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Sample records for mediate cardiovascular transplantation

  1. Monocytic suppressive cells mediate cardiovascular transplantation tolerance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Mercedes Rodriguez; Ledgerwood, Levi; Yang, Yu; Xu, Jiangnan; Lal, Girdhari; Burrell, Bryna; Ma, Ge; Hashimoto, Daigo; Li, Yansui; Boros, Peter; Grisotto, Marcos; van Rooijen, Nico; Matesanz, Rafael; Tacke, Frank; Ginhoux, Florent; Ding, Yaozhong; Chen, Shu-Hsia; Randolph, Gwendalyn; Merad, Miriam; Bromberg, Jonathan S.; Ochando, Jordi C.

    2010-01-01

    One of the main unresolved questions in solid organ transplantation is how to establish indefinite graft survival that is free from long-term treatment with immunosuppressive drugs and chronic rejection (i.e., the establishment of tolerance). The failure to achieve this goal may be related to the difficulty in identifying the phenotype and function of the cell subsets that participate in the induction of tolerance. To address this issue, we investigated the suppressive roles of recipient myeloid cells that may be manipulated to induce tolerance to transplanted hearts in mice. Using depleting mAbs, clodronate-loaded liposomes, and transgenic mice specific for depletion of CD11c+, CD11b+, or CD115+ cells, we identified a tolerogenic role for CD11b+CD115+Gr1+ monocytes during the induction of tolerance by costimulatory blockade with CD40L-specific mAb. Early after transplantation, Gr1+ monocytes migrated from the bone marrow into the transplanted organ, where they prevented the initiation of adaptive immune responses that lead to allograft rejection and participated in the development of Tregs. Our results suggest that mobilization of bone marrow CD11b+CD115+Gr1+ monocytes under sterile inflammatory conditions mediates the induction of indefinite allograft survival. We propose that manipulating the common bone marrow monocyte progenitor could be a useful clinical therapeutic approach for inducing transplantation tolerance. PMID:20551515

  2. Screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Palepu, Sneha; Prasad, G V Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Pre-kidney transplant cardiac screening has garnered particular attention from guideline committees as an approach to improving post-transplant success. Screening serves two major purposes: To more accurately inform transplant candidates of their risk for a cardiac event before and after the transplant, thereby informing decisions about proceeding with transplantation, and to guide pre-transplant management so that post-transplant success can be maximized. Transplant candidates on dialysis are more likely to be screened for coronary artery disease than those not being considered for transplantation. Thorough history and physical examination taking, resting electrocardiography and echocardiography, exercise stress testing, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, dobutamine stress echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography, cardiac biomarker measurement, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging all play contributory roles towards screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation. In this review, the importance of each of these screening procedures for both coronary artery disease and other forms of cardiac disease are discussed. PMID:26722655

  3. Screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Palepu, Sneha; Prasad, G V Ramesh

    2015-12-24

    Pre-kidney transplant cardiac screening has garnered particular attention from guideline committees as an approach to improving post-transplant success. Screening serves two major purposes: To more accurately inform transplant candidates of their risk for a cardiac event before and after the transplant, thereby informing decisions about proceeding with transplantation, and to guide pre-transplant management so that post-transplant success can be maximized. Transplant candidates on dialysis are more likely to be screened for coronary artery disease than those not being considered for transplantation. Thorough history and physical examination taking, resting electrocardiography and echocardiography, exercise stress testing, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, dobutamine stress echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography, cardiac biomarker measurement, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging all play contributory roles towards screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation. In this review, the importance of each of these screening procedures for both coronary artery disease and other forms of cardiac disease are discussed. PMID:26722655

  4. Cardiovascular disease in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, Emily P; Fellström, Bengt C; Holdaas, Hallvard; Jardine, Alan G

    2010-05-01

    Renal transplant recipients have a markedly increased risk of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with the general population, although considerably lower than that of patients receiving maintenance haemodialysis. CVD in transplant recipients is poorly characterised and differs from the nonrenal population, with a much higher proportion of fatal to nonfatal cardiac events. In addition to traditional ischaemic heart disease risk factors such as age, gender, diabetes and smoking, there are additional factors to consider in this population such as the importance of hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy and uraemic cardiomyopathy. There are factors specific to transplantation such immunosuppressive therapies and graft dysfunction which contribute to this altered risk profile. However, understanding and treatment is limited by the absence of large randomised intervention trials addressing risk factor modification, with the exception of the ALERT study. The approach to managing these patients should begin early and be multifactorial in nature. PMID:20586909

  5. Cardiovascular risk factors following renal transplant

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Jill; Smith, Alice C

    2015-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the gold-standard treatment for many patients with end-stage renal disease. Renal transplant recipients (RTRs) remain at an increased risk of fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular (CV) events compared to the general population, although rates are lower than those patients on maintenance haemodialysis. Death with a functioning graft is most commonly due to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and therefore this remains an important therapeutic target to prevent graft failure. Conventional CV risk factors such as diabetes, hypertension and renal dysfunction remain a major influence on CVD in RTRs. However it is now recognised that the morbidity and mortality from CVD are not entirely accounted for by these traditional risk-factors. Immunosuppression medications exert a deleterious effect on many of these well-recognised contributors to CVD and are known to exacerbate the probability of developing diabetes, graft dysfunction and hypertension which can all lead on to CVD. Non-traditional CV risk factors such as inflammation and anaemia have been strongly linked to increased CV events in RTRs and should be considered alongside those which are classified as conventional. This review summarises what is known about risk-factors for CVD in RTRs and how, through identification of those which are modifiable, outcomes can be improved. The overall CV risk in RTRs is likely to be multifactorial and a complex interaction between the multiple traditional and non-traditional factors; further studies are required to determine how these may be modified to enhance survival and quality of life in this unique population. PMID:26722646

  6. Preoperative cardiovascular investigations in liver transplant candidate: An update

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Lalit; Srivastava, Piyush; Pandey, Chandra Kant; Jha, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with end-stage liver disease (ESLD) undergoing liver transplantation. Identifying candidates at the highest risk of postoperative cardiovascular complications is the cornerstone for optimizing the outcome. Ischaemic heart disease contributes to major portion of cardiovascular complications and therefore warrants evaluation in the preoperative period. Patients of ESLD usually demonstrate increased cardiac output, compromised ventricular response to stress, low systemic vascular resistance and occasionally bradycardia. Despite various recommendations for preoperative evaluation of cardiovascular disease in liver transplant candidates, a considerable controversy on screening methodology persists. This review critically focuses on the rapidly expanding body of evidence for diagnosis and risk stratification of cardiovascular disorder in liver transplant candidates. PMID:26962249

  7. Metabolic and cardiovascular complications in the liver transplant recipient

    PubMed Central

    Luca, Laura De; Westbrook, Rachel; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is an established risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease that affects 20-30% of the adult population in the western world, correlating with increased incidence of cardiovascular disease. Survival following liver transplantation (LT) has been steadily improving over the last 2 decades, with graft loss becoming a relatively rare cause of morbidity and mortality post LT. The improvement in short-term survival following LT has resulted in an increased incidence of metabolic and cardiovascular complications, which affect the mid- and long term survival. Patients following LT typically gain weight and might develop diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia as a consequence of their immunosuppressive therapy and their lifestyle. In this paper we review the prevalence of metabolic and cardiovascular complications following LT, their impact on post-transplant morbidity and mortality and their optimal management. PMID:25830307

  8. Role of cardiovascular intervention as a bridge to liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Raval, Zankhana; Harinstein, Matthew E; Flaherty, James D

    2014-08-21

    End stage liver disease (ESLD) is associated with many specific derangements in cardiovascular physiology, which influence perioperative outcomes and may profoundly influence diagnostic and management strategies in the preoperative period. This review focuses on evidence-based diagnosis and management of coronary, hemodynamic and pulmonary vascular disease in this population with an emphasis on specific strategies that may provide a bridge to transplantation. Specifically, we address the underlying prevalence of cardiovascular disease states in the ESLD population, and relevant diagnostic criteria thereof. We highlight traditional and non-traditional predictors of cardiovascular outcomes following liver transplant, as well as data to guide risk-factor based diagnostic strategies. We go on to discuss the alterations in cardiovascular physiology which influence positive- and negative-predictive values of standard noninvasive testing modalities in the ESLD population, and review the data regarding the safety and efficacy of invasive testing in the face of ESLD and its co-morbidities. Finally, based upon the totality of available data, we outline an evidence-based approach for the management of ischemia, heart failure and pulmonary vascular disease in this population. It is our hope that such evidence-driven strategies can be employed to more safely bridge appropriate candidates to liver transplant, and to improve their cardiovascular health and outcomes in the peri-operative period. PMID:25152569

  9. Antibody-Mediated Lung Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Hachem, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection after lung transplantation remains enigmatic. However, emerging evidence over the past several years suggests that humoral immunity plays an important role in allograft rejection. Indeed, the development of donor-specific antibodies after transplantation has been identified as an independent risk factor for acute cellular rejection and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Furthermore, cases of acute antibody-mediated rejection resulting in severe allograft dysfunction have been reported, and these demonstrate that antibodies can directly injure the allograft. However, the incidence and toll of antibody-mediated rejection are unknown because there is no widely accepted definition and some cases may be unrecognized. Clearly, humoral immunity has become an important area for research and clinical investigation. PMID:23002428

  10. Cardiovascular Risk Assessment and Management in Prerenal Transplantation Candidates.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Eric M; Hall, Amanda K; Hess, Jordan; Abraham, Jo; Smith, Brigham; Hopkins, Paul N; Shihab, Fuad; Welt, Frederick; Owan, Theophilus; Fang, James C

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) assessment in prerenal transplant patients varies by center. Current guidelines recommend stress testing for candidates if ≥ 3 CV risk factors exist. We evaluated the CV assessment and management in 685 patients referred for kidney transplant over a 7-year period. All patients had CV risk factors, and the most common cause of end-stage renal disease was diabetes. Thirty-three percent (n = 229) underwent coronary angiography. The sensitivity of stress testing to detect obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) was poor (0.26). Patients who had no CAD, nonobstructive CAD, or CAD with intervention had significantly higher event-free survival compared with patients with obstructive CAD without intervention. There were no adverse clinical events (death, myocardial infarction, stroke, revascularization, and graft failure) within 30 days post-transplant in patients who had preoperative angiography (n = 77). Of the transplanted patients who did not have an angiogram (n = 289), there were 8 clinical events (6 myocardial infarctions) in the first 30 days. In conclusion, our results indicate that stress testing and usual risk factors were poor predictors of obstructive CAD and that revascularization may prove beneficial in these patients. PMID:26552506

  11. Aspirin resistance as cardiovascular risk after kidney transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandor, Barbara; Varga, Adam; Rabai, Miklos; Toth, Andras; Papp, Judit; Toth, Kalman; Szakaly, Peter

    2014-05-01

    International surveys have shown that the leading cause of death after kidney transplantation has cardiovascular origin with a prevalence of 35-40%. As a preventive strategy these patients receive aspirin (ASA) therapy, even though their rate of aspirin resistance is still unknown. In our study, platelet aggregation measurements were performed between 2009 and 2012 investigating the laboratory effect of low-dose aspirin (100 mg) treatment using a CARAT TX4 optical aggregometer. ASA therapy was considered clinically effective in case of low ( i.e., below 40%) epinephrine-induced (10 μM) platelet aggregation index. Rate of aspirin resistance, morbidity and mortality data of kidney transplanted patients (n = 255, mean age: 49 ± 12 years) were compared to a patient population with cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases (n = 346, mean age: 52.6 ± 11 years). Rate of aspirin resistance was significantly higher in the renal transplantation group (RT) compared to the positive control group (PC) (35.9% vs. 25.6%, p < 0.002). Morbidity analysis demonstrated significantly higher incidence of myocardial infarction, hypertension and diabetes mellitus in the RT group (p < 0.05). The subgroup analysis revealed significantly higher incidence of infarction and stroke in the ASA resistant RT group compared to the RT patients without ASA resistance (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the incidence of myocardial infarction and hypertension was significantly higher in the non-resistant RT group than in the group of PC patients without ASA resistance (p < 0.05). These results may suggest that the elevated rate of aspirin resistance contributes to the high cardiovascular mortality after kidney transplantation.

  12. Immune-Mediated Vascular Injury and Dysfunction in Transplant Arteriosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    von Rossum, Anna; Laher, Ismail; Choy, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation is the only treatment for end-stage organ failure but this life-saving procedure is limited by immune-mediated rejection of most grafts. Blood vessels within transplanted organs are targeted by the immune system and the resultant vascular damage is a main contributor to acute and chronic graft failure. The vasculature is a unique tissue with specific immunological properties. This review discusses the interactions of the immune system with blood vessels in transplanted organs and how these interactions lead to the development of transplant arteriosclerosis, a leading cause of heart transplant failure. PMID:25628623

  13. Anoikis in the cardiovascular system: known and unknown extracellular mediators.

    PubMed

    Michel, Jean-Baptiste

    2003-12-01

    Anoïkis is defined as programmed cell death induced by the loss of cell/matrix interactions. Adhesion to structural glycoproteins of the extracellular matrix is necessary for survival of the differentiated adherent cells in the cardiovascular system, including endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, and cardiac myocytes. Adhesion is also a key factor for the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. In particular, fibronectin is considered a factor of survival and differentiation for many adherent cells. Adhesion generates cell tensional integrity (tensegrity) and repression of apoptotic signals, whereas detachment has the opposite effect. Anoïkis plays a physiological role by regulating cell homeostasis in tissues. However, anoïkis can also be involved in pathological processes, as illustrated by the resistance to anoïkis in cancer and its enhancement in degenerative tissue remodeling. Extracellular mediators of anoïkis include matrix retraction, leading to loss of tensegrity in fibroblasts, pharmacological disengagement of integrins by RGD-like peptides and fragments of fibronectin, and focal adhesion disassembly by fragments of thrombospondin, plasminogen activator-1, and high-molecular-weight kininogen. In addition to binding of the RGD peptide by integrins, the engagement of the heparin binding sites of adhesive glycoproteins with glycosaminoglycans on the cell surface is also involved in the prevention of cell detachment-induced apoptosis. Proteases able to degrade adhesive glycoproteins, such as fibronectin, induce anoïkis of vascular adherent cells. Active proteases can either be secreted directly by inflammatory cells, as elastase and cathepsin G by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, chymase and tryptase by mast cells, and granzymes by lymphocytes, or generated from circulating zymogens by activation in close contact with the cells. This is the case for the pericellular conversion of plasminogen to plasmin, which degrades fibronectin and

  14. p-Cresol and Cardiovascular Risk in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Ligabue, G; Damiano, F; Cuoghi, A; De Biasi, S; Bellei, E; Granito, M; Aldo, T; Cossarizza, A; Cappelli, G

    2015-09-01

    p-Cresol Sulphate (pCS) is a uremic toxin that originates exclusively from dietary sources and has a high plasma level related to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of our study was to evaluate the plasma levels of pCS in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) related to estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), traditional risk factors, cardiovascular clinical events and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), bone marrow-derived cells for the vascular repair system. We considered 51 KTRs and 25 healthy blood donors (HBDs). pCs levels were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with mass spectrometry with an electrospray ionization (ESI) (LC/ESI-MS/MS) on a triple-quadrupole; EPCs were analyzed using flow cytometric analysis. eGFR was 52.61 ± 19.9 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in KTRs versus 94 ± 21 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in HBDs. We did not find differences in pCS levels between KTRs and HBDs. Levels of pCS were inversely related with eGFR in KTRs and pCS levels were significantly lower in KTRs with eGFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2) versus eGFR >30 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Furthermore, there was a difference in pCS levels between eGFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2) of KTRs compared with HBDs. Levels of pCS were almost significantly influenced by the presence of a previous vascular event and were inversely related with mature EPCs. These findings suggest that KTRs should not have higher CVD risk than HBDs and their physiological vascular repair system appears to be intact. In KTRs the reduction of eGFR also increased pCS levels and reduced EPCs numbers and angiogenesis capacity. In summary, pCS acts as an emerging marker of a uremic state, helping assess the global vascular competence in KTRs. PMID:26361658

  15. The Complement System and Antibody-Mediated Transplant Rejection.

    PubMed

    Stites, Erik; Le Quintrec, Moglie; Thurman, Joshua M

    2015-12-15

    Complement activation is an important cause of tissue injury in patients with Ab-mediated rejection (AMR) of transplanted organs. Complement activation triggers a strong inflammatory response, and it also generates tissue-bound and soluble fragments that are clinically useful markers of inflammation. The detection of complement proteins deposited within transplanted tissues has become an indispensible biomarker of AMR, and several assays have recently been developed to measure complement activation by Abs reactive to specific donor HLA expressed within the transplant. Complement inhibitors have entered clinical use and have shown efficacy for the treatment of AMR. New methods of detecting complement activation within transplanted organs will improve our ability to diagnose and monitor AMR, and they will also help guide the use of complement inhibitory drugs. PMID:26637661

  16. Immune-Mediated Complications after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuoyan; Rubinstein, Samuel M; Thota, Ramya; Savani, Malvi; Brissot, Eolia; Shaw, Bronwen E; Majhail, Navneet S; Mohty, Mohamad; Savani, Bipin N

    2016-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has an integral role in the treatment of malignant and nonmalignant diseases. Long-term complications after HSCT have been well established and include graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), conditioning regimen-related toxicities, disease relapse, and infections. Immune-mediated phenomena are increasingly described after HSCT with clinically significant sequelae. Diagnosis is challenging because of features that overlap with other commonly reported post-transplantation complications. Patients who experience immune-mediated disease after HSCT tend to have poor outcomes. Early recognition of immune-mediated complications is imperative to reduce preventable morbidity and mortality. This review looks at the currently available literature on pathogenesis, incidence, risk factors, treatment, and outcomes of immune-mediated disease (other than GVHD) after HSCT. PMID:27095688

  17. Divergence of mechanistic pathways mediating cardiovascular aging and developmental programming of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Allison, Beth J; Kaandorp, Joepe J; Kane, Andrew D; Camm, Emily J; Lusby, Ciara; Cross, Christine M; Nevin-Dolan, Rhianon; Thakor, Avnesh S; Derks, Jan B; Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Ozanne, Susan E; Giussani, Dino A

    2016-05-01

    Aging and developmental programming are both associated with oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, suggesting common mechanistic origins. However, their interrelationship has been little explored. In a rodent model of programmed cardiovascular dysfunction we determined endothelial function and vascular telomere length in young (4 mo) and aged (15 mo) adult offspring of normoxic or hypoxic pregnancy with or without maternal antioxidant treatment. We show loss of endothelial function [maximal arterial relaxation to acetylcholine (71 ± 3 vs. 55 ± 3%) and increased vascular short telomere abundance (4.2-1.3 kb) 43.0 ± 1.5 vs. 55.1 ± 3.8%) in aged vs. young offspring of normoxic pregnancy (P < 0.05). Hypoxic pregnancy in young offspring accelerated endothelial dysfunction (maximal arterial relaxation to acetylcholine: 42 ± 1%, P < 0.05) but this was dissociated from increased vascular short telomere length abundance. Maternal allopurinol rescued maximal arterial relaxation to acetylcholine in aged offspring of normoxic or hypoxic pregnancy but not in young offspring of hypoxic pregnancy. Aged offspring of hypoxic allopurinol pregnancy compared with aged offspring of untreated hypoxic pregnancy had lower levels of short telomeres (vascular short telomere length abundance 35.1 ± 2.5 vs. 48.2 ± 2.6%) and of plasma proinflammatory chemokine (24.6 ± 2.8 vs. 36.8 ± 5.5 pg/ml, P < 0.05). These data provide evidence for divergence of mechanistic pathways mediating cardiovascular aging and developmental programming of cardiovascular disease, and aging being decelerated by antioxidants even prior to birth.-Allison, B. J., Kaandorp, J. J., Kane, A. D., Camm, E. J., Lusby, C., Cross, C. M., Nevin-Dolan, R., Thakor, A. S., Derks, J. B., Tarry-Adkins, J. L., Ozanne, S. E., Giussani, D. A. Divergence of mechanistic pathways mediating cardiovascular aging and developmental programming of cardiovascular disease. PMID:26932929

  18. Ultrasound-mediated drug delivery for cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Jonathan T; Haworth, Kevin J; Pyne-Geithman, Gail; Holland, Christy K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound (US) has been developed as both a valuable diagnostic tool and a potent promoter of beneficial tissue bioeffects for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. These effects can be mediated by mechanical oscillations of circulating microbubbles, or US contrast agents, which may also encapsulate and shield a therapeutic agent in the bloodstream. Oscillating microbubbles can create stresses directly on nearby tissue or induce fluid effects that effect drug penetration into vascular tissue, lyse thrombi or direct drugs to optimal locations for delivery. Areas covered The present review summarizes investigations that have provided evidence for US-mediated drug delivery as a potent method to deliver therapeutics to diseased tissue for cardiovascular treatment. In particular, the focus will be on investigations of specific aspects relating to US-mediated drug delivery, such as delivery vehicles, drug transport routes, biochemical mechanisms and molecular targeting strategies. Expert opinion These investigations have spurred continued research into alternative therapeutic applications, such as bioactive gas delivery and new US technologies. Successful implementation of US-mediated drug delivery has the potential to change the way many drugs are administered systemically, resulting in more effective and economical therapeutics, and less-invasive treatments. PMID:23448121

  19. Aspirin and lipid mediators in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Schrör, Karsten; Rauch, Bernhard H

    2015-09-01

    Aspirin is an unique compound because it bears two active moieties within one and the same molecule: a reactive acetyl group and the salicylate metabolite. Salicylate has some effects similar to aspirin, however only at higher concentrations, usually in the millimolar range, which are not obtained at conventional antiplatelet aspirin doses of 100-300 mg/day. Pharmacological actions of aspirin in the cardiovascular system at these doses are largely if not entirely due to target structure acetylation. Several classes of lipid mediators become affected: Best known is the cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) in platelets with subsequent inhibition of thromboxane and, possibly, thrombin formation. By this action, aspirin also inhibits paracrine thromboxane functions on other lipid mediators, such as the platelet storage product sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an inflammatory mediator. Acetylation of COX-2 allows for generation of 15-(R)HETE and subsequent formation of "aspirin-triggered lipoxin" (ATL) by interaction with white cell lipoxygenases. In the cardiovascular system, aspirin also acetylates eNOS with subsequent upregulation of NO formation and enhanced expression of the antioxidans heme-oxygenase-1. This action is possibly also COX-2/ATL mediated. Many more acetylation targets have been identified in live cells by quantitative acid-cleavable activity-based protein profiling and might result in discovery of even more aspirin targets in the near future. PMID:26201059

  20. Kinase-SUMO networks in diabetes-mediated cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eugene; Abe, Jun-Ichi

    2016-05-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common comorbidity in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Epidemiological studies including the Framingham, UKPDS, and MRFIT studies have shown diabetes to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease associated with increased incidence of morbidity and mortality. However, major randomized controlled clinical trials including ADVANCE, VAD, and ACCORD have failed to demonstrate a significant reduction in CVD complications from longstanding DM with strict glycemic control. This suggests that despite the strong clinical correlation between DM and CVD, the precise mechanisms of DM-mediated CVD pathogenesis remain unclear. Signal transduction investigations have shed some light on this question with numerous studies demonstrating the role of kinase pathways in facilitating DM and CVD pathology. Abnormalities in endothelial, vascular smooth muscle, and myocardial function from the pathological insults of hyperglycemia and oxidative stress in diabetes are thought to accelerate the development of cardiovascular disease. Extensive interplay between kinase pathways that regulate the complex pathology of DM-mediated CVD is heavily regulated by a number of post-translational modifications (PTMs). In this review, we focus on the role of a dynamic PTM known as SUMOylation and its role in regulating these kinase networks to provide a mechanistic link between DM and CVD. PMID:27085771

  1. Prevention trumps treatment of antibody-mediated transplant rejection

    PubMed Central

    Knechtle, Stuart J.; Kwun, Jean; Iwakoshi, Neal

    2010-01-01

    Belying the spectacular success of solid organ transplantation and improvements in immunosuppressive therapy is the reality that long-term graft survival rates remain relatively unchanged, in large part due to chronic and insidious alloantibody-mediated graft injury. Half of heart transplant recipients develop chronic rejection within 10 years — a daunting statistic, particularly for young patients expecting to achieve longevity by enduring the rigors of a transplant. The current immunosuppressive pharmacopeia is relatively ineffective in preventing late alloantibody-associated chronic rejection. In this issue of the JCI, Kelishadi et al. report that preemptive deletion of B cells prior to heart transplantation in cynomolgus monkeys, in addition to conventional posttransplant immunosuppressive therapy with cyclosporine, markedly attenuated not only acute graft rejection but also alloantibody elaboration and chronic graft rejection. The success of this preemptive strike implies a central role for B cells in graft rejection, and this approach may help to delay or prevent chronic rejection after solid organ transplantation. PMID:20335653

  2. Role of Coronary Angiography in the Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk in Kidney Transplant Candidates.

    PubMed

    Mann, David M; Fernandez, Sonalis; Mondal, Zahidul; Laskow, David; Osband, Adena; Debroy, Meelie; Lebowitz, Jonathan; Coromilas, James; Vagaonescu, Tudor; Moreyra, Abel; Melita, Elizabeth A; Mann, Richard A

    2016-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among those with renal insufficiency, those requiring dialysis, and in recipients of kidney transplants reflecting the greatly increased cardiovascular burden that these patients carry. The best method by which to assess cardiovascular risk in such patients is not well established. In the present study, 1,225 patients seeking a kidney transplant, over a 30-month period, underwent cardiovascular evaluation. Two hundred twenty-five patients, who met selected criteria, underwent coronary angiography that revealed significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in 47%. Those found to have significant disease underwent revascularization. Among the patients found to have significant CAD, 74% had undergone a nuclear stress test before angiography and 65% of these stress tests were negative for ischemia. The positive predictive value of a nuclear stress test in this patient population was 0.43 and the negative predictive value was 0.47. During a 30-month period, 28 patients who underwent coronary angiography received an allograft. None of these patients died, experienced a myocardial infarction, or lost their allograft. The annual mortality rate of those who remained on the waiting list was well below the national average. In conclusion, our results indicate that, in renal failure patients, noninvasive testing fails to detect the majority of significant CAD, that selected criteria may identify patients with a high likelihood of CAD, and that revascularization reduces mortality both for those on the waiting list and for those who receive an allograft. PMID:27392506

  3. Sphingolipid mediators in cardiovascular cell biology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Levade, T; Augé, N; Veldman, R J; Cuvillier, O; Nègre-Salvayre, A; Salvayre, R

    2001-11-23

    Sphingolipids have emerged as a new class of lipid mediators. In response to various extracellular stimuli, sphingolipid turnover can be stimulated in vascular cells and cardiac myocytes. Subsequent generation of sphingolipid molecules such as ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate, is followed by regulation of ion fluxes and activation of various signaling pathways leading to smooth muscle cell proliferation, endothelial cell differentiation or apoptotic cell death, cell contraction, retraction, or migration. The importance of sphingolipids in cardiovascular signaling is illustrated by recent observations implicating them in physiological processes such as vasculogenesis as well as in frequent pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis and its complications. PMID:11717151

  4. Impact of vitamin D on proteinuria, insulin resistance, and cardiovascular parameters in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Lee, D R; Kong, J M; Cho, K I; Chan, L

    2011-12-01

    Low vitamin D levels prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease have been reported to be associated with proteinuria, insulin resistance, and cardiovascular disease. Kidney transplant recipients are also susceptible to low vitamin D levels but their clinical significance is uncertain. This study investigated the prevalence and association of vitamin D insufficiency with proteinuria, insulin resistance, and cardiovascular parameters among 95 living donor kidney transplant recipients. Levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] were stratified into an insufficient group [25(OH)D≤30 ng/mL; n=19] versus a normal group [25(OH)D>30 ng/mL; n=76]. Proteinuria (urinary protein-creatinine [P/C]≥0.2 mg/mg), insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]) and cardiovascular parameters were compared between groups. Twenty percent of subjects showed vitamin D insufficiency. Proteinuria was higher among the vitamin D insufficient than the normal group (47.4% vs 18.7%; P=.02). 25(OH)D levels inversely correlated with urinary P/C ratio and intact parathyroid hormone (I-PTH) levels (r=-.24, P=.02 and r=-.23, P=.02, respectively). No correlations were observed between 25(OH)D levels and HOMA-IR scores or cardiovascular parameters. On univariate analysis, proteinuria and i-PTH levels were independent predictors of vitamin D insufficiency (P<.01 and P=.03, respectively). Multivariate analysis demonstrated proteinuria to be a significant predictor of vitamin D insufficiency (odds ratio=4.526; P=.03). In conclusion, vitamin D insufficiency was common and significantly associated with proteinuria among kidney transplant recipients. Additional studies are needed to clarify the causal relationship of vitamin D insufficiency with proteinuria and to determine the role of vitamin D supplementation to attenuate the development of proteinuria. PMID:22172835

  5. Metabolic syndrome definitions and components in predicting major adverse cardiovascular events after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Prasad, G V Ramesh; Huang, Michael; Silver, Samuel A; Al-Lawati, Ali I; Rapi, Lindita; Nash, Michelle M; Zaltzman, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) associates with cardiovascular risk post-kidney transplantation, but its ambiguity impairs understanding of its diagnostic utility relative to components. We compared five MetS definitions and the predictive value of constituent components of significant definitions for major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in a cohort of 1182 kidney transplant recipients. MetS definitions were adjusted for noncomponent traditional Framingham risk factors and relevant transplant-related variables. Kaplan-Meier, logistic regression, and Cox proportional hazards analysis were utilized. There were 143 MACE over 7447 patient-years of follow-up. Only the World Health Organization (WHO) 1998 definition predicted MACE (25.3 vs 15.5 events/1000 patient-years, P = 0.019). Time-to-MACE was 5.5 ± 3.5 years with MetS and 6.8 ± 3.9 years without MetS (P < 0.0001). MetS was independent of pertinent MACE risk factors except age and previous cardiac disease. Among MetS components, dysglycemia provided greatest hazard ratio (HR) for MACE (1.814 [95% confidence interval 1.26-2.60]), increased successively by microalbuminuria (HR 1.946 [1.37-2.75]), dyslipidemia (3.284 [1.72-6.26]), hypertension (4.127 [2.16-7.86]), and central obesity (4.282 [2.09-8.76]). MetS did not affect graft survival. In summary, although the WHO 1998 definition provides greatest predictive value for post-transplant MACE, most of this is conferred by dysglycemia and is overshadowed by age and previous cardiac disease. PMID:25207680

  6. Sympathetic dysfunction mediating cardiovascular regulation in alcoholic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chida, K; Takasu, T; Mori, N; Tokunaga, K; Komatsu, K; Kawamura, H

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated autonomic function in alcoholic neuropathy by non-invasive hemodynamic studies using servo-plethysmo-manometry and laser Doppler flowmetry. In 16 alcoholics compared with 17 age-matched healthy controls, the extent of AP responses to phase IV of the Valsalva maneuver, cold pressor test and isometric exercise decreased significantly, indicating sympathetic hypofunction. Five patients had paradoxical depressor response to cold pressor test, which was reproducible by submersion of the hand in warm water. The data suggest involvement of the higher autonomic center. Reflex bradycardia in phase IV of the Valsalva maneuver and the variation coefficient of R-R intervals in the electrocardiogram were lower, indicating parasympathetic hypofunction. Cutaneous blood flow response in the foot upon local warming and submersion of the hand in cold water was significantly impaired, but that in the contralateral hand was not. Abnormalities in the autonomic function tests may result from a toxic effect of ethanol on the peripheral and central autonomic nervous system and the cardiovascular system. The results indicate not only parasympathetic (vagal) but sympathetic dysfunction mediating cardiovascular regulation in patients with alcoholic neuropathy. PMID:7926889

  7. Impact of Cardiovascular Risk Factors on Graft Outcome Disparities in Black Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Taber, David J; Hunt, Kelly J; Fominaya, Cory E; Payne, Elizabeth H; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Srinivas, Titte R; Baliga, Prabhakar K; Egede, Leonard E

    2016-09-01

    Although outcome inequalities for non-Hispanic black (NHB) kidney transplant recipients are well documented, there is paucity in data assessing the impact of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors on this disparity in kidney transplantation. This was a longitudinal study of a national cohort of veteran kidney recipients transplanted between January 2001 and December 2007. Data included baseline characteristics acquired through the United States Renal Data System linked to detailed clinical follow-up information acquired through the Veterans Affairs electronic health records. Analyses were conducted using sequential multivariable modeling (Cox regression), incorporating blocks of variables into iterative nested models; 3139 patients were included (2095 non-Hispanic whites [66.7%] and 1044 NHBs [33.3%]). NHBs had a higher prevalence of hypertension (100% versus 99%; P<0.01) and post-transplant diabetes mellitus (59% versus 53%; P<0.01) with reduced control of hypertension (blood pressure <140/90 60% versus 69%; P<0.01), diabetes mellitus (A1c <7%, 35% versus 47%; P<0.01), and low-density lipoprotein (<100 mg/dL, 55% versus 61%; P<0.01). Adherence to medications used to manage CVD risk was significantly lower in NHBs. In the fully adjusted models, the independent risk of graft loss in NHBs was substantially reduced (unadjusted hazard ratio, 2.00 versus adjusted hazard ratio, 1.49). CVD risk factors and control reduced the influence of NHB race by 9% to 18%. Similar trends were noted for mortality, and estimates were robust across in sensitivity analyses. These results demonstrate that NHB kidney transplant recipients have significantly higher rates of CVD risk factors and reduced CVD risk control. These issues are likely partly related to medication nonadherence and meaningfully contribute to racial disparities for graft outcomes. PMID:27402921

  8. Pressure-Mediated Oligonucleotide Transfection of Rat and Human Cardiovascular Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Michael J.; Gibbons, Gary H.; Hutchinson, Howard; Poston, Robert S.; Hoyt, E. Grant; Robbins, Robert C.; Dzau, Victor J.

    1999-05-01

    The application of gene therapy to human disease is currently restricted by the relatively low efficiency and potential hazards of methods of oligonucleotide or gene delivery. Antisense or transcription factor decoy oligonucleotides have been shown to be effective at altering gene expression in cell culture expreriments, but their in vivo application is limited by the efficiency of cellular delivery, the intracellular stability of the compounds, and their duration of activity. We report herein the development of a highly efficient method for naked oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) transfection into cardiovascular tissues by using controlled, nondistending pressure without the use of viral vectors, lipid formulations, or exposure to other adjunctive, potentially hazardous substances. In this study, we have documented the ability of ex vivo, pressure-mediated transfection to achieve nuclear localization of fluorescent (FITC)-labeled ODN in approximately 90% and 50% of cells in intact human saphenous vein and rat myocardium, respectively. We have further documented that pressure-mediated delivery of antisense ODN can functionally inhibited target gene expression in both of these tissues in a sequence-specific manner at the mRNA and protein levels. This oligonucleotide transfection system may represent a safe means of achieving the intraoperative genetic engineering of failure-resistant human bypass grafts and may provide an avenue for the genetic manipulation of cardiac allograft rejection, allograft vasculopathy, or other transplant diseases.

  9. Obesity is associated with worsening cardiovascular risk factor profiles and proteinuria progression in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Kirsten A; Campbell, Scott B; Hawley, Carmel M; Nicol, David L; Johnson, David W; Isbel, Nicole M

    2005-11-01

    Obesity is associated with adverse cardiovascular (CV) parameters and may be involved in the pathogenesis of allograft dysfunction in renal transplant recipients (RTR). We sought the spectrum of body mass index (BMI) and the relationships between BMI, CV parameters and allograft function in prevalent RTR. Data were collected at baseline and 2 years on 90 RTR (mean age 51 years, 53% male, median transplant duration 7 years), categorized by BMI (normal, BMI < or = 24.9 kg/m2; pre-obese, BMI 25-29.9 kg/m2; obese, BMI > or = 30 kg/m2). Proteinuria and glomerular filtration rate (eGFR(MDRD)) were determined. Nine percent RTR were obese pre-transplantation compared to 30% at baseline (p < 0.001) and follow-up (25 +/- 2 months). As BMI increased, prevalence of metabolic syndrome and central obesity increased (12 vs 48 vs 85%, p < 0.001 and 3 vs 42 vs 96%, p < 0.001, respectively). Systolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose and lipid parameters changed significantly with BMI category and over time. Proteinuria progression occurred in 65% obese RTR (23 (13-59 g/mol creatinine) to 59 (25-120 g/mol creatinine)). BMI was independently associated with proteinuria progression (beta 0.01, p = 0.008) but not with changing eGFR(MDRD.) In conclusion, obesity is common in RTR and is associated with worsening CV parameters and proteinuria progression. PMID:16212631

  10. Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Disease after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Screening and Preventive Practice Recommendations from the CIBMTR and EBMT.

    PubMed

    DeFilipp, Zachariah; Duarte, Rafael F; Snowden, John A; Majhail, Navneet S; Greenfield, Diana M; Miranda, José López; Arat, Mutlu; Baker, K Scott; Burns, Linda J; Duncan, Christine N; Gilleece, Maria; Hale, Gregory A; Hamadani, Mehdi; Hamilton, Betty K; Hogan, William J; Hsu, Jack W; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Kamble, Rammurti T; Lupo-Stanghellini, Maria Teresa; Malone, Adriana K; McCarthy, Philip; Mohty, Mohamad; Norkin, Maxim; Paplham, Pamela; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Richart, John M; Salooja, Nina; Schouten, Harry C; Schoemans, Helene; Seber, Adriana; Steinberg, Amir; Wirk, Baldeep M; Wood, William A; Battiwalla, Minoo; Flowers, Mary E D; Savani, Bipin N; Shaw, Bronwen E

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of cardiovascular risk factors that increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and all-cause mortality. Long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) have a substantial risk of developing MetS and cardiovascular disease, with an estimated prevalence of MetS of 31% to 49% among HCT recipients. Although MetS has not yet been proven to impact cardiovascular risk after HCT, an understanding of the incidence and risk factors for MetS in HCT recipients can provide the foundation to evaluate screening guidelines and develop interventions that may mitigate cardiovascular-related mortality. A working group was established through the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation with the goal to review literature and recommend practices appropriate to HCT recipients. Here we deliver consensus recommendations to help clinicians provide screening and preventive care for MetS and cardiovascular disease among HCT recipients. All HCT survivors should be advised of the risks of MetS and encouraged to undergo recommended screening based on their predisposition and ongoing risk factors. PMID:27184625

  11. Computational Chemical Imaging for Cardiovascular Pathology: Chemical Microscopic Imaging Accurately Determines Cardiac Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Saumya; Reddy, Vijaya B.; Bhargava, Rohit; Raman, Jaishankar

    2015-01-01

    Rejection is a common problem after cardiac transplants leading to significant number of adverse events and deaths, particularly in the first year of transplantation. The gold standard to identify rejection is endomyocardial biopsy. This technique is complex, cumbersome and requires a lot of expertise in the correct interpretation of stained biopsy sections. Traditional histopathology cannot be used actively or quickly during cardiac interventions or surgery. Our objective was to develop a stain-less approach using an emerging technology, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging to identify different components of cardiac tissue by their chemical and molecular basis aided by computer recognition, rather than by visual examination using optical microscopy. We studied this technique in assessment of cardiac transplant rejection to evaluate efficacy in an example of complex cardiovascular pathology. We recorded data from human cardiac transplant patients’ biopsies, used a Bayesian classification protocol and developed a visualization scheme to observe chemical differences without the need of stains or human supervision. Using receiver operating characteristic curves, we observed probabilities of detection greater than 95% for four out of five histological classes at 10% probability of false alarm at the cellular level while correctly identifying samples with the hallmarks of the immune response in all cases. The efficacy of manual examination can be significantly increased by observing the inherent biochemical changes in tissues, which enables us to achieve greater diagnostic confidence in an automated, label-free manner. We developed a computational pathology system that gives high contrast images and seems superior to traditional staining procedures. This study is a prelude to the development of real time in situ imaging systems, which can assist interventionists and surgeons actively during procedures. PMID:25932912

  12. Identifying Subphenotypes of Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplants.

    PubMed

    Halloran, P F; Merino Lopez, M; Barreto Pereira, A

    2016-03-01

    The key lesions in antibody-mediated kidney transplant rejection (ABMR) are microcirculation inflammation (peritubular capillaritis and/or glomerulitis lesions, abbreviated "pg") and glomerular double contours (cg lesions). We used these features to explore subphenotypes in 164 indication biopsies with ABMR-related diagnoses: 137 ABMR (109 pure and 28 mixed with T cell-mediated rejection [TCMR]) and 27 transplant glomerulopathy (TG), identified from prospective multicenter studies. The lesions indicated three ABMR subphenotypes: pgABMR, cgABMR, and pgcgABMR. Principal component analysis confirmed these subphenotypes and showed that TG can be reclassified as pgcgABMR (n = 17) or cgABMR (n = 10). ABMR-related biopsies included 45 pgABMR, 90 pgcgABMR, and 25 cgABMR, with four unclassifiable. Dominating all time intervals was the subphenotype pgcgABMR. The pgABMR subphenotype presented earliest (median <2 years), frequently mixed with TCMR, and was most associated with nonadherence. The cgABMR subphenotype presented late (median 9 years). Subphenotypes differed in their molecular changes, with pgABMR having the most histologic-molecular discrepancies (i.e. potential errors). Donor-specific antibody (DSA) was not identified in 29% of pgcgABMR and 46% of cgABMR, but failure rates and molecular findings were similar to cases where DSA was known to be positive. Thus, ABMR presents distinct subphenotypes, early pg-dominant, late cg-dominant, and combined pgcg phenotype, differing in time, molecular features, accompanying TCMR, HLA antibody, and probability of nonadherence. PMID:26743766

  13. Cardiovascular effects of Juniperus excelsa are mediated through multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Khan, Munasib; Khan, Arif-Ullah; Najeeb-ur-Rehman; Zafar, Muhammad Abdullah; Hazrat, Ali; Gilani, Anwarul-Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Juniperus excelsa Bieb. is used in folk medicine for lowering blood pressure (BP). Its BP-lowering effect, endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilator effects, and cardio-modulatory effect are reported here. The crude extract of J. excelsa (Je.Cr) which tested positive for the presence of anthraquinone, flavonoids, saponins, sterols, terpenes, and tannins induced a dose-dependent (10-300 mg/kg) fall in the arterial BP of anesthetized rats. In isolated rabbit aorta, Je.Cr (0.01-5.0 mg/mL) inhibited high K(+) (80 mM)- and phenylephrine (1 μM)-induced contractions, like that caused by verapamil and papaverine. In endothelium-intact rat aortic preparations, N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride-sensitive vasodilator activity was noted from Je.Cr, which also relaxed the endothelium-denuded aorta tissues. In guinea pig atria, Je.Cr initially caused mild cardiac stimulation, followed by inhibition, like that exhibited by papaverine. Je.Cr prolonged the R-R interval in electrocardiogram of rats under anesthesia. These results reveal that cardiovascular effects of J. excelsa are mediated possibly through a combination of Ca(++) antagonism, nitric oxide-modulating mechanism, and phosphodiesterase inhibitory mechanism, which explain its medicinal use in hypertension. PMID:22468685

  14. Immunosuppressive agents and metabolic factors of cardiovascular risk in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Sessa, A; Esposito, A; Giliberti, A; Iavicoli, G; Costa, C; Bergallo, M; Lettieri, E; Rossano, R; Capuano, M

    2009-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) accounts for 35% to 50% of deaths among renal transplant recipients. Beside the atherogenic risk factors related to hemodialysis, renal function, and use of immunosuppressive agents, other relevant risk factors for CVD include acute rejection episodes, microalbuminuria (muAlb), diabetes, arterial hypertension, lipid disorders, inflammatory triggers, hyperhomocysteinemia, anemia, erythrocytosis, obesity, and hyperuricemia. We studied the prevalence of risk factors and the impact of various drugs on CVD among 103 renal transplant recipients with measured glomerular filtration rates showing values >45 mL/min. We measured uric acid, triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein (LDL)/high-density lipoprotein (HDL) LDL/HDL ratio, homocysteine (HOMO), insulin resistance, muAlb, C-reactive protein (CRP), and fibrinogen. Subsequently, patients were divided into 8 groups based on the immunosuppressive protocol to evaluate its impact on CVD risk factors. Insulin resistance and hyperhomocysteinemia were present in >2/3 of patients. Considering the impact of protocols, the combination of cyclosporine (CsA) + everolimus (EVL) resulted in the most favorable profile in terms of reduction of hyperuricemia, hyperlipidemia, and hyperhomocysteinemia. Insulin resistance tended to be more frequent among patients treated with protocols including calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) and steroids. The prevalence of hyperhomocyteinemia was similar among patients on CsA and on tacrolimus (Tac). Sirolimus (SRL) was associated with higher levels of HOMO. The combination of CNI and proliferative signal inhibitors (PSI) seemed to be the most promising one to reduce the impact of CVD risk factors. The reduction in CVD morbidity can improve expectancy and quality of life, as well as graft function and survival among renal transplant patients. PMID:19460510

  15. Pre-Transplant Cardiovascular Risk Factors Affect Kidney Allograft Survival: A Multi-Center Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Pyo; Bae, Eunjin; Kang, Eunjeong; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Kim, Yong-Jin; Oh, Yun Kyu; Kim, Yon Su; Kim, Young Hoon; Lim, Chun Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Pre-transplant cardiovascular (CV) risk factors affect the development of CV events even after successful kidney transplantation (KT). However, the impact of pre-transplant CV risk factors on allograft failure (GF) has not been reported. Methods and Findings We analyzed the graft outcomes of 2,902 KT recipients who were enrolled in a multi-center cohort from 1997 to 2012. We calculated the pre-transplant CV risk scores based on the Framingham risk model using age, gender, total cholesterol level, smoking status, and history of hypertension. Vascular disease (a composite of ischemic heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, and cerebrovascular disease) was noted in 6.5% of the patients. During the median follow-up of 6.4 years, 286 (9.9%) patients had developed GF. In the multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazard model, pre-transplant vascular disease was associated with an increased risk of GF (HR 2.51; 95% CI 1.66–3.80). The HR for GF (comparing the highest with the lowest tertile regarding the pre-transplant CV risk scores) was 1.65 (95% CI 1.22–2.23). In the competing risk model, both pre-transplant vascular disease and CV risk score were independent risk factors for GF. Moreover, the addition of the CV risk score, the pre-transplant vascular disease, or both had a better predictability for GF compared to the traditional GF risk factors. Conclusions In conclusion, both vascular disease and pre-transplant CV risk score were independently associated with GF in this multi-center study. Pre-transplant CV risk assessments could be useful in predicting GF in KT recipients. PMID:27501048

  16. Factors Associated With Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events After Liver Transplantation Among a National Sample.

    PubMed

    VanWagner, L B; Serper, M; Kang, R; Levitsky, J; Hohmann, S; Abecassis, M; Skaro, A; Lloyd-Jones, D M

    2016-09-01

    Assessment of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) after liver transplantation (LT) has been limited by the lack of a multicenter study with detailed clinical information. An integrated database linking information from the University HealthSystem Consortium and the Organ Procurement and Transplant Network was analyzed using multivariate Poisson regression to assess factors associated with 30- and 90-day MACE after LT (February 2002 to December 2012). MACE was defined as myocardial infarction (MI), heart failure (HF), atrial fibrillation (AF), cardiac arrest, pulmonary embolism, and/or stroke. Of 32 810 recipients, MACE hospitalizations occurred in 8% and 11% of patients at 30 and 90 days, respectively. Recipients with MACE were older and more likely to have a history of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), alcoholic cirrhosis, MI, HF, stroke, AF and pulmonary and chronic renal disease than those without MACE. In multivariable analysis, age >65 years (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 2.8, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.8-4.4), alcoholic cirrhosis (IRR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2-2.2), NASH (IRR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.4), pre-LT creatinine (IRR 1.1, 95% CI 1.04-1.2), baseline AF (IRR 6.9, 95% CI 5.0-9.6) and stroke (IRR 6.3, 95% CI 1.6-25.4) were independently associated with MACE. MACE was associated with lower 1-year survival after LT (79% vs. 88%, p < 0.0001). In a national database, MACE occurred in 11% of LT recipients and had a negative impact on survival. Pre-LT AF and stroke substantially increase the risk of MACE, highlighting potentially high-risk LT candidates. PMID:26946333

  17. Effects of Liver Transplantation on Lipids and Cardiovascular Disease in Children With Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Mercedes; Brodlie, Susan; Griesemer, Adam; Kato, Tomoaki; Harren, Patricia; Gordon, Bruce; Parker, Thomas; Levine, Daniel; Tyberg, Theodore; Starc, Thomas; Cho, Iksung; Min, James; Elmore, Kimberly; Lobritto, Steven; Hudgins, Lisa Cooper

    2016-08-15

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) is a rare, inherited, life-threatening, metabolic disorder of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor function characterized by elevated serum LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) and rapidly progressive atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). Since LDL receptors are predominantly found on hepatocytes, orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) has emerged as a viable intervention for HoFH because LDL receptor activity is restored. This study assessed the effects of OLT on ACVD and ACVD risk factors in pediatric patients with HoFH. We analyzed lipids, lipoproteins, body mass index, glucose, blood pressure, and cardiovascular imaging in 8 pediatric patients who underwent OLT for HoFH. Total serum cholesterol, LDL-C, lipoprotein (a), and apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 ratio decreased to normal values in all subjects (p values <0.001) at 1 month after OLT and were maintained for the length of follow-up (2 to 6 years). There were few complications related to surgery or immunosuppressive therapy. Two patients developed mild hypertension. In the first 4 subjects monitored for 4 to 6 years after OLT, coronary artery disease did not develop or progress except in 1 minor artery in 1 subject and actually regressed in 2 subjects with >50% stenosis. However, aortic valve stenosis progressed in 2 of 4 subjects. In conclusion, OLT is an effective therapeutic option for patients with HoFH with coronary artery disease and persistently elevated serum LDL-C despite maximum medical therapy. Aortic valvular disease may progress. Long-term data are needed to evaluate the true risk-benefit ratio of this surgical approach. PMID:27365335

  18. Cardiovascular disease following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Pathogenesis, detection, and the cardioprotective role of aerobic training.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jessica M; Armenian, Saro; Giralt, Sergio; Moslehi, Javid; Wang, Thomas; Jones, Lee W

    2016-02-01

    Advances in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) techniques and supportive care strategies have led to dramatic improvements in relapse mortality in patients with high-risk hematological malignancies. These improvements, however, conversely increase the risk of late-occurring non-cancer competing causes, mostly cardiovascular disease (CVD). HCT recipients have a significantly increased risk of CVD-specific mortality, including elevated incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD), cerebrovascular disease, and heart failure (HF) compared to age-matched counterparts. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to identify techniques for the detection of early CVD in HCT patients to inform early prevention strategies. Aerobic training (AT) is established as the cornerstone of primary and secondary disease prevention in multiple clinical settings, and may confer similar benefits in HCT patients at high-risk of CVD. The potential benefits of AT either before, immediately after, or in the months/years following HCT have received limited attention. Here, we discuss the risk and extent of CVD in adult HCT patients, highlight novel tools for early detection of CVD, and review existing evidence in oncology and non-oncology populations supporting the efficacy of AT to attenuate HCT-induced CVD. This knowledge can be utilized to optimize treatment, while minimizing CVD risk in individuals with hematological malignancies undergoing HCT. PMID:26643524

  19. Homocysteine-Lowering and Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes in Kidney Transplant Recipients: Primary Results from the Folic Acid for Vascular Outcome Reduction in Transplantation (FAVORIT) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bostom, Andrew G.; Carpenter, Myra A.; Kusek, John W.; Levey, Andrew S.; Hunsicker, Lawrence; Pfeffer, Marc A.; Selhub, Jacob; Jacques, Paul F.; Cole, Edward; Gravens-Mueller, Lisa; House, Andrew A.; Kew, Clifton; McKenney, Joyce L.; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro; Pesavento, Todd; Pirsch, John; Smith, Stephen; Solomon, Scott; Weir, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background Kidney transplant recipients, like other patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), experience excess risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and elevated total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations. Observational studies of patients with CKD suggest increased homocysteine is a risk factor for CVD. The impact of lowering total homocysteine (tHcy) levels in kidney transplant recipients is unknown. Methods and Results In a double-blind controlled trial, we randomized 4110 stable kidney transplant recipients to a multivitamin that included either a high dose (n=2056) or low dose (n=2054) of folic acid, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 to determine whether decreasing tHcy concentrations reduced the rate of the primary composite arteriosclerotic CVD outcome (myocardial infarction, stroke, CVD death, resuscitated sudden death, coronary artery or renal artery revascularization, lower extremity arterial disease, carotid endarterectomy or angioplasty, or abdominal aortic aneurysm repair). Mean follow-up was 4.0 years. Treatment with the high dose multivitamin reduced homocysteine but did not reduce the rates of the primary outcome (n= 547 total events; hazards ratio [95% confidence interval] = 0.99 [0.84–1.17]), or secondary outcomes of all-cause mortality (n=431 deaths; 1.04 [0.86–1.26]) or dialysis-dependent kidney failure (n=343 events; 1.15 [0.93–1.43]) compared to the low dose multivitamin. Conclusions Treatment with a high dose folic acid, B6, and B12 multivitamin in kidney transplant recipients did not reduce a composite cardiovascular disease outcome, all-cause mortality, or dialysis-dependent kidney failure despite significant reduction in homocysteine level. PMID:21482964

  20. Late antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation during Gram-negative sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The major challenge in ABO-incompatible transplantation is to minimize antibody-mediated rejection. Effective reduction of the anti-ABO blood group antibodies at the time of transplantation has made ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation a growing practice in our hospital and in centers worldwide. ABO antibodies result from contact with A- and B-like antigens in the intestines via nutrients and bacteria. We demonstrate a patient with fulminant antibody-mediated rejection late after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation, whose anti-A antibody titers rose dramatically following Serratia marcescens sepsis. Case presentation A 58-year-old woman underwent an ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation for end-stage renal disease secondary to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. It concerned a blood group A1 to O donation. Pre-desensitization titers were 64 for anti-blood group A IgM and 32 for anti-blood group A IgG titers. Desensitization treatment consisted of rituximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, corticosteroids, immunoadsorption and intravenous immunoglobulines. She was readmitted to our hospital 11 weeks after transplantation for S. marcescens urosepsis. Her anti-A IgM titer rose to >5000 and she developed a fulminant antibody-mediated rejection. We hypothesized that the (overwhelming) presence in the blood of S. marcescens stimulated anti-A antibody formation, as S. marcescens might share epitopes with blood group A antigen. Unfortunately we could not demonstrate interaction between blood group A and S. marcescens in incubation experiments. Conclusion Two features of this post-transplant course are remarkably different from other reports of acute rejection in ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation: first, the late occurrence 12 weeks after kidney transplantation and second, the very high anti-A IgM titers (>5000), suggesting recent boosting of anti-A antibody formation by S. marcescens. PMID:24517251

  1. Disappearance of T Cell-Mediated Rejection Despite Continued Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Late Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Halloran, Philip F; Chang, Jessica; Famulski, Konrad; Hidalgo, Luis G; Salazar, Israel D R; Merino Lopez, Maribel; Matas, Arthur; Picton, Michael; de Freitas, Declan; Bromberg, Jonathan; Serón, Daniel; Sellarés, Joana; Einecke, Gunilla; Reeve, Jeff

    2015-07-01

    The prevalent renal transplant population presents an opportunity to observe the adaptive changes in the alloimmune response over time, but such studies have been limited by uncertainties in the conventional biopsy diagnosis of T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) and antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). To circumvent these limitations, we used microarrays and conventional methods to investigate rejection in 703 unselected biopsies taken 3 days to 35 years post-transplant from North American and European centers. Using conventional methods, we diagnosed rejection in 205 biopsy specimens (28%): 67 pure TCMR, 110 pure ABMR, and 28 mixed (89 designated borderline). Using microarrays, we diagnosed rejection in 228 biopsy specimens (32%): 76 pure TCMR, 124 pure ABMR, and 28 mixed (no borderline). Molecular assessment confirmed most conventional diagnoses (agreement was 90% for TCMR and 83% for ABMR) but revealed some errors, particularly in mixed rejection, and improved prediction of failure. ABMR was strongly associated with increased graft loss, but TCMR was not. ABMR became common in biopsy specimens obtained >1 year post-transplant and continued to appear in all subsequent intervals. TCMR was common early but progressively disappeared over time. In 108 biopsy specimens obtained 10.2-35 years post-transplant, TCMR defined by molecular and conventional features was never observed. We conclude that the main cause of kidney transplant failure is ABMR, which can present even decades after transplantation. In contrast, TCMR disappears by 10 years post-transplant, implying that a state of partial adaptive tolerance emerges over time in the kidney transplant population. PMID:25377077

  2. Role of arterial baroreceptors in mediating cardiovascular response to exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcritchie, R. J.; Vatner, S. F.; Patrick, T. A.; Braunwald, E.; Boettcher, D.; Heyndrickx, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to define the role of the major arterial baroreceptors during moderately severe exercise by comparing the responses of untethered conscious dogs instrumented for the measurement of aortic pressure and cardiac output with those of dogs with total arterial baroreceptor denervation. The reflex heart rate responses to intravenous bolus doses of methoxamine were also examined in intact animals, both at rest and during exercise. Methoxamine is found to cause striking bradycardia at rest, but little bradycardia during exercise. Experimental findings suggest that the arterial baroreceptor reflex is normally inhibited during severe exercise and therefore plays little role in modulating the cardiovascular response to exercise.

  3. Oxidative stress-mediated effects of angiotensin II in the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Hairuo; Gwathmey, Judith K; Xie, Lai-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II), an endogenous peptide hormone, plays critical roles in the pathophysiological modulation of cardiovascular functions. Ang II is the principle effector of the renin-angiotensin system for maintaining homeostasis in the cardiovascular system, as well as a potent stimulator of NAD(P)H oxidase, which is the major source and primary trigger for reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in various tissues. Recent accumulating evidence has demonstrated the importance of oxidative stress in Ang II-induced heart diseases. Here, we review the recent progress in the study on oxidative stress-mediated effects of Ang II in the cardiovascular system. In particular, the involvement of Ang II-induced ROS generation in arrhythmias, cell death/heart failure, ischemia/reperfusion injury, cardiac hypertrophy and hypertension are discussed. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II is an important molecule linking Ang II, ROS and cardiovascular pathological conditions. PMID:24587981

  4. The impact of vitamin D deficiency on patients undergoing kidney transplantation: focus on cardiovascular, metabolic, and endocrine outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sarno, Gerardo; Daniele, Giuseppe; Tirabassi, Giacomo; Chavez, Alberto O; Ojo, Opeolu O; Orio, Francesco; Kahleova, Hana; Balercia, Giancarlo; Grant, William B; De Rosa, Paride; Colao, Annamaria; Muscogiuri, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common among kidney transplant (KT) recipients because of reduced sunlight exposure, low intake of vitamin D, the immunosuppressive drug regimen administered, and steroid therapy. Glucocorticoids regulate expression of genes coding for enzymes that catabolize vitamin D, further reducing its level in serum. Although vitamin D primarily regulates calcium homeostasis, vitamin D deficiency is associated with the risk of several diseases, such as diabetes mellitus and tuberculosis. Aim of this review is to highlight endocrine and metabolic alterations due to the vitamin D deficiency by evaluating the mechanisms involved in the development of KT-related disease (cardiovascular, bone mineral density, and new-onset diabetes after transplantation). Next, we review evidence to support a link between low vitamin D status and KT-related diseases. Finally, we briefly highlight strategies for restoring vitamin D status in KT patients. PMID:25999028

  5. The Biological Effects of IL-21 Signaling on B-Cell-Mediated Responses in Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yongkang; van Besouw, Nicole M.; Shi, Yunying; Hoogduijn, Martin J.; Wang, Lanlan; Baan, Carla C.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection has emerged as one of the major issues limiting the success of organ transplantation. It exerts a highly negative impact on graft function and outcome, and effective treatment is lacking. The triggers for antibody development, and the mechanisms leading to graft dysfunction and failure, are incompletely understood. The production of antibodies is dependent on instructions from various immunocytes including CD4 T-helper cells that secrete interleukin (IL)-21 and interact with antigen-specific B-cells via costimulatory molecules. In this article, we discuss the role of IL-21 in the activation and differentiation of B-cells and consider the mechanisms of IL-21 and B-cell interaction. An improved understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in antibody-mediated complications after organ transplantation could lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies, which control humoral alloreactivity, potentially preventing and treating graft-threatening antibody-mediated rejection. PMID:27602031

  6. The Biological Effects of IL-21 Signaling on B-Cell-Mediated Responses in Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yongkang; van Besouw, Nicole M; Shi, Yunying; Hoogduijn, Martin J; Wang, Lanlan; Baan, Carla C

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection has emerged as one of the major issues limiting the success of organ transplantation. It exerts a highly negative impact on graft function and outcome, and effective treatment is lacking. The triggers for antibody development, and the mechanisms leading to graft dysfunction and failure, are incompletely understood. The production of antibodies is dependent on instructions from various immunocytes including CD4 T-helper cells that secrete interleukin (IL)-21 and interact with antigen-specific B-cells via costimulatory molecules. In this article, we discuss the role of IL-21 in the activation and differentiation of B-cells and consider the mechanisms of IL-21 and B-cell interaction. An improved understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in antibody-mediated complications after organ transplantation could lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies, which control humoral alloreactivity, potentially preventing and treating graft-threatening antibody-mediated rejection. PMID:27602031

  7. Recent advances in renal transplantation: antibody-mediated rejection takes center stage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien Chia; Sicard, Antoine; Rabeyrin, Maud; Morelon, Emmanuel; Dubois, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Overlooked for decades, antibodies have taken center stage in renal transplantation and are now widely recognized as the first cause of allograft failure. Diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection has considerably improved with identification of antibody-mediated lesions in graft biopsies and advances made in the detection of circulating donor-specific antibodies. Unfortunately, this progress has not yet translated into better outcomes for patients. Indeed, in the absence of a drug able to suppress antibody generation by plasma cells, available therapies can only slow down graft destruction. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of antibody-mediated rejection and discusses future interesting research directions. PMID:26097724

  8. De novo donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies mediated rejection in liver-transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Del Bello, Arnaud; Congy-Jolivet, Nicolas; Danjoux, Marie; Muscari, Fabrice; Lavayssière, Laurence; Esposito, Laure; Cardeau-Desangles, Isabelle; Guitard, Joëlle; Dörr, Gaëlle; Milongo, David; Suc, Bertrand; Duffas, Jean Pierre; Alric, Laurent; Bureau, Christophe; Guilbeau-Frugier, Céline; Rostaing, Lionel; Kamar, Nassim

    2015-12-01

    The incidence and consequences of de novo donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSAs) after liver transplantation (LT) are not well known. We investigated the incidence, risk factors, and complications associated with de novo DSAs in this setting. A total of 152 de novo liver-transplant patients, without preformed anti-HLA DSAs, were tested for anti-HLA antibodies, with single-antigen bead technology, before, at transplantation, at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after transplantation, and thereafter annually and at each time they presented with increased liver-enzyme levels until the last follow-up, that is, 34 (1.5-77) months. Twenty-one patients (14%) developed de novo DSAs. Of these, five patients had C1q-binding DSAs (24%). Younger age, low exposure to calcineurin inhibitors, and noncompliance were predictive factors for de novo DSA formation. Nine of the 21 patients (43%) with de novo DSAs experienced an acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Positive C4d staining was more frequently observed in liver biopsies of patients with AMR (9/9 vs. 1/12, P < 0.0001). Eight patients received a B-cell targeting therapy, and one patient received polyclonal antibodies. Only one patient required retransplantation. Patient- and graft-survival rates did not differ between patients with and without DSAs. In conclusion, liver-transplant patients with liver abnormalities should be screened for DSAs and AMR. PMID:26303035

  9. Role of the Sympathetic Nervous System in Stress-Mediated Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Hering, Dagmara; Lachowska, Kamila; Schlaich, Markus

    2015-10-01

    A high incidence of acute cardiovascular events and sudden cardiac death following unexpected acute emotional stress or a natural catastrophic disaster has been well-documented over the past decades. Chronic psychosocial factors have been shown to be directly linked to the development of hypertension, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Activation of various neurogenic pathways is an important mediator of acute and chronic stress-induced hypertension and heart disease. Heightened sympathetic activation has been shown to be a critical contributor linking psychogenic effects on cardiovascular regulation to serious and often fatal CV outcomes. Accordingly, several therapeutic approaches that attenuate autonomic imbalance via modulation of increased sympathetic outflow by either non-pharmacological or interventional means have been shown to alleviate clinical symptoms. Likewise stress reduction per se achieved with transcendental medicine has been linked to improved patient outcomes. Therapies that oppose adrenergic activity and/or have the potential to attenuate negative emotions are likely to reduce cardiovascular risk and its adverse consequences attributable to chronic mental stress. PMID:26318888

  10. Prothrombin activator-like toxin appears to mediate cardiovascular collapse following envenoming by Pseudonaja textilis.

    PubMed

    Chaisakul, Janeyuth; Isbister, Geoffrey K; O'Leary, Margaret A; Parkington, Helena C; Smith, A Ian; Hodgson, Wayne C; Kuruppu, Sanjaya

    2015-08-01

    Brown snake (Pseudonaja spp.)-induced early cardiovascular collapse is a life-threatening medical emergency in Australia. We have previously shown that this effect can be mimicked in animals and is mediated via the release of endogenous mediators. In the present study, we aimed to purify and characterize the component in Pseudonaja textilis venom which induces cardiovascular collapse following envenoming. The component (fraction 3) was isolated using a combination of techniques including hydroxyapatite and reverse phase chromatography. Fraction 3 (10 or 20 μg/kg, i.v.) produced a rapid decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP) followed by cardiovascular collapse. Fraction 3-induced early collapse was abolished by prior administration of smaller priming doses of fraction 3 (i.e. 2 and 5 μg/kg, i.v.) or heparin (300 units/kg, i.v.). P. textilis whole venom (1 and 3 μg/ml), but not fraction 3 (1 or 3 μg/ml), induced endothelium-dependent relaxation in isolated rat mesenteric arteries. SDS-PAGE gel indicated the presence of 9-10 protein bands of fraction 3. Using proteomic based analysis some protein bands of fraction 3 were identified as subunits of venom prothrombin activator, pseutarin C of P. textilis venom. Our results conclude that prothrombin activator-like toxin is likely to be a contributor to the rapid collapse induced by P. textilis venom. PMID:25959508

  11. Low-Dose Rituximab Therapy for Antibody-Mediated Rejection in a Highly Sensitized Heart-Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Ashim; Pyle, Joseph; Hamilton, John; Bhat, Geetha

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection is the B-cell–mediated production of immunoglobulin G antibody against the transplanted heart. The currently available therapies for antibody-mediated rejection have had marginal success, and chronic manifestations of rejection can result in an increased risk of graft vasculopathy and perhaps require repeat transplantation. Rituximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against the CD20 receptor of B-lymphocytes and approved as therapy for lymphoma, can be used in heart-transplant patients for the management of antibody-mediated rejection. We present the case of a 52-year-old woman with high allosensitization (pre-transplantation panel reactive antibody level, 72%) who underwent successful orthotopic heart transplantation. Postoperatively, her acute antibody-mediated rejection with concomitant cellular rejection was successfully treated with low-dose rituximab. The patient died 5 months later because of multiple other medical problems. The present case suggests a role for low-dose rituximab as therapy for antibody-mediated rejection in heart-transplant patients. PMID:23304051

  12. Urinary Sulfur Metabolites Associate with a Favorable Cardiovascular Risk Profile and Survival Benefit in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Pasch, Andreas; Westendorp, Welmoet H.; Navis, Gerjan; Brink, Elizabeth J.; Gans, Reinold O.B.; van Goor, Harry; Bakker, Stephan J.L.

    2014-01-01

    In post-transplant conditions, sulfur may be protective by intermediate conversion to hydrogen sulfide and thiosulfate. However, sulfate, the end product of sulfur-containing amino acids (SAAs), contributes to metabolic acid load and may adversely influence acid-base homeostasis. We investigated the association of urinary sulfur metabolites with cardiometabolic parameters in renal transplant recipients (RTRs) and analyzed their predictive capacity for mortality. We studied urinary sulfate and thiosulfate excretion in 24-hour urine samples from 707 RTRs at a median 5.4 years (interquartile range, 1.9 to 12.2) after transplantation as well as from 110 controls. Diet was assessed for SAA content and various risk factors were measured. Urinary sulfate was similar, whereas thiosulfate was higher in RTRs versus controls. SAA intake was lower in RTRs compared with controls and correlated with sulfate but not thiosulfate excretion. Sulfate beneficially associated with eGFR, net acid excretion, systolic BP, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide, and proteinuria (all P≤0.01). Thiosulfate beneficially associated with eGFR, serum acidity, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide (all P≤0.001). During a median 27 months (interquartile range, 22–36) of follow-up, 47 RTRs died. After adjustment for age, sex, and eGFR, hazard ratios for mortality were 0.87 (95% confidence interval, 0.82 to 0.92; P<0.001) for urinary sulfate and 0.60 (95% confidence interval, 0.41 to 0.59; P=0.01) for thiosulfate. Thus, despite the association of urinary sulfate with metabolic acid load, urinary sulfate and thiosulfate beneficially associated with survival in RTRs, possibly by influencing cardiovascular parameters. Intervention studies with exogenous sulfur are warranted to elucidate mechanisms underlying these promising associations in RTRs. PMID:24511127

  13. Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Faro, Albert; Weymann, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Despite improvement in median life expectancy and overall health, some children with cystic fibrosis (CF) progress to end-stage lung or liver disease and become candidates for transplant. Transplants for children with CF hold the promise to extend and improve the quality of life, but barriers to successful long-term outcomes include shortage of suitable donor organs; potential complications from the surgical procedure and immunosuppressants; risk of rejection and infection; and the need for lifelong, strict adherence to a complex medical regimen. This article reviews the indications and complications of lung and liver transplantation in children with CF. PMID:27469184

  14. Predictive Value of Echocardiographic Abnormalities and the Impact of Diastolic Dysfunction on In-hospital Major Cardiovascular Complications after Living Donor Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Jung; Chang, Suyon; Kim, So Yeon; Huh, Kyu Ha; Kang, Soojeong; Choi, Yong Seon

    2016-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) show characteristic abnormalities in cardiac structure and function. We evaluated the influence of these abnormalities on adverse cardiopulmonary outcomes after living donor kidney transplantation in patients with valid preoperative transthoracic echocardiographic evaluation. We then observed any development of major postoperative cardiovascular complications and pulmonary edema until hospital discharge. In-hospital major cardiovascular complications were defined as acute myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation/tachycardia, cardiogenic shock, newly-onset atrial fibrillation, clinical pulmonary edema requiring endotracheal intubation or dialysis. Among the 242 ESRD study patients, 9 patients (4%) developed major cardiovascular complications, and 39 patients (16%) developed pulmonary edema. Diabetes, ischemia-reperfusion time, left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDd), left ventricular mass index (LVMI), right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), left atrium volume index (LAVI), and high E/E' ratios were risk factors of major cardiovascular complications, while age, LVEDd, LVMI, LAVI, and high E/E' ratios were risk factors of pulmonary edema. The optimal E/E' cut-off value for predicting major cardiovascular complications was 13.0, showing 77.8% sensitivity and 78.5% specificity. Thus, the patient's E/E' ratio is useful for predicting in-hospital major cardiovascular complications after kidney transplantation. We recommend that goal-directed therapy employing E/E' ratio be enacted in kidney recipients with baseline diastolic dysfunction to avert postoperative morbidity. (http://Clinical Trials.gov number: NCT02322567) PMID:27499694

  15. Predictive Value of Echocardiographic Abnormalities and the Impact of Diastolic Dysfunction on In-hospital Major Cardiovascular Complications after Living Donor Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Jung; Chang, Suyon; Kim, So Yeon; Huh, Kyu Ha; Kang, Soojeong; Choi, Yong Seon

    2016-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) show characteristic abnormalities in cardiac structure and function. We evaluated the influence of these abnormalities on adverse cardiopulmonary outcomes after living donor kidney transplantation in patients with valid preoperative transthoracic echocardiographic evaluation. We then observed any development of major postoperative cardiovascular complications and pulmonary edema until hospital discharge. In-hospital major cardiovascular complications were defined as acute myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation/tachycardia, cardiogenic shock, newly-onset atrial fibrillation, clinical pulmonary edema requiring endotracheal intubation or dialysis. Among the 242 ESRD study patients, 9 patients (4%) developed major cardiovascular complications, and 39 patients (16%) developed pulmonary edema. Diabetes, ischemia-reperfusion time, left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDd), left ventricular mass index (LVMI), right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), left atrium volume index (LAVI), and high E/E' ratios were risk factors of major cardiovascular complications, while age, LVEDd, LVMI, LAVI, and high E/E' ratios were risk factors of pulmonary edema. The optimal E/E' cut-off value for predicting major cardiovascular complications was 13.0, showing 77.8% sensitivity and 78.5% specificity. Thus, the patient's E/E' ratio is useful for predicting in-hospital major cardiovascular complications after kidney transplantation. We recommend that goal-directed therapy employing E/E' ratio be enacted in kidney recipients with baseline diastolic dysfunction to avert postoperative morbidity. (http://Clinical Trials.gov number: NCT02322567). PMID:27499694

  16. Immune-Mediated Inflammation May Contribute to the Pathogenesis of Cardiovascular Disease in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I

    PubMed Central

    Gordts, Philip L.; Ellinwood, N. Matthew; Schwartz, Philip H.; Dickson, Patricia I.; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Wang, Raymond Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease, a progressive manifestation of α-L-iduronidase deficiency or mucopolysaccharidosis type I, continues in patients both untreated and treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or intravenous enzyme replacement. Few studies have examined the effects of α-L-iduronidase deficiency and subsequent glycosaminoglycan storage upon arterial gene expression to understand the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Methods Gene expression in carotid artery, ascending, and descending aortas from four non-tolerized, non-enzyme treated 19 month-old mucopolysaccharidosis type I dogs was compared with expression in corresponding vascular segments from three normal, age-matched dogs. Data were analyzed using R and whole genome network correlation analysis, a bias-free method of categorizing expression level and significance into discrete modules. Genes were further categorized based on module-trait relationships. Expression of clusterin, a protein implicated in other etiologies of cardiovascular disease, was assessed in canine and murine mucopolysaccharidosis type I aortas via Western blot and in situ immunohistochemistry. Results Gene families with more than two-fold, significant increased expression involved lysosomal function, proteasome function, and immune regulation. Significantly downregulated genes were related to cellular adhesion, cytoskeletal elements, and calcium regulation. Clusterin gene overexpression (9-fold) and protein overexpression (1.3 to 1.62-fold) was confirmed and located specifically in arterial plaques of mucopolysaccharidosis-affected dogs and mice. Conclusions Overexpression of lysosomal and proteasomal-related genes are expected responses to cellular stress induced by lysosomal storage in mucopolysaccharidosis type I. Upregulation of immunity-related genes implicates the potential involvement of glycosaminoglycan-induced inflammation in the pathogenesis of mucopolysaccharidosis-related arterial disease, for

  17. Microbial mediation of biogeochemical cycles revealed by simulation of global changes with soil transplant and cropping

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mengxin; Xue, Kai; Wang, Feng; Liu, Shanshan; Bai, Shijie; Sun, Bo; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2014-01-01

    Despite microbes' key roles in driving biogeochemical cycles, the mechanism of microbe-mediated feedbacks to global changes remains elusive. Recently, soil transplant has been successfully established as a proxy to simulate climate changes, as the current trend of global warming coherently causes range shifts toward higher latitudes. Four years after southward soil transplant over large transects in China, we found that microbial functional diversity was increased, in addition to concurrent changes in microbial biomass, soil nutrient content and functional processes involved in the nitrogen cycle. However, soil transplant effects could be overridden by maize cropping, which was attributed to a negative interaction. Strikingly, abundances of nitrogen and carbon cycle genes were increased by these field experiments simulating global change, coinciding with higher soil nitrification potential and carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux. Further investigation revealed strong correlations between carbon cycle genes and CO2 efflux in bare soil but not cropped soil, and between nitrogen cycle genes and nitrification. These findings suggest that changes of soil carbon and nitrogen cycles by soil transplant and cropping were predictable by measuring microbial functional potentials, contributing to a better mechanistic understanding of these soil functional processes and suggesting a potential to incorporate microbial communities in greenhouse gas emission modeling. PMID:24694714

  18. Successful Salvage Treatment of Resistant Acute Antibody-Mediated Kidney Transplant Rejection with Eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saif A.; Al-Riyami, Dawood; Al-Mula Abed, Yasser W.; Mohammed, Saja; Al-Riyami, Marwa; Al-Lawati, Nabil M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) jeopardises short- and long-term transplant survival and remains a challenge in the field of organ transplantation. We report the first use of the anticomplement agent eculizumab in Oman in the treatment of a 61-year-old female patient with ABMR following a living unrelated kidney transplant. The patient was admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in 2013 on the eighth day post-transplantation with serum creatinine (Cr) levels of 400 µmol/L which continued to rise, necessitating haemodialysis. A biopsy indicated ABMR with acute cellular rejection. No improvement was observed following standard ABMR treatment and she continued to require dialysis. Five doses of eculizumab were administered over six weeks with a subsequent dramatic improvement in renal function. The patient became dialysis-free with serum Cr levels of 119 µmol/L within four months. This case report indicates that eculizumab is a promising agent in the treatment of ABMR. PMID:27606122

  19. Successful Salvage Treatment of Resistant Acute Antibody-Mediated Kidney Transplant Rejection with Eculizumab.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saif A; Al-Riyami, Dawood; Al-Mula Abed, Yasser W; Mohammed, Saja; Al-Riyami, Marwa; Al-Lawati, Nabil M

    2016-08-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) jeopardises short- and long-term transplant survival and remains a challenge in the field of organ transplantation. We report the first use of the anticomplement agent eculizumab in Oman in the treatment of a 61-year-old female patient with ABMR following a living unrelated kidney transplant. The patient was admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in 2013 on the eighth day post-transplantation with serum creatinine (Cr) levels of 400 µmol/L which continued to rise, necessitating haemodialysis. A biopsy indicated ABMR with acute cellular rejection. No improvement was observed following standard ABMR treatment and she continued to require dialysis. Five doses of eculizumab were administered over six weeks with a subsequent dramatic improvement in renal function. The patient became dialysis-free with serum Cr levels of 119 µmol/L within four months. This case report indicates that eculizumab is a promising agent in the treatment of ABMR. PMID:27606122

  20. Inflammation-mediated dysfunction and apoptosis in pancreatic islet transplantation: implications for intrahepatic grafts.

    PubMed

    Barshes, Neal R; Wyllie, Samuel; Goss, John A

    2005-05-01

    Recent advances in clinical protocols have improved the outcomes of pancreatic islet transplantation (PIT), yet PIT recipients typically require pancreatic islet grafts derived from multiple donors to achieve insulin independence. This along with experimental models of syngeneic PIT, showing that up to 60% of pancreatic islet tissue undergoes apoptosis within the first several days post-transplantation, strongly suggest the involvement of nonalloantigen-specific, inflammatory events in partial destruction of the graft following PIT. Interleukin-1beta appears to be among the most important inflammatory mediators, causing pancreatic islet dysfunction and apoptosis through the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase and cyclooxygenase-2. Kupffer cells secrete many molecules, including cytokines, NO, and free radicals, which are known to be directly toxic to the pancreatic islets, and depletion or inhibition of Kupffer cells improves outcomes following experimental PIT. Immediately after transplantation, the pancreatic islets are perfused only by portal vein blood until the process of angiogenesis restores arterial blood flow some 7-10 days later. This delayed vascularization may have implications for the expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules, the effects of free radicals, and the role of ischemia-reperfusion injury. Finally, in the immediate post-transplant period, hepatocytes may contribute to pancreatic islet injury through the production of NO. This paper reviews literature regarding the inflammatory events that follow PIT as well as the pathogenesis of diabetes and the pathophysiology of hepatic ischemia-reperfusion and their relation to the survival and function of intrahepatic pancreatic islet grafts. PMID:15728243

  1. IL-34 is a Treg-specific cytokine and mediates transplant tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Bézie, Séverine; Picarda, Elodie; Ossart, Jason; Tesson, Laurent; Usal, Claire; Renaudin, Karine; Anegon, Ignacio; Guillonneau, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines and metabolic pathway–controlling enzymes regulate immune responses and have potential as powerful tools to mediate immune tolerance. Blockade of the interaction between CD40 and CD40L induces long-term cardiac allograft survival in rats through a CD8+CD45RClo Treg potentiation. Here, we have shown that the cytokine IL-34, the immunoregulatory properties of which have not been previously studied in transplantation or T cell biology, is expressed by rodent CD8+CD45RClo Tregs and human FOXP3+CD45RCloCD8+ and CD4+ Tregs. IL-34 was involved in the suppressive function of both CD8+ and CD4+ Tregs and markedly inhibited alloreactive immune responses. Additionally, in a rat cardiac allograft model, IL-34 potently induced transplant tolerance that was associated with a total inhibition of alloantibody production. Treatment of rats with IL-34 promoted allograft tolerance that was mediated by induction of CD8+ and CD4+ Tregs. Moreover, these Tregs were capable of serial tolerance induction through modulation of macrophages that migrate early to the graft. Finally, we demonstrated that human macrophages cultured in the presence of IL-34 greatly expanded CD8+ and CD4+ FOXP3+ Tregs, with a superior suppressive potential of antidonor immune responses compared with non–IL-34–expanded Tregs. In conclusion, we reveal that IL-34 serves as a suppressive Treg–specific cytokine and as a tolerogenic cytokine that efficiently inhibits alloreactive immune responses and mediates transplant tolerance. PMID:26389674

  2. Transplantation of T cell-mediated, lymphoreticular disease from the scurfy (sf) mouse.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, V L; Rouse, B T; Wilkinson, J E

    1994-08-01

    The X-linked mutation, scurfy (sf), causes a fatal lymphoreticular disease characterized by runting, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hypergammaglobulinemia, exfoliative dermatitis, Coombs'-positive anemia, and death by 24 days of age. T lymphocytes are required to mediate this syndrome as shown by a total absence of disease in mice bred to be scurfy and nude (sf/Y; nu/nu). The scurfy phenotype is not transmitted by sf/Y bone marrow transplants, though cells of scurfy origin do reconstitute all lymphoid organs in the recipient mouse. These data suggest that scurfy disease results from an abnormal T cell development process and not from an intrinsic stem cell defect. We therefore tested the ability of transplanted scurfy thymuses to transmit scurfy disease to congenic euthymic mice, to athymic (nude) mice, and to severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Euthymic recipients of sf/Y thymic grafts remained clinically normal as did all SCID and nude recipients of normal thymus transplants. Morphological lesions similar to those found in scurfy mice occurred in all H-2-compatible nude and SCID recipients of sf/Y thymic grafts. Intraperitoneal injections of scurfy thymocytes, splenocytes, and lymph node cells also transmitted the scurfy phenotype to H-2-compatible nude mice and SCID mice. Our findings indicate that scurfy disease can be transmitted to T cell-deficient mice by engraftment of scurfy T cells, but that pathogenic scurfy T cell activities can be inhibited (or prevented) in immunocompetent recipient mice. PMID:8053488

  3. Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Retinal Reactive Gliosis Following Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tassoni, Alessia; Gutteridge, Alex; Barber, Amanda C.; Osborne, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    abstract A variety of diseases lead to degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons within the optic nerve resulting in loss of visual function. Although current therapies may delay RGC loss, they do not restore visual function or completely halt disease progression. Regenerative medicine has recently focused on stem cell therapy for both neuroprotective and regenerative purposes. However, significant problems remain to be addressed, such as the long‐term impact of reactive gliosis occurring in the host retina in response to transplanted stem cells. The aim of this work was to investigate retinal glial responses to intravitreally transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM‐MSCs) to help identify factors able to modulate graft‐induced reactive gliosis. We found in vivo that intravitreal BM‐MSC transplantation is associated with gliosis‐mediated retinal folding, upregulation of intermediate filaments, and recruitment of macrophages. These responses were accompanied by significant JAK/STAT3 and MAPK (ERK1/2 and JNK) cascade activation in retinal Muller glia. Lipocalin‐2 (Lcn‐2) was identified as a potential new indicator of graft‐induced reactive gliosis. Pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 in BM‐MSC cocultured retinal explants successfully reduced glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in retinal Muller glia and increased BM‐MSC retinal engraftment. Inhibition of stem cell‐induced reactive gliosis is critical for successful transplantation‐based strategies for neuroprotection, replacement, and regeneration of the optic nerve. Stem Cells 2015;33:3006–3016 PMID:26175331

  4. Risk-stratified cardiovascular screening including angiographic and procedural outcomes of percutaneous coronary interventions in renal transplant candidates.

    PubMed

    König, Julian; Möckel, Martin; Mueller, Eda; Bocksch, Wolfgang; Baid-Agrawal, Seema; Babel, Nina; Schindler, Ralf; Reinke, Petra; Nickel, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background. Benefits of cardiac screening in kidney transplant candidates (KTC) will be dependent on the availability of effective interventions. We retrospectively evaluated characteristics and outcome of percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) in KTC selected for revascularization by a cardiac screening approach. Methods. In 267 patients evaluated 2003 to 2006, screening tests performed were reviewed and PCI characteristics correlated with major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) during a follow-up of 55 months. Results. Stress tests in 154 patients showed ischemia in 28 patients (89% high risk). Of 58 patients with coronary angiography, 38 had significant stenoses and 18 cardiac interventions (6.7% of all). 29 coronary lesions in 17/18 patients were treated by PCI. Angiographic success rate was 93.1%, but procedural success rate was only 86.2%. Long lesions (P = 0.029) and diffuse disease (P = 0.043) were associated with MACE. In high risk patients, cardiac screening did not improve outcome as 21.7% of patients with versus 15.5% of patients without properly performed cardiac screening had MACE (P = 0.319). Conclusion. The moderate procedural success of PCI and poor outcome in long and diffuse coronary lesions underscore the need to define appropriate revascularization strategies in KTC, which will be a prerequisite for cardiac screening to improve outcome in these high-risk patients. PMID:25045528

  5. Post-Transplant Membranous Nephropathy Associated with Chronic Active Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Hepatitis C Infection after Deceased Donor Renal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Doke, Tomohito; Sato, Waichi; Takahashi, Kazuo; Hayashi, Hiroki; Koide, Sigehisa; Sasaki, Hitomi; Kusaka, Mamoru; Shiroki, Ryoichi; Hoshinaga, Kiyotaka; Takeda, Asami; Yuzawa, Yukio; Hasegawa, Midori

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman who had undergone deceased donor kidney transplantation twice, at 35 and 43 years of age, presented with renal impairment. She was infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The histology of the graft kidney revealed post-transplant membranous nephropathy (MN) with podocytic infolding and antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). IgG subclass staining showed fine granular deposits of IgG1 and IgG3, but not IgG4, in the glomerular capillary walls. Panel reactive antibody scores for human leukocyte antigen class I and class II were 92.67% and 66.68%, respectively. Thus, this case of post-transplanted MN was considered to be associated with AMR and HCV infection. PMID:26875963

  6. Dual Islet Transplantation Modeling of the Instant Blood-Mediated Inflammatory Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Martin, BM; Samy, KP; Lowe, MC; Thompson, PW; Cano, J; Farris, AB; Song, M; Dove, CR; Leopardi, FV; Strobert, EA; Jenkins, JB; Collins, BH; Larsen, CP; Kirk, AD

    2015-01-01

    Islet xenotransplantation is a potential treatment for diabetes without the limitations of tissue availability. Although successful experimentally, early islet loss remains substantial and attributed to an instant blood mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR). This syndrome of islet destruction has been incompletely defined and characterization in pig-to-primate models has been hampered by logistical and statistical limitations of large animal studies. To further investigate IBMIR, we developed a novel in vivo dual islet transplant model to precisely characterize IBMIR as proof-of-concept that this model can serve to properly control experiments comparing modified xenoislet preparations. Wild-type (WT) and α1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout (GTKO) neonatal porcine islets (NPIs) were studied in non-immunosuppressed rhesus macaques. Inert polyethylene microspheres served as a control for the effects of portal embolization. Digital analysis of immunohistochemistry targeting IBMIR mediators was performed at one and 24 hours after intraportal islet infusion. Early findings observed in transplanted islets include complement and antibody deposition, and infiltration by neutrophils, macrophages, and platelets. Insulin, complement, antibody, neutrophils, macrophages, and platelets were similar between GTKO and WT islets, with increasing macrophage infiltration at 24 hours in both phenotypes. This model provides an objective and internally controlled study of distinct islet preparations and documents the temporal histology of IBMIR. PMID:25702898

  7. Do the carotid body chemoreceptors mediate cardiovascular and sympathetic adjustments induced by sodium overload in rats?

    PubMed

    Pedrino, Gustavo R; Mourão, Aline A; Moreira, Marina C S; da Silva, Elaine F; Lopes, Paulo R; Fajemiroye, James O; Schoorlemmer, Guss H M; Sato, Mônica A; Reis, Ângela A S; Rebelo, Ana C S; Cravo, Sergio L

    2016-05-15

    Acute plasma hypernatremia induces several cardiovascular and sympathetic responses. It is conceivable that these responses contribute to rapid sodium excretion and restoration of normal conditions. Afferent pathways mediating these responses are not entirely understood. The present study analyses the effects of acute carotid chemoreceptor inactivation on cardiovascular and sympathetic responses induced by infusion of hypertonic saline (HS). All experiments were performed on anesthetized male Wistar rats instrumented for recording of arterial blood pressure (ABP), renal blood flow (RBF) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Animals were subjected to sham surgery or carotid chemoreceptor inactivation by bilateral ligation of the carotid body artery (CBA). In sham rats (n=8), intravenous infusion of HS (3 M NaCl, 1.8 ml/kg b.wt.) elicited a transient increase (9±2mmHg) in ABP, and long lasting (30 min) increases in RBF (138±5%) and renal vascular conductance (RVC) (128±5%) with concurrent decrease in RSNA (-19±4%). In rats submitted to CBA ligation (n=8), the pressor response to HS was higher (24±2mmHg; p<0.05). However, RBF and RVC responses to HS infusion were significantly reduced (113±5% and 93±4%, respectively) while RSNA was increased (13±2%). When HS (3M NaCl, 200μl) was administrated into internal carotid artery (ICA), distinct sympathetic and cardiovascular responses were observed. In sham-group, HS infusion (3M NaCl, 200μl) into ICA promoted an increase in ABP (26±8mmHg) and RSNA (29±13%). In CBA rats, ABP (-3±5.6mmHg) remained unaltered despite sympathoinhibition (-37.6±5.4%). These results demonstrate that carotid body chemoreceptors play a role in the development of hemodynamic and sympathetic responses to acute HS infusion. PMID:27060222

  8. Aged spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) are predisposed to ultrafine carbon particle (UfCP) mediated cardiovascular impairment.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Elderly individuals are considered to be more susceptible to particulate matter (PM) related cardiovascular (CV) health effects. In this study we investigated UfCP mediated CV effects on aged SHRs and compared the findings to that of adult SHRs to identify age related...

  9. Ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction enhances the therapeutic effect of intracoronary transplantation of bone marrow stem cells on myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xuefeng; Liu, Jiaqing; Liao, Xudong; Liu, Guohui

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The combination of intracoronary transplantation and ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction may promote effective and accurate delivery of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) into the infarct zone. To test this hypothesis in this study we examined the effectiveness of ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction in combination with intracoronary transplantation of BMSCs for the treatment of myocardial infarction in canine model of acute myocardial infarction. Method: The dogs were randomly assigned to four groups: PBS, ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction, BMSCs, BMSCs together with ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction. At 28 days post-surgery, cardiac function and the percentage of perfusion defect area to total left ventricular perfusion area (DA%) were determined by myocardial contrast echocardiography. Nitro blue tetrazolium staining was performed to determine myocardial infarct size, hematoxylin and eosin staining for assessing microvascular injury, Masson’s staining for analyzing myocardial tissue collagen, immunohistochemical analysis of α-actin to measure cardiac contractile function and of BrdU-labeled myocardial cells to measure the number of the BMSCs homing to the infarcted region. Results: The transplantation of BMSCs significantly improved heart function and DA% (P < 0.05). The group that received ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction with BMSCs transplantation showed the most improvement in heart function and DA% (P < 0.05). This group also showed a denser deposition of BMSCs in the coronary artery and more BrdU positive cells in the infarcted region, had the maximum number of α-actin positive cells, showed the smallest myocardial infarct area compared to other groups (P< 0.05). Conclusion: Ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction increases the homing of BMSCs in the target area following intracoronary transplantation, which allows more BMSCs to differentiate into functional cardiomyocytes, thereby reducing

  10. High prevalence of cardiovascular and respiratory abnormalities in advanced, intensively treated (transplanted) myeloma: The case for ‘late effects’ screening and preventive strategies

    PubMed Central

    Samuelson, Clare; O'Toole, Laurence; Boland, Elaine; Greenfield, Diana; Ezaydi, Yousef; Ahmedzai, Sam H.; Snowden, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Modern management of myeloma has significantly improved survival, with increasing numbers of patients living beyond a decade. However, little is known about the long-term cardiovascular and respiratory status of intensively treated and multiply relapsed survivors. Methods: We performed detailed cardiovascular and respiratory evaluations in patients with intensively treated, advanced but stable myeloma. All patients had received at least two lines of treatment, including at least one haematopoietic stem cell transplantation procedure, but had stable, controlled disease and were off active treatment at the time of evaluation. Results: Thirty-two patients with a median duration of 6 years (range 2–12) from original diagnosis of myeloma and three lines (range 2–6) of treatment were evaluated. Despite normal physical examination in the majority, there was a high prevalence of sub-clinical cardiac and respiratory dysfunction, reflected by abnormalities of electrocardiography (45%), echocardiography (50%), serum N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide level (NT-pro-BNP, 50%), and pulmonary function testing (45%). NT-pro-BNP level correlated negatively with quality of life (P = 0.012) and positively with serum ferritin (P = 0.027). Dyspnoea score correlated with BMI (P = 0.001). Risk factors for cardiovascular disease (obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, and hyperinsulinaemia) were common. Discussion: Even in the absence of overt clinical features, the majority of intensively treated long-term survivors of myeloma have established cardiovascular and/or respiratory dysfunction, above levels expected in the general population of a similar age. Conclusion: This study supports routine screening and lifestyle modification combined with primary and secondary preventive strategies to reduce cardiovascular and respiratory disease and to preserve quality of life in transplanted myeloma patients. PMID:27077780

  11. Report from a consensus conference on antibody-mediated rejection in heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kobashigawa, Jon; Crespo-Leiro, Maria G.; Ensminger, Stephan M.; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Angelini, Annalisa; Berry, Gerald; Burke, Margaret; Czer, Lawrence; Hiemann, Nicola; Kfoury, Abdallah G.; Mancini, Donna; Mohacsi, Paul; Patel, Jignesh; Pereira, Naveen; Platt, Jeffrey L.; Reed, Elaine F.; Reinsmoen, Nancy; Rodriguez, E. Rene; Rose, Marlene L.; Russell, Stuart D.; Starling, Randy; Suciu-Foca, Nicole; Tallaj, Jose; Taylor, David O.; Van Bakel, Adrian; West, Lori; Zeevi, Adriana; Zuckermann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The problem of AMR remains unsolved because standardized schemes for diagnosis and treatment remains contentious. Therefore, a consensus conference was organized to discuss the current status of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in heart transplantation. METHODS The conference included 83 participants (transplant cardiologists, surgeons, immunologists and pathologists) representing 67 heart transplant centers from North America, Europe, and Asia who all participated in smaller break-out sessions to discuss the various topics of AMR and attempt to achieve consensus. RESULTS A tentative pathology diagnosis of AMR was established, however, the pathologist felt that further discussion was needed prior to a formal recommendation for AMR diagnosis. One of the most important outcomes of this conference was that a clinical definition for AMR (cardiac dysfunction and/or circulating donor-specific antibody) was no longer believed to be required due to recent publications demonstrating that asymptomatic (no cardiac dysfunction) biopsy-proven AMR is associated with subsequent greater mortality and greater development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy. It was also noted that donor-specific antibody is not always detected during AMR episodes as the antibody may be adhered to the donor heart. Finally, recommendations were made for the timing for specific staining of endomyocardial biopsy specimens and the frequency by which circulating antibodies should be assessed. Recommendations for management and future clinical trials were also provided. CONCLUSIONS The AMR Consensus Conference brought together clinicians, pathologists and immunologists to further the understanding of AMR. Progress was made toward a pathology AMR grading scale and consensus was accomplished regarding several clinical issues. PMID:21300295

  12. Acrolein inhalation alters arterial blood gases and triggers carotid body-mediated cardiovascular responses in hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Christina M.; Hazari, Mehdi S.; Ledbetter, Allen D.; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Carll, Alex P.; Cascio, Wayne E.; Winsett, Darrell W.; Costa, Daniel L.; Farraj, Aimen K.

    2016-01-01

    Context Air pollution exposure affects autonomic function, heart rate, blood pressure and left ventricular function. While the mechanism for these effects is uncertain, several studies have reported that air pollution exposure modifies activity of the carotid body, the major organ that senses changes in arterial oxygen and carbon dioxide levels, and elicits downstream changes in autonomic control and cardiac function. Objective We hypothesized that exposure to acrolein, an unsaturated aldehyde and mucosal irritant found in cigarette smoke and diesel exhaust, would activate the carotid body chemoreceptor response and lead to secondary cardiovascular responses in rats. Materials and methods Spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats were exposed once for 3 h to 3 ppm acrolein gas or filtered air in whole body plethysmograph chambers. To determine if the carotid body mediated acrolein-induced cardiovascular responses, rats were pretreated with an inhibitor of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), an enzyme essential for carotid body signal transduction. Results Acrolein exposure induced several cardiovascular effects. Systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure increased during exposure, while cardiac contractility decreased 1 day after exposure. The cardiovascular effects were associated with decreases in pO2, breathing frequency and expiratory time, and increases in sympathetic tone during exposure followed by parasympathetic dominance after exposure. The CSE inhibitor prevented the cardiovascular effects of acrolein exposure. Discussion and conclusion Pretreatment with the CSE inhibitor prevented the cardiovascular effects of acrolein, suggesting that the cardiovascular responses with acrolein may be mediated by carotid body-triggered changes in autonomic tone. (This abstract does not reflect EPA policy.) PMID:25600140

  13. Mediation of Cardiovascular Risk Factor Effects Through Subclinical Vascular Disease: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yeboah, Joseph; Delaney, Joseph A; Nance, Robin; McClelland, Robyn L; Polak, Joseph F.; Sibley, Christopher T.; Bertoni, Alain; Burke, Gregory L; Carr, J. Jeffery; Herrington, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective It is unclear to what extent subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) such as coronary artery calcium (CAC), carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and brachial flow mediated dilation (FMD) are mediators of the known associations between traditional cardiovascular risk factors and incident CVD events. We assessed the portion of the effects of risk factors on incident CVD events that are mediated through CAC, CIMT and FMD. Approach and Results 6355 out of 6814 MESA participants were included. Nonlinear implementation of structural equation modeling (STATA mediation package) were used to assess whether CAC, CIMT or FMD are mediators of the association between traditional risk factors and incident CVD event. Mean age of 62, with 47% males, 12% diabetics and 13% current smokers. Mean follow up of 7.5 years, 539 CVD events were adjudicated. CAC showed the highest mediation while FMD showed the least. Age had the highest percent of total effect mediated via CAC for CVD outcomes while current cigarette smoking had the least percent of total effect mediated via CAC [percent (95%CI: 80.2(58.8, 126.7) % vs. 10.6(6.1, 38.5) % respectively). BMI showed the highest percent of total effect mediated via CIMT [17.7(11.6, 38.9) %], only a negligible amount of the association between traditional risk factors and CVD was mediated via FMD. Conclusion Many of the risk factors for incident CVD (other than age, sex and BMI) showed a modest level of mediation via CAC, CIMT and FMD suggesting that current subclinical CVD markers may not be optimal intermediaries for gauging upstream risk factor modification PMID:24876350

  14. A novel model for studies of blood-mediated long-term responses to cellular transplants

    PubMed Central

    Lindblom, Susanne; Hong, Jaan; Nilsson, Bo; Korsgren, Olle; Ronquist, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Aims Interaction between blood and bio-surfaces is important in many medical fields. With the aim of studying blood-mediated reactions to cellular transplants, we developed a whole-blood model for incubation of small volumes for up to 48 h. Methods Heparinized polyvinyl chloride tubing was cut in suitable lengths and sealed to create small bags. Multiple bags, with fresh venous blood, were incubated attached to a rotating wheel at 37°C. Physiological variables in blood were monitored: glucose, blood gases, mono- and divalent cations and chloride ions, osmolality, coagulation (platelet consumption, thrombin-antithrombin complexes (TAT)), and complement activation (C3a and SC5b-9), haemolysis, and leukocyte viability. Results Basic glucose consumption was high. Glucose depletion resulted in successive elevation of extracellular potassium, while sodium and calcium ions decreased due to inhibition of energy-requiring ion pumps. Addition of glucose improved ion balance but led to metabolic acidosis. To maintain a balanced physiological environment beyond 6 h, glucose and sodium hydrogen carbonate were added regularly based on analyses of glucose, pH, ions, and osmotic pressure. With these additives haemolysis was prevented for up to 72 h and leukocyte viability better preserved. Despite using non-heparinized blood, coagulation and complement activation were lower during long-term incubations compared with addition of thromboplastin and collagen. Conclusion A novel whole-blood model for studies of blood-mediated responses to a cellular transplant is presented allowing extended observations for up to 48 h and highlights the importance of stringent evaluations and adjustment of physiological conditions. PMID:25322825

  15. Thallium stress testing does not predict cardiovascular risk in diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing cadaveric renal transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Holley, J.L.; Fenton, R.A.; Arthur, R.S. )

    1991-05-01

    This study assessed the usefulness of thallium stress testing as a predictor of perioperative cardiovascular risk in diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing cadaveric renal transplantation. Demographic factors influencing the exercise performance in these patients were also examined. The medical records of 189 consecutive patients with diabetic nephropathy who were evaluated for cadaveric renal transplantation were reviewed. Thallium stress testing was the initial examination of cardiovascular status in 141 patients. An adequate examination was one in which at least 70% of maximum heart rate was achieved. A thallium stress test was normal if there were no ST segment depressions on the electrocardiogram and no perfusion abnormalities on the thallium scan. Forty-four patients underwent cardiac catheterization as the initial evaluation (Group C) and four patients underwent transplantation without a formal cardiovascular evaluation (Group D). Sixty-four of the 141 patients undergoing thallium stress testing had an adequate and normal examination (Group A). The incidence of perioperative cardiac events in this group was 2%. Seventy-seven patients (Group B) had an abnormal (n = 41) or an inadequate (n = 36) thallium stress test and most (n = 61) then underwent coronary angiography. The use of beta-blockers was the only predictor of an abnormal or inadequate thallium stress test. Forty-three percent of patients with inadequate or abnormal thallium stress tests had significant coronary artery disease on cardiac catheterization. The perioperative risk of cardiac events was not different in Group A versus Groups B, C, and D combined. Survival of Group A and B patients was not different but was significantly longer than that of Group C patients.

  16. Eculizumab Salvage Therapy for Antibody-Mediated Rejection in a Desensitization-Resistant Intestinal Re-Transplant Patient.

    PubMed

    Fan, J; Tryphonopoulos, P; Tekin, A; Nishida, S; Selvaggi, G; Amador, A; Jebrock, J; Weppler, D; Levi, D; Vianna, R; Ruiz, P; Tzakis, A

    2015-07-01

    The presence of elevated calculated panel reactive antibody (cPRA) and anti-HLA donor specific antibodies (DSA) are high risk factors for acute antibody-mediated rejection (AAMR) in intestinal transplantation that may lead to graft loss. Eculizumab has been used for the treatment of AAMR in kidney transplantation of sensitized patients that do not respond to other treatment. Here, we report a case where eculizumab was used to treat AAMR in a desensitization-resistant intestinal re-transplant patient. A male patient lost his intestinal graft to AAMR 8.14 years after his primary transplant. He received a second intestinal graft that had to be explanted a month later due to refractory AAMR. The patient remained highly sensitized despite multiple treatments. He received a multivisceral graft and presented with severe AAMR on day 3 posttransplantation. The AAMR was successfully treated with eculizumab. The patient presently maintains an elevated cPRA level above 90% but his DSAs have decreased from 18 000 MFI (mean fluorescent intensity) to below the positive cut-off value of 3000 MFI and remains rejection free with a 2-year follow-up since his multivisceral transplant. Eculizumab offers an alternative to treat AAMR in intestinal transplantation in desensitization-resistant patients. PMID:25649227

  17. Dietary carotenoids are associated with cardiovascular disease risk biomarkers mediated by serum carotenoid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Chung, Sang-Jin; McCullough, Marjorie L; Song, Won O; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Koo, Sung I; Chun, Ock K

    2014-07-01

    Hyperlipidemia and elevated circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) and total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations are cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Previous studies indicated that higher serum carotenoid concentrations were inversely associated with some of these biomarkers. However, whether dietary carotenoid intake is inversely associated with these CVD risk biomarkers is not well known. We assessed the associations between individual dietary carotenoid intake and CVD risk biomarkers and tested whether the serum carotenoid concentrations explain (mediate) or influence the strength of (moderate) the associations, if any association exists. Dietary data collected from 2 24-h dietary recalls and serum measurements in adult men (n = 1312) and women (n = 1544) from the NHANES 2003-2006 were used. Regression models designed for survey analysis were used to examine the associations between individual dietary carotenoids and log-transformed blood cholesterol, CRP, and tHcy. The corresponding individual serum carotenoid concentration was considered as mediator (and moderator if applicable). After adjustment for covariates, significant inverse associations with LDL cholesterol were observed for dietary β-carotene (P < 0.05) and lutein + zeaxanthin (P < 0.001), and with tHcy for dietary β-carotene (P < 0.05), lycopene (P < 0.05), and total carotenoids (P < 0.05). Dietary lutein + zeaxanthin intake was also positively associated with HDL cholesterol concentrations (P < 0.01). Most of these associations were null after additional adjustment for corresponding serum carotenoid concentrations, indicating the complete mediation effects of serum carotenoids. Serum β-carotene significantly moderated the associations between dietary β-carotene and CRP (P-interaction < 0.05), and quartile 4 of dietary β-carotene was associated with lower CRP concentrations only among participants with serum β-carotene > 0.43 μmol/L. In this population-based cross-sectional study

  18. Radish seed extract mediates its cardiovascular inhibitory effects via muscarinic receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Ghayur, Muhammad Nabeel; Gilani, Anwarul Hassan

    2006-02-01

    In this study, we describe the hypotensive, cardio-modulatory and endothelium-dependent vasodilator actions of Raphanus sativus (radish) seed crude extract in an attempt to provide scientific basis for its traditional use in hypertension. The plant extract (Rs.Cr) was prepared in distilled water and was subjected to phytochemical screening using standard analytical procedures. In vivo blood pressure was monitored in anaesthetized normotensive rats. Isolated tissue preparations were suspended in tissue baths containing Kreb's solution while acute toxicity study was performed in mice for 24 h. Rs.Cr tested positive for the presence of saponins, flavonoids, tannins, phenols and alkaloids and caused a dose-dependent (0.1-3 mg/kg) fall in blood pressure and heart rate of rats that was mediated via an atropine-sensitive pathway. In isolated guinea-pig atria, Rs.Cr showed dose-dependent (0.03-3.0 mg/mL) inhibition of force and rate of contractions. In the atropine-treated tissues, the inhibitory effect was abolished and a cardiac stimulant effect was unmasked which was resistant to adrenergic and serotonergic receptor blockade. In the endothelium-intact rat aorta, Rs.Cr inhibited phenylephrine-induced contractions, which was blocked by atropine and Nomega-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride while was also absent in the endothelium-denuded preparations. The extract was safe in mice up to the dose of 10 g/kg. The study shows that the cardiovascular inhibitory effects of the plant are mediated through activation of muscarinic receptors thus possibly justifying its use in hypertension. PMID:16448395

  19. Alcohol Consumption and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality in Women: Potential Mediating Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Djoussé, Luc; Lee, I-Min; Buring, Julie E; Gaziano, J. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background: Although an association between moderate alcohol consumption and decreased cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality has been reported, limited data are available on potential mediating mechanisms. We examined the association between alcohol and CVD and mortality in 26,399 women and estimated the proportion of reduced risk of CVD/mortality explained by a series of intermediate factors. Methods and Results: Alcohol consumption was self-reported at baseline and CVD events and deaths were ascertained via follow-up questionnaires and medical records. Baseline levels of hemoglobin A1c, inflammatory markers, hemostatic factors, and lipids were measured. Blood pressure and hypercholesterolemia; and treatment for lipids were self-reported. During a mean follow up of 12.2 years, 1039 CVD events, 785 deaths (153 CVD deaths) occurred. There was a J-shaped relation between alcohol consumption and incident CVD, total and CVD mortality in a multivariable model. Compared with abstainers, alcohol intake of 5-14.9 g/d was associated with 26%, 35%, and 51% lower risk of CVD, total and CVD mortality, respectively, in a multivariable model. For CVD risk reduction, lipids made the largest contribution to the lower risk of CVD (28.7%), followed by hemoglobin A1c/diabetes (25.3%), inflammatory/hemostatic factors (5%), and blood pressure factors (4.6%). All these mediating factors together explained 86.3%, 18.7%, and 21.8% of the observed lower risk of CVD, total and CVD mortality, respectively. Conclusions: These data suggest that alcohol effects on lipids and insulin sensitivity may account for a large proportion of the lower risk of CVD/mortality observed with moderate drinking under the assumption that the alcohol-CVD association is causal. PMID:19597054

  20. Mindfulness may both moderate and mediate the effect of physical fitness on cardiovascular responses to stress: a speculative hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Demarzo, Marcelo M. P.; Montero-Marin, Jesús; Stein, Phyllis K.; Cebolla, Ausiàs; Provinciale, Jaime G.; García-Campayo, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The psychological construct of mindfulness refers to an awareness that emerges by intentionally paying attention to the present experience in a non-judgmental or evaluative way. This particular quality of awareness has been associated to several indicators of physical and psychological health, and can be developed using mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs), and therefore MBIs have been successfully applied as preventive and complementary interventions and therapies in medicine and psychology. Together with quiet sitting and lying meditation practices, mindful physical exercises such as “mindful walking” and “mindful movement” are key elements in MBIs and couple muscular activity with an internally directed focus, improving interoceptive attention to bodily sensations. In addition, MBIs seem to share similar mechanisms with physical fitness (PF) by which they may influence cardiovascular responses to stress. Based on these facts, it is feasible to raise the question of whether physical training itself may induce the development of that particular quality of awareness associated with mindfulness, or if one's dispositional mindfulness (DM) (the tendency to be more mindful in daily life) could moderate the effects of exercise on cardiovascular response to stress. The role of mindfulness as a mediator or moderator of the effect of exercise training on cardiovascular responses to stress has barely been studied. In this study, we have hypothesized pathways (moderation and mediation) by which mindfulness could significantly influence the effects of PF on cardiovascular responses to stress and discussed potential practical ways to test these hypotheses. PMID:24723891

  1. Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Lung Transplantation: Clinical Outcomes and Donor-Specific Antibody Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Roux, A; Bendib Le Lan, I; Holifanjaniaina, S; Thomas, K A; Hamid, A M; Picard, C; Grenet, D; De Miranda, S; Douvry, B; Beaumont-Azuar, L; Sage, E; Devaquet, J; Cuquemelle, E; Le Guen, M; Spreafico, R; Suberbielle-Boissel, C; Stern, M; Parquin, F

    2016-04-01

    In the context of lung transplant (LT), because of diagnostic difficulties, antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) remains a matter of debate. We retrospectively analyzed an LT cohort at Foch Hospital to demonstrate the impact of AMR on LT prognosis. AMR diagnosis requires association of clinical symptoms, donor-specific antibodies (DSAs), and C4d(+) staining and/or histological patterns consistent with AMR. Prospective categorization split patients into four groups: (i) DSA positive, AMR positive (DSA(pos) AMR(pos) ); (ii) DSA positive, AMR negative (DSA(pos) AMR(neg) ); (iii) DSA limited, AMR negative (DSA(Lim) ; equal to one specificity, with mean fluorescence intensity of 500-1000 once); and (iv) DSA negative, AMR negative (DSA(neg) ). AMR treatment consisted of a combination of plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab. Among 206 transplanted patients, 10.7% were DSA(pos) AMR(pos) (n = 22), 40.3% were DSA(pos) AMR(neg) (n = 84), 6% were DSA(Lim) (n = 13) and 43% were DSA(neg) (n = 88). Analysis of acute cellular rejection at month 12 showed higher cumulative numbers (mean plus or minus standard deviation) in the DSA(pos) AMR(pos) group (2.1 ± 1.7) compared with DSA(pos) AMR(neg) (1 ± 1.2), DSA(Lim) (0.75 ± 1), and DSA(neg) (0.7 ± 1.23) groups. Multivariate analysis demonstrated AMR as a risk factor for chronic lung allograft dysfunction (hazard ratio [HR] 8.7) and graft loss (HR 7.56) for DSA(pos) AMR(pos) patients. Our results show a negative impact of AMR on LT clinical course and advocate for an early active diagnostic approach and evaluation of therapeutic strategies to improve prognosis. PMID:26845386

  2. Dietary Intake as a Link between Obesity, Systemic Inflammation, and the Assumption of Multiple Cardiovascular and Antidiabetic Drugs in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Guida, Bruna; Maresca, Immacolata Daniela; Germanò, Roberta; Trio, Rossella; Nastasi, Anna Maria; Federico, Stefano; Memoli, Andrea; Apicella, Luca; Memoli, Bruno; Sabbatini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated dietary intake and nutritional-inflammation status in ninety-six renal transplant recipients, 7.2 ± 5.0 years after transplantation. Patients were classified as normoweight (NW), overweight (OW), and obese (OB), if their body mass index was between 18.5 and 24.9, 25.0 and 29.9, and ≥30 kg/m2, respectively. Food composition tables were used to estimate nutrient intakes. The values obtained were compared with those recommended in current nutritional guidelines. 52% of the patients were NW, 29% were OW, and 19% were OB. Total energy, fat, and dietary n-6 PUFAs intake was higher in OB than in NW. IL-6 and hs-CRP were higher in OB than in NW. The prevalence of multidrug regimen was higher in OB. In all patients, total energy, protein, saturated fatty acids, and sodium intake were higher than guideline recommendations. On the contrary, the intake of unsaturated and n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and fiber was lower than recommended. In conclusion, the prevalence of obesity was high in our patients, and it was associated with inflammation and the assumption of multiple cardiovascular and antidiabetic drugs. Dietary intake did not meet nutritional recommendations in all patients, especially in obese ones, highlighting the need of a long-term nutritional support in renal transplant recipients. PMID:23984354

  3. Nanoparticle-mediated transcriptional modification enhances neuronal differentiation of human neural stem cells following transplantation in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowei; Tzeng, Stephany Y; Liu, Xiaoyan; Tammia, Markus; Cheng, Yu-Hao; Rolfe, Andrew; Sun, Dong; Zhang, Ning; Green, Jordan J; Wen, Xuejun; Mao, Hai-Quan

    2016-04-01

    Strategies to enhance survival and direct the differentiation of stem cells in vivo following transplantation in tissue repair site are critical to realizing the potential of stem cell-based therapies. Here we demonstrated an effective approach to promote neuronal differentiation and maturation of human fetal tissue-derived neural stem cells (hNSCs) in a brain lesion site of a rat traumatic brain injury model using biodegradable nanoparticle-mediated transfection method to deliver key transcriptional factor neurogenin-2 to hNSCs when transplanted with a tailored hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel, generating larger number of more mature neurons engrafted to the host brain tissue than non-transfected cells. The nanoparticle-mediated transcription activation method together with an HA hydrogel delivery matrix provides a translatable approach for stem cell-based regenerative therapy. PMID:26828681

  4. Transplantation tolerance mediated by suppressor T cells and suppressive antibody in a recipient of a renal transplant.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Mizuochi, I; Sada, M; Amemiya, H

    1985-10-01

    This is a report of a patient who underwent cadaveric renal transplantation in spite of the presence of three HLA-A, B and two DR antigen mismatches between the recipient and donor. The recipient received more than 20 units of blood before transplantation. The crossmatch between the recipient's serum and the T and B cells of the donor was negative. The patient exhibited hepatic dysfunction from the early posttransplant period, which eventually led to discontinuation of azathioprine or Bredinin at one year posttransplantation. Thereafter, only betamethasone was administered once every 3 days. The patients has maintained good renal function for more than one year following withdrawal of the immunosuppressants. It appeared that transplantation tolerance was established in this patient. Therefore, we examined the mechanisms sustaining the tolerance. Both nylon-wool-adherent, alloantigen-specific suppressor T cells and nonadherent, nonspecific suppressor T cells were observed in the lymphocytes of the patient after transplantation. It was also shown that suppressive antibody was present in the serum directed toward the clone of autologous lymphocytes that reacted with the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) antigen of the donor. In the inhibition test against various types of MLR antigens using this suppressive antibody, it was found that the reaction against the donor cells was suppressed when the responding cells shared the same class I antigen with the recipient. When the stimulating cells had the class II antigen of the donor, the reaction of the specific responding cells was also inhibited. These inhibiting effects were only seen when the responding cells were pretreated with the antibody, but not when stimulating cells were pretreated. PMID:2413592

  5. Cannabidiol Limits T Cell–Mediated Chronic Autoimmune Myocarditis: Implications to Autoimmune Disorders and Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-Shin; Erdelyi, Katalin; Matyas, Csaba; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Varga, Zoltan V; Liaudet, Lucas; Hask’, György; ’iháková, Daniela; Mechoulam, Raphael; Pacher, Pal

    2016-01-01

    Myocarditis is a major cause of heart failure and sudden cardiac death in young adults and adolescents. Many cases of myocarditis are associated with autoimmune processes in which cardiac myosin is a major autoantigen. Conventional immunosuppressive therapies often provide unsatisfactory results and are associated with adverse toxicities during the treatment of autoimmune myocarditis. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a nonpsychoactive constituent of marijuana that exerts antiinflammatory effects independent of classical cannabinoid receptors. Recently, 80 clinical trials have investigated the effects of CBD in various diseases from inflammatory bowel disease to graft versus host disease. CBD-based formulations are used for the management of multiple sclerosis in numerous countries, and CBD also received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of refractory childhood epilepsy and glioblastoma multiforme. Herein, using a well-established mouse model of experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) induced by immunization with cardiac myosin emmulsified in adjuvant resulting in T cell–mediated inflammation, cardiomyocyte cell death, fibrosis and myocardial dysfunction, we studied the potential beneficial effects of CBD. EAM was characterized by marked myocardial T-cell infiltration, profound inflammatory response and fibrosis (measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, histology and immunohistochemistry analyses) accompanied by marked attenuation of both systolic and diastolic cardiac functions measured with a pressure-volume conductance catheter technique. Chronic treatment with CBD largely attenuated the CD3+ and CD4+ T cell–mediated inflammatory response and injury, myocardial fibrosis and cardiac dysfunction in mice. In conclusion, CBD may represent a promising novel treatment for managing autoimmune myocarditis and possibly other autoimmune disorders and organ transplantation. PMID:26772776

  6. Better understanding of transplant glomerulopathy secondary to chronic antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Remport, Adam; Ivanyi, Bela; Mathe, Zoltan; Tinckam, Kathryn; Mucsi, Istvan; Molnar, Miklos Z

    2015-11-01

    Transplant glomerulopathy (TG) is generally accepted to result from repeated episodes of endothelial activation, injury and repair, leading to pathological abnormalities of double contouring or multi-layering of the glomerular basement membrane. TG is a major sequel of chronic active antibody-mediated rejection (cABMR), from pre-existing or de novo anti-HLA antibodies. Hepatitis C infection, thrombotic microangiopathy or other factors may also contribute to TG development. TG prevalence is 5-20% in most series, reaching 55%, in some high-risk cohorts, and is associated with worse allograft outcomes. Despite its prevalence and clinical significance, few well-studied treatment options have been proposed. Similar to desensitization protocols, plasmapheresis with or without immunoabsorption, high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, bortezomib and eculizumab have been proposed in the treatment of TG due to cABMR individually or in various combinations. Robust clinical trials are urgently needed to address this major cause of allograft loss. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the epidemiology, etiology, pathology, and the preventive and treatment options for TG secondary to cABMR. PMID:25473123

  7. Degradation of Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycans Potentiates Transplant-Mediated Axonal Remodeling and Functional Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung G.; Dai, Hai-Ning; Lynskey, James V.; Mcatee, Marietta; Bregman, Barbara S.

    2008-01-01

    Transplantation of growth-permissive cells or tissues was used to bridge a lesion cavity and induce axonal growth in experimental spinal cord injury (SCI). Axonal interactions between host and transplant may be affected by upregulation of inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) following various transplantation strategies. The extent of axonal growth and functional recovery after transplantation of embryonic spinal cord tissue decreases in adult compared to neonatal host. We hypothesized that CSPGs contribute to the decrease in the extent to which transplant supports axonal remodeling and functional recovery. Expression of CSPGs increased after overhemisection SCI in adult rats but not in neonates. Embryonic spinal cord transplant was surrounded by CSPGs deposited in host cord, and the interface between host and transplant seemed to contain a large amount of CSPGs. Intrathecally delivered chondroitinase ABC (C'ase) improved recovery of distal forelimb usage and skilled motor behavior after C4 overhemisection injury and transplantation in adults. This behavioral recovery was accompanied by an increased amount of raphespinal axons growing into the transplant, and raphespinal innervation to the cervical motor region was promoted by C'ase plus transplant. Moreover, C'ase increased the number of transplanted neurons that grew axons to the host cervical enlargement, suggesting that degradation of CSPGs supports remodeling not only of host axons but also axons from transplanted neurons. Our results suggest that CSPGs constitute an inhibitory barrier to prevent axonal interactions between host and transplant in adults, and degradation of the inhibitory barrier can potentiate transplant-mediated axonal remodeling and functional recovery after SCI. PMID:16705682

  8. Ultrafine carbon particle mediated cardiovascular impairment of aged spontaneously hypertensive rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Previous studies provided compelling evidences for particulate matter (PM) associated cardiovascular health effects. Elderly individuals, particularly those with preexisting conditions like hypertension are regarded to be vulnerable. Experimental data are warranted to...

  9. Acrolein Inhalation Alters Arterial Blood Gases and Triggers Carotid Body Mediated Cardiovascular Responses in Hypertensive Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to air pollution increases risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially in individuals with underlying cardiopulmonary disease. While the mechanisms accounting for these effects are unclear, several epidemiological studies have reported decreases in oxygen ...

  10. Long-term transplantation of canine keratinocytes made resistant to G418 through retrovirus-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, M E; Stockschlaeder, M A; Schuening, F G; Niederwieser, D; Hackman, R; Miller, A D; Storb, R

    1990-01-01

    We studied cultured canine keratinocytes to determine whether they could serve as targets for retrovirus-mediated gene transfer and whether infected cells could persist after transplantation into dogs, a large random-bred model for gene transfer studies. Canine keratinocytes obtained from skin biopsy samples were cultured in vitro with lethally irradiated NIH 3T3 cells used as a feeder layer. The keratinocyte colonies consisted of squamous epithelium with numerous desmosomes, tonofilaments, and keratohyalin granules. In addition, the cells were strongly reactive with monoclonal antibodies to cytokeratin intermediate filament proteins. For the infection studies, we grew the keratinocytes on a feeder layer of lethally irradiated PA317 retrovirus packaging cells, which produced a helper-free amphotropic retroviral vector containing the neomycin phosphotransferase (neo) gene. After cocultivation, 34% (range, 10-76%) of the keratinocytes were found to be resistant to the neomycin analogue G418. Infected keratinocytes were then transplanted into the dog of origin; 1% (range, less than 0.1-3%) of the keratinocytes obtained 27-130 days after transplantation from skin biopsy samples gave rise to G418-resistant colonies. We conclude that canine keratinocytes cultured in vitro can be infected efficiently with a neo gene-containing retroviral vector, and they show persistent G418 resistance for at least 130 days after transplantation into the skin donor. Images PMID:2315325

  11. Developmental endothelial locus-1 modulates platelet-monocyte interactions and instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction in islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kourtzelis, Ioannis; Kotlabova, Klara; Lim, Jong-Hyung; Mitroulis, Ioannis; Ferreira, Anaisa; Chen, Lan-Sun; Gercken, Bettina; Steffen, Anja; Kemter, Elisabeth; Klotzsche-von Ameln, Anne; Waskow, Claudia; Hosur, Kavita; Chatzigeorgiou, Antonios; Ludwig, Barbara; Wolf, Eckhard; Hajishengallis, George; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2016-04-01

    Platelet-monocyte interactions are strongly implicated in thrombo-inflammatory injury by actively contributing to intravascular inflammation, leukocyte recruitment to inflamed sites, and the amplification of the procoagulant response. Instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR) represents thrombo-inflammatory injury elicited upon pancreatic islet transplantation (islet-Tx), thereby dramatically affecting transplant survival and function. Developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1) is a functionally versatile endothelial cell-derived homeostatic factor with anti-inflammatory properties, but its potential role in IBMIR has not been previously addressed. Here, we establish Del-1 as a novel inhibitor of IBMIR using a whole blood-islet model and a syngeneic murine transplantation model. Indeed, Del-1 pre-treatment of blood before addition of islets diminished coagulation activation and islet damage as assessed by C-peptide release. Consistently, intraportal islet-Tx in transgenic mice with endothelial cell-specific overexpression of Del-1 resulted in a marked decrease of monocytes and platelet-monocyte aggregates in the transplanted tissues, relative to those in wild-type recipients. Mechanistically, Del-1 decreased platelet-monocyte aggregate formation, by specifically blocking the interaction between monocyte Mac-1-integrin and platelet GPIb. Our findings reveal a hitherto unknown role of Del-1 in the regulation of platelet-monocyte interplay and the subsequent heterotypic aggregate formation in the context of IBMIR. Therefore, Del-1 may represent a novel approach to prevent or mitigate the adverse reactions mediated through thrombo-inflammatory pathways in islet-Tx and perhaps other inflammatory disorders involving platelet-leukocyte aggregate formation. PMID:26676803

  12. Effectiveness of Intravenous Immunoglobulin Plus Plasmapheresis on Antibody-mediated Rejection or Thrombotic Microangiopathy in Iranian Kidney Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin; Shojaie, Lida; Hosni, Amin; Khatami, Mohammad Reza; Jafari, Atefeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antibody mediated rejection (AMR) and thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) after kidney transplantation are difficult to differentiate most of the times and both play important roles in kidney allograft loss. Common treatment strategies of these two conditions include plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and rituximab. Objectives: This study was designed to assess the efficacy of routine treatment of AMR/TMA in Iranian kidney transplant recipients, which comprises of plasmapheresis and IVIG. Patients and Methods: This one-year cross-sectional study was performed in the Kidney Transplantation Ward of Imam-Khomeini Hospital Complex, Tehran, Iran. All kidney transplant recipients who were administered plasmapheresis and IVIG to treat definite or suggested AMR or TMA were assessed clinically and also evaluated on laboratory data. Results: During 2014, we encountered five patients with suspicious AMR or TMA at our kidney transplant center. Renal biopsy was performed for two of them, suggesting AMR for one patient and TMA for another patient. All patients were treated with plasmapheresis plus IVIG. In this center, as a routine practice, the cumulative dose of 2 g/kg of IVIG was divided to 300 - 400 mg/kg after each plasmapheresis. Only one out of the five patients showed response, albeit not completely. Conclusions: Due to daily plasmapheresis within the first several days after AMR or TMA, administering high amounts of the cumulative dose of IVIG after plasmapheresis may result in high amounts of IVIG withdrawal by plasmapheresis and response failure. Our suggestion is to reduce the IVIG dose after each plasmapheresis to 100 mg/kg (i.e. replacement dose) to reach a cumulative dose of 2 g/Kg. If plasmapheresis treatment is initiated sooner than the completion of the IVIG cumulative dose of 2 g/kg, the remaining dose can be administered during one injection. PMID:26034746

  13. The HMGB1-RAGE axis mediates traumatic brain injury-induced pulmonary dysfunction in lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Daniel J; Gracon, Adam S A; Ripsch, Matthew S; Fisher, Amanda J; Cheon, Bo M; Pandya, Pankita H; Vittal, Ragini; Capitano, Maegan L; Kim, Youngsong; Allette, Yohance M; Riley, Amanda A; McCarthy, Brian P; Territo, Paul R; Hutchins, Gary D; Broxmeyer, Hal E; Sandusky, George E; White, Fletcher A; Wilkes, David S

    2014-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in systemic inflammatory responses that affect the lung. This is especially critical in the setting of lung transplantation, where more than half of donor allografts are obtained postmortem from individuals with TBI. The mechanism by which TBI causes pulmonary dysfunction remains unclear but may involve the interaction of high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein with the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). To investigate the role of HMGB1 and RAGE in TBI-induced lung dysfunction, RAGE-sufficient (wild-type) or RAGE-deficient (RAGE(-/-)) C57BL/6 mice were subjected to TBI through controlled cortical impact and studied for cardiopulmonary injury. Compared to control animals, TBI induced systemic hypoxia, acute lung injury, pulmonary neutrophilia, and decreased compliance (a measure of the lungs' ability to expand), all of which were attenuated in RAGE(-/-) mice. Neutralizing systemic HMGB1 induced by TBI reversed hypoxia and improved lung compliance. Compared to wild-type donors, lungs from RAGE(-/-) TBI donors did not develop acute lung injury after transplantation. In a study of clinical transplantation, elevated systemic HMGB1 in donors correlated with impaired systemic oxygenation of the donor lung before transplantation and predicted impaired oxygenation after transplantation. These data suggest that the HMGB1-RAGE axis plays a role in the mechanism by which TBI induces lung dysfunction and that targeting this pathway before transplant may improve recipient outcomes after lung transplantation. PMID:25186179

  14. Notch-1 Mediated Cardiac Protection following Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Transplantation in Doxorubicin-Induced Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Hilda; Singla, Dinender K.

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX), an effective chemotherapeutic drug used in the treatment of various cancers, is limited in its clinical applications due to cardiotoxicity. Recent studies suggest that transplanted adult stem cells inhibit DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. However, the effects of transplanted embryonic stem (ES) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are completely unknown in DOX-induced left ventricular dysfunction following myocardial infarction (MI). In brief, C57BL/6 mice were divided into five groups: Sham, DOX-MI, DOX-MI+cell culture (CC) media, DOX-MI+ES cells, and DOX-MI+iPS cells. Mice were injected with cumulative dose of 12 mg/kg of DOX and 2 weeks later, MI was induced by coronary artery ligation. Following ligation, 5×104 ES or iPS cells were delivered into the peri-infarct region. At day 14 post-MI, echocardiography was performed, mice were sacrificed, and hearts were harvested for further analyses. Our data reveal apoptosis was significantly inhibited in ES and iPS cell transplanted hearts compared with respective controls (DOX-MI+ES: 0.48±0.06% and DOX-MI+iPS: 0.33±0.05% vs. DOX-MI: 1.04±0.07% and DOX-MI+CC: 0.96±0.21%; p<0.05). Furthermore, a significant increase in levels of Notch-1 (p<0.05), Hes1 (p<0.05), and pAkt (p<0.05) were observed whereas a decrease in the levels of PTEN (p<0.05), a negative regulator of Akt, was evident following stem cell transplantation. Moreover, hearts transplanted with stem cells demonstrated decreased vascular and interstitial fibrosis (p<0.05) as well as MMP-9 expression (p<0.01) compared with controls. Additionally, heart function was significantly improved (p<0.05) in both cell-transplanted groups. In conclusion, our data show that transplantation of ES and iPS cells blunt DOX-induced adverse cardiac remodeling, which is associated with improved cardiac function, and these effects are mediated by the Notch pathway. PMID:24988225

  15. Coincidence of cellular and antibody mediated rejection in heart transplant recipients - preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Zakliczyński, Michał; Nożyński, Jerzy; Konecka-Mrówka, Dominika; Babińska, Agnieszka; Flak, Bożena; Hrapkowicz, Tomasz; Zembala, Marian

    2014-03-01

    Antibody mediated rejection (AMR) can significantly influence the results of orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT). However, AMR and cellular rejection (CR) coexistence is poorly described. Therefore we performed a prospective pilot study to assess AMR/CR concomitance in endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) obtained electively in 27 OHT recipients (21 M/6 F, 45.4 ± 14.4 y/o). Biopsy samples were paraffin embedded and processed typically with hematoxylin/eosin staining to assess CR, and, if a sufficient amount of material remained, treated with immunohistochemical methods to localize particles C3d and C4d as markers of antibody dependent complement activation. With this approach 80 EMBs, including 41 (51%) harvested within the first month after OHT, were qualified for the study. Among them 14 (18%) were C3d+, 37 (46%) were C4d+, and 12 (15%) were both C3d and C4d positive. At least one C3d+, C4d+, and C3d/C4d+ EMB was found in 10 (37%), 17 (63%), and 8 (30%) patients, respectively. Among 37 CR0 EMBs C3d was observed in 4 (11%), C4d in 17 (46%), and both C3d/C4d in 3 (8%) cases. Among 28 CR1 EMBs C3d was observed in 3 (11%), C4d in 11 (39%), and C3d/C4d in 3 (11%) cases. Among 15 CR2 EMBs C3d was observed in 7 (47%), C4d in 9 (60%), and C3d/C4d in 6 (40%) cases. Differences in C3d and C3d/C4d occurrence between grouped CR0-1 EMBs and CR2 EMBs (7/65 - 11% vs. 7/15 - 47%; 6/65 - 9% vs. 6/15 - 40%) were significant (p = 0.0035 and p = 0.0091, respectively, χ(2) test). In conclusion, apparently frequent CR and AMR coexistence demonstrated in this preliminary study warrants further investigation in this field. PMID:26336395

  16. Coincidence of cellular and antibody mediated rejection in heart transplant recipients – preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Nożyński, Jerzy; Konecka-Mrówka, Dominika; Babińska, Agnieszka; Flak, Bożena; Hrapkowicz, Tomasz; Zembala, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Antibody mediated rejection (AMR) can significantly influence the results of orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT). However, AMR and cellular rejection (CR) coexistence is poorly described. Therefore we performed a prospective pilot study to assess AMR/CR concomitance in endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) obtained electively in 27 OHT recipients (21 M/6 F, 45.4 ± 14.4 y/o). Biopsy samples were paraffin embedded and processed typically with hematoxylin/eosin staining to assess CR, and, if a sufficient amount of material remained, treated with immunohistochemical methods to localize particles C3d and C4d as markers of antibody dependent complement activation. With this approach 80 EMBs, including 41 (51%) harvested within the first month after OHT, were qualified for the study. Among them 14 (18%) were C3d+, 37 (46%) were C4d+, and 12 (15%) were both C3d and C4d positive. At least one C3d+, C4d+, and C3d/C4d+ EMB was found in 10 (37%), 17 (63%), and 8 (30%) patients, respectively. Among 37 CR0 EMBs C3d was observed in 4 (11%), C4d in 17 (46%), and both C3d/C4d in 3 (8%) cases. Among 28 CR1 EMBs C3d was observed in 3 (11%), C4d in 11 (39%), and C3d/C4d in 3 (11%) cases. Among 15 CR2 EMBs C3d was observed in 7 (47%), C4d in 9 (60%), and C3d/C4d in 6 (40%) cases. Differences in C3d and C3d/C4d occurrence between grouped CR0-1 EMBs and CR2 EMBs (7/65 – 11% vs. 7/15 – 47%; 6/65 – 9% vs. 6/15 – 40%) were significant (p = 0.0035 and p = 0.0091, respectively, χ2 test). In conclusion, apparently frequent CR and AMR coexistence demonstrated in this preliminary study warrants further investigation in this field. PMID:26336395

  17. Activation of the central histaminergic system mediates arachidonic-acid-induced cardiovascular effects.

    PubMed

    Altinbas, Burcin; Topuz, Bora Burak; İlhan, Tuncay; Yilmaz, Mustafa Sertac; Erdost, Hatice; Yalcin, Murat

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explain the involvement of the central histaminergic system in arachidonic acid (AA)-induced cardiovascular effects in normotensive rats using hemodynamic, immunohistochemistry, and microdialysis studies. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered AA (0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 μmol) induced dose- and time-dependent increases in mean arterial pressure and decreased heart rate in conscious normotensive Sprague-Dawley rats. Central injection of AA (0.5 μmol) also increased posterior hypothalamic extracellular histamine levels and produced strong COX-1 but not COX-2 immunoreactivity in the posterior hypothalamus of rats. Moreover, the cardiovascular effects and COX-1 immunoreactivity in the posterior hypothalamus induced by AA (0.5 μmol; i.c.v.) were almost completely blocked by the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (50 and 100 nmol; i.c.v.) and partially blocked by the H1 receptor blocker chlorpheniramine (100 nmol; i.c.v.) and the H3-H4 receptor antagonist thioperamide (50 and 100 nmol; i.c.v.). In conclusion, these results indicate that centrally administered AA induces pressor and bradycardic responses in conscious rats. Moreover, we suggest that AA may activate histaminergic neurons and increase extracellular histamine levels, particularly in the posterior hypothalamus. Acting as a neurotransmitter, histamine is potentially involved in AA-induced cardiovascular effects under normotensive conditions. PMID:25065747

  18. Viral-mediated Labeling and Transplantation of Medial Ganglionic Eminence (MGE) Cells for In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Daniel; Wu, Pei-Rung; Sorrells, Shawn F.; Arnold, Christine; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Rubenstein, John L. R.

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic cortical interneurons, derived from the embryonic medial and caudal ganglionic eminences (MGE and CGE), are functionally and morphologically diverse. Inroads have been made in understanding the roles of distinct cortical interneuron subgroups, however, there are still many mechanisms to be worked out that may contribute to the development and maturation of different types of GABAergic cells. Moreover, altered GABAergic signaling may contribute to phenotypes of autism, schizophrenia and epilepsy. Specific Cre-driver lines have begun to parcel out the functions of unique interneuron subgroups. Despite the advances in mouse models, it is often difficult to efficiently study GABAergic cortical interneuron progenitors with molecular approaches in vivo. One important technique used to study the cell autonomous programming of these cells is transplantation of MGE cells into host cortices. These transplanted cells migrate extensively, differentiate, and functionally integrate. In addition, MGE cells can be efficiently transduced with lentivirus immediately prior to transplantation, allowing for a multitude of molecular approaches. Here we detail a protocol to efficiently transduce MGE cells before transplantation for in vivo analysis, using available Cre-driver lines and Cre-dependent expression vectors. This approach is advantageous because it combines precise genetic manipulation with the ability of these cells to disperse after transplantation, permitting greater cell-type specific resolution in vivo. PMID:25938985

  19. Cystathionine-γ lyase-derived hydrogen sulfide mediates the cardiovascular protective effects of moxonidine in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Shaimaa S; Zakaria, Mohamed N M; Abdel-Ghany, Rasha H; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A

    2016-07-15

    Blunted cystathionine-γ lyase (CSE) activity (reduced endogenous H2S-level) is implicated in hypertension and myocardial dysfunction in diabetes. Here, we tested the hypothesis that CSE derived H2S mediates the cardiovascular protection conferred by the imidazoline I1 receptor agonist moxonidine in a diabetic rat model. We utilized streptozotocin (STZ; 55mg/kg i.p) to induce diabetes in male Wistar rats. Four weeks later, STZ-treated rats received vehicle, moxonidine (2 or 6mg/kg; gavage), CSE inhibitor DL-propargylglycine, (37.5mg/kg i.p) or DL-propargylglycine with moxonidine (6mg/kg) for 3 weeks. Moxonidine improved the glycemic state, and reversed myocardial hypertrophy, hypertension and baroreflex dysfunction in STZ-treated rats. Ex vivo studies revealed that STZ caused reductions in CSE expression/activity, H2S and nitric oxide (NO) levels and serum adiponectin and elevations in myocardial imidazoline I1 receptor expression, p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, ERK1/2, phosphorylation and lipid peroxidation (expressed as malondialdehyde). Moxonidine reversed these biochemical responses, and suppressed the expression of death associated protein kinase-3. Finally, pharmacologic CSE inhibition (DL-propargylglycine) abrogated the favorable cardiovascular, glycemic and biochemical responses elicited by moxonidine. These findings present the first evidence for a mechanistic role for CSE derived H2S in the glycemic control and in the favorable cardiovascular effects conferred by imidazoline I1 receptor activation (moxonidine) in a diabetic rat model. PMID:27138707

  20. Centrally administered CDP-choline induced cardiovascular responses are mediated by activation of the central phospholipase-prostaglandin signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Topuz, Bora B; Altinbas, Burcin; Ilhan, Tuncay; Yilmaz, Mustafa S; Erdost, Hatice; Saha, Sikha; Savci, Vahide; Yalcin, Murat

    2014-05-14

    The present study was designed to determine the involvement of central prostaglandin synthesis on the pressor and bradycardic effect of cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline). Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of CDP-choline was made and blood pressure and heart rate were recorded in male Sprague Dawley rats throughout this study. Microdialysis and immunohistochemical studies were performed to measure extracellular total prostaglandin concentration and to show cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (COX-1 and -2) immunoreactivities, respectively, in the posterior hypothalamic area. Moreover, rats were pretreated (i.c.v) with mepacrine [a phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitor], ibuprofen [a nonselective COX inhibitor], neomycine [a phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor] or furegrelate [a thromboxane A2 (TXA2) synthesis inhibitor] 5 min prior to the injection of CDP-choline to determine the effects of these inhibitors on cardiovascular responses to CDP-choline. Control rats were pretreated (i.c.v) with saline. CDP-choline caused a dose- and time-dependent increase in blood pressure and decrease in heart rate. Immunohistochemical studies showed that CDP-choline increased COX-1 and -2 immunoreactivities in the posterior hypothalamic area. CDP-choline also elevated hypothalamic extracellular total prostaglandin concentration by 62%, as shown in microdialysis studies. Mepacrine or ibuprofen pretreatments almost completely blocked the pressor and bradycardic responses to CDP-choline while neomycine or furegrelate partially attenuated the drug-induced cardiovascular effects. The results suggest that CDP-choline may stimulate prostaglandin synthesis through the activation of PLA2, cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and -2) and prostaglandins and at least TXA2, may mediate the drug׳s cardiovascular effects. PMID:24704528

  1. Amygdalar neuronal activity mediates the cardiovascular responses evoked from the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    de Abreu, A R; Abreu, A R; Santos, L T; de Souza, A A; da Silva, L G; Chianca, D A; de Menezes, R C

    2015-01-22

    There is ample evidence that both lateral/dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (l/dlPAG) and basolateral amygdala (BLA) are essential for the regulation of the autonomic responses evoked during innate reactions to threatening stimuli. However, it is not well established to what extent the BLA regulates the upstream functional connection from the l/dlPAG. Here we evaluated the role of the BLA and its glutamatergic receptors in the cardiovascular responses induced by l/dlPAG stimulation in rats. We examined the influence of acute inhibition of the BLA, unilaterally, by injecting muscimol on the cardiovascular responses evoked by the injection of N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) into the l/dlPAG. We also evaluated the role of BLA ionotropic glutamate receptors in these responses by injecting antagonists of NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptor subtypes into the BLA. Our results show that the microinjection of NMDA in the BLA increased the mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR). Injection of NMDA into the l/dlPAG caused similar increases in these variables, which was prevented by the prior injection of muscimol, a GABAA agonist, into the BLA. Moreover, injection of glutamatergic antagonists (2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (AP5) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX)) into the BLA reduced the increase in MAP and HR induced by l/dlPAG activation. Finally, the inhibition of the central amygdala neurons failed to reduce the cardiovascular changes induced by l/dlPAG activation. These results indicate that physiological responses elicited by l/dlPAG activation require the neuronal activity in the BLA. This ascending excitatory pathway from the l/dlPAG to the BLA might ensure the expression of the autonomic component of the defense reaction. PMID:25451289

  2. Lentivirus mediated HO-1 gene transfer enhances myogenic precursor cell survival after autologous transplantation in pig.

    PubMed

    Laumonier, Thomas; Yang, Sheng; Konig, Stephane; Chauveau, Christine; Anegon, Ignacio; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Menetrey, Jacques

    2008-02-01

    Cell therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other muscle diseases is limited by a massive early cell death following injections. In this study, we explored the potential benefit of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in the survival of porcine myogenic precursor cells (MPCs) transplanted in pig skeletal muscle. Increased HO-1 expression was assessed either by transient hyperthermia or by HO-1 lentiviral infection. One day after the thermic shock, we observed a fourfold and a threefold increase in HSP70/72 and HO-1 levels, respectively. This treatment protected 30% of cells from staurosporine-induced apoptosis in vitro. When porcine MPC were heat-shocked prior to grafting, we improved cell survival by threefold at 5 days after autologous transplantation (26.3 +/- 5.5% surviving cells). After HO-1 lentiviral transduction, almost 60% of cells expressed the transgene and kept their myogenic properties to proliferate and fuse in vitro. Apoptosis of HO-1 transduced cells was reduced by 50% in vitro after staurosporine induction. Finally, a fivefold enhancement in cell survival was observed after transplantation of HO-1-group (47.5 +/- 9.1% surviving cells) as compared to the nls-LacZ-group or control group. These results identify HO-1 as a protective gene against early MPC death post-transplantation. PMID:18026170

  3. Combined LFA-1 and costimulatory blockade prevents transplant rejection mediated by heterologous immune memory alloresponses

    PubMed Central

    Kitchens, William H.; Haridas, Divya; Wagener, Maylene E.; Song, Mingqing; Ford, Mandy L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that alloreactive memory T cells are generated by the process of heterologous immunity, whereby memory T cells arising in response to pathogen infection cross-react with donor antigens. Due to their diminished requirements for costimulation during recall, these pathogen-elicited allo-crossreactive memory T cells are of particular clinical importance, especially given the emergence of costimulatory blockade as a transplant immunosuppression strategy. Methods We utilized an established model of heterologous immunity involving sequential infection of a naïve C57BL/6 recipient with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and vaccinia virus, followed by combined skin and bone marrow transplant from a BALB/c donor. Results We demonstrate that coupling the integrin antagonist anti-LFA-1 with costimulatory blockade could surmount the barrier posed by heterologous immunity in a fully allogeneic murine transplant system. The combined costimulatory and integrin blockade regimen suppressed proliferation of alloreactive memory T cells and attenuated their cytokine effector responses. This combined blockade regimen also promoted the retention of FoxP3+ Tregs in draining lymph nodes. Finally, we show that in an in vitro mixed lymphocyte reaction system using human T cells, the combination of belatacept and anti-LFA-1 was able to suppress cytokine production by alloreactive memory T cells that was resistant to belatacept alone. Conclusions As an antagonist against human LFA-1 exists and has been used clinically to treat psoriasis, these findings have significant translational potential for future clinical transplant trials. PMID:22475765

  4. Transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, Emma M; Game, David S; Lechler, Robert I

    2014-12-01

    Although transplantation has been a standard medical practice for decades, marked morbidity from the use of immunosuppressive drugs and poor long-term graft survival remain important limitations in the field. Since the first solid organ transplant between the Herrick twins in 1954, transplantation immunology has sought to move away from harmful, broad-spectrum immunosuppressive regimens that carry with them the long-term risk of potentially life-threatening opportunistic infections, cardiovascular disease, and malignancy, as well as graft toxicity and loss, towards tolerogenic strategies that promote long-term graft survival. Reports of "transplant tolerance" in kidney and liver allograft recipients whose immunosuppressive drugs were discontinued for medical or non-compliant reasons, together with results from experimental models of transplantation, provide the proof-of-principle that achieving tolerance in organ transplantation is fundamentally possible. However, translating the reconstitution of immune tolerance into the clinical setting is a daunting challenge fraught with the complexities of multiple interacting mechanisms overlaid on a background of variation in disease. In this article, we explore the basic science underlying mechanisms of tolerance and review the latest clinical advances in the quest for transplantation tolerance. PMID:24213880

  5. Cyclosporin A-mediated cholestasis in patients with chronic hepatitis after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Myara, A; Cadranel, J F; Dorent, R; Lunel, F; Bouvier, E; Gerhardt, M; Bernard, B; Ghoussoub, J J; Cabrol, A; Gandjbakhch, I; Opolon, P; Trivin, F

    1996-03-01

    Viral chronic hepatitis often occurs in heart transplant recipients receiving cyclosporin. This essential immunosuppressive drug may induce cholestasis. We investigated the effect of treatment with cyclosporin on serum conjugated bile acids in patients with chronic hepatitis developing after heart transplantation. Fifty-nine patients were studied: 17 with chronic hepatitis, 15 heart transplant patients with normal alanine aminotransferase activity, and 27 heart transplant patients with chronic hepatitis, the last two groups receiving cyclosporin. Hepatic biochemical tests and total bile acid concentration were determined on fasting blood samples. The individual glyco- and tauroconjugated bile acids were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography and direct spectrometry. In patients taking cyclosporin the bilirubin concentration and the alkaline phosphatase activity were increased only when hepatitis was present, in association with a slight increase in cholic acid level (5.13 microM vs. 0.68 microM; P < 0.01). Conjugated lithocholate concentration was dramatically higher when hepatitis and immunosuppression with cyclosporin were associated (1.17 microM vs. 0.03 and 0.04 microM; P < 0.01). Chenodeoxycholate was the main circulating bile acid only in the heart transplant patients treated with cyclosporin but without hepatitis. These results suggest that the mechanisms which explain the cyclosporin-associated modifications of the bile acid pool are different according to the presence or absence of hepatitis. The occurrence of hepatitis in patients on cyclosporin led to an increase in serum lithocholate and primary bile acid concentrations. Further studies are required to assess the effect of ursodeoxycholic acid for this cholestasis. PMID:8724029

  6. Bortezomib in late antibody-mediated kidney transplant rejection (BORTEJECT Study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite major advances in transplant medicine, improvements in long-term kidney allograft survival have not been commensurate with those observed shortly after transplantation. The formation of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) and ongoing antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) processes may critically contribute to late graft loss. However, appropriate treatment for late AMR has not yet been defined. There is accumulating evidence that the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib may substantially affect the function and integrity of alloantibody-secreting plasma cells. The impact of this agent on the course of late AMR has not so far been systematically investigated. Methods/design The BORTEJECT Study is a randomized controlled trial designed to clarify the impact of intravenous bortezomib on the course of late AMR. In this single-center study (nephrological outpatient service, Medical University Vienna) we plan an initial cross-sectional DSA screening of 1,000 kidney transplant recipients (functioning graft at ≥180 days; estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) >20 ml/minute/1.73 m2). DSA-positive recipients will be subjected to kidney allograft biopsy to detect morphological features consistent with AMR. Forty-four patients with biopsy-proven AMR will then be included in a double-blind placebo-controlled intervention trial (1:1 randomization stratified for eGFR and the presence of T-cell-mediated rejection). Patients in the active group will receive two cycles of bortezomib (4 × 1.3 mg/m2 over 2 weeks; 3-month interval between cycles). The primary end point will be the course of eGFR over 24 months (intention-to-treat analysis). The sample size was calculated according to the assumption of a 5 ml/minute/1.73 m2 difference in eGFR slope (per year) between the two groups (alpha: 0.05; power: 0.8). Secondary endpoints will be DSA levels, protein excretion, measured glomerular filtration rate, transplant and patient survival, and the development of

  7. Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Presence of MICA-DSA and Successful Renal Re-Transplant with Negative-MICA Virtual Crossmatch

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Yingzi; Hu, Juan; Luo, Qizhi; Ding, Xiang; Luo, Weiguang; Zhuang, Quan; Zou, Yizhou

    2015-01-01

    The presence of donor-specific alloantibodies (DSAs) against the MICA antigen results in high risk for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of a transplanted kidney, especially in patients receiving a re-transplant. We describe the incidence of acute C4d+ AMR in a patient who had received a first kidney transplant with a zero HLA antigen mismatch. Retrospective analysis of post-transplant T and B cell crossmatches were negative, but a high level of MICA alloantibody was detected in sera collected both before and after transplant. The DSA against the first allograft mismatched MICA*018 was in the recipient. Flow cytometry and cytotoxicity tests with five samples of freshly isolated human umbilical vein endothelial cells demonstrated the alloantibody nature of patient’s MICA-DSA. Prior to the second transplant, a MICA virtual crossmatch and T and B cell crossmatches were used to identify a suitable donor. The patient received a second kidney transplant, and allograft was functioning well at one-year follow-up. Our study indicates that MICA virtual crossmatch is important in selection of a kidney donor if the recipient has been sensitized with MICA antigens. PMID:26024219

  8. PCL-PDMS-PCL copolymer-based microspheres mediate cardiovascular differentiation from embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Liqing

    Poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PCL) based copolymers have received much attention as drug or growth factor delivery carriers and tissue engineering scaffolds due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, and tunable biophysical properties. Copolymers of PCL and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) also have shape memory behaviors and can be made into thermoresponsive shape memory polymers for various biomedical applications such as smart sutures and vascular stents. However, the influence of biophysical properties of PCL-PDMS-PCL copolymers on stem cell lineage commitment is not well understood. In this study, PDMS was used as soft segments of varying length to tailor the biophysical properties of PCL-based co-polymers. While low elastic modulus (<10 kPa) of the tri-block copolymer PCL-PDMS-PCL affected cardiovascular differentiation of embryonic stem cells, the range of 60-100 MPa PCL-PDMS-PCL showed little influence on the differentiation. Then different size (30-140 mum) of microspheres were fabricated from PCL-PDMS-PCL copolymers and incorporated within embryoid bodies (EBs). Mesoderm differentiation was induced using bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-4 for cardiovascular differentiation. Differential expressions of mesoderm progenitor marker KDR and vascular markers CD31 and VE-cadherin were observed for the cells differentiated from EBs incorporated with microspheres of different size, while little difference was observed for cardiac marker alpha-actinin expression. Small size of microspheres (30 mum) resulted in higher expression of KDR while medium size of microspheres (94 mum) resulted in higher CD31 and VE-cadherin expression. This study indicated that the biophysical properties of PCL-based copolymers impacted stem cell lineage commitment, which should be considered for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications.

  9. Acute antibody-mediated rejection in pediatric kidney transplants: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Twombley, Katherine; Thach, Lonnie; Ribeiro, Annelise; Joseph, Catherine; Seikaly, Mouin

    2013-11-01

    aAMR is a potentially devastating complication of kidney transplantation. The incidence of aAMR in children, while thought to be rare, is not well defined, and there is a paucity of data on treatment regimens in children. We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of our pediatric patients that were treated for aAMR between 2007 and 2009. Three adolescent Hispanic males were found to have aAMR. All three received deceased donor transplants, and all three verbalized non-adherence. Treatment consisted of rituximab, solumedrol, PE, and IVIgG in one patient, and PE, IVIgG, and bortezomib in two patients. The only side effect of therapy noted was mild hypotension with rituximab that resolved after decreasing the infusion rate. There were no reported infections two yr after treatment, and all of the viral monitoring in these patients remained negative. PMID:23901848

  10. Matrix elasticity of void-forming hydrogels controls transplanted-stem-cell-mediated bone formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebsch, Nathaniel; Lippens, Evi; Lee, Kangwon; Mehta, Manav; Koshy, Sandeep T.; Darnell, Max C.; Desai, Rajiv M.; Madl, Christopher M.; Xu, Maria; Zhao, Xuanhe; Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Verbeke, Catia; Kim, Woo Seob; Alim, Karen; Mammoto, Akiko; Ingber, Donald E.; Duda, Georg N.; Mooney, David J.

    2015-12-01

    The effectiveness of stem cell therapies has been hampered by cell death and limited control over fate. These problems can be partially circumvented by using macroporous biomaterials that improve the survival of transplanted stem cells and provide molecular cues to direct cell phenotype. Stem cell behaviour can also be controlled in vitro by manipulating the elasticity of both porous and non-porous materials, yet translation to therapeutic processes in vivo remains elusive. Here, by developing injectable, void-forming hydrogels that decouple pore formation from elasticity, we show that mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) osteogenesis in vitro, and cell deployment in vitro and in vivo, can be controlled by modifying, respectively, the hydrogel’s elastic modulus or its chemistry. When the hydrogels were used to transplant MSCs, the hydrogel’s elasticity regulated bone regeneration, with optimal bone formation at 60 kPa. Our findings show that biophysical cues can be harnessed to direct therapeutic stem cell behaviours in situ.

  11. Immunosuppressive Therapy in Immune-Mediated Liver Disease in the Non-Transplanted Patient

    PubMed Central

    Abhyankar, Anita; Tapper, Elliot; Bonder, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune liver disease management goals are primarily slowing disease progression and symptomatic treatment. There are few options for curative medical management other than transplant for a spectrum of autoimmune liver disease that encompasses autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis as well as their overlap syndromes. These diseases are managed primarily with immunosuppressive therapy. Herein, we review the current literature, detailing the promise and pitfalls of the recommended immunosuppressive therapy for these challenging diseases. PMID:24380894

  12. Immunosuppressive therapy in immune-mediated liver disease in the non-transplanted patient.

    PubMed

    Abhyankar, Anita; Tapper, Elliot; Bonder, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune liver disease management goals are primarily slowing disease progression and symptomatic treatment. There are few options for curative medical management other than transplant for a spectrum of autoimmune liver disease that encompasses autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis as well as their overlap syndromes. These diseases are managed primarily with immunosuppressive therapy. Herein, we review the current literature, detailing the promise and pitfalls of the recommended immunosuppressive therapy for these challenging diseases. PMID:24380894

  13. Transplantation-Mediated Strategies to Promote Axonal Regeneration following Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Ming; Onifer, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    Devastating central nervous system injuries and diseases continue to occur in spite of the tremendous efforts of various prevention programs. The enormity of and annual escalation of healthcare costs due to them require that therapeutic strategies be responsibly developed. The dysfunctions that occur after injury and disease are primarily due to neurotransmission damage. The last two decades of both experimental and clinical research have demonstrated that neural and non-neural tissue and cell transplantation is a viable option for ameliorating dysfunctions to markedly improve quality of life. Moreover, significant progress has been made with tissue and cell transplantation in studies of pathophysiology, plasticity, sprouting, regeneration, and functional recovery. This chapter will review information about the ability and potential, particularly for traumatic spinal cord injury, that neural and non-neural tissue and cell transplantation has to replace lost neurons and glia, reconstruct damaged neural circuitry, and to restore neurotransmitters, hormones, neurotrophic factors, and neurotransmission. Donor tissues and cells to be discussed include peripheral nerve, fetal spinal cord and brain, central and peripheral nervous systems’ glia, stem cells, those that have been genetically engineered, and non-neural ones. Combinatorial approaches and clinical research are also reviewed. PMID:19665611

  14. Modulation of HCV reinfection after orthotopic liver transplantation by fibroblast growth factor-2 and other non-interferon mediators

    PubMed Central

    Van, Nguyen Dinh; Falk, Christine S; Sandmann, Lisa; Vondran, Florian W R; Helfritz, Fabian; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Manns, Michael P; Ciesek, Sandra; von Hahn, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Objective In HCV infected individuals graft infection occurs shortly after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). We aimed to describe the composition of the inflammatory response at this time, how it affects the HCV replication cycle and identify novel proviral and antiviral factors. Design We used a Luminex assay to quantify 50 inflammatory mediators in sera before and shortly after OLT. In vitro grown HCV based on the JFH-1 isolate were used to characterise the effects of patient sera and individual mediators on HCV. Results Although the mediator composition is highly variable between individuals, sera drawn immediately post-OLT significantly enhance HCV infectivity compared with control sera from before OLT in about half of the cases. Among 27 non-interferon inflammatory mediators fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 stood out as it enhanced HCV RNA replication and release of infectious particles. The effect was concentration-dependent and detectable in dividing and non-dividing cells. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of FGF-2 receptor signalling abrogated the enhancing effect of FGF-2 and inhibited HCV replication in the absence of serum FGF-2 suggesting that HCV replication is dependent on basal activation of the FGF-2 triggered signalling pathway. Finally, in individuals with chronic HCV infection with high viral load, serum FGF-2 was significantly higher compared with those with low viral load. Conclusions Although no single mediator may account for this effect, serum shortly post-OLT enhances HCV infection. FGF-2 is a novel endogenous driver of HCV replication and a potential therapeutic target. PMID:25800783

  15. Allogeneic cell-mediated immunotherapy for breast cancer after autologous stem cell transplantation: a clinical pilot study.

    PubMed

    Or, R; Ackerstein, A; Nagler, A; Kapelushnik, J; Naparstek, E; Samuel, S; Amar, A; Bruatbar, C; Slavin, S

    1998-03-01

    Allogeneic cell therapy (allo-CT) is emerging as an effective treatment for patients relapsing after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT), indicating that tumor cells resisting chemoradiotherapy may still respond to immunocompetent allogeneic lymphocytes. We investigated possible graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects in six patients with metastatic breast cancer that would be comparable to the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) phenomenon occurring after allogeneic BMT in hematologic malignancies. The patients were cytoreduced with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT), and were treated ambulatory with allo-CT consisting of adoptive transfer of HLA-matched donor peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) activated in vivo with human recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2). If no graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developed, allo-CT was augmented with infusion of donor PBL, preactivated in vitro with rIL-2. Treatment was well tolerated, with low therapy-related toxicity in all patients. Two patients developed signs and symptoms compatible with GVHD grade I-II, one of whom shows no evidence of disease at more than 34 months out. In the remaining patients, progression-free survival following allo-CT ranged between 7 and 13 months. Allogeneic cell-mediated, cytokine-activated immunotherapy might be utilized for induction of GVT in metastatic breast cancer. A search for techniques to boost chimerism without severe GVHD is indicated. PMID:9557210

  16. Eculizumab for Treatment of Refractory Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplant Patients: A Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Yelken, B; Arpalı, E; Görcin, S; Kocak, B; Karatas, C; Demiralp, E; Turkmen, A

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is responsible for up to 20%-30% of acute rejection episodes after kidney transplantation. In several cases, conventional therapies including plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin, and anti-CD20 therapy can resolve AMR successfully. But in some cases the load of immunoglobulins that can activate complement cascade may submerge the routine desensitization therapy and result in the formation of membrane attack complexes. Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody against C5, was reported to be an option in cases with severe AMR that are resistant to conventional therapy. Here, we present 8 cases that were resistant to conventional therapy and in which eculizumab was given as a salvage treatment. Given the bad prognosis for renal transplants displaying acute injury progressing rapidly to cortical necrosis on the biopsy, the prompt use of eculizumab could have the advantage of immediate effects by stopping cellular injury. This can provide a therapeutic window to allow conventional treatment modalities to be effective and prevent early graft loss. PMID:26293046

  17. Common and small molecules as the ultimate regulatory and effector mediators of antigen-specific transplantation reactions

    PubMed Central

    Holan, Vladimir; Krulova, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    In spite of intensive research, the molecular basis of allograft and xenograft rejection still remains not fully understood. The acute rejection of an allograft is associated with the intragraft Th1 cytokine response, while tolerance of an allograft or xenograft rejection is accompanied by a higher production of the Th2 cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10. Nevertheless, these cytokines are not the final regulatory and effector molecules mediating transplantation reactions. Data indicate that the functioning of common molecules with enzymatic activities, such are inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), arginase, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) or indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), the bioavailability of their substrates (L-arginine, tryptophan, heme) and the cytotoxic and regulatory actions of their small gaseous products (NO, CO) can be the ultimate mechanisms responsible for effector or regulatory reactions. Using models of transplantation immunity and tolerance we show that T cell receptor-mediated recognition of allogeneic or xenogeneic antigens as well as the balance between immunity/tolerance induces distinct cytokine production profiles. The ratio between Th1 and Th2 cytokines efficiently regulates the expression of genes for common enzymes, such as iNOS, arginase, HO-1 and IDO. These enzymes may compete for substrates, such as L-arginine or tryptophan, and the final product of their activity are small molecules (NO, CO) displaying effector or regulatory functions of the immune system. Thus, it is suggested that in spite of the high immunological specificity of transplatation reaction, the ultimate players in regulatory and effector functions could be small and common molecules. PMID:24392309

  18. Human neutrophil peptides: a novel potential mediator of inflammatory cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Kieran; Henriques, Melanie; Parker, Tom; Slutsky, Arthur S.; Zhang, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    The traditional view of atherosclerosis has recently been expanded from a predominantly lipid retentive disease to a coupling of inflammatory mechanisms and dyslipidemia. Studies have suggested a novel role for polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN)-dominant inflammation in the development of atherosclerosis. Human neutrophil peptides (HNPs), also known as α-defensins, are secreted and released from PMN granules upon activation and are conventionally involved in microbial killing. Current evidence suggests an important immunomodulative role for these peptides. HNP levels are markedly increased in inflammatory diseases including sepsis and acute coronary syndromes. They have been found within the intima of human atherosclerotic arteries, and their deposition in the skin correlates with the severity of coronary artery diseases. HNPs form complexes with LDL in solution and increase LDL binding to the endothelial surface. HNPs have also been shown to contribute to endothelial dysfunction, lipid metabolism disorder, and the inhibition of fibrinolysis. Given the emerging relationship between PMN-dominant inflammation and atherosclerosis, HNPs may serve as a link between them and as a biological marker and potential therapeutic target in cardiovascular diseases including coronary artery diseases and acute coronary syndromes. PMID:18805897

  19. Cardiovascular actions of DOPA mediated by the gene product of ocular albinism 1.

    PubMed

    Goshima, Yoshio; Nakamura, Fumio; Masukawa, Daiki; Chen, Sandy; Koga, Motokazu

    2014-01-01

    l-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) is the metabolic precursor of dopamine, and the single most effective agent in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. One problem with DOPA therapy for Parkinson's disease is its cardiovascular side effects including hypotension and syncope, the underlying mechanisms of which are largely unknown. We proposed that DOPA is a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, but specific receptors for DOPA had not been identified. Recently, the gene product of ocular albinism 1 (OA1) was shown to possess DOPA-binding activity. It was unknown, however, whether or not OA1 is responsible for the actions of DOPA itself. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that OA1 was expressed in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS). OA1-positive cells adjacent to tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cell bodies and nerve fibers were detected in the depressor sites of the NTS. OA1 knockdown using oa1-specific shRNA-adenovirus vectors in the NTS reduced the expression levels of OA1 in the NTS. The prior injection of the shRNA against OA1 suppressed the depressor and bradycardic responses to DOPA but not to glutamate in the NTS of anesthetized rats. Thus OA-1 is a functional receptor of DOPA in the NTS, which warrants reexamination of the mechanisms for the therapeutic and untoward actions of DOPA. PMID:25185585

  20. Median Preoptic Nucleus Mediates the Cardiovascular Recovery Induced by Hypertonic Saline in Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Nathalia Oda; Naves, Lara Marques; Ferreira-Neto, Marcos Luiz; Freiria-Oliveira, André Henrique; Colombari, Eduardo; Reis, Angela Adamski da Silva; Xavier, Carlos Henrique; Pedrino, Gustavo Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Changes in plasma osmolarity, through central and peripheral osmoreceptors, activate the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) that modulates autonomic and neuroendocrine adjustments. The present study sought to determine the participation of MnPO in the cardiovascular recovery induced by hypertonic saline infusion (HSI) in rats submitted to hemorrhagic shock. The recordings of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal vascular conductance (RVC) were carried out on male Wistar rats (250–300 g). Hemorrhagic shock was induced by blood withdrawal over 20 min until the MAP values of approximately 60 mmHg were attained. The nanoinjection (100 nL) of GABAA agonist (Muscimol 4 mM; experimental group (EXP)) or isotonic saline (NaCl 150 mM; control (CONT)) into MnPO was performed 2 min prior to intravenous overload of sodium through HSI (3 M NaCl, 1.8 mL/kg, b.wt.). Hemorrhagic shock reduced the MAP in control (62 ± 1.1 mmHg) and EXP (61 ± 0.4 mmHg) equipotently. The inhibition of MnPO impaired MAP (CONT: 104 ± 4.2 versus EXP: 60 ± 6.2 mmHg) and RVC (CONT: 6.4 ± 11.4 versus EXP: -53.5 ± 10.0) recovery 10 min after HSI. The overall results in this study demonstrated, for the first time, that the MnPO plays an essential role in the HSI induced resuscitation during hypovolemic hemorrhagic shock. PMID:25485300

  1. The role of the solitary and paramedian reticular nuclei in mediating cardiovascular reflex responses from carotid baro- and chemoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Mitsuhiko; Reis, Donald J.

    1972-01-01

    chemoreceptors; it may serve as an important area integrating cardiovascular activity descending from forebrain, brain stem and cerebellum with baroreceptor reflexes. 8. Cardiovascular reflex responses arising from non-myelinated baroreceptors and all chemoreceptors are mediated by neurones in the intermediate area of the NTS. PMID:5039285

  2. Matrix Elasticity of Void-Forming Hydrogels Controls Transplanted Stem Cell-Mediated Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Huebsch, Nathaniel; Lippens, Evi; Lee, Kangwon; Mehta, Manav; Koshy, Sandeep T; Darnell, Max C; Desai, Rajiv; Madl, Christopher M.; Xu, Maria; Zhao, Xuanhe; Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Verbeke, Catia; Kim, Woo Seob; Alim, Karen; Mammoto, Akiko; Ingber, Donald E.; Duda, Georg N; Mooney, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of stem-cell therapies has been hampered by cell death and limited control over fate1. These problems can be partially circumvented by using macroporous biomaterials that improve the survival of transplanted stem cells and provide molecular cues to direct cell phenotype2–4. Stem cell behavior can also be controlled in vitro by manipulating the elasticity of both porous and non-porous materials5–7, yet translation to therapeutic processes in vivo remains elusive. Here, by developing injectable, void-forming hydrogels that decouple pore formation from elasticity, we show that mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) osteogenesis in vitro, and cell deployment in vitro and in vivo, can be controlled by modifying, respectively, the hydrogel's elastic modulus or its chemistry. When the hydrogels were used to transplant MSCs, the hydrogel's elasticity regulated bone regeneration, with optimal bone formation at 60 kPa. Our findings show that biophysical cues can be harnessed to direct therapeutic stem-cell behaviors in situ. PMID:26366848

  3. Ventral lamina terminalis mediates enhanced cardiovascular responses of rostral ventrolateral medulla neurons during increased dietary salt.

    PubMed

    Adams, Julye M; Bardgett, Megan E; Stocker, Sean D

    2009-08-01

    Increased dietary salt enhances sympathoexcitatory and sympathoinhibitory responses evoked from the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). The purpose of the present study was to determine whether neurons of the forebrain lamina terminalis (LT) mediated these changes in the RVLM. Male Sprague-Dawley rats with and without LT lesions were fed normal chow and given access to water or 0.9% NaCl for 14 to 15 days. Unilateral injection of l-glutamate into the RVLM produced significantly larger increases in renal sympathetic nerve activity and arterial blood pressure of sham rats ingesting 0.9% NaCl versus water. However, these differences were not observed between ventral LT-lesioned rats drinking 0.9% NaCl versus water. Similar findings were observed when angiotensin II or gamma-aminobutyric acid was injected into the RVLM. Interestingly, a subset of animals drinking 0.9% but with damage restricted to the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis did not show enhanced responses to l-glutamate or gamma-aminobutyric acid. In marked contrast, RVLM injection of l-glutamate or gamma-aminobutyric acid produced exaggerated sympathetic nerve activity and arterial blood pressure responses in animals drinking 0.9% NaCl versus water after an acute ventral LT lesion or chronic lesion of the subfornical organ. Additional experiments demonstrated that plasma sodium concentration and osmolality were increased at night in rats ingesting 0.9% NaCl. These findings suggest that neurons of the ventral LT mediate the ability of increased dietary salt to enhance the responsiveness of RVLM sympathetic neurons. PMID:19506102

  4. Characterizing the Mechanistic Pathways of the Instant Blood-Mediated Inflammatory Reaction in Xenogeneic Neonatal Islet Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Liuwantara, David; Chew, Yi Vee; Favaloro, Emmanuel J.; Hawkes, Joanne M.; Burns, Heather L.; O'Connell, Philip J.; Hawthorne, Wayne J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR) causes major loss of islets after transplantation and consequently represents the initial barrier to survival of porcine neonatal islet cell clusters (NICC) after xenotransplantation. Methods This study used novel assays designed to characterize the various immunologic components responsible for xenogeneic IBMIR to identify initiators and investigate processes of IBMIR-associated coagulation, complement activation and neutrophil infiltration. The IBMIR was induced in vitro by exposing NICC to platelet-poor or platelet-rich human plasma or isolated neutrophils. Results We found that xenogeneic IBMIR was characterized by rapid, platelet-independent thrombin generation, with addition of platelets both accelerating and exacerbating this response. Platelet-independent complement activation was observed as early as 30 minutes after NICC exposure to plasma. However, membrane attack complex formation was not observed in NICC histopathology sections until after 60 minutes. We demonstrated for the first time that NICC-mediated complement activation was necessary for neutrophil activation in the xenogeneic IBMIR setting. Finally, using the Seahorse extracellular flux analyzer, we identified substantial loss of islet function (up to 40%) after IBMIR with surviving NICC showing evidence of mitochondrial damage. Conclusions This study used novel assays to describe multiple key pathways by which xenogeneic IBMIR causes islet destruction, allowing further refinement of future interventions aimed at resolving the issue of IBMIR in xenotransplantation. PMID:27500267

  5. Post-transplant dyslipidemia: Mechanisms, diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Arnav; Prasad, G V Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant dyslipidemia is highly prevalent and presents unique management challenges to the clinician. The two major outcomes to consider with post-transplant therapies for dyslipidemia are preserving or improving allograft function, and reducing cardiovascular risk. Although there are other cardiovascular risk factors such as graft dysfunction, hypertension, and diabetes, attention to dyslipidemia is warranted because interventions for dyslipidemia have an impact on reducing cardiac events in clinical trials specific to the transplant population. Dyslipidemia is not synonymous with hyperlipidemia. Numerous mechanisms exist for the occurrence of post-transplant dyslipidemia, including those mediated by immunosuppressive drug therapy. Statin therapy has received the most attention in all solid organ transplant recipient populations, although the effect of proper dietary advice and adjuvant pharmacological and non-pharmacological agents should not be dismissed. At all stages of treatment appropriate monitoring strategies for side effects should be implemented so that the benefits from these therapies can be achieved. Clinicians have a choice when there is a conflict between various transplant society and lipid society guidelines for therapy and targets. PMID:27011910

  6. Outcome of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplant recipients with preformed donor-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Loupy, A; Suberbielle-Boissel, C; Hill, G S; Lefaucheur, C; Anglicheau, D; Zuber, J; Martinez, F; Thervet, E; Méjean, A; Charron, D; Duong van Huyen, J P; Bruneval, P; Legendre, C; Nochy, D

    2009-11-01

    This study describes clinical relevance of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection (SAMR) in a cohort of 54 DSA-positive kidney transplant recipients receiving a deceased donor. In 3 months screening biopsies, 31.1% of patients met the criteria of SAMR. A total of 48.9% had an incomplete form of SAMR (g+/ptc+/C4d-negative) whereas 20% had no humoral lesions. Patients with SAMR at 3 months had at 1 year: a higher C4d score, ptc score, and arteriosclerosis score, higher rate of IFTA (100% vs. 33.3%, p < 0.01) and a higher rate of transplant glomerulopathy (43% vs. 0%, p = 0.02) compared to patients without 3-month SAMR. Patients with SAMR at 3 months exhibited at 1 year a higher class II MFImax-DSA and a lower mGFR compared to patients without SAMR (39.2 +/- 13.9 vs. 61.9 +/- 19.2 mL/min/1.73 m(2) respectively, p < 0.01). The group of patients with C4d-negative SAMR at 3 months developed more ptc and IFTA lesions, and lower GFR at 1 year in comparison to biopsies without humoral lesions. SAMR is a frequent entity in KTR with preexisting DSAs and promotes subsequent GFR impairment and development of chronic AMR. C4d-negative SAMR patients displayed an intermediate course between the no-SAMR group and the C4d+ SAMR group. Screening biopsies may be useful to recognize patients more likely to develop SAMR. PMID:19775320

  7. Early Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection of a Negative Flow Crossmatch 3rd Kidney Transplant with Exclusive Disparity at HLA-DP

    PubMed Central

    Mierzejewska, Beata; Schroder, Paul M.; Baum, Caitlin E.; Blair, Annette; Smith, Connie; Duquesnoy, Rene J.; Marrari, Marilyn; Gohara, Amira; Malhotra, Deepak; Kaw, Dinkar; Liwski, Robert; Rees, Michael A.; Stepkowski, Stanislaw

    2014-01-01

    Donor-specific alloantibodies (DSA) to HLA-DP may cause antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), especially in re-transplants. We describe the immunization history of a patient who received 3 kidney transplants; the 3rd kidney was completely matched except at DPA1 and DPB1. Prior to the 3rd transplant, single antigen bead analysis (SAB) showed DSA reactivity against DPA1 shared by the 1st and 3rd donors, but B and T flow crossmatch (FXM) results were negative. Within 11 days the 3rd transplant underwent acute C4d+ AMR which coincided with the presence of complement (C1q)-binding IgG1 DSA against donor DPA1 and DPB1. Using HLAMatchmaker and SAB, we provide evidence that eplet (epitope) spreading on DPA1 and eplet sharing on differing DPB1 alleles of the 1st and 3rd transplants was associated with AMR. Since weak DSA to DPA1/DPB1 may induce acute AMR with negative FXM, donor DPA1/DPB1 high resolution typing should be considered in sensitized patients with DP-directed DSA. PMID:24755353

  8. Serotonergic neurons mediate dyskinesia side effects in Parkinson's patients with neural transplants.

    PubMed

    Politis, Marios; Wu, Kit; Loane, Clare; Quinn, Niall P; Brooks, David J; Rehncrona, Stig; Bjorklund, Anders; Lindvall, Olle; Piccini, Paola

    2010-06-30

    Troublesome involuntary movements in the absence of dopaminergic medication, so-called off-medication dyskinesias, are a serious adverse effect of fetal neural grafts that hinders the development of cell-based therapies for Parkinson's disease. The mechanisms underlying these dyskinesias are not well understood, and it is not known whether they are the same as in the dyskinesias induced by l-dopa treatment. Using in vivo brain imaging, we show excessive serotonergic innervation in the grafted striatum of two patients with Parkinson's disease, who had exhibited major motor recovery after transplantation with dopamine-rich fetal mesencephalic tissue but had later developed off-medication dyskinesias. The dyskinesias were markedly attenuated by systemic administration of a serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] receptor (5-HT(1A)) agonist, which dampens transmitter release from serotonergic neurons, indicating that the dyskinesias were caused by the serotonergic hyperinnervation. Our observations suggest strategies for avoiding and treating graft-induced dyskinesias that result from cell therapies for Parkinson's disease with fetal tissue or stem cells. PMID:20592420

  9. Endothelial and neuronal nitric oxide synthases variably modulate the estrogen-mediated control of blood pressure and cardiovascular autonomic control

    PubMed Central

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M.; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We have previously shown that long-term estrogen (E2) replacement lowers blood pressure (BP) and improves the cardiovascular autonomic control in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. In this study, we investigated whether constitutive and/or inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS) modulate these E2 effects.We evaluated changes in BP, myocardial contractility index (dP/dtmax), and power spectral indices of hemodynamic variability following selective inhibition of eNOS [N5-(1-iminoethyl)-L-ornithine; L-NIO], nNOS (Nω-propyl-L-arginine; NPLA), or iNOS (1400W) in telemetered OVX rats treated for 16 weeks with (OVXE2) or without (control, OVXC) E2.OVXE2 rats exhibited: (i) reduced BP, and increased dP/dtmax, (ii) cardiac parasympathetic dominance as reflected by the reduced low-frequency (LF, 0.25–0.75 Hz)/high-frequency (HF, 0.75–3 Hz) ratio of interbeat intervals (IBILF/HF), and (iii) reduced LF oscillations of systolic BP, suggesting a reduced vasomotor sympathetic tone.eNOS inhibition (L-NIO, 20 mg/kg i.p.) elicited a shorter-lived pressor response in OVXE2, than in OVXC, rats along with reductions in dP/dtmax and increases in the spectral index of spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (index α). NPLA (1 mg/kg i.p.) reduced BP and increased IBILF/HF ratio in OVXE2, but not OVXC rats. The iNOS inhibitor 1400W (5 mg/kg i.p.) caused no hemodynamic changes in OVXC or OVXE2 rats.Overall, constitutive NOS isoforms exert restraining tonic modulatory BP effects, which encompass eNOS-mediated reduction and nNOS-mediated elevation in BP in OVXE2 rats. Baroreflex facilitation, and dP/dtmax reductions might account for the shorter pressor action of L-NIO in E2-treated, compared with untreated, OVX rats. PMID:24471817

  10. Beta-adrenergic receptor mediated inflammation control by monocytes is associated with blood pressure and risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Hong, Suzi; Dimitrov, Stoyan; Cheng, Tiefu; Redwine, Laura; Pruitt, Christopher; Mills, Paul J; Ziegler, Michael G; Green, J Michael; Shaikh, Farah; Wilson, Kathleen

    2015-11-01

    Overwhelming data indicate that individuals with even mildly elevated blood pressure (BP) are at great risk for developing clinical hypertension and future cardiovascular disease (CVD). There remains a lack of consensus regarding treatment strategies for mildly elevated BP, termed prehypertension, and the knowledge of pathophysiology and mechanisms of its clinical outcomes remains limited. Our primary aim was to investigate βAR-mediated inflammation control (BARIC) responses of blood monocytes to isoproterenol (Iso) in relation to BP and CVD risk factors, including obesity, depressive mood, fasting glucose, triglycerides, and cholesterol levels in the 64 prehypertensive compared to 84 individuals with normal BP. BARIC was determined by measuring the degree of inhibition in lipopolysaccharides-stimulated monocytic intracellular TNF production by ex vivo Iso treatment (10(-8)M). Depressive mood was assessed by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Fasting metabolic and lipid panels were assessed, and plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines TNF, IL-1β, IL-6 were measured in a subset to confirm proinflammatory state of prehypertensive participants. Prehypertensive participants were older, heavier, included more men, and presented higher levels of fasting glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, and plasma TNF compared to normotensive participants (p's<.05). BARIC was significantly attenuated in the prehypertensive compared to normotensive group (p<.05). BARIC was negatively associated with systolic BP, diastolic BP, age, BMI, fasting glucose, triglycerides, total and low density cholesterol levels, and somatic depressive symptoms in all participants (p's<.0001 to .05). However, among the prehypertensive individuals BARIC was positively associated with SBP even after controlling for the covariates (age, gender, race, BMI, glucose and lipid panel, somatic BDI scores) (p<.05). This differing nature of the BARIC-SBP relationship between the two BP groups may be attributed to

  11. Impact of ABO Incompatibility on the Development of Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplant Recipients Presensitized to HLA

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Byung Ha; Joo, Yu Young; Lee, Jaesin; Kim, Hyung Duk; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In Sung; Choi, Bum Soon; Oh, Eun-Jee; Park, Cheol Whee; Kim, Yong-Soo; Yang, Chul Woo

    2015-01-01

    Whether the coexistence of anti-A/B antibody and donor specific anti-HLA antibody (HLA-DSA) has a synergistic impact on the development of acute antibody-mediated rejection (AAMR) in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) is unclear. This study includes 92 KTRs who received a kidney from an ABO-incompatible (ABOi) donor or were presensitized to donor HLA (HLAs) and 292 controls (CONT). HLAs was defined as a crossmatch positivity or the presence of HLA-DSA. We compared the incidence of AAMR among ABOi (n = 58), ABOi+HLAs (n = 12), HLAs (n = 22), and CONT (n = 292) groups and evaluated the risk factors and antibody type (anti-A/B vs. HLA-DSA) responsible for AAMR. AAMR developed less frequently in ABOi and CONT than in the ABOi+HLAs or HLAs (P < 0.05 for all); however, there was no difference between the ABOi+HLAs and HLAs groups. AAMR developed more frequently with strong HLA-DSA at baseline; however, high baseline anti-A/B titer did not affect AAMR development. Strong baseline HLA-DSA was an independent predictor for AAMR, however the baseline anti-A/B titer was not. All four AAMR episodes in ABOi+HLAs were positive to HLA-DSA but not to anti-A/B. In conclusion, ABO incompatibility does not increase the risk for AAMR in HLAs KTRs. PMID:25897756

  12. Vasopressin and sympathetic system mediate the cardiovascular effects of the angiotensin II in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in rat.

    PubMed

    Nasimi, Ali; Kafami, Marzieh

    2016-07-01

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) is involved in cardiovascular regulation. The angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor (AT1), and angiotensinogen were found in the BST. In our previous study we found that microinjection of Ang II into the BST produced a pressor response. This study was performed to find the mechanisms mediating this response in anesthetized rats. Ang II was microinjected into the BST and the cardiovascular responses were re-tested after systemic injection of a blocker of autonomic or vasopressin V1 receptor. The ganglionic nicotinic receptor blocker, hexamethonium dichloride, attenuated the pressor response to Ang II, indicating that the cardiovascular sympathetic system is involved in the pressor effect of Ang II. A selective vasopressin V1 receptor antagonist greatly attenuated the pressor effect of Ang II, indicating that the Ang II increases the arterial pressure via stimulation of vasopressin release as well. In conclusion, in the BST, Ang II as a neurotransmitter increases blood pressure by exciting cardiovascular sympathetic system and directly or indirectly causing vasopressin to release into bloodstream by VPN. This is an interesting new finding that not only circulating Ang II but also brain Ang II makes vasopressin release. PMID:26820216

  13. Immunosuppressive treatment for kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zivčić-Ćosić, S; Trobonjača, Z; Rački, S

    2011-01-01

    Immunosuppressive treatment minimizes unwanted immune reactivity, but it also leads to complications such as metabolic disorders, cardiovascular diseases and malignant tumours. In this paper we summarise the recent developments in action mechanisms of available immunosuppressive drugs and their usage for renal transplantation. These drugs act at various levels of lymphocytic activation and proliferation, and they may have additive or synergic effects when combined. In the majority of patients, the immunosuppressive protocol includes a calcineurin inhibitor (tacrolimus or cyclosporin), an antimetabolite (mycophenolate mofetil or mycophenolic acid) and a corticosteroid. Most patients also receive induction with monoclonal or polyclonal antilymphocytic antibodies. These immunosuppressive drugs allow a one-year survival of renal allografts in over 90% of cases and an incidence of acute rejection episodes below 15%. In most cases, acute cell-mediated rejection can be reversed with pulse doses of methylprednisolone; less often antilymphocytic antibodies must be applied. Acute humoral rejection can be suppressed with high doses of intravenous immunoglobulines or low doses of cytomegalovirus hyperimmune globuline, in combination with plasmapheresis, to obtain a satisfactory reduction of anti-donor antibodies. This treatment also allows renal transplantation for sensitised recipients, or transplantation against a positive cross match or AB0 incompatibility. Less often, immunoadsorption, alemtuzumab, rituximab or splenectomy are applied. New immunosuppressive drugs and protocols are currently under investigation. Immunosuppressive agents and methods targeting the induction of immune tolerance to the donor organ are especially promising. PMID:22286615

  14. Hypomagnesaemia in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Van Laecke, Steven; Van Biesen, Wim

    2015-07-01

    In the era of calcineurin inhibitors, hypomagnesaemia is a very common finding in kidney transplant recipients. Especially the first weeks after transplantation it is the rule rather than the exception. Hypomagnesaemia or low magnesium intake have been associated with a higher mortality or more cardiovascular events in the general population, but this association has never been explored in kidney transplant recipients, despite their increased cardiovascular risk. Kidney transplant recipients with pre- or post-transplant hypomagnesaemia seem to have an aberrant glucose metabolism and develop diabetes mellitus more frequently. Moreover, observations from alternate study populations, animal experiments or in vitro studies suggest a possible role of magnesium deficiency in graft dysfunction, bone metabolism and transplant immunology. Future observational and especially interventional studies should further define whether and to what extent we should make effort to correct this electrolyte disturbance in transplant recipients. Considering the mechanism of renal magnesium wasting, normalizing the serum magnesium concentration by oral supplementation alone might turn out to be cumbersome in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:26001746

  15. The role of material, psychosocial and behavioral factors in mediating the association between socioeconomic position and allostatic load (measured by cardiovascular, metabolic and inflammatory markers)

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Tony; Benzeval, Michaela; Whitley, Elise; Popham, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Lower socioeconomic position (SEP), both accumulated across the life course and at different life-stages, has been found to be associated with higher cumulative physiological burden, as measured by allostatic load. This study aimed to identify what factors mediate the association between SEP and allostatic load, as measured through combining cardiovascular, metabolic and inflammatory markers. We explored the role of material, psychological and behavioral factors, accumulated across two periods in time, in mediating the association between SEP and allostatic load. Data are from the West of Scotland Twenty-07 Study, with respondents followed over five waves of data collection from ages 35 to 55 (n = 999). Allostatic load was measured by summing nine binary biomarker scores (‘1’ = in the highest-risk quartile) measured when respondents were 55 years old (wave 5). SEP was measured by a person’s accumulated social class over two periods All mediators and SEP were measured at baseline in 1987 and 20 years later and combined to form accumulated measures of risk. Material mediators included car and home ownership, and having low income. The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) was used as the psychosocial mediator. Behavioral mediators included smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity and diet. Path analysis using linear regressions adjusting for sex were performed for each of the potential mediators to assess evidence of attenuation in the association between lower SEP and higher allostatic load. Analyses by mediator type revealed that renting one’s home (approximately 78% attenuation) and having low income (approx. 62% attenuation) largely attenuated the SEP–allostatic load association. GHQ did not attenuate the association. Smoking had the strongest attenuating effect of all health behaviors (by 33%) with no other health behaviors attenuating the association substantially. Material factors, namely home tenure and income status, and smoking have

  16. CXCL9 and CXCL10 accelerate acute transplant rejection mediated by alloreactive memory T cells in a mouse retransplantation model

    PubMed Central

    ZHUANG, JIAWEI; SHAN, ZHONGGUI; MA, TENG; LI, CHUN; QIU, SHUIWEI; ZHOU, XIAOBIAO; LIN, LIANFENG; QI, ZHONGQUAN

    2014-01-01

    C-X-C motif chemokine ligand (CXCL) 9 and CXCL10 play key roles in the initiation and development of acute transplant rejection. Previously, higher levels of RANTES expression and secretion were demonstrated in retransplantation or T-cell memory-transfer models. In the present study, the effect of the chemokines, CXCL9 and CXCL10, were investigated in a mouse retransplantation model. BALB/c mice were used as donors, while C57BL/6 mice were used as recipients. In the experimental groups, a heterotopic heart transplantation was performed six weeks following skin grafting. In the control groups, a heterotopic heart transplantation was performed without skin grafting. Untreated mice served as blank controls. The mean graft survival time of the heterotopic heart transplantations was 7.7 days in the experimental group (n=6), as compared with 3.25 days in the control group (n=6; P<0.001). On day three following cardiac transplantation, histological evaluation of the grafts revealed a higher International Society for Heart & Lung Transplantation grade in the experimental group as compared with the control group. In addition, gene expression and serum concentrations of CXCL9, CXCL10, interferon-γ, and interleukin-2 were markedly higher in the experimental group when compared with the control group. Differences between the levels of CXCL9 and CXCL10 in the pre- and post-transplant mice indicated that the chemokines may serve as possible biomarkers to predict acute rejection. The results of the present study demonstrated that CXCL9 and CXCL10 play a critical role in transplantation and retransplantation. High levels of these cytokines during the pre-transplant period may lead to extensive acute rejection. Thus, the observations enhance the understanding of the mechanism underlying the increased expression and secretion of CXCL9 and CXCL10 by alloreactive memory T cells. PMID:24944628

  17. Cardiovascular health outcomes of Latinos in the Affordable Housing as an Obesity Mediating Environment (AHOME) study: a study of rental assistance use.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Earle C; Rosenbaum, Emily

    2014-06-01

    Studies have shown that households subsidized with vouchers live in higher quality units and exhibit fewer physical, mental, and social problems than do their peers living in public housing. However, none of these studies have included cardiovascular outcomes. The objective of this study was to assess if use/type of rental assistance is independently associated with poor cardiovascular health among Latino adults (ages ≥ 18) who are eligible for federal low-income rental assistance and living in the Bronx, NY. Data from the cross-sectional, Affordable Housing as an Obesity Mediating Environment study, collected over 18 months (January 2011 to August 2012) were used. The prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes was determined by measured high blood pressure and self-reported heart attack and/or stroke. Type of housing status was defined as: public housing units, units subsidized by section 8 vouchers, and units unassisted by either federal program. Statistical techniques used were analysis of variance and multivariate logistic regression. The prevalence of CVD was significantly higher among public housing residents than unassisted participants even in the presence of all individual level covariates. Public housing residents also have higher levels of CVD than do section 8 participants. The prevalence of CVD was similar for unassisted and section 8 participants. These findings point to the potential for health benefits arising from housing voucher use even within a fairly delimited geographic area. PMID:24190105

  18. Protective effect of thymoquinone improves cardiovascular function, and attenuates oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis by mediating the PI3K/Akt pathway in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Liu, Hong-Yang; Jiang, Yi-Nong; Li, Nan

    2016-03-01

    Thymoquinone is the main active monomer extracted from black cumin and has anti‑inflammatory, antioxidant and anti‑apoptotic functions. However, the protective effects of thymoquinone on cardiovascular function in diabetes remain to be fully elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms underling the beneficial effects of thymoquinone on the cardiovascular function in streptozotocin‑induced diabetes mellitus (DM) rats. Supplement thymoquinone may recover the insulin levels and body weight, inhibit blood glucose levels and reduce the heart rate in DM‑induced rats. The results indicated that the heart, liver and lung to body weight ratios, in addition to the blood pressure levels, were similar for each experimental group. Treatment with thymoquinone significantly reduced oxidative stress damage, inhibited the increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein expression and suppressed the elevation of cyclooxygenase‑2 levels in DM‑induced rats. In addition, thymoquinone significantly suppressed the promotion of tumor necrosis factor‑α and interleukin‑6 levels in the DM‑induced rats. Furthermore, administration of thymoquinone significantly reduced caspase‑3 activity and the promotion of phosphorylated‑protein kinase B (Akt) protein expression levels in DM‑induced rats. These results suggest that the protective effect of thymoquinone improves cardiovascular function and attenuates oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis by mediating the phosphatidylinositol 3‑kinase/Akt pathway in DM‑induced rats. PMID:26820252

  19. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; ...

  20. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity, nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; Umbilical ...

  1. The role of GαO-mediated signaling in the rostral ventrolateral medulla oblongata in cardiovascular reflexes and control of cardiac ventricular excitability.

    PubMed

    Ang, Richard; Abramowitz, Joel; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Gourine, Alexander V; Tinker, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    The heart is controlled by the sympathetic and parasympathetic limbs of the autonomic nervous system with inhibitory signaling mechanisms recruited in both limbs. The aim of this study was to determine the role of inhibitory heterotrimeric G proteins in the central nervous mechanisms underlying autonomic control of the heart and its potential role in arrhythmogenesis. Mice with conditional deletion of the inhibitory heterotrimeric G protein GαO in the presympathetic area of the rostral ventral lateral medulla (RVLM) were generated to determine the role of GαO-mediated signalling in autonomic control and electrophysiological properties of the heart. GαO deletion within the RVLM was not associated with changes in heart rate (HR) or the arterial blood pressure at rest (home cage, normal behavior). However, exposure to stressful conditions (novel environment, hypoxia, or hypercapnia) in these mice was associated with abnormal HR responses and an increased baroreflex gain when assessed under urethane anesthesia. This was associated with shortening of the ventricular effective refractory period. This phenotype was reversed by systemic beta-adrenoceptor blockade, suggesting that GαO depletion in the RVLM increases central sympathetic drive. The data obtained support the hypothesis that GαO-mediated signaling within the presympathetic circuits of the RVLM contributes to the autonomic control of the heart. GαO deficiency in the RVLM has a significant impact on cardiovascular responses to stress, cardiovascular reflexes and electrical properties of the heart. PMID:27528004

  2. Rapid Reduction in Donor-Specific Anti-Human Leukocyte Antigen Antibodies and Reversal of Antibody-Mediated Rejection With Bortezomib in Pediatric Heart Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, William Robert; Frazier, Elizabeth A.; Mahle, William T.; Harville, Terry O.; Pye, Sherry E.; Knecht, Kenneth R.; Howard, Emily L.; Smith, R. Neal; Saylors, Robert L.; Garcia, Xiomara; Jaquiss, Robert D.B.; Woodle, E. Steve

    2013-01-01

    Background High titer donor-specific antibodies (DSA) and positive crossmatch in cardiac transplant recipients is associated with increased mortality from antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Although treatment to reduce antihuman leukocyte antigen antibodies using plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin, and rituximab has been reported to be beneficial, in practice these are often ineffective. Moreover, these interventions do not affect the mature antibody producing plasma cell. Bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor active against plasma cells, has been shown to reduce DSA in renal transplant patients with AMR. We report here the first use of bortezomib for cardiac transplant recipients in four pediatric heart recipients with biopsy-proven AMR, hemodynamic compromise, positive crossmatch, and high titer class I DSA. Methods Patients received four intravenous dose of bortezomib (1.3 mg/m2) over 2 weeks with plasmapheresis and rituximab. DSA specificity and strength (mean fluorescence intensity) was determined with Luminex. All had received previous treatment with plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin, and rituximab that was ineffective. Results AMR resolved in all patients treated with bortezomib with improvement in systolic function, conversion of biopsy to C4d negative in three patients and IgG negative in one patient, and a prompt, precipitous reduction in DSAs. In three patients who received plasmapheresis before bortezomib, plasmapheresis failed to reduce DSA. In one case, DSA increased after bortezomib but decreased after retreatment. Conclusions Bortezomib reduces DSA and may be an important adjunct to treatment of AMR in cardiac transplant recipients. Bortezomib may also be useful in desensitization protocols and in prevention of AMR in sensitized patients with positive crossmatch and elevated DSA. PMID:22179403

  3. A refractory case of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection due to anti-HLA-DQ antibody in a kidney transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Toshinari; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Izumi; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Tanno, Yudo; Yamada, Hiroki; Miki, Jun; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    We herein report a refractory case of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) due to anti-HLA-DQ antibody in a kidney transplant patient. A 45-year-old man was admitted for a protocol biopsy; he had a serum creatinine (S-Cr) level of 1.8 mg/dL 3 years following primary kidney transplantation. Histological examination revealed moderate to severe inflammatory cell infiltration in the peritubular capillaries. Thorough laboratory examination showed that the patient had donor-specific antibodies (DSAbs) to DR9 and DQ9. Considering both the histological and laboratory findings, we diagnosed acute antibody-mediated rejection. The patient underwent 3 days of consecutive steroid pulse therapy, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and plasma exchange. We also administered rituximab (200 mg/body). Six months after the treatment, a second allograft biopsy revealed the progression of interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy and persistence of mild peritubular capillaritis. Further analysis showed that the anti-DR9 antibodies had disappeared, but that the mean fluorescence intensity value of the anti-DQ9 antibodies had increased. Therefore, we repeated the plasma exchange and IVIG. Allograft function was stable throughout the course of treatment, and the S-Cr level remained at 1.8 mg/dL. This case report demonstrates the difficulty of treating AMR due to the presence of anti-DQ DSAbs and the necessity for subsequent therapies in refractory cases. PMID:26031594

  4. Heart transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... 10 years. Alternative Names Cardiac transplant; Transplant - heart; Transplantation - heart Images Heart, section through the middle Heart, ... 28. Bernstein D. Pediatric heart and heart-lung transplantation. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton ...

  5. Hair Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Hair Transplants What are hair transplants? In punch transplanting, a plug containing hair ... What should first be done before considering a hair transplant? Before the procedure, an ASDS doctor will ...

  6. Cancer in the Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Jeremy R.; Webster, Angela C.; Wong, Germaine

    2013-01-01

    Malignancy has become one of the three major causes of death after transplantation in the past decade and is thus increasingly important in all organ transplant programs. Death from cardiovascular disease and infection are both decreasing in frequency from a combination of screening, prophylaxis, aggressive risk factor management, and interventional therapies. Cancer, on the other hand, is poorly and expensively screened for; risk factors are mostly elusive and/or hard to impact on except for the use of immunosuppression itself; and finally therapeutic approaches to the transplant recipient with cancer are often nihilistic. This article provides a review of each of the issues as they come to affect transplantation: cancer before wait-listing, cancer transmission from the donor, cancer after transplantation, outcomes of transplant recipients after a diagnosis of cancer, and the role of screening and therapy in reducing the impact of cancer in transplant recipients. PMID:23818517

  7. The PI3K signaling-mediated nitric oxide contributes to cardiovascular effects of angiotensin-(1-7) in the nucleus tractus solitarii of rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhao-Tang; Ren, Chang-Zhen; Yang, Ya-Hong; Zhang, Ru-Wen; Sun, Jia-Cen; Wang, Yang-Kai; Su, Ding-Feng; Wang, Wei-Zhong

    2016-01-30

    Angiotensin-1-7 [Ang-(1-7)], acting via the Mas receptor in the central nervous system, is involved in the regulation of cardiovascular activity. Nitric oxide (NO) is implicated as an important modulator in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS), a key region involved in control of cardiovascular activity. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling in mediating the effect of Ang-(1-7) on NO generation in the NTS. In Sprague-Dawley rats, acute injection of Ang-(1-7) into the NTS significantly increased NO generation and neuronal/endothelial NO synthase (n/eNOS) activity, which were abolished by the selective Mas receptor antagonist d-Alanine-[Ang-(1-7)] (A-779), the PI3K inhibitor LY294002, or the Akt inhibitor triciribine (TCN). Western blotting analysis further demonstrated that Ang-(1-7) significantly increased levels of Akt/NOS phosphorylation in the NTS, and Ang-(1-7)-induced e/nNOS phosphorylation was antagonized by LY294002 or TCN. Furthermore, gene knockdown of PI3K by lentivirus containing small hairpin RNA in the NTS prevented the Ang-(1-7)-induced increases in NOS/Akt phosphorylation and NO production. The physiological (in vivo) experiments showed that pretreatment with the NOS inhibitor l-NAME, LY294002, or TCN abolished the decreases in blood pressure, heart rate, and renal sympathetic nerve activity induced by Ang-(1-7) injected into the NTS. Our findings suggest that nitric oxide release meditated by the Mas-PI3K-NOS signaling pathway is involved in the cardiovascular effects of Ang-(1-7) in the NTS. PMID:26686278

  8. Static magnetic field effect on the arterial baroreflex-mediated control of microcirculation: implications for cardiovascular effects due to environmental magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Gmitrov, Juraj

    2007-08-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that time-varying and static magnetic fields in the environment might affect the cardiovascular system. To explore the underlying physiology, the effect of static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the carotid baroreflex control of microcirculation was studied. Twenty-four hemodynamic monitorings were performed in rabbits sedated by pentobarbital infusion (5 mg/kg/h) during experiments that lasted 120 min. Mean femoral artery blood pressure, heart rate, and ear lobe skin microcirculatory blood flow, measured by microphotoelectric plethysmogram (MPPG), were simultaneously recorded before and after a 40 min exposure of the sinocarotid baroreceptors to Nd(2)-Fe(14)-B alloy magnets (n = 14) or sham magnets (n = 10, control series). The local SMF field was 350 mT, at the baroreceptors' site. Arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was estimated from heart rate/blood pressure response to intravenous bolus injections of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. A significant positive correlation was found between the SMF-induced increase in BRS (DeltaBRS = BRS(afterSMF) - BRS(priorSMF)) and the increment in microvascular blood flow (DeltaMPPG = MPPG(afterSMF) - MPPG(priorSMF)) (r = 0.66, p < 0.009). The SMF probably modulated the arterial baroreflex-mediated microcirculatory control. This could represent one possible mechanism how environmental magnetic fields act on the cardiovascular system, and a method how to complexly adjust macro- and microcirculation with potential clinical implementation. PMID:17530271

  9. Bioavailable dietary phosphate, a mediator of cardiovascular disease, may be decreased with plant-based diets, phosphate binders, niacin, and avoidance of phosphate additives.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; DiNicolantonio, James J

    2014-01-01

    Increased fasting serum phosphate within the normal physiological range has been linked to increased cardiovascular risk in prospective epidemiology; increased production of fibroblast growth factor 23, and direct vascular effects of phosphate, may mediate this risk. Although dietary phosphate intake does not clearly influence fasting serum phosphate in individuals with normal renal function, increased phosphate intake can provoke a rise in fibroblast growth factor 23, and in diurnal phosphate levels, and hence may adversely influence vascular health. Dietary phosphate absorption can be moderated by emphasizing plant-based dietary choices (which provide phosphate in less bioavailable forms); avoidance of processed foods containing inorganic phosphate food additives; and by ingestion of phosphate-binder drugs, magnesium supplements, or niacin, which precipitate phosphate or suppress its gastrointestinal absorption. The propensity of dietary phosphate to promote vascular calcification may be opposed by optimal intakes of magnesium, vitamin K, and vitamin D; the latter should also counter the tendency of phosphate to elevate parathyroid hormone. PMID:24984987

  10. Persistent strong anti-HLA antibody at high titer is complement binding and associated with increased risk of antibody-mediated rejection in heart transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Zeevi, Adriana; Lunz, John; Feingold, Brian; Shullo, Michael; Bermudez, Christian; Teuteberg, Jeffery; Webber, Steven

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sensitized heart transplant candidates are evaluated for donor-specific anti-HLA IgG antibody (DSA) by Luminex single-antigen bead (SAB) testing (SAB-IgG) to determine donor suitability and help predict a positive complement-dependent cytotoxicity crossmatch (CDC-XM) by virtual crossmatching (VXM). However, SAB testing used for VXM does not correlate perfectly with CDC-XM results and individual transplant programs have center-specific permissible thresholds to predict crossmatch positivity. A novel Luminex SAB-based assay detecting C1q-binding HLA antibodies (SAB-C1q) contributes functional information to SAB testing, but the relationship between SAB strength and complement-binding ability is unclear. METHODS In this retrospective study, we identified 15 pediatric and adult heart allograft candidates with calculated panel-reactive antibody (cPRA) >50% by SAB-IgG and compared conventional SAB-IgG results with SAB-C1q testing. RESULTS Pre- and post-transplant DSA by SAB-C1q correlated with DSA by SAB-IgG and also with CDC-XM results and early post-transplant endomyocardial biopsy findings. Individual HLA antibodies by SAB-IgG in undiluted sera correlated poorly with SAB-C1q; however, when sera were diluted 1:16, SAB-IgG results were well correlated with SAB-C1q. In some sera, HLA antibodies with low mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) by SAB-IgG exhibited high SAB-C1q MFIs for the same HLA antigens. Diluting or heat-treating these sera increased SAB-IgG MFI, consistent with SAB-C1q results. In 13 recipients, SAB-C1q–positive DSA was associated with positive CDC-XM and with early clinical post-transplant antibody-mediated rejection (cAMR). CONCLUSIONS Risk assessment for positive CDC-XM and early cAMR in sensitized heart allograft recipients are correlated with SAB-C1q reactivity. PMID:23142561

  11. Bone marrow transplant - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow - discharge; Stem cell transplant - discharge; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant - discharge; Reduced intensity; Non-myeloablative transplant - discharge; Mini transplant - discharge; Allogenic bone marrow transplant - ...

  12. Oxidized lipids and lipid-mediators are involved in cardiovascular injury induced by diesel exhaust particles and ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanisms by which air pollutants induce cardiac and vascular injuries are unknown. We hypothesized that these injuries involve alterations in'aortic membrane lipids and lipid-mediators. We exposed male Wistar Kyoto rats (12-15 wk old), nose-only to air, ozone (03; 0.5 ppm),...

  13. The Transplant Patient and Transplant Medicine in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Lloyd D.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades in particular there has been a remarkable increase in the number of solid organ transplants being performed worldwide alongside improvements in long-term survival rates. However, the infrastructure at transplant centres has been unable to keep pace with the current volume of the transplant patient work load. These pressures on transplant specialist centres has led to calls for an increased role of the general practitioner (GP) managing particular aspects of transplant patients’ medical care. Indeed, many aspects of follow-up care such as screening for malignancies, preventing infection through immunisation programmes, and managing cardiovascular risk factors are already important aspects of family practice medicine. This paper aims to review some of the aspects of transplant patient care that is important for healthcare workers in family practice to manage. PMID:25657941

  14. Total Body Irradiation Is Permissive for Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Mediated New Bone Formation Following Local Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Herberg, Samuel; Kondrikova, Galina; Hussein, Khaled A.; Periyasamy-Thandavan, Sudharsan; Johnson, Maribeth H.; Elsalanty, Mohammed E.; Shi, Xingming; Hamrick, Mark W.; Isales, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal injury is a major clinical challenge accentuated by the decrease of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (BMSCs) with age or disease. Numerous experimental and clinical studies have revealed that BMSCs hold great promise for regenerative therapies due to their direct osteogenic potential and indirect trophic/paracrine actions. Increasing evidence suggests that stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) is involved in modulating the host response to the injury. Common problems with BMSC therapy include poor cell engraftment, which can be addressed by total body irradiation (TBI) prior to transplantation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that direct tibial transplantation of BMSCs drives endogenous bone formation in a dose-dependent manner, which is enhanced by TBI, and investigated the potential role of SDF-1 in facilitating these events. We found that TBI is permissive for transplanted BMSCs to engraft and contribute to new bone formation. Bone marrow (BM) interstitial fluid analysis revealed no differences of SDF-1 splice variants in irradiated animals compared to controls, despite the increased mRNA and protein levels expressed in whole BM cells. This correlated with increased dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity and the failure to induce chemotaxis of BMSCs in vitro. We found increased mRNA expression levels of the major SDF-1-cleaving proteases in whole BM cells from irradiated animals suggesting distinct spatial differences within the BM in which SDF-1 may play different autocrine and paracrine signaling roles beyond the immediate cell surface microenvironment. PMID:24914464

  15. Brain mediators of cardiovascular responses to social threat, Part II: Prefrontal-subcortical pathways and relationship with anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Wager, Tor D.; van Ast, Vanessa A.; Hughes, Brent L.; Davidson, Matthew L.; Lindquist, Martin A.; Ochsner, Kevin N.

    2009-01-01

    Social evaluative threat (SET) is a potent stressor in humans linked to autonomic and endocrine responses, and multiple health problems. Neuroimaging has recently begun to elucidate the brain correlates of SET, but as yet little is known about the mediating cortical-brainstem pathways in humans. This paper replicates and extends findings in a companion paper (Wager et al., submitted) using an independent cohort of participants and different image acquisition parameters. Here, we focused specifically on relationships between the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG), and heart rate (HR). We applied multi-level path analysis to localize brain mediators of SET effects on HR and self-reported anxiety. HR responses were mediated by opposing signals in two distinct sub-regions of the MPFC—increases in rostral dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (rdACC) and deactivation in ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). In addition, HR responses were mediated by PAG. Additional path analyses provided support for two cortical subcortical pathways: one linking vmPFC, PAG, and HR, and another linking rdACC, thalamus, and HR. PAG responses were linked with HR changes both before and during SET, whereas cortical regions showed stronger connectivity with HR during threat. Self-reported anxiety showed a partially overlapping, but weaker, pattern of mediators, including the vmPFC, dorsomedial PFC (dmPFC), and lateral frontal cortex, as well as substantial individual differences that were largely unexplained. Taken together, these data suggest pathways for the translation of social threats into both physiological and experiential responses, and provide targets for future research on the generation and regulation of emotion. PMID:19465135

  16. Pancreatic Tissue Transplanted in TheraCyte™ Encapsulation Devices Is Protected and Prevents Hyperglycemia in a Mouse Model of Immune-Mediated Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Boettler, Tobias; Schneider, Darius; Cheng, Yang; Kadoya, Kuniko; Brandon, Eugene P; Martinson, Laura; von Herrath, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is characterized by destruction of glucose-responsive insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells and exhibits immune infiltration of pancreatic islets, where CD8 lymphocytes are most prominent. Curative transplantation of pancreatic islets is seriously hampered by the persistence of autoreactive immune cells that require high doses of immunosuppressive drugs. An elegant approach to confer graft protection while obviating the need for immunosuppression is the use of encapsulation devices that allow for the transfer of oxygen and nutrients, yet prevent immune cells from making direct contact with the islet grafts. Here we demonstrate that macroencapsulation devices (TheraCyte™) loaded with neonatal pancreatic tissue and transplanted into RIP-LCMV.GP mice prevented disease onset in a model of virus-induced diabetes mellitus. Histological analyses revealed that insulin-producing cells survived within the device in animal models of diabetes. Our results demonstrate that these encapsulation devices can protect from an immune-mediated attack and can contain a sufficient amount of insulin-producing cells to prevent overt hyperglycemia. PMID:26300527

  17. 3-bromopyruvate and sodium citrate target glycolysis, suppress survivin, and induce mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in gastric cancer cells and inhibit gastric orthotopic transplantation tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting-An; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Guo, Xing-Yu; Xian, Shu-Lin; Lu, Yun-Fei

    2016-03-01

    Glycolysis is the primary method utilized by cancer cells to produce the energy (adenosine triphosphate, ATP) required for cell proliferation. Therefore, inhibition of glycolysis may inhibit tumor growth. We previously found that both 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) and sodium citrate (SCT) can inhibit glycolysis in vitro; however, the underlying inhibitory mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we used a human gastric cancer cell line (SGC-7901) and an orthotopic transplantation tumor model in nude mice to explore the specific mechanisms of 3-BrPA and SCT. We found that both 3-BrPA and SCT effectively suppressed cancer cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle, induced apoptosis, and decreased the production of lactate and ATP. 3-BrPA significantly reduced the glycolytic enzyme hexokinase activity, while SCT selectively inhibited phosphofructokinase-1 activity. Furthermore, 3-BrPA and SCT upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, cytochrome c, and cleaved caspase-3) and downregulated the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2 and survivin). Finally, our animal model of gastric cancer indicated that intraperitoneal injection of 3-BrPA and SCT suppressed orthotopic transplantation tumor growth and induced tumor apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that 3-BrPA and SCT selectively suppress glycolytic enzymes, decrease ATP production, induce mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis, downregulate survivin, and inhibit tumor growth. Moreover, an intraperitoneal injection is an effective form of administration of 3-BrPA and SCT. PMID:26708213

  18. 3-Bromopyruvate and sodium citrate target glycolysis, suppress survivin, and induce mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in gastric cancer cells and inhibit gastric orthotopic transplantation tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    WANG, TING-AN; ZHANG, XIAO-DONG; GUO, XING-YU; XIAN, SHU-LIN; LU, YUN-FEI

    2016-01-01

    Glycolysis is the primary method utilized by cancer cells to produce the energy (adenosine triphosphate, ATP) required for cell proliferation. Therefore, inhibition of glycolysis may inhibit tumor growth. We previously found that both 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) and sodium citrate (SCT) can inhibit glycolysis in vitro; however, the underlying inhibitory mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we used a human gastric cancer cell line (SGC-7901) and an orthotopic transplantation tumor model in nude mice to explore the specific mechanisms of 3-BrPA and SCT. We found that both 3-BrPA and SCT effectively suppressed cancer cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle, induced apoptosis, and decreased the production of lactate and ATP. 3-BrPA significantly reduced the glycolytic enzyme hexokinase activity, while SCT selectively inhibited phosphofructokinase-1 activity. Furthermore, 3-BrPA and SCT upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, cytochrome c, and cleaved caspase-3) and downregulated the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2 and survivin). Finally, our animal model of gastric cancer indicated that intraperitoneal injection of 3-BrPA and SCT suppressed orthotopic transplantation tumor growth and induced tumor apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that 3-BrPA and SCT selectively suppress glycolytic enzymes, decrease ATP production, induce mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis, downregulate survivin, and inhibit tumor growth. Moreover, an intraperitoneal injection is an effective form of administration of 3-BrPA and SCT. PMID:26708213

  19. Fluorophore-mediated, fiber-optic, multi-analyte, immunosensing system for rapid diagnosis and prognosis of cardiovascular diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Liang; Ren, Yongjie; Hong, Bin; Kang, Kyung A.

    2006-03-01

    A prototype of a fiber-optic, multi-analyte, immunobiosensing system was developed to simultaneously quantify disease-representing biomarkers in blood plasma. This system was for simultaneous quantification of two different groups of multi-biomarkers related to cardiovascular diseases (CVD): anticoagulants (protein C, protein S, antithrombin III, and plasminogen) for deficiency diagnosis; and cardiac markers (B-type natriuretic peptide, cardiac troponin I, myoglobin, and C-reactive protein) for coronary heart disease diagnosis. As an initial effort towards the development of a disposable and easy-to-use sensing cartridge as a rapid diagnostic tool for CVD related diseases, a prototype of a flow control system was also developed to automatically perform simultaneous four-analyte quantification. Currently, the system is capable of quantifying the multiple anticoagulants in their clinically significant sensing ranges within 5 minutes, at an average signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of 25. A simultaneous assay of the four cardiac markers can be performed within 10 min, at an average S/N ratio of 20. When this highly portable multi-analyte sensing system is completed and successfully tested for CVD patient's plasma, it can provide rapid (<10 min) and reliable diagnostic and prognostic information at a patient's bedside.

  20. "Immuknow" to measurement of cell-mediated immunity in renal transplant recipients undergoing short-term evaluation.

    PubMed

    De Paolis, P; Favarò, A; Piola, A; Martini, F; Cristiana, G; Agrati, C; Iappelli, M; Di Giulio, S

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this preliminary, observational study was to evaluate the value of ImmuKnow (IK), a new tool to measure the net state of immunefunction among renal transplant recipients, in correlation with clinical and laboratory data among unselected renal transplant recipients. Forty-nine recipients of mean age of 51 years were enrolled and followed for 1 year after transplantation. All subjects received the same immunosuppressive strategy with basiliximab induction and tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and steroid maintenance therapy. Samples for IK were collected before transplantation as well as at 7, 14, 21 and 42 days and after 3, 6, and 12 months. There were 54 samples with IK <225 ng/mL, 201 samples with normal IK values, and 135 samples with >525 ng/mL. We divided recipients into 3 groups with respect to their basal IK values: Group 1 (Gr1; IK <225 ng/mL); Group 2 (Gr2; normal values of IK between 226 and 524 ng/mL); and Group 3 (Gr3; IK >525 ng/mL). At 1 year, we observed a significant difference among IK values at the start and the end of the study: Gr1 vs Gr2, P<.0001; Gr2 vs Gr3, P<.06 and Gr 1 vs Gr 3, P<.01). We observed reduced IK values to predict an increased risk of infection, particularly with cytomegalovirus (CMV) replication while higher IK value did not correlate with an increased risk of acute rejection episodes. Reduction of serum creatine levels occurred within 1 year in all groups (P<.005), but there was a significant difference between Gr 2 versus Grs 1 and 3 (P<.0001 and P<.0005, respectively). There findings suggested that more stable IK values were associated with clinical quiescence and laboratory stability. In conclusion, our preliminary analysis showed a beneficial capacity of this assay to represent the global depression of the immune system. We noted that reduced IK values, as a sign of excessive immunosuppressive therapy, were associated with an increased risk of infection. We did not confirm the predictive value of higher IK

  1. Transplant services

    MedlinePlus

    ... to determine if you meet the criteria for organ transplantation. Most types of organ transplants have guidelines detailing ... you may have. References Herman M, Keaveny AP. Organ transplantation. In: Walsh D, Caraceni AT, Fainsinger R, et ...

  2. Lung Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Lung Transplant? A lung transplant is surgery to remove a person's diseased lung ... a healthy lung from a deceased donor. Lung transplants are used for people who are likely to ...

  3. Kidney transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections Side effects from medicines used to prevent transplant rejection Loss of transplanted kidney ... tries to destroy it. In order to avoid rejection, almost all kidney transplant recipients must take medicines that suppress their immune ...

  4. Heart transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... have symptoms. You must take drugs that prevent transplant rejection for the rest of your life. You will ... heart transplant. The main problem, as with other transplants, is rejection. If rejection can be controlled, survival increases to ...

  5. Nephrotic syndrome: an under-recognised immune-mediated complication of non-myeloablative allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, R; Balow, J E; Sabnis, S; Lundqvist, A; Igarashi, T; Takahashi, Y; Austin, H; Tisdale, J; Barrett, J; Geller, N; Childs, R

    2005-10-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is an extremely rare complication of myeloablative allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) that usually occurs in association with chronic graft-versus-host disease (C-GVHD). We observed an unexpectedly high incidence of NS in a cohort of 163 consecutive patients undergoing non-myeloablative HCT from a related human leucocyte antigen-compatible donor. Seven patients developed NS at a median 318 d post-transplant (range 119-1203 d; cumulative incidence 6.1%). The median age at onset of NS was 46 years (range 33-59 years); three of the seven patients had no evidence of C-GVHD while four had accompanying limited C-GVHD. At diagnosis, median proteinuria was 16.5 g/24 h (range 3-24 g/24 h). Renal biopsy was performed in four cases and revealed membranous nephropathy. NS was not always associated with other symptoms of C-GVHD, and in contrast to previous reports, usually did not improve with the re-initiation of aggressive immunosuppression, resulting in progressive renal failure necessitating dialysis in three of seven cases. Membranous nephropathy resulting in NS is a previously unrecognised and clinically significant complication of non-myeloablative HCT. PMID:16173966

  6. Excitatory Amino Acid Receptors Mediate Asymmetry and Lateralization in the Descending Cardiovascular Pathways from the Dorsomedial Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Carlos Henrique; Ianzer, Danielle; Lima, Augusto Martins; Marins, Fernanda Ribeiro; Pedrino, Gustavo Rodrigues; Vaz, Gisele; Menezes, Gustavo Batista; Nalivaiko, Eugene; Fontes, Marco Antônio Peliky

    2014-01-01

    The dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) and lateral/dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (PAG) are anatomically and functionally connected. Both the DMH and PAG depend on glutamatergic inputs for activation. We recently reported that removal of GABA-ergic tone in the unilateral DMH produces: asymmetry, that is, a right- (R-) sided predominance in cardiac chronotropism, and lateralization, that is, a greater increase in ipsilateral renal sympathetic activity (RSNA). In the current study, we investigated whether excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptors in the DMH–PAG pathway contribute to the functional interhemispheric difference. In urethane (1.2 to 1.4 g/kg, i.p.) anesthetized rats, we observed that: (i) nanoinjections of N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA 100 pmol/100 nl) into the unilateral DMH produced the same right-sided predominance in the control of cardiac chronotropy, (ii) nanoinjections of NMDA into the ipsilateral DMH or PAG evoked lateralized RSNA responses, and (iii) blockade of EAA receptors in the unilateral DMH attenuated the cardiovascular responses evoked by injection of NMDA into either the R- or left- (L-) PAG. In awake rats, nanoinjection of kynurenic acid (1 nmol/100 nL) into the L-DMH or R- or L-PAG attenuated the tachycardia evoked by air stress. However, the magnitude of stress-evoked tachycardia was smallest when the EAA receptors of the R-DMH were blocked. We conclude that EAA receptors contribute to the right-sided predominance in cardiac chronotropism. This interhemispheric difference that involves EAA receptors was observed in the DMH but not in the PAG. PMID:25397884

  7. Lipids in liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Hüsing, Anna; Kabar, Iyad; Schmidt, Hartmut H

    2016-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is very common after liver transplantation and can be observed in up to 71% of patients. The etiology of lipid disorders in these patients is multifactorial, with different lipid profiles observed depending on the immunosuppressive agents administered and the presence of additional risk factors, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus and nutrition. Due to recent improvements in survival of liver transplant recipients, the prevention of cardiovascular events has become more important, especially as approximately 64% of liver transplant recipients present with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Management of dyslipidemia and of other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes and smoking, has therefore become essential in these patients. Treatment of hyperlipidemia after liver transplantation consists of life style modification, modifying the dose or type of immunosuppressive agents and use of lipid lowering agents. At the start of administration of lipid lowering medications, it is important to monitor drug-drug interactions, especially between lipid lowering agents and immunosuppressive drugs. Furthermore, as combinations of various lipid lowering drugs can lead to severe side effects, such as myopathies and rhabdomyolysis, these combinations should therefore be avoided. To our knowledge, there are no current guidelines targeting the management of lipid metabolism disorders in liver transplant recipients. This paper therefore recommends an approach of managing lipid abnormalities occurring after liver transplantation. PMID:27022213

  8. Lipids in liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Hüsing, Anna; Kabar, Iyad; Schmidt, Hartmut H

    2016-03-28

    Hyperlipidemia is very common after liver transplantation and can be observed in up to 71% of patients. The etiology of lipid disorders in these patients is multifactorial, with different lipid profiles observed depending on the immunosuppressive agents administered and the presence of additional risk factors, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus and nutrition. Due to recent improvements in survival of liver transplant recipients, the prevention of cardiovascular events has become more important, especially as approximately 64% of liver transplant recipients present with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Management of dyslipidemia and of other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes and smoking, has therefore become essential in these patients. Treatment of hyperlipidemia after liver transplantation consists of life style modification, modifying the dose or type of immunosuppressive agents and use of lipid lowering agents. At the start of administration of lipid lowering medications, it is important to monitor drug-drug interactions, especially between lipid lowering agents and immunosuppressive drugs. Furthermore, as combinations of various lipid lowering drugs can lead to severe side effects, such as myopathies and rhabdomyolysis, these combinations should therefore be avoided. To our knowledge, there are no current guidelines targeting the management of lipid metabolism disorders in liver transplant recipients. This paper therefore recommends an approach of managing lipid abnormalities occurring after liver transplantation. PMID:27022213

  9. Expression of miR-142-5p in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Renal Transplant Patients with Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Danger, Richard; Paul, Chloé; Giral, Magali; Lavault, Amélie; Foucher, Yohann; Degauque, Nicolas; Pallier, Annaïck; Durand, Maxim; Castagnet, Stéphanie; Duong Van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Delahousse, Michel; Renaudin, Karine; Soulillou, Jean-Paul; Brouard, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    In renal transplantation, the unresponsiveness of patients undergoing chronic antibody mediated rejection (CAMR) to classical treatment stress on the need for accurate biomarkers to improve its diagnosis. We aim to determine whether microRNA expression patterns may be associated with a diagnosis of CAMR. We performed expression profiling of miRNAs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of kidney transplant recipients with CAMR or stable graft function. Among 257 expressed miRNAs, 10 miRNAs associated with CAMR were selected. Among them, miR-142-5p was increased in PBMC and biopsies of patients with CAMR as well as in a rodent model of CAMR. The lack of modulation of miR-142-5p in PBMC of patients with renal failure, suggests that its over-expression in CAMR was associated with immunological disorders rather than renal dysfunction. A ROC curve analysis performed on independent samples showed that miR-142-5p is a potential biomarker of CAMR allowing a very good discrimination of the patients with CAMR (AUC = 0.74; p = 0.0056). Moreover, its expression was decreased in PHA-activated blood cells and was not modulated in PBMC from patients with acute rejection, excluding a non-specific T cell activation expression. The absence of modulation of this miRNA in immunosuppressed patients suggests that its expression was not influenced by treatment. Finally, the analysis of miR-142-5p predicted targets under-expressed in CAMR PBMC in a published microarray dataset revealed an enrichment of immune-related genes. Altogether, these data suggest that miR-142-5p could be used as a biomarker in CAMR and these finding may improve our understanding of chronic rejection mechanisms. PMID:23577151

  10. Use of annual ABPM, and repeated carotid scan and echocardiography to monitor cardiovascular health over nine yr in pediatric and young adult renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Balzano, Rita; Lindblad, Ylva Tranaeus; Vavilis, Georgios; Jogestrand, Tomas; Berg, Ulla B; Krmar, Rafael T

    2011-09-01

    In adult hypertensive patients, increased cIMT and LVH are independent risk factors for cardiovascular events. We have previously observed that in pediatric RTRs with tight control of BP, cIMT did not progress over time. This investigation is an extension of the aforementioned study aimed at re-examining cIMT and also reporting serial echocardiography results. Twenty-two RTRs aged 9.4 ± 3.3 yr at their baseline carotid scan underwent two additional vascular ultrasounds during a follow-up of 9.1 ± 0.9 yr. Carotid scan and echocardiography examinations were carried out simultaneously with ABPM. Antihypertensive therapy was determined according to the recipient's ABPM results, which were performed at yearly intervals. Baseline cIMT was significantly greater in RTRs than in healthy controls. There was no statistical evidence of systematic changes in cIMT over time. At the last examination, 14 of 17 RTRs with treated hypertension had controlled hypertension (prevalence 82%; 95% CI, 56.5-96.2), and the overall prevalence of LVH was 4.5% (95% CI, -0.01 to 23.5). The lack of progression of cIMT over time and the low prevalence of LVH might reflect the effect of long-standing BP control. PMID:21884348

  11. INTESTINAL TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Tzakis, Andreas G.; Todo, Satoru; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Intestinal transplantation is often the only alternative form of treatment for patients dependent on total parenteral nutrition for survival. Although a limited number of intestinal transplantations have been performed, results with FK 506 immunosuppression are comparable to those for other organ transplants. The impact of successful intestinal transplantation on gastroenterology will likely be similar to the impact of kidney and liver transplantation on nephrology and hepatology. PMID:7515221

  12. Recombinant IL-33 prolongs leflunomide-mediated graft survival by reducing IFN-γ and expanding CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cells in concordant heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chen; Lu, Fang-Na; Jin, Ning; Yang, Bo; Gao, Chang; Zhao, Bin; Fu, Jia-Zhao; Hong, Shi-Fu; Liang, Han-Ting; Chen, Li-Hong; Chen, Zhi-Shui; Chen, Jie; Qi, Zhong-Quan

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33 is a novel IL-1 family member, and its administration has been associated with promotion of T helper type-2 (Th2) cell activity and cytokines, particularly IL-4 and IL-5 in vivo. Recently, IL-33 was shown to increase CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and to suppress levels of the Th1-type cytokine IFN-γ in allogeneic heart transplantation in mice. Therefore, we hypothesized that IL-33 and leflunomide (Lef) could prolong graft survival in the concordant mouse-to-rat heart transplantation model. In this model, xenografts undergo acute humoral xenograft rejection (AHXR) typically on day 3 or cell-mediated rejection approximately on day 7 if AHXR is inhibited by Lef treatment. Recipients were treated with Lef (n=6), IL-33 (n=6), IL-33 combined with Lef (n=6), or left untreated (n=6) for survival studies. Heart grafts were monitored until they stopped beating. Mouse heterotopic grafts were performed, and recipients were sacrificed on days 2 and 7 for histological and flow cytometric analyses. The combination of IL-33 and Lef significantly prolonged the grafts from 17.3±2.3 to 2.8±0.4 days, compared to untreated controls. IL-33 administration with Lef, while facilitating Th2-associated cytokines (IL-4 on day 2 but not day 7), also decreased IFN-γ on day 2 and day 7, compared with Lef treatment only. Furthermore, IL-33 with Lef administration caused an expansion of suppressive CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs in rats. The IL-33 and Lef combination therapy resulted in significantly prolonged graft survival, associated with markedly decreased Th1 cells and increased IL-10 levels. In addition, the combination therapy significantly decreased the percentage of CD-45(+) B cells on days 2 and 7, compared with monotherapy. These findings reveal a new immunoregulatory property of IL-33. Specifically, it facilitates regulatory cells, particularly functional CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs that underlie IL-33-mediated cardiac xenograft survival. Moreover, it can decrease Th

  13. Oxidative stress in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Csányi, Gábor; Miller, Francis J

    2014-01-01

    In the special issue "Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease" authors were invited to submit papers that investigate key questions in the field of cardiovascular free radical biology. The original research articles included in this issue provide important information regarding novel aspects of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signaling, which have important implications in physiological and pathophysiological cardiovascular processes. The issue also included a number of review articles that highlight areas of intense research in the fields of free radical biology and cardiovascular medicine. PMID:24722571

  14. Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Csányi, Gábor; Miller, Francis J.

    2014-01-01

    In the special issue “Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease” authors were invited to submit papers that investigate key questions in the field of cardiovascular free radical biology. The original research articles included in this issue provide important information regarding novel aspects of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signaling, which have important implications in physiological and pathophysiological cardiovascular processes. The issue also included a number of review articles that highlight areas of intense research in the fields of free radical biology and cardiovascular medicine. PMID:24722571

  15. Renal dysfunction associated with liver transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, R. M.; Popescu, I.

    1995-01-01

    It has been known for some time that a variety of liver diseases affect kidney function, but renal dysfunction associated with orthotopic liver transplantation has received scant attention. Although the mechanisms mediating these abnormalities are incompletely defined, advances in the understanding of renal pathophysiology after liver transplantation have made it possible to develop new treatment strategies. Aggressive and early intervention to diagnose and treat renal complications associated with liver transplantation should be the goal for transplant centres. PMID:7479462

  16. Kidney transplant in diabetic patients: modalities, indications and results

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Érika B; de Sá, João R; Melaragno, Cláudio S; Gonzalez, Adriano M; Linhares, Marcelo M; Salzedas, Alcides; Medina-Pestana, José O

    2009-01-01

    Background Diabetes is a disease of increasing worldwide prevalence and is the main cause of chronic renal failure. Type 1 diabetic patients with chronic renal failure have the following therapy options: kidney transplant from a living donor, pancreas after kidney transplant, simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant, or awaiting a deceased donor kidney transplant. For type 2 diabetic patients, only kidney transplant from deceased or living donors are recommended. Patient survival after kidney transplant has been improving for all age ranges in comparison to the dialysis therapy. The main causes of mortality after transplant are cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events, infections and neoplasias. Five-year patient survival for type 2 diabetic patients is lower than the non-diabetics' because they are older and have higher body mass index on the occasion of the transplant and both pre- and posttransplant cardiovascular diseases prevalences. The increased postransplant cardiovascular mortality in these patients is attributed to the presence of well-known risk factors, such as insulin resistance, higher triglycerides values, lower HDL-cholesterol values, abnormalities in fibrinolysis and coagulation and endothelial dysfunction. In type 1 diabetic patients, simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant is associated with lower prevalence of vascular diseases, including acute myocardial infarction, stroke and amputation in comparison to isolated kidney transplant and dialysis therapy. Conclusion Type 1 and 2 diabetic patients present higher survival rates after transplant in comparison to the dialysis therapy, although the prevalence of cardiovascular events and infectious complications remain higher than in the general population. PMID:19825194

  17. B Cells and Antibodies in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Alice; Mariat, Christophe; Mousson, Christiane; Wood, Kathryn J; Rifle, Gérard; Thaunat, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Overlooked for decades, the humoral alloimmune response is increasingly recognized as a leading cause of graft loss after transplantation. However, improvement in the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection has not yet translated into better outcomes for transplanted patients. After an update on B cell physiology and antibody generation, the 2015 Beaune Seminar in Transplant Research challenged the conventional view of antibody-mediated rejection pathophysiology and discussed the latest promising therapeutic approaches. PMID:26845305

  18. Hair transplantation.

    PubMed

    Avram, Marc R

    2012-12-01

    Hair transplantation is a purely dermatologic surgical procedure that dermatologists should be able to perform in appropriate candidates with hair loss. Hair transplantation techniques performed in the 1960s through the 1990s utilized large grafts that created an unfortunate public image of unnatural-appearing transplanted hair. Over the last 15 years, hair transplantation has been performed using follicular units to create consistently natural-looking transplanted hair in both men and women. This article provides an overview of candidate selection and state-of-the-art techniques for performing hair transplantation. PMID:23409484

  19. Cardiovascular Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.; Fritsch-Yelle, Janice M.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Wood, Margie L.; Brown, Troy E.; Fortner, G. William

    1999-01-01

    Spaceflight causes adaptive changes in cardiovascular function that may deleteriously affect crew health and safety. Over the last three decades, symptoms of cardiovascular changes have ranged from postflight orthostatic tachycardia and decreased exercise capacity to serious cardiac rhythm disturbances during extravehicular activities (EVA). The most documented symptom of cardiovascular dysfunction, postflight orthostatic intolerance, has affected a significant percentage of U.S. Space Shuttle astronauts. Problems of cardiovascular dysfunction associated with spaceflight are a concern to NASA. This has been particularly true during Shuttle flights where the primary concern is the crew's physical health, including the pilot's ability to land the Orbiter, and the crew's ability to quickly egress and move to safety should a dangerous condition arise. The study of astronauts during Shuttle activities is inherently more difficult than most human research. Consequently, sample sizes have been small and results have lacked consistency. Before the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP), there was a lack of normative data on changes in cardiovascular parameters during and after spaceflight. The EDOMP for the first time allowed studies on a large enough number of subjects to overcome some of these problems. There were three primary goals of the Cardiovascular EDOMP studies. The first was to establish, through descriptive studies, a normative data base of cardiovascular changes attributable to spaceflight. The second goal was to determine mechanisms of cardiovascular changes resulting from spaceflight (particularly orthostatic hypotension and cardiac rhythm disturbances). The third was to evaluate possible countermeasures. The Cardiovascular EDOMP studies involved parallel descriptive, mechanistic, and countermeasure evaluations.

  20. Clinical Significance of HLA-DQ Antibodies in the Development of Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Allograft Failure in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Min, Ji Won; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In-Sung; Park, Ki-Hyun; Yang, Chul Woo; Chung, Byung Ha; Oh, Eun-Jee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract With the development of the single antigen beads assay, the role of donor specific alloantibody (DSA) against human leukocyte antigens in kidney transplantation (KT) has been highlighted. This study aimed to investigate the clinical significance of DQ-DSA detected at renal allograft biopsy. We evaluated 263 KT recipients who underwent allograft biopsy and DSA detection at the same time. Among them, 155 patients who were nonsensitized before transplantation were selected to investigate the role of de-novo DQ-DSA. Both the total and nonsensitized subgroup was categorized into 4 groups each according to DSA results as: DQ only, DQ + non-DQ, non-DQ, and no DSA. In the total patient group, post-KT DSA was positive in 79 (30.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was most prevalent (64.6%). In the nonsensitized subgroup, de-novo DSAs were detected in 45 (29.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was also most prevalent (73.3%). The DQ only group showed a significantly longer post-KT duration compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). The overall incidence of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) was 17.9%. B-DSA, DR-DSA, and DQ-DSA were associated with AMR (P < 0.05), but in the analysis for chronic AMR, only DQ-DSA showed significance in both the total and the nonsensitized subgroup (P < 0.05). On comparison of Banff scores among groups, those representing humoral immunity were significantly dominant in all DSA positive groups compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05), and higher scores of markers representing chronic tissue injury were more frequently detected in the groups with DQ-DSA. The worst postbiopsy survival was seen in the DQ + non-DQ group of the total patient group, and patients with de-novo DQ-DSA showed poorer graft survival in the nonsensitized subgroup compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, de-novo DQ-DSA was the only significant risk factor associated with late allograft failure (P < 0.05). Our study is the first to

  1. Clinical Significance of HLA-DQ Antibodies in the Development of Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Allograft Failure in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Min, Ji Won; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In-Sung; Park, Ki-Hyun; Yang, Chul Woo; Chung, Byung Ha; Oh, Eun-Jee

    2016-03-01

    With the development of the single antigen beads assay, the role of donor specific alloantibody (DSA) against human leukocyte antigens in kidney transplantation (KT) has been highlighted. This study aimed to investigate the clinical significance of DQ-DSA detected at renal allograft biopsy. We evaluated 263 KT recipients who underwent allograft biopsy and DSA detection at the same time. Among them, 155 patients who were nonsensitized before transplantation were selected to investigate the role of de-novo DQ-DSA. Both the total and nonsensitized subgroup was categorized into 4 groups each according to DSA results as: DQ only, DQ + non-DQ, non-DQ, and no DSA. In the total patient group, post-KT DSA was positive in 79 (30.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was most prevalent (64.6%). In the nonsensitized subgroup, de-novo DSAs were detected in 45 (29.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was also most prevalent (73.3%). The DQ only group showed a significantly longer post-KT duration compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). The overall incidence of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) was 17.9%. B-DSA, DR-DSA, and DQ-DSA were associated with AMR (P < 0.05), but in the analysis for chronic AMR, only DQ-DSA showed significance in both the total and the nonsensitized subgroup (P < 0.05). On comparison of Banff scores among groups, those representing humoral immunity were significantly dominant in all DSA positive groups compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05), and higher scores of markers representing chronic tissue injury were more frequently detected in the groups with DQ-DSA. The worst postbiopsy survival was seen in the DQ + non-DQ group of the total patient group, and patients with de-novo DQ-DSA showed poorer graft survival in the nonsensitized subgroup compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, de-novo DQ-DSA was the only significant risk factor associated with late allograft failure (P < 0.05). Our study is the first to demonstrate

  2. Pancreas Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Pancreas Transplantation Some patients with type 1 diabetes have ... weigh the potential benefits and risks. Benefits of Pancreas Transplants You may be able to maintain a ...

  3. Lung transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/pubmed/20675678 . Kotloff RM, Keshavjee S. Lung transplantation. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst MD, et ... 58. Solomon M, Grasemann H, Keshavjee S. Pediatric lung transplantation. Pediatr Clin North Am . 2010; 57(2):375- ...

  4. Kidney transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... series References Barry JM, Conlin MJ. In: Renal transplantation. Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ed. ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Kidney Transplantation Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  5. Liver transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... series References Keefe EB. Hepatic failure and liver transplantation. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ... 2011:chap 157. Martin P, Rosen HR. Liver transplantation. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. ...

  6. Pancreas transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... liver cells, where it can be used as fuel. In people with type 1 diabetes , the pancreas ... and kidney for the rest of your life. Alternative Names Transplant - pancreas; Transplantation - pancreas Images Endocrine glands ...

  7. Hair transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... this procedure: Scarring Unnatural-looking tufts of new hair growth It is possible that the transplanted hair will ... Most hair transplants result in excellent hair growth within several ... may be needed to create best results. The replaced hairs are ...

  8. Organ Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... donors to recipients to reduce the risk of transplant rejection. Rejection happens when your immune system attacks the new organ. If you have a transplant, you must take drugs the rest of your ...

  9. Asymmetric Dimethylarginine Is a Well Established Mediating Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Morbidity and Mortality-Should Patients with Elevated Levels Be Supplemented with Citrulline?

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F

    2016-01-01

    The arginine metabolite asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is a competitive inhibitor and uncoupler of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), an enzyme that acts in multifarious ways to promote cardiovascular health. This phenomenon likely explains, at least in part, why elevated ADMA has been established as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events, ventricular hypertrophy, and cardiovascular mortality. Fortunately, the suppressive impact of ADMA on eNOS activity can be offset by increasing intracellular arginine levels with supplemental citrulline. Although the long-term impact of supplemental citrulline on cardiovascular health in patients with elevated ADMA has not yet been studied, shorter-term clinical studies of citrulline administration demonstrate effects suggestive of increased NO synthesis, such as reductions in blood pressure and arterial stiffness, improved endothelium-dependent vasodilation, increased erection hardness, and increased ejection fractions in patients with heart failure. Supplemental citrulline could be a practical option for primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular events and mortality, as it is inexpensive, has a mild flavor, and is well tolerated in doses (3-6 g daily) that can influence eNOS activity. Large and long-term clinical trials, targeting patients at high risk for cardiovascular events in whom ADMA is elevated, are needed to evaluate citrulline's potential for aiding cardiovascular health. PMID:27417628

  10. Organ Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... have to wait a long time for an organ transplant. Doctors must match donors to recipients to reduce the risk of transplant rejection. Rejection happens when your immune system attacks the new organ. If you have a transplant, you must take ...

  11. Treatment of Antibody-Mediated Rejection After Kidney Transplantation - 10 Years' Experience With Apheresis at a Single Center.

    PubMed

    Gubensek, Jakob; Buturovic-Ponikvar, Jadranka; Kandus, Aljosa; Arnol, Miha; Lindic, Jelka; Kovac, Damjan; Rigler, Andreja Ales; Romozi, Karmen; Ponikvar, Rafael

    2016-06-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is a major cause of kidney graft failure. We aimed to analyze treatment and outcome of AMR in a national cohort of 75 biopsy-proven acute (43 patients, 57%) or chronic active (32 patients, 43%) AMR episodes between 2000 and 2015. The mean patients' age was 46 ± 16 years, the majority was treated with plasma exchange, 4% received immunoadsorption and 7% received both. The majority received pulse methylprednisolone and low-dose CMV hyperimmune globulin, 20% received bortezomib and 13% rituximab. Concomitant infection was treated in 40% of patients. The immediate treatment outcome was successful in 91%, the 1- and 3-year graft survival rates were 71% and 57%, while 3-year patient survival was 97%. Chronic active AMR was associated with worse graft survival than acute AMR (log rank P = 0.06). To conclude, intensive treatment with apheresis and additional immunosuppression was effective in reversing AMR, but long-term graft survival remains markedly decreased, especially in chronic active AMR. PMID:27312908

  12. Thoracic organ transplantation: laboratory methods.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jignesh K; Kobashigawa, Jon A

    2013-01-01

    Although great progress has been achieved in thoracic organ transplantation through the development of effective immunosuppression, there is still significant risk of rejection during the early post-transplant period, creating a need for routine monitoring for both acute antibody and cellular mediated rejection. The currently available multiplexed, microbead assays utilizing solubilized HLA antigens afford the capability of sensitive detection and identification of HLA and non-HLA specific antibodies. These assays are being used to assess the relative strength of donor specific antibodies; to permit performance of virtual crossmatches which can reduce the waiting time to transplantation; to monitor antibody levels during desensitization; and for heart transplants to monitor antibodies post-transplant. For cell mediated immune responses, the recent development of gene expression profiling has allowed noninvasive monitoring of heart transplant recipients yielding predictive values for acute cellular rejection. T cell immune monitoring in heart and lung transplant recipients has allowed individual tailoring of immunosuppression, particularly to minimize risk of infection. While the current antibody and cellular laboratory techniques have enhanced the ability to manage thoracic organ transplant recipients, future developments from improved understanding of microchimerism and graft tolerance may allow more refined allograft monitoring techniques. PMID:23775735

  13. C1 Inhibitor in Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection Nonresponsive to Conventional Therapy in Kidney Transplant Recipients: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Viglietti, D; Gosset, C; Loupy, A; Deville, L; Verine, J; Zeevi, A; Glotz, D; Lefaucheur, C

    2016-05-01

    Complement inhibitors have not been thoroughly evaluated in the treatment of acute antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). We performed a prospective, single-arm pilot study to investigate the potential effects and safety of C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) Berinert added to high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) for the treatment of acute ABMR that is nonresponsive to conventional therapy. Kidney recipients with nonresponsive active ABMR and acute allograft dysfunction were enrolled between April 2013 and July 2014 and received C1-INH and IVIG for 6 months (six patients). The primary end point was the change in eGFR at 6 months after inclusion (M+6). Secondary end points included the changes in histology and DSA characteristics and adverse events as evaluated at M+6. All patients showed an improvement in eGFR between inclusion and M+6: from 38.7 ± 17.9 to 45.2 ± 21.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (p = 0.0277). There was no change in histological features, except a decrease in the C4d deposition rate from 5/6 to 1/6 (p = 0.0455). There was a change in DSA C1q status from 6/6 to 1/6 positive (p = 0.0253). One deep venous thrombosis was observed. In a secondary analysis, C1-INH patients were compared with a similar historical control group (21 patients). C1-INH added to IVIG is safe and may improve allograft function in kidney recipients with nonresponsive acute ABMR. PMID:26693703

  14. T cells recognizing leukemic CD34+ progenitor cells mediate the antileukemic effect of donor lymphocyte infusions for relapsed chronic myeloid leukemia after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Willem M.; Rijnbeek, Marion; van Bergen, Cornelis A. M.; Fibbe, Willem E.; Willemze, Roel; Falkenburg, J. H. Frederik

    1998-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) is an effective treatment for relapsed chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. To identify the effector and target cell populations responsible for the elimination of the leukemic cells in vivo we developed an assay to measure the frequency of T lymphocyte precursor cells capable of suppressing leukemic progenitor cells. Target cells in this assay were CML cells that were cultured in the presence of stem cell factor, interleukin 3, granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and erythropoietin. [3H]thymidine incorporation at day 7 represented the proliferation of the progeny of the CD34+ CML progenitor cells, and not of the more mature CD34− CML cells. Effector cells were mononuclear cells, which were used in a limiting dilution analysis to measure the frequencies of CML progenitor cell-inhibitory lymphocyte precursors (PCILp) in peripheral blood of seven patients before and after DLI for relapsed CML. In the six patients who entered complete remission, a 5- to 100-fold increase of PCILp was found during the clinical response. In the patient with resistant relapse the frequency of PCILp was <10 per ml before and after DLI. Leukemia-reactive helper T lymphocyte precursor frequencies remained unchanged after DLI. A significant increase in cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursor frequency against more mature leukemic cells was found in only two responding patients. These results indicate that T cells specifically directed against CD34+ CML progenitor cells mediate the antileukemic effect of DLI. PMID:9707616

  15. INCREASED ERYTHROCYTE C4D IS ASSOCIATED WITH KNOWN ALLOANTIBODY AND AUTOANTIBODY MARKERS OF ANTIBODY MEDIATED REJECTION IN HUMAN LUNG TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Golocheikine, Angali; Nath, Dilip S.; Basha, Haseeb Ilias; Saini, Deepti; Phelan, Donna; Aloush, Aviva; Trulock, Elbert P.; Hachem, Ramsey R.; Patterson, G.Alexander; Ahearn, Joseph M.; Mohanakumar, Thalachallour

    2009-01-01

    Background Immune responses to mismatched donor HLA antigens play a significant role in the pathogenesis of chronic rejection. The study objective was to evaluate whether erythrocyte bound C4d (E-C4d) is associated with known alloimmune and autoimmune markers of antibody mediated rejection (AMR) following human lung transplantation (LTx). Methods 22 LTx recipients and 15 normal subjects were analyzed for E-C4d using flow cytometry. Development of antibodies (Abs) to donor mismatched HLA (DSA) and Abs to HLA were determined using solid phase method by Luminex. Development of Abs to self-antigens, K-alpha-1-tubulin (KA1T) and collagen V (Col-V) were measured by ELISA. C3d deposition in lung biopsies was determined by immunohistochemical staining. Results Percent E-C4d (%E-C4d) levels in LTx patients were higher compared to normal subjects (19.9% vs. 3.7%, p = 0.02). DSA+ patients had higher E-C4d levels compared to DSA- patients (34.1% vs. 16.7%, p = 0.02). In 5 patients with preformed anti-HLA, E-C4d levels were not significantly different compared to 13 patients with no detectable anti-HLA (p=0.1). Higher E-C4d levels were noted in patients who developed Abs to KA1T (p = 0.02) and Col-V (p = 0.03). Recipients with C3d tissue deposition had higher E-C4d levels compared to patients with C3d negative biopsy results (p = 0.01). Conclusions Increased % E-C4d levels are found in patients with positive DSA, high Abs titers to KA1T and Col-V, and have C3d positive lung biopsy findings. Therefore, % E-C4d can serve as a potential marker for AMR following LTx. PMID:20022265

  16. Angiotensin converting enzyme-regulated, noncholinergic sympathoadrenal catecholamine release mediates the cardiovascular actions of human ‘new pressor protein’ related to coagulation beta-factor XIIa

    PubMed Central

    Papageorgiou, Peter C; Simos, Demetrios; Boomsma, Frans; Rojkjaer, Rasmus; Osmond, Daniel H

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human ‘new pressor protein’ (NPP), related to coagulation beta-factor XIIa (β-FXIIa), potently releases sympathoadrenal catecholamines in bioassay rats, with concurrent elevation of systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP) and heart rate (HR). Elevated plasma NPP/β-FXIIa levels in hypertensive anephric pediatric patients on hemodialysis associated with fluid status and blood pressure changes were previously reported, suggesting that NPP/β-FXIIa contributed to their hypertension. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the mechanism of action of NPP/β-FXIIa. METHODS: Hemodynamic and sympathoadrenal responses to NPP (20 µL plasma equivalent/rat) or coagulation β-FXIIa (300 ng/kg intravenously) were measured in rats treated with pentolinium (ganglion blockade [+GB]) and/or captopril (+CAP; angiotensin converting enzyme [ACE] inhibition). RESULTS: In controls not receiving GB or CAP (–GB–CAP), NPP/β-FXIIa raised plasma epinephrine (E) sixfold, SBP/DBP by 14/8 mmHg and HR by 15 beats/min. With blockade of the cholinergic pathway to the sympathoadrenal system (+GB), basal E, norepinephrine (NE), SBP, DBP and HR all dropped. However NPP/β-FXIIa remained capable of raising E 20-fold, NE fourfold, SBP/DBP by 27/11 mmHg and HR by 20 beats/min, suggesting that it acted through a ‘noncholinergic’ mechanism. With +CAP alone, NPP/β-FXIIa raised plasma E 18-fold, NE threefold, SBP/DBP by 29/8 mmHg and HR by 73 beats/min, implicating an ACE-regulated ‘peptidergic’ mechanism. Combining +GB with +CAP potentiated NPP/β-FXIIa actions further by raising E 50-fold, NE sevenfold, SBP/DBP by 55/20 mmHg and HR by 87 beats/min, strengthening the efficacy of this alternate pathway. CONCLUSIONS: The cardiovascular effects of NPP/β-FXIIa are considerably mediated by a noncholinergic (peptidergic) ACE-regulated mechanism for sympathoadrenal catecholamine release that is enhanced by +GB and/or +CAP. Under inflammatory procoagulant conditions, endogenously produced

  17. SENIOR Transplant Registry - European Transplant Registry of Senior Renal Transplant Recipients (Above the Age of 65 Years) on Tacrolimus Once Daily (Advagraf) Based Triple Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-22

    Graft Failure; Death; Biopsy Proven Acute Rejection (BPAR); Infections; Bone Disease; Post Transplant Diabetes Mellitus; Quality of Life; HLA Antibody Production; Cardiovascular Risk Factors; Non-HLA Antibody Production

  18. The importance of A9 dopaminergic neurons in mediating the functional benefits of fetal ventral mesencephalon transplants and levodopa-induced dyskinesias.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Wei-Li; Lin, Rachel; Tyers, Pam; Barker, Roger A

    2007-03-01

    Intrastriatal transplantation of fetal ventral mesencephalon (VM) tissue provides the potential to alleviate motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) and levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID). However, the degree of recovery varies among individuals with an incidence of "off-phase", graft-induced dyskinesia (GID) in some patients. We hypothesised that this variability is due to the heterogeneous nature of dopaminergic neurons in the transplant. We therefore investigated this in the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat model of PD. These animals were primed to develop LID and then transplanted with fetal VM into the caudal aspects of the striatum. No GID was observed but in a significant number of animals the transplants ameliorated LID. There was a correlation between the degree of behavioural and LID recovery with the number of A9 dopaminergic neurons in the transplant, based on their expression of a G-protein-coupled inward rectifying current potassium channel (Girk2). Furthermore, we showed that LID development is related to an abnormal expression profile of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32) in the striatum and that intrastriatal VM transplants normalised both Cdk5 expression and DARPP-32 phosphorylation in animals exhibiting functional improvement. These results suggest that an A9 dopaminergic neuron-enriched transplant may be the key to an effective PD cell replacement therapy through normalisation of the altered striatal expression of Cdk5/DARPP-32. PMID:17188499

  19. Lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, José Eduardo; Werebe, Eduardo de Campos; Carraro, Rafael Medeiros; Teixeira, Ricardo Henrique de Oliveira Braga; Fernandes, Lucas Matos; Abdalla, Luis Gustavo; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lung transplantation is a globally accepted treatment for some advanced lung diseases, giving the recipients longer survival and better quality of life. Since the first transplant successfully performed in 1983, more than 40 thousand transplants have been performed worldwide. Of these, about seven hundred were in Brazil. However, survival of the transplant is less than desired, with a high mortality rate related to primary graft dysfunction, infection, and chronic graft dysfunction, particularly in the form of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. New technologies have been developed to improve the various stages of lung transplant. To increase the supply of lungs, ex vivo lung reconditioning has been used in some countries, including Brazil. For advanced life support in the perioperative period, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and hemodynamic support equipment have been used as a bridge to transplant in critically ill patients on the waiting list, and to keep patients alive until resolution of the primary dysfunction after graft transplant. There are patients requiring lung transplant in Brazil who do not even come to the point of being referred to a transplant center because there are only seven such centers active in the country. It is urgent to create new centers capable of performing lung transplantation to provide patients with some advanced forms of lung disease a chance to live longer and with better quality of life. PMID:26154550

  20. The impact of escitalopram on vagally mediated cardiovascular function to stress and the moderating effects of vigorous physical activity: a randomized controlled treatment study in healthy participants

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Camilla S.; Outhred, Tim; Brunoni, Andre R.; Malhi, Gin S.; Kemp, Andrew H.

    2013-01-01

    Recent concerns over the impact of antidepressant medications, including the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), on cardiovascular function highlight the importance of research on the moderating effects of specific lifestyle factors such as physical activity. Studies in affective neuroscience have demonstrated robust acute effects of SSRIs, yet the impact of SSRIs on cardiovascular stress responses and the moderating effects of physical activity remain to be determined. This was the goal of the present study, which involved a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial of a single-dose of escitalopram (20 mg) in 44 healthy females; outcomes were heart rate (HR) and its variability. Participants engaging in at least 30 min of vigorous physical activity at least 3 times per week (regular exercisers) showed a more resilient cardiovascular stress response than irregular vigorous exercisers, a finding associated with a moderate effect size (Cohen's d = 0.48). Escitalopram attenuated the cardiovascular stress response in irregular exercisers only (HR decreased: Cohen's d = 0.80; HR variability increased: Cohen's d = 0.33). HR during stress under escitalopram in the irregular exercisers was similar to that during stress under placebo in regular exercisers. These findings highlight that the effects of regular vigorous exercise during stress are comparable to the effects of an acute dose of escitalopram, highlighting the beneficial effects of this particular antidepressant in irregular exercisers. Given that antidepressant drugs alone do not seem to protect patients from cardiovascular disease (CVD), longitudinal studies are needed to evaluate the impact of exercise on cardiovascular stress responses in patients receiving long-term antidepressant treatment. PMID:24069000

  1. Predicting Alloreactivity in Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Geneugelijk, Kirsten; Thus, Kirsten Anne; Spierings, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte Antigen (HLA) mismatching leads to severe complications after solid-organ transplantation and hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. The alloreactive responses underlying the posttransplantation complications include both direct recognition of allogeneic HLA by HLA-specific alloantibodies and T cells and indirect T-cell recognition. However, the immunogenicity of HLA mismatches is highly variable; some HLA mismatches lead to severe clinical B-cell- and T-cell-mediated alloreactivity, whereas others are well tolerated. Definition of the permissibility of HLA mismatches prior to transplantation allows selection of donor-recipient combinations that will have a reduced chance to develop deleterious host-versus-graft responses after solid-organ transplantation and graft-versus-host responses after hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Therefore, several methods have been developed to predict permissible HLA-mismatch combinations. In this review we aim to give a comprehensive overview about the current knowledge regarding HLA-directed alloreactivity and several developed in vitro and in silico tools that aim to predict direct and indirect alloreactivity. PMID:24868561

  2. Challenges of valve surgeries in post-renal transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Tanveer; Kishore, Kolkebaile Sadanand; Maheshwarappa, Nandakumar Neralakere; Pasarad, Ashwini Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation remains a mainstay of therapy for the end-stage renal disease. Cardiac disease has a high prevalence in this patient population. Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death among kidney transplantation patients. The cardiac disease accounts for 43% of all-cause mortality among dialysis patients and for ≈38% of all-cause mortality after transplantation. In this article, we review the factors and outcomes associated with valve surgeries in renal transplant recipients and evaluate the strategy for open heart surgery after renal transplantation performed. PMID:26440255

  3. Fear of Movement and Low Self-Efficacy Are Important Barriers in Physical Activity after Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zelle, Dorien M.; Corpeleijn, Eva; Klaassen, Gerald; Schutte, Elise; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical activity (PA) and exercise are commonly used as preventive measures for cardiovascular disease in the general population, and could be effective in the management of post-transplantation cardiovascular risk. PA levels are low after renal transplantation and very few renal transplant recipients (RTR) meet the PA guidelines. Identification of barriers to regular PA is important to identify targets for intervention to improve PA levels after renal transplantation. We investigated fear of movement and physical self-efficacy as barriers to PA in RTR. Methods RTR were investigated between 2001–2003. The Tampa Score of Kinesiophobia–Dutch Version (TSK-11) was used to assess fear of movement. Physical self-efficacy was measured with the LIVAS-scale. PA was assessed using validated questionnaires (Tecumseh Occupational Activity Questionnaire and the Minnesota Leisure Time Physical Activity Questionnaire). Results A total of 487 RTR (age 51±12 years, 55% men) were studied. Median score [interquartile range] on TSK-11 was 22 [17–26]. Low physical self-efficacy (Exp B:0.41[0.31–0.54], p<0.001) and history of myocardial infarction, transient ischemic attack and cerebrovascular accident (Exp B:1.30[1.03–1.63],p = 0.03) were independent determinants for fear of movement. Fear of movement was associated with lower daily PA, occupational, sports and leisure time PA. Mediation-analysis showed that a large part (73%) of the effect of fear of movement on PA was explained by low physical self-efficacy. Conclusions This study was the first to examine fear of movement and self-efficacy in relation to PA in RTR. Fear of movement was associated with a low PA level, and the larger part of this relation was mediated by low physical self-efficacy. Both fear of movement and physical self-efficacy level are important targets for intervention during rehabilitation after renal transplantation. PMID:26844883

  4. Pulmonary transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, R D; Pasque, M K

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: More than 2700 lung transplants have been performed since the initial clinical success in 1983. The evolution in the techniques of lung transplantation and patient management and the effects on results are reviewed. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Improvements in donor management, lung preservation, operative techniques, immunosuppression management, infection prophylaxis and treatment, rejection surveillance, and long-term follow-up have occurred in the decade following the first clinically successful lung transplant. A wider spectrum of diseases and patients treated with lung transplant have accentuated the shortage of suitable lung donors. The organ shortage has led to the use of marginal donors and a limited experience using living, related donors. METHODS: Changes in techniques and patient selection and management are reviewed and controversial issues and problems are highlighted. RESULTS: One-year survival of greater than 90% for single-lung transplant recipients and greater than 85% for bilateral lung transplant recipients have been achieved. Complications caused by airway complications has been reduced greatly. Obliterative bronchiolitis develops in 20% to 50% of long-term survivors and is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality after the first year after transplant. CONCLUSIONS: Lung transplantation has evolved into an effective therapy for a wide variety of causes of end-stage lung disease. Wider applicability requires solutions to the problems of donor shortage and development of obliterative bronchiolitis. Images Figure 1. PMID:7826157

  5. Transplant rejection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wood K, Shankar S, Mittal S. Concepts and challenges in organ transplantation. In: Rich RR, Fleisher TA, Shearer WT, et ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Organ Transplantation Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  6. Intestine Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... intestine segment, most intestine transplants involve a whole organ from a deceased donor. In addition, most intestine transplants are performed in ... blood before surgery. I am looking for ... allocation About UNOS Being a living donor Calculator - CPRA Calculator - KDPI Calculator - LAS Calculator - MELD ...

  7. Intestinal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rege, Aparna; Sudan, Debra

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal transplantation has now emerged as a lifesaving therapeutic option and standard of care for patients with irreversible intestinal failure. Improvement in survival over the years has justified expansion of the indications for intestinal transplantation beyond the original indications approved by Center for Medicare and Medicaid services. Management of patients with intestinal failure is complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach to accurately select candidates who would benefit from rehabilitation versus transplantation. Significant strides have been made in patient and graft survival with several advancements in the perioperative management through timely referral, improved patient selection, refinement in the surgical techniques and better understanding of the immunopathology of intestinal transplantation. The therapeutic efficacy of the procedure is well evident from continuous improvements in functional status, quality of life and cost-effectiveness of the procedure. This current review summarizes various aspects including current practices and evidence based recommendations of intestinal transplantation. PMID:27086894

  8. Transplant psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Potts, S G

    2009-12-01

    Transplant units increasingly recognise a need for assistance from psychiatrists and psychologists in the assessment and management of potential transplant recipients and live donors. This arises from the various known associations between mental disorder and the need for transplantation; the intensifying requirement to select carefully among the potential recipients and donors of scarce human organs; and the drive to maximise transplant outcomes by optimising all aspects of treatment after surgery. There is good evidence that careful, protocol-guided selection among potential candidates for transplantation with alcoholic liver disease helps ensure outcomes at least as good as for other forms of liver disease. The evidence base in other areas is less robust, but the principles guiding the psychiatric assessment are broadly the same. There is an increasing need for psychiatric assessment of potential live organ donors, in order to minimise the risks they run, and in the case of altruistic donation this is now mandatory in UK law. PMID:21152475

  9. Lipoprotein(a) in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Malaguarnera, Michele; Vacante, Marco; Russo, Cristina; Malaguarnera, Giulia; Antic, Tijana; Malaguarnera, Lucia; Bella, Rita; Pennisi, Giovanni; Galvano, Fabio; Frigiola, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) is an LDL-like molecule consisting of an apolipoprotein B-100 (apo(B-100)) particle attached by a disulphide bridge to apo(a). Many observations have pointed out that Lp(a) levels may be a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Lp(a) inhibits the activation of transforming growth factor (TGF) and contributes to the growth of arterial atherosclerotic lesions by promoting the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells and the migration of smooth muscle cells to endothelial cells. Moreover Lp(a) inhibits plasminogen binding to the surfaces of endothelial cells and decreases the activity of fibrin-dependent tissue-type plasminogen activator. Lp(a) may act as a proinflammatory mediator that augments the lesion formation in atherosclerotic plaques. Elevated serum Lp(a) is an independent predictor of coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction. Furthermore, Lp(a) levels should be a marker of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, saphenous vein bypass graft atherosclerosis, and accelerated coronary atherosclerosis of cardiac transplantation. Finally, the possibility that Lp(a) may be a risk factor for ischemic stroke has been assessed in several studies. Recent findings suggest that Lp(a)-lowering therapy might be beneficial in patients with high Lp(a) levels. A future therapeutic approach could include apheresis in high-risk patients in order to reduce major coronary events. PMID:23484137

  10. Cardiovascular Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), particularly CHD (coronary heart disease) and stroke, remain the leading causes of death of women in America and most developed countries. In recent years the rate of CVD has declined in men but not in women. This is contributed to by an under-recognition of women’s C...

  11. Cardiovascular system

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The cardiovascular system is composed of the heart and the network of arteries, veins, and capillaries that transport blood throughout the body. The ... which they are eliminated. Most of the blood is made up of a watery, protein-laden fluid ...

  12. Facial Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Russo, Jack E; Genden, Eric M

    2016-08-01

    Reconstruction of severe facial deformities poses a unique surgical challenge: restoring the aesthetic form and function of the face. Facial transplantation has emerged over the last decade as an option for reconstruction of these defects in carefully selected patients. As the world experience with facial transplantation grows, debate remains regarding whether such a highly technical, resource-intensive procedure is warranted, all to improve quality of life but not necessarily prolong it. This article reviews the current state of facial transplantation with focus on the current controversies and challenges, with particular attention to issues of technique, immunology, and ethics. PMID:27400850

  13. [Heart transplantation].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Norihide; Matsuda, Hikaru

    2005-11-01

    While nearly 4,000 patients undergo heart transplantation (HTx) every year in the world, only 27 HTx were performed since February, 1999, because of very strict Organ Transplantation Law in Japan. All were treated with triple immunosuppressive regimen. Although two patients died of infection 4 months and 4 years after HTx, respectively, 23 were discharged and 16 returned to work or go to school. New immunosuppressive drugs, such as sirolimus and everolimus, treatment of presensitized patients before transplantation using cyclophosphamide and intravenous globulin infusion, compact implantable left ventricular assist supports and the future of pediatric HTx in Japan are discussed. PMID:16277260

  14. Adventitial transplantation of blood outgrowth endothelial cells in porcine haemodialysis grafts alleviates hypoxia and decreases neointimal proliferation through a matrix metalloproteinase-9-mediated pathway—a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Deborah; Fu, Alex A.; Puggioni, Alessandra; Glockner, James F.; Anwer, Bilal; McGuire, Antonio M.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Misra, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    Purpose. We hypothesized that adventitial transplantation of blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOEC) to the vein-to-graft anastomosis of polytetrafluoroethylene grafts will reduce neointimal hyperplasia by reducing hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), by increasing angiogenesis in a porcine model of chronic renal insufficiency with haemodialysis polytetrafluoroethylene grafts. Because matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been shown to be involved with angiogenesis, the expression of MMPs and their inhibitors was determined. Methods. Chronic renal insufficiency was created by subtotal renal infarction and 28 days later, arteriovenous PTFE grafts were placed bilaterally from the carotid artery to the jugular vein. Autologous blood outgrowth endothelial cells labeled with Lac Z were transplanted to the adventitia of the vein-to-graft anastomosis using polyglycolic acid scaffolding and scaffolding only to other side (control). Animals were killed 14 days later and vessels were explanted from the vein-to-graft anastomosis of both sides and underwent immunohistochemical analysis, western blotting and zymography for HIF-1α, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2. BOEC were also made hypoxic and normoxic for 12, 24 and 48 h to determine protein expression for MMPs and TIMPs. Results. Under hypoxia, BOEC significantly increased the expression of pro MMP-2 by 12 h and TIMP-2 by 24 h when compared to normoxic cells (P < 0.05). Transplantation of BOEC resulted in a significant decrease in both HIF-1α and intima-to-media ratio with a significant increase in both pro and active MMP-9 when compared to control vessels (P < 0.05). MMP-9 activity was localized to the neointima of the transplanted vessels by immunohistochemistry. There was increased CD31 density with engraftment of BOEC cells into the neointima of both the transplanted vessels compared to controls (P = NS). Conclusion. Transplantation of BOEC resulted in a significant decrease in intimal hyperplasia and HIF-1α with

  15. Horseshoe kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kanyári, Zsolt; Zádori, Gergely; Zsom, Lajos; Berhés, Mariann; Hamar, Mátyás; Kóbor, Krisztina; Péter, Antal

    2015-01-01

    Horseshoe kidney is a fusion anomaly found in approximately one in 400–600 people. Due to vascular and ureteral variations, transplantation with a horseshoe kidney presents a technical challenge. In our case, the isthmus connected the upper poles and contained parenchyma. It consisted of three renal arteries, five veins collected to the inferior vena cava, and two ureters and pyelons. It was implanted en bloc to the left side retroperitoneally. During the early period, cellular and humoral rejection was confirmed and treated. For a urine leak, double J catheters were implanted into both ureters. Later, the first catheter was removed. Subsequently, urinary sepsis developed, necessitating graftectomy. The uncommon anatomy of ureters and antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) may both be factors for a ureter tip necrosis led to an infected urinoma. After other Hungarian authors, we also report a horseshoe kidney transplantation that was technically successful. However, after an adequately treated but severe acute humoral rejection, the patient developed sepsis, and the kidney had to be removed. We conclude that transplantation with horseshoe kidney is technically feasible but may increase the risk for urinary complications and resultant infections. Careful consideration of risk and benefit is advised when a transplant professional is faced with this option. PMID:26120481

  16. Transplant services

    MedlinePlus

    ... an option for patients with short bowel or short gut syndrome or advanced liver disease, or who must receive all nutrients through a feeding line. See: Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) Kidney transplant is an option for someone ...

  17. Pancreas transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... pancreas from a donor into a person with diabetes. Pancreas transplants give the person a chance to ... used as fuel. In people with type 1 diabetes , the pancreas does not make enough, or sometimes ...

  18. Lung transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseases that may require a lung transplant are: Cystic fibrosis Damage to the arteries of the lung because ... BC; Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pulmonary Therapies Committee; ... Therapies Committee. Cystic fibrosis pulmonary guidelines: ...

  19. Transplant rejection

    MedlinePlus

    Abbas AK, Lichtman AH, Pillai S. Transplantation immunology. In: Abbas AK, Lichtman AH, Pillai S, eds. Cellular and Molecular Immunology. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 17. Adams AB, ...

  20. Pancreas Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    The pancreas is a gland behind your stomach and in front of your spine. It produces the juices that ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. A pancreas transplant is surgery to place a healthy pancreas ...

  1. Intestine Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... with any one product nor does UNOS assume responsibility for any error, omissions or other discrepancies. Share this: Was this information helpful? Talk to your doctor The process of being admitted and preparing for transplant surgery ...

  2. Hepatocyte Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mitry, Ragai R; Hughes, Robin D; Dhawan, Anil

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation (HTx) has been developed for use in liver-based metabolic disorders and in acute liver failure. Worldwide, there are around 80 patients that have been transplanted with hepatocytes. Almost all reported studies prove feasibility and safety of the procedure with short- to medium-term success. Availability of good quality hepatocytes (HCs) is the main limiting factor, and therefore alternative sources of cells such as stem cells are being investigated. Other limiting factors include cell engraftment, survival, and function of transplanted cells. It remains to be seen if progress in HTx research can overcome these hurdles leading to the wider use of the technique as an alternative to liver transplantation in the future. PMID:25755322

  3. Liver transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Risks for any anesthesia are: Problems breathing Reactions to medications Risks for any surgery are: Bleeding Heart attack or stroke Infection Liver transplant surgery and management after surgery carry major risks. There is ...

  4. Liver Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... patient who has poor kidney function is on dialysis. The PELD score is calculated based on the ... example, a person who had cirrhosis caused by long-term alcohol abuse resumes drinking after the transplant. Recurrence ...

  5. Corneal transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... clear outer lens on the front of the eye. A corneal transplant is surgery to replace the cornea with tissue ... years. Rejection can sometimes be controlled with steroid eye drops. Other ... are: Bleeding Cataracts Infection of the eye Glaucoma ( ...

  6. High-density lipoprotein-mediated anti-atherosclerotic and endothelial-protective effects: a potential novel therapeutic target in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Besler, Christian; Heinrich, Kathrin; Riwanto, Meliana; Lüscher, Thomas F; Landmesser, Ulf

    2010-05-01

    Reduced levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) are associated with a substantially increased risk of coronary disease and cardiovascular events. Furthermore, numerous studies have suggested that HDL may exert several potentially important antiatherosclerotic and endothelial-protective effects. In particular, the promotion of reverse cholesterol transport, i.e. cholesterol efflux from lipid-loaded macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions and the subsequent cholesterol transport back to the liver, has been proposed as an anti-atherogenic effect of HDL that may promote regression of atherosclerotic lesions. Moreover, endothelial dysfunction is thought to play a critical role in development and progression of atherosclerosis and several recent studies have suggested that HDL exerts direct endothelial-protective effects, such as stimulation of endothelial production of the anti-atherogenic molecule nitric oxide, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic effects. Furthermore, it has been observed that HDL may stimulate endothelial repair processes, involving mobilisation and promotion of endothelial repair capacity of endothelial progenitor cells. The relative significance of these different potential anti-atherosclerotic effects of HDL remains still unclear at present. Importantly, at the same time it has been recognized that the vascular effects of HDL may be variable, i.e. the capacity of HDL to stimulate macrophage cholesterol efflux and endothelial-protective effects may be altered in patients with inflammatory or cardiovascular disease. The further characterisation of underlying mechanisms and the identification of the clinical relevance of this "HDL dysfunction" are currently an active field of research. HDL-targeted treatment strategies are at present intensely evaluated and may lead to increased HDL plasma levels and/or HDL-stimulated anti-atherosclerotic effects. The cardiovascular protection provided by such approaches may likely depend

  7. Meniscus transplantation.

    PubMed

    Frank, Rachel M; Cole, Brian J

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the structure and function of the meniscus is critical to understanding its role in overall knee joint function. Injury to, or removal of, meniscal tissue may be associated with articular cartilage wear, knee instability, and, ultimately, the progression of osteoarthritis. While every effort is made for preserving and/or repairing damaged meniscal tissue, in some cases, the meniscus is not amenable to repair after injury. For appropriately indicated patients with symptomatic meniscal deficiency, meniscus allograft transplantation is an excellent surgical solution aimed at reducing pain and improving function. Indications for meniscus allograft transplantation are limited, and concomitant procedures such as osteotomy for malalignment, ligamentous, and/or articular cartilage restoration may be necessary in order to ensure an optimal result following meniscus allograft transplantation. Surgical techniques for meniscus allograft transplantation are variable and include soft-tissue fixation versus bone plug fixation versus bone bridge fixation. Outcomes following meniscus allograft transplantation are generally good to excellent, though reoperation rates are relatively high. The purpose of this article is to provide a concise review of recently published data on meniscus allograft transplantation, with a focus on recent outcomes studies. PMID:26431702

  8. Lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplantation may be the only intervention that can prolong survival and improve quality of life for those individuals with advanced lung disease who are acceptable candidates for the procedure. However, these candidates may be extremely ill and require ventilator and/or circulatory support as a bridge to transplantation, and lung transplantation recipients are at risk of numerous post-transplant complications that include surgical complications, primary graft dysfunction, acute rejection, opportunistic infection, and chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD), which may be caused by chronic rejection. Many advances in pre- and post-transplant management have led to improved outcomes over the past decade. These include the creation of sound guidelines for candidate selection, improved surgical techniques, advances in donor lung preservation, an improving ability to suppress and treat allograft rejection, the development of prophylaxis protocols to decrease the incidence of opportunistic infection, more effective therapies for treating infectious complications, and the development of novel therapies to treat and manage CLAD. A major obstacle to prolonged survival beyond the early post-operative time period is the development of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), which is the most common form of CLAD. This manuscript discusses recent and evolving advances in the field of lung transplantation. PMID:23710330

  9. American Society of Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials in Transplantation September 13, 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and its Transplantation & Immunology Research Network ... Learn More Donate Donate Donate to the American Society of Transplantation Advertisement member spotlight View all Joanna ...

  10. Meniscal allograft transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    Meniscus transplant; Surgery - knee - meniscus transplant; Surgery - knee - cartilage; Arthroscopy - knee - meniscus transplant ... you are a good candidate for a meniscus transplant, x-rays of your knee are usually taken ...

  11. Adrenergic System Activation Mediates Changes in Cardiovascular and Psychomotoric Reactions in Young Individuals after Red Bull© Energy Drink Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Cavka, Ana; Stupin, Marko; Panduric, Ana; Plazibat, Ana; Cosic, Anita; Rasic, Lidija; Debeljak, Zeljko; Martinovic, Goran; Drenjancevic, Ines

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the effect of Red Bull© on (1) blood glucose and catecholamine levels, (2) cardiovascular and respiratory function changes before, during, and after exercise, (3) reaction time, (4) cognitive functions, and (5) response to mental stress test and emotions in young healthy individuals (N=38). Methods. Heart rate (HR) and arterial blood pressure (ABP), blood glucose, adrenaline, and noradrenalin plasma levels were measured before and after Red Bull© intake. Participants were subjected to 4 different study protocols by randomized order, before and 30 minutes after consumption of 500 mL of Red Bull©. Results. Mean ABP and HR were significantly increased at rest after Red Bull© intake. Blood glucose level and plasma catecholamine levels significantly increased after Red Bull© consumption. Heart rate, respiration rate, and respiratory flow rate were significantly increased during exercise after Red Bull© consumption compared to control condition. Intake of Red Bull© significantly improved reaction time, performance in immediate memory test, verbal fluency, and subject's attention as well as performance in mental stress test. Conclusion. This study demonstrated that Red Bull© has beneficial effect on some cognitive functions and effect on cardiovascular and respiratory system at rest and during exercise by increasing activity of the sympathetic nervous system. PMID:26124829

  12. Bortezomib in Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Rajeev; Jeroudi, Abdallah; Achkar, Katafan; Gaber, A. Osama; Patel, Samir J.; Abdellatif, Abdul

    2010-01-01

    Although current therapies for pretransplant desensitization and treatment of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) have had some success, they do not specifically deplete plasma cells that produce antihuman leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. Bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma (a plasma cell neoplasm), induces plasma cell apoptosis. In this paper we review the current body of literature regarding the use of this biological agent in the field of transplantation. Although limited experience with bortezomib may seem to show promise in the realm of transplant recipients desensitization and treatment of AMR, there is also experience that may suggest otherwise. Bortezomib's role in desensitization protocols and treatment of AMR will be defined better as more clinical data and trials become available. PMID:20953363

  13. Tissue engineering therapy for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Helen M; Edelman, Elazer R

    2003-05-30

    The present treatments for the loss or failure of cardiovascular function include organ transplantation, surgical reconstruction, mechanical or synthetic devices, or the administration of metabolic products. Although routinely used, these treatments are not without constraints and complications. The emerging and interdisciplinary field of tissue engineering has evolved to provide solutions to tissue creation and repair. Tissue engineering applies the principles of engineering, material science, and biology toward the development of biological substitutes that restore, maintain, or improve tissue function. Progress has been made in engineering the various components of the cardiovascular system, including blood vessels, heart valves, and cardiac muscle. Many pivotal studies have been performed in recent years that may support the move toward the widespread application of tissue-engineered therapy for cardiovascular diseases. The studies discussed include endothelial cell seeding of vascular grafts, tissue-engineered vascular conduits, generation of heart valve leaflets, cardiomyoplasty, genetic manipulation, and in vitro conditions for optimizing tissue-engineered cardiovascular constructs. PMID:12775655

  14. Low rate of cardiovascular events in patients with acute myocarditis diagnosed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    De Stefano, Luciano; Yeyati, Ezequiel Levy; Pietrani, Marcelo; Kohan, Andres; Falconi, Mariano; Benger, Juan; Dragonetti, Laura; Garcia-Monaco, Ricardo; Cagide, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Background Myocarditis is a relatively common inflammatory disease that affects the myocardium. Infectious disease accounts for most of the cases either because of a direct viral infection or post-viral immune-mediated reaction. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has become an established non-invasive diagnosis tool for acute myocarditis. A recent large single centre study with patients with biopsy-proven viral myocarditis undergoing CMR scans found a high rate of mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the rate of clinical events in our population of patients with diagnosed myocarditis by CMR scan. Methods Patients who consulted to the emergency department with diagnosis of myocarditis by CMR were retrospectively included in the study from January 2008 to May 2012. A CMR protocol was used in all patients, and were followed up to assess the rate of the composite endpoint of all-cause death, congestive heart failure, sudden cardiac death, hospitalization for cardiac cause, recurrent myocarditis or need of radiofrequency ablation or implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD). A descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results Thirty-two patients with myocarditis were included in the study. The mean age was 42.6±21.2 years and 81.2% were male. In a mean follow up of 30.4±17.8 months, the rate of the composite endpoint of all-cause death, congestive heart failure, sudden cardiac death, hospitalization for cardiac cause, recurrent myocarditis or need of radiofrequency ablation or ICD was 15.6% (n=5). Two patients had heart failure (one of them underwent heart transplant), one patient needed ICD because of ventricular tachycardia and two other patients were re-hospitalized, for recurrent chest pain and for recurrent myocarditis respectively. Conclusions In our series of acute myocarditis diagnosed by CMR we found a low rate of cardiovascular events without mortality. These findings might oppose data from recently published myocarditis trials. PMID

  15. Pre-liver transplantation, cardiac assessment.

    PubMed

    Rugină, M; Predescu, L; Sălăgean, M; Gheorghe, L; Gheorghe, C; Tulbure, D; Popescu, I; Bubenek-Turconi, S

    2012-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is a stressful condition for the cardiovascular system of patients with advanced hepatic disease. The underlying hemodynamic and cardiac status of patients with cirrhosis is crucial to determine which patients should became recipients. In addition to advanced age and the presence of comorbidities, there are specific cardiovascular responses in cirrhosis that can be detrimental to the LT candidate. Patients with cirrhosis requiring LT usually demonstrate increased cardiac output, a compromised ventricular response to stress, low systemic vascular resistance and bradycardia. Post-transplant reperfusion may result in cardiac death due to a multitude of causes, including arrhythmia, acute heart failure and myocardial infarction. This review examines screening strategies for transplant candidates and details the prognostic value of common test used to identify ischemic heart disease, heart failure, portopulmonary hypertension. There are discused evidence-based recommendations for their evaluation and management. PMID:22844825

  16. Cell Therapy for Cardiovascular Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A great numbers of cardiovascular disease patients all over the world are suffering in the poor outcomes. Under this situation, cardiac regeneration therapy to reorganize the postnatal heart that is defined as a terminal differentiated-organ is a very important theme and mission for human beings. However, the temporary success of several clinical trials using usual cell types with uncertain cell numbers has provided the transient effect of cell therapy to these patients. We therefore should redevelop the evidence of cell-based cardiovascular regeneration therapy, focusing on targets (disease, patient’s status, cardiac function), materials (cells, cytokines, genes), and methodology (transplantation route, implantation technology, tissue engineering). Meanwhile, establishment of the induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells is an extremely innovative technology which should be proposed as embryonic stem (ES) cellularization of post natal somatic cells, and this application have also showed the milestones of the direct conversion to reconstruct cardiomyocyte from the various somatic cells, which does not need the acquisition of the re-pluripotency. This review discusses the new advance in cardiovascular regeneration therapy from cardiac regeneration to cardiac re-organization, which is involved in recent progress of on-going clinical trials, basic research in cardiovascular regeneration, and the possibility of tissue engineering technology. PMID:23825492

  17. ASICs and cardiovascular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Abboud, François M; Benson, Christopher J

    2015-07-01

    In this review we address primarily the role of ASICs in determining sensory signals from arterial baroreceptors, peripheral chemoreceptors, and cardiopulmonary and somatic afferents. Alterations in these sensory signals during acute cardiovascular stresses result in changes in sympathetic and parasympathetic activities that restore cardiovascular homeostasis. In pathological states, however, chronic dysfunctions of these afferents result in serious sympatho-vagal imbalances with significant increases in mortality and morbidity. We identified a role for ASIC2 in the mechano-sensitivity of aortic baroreceptors and of ASIC3 in the pH sensitivity of carotid bodies. In spontaneously hypertensive rats, we reported decreased expression of ASIC2 in nodose ganglia neurons and overexpression of ASIC3 in carotid bodies. This reciprocal expression of ASIC2 and ASIC3 results in reciprocal changes in sensory sensitivity of baro- and chemoreceptors and a consequential synergistic exaggeration sympathetic nerve activity. A similar reciprocal sensory dysautonomia prevails in heart failure and increases the risk of mortality. There is also evidence that ASIC heteromers in skeletal muscle afferents contribute significantly to the exercise pressor reflex. In cardiac muscle afferents of the dorsal root ganglia, they contribute to nociception and to the detrimental sympathetic activation during ischemia. Finally, we report that an inhibitory influence of ASIC2-mediated baroreceptor activity suppresses the sympatho-excitatory reflexes of the chemoreceptors and skeletal muscle afferents, as well as the ASIC1a-mediated excitation of central neurons during fear, threat, or panic. The translational potential of activation of ASIC2 in cardiovascular disease states may be a beneficial sympatho-inhibition and parasympathetic activation. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'. PMID:25592213

  18. Diabetes Mellitus in the Transplanted Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Peev, Vasil; Reiser, Jochen; Alachkar, Nada

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most common cause of chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. New onset diabetes mellitus after transplant (NODAT) has been described in approximately 30% of non-diabetic kidney-transplant recipients many years post transplantation. DM in patients with kidney transplantation constitutes a major comorbidity, and has significant impact on the patients and allografts’ outcome. In addition to the major comorbidity and mortality that result from cardiovascular and other DM complications, long standing DM after kidney-transplant has significant pathological injury to the allograft, which results in lowering the allografts and the patients’ survivals. In spite of the cumulative body of data on diabetic nephropathy (DN) in the native kidney, there has been very limited data on the DN in the transplanted kidney. In this review, we will shed the light on the risk factors that lead to the development of NODAT. We will also describe the impact of DM on the transplanted kidney, and the outcome of kidney-transplant recipients with NODAT. Additionally, we will present the most acceptable data on management of NODAT. PMID:25221544

  19. Cardiovascular effects of basal insulins.

    PubMed

    Mannucci, Edoardo; Giannini, Stefano; Dicembrini, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Basal insulin is an important component of treatment for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. One of the principal aims of treatment in patients with diabetes is the prevention of diabetic complications, including cardiovascular disease. There is some evidence, although controversial, that attainment of good glycemic control reduces long-term cardiovascular risk in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the potential cardiovascular safety of the different available preparations of basal insulin. Current basal insulin (neutral protamine Hagedorn [NPH], or isophane) and basal insulin analogs (glargine, detemir, and the more recent degludec) differ essentially by various measures of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in the bloodstream, presence and persistence of peak action, and within-subject variability in the glucose-lowering response. The currently available data show that basal insulin analogs have a lower risk of hypoglycemia than NPH human insulin, in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, then excluding additional harmful effects on the cardiovascular system mediated by activation of the adrenergic system. Given that no biological rationale for a possible difference in cardiovascular effect of basal insulins has been proposed so far, available meta-analyses of publicly disclosed randomized controlled trials do not show any signal of increased risk of major cardiovascular events between the different basal insulin analogs. However, the number of available cardiovascular events in these trials is very small, preventing any clear-cut conclusion. The results of an ongoing clinical trial comparing glargine and degludec with regard to cardiovascular safety will provide definitive evidence. PMID:26203281

  20. Cardiovascular effects of basal insulins

    PubMed Central

    Mannucci, Edoardo; Giannini, Stefano; Dicembrini, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Basal insulin is an important component of treatment for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. One of the principal aims of treatment in patients with diabetes is the prevention of diabetic complications, including cardiovascular disease. There is some evidence, although controversial, that attainment of good glycemic control reduces long-term cardiovascular risk in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the potential cardiovascular safety of the different available preparations of basal insulin. Current basal insulin (neutral protamine Hagedorn [NPH], or isophane) and basal insulin analogs (glargine, detemir, and the more recent degludec) differ essentially by various measures of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in the bloodstream, presence and persistence of peak action, and within-subject variability in the glucose-lowering response. The currently available data show that basal insulin analogs have a lower risk of hypoglycemia than NPH human insulin, in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, then excluding additional harmful effects on the cardiovascular system mediated by activation of the adrenergic system. Given that no biological rationale for a possible difference in cardiovascular effect of basal insulins has been proposed so far, available meta-analyses of publicly disclosed randomized controlled trials do not show any signal of increased risk of major cardiovascular events between the different basal insulin analogs. However, the number of available cardiovascular events in these trials is very small, preventing any clear-cut conclusion. The results of an ongoing clinical trial comparing glargine and degludec with regard to cardiovascular safety will provide definitive evidence. PMID:26203281

  1. Uterine transplantation.

    PubMed

    Brännström, Mats; Racho El-Akouri, Randa; Wranning, Caiza Almén

    2003-08-15

    Uterine factor infertility is either due to congenital malformation or acquired. Most women with uterine factor infertility have no chance to become genetic mothers, except by the use of gestational surrogacy. The logical but radical approach for treatment would be replacement of the unfunctional or absent uterus. Uterine transplantation could allow these women to become both genetic and gestational mothers. The present work reviews the existing literature on the history and recent development around this topic. We also briefly describe a newly developed model for heterotopic uterine transplantation in the mouse, in which pregnancies have been accomplished. Some specific issues that are required to be solved prior any further attempts to transplant the uterus in humans are also addressed. PMID:12860325

  2. Recent advancements in the cardiovascular drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Singh, Baljeet; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the disease that affects the cardiovascular system, vascular diseases of the brain and kidney, and peripheral arterial disease. Despite of all advances in pharmacological and clinical treatment, heart failure is a leading cause of morbidness and mortality worldwide. Many new therapeutic advance strategies, including cell transplantation, gene delivery or therapy, and cytokines or other small molecules, have been research to treat heart failure. The main aim of this review article is to focus on nano carriers advancement and addressing the problems associated with old and modern therapeutics such as nonspecific effects and poor stability. PMID:25046615

  3. Immunological aspects of corneal transplant.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Kumar, Asha

    2014-01-01

    Corneal transplant is the most common solid tissue transplant in humans. Advances in microsurgical techniques, eye banking and the use of corticosteroids have improved the success of corneal transplants. Over 65,000 corneal transplants are being performed worldwide annually. Most of these transplants are performed in developed countries. Cornea is considered an immune privileged site. Despite this, immune mediated graft rejection is the most single cause of cornea graft failure and is one of the major postoperative complications. Incidences from as low as 2% to as high as 50% have been reported depending upon the degree of vascularization. Rejection involves donor tissue recognition and various factors may influence this rejection. Major factors include the antigenic load of the donor tissue; other factors include death to enucleation time, methods and temperature of preserving the tissue. Host factors that may impact the graft include ocular surface diseases such as dry eye, chemical burns and autoimmune diseases such as mucous membrane pemphigoid. Following infection, surgery or trauma, cells of the innate immune system invade the cornea as a result of up-regulation of cytokines, cellular adhesion molecules and growth and angiogenic factors. These factors results in neoangiogenesis and lymphoangiogenesis, leading to immune activation and graft rejection. The various immunological mechanisms that may play a role in the corneal transplant are discussed. PMID:25296240

  4. Kidney transplantation after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Yang; Liu, Hang; Liu, Wei; Li, Han; Zhang, Xiao-Dong

    2016-08-01

    Kidney transplantation after liver transplantation (KALT) offers longer survival and a better quality of life to liver transplantation recipients who develop chronic renal failure. This article aimed to discuss the efficacy and safety of KALT compared with other treatments. The medical records of 5 patients who had undergone KALT were retrospectively studied, together with a literature review of studies. Three of them developed chronic renal failure after liver transplantation because of calcineurin inhibitor (CNI)-induced nephrotoxicity, while the others had lupus nephritis or non-CNI drug-induced nephrotoxicity. No mortality was observed in the 5 patients. Three KALT cases showed good prognoses, maintaining a normal serum creatinine level during entire follow-up period. Chronic rejection occurred in the other two patients, and a kidney graft was removed from one of them. Our data suggested that KALT is a good alternative to dialysis for liver transplantation recipients. The cases also indicate that KALT can be performed with good long-term survival. PMID:27498586

  5. Advantage of tacrolimus/mycophenolate mofetil regimen for cytotoxic T cell-mediated defence and its inhibition by additive steroid administration in high-risk liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Uemoto, S; Ozawa, K; Kaido, T; Mori, A; Fujimoto, Y

    2016-04-01

    Our previous work revealed that the recipients with the highest pre-existing numbers of CD8(+) effector T cells (TE ) [hyperparathyroidism (HPT)E recipients] occupied approximately 30% of adult transplant recipients performed in our hospital. HPTE recipients demonstrated very poor clinical outcome compared with the remaining 70% of recipients with the lowest pre-existing TE (LPTE recipient). This study aimed to clarify the best combined immunosuppressive regimen related to function of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) for HPTE recipients. Eighty-one HPTE recipients were classified into three types, according to the immunosuppressive regimens: type 1, tacrolimus (Tac)/glucocorticoid (GC); type 2, Tac/mycophenolate mofetil (MMF)/GC; and type 3, Tac/MMF. Frequencies of severe infection, rejection and hospital death were the highest in types 1 and 2, whereas the lowest occurred in type 3. The survival rate in type 3 was the highest (100%) during follow-up until post-operative day 2000. Regarding the immunological mechanism, in type 1 TE perforin and interferon (IFN)-γ were generated through the self-renewal of CD8(+) central memory T cells (TCM ), but decreased in the early post-transplant period due to marked down-regulation of interleukin (IL)-12 receptor beta-1 of TCM. In type 2, the self-renewal TCM did not develop, and the effector function could not be increased. In type 3, in contrast, the effectors and cytotoxicity were correlated inversely with IL-12Rβ1(+) TCM levels, and increased at the highest level around the pre-transplant levels of IL-12Rβ1(+) TCM . However, the immunological advantage of Tac/MMF therapy was inhibited strongly by additive steroid administration. PMID:26560892

  6. Lung Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... years. Their conditions are so severe that other treatments, such as medicines or breathing devices, no longer work. Lung transplants most often are used to treat people who have severe COPD Cystic fibrosis Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency Pulmonary ...

  7. Heart Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  8. Transplant production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For field pepper (Capsicum spp.) production, plants can be established from direct seed or transplants depending on the location and cultural practices for the specific pepper type grown. Direct seeding can result in slow, variable, and reduced plant stands due to variations in soil temperature, wat...

  9. Association of 10‐Year and Lifetime Predicted Cardiovascular Disease Risk With Subclinical Atherosclerosis in South Asians: Findings From the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Kandula, Namratha R.; Kanaya, Alka M.; Liu, Kiang; Lee, Ji Young; Herrington, David; Hulley, Stephen B.; Persell, Stephen D.; Lloyd‐Jones, Donald M.; Huffman, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Ten‐year and lifetime cardiovascular risk assessment algorithms have been adopted into atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) prevention guidelines, but these prediction models are not based on South Asian populations and may underestimate the risk in Indians, Pakistanis, Bangladeshis, Nepali, and Sri Lankans in the United States. Little is known about ASCVD risk prediction and intermediate endpoints such as subclinical atherosclerosis in US individuals of South Asian ancestry. Methods and Results South Asians (n=893) from the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) study who were 40 to 79 years and free of ASCVD were included. Ten‐year ASCVD predicted risk was calculated using the 2013 Pooled Cohort Equations. Lifetime predicted risk was based on risk factor burden. Baseline levels of subclinical atherosclerosis (coronary artery calcium [CAC] and carotid intima media thickness [CIMT]) were compared across 10‐year and lifetime risk strata: (1) high (≥7.5%) 10‐year and low (<7.5%) 10‐year risk; (2) high (≥39%) lifetime and low (<39%) lifetime risk. South Asian men and women with high 10‐year predicted risk had a significantly greater CAC burden than those with low 10‐year risk. South Asians with high lifetime predicted risk had a significantly increased odds for CAC higher than 0 (odds ratio: men 1.97; 95% CI, 1.2 to 3.2; women 3.14; 95% CI, 1.5, 6.6). Associations between risk strata and CIMT were also present. Conclusion This study is the first to provide evidence that contemporary ASCVD risk assessment algorithms derived from non‐Hispanic white and African‐American samples can successfully identify substantial differences in atherosclerotic burden in US South Asians. PMID:25277669

  10. Cardiovascular group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  11. Expansion of CMV-mediated NKG2C+ NK cells associates with the development of specific de novo malignancies in liver-transplanted patients.

    PubMed

    Achour, Abla; Baychelier, Florence; Besson, Caroline; Arnoux, Armelle; Marty, Michel; Hannoun, Laurent; Samuel, Didier; Debré, Patrice; Vieillard, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Solid cancers are a major adverse outcome of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Although the use of chronic immunosuppression is known to play a role in T cell impairment, recent insights into the specificities of NK cells led us to reassess the potential modulation of this innate immune cell compartment after transplantation. Our extensive phenotypic and functional study reveals that the development of specific de novo noncutaneous tumors post-OLT is linked to unusual NK cell subsets with maturation defects and to uncommon cytokine production associated with the development of specific cancers. Remarkably, in CMV(+) patients, the development de novo head/neck or colorectal tumors is linked to an aberrant expansion of NK cells expressing NKG2C and a high level of intracellular TNF-α, which impact on their polyfunctional capacities. In contrast, NK cells from patients diagnosed with genitourinary tumors possessed a standard immature signature, including high expression of NKG2A and a robust production of IFN-γ. Taken together, our results suggest that under an immunosuppressive environment, the interplay between the modulation of NK repertoire and CMV status may greatly hamper the spectrum of immune surveillance and thus favor outgrowth and the development of specific de novo tumors after OLT. PMID:24307732

  12. Long-term outcomes of children after solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jon Jin; Marks, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation has transformed the lives of many children and adults by providing treatment for patients with organ failure who would have otherwise succumbed to their disease. The first successful transplant in 1954 was a kidney transplant between identical twins, which circumvented the problem of rejection from MHC incompatibility. Further progress in solid organ transplantation was enabled by the discovery of immunosuppressive agents such as corticosteroids and azathioprine in the 1950s and ciclosporin in 1970. Today, solid organ transplantation is a conventional treatment with improved patient and allograft survival rates. However, the challenge that lies ahead is to extend allograft survival time while simultaneously reducing the side effects of immunosuppression. This is particularly important for children who have irreversible organ failure and may require multiple transplants. Pediatric transplant teams also need to improve patient quality of life at a time of physical, emotional and psychosocial development. This review will elaborate on the long-term outcomes of children after kidney, liver, heart, lung and intestinal transplantation. As mortality rates after transplantation have declined, there has emerged an increased focus on reducing longer-term morbidity with improved outcomes in optimizing cardiovascular risk, renal impairment, growth and quality of life. Data were obtained from a review of the literature and particularly from national registries and databases such as the North American Pediatric Renal Trials and Collaborative Studies for the kidney, SPLIT for liver, International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation and UNOS for intestinal transplantation. PMID:24860856

  13. Long-term outcomes of children after solid organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jon Jin; Marks, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation has transformed the lives of many children and adults by providing treatment for patients with organ failure who would have otherwise succumbed to their disease. The first successful transplant in 1954 was a kidney transplant between identical twins, which circumvented the problem of rejection from MHC incompatibility. Further progress in solid organ transplantation was enabled by the discovery of immunosuppressive agents such as corticosteroids and azathioprine in the 1950s and ciclosporin in 1970. Today, solid organ transplantation is a conventional treatment with improved patient and allograft survival rates. However, the challenge that lies ahead is to extend allograft survival time while simultaneously reducing the side effects of immunosuppression. This is particularly important for children who have irreversible organ failure and may require multiple transplants. Pediatric transplant teams also need to improve patient quality of life at a time of physical, emotional and psychosocial development. This review will elaborate on the long-term outcomes of children after kidney, liver, heart, lung and intestinal transplantation. As mortality rates after transplantation have declined, there has emerged an increased focus on reducing longer-term morbidity with improved outcomes in optimizing cardiovascular risk, renal impairment, growth and quality of life. Data were obtained from a review of the literature and particularly from national registries and databases such as the North American Pediatric Renal Trials and Collaborative Studies for the kidney, SPLIT for liver, International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation and UNOS for intestinal transplantation. PMID:24860856

  14. Air pollution and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Barry A; Brook, Robert; Arden Pope, C

    2015-05-01

    An escalating body of epidemiologic and clinical research provides compelling evidence that exposure to fine particulate matter air pollution contributes to the development of cardiovascular disease and the triggering of acute cardiac events. There are 3 potential mediating pathways that have been implicated, including "systemic spillover," autonomic imbalance, and circulating particulate matter constituents. Further support that the increased morbidity and mortality attributed to air pollution comes from studies demonstrating the adverse cardiovascular effects of even brief periods of exposure to secondhand smoke. Accordingly, persons with known or suspected cardiovascular disease, the elderly, diabetic patients, pregnant women, and those with pulmonary disease should be counseled to limit leisure-time outdoor activities when air pollution is high. Recognizing the insidious and pervasive nature of air pollution, and the associated odds ratios and population attributable fractions for this widely underappreciated chemical trigger of acute cardiovascular events, may serve to maximize the potential for cardiovascular risk reduction by addressing at least a portion of the 10%-25% incidence of coronary disease that is unexplained by traditional risk factors. PMID:25882781

  15. Islet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat undertook a review of the evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of islet transplantation alone (ITA) in non-uremic patients with type 1 DM who have severe hypoglycemia and uncontrolled diabetes (brittle diabetics). Results In a health technology assessment from Alberta, Guo et al. (2003) stated that limited evidence from the Edmonton series suggested that islet cell transplantation (ITA) (using the Edmonton Protocol) is effective in 1) controlling labile diabetes and 2) protecting against unrecognized hypoglycemia in highly selected patients in the short term. This conclusion by Guo et al. (2003) was based on the results of 11/17 insulin independent patients who were followed up for a median of 20.4 months in the trial by Ryan et al. (2002). In contrast, Paty et al. (2002) concluded that glucagon and epinephrine responses and hypoglycemic symptom recognition were not improved by islet transplantation in patients receiving the procedure in Edmonton, despite prolonged insulin independence and near-normal glycemic control. Paty et al. (2002) (a member of the Edmonton team) examined 7 ITA recipients, 7 type 1 DM patients (nonITA), and 7 nondiabetic control patients. The follow-up for most studies was short. It was suggested that the modifications to the conventional ITA approaches, including the steroid free immunosuppressive regimen, islet preparation in xenoproteins free media and transplantation of fresh islets from multiple donors were associated with improved success. The effects of ITA on beta cell function (secretion of insulin) look promising, however, the effects of ITA on pancreatic alpha cell function (secretion of counter-regulatory hormones such as glucagon and epinephrine) in long standing type 1 diabetes remain unclear. The most important barriers to more widespread islet transplantation using the Edmonton protocol are the availability of sufficient donor organs and the

  16. Fungal infections in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Khan, Asif; El-Charabaty, Elie; El-Sayegh, Suzanne

    2015-06-01

    Organ transplantation has always been considered to be the standard therapeutic interventions in patients with end-stage organ failure. In 2008, more than 29,000 organ transplants were performed in US. Survival rates among transplant recipients have greatly improved due to better understanding of transplant biology and more effective immunosuppressive agents. After transplant, the extent of the immune response is influenced by the amount of interleukin 2 (IL-2) being produced by the T-helper cells. Transplant immunosuppressive therapy primarily targets T cell-mediated graft rejection. Calcineurin inhibitor, which includes cyclosporine, pimecrolimus and tacrolimus, impairs calcineurin-induced up-regulation of IL-2 expression, resulting in increased susceptibility to invasive fungal diseases. This immunosuppressive state allows infectious complication, leading to a high mortality rate. Currently, overall mortality due to invasive fungal infections (IFIs) in solid organ transplant recipients ranges between 25% and 80%. The risk of IFI following renal transplant is associated with the dosage of immunosuppressive agents given, environmental factors and post-transplant duration. Most fungal infections occur in the first 6 months after transplant because of the use of numerous immunosuppressors. Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. are the yeasts most frequently isolated, while most frequent filamentous fungi (molds) isolated are Aspergillus spp. The symptoms of systemic fungal infections are non-specific and early detection of fungal infections and proper therapy are important in improving survival and reducing mortality. This article will provide an insight on the risk factors and clinical presentation, compare variation in treatment of IFIs in renal transplant patients, and evaluate the role of prophylactic therapy in this group of patients. We also report the course and management of two renal transplant recipients admitted to Staten Island University Hospital, both of

  17. Fungal Infections in Renal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Asif; El-Charabaty, Elie; El-Sayegh, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Organ transplantation has always been considered to be the standard therapeutic interventions in patients with end-stage organ failure. In 2008, more than 29,000 organ transplants were performed in US. Survival rates among transplant recipients have greatly improved due to better understanding of transplant biology and more effective immunosuppressive agents. After transplant, the extent of the immune response is influenced by the amount of interleukin 2 (IL-2) being produced by the T-helper cells. Transplant immunosuppressive therapy primarily targets T cell-mediated graft rejection. Calcineurin inhibitor, which includes cyclosporine, pimecrolimus and tacrolimus, impairs calcineurin-induced up-regulation of IL-2 expression, resulting in increased susceptibility to invasive fungal diseases. This immunosuppressive state allows infectious complication, leading to a high mortality rate. Currently, overall mortality due to invasive fungal infections (IFIs) in solid organ transplant recipients ranges between 25% and 80%. The risk of IFI following renal transplant is associated with the dosage of immunosuppressive agents given, environmental factors and post-transplant duration. Most fungal infections occur in the first 6 months after transplant because of the use of numerous immunosuppressors. Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. are the yeasts most frequently isolated, while most frequent filamentous fungi (molds) isolated are Aspergillus spp. The symptoms of systemic fungal infections are non-specific and early detection of fungal infections and proper therapy are important in improving survival and reducing mortality. This article will provide an insight on the risk factors and clinical presentation, compare variation in treatment of IFIs in renal transplant patients, and evaluate the role of prophylactic therapy in this group of patients. We also report the course and management of two renal transplant recipients admitted to Staten Island University Hospital, both of

  18. Repair of liver mediated by adult mouse liver neuro-glia antigen 2-positive progenitor cell transplantation in a mouse model of cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyu; Siegel, Christopher T.; Shuai, Ling; Lai, Jiejuan; Zeng, Linli; Zhang, Yujun; Lai, Xiangdong; Bie, Ping; Bai, Lianhua

    2016-01-01

    NG2-expressing cells are a population of periportal vascular stem/progenitors (MLpvNG2+ cells) that were isolated from healthy adult mouse liver by using a “Percoll-Plate-Wait” procedure. We demonstrated that isolated cells are able to restore liver function after transplantation into a cirrhotic liver, and co-localized with the pericyte marker (immunohistochemistry: PDGFR-β) and CK19. Cells were positive for: stem cell (Sca-1, CD133, Dlk) and liver stem cell markers (EpCAM, CD14, CD24, CD49f); and negative for: hematopoietic (CD34, CD45) and endothelial markers (CD31, vWf, von Willebrand factor). Cells were transplanted (1 × 106 cells) in mice with diethylnitrosamine-induced cirrhosis at week 6. Cells showed increased hepatic associated gene expression of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), Albumin (Alb), Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pc), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (Sox9), hepatic nuclear factors (HNF1a, HNF1β, HNF3β, HNF4α, HNF6, Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), Leucine-rich repeated-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5) and Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT). Cells showed decreased fibrogenesis, hepatic stellate cell infiltration, Kupffer cells and inflammatory cytokines. Liver function markers improved. In a cirrhotic liver environment, cells could differentiate into hepatic lineages. In addition, grafted MLpvNG2+ cells could mobilize endogenous stem/progenitors to participate in liver repair. These results suggest that MLpvNG2+ cells may be novel adult liver progenitors that participate in liver regeneration. PMID:26905303

  19. Repair of liver mediated by adult mouse liver neuro-glia antigen 2-positive progenitor cell transplantation in a mouse model of cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyu; Siegel, Christopher T; Shuai, Ling; Lai, Jiejuan; Zeng, Linli; Zhang, Yujun; Lai, Xiangdong; Bie, Ping; Bai, Lianhua

    2016-01-01

    NG2-expressing cells are a population of periportal vascular stem/progenitors (MLpvNG2(+) cells) that were isolated from healthy adult mouse liver by using a "Percoll-Plate-Wait" procedure. We demonstrated that isolated cells are able to restore liver function after transplantation into a cirrhotic liver, and co-localized with the pericyte marker (immunohistochemistry: PDGFR-β) and CK19. Cells were positive for: stem cell (Sca-1, CD133, Dlk) and liver stem cell markers (EpCAM, CD14, CD24, CD49f); and negative for: hematopoietic (CD34, CD45) and endothelial markers (CD31, vWf, von Willebrand factor). Cells were transplanted (1 × 10(6) cells) in mice with diethylnitrosamine-induced cirrhosis at week 6. Cells showed increased hepatic associated gene expression of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), Albumin (Alb), Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pc), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (Sox9), hepatic nuclear factors (HNF1a, HNF1β, HNF3β, HNF4α, HNF6, Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), Leucine-rich repeated-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5) and Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT). Cells showed decreased fibrogenesis, hepatic stellate cell infiltration, Kupffer cells and inflammatory cytokines. Liver function markers improved. In a cirrhotic liver environment, cells could differentiate into hepatic lineages. In addition, grafted MLpvNG2(+) cells could mobilize endogenous stem/progenitors to participate in liver repair. These results suggest that MLpvNG2(+) cells may be novel adult liver progenitors that participate in liver regeneration. PMID:26905303

  20. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in renal transplantation: should ABPM be routinely performed in renal transplant patients?

    PubMed

    Covic, Adrian; Segall, Liviu; Goldsmith, David J A

    2003-12-15

    In renal transplant recipients, hypertension is common and associated with increased cardiovascular and allograft rejection risks. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is required for its accurate diagnosis and adequate treatment, as it clearly offers several advantages over office or casual blood pressure measurements. First, it correlates better with target-organ damage and with cardiovascular mortality. Second, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring can eliminate "white coat" hypertension. Most important is the identification of nocturnal hypertension, an independent cardiovascular risk factor. A circadian nondipping pattern is often found in renal transplant recipients, most probably resulting from cyclosporine A and persistent fluid overload in the early posttransplant phase (approximately 70% prevalence), but reflecting an underlying renal (parenchymal or vascular) allograft disease when persistent (approximately 25% prevalence) beyond the first year posttransplant. PMID:14702541

  1. Before the Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Devices About Organ Allocation Getting on the List Financing a Transplant Waiting for your Transplant About the ... Types Being a Living Donor About the Operation Financing Living Donation Home / Before The Transplant Organ Facts ...

  2. International Transplant Nurses Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Register for the 25th Annual ITNS Symposium The International Transplant Nurses Society (ITNS) cordially invites transplant nurses ... Barriers (PDF) This pocket guide, developed by the International Transplant Nurses Society (ITNS), provides an overview of ...

  3. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... allo-transplantation?" For each pancreatic islet allo-transplant infusion, researchers use specialized enzymes to remove islets from ... in a lab. Transplant patients typically receive two infusions with an average of 400,000 to 500, ...

  4. Current Issues in Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The state of liver transplantation continues to evolve. This article focuses on 3 separate yet important issues within this field. First, there is a proposal to change the allocation of donor livers in the United States. The fundamental premise of this proposal is to equalize access to donor livers across the country. To accomplish this goal, the proposal is to increase the geographic area of liver allocation. As might be expected, there is a great deal of controversy surrounding the possibility of a major change in liver allocation and distribution. A second area of interest, and perhaps the most important therapeutic breakthrough in the field of hepatology, is the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. With cure rates up to 100%, an increasing proportion of liver transplant candidates and recipients are being cured of HCV infection with therapies that have minimal side effects. Consequently, the impact of HCV infection on patient and graft survival will likely improve substantially over the next few years. Finally, this article reviews the role of donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) in antibody-mediated rejection. Long recognized as an important factor in graft survival in renal transplantation, DSAs have recently been shown to be a strong predictor of graft and patient survival in liver transplantation. However, the importance of DSAs in liver transplantation is uncertain, in large part due to the absence of proven therapies. PMID:27231452

  5. Cellular and Functional Imaging of Cardiac Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yijen L.; Ye, Qing

    2011-01-01

    Heart transplantation is now an established treatment for patients suffering from end-stage heart diseases. With the advances in immunosuppressive treatment, the survival rate for transplant patients has improved greatly. However, allograft rejection, both acute and chronic, after heart transplantation is still a limitation leading to morbidity and mortality. The current clinical gold standard for screening rejection is endomyocardial biopsy (EMB), which is not only invasive, but also error-prone, due to the limited sample size and the site location of sampling. It would be highly desirable to have reliable and noninvasive alternatives for EMB in monitoring cardiac allograft rejection. The objective of this review is to highlight how cardiovascular imaging can contribute to noninvasively detecting and to evaluating both acute and chronic allograft rejection after heart transplantation, in particular, cardiovascular MRI (CMRI); and how CMRI can assess both immune cell infiltration at the rejecting organ, and the cardiac dysfunctions resulting from allograft rejection. PMID:21359095

  6. Post-transplantation diabetes-state of the art.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Adnan; Cohney, Solomon

    2016-04-01

    With increasing success in overcoming the immunological and infectious challenges accompanying solid organ transplantation, susceptibility to post-transplant diabetes and cardiovascular disease has assumed increasing importance. Although some guidance is available from diabetes-related literature pertaining to the general population, some aspects are unique to solid organ allograft recipients. Both insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction are generally agreed to contribute to development and manifestation of post-transplant diabetes, but controversy continues about which is most important and to what extent post-transplant diabetes is a distinct entity or simply a variant of type 2 diabetes with transplant-specific components. The optimum method and timing for detection and diagnosis of post-transplant diabetes remains an area of uncertainty. However, the greatest needs are to: address the absence of contemporary data for incidence and clinical outcomes associated with post-transplant diabetes; establish the role of glycaemic control; and assess the role of new diabetic therapies in prevention and management of post-transplant diabetes. We place the present knowledge base in the context of other advances in transplantation, challenge some existing ideas, and examine the potential role of emerging diabetes therapies. In highlighting existing deficiencies, we hope to provide direction for future research that will ultimately reduce incidence and improve management of post-transplant diabetes. PMID:26632096

  7. Rat CD8+ FOXP3+ T suppressor cells mediate tolerance to allogeneic heart transplants, inducing PIR-B in APC and rendering the graft invulnerable to rejection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiawang; Liu, Zhuoru; Witkowski, Piotr; Vlad, George; Manavalan, John S; Scotto, Luigi; Kim-Schulze, Seunghee; Cortesini, Raffaello; Hardy, Mark A; Suciu-Foca, Nicole

    2004-12-01

    Human CD8+ FOXP3+ T suppressor cells (TS) were previously shown to induce the expression of the inhibitory receptors, Immunoglobulin-like transcript (ILT) 3 and ILT4 on dendritic and endothelial cells, rendering them tolerogenic to allogeneic T cells. We have demonstrated the importance of CD8+ TS in a rat model of heart allo-transplantation. Tolerance was induced in ACI recipients by multiple transfusions of UVB-irradiated blood from Lewis heart donors. CD8+ T cells from tolerant ACI rats expressed FOXP3, transferred tolerance to naive secondary hosts and induced the upregulation of the inhibitory receptor, paired immunoglobulin-like receptor (PIR)-B, an ILT4 orthologue, in Lewis dendritic cells (DC) and heart endothelial cells (EC). When long-term surviving Lewis heart allografts with PIR-B+ EC were retransplanted from a primary to a secondary ACI recipient they did not elicit rejection. This study focuses attention on the need to develop agents that act directly on graft EC in order to achieve tolerance. PMID:15589736

  8. Perioperative monitoring in liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Nasa, Vaibhav; Tandon, Manish

    2012-09-01

    Liver transplant (LT) is a major surgical undertaking involving major fluid shifts, hemodynamic instability and metabolic derangements in a patient with preexisting liver failure and multisystemic derangements. Monitoring and organ support initiated in the preoperative phase is continued intraoperatively and into the postoperative phase to ensure an optimal outcome. As cardiovascular events are the leading cause of non-graft related death among LT recipients, major emphasis is placed on cardiovascular monitoring. The other essential monitoring are the continuous assessment of coagulapathy, extent of metabolic derangements, dyselectrolytemis and intracranial pressure monitoring in patients with fulminant hepatic failure. The type and extent of monitoring differs with need according to preexisting child status of the patient and the extent of systemic derangements. It also varies among transplant centers and is mainly determined by individual or institutional practices. PMID:25755443

  9. Perioperative Monitoring in Liver Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shweta; Nasa, Vaibhav; Tandon, Manish

    2012-01-01

    Liver transplant (LT) is a major surgical undertaking involving major fluid shifts, hemodynamic instability and metabolic derangements in a patient with preexisting liver failure and multisystemic derangements. Monitoring and organ support initiated in the preoperative phase is continued intraoperatively and into the postoperative phase to ensure an optimal outcome. As cardiovascular events are the leading cause of non-graft related death among LT recipients, major emphasis is placed on cardiovascular monitoring. The other essential monitoring are the continuous assessment of coagulapathy, extent of metabolic derangements, dyselectrolytemis and intracranial pressure monitoring in patients with fulminant hepatic failure. The type and extent of monitoring differs with need according to preexisting child status of the patient and the extent of systemic derangements. It also varies among transplant centers and is mainly determined by individual or institutional practices. PMID:25755443

  10. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gitto, Stefano; Vukotic, Ranka; Vitale, Giovanni; Pirillo, Martina; Villa, Erica; Andreone, Pietro

    2016-06-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis is a growing liver-related health problem. In Europe, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most usual reason of chronic liver illness while steatohepatitis, its progressive form, affects 1% of Europeans and North Americans. In the United States steatohepatitis-related cirrhosis is one of the main indications for liver transplant. A targeted stratification for patients waiting for transplant and affected by this disease is mandatory especially because of their increased cardiovascular and cancer risk. The adequate treatment of NAFLD is crucial for the reduction of the disease related morbidity and mortality. In post-transplant setting, the recurrent or de novo steatosis might seriously affect the allograft short- and long-term outcome. Many conditions can represent the basis of the post-transplant steatohepatitis: obesity, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, immunosuppressant treatment, alcoholic habit and liver graft steatosis. Today, the only consolidated therapy is represented by a deep life-style intervention since the use of drug-based alternative strategies is still limited and a very few data are available for the post-transplant period. Targeted and personalized behaviour and pharmacological interventions have to be developed for both the pre- and post-transplant phase. PMID:27038703

  11. Selection of uremic patients for kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, G; Svensson, M

    2001-08-01

    Selection of patients for kidney transplantations is necessary due to the shortage of organs. The process has not been greatly studied. Twelve hypothetical cases were constructed, each with one or several relative contraindications, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, old age or a mental disorder. The cases were submitted to 40 nephrologists, chosen to represent the recruitment areas of the four Swedish transplant units. They were asked to declare whether the 'patient' was suitable for transplantation or not, and, independently, whether the patient would be referred to the transplant unit. The same cases were evaluated by 3-4 representatives of each transplant unit. The response rate was 100%. A median of 6 cases was considered suitable (range 3-11). The acceptance rate differed significantly between the four unit areas, from 4 cases (3-7) to 7 (4-11), p=0.014. Nephrologists would accept fewer patients than staff from the transplant units, 5 (3-10) vs. 7 (3-11), p=0.009. Most of the latter difference was compensated for by referral of borderline cases to the unit. Only 5 individual cases were equally judged by at least 75% of the respondents. Discrepancies in view were noted with respect to the significance of old or young age, the patient's determination and severe obesity. PMID:11683821

  12. Bile Acids Regulate Cardiovascular Function

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Sandeep; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Pallone, Thomas L.

    2011-01-01

    Research over the last decade has uncovered roles for bile acids (BAs) that extend beyond their traditional functions in regulating lipid digestion and cholesterol metabolism. BAs are now recognized as signaling molecules that interact with both plasma membrane and nuclear receptors. Emerging evidence indicates that by interacting with these receptors BAs regulate their own synthesis, glucose and energy homeostasis, and other important physiological events. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of the actions of BAs on cardiovascular function. In the heart and the systemic circulation, BAs interact with plasma membrane G-protein coupled receptors, e.g. TGR5 and muscarinic receptors, and nuclear receptors, e.g. the farnesoid (FXR) and pregnane (PXR) xenobiotic receptors. BA receptors are expressed in cardiovascular tissue, however, the mechanisms underlying BA-mediated regulation of cardiovascular function remain poorly understood. BAs reduce heart rate by regulating channel conductance and calcium dynamics in sino-atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes, and regulate vascular tone via both endothelium-dependent and -independent mechanisms. End-stage-liver disease, obstructive jaundice and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy are prominent conditions in which elevated serum BAs alter vascular dynamics. This review focuses on BAs as newly-recognized signaling molecules that modulate cardiovascular function. PMID:21707953

  13. Alloimmunity and Tolerance in Corneal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Amouzegar, Afsaneh; Chauhan, Sunil K; Dana, Reza

    2016-05-15

    Corneal transplantation is one of the most prevalent and successful forms of solid tissue transplantation. Despite favorable outcomes, immune-mediated graft rejection remains the major cause of corneal allograft failure. Although low-risk graft recipients with uninflamed graft beds enjoy a success rate ∼90%, the rejection rates in inflamed graft beds or high-risk recipients often exceed 50%, despite maximal immune suppression. In this review, we discuss the critical facets of corneal alloimmunity, including immune and angiogenic privilege, mechanisms of allosensitization, cellular and molecular mediators of graft rejection, and allotolerance induction. PMID:27183635

  14. [Long-term-management of organ transplant recipients].

    PubMed

    Bürger, Christin; Schmidt, Martina; Maschmeier, Miriam; Stella, Jaqueline; Hüsing, Anna; Wilms, Christian; Schmidt, Hartmut Hans-Jürgen; Kabar, Iyad

    2016-07-01

    Due to advances in immunosuppressive therapy and surgical techniques, survival rates after solid organ transplantation have constantly improved over the last decades. In long-term care after transplantation, physicians need to focus as much on diagnosis and treatment of allograft-related complications as they should consider comorbidities and evaluate risk-factors and adverse events of immunosuppressive agents to prevent secondary diseases. In particular, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, malignancy and infection play a major role in long-term survival. Therefore, screening of organ transplant recipients in regard to these complications and adverse events is a crucial part of follow up in these patients. PMID:27359310

  15. Adult liver transplantation at UCL: update 2002.

    PubMed

    Lerut, J; Matthys, J; Lemaire, J; Van Thuyne, V; Ciccarelli, O; Goffette, P; Peeters, A; Aunac, S; Boddeus, M; Carlier, M A; Danse, E; De Kock, M; De Reyck, Ch; Donataccio, M; Geubel, A; Gonze, D; Goubau, P; Latinne, D; Laterre, P F; Luts, A; Cool, G; Otte, J B; Horsmans, Y; Martinez, J; Orlando, G; Rahier, J; Reding, R; Reynaert, M; Starkel, P; Sempoux, Ch; Talpe, St; Van Obbergh, L; Veyckemans, F; Wallemacq, P; Wittebolle, X; Roggen, F

    2004-01-01

    The authors present the results of a single centre study of 587 liver transplants performed in 522 adults during the period 1984-2002. Results have improved significantly over time due to better pre-, peri- and post-transplant care. One, five, ten and fifteen year actuarial survivals for the whole patient group are 81.2; 69.8; 58.9 and 51.2%. The high incidence of de novo tumors (12.3%), of cardiovascular diseases (7.5%) and of end-stage renal function (3.6%) should be further incentives to tailor the immunosuppression to the individual patient and to direct the attention of the transplant physician to the long-term quality of life of the liver recipient. PMID:15285577

  16. Non-invasive cardiac investigations in patients awaiting renal transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Langford, E J; de Belder, A J; Cairns, H; Hendry, B M; Wainwright, R J

    1997-01-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure undergoing renal transplantation have a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease. Invasive investigation may identify those at risk of cardiac death during or after renal transplantation, but which patients should undergo cardiac catheterization is currently not clear. In 95 patients awaiting renal transplantation we assessed the ability of echocardiography and exercise electrocardiography to identify patients at risk of cardiac death. Echocardiography identified impaired left ventricular (LV) systolic function in 20%, severe in 8%. Of the patients with severe LV dysfunction, 25% died before transplantation. Of those undergoing exercise electrocardiography, 44% did not achieve 85% of maximum predicted heart rate. No coronary artery disease requiring intervention was identified by exercise testing. These findings indicate that echocardiography, but not exercise electrocardiography, should be part of the assessment for renal transplantation. PMID:9135610

  17. Risk assessment and management of post-transplant diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Han, Eugene; Kim, Myoung Soo; Kim, Yu Seun; Kang, Eun Seok

    2016-10-01

    The success rate of organ transplantation has been increasing with advances in surgical and pharmacological techniques. However, the number of solid organ transplant recipients who require metabolic disease management is also growing. Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a common complication after solid organ transplantation and is associated with risks of graft loss, cardiovascular morbidity, and mortality. Other risk factors for PTDM include older age, genetic background, obesity, hepatitis C virus infection, hypomagnesemia, and use of immunosuppressant agents (corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor). Management of PTDM should be started before the transplantation plan to properly screen high-risk patients. Even though PTDM management is similar to that of general type 2 diabetes, therapeutic approaches must be made with consideration of drug interactions between immunosuppressive agents, glucose-lowering medications, and graft rejection and function. PMID:27621191

  18. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Reenam S; Newsome, Philip N

    2016-08-01

    Cirrhosis secondary to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a common indication for liver transplant. In comparison to other cirrhotic patients, patients with NASH cirrhosis are more likely to be older and have the metabolic syndrome. Pre-transplant, patients require careful evaluation of cardiovascular risk. As the incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is rising, a greater proportion of donor grafts have steatosis greater than 30%, which is associated with poor outcomes. Grafts with steatosis greater than 60% are unsuitable for transplant. Overall, post-transplant survival outcomes for patients with NASH cirrhosis are similar to those with cirrhosis without NASH. However, NASH cirrhosis is associated with a higher 30-day mortality, predominantly from an increase in cardiovascular events and infections. Following liver transplant, there is a significant risk of NASH recurrence, although this seldom results in allograft loss. Furthermore, a significant number of patients who had a liver transplant for other reasons develop NASH de novo. When patients with NASH cirrhosis are considered for transplant, one of the major challenges lies in identifying which patients are too high risk for surgery. This review aims to provide information to aid this decision making process, and to provide guidance on the peri-operative care strategies that can modify risk. PMID:26997540

  19. Associations of Pre-transplant Prescription Narcotic Use with Clinical Complications after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lentine, Krista L.; Lam, Ngan N.; Xiao, Huiling; Tuttle-Newhall, Janet E.; Axelrod, David; Brennan, Daniel C.; Dharnidharka, Vikas R.; Yuan, Hui; Nazzal, Mustafa; Zheng, Jie; Schnitzler, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Associations of narcotic use before kidney transplantation with post-transplant clinical outcomes are not well described. Methods We examined integrated national transplant registry, pharmacy records, and Medicare billing claims to follow 16,322 kidney transplant recipients, of whom 28.3% filled a narcotic prescription in the year before transplantation. Opioid analgesic fills were normalized to morphine equivalents (ME) and expressed as mg/kg exposures (approximate quartiles: 0.1– 1.7, 1.8–5.4, 5.5–23.7, and ≥23.8 mg/kg, respectively). Post-transplant cardiovascular, respiratory, neurological, accidents, substance abuse, and non-compliance events were identified using diagnosis codes on Medicare billing claims. Adjusted associations of ME level with post-transplant complications were quantified by multivariate Cox regression. Results The incidence of complications at 3 years post-transplant among those with the highest pre-transplant ME exposure compared to no use included: ventricular arrhythmias, 1.1% vs. 0.2% (p<0.001); cardiac arrest, 4.7% vs. 2.7% (p<0.05); hypotension, 14% vs. 8% (p<0.0001); hypercapnia, 1.6% vs. 0.9% (p<0.05); mental status changes, 5.3% vs. 2.7% (p<0.001); drug abuse/dependence, 7.0% vs. 1.7% (p<0.0001); alcohol abuse, 1.8% vs. 0.6% (p=0.0001); accidents, 0.9% vs. 0.3% (p<0.05); and non-compliance, 3.5% vs. 2.3% (p<0.05). In multivariate analyses, transplant recipients with the highest level of pre-transplant narcotic use had approximately 2-to-4-times the risks of post-transplant ventricular arrhythmias, mental status changes, drug abuse, alcohol abuse, and accidents compared with non-users, and 35% to 45% higher risks of cardiac arrest and hypotension. Conclusion Although associations may reflect underlying conditions or behaviors, high-level prescription narcotic use before kidney transplantation predicts increased risk of clinical complications after transplantation. PMID:25832723

  20. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Mar 23,2016 The following statistics speak ... disease. This content was last reviewed August 2015. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  1. Infection and Cardiovascular Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Heart Diseases; Myocardial Infarction; Infection; Chlamydia Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Helicobacter Infections; Atherosclerosis

  2. [Liver transplants from living donors].

    PubMed

    Rogiers, X; Danninger, F; Malagó, M; Knoefel, W T; Gundlach, M; Bassas, A; Burdelski, M; Broelsch, C E

    1996-03-01

    In this article the authors discuss the advantages of Living Related Liver Transplantation (LRLT), criteria for the selection of donors and the standard operation technique. Among a total of 241 liver transplantation (LTx), 42 LRLT were performed at the University of Hamburg between October 1, 1991 and December 19, 1994. The body weight of recipients for LRLT ranged from 4,6 to 39 kg, with 64,2% having less than 10 kg. The volume of the donor left lateral liver lobe ranged from 100 cc to 350 cc. The average one year survival rate among electively operated patients-status 3-4 (UNOS 1995 classification) was 86.7%, two year survival rate 83.3%. The main advantages of LRLT are consired the following: 1. Absence of mortality on the waiting list, 2. Optimal timing of the transplantation (elective procedure, patient in a good condition), 3. Excellent organ (no primary non function), 4. A possible immunologic advantage, 5. Relief of the waiting list for cadaveric organs, 6. Psychological benefit for the family, 7. Cost effectiveness. Potential candidates for living donation with more than one cardiovascular risk factors were excluded. Social and psychological reasons leading to rejection of candidates were as follows: unstable family structure, expected professional or financial difficulties after living donation or withdrawal from consent. LRLT gives parents of a child with TLD a chance to avoid the risk of death on the waiting list or primary non function of the graft. LRLT has therefore established an important place in pediatric liver transplantation. PMID:8768973

  3. Organ transplantation in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    El Matri, Aziz; Ben Abdallah, Taieb

    2015-04-01

    Kidney transplants were first performed in Tunisia in 1986, and transplants soon extended to other organs including the heart, liver, and pancreas. Live-related donor and deceased-donor kidney transplants were both began in the summer of 1986. An organ procurement and transplant law was passed in March 1991, and the National Centre for Advancement of Organ Transplantation was created in 1995. The number of transplantation units has increased to 7 throughout the country, and the yearly transplant number has progressively increased to 139 in 2010, including 20% from deceased kidney donors. Despite these gains, the need continues to grow. Heart transplants began in January 1993, and Tunisia and Jordan are currently the only Arab countries where it is practiced. However, only 16 patients have received a heart transplant as of 2004, and the number of recipients has decreased in the past 10 years. Liver transplants are rare in other Arab countries, but began in Tunisia in January 1998. Over 10 years, 38 patients benefited from this procedure. After a few years of stagnation, the number of liver transplants is increasing. While all types of transplantation are needed, kidney transplantation is a priority in Tunisia. The target is to perform 400 transplants annually, which would require a long-term strategy to provide full financial coverage using the National Health Insurance Funds in both the public and private sectors. PMID:25894125

  4. [Cardiovascular safety of antidiabetics].

    PubMed

    Aline Roth, Pressl-Wenger; Jornayvaz, François R

    2016-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by a high risk of micro- and macro-vascular complications. Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death of diabetic patients. In this context, the search for molecules decreasing cardiovascular mortality makes sense. Until the EMPA-REG OUTCOME study published late 2015, showing a reduction of cardiovascular mortality of patients treated with empagliflozin, an SGLT2 inhibitor, there was no molecule known to decrease cardiovascular mortality. The purpose of this article is to review the various existing antidiabetic molecules and their impact (positive/neutral/negative) on cardiovascular mortality. PMID:27487675

  5. Hp: an inflammatory indicator in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Graves, Karen L; Vigerust, David J

    2016-07-01

    Over the past decade significant advancement has occurred in the biological and pathological role that Hp has in cardiovascular disease. Hp is an acute-phase protein with a role in the neutralization and clearance of free heme. Iron has tremendous potential for initiating vascular oxidation, inflammation and exacerbating coronary atherosclerosis. Hp genotype has been linked as a prognostic biomarker of acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, restenosis and cardiac transplant rejection. The increased understanding of Hp as a biomarker has provided new insights into the mechanisms of inflammation after cardiac injury and support the concept that Hp is not only an important antioxidant in vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis, but also an enhancer of inflammation in cardiac transplant. PMID:27203711

  6. The effect of the American Heart Association step one diet on hyperlipidemia following renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Moore, R A; Callahan, M F; Cody, M; Adams, P L; Litchford, M; Buckner, K; Galloway, J

    1990-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality following renal transplantation. The percentage of deaths due to ischemic cardiovascular disease and cerebrovascular accidents nearly equals that caused by infection among patients receiving their first transplant, according to data from the European Dialysis and Transplant Association Registry. Hypercholesterolemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease frequently identified following renal transplantation, and diets low in fat and cholesterol have been suggested as treatment. Previous studies have not reported the response of LDL cholesterol to dietary treatment, and it is this form of cholesterol that is most closely related to cardiovascular disease. The American Heart Association has provided nutritionists with guidelines for the treatment of hyperlipidemic patients which include the Step One Diet. Previous dietary studies of renal transplant recipients have allowed a slightly higher intake of fat than that currently recommended by the AHA. We wondered if an easily reproducible diet well known to nutritionists such as the AHA Step One Diet would be effective in lowering cholesterol levels in hyperlipidemic renal transplant recipients. The purpose of our study was not to define the mechanisms of posttransplant hyperlipidemia, but rather to assess the effectiveness of dietary intervention on hyperlipidemia following renal transplantation. PMID:2301029

  7. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ramesh Prasad, G V

    2012-01-01

    Solid organ transplant recipients are at an increased risk for hypertension and cardiovascular disease. To assist in their management, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) has become increasingly used in both clinical research settings and practice. ABPM has been used to better define post-transplant hypertension incidence and prevalence in different solid organ transplantation populations. ABPM provides additional information on cardiovascular risk beyond that obtained by clinic-based readings, based on its ability to assess 24-h blood pressure (BP) load, detect nocturnal non-dipping, and predict target organ damage. It has provided some assurance about the safety of living kidney donation. Information from ABPM can be used to guide living kidney donor selection, and because ABPM-related data has been correlated with clinically important kidney and heart transplant recipient outcomes, it may be a valuable adjunct in their management. Despite these advantages, barriers to wider use of ABPM include expense, clinical inertia in hypertension management, lack of prospective clinical trial data, and clinical problems that compete with hypertension for attention such as acute or chronic allograft dysfunction. The increasing amount of research and clinical use for ABPM may allow for closer assessment and intervention to help address the increased cardiovascular risk faced by many solid organ transplant recipients. PMID:22220828

  8. What Is a Heart Transplant?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Heart Transplant? A heart transplant is surgery to remove a ... return to work for many different reasons. The Heart Transplant Process The heart transplant process starts when doctors ...

  9. Who Needs a Heart Transplant?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Who Needs a Heart Transplant? Most patients referred to heart transplant centers have ... for heart failure. Who Is Eligible for a Heart Transplant? The specialists at the heart transplant center will ...

  10. Who Needs a Lung Transplant?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Who Needs a Lung Transplant? Your doctor may recommend a lung transplant ... lungs to pick up oxygen. Applying to a Lung Transplant Program Lung transplants are done in medical ...

  11. The Effect of Combination Therapy with Rituximab and Intravenous Immunoglobulin on the Progression of Chronic Antibody Mediated Rejection in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jintak; Khvan, Marina; Park, Cheol Whee; Choi, Yeong Jin; Kim, Yong-Soo; Yang, Chul Woo

    2014-01-01

    The treatment for chronic active antibody-mediated rejection (CAMR) remains controversial. We investigated the efficacy of rituximab (RTX) and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) for CAMR. Eighteen patients with CAMR were treated with RTX (375 mg/m2) and IVIg (0.4 g/kg) for 4 days. The efficacy of RTX/IVIg combination therapy (RIT) was assessed by decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate per month (ΔeGFR) before and after RIT. Patients were divided into responder and nonresponder groups based on decrease and no decrease in ΔeGFR, respectively, and their clinical and histological characteristics were compared. Response rate to RIT was 66.7% (12/18), and overall ΔeGFR decreased significantly to 0.4 ± 1.7 mL·min−1·1.73 m−2 per month 6 months after RIT compared to that observed 6 months before RIT (1.8 ± 1.0, P < 0.05). Clinical and histological features between the 12 responders and the 6 nonresponders were not significantly different, but nonresponders had a significantly higher proteinuria levels at the time of RIT (2.5 ± 2.5 versus 7.0 ± 3.5 protein/creatinine (g/g), P < 0.001). The effect of the RIT on ΔeGFR had dissipated in all patients by 1 year post-RIT. Thus, RIT delayed CAMR progression, and baseline proteinuria level was a prognostic factor for response to RIT. PMID:24741626

  12. Transplantation: a brief history.

    PubMed

    Dangoor, Joseph Yoav; Hakim, David N; Singh, Rajinder Pal; Hakim, Nadey S

    2015-02-01

    Developments in transplantation have progressed dramatically over the past century. Current research is underway to optimize immune modulation, genetically engineering animals for xenografting, and breakthroughs are occurring in regenerative medicine. However, pioneering live-donor transplantation has transformed transplantation in the organ shortage, and these contribute an increased proportion of transplanted organs. Live-donor transplantation is associated with better long-term outcomes, and techniques to recover organs have become less invasive. We set out to examine the evolution of transplantation from its historic beginnings to the developments that make it successful today. PMID:25542855

  13. Gene Therapy in Corneal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Yureeda; Hamrah, Pedram

    2014-01-01

    Corneal transplantation is the most commonly performed organ transplantation. Immune privilege of the cornea is widely recognized, partly because of the relatively favorable outcome of corneal grafts. The first-time recipient of corneal allografts in an avascular, low-risk setting can expect a 90% success rate without systemic immunosuppressive agents and histocompatibility matching. However, immunologic rejection remains the major cause of graft failure, particularly in patients with a high risk for rejection. Corticosteroids remain the first-line therapy for the prevention and treatment of immune rejection. However, current pharmacological measures are limited in their side-effect profiles, repeated application, lack of targeted response, and short duration of action. Experimental ocular gene therapy may thus present new horizons in immunomodulation. From efficient viral vectors to sustainable alternative splicing, we discuss the progress of gene therapy in promoting graft survival and postulate further avenues for gene-mediated prevention of allogeneic graft rejection. PMID:24138037

  14. Vascular calcification, bone and mineral metabolism after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    D’Marco, Luis; Bellasi, Antonio; Mazzaferro, Sandro; Raggi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The development of end stage renal failure can be seen as a catastrophic health event and patients with this condition are considered at the highest risk of cardiovascular disease among any other patient groups and risk categories. Although kidney transplantation was hailed as an optimal solution to such devastating disease, many issues related to immune-suppressive drugs soon emerged and it became evident that cardiovascular disease would remain a vexing problem. Progression of chronic kidney disease is accompanied by profound alterations of mineral and bone metabolism that are believed to have an impact on the cardiovascular health of patients with advanced degrees of renal failure. Cardiovascular risk factors remain highly prevalent after kidney transplantation, some immune-suppression drugs worsen the risk profile of graft recipients and the alterations of mineral and bone metabolism seen in end stage renal failure are not completely resolved. Whether this complex situation promotes progression of vascular calcification, a hall-mark of advanced chronic kidney disease, and whether vascular calcifications contribute to the poor cardiovascular outcome of post-transplant patients is reviewed in this article. PMID:26722649

  15. Pancreas transplantation: review

    PubMed Central

    Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascularized pancreas transplantation is the only treatment that establishes normal glucose levels and normalizes glycosylated hemoglobin levels in type 1 diabetic patients. The first vascularized pancreas transplant was performed by William Kelly and Richard Lillehei, to treat a type 1 diabetes patient, in December 1966. In Brazil, Edison Teixeira performed the first isolated segmental pancreas transplant in 1968. Until the 1980s, pancreas transplants were restricted to a few centers of the United States and Europe. The introduction of tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil in 1994, led to a significant outcome improvement and consequently, an increase in pancreas transplants in several countries. According to the International Pancreas Transplant Registry, until December 31st, 2010, more than 35 thousand pancreas transplants had been performed. The one-year survival of patients and pancreatic grafts exceeds 95 and 83%, respectively. The better survival of pancreatic (86%) and renal (93%) grafts in the first year after transplantation is in the simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant group of patients. Immunological loss in the first year after transplant for simultaneous pancreas-kidney, pancreas after kidney, and pancreas alone are 1.8, 3.7, and 6%, respectively. Pancreas transplant has 10 to 20% surgical complications requiring laparotomy. Besides enhancing quality of life, pancreatic transplant increases survival of uremic diabetic patient as compared to uremic diabetic patients on dialysis or with kidney transplantation alone. PMID:26154551

  16. Cardiovascular complications of respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Chowdhuri, Susmita; Crook, Errol D; Taylor, Herman A; Badr, M Safwan

    2007-11-01

    A major burden of morbidity and mortality due to respiratory diseases can be directly related to the cardiovascular (CV) complications of these disorders. Evidence from cross-sectional and longitudinal studies link reduced lung function and cardiovascular diseases. However, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. Hypoxia-induced increased sympathetic activity, blood viscosity, or inflammation, among other factors, may mediate the underlying pathogenesis. In addition, sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) has been implicated by association in multiple CV diseases including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, and stroke. However, the exact contribution of SDB, including obstructive and central sleep apneas, to the development of cardiovascular diseases is not fully understood. In this context, the contribution of the new large, prospective, Jackson Heart Study could be significant in that it is designed to answer several of these questions, specifically in the African American population. This review examines the current evidence that links both reduced lung function and SDB to CV diseases. PMID:18004091

  17. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... researchers at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, reported their findings in the New England Journal ... transplantation as therapeutic. In other countries, such as Canada and Scandinavia, islet allo-transplantation is no longer ...

  18. [Promoting Living Kidney Transplantation].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2016-04-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best approach for treating patients with end stage renal disease, offering patients the best chance of returning to normal health. While the techniques used in kidney transplantation surgery are mature and highly successful, there is a severe shortage of donor organs. Statistics show a serious imbalance between organ donations and patients on the waiting list for organ transplantation. Moreover, evidence from empirical studies has shown a better transplantation outcome for patients who receive living donor transplantation than for those who receive organs from cadavers. Although using relatives as donors offers an effective way to reduce the problem of organ shortage, this strategy faces many challenges and many other factors affect the promotion of living donor transplantation. This article elaborates how cultural and psychological factors, kidney transplantation awareness, and ethics and laws impact upon living kidney donations and then proposes coping strategies for promoting living kidney transplantation. PMID:27026555

  19. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... of immunosuppressive medications?" [ Top ] Collaborative Islet Transplant Registry Data In its 2010 annual report, 1 the Collaborative Islet Transplant Registry presented data on 571 patients who received pancreatic islet allo- ...

  20. Diet and Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sign up for our FREE magazine, Kidney Living Organ Donation & Transplantation Be an Organ Donor Living Donation Donor ... Giving Primary menu Home Prevention Kidney Disease Patients Organ Donation & Transplantation Professionals Events Advocacy Donate Search Search Header ...

  1. Apelin and its receptor APJ in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Hua; Tang, Zhi-Bin; Liu, Li-Jing; Qian, Hong; Tang, Shi-Lin; Zhang, Da-Wei; Tian, Guo-Ping; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2014-01-20

    Apelin is an adipokine that has been identified as an endogenous ligand for the orphan receptor APJ. Apelin and APJ are expressed in a diverse range of tissues with particular preponderance for the heart and vasculature. Apelin has powerful positive inotropic actions and causes endothelium- and nitric oxide-dependent vasodilatation. Growing evidence shows that apelin/APJ system functions as a critical mediator of cardiovascular homeostasis and is involved in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. Targeting apelin/APJ axis produces protection against cardiovascular diseases. In the current review we have summarized recent data concerning the role and therapeutic potential of apelin/APJ in several major cardiovascular diseases. An increased understanding of the cardiovascular actions of apelin/APJ system will help to develop novel therapeutic interventions for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24055369

  2. Buyer beware transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Jeremy R; Delmonico, Francis L

    2016-05-01

    Poor long-term outcomes of commercial transplantation of transplant tourists reinforce the need to prevent this form of human trafficking. The development of an International Convention by the Council of Europe is highlighted and the implications for physicians of the criminalizing of organ trafficking are considered. The causes of poor outcomes from transplant tourism are considered, with the actions needed to provide both equity and sufficiency of access to transplantation as critical deterrent measures. PMID:27083275

  3. IL-6 in diabetes and cardiovascular complications

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Dan; Liu, Jian; Lau, Chi Wai; Huang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    IL-6 is a pleiotropic cytokine that participates in normal functions of the immune system, haematopoiesis, metabolism, as well as in the pathogenesis of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Both pro- and anti-inflammatory roles of IL-6 have been described, which are distinguished by different cascades of signalling transduction, namely classic and trans-signalling. The present review summarizes the basic principles of IL-6 signalling and discusses its roles in diabetes and associated cardiovascular complications, with emphasis on the different outcomes mediated by the two modes of IL-6 signalling and the value of developing therapeutic strategies to specifically target the deleterious trans-signalling of IL-6. PMID:24697653

  4. Potential applications of catestatin in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yilin; Zhu, Dan

    2016-08-01

    Catestatin (CST) was first named in 1997 for its catecholamine-inhibitory activity. It was discovered as a potent inhibitor of catecholamine secretion and as a regulator of histamine release. Accumulating evidence shows that CST is involved with cardiovascular diseases; however, whether CST is a protective factor for these conditions and the mechanisms by which such actions may be mediated are not well understood. In this article, we review recent basic research and clinical trials in the study of CST and summarize the association of CST with cardiovascular diseases. We review data obtained from MedLine via PubMed and from our own investigations. PMID:27415768

  5. Obesity and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, E

    2015-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of mortality in rich countries and today it has the same meaning for health care as the epidemics of past centuries had for medicine in earlier times: 50% of the population in these countries die of cardiovascular disease. The amount of cardiovascular disease is also increasing in the developing countries together with economic growth. By 2015 one in three deaths will globally be due to cardiovascular diseases. Coronary heart disease is a chronic disease that starts in childhood, even if the symptoms first occur in the middle age. The risks for coronary heart disease are well-known: lipid disorders, especially high serum LDL-cholesterol concentration, high blood pressure, tobacco smoking, obesity, diabetes, male gender and physical inactivity. Obesity is both an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease but is also closely connected with several other risk factors. This review focuses on the connection between overweight or obesity and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25387321

  6. Heart transplant - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... The main problem, as with other transplants, is graft rejection. If rejection can be controlled, then survival can ... major problems are the same all major organ transplants face: a shortage of donor hearts rejection of the transplanted heart cost of the surgery ...

  7. Human Neonatal Cardiovascular Progenitors: Unlocking the Secret to Regenerative Ability

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Tania I.; Appleby, Nancy; Tsay, Eric; Martinez, J. Julian; Bailey, Leonard; Hasaniya, Nahidh; Kearns-Jonker, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Although clinical benefit can be achieved after cardiac transplantation of adult c-kit+ or cardiosphere-derived cells for myocardial repair, these stem cells lack the regenerative capacity unique to neonatal cardiovascular stem cells. Unraveling the molecular basis for this age-related discrepancy in function could potentially transform cardiovascular stem cell transplantation. In this report, clonal populations of human neonatal and adult cardiovascular progenitor cells were isolated and characterized, revealing the existence of a novel subpopulation of endogenous cardiovascular stem cells that persist throughout life and co-express both c-kit and isl1. Epigenetic profiling identified 41 microRNAs whose expression was significantly altered with age in phenotypically-matched clones. These differences were correlated with reduced proliferation and a limited capacity to invade in response to growth factor stimulation, despite high levels of growth factor receptor on progenitors isolated from adults. Further understanding of these differences may provide novel therapeutic targets to enhance cardiovascular regenerative capacity. PMID:24204836

  8. ABO-incompatible living donor kidney transplantation without post-transplant therapeutic plasma exchange.

    PubMed

    Yabu, Julie M; Fontaine, Magali J

    2015-12-01

    Blood group incompatibility remains a significant barrier to kidney transplantation. Approximately, one-third of donors are blood group incompatible with their intended recipient. Options for these donor-recipient pairs include blood group incompatible transplantation or kidney paired donation. However, the optimal protocol for blood group incompatible transplantation is unknown. Protocols differ in techniques to remove ABO antibodies, titer targets, and immunosuppression regimens. In addition, the mechanisms of graft accommodation to blood group antigens remain poorly understood. We describe a blood group incompatible protocol using pretransplant therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE), high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin, and rituximab in addition to prednisone, mycophenolate mofetil, and tacrolimus. In this protocol, we do not exclude patients based on a high initial titer and do not implement post-transplant TPE. All 16 patients who underwent this protocol received a living donor transplant with 100% patient and graft survival, and no reported episodes of antibody-mediated rejection to date with a median follow-up of 2.6 years (range 0.75-4.7 years). We conclude that blood group incompatible transplantation can be achieved without post-transplant TPE. PMID:25739580

  9. Neoplastic disease after liver transplantation: Focus on de novo neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Burra, Patrizia; Rodriguez-Castro, Kryssia I

    2015-01-01

    De novo neoplasms account for almost 30% of deaths 10 years after liver transplantation and are the most common cause of mortality in patients surviving at least 1 year after transplant. The risk of malignancy is two to four times higher in transplant recipients than in an age- and sex-matched population, and cancer is expected to surpass cardiovascular complications as the primary cause of death in transplanted patients within the next 2 decades. Since exposure to immunosuppression is associated with an increased frequency of developing neoplasm, long-term immunosuppression should be therefore minimized. Promising results in the prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence have been reported with the use of mTOR inhibitors including everolimus and sirolimus and the ongoing open-label prospective randomized controlled SILVER. Study will provide more information on whether sirolimus-containing vs mTOR-inhibitor-free immunosuppression is more efficacious in reducing HCC recurrence. PMID:26269665

  10. Paediatric obesity and renal transplantation: current challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Terrace, John D; Oniscu, Gabriel C

    2016-04-01

    The increased incidence of obesity in the paediatric population poses significant challenges to renal transplantation. Whilst the body mass index appears to be widely used as a measure of obesity in adults, there are no standardised definitions in the paediatric population, making comparative analyses difficult. In the paediatric transplant population, obesity is associated with an increased incidence of surgical complications, diabetes, hyperlipidaemia and cardiovascular morbidity, leading to diminished graft function and impacting patient and graft survival. Management of obesity in renal transplantation requires multiple interventions starting with life-style and behavioural modification combined with medical and possibly surgical therapies, representing a unique challenge in the childhood setting. In this review we discuss the current challenges of obesity and potential solutions in the setting of paediatric transplantation. PMID:26018121

  11. [Transplantation and outcome quality].

    PubMed

    Bechstein, W O; Wullstein, C

    2002-06-01

    Organ transplants are procedures which require intensive personal and material resources. The results of organ transplants have continuously improved during recent decades. International data bases (registries) have documented the continuous evolution of organ transplantation. On the basis of the German Transplant Law guidelines for "Requirements regarding quality control for procedures related to organ procurement and transplantation" have been formulated by the German Medical Chamber. Thus, monitoring of outcome quality will become a requirement for all German transplant centers. In this paper, the guidelines for the different organ transplants (kidney, pancreas, liver, heart, lung) are discussed as well as quality control for living donor transplantation. Studies from the USA and Europe demonstrated volume-outcome relationships in organ transplantation. In addition, in kidney transplantation a centre-effect could be demonstrated which influences outcome more than the immunological match between donor and recipient. The introduction of required quality control may have far reaching consequences for the future structure of organ transplantation in Germany. PMID:12149941

  12. Liver transplantation in India.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Gomathy; Kota, Venugopal; Rela, Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    Liver transplantation as an established form of treatment for end-stage liver disease has gained acceptance in India over the last 10 years. Liver transplantation in India has unique features that have contributed to the growth of both deceased donor and living donor transplantations of which living donor currently dominates the picture. Living donor contributes to 80% and deceased donor to 20% of the liver transplants currently performed in India. The majority of these transplants are performed within the private sector with public sector hospitals lagging behind significantly. This article gives an overview of the evolution of liver transplantation in India and the potential future challenges. Liver Transplantation 22 1019-1024 2016 AASLD. PMID:27082718

  13. Infection Prevention in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pergam, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    The number of patients undergoing hematopoietic cell and solid organ transplantation are increasing every year, as are the number of centers both transplanting and caring for these patients. Improvements in transplant procedures, immunosuppressive regimens, and prevention of transplant-associated complications have led to marked improvements in survival in both populations. Infections remain one of the most important sources of excess morbidity and mortality in transplant, and therefore, infection prevention strategies are a critical element for avoiding these complications in centers caring for high-risk patients. This manuscript aims to provide an update of recent data on prevention of major healthcare-associated infections unique to transplantation, reviews the emergence of antimicrobial resistant infections, and discusses updated strategies to both identify and prevent transmission of these pathogens in transplant recipients. PMID:26820654

  14. Ceruloplasmin and cardiovascular disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, P. L.; Mazumder, B.; Ehrenwald, E.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.

    2000-01-01

    Transition metal ion-mediated oxidation is a commonly used model system for studies of the chemical, structural, and functional modifications of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The physiological relevance of studies using free metal ions is unclear and has led to an exploration of free metal ion-independent mechanisms of oxidation. We and others have investigated the role of human ceruloplasmin (Cp) in oxidative processes because it the principal copper-containing protein in serum. There is an abundance of epidemiological data that suggests that serum Cp may be an important risk factor predicting myocardial infarction and cardiovascular disease. Biochemical studies have shown that Cp is a potent catalyst of LDL oxidation in vitro. The pro-oxidant activity of Cp requires an intact structure, and a single copper atom at the surface of the protein, near His(426), is required for LDL oxidation. Under conditions where inhibitory protein (such as albumin) is present, LDL oxidation by Cp is optimal in the presence of superoxide, which reduces the surface copper atom of Cp. Cultured vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells also oxidize LDL in the presence of Cp. Superoxide release by these cells is a critical factor regulating the rate of oxidation. Cultured monocytic cells, when activated by zymosan, can oxidize LDL, but these cells are unique in their secretion of Cp. Inhibitor studies using Cp-specific antibodies and antisense oligonucleotides show that Cp is a major contributor to LDL oxidation by these cells. The role of Cp in lipoprotein oxidation and atherosclerotic lesion progression in vivo has not been directly assessed and is an important area for future studies.

  15. Lasers in Cardiovascular Surgery—Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, John G.; Dixon, John A.

    1985-01-01

    The argon, carbon dioxide and neodymium-YAG lasers have been proposed as effective instruments for surgical procedures of the intact cardiovascular system. While argon and CO2 lasers cause superficial (0 to 1 mm) thermal injury, the Nd:YAG laser is better suited for effecting deep thermal necrosis (3 to 4 mm). Microsurgical vessel anastomoses can be done by “tissue welding” with any of the three clinical lasers. Myocardial revascularization may be accomplished by drilling “neocapillaries” in ischemic myocardium. Endocardial resection for destroying arrhythmic pathways and removing hypertrophied septal muscle has also been successfully accomplished with laser phototherapy. Last, laser-mediated vaporization of atherosclerotic plaque in the coronary arteries and peripheral circulation may offer a percutaneous approach to the treatment of arterial occlusive disease. Cardiovascular uses of lasers are purely investigational at the current time. Much more needs to be known before widespread clinical use of lasers in the cardiovascular system can occur. PMID:3160168

  16. Stress habituation, body shape and cardiovascular mortality.

    PubMed

    Peters, Achim; McEwen, Bruce S

    2015-09-01

    High cardiovascular mortality is well documented in lean phenotypes exhibiting visceral fat accumulation. In contrast, corpulent phenotypes with predominantly subcutaneous fat accumulation display a surprisingly low mortality. The term 'obesity paradox' reflects the difficulty in understanding the biological mechanisms underlying these clinical observations. The allostatic load model of chronic stress focuses on glucocorticoid dysregulation as part of a 'network of allostasis' involving autonomic, endocrine, metabolic, and immune mediators. Here, we expand upon the energetic demands of the brain and show that 'habituators' and 'non-habituators' develop divergent patterns of fat distribution. Central to this process is the recurrent rise in the cerebral energy need (arousal) that non-habituators experience during chronic stress. These neuroenergetic alterations promote visceral fat accumulation, subcutaneous fat loss, and atherogenesis with subsequent cardiovascular events. Habituators are more or less protected against such cardiovascular complications, but there is a metabolic trade-off that we shall discuss in the present paper. PMID:26148986

  17. Role of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus in cardiovascular regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sapru, Hreday N.

    2012-01-01

    Recently the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc) has been implicated in cardiovascular regulation. Both pressor and depressor responses can be elicited by the chemical stimulation of the Arc. The direction of cardiovascular responses (increase or decrease) elicited from the Arc depends on the baseline blood pressure. The pressor responses are mediated via increase in sympathetic nerve activity and involve activation of the spinal ionotropic glutamate receptors. Arc-stimulation elicits tachycardic responses which are mediated via inhibition of vagal input and excitation of sympathetic input to the heart. The pathways within the brain mediating the pressor and tachycardic responses elicited from the Arc have not been delineated. The depressor responses to the Arc-stimulation are mediated via the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Gamma aminobutyric acid type A receptors, neuropeptide Y1 receptors, and opiate receptors in the PVN mediate the depressor responses elicited from the Arc. Some circulating hormones (e.g., leptin and insulin) may reach the Arc via the leaky blood-brain barrier and elicit their cardiovascular effects. Although the Arc is involved in mediating the cardiovascular responses to intravenously injected angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-12), these effects may not be due to leakage of these peptides across the blood-brain barrier in the Arc; instead, circulating angiotensins may act on neurons in the SFO and mediate cardiovascular actions via the projections of SFO neurons to the Arc. Cardiovascular responses elicited by acupuncture have been reported to be mediated by direct and indirect projections of the Arc to the RVLM. PMID:23260431

  18. Role of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus in cardiovascular regulation.

    PubMed

    Sapru, Hreday N

    2013-04-01

    Recently the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc) has been implicated in cardiovascular regulation. Both pressor and depressor responses can be elicited by the chemical stimulation of the Arc. The direction of cardiovascular responses (increase or decrease) elicited from the Arc depends on the baseline blood pressure. The pressor responses are mediated via increase in sympathetic nerve activity and involve activation of the spinal ionotropic glutamate receptors. Arc-stimulation elicits tachycardic responses which are mediated via inhibition of vagal input and excitation of sympathetic input to the heart. The pathways within the brain mediating the pressor and tachycardic responses elicited from the Arc have not been delineated. The depressor responses to the Arc-stimulation are mediated via the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Gamma aminobutyric acid type A receptors, neuropeptide Y1 receptors, and opiate receptors in the PVN mediate the depressor responses elicited from the Arc. Some circulating hormones (e.g., leptin and insulin) may reach the Arc via the leaky blood-brain barrier and elicit their cardiovascular effects. Although the Arc is involved in mediating the cardiovascular responses to intravenously injected angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-12), these effects may not be due to leakage of these peptides across the blood-brain barrier in the Arc; instead, circulating angiotensins may act on neurons in the SFO and mediate cardiovascular actions via the projections of SFO neurons to the Arc. Cardiovascular responses elicited by acupuncture have been reported to be mediated by direct and indirect projections of the Arc to the RVLM. PMID:23260431

  19. Lung Transplantation in Cystic Fibrosis: Trends and Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    This article is not an overview of all facets of lung transplantation in cystic fibrosis (CF), but rather it is intended as a review of current allocation controversies, as well as of trends in diagnostics and management in lung transplant recipients and in patients with end-stage lung disease. Despite changes in donor and recipient selection, long-term survival in pediatric lung transplant has continued to be limited by chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD). Due to, in part, this short survival benefit, transplant continues to be an appropriate option for only a subset of pediatric patients with CF. The feasibility of transplant as a therapeutic option is also affected by the limited pediatric organ supply, which has moreover contributed to controversy over lung allocation. Debates over the allocation of this scarce resource, however, may also help to drive innovation in the field of lung transplant. Longer pretransplant survival—as aided by new lung bypass technologies, for example—could help to alleviate organ shortages, as well as facilitate the transport of organs to suitable pediatric recipients. Improved diagnosis and treatment for CLAD and for antibody-mediated rejection have the potential to extend survival in pediatric lung transplant. Regardless, the relative rarity of transplant could pose future challenges for pediatric lung transplant programs, which require adequate numbers of patients to maintain proper expertise. PMID:26697265

  20. Management of Minerals and Bone Disorders after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Molnar, Miklos Z; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Mucsi, Istvan; Bunnapradist, Suphamai

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Mineral and bone disorders (MBD), inherent complications of moderate and advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD), occur frequently in kidney transplant recipients. However, much confusion exists about clinical application of diagnostic tools and preventive or treatment strategies to correct bone loss or mineral disarrays in transplanted patients. We have reviewed the recent evidence about prevalence and consequences of MBD in kidney transplant recipients and examined diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic options to this end. Recent findings Low turnover bone disease occurs more frequently after kidney transplantation according to bone biopsy studies. The risk of fracture is high, especially in the first several months after kidney transplantation. Alterations in minerals (calcium, phosphorus and magnesium) and biomarkers of bone metabolism (PTH, alkaline phosphatase, vitamin D and FGF-23) are observed with varying impact on post-transplant outcomes. Calcineurin inhibitors are linked to osteoporosis, whereas steroid therapy may lead to both osteoporosis and varying degrees of osteonecrosis. Sirolimus and everolimus might have a bearing on osteoblasts proliferation and differentiation or decreasing osteoclast mediated bone resorption. Selected pharmacologic interventions for treatment of MBD in transplant patients include steroid withdrawal, the use of bisphosphonates, vitamin D derivatives, calcimimetics, teriparatide, calcitonin and denosumab. Summary MBD following kidney transplantation is common and characterized by loss of bone volume and mineralization abnormalities often leading to low turnover bone disease. Although there are no well-established therapeutic approaches for management of MBD in renal transplant recipients, clinicians should continue individualizing therapy as needed. PMID:22614626

  1. Metabolic complications in liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Pérez, Miguel; González-Grande, Rocío; Omonte Guzmán, Edith; Amo Trillo, Víctor; Rodrigo López, Juan Miguel

    2016-07-28

    The metabolic syndrome (MS), which includes obesity, dyslipidaemia, hypertension and hyperglycaemia according to the most widely accepted definitions now used, is one of the most common post-transplant complications, with a prevalence of 44%-58%. The MS, together with the immunosuppression, is considered the main risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in transplant recipients, which in turn accounts for 19%-42% of all deaths unrelated to the graft. The presence of MS represents a relative risk for the development of CVD and death of 1.78. On the other hand, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), considered as the manifestation of the MS in the liver, is now the second leading reason for liver transplantation in the United States after hepatitis C and alcohol. NAFLD has a high rate of recurrence in the liver graft and a direct relation with the worsening of other metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance or diabetes mellitus. Consequently, it is vitally important to identify and treat as soon as possible such modifiable factors as hypertension, overweight, hyperlipidaemia or diabetes in transplanted patients to thus minimise the impact on patient survival. Additionally, steroid-free regimens are favoured, with minimal immunosuppression to limit the possible effects on the development of the MS. PMID:27605877

  2. Metabolic complications in liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Pérez, Miguel; González-Grande, Rocío; Omonte Guzmán, Edith; Amo Trillo, Víctor; Rodrigo López, Juan Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS), which includes obesity, dyslipidaemia, hypertension and hyperglycaemia according to the most widely accepted definitions now used, is one of the most common post-transplant complications, with a prevalence of 44%-58%. The MS, together with the immunosuppression, is considered the main risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in transplant recipients, which in turn accounts for 19%-42% of all deaths unrelated to the graft. The presence of MS represents a relative risk for the development of CVD and death of 1.78. On the other hand, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), considered as the manifestation of the MS in the liver, is now the second leading reason for liver transplantation in the United States after hepatitis C and alcohol. NAFLD has a high rate of recurrence in the liver graft and a direct relation with the worsening of other metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance or diabetes mellitus. Consequently, it is vitally important to identify and treat as soon as possible such modifiable factors as hypertension, overweight, hyperlipidaemia or diabetes in transplanted patients to thus minimise the impact on patient survival. Additionally, steroid-free regimens are favoured, with minimal immunosuppression to limit the possible effects on the development of the MS. PMID:27605877

  3. Genetic Modification of Stem Cells for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, M. Ian; Tang, Yao Liang

    2009-01-01

    Gene modification of cells for prior to their transplantation, especially stem cells, enhances their survival and increases their function in cell therapy. Like the Trojan horse, the gene modified cell has to gain entrance inside the host’s walls and survive and deliver its transgene products Using cellular, molecular and gene manipulation techniques the transplanted cell can be protected in a hostile environment from immune rejection, inflammation, hypoxia and apoptosis. Genetic engineering to modify cells involves constructing modules of functional gene sequences. They can be simple reporter genes or complex cassettes with gene switches, cell specific promoters and multiple transgenes. We discuss methods to deliver and construct gene cassettes with viral and non viral delivery, siRNA, and conditional Cre/Lox P. We review the current uses of gene modified stem cells in cardiovascular disease, diabetes, neurological diseases,( including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and spinal cord injury repair), bone defects, hemophilia, and cancer. PMID:18031863

  4. Immunological reconstitution and correlation of circulating serum inflammatory mediators/cytokines with the incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease during the first 100 days following unrelated umbilical cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Abu-Ghosh, A; Goldman, S; Slone, V; van de Ven, C; Suen, Y; Murphy, L; Sender, L; Cairo, M

    1999-09-01

    conclusion, serum levels of inflammatory mediators were not predictive nor did they correlate with the severity of aGVHD. Recovery of NK cells, B cells, and PMN functions occurred within the first 90 days post transplant. However, T cell subsets, CD3+/CD4+ and CD3+/CD8+, and T cell functional activity remained significantly decreased and may account for the high incidence of infectious morbidity seen during this immediate post UCBT period. PMID:10482939

  5. Notch signaling in cardiovascular disease and calcification.

    PubMed

    Rusanescu, Gabriel; Weissleder, Ralph; Aikawa, Elena

    2008-08-01

    Recent increase in human lifespan has shifted the spectrum of aging-related disorders to an unprecedented upsurge in cardiovascular diseases, especially calcific aortic valve stenosis, which has an 80% risk of progression to heart failure and death. A current therapeutic option for calcified valves is surgical replacement, which provides only temporary relief. Recent progress in cardiovascular research has suggested that arterial and valve calcification are the result of an active process of osteogenic differentiation, induced by a pro-atherogenic inflammatory response. At molecular level, the calcification process is regulated by a network of signaling pathways, including Notch, Wnt and TGFbeta/BMP pathways, which control the master regulator of osteogenesis Cbfa1/Runx2. Genetic and in vitro studies have implicated Notch signaling in the regulation of macrophage activation and cardiovascular calcification. Individuals with inactivating Notch1 mutations have a high rate of cardiovascular disorders, including valve stenosis and calcification. This article reviews recent progress in the mechanism of cardiovascular calcification and discusses potential molecular mechanisms involved, focusing on Notch receptors. We propose a calcification model where extreme increases in vascular wall cell density due to inflammation-induced cell proliferation can trigger an osteogenic differentiation program mediated by Notch receptors. PMID:19936191

  6. Pre- and postmortem imaging of transplanted cells

    PubMed Central

    Andrzejewska, Anna; Nowakowski, Adam; Janowski, Miroslaw; Bulte, Jeff WM; Gilad, Assaf A; Walczak, Piotr; Lukomska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic interventions based on the transplantation of stem and progenitor cells have garnered increasing interest. This interest is fueled by successful preclinical studies for indications in many diseases, including the cardiovascular, central nervous, and musculoskeletal system. Further progress in this field is contingent upon access to techniques that facilitate an unambiguous identification and characterization of grafted cells. Such methods are invaluable for optimization of cell delivery, improvement of cell survival, and assessment of the functional integration of grafted cells. Following is a focused overview of the currently available cell detection and tracking methodologies that covers the entire spectrum from pre- to postmortem cell identification. PMID:26366076

  7. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tuan; Dick, Travis B; Charlton, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is prevalent in the general population and a growing indication for liver transplant. Longer wait times and challenges with pretransplant survivorship are expected, underscoring the need for improved management of attendant comorbidities. Recognition with potential modification of obesity, sarcopenia, chronic kidney disease, and cardiovascular disease in patients with NAFLD may have important implications in the pretransplant and posttransplant periods. Although patients with NAFLD have generally favorable postoperative outcomes, they are at risk for developing recurrent disease in their allograft, driving the need for pharmacotherapies and dietary innovations appropriate for use in the posttransplant period. PMID:27063277

  8. Lung transplantation at Duke

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Alice L.; Hartwig, Matthew G.

    2016-01-01

    Lung transplantation represents the gold-standard therapy for patients with end-stage lung disease. Utilization of this therapy continues to rise. The Lung Transplant Program at Duke University Medical Center was established in 1992, and since that time has grown to one of the highest volume centers in the world. The program to date has performed over 1,600 lung transplants. This report represents an up-to-date review of the practice and management strategies employed for safe and effective lung transplantation at our center. Specific attention is paid to the evaluation of candidacy for lung transplantation, donor selection, surgical approach, and postoperative management. These evidence-based strategies form the foundation of the clinical transplantation program at Duke. PMID:27076968

  9. Testosterone and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tambo, Amos; Roshan, Mohsin H.K.; Pace, Nikolai P.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease [CVD] is a leading cause of mortality accounting for a global incidence of over 31%. Atherosclerosis is the primary pathophysiology underpinning most types of CVD. Historically, modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors were suggested to precipitate CVD. Recently, epidemiological studies have identified emerging risk factors including hypotestosteronaemia, which have been associated with CVD. Previously considered in the realms of reproductive biology, testosterone is now believed to play a critical role in the cardiovascular system in health and disease. The actions of testosterone as they relate to the cardiac vasculature and its implication in cardiovascular pathology is reviewed. PMID:27014372

  10. Cardiovascular disease screening.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Jennifer Y; Hameed, Afshan B

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death amongst women worldwide. Cardiovascular risk assessment and primary prevention are important strategies to improve morbidity and mortality. In additional to the traditional risk factors, pregnancy complications such as pre-eclampsia and gestational diabetes increment future risk of developing cardiovascular complications. Additionally, several serum biomarkers are valuable measures for both risk assessment and predictors of clinical outcomes in women. The purpose of this review is to describe current risk stratification schemes as well as outline the role of obstetric history and serum biomarkers in adjusting risk stratification in women. PMID:26143091

  11. Cyclic GMP signaling in cardiovascular pathophysiology and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Emily J.; Kass, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) mediates a wide spectrum of physiologic processes in multiple cell types within the cardiovascular system. Dysfunctional signaling at any step of the cascade--- cGMP synthesis, effector activation, or catabolism--- have been implicated in numerous cardiovascular diseases, ranging from hypertension to atherosclerosis to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. In this review, we outline each step of the cGMP signaling cascade and discuss its regulation and physiologic effects within the cardiovascular system. In addition, we illustrate how cGMP signaling becomes dysregulated in specific cardiovascular disease states. The ubiquitous role cGMP plays in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology presents great opportunities for pharmacologic modulation of the cGMP signal in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. We detail the various therapeutic interventional strategies that have been developed or are in development, summarizing relevant preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:19306895

  12. [Tumours and liver transplants].

    PubMed

    Mejzlík, Vladimír; Husová, Libuše; Kuman, Milan; Štěpánková, Soňa; Ondrášek, Jiří; Němec, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation as a curative treatment method can be used for selected primary liver tumours, in particular for hepatocellular carcinoma and rather rare semi-malignant tumours such as epithelioid hemangioendothelioma, further for infiltration of liver by metastatic neuroendocrine tumours (provided that metastases are only located in the liver and the primary tumour was removed) and for benign tumours (hemangiomas and adenomas) with oppression symptoms and size progression. Cholangiocarcinoma is not indicated for liver transplantation at the CKTCH Brno. In recent years liver transplants for hepatocellular carcinoma have increased and hepatocellular carcinoma has also been more frequently found ex post, in the explanted livers. Liver transplantation is indicated in selected patients with a good chance of long-term survival after liver transplantation (a generally accepted limit is 5 year survival of 50 % after transplantation). By 20 March 2015 there were liver transplants carried out on 38 patients - in 25 of them was hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosed before transplantation and in 13 it was found in the liver explants. 5 year survival following transplantation is reached by 53 % of this cohort. 32 % patients suffered from chronic hepatitis C. The longest surviving (32 years) patient at CKTCH Brno had liver transplanted for a big fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma, which points to the prognostic significance of tumour histology: the criterion only considered in some indication schemes for practical reasons. Benign liver tumours (adenomatosis, cystadenoma, hemangioma with oppression symptoms) are rather rare indications and the transplantation results are favourable. 4 patients underwent transplantation for infiltration of liver by carcinoid, tumour recurrence occurred in one. PMID:26375706

  13. MedlinePlus: Kidney Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Start Here Kidney Transplant (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Kidney Transplant (National Kidney Foundation) Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Transplantation (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and ...

  14. HCV in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Germani, Giacomo; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel; Papastergiou, Vasilios; Burroughs, Andrew K

    2013-01-01

    HCV-related cirrhosis represents the leading indication for liver transplantation in the Western countries. HCV reinfection after liver transplantation occurs in virtually all patients transplanted for HCV-related liver disease Histological evidence of chronic HCV infection develops in 50 to 90 % of patients by 12 months after liver transplantation, and cirrhosis occurs in about 20 % of patients within 5 years after transplant. Several studies have evaluated host, viral, and transplant-related factors that might be associated with the severity of HCV recurrence. Among host factors, immunosuppression is one of the major factors that accounts for accelerated HCV recurrence and it has been an area of extensive research and controversy. Donor age, steatosis, and immunogenetic factors are also relevant in determining the outcome in patients transplanted for HCV-related cirrhosis. A major step to prevent complications of HCV recurrence related to the rapid fibrosis is the posttransplant antiviral treatment. Two strategies have been tried: pre-emptive or other strategies as soon as possible after liver transplantation or elective therapy once there is histological evidence of recurrent hepatitis C. Retransplantation due to graft failure from recurrent hepatitis C is rarely an option in the era of organ shortage as it is associated with poor outcome, but many case needs to be considered early in the evolution of disease. New antivirals may change the outcome dramatically of patients transplanted for HCV cirrhosis. PMID:22829333

  15. Immunosenescence and organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Heinbokel, Timm; Elkhal, Abdallah; Liu, Guangxiang; Edtinger, Karoline; Tullius, Stefan G.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing numbers of elderly transplant recipients and a growing demand for organs from older donors impose pressing challenges on transplantation medicine. Continuous and complex modifications of the immune system in parallel to aging have a major impact on transplant outcome and organ quality. Both, altered alloimmune responses and increased immunogenicity of organs present risk factors for inferior patient and graft survival. Moreover, a growing body of knowledge on age-dependent modifications of allorecognition and alloimmune responses may require age-adapted immunosuppression and organ allocation. Here, we summarize relevant aspects of immunosenescence and their possible clinical impact on organ transplantation. PMID:23639337

  16. Norovirus in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Angarone, Michael P; Sheahan, Anna; Kamboj, Mini

    2016-06-01

    Noroviruses are among the most common cause of diarrhea in transplant recipients. The clinical spectrum of norovirus infection after transplant is increasingly being recognized. As substantial morbidity is now associated with norovirus infections in this population; the quest for rapid diagnostic modalities and newer therapies has expanded. Transplant recipients with norovirus infection are at risk for several complications, including protracted illness with malnutrition, organ failure, and chronic viral shedding. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the epidemiology, complications, diagnosis, and treatment of norovirus infection in the transplant setting. PMID:27115700

  17. [Infertility and kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Atallah, David; Salameh, Charbel; El Kassis, Nadine; Safi, Joelle; Lutfallah, Fouad; Bejjani, Lina; Ghaname, Wadih; Moukarzel, Maroun

    2015-01-01

    Renal failure impairs the endocrine system, especially in women, due to hyperprolactinemia, altering fertility, ovulatory cycles, libido and growth in adolescents. Renal transplantation is considered the best solution to the problems of renal failure and and of dialysis, as evidenced by comparing the rate of hyperprolactinemia (100% in chronic renal failure, 60% in patients on dialysis and 35% in post-transplantation). Kidney transplant is less efficient for restoring perfect function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis due in part to the immunosuppressant regimens prescribed. When these drugs are properly managed, transplantation will restore near normal sexual function. PMID:26591193

  18. Restoration of sensory and motor function in earthworm escape reflex pathways following ventral nerve cord transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vining, E P; Drewes, C D

    1985-07-01

    Twelve segments of earthworm ventral nerve cord (VNC) were excised from either segments 10-22 (i.e., within the MGF sensory field) or segments 75-87 (i.e., within the LGF sensory field) in donor worms and heterotopically, or homotopically, transplanted into recipient animals. Morphological evidence indicated that by four days after transplantation, peripheral connections were formed between the transplanted VNC and the body wall of the recipient, many of these connections involving novel pathways projecting ventrally from the transplant. Restoration of giant fiber touch sensitivity in the transplant occurred from 4-14 days after transplantation. Regardless of the site of transplantation, the restored sensitivity (i.e., MGF versus LGF sensory field) always reflected the origin of the donor VNC. Restoration of MGF-mediated motor activity in the transplant occurred approximately 17-22 days after transplantation. In the case of heterotopic transplants (i.e., anterior VNC into posterior segments), the restored MGF-mediated muscle potentials were facilitating, indicating at least some tendency for persistence of this feature after transplantation. Behavioral observations suggested that reconnections involving other reflex pathways (e.g., those controlling setal movements and peristaltic locomotion) were made within the transplant region and that properties of the restored reflexes reflected those of the donor VNC. The rapid restoration of sensory and motor connections, despite heterotopic placement, indicates a significant capacity for peripheral regeneration by the transplanted VNC. On the other hand, the maintenance of various properties of reflex function, despite heterotopic transplantation, suggests a limited capacity for rearrangement of established central connections in the transplanted VNC. PMID:4031850

  19. Polycaprolactone nanowire surfaces as interfaces for cardiovascular applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leszczak, Victoria

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading killer of people worldwide. Current treatments include organ transplants, surgery, metabolic products and mechanical/synthetic implants. Of these, mechanical and synthetic implants are the most promising. However, rejection of cardiovascular implants continues to be a problem, eliciting a need for understanding the mechanisms behind tissue-material interaction. Recently, bioartificial implants, consisting of synthetic tissue engineering scaffolds and cells, have shown great promise for cardiovascular repair. An ideal cardiovascular implant surface must be capable of adhering cells and providing appropriate physiological responses while the native tissue integrates with the scaffold. However, the success of these implants is not only dependent on tissue integration but also hemocompatibility (interaction of material with blood components), a property that depends on the surface of the material. A thorough understanding of the interaction of cardiovascular cells and whole blood and its components with the material surface is essential in order to have a successful application which promotes healing as well as native tissue integration and regeneration. The purpose of this research is to study polymeric nanowire surfaces as potential interfaces for cardiovascular applications by investigating cellular response as well as hemocompatibility.

  20. Rodent Studies of Cardiovascular Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoukas, Artin A.

    1999-01-01

    Changes in blood pressure can occur for two reasons: 1) A decrease in cardiac output resulting from the altered contractility of the heart or through changes in venous filling pressure via the Frank Starling mechanism or; 2) A change in systemic vascular resistance. The observed changes in cardiac output and blood pressure after long term space flight cannot be entirely explained through changes in contractility or heart rate alone. Therefore, alterations in filling pressure mediated through changes in systemic venous capacitance and arterial resistance function may be important determinants of cardiac output and blood pressure after long term space flight. Our laboratory and previous studies have shown the importance of veno-constriction mediated by the carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex system on overall circulatory homeostasis and in the regulation of cardiac output. Our proposed experiments test the overall hypothesis that alterations in venous capacitance function and arterial resistance by the carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex system are an important determinant of the cardiac output and blood pressure response seen in astronauts after returning to earth from long term exposure to microgravity. This hypothesis is important to our overall understanding of circulatory adjustments made during long term space flight. It also provides a framework for investigating counter measures to reduce the incidence of orthostatic hypotension caused by an attenuation of cardiac output. We continue to use hind limb unweighted (HLU) rat model to simulate the patho physiological effects as they relate to cardiovascular deconditioning in microgravity. We have used this model to address the hypothesis that microgravity induced cardiovascular deconditioning results in impaired vascular responses and that these impaired vascular responses result from abnormal alpha-1 AR signaling. The impaired vascular reactivity results in attenuated blood pressure and cardiac output responses to an

  1. Autophagy in cardiovascular biology

    PubMed Central

    Lavandero, Sergio; Chiong, Mario; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Hill, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. As such, there is great interest in identifying novel mechanisms that govern the cardiovascular response to disease-related stress. First described in failing hearts, autophagy within the cardiovascular system has been widely characterized in cardiomyocytes, cardiac fibroblasts, endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and macrophages. In all cases, a window of optimal autophagic activity appears to be critical to the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis and function; excessive or insufficient levels of autophagic flux can each contribute to heart disease pathogenesis. In this Review, we discuss the potential for targeting autophagy therapeutically and our vision for where this exciting biology may lead in the future. PMID:25654551

  2. Hypertriglyceridemia and Cardiovascular Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Gurveen; Sethi, Ankur; Arora, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease, particularly ischemic heart disease, is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Atherosclerosis, the root cause of ischemic heart disease, is promoted by risk factors like elevated plasma low-density lipoprotein, low plasma high-density lipoprotein, smoking, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Even 66 years after a relation between triglycerides (TG) and cardiovascular disease was first suspected, TGs still continue to be a controversial risk factor and target for therapy. Some previous studies did not show any significant positive relationship between TG and cardiovascular mortality; however, recent meta-analyses found otherwise. The role of elevated TG in patients with low low-density lipoprotein and interventions to lower TG to reduce cardiovascular mortality and morbidity is an area of active research. PMID:25415545

  3. Cardiovascular modeling and diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kangas, L.J.; Keller, P.E.; Hashem, S.; Kouzes, R.T.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, a novel approach to modeling and diagnosing the cardiovascular system is introduced. A model exhibits a subset of the dynamics of the cardiovascular behavior of an individual by using a recurrent artificial neural network. Potentially, a model will be incorporated into a cardiovascular diagnostic system. This approach is unique in that each cardiovascular model is developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled variables and the variables of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis. This approach also exploits sensor fusion to optimize the utilization of biomedical sensors. The advantage of sensor fusion has been demonstrated in applications including control and diagnostics of mechanical and chemical processes.

  4. Cardiovascular Effects of Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, K.

    1985-01-01

    Physiological changes resulting from long term weightlessness are reviewed and activities conducted to study cardiovascular deconditioning at NASA Ames are discussed. Emphasis is on using monkeys in chair rest, water immersion, and tilt table studies to simulate space environment effects.

  5. [Cardiovascular syphilis: diagnosis, treatment].

    PubMed

    Carrada-Bravo, Teodoro

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular tertiary syphilis may lead to aortitis, aortic aneurism, coronary stenosis, aortic insufficiency and, rarely, to myocarditis. The physician must be familiar with the clinical presentations of this process, including the asymptomatic variety and must be able to have an organized plan for the diagnosis and evaluation to establish or exclude the presence of cardiovascular pathology and the differential diagnosis with other entities. Once the etiologic and topographic diagnosis is established, the patient should be treated with penicillin, doxicycline and other antibiotics, and the consequences of the disorder, both actual and potential, should be considered before deciding weather to recommend surgical intervention. Although late syphilis can be prevented by appropriate therapy of early syphilis, this is a cardiovascular disease that most likely will continue to be diagnosed lately. Understanding of the pathology and pathophysiology of the disease, is most important for its prompt recognition and subsequent management. This paper reviews the natural history, diagnosis and therapy of cardiovascular syphilis. PMID:17469346

  6. [Cardiovascular complications of obesity].

    PubMed

    Cascella, Teresa; Giallauria, Francesco; Tafuri, Domenico; Lombardi, Gaetano; Colao, Annamaria; Vigorito, Carlo; Orio, Francesco

    2006-12-01

    Obesity is one of the major coronary risk factor representing an increasingly important worldwide health problem. The increased prevalence of obesity among younger population is likely to have long-term implications for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Obesity plays a central role in the insulin resistance syndrome and contributes to increase the risk of atherosclerotic CVD. The present review will examine the relationships among cardiovascular risk factors during the childhood-adolescence-adulthood transition. In fact, the relationship between obesity (especially visceral obesity) and CVD appears to develop at a relatively young age. The foremost physical consequence of obesity is atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and polycystic ovary syndrome represents an intriguing example of obesity-related cardiovascular complications affecting young women. PMID:17312846

  7. Cocaine and Cardiovascular Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantwell, John D.; Rose, Fred D.

    1986-01-01

    The case of a 21-year-old man who suffered a myocardial infarction after using cocaine and amphetamines is reported. A brief literature review provides evidence of cocaine's potential cardiovascular effects. (Author/MT)

  8. Understanding cardiovascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... of plaque. Narrow arteries reduce or block blood flow. When blood and oxygen can't get to the legs, it can injure nerves and tissue. High blood pressure (hypertension) is a cardiovascular disease that ...

  9. Depression and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Steven M; Rumsfeld, John S

    2015-10-01

    There is a wealth of evidence linking depression to increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and worse outcomes among patients with known CVD. In addition, there are safe and effective treatments for depression. Despite this, depression remains under-recognized and undertreated in patients at risk for or living with CVD. In this review, we first summarize the evidence linking depression to increased risk of CVD and worse patient outcomes. We then review the mechanisms by which depression may contribute to cardiovascular risk and poor cardiovascular outcomes. We then summarize prior studies of depression treatment on cardiovascular outcomes. Finally, we offer guidance in the identification and management of depression among CVD populations. Given that 1 in 4 CVD patients has concurrent depression, application of these best-practices will assist providers in achieving optimal outcomes for their CVD patients. PMID:25850976

  10. Testosterone and Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Kloner, Robert A; Carson, Culley; Dobs, Adrian; Kopecky, Stephen; Mohler, Emile R

    2016-02-01

    Testosterone (T) is the principal male sex hormone. As men age, T levels typically fall. Symptoms of low T include decreased libido, vasomotor instability, and decreased bone mineral density. Other symptoms may include depression, fatigue, erectile dysfunction, and reduced muscle strength/mass. Epidemiology studies show that low levels of T are associated with more atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, and cardiovascular events. However, treating hypogonadism in the aging male has resulted in discrepant results in regard to its effect on cardiovascular events. Emerging studies suggest that T may have a future role in treating heart failure, angina, and myocardial ischemia. A large, prospective, long-term study of T replacement, with a primary endpoint of a composite of adverse cardiovascular events including myocardial infarction, stroke, and/or cardiovascular death, is needed. The Food and Drug Administration recently put additional restrictions on T replacement therapy labeling and called for additional studies to determine its cardiac safety. PMID:26846952

  11. Prognostic Indicators of Cardiovascular Risk in Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hildreth, Cara M.

    2011-01-01

    Although the annual mortality rate for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is decreasing, likely due to an increase in kidney transplantation rate, the survival probability for ESRD patients from day one of dialysis has not changed, and is still poor with a 5-year survival rate of approximately 34%. This is contributed to by a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of death in ESRD patients. In order to improve survival outcomes, patients at high risk of cardiovascular related mortality need to be identified. Heart rate variability (HRV), baroreceptor sensitivity, and baroreceptor reflex effectiveness index can be used to assess heart rate control and may predict cardiovascular mortality. This paper will discuss how HRV, baroreceptor sensitivity, and baroreceptor reflex effectiveness index are altered in renal disease and the utility of these indices as markers of cardiac risk in this patient population. PMID:22294981

  12. Clinical Application of Stem Cells in the Cardiovascular System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamm, Christof; Klose, Kristin; Choi, Yeong-Hoon

    Regenerative medicine encompasses "tissue engineering" - the in vitro fabrication of tissues and/or organs using scaffold material and viable cells - and "cell therapy" - the transplantation or manipulation of cells in diseased tissue in vivo. In the cardiovascular system, tissue engineering strategies are being pursued for the development of viable replacement blood vessels, heart valves, patch material, cardiac pacemakers and contractile myocardium. Anecdotal clinical applications of such vessels, valves and patches have been described, but information on systematic studies of the performance of such implants is not available, yet. Cell therapy for cardiovascular regeneration, however, has been performed in large series of patients, and numerous clinical studies have produced sometimes conflicting results. The purpose of this chapter is to summarize the clinical experience with cell therapy for diseases of the cardiovascular system, and to analyse possible factors that may influence its outcome.

  13. Biomaterial applications in cardiovascular tissue repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Mai T; Wu, Joseph C

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease physically damages the heart, resulting in loss of cardiac function. Medications can help alleviate symptoms, but it is more beneficial to treat the root cause by repairing injured tissues, which gives patients better outcomes. Besides heart transplants, cardiac surgeons use a variety of methods for repairing different areas of the heart such as the ventricular septal wall and valves. A multitude of biomaterials are used in the repair and replacement of impaired heart tissues. These biomaterials fall into two main categories: synthetic and natural. Synthetic materials used in cardiovascular applications include polymers and metals. Natural materials are derived from biological sources such as human donor or harvested animal tissues. A new class of composite materials has emerged to take advantage of the benefits of the strengths and minimize the weaknesses of both synthetic and natural materials. This article reviews the current and prospective applications of biomaterials in cardiovascular therapies. PMID:23030293

  14. Violence and Cardiovascular Health

    PubMed Central

    Suglia, Shakira F.; Sapra, Katherine J.; Koenen, Karestan C.

    2014-01-01

    Context Violence, experienced in either childhood or adulthood, has been associated with physical health outcomes including cardiovascular disease. However, the consistency of the existing literature has not been evaluated. Evidence acquisition In 2013, the authors conducted a PubMed and Web of Science review of peer reviewed articles published prior to August 2013 on the relation between violence exposure, experienced in either childhood or adulthood, and cardiovascular outcomes. To meet inclusion criteria, articles had to present estimates for the relation between violence exposure and cardiovascular outcomes (hypertension, blood pressure, stroke, coronary disease, or myocardial infarction) adjusted for demographic factors. Articles focusing on violence from TV, video games, natural disasters, terrorism, or war were excluded. Evidence synthesis The initial search yielded 2,273 articles; after removing duplicates and applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, 30 articles were selected for review. A consistent positive relation was noted on the association between violence experienced during childhood and cardiovascular outcomes in adulthood (i.e., hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction). Associations across genders with varying types of violence exposure were also noted. By contrast, findings were mixed on the relation between adult violence exposure and cardiovascular outcome. Conclusions Despite varying definitions of violence exposure and cardiovascular endpoints, a consistent relation exists between childhood violence exposure, largely assessed retrospectively, and cardiovascular endpoints. Findings are mixed for the adult violence–cardiovascular health relation. The cross-sectional nature of most adult studies and the reliance of self-reported outcomes can potentially be attributed to the lack of findings among adult violence exposure studies. PMID:25599905

  15. The clinical relevance of alloantibody in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Burghuber, C K; Roberts, T K; Knechtle, S J

    2015-01-01

    The transplanted liver appears resistant to antibody-mediated injury compared to other transplanted organs such as kidney or heart. However, a growing number of reports suggest that alloantibody to the liver is associated with poorer outcomes. The data surrounding this field are unclear, and their interpretation remains controversial. Mechanistically, there is not a clear explanation for the liver's resistance to antibody-mediated injury, and the pathological criteria for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) remain ill-defined. Furthermore, treatment of AMR is non-uniform. The field would benefit from better outcome data based on measurement of antibody at the time of transplantation and at the time of rejection. Consensus opinion regarding antibody and the liver might emerge with better standardization of antibody measurement and pathological definition of AMR. PMID:25510576

  16. Bioethics of organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Arthur

    2014-03-01

    As the ability to transplant organs and tissues has grown, the demand for these procedures has increased as well--to the point at which it far exceeds the available supply creating the core ethical challenge for transplantation--rationing. The gap between supply and demand, although large, is worse than it appears to be. There are two key steps to gaining access to a transplant. First, one must gain access to a transplant center. Then, those waiting need to be selected for a transplant. Many potential recipients do not get admitted to a program. They are deemed too old, not of the right nationality, not appropriate for transplant as a result of severe mental impairment, criminal history, drug abuse, or simply because they do not have access to a competent primary care physician who can refer them to a transplant program. There are also financial obstacles to access to transplant waiting lists in the United States and other nations. In many poor nations, those needing transplants simply die because there is no capacity or a very limited capacity to perform transplants. Although the demand for organs now exceeds the supply, resulting in rationing, the size of waiting lists would quickly expand were there to suddenly be an equally large expansion in the number of organs available for transplantation. Still, even with the reality of unavoidable rationing, saving more lives by increasing organ supply is a moral good. Current public policies for obtaining organs from cadavers are not adequate in that they do not produce the number of organs that public polls of persons in the United States indicate people are willing to donate. PMID:24478386

  17. Transplantation activities in Iran.

    PubMed

    Broumand, Behrooz

    2005-06-01

    Iran is a tropical country with a land area of 1,648,000 square kilometers and a population of 68,100,000. Iran has a recorded history that dates back 2553 years. Its earliest medical school was Pasargad. Jondi Chapour University was founded 1753 years ago during the Sassanid dynasty as a center for higher education in medicine, philosophy, and pharmacology. Indeed, the idea of xenotransplantation dates back to days of Achaemenidae (Achaemenian dynasty), as evidenced by engravings of many mythologic chimeras still present in Persepolis. Avicenna (980-1037 AD), the great Iranian physician, performed the first nerve repair. Transplantation progress in Iran follows roughly the same pattern as that of the rest of the world, with some 10-20 years' delay. Modern organ transplantation dates back to 1935, when the first cornea transplant was performed at Farabi Hospital in Tehran, Iran. The first living-related kidney transplantation performed at Shiraz University Hospital dates back to 1968. The first bone marrow transplant was performed at Dr. Shariaati's Hospital in Tehran. The first heart transplant was performed 1993 in Tabriz, Iran. The first liver transplant was performed in 1993 in Shiraz. The first lung transplant was performed in 2001, and the first heart and lung transplants were performed in 2002, both at Tehran. In late 1985, the renal transplantation program was officially started in a major university hospital in Tehran and was poised to carry out 2 to 4 transplantations each week. Soon, another large center initiated a similar program. Both of these centers accepted surgical, medical, and nursing teams from other academic medical centers for training in kidney transplantation. Since 2002, Iran has grown to include 23 active renal, 68 cornea, 2 liver, 4 heart, 2 lung, and 2 bone marrow transplantation centers in different cities. In June 2000, the Organ Transplantation Brain Death Act was approved by the Parliament, followed by the establishment of the

  18. Islet cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, P; Huang, G C; Amiel, S A; Heaton, N D

    2007-04-01

    People with type 1 diabetes have normal exocrine pancreatic function, making islet cell rather than whole organ transplantation an attractive option. Achieving insulin independence in type 1 diabetes was the perceived goal of islet cell transplantation. The success of the Edmonton group in achieving this in a selected group of type 1 patients has led to renewed optimism that this treatment could eventually replace whole organ pancreas transplantation. However the long-term results of this treatment indicate that insulin independence is lost with time in a significant proportion of patients, although they may retain glycaemic stability. In this context, the indications for islet cell transplantation, which have evolved over the last 5 years, indicate that the patients who benefit most are those who experience severe hypoglycaemic reactions despite optimal insulin therapy. This review will summarise the history of islet cell transplantation, islet isolation techniques, the transplant procedure, immunosuppressive therapy, indications for islet cell transplantation, current clinical trials, the early UK islet cell transplant experience using the Edmonton protocol, and some of the challenges that lie ahead. PMID:17403947

  19. Malignancy after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zeier, Martin; Hartschuh, Wolfgang; Wiesel, Manfred; Lehnert, Thomas; Ritz, Eberhard

    2002-01-01

    Malignancy following renal transplantation is an important medical problem during the long-term follow-up. The overall incidence of malignancy at this time is 3 to 5 times higher than in the general population. The most common malignancies are lymphoproliferative disorders (early after transplantation) and skin carcinomas (late after transplantation). The type of malignancy is different in various countries and dependent on genetic and environmental factors. Another important confounder for risk of malignancy after renal transplantation is the type of immunosuppression. Previous use of cytotoxic drugs (eg, cyclophosphamide) or a history of analgesic abuse are additional risk factors. Malignancy may even be transplanted by the graft. Previous cancer treatment in a uremic patient on the transplant waiting list is of great importance in relation to waiting time and postmalignancy screening. Finally, every dialysis patient on the waiting list should undergo a regular screening program before and after renal transplantation to detect a potentially malignant tumor in an early stage. In addition to specific oncological treatment, managing a malignancy after renal transplantation should include modification of immunosuppression. PMID:11774131

  20. Liver transplantation in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Masood; Elrayah, Elgaily A; Traynor, Oscar; McCormick, P Aiden

    2016-07-01

    The Irish National Liver Transplant program commenced in 1993 in St. Vincent's University Hospital in Dublin. It is an adult-only program and is the only liver transplant program in Ireland. Pediatric recipients are referred to King's College Hospital in the United Kingdom. To date, almost 1000 adult liver transplants have been performed. Current 1-year patient survival is 93%, and 5-year survival is 79%. The program is fully funded by the government health service. There is a close collaboration with the United Kingdom Organ Donation and Transplant Directorate, and there is an arrangement for organ sharing for super-urgent transplants. Traditionally, organ donation rates have been high in Ireland. However, demand for liver transplant has increased over the past 20 years, and waiting lists are now lengthening. Deceased cardiac death donation is now being considered, but there are no plans for living related donor liver transplant. Donor coordinators have recently been appointed to the major hospitals in Ireland, and it is hoped that this initiative will lead to an increase in organ donation rates. Liver Transplantation 22 1014-1018 2016 AASLD. PMID:27065358

  1. Heart transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100086.htm Heart transplant - series To use the sharing features on this ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heart Transplantation A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  2. [Uterus transplantation. Current situation].

    PubMed

    Gauthier, T; Piver, P; Mesnard, C; Marquet, P; Pichon, N; Guillaudeau, A; Drouet, M; Gardet, E; Laskar, M; Essig, M; Aubard, Y

    2012-11-01

    Except adoption, absolute uterine factor infertility lacks solution in case of motherhood desire. Gestational surrogacy is still not approved in France. Over the last decade, uterus transplantation experimentation made advances. Data from animal research, progress in immunosuppressive treatment and knowledge about pregnancy after transplantation provide a scenario in which a human allotransplantation project can become reality. PMID:23084737

  3. Organ transplantation and replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Cerilli, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 49 chapters. Some of the titles are: Molecular, Genetic, and Clinical Aspects of the HLA System; The Normal Immune Response; Significance of the ABO Antigen System; The Role of Dialysis in the Management of End-Stage Renal Disease; Access for Dialysis; Patient Selection for Renal Transplantation; The Living Donor in Kidney Transplantation; and Kidney Preservation by Cold Storage.

  4. Treating humoral rejection after cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Verheyen, Jef; Vermeulen, Tom; Janssen Van Doorn, Karin; Vrints, Christiaan; Conraads, Viviane

    2011-04-01

    Whereas effective strategies are available to treat acute cellular cardiac rejection, humoral rejection, also called vascular or antibody-mediated rejection, is more difficult to manage. Antibody-mediated (non-cellular) rejections (AMR) are rare and few successfully treated cases have been described in the literature. We report on a female patient, diagnosed with humoral rejection, leading to severe ventricular dysfunction and haemodynamic compromise, two months after transplantation. The patient received a combination therapy, consisting of plasmapheresis and immunoglobulins, which resulted in complete resolution of immunohistochemical signs of AMR. In this report, we will overview AMR and discuss several treatment modalities. PMID:21591590

  5. An update on liver transplantation: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, James

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation, although now a routine procedure, with defined indications and usually excellent outcomes, still has challenges. Donor shortage remains a key issue. Transplanted organs are not free of risk and may transmit cancer, infection, metabolic or autoimmune disease. Approaches to the donor shortage include use of organs from donors after circulatory death, from living donors and from those previously infected with Hepatitis B and C and even HIV for selected recipients. Normothermic regional and/or machine perfusion, whether static or pulsatile, normo- or hypothermic, are being explored and will be likely to have a major place in improving donation rates and outcomes. The main indications for liver replacement are alcoholic liver disease, HCV, non-alcoholic liver disease and liver cancer. Recent studies have shown that selected patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis may also benefit from liver transplant. The advent of new and highly effective treatments for HCV, whether given before or after transplant will have a major impact on outcomes. The role of transplantation for those with liver cell cancer continues to evolve as other interventions become more effective. Immunosuppression is usually required life-long and adherence remains a challenge, especially in adolescents. Immunosuppression with calcineurin inhibitors (primarily tacrolimus), antimetabolites (azathioprine or mycophenolate) and corticosteroids remains standard. Outcomes after transplantation are good but not normal in quality or quantity. Premature death may be due to increased risk of cardiovascular disease, de novo cancer, recurrent disease or late technical problems. PMID:26350881

  6. Heart transplantation: review

    PubMed Central

    Mangini, Sandrigo; Alves, Bárbara Rubim; Silvestre, Odílson Marcos; Pires, Philippe Vieira; Pires, Lucas José Tachotti; Curiati, Milena Novaes Cardoso; Bacal, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heart transplantation is currently the definitive gold standard surgical approach in the treatment of refractory heart failure. However, the shortage of donors limits the achievement of a greater number of heart transplants, in which the use of mechanical circulatory support devices is increasing. With well-established indications and contraindications, as well as diagnosis and treatment of rejection through defined protocols of immunosuppression, the outcomes of heart transplantation are very favorable. Among early complications that can impact survival are primary graft failure, right ventricular dysfunction, rejection, and infections, whereas late complications include cardiac allograft vasculopathy and neoplasms. Despite the difficulties for heart transplantation, in particular, the shortage of donors and high mortality while on the waiting list, in Brazil, there is a great potential for both increasing effective donors and using circulatory assist devices, which can positively impact the number and outcomes of heart transplants. PMID:26154552

  7. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hatzimichael, Eleftheria; Tuthill, Mark

    2010-01-01

    More than 25,000 hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCTs) are performed each year for the treatment of lymphoma, leukemia, immune-deficiency illnesses, congenital metabolic defects, hemoglobinopathies, and myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative syndromes. Before transplantation, patients receive intensive myeloablative chemoradiotherapy followed by stem cell “rescue.” Autologous HSCT is performed using the patient’s own hematopoietic stem cells, which are harvested before transplantation and reinfused after myeloablation. Allogeneic HSCT uses human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched stem cells derived from a donor. Survival after allogeneic transplantation depends on donor–recipient matching, the graft-versus-host response, and the development of a graft versus leukemia effect. This article reviews the biology of stem cells, clinical efficacy of HSCT, transplantation procedures, and potential complications. PMID:24198516

  8. Bioethics of Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    As the ability to transplant organs and tissues has grown, the demand for these procedures has increased as well—to the point at which it far exceeds the available supply creating the core ethical challenge for transplantation—rationing. The gap between supply and demand, although large, is worse than it appears to be. There are two key steps to gaining access to a transplant. First, one must gain access to a transplant center. Then, those waiting need to be selected for a transplant. Many potential recipients do not get admitted to a program. They are deemed too old, not of the right nationality, not appropriate for transplant as a result of severe mental impairment, criminal history, drug abuse, or simply because they do not have access to a competent primary care physician who can refer them to a transplant program. There are also financial obstacles to access to transplant waiting lists in the United States and other nations. In many poor nations, those needing transplants simply die because there is no capacity or a very limited capacity to perform transplants. Although the demand for organs now exceeds the supply, resulting in rationing, the size of waiting lists would quickly expand were there to suddenly be an equally large expansion in the number of organs available for transplantation. Still, even with the reality of unavoidable rationing, saving more lives by increasing organ supply is a moral good. Current public policies for obtaining organs from cadavers are not adequate in that they do not produce the number of organs that public polls of persons in the United States indicate people are willing to donate. PMID:24478386

  9. Marathon run: cardiovascular adaptation and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Predel, Hans-Georg

    2014-11-21

    The first marathon run as an athletic event took place in the context of the Olympic Games in 1896 in Athens, Greece. Today, participation in a 'marathon run' has become a global phenomenon attracting young professional athletes as well as millions of mainly middle-aged amateur athletes worldwide each year. One of the main motives for these amateur marathon runners is the expectation that endurance exercise (EE) delivers profound beneficial health effects. However, with respect to the cardiovascular system, a controversial debate has emerged whether the marathon run itself is healthy or potentially harmful to the cardiovascular system, especially in middle-aged non-elite male amateur runners. In this cohort, exercise-induced increases in cardiac biomarkers-troponin and brain natriuretic peptide-and acute functional cardiac alterations have been observed and interpreted as potential cardiac damage. Furthermore, in the cohort of 40- to 65-year-old males engaged in intensive EE, a significant risk for the development of atrial fibrillation has been identified. Fortunately, recent studies demonstrated a normalization of the cardiac biomarkers and the functional alterations within a short time frame. Therefore, these alterations may be perceived as physiological myocardial reactions to the strenuous exercise and the term 'cardiac fatigue' has been coined. This interpretation is supported by a recent analysis of 10.9 million marathon runners demonstrating that there was no significantly increased overall risk of cardiac arrest during long-distance running races. In conclusion, intensive and long-lasting EE, e.g. running a full-distance Marathon, results in high cardiovascular strain whose clinical relevance especially for middle-aged and older athletes is unclear and remains a matter of controversy. Furthermore, there is a need for evidence-based recommendations with respect to medical screening and training strategies especially in male amateur runners over the age of

  10. Allergy and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Triggiani, M; Patella, V; Staiano, R I; Granata, F; Marone, G

    2008-09-01

    The most dangerous and life-threatening manifestation of allergic diseases is anaphylaxis, a condition in which the cardiovascular system is responsible for the majority of clinical symptoms and for potentially fatal outcome. The heart is both a source and a target of chemical mediators released during allergic reactions. Mast cells are abundant in the human heart, where they are located predominantly around the adventitia of large coronary arteries and in close contact with the small intramural vessels. Cardiac mast cells can be activated by a variety of stimuli including allergens, complement factors, general anesthetics and muscle relaxants. Mediators released from immunologically activated human heart mast cells strongly influence ventricular function, cardiac rhythm and coronary artery tone. Histamine, cysteinyl leukotrienes and platelet-activating factor (PAF) exert negative inotropic effects and induce myocardial depression that contribute significantly to the pathogenesis of anaphylactic shock. Moreover, cardiac mast cells release chymase and renin that activates the angiotensin system locally, which further induces arteriolar vasoconstriction. The number and density of cardiac mast cells is increased in patients with ischaemic heart disease and dilated cardiomyopathies. This observation may help explain why these conditions are major risk factors for fatal anaphylaxis. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in cardiac mast cell activation may lead to an improvement in prevention and treatment of systemic anaphylaxis. PMID:18721322

  11. Haptoglobin activates innate immunity to enhance acute transplant rejection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hua; Song, Yang; Colangelo, Christopher M.; Wu, Terence; Bruce, Can; Scabia, Gaia; Galan, Anjela; Maffei, Margherita; Goldstein, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Immune tolerance to transplanted organs is impaired when the innate immune system is activated in response to the tissue necrosis that occurs during harvesting and implantation procedures. A key molecule in this immune pathway is the intracellular TLR signal adaptor known as myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88). After transplantation, MyD88 induces DC maturation as well as the production of inflammatory mediators, such as IL-6 and TNF-α. However, upstream activators of MyD88 function in response to transplantation have not been identified. Here, we show that haptoglobin, an acute phase protein, is an initiator of this MyD88-dependent inflammatory process in a mouse model of skin transplantation. Necrotic lysates from transplanted skin elicited higher inflammatory responses in DCs than did nontransplanted lysates, suggesting DC-mediated responses are triggered by factors released during transplantation. Analysis of transplanted lysates identified haptoglobin as one of the proteins upregulated during transplantation. Expression of donor haptoglobin enhanced the onset of acute skin transplant rejection, whereas haptoglobin-deficient skin grafts showed delayed acute rejection and antidonor T cell priming in a MyD88-dependent graft rejection model. Thus, our results show that haptoglobin release following skin necrosis contributes to accelerated transplant rejection, with potential implications for the development of localized immunosuppressive therapies. PMID:22156194

  12. Cardiovascular Pharmacogenomics: The Future of Cardiovascular Therapeutics?

    PubMed Central

    Roden, Dan M.

    2012-01-01

    Responses to drug therapy vary from benefit to no effect to adverse effects which can be serious or occasionally fatal. Increasing evidence supports the idea that genetic variants can play a major role in this spectrum of responses. Well-studied examples in cardiovascular therapeutics include predictors of steady-state warfarin dosage, predictors of reduced efficacy among patients receiving clopidogrel for drug eluting stents, and predictors of some serious adverse drug effects. This review summarizes contemporary approaches to identifying and validating genetic predictors of variability in response to drug treatment. Approaches to incorporating this new knowledge into clinical care, and the barriers to this concept, are addressed. PMID:23200096

  13. Diabetes Drugs and Cardiovascular Safety

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a well-known risk factor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and the beneficial effect of improved glycemic control on cardiovascular complications has been well established. However, the rosiglitazone experience aroused awareness of potential cardiovascular risk associated with diabetes drugs and prompted the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to issue new guidelines about cardiovascular risk. Through postmarketing cardiovascular safety trials, some drugs demonstrated cardiovascular benefits, while some antidiabetic drugs raised concern about a possible increased cardiovascular risk associated with drug use. With the development of new classes of drugs, treatment options became wider and the complexity of glycemic management in type 2 diabetes has increased. When choosing the appropriate treatment strategy for patients with type 2 diabetes at high cardiovascular risk, not only the glucose-lowering effects, but also overall benefits and risks for cardiovascular disease should be taken into consideration. PMID:27302713

  14. Hypertension and arterial stiffness in heart transplantation patients

    PubMed Central

    de Souza-Neto, João David; de Oliveira, Ítalo Martins; Lima-Rocha, Hermano Alexandre; Oliveira-Lima, José Wellington; Bacal, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Post-transplantation hypertension is prevalent and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and subsequent graft dysfunction. The present study aimed to identify the factors associated with arterial stiffness as measured by the ambulatory arterial stiffness index. METHODS: The current study used a prospective, observational, analytical design to evaluate a group of adult heart transplantation patients. Arterial stiffness was obtained by monitoring ambulatory blood pressure and using the ambulatory arterial stiffness index as the surrogate outcome. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to control confounding. RESULTS: In a group of 85 adult heart transplantation patients, hypertension was independently associated with arterial stiffness (OR 4.98, CI 95% 1.06-23.4) as well as systolic and diastolic blood pressure averages and nighttime descent. CONCLUSIONS: Measurement of ambulatory arterial stiffness index is a new, non-invasive method that is easy to perform, may contribute to better defining arterial stiffness prognosis and is associated with hypertension.

  15. Sexual health in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuoyan; Mewawalla, Prerna; Stratton, Pamela; Yong, Agnes S M; Shaw, Bronwen E; Hashmi, Shahrukh; Jagasia, Madan; Mohty, Mohamad; Majhail, Navneet S; Savani, Bipin N; Rovó, Alicia

    2015-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) plays a central role in patients with malignant and, increasingly, nonmalignant conditions. As the number of transplants increases and the survival rate improves, long-term complications are important to recognize and treat to maintain quality of life. Sexual dysfunction is a commonly described but relatively often underestimated complication after HSCT. Conditioning regimens, generalized or genital graft-versus-host disease, medications, and cardiovascular complications as well as psychosocial problems are known to contribute significantly to physical and psychological sexual dysfunction. Moreover, it is often a difficult topic for patients, their significant others, and health care providers to discuss. Early recognition and management of sexual dysfunction after HSCT can lead to improved quality of life and outcomes for patients and their partners. This review focuses on the risk factors for and treatment of sexual dysfunction after transplantation and provides guidance concerning how to approach and manage a patient with sexual dysfunction after HSCT. PMID:26372459

  16. Sexual Health in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhuoyan; Mewawalla, Prerna; Stratton, Pamela; Yong, Agnes S.M.; Shaw, Bronwen E.; Hashmi, Shahrukh; Jagasia, Madan; Mohty, Mohamad; Majhail, Navneet S.; Savani, Bipin N.; Rovó, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) plays a central role in patients with malignant and, increasingly, nonmalignant conditions. As the number of transplants increases and the survival rate improves, long-term complications are important to recognize and treat to maintain quality of life. Sexual dysfunction is a commonly described but relatively often underestimated complication after HSCT. Conditioning regimens, generalized or genital graft-versus-host disease, medications, and cardiovascular complications as well as psychosocial problems are known to contribute significantly to physical and psychological sexual dysfunction. Moreover, it is often a difficult topic for patients, their significant others, and health care providers to discuss. Early recognition and management of sexual dysfunction after HSCT can lead to improved quality of life and outcomes for patients and their partners. This review focuses on the risk factors for and treatment of sexual dysfunction after transplantation and provides guidance concerning how to approach and manage a patient with sexual dysfunction after HSCT. PMID:26372459

  17. Corticosteroids: do they damage the cardiovascular system?

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, S. R.; Moots, R. J.; Kendall, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    Since their introduction for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, corticosteroids have become widely used as effective agents in the control of inflammatory diseases. Although there have been undoubted benefits upon mortality in diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, many patients survive only to suffer a high incidence of premature atherosclerosis. There is also evidence of increased rates of vascular mortality in other corticosteroid-treated diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, reversible airways obstruction and transplant recipients. Possible mechanisms of damage include elevated blood pressure, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidaemia, and imbalances in thrombosis and fibrinolysis. This paper reviews the clinical evidence supporting the contention that there is an excess cardiovascular mortality in steroid-treated patients and the underlying mechanisms, and points to further areas of research. PMID:7870631

  18. [Cardiovascular disease in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Bauersachs, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are among the most frequent complications in pregnancies. Among them preexisting heart diseases including congenital heart disease, genetic cardiomyopathies, myocardial infarction and chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathies display a special challenge for the mother and her physicians. Moreover, the incidence of cardiovascular disease induced by or associated with pregnancy, i.e. hypertensive disorders and peripartum cardiomyopathies, has increased over the past decades. In the present overview we explain why pregnancy is a stress model for the maternal heart and summarize the current knowledge on the influence of pregnancy on preexisting cardiomyopathies. We highlight recent advances in research with regard to hypertensive complications in pregnancy and peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM). Moreover, we summarize etiologies, risk factors, pathomechanisms, diagnosis, treatment, management and prognosis. Finally, interdisciplinarity between different clinical fields and basic science is a key requirement to avoid longterm damage to the cardiovascular system induced by pregnancy associated impacts and with this improve women's health in general. PMID:26800071

  19. Cardiovascular actions of berberine.

    PubMed

    Lau, C W; Yao, X Q; Chen, Z Y; Ko, W H; Huang, Y

    2001-01-01

    Berberine, is an alkaloid from Hydrastis canadensis L., Chinese herb Huanglian, and many other plants. It is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine as an antimicrobial in the treatment of dysentery and infectious diarrhea. This manuscript describes cardiovascular effects of berberine and its derivatives, tetrahydroberberine and 8-oxoberberine. Berberine has positive inotropic, negative chronotropic, antiarrhythmic, and vasodilator properties. Both derivatives of berberine have antiarrhythmic activity. Some cardiovascular effects of berberine and its derivatives are attributed to the blockade of K+ channels (delayed rectifier and K(ATP)) and stimulation of Na+ -Ca(2+) exchanger. Berberine has been shown to prolong the duration of ventricular action potential. Its vasodilator activity has been attributed to multiple cellular mechanisms. The cardiovascular effects of berberine suggest its possible clinical usefulness in the treatment of arrhythmias and/or heart failure. PMID:11607041

  20. Transplant tourism: understanding the risks.

    PubMed

    Babik, Jennifer M; Chin-Hong, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Transplant tourism is commonly defined as travel abroad for the purpose of transplantation, but the term evokes ethical and legal concerns about commercial transplantation. Due to the mismatch in supply and demand for organs, transplant tourism has increased over the last several decades and now accounts for 10 % of transplants worldwide. Patients from the USA who pursue transplantation abroad do so most commonly for renal transplantation, and travel mostly to China, the Philippines, and India. Transplant tourism puts the organ recipient at risk for surgical complications, poor graft outcome, increased mortality, and a variety of infectious complications. Bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic infections have all been described, and most concerning are the high rates of blood-borne viral infections and invasive, often fatal, fungal infections. Transplant and infectious diseases physicians should have a high degree of suspicion for infectious complications in patients returning from transplantation abroad. PMID:25870141

  1. Intestinal and multivisceral transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Meira, Sérgio Paiva; Guardia, Bianca Della; Evangelista, Andréia Silva; Matielo, Celso Eduardo Lourenço; Neves, Douglas Bastos; Pandullo, Fernando Luis; Felga, Guilherme Eduardo Gonçalves; Alves, Jefferson André da Silva; Curvelo, Lilian Amorim; Diaz, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Rusi, Marcela Balbo; Viveiros, Marcelo de Melo; de Almeida, Marcio Dias; Epstein, Marina Gabrielle; Pedroso, Pamella Tung; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Rocco, Rodrigo Andrey; de Almeida, Samira Scalso; de Rezende, Marcelo Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal transplantation has shown exceptional growth over the past 10 years. At the end of the 1990’s, intestinal transplantation moved out of the experimental realm to become a routine practice in treating patients with severe complications related to total parenteral nutrition and intestinal failure. In the last years, several centers reported an increasing improvement in survival outcomes (about 80%), during the first 12 months after surgery, but long-term survival is still a challenge. Several advances led to clinical application of transplants. Immunosuppression involved in intestinal and multivisceral transplantation was the biggest gain for this procedure in the past decade due to tacrolimus, and new inducing drugs, mono- and polyclonal anti-lymphocyte antibodies. Despite the advancement of rigid immunosuppression protocols, rejection is still very frequent in the first 12 months, and can result in long-term graft loss. The future of intestinal transplantation and multivisceral transplantation appears promising. The major challenge is early recognition of acute rejection in order to prevent graft loss, opportunistic infections associated to complications, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease and graft versus host disease; and consequently, improve results in the long run. PMID:25993080

  2. Pediatric heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Stiasny, Brian; Dave, Hitendu; Cavigelli-Brunner, Anna; Balmer, Christian; Kretschmar, Oliver; Bürki, Christoph; Klauwer, Dietrich; Hübler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric heart transplantation (pHTx) represents a small (14%) but very important and particular part in the field of cardiac transplantation. This treatment has lifelong impact on children. To achieve the best short and especially long-term survival with adequate quality of life, which is of crucial importance for this young patient population, one has to realize and understand the differences with adult HTx. Indication for transplantation, waitlist management including ABO incompatible (ABOi) transplantation and immunosuppression differ. Although young transplant recipients are ultimately likely to be considered for re-transplantation. One has to distinguish between myopathy and complex congenital heart disease (CHD). The differences in anatomy and physiology make the surgical procedure much more complex and create unique challenges. These recipients need a well-organized and educated team with pediatric cardiologists and intensivists, including a high skilled surgeon, which is dedicated to pHTx. Therefore, these types of transplants are best concentrated in specialized centers to achieve promising outcome. PMID:25922739

  3. Immunosuppression for lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Choo Y.; Madsen, Joren C.; Rosengard, Bruce R.; Allan, James S.

    2010-01-01

    1. ABSTRACT As a result of advances in surgical techniques, immunosuppressive therapy, and postoperative management, lung transplantation has become an established therapeutic option for individuals with a variety of end-stage lung diseases. The current 1-year actuarial survival rate following lung transplantation is approaching 80%. However, the 5- year actuarial survival rate has remained virtually unchanged at approximately 50% over the last 15 years due to the processes of acute and chronic lung allograft rejection (1). Clinicians still rely on a vast array of immunosuppressive agents to suppress the process of graft rejection, but find themselves limited by an inescapable therapeutic paradox. Insufficient immunosuppression results in graft loss due to rejection, while excess immunosuppression results in increased morbidity and mortality from opportunistic infections and malignancies. Indeed, graft rejection, infection, and malignancy are the three principal causes of mortality for the lung transplant recipient. One should also keep in mind that graft loss in a lung transplant recipient is usually a fatal event, since there is no practical means of long-term mechanical support, and since the prospects of re-transplantation are low, given the shortage of acceptable donor grafts. This chapter reviews the current state of immunosuppressive therapy for lung transplantation and suggests alternative paradigms for the management of future lung transplant recipients. PMID:19273152

  4. [Cardiovascular complications of diabetes].

    PubMed

    Nishio, Yoshihiko

    2015-12-01

    Several lines of epidemical evidence have shown that type 2 diabetes is the most important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). It has been shown that the risk of primary prevention of CVD in patients with diabetes is equal to that of the secondary prevention in general population. In this manuscript, recent reports on the cardiac tests to detect the cardiovascular lesions will be reviewed. The data suggest that MDCT is a promising test even in the patients with diabetes. Furthermore, recent evidence of the treatment of diabetes with insulin or the drugs available recently such as DPP-4 inhibitors and SGLT-2 inhibitors will be reviewed. PMID:26666152

  5. Advancing cardiovascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Truskey, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular tissue engineering offers the promise of biologically based repair of injured and damaged blood vessels, valves, and cardiac tissue. Major advances in cardiovascular tissue engineering over the past few years involve improved methods to promote the establishment and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), scaffolds from decellularized tissue that may produce more highly differentiated tissues and advance clinical translation, improved methods to promote vascularization, and novel in vitro microphysiological systems to model normal and diseased tissue function. iPSC technology holds great promise, but robust methods are needed to further promote differentiation. Differentiation can be further enhanced with chemical, electrical, or mechanical stimuli. PMID:27303643

  6. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Niamh

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy often goes unrecognized. We present a case of a 22-year-old man with multiple manifestations of this disease, including weakness, dizziness, fatigue, tachycardia, abnormal QTc, and orthostasis, which occurred 2 years after his type 1 diabetes diagnosis. He exhibited parasympathetic denervation with resting tachycardia and exercise intolerance but also had evidence of orthostatic hypotension, which suggests sympathetic denervation. He did not have complete cardiovascular autonomic reflex testing, which would have been helpful, but improved with aggressive diabetes treatment and the increase of beta-blockade. It is important to identify these patients to understand their signs and symptoms and consider appropriate therapies. PMID:27034552

  7. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Niamh; Silverman, Barry

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy often goes unrecognized. We present a case of a 22-year-old man with multiple manifestations of this disease, including weakness, dizziness, fatigue, tachycardia, abnormal QTc, and orthostasis, which occurred 2 years after his type 1 diabetes diagnosis. He exhibited parasympathetic denervation with resting tachycardia and exercise intolerance but also had evidence of orthostatic hypotension, which suggests sympathetic denervation. He did not have complete cardiovascular autonomic reflex testing, which would have been helpful, but improved with aggressive diabetes treatment and the increase of beta-blockade. It is important to identify these patients to understand their signs and symptoms and consider appropriate therapies. PMID:27034552

  8. Nanomedicine and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Jason R.

    2010-01-01

    Nanomedicine has become an important tool in the imaging and therapy of numerous diseases. This is due, in large part, to the ability to generate multifunctional nanoagents bearing combinations of targeting, diagnostic, and therapeutic moieties, allowing for the tailoring of the properties of the synthesized nanomaterials. With respect to cardiovascular disease and its sequelae, nanomedicine has the potential to detect and treat some of the leading causes of death and disability in the developed world, including atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and myocardial infarction. As such, this review focuses on some of the most poignant examples of the utility of nanomedicine in the detection and treatment of cardiovascular disease that have been recently reported. PMID:20369034

  9. Long-term sequelae of autologous bone marrow or peripheral stem cell transplantation for lymphoid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Vose, J M; Kennedy, B C; Bierman, P J; Kessinger, A; Armitage, J O

    1992-02-01

    The study was made to evaluate the long-term physical and psychosocial changes after high-dose therapy and autologous bone marrow or peripheral stem transplantation for recurrent lymphoid malignancies. Patients who had undergone high dose therapy and autologous bone marrow or peripheral stem cell transplantation for recurrent lymphoid malignancies at least 1 year previously were contacted by phone interview regarding their status after the transplant. The patients' comments were confirmed by checking medical records when possible. Fifty patients who had undergone transplantation at the University of Nebraska Medical Center at least 1 year before the interview were available for interview and willing to answer questions. After transplant, many patients noticed temporary changes in their appearance, which usually returned to normal within 1 year. Few patients reported remarkable cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, or pulmonary changes after transplantation. However, up to one-third of the patients reported changes in sexual function or desire. The most common infectious problem after transplant was Herpes zoster, which occurred in 25% of the patients. Overall, the patients had a positive outlook after high-dose therapy and transplantation, with most being able to return to work and enjoy a normal life style. Ninety-six percent of the patients stated that they would be willing to undergo high-dose therapy and transplantation again under the same circumstances. PMID:1730128

  10. Pancreatic islet transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa-Giannella, Maria Lúcia; Raposo do Amaral, Alexandre S

    2009-01-01

    Background No formulation of exogenous insulin available to date has yet been able to mimic the physiological nictemeral rhythms of this hormone, and despite all engineering advancements, the theoretical proposal of developing a mechanical replacement for pancreatic β cell still has not been reached. Thus, the replacement of β cells through pancreas and pancreatic islet transplantation are the only concrete alternatives for re-establishing the endogenous insulin secretion in type 1 diabetic patients. Since only 1 to 1.5% of the pancreatic mass corresponds to endocrine tissue, pancreatic islets transplantation arises as a natural alternative. Data from the International Islet Transplant Registry (ITR) from 1983 to December 2000 document a total of 493 transplants performed around the world, with progressively worse rates of post-transplant insulin independence. In 2000, the "Edmonton Protocol" introduced several modifications to the transplantation procedure, such as the use of a steroid-free immunosuppression regimen and transplantation of a mean islet mass of 11,000 islet equivalents per kilogram, which significantly improved 1-year outcomes. Although the results of a 5-year follow-up in 65 patients demonstrated improvement in glycemic instability in a significant portion of them, only 7.5% of the patients have reached insulin independence, indicating the need of further advances in the preservation of the function of transplanted islet. In addition to the scarcity of organs available for transplantation, islets transplantation still faces major challenges, specially those related to cell loss during the process of islet isolation and the losses related to the graft site, apoptosis, allorejection, autoimmunity, and immunosuppression. The main strategies to optimize islet transplantation aim at improving all these aspects. Conclusion Human islet transplantation should be regarded as an intervention that can decrease the frequency of severe hypoglycemic episodes

  11. Standardized Outcomes in Nephrology-Transplantation: A Global Initiative to Develop a Core Outcome Set for Trials in Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Allison; Budde, Klemens; Gill, John; Josephson, Michelle A.; Marson, Lorna; Pruett, Timothy L.; Reese, Peter P.; Rosenbloom, David; Rostaing, Lionel; Warrens, Anthony N.; Wong, Germaine; Craig, Jonathan C.; Crowe, Sally; Harris, Tess; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Manns, Braden; Tugwell, Peter; Van Biesen, Wim; Wheeler, David C.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.; Evangelidis, Nicole; Sautenet, Benedicte; Howell, Martin; Chapman, Jeremy R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although advances in treatment have dramatically improved short-term graft survival and acute rejection in kidney transplant recipients, long-term graft outcomes have not substantially improved. Transplant recipients also have a considerably increased risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and infection, which all contribute to appreciable morbidity and premature mortality. Many trials in kidney transplantation are short-term, frequently use unvalidated surrogate endpoints, outcomes of uncertain relevance to patients and clinicians, and do not consistently measure and report key outcomes like death, graft loss, graft function, and adverse effects of therapy. This diminishes the value of trials in supporting treatment decisions that require individual-level multiple tradeoffs between graft survival and the risk of side effects, adverse events, and mortality. The Standardized Outcomes in Nephrology-Transplantation initiative aims to develop a core outcome set for trials in kidney transplantation that is based on the shared priorities of all stakeholders. Methods This will include a systematic review to identify outcomes reported in randomized trials, a Delphi survey with an international multistakeholder panel (patients, caregivers, clinicians, researchers, policy makers, members from industry) to develop a consensus-based prioritized list of outcome domains and a consensus workshop to review and finalize the core outcome set for trials in kidney transplantation. Conclusions Developing and implementing a core outcome set to be reported, at a minimum, in all kidney transplantation trials will improve the transparency, quality, and relevance of research; to enable kidney transplant recipients and their clinicians to make better-informed treatment decisions for improved patient outcomes. PMID:27500269

  12. Liver transplantation: Current status and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Jadlowiec, Caroline C; Taner, Timucin

    2016-01-01

    Great progress has been made in the field of liver transplantation over the past two decades. This progress, however, also brings up the next set of challenges: First, organ shortage remains a major limitation, and accounts for a large proportion of wait list mortality. While living donation has successfully increased the total number of liver transplants done in Asian countries, the total number of such transplants has been stagnant in the western hemisphere. As such, there has been a significant effort over the past decade to increase the existing deceased donor pool. This effort has resulted in a greater use of liver allografts following donation after cardiac death (DCD) along with marginal and extended criteria donors. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of liver allografts procured after circulatory arrest has not only resulted in better selection and management of DCD donors, but has also helped in the development of mechanical perfusion strategies. Early outcomes demonstrating the clinical applicability of both hypothermic and normothermic perfusion and its potential to impact patient survival and allograft function have generated much interest. Second, long-term outcomes of liver transplant recipients have not improved significantly, as recipients continue to succumb to complications of long-term immunosuppression, such as infection, malignancy and renal failure. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that chronic immune-mediated injury to the liver may also impact graft function. PMID:27182155

  13. Liver transplantation: Current status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Jadlowiec, Caroline C; Taner, Timucin

    2016-05-14

    Great progress has been made in the field of liver transplantation over the past two decades. This progress, however, also brings up the next set of challenges: First, organ shortage remains a major limitation, and accounts for a large proportion of wait list mortality. While living donation has successfully increased the total number of liver transplants done in Asian countries, the total number of such transplants has been stagnant in the western hemisphere. As such, there has been a significant effort over the past decade to increase the existing deceased donor pool. This effort has resulted in a greater use of liver allografts following donation after cardiac death (DCD) along with marginal and extended criteria donors. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of liver allografts procured after circulatory arrest has not only resulted in better selection and management of DCD donors, but has also helped in the development of mechanical perfusion strategies. Early outcomes demonstrating the clinical applicability of both hypothermic and normothermic perfusion and its potential to impact patient survival and allograft function have generated much interest. Second, long-term outcomes of liver transplant recipients have not improved significantly, as recipients continue to succumb to complications of long-term immunosuppression, such as infection, malignancy and renal failure. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that chronic immune-mediated injury to the liver may also impact graft function. PMID:27182155

  14. Microbial responses to southward and northward Cambisol soil transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Mengmeng; Liu, Shanshan; Wang, Feng; Sun, Bo; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2015-10-26

    We report that soil transplant serves as a proxy to simulate climate changes. Recently, we have shown that southward transplant of black soil and northward transplant of red soil altered soil microbial communities and biogeochemical variables. However, fundamental differences in soil types have prevented direct comparison between southward and northward transplants. To tackle it, herein we report an analysis of microbial communities of Cambisol soil in an agriculture field after 4 years of adaptation to southward and northward soil transplants over large transects. Analysis of bare fallow soils revealed concurrent increase in microbial functional diversity and coarse-scale taxonomic diversity at both transplanted sites, as detected by GeoChip 3.0 and DGGE, respectively. Furthermore, a correlation between microbial functional diversity and taxonomic diversity was detected, which was masked in maize cropped soils. Mean annual temperature, soil moisture, and nitrate (NO3¯-N) showed strong correlations with microbial communities. In addition, abundances of ammonium-oxidizing genes (amoA) and denitrification genes were correlated with nitrification capacity and NO3¯-N contents, suggesting that microbial responses to soil transplant could alter microbe-mediated biogeochemical cycle at the ecosystem level.

  15. Microbial responses to southward and northward Cambisol soil transplant

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Mengmeng; Liu, Shanshan; Wang, Feng; Sun, Bo; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2015-10-26

    We report that soil transplant serves as a proxy to simulate climate changes. Recently, we have shown that southward transplant of black soil and northward transplant of red soil altered soil microbial communities and biogeochemical variables. However, fundamental differences in soil types have prevented direct comparison between southward and northward transplants. To tackle it, herein we report an analysis of microbial communities of Cambisol soil in an agriculture field after 4 years of adaptation to southward and northward soil transplants over large transects. Analysis of bare fallow soils revealed concurrent increase in microbial functional diversity and coarse-scale taxonomic diversity atmore » both transplanted sites, as detected by GeoChip 3.0 and DGGE, respectively. Furthermore, a correlation between microbial functional diversity and taxonomic diversity was detected, which was masked in maize cropped soils. Mean annual temperature, soil moisture, and nitrate (NO3¯-N) showed strong correlations with microbial communities. In addition, abundances of ammonium-oxidizing genes (amoA) and denitrification genes were correlated with nitrification capacity and NO3¯-N contents, suggesting that microbial responses to soil transplant could alter microbe-mediated biogeochemical cycle at the ecosystem level.« less

  16. Striated Muscle as Implantation Site for Transplanted Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Espes, Daniel; Eriksson, Olof; Lau, Joey; Carlsson, Per-Ola

    2011-01-01

    Islet transplantation is an attractive treatment for selected patients with brittle type 1 diabetes. In the clinical setting, intraportal transplantation predominates. However, due to extensive early islet cell death, the quantity of islets needed to restore glucose homeostasis requires in general a minimum of two donors. Moreover, the deterioration of islet function over time results in few insulin-independent patients after five-year followup. Specific obstacles to the success of islet transplantation include site-specific concerns for the liver such as the instant blood mediated inflammatory reaction, islet lipotoxicity, low oxygen tension, and poor revascularization, impediments that have led to the developing interest for alternative implantation sites over recent years. Within preclinical settings, several alternative sites have now been investigated and proven favorable in various aspects. Muscle is considered a very promising site and has physiologically properties and technical advantages that could make it optimal for islet transplantation. PMID:22174984

  17. Adipocytokines in renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Kristof; Nagaraju, Shankar Prasad; Rhee, Connie M.; Mathe, Zoltan; Molnar, Miklos Z.

    2016-01-01

    In the last two decades, perceptions about the role of body fat have changed. Adipocytes modulate endocrine and immune homeostasis by synthesizing hundreds of hormones, known as adipocytokines. Many studies have been investigating the influences and effects of these adipocytokines and suggest that they are modulated by the nutritional and immunologic milieu. Kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) are a unique and relevant population in which the function of adipocytokines can be examined, given their altered nutritional and immune status and subsequent dysregulation of adipocytokine metabolism. In this review, we summarize the recent findings about four specific adipocytokines and their respective roles in KTRs. We decided to evaluate the most widely described adipocytokines, including leptin, adiponectin, visfatin and resistin. Increasing evidence suggests that these adipocytokines may lead to cardiovascular events and metabolic changes in the general population and may also increase mortality and graft loss rate in KTRs. In addition, we present findings on the interrelationship between serum adipocytokine levels and nutritional and immunologic status, and mechanisms by which adipocytokines modulate morbidity and outcomes in KTRs. PMID:27274819

  18. Adipocytokines in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Kristof; Nagaraju, Shankar Prasad; Rhee, Connie M; Mathe, Zoltan; Molnar, Miklos Z

    2016-06-01

    In the last two decades, perceptions about the role of body fat have changed. Adipocytes modulate endocrine and immune homeostasis by synthesizing hundreds of hormones, known as adipocytokines. Many studies have been investigating the influences and effects of these adipocytokines and suggest that they are modulated by the nutritional and immunologic milieu. Kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) are a unique and relevant population in which the function of adipocytokines can be examined, given their altered nutritional and immune status and subsequent dysregulation of adipocytokine metabolism. In this review, we summarize the recent findings about four specific adipocytokines and their respective roles in KTRs. We decided to evaluate the most widely described adipocytokines, including leptin, adiponectin, visfatin and resistin. Increasing evidence suggests that these adipocytokines may lead to cardiovascular events and metabolic changes in the general population and may also increase mortality and graft loss rate in KTRs. In addition, we present findings on the interrelationship between serum adipocytokine levels and nutritional and immunologic status, and mechanisms by which adipocytokines modulate morbidity and outcomes in KTRs. PMID:27274819

  19. Testosterone therapy and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Walsh, James P; Kitchens, Anne C

    2015-04-01

    Endogenous testosterone levels are inversely associated with cardiovascular risk in older men and men with cardiovascular disease. Current data on cardiovascular outcomes of testosterone therapy include only observational studies and adverse event monitoring in short-term trials that were not designed to measure cardiovascular outcomes. These studies have yielded conflicting results, and some have raised concerns that testosterone therapy may increase cardiovascular risk. A well-designed, adequately powered, prospective trial will ultimately be required to clarify whether testosterone therapy impacts cardiovascular outcomes. This review describes the findings and limitations of recent studies of cardiovascular risk in older men on testosterone therapy and discusses some of the mechanisms through which testosterone may modify cardiovascular risk. PMID:25467243

  20. Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, C. David

    1988-01-01

    Reviews epidemiological studies of cardiovascular diseases especially coronary heart disease (CHD), to document their major public health importance, changes in mortality during this century, and international comparisons of trends. Finds major risk factors for CHD are determined in large part by psychosocial and behavioral mechanisms. Asserts…

  1. Cardiovascular Effects Of Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandler, Harold

    1992-01-01

    NASA technical memorandum presents study of effects of weightlessness and simulations upon cardiovascular systems of humans and animals. Reviews research up to year 1987 in United States and Soviet space programs on such topics as physiological changes induced by weightlessness in outer space and by subsequent return to Earth gravity and also reviews deconditioning effects of prolonged bed rest on ground.

  2. Cardiovascular Health, Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Baman, Timir S.; Gupta, Sanjaya; Day, Sharlene M.

    2010-01-01

    Context: An athlete’s health may be endangered if he or she continues to compete after diagnosis of certain cardiovascular conditions. The most worrisome risk is sudden cardiac death; the annual rate in US athletes is 1 in 50 000 to 200 000. Evidence Acquisition: Part 2 of this review highlights the current guidelines and controversies surrounding compatibility of participation with a variety of cardiac conditions in competitive and recreational athletics. Data sources were limited to peer-reviewed publications from 1984 to the April 2009. Results: The guidelines published by the American College of Cardiology and the European Society of Cardiology provide a framework for safe competitive and recreational sports participation in athletes with a broad spectrum of inherited and acquired cardiovascular disorders. These guidelines are necessarily conservative because it is not currently possible to individualize risk prediction. Few data are available in many areas, particularly in the noncompetitive arena or in older athletes. Conclusions: Published national guidelines are currently the foundation governing return-to-play decisions in athletes with cardiovascular conditions. Further studies are needed to refine risk stratification algorithms to allow athletes with cardiovascular conditions to reap the health benefits of regular exercise and sports participation without undue risk. PMID:23015920

  3. Epigenetics and cardiovascular disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite advances in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease (CVD), this group of multifactorial disorders remains a leading cause of mortality worldwide. CVD is associated with multiple genetic and modifiable risk factors; however, known environmental and genetic influences can only...

  4. Talking about Kidney Transplants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Joan; Swift, Julia

    1990-01-01

    Described is a project in which information about the moral issues surrounding tissue transplants was obtained and videotaped for classroom use. Moral positions and possible educational strategies are discussed. Examples of student statements are presented. (CW)

  5. Pregnancy after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Carlo B; Doria, Cataldo

    2014-11-01

    Women constitute >30% of patients undergoing liver transplantation (orthotopic liver transplantation, OLT) and about 8% are of reproductive age, and 5% are pediatric females who will mostly survive into adulthood and will consider pregnancy. Although pregnancy in OLT recipients is associated with an increased incidence of hypertension, preeclampsia, anemia, preterm deliveries, and cesarean section, acute rejection and liver allograft loss do not appear to be increased and pregnancy-related maternal death is uncommon. The incidence of structural malformations in the newborn of liver transplant recipients is reported to be 4.4%, which is similar to the rate of 3-5% in the US general population. Patients are advised to defer conception for at least 1-2 years after OLT, while maintaining effective contraception. Pregnancy after OLT usually results in a favorable maternal and neonatal outcome when there is coordinated pre- and perinatal care by a multidisciplinary team composed of obstetric-gynecologists, and a transplant team. PMID:25257968

  6. Bone Marrow Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. ... platelets, which help the blood to clot. A bone marrow transplant is a procedure that replaces a person's ...

  7. Pancreas transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100129.htm Pancreas transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 6 out of 6 Overview The pancreas resides in the back of the abdomen. It ...

  8. Experimental uterus transplantation.

    PubMed

    Johannesson, Liza; Enskog, Anders

    2014-11-01

    Today, most causes of infertility are successfully treated. Yet there is still a subgroup of female infertility affecting around 4%, which so far is untreatable because of an absolute uterine factor. To acquire motherhood, these women are today referred to either adoption or surrogacy. Research in the field of uterus transplantation has been evaluated in different animal models for decades and has presently reached a human clinical application as a possible treatment for absolute uterine factor infertility. Organ transplantation is no longer reserved to those with a life-threatening disease and neither is organ transplantation together with concurrent immunosuppression prohibiting pregnancy. Uterus transplantation involves four parties - recipient, donor, partner of recipient and future child - and is a subject of ethical controversies. PMID:25193068

  9. Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... around the scar. The bulges can usually be fixed with surgery. During your medical exam, ask the ... to find out if the donor's blood type matches the recipient’s blood type. Next, the transplant team ...

  10. Kidney transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Kidney Transplantation A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  11. Bone marrow transplant - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... sugar-free popsicles or sugar-free hard candies. Take care of your dentures, braces, or other dental products. ... Take care not to get infections for up to 1 year or more after your transplant. Practice safe ...

  12. Liver transplant - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Liver failure causes many problems, including malnutrition, problems with blood clotting, bleeding form the gastrointestinal tract, and jaundice. Frequently, patients who undergo liver transplantation are quite ill, and require ...

  13. Islet Cell Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... It is an experimental treatment for type 1 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas no longer make insulin. A person who has type 1 diabetes must take insulin daily to live. Transplanted islet ...

  14. After the Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... simple things you can do to help promote organ donation > I am looking for >> About organ allocation About ... Contacting my donor family Data Facts about living donation Financing a transplant Matching organs Member directory Newsroom Online store Stories of hope ...

  15. Liver transplant - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The liver is in the right upper abdomen. The liver serves many functions, including the detoxification of substances delivered ... A liver transplant may be recommended for: liver damage due to alcoholism (Alcoholic cirrhosis) primary biliary cirrhosis long-term ( ...

  16. [Preventing cardiovascular risk in miners].

    PubMed

    Lipatova, L V; Izmailova, O A

    2016-01-01

    The article presents results concerning usage of intravenous laser radiation of blood in miners with cardiovascular diseases. After cardiovascular state assessment, the miners at high cardiovascular risk were subjected to prophylactic procedures with traditional medical treatment added by intravenous laser therapy. Findings are anti-arrhythmic, antihypertensive, antiatherogenic and anti-aggregation effects of complex treatment with intravenous laser radiation of blood in miners at high cardiovascular risk and its subsequent decrease due to treatment. PMID:27265943

  17. Cardiovascular effects of thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Sangster, Jodi K; Panciera, David L; Abbott, Jonathan A

    2013-07-01

    Thyroid hormones have many effects on cardiovascular function, and deficiency or excess of thyroid hormones can result in cardiac dysfunction. Abnormalities of the cardiovascular system are often identified during examination of hyperthyroid and hypothyroid patients. This article addresses the effects of thyroid hormones on the cardiovascular system and the clinical relevance of the cardiovascular response to thyroid dysfunction. In addition, treatment recommendations are presented. PMID:23677842

  18. Stem cells used for cardiovascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Siepe, Matthias; Akhyari, Payam; Lichtenberg, Artur; Schlensak, Christian; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

    2008-08-01

    Stem cell research and tissue engineering have become leading fields in basic research worldwide. Especially in cardiovascular medicine, initial reports on the potential of using stem cells to recover cardiac function and replace organ subunits such as heart valves seemed to offer the promise of widespread clinical use in the near future. However, the broad application of this new therapy failed due to safety and efficacy concerns. Due in part to the initial reports, major basic research efforts were undertaken to explore the specific cell types in greater detail and identify their mechanisms of supporting function, resulting in remarkable new findings in stem cell biology. For example, the notion of resident human cardiac stem cells has disproved the earlier supposition that the human heart is a finitely differentiated organ without the intrinsic potential for regeneration. Furthermore, new technologies emerged to produce pluripotent cells without the ethical and immunological drawbacks of embryonic stem cells (for instance by nuclear transfer). Other autologous cell sources are presently under investigation in myocardial tissue engineering. For tissue engineering of heart valves and small calibre vessels, the use of autologous endothelial (precursor) cells may be the optimal means of seeding a biological or artificial scaffold. It is important that ongoing basic and clinical research in cardiovascular surgery might explore the potential of different cell types either using tissue engineering constructs or in cell transplantation approaches. PMID:18468449

  19. Ultrasound biomicroscopy in mouse cardiovascular development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, Daniel H.

    2001-05-01

    The mouse is the preferred animal model for studying mammalian cardiovascular development and many human congenital heart diseases. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), utilizing high-frequency (40-50-MHz) ultrasound, is uniquely capable of providing in vivo, real-time microimaging and Doppler blood velocity measurements in mouse embryos and neonates. UBM analyses of normal and abnormal mouse cardiovascular function will be described to illustrate the power of this microimaging approach. In particular, real-time UBM images have been used to analyze dimensional changes in the mouse heart from embryonic to neonatal stages. UBM-Doppler has been used recently to examine the precise timing of onset of a functional circulation in early-stage mouse embryos, from the first detectable cardiac contractions. In other experiments, blood velocity waveforms have been analyzed to characterize the functional phenotype of mutant mouse embryos having defects in cardiac valve formation. Finally, UBM has been developed for real-time, in utero image-guided injection of mouse embryos, enabling cell transplantation and genetic gain-of-function experiments with transfected cells and retroviruses. In summary, UBM provides a unique and powerful approach for in vivo analysis and image-guided manipulation in normal and genetically engineered mice, over a wide range of embryonic to neonatal developmental stages.

  20. Pregnancy after cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Scott W; Davison, John M; Doria, Cataldo; Moritz, Michael J; Armenti, Vincent T

    2012-08-01

    More women are reporting pregnancy following heart transplantation. Although successful outcomes have been reported for the mother, transplanted heart, and newborn, such pregnancies should be considered high risk. Hypertension, preeclampsia, and infection should be treated. Vaginal delivery is recommended unless cesarean section is obstetrically necessary. Most outcomes are live births, and long-term follow-up of children show most are healthy and developing well. Maternal survival, independent of pregnancy-related events, should be part of prepregnancy counseling. PMID:22813369

  1. Post-transplant hyperlipidaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    The correction of post-transplant hyperlipidaemia warrants the judicious and timely use of pharmacological agents with dietary modification and exercise. Reduction in hyperlipidaemia may have some role in decreasing the incidence of chronic rejection of allografts. The awareness that the morbidity and mortality of atherosclerotic disease may be lowered by active intervention will result in a better quality of life for transplant recipients. PMID:9497947

  2. The putative role of mast cells in lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jungraithmayr, W

    2015-03-01

    Mast cells (MCs) were primarily recognized as effector cells of allergy. These cells are acting predominantly at the interface between the host and the external environment, such as skin, gastrointestinal and the respiratory tract. Only recently, MCs have gained increased recognition as cells of functional plasticity with immune-regulatory properties that influence both the innate and the adaptive immune response in inflammatory disorders, cancer and transplantation. Through the secretion of both proinflammatory and antiinflammatory mediators, MCs can either ameliorate or deteriorate the course and outcome in lung transplantation. Recent research from other models recognized the immune-protective activity of MCs including its role as an important source of IL-10 and TGF-β for the modulation of alloreactive T cell responses or assistance in Treg activity. This paper summarizes the current understanding of MCs in lung transplantation and discusses MC-mediated immune-mechanisms by which the outcome of the engrafted organ is modulated. PMID:25693471

  3. [Principles of dietotherapy in patients with long-term renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Sharafetdinov, Kh Kh; Plotnikova, O A; Alekseeva, R I; Zuglova, E A; Kaganov, B S; Kandidova, I E

    2009-01-01

    In this review role of clinical nutrition of the some components of dietotherapy in correction metabolic parameters and in decrease of complication risk (cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis and other) in patients with long-term renal transplantation is discussed. PMID:20387684

  4. Dysglycemia after renal transplantation: Definition, pathogenesis, outcomes and implications for management.

    PubMed

    Langsford, David; Dwyer, Karen

    2015-08-25

    New-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) is major complication following renal transplantation. It commonly develops within 3-6 mo post-transplantation. The development of NODAT is associated with significant increase in risk of major cardiovascular events and cardiovascular death. Other dysglycemic states, such as impaired glucose tolerance are also associated with increasing risk of cardiovascular events. The pathogenesis of these dysglycemic states is complex. Older recipient age is a consistent major risk factor and the impact of calcineurin inhibitors and glucocorticoids has been well described. Glucocorticoids likely cause insulin resistance and calcineurin inhibitors likely cause β-cell toxicity. The impact of transplantation in incretin hormones remains to be clarified. The oral glucose tolerance test remains the best diagnostic test but other tests may be validated as screening tests. Possibly, NODAT can be prevented by administering insulin early in patients identified as high risk for NODAT. Once NODAT has been diagnosed altering immunosuppression may be acceptable, but creates the difficulty of balancing immunological with metabolic risk. With regard to hypoglycemic use, metformin may be the best option. Further research is needed to better understand the pathogenesis, identify high risk patients and to improve management options given the significant increased risk of major cardiovascular events and death. PMID:26322159

  5. Transplant Outcomes (Bone Marrow and Cord Blood)

    MedlinePlus

    ... reports show patient survival and transplant data of bone marrow and umbilical cord blood transplants in the transplant ... Data by Center Report —View the number of bone marrow and cord blood transplants performed at a specific ...

  6. Antidiabetic therapy in post kidney transplantation diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Werzowa, Johannes; Säemann, Marcus; Haidinger, Michael; Krebs, Michael; Hecking, Manfred

    2015-07-01

    Post-transplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a common complication after kidney transplantation that affects up to 40% of kidney transplant recipients. By pathogenesis, PTDM is a diabetes form of its own, and may be characterised by a sudden, drug-induced deficiency in insulin secretion rather than worsening of insulin resistance over time. In the context of deteriorating allograft function leading to a re-occurrence of chronic kidney disease after transplantation, pharmacological interventions in PTDM patients deserve special attention. In the present review, we aim at presenting the current evidence regarding efficacy and safety of the modern antidiabetic armamentarium. Specifically, we focus on incretin-based therapies and insulin treatment, besides metformin and glitazones, and discuss their respective advantages and pitfalls. Although recent pilot trials are available in both prediabetes and PTDM, further studies are warranted to elucidate the ideal timing of various antidiabetics as well as its long-term impact on safety, glucose metabolism and cardiovascular outcomes in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:25641399

  7. The global alliance for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Groth, C G; Chapman, J R

    2006-03-01

    In 2002, The Transplantation Society proposed the creation of a Global Alliance for Transplantation, with the purpose of reducing the existing disparity regarding transplantation activities across the globe. This alliance should include major international scientific societies, international governmental organizations, and pharmaceutical companies. Consultations with each of these parties have taken place during the past 18 months and three Strategic Programs have been initiated: (1) the collection of information on transplantation; (2) the expansion of education in transplantation; and (3) the development of professional guidelines for organ donation and transplantation. PMID:16549119

  8. Transfusion problems associated with transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Storb, R.; Weiden, P.L.

    1981-04-01

    Researchers have reviewed the role of blood transfusions in renal and marrow graft recipients. Striking contrasts are evident: while transfusions may promote successful kidney grafting, any transfusions before initiation of the transplant conditioning regimen may jeopardize the treatment of severe aplastic anemia by marrow transplantation. Researchers have suggested guidelines for the transfusion support of transplant candidates before transplantation and for marrow graft recipients after transplantation. It is important to recognize that after conditioning for marrow transplantation, all patients will be profoundly pancytopenic for a limited period of time, and intensive transfusion support is vital to patient survival.

  9. Childhood obesity and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Bridger, Tracey

    2009-01-01

    Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions. Many of these children have risk factors for later disease, including cardiovascular disease. For optimal cardiovascular health, health care professionals must be able to identify children and youth at risk and provide appropriate support as needed. The present article reviews the current medical literature on obesity and cardiovascular disease risk factors in the paediatric population, the long-term cardiovascular consequences of childhood obesity and the importance of early life. Recommendations promoting optimal cardiovascular health in all children and youth are discussed. PMID:20190900

  10. Liver transplantation in Spain.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, Gloria; Fondevila, Constantino; Navasa, Miquel

    2016-09-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) activity started in Spain in 1984 and has exceeded 23,700 interventions, with more than 1000 transplants performed yearly. Every hospital needs official authorization to perform a LT, which implies the obligation to register all patients on the national waiting list. The Spanish National Transplant Organization (ONT) provides essential support for organ procurement, allocation, and management of the waiting list at a national level. Liver allocation is center-oriented as all available organs are referred to the ONT for the whole country. The allocation rules for LT are made according to disease severity after consensus among professionals from every transplant center and ratified by representatives of the regional health authorities. Authorization and location/distribution of transplant centers are regulated by the country (Spain) and by the different regions according to the Real Decreto 1723/2012. For a total population of 47,850,795 inhabitants, there are 24 centers for LT for adults (1 team/2 million people) and 5 for LT for children (1 team/9.5 million people). Nonbiliary cirrhosis, particularly alcohol- and hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis (60%), and tumors, mainly hepatocellular carcinoma (19%), are the most common indications for LT in Spain. Unusual causes of LT include metabolic diseases like Wilson's disease, familial amyloid polyneuropathy and hyperoxaluria type I, polycystic kidney and liver disease, and some tumors (epithelioid hemangioendothelioma and neuroendocrine tumors). Important efforts are now being undertaken to improve the quality and transplantability of extended criteria livers, in particular those arising from DCD, which represent the greatest opportunity to expand the donor pool. These efforts have to be addressed to adapt the organ preservation procedures, be it through the application of regional perfusion in situ or the use of machine perfusion preservation ex situ. Liver Transplantation 22 1259-1264 2016

  11. Exercise limitation following transplantation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Trevor J; McKenna, Michael J

    2012-07-01

    Organ transplantation is one of the medical miracles or the 20th century. It has the capacity to substantially improve exercise performance and quality of life in patients who are severely limited with chronic organ failure. We focus on the most commonly performed solid-organ transplants and describe peak exercise performance following recovery from transplantation. Across all of the common transplants, evaluated significant reduction in VO2peak is seen (typically renal and liver 65%-80% with heart and/or lung 50%-60% of predicted). Those with the lowest VO2peak pretransplant have the lowest VO2peak posttransplant. Overall very few patients have a VO2peak in the normal range. Investigation of the cause of the reduction of VO2peak has identified many factors pre- and posttransplant that may contribute. These include organ-specific factors in the otherwise well-functioning allograft (e.g., chronotropic incompetence in heart transplantation) as well as allograft dysfunction itself (e.g., chronic lung allograft dysfunction). However, looking across all transplants, a pattern emerges. A low muscle mass with qualitative change in large exercising skeletal muscle groups is seen pretransplant. Many factor posttransplant aggravate these changes or prevent them recovering, especially calcineurin antagonist drugs which are key immunosuppressing agents. This results in the reduction of VO2peak despite restoration of near normal function of the initially failing organ system. As such organ transplantation has provided an experiment of nature that has focused our attention on an important confounder of chronic organ failure-skeletal muscle dysfunction. PMID:23723030

  12. Liver transplantation in Germany.

    PubMed

    Tacke, Frank; Kroy, Daniela C; Barreiros, Ana Paula; Neumann, Ulf P

    2016-08-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is a well-accepted procedure for end-stage liver disease in Germany. In 2015, 1489 patients were admitted to the waiting list (including 1308 new admissions), with the leading etiologies being fibrosis and cirrhosis (n = 349), alcoholic liver disease (n = 302), and hepatobiliary malignancies (n = 220). Organ allocation in Germany is regulated within the Eurotransplant system based on urgency as expressed by the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score. In 2015, only 894 LTs (n = 48 from living donors) were performed at 23 German transplant centers, reflecting a shortage of organs. Several factors may contribute to the low number of organ donations. The German transplant legislation only accepts donation after brain death (not cardiac death), whereas advances in neurosurgery and a more frequently requested "palliative care" approach render fewer patients suitable as potential donors. The legislation further requires the active consent of the donor or first-degree relatives before donation. Ongoing debates within the German transplant field address the optimal management of patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and cholangiocarcinoma and measures to increase living donor transplantations. As a result of irregularities at mainly 4 German transplant centers that were exposed in 2012, guiding principles updated by the German authorities have since implemented strict rules (including internal and external auditing, the 8-eyes principle, mandatory repeated testing for alcohol consumption) to prohibit any manipulations in organ allocation. In conclusion, we will summarize important aspects on the management of LT in Germany, discuss legal and organizational aspects, and highlight challenges mainly related to the relative lack of organ donations, increasing numbers of extended criteria donors, and the peculiarities of the recipient patients. Liver Transplantation 22 1136-1142 2016 AASLD. PMID:27082951

  13. Heart Transplantation: Challenges Facing the Field

    PubMed Central

    Tonsho, Makoto; Michel, Sebastian; Ahmed, Zain; Alessandrini, Alessandro; Madsen, Joren C.

    2014-01-01

    There has been significant progress in the field of heart transplantation over the last 45 years. The 1-yr survival rates following heart transplantation have improved from 30% in the 1970s to almost 90% in the 2000s. However, there has been little change in long-term outcomes. This is mainly due to chronic rejection, malignancy, and the detrimental side effects of chronic immunosuppression. In addition, over the last decade, new challenges have arisen such as increasingly complicated recipients and antibody-mediated rejection. Most, if not all, of these obstacles to long-term survival could be prevented or ameliorated by the induction of transplant tolerance wherein the recipient’s immune system is persuaded not to mount a damaging immune response against donor antigens, thus eliminating the need for chronic immunosuppression. However, the heart, as opposed to other allografts like kidneys, appears to be a tolerance-resistant organ. Understanding why organs like kidneys and livers are prone to tolerance induction, whereas others like hearts and lungs are tolerance-resistant, could aid in our attempts to achieve long-term, immunosuppression-free survival in human heart transplant recipients. It could also advance the field of pig-to-human xenotransplantation, which, if successful, would eliminate the organ shortage problem. Of course, there are alternative futures to the field of heart transplantation that may include the application of total mechanical support, stem cells, or bioengineered whole organs. Which modality will be the first to reach the ultimate goal of achieving unlimited, long-term, circulatory support with minimal risk to longevity or lifestyle is unknown, but significant progress in being made in each of these areas. PMID:24789875

  14. Heart transplantation: challenges facing the field.

    PubMed

    Tonsho, Makoto; Michel, Sebastian; Ahmed, Zain; Alessandrini, Alessandro; Madsen, Joren C

    2014-05-01

    There has been significant progress in the field of heart transplantation over the last 45 years. The 1-yr survival rates following heart transplantation have improved from 30% in the 1970s to almost 90% in the 2000s. However, there has been little change in long-term outcomes. This is mainly due to chronic rejection, malignancy, and the detrimental side effects of chronic immunosuppression. In addition, over the last decade, new challenges have arisen such as increasingly complicated recipients and antibody-mediated rejection. Most, if not all, of these obstacles to long-term survival could be prevented or ameliorated by the induction of transplant tolerance wherein the recipient's immune system is persuaded not to mount a damaging immune response against donor antigens, thus eliminating the need for chronic immunosuppression. However, the heart, as opposed to other allografts like kidneys, appears to be a tolerance-resistant organ. Understanding why organs like kidneys and livers are prone to tolerance induction, whereas others like hearts and lungs are tolerance-resistant, could aid in our attempts to achieve long-term, immunosuppression-free survival in human heart transplant recipients. It could also advance the field of pig-to-human xenotransplantation, which, if successful, would eliminate the organ shortage problem. Of course, there are alternative futures to the field of heart transplantation that may include the application of total mechanical support, stem cells, or bioengineered whole organs. Which modality will be the first to reach the ultimate goal of achieving unlimited, long-term, circulatory support with minimal risk to longevity or lifestyle is unknown, but significant progress in being made in each of these areas. PMID:24789875

  15. Slow breathing and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Chaddha, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women worldwide. Much emphasis has been placed on the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. While depression and anxiety increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular disease also increases the risk of developing anxiety and depression. Thus, promoting optimal mental health may be important for both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Like lowering blood pressure, lipids, and body weight, lowering anger and hostility and improving depression and anxiety may also be an important intervention in preventive cardiology. As we strive to further improve cardiovascular outcomes, the next bridge to cross may be one of offering patients nonpharmacologic means for combating daily mental stress and promoting mental health, such as yoga and pranayama. Indeed, the best preventive cardiovascular medicine may be a blend of both Western and Eastern medicine. PMID:26170595

  16. The implication of protein malnutrition on cardiovascular control systems in rats

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Fernanda C.; de Menezes, Rodrigo C.; Chianca, Deoclécio A.

    2015-01-01

    The malnutrition in early life is associated with metabolic changes and cardiovascular impairment in adulthood. Deficient protein intake-mediated hypertension has been observed in clinical and experimental studies. In rats, protein malnutrition also increases the blood pressure and enhances heart rate and sympathetic activity. In this review, we discuss the effects of post-weaning protein malnutrition on the resting mean arterial pressure and heart rate and their variabilities, cardiovascular reflexes sensitivity, cardiac autonomic balance, sympathetic and renin-angiotensin activities and neural plasticity during adult life. These insights reveal an interesting prospect on the autonomic modulation underlying the cardiovascular imbalance and provide relevant information on preventing cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26388783

  17. Cardiovascular adaptation to spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.; Lathers, Claire M.

    1991-01-01

    Data are presented on the rate of adaptation of the human cardiovascular system to conditions of spaceflight, with particular attention given to data obtained during spaceflight in the U.S. Space Shuttle Program. It is pointed out that many of the cardiovascular changes that occurred during spaceflights that lasted from 2 to 11 days can be traced directly to changes in the body fluid volume. The beneficial effects of a fluid loading countermeasure (oral rehydration) and of the supine body position on the heart rate during the spaceflight are demonstrated. It is noted that, after hours or a few days of spaceflight, a state of adaptation is reached, in which the subject is well adapted and appropriately hydrated for the weightless environment. However, the return to the normal gravity of the earth leaves the individual especially sensitive to orthostatic stress.

  18. Cardiovascular responses to spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, A.; Pool, S. L.; Rambaut, P. C.

    1983-01-01

    The cardiovascular system's adaptive changes during and after spaceflight are discussed. Cephalic fluid shifts are demonstrated by photographs along with calf girth and leg volume changes. Inflight measurements show an increase in average resting heart rate and systolic blood pressure, and a sympathetic-parasympathetic neural imbalance. Postflight findings include a small but reversible decrease in the left ventricular muscle mass. Since 1980, NASA's research has emphasized cardiovascular deconditioning and countermeasures: hemodynamic changes, endocrine and neurohumoral aspects, etiologic factors, and lower body negative pressure devices. Though human beings acclimate to the space environment, questions concerning the immediate and long-term aspects of spaceflight need to be answered for adequate planning of extended space missions.

  19. Ethiopian cardiovascular studies

    PubMed Central

    Parry, E. H. O.; Gordon, C. G. I.

    1968-01-01

    No large series of patients with cardiovascular disease has yet been reported from Ethiopia, where only limited means for investigation are at present available. The authors therefore studied the types of heart disease detected by mass miniature radiography in a largely self-selected population at the Addis Ababa Tuberculosis Centre, and examined the value of this method of cardiac case-finding. Rheumatic heart disease occurred in 34.8% of patients, but syphilitic aortitis, hypertension, “cardiomyopathy” and tuberculous pericarditis were also common. Endomyocardial fibrosis was not seen; this may be a further significant fact in the search for its cause. Mass miniature radiography is valuable for detecting symptomatic patients with the cardiovascular diseases mentioned above. The technique described in this paper could be used in other developing countries as it uses a single method of screening for 2 groups of diseases. ImagesFIG. 2 PMID:5306099

  20. Cardiovascular adaptation to spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.; Watenpaugh, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    This article reviews recent flight and ground-based studies of cardiovascular adaptation to spaceflight. Prominent features of microgravity exposure include loss of gravitational pressures, relatively low venous pressures, headward fluid shifts, plasma volume loss, and postflight orthostatic intolerance and reduced exercise capacity. Many of these short-term responses to microgravity extend themselves during long-duration microgravity exposure and may be explained by altered pressures (blood and tissue) and fluid balance in local tissues nourished by the cardiovascular system. In this regard, it is particularly noteworthy that tissues of the lower body (e.g., foot) are well adapted to local hypertension on Earth, whereas tissues of the upper body (e.g., head) are not as well adapted to increase in local blood pressure. For these and other reasons, countermeasures for long-duration flight should include reestablishment of higher, Earth-like blood pressures in the lower body.

  1. Cardiovascular Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Andrew M.; Vinci, Lisa M.; Okwuosa, Tochi M.; Chase, Ayana R.; Huang, Elbert S.

    2008-01-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities in cardiovascular health care are well documented. Promising approaches to disparity reduction are increasingly described in literature published since 1995, but reports are fragmented by risk, condition, population, and setting. The authors conducted a systematic review of clinically oriented studies in communities of color that addressed hypertension, hyperlipidemia, physical inactivity, tobacco, and two major cardiovascular conditions, coronary artery disease and heart failure. Virtually no literature specifically addressed disparity reduction. The greatest focus has been African American populations, with relatively little work in Hispanic, Asian, and Native American populations. The authors found 62 interventions, 27 addressing hypertension, 9 lipids, 18 tobacco use, 8 physical inactivity, and 7 heart failure. Only 1 study specifically addressed postmyocardial infarction care. Data supporting the value of registries, multidisciplinary teams, and community outreach were found across several conditions. Interventions addressing care transitions, using telephonic outreach, and promoting medication access and adherence merit further exploration. PMID:17881625

  2. Lycopene and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Arab, L; Steck, S

    2000-06-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that lycopene, a carotenoid without provitamin A activity found in high concentrations in a small set of plant foods, has significant antioxidant potential in vitro and may play a role in preventing prostate cancer and cardiovascular disease in humans. Tomato products, including ketchup, tomato juice, and pizza sauce, are the richest sources of lycopene in the US diet, accounting for >80% of the total lycopene intake of Americans. Unlike other carotenoids, lycopene is not consistently lower among smokers than among nonsmokers, suggesting that any possible preventive activity is not as an antioxidant. Instead, lycopene may have a cholesterol synthesis-inhibiting effect and may enhance LDL degradation. Available evidence suggests that intimal wall thickness and risk of myocardial infarction are reduced in persons with higher adipose tissue concentrations of lycopene. The question of whether lycopene helps to prevent cardiovascular disease can only be answered by a trial specifically evaluating its effectiveness in this area. PMID:10837319

  3. Winter Cardiovascular Diseases Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Fares, Auda

    2013-01-01

    This paper review seasonal patterns across twelve cardiovascular diseases: Deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, aortic dissection and rupture, stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, hypertension, heart failure, angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, sudden cardiac death, venricular arrythmia and atrial fibrillation, and discuss a possible cause of the occurrence of these diseases. There is a clear seasonal trend of cardiovascular diseases, with the highest incidence occurring during the colder winter months, which have been described in many countries. This phenomenon likely contributes to the numbers of deaths occurring in winter. The implications of this finding are important for testing the relative importance of the proposed mechanisms. Understanding the influence of season and other factors is essential when seeking to implement effective public health measures. PMID:23724401

  4. Cardiovascular instrumentation for spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schappell, R. T.; Polhemus, J. T.; Ganiaris, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    The observation mechanisms dealing with pressure, flow, morphology, temperature, etc. are discussed. The approach taken in the performance of this study was to (1) review ground and space-flight data on cardiovascular function, including earlier related ground-based and space-flight animal studies, Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, and recent bed-rest studies, (2) review cardiovascular measurement parameters required to assess individual performance and physiological alternations during space flight, (3) perform an instrumentation survey including a literature search as well as personal contact with the applicable investigators, (4) assess instrumentation applicability with respect to the established criteria, and (5) recommend future research and development activity. It is concluded that, for the most part, the required instrumentation technology is available but that mission-peculiar criteria will require modifications to adapt the applicable instrumentation to a space-flight configuration.

  5. Immunity, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the major cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD), is a chronic inflammatory condition with immune competent cells in lesions producing mainly pro-inflammatory cytokines. Dead cells and oxidized forms of low density lipoproteins (oxLDL) are abundant. The major direct cause of CVD appears to be rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. oxLDL has proinflammatory and immune-stimulatory properties, causes cell death at higher concentrations and contains inflammatory phospholipids with phosphorylcholine (PC) as an interesting epitope. Antibodies against PC (anti-PC) may be atheroprotective, one mechanism being anti-inflammatory. Bacteria and virus have been discussed, but it has been difficult to find direct evidence, and antibiotic trials have not been successful. Heat shock proteins could be one major target for atherogenic immune reactions. More direct causes of plaque rupture include pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and lipid mediators. To prove that inflammation is a cause of atherosclerosis and CVD, clinical studies with anti-inflammatory and/or immune-modulatory treatment are needed. The potential causes of immune reactions and inflammation in atherosclerosis and how inflammation can be targeted therapeutically to provide novel treatments for CVD are reviewed. PMID:23635324

  6. Cardiovascular disease in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cannarile, Francesca; Valentini, Valentina; Mirabelli, Giulia; Alunno, Alessia; Terenzi, Riccardo; Luccioli, Filippo; Bartoloni, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) system involvement is a frequent complication of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It still remains unclear if a premature atherosclerosis (ATS) occurs even in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Although microvascular disease is a hallmark of SSc, in the last few years a number of studies highlighted a higher prevalence of macrovascular disease in SSc patients in comparison to healthy individuals and these data have been correlated with a poorer prognosis. The mechanisms promoting ATS in SSc are not fully understood, but it is believed to be secondary to multi-system organ inflammation, endothelial wall damage and vasculopathy. Both traditional risk factors and endothelial dysfunction have been proposed to participate to the onset and progression of ATS in such patients. In particular, endothelial cell injury induced by anti-endothelial antibodies, ischemia/reperfusion damage, immune-mediated cytotoxicity represent the main causes of vascular injury together with an impaired vascular repair mechanism that determine a defective vasculogenesis. Aim of this review is to analyse both causes and clinical manifestations of macrovascular involvement and ATS in SSc. PMID:25705640

  7. Gout in solid organ transplantation: a challenging clinical problem.

    PubMed

    Stamp, Lisa; Searle, Martin; O'Donnell, John; Chapman, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Hyperuricaemia occurs in 5-84% and gout in 1.7-28% of recipients of solid organ transplants. Gout may be severe and crippling, and may hinder the improved quality of life gained through organ transplantation. Risk factors for gout in the general population include hyperuricaemia, obesity, weight gain, hypertension and diuretic use. In transplant recipients, therapy with ciclosporin (cyclosporin) is an additional risk factor. Hyperuricaemia is recognised as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease; however, whether anti-hyperuricaemic therapy reduces cardiovascular events remains to be determined. Dietary advice is important in the management of gout and patients should be educated to partake in a low-calorie diet with moderate carbohydrate restriction and increased proportional intake of protein and unsaturated fat. While gout is curable, its pharmacological management in transplant recipients is complicated by the risk of adverse effects and potentially severe interactions between immunosuppressive and hypouricaemic drugs. NSAIDs, colchicine and corticosteroids may be used to treat acute gouty attacks. NSAIDs have effects on renal haemodynamics, and must be used with caution and with close monitoring of renal function. Colchicine myotoxicty is of particular concern in transplant recipients with renal impairment or when used in combination with ciclosporin. Long-term urate-lowering therapy is required to promote dissolution of uric acid crystals, thereby preventing recurrent attacks of gout. Allopurinol should be used with caution because of its interaction with azathioprine, which results in bone marrow suppression. Substitution of mycophenylate mofetil for azathioprine avoids this interaction. Uricosuric agents, such as probenecid, are ineffective in patients with renal impairment. The exception is benzbromarone, which is effective in those with a creatinine clearance >25 mL/min. Benzbromarone is indicated in allopurinol-intolerant patients with

  8. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Metabolic Syndrome after Liver Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Gitto, Stefano; Villa, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplant is the unique curative therapy for patients with acute liver failure or end-stage liver disease, with or without hepatocellular carcinoma. Increase of body weight, onset of insulin resistance and drug-induced alterations of metabolism are reported in liver transplant recipients. In this context, post-transplant diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and arterial hypertension can be often diagnosed. Multifactorial illnesses occurring in the post-transplant period represent significant causes of morbidity and mortality. This is especially true for metabolic syndrome. Non-alcoholic steatosis and steatohepatitis are hepatic manifestations of metabolic syndrome and after liver transplant both recurrent and de novo steatosis can be found. Usually, post-transplant steatosis shows an indolent outcome with few cases of fibrosis progression. However, in the post-transplant setting, both metabolic syndrome and steatosis might play a key role in the stratification of morbidity and mortality risk, being commonly associated with cardiovascular disease. The single components of metabolic syndrome can be treated with targeted drugs while lifestyle intervention is the only reasonable therapeutic approach for transplant patients with non-alcoholic steatosis or steatohepatitis. PMID:27049380

  9. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Key Considerations Before and After Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yuval A; Berg, Carl L; Moylan, Cynthia A

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common etiology of chronic liver disease in developed countries and is on trajectory to become the leading indication for liver transplantation in the USA and much of the world. Patients with NAFLD cirrhosis awaiting liver transplant face unique challenges and increased risk for waiting list stagnation and dropout due to burdensome comorbidities including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and kidney disease. Thus far, patients transplanted for NAFLD cirrhosis have excellent mid- and long-term patient and graft survival, but concerns regarding short-term morbidity and mortality continue to exist. Post-liver transplantation, NAFLD occurs as both a recurrent and de novo manifestation, each with unique outcomes. NAFLD in the donor population is of concern given the growing demand for liver transplantation and mounting pressure to expand the donor pool. This review addresses key issues surrounding NAFLD as an indication for transplantation, including its increasing prevalence, unique patient demographics, outcomes related to liver transplantation, development of post-liver transplantation NAFLD, and NAFLD in the liver donor population. It also highlights exciting areas where further research is needed, such as the role of bariatric surgery and preconditioning of marginal donor grafts. PMID:26815171

  10. Smoking after cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Botha, P; Peaston, R; White, K; Forty, J; Dark, J H; Parry, G

    2008-04-01

    Although smoking cessation is a prerequisite prior to listing for cardiac transplantation, some patients return to smoking after recovery. We have covertly assessed the smoking habits of our cardiac transplant recipients (with ethical approval) since 1993 by measuring urinary cotinine: a level of >500 ng/mL signifying continued tobacco use. We retrospectively analyzed survival, causes of death and the development of graft coronary artery disease (GCAD) with respect to the number of positive and negative cotinine levels. One hundred four of 380 (27.4%) patients tested positive for active smoking at some point posttransplant, and 57 (15.0%) tested positive repeatedly. Smokers suffered significantly more deaths due to GCAD (21.2% vs. 12.3%, p < 0.05), and due to malignancy (16.3% vs. 5.8%, p < 0.001). In univariate analysis, smoking after heart transplantation shortened median survival from 16.28 years to 11.89 years. After correcting for the effects of pretransplant smoking in time-dependent multivariate analysis, posttransplant smoking remained the most significant determinant of overall mortality (p < 0.00001). We conclude that tobacco smoking after cardiac transplantation significantly impacts survival by accelerating the development of graft vasculopathy and malignancy. We hope that this information will deter cardiac transplant recipients from relapsing, and intensify efforts in improving cessation rates. PMID:18324978

  11. PREGNANCY AND RENAL TRANSPLANTATION.

    PubMed

    Atallah, David; El Kassis, Nadine; Salameh, Charbel; Safi, Joelle; Bejjani, Lina; Lutfallah, Fouad; Ghaname, Wadih; Moukarzel, Maroun

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy is common nowadays in kidney transplant female patients because of medical and surgical advances. However, pregnancy is a high risk one in these patients. Fertility is rapidly restored after the transplantation; thus, contraception is a good option in the first year. Adding to that, pregnancy can endanger the allograft function in the presence of hypertension, a moderate to severe kidney disease and proteinuria. Medical complications are more prevalent in kidney transplant population, such as infections, gestational hypertension and diabetes and anemia. Low birth weight infants and premature delivery are two other major concerns in this population. Acute rejection of the allograft is another major complication that can be avoided with close monitoring of the graft and convenient immunosuppression. Immunosuppressive drugs must be continued during pregnancy except for mycophenolic acid and sirolimus that can be teratogen. Delivery of kidney transplant patients should be vaginal and spontaneous. Cesarean section should be reserved for obstetrical indications. Prophylactic antibiotics should be administered for every invasive procedure. Patients treated with corticosteroids can breastfeed their babies. Kidney donating women can have a safe pregnancy but with a slight risk of gestational diabetes and hypertension. In summary, a multidisciplinary medical team should follow pregnant kidney transplant patients in a tertiary center. International and national registries are a must to collect data concerning this particular high-risk population in order to solve unanswered questions. PMID:26591192

  12. [Renal transplantation: ethical issues].

    PubMed

    Mamzer-Bruneel, Marie-France; Laforêt, Emmanuelle Grand; Kreis, Henri; Thervet, Éric; Martinez, Frank; Snanoudj, Renaud; Hervé, Christian; Legendre, Christophe

    2012-12-01

    One of the most significant advances in medicine during the last 50 years is the development of organ transplantation. In the context of chronic kidney diseases, renal transplantation offers patients a better clinical outcome than other treatment options. However, the benefits of organ transplantation have not been maximized due to an inadequate supply of organs for transplantation. Despite the establishment of elaborate legal rules for organs procurement, both on deceased and living donors in numerous countries, ethical concerns remain. Most of them are consequences of the strategies implemented or proposed to address the so-called organ shortage. The involvement of society in these complex problems is crucial as numerous questions emerge: could actual state of organ procurement change? Is it possible and/or realistic to increase the number of organs, with respects to living donors or deceased persons? Is the shortage an indicator to limit the use of kidney transplantation? How do we maintain efficiency and justice, in this context. PMID:23168353

  13. Organ Transplantation: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... contact. What questions should I ask the transplant team? What kind of medical tests are done in ... listing? Who are the members of the transplant team and what are their jobs? How many attending ...

  14. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Teens > Stem Cell Transplants Print ... Does it Take to Recover? Coping What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  15. About the Operation: Liver Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Liver Transplant There are two very different surgical approaches to liver transplantation: the orthotopic and the heterotopic approach, both of ...

  16. About the Operation: Liver Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Liver Transplant There are two very different surgical approaches to liver transplantation: the orthotopic and the heterotopic approach, both ...

  17. Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... comment. View all news articles Organ Procurement & Transplantation Network U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health ... Privacy Policy Questions? Contact Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network United Network for Organ Sharing Post Office Box ...

  18. The Role of Immunogenicity in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Michael; Virtue, Anthony T.; Pansuria, Meghanaben; Liu, Jingshan; Xiong, Xinyu; Fang, Pu; Meng, Shu; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Recently, many of the complexities associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) have been unlocked. However, despite these breakthroughs, CVD and its related complications are the leading contributors of morbidity and mortality worldwide, which indicates the shortcomings of current treatment regimens and the need for continued research. Published data within the field clearly indicates that CVD are built on inflammation and autoimmune platforms, though a strong, fundamental understanding of the mechanisms remains elusive. Areas such as the mechanisms underlying increased immunogenicity of self-proteins in the cardiovascular system, the roles of immunogenic auto-antigens in eliciting inflammatory autoimmune responses, and the immunosuppressive mechanisms involved in controlling inflammatory and autoimmune cardiovascular diseases remain to be well-understood. We will delve into these topics and the advancements made within the field in this review. Specifically, we will concentrate on the innate and adaptive immune responses mediating immunogenicity; the mechanisms of inflammation and autoimmunity in atherogenesis; the mechanisms of inflammation and autoimmunity in diabetic atherosclerosis; immunogenicity and stem cell therapy; as well as immunogenicity and immunosuppression. In depth examination and comprehension of these topics will provide insight into the recent progress of the field and bring to the forefront potentially novel therapeutic avenues. PMID:24511305

  19. Promethazine affects autonomic cardiovascular mechanisms minimally.

    PubMed

    Brown, T E; Eckberg, D L

    1997-08-01

    Promethazine hydrochloride, Phenergan, is a phenothiazine derivative with antihistaminic (H1), sedative, antiemetic, anticholinergic, and antimotion sickness properties. These properties have made promethazine a candidate for use in environments such as microgravity, which provoke emesis and motion sickness. Recently, we evaluated carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses during two Space Shuttle missions 18 to 20 hr after the 50 mg intramuscular administration of promethazine. Because the effects of promethazine on autonomic cardiovascular mechanisms in general and baroreflex function in particular were not known, we were unable to exclude a possible influence of promethazine on our results. Our purpose was to determine the ground-based effects of promethazine on autonomic cardiovascular control. Because of promethazine's antihistaminic and anticholinergic properties, we expected that a 50-mg intramuscular injection of promethazine would affect sympathetically and vagally mediated cardiovascular mechanisms. Eight healthy young subjects, five men and three women, were studied at rest in recumbency. All reported drowsiness as a result of the promethazine injection; most also reported nervous excitation, dry mouth, and fatigue. Three subjects had significant reactions: two reported excessive anxiety and one reported dizziness. Measurements were performed immediately prior to injection and 3.1 +/- 0.1 and 19.5 +/- 0.4 hr postinjection. We found no significant effect of promethazine on resting mean R-R interval, arterial pressure, R-R interval power spectra, carotid baroreflex function, and venous plasma catecholamine levels. PMID:9262349

  20. T cell senescence and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hee Tae; Park, Sungha; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Lee, Won-Woo

    2016-08-01

    Age-related changes in the immune system, commonly termed "immunosenescence," contribute to deterioration of the immune response and fundamentally impact the health and survival of elderly individuals. Immunosenescence affects both the innate and adaptive immune systems; however, the most notable changes are in T cell immunity and include thymic involution, the collapse of T cell receptor (TCR) diversity, an imbalance in T cell populations, and the clonal expansion of senescent T cells. Senescent T cells have the ability to produce large quantities of proinflammatory cytokines and cytotoxic mediators; thus, they have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory diseases. Recently, an increasing body of evidence has suggested that senescent T cells also have pathogenic potential in cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and myocardial infarction, underscoring the detrimental roles of these cells in various chronic inflammatory responses. Given that cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death worldwide, there is great interest in understanding the contribution of age-related immunological changes to its pathogenesis. In this review, we discuss general features of age-related alterations in T cell immunity and the possible roles of senescent T cells in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. PMID:26188489

  1. Promethazine affects autonomic cardiovascular mechanisms minimally

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, T. E.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    Promethazine hydrochloride, Phenergan, is a phenothiazine derivative with antihistaminic (H1), sedative, antiemetic, anticholinergic, and antimotion sickness properties. These properties have made promethazine a candidate for use in environments such as microgravity, which provoke emesis and motion sickness. Recently, we evaluated carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses during two Space Shuttle missions 18 to 20 hr after the 50 mg intramuscular administration of promethazine. Because the effects of promethazine on autonomic cardiovascular mechanisms in general and baroreflex function in particular were not known, we were unable to exclude a possible influence of promethazine on our results. Our purpose was to determine the ground-based effects of promethazine on autonomic cardiovascular control. Because of promethazine's antihistaminic and anticholinergic properties, we expected that a 50-mg intramuscular injection of promethazine would affect sympathetically and vagally mediated cardiovascular mechanisms. Eight healthy young subjects, five men and three women, were studied at rest in recumbency. All reported drowsiness as a result of the promethazine injection; most also reported nervous excitation, dry mouth, and fatigue. Three subjects had significant reactions: two reported excessive anxiety and one reported dizziness. Measurements were performed immediately prior to injection and 3.1 +/- 0.1 and 19.5 +/- 0.4 hr postinjection. We found no significant effect of promethazine on resting mean R-R interval, arterial pressure, R-R interval power spectra, carotid baroreflex function, and venous plasma catecholamine levels.

  2. Solid organ donation and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2012-01-01

    Medical imaging plays a key role in solid organ donation and transplantation. In addition to confirming the clinical diagnosis of brain death, imaging examinations are used to assess potential organ donors and recipients, evaluate donated organs, and monitor transplantation outcomes. This article introduces the history, biology, ethics, and institutions of organ donation and transplantation medicine. The article also discusses current and emerging imaging applications in the transplantation field and the controversial role of neuroimaging to confirm clinically diagnosed brain death. PMID:22461345

  3. Neurological complications of transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pustavoitau, Aliaksei; Bhardwaj, Anish; Stevens, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Recipients of solid organ or hematopoietic cell transplants are at risk of life-threatening neurological disorders including encephalopathy, seizures, infections and tumors of the central nervous system, stroke, central pontine myelinolysis, and neuromuscular disorders-often requiring admission to, or occurring in, the intensive care unit (ICU). Many of these complications are linked directly or indirectly to immunosuppressive therapy. However, neurological disorders may also result from graft versus host disease, or be an expression of the underlying disease which prompted transplantation, as well as injury induced during radiation, chemotherapy, surgery, and ICU stay. In rare cases, neuroinfectious pathogens may be transmitted with the transplanted tissue or organ. Diagnosis may be a challenge because clinical symptoms and findings on neuroimaging lack specificity, and a biological specimen or tissue diagnosis is often needed for definitive diagnosis. Management is centered on preventing further neurological injury, etiology-targeted therapy, and balancing the benefits and toxicities of specific immunosuppressive agents. PMID:21764765

  4. Hepatitis E in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Lhomme, Sebastien; Izopet, Jacques; Kamar, Nassim

    2016-03-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) has a worldwide distribution and is known to cause acute and fulminant hepatitis. However, over the last few years, it has been shown to also cause chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis in immunosuppressed patients, especially solid-organ-transplant patients. In immunocompetent and immunosuppressed patients, HEV is also associated with extra-hepatic manifestations, such as neurological symptoms and kidney injury. Unfortunately, a diagnostic assay for HEV infection is still not available in all countries. Reduction of immunosuppression is the first-line therapeutic option for organ-transplant patients with chronic hepatitis. In addition, ribavirin is highly efficient at treating chronic HEV infection. In this comprehensive review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding HEV diagnosis, its natural history, clinical manifestations, and treatments in patients with a solid-organ transplant. PMID:26838163

  5. Pediatric liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Spada, Marco; Riva, Silvia; Maggiore, Giuseppe; Cintorino, Davide; Gridelli, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    In previous decades, pediatric liver transplantation has become a state-of-the-art operation with excellent success and limited mortality. Graft and patient survival have continued to improve as a result of improvements in medical, surgical and anesthetic management, organ availability, immunosuppression, and identification and treatment of postoperative complications. The utilization of split-liver grafts and living-related donors has provided more organs for pediatric patients. Newer immunosuppression regimens, including induction therapy, have had a significant impact on graft and patient survival. Future developments of pediatric liver transplantation will deal with long-term follow-up, with prevention of immunosuppression-related complications and promotion of as normal growth as possible. This review describes the state-of-the-art in pediatric liver transplantation. PMID:19222089

  6. Tofacitinab in Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zand, Martin S.

    2013-01-01

    Tofacitinib (tositinib, CP-690,550) is a small molecule inhibitor of Janus associated kinases, primarily JAK3 and JAK2, which inhibits cytokine signaling through the IL-2Rγ chain. In this article, we review the mechanism of action of tofacitinib, and pre-clinical and clinical data regarding its use in solid organ transplantation thus far. It is hoped that tofacitinib may form the basis for calcineurin-free immunosuppression, improving renal function while eliminating calcineurin inhibitor renal toxicity. Current studies suggest that tofacitinib is an effective immunosuppressive agent for renal transplantation, but it's use in current protocols carries an increased risk of CMV, BK, and EBV viral infection, anemia and leukopenia, and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:23849222

  7. Heart-lung transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100147.htm Heart-lung transplant - series To use the sharing features on this ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heart Transplantation Lung Transplantation A.D.A.M., Inc. is ...

  8. Altered cardiovascular control in preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Viskari, Suvi; Andersson, Sture; Hytinantti, Timo; Kirjavainen, Turkka

    2007-05-01

    Vestibulo-mediated cardiovascular control in hazardous situations is important. Our hypothesis is that the prerequisite for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is impaired vestibulo-mediated cardiovascular control. Prematurity is a risk factor for SIDS, and postnatal intermittent hypoxia may contribute to this risk. We studied heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) responses in 10 infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) who were born at 27 +/- 2.4 (23-30) wk of gestation. Twenty healthy term infants served as controls. Cardiovascular tests were performed under polysomnographic control during slow-wave sleep (SWS) at a corrected age of 12 +/- 3.5 (7-19) wk. Control infants showed biphasic HR and BP responses to side motion with an immediate increase followed by a modest decrease and return to baseline. Compared with the controls, half of the BPD infants had altered BP responses (p < 0.005) without an early increase, followed by a more prominent decrease in BP. BPD infants also presented with a greater variability in BP responses to head-up tilts than did the controls (p < 0.001). In conclusion, these findings suggest that some BPD infants have impaired vestibular sympathoreflex-mediated cardiovascular control. This dysfunction may become critical in life-threatening situations. PMID:17413872

  9. THEMES OF LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Starzl, Thomas E.; Fung, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Liver transplantation was the product of 5 interlocking themes. These began in 1958-59 with canine studies of then theoretical hepatotrophic molecules in portal venous blood (Theme I) and with the contemporaneous parallel development of liver and multivisceral transplant models (Theme II). Further Theme I investigations showed that insulin was the principal, although not the only, portal hepatotrophic factor. In addition to resolving long-standing controversies about the pathophysiology of portacaval shunt, the hepatotrophic studies blazed new trails in the regulation of liver size, function, and regeneration. They also targeted inborn metabolic errors (e.g. familial hyperlipoproteinemia) whose palliation by portal diversion presaged definitive correction with liver replacement. Clinical use of the Theme II transplant models depended on multiple drug immunosuppression (Theme III, Immunology), guided by an empirical algorithm of pattern recognition and therapeutic response. Successful liver replacement was first accomplished in 1967 with azathioprine, prednisone, and ALG. With this regimen, the world’s longest surviving liver recipient is now 40 years postoperative. Incremental improvements in survival outcome occurred (Theme IV) when azathioprine was replaced by cyclosporine (1979) which was replaced in turn by tacrolimus (1989). However, the biologic meaning of alloengraftment remained enigmatic until multilineage donor leukocyte microchimerism was discovered in 1992 in long surviving organ recipients. Seminal mechanisms were then identified (clonal exhaustion-deletion and immune ignorance) that linked organ engraftment and the acquired tolerance of bone marrow transplantation and eventually clarified the relationship of transplantation immunology to the immunology of infections, neoplasms, and autoimmune disorders. With this insight, better strategies of immunosuppression have evolved. As liver and other kinds of organ transplantation became accepted as

  10. History of Clinical Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of transplantation has seen the development of increasingly potent immunosuppressive agents, progressively better methods of tissue and organ preservation, refinements in histocompatibility matching, and numerous innovations in surgical techniques. Such efforts in combination ultimately made it possible to successfully engraft all of the organs and bone marrow cells in humans. At a more fundamental level, however, the transplantation enterprise hinged on two seminal turning points. The first was the recognition by Billingham, Brent, and Medawar in 1953 that it was possible to induce chimerism-associated neonatal tolerance deliberately. This discovery escalated over the next 15 years to the first successful bone marrow transplantations in humans in 1968. The second turning point was the demonstration during the early 1960s that canine and human organ allografts could self-induce tolerance with the aid of immunosuppression. By the end of 1962, however, it had been incorrectly concluded that turning points one and two involved different immune mechanisms. The error was not corrected until well into the 1990s. In this historical account, the vast literature that sprang up during the intervening 30 years has been summarized. Although admirably documenting empiric progress in clinical transplantation, its failure to explain organ allograft acceptance predestined organ recipients to lifetime immunosuppression and precluded fundamental changes in the treatment policies. After it was discovered in 1992 that long-surviving organ transplant recipients had persistent microchimerism, it was possible to see the mechanistic commonality of organ and bone marrow transplantation. A clarifying central principle of immunology could then be synthesized with which to guide efforts to induce tolerance systematically to human tissues and perhaps ultimately to xenografts. PMID:10833242

  11. Themes of liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Starzl, Thomas E; Fung, John J

    2010-06-01

    Liver transplantation was the product of five interlocking themes. These began in 1958-1959 with canine studies of then theoretical hepatotrophic molecules in portal venous blood (Theme I) and with the contemporaneous parallel development of liver and multivisceral transplant models (Theme II). Further Theme I investigations showed that insulin was the principal, although not the only, portal hepatotrophic factor. In addition to resolving long-standing controversies about the pathophysiology of portacaval shunt, the hepatotrophic studies blazed new trails in the regulation of liver size, function, and regeneration. They also targeted inborn metabolic errors (e.g., familial hyperlipoproteinemia) whose palliation by portal diversion presaged definitive correction with liver replacement. Clinical use of the Theme II transplant models depended on multiple drug immunosuppression (Theme III, Immunology), guided by an empirical algorithm of pattern recognition and therapeutic response. Successful liver replacement was first accomplished in 1967 with azathioprine, prednisone, and antilymphoid globulin. With this regimen, the world's longest surviving liver recipient is now 40 years postoperative. Incremental improvements in survival outcome occurred (Theme IV) when azathioprine was replaced by cyclosporine (1979), which was replaced in turn by tacrolimus (1989). However, the biologic meaning of alloengraftment remained enigmatic until multilineage donor leukocyte microchimerism was discovered in 1992 in long-surviving organ recipients. Seminal mechanisms were then identified (clonal exhaustion-deletion and immune ignorance) that linked organ engraftment and the acquired tolerance of bone marrow transplantation and eventually clarified the relationship of transplantation immunology to the immunology of infections, neoplasms, and autoimmune disorders. With this insight, better strategies of immunosuppression have evolved. As liver and other kinds of organ transplantation

  12. [Research Progress of NOS3 Participation in Regulatory Mechanisms of Cardiovascular Diseases].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ting; Chi, Qingjia; Wang, Guixue

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease has been a major threat to human's health and lives for many years. It is of great importance to explore the mechanisms and develop strategies to prevent the pathogenesis. Generally, cardiovascular disease is associated with endothelial dysfunction, which is closely related to the nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilatation. The release of NO is regulated by NOS3 gene in mammals' vascular system. A great deal of evidences have shown that the polymorphism and epigenetic of NOS3 gene play vital roles in the pathological process of cardiovascular disease. To gain insights into the role of NOS3 in the cardiovascular diseases, we reviewed the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of cardiovascular diseases in this paper, including the uncoupling of NOS3 protein, epigenetic and polymorphism of NOS3 gene. The review can also offer possible strategies to prevent and treat cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27382763

  13. Flash fire and slow burn: women's cardiovascular reactivity and recovery following hostile and benevolent sexism.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Kristen; Burgess, Kaleena D; Bosson, Jennifer K

    2015-04-01

    Women's cardiovascular responses to sexist treatment are documented, but researchers have yet to consider these responses separately as a function of sexism type (hostile vs. benevolent). This study demonstrates distinct effects of hostile and benevolent sexism for women's cardiovascular responses that indicate increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Female participants performed a demanding insight task after exposure to a male researcher who offered them a hostilely sexist, benevolently sexist, or nonsexist comment. Women displayed heightened cardiovascular reactivity (increases from baseline) during the task following hostile sexism, and they displayed impaired cardiovascular recovery (return to baseline after the task) following benevolent sexism. The effects seen in the hostile condition were mediated by self-reported anger. These findings indicate that women's affective responses to hostile and benevolent sexism differ but that exposure to both forms of sexism may have negative cardiovascular consequences. PMID:25844626

  14. "Infectious" Transplantation Tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shixin; Cobbold, Stephen P.; Pope, Heather; Elliott, James; Kioussis, Dimitris; Davies, Joanna; Waldmann, Herman

    1993-02-01

    The maintenance of transplantation tolerance induced in adult mice after short-term treatment with nonlytic monoclonal antibodies to CD4 and CD8 was investigated. CD4^+ T cells from tolerant mice disabled naive lymphocytes so that they too could not reject the graft. The naive lymphocytes that had been so disabled also became tolerant and, in turn, developed the capacity to specifically disable other naive lymphocytes. This process of "infectious" tolerance explains why no further immunosuppression was needed to maintain long-term transplantation tolerance.

  15. Obesity and liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ayloo, Subhashini; Armstrong, John; Hurton, Scott; Molinari, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The percentage of overweight and obese patients (OPs) waiting for a liver transplant continues to increase. Despite the significant advances occurred in bariatric medicine, obesity is still considered a relative contraindication to liver transplantation (LT). The main aim of this review is to appraise the literature on the outcomes of OPs undergoing LT, treatments that might reduce their weight before, during or after surgery, and discuss some of the controversies and limitations of the current knowledge with the intent of highlighting areas where future research is needed. PMID:26421262

  16. Xenogeneic lung transplantation models

    PubMed Central

    Burdorf, Lars; Azimzadeh, Agnes M.; Pierson, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Study of lung xenografts has proven useful to understand the remaining barriers to successful transplantation of other organ xenografts. In this chapter, the history and current status of lung xenotransplantation will be briefly reviewed and two different experimental models, the ex vivo porcine-to-human lung perfusion and the in vivo xenogeneic lung transplantation, will be presented. We will focus on the technical details of these lung xenograft models in sufficient detail, list the needed materials and mention analysis techniques to allow others to adopt them with minimal learning curve. PMID:22565996

  17. Cardiovascular risk in pediatric-onset rheumatological diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are becoming major health concerns for adults with inflammatory rheumatic diseases. The enhanced atherogenesis in this patient population is promoted by the exposure to traditional risk factors as well as nontraditional cardiovascular insults, such as corticosteroid therapy, chronic inflammation and autoantibodies. Despite definite differences between many adult-onset and pediatric-onset rheumatologic diseases, it is extremely likely that atherosclerosis will become the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in this pediatric patient population. Because cardiovascular events are rare at this young age, surrogate measures of atherosclerosis must be used. The three major noninvasive vascular measures of early atherosclerosis - namely, flow-mediated dilatation, carotid intima-media thickness and pulse wave velocity - can be performed easily on children. Few studies have explored the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and even fewer have used the surrogate vascular measures to document signs of early atherosclerosis in children with pediatric-onset rheumatic diseases. The objective of this review is to provide an overview on cardiovascular risk and early atherosclerosis in pediatric-onset systemic lupus erythematosus, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and juvenile dermatomyositis patients, and to review cardiovascular preventive strategies that should be considered in this population. PMID:23731870

  18. Progestins and cardiovascular risk markers.

    PubMed

    Sitruk-Ware, R

    2000-01-01

    Several risks are attributed to progestins as a class-effect; however, the progestins used in hormone replacement therapy (HRT) have varying pharmacologic properties and do not induce the same side effects. Natural progesterone (P) and some of its derivatives, such as the 19-norprogesterones, do not exert any androgenic effect and, hence, have no negative effect on the lipids. On the other hand, the 19-nortestosterone derivatives and even some 17-hydroxyprogesterones have a partial androgenic effect, which may explain some of the negative effects observed on surrogate markers of cardiovascular risk. The relevance of the lipid changes induced by sex steroids has been questioned, and studies in the female cynomolgous monkey have not shown a direct relationship to atherosclerosis. Results suggest that estrogens (E) have antiatherogenic effects and that P does not reverse the beneficial effect of estradiol. Also, sex hormones modulate the vasomotor response of the main arteries. E preserves the normal endothelium-mediated dilation of coronary arteries, and P does not reverse this potential cardioprotective mechanism. In the same animal model, the addition of cyclic or continuous medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) to E inhibited vasodilatation by 50%, while nomegestrol acetate did not diminish the E-induced vasodilatation. Not all progestins act similarly on vasomotion or affect cardiovascular risk factors in the same way. Progestins, such as MPA or norethisterone acetate (NETA), exert a partial detrimental effect on the beneficial actions of estrogens with regard to lipid changes, atheroma development, or vasomotion. In contrast, progesterone itself does not have this inhibitory effect on lipid changes and vascular reactivity in animal models or on exercise-induced myocardial ischemia in humans. Nonandrogenic molecules of P itself and of derivatives, such as 19-norprogesterones, would appear neutral on the vessels. Several ongoing randomized controlled trials of HRT are

  19. Cardiovascular comorbidity in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Nurmohamed, Michael T; Heslinga, Maaike; Kitas, George D

    2015-12-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other inflammatory joint diseases (IJDs) have an increased risk of premature death compared with the general population, mainly because of the risk of cardiovascular disease, which is similar in patients with RA and in those with diabetes mellitus. Pathogenic mechanisms and clinical expression of cardiovascular comorbidities vary greatly between different rheumatic diseases, but atherosclerosis seems to be associated with all IJDs. Traditional risk factors such as age, gender, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, smoking, obesity and diabetes mellitus, together with inflammation, are the main contributors to the increased cardiovascular risk in patients with IJDs. Although cardiovascular risk assessment should be part of routine care in such patients, no disease-specific models are currently available for this purpose. The main pillars of cardiovascular risk reduction are pharmacological and nonpharmacological management of cardiovascular risk factors, as well as tight control of disease activity. PMID:26282082

  20. Platelets Influence Vascularized Organ Transplants from Start to Finish

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, A. D.; Morrell, C.N.; Baldwin, W. M.

    2009-01-01

    This review relates the basic functions of platelets to specific aspects of organ allograft rejection. Platelet activation can occur in the donor or recipient before transplantation as well as during antibody- and cell-mediated rejection. Biopsies taken during organ procurement from cadaver donors have documented that activated platelets are attached to vascular endothelial cells or leukocytes. In addition, many patients waiting for transplants have activated platelets due to the diseases that lead to organ failure or as a result of interventions used to support patients before and during transplantation. The contribution of platelets to hyperacute rejection of both allografts and xenografts is well recognized. Intravascular aggregates of platelets can also be prominent in experimental and clinical transplants that undergo acute antibody or cell-mediated rejection. In acute rejection, platelets can recruit mononuclear cells by secretion of chemokines. After contact, monocytes, macrophages and T cells interact with platelets through receptor/ligand pairs, including P-selectin/PSGL-1 and CD40/CD154. There is a potential for therapy to inhibit platelet mediated immune stimulation, but it is counterbalanced by the need to maintain coagulation in the perioperative period. PMID:19067663

  1. The importance of non-HLA antibodies in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiuheng; Reed, Elaine F

    2016-08-01

    The development of post-transplantation antibodies against non-HLA autoantigens is associated with rejection and decreased long-term graft survival. Although our knowledge of non-HLA antibodies is incomplete, compelling experimental and clinical findings demonstrate that antibodies directed against autoantigens such as angiotensin type 1 receptor, perlecan and collagen, contribute to the process of antibody-mediated acute and chronic rejection. The mechanisms that underlie the production of autoantibodies in the setting of organ transplantation is an important area of ongoing investigation. Ischaemia-reperfusion injury, surgical trauma and/or alloimmune responses can result in the release of organ-derived autoantigens (such as soluble antigens, extracellular vesicles or apoptotic bodies) that are presented to B cells in the context of the transplant recipient's antigen presenting cells and stimulate autoantibody production. Type 17 T helper cells orchestrate autoantibody production by supporting the proliferation and maturation of autoreactive B cells within ectopic tertiary lymphoid tissue. Conversely, autoantibody-mediated graft damage can trigger alloimmunity and the development of donor-specific HLA antibodies that can act in synergy to promote allograft rejection. Identification of the immunologic phenotypes of transplant recipients at risk of non-HLA antibody-mediated rejection, and the development of targeted therapies to treat such rejection, are sorely needed to improve both graft and patient survival. PMID:27345243

  2. Myoblasts transplanted into rat infarcted myocardium are functionally isolated from their host

    PubMed Central

    Léobon, Bertrand; Garcin, Isabelle; Menasché, Philippe; Vilquin, Jean-Thomas; Audinat, Etienne; Charpak, Serge

    2003-01-01

    Survival and differentiation of myogenic cells grafted into infarcted myocardium have raised the hope that cell transplantation becomes a new therapy for cardiovascular diseases. The approach was further supported by transplantation of skeletal myoblasts, which was shown to improve cardiac performance in several animal species. Despite the success of myoblast transplantation and its recent trial in human, the mechanism responsible for the functional improvement remains unclear. Here, we used intracellular recordings coupled to video and fluorescence microscopy to establish whether myoblasts, genetically labeled with enhanced GFP and transplanted into rat infarcted myocardium, retain excitable and contractile properties, and participate actively to cardiac function. Our results indicate that grafted myoblasts differentiate into peculiar hyperexcitable myotubes with a contractile activity fully independent of neighboring cardiomyocytes. We conclude that mechanisms other than electromechanical coupling between grafted and host cells are involved in the improvement of cardiac function. PMID:12805561

  3. Cardiovascular regulation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomqvist, C. G.; Lane, L. D.; Wright, S. J.; Meny, G. M.; Buckey, J. C.; Levine, B. D.; Gaffney, F. A.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Arbeille, P.; Baisch, F.

    1997-01-01

    The human cardiovascular adaptation to microgravity was investigated in the framework of the German Spacelab D2 mission. Preflight and postflight studies were performed to examine the relationship between disuse atrophy and the function of cardiac and skeletal muscles. Special attention was given to fluid load responses and postflight orthostatic hypotension. The preflight measurements were obtained, in supine and sitting positions. These measurements, carried out in the four D2 crew members, were performed six and nine months before flight and on mission day number five. The results obtained on the male crew showed that the stroke volume data from microgravity are virtually identical to preflight measurements in the sitting position.

  4. Periodontitis and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jeftha, A; Holmes, H

    2013-03-01

    Periodontal medicine has been studied and reviewed extensively since its introduction to the dental fraternity. The association of periodontal disease with and its effects on the cardiovascular system are amongst the many topics explored. A summary of the research into these associations and the possible mechanisms of any relationship is presented. Although a link between these two chronic inflammatory diseases is evident, the very heterogeneity of the relevant studies has not provided evidence sufficient to support an actual causal relationship. More stringent epidemiologic and intervention studies are required. PMID:23951765

  5. Long-term Medical Management of the Liver Transplant Recipient: What the Primary Care Physician Needs to Know

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Siddharth; Watt, Kymberly D.

    2012-01-01

    Recognition, management, and prevention of medical complications and comorbidities after liver transplant is the key to improved long-term outcomes. Beyond allograft-related complications, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, renal dysfunction, and malignancies are leading causes of morbidity and mortality in this patient population. Primary care physicians have an important role in improving outcomes of liver transplant recipients and are increasingly relied on for managing these complex patients. This review serves to assist the primary care physician in the long-term management issues of liver transplant recipients. PMID:22763347

  6. Changing Role of Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kittleson, Michelle M

    2016-07-01

    Heart transplantation has become standard of care for end-stage heart failure. Challenges include the limited supply of donor organs and the increased complexity of heart transplant candidates who are at higher risk for poor outcomes. Recent advances may address these challenges, including proposed changes in heart transplant allocation policy, a better understanding of the definition and management of primary graft dysfunction, and advances in the management of sensitized heart transplant candidates. Developments in these areas may result in more equitable distribution and expansion of the donor pool and improved quality of life and survival for heart transplant recipients. PMID:27371517

  7. Stem Cell Transplantation for Pulpal Regeneration: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Fawzy El-Sayed, Karim M; Jakusz, Kimberley; Jochens, Arne; Dörfer, Christof; Schwendicke, Falk

    2015-10-01

    For treating pulpal pathological conditions, pulpal regeneration through transplanted stem/progenitor cells might be an alternative to conventional root canal treatment. A number of animal studies demonstrated beneficial effects of stem/progenitor cell transplantation for pulp-dentin complex regeneration, that is, pulpal tissue, neural, vascular, and dentinal regeneration. We systematically reviewed animal studies investigating stem/progenitor cell-mediated pulp-dentin complex regeneration. Studies quantitatively comparing pulp-dentin complex regeneration after transplantation of stem/progenitor cells versus no stem/progenitor cell transplantation controls in intraoral in vivo teeth animal models were analyzed. The following outcomes were investigated: regenerated pulp area per root canal total area, capillaries per total surface, regenerated dentinal area per total defect area, and nerves per total surface. PubMed and EMBASE were screened for studies published until July 2014. Cross-referencing and hand searching were used to identify further articles. Standardized mean differences (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using random-effects meta-analysis. To assess possible bias, SYRCLE's risk of bias tool for animal studies was used. From 1364 screened articles, five studies (representing 64 animals) were included in the quantitative analysis. Risk of bias of all studies was high. Stem/progenitor cell-transplanted pulps showed significantly larger regenerated pulp area per root canal total area (SMD [95% CI]: 2.28 [0.35-4.21]) and regenerated dentin area per root canal total area (SMD: 6.91 [5.39-8.43]) compared with no stem/progenitor cell transplantation controls. Only one study reported on capillaries per or nerves per total surface and found both significantly increased in stem/progenitor cell-transplanted pulps compared with controls. Stem/progenitor cell transplantation seems to enhance pulp-dentin complex regeneration in animal models

  8. [Hyperuricemia, gout and cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Murray, Karsten; Burkard, Thilo

    2016-01-01

    Hyperuricemia, gout as well as arterial hypertension and metabolic syndrom are highly prevalent and clinicians are frequently confronted with both conditions in the same patient. Hyperuricemia and gout are associated with cardiovascular comorbidities and a high cardiovascular risk. Despite coherent pathophysiological concepts, it remains to be determined, if this association is independent and causal. In daily clinical practice, cardiovascular risk factors should be thoroughly identified and consequently treated in all patients with hyperuricemia and gout. If preventive treatment of asymptomatic hyperuricemia with urate-lowering agents may improve cardiovascular risk and outcomes remains to be determined and is recommended only in special situations like young patients with severe hyperuricemia. PMID:27008446

  9. Facial transplantation: A concise update

    PubMed Central

    Barrera-Pulido, Fernando; Gomez-Cia, Tomas; Sicilia-Castro, Domingo; Garcia-Perla-Garcia, Alberto; Gacto-Sanchez, Purificacion; Hernandez-Guisado, Jose-Maria; Lagares-Borrego, Araceli; Narros-Gimenez, Rocio; Gonzalez-Padilla, Juan D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Update on clinical results obtained by the first worldwide facial transplantation teams as well as review of the literature concerning the main surgical, immunological, ethical, and follow-up aspects described on facial transplanted patients. Study design: MEDLINE search of articles published on “face transplantation” until March 2012. Results: Eighteen clinical cases were studied. The mean patient age was 37.5 years, with a higher prevalence of men. Main surgical indication was gunshot injuries (6 patients). All patients had previously undergone multiple conventional surgical reconstructive procedures which had failed. Altogether 8 transplant teams belonging to 4 countries participated. Thirteen partial face transplantations and 5 full face transplantations have been performed. Allografts are varied according to face anatomical components and the amount of skin, muscle, bone, and other tissues included, though all were grafted successfully and remained viable without significant postoperative surgical complications. The patient with the longest follow-up was 5 years. Two patients died 2 and 27 months after transplantation. Conclusions: Clinical experience has demonstrated the feasibility of facial transplantation as a valuable reconstructive option, but it still remains considered as an experimental procedure with unresolved issues to settle down. Results show that from a clinical, technical, and immunological standpoint, facial transplantation has achieved functional, aesthetic, and social rehabilitation in severely facial disfigured patients. Key words:Face transplantation, composite tissue transplantation, face allograft, facial reconstruction, outcomes and complications of face transplantation. PMID:23229268

  10. Lung Transplantation for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Frederick R.; Aurora, Paul; Barker, David H.; Barr, Mark L.; Blackwell, Laura S.; Bosma, Otto H.; Brown, Samuel; Cox, D. R.; Jensen, Judy L.; Kurland, Geoffrey; Nossent, George D.; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Robinson, Walter M.; Romero, Sandy L.; Spencer, Helen; Sweet, Stuart C.; van der Bij, Wim; Vermeulen, J.; Verschuuren, Erik A. M.; Vrijlandt, Elianne J. L. E.; Walsh, William; Woo, Marlyn S.; Liou, Theodore G.

    2009-01-01

    Lung transplantation is a complex, high-risk, potentially life-saving therapy for the end-stage lung disease of cystic fibrosis (CF). The decision to pursue transplantation involves comparing the likelihood of survival with and without transplantation as well as assessing the effect of wait-listing and transplantation on the patient's quality of life. Although recent population-based analyses of the US lung allocation system for the CF population have raised controversies about the survival benefits of transplantation, studies from the United Kingdom and Canada have suggested a definite survival advantage for those receiving transplants. In response to these and other controversies, leaders in transplantation and CF met together in Lansdowne, Virginia, to consider the state of the art in lung transplantation for CF in an international context, focusing on advances in surgical technique, measurement of outcomes, use of prognostic criteria, variations in local control over listing, and prioritization among the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, and The Netherlands, patient adherence before and after transplantation and other issues in the broader context of lung transplantation. Finally, the conference members carefully considered how efforts to improve outcomes for lung transplantation for CF lung disease might best be studied. This Roundtable seeks to communicate the substance of our discussions. PMID:20008865

  11. Face Transplantation in a Highly Sensitized Recipient.

    PubMed

    Chandraker, Anil; Arscott, Ramon; Murphy, George; Lian, Christine; Bueno, Ericka; Marty, Francisco; Rennke, Helmut; Milford, Edgar; Tullius, Stefan; Pomahac, Bodhan

    2016-05-01

    Face transplantation was performed in a highly sensitized recipient with positive preoperative crossmatch and subsequent antibody-mediated rejection. The recipient was a 45-year-old female with extensive conventional reconstructions after chemical burns over the majority of the body. Residual quality of life and facial functions were poor. Levels of circulating anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies were high, and panel reactive antibody score was 98%. A potential donor was identified; however, with positive T and B cell flow crossmatches. The transplant team proceeded with face transplantation from this donor, under tailored immune suppression and with available salvage options. The operation was successful. Plasmapheresis and induction immune suppression (i.e., thymoglobulin followed by mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, and steroids) were provided. Five days later, there was significant facial swelling, rising anti-HLA antibody titers, and unprecedented evidence of C4d deposits on skin. High doses of steroids and thymoglobulin were provided; however, rejection increased such that by day 19 it was diagnosed grade III in the BANFF scale. After stopping thymoglobulin because of serum sickness, combination therapy of plasmapheresis, eculizumab, bortezomib, and alemtuzumab was provided. HLA antibody levels decreased while swelling and redness improved. At 3 months, there were no longer signs of rejection on biopsy. PMID:27168576

  12. Organ Transplantation in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Faissal A M

    2016-07-01

    Organ transplantation started in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) in 1979 with a kidney transplanted from a live donor. The Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation has been established in 1985 as a governmental agency that supervises all national transplant activities in the KSA. Organ transplantation in the KSA has made great strides since 1985. Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation is playing a central role in all aspects of transplantation including education on all levels, allocation, coordination and procurement. A new initiative has started an ambitious program in 2014 to improve the identification and reporting of organ donors aiming at an annual rate of 15 donors per million populations within 3 years in the KSA. PMID:27326805

  13. Progress in abdominal organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kosieradzki, Maciej; Lisik, Wojciech; Rowiński, Wojciech; Małkowski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Summary The excellent results of vascularized organ transplantation have resulted in an increasing number of end-stage organ failure patients seeking such treatment. The results of organ transplantation depend on a number of factors – the quality of the donor (and an organ), living vs. deceased donation, magnitude of ischemic injury (and its prevention), and recipient-dependent factors. Ischemia/reperfusion injury in organ transplantation is a multifactorial process, which may lead to delayed graft function. In addition, surgical and preservation techniques, type of immunosuppressive regimens, complications after transplantation and post-transplant management may also have a significant impact on short- and long-term results of transplantation. In this paper we describe advances in transplantation in recent years, with particular emphasis on kidney, liver, intestines, whole pancreas and pancreatic islets. PMID:22129915

  14. Will Regenerative Medicine Replace Transplantation?

    PubMed Central

    Orlando, Giuseppe; Soker, Shay; Stratta, Robert J.; Atala, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Recent groundbreaking advances in organ bioengineering and regeneration have provided evidence that regenerative medicine holds promise to dramatically improve the approach to organ transplantation. The two fields, however, share a common heritage. Alexis Carrel can be considered the father of both regenerative medicine and organ transplantation, and it is now clear that his legacy is equally applicable for the present and future generations of transplant and regenerative medicine investigators. In this review, we will briefly illustrate the interplay that should be established between these two complementary disciplines of health sciences. Although regenerative medicine has shown to the transplant field its potential, transplantation is destined to align with regenerative medicine and foster further progress probably more than either discipline alone. Organ bioengineering and regeneration technologies hold the promise to meet at the same time the two most urgent needs in organ transplantation, namely, the identification of a new, potentially inexhaustible source of organs and immunosuppression-free transplantation of tissues and organs. PMID:23906883

  15. Will regenerative medicine replace transplantation?

    PubMed

    Orlando, Giuseppe; Soker, Shay; Stratta, Robert J; Atala, Anthony

    2013-08-01

    Recent groundbreaking advances in organ bioengineering and regeneration have provided evidence that regenerative medicine holds promise to dramatically improve the approach to organ transplantation. The two fields, however, share a common heritage. Alexis Carrel can be considered the father of both regenerative medicine and organ transplantation, and it is now clear that his legacy is equally applicable for the present and future generations of transplant and regenerative medicine investigators. In this review, we will briefly illustrate the interplay that should be established between these two complementary disciplines of health sciences. Although regenerative medicine has shown to the transplant field its potential, transplantation is destined to align with regenerative medicine and foster further progress probably more than either discipline alone. Organ bioengineering and regeneration technologies hold the promise to meet at the same time the two most urgent needs in organ transplantation, namely, the identification of a new, potentially inexhaustible source of organs and immunosuppression-free transplantation of tissues and organs. PMID:23906883

  16. Organ Harvesting and Transplants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskette, Kimberly G.; Ritz, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Humans and animals need healthy organs to live. Due to medical conditions and accidents, some organs fail to function properly. For these reasons, the medical community has experimented and can now perform successful organ transplants, allowing patients to continue to live their lives. Many countries have medical programs where individuals can…

  17. Faith in transplants.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Elizabeth

    The number of people needing organ transplants outstrips supply--and this is particularly acute in black and minority ethnic groups. A reluctance to talk about the possibility of donation after death is coupled with misconceptions about religious teaching on the subject. PMID:15884298

  18. After the Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... you from post-surgical pain for a short time. Follow your team's pain management instructions to make the overall experience as comfortable as possible. Transplant is major surgery. It may take time to get back to eating normally, moving around, ...

  19. Hair transplantation update.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Nicole E

    2015-06-01

    Contemporary hair transplant surgery offers results that are natural and undetectable. It is an excellent treatment option for male and female pattern hair loss. Patients are encouraged to also use medical therapy to help protect their surgical results and prevent ongoing thinning of the surrounding hairs. The two major techniques of donor elliptical harvesting and follicular unit extraction are discussed here. PMID:26176286

  20. Bone Marrow Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains immature cells, called stem cells. The ... platelets, which help the blood to clot. A bone marrow transplant is a procedure that replaces a ...