement in Kujala scores, a low redislocation rate, and acceptable complication rate. Randomized trials would be needed to draw influences on the superiority of MPFL reconstruction compared with other treatments. PMID:26535352

  2. The first Iraqi experience with the rectus fascia sling and transobturator tape for female stress incontinence: A randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Al-Azzawi, Issam S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To present the first experience in Iraq of autologous rectus fascia sling (RFS) procedures and transobturator tape (TOT) for treating female stress urinary incontinence (SUI), and to review the validity of the RFS in the era of synthetic tapes. Patients and methods From December 2004 to July 2012, 80 female patients with SUI were enrolled in the study, and randomly assigned into two types of surgery, with 40 treated by RFS (retropubic route) and 40 by TOT. The surgical results were compared between the groups and with those from previous studies. Results The mean operative duration was 80 min for RFS vs. 20 min for TOT. The early cure rate was 98% for RFS (with one failure due to prolonged urinary retention) and 95% for TOT (with two failures due to persistent incontinence). The early complications were mainly abdominal wound problems (20%) for RFS, and groin and upper thigh pain (13%) for TOT. The late complications were the development of postvoid residual urine (8% in RFS vs. 5% in TOT) and de novo detrusor overactivity (5% in each group). There were no vaginal or urethral erosions up to the end of the study. Conclusions RFS and TOT have comparable efficacy and safety in treating SUI. Nevertheless RFS, with its more invasive nature and long operative duration, should only be used when synthetic tapes are not available or not preferable. PMID:26019950

  3. Development of estimation system of knee extension strength using image features in ultrasound images of rectus femoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tsuneo; Fukuoka, Daisuke; Terabayashi, Nobuo; Hara, Takeshi; Muramatsu, Chisako; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    The word "Locomotive syndrome" has been proposed to describe the state of requiring care by musculoskeletal disorders and its high-risk condition. Reduction of the knee extension strength is cited as one of the risk factors, and the accurate measurement of the strength is needed for the evaluation. The measurement of knee extension strength using a dynamometer is one of the most direct and quantitative methods. This study aims to develop a system for measuring the knee extension strength using the ultrasound images of the rectus femoris muscles obtained with non-invasive ultrasonic diagnostic equipment. First, we extract the muscle area from the ultrasound images and determine the image features, such as the thickness of the muscle. We combine these features and physical features, such as the patient's height, and build a regression model of the knee extension strength from training data. We have developed a system for estimating the knee extension strength by applying the regression model to the features obtained from test data. Using the test data of 168 cases, correlation coefficient value between the measured values and estimated values was 0.82. This result suggests that this system can estimate knee extension strength with high accuracy.

  4. Weak Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Sandrine; Starck, Jean-Luc; Leonard, Adrienne; Réfrégier, Alexandre

    2012-03-01

    This chapter reviews the data mining methods recently developed to solve standard data problems in weak gravitational lensing. We detail the different steps of the weak lensing data analysis along with the different techniques dedicated to these applications. An overview of the different techniques currently used will be given along with future prospects. Until about 30 years ago, astronomers thought that the Universe was composed almost entirely of ordinary matter: protons, neutrons, electrons, and atoms. The field of weak lensing has been motivated by the observations made in the last decades showing that visible matter represents only about 4-5% of the Universe (see Figure 14.1). Currently, the majority of the Universe is thought to be dark, that is, does not emit electromagnetic radiation. The Universe is thought to be mostly composed of an invisible, pressure less matter - potentially relic from higher energy theories - called "dark matter" (20-21%) and by an even more mysterious term, described in Einstein equations as a vacuum energy density, called "dark energy" (70%). This "dark" Universe is not well described or even understood; its presence is inferred indirectly from its gravitational effects, both on the motions of astronomical objects and on light propagation. So this point could be the next breakthrough in cosmology. Today's cosmology is based on a cosmological model that contains various parameters that need to be determined precisely, such as the matter density parameter Omega_m or the dark energy density parameter Omega_lambda. Weak gravitational lensing is believed to be the most promising tool to understand the nature of dark matter and to constrain the cosmological parameters used to describe the Universe because it provides a method to directly map the distribution of dark matter (see [1,6,60,63,70]). From this dark matter distribution, the nature of dark matter can be better understood and better constraints can be placed on dark energy

  5. Complications Associated With Medial Thigh Lift: A Comprehensive Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Sisti, Andrea; Cuomo, Roberto; Zerini, Irene; Tassinari, Juri; Brandi, Cesare; Grimaldi, Luca; D’Aniello, Carlo; Nisi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Medial contouring of the thigh is frequently requested to improve appearance and function of medial thigh deformities, following massive weight loss or aging process. This surgical procedure can be associated with a significant rate of complications. Our aim was to consider the complications and outcomes according to the performed technique, through a wide and comprehensive review of the literature. A search on PubMed/Medline was performed using “medial thighplasty”, “medial thigh lifting” and “technique” as key words. As inclusion criteria, we selected the clinical studies describing techniques of medial thighplasty. We excluded the papers in which complications related to medial thighplasty were not specified. We also excluded literature-review articles. We found 16 studies from 1988 to 2015. Overall, 447 patients were treated. Different techniques were applied. Complications were observed in 191/447 patients (42.72%). The most frequent complications were wound dehiscence(18.34%) and seroma (8.05%). No major complications, such as thromboembolism and sepsis, were observed. Minor complications occurred in a high percent of patients, regardless of the performed surgical procedure. Patients should be informed about the possible occurrence of wound dehiscence and seroma, as common complications associated with this surgical procedure. PMID:26865783

  6. Complications Associated With Medial Thigh Lift: A Comprehensive Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Sisti, Andrea; Cuomo, Roberto; Zerini, Irene; Tassinari, Juri; Brandi, Cesare; Grimaldi, Luca; D'Aniello, Carlo; Nisi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Medial contouring of the thigh is frequently requested to improve appearance and function of medial thigh deformities, following massive weight loss or aging process. This surgical procedure can be associated with a significant rate of complications. Our aim was to consider the complications and outcomes according to the performed technique, through a wide and comprehensive review of the literature. A search on PubMed/Medline was performed using "medial thighplasty", "medial thigh lifting" and "technique" as key words. As inclusion criteria, we selected the clinical studies describing techniques of medial thighplasty. We excluded the papers in which complications related to medial thighplasty were not specified. We also excluded literature-review articles. We found 16 studies from 1988 to 2015. Overall, 447 patients were treated. Different techniques were applied. Complications were observed in 191/447 patients (42.72%). The most frequent complications were wound dehiscence(18.34%) and seroma (8.05%). No major complications, such as thromboembolism and sepsis, were observed. Minor complications occurred in a high percent of patients, regardless of the performed surgical procedure. Patients should be informed about the possible occurrence of wound dehiscence and seroma, as common complications associated with this surgical procedure. PMID:26865783

  7. Weakly supervised glasses removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhicheng; Zhou, Yisu; Wen, Lijie

    2015-03-01

    Glasses removal is an important task on face recognition, in this paper, we provide a weakly supervised method to remove eyeglasses from an input face image automatically. We choose sparse coding as face reconstruction method, and optical flow to find exact shape of glasses. We combine the two processes iteratively to remove glasses more accurately. The experimental results reveal that our method works much better than these algorithms alone, and it can remove various glasses to obtain natural looking glassless facial images.

  8. Asymptotically Safe Weak Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmet, Xavier

    We emphasize that the electroweak interactions without a Higgs boson are very similar to quantum general relativity. The Higgs field could just be a dressing field and might not exist as a propagating particle. In that interpretation, the electroweak interactions without a Higgs boson could be renormalizable at the nonperturbative level because of a nontrivial fixed point. Tree-level unitarity in electroweak bosons scattering is restored by the running of the weak scale.

  9. Composite weak bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, M.

    1988-04-01

    Dynamical mechanism of composite W and Z is studied in a 1/N field theory model with four-fermion interactions in which global weak SU(2) symmetry is broken explicitly by electromagnetic interaction. Issues involved in such a model are discussed in detail. Deviation from gauge coupling due to compositeness and higher order loop corrections are examined to show that this class of models are consistent not only theoretically but also experimentally.

  10. Simultaneous bilateral breast reconstruction with the transverse rectus abdominus musculocutaneous free flap.

    PubMed Central

    Khouri, R K; Ahn, C Y; Salzhauer, M A; Scherff, D; Shaw, W W

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to assess the results and morbidity associated with simultaneous bilateral TRAM free flap breast reconstruction and describe refinements in its surgical technique. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Bilateral prophylactic total mastectomies might be an agreeable option for those patients at highest risk for breast cancer if autogenous tissue breast reconstruction could be performed with reasonable technical ease and acceptable morbidity. However, some surgeons harbor reservations regarding the extensiveness of the surgery, the associated morbidity, and the aesthetic quality of the resulting outcome. METHODS: A multicenter retrospective review of clinical experience with 120 consecutive patients who underwent 240 simultaneous bilateral TRAM free flap breast reconstructions was developed. RESULTS: The average operating time, including the time required for the breast ablative portion of the procedures, was 8.6 hours. The average length of hospitalization was 7.6 days. However, for the last 40 patients, these figures were reduced to 7.1 hours and 6.1 days, respectively. Nonautologous blood transfusions were needed in 33 cases (28%), but only 1 was required in the last 40 patients. Thromboses developed in six of 240 flaps (2.5%): 4 were arterial and 2 were venous. Re-exploration allowed us to restore circulation in five flaps, whereas one flap was unsalvageable and was replaced successfully with an alternate flap. An uncomplicated deep vein thromboses developed in one patient with a history of recurrent deep vein thromboses that had no adverse effect on her outcome. Minor complications developed in 18 patients (15%) (e.g., hematoma, partial wound necrosis, wound infection, or prolonged postoperative ileus) that did not affect the long-term outcome. Fourteen patients (11.6%) had abdominal wall weakness or hernias. Follow-up time averaged 37.2 months (range, 14-62 months). On last follow-up, patients' self-reported overall satisfaction with

  11. Comparison of medial versus lateral meniscus allograft transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guo; Liang, Jie; Ru, Neng; Li, Yu-Peng; Shang, Zheng-Hui; Chen, Jian-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To perform a literature review and meta-analysis evaluating the effectiveness of medial and lateral meniscus allograft transplantation (MAT). Methods: The literature review and meta-analysis were conducted between August and October 2015 in the People’s Hospital of China Three Gorges University, Yi Chang, China. A systematic search was performed in the Medline and EMBASE databases, and the Cochrane Library for relevant literature published through October 2015. The outcomes of the included studies were analyzed in terms of the Lysholm Score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Score, Knee Injury And Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Tegner Activity Score, MRI results, and failure rates. An adapted version of the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used for the methodological quality assessment in the meta-analyses. Results: The literature review identified 12 observational studies, including 7 retrospective studies, 4 prospective studies, and the nature of one study was not reported. Significant differences in the outcomes of the lateral MAT group and the medial MAT group were observed in the IKDC scores, KOOS pain values, KOOS activities of daily living (ADL) values, and the absolute and relative extrusions observed on MRI, which suggested that the lateral MAT patients experienced superior clinical benefits compared with the medial MAT patients. However, significant differences between the lateral MAT group and the medial MAT group were not observed with regards to the Lysholm Scores, KOOS symptom values, KOOS sports and recreations values, KOOS quality of life (QOL) values, Tegner Activity Scores, VAS for pain values, and failure rates. Conclusion: The analysis results indicated that lateral MAT provides superior clinical outcomes compared with medial MAT according to the KOOS and IKDC scores. In addition, greater graft extrusion was observed in the medial group on MRI. Although significant differences were not

  12. Protrusio After Medial Acetabular Wall Breach in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Christopher T.; Heiner, Anneliese D.; Baer, Thomas E.; Pugely, Andrew J.; Noiseux, Nicolas O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Medial protrusio is a recognized complication of total hip arthroplasty, but it is not known if a medial wall breach during cup implantation increases the risk. We thus investigated the effect of up to a 2 cm defect in the medial acetabular wall in a cadaveric model. Separately, we investigated the ability of acetabular screws to rescue the construct. Methods Nine human fresh-frozen hemipelves were reamed medially to create the defect, implanted with acetabular cups, and then loaded to failure. The nine contralateral hemipelves were reamed in a standard fashion and served as controls. Separately, nine hemipelves with a medial defect were augmented with two acetabular screws each, then loaded to failure, with the contralateral side as a control. Load-to-failure, stiffness, and energy were recorded. Findings The presence of a medial wall defect decreased the load-to-failure by a mean of 26% (5710 v. 4221 N, p=0.024). The addition of two acetabular screws did not rescue the construct (mean 27% decrease, 4082 v. 2985 N, p=0.024). The majority of specimens failed in a supra-physiologic range of force. Bone density correlated with failure loads (R2 range of 0.54-0.78), and osteoporotic specimens were more likely to fail at a physiologic range, consistent with forces experienced during minor stumbles or falls. Interpretation Osteoporotic patients with a medial wall defect after hip arthroplasty may be susceptible to fracture during activities of daily living. Protected weight bearing with an assistive device may be reasonable in order to minimize fall risk until cup ingrowth is achieved. PMID:26361450

  13. Knee stabilization in patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lewek, Michael D.; Ramsey, Dan K.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Rudolph, Katherine S.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis (MKOA) experience knee laxity and instability. Muscle stabilization strategies may influence the long term integrity of the joint. In this study we determined how individuals with medial knee OA respond to a rapid valgus knee movement to investigate the relationship between muscle stabilization strategies and knee instability. METHODS Twenty one subjects with MKOA and genu varum, and 19 control subjects were tested. Subjects stood with the test limb on a moveable platform that translated laterally to rapidly stress the knee’s medial periarticular structures and create a potentially destabilizing feeling at the knee joint. Knee motion and muscle responses were recorded. Subjects rated their knee instability with a self-report questionnaire about knee instability during daily activities. RESULTS Prior to plate movement the OA subjects demonstrated more medial muscle co-contraction (p=0.014). Following plate movement the OA subjects shifted less weight off the test limb (p = 0.013) and had more medial co-contraction (p=0.037). Those without instability had higher VMMH co-contraction than those who reported more instability (p=0.038). Knee stability correlated positively with VMMH co-contraction prior to plate movement (r = 0.459; p = 0.042). CONCLUSION This study demonstrates that individuals with MKOA attempt to stabilize the knee with greater medial muscle co-contraction in response to laxity that appears on only the medial side of the joint. This strategy presumably contributes to higher joint compression and could exacerbate joint destruction and needs to be altered to slow or stop the progression of the OA disease process. PMID:16142714

  14. TCDD alters medial epithelial cell differentiation during palatogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.D.; Birnbaum, L.S. )

    1989-06-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a widely distributed, persistent environmental contaminant that is teratogenic in mice, where it induces hydronephrosis and cleft palate. The incidence of clefting has been shown to be dose dependent after exposure on either gestation Day (GD) 10 or 12, although the embryo is more susceptible on GD 12. TCDD-exposed palatal shelves meet but do not fuse, and programmed cell death of the medial epithelial cells is inhibited. The mechanism of action through which TCDD alters the program of medial cell development has not been examined in earlier studies, and it is not known whether the mechanism is the same regardless of the dose or developmental stage of exposure. In this study, C57BL/6N mice, a strain sensitive to TCDD, were dosed orally on GD 10 or 12 with 0, 6, 12, 24, or 30 micrograms/kg body wt, in 10 ml corn oil/kg. Embryonic palatal shelves were examined on GD 14, 15, or 16. The degree of palatal closure, epithelial surface morphology, and cellular ultrastructure, the incorporation of (3H)TdR, the expression of EGF receptors, and the binding of 125I-EGF were assessed. After exposure on GD 10 or 12, TCDD altered the differentiation pathway of the medial epithelial cells. The palatal shelves were of normal size and overall morphology, but fusion of the medial epithelia of the opposing shelves did not occur. TCDD prevented programmed cell death of the medial peridermal cells. The expression of EGF receptors by medial cells continued through Day 16 and the receptors were able to bind ligand. The medial cells differentiated into a stratified, squamous, keratinizing epithelium. The shift in phenotype to an oral-like epithelium occurred after exposure on either GD 10 or 12. At the lower dose (6 micrograms/kg), fewer cleft palates were produced, but those shelves which did respond had a fully expressed shift in differentiation.

  15. Weakly broken galileon symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Pirtskhalava, David; Santoni, Luca; Trincherini, Enrico; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2015-09-01

    Effective theories of a scalar ϕ invariant under the internal galileon symmetryϕ→ϕ+b{sub μ}x{sup μ} have been extensively studied due to their special theoretical and phenomenological properties. In this paper, we introduce the notion of weakly broken galileon invariance, which characterizes the unique class of couplings of such theories to gravity that maximally retain their defining symmetry. The curved-space remnant of the galileon’s quantum properties allows to construct (quasi) de Sitter backgrounds largely insensitive to loop corrections. We exploit this fact to build novel cosmological models with interesting phenomenology, relevant for both inflation and late-time acceleration of the universe.

  16. Weak decay of hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, R.

    1983-01-01

    The Moby Dick spectrometer (at BNL) in coincidence with a range spectrometer and a TOF neutron detector will be used to study the weak decay modes of /sup 12/C. The Moby Dick spectrometer will be used to reconstruct and tag events in which specific hypernuclear states are formed in the reaction K/sup -/ + /sup 12/C ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/ + /sup 12/C. Subsequent emission of decay products (pions, protons and neutrons) in coincidence with the fast forward pion will be detected in a time and range spectrometer, and a neutron detector.

  17. Relationship between foot function and medial knee joint loading in people with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dynamic joint loading, particularly the external knee adduction moment (KAM), is an important surrogate measure for the medio-lateral distribution of force across the knee joint in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Foot motion may alter the load on the medial tibiofemoral joint and hence affect the KAM. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the relationship between tibia, rearfoot and forefoot motion in the frontal and transverse planes and the KAM in people with medial compartment knee OA. Method Motion of the knee, tibia, rearfoot and forefoot and knee moments were evaluated in 32 patients with clinically and radiographically-confirmed OA, predominantly in the medial compartment. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to investigate the association between peak values of tibia, rearfoot and forefoot motion in the frontal and transverse planes and 1st peak KAM, 2nd peak KAM, and the knee adduction angular impulse (KAAI). Results Lateral tilt of the tibia was significantly associated with increased 1st peak KAM (r = 0.60, p < 0.001), 2nd peak KAM (r = 0.67, p = 0.001) and KAAI (r = 0.82, p = 0.001). Increased peak rearfoot eversion was significantly correlated with decreased 2nd peak KAM (r = 0.59, p < 0.001) and KAAI (r = 0.50, p = 0.004). Decreased rearfoot internal rotation was significantly associated with increased 2nd peak KAM (r = −0.44, p = 0.01) and KAAI (r = −0.38, p = 0.02), while decreased rearfoot internal rotation relative to the tibia was significantly associated with increased 2nd peak KAM (r = 0.43, p = 0.01). Significant negative correlations were found between peak forefoot eversion relative to the rearfoot and 2nd peak KAM (r = −0.53, p = 0.002) and KAAI (r = −0.51, p = 0.003) and between peak forefoot inversion and 2nd peak KAM (r = −0.54, p = 0.001) and KAAI (r = −0.48, p = 0.005). Conclusion Increased rearfoot

  18. Open Right Hemicolectomy:Lateral to Medial or Medial to Lateral Approach?

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qi; Zhong, Yunshi; Tang, Wentao; Feng, Qingyang; Zheng, Peng; Ji, Meiling; Wei, Ye; Xu, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Currently, no published studies have compared the clinical outcomes of the medial-to-lateral approach (MA) and lateral-to-medial approach (LA) for open right hemicolectomy. Thus, the present study aimed to assess whether one of these approaches has any potential benefits over the other. Methods A retrospective study was performed of all patients who underwent open right hemicolectomy with pathologically confirmed disease who met the eligibility criteria between June 2008 and June 2012. The population was divided into an MA group and an LA group by propensity scoring. We compared patient demographic and clinical characteristic variables between the two groups and assessed short-term and long-term outcomes. Results A total of 450 patients (MA, n = 150; LA, n = 300) were evaluated. The operation time (MA,138.4 minutesvs.LA,166.2 minutes; P < .05) and blood loss (MA,52.0mL vs. LA,62.6mL; P < .05)were significantly lower in the MA group. No differences in the number of harvested lymph nodes and oncologic outcomes were observed between the two groups. Further subgroup analysis for stage III colon cancer revealed that the MA group had significantly more retrieved lymph nodes (MA,18.8vs. LA,16.0; P = .028). There were no differences in other variables between the two groups. Conclusions The MA reduced operative time and blood loss compared with the LA. We thus concluded that the MA provided short-term benefits compared with the LA in open right hemicolectomy for right-sided colon cancer. PMID:26720634

  19. Lateral–Medial Dissociation in Orbitofrontal Cortex–Hypothalamus Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Satoshi; Osada, Takahiro; Ogawa, Akitoshi; Tanaka, Masaki; Wada, Hiroyuki; Yoshizawa, Yasunori; Imai, Yoshio; Machida, Toru; Akahane, Masaaki; Shirouzu, Ichiro; Konishi, Seiki

    2016-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is involved in cognitive functions, and is also closely related to autonomic functions. The OFC is densely connected with the hypothalamus, a heterogeneous structure controlling autonomic functions that can be divided into two major parts: the lateral and the medial. Resting-state functional connectivity has allowed us to parcellate the cerebral cortex into putative functional areas based on the changes in the spatial pattern of connectivity in the cerebral cortex when a seed point is moved from one voxel to another. In the present high spatial-resolution fMRI study, we investigate the connectivity-based organization of the OFC with reference to the hypothalamus. The OFC was parcellated using resting-state functional connectivity in an individual subject approach, and then the functional connectivity was examined between the parcellated areas in the OFC and the lateral/medial hypothalamus. We found a functional double dissociation in the OFC: the lateral OFC (the lateral orbital gyrus) was more likely connected with the lateral hypothalamus, whereas the medial OFC (the medial orbital and rectal gyri) was more likely connected with the medial hypothalamus. These results demonstrate the fundamental heterogeneity of the OFC, and suggest a potential neural basis of the OFC–hypothalamic functional interaction. PMID:27303281

  20. Lateral-Medial Dissociation in Orbitofrontal Cortex-Hypothalamus Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Satoshi; Osada, Takahiro; Ogawa, Akitoshi; Tanaka, Masaki; Wada, Hiroyuki; Yoshizawa, Yasunori; Imai, Yoshio; Machida, Toru; Akahane, Masaaki; Shirouzu, Ichiro; Konishi, Seiki

    2016-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is involved in cognitive functions, and is also closely related to autonomic functions. The OFC is densely connected with the hypothalamus, a heterogeneous structure controlling autonomic functions that can be divided into two major parts: the lateral and the medial. Resting-state functional connectivity has allowed us to parcellate the cerebral cortex into putative functional areas based on the changes in the spatial pattern of connectivity in the cerebral cortex when a seed point is moved from one voxel to another. In the present high spatial-resolution fMRI study, we investigate the connectivity-based organization of the OFC with reference to the hypothalamus. The OFC was parcellated using resting-state functional connectivity in an individual subject approach, and then the functional connectivity was examined between the parcellated areas in the OFC and the lateral/medial hypothalamus. We found a functional double dissociation in the OFC: the lateral OFC (the lateral orbital gyrus) was more likely connected with the lateral hypothalamus, whereas the medial OFC (the medial orbital and rectal gyri) was more likely connected with the medial hypothalamus. These results demonstrate the fundamental heterogeneity of the OFC, and suggest a potential neural basis of the OFC-hypothalamic functional interaction. PMID:27303281

  1. Medial prefrontal theta phase coupling during spatial memory retrieval.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Raphael; Bush, Daniel; Bonnefond, Mathilde; Bandettini, Peter A; Barnes, Gareth R; Doeller, Christian F; Burgess, Neil

    2014-06-01

    Memory retrieval is believed to involve a disparate network of areas, including medial prefrontal and medial temporal cortices, but the mechanisms underlying their coordination remain elusive. One suggestion is that oscillatory coherence mediates inter-regional communication, implicating theta phase and theta-gamma phase-amplitude coupling in mnemonic function across species. To examine this hypothesis, we used non-invasive whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) as participants retrieved the location of objects encountered within a virtual environment. We demonstrate that, when participants are cued with the image of an object whose location they must subsequently navigate to, there is a significant increase in 4-8 Hz theta power in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and the phase of this oscillation is coupled both with ongoing theta phase in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) and perceptually induced 65-85 Hz gamma amplitude in medial parietal cortex. These results suggest that theta phase coupling between mPFC and MTL and theta-gamma phase-amplitude coupling between mPFC and neocortical regions may play a role in human spatial memory retrieval. PMID:24497013

  2. Interrelationships between meat quality traits, texture measurements and physicochemical characteristics of M. rectus abdominis from Charolais heifers.

    PubMed

    Oury, M P; Picard, B; Briand, M; Blanquet, J P; Dumont, R

    2009-10-01

    Ninety-nine Charolais heifers were used to study the variability of meat quality traits in relation to the physicochemical characteristics of M. rectus abdominis. The heifers of the same trade class were slaughtered at 33months of age (±4months) and 381kg carcass weight (±31kg). Muscle and bone development scores were evaluated before slaughter. Carcass weight, slaughter age and life average daily gain were recorded. Shear force measurements and meat quality traits were evaluated after 14days of aging. Some physicochemical characteristics were measured 24h post-slaughter. Tenderness was correlated with slaughter age (r=-0.31), bone development (r=-0.22) and life average daily gain (r=+0.37). Tenderness was significantly related to total collagen content (r=-0.24), lipid content (r=+0.27) and I myosin heavy chain proportion (r=+0.24). Juiciness was positively correlated with lipid content (r=+0.31) and I myosin heavy chain proportion (r=+0.20). Flavor intensity was correlated with lipid content (r=+0.26) and mean fiber area (r=+0.24). Shear force was correlated with total collagen, lipid and 27K proteasome sub-unit contents. Taking animal characteristics and muscle properties together in a multiple regression analysis increased the explained tenderness variability to 33%. The independent variables listed in order of importance were life average daily gain, total collagen content, bone development, lipid content, I myosin heavy chain isoform proportion, shear force of broiled meat and slaughter age. PMID:20416732

  3. Weakly relativistic plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Fermous, Rachid Djebli, Mourad

    2015-04-15

    Plasma expansion is an important physical process that takes place in laser interactions with solid targets. Within a self-similar model for the hydrodynamical multi-fluid equations, we investigated the expansion of both dense and under-dense plasmas. The weakly relativistic electrons are produced by ultra-intense laser pulses, while ions are supposed to be in a non-relativistic regime. Numerical investigations have shown that relativistic effects are important for under-dense plasma and are characterized by a finite ion front velocity. Dense plasma expansion is found to be governed mainly by quantum contributions in the fluid equations that originate from the degenerate pressure in addition to the nonlinear contributions from exchange and correlation potentials. The quantum degeneracy parameter profile provides clues to set the limit between under-dense and dense relativistic plasma expansions at a given density and temperature.

  4. Unusual Appearance of an Osteochondral Lesion Accompanying Medial Meniscus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mine, Takatomo; Ihara, Koichiro; Kawamura, Hiroyuki; Date, Ryo; Chagawa, Kazuki

    2014-01-01

    An osteochondral lesion in the knee joint is caused by a focal traumatic osteochondral defect, osteochondritis dissecans, an isolated degenerative lesion, or diffuse degenerative disease. An osteochondral lesion with a cleft-like appearance accompanying medial meniscus injury is rare without trauma. We report the case of a 13-year-old boy who complained of right knee pain and swelling, with radiographic findings of an osteochondral defect. Arthroscopic inspection showed an osteochondral lesion in the medial condyle of the femur and tibial plateau accompanying a partial medial meniscus discoid tear. Partial meniscectomy was performed, and a microfracture procedure was carried out on the osteochondral defect. The patient was asymptomatic at 2 years' follow-up. This technique is a relatively easy, completely arthroscopic procedure that spares the bone and cartilage and has yielded a good clinical outcome in a skeletally immature patient who had an osteochondral lesion with a cleft-like appearance. PMID:24749028

  5. Postero‐medial elbow problems in the adult athlete

    PubMed Central

    Eygendaal, D; Safran, M R

    2006-01-01

    The ligamentous, osseous, musculotendinous, and neural structures at the postero‐medial side of the elbow are at risk for various injuries in overhead athletes. The combination of valgus and extension overload during overhead activities results in tensile forces along the medial stabilising structures, with compression on the lateral compartment and shear stress posteriorly. The combination of tensile forces medially and shear forces posteriorly can result in ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) tears, flexor–pronator mass injuries, neuritis of the ulnar nerve, posterior impingement, and olecranon stress fractures. Most symptomatic conditions of the overhead athlete can be treated conservatively initially. In cases where conservative treatment is unsuccessful surgical intervention is indicated. Recent advances in arthroscopic surgical techniques and ligamentous reconstruction ensure that the prognosis for return to pre‐injury level is good. PMID:16632574

  6. Common medial elbow injuries in the adolescent athlete.

    PubMed

    Leahy, Ian; Schorpion, Melissa; Ganley, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Recently there has been increased year-round sports participation among children and adolescents with limited to no rest periods. This has led to increases in pediatric repetitive stress injuries, once considered a rarity. Whether in the throwing athlete or in the athlete that experiences repetitive axial loading; increased medial tension and overload syndromes can lead to stress reactions and fractures. This occurs in the developing athlete due to the bone being weaker than the surrounding tendons and ligaments. The medial elbow is a high stress area and is susceptible to many conditions including apophysitis , avulsion fractures and ulnar collateral ligament disruption. Valgus stress can cause injury to the medial elbow which can lead to increased lateral compression, Panner's disease and osteochondral lesions of the capitellum and olecranon. The purpose of this manuscript is to review common elbow disorders in the adolescent population, outline management and highlight important features of rehabilitation. PMID:25840494

  7. Medial Arterial Calcification: An Overlooked Player in Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chin Yee; Shanahan, Catherine M

    2016-08-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a global health issue that is becoming more prevalent in an aging world population. Diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease are also on the increase, and both are associated with accelerated vascular calcification and an unfavorable prognosis in PAD. These data challenge the traditional athero-centric view of PAD, instead pointing toward a disease process complicated by medial arterial calcification. Like atherosclerosis, aging is a potent risk factor for medial arterial calcification, and accelerated vascular aging may underpin the devastating manifestations of PAD, particularly in patients prone to calcification. Consequently, this review will attempt to dissect the relationship between medial arterial calcification and atherosclerosis in PAD and identify common as well as novel risk factors that may contribute to and accelerate progression of PAD. In this context, we focus on the complex interplay between oxidative stress, DNA damage, and vascular aging, as well as the unexplored role of neuropathy. PMID:27312224

  8. Individuals' and groups' intentions in the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Chaminade, Thierry; Kawato, Mitsuo; Frith, Chris

    2011-11-16

    Functional MRI signal was recorded while participants perceived stimuli presented using moving dots. In two conditions of interest, the motion of dots depicted intentions: dots representing the joints of an agent performing an action, and dots representing individual agents behaving contingently. The finding of a common cluster in the posterior part of the medial frontal cortex involved in intentional action representation validates the hypothesis that perception of these two conditions requires a similar internal representation. A cluster responding to the behaving group only is found in the anterior medial frontal cortex. These results support a division of the medial frontal cortex according to social stimuli attributes, with anterior areas responding to higher-order group behaviours integrating the action of multiple individual agents. PMID:21897305

  9. Two cases of medial knee pain involving the medial coronary ligament in adolescents treated with conservative rehabilitation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hudes, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This case study chronicled the assessment, treatment and management of two adolescent patients presenting with acute knee pain, diagnosed as medial meniscus tear, with or without a medial collateral ligament sprain, with coronary ligament involvement. Cases Patient 1: A 16 year old male football player presented with right medial knee pain of 2 days duration after having been tackled during practice from the left side. Patient 2: A 16 year old female presented with right medial knee pain that began 1 week prior to presentation after a fall down the stairs. Treatment: Treatment was initiated in both cases using inflammatory control techniques of icing and fascial stripping and progressed to rehabilitative exercises including VMO (vastus medialis oblique) exercises and squatting exercises to strengthen the quadriceps femoris musculature and proprioceptive exercise. Rehabilitation occurred over a four week duration in both cases with progression of exercises on an individual basis. Both cases resolved within four weeks and return to normal activities resumed at the three week mark including a return to play in patient 1. Both patients reported complete resolution of symptoms at the four week mark with no recurrence on follow up a number of months later. Summary: Conservative management, including icing, fascial stripping, and rehabilitative exercises may be beneficial in the treatment of medial meniscus tears with coronary ligament involvement in adolescents. PMID:21629464

  10. Bilateral medial medullary syndrome secondary to Takayasu arteritis.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Anirudda; Chandran, Vijay; Pai, Aparna; Rao, Suryanarayana; Shetty, Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    Medial medullary syndrome (MMS) is a rare type of stroke which results due to occlusion of the anterior spinal artery or vertebral artery or its branches. In this case report we present a patient who developed MMS secondary to Takayasu arteritis (TA). TA is a chronic inflammatory arteritis primarily involving the arch of aorta and its branches, which in our patient resulted in occlusion of subclavian arteries as well as infarction of the medial medulla bilaterally. To our knowledge this is the first time that MMS has been found to occur secondary to TA. PMID:23943806

  11. Tentorial dural arteriovenous fistula of the medial tentorial artery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Syrone; Lee, Dane C; Tanoura, Tad

    2016-09-01

    The medial tentorial artery arises from the meningohypophyseal trunk, a branch of the cavernous internal carotid artery, and it is poorly visualized on angiography in the absence of pathologically increased blood flow. We present the case of a 38-year-old man with intraventricular hemorrhage from a tentorial dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) singularly supplied by a robust medial tentorial artery. Tentorial DAVFs comprise a rare but high-risk subset of DAVFs. The diagnosis was suggested by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings and confirmed with digital subtraction angiography. PMID:27594958

  12. Reducing Postoperative Opioid Consumption by Adding an Ultrasound-Guided Rectus Sheath Block to Multimodal Analgesia for Abdominal Cancer Surgery With Midline Incision

    PubMed Central

    Bashandy, Ghada Mohammad Nabih; Elkholy, Abeer Hassan Hamed

    2014-01-01

    Background: Many multimodal analgesia techniques have been tried to provide adequate analgesia for midline incisions extending above and below the umbilicus aiming at limiting the perioperative use of morphine thus limiting side effects. Ultrasound (US) guidance made the anesthesiologist reconsider old techniques for wider clinical use. The rectus sheath block (RSB) is a useful technique under-utilized in the adult population. Objectives: Our study examined the efficacy of a preemptive single-injection rectus sheath block in providing better early postoperative pain scores compared to general anesthesia alone. Patients and Methods: Sixty patients were recruited in this randomized controlled trial. These patients were divided into two groups: RSB group had an RSB after induction of anesthesia and before surgical incision, and GA (general anesthesia) group had general anesthesia alone. Both groups were compared for verbal analogue scale (VAS) score, opioid consumption and hemodynamic variables in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU). Analgesic requirements in surgical wards were recorded in postoperative days (POD) 0, 1 and 2. Results: The median VAS score was significantly lower in RSB group compared with GA group in all 5 time points in the PACU (P ˂ 0.05). Also PACU morphine consumption was lower in RSB group than GA group patients (95% confidence interval [CI] of the difference in means between groups, −4.59 to −2.23 mg). Morphine consumption was also less in the first 2 postoperative days (POD0 and POD1). Conclusions: Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block is an easy technique to learn. This technique, when it is used with general anesthesia, will be more effective in reducing pain scores and opioid consumption compared with general anesthesia alone. PMID:25289373

  13. Medial proximal tibial angle after medial opening wedge HTO: A retrospective diagnostic test study

    PubMed Central

    Pornrattanamaneewong, Chaturong; Narkbunnam, Rapeepat; Chareancholvanich, Keerati

    2012-01-01

    Background: Medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) is the commonly used angle, which is simply measured from the knee radiographs. It can determine the correction angle in medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (MOWHTO). The hypothesis of our study is that post-osteotomy MPTA can predict the change in correction angle, and we aimed to determine the optimal MPTA with which to prevent recurrent varus deformity after MOWHTO. Materials and Methods: Between January 2002 and April 2010, radiographs of 59 patients, who underwent 71 MOWHTOs using the locking-compression osteotomy plates without bone grafts, were evaluated for the change of the MPTA. The MPTA was measured preoperatively and one and twelve months postoperatively. The changes of MPTA between one and twelve months were classified into valgus, stable, and varus change. The predicting factors were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni multiple comparisons. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to find out the cut off point for preventing the recurrent varus deformity. Results: The overall preoperative, and one and twelve month postoperative MPTA values were 84.4 ± 2.4°, 97.2 ± 4.1°, and 96.3 ± 3.6°, respectively. Between one and twelve months, 39 knees displayed reduced varus change (–2.8 ± 2.1°), 18 knees displayed no change, and 14 knees displayed a greater valgus change (+2.9 ± 2.1°). The best factor for predicting these changes was the one month MPTA value (P = 0.006). By using the ROC curve, a one month MPTA of 95° was analyzed as the cut off point for preventing the recurrent varus deformity. With MPTA ≥95°, 92.3% of the osteotomies exhibited stable or varus change and 7.7% exhibited valgus change. However, with MPTA <95°, 47.4% exhibited stable or varus change and 52.6% exhibited valgus change (P < 0.001, odds ratio = 13.3). Conclusion: The postoperative MPTA can be used to predict the change in correction angle and an MPTA of at least 95° is

  14. Cutaneous reinnervation of the rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap after chest wall reconstruction: development of herpes zoster in the transplanted musculocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Tomita, K; Inoue, K

    1998-08-01

    We report a patient in whom herpes zoster developed in the transplanted rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap 14 months after a chest wall reconstruction for recurrent breast cancer. Based on the distribution of the varicella zoster virus spreading along the sensory nerve fibers, we concluded that the virus spread along the reinnervated sensory nerves from the dorsal ganglia, through the intercostal nerves, and into the flap skin. It is suggested that this finding demonstrates the pathway of reinnervation into the transferred musculocutaneous flap on the chest wall. PMID:9718154

  15. Acute effects of anterior thigh foam rolling on hip angle, knee angle, and rectus femoris length in the modified Thomas test

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Gregory J.; Contreras, Bret; Beardsley, Chris; Chung, Bryan; Feser, Erin H.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Foam rolling has been shown to acutely increase range of motion (ROM) during knee flexion and hip flexion with the experimenter applying an external force, yet no study to date has measured hip extensibility as a result of foam rolling with controlled knee flexion and hip extension moments. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of foam rolling on hip extension, knee flexion, and rectus femoris length during the modified Thomas test. Methods. Twenty-three healthy participants (male = 7; female = 16; age = 22 ± 3.3 years; height = 170 ± 9.18 cm; mass = 67.7 ± 14.9 kg) performed two, one-minute bouts of foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh. Hip extension and knee flexion were measured via motion capture before and after the foam rolling intervention, from which rectus femoris length was calculated. Results. Although the increase in hip extension (change = +1.86° (+0.11, +3.61); z(22) = 2.08; p = 0.0372; Pearson’s r = 0.43 (0.02, 0.72)) was not due to chance alone, it cannot be said that the observed changes in knee flexion (change = −1.39° (−5.53, +2.75); t(22) = −0.70; p = 0.4933; Cohen’s d = − 0.15 (−0.58, 0.29)) or rectus femoris length (change = −0.005 (−0.013, +0.003); t(22) = −1.30; p = 0.2070; Cohen’s d = − 0.27 (−0.70, 0.16)) were not due to chance alone. Conclusions. Although a small change in hip extension was observed, no changes in knee flexion or rectus femoris length were observed. From these data, it appears unlikely that foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh will improve passive hip extension and knee flexion ROM, especially if performed in combination with a dynamic stretching protocol. PMID:26421244

  16. Locked bucket-handle tears of both medial and lateral menisci with simultaneous anterior cruciate and medial collateral ligaments injury.

    PubMed

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Kyparlis, Dimitris; Koumis, Panagiotis; Lola, Despoina; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 38-year-old male who presented to the accident and emergency department with a locked knee after falling from a height. The knee was locked at 35° of flexion without any signs of instability in clinical examination. The patient was operated within 6 h from injury. During arthroscopy bucket-handle tears of both medial and lateral menisci were found. The bucket-handle fragments were displaced into the intercondylar notch causing the knee to lock. Additionally, tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the medial collateral ligament (MCL) were also found. The patient underwent ACL reconstruction with hamstrings autograft, medial subtotal meniscectomy and lateral meniscus repair. The MCL was treated conservatively. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient returned to the preinjury level of activity within 8 months. The patient remains asymptomatic 2 years postoperatively. PMID:22691631

  17. Locked bucket-handle tears of both medial and lateral menisci with simultaneous anterior cruciate and medial collateral ligaments injury

    PubMed Central

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Kyparlis, Dimitris; Koumis, Panagiotis; Lola, Despoina; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 38-year-old male who presented to the accident and emergency department with a locked knee after falling from a height. The knee was locked at 35° of flexion without any signs of instability in clinical examination. The patient was operated within 6 h from injury. During arthroscopy bucket-handle tears of both medial and lateral menisci were found. The bucket-handle fragments were displaced into the intercondylar notch causing the knee to lock. Additionally, tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the medial collateral ligament (MCL) were also found. The patient underwent ACL reconstruction with hamstrings autograft, medial subtotal meniscectomy and lateral meniscus repair. The MCL was treated conservatively. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient returned to the preinjury level of activity within 8 months. The patient remains asymptomatic 2 years postoperatively. PMID:22691631

  18. Medial Posterior Meniscal Root Tears Are Associated with Development or Worsening of Medial Tibiofemoral Cartilage Damage: The Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Daichi; Jarraya, Mohamed; Roemer, Frank W.; Zhang, Yuqing; Niu, Jingbo; Crema, Michel D.; Englund, Martin; Lynch, John A.; Nevitt, Michael C.; Torner, James C.; Lewis, Cora E.; Felson, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the association of meniscal root tear with the development or worsening of tibiofemoral cartilage damage. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval and written informed consent from all subjects were obtained. A total of 596 knees with radiographically depicted osteoarthritis were randomly selected from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis study cohort. Cartilage damage was semiquantitatively assessed by using the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (WORMS) system (grades 0–6). Subjects were separated into three groups: root tear only, meniscal tear without root tear, and neither meniscal nor root tear. A log-binomial regression model was used to calculate the relative risks for knees to develop incident or progressing cartilage damage in the root tear group and the meniscal tear group, with the no tear group serving as a reference. Results: In the medial tibiofemoral joint, there were 37 knees with isolated medial posterior root tear, 294 with meniscal tear without root tear, and 264 without meniscal or root tear. There were only two lateral posterior root tears, and no anterior root tears were found. Thus, the focus was on the medial posterior root tear. The frequency of severe cartilage damage (WORMS ≥5) was higher in the group with root tear than in the group without root or meniscal tear (76.7% vs 19.7%, P < .0001) but not in the group with meniscal but no root tear (76.7% vs 65.2%, P = .055). Longitudinal analyses included 33 knees with isolated medial posterior root tear, 270 with meniscal tear, and 245 with no tear. Adjusted relative risk of cartilage loss was 2.03 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.18, 3.48) for the root tear group and 1.84 (95% CI: 1.32, 2.58) for the meniscal tear group. Conclusion: Isolated medial posterior meniscal root tear is associated with incident and progressive medial tibiofemoral cartilage loss. © RSNA, 2013 PMID:23696679

  19. RefZ Facilitates the Switch from Medial to Polar Division during Spore Formation in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Remi; Dunne, Roisin; Bisson-Filho, Alexandre W.; Kumar, Krithika; Nguyen, Trang; Mulcahy, Lawrence; Koullias, John; Gueiros-Filho, Frederico J.

    2012-01-01

    During sporulation, Bacillus subtilis redeploys the division protein FtsZ from midcell to the cell poles, ultimately generating an asymmetric septum. Here, we describe a sporulation-induced protein, RefZ, that facilitates the switch from a medial to a polar FtsZ ring placement. The artificial expression of RefZ during vegetative growth converts FtsZ rings into FtsZ spirals, arcs, and foci, leading to filamentation and lysis. Mutations in FtsZ specifically suppress RefZ-dependent division inhibition, suggesting that RefZ may target FtsZ. During sporulation, cells lacking RefZ are delayed in polar FtsZ ring formation, spending more time in the medial and transition stages of FtsZ ring assembly. A RefZ-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion localizes in weak polar foci at the onset of sporulation and as a brighter midcell focus at the time of polar division. RefZ has a TetR DNA binding motif, and point mutations in the putative recognition helix disrupt focus formation and abrogate cell division inhibition. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays identified sites of RefZ enrichment in the origin region and near the terminus. Collectively, these data support a model in which RefZ helps promote the switch from medial to polar division and is guided by the organization of the chromosome. Models in which RefZ acts as an activator of FtsZ ring assembly near the cell poles or as an inhibitor of the transient medial ring at midcell are discussed. PMID:22730127

  20. Medial Temporal Lobe Memory in Childhood: Developmental Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Elise L.; Richmond, Jenny L.; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa K.; Thomas, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    The medial temporal lobes (MTL) support declarative memory and mature structurally and functionally during the postnatal years in humans. Although recent work has addressed the development of declarative memory in early childhood, less is known about continued development beyond this period of time. The purpose of this investigation was to explore…

  1. Sural Versus Perforator Flaps for Distal Medial Leg Wounds.

    PubMed

    Schannen, Andrew P; Truchan, Lisa; Goshima, Kaoru; Bentley, Roger; DeSilva, Gregory L

    2015-12-01

    Soft tissue coverage of distal medial ankle wounds is a challenging problem in orthopedic surgery because of the limited local tissues and prominent instrumentation. Traditionally, these wounds required free tissue transfer to achieve suitable coverage and subsequent bony union. To better respect the reconstructive ladder and to avoid the inherent difficulty of free flap coverage, rotational flaps have been used to cover these wounds. Both sural fasciocutaneous flaps and rotational fasciocutaneous perforator (propeller) flaps have been described for distal medial soft tissue coverage. The authors performed a retrospective chart review of patients who underwent distal medial leg coverage with the use of either sural flaps or rotational fasciocutaneous perforator flaps. The authors identified 14 patients by Current Procedural Terminology code who met the study criteria. The average age and degree of medical comorbidities were comparable in the 2 groups. The authors reviewed their medical records to evaluate fracture healing, flap size, complications, and return to normal shoe wear. All 7 sural flaps healed without incident, with underlying fracture healing. Of the 7 perforator flaps, 6 healed without incident, with underlying fracture healing. One perforator-based flap was complicated by superficial tip necrosis and went on to heal with local wound care. All patients returned to normal shoe wear. Both sural artery rotational flaps and posterior tibial artery-based rotational flaps are viable options for coverage of the distal medial leg. Coverage can be achieved reliably without microsurgery, anticoagulation, or monitoring in the intensive care unit. PMID:26652325

  2. Medial Prefrontal Cortex Lesions Abolish Contextual Control of Competing Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddon, J. E.; Killcross, A. S.

    2005-01-01

    There is much debate as to the extent and nature of functional specialization within the different subregions of the prefrontal cortex. The current study was undertaken to investigate the effect of damage to medial prefrontal cortex subregions in the rat. Rats were trained on two biconditional discrimination tasks, one auditory and one visual, in…

  3. Medial temporal N-acetyl aspartate in pediatric major depression

    PubMed Central

    MacMaster, Frank P.; Moore, Gregory J; Russell, Aileen; Mirza, Yousha; Taormina, S. Preeya; Buhagiar, Christian; Rosenberg, David R.

    2008-01-01

    The medial temporal cortex (MTC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pediatric major depressive disorder (MDD). Eleven MDD-case control pairs underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. N-acetyl-aspartate was lower in left MTC (27%) in MDD patients versus controls. Lower N-acetyl-aspartate concentrations in MDD patients may reflect reduced neuronal viability. PMID:18703320

  4. Medial temporal N-acetyl-aspartate in pediatric major depression.

    PubMed

    MacMaster, Frank P; Moore, Gregory J; Russell, Aileen; Mirza, Yousha; Taormina, S Preeya; Buhagiar, Christian; Rosenberg, David R

    2008-10-30

    The medial temporal cortex (MTC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pediatric major depressive disorder (MDD). Eleven MDD case-control pairs underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. N-acetyl-aspartate was lower in the left MTC (27%) in MDD patients versus controls. Lower N-acetyl-aspartate concentrations in MDD patients may reflect reduced neuronal viability. PMID:18703320

  5. Osteochondritis dissecans on the medial aspect of the humeral head

    PubMed Central

    Mima, Yuichiro; Matsumura, Noboru; Ogawa, Kiyohisa; Iwamoto, Takuji; Ochi, Kensuke; Sato, Kazuki; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    The case of a 29-year-old man who had osteochondritis dissecans on the medial aspect of the humeral head is reported. Repetitive micro-trauma at a low elevated arm position was thought to have induced the osteochondral lesion. PMID:27186062

  6. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction in a Below-Knee Amputee

    PubMed Central

    El-Tawil, Sherif; Elfons Tawafig, Marian; Miles, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Patellar instability is a common finding in patients with below-knee amputation and yet management options are not commonly described in the literature. We describe the first reported case of a medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction using allograft in a patient with a below-knee amputation. Clinical outcome at two-year follow-up remains very good. PMID:26579321

  7. Medial Temporal Lobe Structures Contribute to On-Line Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, David

    2009-01-01

    For the last five decades, the medial temporal lobes have been generally understood to facilitate enduring representation of certain kinds of information. In particular, knowledge about the relations among items and concepts appears to rely on that region of the brain. Recent results suggest that those same structures also play a subtle role in…

  8. Theta Synchronizes the Activity of Medial Prefrontal Neurons during Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paz, Rony; Bauer, Elizabeth P.; Pare, Denis

    2008-01-01

    Memory consolidation is thought to involve the gradual transfer of transient hippocampal-dependent traces to distributed neocortical sites via the rhinal cortices. Recently, medial prefrontal (mPFC) neurons were shown to facilitate this process when their activity becomes synchronized. However, the mechanisms underlying this enhanced synchrony…

  9. Scene-Selectivity and Retinotopy in Medial Parietal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Silson, Edward H; Steel, Adam D; Baker, Chris I

    2016-01-01

    Functional imaging studies in human reliably identify a trio of scene-selective regions, one on each of the lateral [occipital place area (OPA)], ventral [parahippocampal place area (PPA)], and medial [retrosplenial complex (RSC)] cortical surfaces. Recently, we demonstrated differential retinotopic biases for the contralateral lower and upper visual fields within OPA and PPA, respectively. Here, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we combine detailed mapping of both population receptive fields (pRF) and category-selectivity, with independently acquired resting-state functional connectivity analyses, to examine scene and retinotopic processing within medial parietal cortex. We identified a medial scene-selective region, which was contained largely within the posterior and ventral bank of the parieto-occipital sulcus (POS). While this region is typically referred to as RSC, the spatial extent of our scene-selective region typically did not extend into retrosplenial cortex, and thus we adopt the term medial place area (MPA) to refer to this visually defined scene-selective region. Intriguingly MPA co-localized with a region identified solely on the basis of retinotopic sensitivity using pRF analyses. We found that MPA demonstrates a significant contralateral visual field bias, coupled with large pRF sizes. Unlike OPA and PPA, MPA did not show a consistent bias to a single visual quadrant. MPA also co-localized with a region identified by strong differential functional connectivity with PPA and the human face-selective fusiform face area (FFA), commensurate with its functional selectivity. Functional connectivity with OPA was much weaker than with PPA, and similar to that with face-selective occipital face area (OFA), suggesting a closer link with ventral than lateral cortex. Consistent with prior research, we also observed differential functional connectivity in medial parietal cortex for anterior over posterior PPA, as well as a region on the lateral

  10. Scene-Selectivity and Retinotopy in Medial Parietal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Silson, Edward H.; Steel, Adam D.; Baker, Chris I.

    2016-01-01

    Functional imaging studies in human reliably identify a trio of scene-selective regions, one on each of the lateral [occipital place area (OPA)], ventral [parahippocampal place area (PPA)], and medial [retrosplenial complex (RSC)] cortical surfaces. Recently, we demonstrated differential retinotopic biases for the contralateral lower and upper visual fields within OPA and PPA, respectively. Here, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we combine detailed mapping of both population receptive fields (pRF) and category-selectivity, with independently acquired resting-state functional connectivity analyses, to examine scene and retinotopic processing within medial parietal cortex. We identified a medial scene-selective region, which was contained largely within the posterior and ventral bank of the parieto-occipital sulcus (POS). While this region is typically referred to as RSC, the spatial extent of our scene-selective region typically did not extend into retrosplenial cortex, and thus we adopt the term medial place area (MPA) to refer to this visually defined scene-selective region. Intriguingly MPA co-localized with a region identified solely on the basis of retinotopic sensitivity using pRF analyses. We found that MPA demonstrates a significant contralateral visual field bias, coupled with large pRF sizes. Unlike OPA and PPA, MPA did not show a consistent bias to a single visual quadrant. MPA also co-localized with a region identified by strong differential functional connectivity with PPA and the human face-selective fusiform face area (FFA), commensurate with its functional selectivity. Functional connectivity with OPA was much weaker than with PPA, and similar to that with face-selective occipital face area (OFA), suggesting a closer link with ventral than lateral cortex. Consistent with prior research, we also observed differential functional connectivity in medial parietal cortex for anterior over posterior PPA, as well as a region on the lateral

  11. A Finite Element Analysis of Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    DeVries Watson, Nicole A.; Duchman, Kyle R.; Bollier, Matthew J.; Grosland, Nicole M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The medial patellofemoral ligament is the primary soft-tissue restraint to lateral patella translation. Medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction has become a viable surgical option to provide patellar stability in patients with recurrent instability. The primary goal of this study was to determine the effect of medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction on the lateral force-displacement behavior of the patella using finite element analyses. Methods A finite element model of the knee was created using cadaveric image data. Experimental testing was performed to validate the computational model. After validation, the model was modified to study the effect of various medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction insertion sites, allowing comparison of patellofemoral contact force and pressure. Results For the intact anatomic model, the lateral restraining force was 80.0 N with a corresponding patellar contact area of 54.97 mm2. For the anatomic reconstructed medial patellofemoral ligament model, the lateral restraining force increased to 148.9 N with a contact area of 71.78 mm2. This compared favorably to the corresponding experimental study. The force required to laterally displace the patella increased when the femoral insertion site was moved anteriorly or distally. The lateral restraining force decreased when the femoral insertion site moved proximally and the patellar insertion site moved either proximal or distal by 5 mm. Conclusion The line of action was altered with insertion site position, which in turn changed the amount of force it took to displace the patella laterally. Considering the model constraints, an anterior femoral attachment may over constrain the patella and increase cartilage wear due to increase contact area and restraining force. Clinical Relevance A malpositioned femoral tunnel in MPFL reconstruction could increase restraining forces and PF contact pressure, thus it is suggested to use intra-operative fluoroscopy to confirm

  12. Predictive Factors Affecting the Short Term and Long Term Exodrift in Patients with Intermittent Exotropia after Bilateral Rectus Muscle Recession and Its Effect on Surgical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Yam, Jason C. S.; Chong, Gabriela S. L.; Wu, Patrick K. W.; Wong, Ursula S. F.; Chan, Clement W. N.; Ko, Simon T. C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the predictive factors that affect short term and long term postoperative drift in intermittent exotropia after bilateral lateral rectus recession and to evaluate its effect on surgical outcome. Methods. Retrospective review of 203 patients with diagnosis of intermittent exotropia, who had surgical corrections with more than 3 years of followup. Different preoperative parameters were obtained and evaluated using Pearson's correlation analysis. Results. The proportion of exodrift increased from 62% at 6 weeks to 84% at 3 years postoperatively. The postoperative drift was 4.3 ± 8.1 PD at 6 weeks, 5.8 ± 8.4 PD at 6 months, 7.2 ± 8.3 PD at 1 year, 7.4 ± 8.4 PD at 2 years, and 7.7 ± 8.5 PD at 3 years. Preoperative deviation and initial overcorrection were significant factors affecting the postoperative drift at 3 years (r = 0.177, P = 0.011, r = −0.349, and P < 0.001, resp.). Conclusions. Postoperative exodrift along three years occurs in a majority of patients after bilateral lateral rectus recession for intermittent exotropia. The long term surgical success is significantly affected by this postoperative exodrift. A larger preoperative deviation and a larger initial overcorrection are associated with a larger early and late postoperative exodrift. PMID:25093170

  13. Rehabilitation and Return to Sport Following Surgical Repair of the Rectus Abdominis and Adductor Longus in a Professional Basketball Player: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Short, Steven M; Anloague, Philip A; Strack, Donald S

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Case report. Background Acute traumatic avulsion of the rectus abdominis and adductor longus is rare. Chronic groin injuries, often falling under the athletic pubalgia spectrum, have been reported to be more common. There is limited evidence detailing the comprehensive rehabilitation and return to sport of an athlete following surgical or conservative treatment of avulsion injuries of the pubis or other sports-related groin pathologies. Case Description A 29-year-old National Basketball Association player sustained a contact injury during a professional basketball game. This case report describes a unique clinical situation specific to professional sport, in which a surgical repair of an avulsed rectus abdominis and adductor longus was combined with a multimodal impairment- and outcomes-based rehabilitation program. Outcomes The patient returned to in-season competition at 5 weeks postoperation. Objective measures were tracked throughout rehabilitation and compared to baseline assessments. Measures such as the Copenhagen Hip and Groin Outcome Score and numeric pain-rating scale revealed progress beyond the minimal important difference. Discussion This case report details the clinical reasoning and evidence-informed interventions involved in the return to elite sport. Detailed programming and objective assessment may assist in achieving desired outcomes ahead of previously established timelines. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 4. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):697-706. Epub 3 Jul 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6352. PMID:27374014

  14. Meniscus delivery: a maneuver for easy arthroscopic access to the posterior horn of the medial meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Said, Hatem Galal; Goyal, Saumitra; Fetih, Tarek Nabil

    2016-01-01

    Pathology of posterior horn of medial meniscus is common and often presents a difficult approach during arthroscopy for various reasons. We describe an easy maneuver to facilitate “delivery of the medial meniscus” during arthroscopy. PMID:27163099

  15. Dynamic Changes in Acetylcholine Output in the Medial Striatum during Place Reversal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragozzino, Michael E.; Choi, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    The present studies explored the role of the medial striatum in learning when task contingencies change. Experiment 1 examined whether the medial striatum is involved in place reversal learning. Testing occurred in a modified cross-maze across two consecutive sessions. Injections of the local anesthetic, bupivacaine, into the medial striatum, did…

  16. Medial Auditory Thalamus Inactivation Prevents Acquisition and Retention of Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Hunter E.; Poremba, Amy; Freeman, John H.

    2008-01-01

    The auditory conditioned stimulus (CS) pathway that is necessary for delay eyeblink conditioning was investigated using reversible inactivation of the medial auditory thalamic nuclei (MATN) consisting of the medial division of the medial geniculate (MGm), suprageniculate (SG), and posterior intralaminar nucleus (PIN). Rats were given saline or…

  17. The affinity and activity of compounds related to nicotine on the rectus abdominis muscle of the frog (Rana pipiens)

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, R. B.; Thompson, G. M.

    1969-01-01

    1. Series of pyridylalkyl- and substituted phenylalkyl-trimethylammonium salts, triethylammonium salts, diethylamines and di-n-propylamines have been made. The substituents in the benzene ring were nitro, chloro, bromo, methoxy, hydroxy and amino groups and the alkyl residues had one, two, or three methylene groups separating the aromatic nucleus from the cationic head. 2. Most of the trimethylammonium compounds caused a contracture of the frog rectus muscle, but some were partial agonists and a few were antagonists. The di-n-propylamines were all antagonists, as were most of the diethylamines and triethylammonium compounds, though some of these were partial agonists and a few triethylammonium compounds were agonists. The affinities of the antagonists and partial agonists for the receptors stimulated by β-pyridylmethyltrimethylammonium (and by nicotine) were measured. The equipotent molar ratios of all the agonists were measured relative to β-pyridylmethyltrimethylammonium. 3. The dissociation constants of the pyridylmethyldiethylamines and substituted benzyldiethylamines were measured. The effects of substituents on the pKa of benzyldiethylamine were similar to their effects on the pKa of aniline, though there were differences with some of the o-substituted compounds, which could be attributed to internal hydrogen-bond formation. 4. There is no obvious correlation between the effects of a substituent on the pKa of benzyldiethylamine and its effects on affinity. Although increasing the size of the cationic group usually increased affinity, it did not always do so. The compounds with the highest affinity, p-hydroxybenzyldiethylamine (log K, 5·90) had about half the affinity of (+)-tubocurarine (log K, 6·11), but the triethylammonium analogue (log K, 4·17) had only about one-fiftieth of the affinity of the tertiary base. The binding of the drug to the receptor appears to involve many factors which include the size of the groups as well as their electron

  18. Coordination of two-joint rectus femoris and hamstrings during the swing phase of human walking and running.

    PubMed

    Prilutsky, B I; Gregor, R J; Ryan, M M

    1998-06-01

    It has been hypothesized previously that because a strong correlation was found between the difference in electromyographic activity (EMG) of rectus femoris (RF) and hamstrings (HA; EMG(RF)-EMG(HA)) and the difference in the resultant moments at the knee and hip (Mk-Mh) during exertion of external forces on the ground by the leg, input from skin receptors of the foot may play an important role in the control of the distribution of the resultant moments between the knee and hip by modulating activation of the two-joint RF and HA. In the present study, we examined the coordination of RF and HA during the swing phase of walking and running at different speeds, where activity of foot mechanoreceptors is not modulated by an external force. Four subjects walked at speeds of 1.8 m/s and 2.7 m/s and ran at speeds of 2.7 m/s and 3.6 m/s on a motor-driven treadmill. Surface EMG of RF, semimembranosus (SM), and long head of biceps femoris (BF) and coordinates of the four leg joints were recorded. An inverse dynamics analysis was used to calculate the resultant moments at the ankle, knee, and hip during the swing phase. EMG signals were rectified and low-pass filtered to obtain linear envelopes and then shifted in time to account for electromechanical delay between EMG and joint moments. During walking and running at all studied speeds, mean EMG envelope values of RF were statistically (P<0.05) higher in the first half of the swing (or at hip flexion/knee extension combinations of joint moments) than in the second half (or at hip extension/knee flexion combinations of joint moments). Mean EMG values of BF and SM were higher (P<0.05) in the second half of the swing than in the first half. EMG and joint moment peaks were substantially higher (P<0.05) in the swing phase of walking at 2.7 m/s than during the swing phase of running at the same speed. Correlation coefficients calculated between the differences (EMG(RF)-EMG(HA)) and (Mk-Mh), taken every 1% of the swing phase, were

  19. Multiple Running Speed Signals in Medial Entorhinal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Hinman, James R; Brandon, Mark P; Climer, Jason R; Chapman, G William; Hasselmo, Michael E

    2016-08-01

    Grid cells in medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) can be modeled using oscillatory interference or attractor dynamic mechanisms that perform path integration, a computation requiring information about running direction and speed. The two classes of computational models often use either an oscillatory frequency or a firing rate that increases as a function of running speed. Yet it is currently not known whether these are two manifestations of the same speed signal or dissociable signals with potentially different anatomical substrates. We examined coding of running speed in MEC and identified these two speed signals to be independent of each other within individual neurons. The medial septum (MS) is strongly linked to locomotor behavior, and removal of MS input resulted in strengthening of the firing rate speed signal, while decreasing the strength of the oscillatory speed signal. Thus, two speed signals are present in MEC that are differentially affected by disrupted MS input. PMID:27427460

  20. MEDIAL PATELLOFEMORAL LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION TO TREAT RECURRENT PATELLAR DISLOCATION

    PubMed Central

    Gonçaives, Matheus Braga Jacques; Júnior, Lúcio Honório de Carvalho; Soares, Luiz Fernando Machado; Gonçaives, Tiago Jacques; dos Santos, Rogério Luciano; Pereira, Marcelo Lobo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present a new technique for reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) in patients with recurrent patellar dislocation and to evaluate the clinical findings from this. Methods: Between January 2007 and January 2008, 23 patients underwent reconstruction of the MPFL with a free graft from the semitendinosus tendon. After a minimum of 24 months of follow-up, 22 patients were evaluated using the Kujala and Lysholm clinical protocols. Results: The mean follow up was 26.2 months. According to the Lysholm protocol, the patients had a mean score of 53.72 points preoperatively and 93.36 points postoperatively (p = 0.000006). According to the Kujala protocol, the mean score was 59.81 points preoperatively and 83.54 points postoperatively (p = 0.002173). Conclusion: Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the proposed technique showed excellent results over the short term, when evaluated by means of clinical protocols. PMID:27027005

  1. Bipartite Medial Cuneiform: Case Report and Retrospective Review of 1000 Magnetic Resonance (MR) Imaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Geraldine H.; Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B.; Resnick, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To present a unique case report of a Lisfranc fracture in a patient with a bipartite medial cuneiform and to evaluate the prevalence of the bipartite medial cuneiform in a retrospective review of 1000 magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies of the foot. Materials and Methods. Case report followed by a retrospective review of 1000 MR imaging studies of the foot for the presence or absence of a bipartite medial cuneiform. Results. The incidence of the bipartite medial cuneiform is 0.1%. Conclusion. A bipartite medial cuneiform is a rare finding but one with both clinical and surgical implications. PMID:24587806

  2. Medial and lateral pectoral nerves: course and branches.

    PubMed

    Macchi, Veronica; Tiengo, Cesare; Porzionato, Andrea; Parenti, Anna; Stecco, Carla; Mazzoleni, Francesco; De Caro, Raffaele

    2007-03-01

    During modified radical mastectomy or cosmetic surgery, denervation of the lower part of the pectoralis major frequently occurs and may reduce muscle spasm, with consequent better reconstruction of the breast. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the pectoral nerves and the pectoral muscles. Eight unembalmed female cadavers were dissected and vascular and radiologic studies performed. The lateral pectoral nerves showed a constant course, parallel to the thoraco-acromial vessels. They coursed for 55 +/- 7 mm inferomedially on the deep surface of pectoralis major, under its fascia. The medial pectoral nerves showed two main patterns of branching, which correlated with the extent of the costal attachments of the pectoralis minor muscles. In pattern A (56%), associated with costal attachments narrower than 6.0 cm, the nerve pierced the deep aspect of the pectoralis minor as a single trunk, ramified in the muscle, and gave some branches that appeared on the superficial aspect to enter the pectoralis major. In pattern B (44%), associated with costal attachments wider than 6.6 cm, the nerve divided before entering pectoralis minor and its branches passed through the muscle or round its lower border to reach pectoralis major. The most medial branch of the medial pectoral nerve directed to the pectoralis major muscle emerged from pectoralis minor at the third intercostal space in the midclavicular line, a mean of 10.3 cm lateral to the margin of the sternum. Knowledge of the relationship between the extent of the costal attachment of pectoralis minor and the two patterns of branching of the medial pectoral nerve may be useful when performing elective denervation of the major pectoralis muscle. PMID:16583383

  3. A combinatorial optogenetic approach to medial habenula function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Eric E.; Hsu, Yun-Wei; Wang, Si; Morton, Glenn; Zeng, Hongkui

    2013-03-01

    The habenula is a brain region found in all vertebrate species. It consists of medial and lateral subnuclei which make complex descending connections to the brainstem. Although the medial habenula (MHb) and its projection, the fasciculus retroflexus (FR), have been recognized for decades, their function remains obscure. The small size of the MHb in rodents, and the cellular and molecular complexity of this region, have made it difficult to study the function of this region with high specificity. Here we describe a Cre-mediated genetic system for expressing the microbial opsin channelrhodopsin (ChR2) specifically in the dorsal (dMHb) and ventral (vMHb) medial habenula. Genetically targeted expression of ChR2 allows MHb neurons to be selectively activated with light in acute brain slices with electrophysiological readouts, and in vivo by means of custom-built fiber optic cannulas. These tools will allow highly specific studies of MHb circuitry and the role of the MHb in behaviors related to addiction and mood regulation.

  4. Continuous Medial Representation of Brain Structures Using the Biharmonic PDE

    PubMed Central

    Yushkevich, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    A new approach for constructing deformable continuous medial models for anatomical structures is presented. Medial models describe geometrical objects by first specifying the skeleton of the object and then deriving the boundary surface corresponding to the skeleton. However, an arbitrary specification of a skeleton will not be “Valid” unless a certain set of sufficient conditions is satisfied. The most challenging of these is the non-linear equality constraint that must hold along the boundaries of the manifolds forming the skeleton. The main contribution of this paper is to leverage the biharmonic partial differential equation as a mapping from a codimension-0 subset of Euclidean space to the space of skeletons that satisfy the equality constraint. The PDE supports robust numerical solution on freeform triangular meshes, providing additional flexibility for shape modeling. The approach is evaluated by generating continuous medial models for a large dataset of hippocampus shapes. Generalizations to modeling more complex shapes and to representing branching skeletons are demonstrated. PMID:19059348

  5. Arthroscopic Removal of Shotgun Pellet From Within the Medial Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Kyle; Cooke, Chris; Cooke, Pat; Tonnos, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic techniques are effective for the removal of intra-articular bullet and metal fragments after gunshot wounds to the shoulder, hip, knee, and sacroiliac joints. Surgical removal of bullets retained within the synovial joints is indicated; lead is dissolved by synovial fluid over time, leading to proliferative synovitis, lead arthropathy, elevated serum lead levels, and lead toxicity. We present an arthroscopic technique for removal of a shotgun pellet retained within the medial meniscus. In this technique, diagnostic knee arthroscopy is initially performed, which allows for localization of the pellet within the medial meniscus. An up-biter is used to resect the inner rim of meniscus surrounding the pellet, and the pellet is removed with a grasper. This arthroscopic approach is advantageous because it allows for efficient visualization of the pellet within the meniscus, thorough visualization of all compartments of the knee, a reduction in blood loss, and a decrease in surgical morbidity to the surrounding cartilaginous, neurovascular, and soft-tissue structures. This technique may therefore be one option to address bullet fragments or shotgun pellets that are retained within the medial meniscus. PMID:27073774

  6. Gender Effect on the Outcome of Partial Medial Meniscectomy.

    PubMed

    Haviv, Barak; Bronak, Shlomo; Kosashvili, Yona; Thein, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    Complex posterior horn tears of the medial meniscus are common. Previous reports performed statistical stratifications to address the influence of gender on outcome following arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy with variable conclusions. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical results of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy of the knee between men and women with complex medial meniscal tear type while controlling for other variables that may affect outcome. This study compared groups of 86 men and 49 women who were followed prospectively using the Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale, the visual analogue scale, and patient's satisfaction. Mean age at operation was 51 years and mean follow-up was 26 months. Mean Lysholm score improved from 69 preoperatively to 82.1 postoperatively (P<.001) in the male group and from 64.2 preoperatively to 73.5 postoperatively (P=.04) in the female group. At last follow-up, 68 (79%) men and 35 (71%) women stated that they were satisfied with the operation. In both groups, the severity of chondral lesions was found to be negatively correlated to the preoperative score. Women had more severe chondral lesions at arthroscopy than men. This comparative study showed no significant difference between men and women in terms of clinical improvement following arthroscopic partial meniscectomies of complex tear types in stable knees with intact lateral meniscus. Women had lower functionality pre- and postoperatively, which correlated with more severe chondral degeneration at surgery compared with men. PMID:26488789

  7. Medial Epicondyle Fractures in the Pediatric Overhead Athlete.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Aristides I; Steere, Joshua T; Lawrence, J Todd R

    2016-06-01

    The medial epicondyle serves as the proximal attachment of the medial ulnar collateral ligament and the origin of the flexor pronator musculature and as such it is responsible for resisting the main static and dynamic restraints to valgus force at the elbow. Fractures through the physis in the developing elbow are common and treatment remains controversial. Biomechanical modeling predicts that anterior should be the direction of greatest displacement. Anatomic considerations predict that anterior displacement should have the greatest effect on elbow stability and range of motion making the ulnar collateral ligament too loose in flexion and too tight in extension and potentially leading to valgus laxity in flexion and a block to full extension. In the elite overhead athlete, where elbow stability is critical both for sports performance and the long-term health of the elbow, assessment of anterior displacement is thus theoretically an important consideration. Standard radiographic views cannot adequately assess anterior displacement. Specialized radiographs and 3-dimensional modalities such as computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging can adequately assess anterior displacement and in the overhead athlete can sometimes aid in the decision-making process. Here, we present a review of the current literature and the rationale for a treatment algorithm for medial epicondyle fractures in the skeletally immature overhead athlete. PMID:27100037

  8. Analysis of 3D strain in the human medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Kolaczek, S; Hewison, C; Caterine, S; Ragbar, M X; Getgood, A; Gordon, K D

    2016-10-01

    This study presents a method to evaluate three-dimensional strain in meniscal tissue using medical imaging. Strain is calculated by tracking small teflon markers implanted within the meniscal tissue using computed tomography imaging. The results are presented for strains in the middle and posterior third of the medial menisci of 10 human cadaveric knees, under simulated physiologically relevant loading. In the middle position, an average compressive strain of 3.4% was found in the medial-lateral direction, and average tensile strains of 1.4% and 3.5% were found in the anterior-posterior and superior-inferior directions respectively at 5° of knee flexion with an applied load of 1× body weight. In the posterior position, under the same conditions, average compressive strains of 2.2% and 6.3% were found in the medial-lateral and superior-inferior directions respectively, and an average tensile strain of 3.8% was found in the anterior-posterior direction. No statistically significant difference between strain in the middle or posterior of the meniscus or between the global strains is uncovered. PMID:27484043

  9. Medial vestibular connections with the hypocretin (orexin) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, Seth S.; Blanchard, Jane; Morin, Lawrence P.

    2005-01-01

    The mammalian medial vestibular nucleus (MVe) receives input from all vestibular endorgans and provides extensive projections to the central nervous system. Recent studies have demonstrated projections from the MVe to the circadian rhythm system. In addition, there are known projections from the MVe to regions considered to be involved in sleep and arousal. In this study, afferent and efferent subcortical connectivity of the medial vestibular nucleus of the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) was evaluated using cholera toxin subunit-B (retrograde), Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (anterograde), and pseudorabies virus (transneuronal retrograde) tract-tracing techniques. The results demonstrate MVe connections with regions mediating visuomotor and postural control, as previously observed in other mammals. The data also identify extensive projections from the MVe to regions mediating arousal and sleep-related functions, most of which receive immunohistochemically identified projections from the lateral hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) neurons. These include the locus coeruleus, dorsal and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei, dorsal raphe, and lateral preoptic area. The MVe itself receives a projection from hypocretin cells. CTB tracing demonstrated reciprocal connections between the MVe and most brain areas receiving MVe efferents. Virus tracing confirmed and extended the MVe afferent connections identified with CTB and additionally demonstrated transneuronal connectivity with the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the medial habenular nucleus. These anatomical data indicate that the vestibular system has access to a broad array of neural functions not typically associated with visuomotor, balance, or equilibrium, and that the MVe is likely to receive information from many of the same regions to which it projects.

  10. Soft-Tissue Loop for Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Miswan, Mohd Fairudz Bin Mohd; Al-Fayyadh, Mohamed Zubair Mohamed; Seow Hui, Teo; Mohamed Ali, Mohamed Razif Bin; Ng, Wuey Min

    2016-04-01

    A patient with patellar instability frequently presents with anterior knee pain, patellar subluxation, or dislocation. Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) has a key role for normal patella tracking and stability. Reconstruction of the MPFL using a hamstring graft is a commonly used procedure for the treatment of chronic lateral subluxation of patella. Anchor sutures and bony tunnels are used for the patellar attachment of the graft. This can be associated with complications such as patella fracture; besides, it does not produce an anatomical reconstruction for the native MPFL that can alter the direction of tension applied on the patella. To overcome these problems, a soft-tissue loop technique is used for MPFL reconstruction. During this procedure, a semitendinosus graft was passed through the prepatellar extensor retinaculum and secured with sutures. The free ends of the graft were then passed between the second and third layers of the medial patellofemoral retinaculum and fixed to a femoral tunnel on the medial femoral condyle with an interference screw. The desired amount of tension on the graft is achieved under direct vision of patella tracking arthroscopically. We found this method to be relatively safe and fast. It is more anatomical and can avoid the complications during the conventional bony procedures. PMID:27354953

  11. Boundary and medial shape analysis of the hippocampus in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Styner, Martin; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Pantazis, Dimitrios; Gerig, Guido

    2004-09-01

    Statistical shape analysis has become of increasing interest to the neuroimaging community due to its potential to precisely locate morphological changes and thus potentially discriminate between healthy and pathological structures. This paper describes a combined boundary and medial shape analysis based on two different shape descriptions applied to a study of the hippocampus shape abnormalities in schizophrenia. The first shape description is the sampled boundary implied by the spherical harmonic SPHARM description. The second one is the medial shape description called M-rep. Both descriptions are sampled descriptions with inherent point correspondence. Their shape analysis is based on computing differences from an average template structure analyzed using standard group mean difference tests. The results of the global and local shape analysis in the presented hippocampus study exhibit the same patterns for the boundary and the medial analysis. The results strongly suggest that the normalized hippocampal shape of the schizophrenic group is different from the control group, most significantly as a deformation difference in the tail region. PMID:15450215

  12. Bottom-up Visual Integration in the Medial Parietal Lobe.

    PubMed

    Pflugshaupt, Tobias; Nösberger, Myriam; Gutbrod, Klemens; Weber, Konrad P; Linnebank, Michael; Brugger, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Largely based on findings from functional neuroimaging studies, the medial parietal lobe is known to contribute to internally directed cognitive processes such as visual imagery or episodic memory. Here, we present 2 patients with behavioral impairments that extend this view. Both had chronic unilateral lesions of nearly the entire medial parietal lobe, but in opposite hemispheres. Routine neuropsychological examination conducted >4 years after the onset of brain damage showed little deficits of minor severity. In contrast, both patients reported persistent unusual visual impairment. A comprehensive series of tachistoscopic experiments with lateralized stimulus presentation and comparison with healthy participants revealed partial visual hemiagnosia for stimuli presented to their contralesional hemifield, applying inferential single-case statistics to evaluate deficits and dissociations. Double dissociations were found in 4 experiments during which participants had to integrate more than one visual element, either through comparison or formation of a global gestalt. Against the background of recent neuroimaging findings, we conclude that of all medial parietal structures, the precuneus is the most likely candidate for a crucial involvement in such bottom-up visual integration. PMID:25331599

  13. Experimental investigations of weak definite and weak indefinite noun phrases

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Natalie M.; Gegg-Harrison, Whitney M.; Carlson, Greg N.; Tanenhaus, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Definite noun phrases typically refer to entities that are uniquely identifiable in the speaker and addressee’s common ground. Some definite noun phrases (e.g. the hospital in Mary had to go the hospital and John did too) seem to violate this uniqueness constraint. We report six experiments that were motivated by the hypothesis that these “weak definite” interpretations arise in “incorporated” constructions. Experiments 1-3 compared nouns that seem to allow for a weak definite interpretation (e.g. hospital, bank, bus, radio) with those that do not (e.g. farm, concert, car, book). Experiments 1 and 2 used an instruction-following task and picture-judgment task, respectively, to demonstrate that a weak definite need not uniquely refer. In Experiment 3 participants imagined scenarios described by sentences such as The Federal Express driver had to go to the hospital/farm. The imagined scenarios following weak definite noun phrases were more likely to include conventional activities associated with the object, whereas following regular nouns, participants were more likely to imagine scenarios that included typical activities associated with the subject; similar effects were observed with weak indefinites. Experiment 4 found that object-related activities were reduced when the same subject and object were used with a verb that does not license weak definite interpretations. In Experiment 5, a science fiction story introduced an artificial lexicon for novel concepts. Novel nouns that shared conceptual properties with English weak definite nouns were more likely to allow weak reference in a judgment task. Experiment 6 demonstrated that familiarity for definite articles and anti- familiarity for indefinite articles applies to the activity associated with the noun, consistent with predictions made by the incorporation analysis. PMID:23685208

  14. Resisting Weakness of the Will

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Neil

    2012-01-01

    I develop an account of weakness of the will that is driven by experimental evidence from cognitive and social psychology. I will argue that this account demonstrates that there is no such thing as weakness of the will: no psychological kind corresponds to it. Instead, weakness of the will ought to be understood as depletion of System II resources. Neither the explanatory purposes of psychology nor our practical purposes as agents are well-served by retaining the concept. I therefore suggest that we ought to jettison it, in favour of the vocabulary and concepts of cognitive psychology. PMID:22984298

  15. Weak-shock reflection factors

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-09-07

    The purpose of this paper is to compare reflection factors for weak shocks from various surfaces, and to focus attention on some unsolved questions. Three different cases are considered: square-wave planar shock reflection from wedges; square-wave planar shock reflection from cylinders; and spherical blast wave reflection from a planar surface. We restrict ourselves to weak shocks. Shocks with a Mach number of M{sub O} < 1.56 in air or with an overpressure of {Delta}{sub PI} < 25 psi (1.66 bar) under normal ambient conditions are called weak.

  16. Multimodal intervention in older adults improves resting-state functional connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe†

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Zhu, Xinyi; Yin, Shufei; Niu, Yanan; Zheng, Zhiwei; Huang, Xin; Wang, Baoxi; Li, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe are particularly vulnerable to the effects of aging. The disconnection between them is suggested to be an important cause of cognitive decline in normal aging. Here, using multimodal intervention training, we investigated the functional plasticity in resting-state connectivity of these two regions in older adults. The multimodal intervention, comprised of cognitive training, Tai Chi exercise, and group counseling, was conducted to explore the regional connectivity changes in the default-mode network, as well as changes in prefrontal-based voxel-wise connectivity in the whole brain. Results showed that the intervention selectively affected resting-state functional connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe. Moreover, the strength of resting-state functional connectivity between these regions correlated with individual cognitive performance. Our results suggest that multimodal intervention could postpone the effects of aging and improve the function of the regions that are most heavily influenced by aging, as well as play an important role in preserving the brain and cognition during old age. PMID:24653698

  17. Weak interactions and presupernova evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Aufderheide, M.B. State Univ. of New York . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-02-19

    The role of weak interactions, particularly electron capture and {beta}{sup {minus}} decay, in presupernova evolution is discussed. The present uncertainty in these rates is examined and the possibility of improving the situation is addressed. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Weak Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ales Psaker; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Anatoly Radyushkin

    2007-03-01

    We extend the analysis of the deeply virtual Compton scattering process to the weak interaction sector in the generalized Bjorken limit. The virtual Compton scattering amplitudes for the weak neutral and charged currents are calculated at the leading twist within the framework of the nonlocal light-cone expansion via coordinate space QCD string operators. Using a simple model, we estimate cross sections for neutrino scattering off the nucleon, relevant for future high intensity neutrino beam facilities.

  19. Weak ferromagnetism in the cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chovan, J.; Papanicolaou, N.

    2001-02-01

    An effective field theory that describes the low-frequency spin dynamics in the low-temperature orthorhombic phase of La 2CuO 4 is derived. The main features of the inherent covert weak ferromagnetism are thus accounted for in a straightforward manner but some of the finer theoretical predictions would require further experimental investigation. In particular, theory predicts the occurrence of magnetic stripes in undoped La 2CuO 4 which mediate the observed weak-ferromagnetic transition.

  20. A Novel Medial Soft Tissue Release Method for Varus Deformity during Total Knee Arthroplasty: Femoral Origin Release of the Medial Collateral Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Yup; Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Lee, Yong-In

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Numerous methods of medial soft tissue release for severe varus deformity during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) have been reported. These include tibial stripping of the superficial medial collateral ligament (MCL), pie-crusting technique, and medial epicondylar osteotomy. However, there are inherent disadvantages in these techniques. Authors hereby present a novel quantitative method: femoral origin release of the medial collateral ligament (FORM). Surgical Technique For medial tightness remaining even after the release of the deep MCL and semimembranosus, the FORM is initiated with identification of the femoral insertion area of the MCL with the knee in flexion. Starting from the most posterior part of the femoral insertion, one third of the MCL femoral insertion is released from its attachment. If necessary, further sequential medial release is performed. Materials and Methods Seventeen knees that underwent the FORM were evaluated for radiological and clinical outcomes. Results Regardless of the extent of the FORM, no knees showed residual valgus instability at 24 weeks after surgery. Conclusions As the FORM is performed in a stepwise manner, fine adjustment during medial release might be beneficial to prevent inadvertent over-release of the medial structures of the knee. PMID:27274473

  1. Evaluation of Joint Space Width and Narrowing After Isolated Partial Medial Meniscectomy for Degenerative Medial Meniscus Tears

    PubMed Central

    Shelbourne, K. Donald; Barnes, Adam F.; Urch, Scott E.; Gray, Tinker

    2013-01-01

    Background: Few studies have evaluated the effect of existing articular cartilage damage and sex on joint space measurements after isolated degenerative medial meniscus tears. Purpose: To determine what factors affected joint space width and narrowing in patients after removal of isolated degenerative medial meniscus tears. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A total of 62 patients (15 women and 47 men) with all ligaments intact, no previous surgery to either knee, and an isolated degenerative medial meniscus tear removed in 1 knee were examined. The mean age at examination was 58.2 years at a mean follow-up of 9.4 years (range, 4-20 years). Subjective results were obtained with the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) knee survey. Radiographs were taken using 45° weightbearing posteroanterior views. Midpoint and perceived minimum joint space width of the medial and lateral compartments of both knees were measured to the nearest 0.1 mm by 2 observers at different times, and they were blinded as to the previous measurements (Pearson intra- and interclass correlations, >0.93). Joint space narrowing was found by calculating the difference in joint space width between knees. Percentage of normal joint space loss was calculated by dividing joint space narrowing by the joint space width in the contralateral knee. Other factors considered were patient sex and Outerbridge grading of articular cartilage. Results: Women had a mean 1.5 mm less normal joint space width than men in the involved and noninvolved knees (P < .01). Mean joint space narrowing was 0.7 mm for both measurements. The mean ± standard deviation narrowing was 0.4 ± 1.2 mm for patients with grade 0-2 damage and 1.1 ± 1.3 for patients with grade 3-4 damage (P = .04). Five women (33%) and 3 men (6%) had narrowing of >50% of the normal joint space as measured in the noninjured knee (P = .016). The mean IKDC total score was 66.1 points for women, which was statistically

  2. Postero-medial approach for complex tibial plateau injuries with a postero-medial or postero-lateral shear fragment.

    PubMed

    Berber, Reshid; Lewis, Charlotte P; Copas, David; Forward, Daren P; Moran, Christopher G

    2014-04-01

    This study demonstrates the utility of a modified postero-medial surgical approach to the knee in treating a series of patients with complex tibial plateau injuries with associated postero-medial and postero-lateral shear fractures. Posterior coronal shear fractures are underappreciated and their clinical relevance has recently been characterised. Less-invasive surgery and indirect reduction techniques are inadequate for treating these coronal plane fractures. Our approach includes an inverted 'L'-shaped incision situated within the posterior flexor knee crease, followed by the retraction or incision of the medial head of the gastrocnemius tendon, while protecting the neurovascular structures. This provides a more extensile exposure, as far as the postero-lateral corner, than previously described. Our case series included eight females and eight males. The average age was 53 years. The majority of these injuries were sustained through high-energy trauma. All patients' fractures were classified as Schatzker grade 4, or above, with a postero-medial split depression. Eight patients had associated postero-lateral corner fractures. Two were open, two had vascular compromise and one had neurological injury. The average time to surgery was 6.4 days (range 0-12), operative time 142 min (range 76-300) and length of stay 17 days (range 7-46). A total of 11 patients were treated using the postero-medial approach alone and in five the treatment was combined with an antero-lateral approach. Two patients suffered a reduced range of movement requiring manipulation and physiotherapy, and three patients had a 5-degree fixed flexion deformity. Two patients developed superficial wound infections treated with antibiotics alone. Anatomical reduction and fracture union was achieved in 15 patients. These are complex fractures to treat, and our modified posterior approach allows direct reduction and optimal positioning of plates to act as buttress devices. It can be extended across the

  3. Weakness

    MedlinePlus

    ... spine) Stroke MUSCLE DISEASES Becker muscular dystrophy Dermatomyositis Muscular dystrophy (Duchenne) Myotonic dystrophy POISONING Botulism Poisoning ( insecticides , nerve gas) Shellfish poisoning OTHER Anemia Myasthenia gravis Polio

  4. Voice Outcome after Gore-Tex Medialization Thyroplasty.

    PubMed

    Elnashar, Ismail; El-Anwar, Mohammad; Amer, Hazem; Quriba, Amal

    2015-07-01

    Introduction Although medialization thyroplasty utilizing Gore-Tex (Gore and Associates, Newark, Delaware, United States) has been discussed in the literature, few reports have assessed voice quality afterward, and they did not use a full assessment protocol. Objective To assess the improvement in voice quality after medialization thyroplasty utilizing Gore-Tex in patients with glottic insufficiency of variable etiology. Methods Eleven patients with glottic insufficiency of different etiologies that failed compensation were operated by type 1 thyroplasty utilizing Gore-Tex. Pre- and postoperative (1 week, 3 months, and 6 months) voice assessment was done and statistical analysis was performed on the results. Results In all postoperative assessments, there was significant improvement in the grade of dysphonia (p < 0.004) and highly significant reduction in the size of glottic gap and prolongation of maximum phonation time (p < 0.0001). The difference in voice parameters in the early (1 week) and the late (3 and 6 months) postoperative period was not significant. None of the patients developed stridor or shortness of breath necessitating tracheotomy, and there was no implant extrusion in any patient during the study period. Conclusion Gore-Tex medialization provides reliable results for both subjective and objective voice parameters. It leads to a satisfactory restoration of voice whatever the etiology of glottic incompetence is. This technique is relatively easy and does not lead to major complications. Further studies with larger number of patients and more extended periods of follow-up are still required to assess the long-term results of the technique regarding voice quality and implant extrusion. PMID:26157500

  5. Voice Outcome after Gore-Tex Medialization Thyroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Elnashar, Ismail; El-Anwar, Mohammad; Amer, Hazem; Quriba, Amal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although medialization thyroplasty utilizing Gore-Tex (Gore and Associates, Newark, Delaware, United States) has been discussed in the literature, few reports have assessed voice quality afterward, and they did not use a full assessment protocol. Objective To assess the improvement in voice quality after medialization thyroplasty utilizing Gore-Tex in patients with glottic insufficiency of variable etiology. Methods Eleven patients with glottic insufficiency of different etiologies that failed compensation were operated by type 1 thyroplasty utilizing Gore-Tex. Pre- and postoperative (1 week, 3 months, and 6 months) voice assessment was done and statistical analysis was performed on the results. Results In all postoperative assessments, there was significant improvement in the grade of dysphonia (p < 0.004) and highly significant reduction in the size of glottic gap and prolongation of maximum phonation time (p < 0.0001). The difference in voice parameters in the early (1 week) and the late (3 and 6 months) postoperative period was not significant. None of the patients developed stridor or shortness of breath necessitating tracheotomy, and there was no implant extrusion in any patient during the study period. Conclusion Gore-Tex medialization provides reliable results for both subjective and objective voice parameters. It leads to a satisfactory restoration of voice whatever the etiology of glottic incompetence is. This technique is relatively easy and does not lead to major complications. Further studies with larger number of patients and more extended periods of follow-up are still required to assess the long-term results of the technique regarding voice quality and implant extrusion. PMID:26157500

  6. The UniSpacer™: correcting varus malalignment in medial gonarthrosis.

    PubMed

    Clarius, Michael; Becker, Justus F; Schmitt, Holger; Seeger, Joern B

    2010-12-01

    While options for operative treatment of leg axis varus malalignment in patients with medial gonarthrosis include several established procedures, such as unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA), total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or high tibial osteotomy (HTO), there has been little focus on a less invasive option introduced more recently: the UniSpacer™ implant, a self-centering, metallic interpositional device for the knee. This study evaluates clinical and radiological results of the UniSpacer™, whether alignment correction can be achieved by UniSpacer™ arthroplasty and alignment change in the first five postoperative years. Anteroposterior long leg stance radiographs of 20 legs were digitally analysed to assess alignment change: two relevant angles and the deviation of the mechanical axis of the leg were analysed before and after surgery. Additionally, the change of the postoperative alignment was determined one and five years postoperatively. Analysing the mechanical tibiofemoral angle, a significant leg axis correction was achieved, with a mean valgus change of 4.7 ± 1.9°; a varus change occurred in the first postoperative year, while there was no significant further change of alignment seen five years after surgery. The UniSpacer™ corrects malalignment in patients with medial gonarthrosis; however, a likely postoperative change in alignment due to implant adaptation to the joint must be considered before implantation. Our results show that good clinical and functional results can be achieved after UniSpacer™ arthroplasty. However, four of 19 knees had to be revised to a TKA or UKA due to persistent pain, which is an unacceptably high revision rate when looking at the alternative treatment options of medial osteoarthritis of the knee. PMID:19946773

  7. Dendritic Organization of Olfactory Inputs to Medial Amygdala Neurons.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzi, Sepideh; Power, John M; Albers, Eva H H; Sullivan, Robert K S; Sah, Pankaj

    2015-09-23

    The medial amygdala (MeA) is a central hub in the olfactory neural network. It receives vomeronasal information directly from the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) and main olfactory information largely via odor-processing regions such as the olfactory cortical amygdala (CoA). How these inputs are processed by MeA neurons is poorly understood. Using the GAD67-GFP mouse, we show that MeA principal neurons receive convergent AOB and CoA inputs. Somatically recorded AOB synaptic inputs had slower kinetics than CoA inputs, suggesting that they are electrotonically more distant. Field potential recording, pharmacological manipulation, and Ca(2+) imaging revealed that AOB synapses are confined to distal dendrites and segregated from the proximally located CoA synapses. Moreover, unsynchronized AOB inputs had significantly broader temporal summation that was dependent on the activation of NMDA receptors. These findings show that MeA principal neurons process main and accessory olfactory inputs differentially in distinct dendritic compartments. Significance statement: In most vertebrates, olfactory cues are processed by two largely segregated neural pathways, the main and accessory olfactory systems, which are specialized to detect odors and nonvolatile chemosignals, respectively. Information from these two pathways ultimately converges at higher brain regions, one of the major hubs being the medial amygdala. Little is known about how olfactory inputs are processed by medial amygdala neurons. This study shows that individual principal neurons in this region receive input from both pathways and that these synapses are spatially segregated on their dendritic tree. We provide evidence suggesting that this dendritic segregation leads to distinct input integration and impact on neuronal output; hence, dendritic mechanisms control olfactory processing in the amygdala. PMID:26400933

  8. Quantum discord with weak measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Uttam Pati, Arun Kumar

    2014-04-15

    Weak measurements cause small change to quantum states, thereby opening up the possibility of new ways of manipulating and controlling quantum systems. We ask, can weak measurements reveal more quantum correlation in a composite quantum state? We prove that the weak measurement induced quantum discord, called as the “super quantum discord”, is always larger than the quantum discord captured by the strong measurement. Moreover, we prove the monotonicity of the super quantum discord as a function of the measurement strength and in the limit of strong projective measurement the super quantum discord becomes the normal quantum discord. We find that unlike the normal discord, for pure entangled states, the super quantum discord can exceed the quantum entanglement. Our results provide new insights on the nature of quantum correlation and suggest that the notion of quantum correlation is not only observer dependent but also depends on how weakly one perturbs the composite system. We illustrate the key results for pure as well as mixed entangled states. -- Highlights: •Introduced the role of weak measurements in quantifying quantum correlation. •We have introduced the notion of the super quantum discord (SQD). •For pure entangled state, we show that the SQD exceeds the entanglement entropy. •This shows that quantum correlation depends not only on observer but also on measurement strength.

  9. Considerations for the Management of Medial Orbital Wall Blowout Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Park, Youngsoo; Chung, Kyu Jin

    2016-01-01

    Recently, diagnoses of and operations for medial orbital blowout fracture have increased because of the development of imaging technology. In this article, the authors review the literature, and overview the accumulated knowledge about the orbital anatomy, fracture mechanisms, surgical approaches, reconstruction materials, and surgical methods. In terms of surgical approaches, transcaruncular, transcutaneous, and transnasal endoscopic approaches are discussed. Reconstruction methods including onlay covering, inlay implantation, and repositioning methods are also discussed. Consideration and understanding of these should lead to more optimal outcomes. PMID:27218019

  10. Sensory conduction in medial and lateral plantar nerves.

    PubMed Central

    Ponsford, S N

    1988-01-01

    A simple and reliable method of recording medial and lateral plantar nerve sensory action potentials is described. Potentials are recorded with surface electrodes at the ankle using surface electrodes stimulating orthodromically at the sole. The normal values obtained are higher in amplitude than those obtained by the method described by Guiloff and Sherratt and are detectable in older subjects aged over 80 years. The procedure is valuable in the diagnosis of early peripheral neuropathy, mononeuritis multiplex, tarsal tunnel syndrome and in differentiation between pre and post ganglionic L5 S1 lesions. PMID:2831304

  11. Technique, indications, and results of proximal medial gastrocnemius lengthening.

    PubMed

    Barouk, Pierre

    2014-12-01

    Gastrocnemius proximal lengthening was first performed to correct spasticity in children, and was adapted for the patient with no neuromuscular condition in the late 1990s. Since then, the proximal gastrocnemius release has become less invasive and has evolved to include only the fascia overlying the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle. The indications for performing this procedure are a clinically demonstrable gastrocnemius contracture that influences a variety of clinical conditions in the forefoot, hindfoot, and ankle. It is a safe and easy procedure that can be performed bilaterally simultaneously, and does not require immobilization of the ankle after surgery. PMID:25456723

  12. Considerations for the Management of Medial Orbital Wall Blowout Fracture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Ha; Park, Youngsoo; Chung, Kyu Jin

    2016-05-01

    Recently, diagnoses of and operations for medial orbital blowout fracture have increased because of the development of imaging technology. In this article, the authors review the literature, and overview the accumulated knowledge about the orbital anatomy, fracture mechanisms, surgical approaches, reconstruction materials, and surgical methods. In terms of surgical approaches, transcaruncular, transcutaneous, and transnasal endoscopic approaches are discussed. Reconstruction methods including onlay covering, inlay implantation, and repositioning methods are also discussed. Consideration and understanding of these should lead to more optimal outcomes. PMID:27218019

  13. Return to Play After Medial Collateral Ligament Injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Christopher; Chasse, Patrick M; Taylor, Dean C

    2016-10-01

    Medial collateral ligament injuries are common in the athletic population. Partial injuries are treated nonoperatively with excellent outcomes. Complete ruptures may be treated nonoperatively, although some will require surgery. A comprehensive rehabilitation program is critical to outcome, but a standardized program for all injuries does not exist. Most of the literature regarding nonoperative and postoperative rehabilitation include observational reports and case studies. Level I studies comparing rehabilitation protocols have not been published. The goal of the injured athlete is to not only return to play with no functional limitations, but to also address risk factors and prevent future injuries. PMID:27543407

  14. Warping the Weak Gravity Conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooner, Karta; Parameswaran, Susha; Zavala, Ivonne

    2016-08-01

    The Weak Gravity Conjecture, if valid, rules out simple models of Natural Inflation by restricting their axion decay constant to be sub-Planckian. We revisit stringy attempts to realise Natural Inflation, with a single open string axionic inflaton from a probe D-brane in a warped throat. We show that warped geometries can allow the requisite super-Planckian axion decay constant to be achieved, within the supergravity approximation and consistently with the Weak Gravity Conjecture. Preliminary estimates of the brane backreaction suggest that the probe approximation may be under control. However, there is a tension between large axion decay constant and high string scale, where the requisite high string scale is difficult to achieve in all attempts to realise large field inflation using perturbative string theory. We comment on the Generalized Weak Gravity Conjecture in the light of our results.

  15. Observing accidental and intentional unusual actions is associated with different subregions of the medial frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Desmet, Charlotte; Brass, Marcel

    2015-11-15

    The literature on action observation revealed contradictory results regarding the activation of different subregions of the medial prefrontal cortex when observing unusual behaviour. Error observation research has shown that the posterior part of the medial prefrontal cortex is more active when observing unusual behaviour compared to usual behaviour while action understanding research has revealed some mixed results concerning the role of the anterior part of the medial prefrontal cortex during the observation of unusual actions. Here, we resolve this discrepancy in the literature by showing that different parts of the medial prefrontal cortex are active depending on whether an observed unusual behaviour is intentional or not. While the posterior medial prefrontal cortex is more active when we observe unusual accidental actions compared to unusual intentional actions, a more anterior part of the medial prefrontal cortex is more active when we observe unusual intentional actions compared to unusual accidental actions. PMID:26279209

  16. Electrophysiological evidence during episodic prospection implicates medial prefrontal and bilateral middle temporal gyrus.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Fen; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J S

    2016-08-01

    fMRI studies have implicated the medial prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe, components of the default mode network (DMN), in episodic prospection. This study compared quantitative EEG localized to these DMN regions during prospection and during resting and while waiting for rewards. EEG was recorded in twenty-two adults while they were asked to (i) envision future monetary episodes; (ii) wait for rewards and (iii) rest. Activation sources were localized to core DMN regions. EEG power and phase coherence were compared across conditions. Prospection, compared to resting and waiting, was associated with reduced power in the medial prefrontal gyrus and increased power in the bilateral medial temporal gyrus across frequency bands as well as greater phase synchrony between these regions in the delta band. The current quantitative EEG analysis confirms prior fMRI research suggesting that medial prefrontal and medial temporal gyrus interactions are central to the capacity for episodic prospection. PMID:27026652

  17. Bioplastique medialization therapy improves the quality of life in terminally ill patients with vocal cord palsy.

    PubMed

    Alves, C B; Loughran, S; MacGregor, F B; Dey, J I R; Bowie, L J

    2002-10-01

    Unilateral vocal cord palsy can result in a weak breathy voice and an inability to communicate effectively. This study was designed to assess prospectively the efficacy of polymethylsiloxane elastomer (Bioplastique) medialization injection therapy in patients with vocal cord palsy and terminal disease with particular regard to quality of life issues. Patients with unilateral vocal cord palsy secondary to malignant disease were offered Bioplastique injection. A digital voice recording was taken preoperatively and at 1 month, 3 months and 6 months postoperatively. Maximum phonation time (MPT) was recorded at the same intervals, and patients completed two questionnaires: the voice handicap index (VHI) and SF 36 general health questionnaire. Sixteen patients were entered into the study. There was a significant improvement in voice score, MPT, VHI and in three subgroups of the SF 36 at 1 month postoperatively, and the improvement was maintained in the small number who survived to 3 and 6 months. Bioplastique injection for unilateral vocal cord palsy produces a significant improvement in quality of life in addition to measured voice quality in patients with terminal disease. It should be recommended in patients even when the life expectancy is short. PMID:12383303

  18. The crooked nose: the use of medial iliac crest bone graft as a supporting framework.

    PubMed

    Cil, Yakup; Ozturk, Serdar; Kocman, Atacan Emre; Isik, Selcuk; Sengezer, Mustafa

    2008-11-01

    The crooked nose is one that the vertical axis of the nose inclines from the midline. As a rule, a major septal deformity almost always accompanies to impairing breathing and aesthetic appearance. To achieve total straightening of the crooked nose, the septum must become the target of the treatment. To prevent redeviation, we used rigid bone grafts instead of flexible and relatively weak cartilage to maintain the support of the corrected deformity. Between February 2005 and July 2007, 9 patients (all male) with crooked noses underwent corrective surgery. The mean age of the patients was 21 years (range, 19-23 years). The source of the bone graft was medial side of iliac crest in all patients. The mean follow-up was 18 months, ranging from 10 to 26 months. All patients had both functional and cosmetic problems. Mean operation time was 4 hours. Airway patency was improved in all cases. The grafts did not shift in any case and did not develop unsightly irregularities over time. Absorption of the grafts was not seen in the follow-up. There were no cases of extrusion or infection. No donor site complication occurred. None of the patient required secondary surgery. A residual deviation can be obvious despite all attempts, which has no deleterious effect on patient satisfaction. This article introduces a novel technique for the correction of the crooked nose. PMID:19098567

  19. Blockade of androgen receptor in the medial amygdala inhibits noncontact erections in male rats.

    PubMed

    Bialy, Michal; Nikolaev-Diak, Anna; Kalata, Urszula; Nikolaev, Evgeni

    2011-06-01

    Our previous work demonstrated that androgens in the medial amygdala (MeA) of castrated male rats maintained noncontact erections (NCEs), which occur during exposure to an inaccessible receptive female, for one week after implantation. The present experiments investigated the effects of implantation into the MeA of either flutamide (F), a blocker of androgen receptors, or of 1,4,6-androstatrien-3,17-dione (ATD), which blocks aromatization of testosterone. One day after implantation of F, fewer males displayed NCEs, and had longer latencies to the first NCE and fewer NCEs, and spent less total time in genital grooming, compared to the control group. ATD had only weak facilitative effects on some measures of NCEs. These results suggest that androgen receptors in the MeA play a major role in the regulation of NCEs and that the MeA is one of the neuronal structures that regulate male sexual arousal. Furthermore, it is sensitive to relatively fast changes in the level of androgen receptors stimulation. PMID:21315100

  20. Cosmology and the weak interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N. ):)

    1989-12-01

    The weak interaction plays a critical role in modern Big Bang cosmology. This review will emphasize two of its most publicized cosmological connections: Big Bang nucleosynthesis and Dark Matter. The first of these is connected to the cosmological prediction of Neutrino Flavours, N{sub {nu}} {approximately} 3 which is now being confirmed at SLC and LEP. The second is interrelated to the whole problem of galaxy and structure formation in the universe. This review will demonstrate the role of the weak interaction both for dark matter candidates and for the problem of generating seeds to form structure. 87 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Cosmology and the weak interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, David N.

    1989-01-01

    The weak interaction plays a critical role in modern Big Bang cosmology. Two of its most publicized comological connections are emphasized: big bang nucleosynthesis and dark matter. The first of these is connected to the cosmological prediction of neutrine flavors, N(sub nu) is approximately 3 which in now being confirmed. The second is interrelated to the whole problem of galacty and structure formation in the universe. The role of the weak interaction both for dark matter candidates and for the problem of generating seeds to form structure is demonstrated.

  2. Increased Intrinsic Activity of Medial-Temporal Lobe Subregions is Associated with Decreased Cortical Thickness of Medial-Parietal Areas in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease Dementia.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, Lorenzo; Scherr, Martin; Tahmasian, Masoud; Myers, Nicholas E; Ortner, Marion; Kurz, Alexander; Förstl, Hans; Zimmer, Claus; Grimmer, Timo; Akhrif, Atae; Wohlschläger, Afra M; Riedl, Valentin; Sorg, Christian

    2016-01-21

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), disrupted connectivity between medial-parietal cortices and medial-temporal lobes (MTL) is linked with increased MTL local functional connectivity, and parietal atrophy is associated with increased MTL memory activation. We hypothesized that intrinsic activity in MTL subregions is increased and associated with medial-parietal degeneration and impaired memory in AD. To test this hypothesis, resting-state-functional and structural-MRI was assessed in 22 healthy controls, 22 mild cognitive impairment patients, and 21 AD-dementia patients. Intrinsic activity was measured by power-spectrum density of blood-oxygenation-level-dependent signal, medial-parietal degeneration by cortical thinning. In AD-dementia patients, intrinsic activity was increased for several right MTL subregions. Raised intrinsic activity in dentate gyrus and cornu ammonis 1 was associated with cortical thinning in posterior cingulate cortices, and at-trend with impaired delayed recall. Critically, increased intrinsic activity in the right entorhinal cortex was associated with ipsilateral posterior cingulate degeneration. Our results provide evidence that in AD, intrinsic activity in MTL subregions is increased and associated with medial-parietal atrophy. Results fit a model in which medial-parietal degeneration contributes to MTL dysconnectivity from medial-parietal cortices, potentially underpinning disinhibition-like changes in MTL activity. PMID:26836175

  3. Reconstruction of medial patellofemoral ligament using quadriceps tendon combined with reconstruction of medial patellotibial ligament using patellar tendon: initial experience☆

    PubMed Central

    Hinckel, Betina Bremer; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe a surgical technique for anatomical reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the quadriceps tendon, combined with reconstruction of the medial patellotibial ligament using the patellar tendon; and to present the initial results from a case series. Method The proposed technique was used on a series of cases of patients with diagnoses of patellofemoral instability and indications for surgical treatment, who were attended by the Knee Group of HC-IOT, University of São Paulo. The following were evaluated before and after the operation: range of motion (ROM), apprehension test, lateral translation test, patellar inclination test, inverted J sign, subluxation upon extension, pain from compression of the patella and pain from contraction of the quadriceps. After the operation, the patients were asked whether any new episode of dislocation had occurred, what their degree of satisfaction with the surgery was (on a scale from 0 to 10) and whether they would be prepared to go through this operation again. Results Seven knees were operated, in seven patients, with a mean follow-up of 5.46 months (±2.07). Four patients who presented apprehension before the operation did not show this after the operation. The lateral translation test became normal for all the patients, while the patellar inclination test remained positive for two patients. The patients with an inverted J sign continued to be positive for this sign. Five patients were positive for subluxation upon extension before the operation, but all patients were negative for this after the operation. None of the patients presented any new episode of dislocation of the patella. All of them stated that they were satisfied: five gave a satisfaction score of 9 and two, a score of 10. All of them said that they would undergo the operation again. Only one patient presented a postoperative complication: dehiscence of the wound. Conclusion Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament

  4. Medial prefrontal cortex role in recognition memory in rodents.

    PubMed

    Morici, Juan Facundo; Bekinschtein, Pedro; Weisstaub, Noelia V

    2015-10-01

    The study of the neurobiology of recognition memory, defined by the integration of the different components of experiences that support recollection of past experiences have been a challenge for memory researches for many years. In the last twenty years, with the development of the spontaneous novel object recognition task and all its variants this has started to change. The features of recognition memory include a particular object or person ("what"), the context in which the experience took place, which can be the arena itself or the location within a particular arena ("where") and the particular time at which the event occurred ("when"). This definition instead of the historical anthropocentric one allows the study of this type of episodic memory in animal models. Some forms of recognition memory that require integration of different features recruit the medial prefrontal cortex. Focusing on findings from spontaneous recognition memory tasks performed by rodents, this review concentrates on the description of previous works that have examined the role that the medial prefrontal cortex has on the different steps of recognition memory. We conclude that this structure, independently of the task used, is required at different memory stages when the task cannot be solved by a single item strategy. PMID:26115848

  5. Medial Foot Loading on Ankle and Knee Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Lyneil C.J.; Ford, Kevin R.; Minning, Stephen; Myer, Gregory D.; Mangine, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    Background The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries among females continues at disproportionate rates compared to males, with research indicating inconclusive multifactorial causality. Data from previous retrospective studies suggest an effect of abnormal foot and ankle bio-mechanics on pathology at the knee, including the ACL. Objective To determine if a relationship exists between plantar foot loading patterns during normal gait and high risk biomechanics purported to increase risk of ACL injury. Methods Dynamic barefoot plantar pressure distribution was measured on 33 female collegiate soccer players. Groups were divided according to their predominant gait loading pattern (medial or lateral). Three dimensional (3-D) motion analysis was conducted during drop vertical jumps to assess vertical ground reaction force and discrete angle and joint moment variables of the lower extremities. Results No significant differences occured in sagittal or coronal plane knee joint kinematics and kinetics between the medial and lateral loading groups. Discussion Dynamic foot and ankle biomechanics during gait do not appear to be related to lower extremity kinematics or kinetics during landing in collegiate female soccer players. Conclusion The exact cause of the abnormal differences in female landing biomechanics has not been irrefutably defined. This study suggests no effect of foot and ankle biomechanics exists on the landing mechanics of female soccer players. PMID:20379384

  6. Medial Meniscus Posterior Root Tear: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dhong Won; Ha, Jeong Ku

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the medial meniscus root, for example by a complete radial tear, destroys the ability of the knee to withstand hoop strain, resulting in contact pressure increases and kinematic alterations. For these reasons, several techniques have been developed to repair the medial meniscus posterior root tear (MMPRT), many of which have shown complete healing of the repaired MMPRT. However, efforts to standardize or optimize the treatment for MMPRT are much needed. When planning a surgical intervention for an MMPRT, strict surgical indications regarding the effect of pullout strength on the refixed root, bony degenerative changes, mechanical alignment, and the Kellgren-Lawrence grade should be considered. Although there are several treatment options and controversies, the current trend is to repair the MMPRT using various techniques including suture anchors and pullout sutures if the patient meets the indications. However, there are still debates on the restoration of hoop tension and prevention of arthritis after repair and further biomechanical and clinical studies should be conducted in the future. The aim of this article was to review and summarize the recent literature regarding various diagnosis and treatment strategies of MMPRT, especially focusing on conflict issues including whether repair techniques can restore the main function of normal meniscus and which is the best suture technique to repair the MMPRT. The authors attempted to provide a comprehensive review of previous studies ranging from basic science to current surgical techniques. PMID:25229041

  7. Is the Medial Prefrontal Cortex Necessary for Theory of Mind?

    PubMed Central

    Otti, Alexander; Wohlschlaeger, Afra M.; Noll-Hussong, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Successful social interaction relies on the ability to attribute mental states to other people. Previous functional neuroimaging studies have shown that this process, described as Theory of Mind (ToM) or mentalization, is reliably associated with activation of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). However, this study presents a novel and surprising finding that provides new insight into the role of the mPFC in mentalization tasks. Methodology/Principal Findings Twenty healthy individuals were recruited from a wide range of ages and social backgrounds. Participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while viewing a well-established ToM visual paradigm involving moving triangles. Functional MRI data were analyzed using a classical general linear model. No activation was detected in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) during movement patterns that typically elicit ToM. However, increased activity was observed in the right middle occipital gyrus, right temporoparietal junction (TPJ), left middle occipital gyrus and right inferior frontal gyrus. No correlation was found between participants’ age and BOLD response. Conclusions/Significance In contrast with previous neuroimaging research, our findings support the notion that mPFC function is not critical for reasoning about the mental states of others; furthermore, our data indicate that the right TPJ and right inferior frontal gyrus are able to perform mentalization without any contributions from the mPFC. PMID:26301900

  8. MRI parcellation of ex vivo medial temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Augustinack, Jean C; Magnain, Caroline; Reuter, Martin; van der Kouwe, André J W; Boas, David; Fischl, Bruce

    2014-06-01

    Recent advancements in radio frequency coils, field strength and sophisticated pulse sequences have propelled modern brain mapping and have made validation to biological standards - histology and pathology - possible. The medial temporal lobe has long been established as a pivotal brain region for connectivity, function and unique structure in the human brain, and reveals disconnection in mild Alzheimer's disease. Specific brain mapping of mesocortical areas affected with neurofibrillary tangle pathology early in disease progression provides not only an accurate description for location of these areas but also supplies spherical coordinates that allow comparison between other ex vivo cases and larger in vivo datasets. We have identified several cytoarchitectonic features in the medial temporal lobe with high resolution ex vivo MRI, including gray matter structures such as the entorhinal layer II 'islands', perirhinal layer II-III columns, presubicular 'clouds', granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus as well as lamina of the hippocampus. Localization of Brodmann areas 28 and 35 (entorhinal and perirhinal, respectively) demonstrates MRI based area boundaries validated with multiple methods and histological stains. Based on our findings, both myelin and Nissl staining relate to contrast in ex vivo MRI. Precise brain mapping serves to create modern atlases for cortical areas, allowing accurate localization with important applications to detecting early disease processes. PMID:23702414

  9. Medial Orbitofrontal Cortex Is Associated with Fatigue Sensation

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, Seiki; Yamamoto, Shigeyuki; Tanaka, Masaaki; Kataoka, Yosky; Iwase, Masao; Yoshikawa, Etsuji; Okada, Hiroyuki; Onoe, Hirotaka; Tsukada, Hideo; Kuratsune, Hirohiko; Ouchi, Yasuomi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Fatigue is an indispensable bioalarm to avoid exhaustive state caused by overwork or stresses. It is necessary to elucidate the neural mechanism of fatigue sensation for managing fatigue properly. We performed H2 15O positron emission tomography scans to indicate neural activations while subjects were performing 35-min fatigue-inducing task trials twice. During the positron emission tomography experiment, subjects performed advanced trail-making tests, touching the target circles in sequence located on the display of a touch-panel screen. In order to identify the brain regions associated with fatigue sensation, correlation analysis was performed using statistical parametric mapping method. The brain region exhibiting a positive correlation in activity with subjective sensation of fatigue, measured immediately after each positron emission tomography scan, was located in medial orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann's area 10/11). Hence, the medial orbitofrontal cortex is a brain region associated with mental fatigue sensation. Our findings provide a new perspective on the neural basis of fatigue. PMID:21188225

  10. [Facilitation of memory consolidation induced by electrical stimulation of the medial septal nucleus in BALB/c mice (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Galey, D; Jeantet, Y; Destrade, C; Jaffard, R

    1982-05-01

    Sinusoidal (100Hz) electrical stimulation was applied at a weak intensity (7.5microA peak to peak) to the medial septal nucleus after partial acquisition of an appetitive operant conditioning task in a Skinner box. Analysis of performance recorded 24 hrs later during a retention session shows that (i) implantation alone impaired performance; (ii) electrical stimulation applied 30 sec. after the end of the acquisition session improves retention; this facilitatory effect disappears when the treatment is delayed 15 min. Furthermore spectral analysis of hippocampal EEG showed that there was no significant modification of theta rhythms. These results are discussed in relation to studies in the literature which demonstrate that RSA (rhythmical slow activity) is associated with memory-storage processes and our own hypothesis which underlines the importance of activation of septo-hippocampal cholinergic neurons in the early stages of these mnemonic processes.U PMID:6809247

  11. A Case of Spontaneous Osteonecrosis of the Knee with Early and Simultaneous Involvement of the Medial Femoral Condyle and Medial Tibial Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Shinya; Arai, Yuji; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SPONK) usually involves a single condyle, most often the medial femoral condyle (MFC). Involvement of the medial tibial plateau (MTP) is less common, occurring in about 2% of knees with SPONK. Early onset SPONK on the ipsilateral side of the medial compartment is very rare, with, to our knowledge, only four cases reported to date. We describe a very rare case of SPONK with early simultaneous development in the MFC and MTP. Serial plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging showed that SPONK in both condyles followed a similar progressive course. The pathological findings in these lesions were similar to those observed in subchondral insufficiency fractures. PMID:27242941

  12. A Case of Spontaneous Osteonecrosis of the Knee with Early and Simultaneous Involvement of the Medial Femoral Condyle and Medial Tibial Plateau.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Shinya; Arai, Yuji; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SPONK) usually involves a single condyle, most often the medial femoral condyle (MFC). Involvement of the medial tibial plateau (MTP) is less common, occurring in about 2% of knees with SPONK. Early onset SPONK on the ipsilateral side of the medial compartment is very rare, with, to our knowledge, only four cases reported to date. We describe a very rare case of SPONK with early simultaneous development in the MFC and MTP. Serial plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging showed that SPONK in both condyles followed a similar progressive course. The pathological findings in these lesions were similar to those observed in subchondral insufficiency fractures. PMID:27242941

  13. N-{Delta} weak transition

    SciTech Connect

    Graczyk, Krzysztof M.

    2011-11-23

    A short review of the Rein-Sehgal and isobar models is presented. The attention is focused on the nucleon-{Delta}(1232) weak transition form-factors. The results of the recent re-analyses of the ANL and BNL bubble chamber neutrino-deuteron scattering data are discussed.

  14. Focal weakness following herpes zoster.

    PubMed Central

    Cockerell, O C; Ormerod, I E

    1993-01-01

    Three patients presented with focal weakness of an arm which followed segmental herpes zoster affecting the same limb. Neurophysiological investigations suggest that the site of the lesion lay at the root, plexus, or peripheral nerve level. This reflects the various ways in which the virus may affect the peripheral nervous system. PMID:8410022

  15. Cosmology with weak lensing surveys.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Dipak; Valageas, Patrick

    2005-12-15

    Weak gravitational lensing is responsible for the shearing and magnification of the images of high-redshift sources due to the presence of intervening mass. Since the lensing effects arise from deflections of the light rays due to fluctuations of the gravitational potential, they can be directly related to the underlying density field of the large-scale structures. Weak gravitational surveys are complementary to both galaxy surveys and cosmic microwave background observations as they probe unbiased nonlinear matter power spectra at medium redshift. Ongoing CMBR experiments such as WMAP and a future Planck satellite mission will measure the standard cosmological parameters with unprecedented accuracy. The focus of attention will then shift to understanding the nature of dark matter and vacuum energy: several recent studies suggest that lensing is the best method for constraining the dark energy equation of state. During the next 5 year period, ongoing and future weak lensing surveys such as the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM; e.g. SNAP) or the Large-aperture Synoptic Survey Telescope will play a major role in advancing our understanding of the universe in this direction. In this review article, we describe various aspects of probing the matter power spectrum and the bi-spectrum and other related statistics with weak lensing surveys. This can be used to probe the background dynamics of the universe as well as the nature of dark matter and dark energy. PMID:16286284

  16. Familial discoid medial meniscus tear in three members of a family: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Ahmed Ali, Raheel; McKay, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Background. A discoid meniscus is a thickened variant of the normal C-shaped meniscus prone to injury. Discoid medial meniscal tears have rarely been reported within families and may suggest familial or developmental origins. Methods. We report the cases of two Caucasian brothers with symptomatic discoid medial meniscus tears. A literature review was conducted addressing discoid medial meniscus and cases of familial meniscus tears. Case Presentation. Physically active brothers presented with progressively worsening knee pain. MRI revealed medial meniscus tears in both brothers. The family history of medial meniscus tears in their mother and the discoid medial meniscus injuries found on arthroscopy suggested evidence for familial discoid medial meniscus tears. Conclusions. Discoid medial meniscus tears within a family have not been previously reported. Two cases of families with discoid lateral meniscus tears have been reported. Discoid medial meniscus is rare relative to the discoid lateral meniscus and predisposes children to symptomatic tears. PMID:25548700

  17. Familial Discoid Medial Meniscus Tear in Three Members of a Family: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed Ali, Raheel; McKay, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Background. A discoid meniscus is a thickened variant of the normal C-shaped meniscus prone to injury. Discoid medial meniscal tears have rarely been reported within families and may suggest familial or developmental origins. Methods. We report the cases of two Caucasian brothers with symptomatic discoid medial meniscus tears. A literature review was conducted addressing discoid medial meniscus and cases of familial meniscus tears. Case Presentation. Physically active brothers presented with progressively worsening knee pain. MRI revealed medial meniscus tears in both brothers. The family history of medial meniscus tears in their mother and the discoid medial meniscus injuries found on arthroscopy suggested evidence for familial discoid medial meniscus tears. Conclusions. Discoid medial meniscus tears within a family have not been previously reported. Two cases of families with discoid lateral meniscus tears have been reported. Discoid medial meniscus is rare relative to the discoid lateral meniscus and predisposes children to symptomatic tears. PMID:25548700

  18. Comparison of Medial and Lateral Meniscus Root Tears

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Ji Hyun; Choi, Sang-Hee; Lee, Seung Ah; Wang, Joon Ho

    2015-01-01

    The meniscus root plays an essential role in maintaining the circumferential hoop tension and preventing meniscal displacement. Studies on meniscus root tears have investigated the relationship of osteoarthritis and an anterior cruciate ligament tear. However, few studies have directly compared the medial and lateral root tears. To assess the prevalence of meniscal extrusion and its relationship with clinical features in medial and lateral meniscus root tears, we performed a retrospective review of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results of 42 knee patients who had meniscus posterior horn root tears and who had undergone arthroscopic operations. The presence of meniscal extrusion was evaluated and the exact extent was measured from the tibial margin. The results were correlated with arthroscopic findings. Clinical features including patients’ ages, joint abnormalities, and previous trauma histories were evaluated. Twenty-two patients had medial meniscus root tears (MMRTs) and twenty patients had lateral meniscus root tears (LMRTs). Meniscal extrusion was present in 18 MMRT patients and one LMRT patient. The mean extent of extrusion was 4.2mm (range, 0.6 to 7.8) in the MMRT group and 0.9mm (range, -1.9 to 3.4) in the LMRT group. Five patients with MMRT had a history of trauma, while 19 patients with LMRT had a history of trauma. Three patients with MMRT had anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears, while 19 patients with LMRT had ACL tears. The mean age of the patients was 52 years (range: 29–71 years) and 30 years (range: 14–62 years) in the MMRT and LMRT group, respectively. There was a significant correlation between a MMRT and meniscal extrusion (p<0.0001), and between an ACL tear and LMRT (p<0.0001). A history of trauma was significantly common in LMRT (p<0.0001). LMRT patients were significantly younger than MMRT patients (p<0.0001). Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grade differed significantly between MMRT and LMRT group (p<0.0001). Meniscal extrusion is

  19. Weak values and weak coupling maximizing the output of weak measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Di Lorenzo, Antonio

    2014-06-15

    In a weak measurement, the average output 〈o〉 of a probe that measures an observable A{sup -hat} of a quantum system undergoing both a preparation in a state ρ{sub i} and a postselection in a state E{sub f} is, to a good approximation, a function of the weak value A{sub w}=Tr[E{sub f}A{sup -hat} ρ{sub i}]/Tr[E{sub f}ρ{sub i}], a complex number. For a fixed coupling λ, when the overlap Tr[E{sub f}ρ{sub i}] is very small, A{sub w} diverges, but 〈o〉 stays finite, often tending to zero for symmetry reasons. This paper answers the questions: what is the weak value that maximizes the output for a fixed coupling? What is the coupling that maximizes the output for a fixed weak value? We derive equations for the optimal values of A{sub w} and λ, and provide the solutions. The results are independent of the dimensionality of the system, and they apply to a probe having a Hilbert space of arbitrary dimension. Using the Schrödinger–Robertson uncertainty relation, we demonstrate that, in an important case, the amplification 〈o〉 cannot exceed the initial uncertainty σ{sub o} in the observable o{sup -hat}, we provide an upper limit for the more general case, and a strategy to obtain 〈o〉≫σ{sub o}. - Highlights: •We have provided a general framework to find the extremal values of a weak measurement. •We have derived the location of the extremal values in terms of preparation and postselection. •We have devised a maximization strategy going beyond the limit of the Schrödinger–Robertson relation.

  20. Tomography and weak lensing statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Munshi, Dipak; Coles, Peter; Kilbinger, Martin E-mail: peter.coles@astro.cf.ac.uk

    2014-04-01

    We provide generic predictions for the lower order cumulants of weak lensing maps, and their correlators for tomographic bins as well as in three dimensions (3D). Using small-angle approximation, we derive the corresponding one- and two-point probability distribution function for the tomographic maps from different bins and for 3D convergence maps. The modelling of weak lensing statistics is obtained by adopting a detailed prescription for the underlying density contrast that involves hierarchal ansatz and lognormal distribution. We study the dependence of our results on cosmological parameters and source distributions corresponding to the realistic surveys such as LSST and DES. We briefly outline how photometric redshift information can be incorporated in our results. We also show how topological properties of convergence maps can be quantified using our results.

  1. Overdamping by weakly coupled environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Massimiliano; Haake, Fritz

    2005-12-01

    A quantum system weakly interacting with a fast environment usually undergoes a relaxation with complex frequencies whose imaginary parts are damping rates quadratic in the coupling to the environment in accord with Fermi’s “golden rule.” We show for various models (spin damped by harmonic-oscillator or random-matrix baths, quantum diffusion, and quantum Brownian motion) that upon increasing the coupling up to a critical value still small enough to allow for weak-coupling Markovian master equations, a different relaxation regime can occur. In that regime, complex frequencies lose their real parts such that the process becomes overdamped. Our results call into question the standard belief that overdamping is exclusively a strong coupling feature.

  2. Overdamping by weakly coupled environments

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, Massimiliano; Haake, Fritz

    2005-12-15

    A quantum system weakly interacting with a fast environment usually undergoes a relaxation with complex frequencies whose imaginary parts are damping rates quadratic in the coupling to the environment in accord with Fermi's 'golden rule'. We show for various models (spin damped by harmonic-oscillator or random-matrix baths, quantum diffusion, and quantum Brownian motion) that upon increasing the coupling up to a critical value still small enough to allow for weak-coupling Markovian master equations, a different relaxation regime can occur. In that regime, complex frequencies lose their real parts such that the process becomes overdamped. Our results call into question the standard belief that overdamping is exclusively a strong coupling feature.

  3. Optimizing SNAP for Weak Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    High, F. W.; Ellis, R. S.; Massey, R. J.; Rhodes, J. D.; Lamoureux, J. I.; SNAP Collaboration

    2004-12-01

    The Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) satellite proposes to measure weak gravitational lensing in addition to type Ia supernovae. Its pixel scale has been set to 0.10 arcsec per pixel as established by the needs of supernova observations. To find the optimal pixel scale for accurate weak lensing measurements we conduct a tradeoff study in which, via simulations, we fix the suvey size in total pixels and vary the pixel scale. Our preliminary results show that with a smaller scale of about 0.08 arcsec per pixel we can minimize the contribution of intrinsic shear variance to the error on the power spectrum of mass density distortion. Currently we are testing the robustness of this figure as well as determining whether dithering yields analogous results.

  4. The Vascularized Medial Femoral Corticoperiosteal Flap for Thumb Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Kavit; Darhouse, Nagham; Sivakumar, Bran; Floyd, David

    2015-01-01

    Summary: We present an interesting method of shaping a vascularized medial femoral condyle (MFC) flap into a “neophalanx” for phalangeal reconstruction. Our patient presented with limited strength and function secondary to fracture nonunion of the proximal phalanx of the dominant thumb. Following excision of the pseudarthrosis, an MFC corticoperiosteal flap was harvested, sculpted into a prism shape and inset. The superomedial genicular pedicle was anastomosed to the princeps pollicis artery and a cephalic tributary. On follow-up, new bone growth was seen on radiographs and the patient had substantially improved function, with full metacarpophalangeal extension, a Kapandji score of 9, and a markedly reduced Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score of 2.68. The MFC flap is useful for reconstruction of bony defects, with minimal donor morbidity. This versatile vascularized flap can be crafted to requisite shapes and is useful for small defects in the hand, including phalangeal reconstruction. PMID:26495205

  5. Angioleiomyoma of the Plantar-Medial Arch: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gilheany, Mark

    2016-01-01

    An angioleiomyoma is a benign soft tissue tumour that arises from smooth muscle layer of blood vessels. The true aetiology of these masses is largely unknown and quite often may not be associated with pain. This paper illustrates the occurrence of an angioleiomyoma in the medial arch of the foot, a previously unreported location. Significant delay occurred in the patient being referred for specialist consultation, after attending numerous general practitioners for management. This highlighted the need for ongoing publication for case reports of this nature. The patient underwent excision with no recurrence of the lesion reported at 12 months. Often masses of this type may be left alone. However, when symptomatic simple excision will suffice where no other surrounding complication exists and where the mass is well encapsulated in the sub cutaneous area.

  6. Medial prefrontal cortex predicts internally driven strategy shifts

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, Nicolas W.; Gaschler, Robert; Wenke, Dorit; Heinzle, Jakob; Frensch, Peter A.; Haynes, John-Dylan; Reverberi, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many daily behaviors require us to actively focus on the current task and ignore all other distractions. Yet, ignoring everything else might hinder the ability to discover new ways to achieve the same goal. Here, we studied the neural mechanisms that support the spontaneous change to better strategies while an established strategy is executed. Multivariate neuroimaging analysis showed that before the spontaneous change to an alternative strategy, medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) encoded information that was irrelevant for the current strategy but necessary for the later strategy. Importantly, this neural effect was related to future behavioral changes: information encoding in MPFC was changed only in participants who eventually switched their strategy and started before the actual strategy change. This allowed us to predict spontaneous strategy shifts ahead of time. These findings suggest that MPFC might internally simulate alternative strategies and sheds new light on the organization of PFC. PMID:25819613

  7. The Medial Temporal Lobe Supports Conceptual Implicit Memory

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Chun; Lazzara, Michele M.; Ranganath, Charan; Knight, Robert T.; Yonelinas, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The medial temporal lobe (MTL) is generally thought to be critical for explicit, but not implicit, memory. Here, we demonstrate that the perirhinal cortex (PRc), within the MTL, plays a role in conceptually-driven implicit memory. Amnesic patients with MTL lesions that converged on the left PRc exhibited deficits on two conceptual implicit tasks (i.e., exemplar generation and semantic decision). A separate functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in healthy subjects indicated that PRc activation during encoding of words was predictive of subsequent exemplar generation. Moreover, across subjects, the magnitude of the fMRI and behavioral conceptual priming effects were directly related. Additionally, the PRc region implicated in the fMRI study was the same region of maximal lesion overlap in the patients with impaired conceptual priming. These patient and imaging results converge to suggest that the PRc plays a critical role in conceptual implicit memory, and possibly conceptual processing in general. PMID:21144998

  8. Galanin neurons in the medial preoptic area govern parental behaviour.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zheng; Autry, Anita E; Bergan, Joseph F; Watabe-Uchida, Mitsuko; Dulac, Catherine G

    2014-05-15

    Mice display robust, stereotyped behaviours towards pups: virgin males typically attack pups, whereas virgin females and sexually experienced males and females display parental care. Here we show that virgin males genetically impaired in vomeronasal sensing do not attack pups and are parental. Furthermore, we uncover a subset of galanin-expressing neurons in the medial preoptic area (MPOA) that are specifically activated during male and female parenting, and a different subpopulation that is activated during mating. Genetic ablation of MPOA galanin neurons results in marked impairment of parental responses in males and females and affects male mating. Optogenetic activation of these neurons in virgin males suppresses inter-male and pup-directed aggression and induces pup grooming. Thus, MPOA galanin neurons emerge as an essential regulatory node of male and female parenting behaviour and other social responses. These results provide an entry point to a circuit-level dissection of parental behaviour and its modulation by social experience. PMID:24828191

  9. Dopaminergic projections to the medial preoptic area of postpartum rats

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Stephanie M.; Lonstein, Joseph S.

    2010-01-01

    Dopamine receptor activity in the rodent medial preoptic area (mPOA) is crucial for the display of maternal behaviors, as well as numerous other physiological and behavioral functions. However, the origin of dopaminergic input to the mPOA has not been identified through neuroanatomical tracing. To accomplish this, the retrograde tracer Fluorogold was iontophoretically applied to the mPOA of postpartum laboratory rats, and dual-label immunocytochemistry for Fluorogold and tyrosine hydroxylase later performed to identify dopaminergic cells of the forebrain and midbrain projecting to the mPOA. Results indicate that the number of dopaminergic cells projecting to the mPOA is moderate (~90 cells to one hemisphere), and that these cells have an unexpectedly wide distribution. Even so, more than half of the dual-labeled cells were found in what has been considered extensions of the A10 dopamine group (particularly the ventrocaudal posterior hypothalamus and adjacent medial supramammillary nucleus), or in the A10 cells of the ventral tegmental area. The rostral hypothalamus and surrounding region also contained numerous dual-labeled cells, with the greatest number found within the mPOA itself (including in the AVPV and PVpo). Notably, dual-labeled cells were rare in the zona incerta (A13), a site previously suggested to provide dopaminergic input to the mPOA. This study is the first to use anatomical tracing to detail the dopaminergic projections to the mPOA in the laboratory rat, and indicates that much of this projection originates more caudally than previously suggested. PMID:19409227

  10. Multidimensional assessment of functional outcomes of medialization thyroplasty.

    PubMed

    Uloza, Virgilijus; Pribuisiene, Ruta; Saferis, Viktoras

    2005-08-01

    Medialization thyroplasty (MT) is the most widely used laryngeal framework phonosurgical procedure for managing glottic incompetence secondary to unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP). The aim of the study was to evaluate the functional outcomes of MT in 32 UVFP patients, comparing multidimensional perceptual and instrumental measures of voice before and after surgery, and to evaluate how close to normal that postoperative voice measure became. Video laryngostroboscopy (VLS), auditory perceptive evaluation of voice, the patients' self-evaluation of hoarseness on the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and calculation of the Voice Handicap Index (VHI), analysis of objective acoustic voice parameters, quantitative assessment of phonetograms and measurement of maximum phonation time were conducted. Vocal function was evaluated before the surgery and for the period from 1 month to 3 years (Mo 1.0 month; Me 2.0 months) after MT. VLS confirmed remarkable medialization of the paralyzed vocal fold. As a consequence, hoarseness and breathiness were found to be significantly decreased after MT. Pitch and intensity range and phonetogram area were significantly increased. A significant decrease of jitter, shimmer and normalized noise energy reflected improvement of the stability of acoustic signal and a more efficient pattern of phonation. Thus, the perceptual and acoustic voice parameters studied showed statistically significant differences (P < 0.001) between preoperative and postoperative voices, and these objective measurements of voice changes provided accurate and documentary evidence of the results of surgical treatment. A high degree of patient satisfaction with the MT was confirmed by a significant decrease of VHI and hoarseness on VAS. Thus, results of the present investigation confirm the functionality and effectiveness of MT in patient voice rehabilitation with UVFP. However, the means of acoustic voice parameters measured in the study did not reach normal limits

  11. Medialized Versus Lateralized Center of Rotation in Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Streit, Jonathan J; Shishani, Yousef; Gobezie, Reuben

    2015-12-01

    Reverse shoulder arthroplasty may be performed using components that medialize or lateralize the center of rotation. The purpose of this prospective study was to directly compare 2 reverse shoulder arthroplasty designs. Two treatment groups and 1 control group were identified. Group I comprised 9 patients using a medialized Grammont-style (GRM) prosthesis with a neck-shaft angle of 155°. Group II comprised 9 patients using a lateralized (LAT) prosthesis with a neck-shaft angle of 135°. Pre- and postoperative assessment of range of motion, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, and visual analog scale pain score were performed. Radiographic measurements of lateral humeral offset and acromiohumeral distance were compared. The GRM prosthesis achieved greater forward flexion (143.9° vs 115.6°; P=.05), whereas the LAT achieved greater external rotation (35.0° vs 28.3°; P=.07). The lateral humeral offset was greater for the LAT prosthesis compared with the GRM prosthesis, but this distance was not significantly different from that found in the control group. The acromiohumeral distance was significantly greater in the GRM prosthesis group compared with both the LAT and the control groups. The results of this study confirm that different reverse shoulder arthroplasty designs produce radiographically different anatomy. Whereas the GRM prosthesis significantly alters the anatomy of the shoulder, the LAT design can preserve some anatomic relationships found in the normal shoulder. The clinical outcomes indicate that this may have an effect on range of motion, with traditional designs achieving greater forward flexion and lateralized designs achieving greater external rotation. PMID:26652330

  12. Supinated forearm is correlated with the onset of medial epicondylitis in professional slalom water-skiers

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Donato; Di Donato, Sigismondo Luca; Balato, Giovanni; D’Addona, Alessio; Schonauer, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background prolonged and laborious activities involving wrists and forearms has been long associated with the onset of epicondylitis. Slalom water-skiing can be included in this category. The purpose of the study is to analyse the correlation between the pronated or supinated position of forearms during water-skiing practice and the presence respectively of lateral and medial epicondylitis. Methods sixty-six pro and semi-pro slalom water-skiers were enrolled in the study. A questionnaire was submitted to each athlete. Diagnosis of lateral or medial epicondylitis was made through anamnesis and clinical exam by an expert orthopaedic surgeon. Chi-squared were performed for categorical variables, and Mann-Whitney U test for continuous ones. Results from 116 upper limbs examined, we observed 15 (12.9%) cases of lateral epicondylitis, 30 (25.9%) cases of medial epicondylitis, 10 (8.6%) were affected by both lateral and medial epicondylitis. Lateral and medial epicondylitis were associated (95% C.I.=2,489–26,355; P=<0,001) and the supinated position was correlated with medial epicondylitis (95% C.I.=1,529–9,542; P=0.003). Conclusion slalom water-skiing can be considered a high-risk sport for epicondylitis. In slalom water-skiers there is a correlation between development of lateral and medial epicondylitis in the same upper limb. Supinated position of forearms is strongly associated with the diagnosis of medial epicondylitis. PMID:27331043

  13. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at the medial clavicular head mimicking Tietze Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jeon, In-Ho; Jeong, Won-Ju; Yi, Jae-Hyuck; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Park, Il-Hyung

    2012-08-01

    We present a case of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving medial clavicular head, which was initially diagnosed as Tietze syndrome. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma arising from medial clavicular head is extremely rare, and CT, MRI findings have not been reported. PMID:21140267

  14. Anterolateral Versus Medial Plating of Distal Extra-articular Tibia Fractures: A Biomechanical Model.

    PubMed

    Pirolo, Joseph M; Behn, Anthony W; Abrams, Geoffrey D; Bishop, Julius A

    2015-09-01

    Both medial and anterolateral plate applications have been described for the treatment of distal tibia fractures, each with distinct advantages and disadvantages. The objective of this study was to compare the biomechanical properties of medial and anterolateral plating constructs used to stabilize simulated varus and valgus fracture patterns of the distal tibia. In 16 synthetic tibia models, a 45° oblique cut was made to model an Orthopedic Trauma Association type 43-A1.2 distal tibia fracture in either a varus or valgus injury pattern. Each fracture was then reduced and plated with a precontoured medial or anterolateral distal tibia plate. The specimens were biomechanically tested in axial and torsional loading, cyclic axial loading, and load to failure. For the varus fracture pattern, medial plating showed less fracture site displacement and rotation and was stiffer in both axial and torsional loading (P<.05). For the valgus fracture pattern, there was no statistically significant difference between medial and anterolateral plating. There were no significant differences between the 2 constructs for either fracture pattern with respect to ultimate load, displacement, or energy absorption in load to failure testing. When used to stabilize varus fracture patterns, medial plates showed superior biomechanical performance compared with anterolateral plates. In this application, the medial plates functioned in anti-glide mode. For valgus fracture patterns, no biomechanical differences between anterolateral and medial plating were observed. In clinical practice, surgeons should take this biomechanical evidence into account when devising a treatment strategy for fixation of distal tibia fractures. PMID:26375532

  15. Medial Frontal Event-Related Potentials and Reward Prediction: Do Responses Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Laura E.; Potts, Geoffrey F.

    2011-01-01

    Medial frontal event-related potentials (ERPs) following rewarding feedback index outcome evaluation. The majority of studies examining the feedback related medial frontal negativity (MFN) employ active tasks during which participants' responses impact their feedback, however, the MFN has been elicited during passive tasks. Many of the studies…

  16. Feasibility of the Medial Temporal lobe Atrophy index (MTAi) and derived methods for measuring atrophy of the medial temporal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Conejo Bayón, Francisco; Maese, Jesús; Fernandez Oliveira, Aníbal; Mesas, Tamara; Herrera de la Llave, Estibaliz; Álvarez Avellón, Tania; Menéndez-González, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The Medial Temporal-lobe Atrophy index (MTAi), 2D-Medial Temporal Atrophy (2D-MTA), yearly rate of MTA (yrRMTA) and yearly rate of relative MTA (yrRMTA) are simple protocols for measuring the relative extent of atrophy in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) in relation to the global brain atrophy. Albeit preliminary studies showed interest of these methods in the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), frontotemporal lobe degeneration (FTLD) and correlation with cognitive impairment in Parkinson’s disease (PD), formal feasibility and validity studies remained pending. As a first step, we aimed to assess the feasibility. Mainly, we aimed to assess the reproducibility of measuring the areas needed to compute these indices. We also aimed to assess the efforts needed to start using these methods correctly. Methods: A series of 290 1.5T-MRI studies from 230 subjects ranging 65–85 years old who had been studied for cognitive impairment were used in this study. Six inexperienced tracers (IT) plus one experienced tracer (ET) traced the three areas needed to compute the indices. Finally, tracers underwent a short survey on their experience learning to compute the MTAi and experience of usage, including items relative to training time needed to understand and apply the MTAi, time to perform a study after training and overall satisfaction. Results: Learning to trace the areas needed to compute the MTAi and derived methods is quick and easy. Results indicate very good intrarater Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) for the MTAi, good intrarater ICC for the 2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRMTA and also good interrater ICC for the MTAi, 2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRMTA. Conclusion: Our data support that MTAi and derived methods (2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRTMA) have good to very good intrarater and interrater reproducibility and may be easily implemented in clinical practice even if new users have no experience tracing the area of regions of interest. PMID:25414666

  17. Suppression of proliferation of a human B-cell leukaemic cell line derived from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia by soluble factor(s) from Campylobacter rectus.

    PubMed

    Saito, S; Hayakawa, M; Takiguchi, H; Abiko, Y

    1993-06-01

    Soluble sonic extracts of several strains were examined for their ability to alter proliferation of a cell line derived from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BALL-1). Extracts of all strains tested caused dose-dependent suppression of proliferation when assessed by DNA (tritiated thymidine incorporation), RNA (tritiated uridine incorporation) and protein (tritiated leucine incorporation) synthesis. There was no effect on the viability of BALL-1 as measured by either trypan-blue exclusion or extracellular release of the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase. The suppressive factor(s) was separated in a well-defined peak by high-pressure liquid DEAE ion-exchange chromatography, which revealed a single active peak with a molecular mass of 48 kDa. Characterization of the peak indicated that the suppressive factor(s) was heat labile (activity destroyed at 80 degrees C) and sensitive to the proteolytic enzyme pronase P. The soluble suppressive factor(s) from Campylobacter rectus thus has protein-like properties and no cytotoxicity to a human B-cell leukaemic cell line. PMID:8343067

  18. Levobupivacaine - dextran mixture for transversus abdominis plane block and rectus sheath block in patients undergoing laparoscopic colectomy: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hamada, T; Tsuchiya, M; Mizutani, K; Takahashi, R; Muguruma, K; Maeda, K; Ueda, W; Nishikawa, K

    2016-04-01

    We performed a randomised controlled double-blinded study of patients having laparoscopic colectomy with bilateral transversus abdominis plane block plus rectus sheath block, comparing a control group receiving 80 ml levobupivacaine 0.2% in saline with a dextran group receiving 80 ml levobupivacaine 0.2% in 8% low-molecular weight dextran. Twenty-seven patients were studied in each group. The mean (SD) maximum plasma concentration of levobupivacaine in the control group (1410 (322) ng.ml(-1) ) was higher than the dextran group (1141 (287) ng.ml(-1) ; p = 0.004), and was reached more quickly (50.6 (30.2) min vs 73.2 (24.6) min; p = 0.006). The area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 min to 240 min in the control group (229,124 (87,254) ng.min.ml(-1) ) was larger than in the dextran group (172,484 (50,502) ng.min.ml(-1) ; p = 0.007). The median (IQR [range]) of the summated numerical pain rating score at rest during the first postoperative 24 h in the control group (16 (9-20 [3-31]) was higher than in the dextran group (8 (2-11 [0-18]); p = 0.0001). In this study, adding dextran to levobupivacaine decreased the risk of levobupivacaine toxicity while providing better analgesia. PMID:26919568

  19. Common medial frontal mechanisms of adaptive control in humans and rodents

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Michael J.; Laubach, Mark

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we describe how common brain networks within the medial frontal cortex facilitate adaptive behavioral control in rodents and humans. We demonstrate that low frequency oscillations below 12 Hz are dramatically modulated after errors in humans over mid-frontal cortex and in rats within prelimbic and anterior cingulate regions of medial frontal cortex. These oscillations were phase-locked between medial frontal cortex and motor areas in both rats and humans. In rats, single neurons that encoded prior behavioral outcomes were phase-coherent with low-frequency field oscillations particularly after errors. Inactivating medial frontal regions in rats led to impaired behavioral adjustments after errors, eliminated the differential expression of low frequency oscillations after errors, and increased low-frequency spike-field coupling within motor cortex. Our results describe a novel mechanism for behavioral adaptation via low-frequency oscillations and elucidate how medial frontal networks synchronize brain activity to guide performance. PMID:24141310

  20. Coding Odorant Concentration Through Activation Timing Between the Medial and Lateral Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhishang; Belluscio, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY In mammals, each olfactory bulb (OB) contains a pair of mirror-symmetric glomerular maps organized to reflect odorant receptor identity. The functional implication of maintaining these symmetric medial-lateral maps within each OB remains unclear. Here, using in vivo multi-electrode recordings to simultaneously detect odorant-induced activity across the entire OB, we reveal a timing difference in the odorant-evoked onset latencies between the medial and lateral halves. Interestingly, the latencies in the medial and lateral OB decreased at different rates as odorant concentration increased, causing the timing difference between them to also diminish. As a result, output neurons in the medial and lateral OB fired with greater synchrony at higher odorant concentrations. Thus, we propose that temporal differences in activity between the medial and lateral OB can dynamically code odorant concentration, which is subsequently decoded in the olfactory cortex through the integration of synchronous action potentials. PMID:23168258

  1. Medial Closing-Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy: Fixation With Proximal Tibial Locking Plate.

    PubMed

    Tírico, Luís Eduardo Passarelli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pécora, José Ricardo

    2015-12-01

    Distal femoral varus osteotomy is a well-established procedure for the treatment of lateral compartment cartilage lesions and degenerative disease, correcting limb alignment and decreasing the progression of the pathology. Surgical techniques can be performed with a lateral opening-wedge or medial closing-wedge correction of the deformity. Fixation methods for lateral opening-wedge osteotomies are widely available, and there are various types of implants that can be used for fixation. However, there are currently only a few options of implants for fixation of a medial closing-wedge osteotomy on the market. This report describes a medial, supracondylar, V-shaped, closing-wedge distal femoral osteotomy using a locked anterolateral proximal tibial locking plate that fits anatomically to the medial side of the distal femur. This is a great option as a stable implant for a medial closing-wedge distal femoral osteotomy. PMID:26870647

  2. Transcaruncular Approach for Treatment of Medial Wall and Large Orbital Blowout Fractures.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dennis C; Shahzad, Farooq; Snyder-Warwick, Alison; Patel, Kamlesh B; Woo, Albert S

    2016-03-01

    We evaluate the safety and efficacy of the transcaruncular approach for reconstruction of medial orbital wall fractures and the combined transcaruncular-transconjunctival approach for reconstruction of large orbital defects involving the medial wall and floor. A retrospective review of the clinical and radiographic data of patients who underwent either a transcaruncular or a combined transcaruncular-transconjunctival approach by a single surgeon for orbital fractures between June 2007 and June 2013 was undertaken. Seven patients with isolated medial wall fractures underwent a transcaruncular approach, and nine patients with combined medial wall and floor fractures underwent a transcaruncular-transconjunctival approach with a lateral canthotomy. Reconstruction was performed using a porous polyethylene implant. All patients with isolated medial wall fractures presented with enophthalmos. In the combined medial wall and floor group, five out of eight patients had enophthalmos with two also demonstrating hypoglobus. The size of the medial wall defect on preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan ranged from 2.6 to 4.6 cm(2); the defect size of combined medial wall and floor fractures was 4.5 to 12.7 cm(2). Of the 11 patients in whom postoperative CT scans were obtained, all were noted to have acceptable placement of the implant. All patients had correction of enophthalmos and hypoglobus. One complication was noted, with a retrobulbar hematoma having developed 2 days postoperatively. The transcaruncular approach is a safe and effective method for reconstruction of medial orbital floor fractures. Even large fractures involving the orbital medial wall and floor can be adequately exposed and reconstructed with a combined transcaruncular-transconjunctival-lateral canthotomy approach. The level of evidence of this study is IV (case series with pre/posttest). PMID:26889348

  3. NUCLEUS REUNIENS OF THE MIDLINE THALAMUS: LINK BETWEEN THE MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX AND THE HIPPOCAMPUS

    PubMed Central

    Vertes, Robert P.; Hoover, Walter B.; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Leranth, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus serve well recognized roles in memory processing. The hippocampus projects densely to, and exerts strong excitatory actions on, the medial prefrontal cortex. Interestingly, the medial prefrontal cortex, in rats and other species, has no direct return projections to the hippocampus, and few projections to parahippocampal structures including the entorhinal cortex. It is well established that the nucleus reuniens of the midline thalamus is the major source of thalamic afferents to the hippocampus. Since the medial prefrontal cortex also distributes to nucleus reuniens, we examined medial prefrontal connections with populations of nucleus reuniens neurons projecting to hippocampus. We used a combined anterograde and retrograde tracing procedure at the light and electron microscopic levels. Specifically, we made Phaseolus vulgaris-leuccoagglutinin (PHA-L) injections into the medial prefrontal cortex and Fluorogold injections into the hippocampus (CA1/subiculum) and examined termination patterns of anterogradely PHA-L labeled fibers on retrogradely FG labeled cells of nucleus reuniens. At the light microscopic level, we showed that fibers from the medial prefrontal cortex form multiple putative synaptic contacts with dendrites of hippocampally projecting neurons throughout the extent of nucleus reuniens. At ultrastructural level, we showed that medial prefrontal cortical fibers form asymmetric contacts predominantly with dendritic shafts of hippocampally projecting reuniens cells. These findings indicate that nucleus reuniens represents a critical link between the medial prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus. We discuss the possibility that nucleus reuniens gates the flow of information between the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus dependent upon attentive/arousal states of the organism. PMID:17292803

  4. Competing weak localization and weak antilocalization in ultrathin topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Murong; He, Liang; Kou, Xufeng; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Fan, Yabin; Chu, Hao; Yeh, Nai-Chang; Wang, Kang

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate the evidences of a surface gap opening in (Bi0.57Sb0.43)2 Te3 samples for film thickness below 6 quintuple layers, through magnetotransport and scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements. By tuning Fermi level position relative to the gap, the striking crossover between weak antilocalization and weak localization is observed in nonmagnetic 4 and 5 QL films at low field region, a characteristic feature of quantum interferences competition, possibly owing to the change of net Berry phase. Furthermore, when the Fermi level is swept into the surface gap, the overall unitary behaviors are revealed at higher magnetic field, which are in contrast to the pure WAL signals obtained in thicker films. Besides, the surface bandgap of ultrathin film is also determined by low temperature STS measurements. Our findings show an exotic phenomenon characterizing the gapped TI surface states and point to the future realization of quantum spin Hall effect and dissipationless TI-based applications. This work was in part supported by Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), Focus Center Research Program-Center on Functional Engineered Nano Architectonics (FENA).

  5. Weak lensing by galaxy troughs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruen, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Galaxy troughs, i.e. underdensities in the projected galaxy field, are a weak lensing probe of the low density Universe with high signal-to-noise ratio. I present measurements of the radial distortion of background galaxy images and the de-magnification of the CMB by troughs constructed from Dark Energy Survey and Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxy catalogs. With high statistical significance and a relatively robust modeling, these probe gravity in regimes of density and scale difficult to access for conventional statistics.

  6. Detecting weakly interacting massive particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drukier, A. K.; Gelmini, G. B.

    The growing synergy between astrophysics, particle physics, and low background experiments strengthens the possibility of detecting astrophysical non-baryonic matter. The idea of direct detection is that an incident, massive weakly interacting particle could collide with a nucleus and transfer an energy that could be measured. The present low levels of background achieved by the PNL/USC Ge detector represent a new technology which yields interesting bounds on Galactic cold dark matter and on light bosons emitted from the Sun. Further improvements require the development of cryogenic detectors. The authors analyse the practicality of such detectors, their optimalization and background suppression using the "annual modulation effect".

  7. Tagged-weak {pi} method

    SciTech Connect

    Margaryan, A.; Hashimoto, O.; Kakoyan, V.; Knyazyan, S.; Tang, L.

    2011-02-15

    A new 'tagged-weak {pi} method' is proposed for determination of electromagnetic transition probabilities B(E2) and B(M1) of the hypernuclear states with lifetimes of {approx}10{sup -10} s. With this method, we are planning to measure B(E2) and B(M1) for light hypernuclei at JLab. The results of Monte Carlo simulations for the case of E2(5/2{sup +}, 3/2{sup +} {yields} 1/2{sup +}) transitions in {sub {Lambda}}{sup 7}He hypernuclei are presented.

  8. Weak quasielastic production of hyperons

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S. K.; Vacas, M. J. Vicente

    2006-09-01

    The quasielastic weak production of {lambda} and {sigma} hyperons from nucleons and nuclei induced by antineutrinos is studied in the energy region of some ongoing neutrino oscillation experiments in the intermediate energy region. The hyperon-nucleon transition form factors determined from neutrino-nucleon scattering and an analysis of high precision data on semileptonic decays of neutron and hyperons using SU(3) symmetry have been used. The nuclear effects due to Fermi motion and final state interaction effects due to hyperon-nucleon scattering have also been studied. The numerical results for differential and total cross sections have been presented.

  9. Electromagnetic weak turbulence theory revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, P. H.; Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.; Pavan, J.

    2012-10-15

    The statistical mechanical reformulation of weak turbulence theory for unmagnetized plasmas including fully electromagnetic effects was carried out by Yoon [Phys. Plasmas 13, 022302 (2006)]. However, the wave kinetic equation for the transverse wave ignores the nonlinear three-wave interaction that involves two transverse waves and a Langmuir wave, the incoherent analogue of the so-called Raman scattering process, which may account for the third and higher-harmonic plasma emissions. The present paper extends the previous formalism by including such a term.

  10. Pyramidal and Stellate Cell Specificity of Grid and Border Representations in Layer 2 of Medial Entorhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qiusong; Burgalossi, Andrea; Ebbesen, Christian Laut; Ray, Saikat; Naumann, Robert; Schmidt, Helene; Spicher, Dominik; Brecht, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Summary In medial entorhinal cortex, layer 2 principal cells divide into pyramidal neurons (mostly calbindin positive) and dentate gyrus-projecting stellate cells (mostly calbindin negative). We juxtacellularly labeled layer 2 neurons in freely moving animals, but small sample size prevented establishing unequivocal structure-function relationships. We show, however, that spike locking to theta oscillations allows assigning unidentified extracellular recordings to pyramidal and stellate cells with ∼83% and ∼89% specificity, respectively. In pooled anatomically identified and theta-locking-assigned recordings, nonspatial discharges dominated, and weakly hexagonal spatial discharges and head-direction selectivity were observed in both cell types. Clear grid discharges were rare and mostly classified as pyramids (19%, 19/99 putative pyramids versus 3%, 3/94 putative stellates). Most border cells were classified as stellate (11%, 10/94 putative stellates versus 1%, 1/99 putative pyramids). Our data suggest weakly theta-locked stellate border cells provide spatial input to dentate gyrus, whereas strongly theta-locked grid discharges occur mainly in hexagonally arranged pyramidal cell patches and do not feed into dentate gyrus. PMID:25482025

  11. Charge on a weak polyelectrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shengqin; Granick, Steve; Zhao, Jiang

    2008-12-01

    Fluorescence measurements with single-molecule sensitivity are used to measure the hydrodynamic size and local pH of a weak polyelectrolyte, poly-2-vinyl pyridine end labeled with pH-sensitive dye, the polyelectrolyte having concentration so low (nanomolars) that molecular properties are resolvable only from fluorescence experiments and cannot be accessed by light scattering. We find that the local pH near the dye, inferred from its brightness, is consistently three orders of magnitude higher than the bulk pH. Upon varying the bulk pH, we measure the collapse point at which hydrophobic attraction overwhelms electrostatic repulsion between charged elements along the chain, and conclude that adding monovalent salt shifts this coil-to-globule collapse to higher pH than in the absence of salt. The influence of salt appears to shift the ionization equilibrium of this weak polyelectrolyte in the direction of the chain possessing enhanced electric charge at a given pH. Phenomenologically, this is opposite to the case for strong polyelectrolytes, although the mechanism differs.

  12. Airway clearance in neuromuscular weakness.

    PubMed

    Gauld, Leanne Maree

    2009-05-01

    Impaired airway clearance leads to recurrent chest infections and respiratory deterioration in neuromuscular weakness. It is frequently the cause of death. Cough is the major mechanism of airway clearance. Cough has several components, and assessment tools are available to measure the different components of cough. These include measuring peak cough flow, respiratory muscle strength, and inspiratory capacity. Each is useful in assessing the ability to generate an effective cough, and can be used to guide when techniques of assisting airway clearance may be effective for the individual and which are most effective. Techniques to assist airway clearance include augmenting inspiration by air stacking, augmenting expiration by assisting the cough, and augmenting both inspiration and expiration with the mechanical insufflator-exsufflator or by direct suctioning via a tracheostomy. Physiotherapists are invaluable in assisting airway clearance, and in teaching patients and their families how to use these techniques. Use of the mechanical insufflator-exsufflator has gained popularity in recent times, but several simpler, more economical methods are available to assist airway clearance that can be used effectively alone or in combination. This review examines the literature available on the assessment and management of impaired airway clearance in neuromuscular weakness. PMID:19379290

  13. Weak lensing and cosmological investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, Viviana

    2005-03-01

    In the last few years the scientific community has been dealing with the challenging issue of identifying the dark energy component. We regard weak gravitational lensing as a brand new, and extremely important, tool for cosmological investigation in this field. In fact, the features imprinted on the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation by the lensing from the intervening distribution of matter represent a pretty unbiased estimator, and can thus be used for putting constraints on different dark energy models. This is true in particular for the magnetic-type B-modes of CMB polarization, whose unlensed spectrum at large multipoles (l ~= 1000) is very small even in presence of an amount of gravitational waves as large as currently allowed by the experiments: therefore, on these scales the lensing phenomenon is the only responsible for the observed power, and this signal turns out to be a faithful tracer of the dark energy dynamics. We first recall the formal apparatus of the weak lensing in extended theories of gravity, introducing the physical observables suitable to cast the bridge between lensing and cosmology, and then evaluate the amplitude of the expected effect in the particular case of a Non-Minimally-Coupled model, featuring a quadratic coupling between quintessence and Ricci scalar.

  14. The weak scale from BBN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Lawrence J.; Pinner, David; Ruderman, Joshua T.

    2014-12-01

    The measured values of the weak scale, v, and the first generation masses, m u, d, e , are simultaneously explained in the multiverse, with all these parameters scanning independently. At the same time, several remarkable coincidences are understood. Small variations in these parameters away from their measured values lead to the instability of hydrogen, the instability of heavy nuclei, and either a hydrogen or a helium dominated universe from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. In the 4d parameter space of ( m u , m d , m e , v), catastrophic boundaries are reached by separately increasing each parameter above its measured value by a factor of (1.4, 1.3, 2.5, ˜ 5), respectively. The fine-tuning problem of the weak scale in the Standard Model is solved: as v is increased beyond the observed value, it is impossible to maintain a significant cosmological hydrogen abundance for any values of m u, d, e that yield both hydrogen and heavy nuclei stability.

  15. Weak antilocalisation in topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Xintao; Hankiewicz, Ewelina; Culcer, Dimitrie

    2014-03-01

    Topological insulators (TI) have changed our understanding of insulating behaviour. They are insulators in the bulk but conducting along their surfaces due to spin-orbit interaction. Much of the recent research focuses on overcoming the transport bottleneck, the fact that surface state transport is overwhelmed by bulk transport stemming from unintentional doping. The key to overcoming this bottleneck is identifying unambiguous signatures of surface state transport. This talk will discuss one such signature, which is manifest in the coherent backscattering of electrons. Due to strong spin-orbit coupling in TI one expects to observe weak antilocalisation rather than weak localisation, meaning that coherent backscattering increases the electrical conductivity. The features of this effect, however, are rather subtle, because in TI the impurities have strong spin-orbit coupling as well. I will show that spin-orbit coupled impurities introduce an additional time scale, which is expected to be shorter than the dephasing time, and the resulting conductivity has a logarithmic dependence on the carrier density, a behaviour hitherto unknown in 2D electron systems. The result we predict is observable experimentally and would provide a smoking gun test of surface transport.

  16. Location and tension of the medial palpebral ligament.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Huan, Fan; Nam, Yong Seok; Han, Seung Ho; Kim, Dae Joong

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the precise anatomic location and tension of the medial palpebral ligament (MPL). Eleven hemifaces of 10 fresh Korean adult cadavers were used in this study. Nine specimens were used for measurement of dissection and tension, and 2 were used for histologic study. Measurements of tensile strength of each part of the MPL and Horner muscle were performed using a force gauge.The MPL consisted of 2 layers in all specimens dissected. The superficial layer of the palpebral ligament (SMPL) was observed from the anterior lacrimal crest to the upper and lower tarsal plates. The deep layer of the palpebral ligament (DMPL) lay from the anterior lacrimal crest to the posterior lacrimal crest, covering the lacrimal sac. The Horner muscle was observed at the posterior lacrimal crest just lateral to the attachment of the DMPL and ran laterally to the tarsal plate deep to the SMPL. The SMPL began at 4.5 ± 2.3 mm lateral to the nasomaxillary suture line to the upper and lower tarsal plates. Its transverse length was 9.6 ± 1.5 mm, and vertical width was 2.4 ± 0.7 mm, and its thickness was 4.5 ± 2.3 mm. The transverse length of the DMPL was 3.7 ± 0.4 mm, and its vertical width was 2.9 ± 1.3 mm, with a thickness of 0.3 ± 0.1 mm. The transverse length of the Horner muscle was 7.6 ± 1.9 mm, and its vertical width was 4.06 ± 1.5 mm, with a thickness of 0.4 ± 0.1 mm. The tensile strength of the SMPL was 13.4 ± 3.2 N, that of the DMPL was 4.1 ± 1.7 N, and that for Horner muscle was 9.0 ± 3.1 N. The tensile strength of the SMPL was significantly higher than that of the DMPL (P = 0.003).We reconfirmed that the MPL consisted of 2 layers: superficial layer and deep layer. Our results might be of use in surgeries of the medial canthi. PMID:24220420

  17. Medial Calcar Support and Radiographic Outcomes of Plate Fixation for Proximal Humeral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Jie; Tsai, Yao-Hung; Yang, Tien-Yu; Shen, Shih-Hsun; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Lee, Mel S.

    2015-01-01

    Plate fixation remains one of the most popular surgical procedures for treating proximal humeral fractures (PHFx); however, substantial rates of complications have been reported in the literature. The objectives of the study were to examine how medial calcar support (MCS) affects the radiographic outcomes and to determine the prognostic factors predicting treatment failure. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 89 adult patients who had PHFx and were treated with plate fixation at our institution in 2007–2011. The enrolled patients were separated into two groups according to disruption of medial calcar. Our results revealed an increased rate of poor radiographic outcomes in patients with disrupted medial calcar. Osteonecrosis of the humeral head and redisplacement were the two radiographic outcomes which had a positive causality with disruption of medial calcar (P = 0.008 and 0.050, resp.). Deficient medial calcar, inadequate reduction, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and chronic liver disease were all significant predictors for the development of osteonecrosis in patients after PHFx surgery. Inadequate reduction was also a predictor for redisplacement. We confirmed that the restoration of medial calcar as well as comorbid conditions plays key roles in treatment of patients having PHFx with disrupted medial calcar. PMID:25692132

  18. Medial amygdaloid suppression of predatory attack behavior in the cat: II. Role of a GABAergic pathway from the medial to the lateral hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Han, Y; Shaikh, M B; Siegel, A

    1996-04-15

    The medial amygdala is known to powerfully suppress predatory attack behavior elicited by electrical stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus of the cat. In the preceding paper, it was shown that the initial limb of a pathway subserving suppression of predatory attack from the medial amygdala to the lateral hypothalamus projects to the ventromedial hypothalamus and its functions are mediated by substance P. The present study tested the hypothesis that the second limb of the pathway subserving medial amygdaloid suppression of predatory attack behavior projects from the medial to lateral hypothalamus and its functions are mediated by GABA. Cannula electrodes were implanted into the lateral hypothalamus for elicitation of predatory attack behavior as well as for the microinfusion of GABA compounds. Monopolar stimulating electrodes were implanted into sites within the medial amygdala from which subseizure levels of stimulation could suppress predatory attack behavior. Initially, the effects of dual stimulation of the medial amygdala and lateral hypothalamus upon response latencies for predatory attack were compared with single stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus alone. Dual stimulation was shown to significantly suppress predatory attack elicited from the lateral hypothalamus. Then, the GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline, was microinjected into sites within the lateral hypothalamus from which predatory attack was elicited in doses of 0.015, 0.075 and 0.15 nmol and paired trials of single and dual stimulation were again repeated in a manner identical to that applied prior to drug administration. Drug infusion produced a blockade of medial amygdaloid suppression of predatory attack in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Conversely, microinfusions of the GABAA receptor agonist, muscimol (10, 25 and 50 pmol), into the same lateral hypothalamic 'attack' site in the absence of medial amygdaloid stimulation suppressed predatory attack, thus simulating the effects of

  19. Correlating Function and Imaging Measures of the Medial Longitudinal Fasciculus

    PubMed Central

    Sakaie, Ken; Takahashi, Masaya; Remington, Gina; Wang, Xiaofeng; Conger, Amy; Conger, Darrel; Dimitrov, Ivan; Jones, Stephen; Frohman, Ashley; Frohman, Teresa; Sagiyama, Koji; Togao, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Objective To test the validity of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures of tissue injury by examining such measures in a white matter structure with well-defined function, the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF). Injury to the MLF underlies internuclear ophthalmoparesis (INO). Methods 40 MS patients with chronic INO and 15 healthy controls were examined under an IRB-approved protocol. Tissue integrity of the MLF was characterized by DTI parameters: longitudinal diffusivity (LD), transverse diffusivity (TD), mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA). Severity of INO was quantified by infrared oculography to measure versional disconjugacy index (VDI). Results LD was significantly lower in patients than in controls in the medulla-pons region of the MLF (p < 0.03). FA was also lower in patients in the same region (p < 0.0004). LD of the medulla-pons region correlated with VDI (R = -0.28, p < 0.05) as did FA in the midbrain section (R = 0.31, p < 0.02). Conclusions This study demonstrates that DTI measures of brain tissue injury can detect injury to a functionally relevant white matter pathway, and that such measures correlate with clinically accepted evaluation indices for INO. The results validate DTI as a useful imaging measure of tissue integrity. PMID:26800522

  20. Human Medial Frontal Cortex Mediates Unconscious Inhibition of Voluntary Action

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, Petroc; Nachev, Parashkev; Morris, Peter; Peters, Andrew M.; Jackson, Stephen R.; Kennard, Christopher; Husain, Masud

    2007-01-01

    Summary Within the medial frontal cortex, the supplementary eye field (SEF), supplementary motor area (SMA), and pre-SMA have been implicated in the control of voluntary action, especially during motor sequences or tasks involving rapid choices between competing response plans. However, the precise roles of these areas remain controversial. Here, we study two extremely rare patients with microlesions of the SEF and SMA to demonstrate that these areas are critically involved in unconscious and involuntary motor control. We employed masked-prime stimuli that evoked automatic inhibition in healthy people and control patients with lateral premotor or pre-SMA damage. In contrast, our SEF/SMA patients showed a complete reversal of the normal inhibitory effect—ocular or manual—corresponding to the functional subregion lesioned. These findings imply that the SEF and SMA mediate automatic effector-specific suppression of motor plans. This automatic mechanism may contribute to the participation of these areas in the voluntary control of action. PMID:17553420

  1. Content representation in the human medial temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jackson C; Wagner, Anthony D; Preston, Alison R

    2013-01-01

    Current theories of medial temporal lobe (MTL) function focus on event content as an important organizational principle that differentiates MTL subregions. Perirhinal and parahippocampal cortices may play content-specific roles in memory, whereas hippocampal processing is alternately hypothesized to be content specific or content general. Despite anatomical evidence for content-specific MTL pathways, empirical data for content-based MTL subregional dissociations are mixed. Here, we combined functional magnetic resonance imaging with multiple statistical approaches to characterize MTL subregional responses to different classes of novel event content (faces, scenes, spoken words, sounds, visual words). Univariate analyses revealed that responses to novel faces and scenes were distributed across the anterior-posterior axis of MTL cortex, with face responses distributed more anteriorly than scene responses. Moreover, multivariate pattern analyses of perirhinal and parahippocampal data revealed spatially organized representational codes for multiple content classes, including nonpreferred visual and auditory stimuli. In contrast, anterior hippocampal responses were content general, with less accurate overall pattern classification relative to MTL cortex. Finally, posterior hippocampal activation patterns consistently discriminated scenes more accurately than other forms of content. Collectively, our findings indicate differential contributions of MTL subregions to event representation via a distributed code along the anterior-posterior axis of MTL that depends on the nature of event content. PMID:22275474

  2. The Necessity of the Medial Temporal Lobe for Statistical Learning

    PubMed Central

    Schapiro, Anna C.; Gregory, Emma; Landau, Barbara; McCloskey, Michael; Turk-Browne, Nicholas B.

    2014-01-01

    The sensory input that we experience is highly patterned, and we are experts at detecting these regularities. Although the extraction of such regularities, or statistical learning (SL), is typically viewed as a cortical process, recent studies have implicated the medial temporal lobe (MTL), including the hippocampus. These studies have employed fMRI, leaving open the possibility that the MTL is involved but not necessary for SL. Here, we examined this issue in a case study of LSJ, a patient with complete bilateral hippocampal loss and broader MTL damage. In Experiments 1 and 2, LSJ and matched control participants were passively exposed to a continuous sequence of shapes, syllables, scenes, or tones containing temporal regularities in the co-occurrence of items. In a subsequent test phase, the control groups exhibited reliable SL in all conditions, successfully discriminating regularities from recombinations of the same items into novel foil sequences. LSJ, however, exhibited no SL, failing to discriminate regularities from foils. Experiment 3 ruled out more general explanations for this failure, such as inattention during exposure or difficulty following test instructions, by showing that LSJ could discriminate which individual items had been exposed. These findings provide converging support for the importance of the MTL in extracting temporal regularities. PMID:24456393

  3. Developmental Differences in Medial Temporal Lobe Function During Memory Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Ghetti, Simona; DeMaster, Dana M.; Yonelinas, Andrew P.; Bunge, Silvia A.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to recollect details about past events improves during childhood. Most researchers favor the view that this improvement depends largely on the development of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), which is thought to have a protracted course of development relative to the medial temporal lobes (MTL). The primary goal of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the development of detail recollection is also associated with changes in MTL function. We collected functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data during an incidental encoding task in 80 participants, divided equally across four age groups: 8-year-olds, 10- to 11-year-olds, 14-year-olds, and young adults. Developmental differences in MTL activation profiles were observed. 14-year-olds and adults engaged regions of the hippocampus and posterior parahippocampal gyrus selectively for subsequent detail recollection, whereas 8- and 10- to 11-year-olds did not. In 8-year-olds, these regions were recruited indiscriminately for detail recollection and item recognition, and in 10- to 11-year-olds, activation in these regions did not consistently predict subsequent memory. These results suggest changes in the functional organization of the MTL, such that the hippocampus and posterior parahippocampal gyrus become increasingly specialized for recollection; these changes may be in part responsible for long-term memory improvements during childhood. PMID:20631183

  4. Morphometric Correlation of Impulsivity in Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sang Soo; Pellecchia, Giovanna; Aminian, Kelly; Ray, Nicola; Segura, Barbara; Obeso, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is a complex behaviour composed of different domains encompassing behavioural disinhibition, risky decision-making and delay discounting abnormalities. To investigate regional brain correlates between levels of individual impulsivity and grey matter volume, we performed voxel-based morphometric correlation analysis in 34 young, healthy subjects using impulsivity scores measured with Barratt Impulsivity Scale-11 and computerized Kirby’s delay discounting task. The VBM analysis showed that impulsivity appears to be reliant on a network of cortical (medial prefrontal cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) and subcortical (ventral striatum) structures emphasizing the importance of brain networks associated with reward related decision-making in daily life as morphological biomarkers for impulsivity in a normal healthy population. While our results in healthy volunteers may not directly extend to pathological conditions, they provide an insight into the mechanisms of impulsive behaviour in patients with abnormalities in prefrontal/frontal-striatal connections, such as in drug abuse, pathological gambling, ADHD and Parkinson’s disease. PMID:23274773

  5. Structural development and dorsoventral maturation of the medial entorhinal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Saikat; Brecht, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the structural development of superficial-layers of medial entorhinal cortex and parasubiculum in rats. The grid-layout and cholinergic-innervation of calbindin-positive pyramidal-cells in layer-2 emerged around birth while reelin-positive stellate-cells were scattered throughout development. Layer-3 and parasubiculum neurons had a transient calbindin-expression, which declined with age. Early postnatally, layer-2 pyramidal but not stellate-cells co-localized with doublecortin – a marker of immature neurons – suggesting delayed functional-maturation of pyramidal-cells. Three observations indicated a dorsal-to-ventral maturation of entorhinal cortex and parasubiculum: (i) calbindin-expression in layer-3 neurons decreased progressively from dorsal-to-ventral, (ii) doublecortin in layer-2 calbindin-positive-patches disappeared dorsally before ventrally, and (iii) wolframin-expression emerged earlier in dorsal than ventral parasubiculum. The early appearance of calbindin-pyramidal-grid-organization in layer-2 suggests that this pattern is instructed by genetic information rather than experience. Superficial-layer-microcircuits mature earlier in dorsal entorhinal cortex, where small spatial-scales are represented. Maturation of ventral-entorhinal-microcircuits – representing larger spatial-scales – follows later around the onset of exploratory behavior. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13343.001 PMID:27036175

  6. Stochastic interpolation model of the medial superior olive neural circuit.

    PubMed

    Sanda, Pavel; Marsalek, Petr

    2012-01-24

    This article presents a stochastic model of binaural hearing in the medial superior olive (MSO) circuit. This model is a variant of the slope encoding models. First, a general framework is developed describing the elementary neural operations realized on spike trains in individual parts of the circuit and how the neurons converging onto the MSO are connected. Random delay, coincidence detection of spikes, divergence and convergence of spike trains are operations implemented by the following modules: spike generator, jitter generator, and coincidence detector. Subsequent processing of spike trains computes the sound azimuth in the circuit. The circuit parameters that influence efficiency of slope encoding are studied. In order to measure the overall circuit performance the concept of an ideal observer is used instead of a detailed model of higher relays in the auditory pathway. This makes it possible to bridge the gap between psychophysical observations in humans and recordings taken of small rodents. Most of the results are obtained through numerical simulations of the model. PMID:21920505

  7. Medial PFC Damage Abolishes the Self-reference Effect

    PubMed Central

    Philippi, Carissa L.; Duff, Melissa C.; Denburg, Natalie L.; Tranel, Daniel; Rudrauf, David

    2012-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies suggest that the medial PFC (mPFC) is a key component of a large-scale neural system supporting a variety of self-related processes. However, it remains unknown whether the mPFC is critical for such processes. In this study, we used a human lesion approach to examine this question. We administered a standard trait judgment paradigm [Kelley, W. M., Macrae, C. N., Wyland, C. L., Caglar, S., Inati, S., & Heatherton, T. F. Finding the self? An event-related fMRI study. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 14, 785–794, 2002] to patients with focal brain damage to the mPFC. The self-reference effect (SRE), a memory advantage conferred by self-related processing, served as a measure of intact self-processing ability. We found that damage to the mPFC abolished the SRE. The results demonstrate that the mPFC is necessary for the SRE and suggest that this structure is important for self-referential processing and the neural representation of self. PMID:21942762

  8. The role of the medial prefrontal cortex in social categorization.

    PubMed

    Molenberghs, Pascal; Morrison, Samantha

    2014-03-01

    Group membership is an important aspect of our everyday behavior. Recently, we showed that existing relevant in-group labels increased activation in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) compared with out-group labels, suggesting a role of the MPFC in social categorization. However, the question still remains whether this increase in MPFC activation for in-group representation is solely related with previous experience with the in-group. To test this, we randomly assigned participants to a red or blue team and in a subsequent functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment they categorized red and blue team words as belonging to either the in-group or the out-group. Results showed that even under these minimal conditions increased activation was found in the MPFC when participants indicated that they belonged to a group, as compared with when they did not. This effect was found to be associated with the level of group identification. These results confirm the role of MPFC in social categorization. PMID:23175678

  9. Basket-Weave Technique for Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kodkani, Pranjal S

    2015-06-01

    The anatomy of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) has been well defined, with parts of its uppermost fibers having a soft-tissue insertion onto the vastus intermedius. Bone tunnels and implants on the patellar side therefore cannot replicate this anatomic construct precisely. Because of implants and tunnels, complications have been reported with bone tunnel fracture. Similarly, on the femoral side, rigid fixation with implants can result in over-constraint with compromised results. Moreover, bone tunnels cannot be used in skeletally immature cases. To overcome issues related to bone tunneling and implants, as well as to reconstruct the MPFL in a precise anatomic manner, an all-soft-tissue fixation technique was devised. Bony landmarks were used as reference points instead of radiologic markers to achieve a more precise construct and to eliminate intraoperative radiography. Hamstring graft was used to reconstruct the MPFL. Special suturing techniques were used to achieve optimal graft fixation with minimal suture knots. A special tissue elevator-suture passer device was designed to facilitate graft passage and ease in performing the procedure. This technique permits differential tensioning, and therefore one achieves stability throughout the range of motion. PMID:26258044

  10. Decoding Representations of Scenes in the Medial Temporal Lobes

    PubMed Central

    Bonnici, Heidi M; Kumaran, Dharshan; Chadwick, Martin J; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Hassabis, Demis; Maguire, Eleanor A

    2012-01-01

    Recent theoretical perspectives have suggested that the function of the human hippocampus, like its rodent counterpart, may be best characterized in terms of its information processing capacities. In this study, we use a combination of high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging, multivariate pattern analysis, and a simple decision making task, to test specific hypotheses concerning the role of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) in scene processing. We observed that while information that enabled two highly similar scenes to be distinguished was widely distributed throughout the MTL, more distinct scene representations were present in the hippocampus, consistent with its role in performing pattern separation. As well as viewing the two similar scenes, during scanning participants also viewed morphed scenes that spanned a continuum between the original two scenes. We found that patterns of hippocampal activity during morph trials, even when perceptual inputs were held entirely constant (i.e., in 50% morph trials), showed a robust relationship with participants' choices in the decision task. Our findings provide evidence for a specific computational role for the hippocampus in sustaining detailed representations of complex scenes, and shed new light on how the information processing capacities of the hippocampus may influence the decision making process. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21656874

  11. Medial prefrontal cortex subserves diverse forms of self-reflection.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Adrianna C; Mitchell, Jason P

    2011-01-01

    The ability to think about oneself--to self--reflect--is one of the defining features of the human mind. Recent research has suggested that this ability may be subserved by a particular brain region: the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC). However, although humans can contemplate a variety of different aspects of themselves, including their stable personality traits, current feelings, and physical attributes, no research has directly examined the extent to which these different forms of self-reflection are subserved by common mechanisms. To address this question, participants were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while making judgments about their own personality traits, current mental states, and physical attributes as well as those of another person. Whereas some brain regions responded preferentially during only one form of self-reflection, a robust region of MPFC was engaged preferentially during self-reflection across all three types of judgment. These results suggest that--although dissociable--diverse forms of self-referential thought draw on a shared cognitive process subserved by MPFC. PMID:20711940

  12. Theta synchronizes the activity of medial prefrontal neurons during learning.

    PubMed

    Paz, Rony; Bauer, Elizabeth P; Paré, Denis

    2008-07-01

    Memory consolidation is thought to involve the gradual transfer of transient hippocampal-dependent traces to distributed neocortical sites via the rhinal cortices. Recently, medial prefrontal (mPFC) neurons were shown to facilitate this process when their activity becomes synchronized. However, the mechanisms underlying this enhanced synchrony remain unclear. Because the hippocampus projects to the mPFC, we tested whether theta oscillations contribute to synchronize mPFC neurons during learning. Thus, we obtained field (LFP) and unit recordings from multiple mPFC sites during the acquisition of a trace-conditioning task, where a visual conditioned stimulus (CS) predicted reward delivery. In quiet waking, the activity of mPFC neurons was modulated by theta oscillations. During conditioning, CS presentation caused an increase in mPFC theta power that augmented as the CS gained predictive value for reward delivery. This increased theta power coincided with a transient theta phase locking at distributed mPFC sites, an effect that was also manifest in the timing of mPFC unit activity. Overall, these results show that theta oscillations contribute to synchronize neuronal activity at distributed mPFC sites, suggesting that the hippocampus, by generating a stronger theta source during learning, can synchronize mPFC activity, in turn facilitating rhinal transfer of its activity to the neocortex. PMID:18612069

  13. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction in Skeletally Immature Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yercan, Hüseyin Serhat; Kale, Gürler; Erkan, Serkan; Özalp, Taçkın; Okcu, Güvenir

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the clinical outcome after medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction for patellofemoral instability in skeletally immature patients. Methods: Study participants were 8 patients ( median age, 10 years; range, 5-14 and one male , others female) who had suffered from persistent patellofemoral instability. Our technique preserves femoral and patellar insertion anatomy of MPFL using a free semitendinosus autograft, together with tenodesis to the adductor magnus tendon thus sparing the open physis of distal femur and the patellar attachment of MPFL. The clinical results were evaluated preoperatively and the final follow-up period using the Kujala patellofemoral score. Patellar shift, tilt and height were measured preoperatively and on the latest follow-up on plain radiographs. Results: At average 42 months follow-up ( range, 16 to 56), %80 of patients were satisfied with the treatment. Redislocation or instability symptoms occurred in two patients. No apprehension signs or redislocations were seen in the remanining six patients. A significant improvement (p‹0.05) in Kujala score (from 36 to 77) was found. Patellar shift & tilt decreased to anatomic values in six patients but patella alta persisted. Conclusion: The result of this study show that MPFL reconstruction with our technique seems to be an effective treatment for recurrent and habitual patellofemoral dislocation in skeletally immature patients; leading to significant increases in stability and functionality.

  14. The Computational Complexity of Weak Saddles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Felix; Brill, Markus; Fischer, Felix; Hoffmann, Jan

    We continue the recently initiated study of the computational aspects of weak saddles, an ordinal set-valued solution concept proposed by Shapley. Brandt et al. gave a polynomial-time algorithm for computing weak saddles in a subclass of matrix games, and showed that certain problems associated with weak saddles of bimatrix games are NP-complete. The important question of whether weak saddles can be found efficiently was left open. We answer this question in the negative by showing that finding weak saddles of bimatrix games is NP-hard, under polynomial-time Turing reductions. We moreover prove that recognizing weak saddles is coNP-complete, and that deciding whether a given action is contained in some weak saddle is hard for parallel access to NP and thus not even in NP unless the polynomial hierarchy collapses. Our hardness results are finally shown to carry over to a natural weakening of weak saddles.

  15. Bilateral medial displacement of the biceps tendon of origin: repair using polypropylene mesh and staples.

    PubMed

    Barnes, D M

    2013-09-01

    A three-year-old male greyhound was presented with acute onset right forelimb lameness because of medial displacement of the biceps tendon of origin. Ultrasonographic examination confirmed the diagnosis, and a concomitant partial tear of the medial glenohumeral ligament was detected during arthroscopy. To stabilise the biceps tendon, polypropylene mesh was fixed across the intertubercular groove to replace the torn transverse humeral retinaculum. Recovery was uneventful and lameness resolved. Fifteen months later, the dog was presented with medial displacement of the biceps tendon of origin of the left shoulder, and was treated successfully using the same technique. PMID:23614688

  16. Discoid medial meniscus with a horizontal cleavage tear: a juvenile who suffered for 3 years.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingqing; Gao, Shijun; Chen, Baicheng

    2012-09-01

    It is very rare to see medial discoid meniscus, and there have been only 82 knees in 61 cases reported to date. The investigators found discoid medial meniscus with horizontal cleavage tear in a 13-year-old juvenile who had been injured while playing basketball, and endured for 3 years. Both magnetic resonance images and the arthroscopic findings were presented. Saucerization of the torn discoid medial meniscus was performed successfully, and the clinical outcomes were satisfying according to the follow-up of 14 months. PMID:21912338

  17. Pain related to robotic cholecystectomy with lower abdominal ports: effect of the bilateral ultrasound-guided split injection technique of rectus sheath block in female patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Soo; Choi, Jong Bum; Lee, Sook Young; Kim, Wook Hwan; Baek, Nam Hyun; Kim, Jayoun; Park, Chu Kyung; Lee, Yeon Ju; Park, Sung Yong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Robotic cholecystectomy (RC) using port sites in the lower abdominal area (T12-L1) rather than the upper abdomen has recently been introduced as an alternative procedure for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Therefore, we investigated the time course of different components of pain and the analgesic effect of the bilateral ultrasound-guided split injection technique for rectus sheath block (sRSB) after RC in female patients. Methods: We randomly assigned 40 patients to undergo ultrasound-guided sRSB (RSB group, n = 20) or to not undergo any block (control group, n = 20). Pain was subdivided into 3 components: superficial wound pain, deep abdominal pain, and referred shoulder pain, which were evaluated with a numeric rating scale (from 0 to 10) at baseline (time of awakening) and at 1, 6, 9, and 24 hours postoperatively. Consumption of fentanyl and general satisfaction were also evaluated 1 hour (before discharge from the postanesthesia care unit) and 24 hours postoperatively (end of study). Results: Superficial wound pain was predominant only at awakening, and after postoperative 1 hour in the control group. Bilateral ultrasound-guided sRSB significantly decreased superficial pain after RC (P < 0.01) and resulted in a better satisfaction score (P < 0.05) 1 hour after RC in the RSB group compared with the control group. The cumulative postoperative consumption of fentanyl at 6, 9, and 24 hours was not significantly different between groups. Conclusions: After RC with lower abdominal ports, superficial wound pain predominates over deep intra-abdominal pain and shoulder pain only at the time of awakening. Afterwards, superficial and deep pain decreased to insignificant levels in 6 hours. Bilateral ultrasound-guided sRSB was effective only during the first hour. This limited benefit should be balanced against the time and risks entailed in performing RSB. PMID:27495072

  18. Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath and transversus abdominis plane blocks for perioperative analgesia in upper abdominal surgery: A randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Abdelsalam, Khaled; Mohamdin, OW

    2016-01-01

    Background: Regional anesthetic techniques can be used to alleviate postoperative pain in patients undergoing major upper abdominal surgery. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of bilateral ultrasound (US)-guided rectus sheath (RS) and transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks for better perioperative analgesia. Patients and Methods: It is a prospective, observer-blinded, randomized clinical study. 40 eligible patients undergoing elective liver resection or Whipple procedure were included. All patients received a standardized anesthetic technique. Group 1 (n = 20) received preincisional US-guided bilateral RS and TAP blocks using 20 ml volume of bupivacaine 0.25% for each, and group 2 (n = 20) received local wound infiltration at end of surgery with 40 ml of bupivacaine 0.25%. A standardized postoperative analgesic regimen composed of intravenous paracetamol and a morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). The use of intraoperative fentanyl and recovery room morphine boluses, PCA-administered morphine, pain scores as well as number of patients’ experienced postoperative nausea and vomiting in the ward at 6 and 24 h were recorded. Results: Group 1 patients received a significantly lower cumulative intraoperative fentanyl, significantly lesser boluses of morphine in postanesthesia care unit, as well, significantly lower cumulative 24 h postoperative morphine dosage than the group 2 patients. Pain visual analog scale scores were significantly lower at both 6 and 24 h postoperatively in TAP group when compared with the no-TAP group. There were no complications related to the TAP block procedures. No signs or symptoms of local anesthetic systemic toxicity were detected. Conclusion: The combination of bilateral US-guided RS and TAP blocks provides excellent perioperative analgesia for major upper abdominal surgery. PMID:26955306

  19. Postmastectomy reconstruction: comparative analysis of the psychosocial, functional, and cosmetic effects of transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap versus breast implant reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cederna, P S; Yates, W R; Chang, P; Cram, A E; Ricciardelli, E J

    1995-11-01

    Over 40,000 postmastectomy breast reconstructions are performed annually. In this study, we investigated the psychosocial, functional, and cosmetic effects of transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap versus breast implant reconstruction. Thirty-three women who had undergone postmastectomy breast reconstruction were contacted by telephone and agreed to participate in the study. Twenty-two women completed the self-assessment questionnaires regarding their quality of life, psychological symptoms, functional status, body image, and global satisfaction. The TRAM and implant groups contained 8 and 14 patients, respectively. The groups were well matched for age, employment status, marital status, race, religion, and severity of medical and surgical illnesses. The average follow-up was 36 months. Statistical analysis of the responses revealed that women who had undergone TRAM flap reconstruction were more satisfied with how their reconstructed breast felt to the touch (p = .01), and there was a trend toward greater satisfaction with the appearance of their reconstructed breast (p = .08). However, these same patients identified more difficulties as far as functioning at work or school, performing vigorous physical activities, participating in community or religious activities, visiting with relatives, and interacting with male friends (p < .04). There were no statistically significant differences in body image or overall satisfaction. In this small cohort study, both the TRAM flap group and the implant group were satisfied with the results of their breast reconstruction, but the TRAM flap group was more satisfied with how their breast felt and tended to be more satisfied with the cosmetic result. The TRAM flap group reported greater psychological, social, and physical impairments as a result of their reconstruction. PMID:8579262

  20. Heterogeneous, weakly coupled map lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotelo Herrera, M.a. Dolores; San Martín, Jesús; Porter, Mason A.

    2016-07-01

    Coupled map lattices (CMLs) are often used to study emergent phenomena in nature. It is typically assumed (unrealistically) that each component is described by the same map, and it is important to relax this assumption. In this paper, we characterize periodic orbits and the laminar regime of type-I intermittency in heterogeneous weakly coupled map lattices (HWCMLs). We show that the period of a cycle in an HWCML is preserved for arbitrarily small coupling strengths even when an associated uncoupled oscillator would experience a period-doubling cascade. Our results characterize periodic orbits both near and far from saddle-node bifurcations, and we thereby provide a key step for examining the bifurcation structure of heterogeneous CMLs.

  1. Weakly ionized cerium plasma radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Germer, Rudolf; Koorikawa, Yoshitake; Murakami, Kazunori; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ichimaru, Toshio; Obata, Fumiko; Takahashi, Kiyomi; Sato, Sigehiro; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki

    2004-02-01

    In the plasma flash x-ray generator, high-voltage main condenser of about 200 nF is charged up to 55 kV by a power supply, and electric charges in the condenser are discharged to an x-ray tube after triggering the cathode electrode. The flash x-rays are then produced. The x-ray tube is of a demountable triode that is connected to a turbo molecular pump with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. As electron flows from the cathode electrode are roughly converged to a rod cerium target of 3.0 mm in diameter by electric field in the x-ray tube, the weakly ionized linear plasma, which consists of cerium ions and electrons, forms by target evaporating. At a charging voltage of 55 kV, the maximum tube voltage was almost equal to the charging voltage of the main condenser, and the peak current was about 20 kA. When the charging voltage was increased, weakly ionized cerium plasma formed, and the K-series characteristic x-ray intensities increased. The x-ray pulse widths were about 500 ns, and the time-integrated x-ray intensity had a value of about 40 μC/kg at 1.0 m from x-ray source with a charging voltage of 55 kV. In the angiography, we employed a film-less computed radiography (CR) system and iodine-based microspheres. Because K-series characteristic x-rays are absorbed easily by the microspheres, high-contrast angiography has been performed.

  2. Statistical theory of electromagnetic weak turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Peter H.

    2006-02-15

    The weak turbulence theory as commonly found in the literature employs electrostatic approximation and is applicable to unmagnetized plasmas only. To this date, fully electromagnetic generalization of the existing weak turbulence theory based upon statistical mechanical approach remains largely incomplete. Instead, electromagnetic effects are incorporated into the weak turbulence formalism by means of the semiclassical approach. The present paper reformulates the fully electromagnetic weak turbulence theory from classical statistical mechanical (i.e., the Klimontovich) approach.

  3. Where the brain grows old: decline in anterior cingulate and medial prefrontal function with normal aging.

    PubMed

    Pardo, José V; Lee, Joel T; Sheikh, Sohail A; Surerus-Johnson, Christa; Shah, Hemant; Munch, Kristin R; Carlis, John V; Lewis, Scott M; Kuskowski, Michael A; Dysken, Maurice W

    2007-04-15

    Even healthy adults worry about declines in mental efficiency with aging. Subjective changes in mental flexibility, self-regulation, processing speed, and memory are often cited. We show here that focal decreases in brain activity occur with normal aging as measured with fluorodeoxyglucose and positron emission tomography. The largest declines localize to a medial network including the anterior cingulate/medial prefrontal cortex, dorsomedial thalamus, and sugenual cingulate/basal forebrain. Declining metabolism in this network correlates with declining cognitive function. The medial prefrontal metabolic changes with aging are similar in magnitude to the hypometabolism found in Mild Cognitive Impairment or Alzheimer's disease. These results converge with data from healthy elderly indicating dysfunction in the anterior attention system. The interaction of attention in the anterior cingulate cortex with memory in the medial temporal lobe may explain the global impairment that defines dementia. Despite the implications for an aging population, the neurophysiologic mechanisms of these metabolic decreases remain unknown. PMID:17321756

  4. Unilateral Resection of the Anterior Medial Temporal Lobe Impairs Odor Identification and Valence Perception

    PubMed Central

    Juran, Stephanie A.; Lundström, Johan N.; Geigant, Michael; Kumlien, Eva; Fredrikson, Mats; Åhs, Fredrik; Olsson, Mats J.

    2016-01-01

    The anterior medial temporal lobe (TL), including the amygdala, has been implicated in olfactory processing, e.g., coding for intensity and valence, and seems also involved in memory. With this background, the present study evaluated whether anterior medial TL-resections in TL epilepsy affected intensity and valence ratings, as well as free and cued identification of odors. These aspects of odor perception were assessed in 31 patients with unilateral anterior medial TL-resections (17 left, 14 right) and 16 healthy controls. Results suggest that the anterior medial TL is in particular necessary for free, but also cued, odor identification. TL resection was also found to impair odor valence, but not intensity ratings. Left resected patients rated nominally pleasant and unpleasant odors as more neutral suggesting a special role for the left anterior TL in coding for emotional saliency in response to odors. PMID:26779109

  5. Medial thigh pain: An unusual presentation of giant calculi in sigmoid neobladder

    PubMed Central

    Abrol, Nitin; Gupta, Narmada; Kumar, Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    Calculi in a neobladder usually present with irritative lower urinary tract symptoms, flank pain, and haematuria. We report a case of giant stones in a sigmoid neobladder, who presented with medial thigh pain. PMID:21814323

  6. Open reduction of medial epicondyle fractures: operative tips for technical ease.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Atul F; Cody, Stephanie R; Hosalkar, Harish S

    2009-08-01

    In the pediatric population, medial humeral epicondylar fractures account for nearly 12% of all elbow fractures. There is ongoing debate about the surgical management of medial epicondyle fracture cases. Our technique in the operative management of medial epicondyle fractures uses the external application of an Esmarch bandage, as well as provisional fixation with needle rather than K-wire fixation. This technique decreases the need for soft-tissue release and, therefore, theoretically, maintains soft-tissue vascularity of the small fracture fragments. Moreover, it preserves the soft-tissue tension medially. It involves the use of a bandage that is universally available in orthopedic operating rooms, including those in developing nations. It is easy to apply by either the principal or assisting surgeon. With practice, it cuts down operative time and can help substitute for an assistant. This relatively simple operative technique makes for a more seamless operative process, improved reduction, and key preservation of soft-tissue vascularity. PMID:19506930

  7. Recruitment of the Rhesus soleus and medial gastrocnemius before, during and after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, R. R.; Hodgson, J. A.; Aragon, J.; Day, M. K.; Kozlovskaya, I.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1996-01-01

    Electromyograms were recorded from the soleus and medial gastrocnemius muscles and tendon force from the medial gastrocnemius muscle of 2 juvenile Rhesus monkeys before, during and after Cosmos flight 2229 and of ground control animals. Recording sessions were made while the Rhesus were performing a foot pedal motor task. Preflight testing indicated normal patterns of recruitment between the soleus and medial gastrocnemius, i.e. a higher level of recruitment of the soleus compared to the medial gastrocnemius during the task. Recording began two days into the spaceflight and showed that the media gastrocnemius was recruited preferentially over the soleus. This observation persisted throughout the flight and for the 2 week period of postflight testing. These data indicate a significant change in the relative recruitment of slow and fast extensor muscles under microgravity conditions. The appearance of clonic-like activity in one muscle of each Rhesus during flight further suggests a reorganization in the neuromotor system in a microgravity environment.

  8. Unilateral Resection of the Anterior Medial Temporal Lobe Impairs Odor Identification and Valence Perception.

    PubMed

    Juran, Stephanie A; Lundström, Johan N; Geigant, Michael; Kumlien, Eva; Fredrikson, Mats; Åhs, Fredrik; Olsson, Mats J

    2015-01-01

    The anterior medial temporal lobe (TL), including the amygdala, has been implicated in olfactory processing, e.g., coding for intensity and valence, and seems also involved in memory. With this background, the present study evaluated whether anterior medial TL-resections in TL epilepsy affected intensity and valence ratings, as well as free and cued identification of odors. These aspects of odor perception were assessed in 31 patients with unilateral anterior medial TL-resections (17 left, 14 right) and 16 healthy controls. Results suggest that the anterior medial TL is in particular necessary for free, but also cued, odor identification. TL resection was also found to impair odor valence, but not intensity ratings. Left resected patients rated nominally pleasant and unpleasant odors as more neutral suggesting a special role for the left anterior TL in coding for emotional saliency in response to odors. PMID:26779109

  9. Protecting weak measurements against systematic errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shengshi; Alonso, Jose Raul Gonzalez; Brun, Todd A.; Jordan, Andrew N.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we consider the systematic error of quantum metrology by weak measurements under decoherence. We derive the systematic error of maximum likelihood estimation in general to the first-order approximation of a small deviation in the probability distribution and study the robustness of standard weak measurement and postselected weak measurements against systematic errors. We show that, with a large weak value, the systematic error of a postselected weak measurement when the probe undergoes decoherence can be significantly lower than that of a standard weak measurement. This indicates another advantage of weak-value amplification in improving the performance of parameter estimation. We illustrate the results by an exact numerical simulation of decoherence arising from a bosonic mode and compare it to the first-order analytical result we obtain.

  10. Medial prefrontal cortex stimulation modulates the processing of conditioned fear

    PubMed Central

    Guhn, Anne; Dresler, Thomas; Andreatta, Marta; Müller, Laura D.; Hahn, Tim; Tupak, Sara V.; Polak, Thomas; Deckert, Jürgen; Herrmann, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    The extinction of conditioned fear depends on an efficient interplay between the amygdala and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). In rats, high-frequency electrical mPFC stimulation has been shown to improve extinction by means of a reduction of amygdala activity. However, so far it is unclear whether stimulation of homologues regions in humans might have similar beneficial effects. Healthy volunteers received one session of either active or sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) covering the mPFC while undergoing a 2-day fear conditioning and extinction paradigm. Repetitive TMS was applied offline after fear acquisition in which one of two faces (CS+ but not CS−) was associated with an aversive scream (UCS). Immediate extinction learning (day 1) and extinction recall (day 2) were conducted without UCS delivery. Conditioned responses (CR) were assessed in a multimodal approach using fear-potentiated startle (FPS), skin conductance responses (SCR), functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), and self-report scales. Consistent with the hypothesis of a modulated processing of conditioned fear after high-frequency rTMS, the active group showed a reduced CS+/CS− discrimination during extinction learning as evident in FPS as well as in SCR and arousal ratings. FPS responses to CS+ further showed a linear decrement throughout both extinction sessions. This study describes the first experimental approach of influencing conditioned fear by using rTMS and can thus be a basis for future studies investigating a complementation of mPFC stimulation to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). PMID:24600362

  11. [Medial posteroventral pallidotomy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Krauss, J K; Grossman, R G; Lai, E C; Schwartz, K; Jankovic, J

    1997-01-01

    Stereotactic medial posteroventral pallidotomy for treatment of Parkinson's disease attracts increasing attention. We report on the preliminary results of 12 patients at 1 year after microelectrode-guided unilateral pallidotomy. The primary indications were severe bradykinesia and levodopa-induced dyskinesias. After radiofrequency lesioning all patients had immediate improvement of contralateral parkinsonian signs. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the localization of the lesions. At the 1-year follow-up, all patients had sustained benefit. The global improvement was rated as moderate in six cases, and as marked in six other cases. The mean values of various subscores of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) showed highly significant changes in the "off" state (pre/postoperatively): UPDRS Motor score (60.3/31). UPDRS Activities of Daily Living (ADL) score (33.2/18.3), gait/postural stability score (13.8/7.0), and subscores for contralateral rigidity (4.9/2.1), tremor (7.1/1.4) and bradykinesia (11.6/5.3). There was also significant improvement of ipsilateral bradykinesia and rigidity. Furthermore, we found significant changes of the mean values of the UPDRS ADL and motor "on" scores, an increase of the percentage of "on" time with reduced on-off fluctuations, and a decrease of the percentage of levodopa-induced dyskinesias, with marked improvement or complete abolition of contralateral dyskinesias in particular. The preoperative levodopa regimen was maintained, in general, or only slightly modified, if necessary. Two patients had transient complications: one patient suffered postoperative pneumonia and altered mental status; another patient displayed mild Broca's aphasia secondary to a small stroke involving the dorsal thalamus and the adjacent white matter. There were no persistent side effects at the 1-year follow-up. Contemporary unilateral pallidotomy is an effective and promising therapeutical option for surgical treatment of

  12. Noradrenergic control of error perseveration in medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Marcelo S; Jin, Lu E; Harenberg, Linda; Stachenfeld, Kimberly L; Arnsten, Amy F T; Laubach, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) plays a key role in behavioral variability, action monitoring, and inhibitory control. The functional role of mPFC may change over the lifespan due to a number of aging-related issues, including dendritic regression, increased cAMP signaling, and reductions in the efficacy of neuromodulators to influence mPFC processing. A key neurotransmitter in mPFC is norepinephrine. Previous studies have reported aging-related changes in the sensitivity of mPFC-dependent tasks to noradrenergic agonist drugs, such as guanfacine. Here, we assessed the effects of yohimbine, an alpha-2 noradrenergic antagonist, in cohorts of younger and older rats in a classic test of spatial working memory (using a T-maze). Older rats (23-29 mo.) were impaired by a lower dose of yohimbine compared to younger animals (5-10 mo.). To determine if the drug acts on alpha-2 noradrenergic receptors in mPFC and if its effects are specific to memory-guided performance, we made infusions of yohimbine into mPFC of a cohort of young rats (6 mo.) using an operant delayed response task. The task involved testing rats in blocks of trials with memory- and stimulus-guided performance. Yohimbine selectively impaired memory-guided performance and was associated with error perseveration. Infusions of muscimol (a GABA-A agonist) at the same sites also selectively impaired memory-guided performance, but did not lead to error perseveration. Based on these results, we propose several potential interpretations for the role for the noradrenergic system in the performance of delayed response tasks, including the encoding of previous response locations, task rules (i.e., using a win-stay strategy instead of a win-shift strategy), and performance monitoring (e.g., prospective encoding of outcomes). PMID:23293590

  13. Disconnection Between Amygdala and Medial Prefrontal Cortex in Psychotic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Prerona; Sabharwal, Amri; Kotov, Roman; Szekely, Akos; Parsey, Ramin; Barch, Deanna M; Mohanty, Aprajita

    2016-07-01

    Distracting emotional information impairs attention more in schizophrenia (SCZ) than in never-psychotic individuals. However, it is unclear whether this impairment and its neural circuitry is indicative generally of psychosis, or specifically of SCZ, and whether it is even more specific to certain SCZ symptoms (eg, deficit syndrome). It is also unclear if this abnormality contributes to impaired behavioral performance and real-world functioning. Functional imaging data were recorded while individuals with SCZ, bipolar disorder with psychosis (BDP) and no history of psychotic disorders (CON) attended to identity of faces while ignoring their emotional expressions. We examined group differences in functional connectivity between amygdala, involved in emotional evaluation, and sub-regions of medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), involved in emotion regulation and cognitive control. Additionally, we examined correlation of this connectivity with deficit syndrome and real-world functioning. Behaviorally, SCZ showed the worst accuracy when matching the identity of emotional vs neutral faces. Neurally, SCZ showed lower amygdala-MPFC connectivity than BDP and CON. BPD did not differ from CON, neurally or behaviorally. In patients, reduced amygdala-MPFC connectivity during emotional distractors was related to worse emotional vs neutral accuracy, greater deficit syndrome severity, and unemployment. Thus, reduced amygdala-MPFC functional connectivity during emotional distractors reflects a deficit that is specific to SCZ. This reduction in connectivity is associated with worse clinical and real-world functioning. Overall, these findings provide support for the specificity and clinical utility of amygdala-MPFC functional connectivity as a potential neural marker of SCZ. PMID:26908926

  14. Medial Prefrontal Cortex: Adding Value to Imagined Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wen-Jing; Horner, Aidan J.; Bisby, James A.; Burgess, Neil

    2016-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is consistently implicated in the network supporting autobiographical memory. Whereas more posterior regions in this network have been related to specific processes, such as the generation of visuospatial imagery or the association of items and contexts, the functional contribution of the mPFC remains unclear. However, the involvement of mPFC in estimation of value during decision-making suggests that it might play a similar role in memory. We investigated whether mPFC activity reflects the subjective value of elements in imagined scenarios. Participants in an MRI scanner imagined scenarios comprising a spatial context, a physiological state of need (e.g., thirst), and two items that could be congruent (e.g., drink) or incongruent (e.g., food) with the state of need. Memory for the scenarios was tested outside the scanner. Our manipulation of subjective value by imagined need was verified by increased subjective ratings of value for congruent items and improved subsequent memory for them. Consistent with our hypothesis, fMRI signal in mPFC reflected the modulation of an item’s subjective value by the imagined physiological state, suggesting the mPFC selectively tracked subjective value within our imagination paradigm. Further analyses showed uncorrected effects in non-mPFC regions, including increased activity in the insula when imagining states of need, the caudate nucleus when imagining congruent items, and the anterior hippocampus/amygdala when imagining subsequently remembered items. We therefore provide evidence that the mPFC plays a role in constructing the subjective value of the components of imagined scenarios and thus potentially in reconstructing the value of components of autobiographical recollection. PMID:26042501

  15. Medial Frontal White and Gray Matter Contributions to General Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Bouix, Sylvain; Kubicki, Marek

    2014-01-01

    The medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) and rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) are part of a wider neural network that plays an important role in general intelligence and executive function. We used structural brain imaging to quantify magnetic resonance gray matter volume and diffusion tensor white matter integrity of the mOFC-rACC network in 26 healthy participants who also completed neuropsychological tests of intellectual abilities and executive function. Stochastic tractography, the most effective Diffusion Tensor Imaging method for examining white matter connections between adjacent gray matter regions, was employed to assess the integrity of mOFC-rACC pathways. Fractional anisotropy (FA), which reflects the integrity of white matter connections, was calculated. Results indicated that higher intelligence correlated with greater gray matter volumes for both mOFC and rACC, as well as with increased FA for left posterior mOFC-rACC connectivity. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that DTI-derived FA of left posterior mOFC-rACC uniquely accounted for 29%–34% of the variance in IQ, in comparison to 11%–16% uniquely explained by gray matter volume of the left rACC. Together, left rACC gray matter volume and white matter connectivity between left posterior mOFC and rACC accounted for up to 50% of the variance in general intelligence. This study is to our knowledge the first to examine white matter connectivity between OFC and ACC, two gray matter regions of interests that are very close in physical proximity, and underscores the important independent contributions of variations in rACC gray matter volume and mOFC-rACC white matter connectivity to individual differences in general intelligence. PMID:25551572

  16. Medial olivocochlear efferent reflex inhibition of human cochlear nerve responses.

    PubMed

    Lichtenhan, J T; Wilson, U S; Hancock, K E; Guinan, J J

    2016-03-01

    Inhibition of cochlear amplifier gain by the medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent system has several putative roles: aiding listening in noise, protection against damage from acoustic overexposure, and slowing age-induced hearing loss. The human MOC reflex has been studied almost exclusively by measuring changes in otoacoustic emissions. However, to help understand how the MOC system influences what we hear, it is important to have measurements of the MOC effect on the total output of the organ of Corti, i.e., on cochlear nerve responses that couple sounds to the brain. In this work we measured the inhibition produced by the MOC reflex on the amplitude of cochlear nerve compound action potentials (CAPs) in response to moderate level (52-60 dB peSPL) clicks from five, young, normal hearing, awake, alert, human adults. MOC activity was elicited by 65 dB SPL, contralateral broadband noise (CAS). Using tympanic membrane electrodes, approximately 10 h of data collection were needed from each subject to yield reliable measurements of the MOC reflex inhibition on CAP amplitudes from one click level. The CAS produced a 16% reduction of CAP amplitude, equivalent to a 1.98 dB effective attenuation (averaged over five subjects). Based on previous reports of efferent effects as functions of level and frequency, it is possible that much larger effective attenuations would be observed at lower sound levels or with clicks of higher frequency content. For a preliminary comparison, we also measured MOC reflex inhibition of DPOAEs evoked from the same ears with f2's near 4 kHz. The resulting effective attenuations on DPOAEs were, on average, less than half the effective attenuations on CAPs. PMID:26364824

  17. Visualization of the medial forebrain bundle using diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hana, Ardian; Hana, Anisa; Dooms, Georges; Boecher-Schwarz, Hans; Hertel, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging is a technique that enables physicians the portrayal of white matter tracts in vivo. We used this technique in order to depict the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) in 15 consecutive patients between 2012 and 2015. Men and women of all ages were included. There were six women and nine men. The mean age was 58.6 years (39–77). Nine patients were candidates for an eventual deep brain stimulation. Eight of them suffered from Parkinson‘s disease and one had multiple sclerosis. The remaining six patients suffered from different lesions which were situated in the frontal lobe. These were 2 metastasis, 2 meningiomas, 1 cerebral bleeding, and 1 glioblastoma. We used a 3DT1-sequence for the navigation. Furthermore T2- and DTI- sequences were performed. The FOV was 200 × 200 mm2, slice thickness 2 mm, and an acquisition matrix of 96 × 96 yielding nearly isotropic voxels of 2 × 2 × 2 mm. 3-Tesla-MRI was carried out strictly axial using 32 gradient directions and one b0-image. We used Echo-Planar-Imaging (EPI) and ASSET parallel imaging with an acceleration factor of 2. b-value was 800 s/mm2. The maximal angle was 50°. Additional scanning time was < 9 min. We were able to visualize the MFB in 12 of our patients bilaterally and in the remaining three patients we depicted the MFB on one side. It was the contralateral side of the lesion. These were 2 meningiomas and one metastasis. Portrayal of the MFB is possible for everyday routine for neurosurgical interventions. As part of the reward circuitry it might be of substantial importance for neurosurgeons during deep brain stimulation in patients with psychiatric disorders. Surgery in this part of the brain should always take the preservation of this white matter tract into account. PMID:26581828

  18. Noradrenergic control of error perseveration in medial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Marcelo S.; Jin, Lu E.; Harenberg, Linda; Stachenfeld, Kimberly L.; Arnsten, Amy F. T.; Laubach, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) plays a key role in behavioral variability, action monitoring, and inhibitory control. The functional role of mPFC may change over the lifespan due to a number of aging-related issues, including dendritic regression, increased cAMP signaling, and reductions in the efficacy of neuromodulators to influence mPFC processing. A key neurotransmitter in mPFC is norepinephrine. Previous studies have reported aging-related changes in the sensitivity of mPFC-dependent tasks to noradrenergic agonist drugs, such as guanfacine. Here, we assessed the effects of yohimbine, an alpha-2 noradrenergic antagonist, in cohorts of younger and older rats in a classic test of spatial working memory (using a T-maze). Older rats (23–29 mo.) were impaired by a lower dose of yohimbine compared to younger animals (5–10 mo.). To determine if the drug acts on alpha-2 noradrenergic receptors in mPFC and if its effects are specific to memory-guided performance, we made infusions of yohimbine into mPFC of a cohort of young rats (6 mo.) using an operant delayed response task. The task involved testing rats in blocks of trials with memory- and stimulus-guided performance. Yohimbine selectively impaired memory-guided performance and was associated with error perseveration. Infusions of muscimol (a GABA-A agonist) at the same sites also selectively impaired memory-guided performance, but did not lead to error perseveration. Based on these results, we propose several potential interpretations for the role for the noradrenergic system in the performance of delayed response tasks, including the encoding of previous response locations, task rules (i.e., using a win-stay strategy instead of a win-shift strategy), and performance monitoring (e.g., prospective encoding of outcomes). PMID:23293590

  19. Detached Anterior Horn of the Medial Meniscus Mimicking a Parameniscal Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Fukuta, Shoji; Tsutsui, Takahiko; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Suzue, Naoto; Hamada, Daisuke; Goto, Tomohiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a detached anterior horn of the medial meniscus with anterior knee pain. Preoperative magnetic resonance images of the knee were initially interpreted as a parameniscal cyst. Arthroscopic examination revealed subluxation of the anterior horn of the medial meniscus due to detachment from its anterior tibial insertion. Arthroscopic fixation with a suture anchor was successful and the cystic lesion was no longer visible on postoperative images. PMID:26550510

  20. Stimulation of the medial plantar nerve for complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mobbs, Ralph J; Lazarro, Amanda

    2010-11-01

    We describe a 47-year old male with complex regional pain syndrome II in the distribution of the medial plantar nerve following metatarsal fracture, which was treated with peripheral nerve stimulation. Using a new technique of nerve stimulation with a percutaneous-type electrode, the patient experienced sustained relief at 12 months follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first report of peripheral neurostimulation effectively managing pain for the medial plantar nerve. PMID:20708936

  1. Functional dissociation between lateral and medial entorhinal cortex in memory processes in mice.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, M; Destrade, C; Soumireu-Mourat, B

    1983-07-01

    The effects of lesions of the medial or the lateral entorhinal cortex in mice were examined on acquisition, retention and extinction of an operant-conditioning task in a Skinner box. Compared with the control animals, lesions in the medial entorhinal had no behavioral effects whereas lesions in the lateral entorhinal enhanced retention and increased resistance to extinction but did not change acquisition of this task. These results suggest a functional dissociation between the two parts of the entorhinal cortex. PMID:6882517

  2. Weak percolation on multiplex networks.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Gareth J; Dorogovtsev, Sergey N; Mendes, José F F; Cellai, Davide

    2014-04-01

    Bootstrap percolation is a simple but nontrivial model. It has applications in many areas of science and has been explored on random networks for several decades. In single-layer (simplex) networks, it has been recently observed that bootstrap percolation, which is defined as an incremental process, can be seen as the opposite of pruning percolation, where nodes are removed according to a connectivity rule. Here we propose models of both bootstrap and pruning percolation for multiplex networks. We collectively refer to these two models with the concept of "weak" percolation, to distinguish them from the somewhat classical concept of ordinary ("strong") percolation. While the two models coincide in simplex networks, we show that they decouple when considering multiplexes, giving rise to a wealth of critical phenomena. Our bootstrap model constitutes the simplest example of a contagion process on a multiplex network and has potential applications in critical infrastructure recovery and information security. Moreover, we show that our pruning percolation model may provide a way to diagnose missing layers in a multiplex network. Finally, our analytical approach allows us to calculate critical behavior and characterize critical clusters. PMID:24827287

  3. Weakly Supervised Human Fixations Prediction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luming; Li, Xuelong; Nie, Liqiang; Yang, Yi; Xia, Yingjie

    2016-01-01

    Automatically predicting human eye fixations is a useful technique that can facilitate many multimedia applications, e.g., image retrieval, action recognition, and photo retargeting. Conventional approaches are frustrated by two drawbacks. First, psychophysical experiments show that an object-level interpretation of scenes influences eye movements significantly. Most of the existing saliency models rely on object detectors, and therefore, only a few prespecified categories can be discovered. Second, the relative displacement of objects influences their saliency remarkably, but current models cannot describe them explicitly. To solve these problems, this paper proposes weakly supervised fixations prediction, which leverages image labels to improve accuracy of human fixations prediction. The proposed model hierarchically discovers objects as well as their spatial configurations. Starting from the raw image pixels, we sample superpixels in an image, thereby seamless object descriptors termed object-level graphlets (oGLs) are generated by random walking on the superpixel mosaic. Then, a manifold embedding algorithm is proposed to encode image labels into oGLs, and the response map of each prespecified object is computed accordingly. On the basis of the object-level response map, we propose spatial-level graphlets (sGLs) to model the relative positions among objects. Afterward, eye tracking data is employed to integrate these sGLs for predicting human eye fixations. Thorough experiment results demonstrate the advantage of the proposed method over the state-of-the-art. PMID:26168451

  4. A Universe without Weak Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Harnik, Roni; Kribs, Graham D.; Perez, Gilad

    2006-04-07

    A universe without weak interactions is constructed that undergoes big-bang nucleosynthesis, matter domination, structure formation, and star formation. The stars in this universe are able to burn for billions of years, synthesize elements up to iron, and undergo supernova explosions, dispersing heavy elements into the interstellar medium. These definitive claims are supported by a detailed analysis where this hypothetical ''Weakless Universe'' is matched to our Universe by simultaneously adjusting Standard Model and cosmological parameters. For instance, chemistry and nuclear physics are essentially unchanged. The apparent habitability of the Weakless Universe suggests that the anthropic principle does not determine the scale of electroweak breaking, or even require that it be smaller than the Planck scale, so long as technically natural parameters may be suitably adjusted. Whether the multi-parameter adjustment is realized or probable is dependent on the ultraviolet completion, such as the string landscape. Considering a similar analysis for the cosmological constant, however, we argue that no adjustments of other parameters are able to allow the cosmological constant to raise up even remotely close to the Planck scale while obtaining macroscopic structure. The fine-tuning problems associated with the electroweak breaking scale and the cosmological constant therefore appear to be qualitatively different from the perspective of obtaining a habitable universe.

  5. Weak percolation on multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Gareth J.; Dorogovtsev, Sergey N.; Mendes, José F. F.; Cellai, Davide

    2014-04-01

    Bootstrap percolation is a simple but nontrivial model. It has applications in many areas of science and has been explored on random networks for several decades. In single-layer (simplex) networks, it has been recently observed that bootstrap percolation, which is defined as an incremental process, can be seen as the opposite of pruning percolation, where nodes are removed according to a connectivity rule. Here we propose models of both bootstrap and pruning percolation for multiplex networks. We collectively refer to these two models with the concept of "weak" percolation, to distinguish them from the somewhat classical concept of ordinary ("strong") percolation. While the two models coincide in simplex networks, we show that they decouple when considering multiplexes, giving rise to a wealth of critical phenomena. Our bootstrap model constitutes the simplest example of a contagion process on a multiplex network and has potential applications in critical infrastructure recovery and information security. Moreover, we show that our pruning percolation model may provide a way to diagnose missing layers in a multiplex network. Finally, our analytical approach allows us to calculate critical behavior and characterize critical clusters.

  6. Endoscopic endonasal versus transfacial approach for blowout fractures of the medial orbital wall.

    PubMed

    Pagnoni, Mario; Giovannetti, Filippo; Amodeo, Giulia; Priore, Paolo; Iannetti, Giorgio

    2015-05-01

    In the last decades, the introduction of computed tomography has allowed an increase in the number of diagnosed fractures of the medial orbital wall. To repair medial wall fractures, many surgical techniques have been proposed (1), each one with its advantages and disadvantages. In this study, we compared endoscopic endonasal and transcutaneous reduction approaches in terms of surgery time and clinical outcome. Between 2001 and 2005, 81 patients with orbital wall fractures were treated at our department. Among these 81 patients, 24 (29.63%) were affected by a medial orbital fracture. Patients with fracture to both floor and medial walls underwent floor reduction by a transcutaneous subpalpebral approach (n = 9, 11.1%), whereas patients with isolated medial wall fracture underwent medial wall reduction by a transcutaneous subpalpebral approach using alloplastic implants (n = 8, 9.88%) or were treated by endoscopic approach (n = 5, 6.17%). After surgery, oculomotor function improved in all 22 patients. None of the patients had complications. Computed tomography revealed a well-consolidated site of fracture in both endoscopic endonasal and transcutaneous approaches. The average operating time for endoscopic endonasal and transfacial approach was 50 and 45 minutes, respectively. In this paper, the author proposed a results comparison between the endoscopic approach and the transcutaneous one. PMID:25974823

  7. Effects of medial meniscal posterior horn avulsion and repair on meniscal displacement.

    PubMed

    Hein, Christopher N; Deperio, Jennifer Gurske; Ehrensberger, Mark T; Marzo, John M

    2011-06-01

    Medial meniscal posterior root avulsion (MMRA) leads to deleterious alteration of medial joint compartment loading profiles and increased risk of medial degenerative changes. Surgical repair restores more normal biomechanics to the knee. Our hypothesis is that MMRA will cause medial meniscal (MM) extrusion and gap formation between the root attachment site and MM. Meniscal root repair will restore the ability of the meniscus to resist extrusion, and reduce gap formation at the defect. Seven fresh frozen human cadaveric knees were dissected and mechanically loaded using a servo-hydraulic load frame (MTS ®) with 0 and 1800 N. The knees were tested under three conditions: native, avulsed, and repaired. Four measurements were obtained: meniscal displacement anteriorly, medially, posteriorly, and gap distance between the root attachment site and MM after transection and repair. The medial displacement of the avulsed MM (3.28 mm) was significantly greater (p < 0.001) than the native knee (1.60mm) and repaired knee (1.46 mm). Gap formation is significantly larger in the avulsed compared to repaired state at 0 (p < 0.02) and 1800N (p < 0.02) and also larger with loading in both avulsed (p < 0.05) and repaired (p < 0.02) conditions. Therefore, MMRA results in MM extrusion from the joint and gap formation between the MM root and the MM. Subsequent surgical repair reduces meniscal displacement and gap formation at the defect. PMID:20684881

  8. [Anatomical variants of the medial calcaneal nerve and the Baxter nerve in the tarsal tunnel].

    PubMed

    Martín-Oliva, X; Elgueta-Grillo, J; Veliz-Ayta, P; Orosco-Villaseñor, S; Elgueta-Grillo, M; Viladot-Perice, R

    2013-01-01

    The tarsal tunnel is composed of the posterior border of the medial malleoulus, the posterior aspect of the talus and the medial aspect of the calcaneus. The medial calcaneal nerve emerges from the posterior aspect of the posterior tibial nerve in 75% of cases and from the lateral plantar nerve in the remaining 25%. Finally, the medial calcaneal nerve ends as a single terminal branch in 79% of cases and in numerous terminal branches in the remaining 21%. To describe the anatomical variants of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches. To describe the steps for tarsal tunnel release. To describe Baxter nerve release. The anatomical variants of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches within the tarsal tunnel were studied. Then the Lam technique was performed; it consists of: 1) opening of the laciniate ligament, 2) opening of the fascia over the abductor hallucis muscle, 3) exoneurolysis of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches, identifying the emergence and pathway of the medial calcaneal branch, the lateral plantar nerve and its Baxter nerve branch and the medial plantar nerve. Baxter nerve was found in 100% of cases. In 100% of cases in our series the nerve going to the abductor digiti minimi muscle of the foot was found; 87.5% of cases had two terminal branches. The dissections proved that a crucial step was the release of the distal tarsal tunnel. PMID:24701749

  9. Dual role of medial A10 dopamine neurons in affective encoding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-Hua; Shin, Rick; Ikemoto, Satoshi

    2008-11-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the activation of medial A10 neurons mediates positive affective encoding. However, little is known about the functions of the inhibition of midbrain dopamine neurons. Here we show evidence suggesting that the inhibition of medial A10 neurons mediates a negative affective state, leading to negative affective encoding, whereas blunting the activation of medial A10 neurons disrupts positive affective encoding involving food reward. We used a microinjection procedure, in which the D(2) dopamine receptor agonist quinpirole was administered into the cell body region of the dopamine neurons, a procedure that reduces dopamine cell firing. Microinjections of quinpirole into the posteromedial ventral tegmental area, but not its more lateral counterparts, led to conditioned place aversion. Quinpirole administration to this site also decreased food intake and basal dopamine concentration in the ventromedial striatum, a major projection area of medial A10 neurons. In addition, moderate quinpirole doses that did not lead to conditioned place aversion or disrupt food intake abolished food-conditioned place preference, suggesting that blunting dopamine impulse activity in response to food reward disrupts positive affective encoding in associated external stimuli. Our data support the hypothesis that activation of medial A10 dopamine neurons mediates a positive affective state, leading to positive affective encoding, while their inhibition mediates a negative affective state, leading to negative affective encoding. Together with previous findings, we propose that medial A10 neurons are an important component of the mechanism via which animals learn to avoid negative incentive stimuli. PMID:18256592

  10. In Vivo Measurement of Rotator Cuff Tear Tension: Medial Versus Lateral Footprint Position.

    PubMed

    Dierckman, Brian D; Wang, David W; Bahk, Michael S; Burns, Joseph P; Getelman, Mark H

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a study to evaluate in vivo tension applied to the rotator cuff tendon positioned at the medial versus lateral footprint during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. We evaluated 20 consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. During repair, a grasper was inserted through a lateral portal, and a digital weigh scale was attached. The tendon was grasped and translated to the medial footprint, and tension recorded. After a relaxation period, the tendon edge was translated to the lateral footprint, and tension recorded. Mean (SD) tension was 0.41 (0.33) pound when tendons were positioned at the medial footprint and 2.21 (1.20) pounds when they were positioned at the lateral footprint, representing a 5.4-fold difference (P < .0001). For smaller tears (≤20 mm anterior-posterior), 7.6 times less tension was applied to the tendons when pulled to the medial versus lateral footprint. For larger tears, 4.1 times less tension was applied to the tendons when pulled to the medial versus lateral footprint. This study demonstrated a significant, 5.4-fold increase in tension when the tendon edge was reduced to the lateral as opposed to the medial footprint in vivo. PMID:26991588

  11. Intralaminar and medial thalamic influence on cortical synchrony, information transmission and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Saalmann, Yuri B.

    2014-01-01

    The intralaminar and medial thalamic nuclei are part of the higher-order thalamus, which receives little sensory input, and instead forms extensive cortico-thalamo-cortical pathways. The large mediodorsal thalamic nucleus predominantly connects with the prefrontal cortex, the adjacent intralaminar nuclei connect with fronto-parietal cortex, and the midline thalamic nuclei connect with medial prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe. Taking into account this connectivity pattern, it is not surprising that the intralaminar and medial thalamus has been implicated in a variety of cognitive functions, including memory processing, attention and orienting, as well as reward-based behavior. This review addresses how the intralaminar and medial thalamus may regulate information transmission in cortical circuits. A key neural mechanism may involve intralaminar and medial thalamic neurons modulating the degree of synchrony between different groups of cortical neurons according to behavioral demands. Such a thalamic-mediated synchronization mechanism may give rise to large-scale integration of information across multiple cortical circuits, consequently influencing the level of arousal and consciousness. Overall, the growing evidence supports a general role for the higher-order thalamus in the control of cortical information transmission and cognitive processing. PMID:24847225

  12. Pixelation Effects in Weak Lensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    High, F. William; Rhodes, Jason; Massey, Richard; Ellis, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing can be used to investigate both dark matter and dark energy but requires accurate measurements of the shapes of faint, distant galaxies. Such measurements are hindered by the finite resolution and pixel scale of digital cameras. We investigate the optimum choice of pixel scale for a space-based mission, using the engineering model and survey strategy of the proposed Supernova Acceleration Probe as a baseline. We do this by simulating realistic astronomical images containing a known input shear signal and then attempting to recover the signal using the Rhodes, Refregier, and Groth algorithm. We find that the quality of shear measurement is always improved by smaller pixels. However, in practice, telescopes are usually limited to a finite number of pixels and operational life span, so the total area of a survey increases with pixel size. We therefore fix the survey lifetime and the number of pixels in the focal plane while varying the pixel scale, thereby effectively varying the survey size. In a pure trade-off for image resolution versus survey area, we find that measurements of the matter power spectrum would have minimum statistical error with a pixel scale of 0.09' for a 0.14' FWHM point-spread function (PSF). The pixel scale could be increased to 0.16' if images dithered by exactly half-pixel offsets were always available. Some of our results do depend on our adopted shape measurement method and should be regarded as an upper limit: future pipelines may require smaller pixels to overcome systematic floors not yet accessible, and, in certain circumstances, measuring the shape of the PSF might be more difficult than those of galaxies. However, the relative trends in our analysis are robust, especially those of the surface density of resolved galaxies. Our approach thus provides a snapshot of potential in available technology, and a practical counterpart to analytic studies of pixelation, which necessarily assume an idealized shape

  13. Weak {}^* convergence of operator means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, Alexandr V.

    2011-12-01

    For a linear operator U with \\Vert U^n\\Vert \\le \\operatorname{const} on a Banach space X we discuss conditions for the convergence of ergodic operator nets T_\\alpha corresponding to the adjoint operator U^* of U in the {W^*O}-topology of the space \\operatorname{End} X^*. The accumulation points of all possible nets of this kind form a compact convex set L in \\operatorname{End} X^*, which is the kernel of the operator semigroup G=\\overline{\\operatorname{co}}\\,\\Gamma_0, where \\Gamma_0=\\{U_n^*, n \\ge 0\\}. It is proved that all ergodic nets T_\\alpha weakly {}^* converge if and only if the kernel L consists of a single element. In the case of X=C(\\Omega) and the shift operator U generated by a continuous transformation \\varphi of a metrizable compactum \\Omega we trace the relationships among the ergodic properties of U, the structure of the operator semigroups L, G and \\Gamma=\\overline{\\Gamma}_0, and the dynamical characteristics of the semi-cascade (\\varphi,\\Omega). In particular, if \\operatorname{card}L=1, then a) for any \\omega \\in\\Omega the closure of the trajectory \\{\\varphi^n\\omega, n \\ge 0\\} contains precisely one minimal set m, and b) the restriction (\\varphi,m) is strictly ergodic. Condition a) implies the {W^*O}-convergence of any ergodic sequence of operators T_n \\in \\operatorname{End} X^* under the additional assumption that the kernel of the enveloping semigroup E(\\varphi,\\Omega) contains elements obtained from the `basis' family of transformations \\{\\varphi^n, n \\ge 0\\} of the compact set \\Omega by using some transfinite sequence of sequential passages to the limit.

  14. Pixelation Effects in Weak Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    High, F. William; Rhodes, Jason; Massey, Richard; Ellis, Richard

    2007-11-01

    Weak gravitational lensing can be used to investigate both dark matter and dark energy but requires accurate measurements of the shapes of faint, distant galaxies. Such measurements are hindered by the finite resolution and pixel scale of digital cameras. We investigate the optimum choice of pixel scale for a space-based mission, using the engineering model and survey strategy of the proposed Supernova Acceleration Probe as a baseline. We do this by simulating realistic astronomical images containing a known input shear signal and then attempting to recover the signal using the Rhodes, Refregier, & Groth algorithm. We find that the quality of shear measurement is always improved by smaller pixels. However, in practice, telescopes are usually limited to a finite number of pixels and operational life span, so the total area of a survey increases with pixel size. We therefore fix the survey lifetime and the number of pixels in the focal plane while varying the pixel scale, thereby effectively varying the survey size. In a pure trade-off for image resolution versus survey area, we find that measurements of the matter power spectrum would have minimum statistical error with a pixel scale of 0.09" for a 0.14" FWHM point-spread function (PSF). The pixel scale could be increased to ~0.16" if images dithered by exactly half-pixel offsets were always available. Some of our results do depend on our adopted shape measurement method and should be regarded as an upper limit: future pipelines may require smaller pixels to overcome systematic floors not yet accessible, and, in certain circumstances, measuring the shape of the PSF might be more difficult than those of galaxies. However, the relative trends in our analysis are robust, especially those of the surface density of resolved galaxies. Our approach thus provides a snapshot of potential in available technology, and a practical counterpart to analytic studies of pixelation, which necessarily assume an idealized shape

  15. Comparative study of linear and curvilinear ultrasound probes to assess quadriceps rectus femoris muscle mass in healthy subjects and in patients with chronic respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, S; Suh, E; Thompson, A; Connolly, B; Ramsay, M; Harding, R; Puthucheary, Z; Moxham, J; Hart, N

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound measurements of rectus femoris cross-sectional area (RFCSA) are clinically useful measurements in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and critically ill patients. Technical considerations as to the type of probe used, which affects image resolution, have limited widespread clinical application. We hypothesised that measurement of RFCSA would be similar with linear and curvilinear probes. Methods Four studies were performed to compare the use of the curvilinear probe in measuring RFCSA. Study 1 investigated agreement of RFCSA measurements using linear and curvilinear probes in healthy subjects, and in patients with chronic respiratory disease. Study 2 investigated the intra-rater and inter-rater agreement using the curvilinear probe. Study 3 investigated the agreement of RFCSA measured from whole and spliced images using the linear probe. Study 4 investigated the applicability of ultrasound in measuring RFCSA during the acute and recovery phases of an exacerbation of COPD. Results Study 1 showed demonstrated no difference in the measurement of RFCSA using the curvilinear and linear probes (308±104 mm2 vs 320±117 mm2, p=0.80; intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)>0.97). Study 2 demonstrated high intra-rater and inter-rater reliability of RFCSA measurement with ICC>0.95 for both. Study 3 showed that the spliced image from the linear probe was similar to the whole image RFCSA (308±103.5 vs 263±147 mm2, p=0.34; ICC>0.98). Study 4 confirmed the clinical acceptability of using the curvilinear probe during an exacerbation of COPD. There were relationships observed between admission RFCSA and body mass index (r=+0.65, p=0.018), and between RFCSA at admission and physical activity levels at 4 weeks post-hospital discharge (r=+0.75, p=0.006). Conclusions These studies have demonstrated that clinicians can employ whole and spliced images from the linear probe or use images from the curvilinear probe, to measure RFCSA. This will extend

  16. The effects of neuromuscular exercise on medial knee joint load post-arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy: ‘SCOPEX’ a randomised control trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Meniscectomy is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, with increased medial joint loading a likely contributor to the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis in this group. Therefore, post-surgical rehabilitation or interventions that reduce medial knee joint loading have the potential to reduce the risk of developing or progressing osteoarthritis. The primary purpose of this randomised, assessor-blind controlled trial is to determine the effects of a home-based, physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint load during functional tasks in people who have recently undergone a partial medial meniscectomy. Methods/design 62 people aged 30–50 years who have undergone an arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy within the previous 3 to 12 months will be recruited and randomly assigned to a neuromuscular exercise or control group using concealed allocation. The neuromuscular exercise group will attend 8 supervised exercise sessions with a physiotherapist and will perform 6 exercises at home, at least 3 times per week for 12 weeks. The control group will not receive the neuromuscular training program. Blinded assessment will be performed at baseline and immediately following the 12-week intervention. The primary outcomes are change in the peak external knee adduction moment measured by 3-dimensional analysis during normal paced walking and one-leg rise. Secondary outcomes include the change in peak external knee adduction moment during fast pace walking and one-leg hop and change in the knee adduction moment impulse during walking, one-leg rise and one-leg hop, knee and hip muscle strength, electromyographic muscle activation patterns, objective measures of physical function, as well as self-reported measures of physical function and symptoms and additional biomechanical parameters. Discussion The findings from this trial will provide evidence regarding the effect of a home-based, physiotherapist

  17. Rheology of weakly vibrated granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijksman, J. A.; Wortel, G.; van Hecke, M.

    2009-06-01

    We show how weak vibrations substantially modify the rheology of granular materials. We experimentally probe dry granular flows in a weakly vibrated split bottom shear cell—the weak vibrations modulate gravity and act as an agitation source. By tuning the applied stress and vibration strength, and monitoring the resulting strain as a function of time, we uncover a rich phase diagram in which non-trivial transitions separate a jammed phase, a creep flow case, and a steady flow case.

  18. Spin effects in the weak interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, S.J. Chicago Univ., IL . Dept. of Physics Chicago Univ., IL . Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1990-01-01

    Modern experiments investigating the beta decay of the neutron and light nuclei are still providing important constraints on the theory of the weak interaction. Beta decay experiments are yielding more precise values for allowed and induced weak coupling constants and putting constraints on possible extensions to the standard electroweak model. Here we emphasize the implications of recent experiments to pin down the strengths of the weak vector and axial vector couplings of the nucleon.

  19. Duane Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eye muscles. In Duane syndrome, the sixth cranial nerve that controls the lateral rectus muscle (the muscle ... abnormal innervation of a branch from the third cranial nerve, which normally controls the medial rectus muscle (the ...

  20. CONTRIBUTION TO THE ANATOMICAL STUDY OF THE CORTICOPERIOSTEAL FLAP OF THE MEDIAL FEMORAL CONDYLE

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Rômulo Guimarães; Bufáiçal, Henrique Gubert; Oliveira, Leandro Alves de; Souza, Fabiano Inácio de; Kuwae, Mário Yoshihide; Teixeira da Silva, João Alírio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to perform the anatomical study, in cadavers, of the corticoperiosteal flap of the medial femoral condyle, based on the medial genicular artery, evaluating challenges in dissection and the topographic patterns. Materials and methods: fifteen limbs from eight cadavers were studied, ages ranging from 19 to 74 years old. They were placed at supine position, and a longitudinal incision on the medial face of the lower part of the thigh was performed, exposing medial vastus and sartorius muscles, with descendent genicular vessels being also exposed. The distance between the descendent genicular artery and the medial articular line of the knee, the diameter of the vessel, the length of the pedicle, and the presence of the fasciocutaneous branch and its location were analyzed. Results: the distance between the origin of the descendent genicular artery and the medial articular line of the knee ranged from 11.2cm to 14.5cm, with an average of 12.63cm. The mean artery diameter was 2.5mm (from 2.25mm to 2.75mm). The distance between the descendent genicular artery and the fasciocutaneous branch ranged from 1.0 to 1.5cm. The mean length of the vascular pedicle was 7.01cm, ranging from 5.6cm to 8.6cm. Conclusion: the corticoperiosteal flap of the medial femoral condyle of the knee is easy to dissect, presents a constant vascular pedicle, with average length of 7.0cm and diameter of 2.5mm, enabling it to be indicated for microsurgical transplants. PMID:27004187

  1. How tibiofemoral alignment and contact locations affect predictions of medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Zachary F; DeMers, Matthew S; Delp, Scott L; Browning, Raymond C

    2015-02-26

    Understanding degeneration of biological and prosthetic knee joints requires knowledge of the in-vivo loading environment during activities of daily living. Musculoskeletal models can estimate medial/lateral tibiofemoral compartment contact forces, yet anthropometric differences between individuals make accurate predictions challenging. We developed a full-body OpenSim musculoskeletal model with a knee joint that incorporates subject-specific tibiofemoral alignment (i.e. knee varus-valgus) and geometry (i.e. contact locations). We tested the accuracy of our model and determined the importance of these subject-specific parameters by comparing estimated to measured medial and lateral contact forces during walking in an individual with an instrumented knee replacement and post-operative genu valgum (6°). The errors in the predictions of the first peak medial and lateral contact force were 12.4% and 11.9%, respectively, for a model with subject-specific tibiofemoral alignment and contact locations determined through radiographic analysis, vs. 63.1% and 42.0%, respectively, for a model with generic parameters. We found that each degree of tibiofemoral alignment deviation altered the first peak medial compartment contact force by 51N (r(2)=0.99), while each millimeter of medial-lateral translation of the compartment contact point locations altered the first peak medial compartment contact force by 41N (r(2)=0.99). The model, available at www.simtk.org/home/med-lat-knee/, enables the specification of subject-specific joint alignment and compartment contact locations to more accurately estimate medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces in individuals with non-neutral alignment. PMID:25595425

  2. How Tibiofemoral Alignment and Contact Locations Affect Predictions of Medial and Lateral Tibiofemoral Contact Forces

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Zachary F.; DeMers, Matthew S.; Delp, Scott L.; Browning, Raymond C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding degeneration of biological and prosthetic knee joints requires knowledge of the in-vivo loading environment during activities of daily living. Musculoskeletal models can estimate medial/lateral tibiofemoral compartment contact forces, yet anthropometric differences between individuals make accurate predictions challenging. We developed a full-body OpenSim musculoskeletal model with a knee joint that incorporates subject-specific tibiofemoral alignment (i.e. knee varus-valgus) and geometry (i.e. contact locations). We tested the accuracy of our model and determined the importance of these subject-specific parameters by comparing estimated to measured medial and lateral contact forces during walking in an individual with an instrumented knee replacement and post-operative genu valgum (6°). The errors in the predictions of the first peak medial and lateral contact force were 12.4% and 11.9%, respectively, for a model with subject-specific tibiofemoral alignment and contact locations determined via radiographic analysis, vs. 63.1% and 42.0%, respectively, for a model with generic parameters. We found that each degree of tibiofemoral alignment deviation altered the first peak medial compartment contact force by 51N (r2=0.99), while each millimeter of medial-lateral translation of the compartment contact point locations altered the first peak medial compartment contact force by 41N (r2=0.99). The model, available at www.simtk.org/home/med-lat-knee/, enables the specification of subject-specific joint alignment and compartment contact locations to more accurately estimate medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces in individuals with non-neutral alignment. PMID:25595425

  3. Pediatric obesity and walking duration increase medial tibiofemoral compartment contact forces.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Zachary F; Board, Wayne J; Browning, Raymond C

    2016-01-01

    With the high prevalence of pediatric obesity there is a need for structured physical activity during childhood. However, altered tibiofemoral loading during physical activity in obese children likely contribute to their increased risk of orthopedic disorders of the knee. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of pediatric obesity and walking duration on medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces. We collected experimental biomechanics data during treadmill walking at 1 m•s(-1) for 20 min in 10 obese and 10 healthy-weight 8-12 year-olds. We created subject-specific musculoskeletal models using radiographic measures of tibiofemoral alignment and centers-of-pressure, and predicted medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces at the beginning and end of each trial. Obesity and walking duration affected tibiofemoral loading. At the beginning of the trail, the average percent of the total load passing through the medial compartment during stance was 85% in the obese children and 63% in the healthy-weight children; at the end of the trial, the medial distribution was 90% in the obese children and 72% in the healthy-weight children. Medial compartment loading rates were 1.78 times greater in the obese participants. The medial compartment loading rate increased 17% in both groups at the end compared to the beginning of the trial (p = 0.001). We found a strong linear relationship between body-fat percentage and the medial-lateral load distribution (r(2) = 0.79). Altered tibiofemoral loading during walking in obese children may contribute to their increased risk of knee pain and pathology. PMID:26271943

  4. PHYSICAL THERAPY INTERVENTION FOR MEDIAL PATELLOFEMORAL LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION AFTER REPEATED LATERAL PATELLAR SUBLUXATION/DISLOCATION

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Brianne; Vitale, Ashley; Apergis, Demitra; Wirth, Stephen; Grossman, Mark G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The incidence of patellar subluxation or dislocation has been documented up to 43/100,000 with females more prevalent then males. There are many contributing factors involving the hip, knee, and ankle that lead to patellar subluxation. A patellar position of lateral tilt with lateral glide may indicate weakness of the vastus medialis oblique (VMO) and adductors, increased tightness in the iliotibial band, and overpowering of the vastus lateralis. Patella alta can predispose an individual to lateral dislocation due to the patella placement outside of the femoral trochlear groove with a disadvantage of boney stability. Other factors that may cause the patella to laterally sublux or dislocate during a functional activity or sporting activity include a position of femoral external rotation, tibial internal rotation, and excessive contraction of the vastus lateralis. The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) aids in the prevention of a lateral patellar subluxation or dislocation. In cases where there is recurrent subluxation/dislocation and Magnetic Resonance Imaging confirms a MPFL tear, a reconstruction may be the treatment of choice. Purpose The purpose of this case series is to describe the post-surgical physical therapy management of MPFL reconstructions, outcomes using the Modified Cincinnati Knee Outcome Measure (MCKOM) and to propose staged physical therapy interventions for this pathology in the form of a treatment progression. Methods Post-operative management data and outcomes were retrospectively collected using a detailed chart review methodology from seven subjects who underwent MPFL reconstruction. Findings The Modified Cincinnati Knee Outcome Measure (MCKOM) was analyzed for each participant in four sections that were most important to the return and maintenance of participation in sport. At follow-up the mean scores for the seven subjects in Section 3 (instability) was 19.3/20, Section 4 (overall activity level) was 17.3/20, Section

  5. Facilitation of memory consolidation by post-training electrical stimulation of the medial septal nucleus: is it mediated by changes in rhythmic slow activity?

    PubMed

    Galey, D; Jeantet, Y; Destrade, C; Jaffard, R

    1983-07-01

    Sinusoidal (100 Hz) electrical stimulation was applied at a weak intensity (7.5 muA peak to peak) through bipolar electrodes located in the medial septal nucleus after partial acquisition of an appetitive operant conditioning task in a Skinner box. Analysis of performance in a retention test 24 hr later showed that (i) the presence of stimulation electrodes by itself impaired retention-test performance, and (ii) electrical stimulation applied 30 sec after the end of the acquisition session improves retention; this facilitatory effect disappeared when the treatment was delayed 15 min. Both impairment and facilitation were found to vary (considerably) among subjects. Electrodes located in the center of the medial septal nucleus led to both a greater impairment in unstimulated subjects and a greater facilitation in stimulated subjects than more anterior placements in the vicinity of the diagonal band. Finally, spectral analysis of hippocampal EEG showed that stimulation had no effect on rhythmic slow activity (RSA). These results are discussed in relation to studies showing that RSA is associated with memory-storage processes and our own hypothesis which underlines the importance of activation of septo-hippocampal cholinergic neurons in the early stages of these mnemonic processes. PMID:6314987

  6. Spontaneous medial dislocation of the tendon of the long biceps brachii. An anatomic study of prevalence and pathomechanics.

    PubMed

    Petersson, C J

    1986-10-01

    Medial displacement of the tendon of the long biceps brachii muscle was analyzed in a dissection study on autopsy in 77 subjects, 42 men and 35 women. The tendon was found to be medially displaced in five shoulders in five different subjects (6.5%). Medial displacement of the tendon was always found in connection with full-thickness supraspinatus tendon ruptures. It is a common belief that the tendon is always displaced medially to the lesser tubercle riding over the subscapularis tendon. In the present series, this condition was found only in one case; in the other shoulders the tendon had slipped medially to the lesser tubercle under the subscapularis tendon, which was partially internally ruptured. In patients with rotator cuff lesions, medial displacement of the long biceps tendon might be one reason for pain over the front of the shoulder. PMID:3769261

  7. Medial gastrocnemius muscle fascicle active torque-length and Achilles tendon properties in young adults with spastic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Barber, Lee; Barrett, Rod; Lichtwark, Glen

    2012-10-11

    Individuals with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) typically experience muscle weakness. The mechanisms responsible for muscle weakness in spastic CP are complex and may be influenced by the intrinsic mechanical properties of the muscle and tendon. The purpose of this study was to investigate the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle fascicle active torque-length and Achilles tendon properties in young adults with spastic CP. Nine relatively high functioning young adults with spastic CP (GMFCS I, 17±2 years) and 10 typically developing individuals (18±2 years) participated in the study. Active MG torque-length and Achilles tendon properties were assessed under controlled conditions on a dynamometer. EMG was recorded from leg muscles and ultrasound was used to measure MG fascicle length and Achilles tendon length during maximal isometric contractions at five ankle angles throughout the available range of motion and during passive rotations imposed by the dynamometer. Compared to the typically developing group, the spastic CP group had 33% lower active ankle plantarflexion torque across the available range of ankle joint motion, partially explained by 37% smaller MG muscle and 4% greater antagonistic co-contraction. The Achilles tendon slack length was also 10% longer in the spastic CP group. This study confirms young adults with mild spastic CP have altered muscle-tendon mechanical properties. The adaptation of a longer Achilles tendon may facilitate a greater storage and recovery of elastic energy and partially compensate for decreased force and work production by the small muscles of the triceps surae during activities such as locomotion. PMID:22867763

  8. Differential effects of GDF5 on the medial and lateral rat ventral mesencephalon.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Kevin B; Sullivan, Aideen M

    2007-11-12

    Growth/differentiation factor 5 (GDF5) is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily that has potent neurotrophic and protective effects on dopaminergic neurones and is expressed in the developing rat substantia nigra (the ventral mesencephalon; VM). GDF5 has the potential to be used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder characterised by the selective degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurones. One therapy being explored for PD involves transplantation of fetal VM tissue into the striatum in order to replace lost dopaminergic neurones. The majority of transplantation studies have used transplants incorporating the whole VM. The principal location of dopaminergic neurones in the E14 rat VM is in the medial VM. In the present study, the effects of GDF5 on cultures prepared from medial, lateral and whole E14 rat VM tissue were compared. GDF5 treatment increased the number of dopaminergic neurones in whole and lateral, but not in medial, VM cultures, whereas it increased total cell number in medial, but not in whole or lateral, VM cultures. RT-PCR studies showed that the receptors for GDF5 were differentially expressed in E14 VM; the expression of BMPR-IB and Ror2 was low in medial but high in lateral VM tissue. This study suggests that GDF5 increases the number of dopaminergic neurones in whole VM cultures by acting on BMPR-IB and Ror2-expressing cells in the lateral VM. PMID:17935884

  9. Radiographic measures of settlement phenomenon in patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Tianhua; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Fei; Yin, Bing; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Yingze

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we proposed for the first time the theory of "settlement phenomenon" in tibial plateau and carefully explored the role of settlement of tibial plateau in the occurrence and progression of medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA) through investigating the relationship between the degree of settlement and the radiographic severity of OA. One hundred twenty-seven patients with knee medial compartment OA were recruited and examined with weight-bearing radiographs of the entire lower limb. The radiographic severity of OA was evaluated using the Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) grading methods. The settlement value, hip-knee-ankle angle, minimum medial joint space width, and condylar plateau angle were measured at the same time. The settlement value increases with the upgrading of KL grades (r = 0.352, P < 0.001) and is significantly correlated with the changes of hip-knee-ankle angle, minimum medial joint space width, and condylar plateau angle (r = -0.527, -0.271, and 0.415, P < 0.001, respectively). These results suggest that the settlement of tibial plateau could be an evaluable indicator of medial compartment knee OA and be used in the early diagnosis and progression of OA. PMID:26712497

  10. Displaced Medial and Lateral Bucket Handle Meniscal Tears With Intact ACL and PCL.

    PubMed

    Boody, Barrett S; Omar, Imran M; Hill, James A

    2015-08-01

    Bucket handle lesions are vertical longitudinal tears in the meniscus that may displace centrally into the respective medial or lateral compartment, frequently causing mechanical symptoms, including pain, perceived instability, and mechanical locking. Bucket handle meniscal tears are most commonly from a traumatic etiology and are frequently found with concomitant anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Multiple imaging signs and associations have been described for the diagnosis of bucket handle meniscus tears, including coronal truncation, absent bow tie sign, double posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), double ACL, displacement of the bucket handle fragment, and disproportionate posterior horn signs. Among meniscal pathology encountered on magnetic resonance imaging or during arthroscopy, bucket handle meniscal tears are infrequent occurrences. Furthermore, the occurrence of displaced medial and lateral bucket handle tears found on imaging and during arthroscopy is very uncommon and is only sparsely reported in the literature. When displaced medial and lateral bucket handle meniscal segments are visualized within the intercondylar notch along with the ACL and PCL, the radiologic findings are referred to as the "quadruple cruciate" sign or the "Jack and Jill lesion." Of the few case reports described in the literature, only one noted displaced medial and lateral bucket handle meniscus tears with an intact ACL and PCL. The current case report outlines a similar rare case of the quadruple cruciate sign: displaced medial and lateral bucket handle meniscal tears located within the intercondylar notch and an intact ACL and PCL. PMID:26270763

  11. TopMaker: Technique Developed for Automatic Multiblock Topology Generation Using the Medial Axis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, David L.

    2004-01-01

    The TopMaker technique was developed in an effort to reduce the time required for grid generation in complex numerical studies. Topology generation accounts for much of the man-hours required for structured multiblock grids. With regard to structured multiblock grids, topology refers to how the blocks are arranged and connected. A two-dimensional multiblock topology generation technique has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Very general configurations can be addressed by the technique. A configuration is defined by a collection of non-intersecting closed curves, which will be referred to as loops. More than a single loop implies that holes exist in the domain, which poses no problem. This technique requires only the medial vertices and the touch points that define each vertex. From the information about the medial vertices, the connectivity between medial vertices is generated. The physical shape of the medial edge is not required. By applying a few simple rules to each medial edge, a multiblock topology can be generated without user intervention. The resulting topologies contain only the level of complexity dictated by the configurations. Grid lines remain attached to the boundary except at sharp concave turns, where a change in index family is introduced as would be desired. Keeping grid lines attached to the boundary is especially important in computational fluid dynamics, where highly clustered grids are used near no-slip boundaries. This technique is simple and robust and can easily be incorporated into the overall grid-generation process.

  12. Dissociating medial frontal and posterior cingulate activity during self-reflection

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Marcia K.; Raye, Carol L.; Mitchell, Karen J.; Touryan, Sharon R.; Greene, Erich J.; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Motivationally significant agendas guide perception, thought and behaviour, helping one to define a ‘self’ and to regulate interactions with the environment. To investigate neural correlates of thinking about such agendas, we asked participants to think about their hopes and aspirations (promotion focus) or their duties and obligations (prevention focus) during functional magnetic resonance imaging and compared these self-reflection conditions with a distraction condition in which participants thought about non-self-relevant items. Self-reflection resulted in greater activity than distraction in dorsomedial frontal/anterior cingulate cortex and posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus, consistent with previous findings of activity in these areas during self-relevant thought. For additional medial areas, we report new evidence of a double dissociation of function between medial prefrontal/anterior cingulate cortex, which showed relatively greater activity to thinking about hopes and aspirations, and posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus, which showed relatively greater activity to thinking about duties and obligations. One possibility is that activity in medial prefrontal cortex is associated with instrumental or agentic self-reflection, whereas posterior medial cortex is associated with experiential self-reflection. Another, not necessarily mutually exclusive, possibility is that medial prefrontal cortex is associated with a more inward-directed focus, while posterior cingulate is associated with a more outward-directed, social or contextual focus. PMID:18574518

  13. The medial-lateral force distribution in the ovine stifle joint during walking.

    PubMed

    Taylor, William R; Poepplau, Berry M; König, Christian; Ehrig, Rainald M; Zachow, Stefan; Duda, Georg N; Heller, Markus O

    2011-04-01

    Knowledge of the load distribution in the knee is essential for understanding the interaction between mechanics and biology in both the healthy and diseased joint. While the sheep stifle joint is a predominant model for better understanding regeneration after injury, little is known about the compartmental force distribution between the medial and lateral condyles. By including sheep specific anatomy and gait analyses, we used computational musculoskeletal analyses to estimate the medial-lateral joint contact force distribution in ovine stifle joints during walking by simplifying the system of equations into a 2D problem that was solved directly. Gait analysis was conducted using bone markers in three female Merino-mix sheep. Joint contact forces were computed with respect to the specific anatomy of the ovine tibia, resulting in low (<0.13 bodyweight) mean anteroposterior shear forces throughout the gait cycle, with mean peak contact forces perpendicular to the tibial plateau of 2.2 times bodyweight. The medial-lateral compartmental load distribution across the tibial condyles was determined and revealed loading predominantly on the medial condyle, bearing approximately 75% of the total load during phases of peak loading. By considering the anatomical characteristics of the ovine stifle joint, together with the dynamic forces during gait, this study provides evidence for predominantly medial loading in sheep, somewhat similar to the distribution reported in man. However, the exact conditions under which the loading in the ovine stifle joint is representative of the human situation will need to be elucidated in further studies. PMID:20957731

  14. TopMaker: A Technique for Automatic Multi-Block Topology Generation Using the Medial Axis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidmann, James D. (Technical Monitor); Rigby, David L.

    2004-01-01

    A two-dimensional multi-block topology generation technique has been developed. Very general configurations are addressable by the technique. A configuration is defined by a collection of non-intersecting closed curves, which will be referred to as loops. More than a single loop implies that holes exist in the domain, which poses no problem. This technique requires only the medial vertices and the touch points that define each vertex. From the information about the medial vertices, the connectivity between medial vertices is generated. The physical shape of the medial edge is not required. By applying a few simple rules to each medial edge, the multiblock topology is generated with no user intervention required. The resulting topologies contain only the level of complexity dictated by the configurations. Grid lines remain attached to the boundary except at sharp concave turns where a change in index family is introduced as would be desired. Keeping grid lines attached to the boundary is especially important in the area of computational fluid dynamics where highly clustered grids are used near no-slip boundaries. This technique is simple and robust and can easily be incorporated into the overall grid generation process.

  15. [Morphological rationale for medial facetectomy during microsurgical removal of herniated lumbar disks].

    PubMed

    Kushniruk, P I; dreval', O N

    2006-01-01

    The study was undertaken to provide an anatomic and morphological rationale for the use of medial facetectomy in the microsurgical treatment of herniated lumbar disks and to assess the results of performed operations. Morphological studies were conducted on corpses, by comparing coronal and transverse sections of the lumbar spine. The concept "nervous root canal" was used during the study. The detected features of the anatomical and topographic structure of the nervous root canal permitted the substantiation of the necessity and volume of medial facetectomy at different levels. When an approach is applied into the discal area, the highest and least volume of bone resection at medial facetectomy is required at the levels of L3-L4 and L5-S1, respectively. The clinical study involved an analysis of the results of microsurgical treatment of 530 patients with herniated lumbar disks. The analysis of clinical findings revealed that medial facetectomy had been used during 382 (72%) operations. When the operations were performed at different levels, the usage of this technique differs: at the levels of L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1 in 30 (100%), 206 (91%), and 145 (53%) cases, respectively. The data on the usage of medial facetectomy during operations correspond to the revealed specific features of the anatomic and topographic structure of the nervous root canal at each of the operated levels. PMID:16739929

  16. CP Violation, Neutral Currents, and Weak Equivalence

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fitch, V. L.

    1972-03-23

    Within the past few months two excellent summaries of the state of our knowledge of the weak interactions have been presented. Correspondingly, we will not attempt a comprehensive review but instead concentrate this discussion on the status of CP violation, the question of the neutral currents, and the weak equivalence principle.

  17. On modeling weak sinks in MODPATH.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Daniel; Haitjema, H; Kauffman, L

    2013-01-01

    Regional groundwater flow systems often contain both strong sinks and weak sinks. A strong sink extracts water from the entire aquifer depth, while a weak sink lets some water pass underneath or over the actual sink. The numerical groundwater flow model MODFLOW may allow a sink cell to act as a strong or weak sink, hence extracting all water that enters the cell or allowing some of that water to pass. A physical strong sink can be modeled by either a strong sink cell or a weak sink cell, with the latter generally occurring in low-resolution models. Likewise, a physical weak sink may also be represented by either type of sink cell. The representation of weak sinks in the particle tracing code MODPATH is more equivocal than in MODFLOW. With the appropriate parameterization of MODPATH, particle traces and their associated travel times to weak sink streams can be modeled with adequate accuracy, even in single layer models. Weak sink well cells, on the other hand, require special measures as proposed in the literature to generate correct particle traces and individual travel times and hence capture zones. We found that the transit time distributions for well water generally do not require special measures provided aquifer properties are locally homogeneous and the well draws water from the entire aquifer depth, an important observation for determining the response of a well to non-point contaminant inputs. PMID:23025655

  18. Spin Seebeck effect in a weak ferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arboleda, Juan David; Arnache Olmos, Oscar; Aguirre, Myriam Haydee; Ramos, Rafael; Anadon, Alberto; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    We report the observation of room temperature spin Seebeck effect (SSE) in a weak ferromagnetic normal spinel Zinc Ferrite (ZFO). Despite the weak ferromagnetic behavior, the measurements of the SSE in ZFO show a thermoelectric voltage response comparable with the reported values for other ferromagnetic materials. Our results suggest that SSE might possibly originate from the surface magnetization of the ZFO.

  19. Staggering towards a calculation of weak amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, S.R.

    1988-09-01

    An explanation is given of the methods required to calculate hadronic matrix elements of the weak Hamiltonians using lattice QCD with staggered fermions. New results are presented for the 1-loop perturbative mixing of the weak interaction operators. New numerical techniques designed for staggered fermions are described. A preliminary result for the kaon B parameter is presented. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Fixing Employee Weaknesses: Addressing the Myth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilley, Jerry W.

    2001-01-01

    Suggests that human resources development professionals need to change their performance improvement focus and philosophy to embrace the importance of building on strengths and managing weaknesses. Identifies five characteristics indicative of employees' strengths. Describes seven strategies to help employees minimize their weaknesses while…

  1. Crossing Institutional Boundaries: Writing Strengths and Weaknesses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumpkins, Julie

    At any level, good writing requires an acknowledgment of writing strengths and weaknesses by both student and instructor. The four project collaborators/writing teachers outlined six specific areas on a teacher feedback sheet to note students' writing strengths and weaknesses; the areas of purpose, audience, thesis, development, organization, and…

  2. Clinical Outcomes of Medial Meniscus Posterior Root Tears

    PubMed Central

    Krych, Aaron John; Reardon, Patrick J.; Pareek, Ayoosh; Peter, Logan; Dahm, Diane L.; Levy, Bruce A.; Stuart, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Medial meniscus posterior root tears (MMPRTs) present a unique challenge for both patients and surgeons as these tears have shown to be biomechanically equivalent to complete meniscectomy. However, little is known about the natural history of these lesions. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to describe the clinical course of MMPRTs with respect to subsequent operative and non-operative treatments, and associated comorbidities. Methods: Over 2600 MRIs were identified by searching radiologist reads for the terms “root” or “root tear” from 2005-2013. Presence or absence of MMPRTs and other associated boney, meniscal, or ligamentous injuries were identified and recorded. Of these MRIs, 102 MRIs from 102 patients who had unrepaired MMPRTs with minimum 2-year follow-up and no prior ligamentous surgery were followed. These MRIs were evaluated to confirm the presence of a meniscal root tear and the presence or absence of associated meniscal or ligamentous injuries, as well as meniscal extrusion, subchondral edema, or insufficiency fractures. Chart review was performed to obtain the treatment summary after diagnosis. Radiographs from before and after the diagnosis of MMPRT were reviewed and Kellgren-Lawrence scores were determined. Finally, the association between concomitant boney, ligamentous, or meniscal injuries, patient factors, and rate of arthroplasty, as well as final Kellgren-Lawrence scores were evaluated. Chi-square analysis was used for categorical variables, and Wilcoxon Rank-Sums was used for continuous variables. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to evaluate the effect of meniscal extrusion on the time-dependant rate of arthroplasty. Results: 104 patients (43 M:61F) were diagnosed with MMPRTs at a mean age of 54±13. These patients were followed for a mean of 66±26 months. 75 (74%) patients had associated meniscal extrusion, 64 (62%) had associated subchondral edema, and 14 (13%) had associated insufficiency fractures at the time of

  3. Maximal Holevo Quantity Based on Weak Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yao-Kun; Fei, Shao-Ming; Wang, Zhi-Xi; Cao, Jun-Peng; Fan, Heng

    2015-01-01

    The Holevo bound is a keystone in many applications of quantum information theory. We propose “ maximal Holevo quantity for weak measurements” as the generalization of the maximal Holevo quantity which is defined by the optimal projective measurements. The scenarios that weak measurements is necessary are that only the weak measurements can be performed because for example the system is macroscopic or that one intentionally tries to do so such that the disturbance on the measured system can be controlled for example in quantum key distribution protocols. We evaluate systematically the maximal Holevo quantity for weak measurements for Bell-diagonal states and find a series of results. Furthermore, we find that weak measurements can be realized by noise and project measurements. PMID:26090962

  4. Identical Quantum Particles and Weak Discernibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieks, Dennis; Versteegh, Marijn A. M.

    2008-10-01

    Saunders has recently claimed that “identical quantum particles” with an anti-symmetric state (fermions) are weakly discernible objects, just like irreflexively related ordinary objects in situations with perfect symmetry (Black’s spheres, for example). Weakly discernible objects have all their qualitative properties in common but nevertheless differ from each other by virtue of (a generalized version of) Leibniz’s principle, since they stand in relations an entity cannot have to itself. This notion of weak discernibility has been criticized as question begging, but we defend and accept it for classical cases likes Black’s spheres. We argue, however, that the quantum mechanical case is different. Here the application of the notion of weak discernibility indeed is question begging and in conflict with standard interpretational ideas. We conclude that the introduction of the conceptual resource of weak discernibility does not change the interpretational status quo in quantum mechanics.

  5. Persisting weakness after withdrawal of a statin.

    PubMed

    Mygland, Åse; Ljøstad, Unn; Krossnes, Bård Kronen

    2014-01-01

    An 81-year-old woman treated with simvastatin for several years followed by atorvastatin for about 1 year presented with fatigue, weakness and unsteady gait. The finding of elevated creatine kinase (CK) and symmetric muscle weakness around shoulders and hips led to suspicion of a toxic statin-associated myopathy. Atorvastatin was withdrawn, but her weakness persisted. Owing to persisting weakness, an autoimmune myopathy (myositis) was suspected, but initially disregarded since a muscle biopsy showed necrotic muscle fibres without inflammatory cell infiltrates and myositis-specific autoantibodies were absent. After 18 months with slowly progressive weakness and increasing CK values, awareness of new knowledge about autoimmunity as a cause of necrotic myopathy, led to a successful treatment trial with intravenous immunoglobulines, followed by steroids and metothrexate. Antibodies to the target enzyme of statins (HMGCR (3-hydroksy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase)) were detected in her serum, and she was diagnosed with autoimmune necrotic myositis probably triggered by atorvastatin. PMID:24713712

  6. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the Star Excursion Balance Test, and the weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion were increased. [Conclusion] This study showed that ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape may be an effective therapy for a patient with a medial ankle sprain. PMID:26311991

  7. Aneurysmal bone cyst of medial cuneiform and a novel surgical technique for mid-foot reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sampath Kumar, Venkatesan; Jalan, Divesh; Khan, Shah Alam; Mridha, Asit Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst of the foot is extremely rare and the involvement of medial cuneiform has never been reported in the literature. In this report, we describe a 15-year-old boy who presented with a 6-month history of pain and swelling in his left foot. Radiograph demonstrated a lytic lesion in the medial cuneiform extending on to the middle cuneiform, the navicular bone and the base of the first metatarsal. En bloc resection of the lesion was performed using a dorsal longitudinal incision along the first ray. Tricortical iliac crest graft was harvested and shaped to fill the defect. Two drill holes were made and the tibialis anterior tendon was attached to the graft. Prepared, morcellised allograft was placed along the junction of autograft and host bone. At 1-year follow-up, the patient was pain free, the medial arch of the foot was maintained and the graft had united with the host bone. PMID:24563041

  8. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the Star Excursion Balance Test, and the weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion were increased. [Conclusion] This study showed that ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape may be an effective therapy for a patient with a medial ankle sprain. PMID:26311991

  9. Exertional Compartment Syndrome of the Medial Foot Compartment: Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Faye E; Richie Jr, Douglas H

    2014-06-25

    Abstract Exertional compartment syndrome (ECS) in the foot is rarely reported and often confused with plantar fasciitis as a cause of arch pain in the running athlete. We describe a case involving a 19 year old competitive collegiate runner who developed a chronic case of bilateral medial arch pain during training, which was initially diagnosed as plantar fasciitis but failed to respond to conventional treatment. After symptoms began to suggest exertional compartment syndrome, the diagnosis was confirmed by measuring an elevated resting pressure in the medial compartment of both feet. The patient underwent a bilateral medial compartment fasciotomy, which allowed a full return to activity, and has remained pain free after a one year follow up. PMID:24963970

  10. Exertional compartment syndrome of the medial foot compartment--diagnosis and treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Faye E; Richie, Douglas H

    2014-07-01

    Exertional compartment syndrome in the foot is rarely reported and often confused with plantar fasciitis as a cause of arch pain in the running athlete. We describe a case involving a 19-year-old competitive collegiate runner who developed a chronic case of bilateral medial arch pain during training, which was initially diagnosed as plantar fasciitis but failed to respond to conventional treatment. After symptoms began to suggest exertional compartment syndrome, the diagnosis was confirmed by measuring an elevated resting pressure in the medial compartment of both feet. The patient underwent a bilateral medial compartment fasciotomy, which allowed a full return to activity, and has remained pain free after a 1-year follow-up. PMID:25076087

  11. Fornix and medial temporal lobe lesions lead to comparable deficits in complex visual perception.

    PubMed

    Lech, Robert K; Koch, Benno; Schwarz, Michael; Suchan, Boris

    2016-05-01

    Recent research dealing with the structures of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) has shifted away from exclusively investigating memory-related processes and has repeatedly incorporated the investigation of complex visual perception. Several studies have demonstrated that higher level visual tasks can recruit structures like the hippocampus and perirhinal cortex in order to successfully perform complex visual discriminations, leading to a perceptual-mnemonic or representational view of the medial temporal lobe. The current study employed a complex visual discrimination paradigm in two patients suffering from brain lesions with differing locations and origin. Both patients, one with extensive medial temporal lobe lesions (VG) and one with a small lesion of the anterior fornix (HJK), were impaired in complex discriminations while showing otherwise mostly intact cognitive functions. The current data confirmed previous results while also extending the perceptual-mnemonic theory of the MTL to the main output structure of the hippocampus, the fornix. PMID:26994782

  12. Radiographic Relevance of the Distal Medial Cuneiform Angle in Hallux Valgus Assessment.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Daniel J; Smith, Abigail; Fowler, Troy

    2016-01-01

    The angle formed by the distal articular facet of the medial cuneiform has been evaluated and discussed by various investigators. However, no consistent method has been available to radiograph and measure this entity. The wide variability of the angle is not conducive to comparative analysis. Additionally, investigators have noted that the angles observed (obliquity) vary greatly because of changes in radiographic angle, foot position, rotation of the first ray, and declination of the first metatarsal. Recognizing that these variables exist, we propose a reproducible assessment using digital radiography and application of deformity of correction principles. Our results have indicated a mean distal medial cuneiform angle of 20.69° in normal feet, 23.51° with moderate hallux valgus, and 20.41° with severe hallux valgus deformity. The radiograph beam was kept at 15° from the coronal plane. An inverse relationship was found between the distal medial cuneiform angle and bunion severity. This was in contrast to our expected hypothesis. The overall angle of the first metatarsal-medial cuneiform did, however, correlate with the severity of the bunion deformity (p < .000). The obliquity values and intermetatarsal angles changed in direct relationship to the radiographic projection angle. This illustrates the importance of using standardized radiographic projection angles. We conclude that the 1-dimensional standard anteroposterior radiograph with assessment of the distal medial cuneiform angle cannot adequately demonstrate the pathologic features of hallux valgus. A better indicator appears to be the first metatarsal-medial cuneiform angle. This pathologic entity is a 3-dimensional one that incorporates the joint morphology of the first ray, triplane osseous positioning, and soft tissue imbalances. Perhaps, 3-dimensional computed tomography imaging will provide better insight into this entity. PMID:26359620

  13. Guanfacine promotes neuronal survival in medial prefrontal cortex under hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Kauser, H; Sahu, S; Panjwani, U

    2016-04-01

    High altitude hypobaric hypoxia (HH) affects prefrontal cognitive and executive functions. Guanfacine, alpha 2A adrenoceptor agonist ameliorates the neurological outcomes of high altitude exposure and associated prefrontal neurodegeneration. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the neuroprotective effect of guanfacine following HH remains elusive. Altered balance of pro and anti-apoptotic proteins have been implicated in the beneficial effect of guanfacine to enhance neuronal survival. We examined the effects of guanfacine on expression of some key neurotropic and cytoskeletal proteins following HH. Male rats were exposed to simulated altitude of 7620 m and received an intramuscular injection of either saline or guanfacine at a dose of 1mg/kg for 7 consecutive days. Differential expression of desired proteins was evaluated in layer II of medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) by biochemical and immunohistochemical assays. Guanfacine treatment significantly increased the expression of BDNF in layer II of the medial PFC during normoxia and HH. Moreover, there was a negative correlation of this neurotropic factor with neurodegeneration of pyramidal cells present in this layer of medial PFC. We found a significant decrease in Caspase3 and Bax while a significant increase in Bcl2 with guanfacine treatment during HH. Further, change in Bax to Bcl2 ratio was in correlation with Caspase3 expression in layer II of the medial PFC, indicating that Caspase3 is responsible for Bcl2 cleavage and hence modulation of apoptosis. Guanfacine treatment induced a marked and significant increase in MAP2 and Spinophilin expression in dendritic arbors and spines respectively. Interestingly, alteration in these cytoskeletal proteins was accompanied by simultaneous changes in morphological parameters of dendrites in layer II of medial PFC. Guanfacine modulates the neurotropic, cytoskeletal, pro and anti-apoptotic protein expression in medial PFC under HH and therefore serve as a

  14. Ostectomy and Medial Plantar Artery Flap Reconstruction for Charcot Foot Ulceration Involving the Midfoot.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomoya; Ichioka, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Charcot foot is a serious complication of diabetes, characterized by deformity and overlying ulceration. The condition most commonly affects the midfoot. However, little information is available on the use of a medial plantar artery flap to treat diabetic midfoot ulceration. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the versatility of ostectomy and medial plantar flap reconstruction for midfoot plantar ulceration associated with rocker-bottom deformity secondary to Charcot foot. Four patients underwent ostectomy and medial plantar flap reconstruction. Before flap reconstruction, the devitalized soft tissues and bone were radically resected. After the infection had been controlled, the ulcerated portion was minimally excised, and the bony prominence underlying the ulcer was removed. A medial plantar artery flap was applied to the ulcer. The donor site was covered with a split-thickness skin graft or artificial dermis. In all patients, the ulcers healed and independent ambulation was achieved. However, 1 patient experienced ulcer recurrence, and subsequent infection necessitated a major amputation. Limb salvage is challenging in the setting of deformity and intractable plantar ulceration. The advantages of medial plantar artery flap reconstruction are that tissues with a rich blood supply are used to cover the exposed bone, and the flap can withstand the pressure and shear stress of the patient's body weight. However, a dominant artery in the foot is sacrificed. Therefore, the patency of the dorsalis pedis artery must be confirmed in every patient. The results of the present study have demonstrated that a medial plantar artery can be an effective alternative for diabetic patients with a plantar ulcer secondary to Charcot foot. PMID:26190780

  15. Experience Rate of Elbow Pain and Morphological Abnormality of Humeral Medial Epicondyle among Youth Baseball Players

    PubMed Central

    Kotoura, Yoshihiro; Morihara, Toru; Kida, Yoshikazu; Sukenari, Tsuyoshi; Furukawa, Ryuhei; Kabuto, Yukichi; MInami, Masataka; Onishi, Okihiro; Tsujihara, Takashi; Hojo, Tatsuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the experience rate of elbow pain and to clarify the relationship between morphological abnormality of the humeral medial epicondyle and positions among baseball players in elementary school (ES), junior high school (JHS) and high school (HS). Methods: In this study, 4353 baseball players who participated in our medical screening (2008-2015) were enrolled. There were 1545 players from ES, 1934 players from JHS, and 874 players from HS. We asked them to answer the questionnaire to investigate the experience of elbow pain, and the position they played. Ultrasonography of the humeral medial epicondyle was examined and irregularity, fragmentation, and malunion of the humeral medial epicondyle. The results were analyzed statistically. P < 0.05 was considered significant for all statistical analyses. Results: The experience rates of elbow pain among players in ES, JHS, and HS were 26.0%, 27.0%, and 68.3%. The rates of abnormality of humeral medial epicondyle among players in ES, JHS, and HS were 18.2%, 36.3%, and 39.9% (Table 1). The experience rate of elbow pain among pitchers and catchers was significantly higher than the fielders in ES (Table 2), however, there were no significant differences between positions in JHS and HS (Table 3,4). According to the rate of morphological abnormalities of humeral medial epicondyle, pitchers and catchers were significantly higher than fielders in ES, while only pitchers were significantly higher than the fielders in JHS and HS (Table 2,3,4). Conclusion: The experience rate of elbow pain among baseball players rose as the age increased, and the rate in HS was almost 70%. The rates of morphological abnormality of humeral medial epicondyle among pitchers and catchers were high and the tendency was observed from a young age. The primary prevention of elbow injuries in youth baseball players of all ages should be considered.

  16. Spectrum of Mathematical Weaknesses: Related Neuropsychological Correlates.

    PubMed

    Perna, Robert; Loughan, Ashlee R; Le, Jessica; Hertza, Jeremy; Cohen, Morris J

    2015-01-01

    Math disorders have been recognized for as long as language disorders yet have received far less research. Mathematics is a complex construct and its development may be dependent on multiple cognitive abilities. Several studies have shown that short-term memory, working memory, visuospatial skills, processing speed, and various language skills relate to and may facilitate math development and performance. The hypotheses explored in this research were that children who performed worse on math achievement than on Full-Scale IQ would exhibit weaknesses in executive functions, memory, and visuoperceptual skills. Participants included 436 children (27% girls, 73% boys; age range = 5-17 years, M(age) = 9.45 years) who were referred for neuropsychological evaluations due to academic and/or behavioral problems. This article specifically focuses on the spectrum of math weakness rather than clinical disability, which has yet to be investigated in the literature. Results suggest that children with relative weakness to impairments in math were significantly more likely to have cognitive weaknesses to impairments on neuropsychological variables, as compared with children without math weaknesses. Specifically, the math-weak children exhibit a weakness to impairment on measures involving attention, language, visuoperceptual skills, memory, reading, and spelling. Overall, our results suggest that math development is multifaceted. PMID:25117216

  17. Bilateral Symptomatic Discoid Medial Meniscus of the Knee: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kini, Sunil Gurpur; Walker, Peter; Bruce, Warwick

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A discoid medial meniscus is a rare pathology of the knee joint, and is even rarer when it presents bilaterally with clinical symptoms. Case Presentation: We present the case of a 38-year-old female with symptomatic bilateral discoid medial meniscus. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) showed complete discoid meniscus in one knee and incomplete, on the other side. The MRI findings were confirmed on arthroscopy, with horizontal cleavage tear in both knees. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomies of both menisci were performed. Conclusions: The patient had an excellent functional outcome at the most recent follow-up, with no recurrence of symptoms and full range of movements. PMID:25834792

  18. Transosseous Medial Meniscal Root Repair Using a Modified Mason-Allen Suture Configuration.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Chad D; Hanzlik, Shane R; Caldwell, Paul E; Pearson, Sara E

    2015-12-01

    Medial meniscal tears are among the most common injuries to the knee joint. Loss of the meniscus has been linked to increased contact pressures on the adjacent articular cartilage and progression of degenerative changes in the knee. A subset of tears known as "root tears" involves the insertion of the posterior horn of the meniscus to the bone. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for root tears led to undesirable outcomes, which prompted surgeons to explore restorative procedures. Multiple repair techniques have been presented with an emphasis placed on initial secure fixation and stimulation of potential healing. We present an arthroscopic-assisted technique for medial meniscal root repair with these goals in mind. PMID:27284511

  19. Mass media-led antismoking campaign can remove the education gap in quitting behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Macaskill, P; Pierce, J P; Simpson, J M; Lyle, D M

    1992-01-01

    This study investigated whether the effective mass media-led antismoking campaigns in Australia had the traditional differential effect across educational levels. Our population surveys included random samples of 12,851 people before the campaign and 11,609 several years after the campaign had started. No statistically significant differences were found in quitting across education levels in three of the four subgroups. Mass media-led antismoking campaigns may play an important role in getting the antismoking message to the less educated. PMID:1536344

  20. Mechanism of the Rapid Effect of 17β -Estradiol on Medial Amygdala Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabekura, Junichi; Oomura, Yutaka; Minami, Taketsugu; Mizuno, Yuji; Fukuda, Atsuo

    1986-07-01

    The mechanism by which sex steroids rapidly modulate the excitability of neurons was investigated by intracellular recording of neurons in rat medial amygdala brain slices. Brief hyperpolarization and increased potassium conductance were produced by 17β - estradiol. This effect persisted after elimination of synaptic input and after suppression of protein synthesis. Thus, 17β -estradiol directly changes the ionic conductance of the postsynaptic membrane of medial amygdala neurons. In addition, a greater proportion of the neurons from females than from males responded to 17β -estradiol.

  1. Misdiagnosis of plexiform neurofibroma of the medial plantar nerve: case report.

    PubMed

    D'Orazi, Valerio; Venditto, Teresa; Panunzi, Andrea; Anichini, Silvia; Manzini, Gabriele; Tallarico, Arturo; Bernetti, Andrea; Paoloni, Marco

    2014-09-01

    Plexiform neurofibromas are benign tumors of the peripheral nerve. Diagnosis may be challenging, if they present mimicking other peripheral nerve pathologies. We report the case of a patient who had severe foot pain, which progressively hampered her walking ability, erroneously attributed to recurrent Morton's neuroma. Diagnosis of plexiform neurofibroma of her right medial plantar nerve was made 15 years after the appearance of symptoms. Pain and function recovered after radical neurotomy of the medial plantar nerve. A correct diagnosis is an essential starting point in the treatment of neurofibromas and a misdiagnosis may lead to an inappropriate treatment. PMID:25024003

  2. Medial malleolus fracture of the ankle combined with rupture of the Achilles tendon

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jike; Maruo Holledge, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old man fell off a 60-cm-high step, with his ankle in a twisted position, and sustained a closed fracture of the medial malleolus, with an ipsilateral complete Achilles tendon (TA) rupture. The TA rupture was initially missed but diagnosed by ultrasound examination, 2 weeks post-operatively. The ankle fracture was diagnosed from routine radiographs. Such a combination of injuries has been reported infrequently in the literature, but significant similarities have been described in the mechanism of injury and fracture patterns. Nevertheless, three of five reported cases with combined medial malleolus fractures were initially misdiagnosed. PMID:27141047

  3. Reconstructive osteotomy for a malunited medial Hoffa fracture - A feasible salvage option.

    PubMed

    Sasidharan, Binu; Shetty, Surendra; Philip, Satheesh; Shetty, Shivanand

    2016-09-01

    A 35-year-old male presented with pain and restriction of movements of right knee of 9 months duration. He underwent open reduction and internal fixation for a coronal plane fracture of medial femoral condyle (Hoffa fracture) in another facility 9 months back. Radiological evaluation showed a malunited isolated medial Hoffa fracture. We did an intraarticular osteotomy as a salvage treatment and got a reasonable outcome. This case report analyses the difficulties in the management of this inherently unstable fracture pattern and the technique of intraarticular osteotomy. PMID:27222618

  4. Reconstruction of Traumatic Composite Tissue Defect of Medial Longitudinal Arch With Free Osteocutaneous Fibular Graft.

    PubMed

    Unal, Mehmet Bekir; Seker, Ali; Demiralp, Bahtiyar; Sahin, Mustafa; Cift, Hakan Turan; Oltulu, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    A 34-year-old male sustained a crush injury resulting in bone and soft tissue loss along the medial longitudinal arch of his left foot. Specifically, the injury resulted in loss of first metatarsal without injury to the medial cuneiform or proximal phalanx, fracture of the third metatarsal, and a 5-cm × 9-cm soft tissue defect overlying the dorsomedial aspect of the right foot. After debridement and daily wound care, the defect was subsequently reconstructed using a free osteocutaneous fibular graft. Approximately 6 months after reconstructive surgery, the patient returned to his job without pain, and his pedogram showed almost equal weightbearing distribution on both feet. PMID:25459091

  5. Angle at the Medial Border: The Spinovertebra Angle and Its Significance

    PubMed Central

    Oladipo, G. S.; Aigbogun, E. O.; Akani, G. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The evolution from quadrupedalism to bipedalism has adjusted the balance of the upper limb to extensive movement at the shoulder. The scapular angles provide the point of attachment and control to various muscles and have been associated with the different movements of the shoulder girdle and joint. This has made the morphometric and anthropometric study of scapula a subject of extensive investigation. Aim. In the present study, the angle at the medial border was measured in the South-Southern Nigerian population and an anatomical name was ascribed to the angle. Method. The study was conducted on 173 scapulae (75 right and 98 left) obtained from various Anatomy Department of South-Sothern Nigerian Universities. The angle at medial border was obtained by pinning the edge of the superior and inferior angles, the lined traced out, and the angle measured using a protractor. SPSS version 20 was used to analyse the data. t-test was used to determine mean angular difference in the sides. Result. The mean ± SD of the medial angle was observed to be 136.88 ± 7.70° (R = 138.13 ± 7.06° : L = 135.92 ± 8.05°). Statistical analysis using the Z-test for mean difference showed the medial angle was found to be higher in the right side of the scapula (mean difference of 2.214 ± 1.152°), but the observed difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The above findings have adjusted the scapula from three to four angles (lateral, superior, inferior, and medial) formed from four borders (lateral, superior, inferior, and superomedial and inferomedial). The medial angle because of its anatomical location was named “spinovertebral” angle, owing to its position at the scapulae spine, and located in medial proximity to the vertebra column. Conclusion. The medial angle (now referred to as the spinovertebral angle) of the right side of the scapula is wider than the left. The representation of the spinovertebral angle is very important, as the

  6. Angle at the Medial Border: The Spinovertebra Angle and Its Significance.

    PubMed

    Oladipo, G S; Aigbogun, E O; Akani, G L

    2015-01-01

    Background. The evolution from quadrupedalism to bipedalism has adjusted the balance of the upper limb to extensive movement at the shoulder. The scapular angles provide the point of attachment and control to various muscles and have been associated with the different movements of the shoulder girdle and joint. This has made the morphometric and anthropometric study of scapula a subject of extensive investigation. Aim. In the present study, the angle at the medial border was measured in the South-Southern Nigerian population and an anatomical name was ascribed to the angle. Method. The study was conducted on 173 scapulae (75 right and 98 left) obtained from various Anatomy Department of South-Sothern Nigerian Universities. The angle at medial border was obtained by pinning the edge of the superior and inferior angles, the lined traced out, and the angle measured using a protractor. SPSS version 20 was used to analyse the data. t-test was used to determine mean angular difference in the sides. Result. The mean ± SD of the medial angle was observed to be 136.88 ± 7.70° (R = 138.13 ± 7.06° : L = 135.92 ± 8.05°). Statistical analysis using the Z-test for mean difference showed the medial angle was found to be higher in the right side of the scapula (mean difference of 2.214 ± 1.152°), but the observed difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The above findings have adjusted the scapula from three to four angles (lateral, superior, inferior, and medial) formed from four borders (lateral, superior, inferior, and superomedial and inferomedial). The medial angle because of its anatomical location was named "spinovertebral" angle, owing to its position at the scapulae spine, and located in medial proximity to the vertebra column. Conclusion. The medial angle (now referred to as the spinovertebral angle) of the right side of the scapula is wider than the left. The representation of the spinovertebral angle is very important, as the directional

  7. Medial malleolus fracture of the ankle combined with rupture of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jike; Maruo Holledge, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old man fell off a 60-cm-high step, with his ankle in a twisted position, and sustained a closed fracture of the medial malleolus, with an ipsilateral complete Achilles tendon (TA) rupture. The TA rupture was initially missed but diagnosed by ultrasound examination, 2 weeks post-operatively. The ankle fracture was diagnosed from routine radiographs. Such a combination of injuries has been reported infrequently in the literature, but significant similarities have been described in the mechanism of injury and fracture patterns. Nevertheless, three of five reported cases with combined medial malleolus fractures were initially misdiagnosed. PMID:27141047

  8. Weak Measurements Destroy Too Much Quantum Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shao-xiong; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Chang-shui; Song, He-shan

    2016-01-01

    The quantum correlation under weak measurements is studied via skew information. For 2 × d-dimensional states, it can be given by a closed form which linearly depends on the quantum correlation [EPL. 107 (2014) 10007] determined by the strength of the weak measurement. It is found that the quantum correlation under weak measurements only captures partial quantumness of the state. In particular, the extraction of the residual quantumness by the latter measurements will inevitably destroy too much quantumness. To demonstration, the Werner state is given as an example.

  9. Weak side of strong topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbierski, Björn; Schneider, Martin; Brouwer, Piet W.

    2016-04-01

    Strong topological insulators may have nonzero weak indices. The nonzero weak indices allow for the existence of topologically protected helical states along line defects of the lattice. If the lattice admits line defects that connect opposite surfaces of a slab of such a "weak-and-strong" topological insulator, these states effectively connect the surface states at opposite surfaces. Depending on the phases accumulated along the dislocation lines, this connection results in a suppression of in-plane transport and the opening of a spectral gap or in an enhanced density of states and an increased conductivity.

  10. Structural features of sequential weak measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diósi, Lajos

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the abstract structure of sequential weak measurement (WM) of general observables. In all orders, the sequential WM correlations without postselection yield the corresponding correlations of the Wigner function, offering direct quantum tomography through the moments of the canonical variables. Correlations in spin-1/2 sequential weak measurements coincide with those in strong measurements, they are constrained kinematically, and they are equivalent with single measurements. In sequential WMs with postselection, an anomaly occurs, different from the weak value anomaly of single WMs. In particular, the spread of polarization σ ̂ as measured in double WMs of σ ̂ will diverge for certain orthogonal pre- and postselected states.

  11. A reduction in the knee adduction moment with medial thrust gait is associated with a medial shift in center of plantar pressure.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, Christopher; Wimmer, Markus A; Trombley, Robert M; Lundberg, Hannah J; Shakoor, Najia; Thorp, Laura E

    2016-07-01

    The knee adduction moment (KAM) is an established marker of compartmental load distribution across the tibiofemoral joint. Research suggests a link between the magnitude of the KAM and center of plantar pressure (COP) thus alterations in the two may be related. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the COP predictably shifts when the KAM is reduced through a gait adaptation. Twenty healthy adults underwent gait analysis walking with their normal gait pattern and with medial thrust gait, a gait adaptation known to significantly reduce the KAM. Simultaneous COP and 3-D kinetics were acquired to allow for a comparison of the change in COP to the change in the KAM. The COP was quantified by determining a customized medial-lateral pressure index (MLPI) which compares the COP tracing line during the first and second halves of stance to the longitudinal axis of the foot. Linear regressions assessing the association between the changes in KAM and MLPI indicated that 48.3% (p=0.001) of the variation in MLPI during the first half of stance can be explained by the KAM during the same period. A trend was observed between the association between the KAM and MLPI during the second half of stance (R(2)=0.16, p=0.080). Backwards elimination regression analysis was used to explore whether simultaneous consideration of the KAM and other potential confounding factors such as sagittal plane knee moments and speed explained variance in the MLPI during the first half of stance. Only the KAM exhibited explanatory power (β=0.695, p=0.001). During medial thrust gait, a reduction in the KAM was associated with a medial shift in the MLPI, and an increase in the KAM was associated with a lateral shift in the MLPI, especially in the first half of the stance phase. Together, these results demonstrate an inherent link between foot pressure and the KAM during medial thrust gait, and suggest that manipulating foot pressure may be a biomechanical mechanism for an intervention

  12. Reversing entanglement change by a weak measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Qingqing; Zubairy, M. Suhail; Al-Amri, M.; Davidovich, Luiz

    2010-11-15

    Entanglement of a system changes due to interactions with the environment. A typical type of interaction is amplitude damping. If we add a detector to monitor the environment and only select the no-damping outcome, this amplitude damping is modified into a weak measurement. Here we show that the entanglement change of a two-qubit state due to amplitude damping or weak measurement can be probabilistically reversed. For the amplitude-damping case, the entanglement partially recovers under most conditions. For the weak-measurement case, the recovery of the initial entangled state is exact. The reversal procedure involves another weak measurement, preceded and followed by bit flips applied to both qubits. We propose a linear optics scheme for the experimental demonstration of these procedures.

  13. Composite weld rod corrects individual filler weaknesses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimaldo, S.

    1967-01-01

    Composite filler wire welds together an assembly made from components of Rene 41 nickel base alloy. Using equal parts of Rene 41 and Hastelloy W weld wire in the filler reduces the cracking and weaknesses of the individual parent metals.

  14. Sodium in weak G-band giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Lambert, David L.

    1994-01-01

    Sodium abundances have been determined for eight weak G-band giants whose atmospheres are greatly enriched with products of the CN-cycling H-burning reactions. Systematic errors are minimized by comparing the weak G-band giants to a sample of similar but normal giants. If, further, Ca is selected as a reference element, model atmosphere-related errors should largely be removed. For the weak-G-band stars (Na/Ca) = 0.16 +/- 0.01, which is just possibly greater than the result (Na/Ca) = 0.10 /- 0.03 from the normal giants. This result demonstrates that the atmospheres of the weak G-band giants are not seriously contaminated with products of ON cycling.

  15. Electromagnetic and Weak transitions in light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    M. Viviani; L.E. Marcucci; A. Kievsky; S. Rosati; R. Schiavilla

    2002-09-01

    Recent advances in the study of the p -- d radiative and mu -- {sup 3}He weak capture processes by our group are presented and discussed. The trinucleon bound and scattering states have been obtained from variational calculations by expanding the corresponding wave functions in terms of correlated hyper-spherical harmonic functions. The electromagnetic and weak transition currents include one- and two-body operators. The accuracy achieved in these calculations allows for interesting comparisons with experimental data.

  16. Elastic scattering with weakly bound projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Figueira, J. M.; Abriola, D.; Arazi, A.; Capurro, O. A.; Marti, G. V.; Martinez Heinmann, D.; Pacheco, A. J.; Testoni, J. E.; Barbara, E. de; Fernandez Niello, J. O.; Padron, I.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.

    2007-02-12

    Possible effects of the break-up channel on the elastic scattering threshold anomaly has been investigated. We used the weakly bound 6,7Li nuclei, which is known to undergo break-up, as projectiles in order to study the elastic scattering on a 27Al target. In this contribution we present preliminary results of these experiments, which were analyzed in terms of the Optical Model and compared with other elastic scattering data using weakly bound nuclei as projectile.

  17. Some Topics in Weak and Electromagnetic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorken, James D.

    1982-01-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * LECTURE I QUANTUM-ELECTRODYNAMICS TESTS; TESTS OF Jμ Jμ STRUCTURE IN WEAK INTERACTIONS; HIGHER-ORDER WEAK INTERACTIONS * LECTURE II PHENOMENOLOGY OF DEEP-INELASTIC PROCESSES; NO FINAL-STATE HADRONS OBSERVED * LECTURE III LIGHT-CONE COMMUTATORS; MODELS OF THE STRUCTURE FUNCTIONS * LECTURE IV HADRON FINAL STATES IN DEEP-INELASTIC PROCESSES; GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS * LECTURE V INCLUSIVE PROCESSES AT VERY HIGH TRANSVERSE MOMENTUM * REFERENCES

  18. Looking for heavier weak bosons with DUMAND

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. W.; Stecker, F. W.

    1980-01-01

    One or more heavier weak bosons may coexist with the standard weak boson, a broad program may be laid out for a search for the heavier W's via change in the total cross section due to the additional propagator, a concomitant search, and a subsequent search for significant antimatter in the universe involving the same annihilation, but being independent of possible neutrino oscillations. The program is likely to require detectors sensitive to higher energies, such as acoustic detectors.

  19. Effects of repeated cocaine on medial prefrontal cortical GABAB receptor modulation of neurotransmission in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system.

    PubMed

    Jayaram, Prathiba; Steketee, Jeffery D

    2004-08-01

    Increased excitatory output from medial prefrontal cortex is an important component in the development of cocaine sensitization. Activation of GABAergic systems in the prefrontal cortex can decrease glutamatergic activity. A recent study suggested that sensitization might be associated with a decrease in GABAB receptor responsiveness in the medial prefrontal cortex. Therefore, the present study examined whether repeated exposure to cocaine-modified neurochemical changes in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system induced by infusion of baclofen into the medial prefrontal cortex. In vivo microdialysis studies were conducted to monitor dopamine, glutamate and GABA levels in the medial prefrontal cortex and glutamate levels in the ipsilateral nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area during the infusion of baclofen into medial prefrontal cortex. Baclofen minimally affected glutamate levels in the medial prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens or ventral tegmental area of control animals, but dose-dependently increased glutamate levels in each of these regions in animals sensitized to cocaine. This effect was not the result of changes in GABAB receptor-mediated modulation of dopamine or GABA in the medial prefrontal cortex. The data suggest that alterations in GABAB receptor modulation of medial prefrontal cortical excitatory output may play an important role in the development of sensitization to cocaine. PMID:15287889

  20. Clinical and surgical implications regarding morphometric variations of the medial wall of the orbit in relation to age and gender.

    PubMed

    Morales-Avalos, Rodolfo; Santos-Martínez, Arlette Gabriela; Ávalos-Fernández, Cesia Gisela; Mohamed-Noriega, Karim; Sánchez-Mejorada, Gabriela; Montemayor-Alatorre, Adolfo; Martínez-Fernández, David A; Espinosa-Uribe, Abraham G; Mohamed-Noriega, Jibran; Cuervo-Lozano, Edgar E; Mohamed-Hamsho, Jesús; Quiroga-García, Oscar; Lugo-Guillen, Roberto A; Guzmán-López, Santos; Elizondo-Omaña, Rodrigo E

    2016-09-01

    The ethmoidal foramens are located on the medial wall of the orbit and are key reference points for intraoperative orientation. Detailed knowledge of the anatomy, bony landmarks and morphometric characteristics of the medial wall of the orbit is essential for various surgical procedures. The aim of this study was to determine the morphometric variations in the medial wall of the orbit and establish significant variations regarding age and gender. A total of 110 orbits were analyzed and subdivided by age (over or under 40 years) and gender. The distances of the medial wall of the orbit between the anterior lacrimal crest, the ethmoidal foramen, the optic canal and the interforamina were determined. Safe surgical areas were sought. Statistical tests were used to determine the differences between groups. In men, there is a safe surgical area proximal to the anterior and posterior ethmoidal foramen. In women, this area is in the posterior third of the medial wall of the orbit between the posterior ethmoidal foramen and the optic canal. Regarding variation according to age, the results of this study suggested that the anteroposterior diameter of the medial wall increases with age. This study showed that the anteroposterior total length of the medial orbit wall is similar between genders of similar age, increases with age, and has significant variations in the distances between the various structures that make up the medial orbit wall with regard to gender and age. PMID:26683469

  1. Gender moderates the association between dorsal medial prefrontal cortex volume and depressive symptoms in a subclinical sample.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Joshua M; Depetro, Emily; Maxwell, Joshua; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Hajcak, Greg

    2015-08-30

    Major depressive disorder is associated with lower medial prefrontal cortex volumes. The role that gender might play in moderating this relationship and what particular medial prefrontal cortex subregion(s) might be implicated is unclear. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess dorsal, ventral, and anterior cingulate regions of the medial prefrontal cortex in a normative sample of male and female adults. The Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS) was used to measure these three variables. Voxel-based morphometry was used to test for correlations between medial prefrontal gray matter volume and depressive traits. The dorsal medial frontal cortex was correlated with greater levels of depression, but not anxiety and stress. Gender moderates this effect: in males greater levels of depression were associated with lower dorsal medial prefrontal volumes, but in females no relationship was observed. The results indicate that even within a non-clinical sample, male participants with higher levels of depressive traits tend to have lower levels of gray matter volume in the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex. Our finding is consistent with low dorsal medial prefrontal volume contributing to the development of depression in males. Future longitudinal work is needed to substantiate this possibility. PMID:26166620

  2. MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX LESIONS AND SPATIAL DELAYED ALTERNATION IN THE RAT: RECOVERY OR SPARING?

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Experiment 1, Long-Evans rat pups received medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) aspirations or sham surgery on Postnatal Day 10 (PND10) and were then trained on PND23 to perform one of two T-maze tasks: iscrete-trials delayed alternation (DA) or simple position discrimination (PD). ...

  3. Arthroscopic medial meniscus trimming or repair under nerve blocks: Which nerves should be blocked?

    PubMed Central

    Taha, AM; Abd-Elmaksoud, AM

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine the role of the sciatic and obturator nerve blocks (in addition to femoral block) in providing painless arthroscopic medial meniscus trimming/repair. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty patients with medial meniscus tear, who had been scheduled to knee arthroscopy, were planned to be included in this controlled prospective double-blind study. The patients were randomly allocated into three equal groups; FSO, FS, and FO. The femoral, sciatic, and obturator nerves were blocked in FSO groups. The femoral and sciatic nerves were blocked in FS group, while the femoral and obturator nerves were blocked in FO group. Intraoperative pain and its causative surgical maneuver were recorded. Results: All the patients (n = 7, 100%) in FO group had intraoperative pain. The research was terminated in this group but completed in FS and FSO groups (40 patients each). During valgus positioning of the knee for surgical management of the medial meniscus tear, the patients in FS group experienced pain more frequently than those in FSO group (P = 0.005). Conclusion: Adding a sciatic nerve block to the femoral nerve block is important for painless knee arthroscopy. Further adding of an obturator nerve block may be needed when a valgus knee position is required to manage the medial meniscus tear. PMID:27375382

  4. Surgical treatment of symptomatic discoid medial meniscus in childhood: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kalenderer, Onder; Türken, Mehmet Aykut; Agus, Haluk

    2012-07-01

    If the meniscus has a spherical shape and not a semilunary structure, it is called as discoid meniscus. This anomaly is generally seen in the lateral meniscus; however, it is rare in the medial meniscus. Although the discoid meniscus is usually asymptomatic in children and adolescents, it could present as a meniscal tear. An 11-year-old boy was admitted to our hospital with right knee pain and lack of extension of the knee joint. He was diagnosed as discoid medial meniscus. On physical examination, we observed tenderness at the knee joint line with an effusion of the knee and a restriction during the extension movement of the knee joint. McMurray test was positive. Conventional radiograms revealed widening of the medial joint line and cupping of the medial tibial plateau. Magnetic resonance imaging indicated a discoid meniscus image at sagittal slices. In this case, after the arthroscopic partial menisectomy, we obtained an excellent result at 2 years follow-up. PMID:21685803

  5. Disruption of the Perineuronal Net in the Hippocampus or Medial Prefrontal Cortex Impairs Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hylin, Michael J.; Orsi, Sara A.; Moore, Anthony N.; Dash, Pramod K.

    2013-01-01

    The perineuronal net (PNN) surrounds neurons in the central nervous system and is thought to regulate developmental plasticity. A few studies have shown an involvement of the PNN in hippocampal plasticity and memory storage in adult animals. In addition to the hippocampus, plasticity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been demonstrated to…

  6. Contributions of the Medial Temporal Lobe to Declarative Memory Retrieval: Manipulating the Amount of Contextual Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tendolkar, Indira; Arnold, Jennifer; Petersson, Karl Magnus; Weis, Susanne; Brockhaus-Dumke, Anke; van Eijndhoven, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Fernandez, Guillen

    2008-01-01

    We investigated how the hippocampus and its adjacent mediotemporal structures contribute to contextual and noncontextual declarative memory retrieval by manipulating the amount of contextual information across two levels of the same contextual dimension in a source memory task. A first analysis identified medial temporal lobe (MTL) substructures…

  7. Medial Temporal Lobe Activity during Source Retrieval Reflects Information Type, Not Memory Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diana, Rachel A.; Yonelinas, Andrew P.; Ranganath, Charan

    2010-01-01

    The medial temporal lobes (MTLs) are critical for episodic memory but the functions of MTL subregions are controversial. According to memory strength theory, MTL subregions collectively support declarative memory in a graded manner. In contrast, other theories assert that MTL subregions support functionally distinct processes. For instance, one…

  8. Hippocampus and Medial Prefrontal Cortex Contributions to Trace and Contextual Fear Memory Expression over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeman, Christopher L.; Bauer, Philip S.; Pierson, Jamie L.; Quinn, Jennifer J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous work has shown that damage to the dorsal hippocampus (DH) occurring at recent, but not remote, timepoints following acquisition produces a deficit in trace conditioned fear memory expression. The opposite pattern has been observed with lesions to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The present studies address: (1) whether these lesion…

  9. Stability of the Medial Olivocochlear Reflex as Measured by Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Srikanta K.; Abdala, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the repeatability of a fine-resolution, distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE)-based assay of the medial olivocochlear (MOC) reflex in normal-hearing adults. Method: Data were collected during 36 test sessions from 4 normal-hearing adults to assess short-term stability and 5 normal-hearing…

  10. Cognitive Functioning after Medial Frontal Lobe Damage Including the Anterior Cingulate Cortex: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Amee; Dewar, Bonnie-Kate; Critchley, Hugo; Gilbert, Sam J.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Cipolotti, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Two patients with medial frontal lobe damage involving the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) performed a range of cognitive tasks, including tests of executive function and anterior attention. Both patients lesions extended beyond the ACC, therefore caution needs to be exerted in ascribing observed deficits to the ACC alone. Patient performance was…

  11. Frontal lobe syndrome reassessed: comparison of patients with lateral or medial frontal brain damage.

    PubMed

    Paradiso, S; Chemerinski, E; Yazici, K M; Tartaro, A; Robinson, R G

    1999-11-01

    Examination of mood and behaviour changes after frontal damage may contribute to understanding the functional role of distinct prefrontal areas in depression and anxiety. Depression and anxiety disorders, symptoms, and behaviour were compared in eight patients with single lateral and eight patients with single medial frontal lesions matched for age, sex, race, education, socioeconomic status, side, and aetiology of lesion 2 weeks and 3 months after brain injury. DSM IV major depressive and generalised anxiety disorders were more frequent in patients with lateral compared with medial lesions at 2 weeks but not at 3 months. At 3 months, however, patients with lateral damage showed greater severity of depressive symptoms, and greater impairment in both activities of daily living and social functioning. At initial evaluation depressed mood and slowness were more frequent, whereas at 3 months slowness, lack of energy, and social unease were more frequent in the lateral than the medial group. Patients with lateral lesions showed greater reduction of emotion and motivation (apathy) during both examinations. Medial frontal injury may fail to produce emotional dysregulation or may inhibit experience of mood changes, anxiety, or apathy. Lateral prefrontal damage may disrupt mood regulation and drive while leaving intact the ability to experience (negative) emotions. PMID:10519877

  12. Distinct Roles for Medial Temporal Lobe Structures in Memory for Objects and Their Locations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buffalo, Elizabeth A.; Bellgowan, Patrick S. F.; Martin, Alex

    2006-01-01

    The ability to learn and retain novel information depends on a system of structures in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) including the hippocampus and the surrounding entorhinal, perirhinal, and parahippocampal cortices. Damage to these structures produces profound memory deficits; however, the unique contribution to memory of each of these…

  13. Performance-Related Activity in Medial Rostral Prefrontal Cortex (Area 10) during Low-Demand Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Sam J.; Simons, Jon S.; Frith, Christopher D.; Burgess, Paul W.

    2006-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have frequently observed relatively high activity in medial rostral prefrontal cortex (PFC) during rest or baseline conditions. Some accounts have attributed this high activity to the occurrence of unconstrained stimulus-independent and task-unrelated thought processes during baseline conditions. Here, the authors investigated…

  14. Medial Prefrontal Cortex Is Selectively Involved in Response Selection Using Visual Context in the Background

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Inah; Shin, Ji Yun

    2012-01-01

    The exact roles of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in conditional choice behavior are unknown and a visual contextual response selection task was used for examining the issue. Inactivation of the mPFC severely disrupted performance in the task. mPFC inactivations, however, did not disrupt the capability of perceptual discrimination for visual…

  15. Multiple routes to memory: distinct medial temporal lobe processes build item and source memories.

    PubMed

    Davachi, Lila; Mitchell, Jason P; Wagner, Anthony D

    2003-02-18

    A central function of memory is to permit an organism to distinguish between stimuli that have been previously encountered and those that are novel. Although the medial temporal lobe (which includes the hippocampus and surrounding perirhinal, parahippocampal, and entorhinal cortices) is known to be crucial for recognition memory, controversy remains regarding how the specific subregions within the medial temporal lobe contribute to recognition. We used event-related functional MRI to examine the relation between activation in distinct medial temporal lobe subregions during memory formation and the ability (i) to later recognize an item as previously encountered (item recognition) and (ii) to later recollect specific contextual details about the prior encounter (source recollection). Encoding activation in hippocampus and in posterior parahippocampal cortex predicted later source recollection, but was uncorrelated with item recognition. In contrast, encoding activation in perirhinal cortex predicted later item recognition, but not subsequent source recollection. These outcomes suggest that the subregions within the medial temporal lobe subserve distinct, but complementary, learning mechanisms. PMID:12578977

  16. The Human Medial Temporal Lobe Processes Online Representations of Complex Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barense, Morgan D.; Gaffan, David; Graham, Kim S.

    2007-01-01

    There has been considerable debate as to whether structures in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) support both memory and perception, in particular whether the perirhinal cortex may be involved in the perceptual discrimination of complex objects with a large number of overlapping features. Similar experiments testing the discrimination of blended…

  17. SF-1 in the ventral medial hypothalamic nucleus: A key regulator of homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ventral medial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) regulates food intake and body weight homeostasis. The nuclear receptor NR5A1 (steroidogenic factor 1; SF-1) is a transcription factor whose expression is highly restricted in the VMH and is required for the development of the nucleus. Neurons expressing...

  18. SPATIAL LEARNING DEFICITS ARE NOT SOLELY DUE TO CHOLINERGIC DEFICITS FOLLOWING MEDIAL SEPTAL LESIONS WITH COLCHICINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Colchicinc was infused bilaterally into the cerebrolateral ventricles (3.75 ug/side) or directly into the medial septum (5 ug) of adult, male Fischer-344 rats (n=48) and effects on behavior and cholinergic markers were determined. ats receiving intracerebroventricular (ICV) admin...

  19. Anterior Medial Temporal Lobe Activation during Encoding of Words: FMRI Methods to Optimize Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Michael W.; Haut, Marc W.; Lemieux, Susan K.; Moran, Maria T.; Leach, Sharon G.

    2006-01-01

    The existence of a rostrocaudal gradient of medial temporal lobe (MTL) activation during memory encoding has historically received support from positron emission tomography studies, but less so from functional MRI (FMRI) studies. More recently, FMRI studies have demonstrated that characteristics of the stimuli can affect the location of activation…

  20. Attention, Emotion, and Deactivation of Default Activity in Inferior Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geday, Jacob; Gjedde, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Attention deactivates the inferior medial prefrontal cortex (IMPC), but it is uncertain if emotions can attenuate this deactivation. To test the extent to which common emotions interfere with attention, we measured changes of a blood flow index of brain activity in key areas of the IMPC with positron emission tomography (PET) of labeled water…