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Sample records for mediate random switching

  1. Correlated randomness and switching phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. E.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Franzese, G.; Havlin, S.; Mallamace, F.; Kumar, P.; Plerou, V.; Preis, T.

    2010-08-01

    One challenge of biology, medicine, and economics is that the systems treated by these serious scientific disciplines have no perfect metronome in time and no perfect spatial architecture-crystalline or otherwise. Nonetheless, as if by magic, out of nothing but randomness one finds remarkably fine-tuned processes in time and remarkably fine-tuned structures in space. Further, many of these processes and structures have the remarkable feature of “switching” from one behavior to another as if by magic. The past century has, philosophically, been concerned with placing aside the human tendency to see the universe as a fine-tuned machine. Here we will address the challenge of uncovering how, through randomness (albeit, as we shall see, strongly correlated randomness), one can arrive at some of the many spatial and temporal patterns in biology, medicine, and economics and even begin to characterize the switching phenomena that enables a system to pass from one state to another. Inspired by principles developed by A. Nihat Berker and scores of other statistical physicists in recent years, we discuss some applications of correlated randomness to understand switching phenomena in various fields. Specifically, we present evidence from experiments and from computer simulations supporting the hypothesis that water’s anomalies are related to a switching point (which is not unlike the “tipping point” immortalized by Malcolm Gladwell), and that the bubbles in economic phenomena that occur on all scales are not “outliers” (another Gladwell immortalization). Though more speculative, we support the idea of disease as arising from some kind of yet-to-be-understood complex switching phenomenon, by discussing data on selected examples, including heart disease and Alzheimer disease.

  2. A random Q-switched fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yulong; Xu, Jianqiu

    2015-01-01

    Extensive studies have been performed on random lasers in which multiple-scattering feedback is used to generate coherent emission. Q-switching and mode-locking are well-known routes for achieving high peak power output in conventional lasers. However, in random lasers, the ubiquitous random cavities that are formed by multiple scattering inhibit energy storage, making Q-switching impossible. In this paper, widespread Rayleigh scattering arising from the intrinsic micro-scale refractive-index irregularities of fiber cores is used to form random cavities along the fiber. The Q-factor of the cavity is rapidly increased by stimulated Brillouin scattering just after the spontaneous emission is enhanced by random cavity resonances, resulting in random Q-switched pulses with high brightness and high peak power. This report is the first observation of high-brightness random Q-switched laser emission and is expected to stimulate new areas of scientific research and applications, including encryption, remote three-dimensional random imaging and the simulation of stellar lasing. PMID:25797520

  3. Causal Mediation Analyses for Randomized Trials.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Kevin G; Cary, Mark; Gallop, Robert; Ten Have, Thomas R

    2008-01-01

    In the context of randomized intervention trials, we describe causal methods for analyzing how post-randomization factors constitute the process through which randomized baseline interventions act on outcomes. Traditionally, such mediation analyses have been undertaken with great caution, because they assume that the mediating factor is also randomly assigned to individuals in addition to the randomized baseline intervention (i.e., sequential ignorability). Because the mediating factors are typically not randomized, such analyses are unprotected from unmeasured confounders that may lead to biased inference. We review several causal approaches that attempt to reduce such bias without assuming that the mediating factor is randomized. However, these causal approaches require certain interaction assumptions that may be assessed if there is enough treatment heterogeneity with respect to the mediator. We describe available estimation procedures in the context of several examples from the literature and provide resources for software code. PMID:19484136

  4. Effects of regular switching between languages during random number generation.

    PubMed

    Strenge, Hans; Böhm, Jessica

    2005-04-01

    Random number generation is a task that engages working memory and executive processes within the domain of number representation. In the present study we address the role of language in number processing by switching languages during random number generation (numbers 1-9), using German (L1) and English (L2), and alternating L1/L2. Results indicate large correspondence between performance in L1 and L2. In contrast to nonswitching performance, randomization with alternating languages showed a significant increase of omitted responses, whereas the random sequences were less stereotyped, showing significantly less repetition avoidance and cycling behavior. During an intentional switch between languages, errors in language sequence appeared in 23% of responses on the average, independently of the quality of randomization but associated with a clear persistence of L2. These results indicate that random number generation is more closely linked to auditory-phonological representation of numerals than to visual arabic notation. PMID:15974362

  5. DNA-mediated excitonic upconversion FRET switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellis, Donald L.; Rehn, Sarah M.; Cannon, Brittany L.; Davis, Paul H.; Graugnard, Elton; Lee, Jeunghoon; Yurke, Bernard; Knowlton, William B.

    2015-11-01

    Excitonics is a rapidly expanding field of nanophotonics in which the harvesting of photons, ensuing creation and transport of excitons via Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET), and subsequent charge separation or photon emission has led to the demonstration of excitonic wires, switches, Boolean logic and light harvesting antennas for many applications. FRET funnels excitons down an energy gradient resulting in energy loss with each step along the pathway. Conversely, excitonic energy upconversion via upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), although currently inefficient, serves as an energy ratchet to boost the exciton energy. Although FRET-based upconversion has been demonstrated, it suffers from low FRET efficiency and lacks the ability to modulate the FRET. We have engineered an upconversion FRET-based switch by combining lanthanide-doped UCNPs and fluorophores that demonstrates excitonic energy upconversion by nearly a factor of 2, an excited state donor to acceptor FRET efficiency of nearly 25%, and an acceptor fluorophore quantum efficiency that is close to unity. These findings offer a promising path for energy upconversion in nanophotonic applications including artificial light harvesting, excitonic circuits, photovoltaics, nanomedicine, and optoelectronics.

  6. DNA-mediated excitonic upconversion FRET switching

    SciTech Connect

    Kellis, Donald L.; Rehn, Sarah M.; Cannon, Brittany L.; Davis, Paul H.; Graugnard, Elton; Lee, Jeunghoon; Yurke, Bernard; Knowlton, William B.

    2015-11-17

    Excitonics is a rapidly expanding field of nanophotonics in which the harvesting of photons, ensuing creation and transport of excitons via Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET), and subsequent charge separation or photon emission has led to the demonstration of excitonic wires, switches, Boolean logic and light harvesting antennas for many applications. FRET funnels excitons down an energy gradient resulting in energy loss with each step along the pathway. Conversely, excitonic energy up conversion via up conversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), although currently inefficient, serves as an energy ratchet to boost the exciton energy. Although FRET-based up conversion has been demonstrated, it suffers from low FRET efficiency and lacks the ability to modulate the FRET. We have engineered an up conversion FRET-based switch by combining lanthanide-doped UCNPs and fluorophores that demonstrates excitonic energy up conversion by nearly a factor of 2, an excited state donor to acceptor FRET efficiency of nearly 25%, and an acceptor fluorophore quantum efficiency that is close to unity. These findings offer a promising path for energy up conversion in nanophotonic applications including artificial light harvesting, excitonic circuits, photovoltaics, nanomedicine, and optoelectronics.

  7. DNA-mediated excitonic upconversion FRET switching

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kellis, Donald L.; Rehn, Sarah M.; Cannon, Brittany L.; Davis, Paul H.; Graugnard, Elton; Lee, Jeunghoon; Yurke, Bernard; Knowlton, William B.

    2015-11-17

    Excitonics is a rapidly expanding field of nanophotonics in which the harvesting of photons, ensuing creation and transport of excitons via Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET), and subsequent charge separation or photon emission has led to the demonstration of excitonic wires, switches, Boolean logic and light harvesting antennas for many applications. FRET funnels excitons down an energy gradient resulting in energy loss with each step along the pathway. Conversely, excitonic energy up conversion via up conversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), although currently inefficient, serves as an energy ratchet to boost the exciton energy. Although FRET-based up conversion has been demonstrated, it suffersmore » from low FRET efficiency and lacks the ability to modulate the FRET. We have engineered an up conversion FRET-based switch by combining lanthanide-doped UCNPs and fluorophores that demonstrates excitonic energy up conversion by nearly a factor of 2, an excited state donor to acceptor FRET efficiency of nearly 25%, and an acceptor fluorophore quantum efficiency that is close to unity. These findings offer a promising path for energy up conversion in nanophotonic applications including artificial light harvesting, excitonic circuits, photovoltaics, nanomedicine, and optoelectronics.« less

  8. Complementary resistive switching behavior for conductive bridge random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hao-Xuan; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Shih, Chih-Cheng; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Kai-Huang; Wang, Ming-Hui; Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Lo, Ikai; Wu, Cheng-Hsien; Tseng, Yi-Ting; Sze, Simon M.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a structure of Pt/Cu18Si12O70/TiN has been investigated. By co-sputtering the Cu and SiO2 targets in the switching layer, we can measure the operation mechanism of complementary resistive switching (CRS). This differs from conventional conductive bridge random access memory (CBRAM) that tends to use Cu electrodes rather than Cu18Si12O70. By changing the voltage and compliance current, we can control device operating characteristics. Because Cu distributes differently in the device depending on this setting, the operating end can be located at either the top or bottom electrode. Device current–voltage (I–V) curves are used to demonstrate that the CRS in the CBRAM device is a double-electrode operation.

  9. Extracellular Adenosine Mediates a Systemic Metabolic Switch during Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Bajgar, Adam; Kucerova, Katerina; Jonatova, Lucie; Tomcala, Ales; Schneedorferova, Ivana; Okrouhlik, Jan; Dolezal, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Immune defense is energetically costly, and thus an effective response requires metabolic adaptation of the organism to reallocate energy from storage, growth, and development towards the immune system. We employ the natural infection of Drosophila with a parasitoid wasp to study energy regulation during immune response. To combat the invasion, the host must produce specialized immune cells (lamellocytes) that destroy the parasitoid egg. We show that a significant portion of nutrients are allocated to differentiating lamellocytes when they would otherwise be used for development. This systemic metabolic switch is mediated by extracellular adenosine released from immune cells. The switch is crucial for an effective immune response. Preventing adenosine transport from immune cells or blocking adenosine receptor precludes the metabolic switch and the deceleration of development, dramatically reducing host resistance. Adenosine thus serves as a signal that the “selfish” immune cells send during infection to secure more energy at the expense of other tissues. PMID:25915062

  10. Field assisted spin switching in magnetic random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, W. C.; Park, J. H.; Oh, J. H.; Koh, G. H.; Jeong, G. T.; Jeong, H. S.; Kim, Kinam

    2006-04-01

    A switching method called by field assisted spin switching has been investigated. A field assisted spin switching consists of a metal line induced magnetic field and a spin switching through a magnetic tunnel junction. It is a variation of a current induced switching and assisted by the magnetic field induced by the current-carrying metal line. Various current paths have been tested to investigate how and how much the spin switching contributes to the overall switching and the results will be explained. A computer simulation has been complemented to measure the degree of the thermal effect in the switching.

  11. Analysis and modeling of resistive switching mechanisms oriented to resistive random-access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Da; Wu, Jun-Jie; Tang, Yu-Hua

    2013-03-01

    With the progress of the semiconductor industry, the resistive random-access memory (RAM) has drawn increasing attention. The discovery of the memristor has brought much attention to this study. Research has focused on the resistive switching characteristics of different materials and the analysis of resistive switching mechanisms. We discuss the resistive switching mechanisms of different materials in this paper and analyze the differences of those mechanisms from the view point of circuitry to establish their respective circuit models. Finally, simulations are presented. We give the prospect of using different materials in resistive RAM on account of their resistive switching mechanisms, which are applied to explain their resistive switchings.

  12. TiO2 thin film based transparent flexible resistive switching random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Kim Ngoc; Dung Hoang, Van; Tran, Cao Vinh; Thang Phan, Bach

    2016-03-01

    In our work we have fabricated TiO2 based resistive switching devices both on transparent substrates (ITO, IGZO/glass) and transparent flexible substrate (ITO/PET). All devices demonstrate the reproducibility of forming free bipolar resistive switching with high transparency in the visible light range (∼80% at the wavelength of 550 nm). Particularly, transparent and flexible device exhibits stable resistive switching performance at the initial state (flat) and even after bending state up to 500 times with curvature radius of 10% compared to flat state. The achieved characteristics of resistive switching of TiO2 thin films seem to be promising for transparent flexible random access memory.

  13. Microstructural transitions in resistive random access memory composed of molybdenum oxide with copper during switching cycles.

    PubMed

    Arita, Masashi; Ohno, Yuuki; Murakami, Yosuke; Takamizawa, Keisuke; Tsurumaki-Fukuchi, Atsushi; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2016-08-21

    The switching operation of a Cu/MoOx/TiN resistive random access memory (ReRAM) device was investigated using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), where the TiN surface was slightly oxidized (ox-TiN). The relationship between the switching properties and the dynamics of the ReRAM microstructure was confirmed experimentally. The growth and/or shrinkage of the conductive filament (CF) can be classified into two set modes and two reset modes. These switching modes depend on the device's switching history, factors such as the amount of Cu inclusions in the MoOx layer and the CF geometry. High currents are needed to produce an observable change in the CF. However, sharp and stable switching behaviour can be achieved without requiring such a major change. The local region around the CF is thought to contribute to the ReRAM switching process. PMID:27456192

  14. Microstructural transitions in resistive random access memory composed of molybdenum oxide with copper during switching cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Masashi; Ohno, Yuuki; Murakami, Yosuke; Takamizawa, Keisuke; Tsurumaki-Fukuchi, Atsushi; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2016-08-01

    The switching operation of a Cu/MoOx/TiN resistive random access memory (ReRAM) device was investigated using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), where the TiN surface was slightly oxidized (ox-TiN). The relationship between the switching properties and the dynamics of the ReRAM microstructure was confirmed experimentally. The growth and/or shrinkage of the conductive filament (CF) can be classified into two set modes and two reset modes. These switching modes depend on the device's switching history, factors such as the amount of Cu inclusions in the MoOx layer and the CF geometry. High currents are needed to produce an observable change in the CF. However, sharp and stable switching behaviour can be achieved without requiring such a major change. The local region around the CF is thought to contribute to the ReRAM switching process.The switching operation of a Cu/MoOx/TiN resistive random access memory (ReRAM) device was investigated using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), where the TiN surface was slightly oxidized (ox-TiN). The relationship between the switching properties and the dynamics of the ReRAM microstructure was confirmed experimentally. The growth and/or shrinkage of the conductive filament (CF) can be classified into two set modes and two reset modes. These switching modes depend on the device's switching history, factors such as the amount of Cu inclusions in the MoOx layer and the CF geometry. High currents are needed to produce an observable change in the CF. However, sharp and stable switching behaviour can be achieved without requiring such a major change. The local region around the CF is thought to contribute to the ReRAM switching process. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02602h

  15. Switching methods in magnetic random access memory for low power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guchang, Han; Jiancheng, Huang; Cheow Hin, Sim; Tran, Michael; Sze Ter, Lim

    2015-06-01

    Effect of saturation magnetization (Ms) of the free layer (FL) on the switching current is analyzed for spin transfer torque (STT) magnetic random access memory (MRAM). For in-plane FL, critical switching current (Ic0) decreases as Ms decreases. However, reduction in Ms also results in a low thermal stability factor (Δ), which must be compensated through increasing shape anisotropy, thus limiting scalability. For perpendicular FL, Ic0 reduction by using low-Ms materials is actually at the expense of data retention. To save energy consumed by STT current, two electric field (EF) controlled switching methods are proposed. Our simulation results show that elliptical FL can be switched by an EF pulse with a suitable width. However, it is difficult to implement this type of switching in real MRAM devices due to the distribution of the required switching pulse widths. A reliable switching method is to use an Oersted field guided switching. Our simulation and experimental results show that the bi-directional magnetization switching could be realized by an EF with an external field as low as  ±5 Oe if the offset field could be removed.

  16. Complementary resistive switching behavior induced by varying forming current compliance in resistance random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Yi-Ting; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Chang, Ting-Chang; Shih, Chih-Cheng; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Kai-Huang; Chen, Jung-Hui; Li, Yu-Chiuan; Lin, Chih-Yang; Hung, Ya-Chi; Syu, Yong-En; Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Sze, Simon M.

    2015-05-01

    In this study of resistance random access memory in a resistive switching film, the breakdown degree was controlled by varying forming current compliance. A SiOx layer was introduced into the ZnO layer of the structure to induce both typical bipolar resistive switching (RS) and complementary resistive switching (CRS). In addition, the SiOx layer-generated vacuum spaces in typical bipolar RS can be verified by electrical characteristics. Changing forming current compliance strikingly modifies the oxygen storage capacity of the inserted SiOx layer. CRS can be achieved, therefore, by tuning the oxygen ion storage behavior made possible by the SiOx layer.

  17. Discrete-time systems with random switches: From systems stability to networks synchronization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yao; Lin, Wei; Ho, Daniel W C

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we develop some approaches, which enable us to more accurately and analytically identify the essential patterns that guarantee the almost sure stability of discrete-time systems with random switches. We allow for the case that the elements in the switching connection matrix even obey some unbounded and continuous-valued distributions. In addition to the almost sure stability, we further investigate the almost sure synchronization in complex dynamical networks consisting of randomly connected nodes. Numerical examples illustrate that a chaotic dynamics in the synchronization manifold is preserved when statistical parameters enter some almost sure synchronization region established by the developed approach. Moreover, some delicate configurations are considered on probability space for ensuring synchronization in networks whose nodes are described by nonlinear maps. Both theoretical and numerical results on synchronization are presented by setting only a few random connections in each switch duration. More interestingly, we analytically find it possible to achieve almost sure synchronization in the randomly switching complex networks even with very large population sizes, which cannot be easily realized in non-switching but deterministically connected networks. PMID:27036191

  18. Discrete-time systems with random switches: From systems stability to networks synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yao; Lin, Wei; Ho, Daniel W. C.

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we develop some approaches, which enable us to more accurately and analytically identify the essential patterns that guarantee the almost sure stability of discrete-time systems with random switches. We allow for the case that the elements in the switching connection matrix even obey some unbounded and continuous-valued distributions. In addition to the almost sure stability, we further investigate the almost sure synchronization in complex dynamical networks consisting of randomly connected nodes. Numerical examples illustrate that a chaotic dynamics in the synchronization manifold is preserved when statistical parameters enter some almost sure synchronization region established by the developed approach. Moreover, some delicate configurations are considered on probability space for ensuring synchronization in networks whose nodes are described by nonlinear maps. Both theoretical and numerical results on synchronization are presented by setting only a few random connections in each switch duration. More interestingly, we analytically find it possible to achieve almost sure synchronization in the randomly switching complex networks even with very large population sizes, which cannot be easily realized in non-switching but deterministically connected networks.

  19. Robust random number generation using steady-state emission of gain-switched laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Z. L. Lucamarini, M.; Dynes, J. F.; Fröhlich, B.; Plews, A.; Shields, A. J.

    2014-06-30

    We demonstrate robust, high-speed random number generation using interference of the steady-state emission of guaranteed random phases, obtained through gain-switching a semiconductor laser diode. Steady-state emission tolerates large temporal pulse misalignments and therefore significantly improves the interference quality. Using an 8-bit digitizer followed by a finite-impulse-response unbiasing algorithm, we achieve random number generation rates of 8 and 20 Gb/s, for laser repetition rates of 1 and 2.5 GHz, respectively, with a ±20% tolerance in the interferometer differential delay. We also report a generation rate of 80 Gb/s using partially phase-correlated short pulses. In relation to the field of quantum key distribution, our results confirm the gain-switched laser diode as a suitable light source, capable of providing phase-randomized coherent pulses at a clock rate of up to 2.5 GHz.

  20. Transcription mediated insulation and interference direct gene cluster expression switches

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tania; Brown, David; Murray, Struan C; Haenni, Simon; Halstead, James M; O'Connor, Leigh; Shipkovenska, Gergana; Steinmetz, Lars M; Mellor, Jane

    2014-01-01

    In yeast, many tandemly arranged genes show peak expression in different phases of the metabolic cycle (YMC) or in different carbon sources, indicative of regulation by a bi-modal switch, but it is not clear how these switches are controlled. Using native elongating transcript analysis (NET-seq), we show that transcription itself is a component of bi-modal switches, facilitating reciprocal expression in gene clusters. HMS2, encoding a growth-regulated transcription factor, switches between sense- or antisense-dominant states that also coordinate up- and down-regulation of transcription at neighbouring genes. Engineering HMS2 reveals alternative mono-, di- or tri-cistronic and antisense transcription units (TUs), using different promoter and terminator combinations, that underlie state-switching. Promoters or terminators are excluded from functional TUs by read-through transcriptional interference, while antisense TUs insulate downstream genes from interference. We propose that the balance of transcriptional insulation and interference at gene clusters facilitates gene expression switches during intracellular and extracellular environmental change. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03635.001 PMID:25407679

  1. Development of Curie point switching for thin film, random access, memory device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, G. W.; Tchernev, D. I.

    1967-01-01

    Managanese bismuthide films are used in the development of a random access memory device of high packing density and nondestructive readout capability. Memory entry is by Curie point switching using a laser beam. Readout is accomplished by microoptical or micromagnetic scanning.

  2. Alcohol-Mediated Resistance-Switching Behavior in Metal-Organic Framework-Based Electronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Hong; Shi, Wenxiong; Zhang, Weina; Yu, Jiancan; Chandran, Bevita K; Cui, Chenlong; Zhu, Bowen; Liu, Zhiyuan; Li, Bin; Xu, Cai; Xu, Zhiling; Li, Shuzhou; Huang, Wei; Huo, Fengwei; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-07-25

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have drawn increasing attentions as promising candidates for functional devices. Herein, we present MOF films in constructing memory devices with alcohol mediated resistance switching property, where the resistance state is controlled by applying alcohol vapors to achieve multilevel information storage. The ordered packing mode and the hydrogen bonding system of the guest molecules adsorbed in MOF crystals are shown to be the reason for the alcohol mediated electrical switching. This chemically mediated memory device can be a candidate in achieving environment-responsive devices and exhibits potential applications in wearable information storage systems. PMID:27311703

  3. Low-threshold and multi-wavelength Q-switched random erbium-doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Simin; Lin, Wei; Chen, Weicheng; Li, Can; Yang, Changsheng; Qiao, Tian; Yang, Zhongmin

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a low-threshold and multi-wavelength Q-switched random fiber laser with erbium-doped fiber as the gain medium and Rayleigh scattering as the randomly distributed feedback. Q-switched pulses are generated with threshold as low as 27 mW by combining random cavity resonances and the Q-value modulation effect induced by stimulated Brillouin scattering. The repetition rate is typically on the kilohertz scale with rms timing jitter of <5.5% and rms amplitude fluctuation of <30%. Raman Stokes emissions up to the third order are observed with an overall energy of nearly 42% of the pulse output, which may open an avenue for applications requiring multiple wavelengths.

  4. Noise Induced Pattern Switching in Randomly Distributed Delayed Swarms.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Brandon; Mier-Y-Teran-Romero, Luis; Schwartz, Ira B

    2013-01-01

    We study the effects of noise on the dynamics of a system of coupled self-propelling particles in the case where the coupling is time-delayed, and the delays are discrete and randomly generated. Previous work has demonstrated that the stability of a class of emerging patterns depends upon all moments of the time delay distribution, and predicts their bifurcation parameter ranges. Near the bifurcations of these patterns, noise may induce a transition from one type of pattern to another. We study the onset of these noise-induced swarm re-organizations by numerically simulating the system over a range of noise intensities and for various distributions of the delays. Interestingly, there is a critical noise threshold above which the system is forced to transition from a less organized state to a more organized one. We explore this phenomenon by quantifying this critical noise threshold, and note that transition time between states varies as a function of both the noise intensity and delay distribution. PMID:25382931

  5. Noise Induced Pattern Switching in Randomly Distributed Delayed Swarms

    PubMed Central

    Lindley, Brandon; Mier-y-Teran-Romero, Luis; Schwartz, Ira B.

    2013-01-01

    We study the effects of noise on the dynamics of a system of coupled self-propelling particles in the case where the coupling is time-delayed, and the delays are discrete and randomly generated. Previous work has demonstrated that the stability of a class of emerging patterns depends upon all moments of the time delay distribution, and predicts their bifurcation parameter ranges. Near the bifurcations of these patterns, noise may induce a transition from one type of pattern to another. We study the onset of these noise-induced swarm re-organizations by numerically simulating the system over a range of noise intensities and for various distributions of the delays. Interestingly, there is a critical noise threshold above which the system is forced to transition from a less organized state to a more organized one. We explore this phenomenon by quantifying this critical noise threshold, and note that transition time between states varies as a function of both the noise intensity and delay distribution. PMID:25382931

  6. Fast 180° magnetization switching in a strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructure driven by a voltage.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ren-Ci; Hu, Jia-Mian; Momeni, Kasra; Wang, Jian-Jun; Chen, Long-Qing; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-driven 180° magnetization switching provides a low-power alternative to current-driven magnetization switching widely used in spintronic devices. Here we computationally demonstrate a promising route to achieve voltage-driven in-plane 180° magnetization switching in a strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructure (e.g., a heterostructure consisting of an amorphous, slightly elliptical Co40Fe40B20 nanomagnet on top of a Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 film as an example). This 180° switching follows a unique precessional path all in the film plane, and is enabled by manipulating magnetization dynamics with fast, local piezostrains (rise/release time <0.1 ns) on the Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 film surface. Our analyses predict ultralow area energy consumption per switching (~0.03 J/m(2)), approximately three orders of magnitude smaller than that dissipated by current-driven magnetization switching. A fast overall switching time of about 2.3 ns is also demonstrated. Further reduction of energy consumption and switching time can be achieved by optimizing the structure and material selection. The present design provides an additional viable route to realizing low-power and high-speed spintronics. PMID:27272678

  7. Fast 180° magnetization switching in a strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructure driven by a voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ren-Ci; Hu, Jia-Mian; Momeni, Kasra; Wang, Jian-Jun; Chen, Long-Qing; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-driven 180° magnetization switching provides a low-power alternative to current-driven magnetization switching widely used in spintronic devices. Here we computationally demonstrate a promising route to achieve voltage-driven in-plane 180° magnetization switching in a strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructure (e.g., a heterostructure consisting of an amorphous, slightly elliptical Co40Fe40B20 nanomagnet on top of a Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 film as an example). This 180° switching follows a unique precessional path all in the film plane, and is enabled by manipulating magnetization dynamics with fast, local piezostrains (rise/release time <0.1 ns) on the Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 film surface. Our analyses predict ultralow area energy consumption per switching (~0.03 J/m2), approximately three orders of magnitude smaller than that dissipated by current-driven magnetization switching. A fast overall switching time of about 2.3 ns is also demonstrated. Further reduction of energy consumption and switching time can be achieved by optimizing the structure and material selection. The present design provides an additional viable route to realizing low-power and high-speed spintronics.

  8. Fast 180° magnetization switching in a strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructure driven by a voltage

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ren-Ci; Hu, Jia-Mian; Momeni, Kasra; Wang, Jian-Jun; Chen, Long-Qing; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-driven 180° magnetization switching provides a low-power alternative to current-driven magnetization switching widely used in spintronic devices. Here we computationally demonstrate a promising route to achieve voltage-driven in-plane 180° magnetization switching in a strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructure (e.g., a heterostructure consisting of an amorphous, slightly elliptical Co40Fe40B20 nanomagnet on top of a Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 film as an example). This 180° switching follows a unique precessional path all in the film plane, and is enabled by manipulating magnetization dynamics with fast, local piezostrains (rise/release time <0.1 ns) on the Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 film surface. Our analyses predict ultralow area energy consumption per switching (~0.03 J/m2), approximately three orders of magnitude smaller than that dissipated by current-driven magnetization switching. A fast overall switching time of about 2.3 ns is also demonstrated. Further reduction of energy consumption and switching time can be achieved by optimizing the structure and material selection. The present design provides an additional viable route to realizing low-power and high-speed spintronics. PMID:27272678

  9. A chemical-induced pH-mediated molecular switch

    PubMed Central

    Jayawardhana, Dilani A.; Sengupta, Mrinal K.; Krishantha, D.M. Milan; Gupta, Jyoti; Armstrong, Daniel W.; Guan, Xiyun

    2011-01-01

    The transmembrane protein α-hemolysin pore has been used to develop ultrasensitive biosensors, study biomolecular folding and unfolding, investigate covalent and non-covalent bonding interactions, and probe enzyme kinetics. Here, we report that by addition of ionic liquid tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium chloride solution to the α-hemolysin pore, the α-hemolysin channel can be controlled open or closed by adjusting the pH of the solution. This approach can be employed to develop a novel molecular switch to regulate molecular transport, and should find potential applications as a ‘smart’ drug delivery method. PMID:21919492

  10. Random parameter-switching synthesis of a class of hyperbolic attractors.

    PubMed

    Danca, Marius-F

    2008-09-01

    The parameter perturbation methods (the most known being the OGY method) apply small wisely chosen swift kicks to the system once per cycle, to maintain it near the desired unstable periodic orbit. Thus, one can consider that a new attractor is finally generated. Another class of methods which allow the attractors born, imply small perturbations of the state variable [see, e.g., J. Güémez and M. A. Matías, Phys. Lett. A 181, 29 (1993)]. Whatever technique is utilized, generating any targeted attractor starting from a set of two or more of any kind of attractors (stable or not) of a considered dissipative continuous-time system cannot be achieved with these techniques. This kind of attractor synthesis [introduced in M.-F. Danca, W. K. S. Tang, and G. Chen, Appl. Math. Comput. 201, 650 (2008) and proved analytically in Y. Mao, W. K. S. Tang, and M.-F. Danca, Appl. Math. Comput. (submitted)] which starts from a set of given attractors, allows us, via periodic parameter-switching, to generate any of the set of all possible attractors of a class of continuous-time dissipative dynamical systems, depending linearly on the control parameter. In this paper we extend this technique proving empirically that even random manners for switching can be utilized for this purpose. These parameter-switches schemes are very easy to implement and require only the mathematical model of the underlying dynamical system, a convergent numerical method to integrate the system, and the bifurcation diagram to choose specific attractors. Relatively large parameter switches are admitted. As a main result, these switching algorithms (deterministic or random) offer a new perspective on the set of all attractors of a class of dissipative continuous-time dynamical systems. PMID:19045449

  11. Random parameter-switching synthesis of a class of hyperbolic attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danca, Marius-F.

    2008-09-01

    The parameter perturbation methods (the most known being the OGY method) apply small wisely chosen swift kicks to the system once per cycle, to maintain it near the desired unstable periodic orbit. Thus, one can consider that a new attractor is finally generated. Another class of methods which allow the attractors born, imply small perturbations of the state variable [see, e.g., J. Güémez and M. A. Matías, Phys. Lett. A 181, 29 (1993)]. Whatever technique is utilized, generating any targeted attractor starting from a set of two or more of any kind of attractors (stable or not) of a considered dissipative continuous-time system cannot be achieved with these techniques. This kind of attractor synthesis [introduced in M.-F. Danca, W. K. S. Tang, and G. Chen, Appl. Math. Comput. 201, 650 (2008) and proved analytically in Y. Mao, W. K. S. Tang, and M.-F. Danca, Appl. Math. Comput. (submitted)] which starts from a set of given attractors, allows us, via periodic parameter-switching, to generate any of the set of all possible attractors of a class of continuous-time dissipative dynamical systems, depending linearly on the control parameter. In this paper we extend this technique proving empirically that even random manners for switching can be utilized for this purpose. These parameter-switches schemes are very easy to implement and require only the mathematical model of the underlying dynamical system, a convergent numerical method to integrate the system, and the bifurcation diagram to choose specific attractors. Relatively large parameter switches are admitted. As a main result, these switching algorithms (deterministic or random) offer a new perspective on the set of all attractors of a class of dissipative continuous-time dynamical systems.

  12. Regulating infidelity: RNA-mediated recruitment of AID to DNA during class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    DiMenna, Lauren J; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2016-03-01

    The mechanism by which the DNA deaminase activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is specifically recruited to repetitive switch region DNA during class switch recombination is still poorly understood. Work over the past decade has revealed a strong link between transcription and RNA polymerase-associated factors in AID recruitment, yet none of these processes satisfactorily explain how AID specificity is affected. Here, we review a recent finding wherein AID is guided to switch regions not by a protein factor but by an RNA moiety, and especially one associated with a noncoding RNA that has been long thought of as being inert. This work explains the long-standing requirement of splicing of noncoding transcripts during class switching, and has implications in both B cell-mediated immunity as well as the underlying pathological syndromes associated with the recombination reaction. PMID:26799454

  13. Flicking the molecular switch underlying MLKL-mediated necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Joanne M; Lucet, Isabelle S; Murphy, James M

    2015-01-01

    The pseudokinase domain of the necroptosis effector mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL) functions as a latch to restrain the unleashing of its N-terminal 4-helix bundle (4HB) domain. Cell death mediated by the 4HB domain relies on membrane association and oligomerization, which can be inhibited by an ATP-mimetic small molecule that binds the pseudokinase domain of MLKL. PMID:27308464

  14. Ultrafast switching in nanoscale phase-change random access memory with superlattice-like structures.

    PubMed

    Loke, Desmond; Shi, Luping; Wang, Weijie; Zhao, Rong; Yang, Hongxin; Ng, Lung-Tat; Lim, Kian-Guan; Chong, Tow-Chong; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2011-06-24

    Phase-change random access memory cells with superlattice-like (SLL) GeTe/Sb(2)Te(3) were demonstrated to have excellent scaling performance in terms of switching speed and operating voltage. In this study, the correlations between the cell size, switching speed and operating voltage of the SLL cells were identified and investigated. We found that small SLL cells can achieve faster switching speed and lower operating voltage compared to the large SLL cells. Fast amorphization and crystallization of 300 ps and 1 ns were achieved in the 40 nm SLL cells, respectively, both significantly faster than those observed in the Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) (GST) cells of the same cell size. 40 nm SLL cells were found to switch with low amorphization voltage of 0.9 V when pulse-widths of 5 ns were employed, which is much lower than the 1.6 V required by the GST cells of the same cell size. These effects can be attributed to the fast heterogeneous crystallization, low thermal conductivity and high resistivity of the SLL structures. Nanoscale PCRAM with SLL structure promises applications in high speed and low power memory devices. PMID:21572204

  15. Bipolar resistive switching characteristics in tantalum nitride-based resistive random access memory devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Myung Ju; Jeon, Dong Su; Park, Ju Hyun; Kim, Tae Geun

    2015-05-18

    This paper reports the bipolar resistive switching characteristics of TaN{sub x}-based resistive random access memory (ReRAM). The conduction mechanism is explained by formation and rupture of conductive filaments caused by migration of nitrogen ions and vacancies; this mechanism is in good agreement with either Ohmic conduction or the Poole-Frenkel emission model. The devices exhibit that the reset voltage varies from −0.82 V to −0.62 V, whereas the set voltage ranges from 1.01 V to 1.30 V for 120 DC sweep cycles. In terms of reliability, the devices exhibit good retention (>10{sup 5 }s) and pulse-switching endurance (>10{sup 6} cycles) properties. These results indicate that TaN{sub x}-based ReRAM devices have a potential for future nonvolatile memory devices.

  16. Voltage induced magnetostrictive switching of nanomagnets: Strain assisted strain transfer torque random access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Asif Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Ghani, Tahir; Young, Ian A.

    2014-06-30

    A spintronic device, called the “strain assisted spin transfer torque (STT) random access memory (RAM),” is proposed by combining the magnetostriction effect and the spin transfer torque effect which can result in a dramatic improvement in the energy dissipation relative to a conventional STT-RAM. Magnetization switching in the device which is a piezoelectric-ferromagnetic heterostructure via the combined magnetostriction and STT effect is simulated by solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation incorporating the influence of thermal noise. The simulations show that, in such a device, each of these two mechanisms (magnetostriction and spin transfer torque) provides in a 90° rotation of the magnetization leading a deterministic 180° switching with a critical current significantly smaller than that required for spin torque alone. Such a scheme is an attractive option for writing magnetic RAM cells.

  17. A Schelling model with switching agents: decreasing segregation via random allocation and social mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazan, Aurélien; Randon-Furling, Julien

    2013-10-01

    We study the behaviour of a Schelling-class system in which a fraction f of spatially-fixed switching agents is introduced. This new model allows for multiple interpretations, including: (i) random, non-preferential allocation (e.g. by housing associations) of given, fixed sites in an open residential system, and (ii) superimposition of social and spatial mobility in a closed residential system. We find that the presence of switching agents in a segregative Schelling-type dynamics can lead to the emergence of intermediate patterns (e.g. mixture of patches, fuzzy interfaces) as the ones described in [E. Hatna, I. Benenson, J. Artif. Soc. Social. Simul. 15, 6 (2012)]. We also investigate different transitions between segregated and mixed phases both at f = 0 and along lines of increasing f, where the nature of the transition changes.

  18. Voltage induced magnetostrictive switching of nanomagnets: Strain assisted strain transfer torque random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Asif; Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Ghani, Tahir; Young, Ian A.

    2014-06-01

    A spintronic device, called the "strain assisted spin transfer torque (STT) random access memory (RAM)," is proposed by combining the magnetostriction effect and the spin transfer torque effect which can result in a dramatic improvement in the energy dissipation relative to a conventional STT-RAM. Magnetization switching in the device which is a piezoelectric-ferromagnetic heterostructure via the combined magnetostriction and STT effect is simulated by solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation incorporating the influence of thermal noise. The simulations show that, in such a device, each of these two mechanisms (magnetostriction and spin transfer torque) provides in a 90° rotation of the magnetization leading a deterministic 180° switching with a critical current significantly smaller than that required for spin torque alone. Such a scheme is an attractive option for writing magnetic RAM cells.

  19. Standardized Effect Size Measures for Mediation Analysis in Cluster-Randomized Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stapleton, Laura M.; Pituch, Keenan A.; Dion, Eric

    2015-01-01

    This article presents 3 standardized effect size measures to use when sharing results of an analysis of mediation of treatment effects for cluster-randomized trials. The authors discuss 3 examples of mediation analysis (upper-level mediation, cross-level mediation, and cross-level mediation with a contextual effect) with demonstration of the…

  20. Flipping the Switch on Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis using Thermally Responsive Protein Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Pastuszka, Martha K.; Okamoto, Curtis T.; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.

    2014-01-01

    A ubiquitous approach to study protein function is to knock down activity (gene deletions, siRNA, small molecule inhibitors, etc) and study the cellular effects. Using a new methodology, this manuscript describes how to rapidly and specifically switch off cellular pathways using thermally responsive protein polymers. A small increase in temperature stimulates cytosolic elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) to assemble microdomains. We hypothesize that ELPs fused to a key effector in a target macromolecular complex will sequester the complex within these microdomains, which will bring the pathway to a halt. To test this hypothesis, we fused ELPs to clathrin-light chain (CLC), a protein associated with clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Prior to thermal stimulation, the ELP fusion is soluble and clathrin-mediated endocytosis remains ‘on.’ Increasing the temperature induces the assembly of ELP fusion proteins into organelle-sized microdomains that switches clathrin-mediated endocytosis ‘off.’ These microdomains can be thermally activated and inactivated within minutes, are reversible, do not require exogenous chemical stimulation, and are specific for components trafficked within the clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway. This temperature-triggered cell switch system represents a new platform for the temporal manipulation of trafficking mechanisms in normal and disease cell models and has applications for manipulating other intracellular pathways. PMID:25419208

  1. Interface-modified random circuit breaker network model applicable to both bipolar and unipolar resistance switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. B.; Lee, J. S.; Chang, S. H.; Yoo, H. K.; Kang, B. S.; Kahng, B.; Lee, M.-J.; Kim, C. J.; Noh, T. W.

    2011-01-01

    We observed reversible-type changes between bipolar (BRS) and unipolar resistance switching (URS) in one Pt/SrTiOx/Pt capacitor. To explain both BRS and URS in a unified scheme, we introduce the "interface-modified random circuit breaker network model," in which the bulk medium is represented by a percolating network of circuit breakers. To consider interface effects in BRS, we introduce circuit breakers to investigate resistance states near the interface. This percolation model explains the reversible-type changes in terms of connectivity changes in the circuit breakers and provides insights into many experimental observations of BRS which are under debate by earlier theoretical models.

  2. Temperature dependence of resistive switching behaviors in resistive random access memory based on graphene oxide film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Mingdong; Cao, Yong; Ling, Haifeng; Du, Zhuzhu; Wang, Laiyuan; Yang, Tao; Fan, Quli; Xie, Linghai; Huang, Wei

    2014-05-01

    We reported resistive switching behaviors in the resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices based on the different annealing temperatures of graphene oxide (GO) film as active layers. It was found that the resistive switching characteristics of an indium tin oxide (ITO)/GO/Ag structure have a strong dependence on the annealing temperature of GO film. When the annealing temperature of the GO film was 20 °C, the devices showed typical write-once-read-many-times (WORM) type memory behaviors, which have good memory performance with a higher ON/OFF current ratio (˜104), the higher the high resistance state (HRS)/low resistance state (LRS) ratio (˜105) and stable retention characteristics (>103 s) under lower programming voltage (-1 V and -0.5 V). With the increasing annealing temperature of GO film, the resistive switching behavior of RRAM devices gradually weakened and eventually disappeared. This phenomenon could be understood by the different energy level distributions of the charge traps in GO film, and the different charge injection ability from the Ag electrode to GO film, which is caused by the different annealing temperatures of the GO film.

  3. Temperature dependence of resistive switching behaviors in resistive random access memory based on graphene oxide film.

    PubMed

    Yi, Mingdong; Cao, Yong; Ling, Haifeng; Du, Zhuzhu; Wang, Laiyuan; Yang, Tao; Fan, Quli; Xie, Linghai; Huang, Wei

    2014-05-01

    We reported resistive switching behaviors in the resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices based on the different annealing temperatures of graphene oxide (GO) film as active layers. It was found that the resistive switching characteristics of an indium tin oxide (ITO)/GO/Ag structure have a strong dependence on the annealing temperature of GO film. When the annealing temperature of the GO film was 20 °C, the devices showed typical write-once-read-many-times (WORM) type memory behaviors, which have good memory performance with a higher ON/OFF current ratio (∼10(4)), the higher the high resistance state (HRS)/low resistance state (LRS) ratio (∼10(5)) and stable retention characteristics (>10(3) s) under lower programming voltage (-1 V and -0.5 V). With the increasing annealing temperature of GO film, the resistive switching behavior of RRAM devices gradually weakened and eventually disappeared. This phenomenon could be understood by the different energy level distributions of the charge traps in GO film, and the different charge injection ability from the Ag electrode to GO film, which is caused by the different annealing temperatures of the GO film. PMID:24739543

  4. Differential Regulation of White-Opaque Switching by Individual Subunits of Candida albicans Mediator

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Anda; Liu, Zhongle

    2013-01-01

    The multisubunit eukaryotic Mediator complex integrates diverse positive and negative gene regulatory signals and transmits them to the core transcription machinery. Mutations in individual subunits within the complex can lead to decreased or increased transcription of certain subsets of genes, which are highly specific to the mutated subunit. Recent studies suggest a role for Mediator in epigenetic silencing. Using white-opaque morphological switching in Candida albicans as a model, we have shown that Mediator is required for the stability of both the epigenetic silenced (white) and active (opaque) states of the bistable transcription circuit driven by the master regulator Wor1. Individual deletions of eight C. albicans Mediator subunits have shown that different Mediator subunits have dramatically diverse effects on the directionality, frequency, and environmental induction of epigenetic switching. Among the Mediator deletion mutants analyzed, only Med12 has a steady-state transcriptional effect on the components of the Wor1 circuit that clearly corresponds to its effect on switching. The MED16 and MED9 genes have been found to be among a small subset of genes that are required for the stability of both the white and opaque states. Deletion of the Med3 subunit completely destabilizes the opaque state, even though the Wor1 transcription circuit is intact and can be driven by ectopic expression of Wor1. The highly impaired ability of the med3 deletion mutant to mate, even when Wor1 expression is ectopically induced, reveals that the activation of the Wor1 circuit can be decoupled from the opaque state and one of its primary biological consequences. PMID:23873866

  5. SCO2 Mediates Oxidative Stress-Induced Glycolysis to Oxidative Phosphorylation Switch in Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Amarachintha, Surya; Wilson, Andrew F; Pang, Qishen

    2016-04-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited bone marrow (BM) failure syndrome, presumably resulting from defects in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Normal HSCs depend more on glycolysis than on oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for energy production. Here, we show that FA HSCs are more sensitive to the respiration inhibitor NaN3 treatment than to glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG), indicating more dependence on OXPHOS. FA HSCs undergo glycolysis-to-OXPHOS switch in response to oxidative stress through a p53-dependent mechanism. Metabolic stresses induce upregulation of p53 metabolic targets in FA HSCs. Inactivation of p53 in FA HSCs prevents glycolysis-to-OXPHOS switch. Furthermore, p53-deficient FA HSCs are more sensitive to 2-DG-mediated metabolic stress. Finally, oxidative stress-induced glycolysis-to-OXPHOS switch is mediated by synthesis of cytochrome c oxidase 2 (SCO2). These findings demonstrate p53-mediated OXPHOS function as a compensatory alteration in FA HSCs to ensure a functional but mildly impaired energy metabolism and suggest a cautious approach to manipulating p53 signaling in FA. Stem Cells 2016;34:960-971. PMID:26676373

  6. S-Nitrosylation—Mediated Redox Transcriptional Switch Modulates Neurogenesis and Neuronal Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Shu-ichi; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Cieplak, Piotr; Chan, Shing Fai; Kalashnikova, Evgenia; Liao, Lujian; Saleem, Sofiyan; Han, Xuemei; Clemente, Arjay; Nutter, Anthony; Sances, Sam; Brechtel, Christopher; Haus, Daniel; Haun, Florian; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Huang, Xiayu; Li, Hao; Zaremba, Jeffrey D.; Cui, Jiankun; Gu, Zezong; Nikzad, Rana; Harrop, Anne; McKercher, Scott R.; Godzik, Adam; Yates, John R.; Lipton, Stuart A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Redox-mediated posttranslational modifications represent a molecular switch that controls major mechanisms of cell function. Nitric oxide (NO) can mediate redox reactions via S-nitrosylation, representing transfer of an NO group to a critical protein thiol. NO is known to modulate neurogenesis and neuronal survival in various brain regions in disparate neurodegenerative conditions. However, a unifying molecular mechanism linking these phenomena remains unknown. Here we report that S-nitrosylation of myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) transcription factors acts as a redox switch to inhibit both neurogenesis and neuronal survival. Structure-based analysis reveals that MEF2 dimerization creates a pocket, facilitating S-nitrosylation at an evolutionally conserved cysteine residue in the DNA binding domain. S-Nitrosylation disrupts MEF2-DNA binding and transcriptional activity, leading to impaired neurogenesis and survival in vitro and in vivo. Our data define a novel molecular switch whereby redox-mediated posttranslational modification controls both neurogenesis and neurodegeneration via a single transcriptional signaling cascade. PMID:25001280

  7. S-nitrosylation-mediated redox transcriptional switch modulates neurogenesis and neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Shu-Ichi; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Cieplak, Piotr; Chan, Shing Fai; Kalashnikova, Evgenia; Liao, Lujian; Saleem, Sofiyan; Han, Xuemei; Clemente, Arjay; Nutter, Anthony; Sances, Sam; Brechtel, Christopher; Haus, Daniel; Haun, Florian; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Huang, Xiayu; Li, Hao; Zaremba, Jeffrey D; Cui, Jiankun; Gu, Zezong; Nikzad, Rana; Harrop, Anne; McKercher, Scott R; Godzik, Adam; Yates, John R; Lipton, Stuart A

    2014-07-10

    Redox-mediated posttranslational modifications represent a molecular switch that controls major mechanisms of cell function. Nitric oxide (NO) can mediate redox reactions via S-nitrosylation, representing transfer of an NO group to a critical protein thiol. NO is known to modulate neurogenesis and neuronal survival in various brain regions in disparate neurodegenerative conditions. However, a unifying molecular mechanism linking these phenomena remains unknown. Here, we report that S-nitrosylation of myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) transcription factors acts as a redox switch to inhibit both neurogenesis and neuronal survival. Structure-based analysis reveals that MEF2 dimerization creates a pocket, facilitating S-nitrosylation at an evolutionally conserved cysteine residue in the DNA binding domain. S-Nitrosylation disrupts MEF2-DNA binding and transcriptional activity, leading to impaired neurogenesis and survival in vitro and in vivo. Our data define a molecular switch whereby redox-mediated posttranslational modification controls both neurogenesis and neurodegeneration via a single transcriptional signaling cascade. PMID:25001280

  8. Narrow-linewidth Q-switched random distributed feedback fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiangming; Ye, Jun; Xiao, Hu; Leng, Jinyong; Wu, Jian; Zhang, Hanwei; Zhou, Pu

    2016-08-22

    A narrow-linewidth Q-switched random fiber laser (RFL) based on a half-opened cavity, which is realized by narrow-linewidth fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and a section of 3 km passive fiber, has been proposed and experimentally investigated. The narrow-linewidth lasing is generated by the spectral filtering of three FBGs with linewidth of 1.21 nm, 0.56 nm, and 0.12 nm, respectively. The Q switching of the distributed cavity is achieved by placing an acousto-optical modulator (AOM) between the FBG and the passive fiber. The maximal output powers of the narrow-linewidth RFLs with the three different FBGs are 0.54 W, 0.27 W, and 0.08 W, respectively. Furthermore, the repetition rates of the output pulses are 500 kHz, and the pulse durations are about 500 ns. The corresponding pulse energies are about 1.08 μJ, 0.54 μJ, and 0.16 μJ, accordingly. The linewidth of FBG can influence the output characteristics in full scale. The narrower the FBG, the higher the pump threshold; the lower the output power at the same pump level, the more serious the linewidth broadening; and thus the higher the proportion of the CW-ground exists in the output pulse trains. Thanks to the assistance of the band-pass filter (BPF), the proportion of the CW-ground of narrow-linewidth Q-switched RFL under the relative high-pump-low-output condition can be reduced effectively. The experimental results indicate that it is challenging to demonstrate a narrow-linewidth Q-switched RFL with high quality output. But further power scaling and linewidth narrowing is possible in the case of operating parameters, optimization efforts, and a more powerful pump source. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of narrow-linewidth generation in a Q-switched RFL. PMID:27557200

  9. Randomness switches the dynamics in a biophysical model for Parkinson Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiliotis, Konstantinos G.; Radhakrishnan, Hari; Georgiou, George C.

    2012-09-01

    The interpallidal network of the two areas, the Globus Pallidus External (GPE) and the Subthalamic nucleus, (STN) plays an important role for controlling the movement. Changes in the dynamics of this network are closed related with the Parkinson Disease (PD) symptoms. In this paper we show how the connectivity between these two areas affects the dynamics of a biophysical-based neuronal-model. By changing the kind of interconnection from local (or lattice) to random structure between the two areas, the system switches the dynamics from correlated and clustered firing state (associated with PD) to a relatively quietness and less correlate state. In addition, the synchronization of the GPE and STN with respect to the connectivity distribution is examined by using the phase synchronization index.

  10. Markov-switching multifractal models as another class of random-energy-like models in one-dimensional space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saakian, David B.

    2012-03-01

    We map the Markov-switching multifractal model (MSM) onto the random energy model (REM). The MSM is, like the REM, an exactly solvable model in one-dimensional space with nontrivial correlation functions. According to our results, four different statistical physics phases are possible in random walks with multifractal behavior. We also introduce the continuous branching version of the model, calculate the moments, and prove multiscaling behavior. Different phases have different multiscaling properties.

  11. Exponential H∞ filtering for discrete-time switched neural networks with random delays.

    PubMed

    Mathiyalagan, Kalidass; Su, Hongye; Shi, Peng; Sakthivel, Rathinasamy

    2015-04-01

    This paper addresses the exponential H∞ filtering problem for a class of discrete-time switched neural networks with random time-varying delays. The involved delays are assumed to be randomly time-varying which are characterized by introducing a Bernoulli stochastic variable. Effects of both variation range and distribution probability of the time delays are considered. The nonlinear activation functions are assumed to satisfy the sector conditions. Our aim is to estimate the state by designing a full order filter such that the filter error system is globally exponentially stable with an expected decay rate and a H∞ performance attenuation level. The filter is designed by using a piecewise Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional together with linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach and average dwell time method. First, a set of sufficient LMI conditions are established to guarantee the exponential mean-square stability of the augmented system and then the parameters of full-order filter are expressed in terms of solutions to a set of LMI conditions. The proposed LMI conditions can be easily solved by using standard software packages. Finally, numerical examples by means of practical problems are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed filter design. PMID:25020225

  12. Oxide thickness dependence of resistive switching characteristics for Ni/HfOx/Pt resistive random access memory device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Daisuke; Hamada, Yoshihumi; Otsuka, Shintaro; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Shingubara, Shoso

    2015-06-01

    The switching process of the conductive filament formed in Ni/HfOx/Pt resistive random access memory (ReRAM) devices were studied. We evaluated the oxide thickness dependence and temperature dependence of voltage for the Forming, Set and Reset operations for HfOx layers whose thickness are between 3.3 and 6.5 nm. The resistance of conductive filaments showed typical metallic behavior, which suggests Ni filament formation in the HfOx layer. There is a clear dependence of switching voltages for the Set and Reset processes on oxide thickness, which implies that the formation and rupture of conductive filaments occur in the entire thickness range of the HfOx layer. This finding differs from that of a previous study by Yang, which suggests the existence of a constant-thickness switching region. It is suggested that the thickness of the switching region in HfOx may be larger than 6.5 nm.

  13. Switching characteristics for ferroelectric random access memory based on RC model in poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) ultrathin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, ChangLi; Wang, XueJun; Zhang, XiuLi; Du, XiaoLi; Xu, HaiSheng

    2016-05-01

    The switching characteristic of the poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethlene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) films have been studied at different ranges of applied electric field. It is suggest that the increase of the switching speed upon nucleation protocol and the deceleration of switching could be related to the presence of a non-ferroelectric layer. Remarkably, a capacitor and resistor (RC) links model plays significant roles in the polarization switching dynamics of the thin films. For P(VDF-TrFE) ultrathin films with electroactive interlayer, it is found that the switching dynamic characteristics are strongly affected by the contributions of resistor and non-ferroelectric (non-FE) interface factors. A corresponding experiment is designed using poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonic) (PEDOT-PSSH) as interlayer with different proton concentrations, and the testing results show that the robust switching is determined by the proton concentration in interlayer and lower leakage current in circuit to reliable applications of such polymer films. These findings provide a new feasible method to enhance the polarization switching for the ferroelectric random access memory.

  14. Aptamer-mediated delivery of splice-switching oligonucleotides to the nuclei of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kotula, Jonathan W; Pratico, Elizabeth D; Ming, Xin; Nakagawa, Osamu; Juliano, Rudolph L; Sullenger, Bruce A

    2012-06-01

    To reduce the adverse effects of cancer therapies and increase their efficacy, new delivery agents that specifically target cancer cells are needed. We and others have shown that aptamers can selectively deliver therapeutic oligonucleotides to the endosome and cytoplasm of cancer cells that express a particular cell surface receptor. Identifying a single aptamer that can internalize into many different cancer cell-types would increase the utility of aptamer-mediated delivery of therapeutic agents. We investigated the ability of the nucleolin aptamer (AS1411) to internalize into multiple cancer cell types and observed that it internalizes into a wide variety of cancer cells and migrates to the nucleus. To determine if the aptamer could be utilized to deliver therapeutic oligonucleotides to modulate events in the nucleus, we evaluated the ability of the aptamer to deliver splice-switching oligonucleotides. We observed that aptamer-splice-switching oligonucleotide chimeras can alter splicing in the nuclei of treated cells and are effective at lower doses than the splice switching oligonucleotides alone. Our results suggest that aptamers can be utilized to deliver oligonucleotides to the nucleus of a wide variety of cancer cells to modulate nuclear events such as RNA splicing. PMID:22703281

  15. Aptamer-Mediated Delivery of Splice-Switching Oligonucleotides to the Nuclei of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kotula, Jonathan W.; Pratico, Elizabeth D.; Ming, Xin; Nakagawa, Osamu; Juliano, Rudolph L.

    2012-01-01

    To reduce the adverse effects of cancer therapies and increase their efficacy, new delivery agents that specifically target cancer cells are needed. We and others have shown that aptamers can selectively deliver therapeutic oligonucleotides to the endosome and cytoplasm of cancer cells that express a particular cell surface receptor. Identifying a single aptamer that can internalize into many different cancer cell-types would increase the utility of aptamer-mediated delivery of therapeutic agents. We investigated the ability of the nucleolin aptamer (AS1411) to internalize into multiple cancer cell types and observed that it internalizes into a wide variety of cancer cells and migrates to the nucleus. To determine if the aptamer could be utilized to deliver therapeutic oligonucleotides to modulate events in the nucleus, we evaluated the ability of the aptamer to deliver splice-switching oligonucleotides. We observed that aptamer-splice-switching oligonucleotide chimeras can alter splicing in the nuclei of treated cells and are effective at lower doses than the splice switching oligonucleotides alone. Our results suggest that aptamers can be utilized to deliver oligonucleotides to the nucleus of a wide variety of cancer cells to modulate nuclear events such as RNA splicing. PMID:22703281

  16. HIV-1 Drug Resistance and Second-line Treatment in Children Randomized to Switch at Low versus Higher RNA Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Linda; Melvin, Ann; Fiscus, Susan; Saidi, Yacine; Nastouli, Eleni; Harper, Lynda; Compagnucci, Alexandra; Babiker, Abdel; McKinney, Ross; Gibb, Diana; Tudor-Williams, Gareth

    2015-01-01

    Background The PENPACT-1 trial compared virologic thresholds to determine when to switch to second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART). Using PENPACT-1 data, we aimed to describe HIV-1 drug resistance accumulation on first-line ART by virologic threshold. Methods PENPACT-1 had a 2x2 factorial design, randomizing HIV-infected children to start protease inhibitor (PI) versus non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) based ART, and switch at a 1000c/ml versus 30000c/ml threshold. Switch-criteria were: not achieving the threshold by week 24, confirmed rebound above the threshold thereafter, or CDC-C event. Resistance tests were performed on samples ≥1000c/ml before switch, re-suppression and at 4-year/trial-end. Results Sixty-seven children started PI-based ART and were randomized to switch at 1000c/ml (PI-1000), 64 PIs and 30000c/ml (PI-30000), 67 NNRTIs and 1000c/ml (NNRTI-1000), and 65 NNRTI and 30000c/ml (NNRTI-30000). Ninety-four (36%) children reached the 1000c/ml switch-criteria during 5 years follow-up. In 30000c/ml threshold arms, median time from 1000c/ml to 30000c/ml switch-criteria was 58 (PI) versus 80 (NNRTI) weeks (P=0.81). In NNRTI-30000 more NRTI resistance mutations accumulated than other groups. NNRTI mutations were selected before switching at 1000c/ml (23% NNRTI-1000, 27% NNRTI-30000). Sixty-two children started abacavir+lamivudine, 166 lamivudine+zidovudine or stavudine, and 35 other NRTIs. The abacavir+lamivudine group acquired fewest NRTI mutations. Of 60 switched to second-line, 79% PI-1000, 63% PI-30000, 64% NNRTI-1000 and 100% NNRTI-30000 were <400c/ml 24 weeks later. Conclusion Children on first-line NNRTI-based ART who were randomized to switch at a higher virologic threshold developed the most resistance, yet re-suppressed on second-line. An abacavir+lamivudine NRTI combination seemed protective against development of NRTI resistance. PMID:26322666

  17. Exo70 Isoform Switching upon Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Mediates Cancer Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hezhe; Liu, Jianglan; Liu, Shujing; Zeng, Jingwen; Ding, Deqiang; Carstens, Russ P.; Cong, Yusheng; Xu, Xiaowei; Guo, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Summary Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important developmental process hijacked by cancer cells for their dissemination. Here we show that Exo70, a component of the exocyst complex, undergoes isoform switching mediated by ESRP1, a pre-mRNA splicing factor that regulates EMT. Expression of the epithelial isoform of Exo70 affects the levels of key EMT transcriptional regulators such as Snail and ZEB2, and is sufficient to drive the transition to epithelial phenotypes. Differential Exo70 isoforms expression in human tumors correlates with cancer progression, and increased expression of the epithelial isoform of Exo70 inhibits tumor metastasis in mice. At the molecular level, the mesenchymal but not the epithelial isoform of Exo70 interacts with the Arp2/3 complex and stimulates actin polymerization for tumor invasion. Our findings provide a mechanism by which the exocyst function and actin dynamics are modulated for EMT and tumor invasion. PMID:24331928

  18. Nanoscale switch for vortex polarization mediated by Bloch core formation in magnetic hybrid systems

    PubMed Central

    Wohlhüter, Phillip; Bryan, Matthew Thomas; Warnicke, Peter; Gliga, Sebastian; Stevenson, Stephanie Elizabeth; Heldt, Georg; Saharan, Lalita; Suszka, Anna Kinga; Moutafis, Christoforos; Chopdekar, Rajesh Vilas; Raabe, Jörg; Thomson, Thomas; Hrkac, Gino; Heyderman, Laura Jane

    2015-01-01

    Vortices are fundamental magnetic topological structures characterized by a curling magnetization around a highly stable nanometric core. The control of the polarization of this core and its gyration is key to the utilization of vortices in technological applications. So far polarization control has been achieved in single-material structures using magnetic fields, spin-polarized currents or spin waves. Here we demonstrate local control of the vortex core orientation in hybrid structures where the vortex in an in-plane Permalloy film coexists with out-of-plane maze domains in a Co/Pd multilayer. The vortex core reverses its polarization on crossing a maze domain boundary. This reversal is mediated by a pair of magnetic singularities, known as Bloch points, and leads to the transient formation of a three-dimensional magnetization structure: a Bloch core. The interaction between vortex and domain wall thus acts as a nanoscale switch for the vortex core polarization. PMID:26238042

  19. Nanoscale switch for vortex polarization mediated by Bloch core formation in magnetic hybrid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlhüter, Phillip; Bryan, Matthew Thomas; Warnicke, Peter; Gliga, Sebastian; Stevenson, Stephanie Elizabeth; Heldt, Georg; Saharan, Lalita; Suszka, Anna Kinga; Moutafis, Christoforos; Chopdekar, Rajesh Vilas; Raabe, Jörg; Thomson, Thomas; Hrkac, Gino; Heyderman, Laura Jane

    2015-08-01

    Vortices are fundamental magnetic topological structures characterized by a curling magnetization around a highly stable nanometric core. The control of the polarization of this core and its gyration is key to the utilization of vortices in technological applications. So far polarization control has been achieved in single-material structures using magnetic fields, spin-polarized currents or spin waves. Here we demonstrate local control of the vortex core orientation in hybrid structures where the vortex in an in-plane Permalloy film coexists with out-of-plane maze domains in a Co/Pd multilayer. The vortex core reverses its polarization on crossing a maze domain boundary. This reversal is mediated by a pair of magnetic singularities, known as Bloch points, and leads to the transient formation of a three-dimensional magnetization structure: a Bloch core. The interaction between vortex and domain wall thus acts as a nanoscale switch for the vortex core polarization.

  20. Stress-stiffening-mediated stem-cell commitment switch in soft responsive hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Rajat K.; Gocheva, Veronika; Hammink, Roel; Zouani, Omar F.; Rowan, Alan E.

    2016-03-01

    Bulk matrix stiffness has emerged as a key mechanical cue in stem cell differentiation. Here, we show that the commitment and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in physiologically soft (~0.2-0.4 kPa), fully synthetic polyisocyanopeptide-based three-dimensional (3D) matrices that mimic the stiffness of adult stem cell niches and show biopolymer-like stress stiffening, can be readily switched from adipogenesis to osteogenesis by changing only the onset of stress stiffening. This mechanical behaviour can be tuned by simply altering the material’s polymer length whilst maintaining stiffness and ligand density. Our findings introduce stress stiffening as an important parameter that governs stem cell fate in a 3D microenvironment, and reveal a correlation between the onset of stiffening and the expression of the microtubule-associated protein DCAMKL1, thus implicating DCAMKL1 in a stress-stiffening-mediated, mechanotransduction pathway that involves microtubule dynamics in stem cell osteogenesis.

  1. Genomic and Genetic Analysis of Bordetella Bacteriophages Encoding Reverse Transcriptase-Mediated Tropism-Switching Cassettes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Minghsun; Gingery, Mari; Doulatov, Sergei R.; Liu, Yichin; Hodes, Asher; Baker, Stephen; Davis, Paul; Simmonds, Mark; Churcher, Carol; Mungall, Karen; Quail, Michael A.; Preston, Andrew; Harvill, Eric T.; Maskell, Duncan J.; Eiserling, Frederick A.; Parkhill, Julian; Miller, Jeff F.

    2004-01-01

    Liu et al. recently described a group of related temperate bacteriophages that infect Bordetella subspecies and undergo a unique template-dependent, reverse transcriptase-mediated tropism switching phenomenon (Liu et al., Science 295: 2091-2094, 2002). Tropism switching results from the introduction of single nucleotide substitutions at defined locations in the VR1 (variable region 1) segment of the mtd (major tropism determinant) gene, which determines specificity for receptors on host bacteria. In this report, we describe the complete nucleotide sequences of the 42.5- to 42.7-kb double-stranded DNA genomes of three related phage isolates and characterize two additional regions of variability. Forty-nine coding sequences were identified. Of these coding sequences, bbp36 contained VR2 (variable region 2), which is highly dynamic and consists of a variable number of identical 19-bp repeats separated by one of three 5-bp spacers, and bpm encodes a DNA adenine methylase with unusual site specificity and a homopolymer tract that functions as a hotspot for frameshift mutations. Morphological and sequence analysis suggests that these Bordetella phage are genetic hybrids of P22 and T7 family genomes, lending further support to the idea that regions encoding protein domains, single genes, or blocks of genes are readily exchanged between bacterial and phage genomes. Bordetella bacteriophages are capable of transducing genetic markers in vitro, and by using animal models, we demonstrated that lysogenic conversion can take place in the mouse respiratory tract during infection. PMID:14973019

  2. Mediation and Spillover Effects in Group-Randomized Trials with Application to the 4Rs Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanderWeele, Tyler J.; Hong, Guanglei; Jones, Stephanie M.; Brown, Joshua L.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the authors extend recent work on mediation in a multilevel setting and on causal inference under interference among units to develop a template for the mediation analysis of group randomized educational interventions. The present work will contribute to the literature on interference, in particular on interference in the context of…

  3. FLIP switches Fas-mediated glucose signaling in human pancreatic cells from apoptosis to cell replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maedler, Kathrin; Fontana, Adriano; Ris, Frédéric; Sergeev, Pavel; Toso, Christian; Oberholzer, José; Lehmann, Roger; Bachmann, Felix; Tasinato, Andrea; Spinas, Giatgen A.; Halban, Philippe A.; Donath, Marc Y.

    2002-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus results from an inadequate adaptation of the functional pancreatic cell mass in the face of insulin resistance. Changes in the concentration of glucose play an essential role in the regulation of cell turnover. In human islets, elevated glucose concentrations impair cell proliferation and induce cell apoptosis via up-regulation of the Fas receptor. Recently, it has been shown that the caspase-8 inhibitor FLIP may divert Fas-mediated death signals into those for cell proliferation in lymphatic cells. We observed expression of FLIP in human pancreatic cells of nondiabetic individuals, which was decreased in tissue sections of type 2 diabetic patients. In vitro exposure of islets from nondiabetic organ donors to high glucose levels decreased FLIP expression and increased the percentage of apoptotic terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated UTP end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells; FLIP was no longer detectable in such TUNEL-positive cells. Up-regulation of FLIP, by incubation with transforming growth factor or by transfection with an expression vector coding for FLIP, protected cells from glucose-induced apoptosis, restored cell proliferation, and improved cell function. The beneficial effects of FLIP overexpression were blocked by an antagonistic anti-Fas antibody, indicating their dependence on Fas receptor activation. The present data provide evidence for expression of FLIP in the human cell and suggest a novel approach to prevent and treat diabetes by switching Fas signaling from apoptosis to proliferation.

  4. Switching characteristics in Cu:SiO2 by chemical soak methods for resistive random access memory (ReRAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Fun-Tat; Lin, Yu-Hsien; Yang, Wen-Luh; Liao, Chin-Hsuan; Lin, Li-Min; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Chao, Tien-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    A limited copper (Cu)-source Cu:SiO2 switching layer composed of various Cu concentrations was fabricated using a chemical soaking (CS) technique. The switching layer was then studied for developing applications in resistive random access memory (ReRAM) devices. Observing the resistive switching mechanism exhibited by all the samples suggested that Cu conductive filaments formed and ruptured during the set/reset process. The experimental results indicated that the endurance property failure that occurred was related to the joule heating effect. Moreover, the endurance switching cycle increased as the Cu concentration decreased. In high-temperature tests, the samples demonstrated that the operating (set/reset) voltages decreased as the temperature increased, and an Arrhenius plot was used to calculate the activation energy of the set/reset process. In addition, the samples demonstrated stable data retention properties when baked at 85 °C, but the samples with low Cu concentrations exhibited short retention times in the low-resistance state (LRS) during 125 °C tests. Therefore, Cu concentration is a crucial factor in the trade-off between the endurance and retention properties; furthermore, the Cu concentration can be easily modulated using this CS technique.

  5. Low power switching of Si-doped Ta2O5 resistive random access memory for high density memory application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Beom Yong; Jeung Lee, Kee; Ock Chung, Su; Gil Kim, Soo; Ko, Young Seok; Kim, Hyeong Soo

    2016-04-01

    We report, for the first time, the resistive switching properties of Si-doped Ta2O5 grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The reduced switching current, improved on/off current ratio, and excellent endurance property are demonstrated in the Si-doped Ta2O5 resistive random access memory (ReRAM) devices of 50 nm tech node. The switching mechanism for the Si-doped Ta2O5 resistor is discussed. Si dopants enable switching layer to have conformal distribution of oxygen vacancy and easily form conductive filament. This leads to higher on/off current ratio at even low operation current of 5-10 µA. Finally, one selector-one resistor (1S1R) ReRAM was developed for large cell array application. For the optimized 1S1R stack, 0.2 µA of off current and 5.0 of on/off current ratio were successfully achieved at 10 µA of low operation current.

  6. Temperature induced complementary switching in titanium oxide resistive random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, D.; Simanjuntak, F. M.; Tseng, T.-Y.

    2016-07-01

    On the way towards high memory density and computer performance, a considerable development in energy efficiency represents the foremost aspiration in future information technology. Complementary resistive switch consists of two antiserial resistive switching memory (RRAM) elements and allows for the construction of large passive crossbar arrays by solving the sneak path problem in combination with a drastic reduction of the power consumption. Here we present a titanium oxide based complementary RRAM (CRRAM) device with Pt top and TiN bottom electrode. A subsequent post metal annealing at 400°C induces CRRAM. Forming voltage of 4.3 V is required for this device to initiate switching process. The same device also exhibiting bipolar switching at lower compliance current, Ic <50 μA. The CRRAM device have high reliabilities. Formation of intermediate titanium oxi-nitride layer is confirmed from the cross-sectional HRTEM analysis. The origin of complementary switching mechanism have been discussed with AES, HRTEM analysis and schematic diagram. This paper provides valuable data along with analysis on the origin of CRRAM for the application in nanoscale devices.

  7. Cellular cytotoxicity mediated by isotype-switch variants of a monoclonal antibody to human neuroblastoma.

    PubMed Central

    d'Uscio, C. H.; Jungi, T. W.; Blaser, K.

    1991-01-01

    The biological property of an antibody is determined by its antigen binding characteristics and its isotype-related effector functions. We have established monoclonal antibodies of different isotypes by stepwise selection and cloning of the hybridoma CE7. The original CE7 secretes an IgG1/kappa (CE7 gamma 1) antibody that recognises a 185 kD cell surface glycoprotein expressed on all human sympatho-adrenomedullary cells. Isotype-switch variants were isolated in the following sequence: from the original CE7 gamma 1, CE7 gamma 2b variants were isolated, and from a CE7 gamma 2b variant CE7 gamma 2a variants were isolated. The antibodies of three different isotype variant cell lines possess identical antigen binding characteristics, but display distinct effector functions as demonstrated by antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). ADCC was performed with the neuroblastoma line IMR-32 as the target cells, and different FcR gamma positive cells were either freshly isolated from human peripheral blood leukocytes or cultured for 6-10 days and tested as potential effector cells. Tumour lysis mediated by monocyte-derived macrophages depended on the presence of CE7 gamma 2a antibodies; antibodies from the CE7 hybridomas of gamma 2b and gamma 1 isotypes were virtually inactive in ADCC assay. Pre-exposure of macrophages to rIFN-gamma enhanced their ADCC activity, a result that is compatible with the notion that the high affinity Fc IgG receptor (FcR gamma I/CD64) is involved in the triggering of ADCC in macrophages. In contrast to macrophages, mononuclear cells, nonadherent cells and monocytes displayed considerable non-specific lytic activity, which was little influenced by the presence of antibody regardless of the isotype added. PMID:1911183

  8. A lipid-mediated conformational switch modulates the thermosensing activity of DesK.

    PubMed

    Inda, María Eugenia; Vandenbranden, Michel; Fernández, Ariel; de Mendoza, Diego; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie; Cybulski, Larisa Estefanía

    2014-03-01

    The thermosensor DesK is a multipass transmembrane histidine-kinase that allows the bacterium Bacillus subtilis to adjust the levels of unsaturated fatty acids required to optimize membrane lipid fluidity. The cytoplasmic catalytic domain of DesK behaves like a kinase at low temperature and like a phosphatase at high temperature. Temperature sensing involves a built-in instability caused by a group of hydrophilic residues located near the N terminus of the first transmembrane (TM) segment. These residues are buried in the lipid phase at low temperature and partially "buoy" to the aqueous phase at higher temperature with the thinning of the membrane, promoting the required conformational change. Nevertheless, the core question remains poorly understood: How is the information sensed by the transmembrane region converted into a rearrangement in the cytoplasmic catalytic domain to control DesK activity? Here, we identify a "linker region" (KSRKERERLEEK) that connects the TM sensor domain with the cytoplasmic catalytic domain involved in signal transmission. The linker adopts two conformational states in response to temperature-dependent membrane thickness changes: (i) random coiled and bound to the phospholipid head groups at the water-membrane interface, promoting the phosphatase state or (ii) unbound and forming a continuous helix spanning a region from the membrane to the cytoplasm, promoting the kinase state. Our results uphold the view that the linker is endowed with a helix/random coil conformational duality that enables it to behave like a transmission switch, with helix disruption decreasing the kinase/phosphatase activity ratio, as required to modulate the DesK output response. PMID:24522108

  9. The Kinesin-8 Kip3 switches protofilaments in a sideward random walk asymmetrically biased by force.

    PubMed

    Bugiel, Michael; Böhl, Elisa; Schäffer, Erik

    2015-04-21

    Molecular motors translocate along cytoskeletal filaments, as in the case of kinesin motors on microtubules. Although conventional kinesin-1 tracks a single microtubule protofilament, other kinesins, akin to dyneins, switch protofilaments. However, the molecular trajectory-whether protofilament switching occurs in a directed or stochastic manner-is unclear. Here, we used high-resolution optical tweezers to track the path of single budding yeast kinesin-8, Kip3, motor proteins. Under applied sideward loads, we found that individual motors stepped sideward in both directions, with and against loads, with a broad distribution in measured step sizes. Interestingly, the force response depended on the direction. Based on a statistical analysis and simulations accounting for the geometry, we propose a diffusive sideward stepping motion of Kip3 on the microtubule lattice, asymmetrically biased by force. This finding is consistent with previous multimotor gliding assays and sheds light on the molecular switching mechanism. For kinesin-8, the diffusive switching mechanism may enable the motor to bypass obstacles and reach the microtubule end for length regulation. For other motors, such a mechanism may have implications for torque generation around the filament axis. PMID:25902441

  10. Switching Lopinavir/Ritonavir to Atazanavir/Ritonavir vs Adding Atorvastatin in HIV-Infected Patients Receiving Second-Line Antiretroviral Therapy With Hypercholesterolemia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Wangpatharawanit, Phanthaboon; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek

    2016-09-15

    A randomized controlled trial was conducted among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients receiving lopinavir/ritonavir-based regimens with hypercholesterolemia. Reduction of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein was significantly greater in patients who were randomized to the addition of atorvastatin compared with those who were switched from lopinavir/ritonavir to atazanavir/ritonavir. PMID:27402817

  11. Acidosis Mediates the Switching of Gs-PKA and Gi-PKCε Dependence in Prolonged Hyperalgesia Induced by Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Yu; Dai, Shih-Ping; Chang, Yan-Ching; Sun, Wei-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory pain, when not effectively treated, is a costly health problem and has a harmful effect on all aspects of health-related quality of life. Previous studies suggested that in male Sprague Dawley rats, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-induced short-term hyperalgesia depends on protein kinase A (PKA) activity, whereas long-lasting hyperalgesia induced by PGE2 with carrageenan pre-injection, requires protein kinase Cε (PKCε). However, the mechanism underlying the kinase switch with short- to long-term hyperalgesia remains unclear. In this study, we used the inflammatory agents carrageenan or complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) to induce long-term hyperalgesia, and examined PKA and PKCε dependence and switching time. Hyperalgesia induced by both agents depended on PKA/PKCε and Gs/Gi-proteins, and the switching time from PKA to PKCε and from Gs to Gi was about 3 to 4 h after inflammation induction. Among the single inflammatory mediators tested, PGE2 and 5-HT induced transient hyperalgesia, which depended on PKA and PKCε, respectively. Only acidic solution-induced hyperalgesia required Gs-PKA and Gi-PKCε, and the switch time for kinase dependency matched inflammatory hyperalgesia, in approximately 2 to 4 h. Thus, acidosis in inflamed tissues may be a decisive factor to regulate switching of PKA and PKCε dependence via proton-sensing G-protein–coupled receptors. PMID:25933021

  12. The role of the local chemical environment of Ag on the resistive switching mechanism of conductive bridging random access memories.

    PubMed

    Souchier, E; D'Acapito, F; Noé, P; Blaise, P; Bernard, M; Jousseaume, V

    2015-10-01

    Conductive bridging random access memories (CBRAMs) are one of the most promising emerging technologies for the next generation of non-volatile memory. However, the lack of understanding of the switching mechanism at the nanoscale level prevents successful transfer to industry. In this paper, Ag/GeSx/W CBRAM devices are analyzed using depth selective X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy before and after switching. The study of the local environment around Ag atoms in such devices reveals that Ag is in two very distinct environments with short Ag-S bonds due to Ag dissolved in the GeSx matrix, and longer Ag-Ag bonds related to an Ag metallic phase. These experiments allow the conclusion that the switching process involves the formation of metallic Ag nano-filaments initiated at the Ag electrode. All these experimental features are well supported by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations showing that Ag favorably bonds to S atoms, and permit the proposal of a model at the microscopic level that can explain the instability of the conductive state in these Ag-GeSx CBRAM devices. Finally, the principle of the nondestructive method described here can be extended to other types of resistive memory concepts. PMID:26312954

  13. Testing Mediators of Intervention Effects in Randomized Controlled Trials: An Evaluation of Three Depression Prevention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul; Seeley, John R.; Gau, Jeff M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate a new 5-step method for testing mediators hypothesized to account for the effects of depression prevention programs. Method: In this indicated prevention trial, at-risk teens with elevated depressive symptoms were randomized to a group cognitive-behavioral (CB) intervention, group supportive expressive intervention, CB…

  14. Randomized Controlled Caregiver Mediated Joint Engagement Intervention for Toddlers with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasari, Connie; Gulsrud, Amanda C.; Wong, Connie; Kwon, Susan; Locke, Jill

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine if a joint attention intervention would result in greater joint engagement between caregivers and toddlers with autism. The intervention consisted of 24 caregiver-mediated sessions with follow-up 1 year later. Compared to caregivers and toddlers randomized to the waitlist control group the immediate treatment (IT)…

  15. A random six-phase switch regulates pneumococcal virulence via global epigenetic changes

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Ana Sousa; Chai, Melissa H.; Atack, John M.; Furi, Leonardo; De Ste Croix, Megan; Haigh, Richard; Trappetti, Claudia; Ogunniyi, Abiodun D.; Shewell, Lucy K.; Boitano, Matthew; Clark, Tyson A.; Korlach, Jonas; Blades, Matthew; Mirkes, Evgeny; Gorban, Alexander N.; Paton, James C.; Jennings, Michael P.; Oggioni, Marco R.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is the world’s foremost bacterial pathogen in both morbidity and mortality. Switching between phenotypic forms (or ‘phases’) that favour asymptomatic carriage or invasive disease was first reported in 1933. Here, we show that the underlying mechanism for such phase variation consists of genetic rearrangements in a Type I restriction-modification system (SpnD39III). The rearrangements generate six alternative specificities with distinct methylation patterns, as defined by single-molecule, real-time (SMRT) methylomics. The SpnD39III variants have distinct gene expression profiles. We demonstrate distinct virulence in experimental infection and in vivo selection for switching between SpnD39III variants. SpnD39III is ubiquitous in pneumococci, indicating an essential role in its biology. Future studies must recognize the potential for switching between these heretofore undetectable, differentiated pneumococcal subpopulations in vitro and in vivo. Similar systems exist in other bacterial genera, indicating the potential for broad exploitation of epigenetic gene regulation. PMID:25268848

  16. Resistive Switching Behavior in Organic-Inorganic Hybrid CH3 NH3 PbI3-x Clx Perovskite for Resistive Random Access Memory Devices.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Eun Ji; Lyu, Miaoqiang; Yun, Jung-Ho; Kang, Chi Jung; Choi, Young Jin; Wang, Lianzhou

    2015-10-28

    The CH3 NH3 PbI3- x Clx organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite material demonstrates remarkable resistive switching behavior, which can be applicable in resistive random access memory devices. The simply designed Au/CH3 NH3 PbI3- x Clx /FTO structure is fabricated by a low-temperature, solution-processable method, which exhibits remarkable bipolar resistive switching and nonvolatile properties. PMID:26331363

  17. Spectral shifts and switches in random fields upon interaction with negative-phase materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Zhisong; Korotkova, Olga

    2010-07-15

    Spectral shifts in stochastic beam-like fields on interaction with layers of positive- and negative-phase materials are examined on the basis of the ABCD-matrix approach and generalized Huygens-Fresnel principle. It is found that boundaries between such materials may cause spectral switches. Effect of absorption of negative-phase materials on the beam spectrum is discussed. Our results may find applications in connection with spectrum-selection optical interconnects, spectrally encoded information transfer, image formation in systems involving negative-phase materials, and geometrically tunable metamaterials.

  18. Code-Switching: L1-Coded Mediation in a Kindergarten Foreign Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    This paper is based on a qualitative inquiry that investigated the role of teachers' mediation in three different modes of coding in a kindergarten foreign language classroom in China (i.e. L2-coded intralinguistic mediation, L1-coded cross-lingual mediation, and L2-and-L1-mixed mediation). Through an exploratory examination of the varying effects…

  19. Stimulus predictability mediates a switch in locomotor smooth pursuit performance for Eigenmannia virescens.

    PubMed

    Roth, Eatai; Zhuang, Katie; Stamper, Sarah A; Fortune, Eric S; Cowan, Noah J

    2011-04-01

    The weakly electric glass knifefish, Eigenmannia virescens, will swim forward and backward, using propulsion from an anal ribbon fin, in response to motion of a computer-controlled moving refuge. Fish were recorded performing a refuge-tracking behavior for sinusoidal (predictable) and sum-of-sines (pseudo-random) refuge trajectories. For all trials, we observed high coherence between refuge and fish trajectories, suggesting linearity of the tracking dynamics. But superposition failed: we observed categorical differences in tracking between the predictable single-sine stimuli and the unpredictable sum-of-sines stimuli. This nonlinearity suggests a stimulus-mediated adaptation. At all frequencies tested, fish demonstrated reduced tracking error when tracking single-sine trajectories and this was typically accompanied by a reduction in overall movement. Most notably, fish demonstrated reduced phase lag when tracking single-sine trajectories. These data support the hypothesis that fish generate an internal dynamical model of the stimulus motion, hence improving tracking of predictable trajectories (relative to unpredictable ones) despite similar or reduced motor cost. Similar predictive mechanisms based on the dynamics of stimulus movement have been proposed recently, but almost exclusively for nonlocomotor tasks by humans, such as oculomotor target tracking and posture control. These data suggest that such mechanisms might be common across taxa and behaviors. PMID:21389203

  20. Antivortex-core switching as write process in random access memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drews, Andre; Matsuyama, Toru; Bocklage, Lars; Bolte, Markus; Meier, Guido; Krueger, Benjamin; Bohlens, Stellan

    2009-03-01

    Magnetic vortices observed in ferromagnetic thin films have received a great deal of interest in recent years. The topological counterpart of a vortex, the antivortex, has not been investigated as intensively so far. Like vortices, magnetic antivortices gyrate when excited by alternating fields or spin-polarized currents. When excited by alternating currents and fields simultaneously, the superposition of the forces leads to an enhancement or suppression of the gyration amplitude, depending on the orientation of the in-plane magnetization, i.e., the c-value of the antivortex, and the antivortex-core polarization p. Thus the c-p-dependent amplitude variation of antivortex core gyration can lead to antivortex-core switching and thus to write binary data. Reading out of the data can be done by detecting the amplitude of gyration, e.g. by inductive loops. A logical zero (one) is represented by a small (large) gyration amplitude, i.e., suppression (enhancement) of the gyration. Due to the c-p-dependence of the excitation amplitude, an ensuing toggle switching is impossible. This technique allows bringing the antivortex into a distinct binary state without the need of a reading process before writing the bits.

  1. Realization of a reversible switching in TaO{sub 2} polymorphs via Peierls distortion for resistance random access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Linggang; Sun, Zhimei; Zhou, Jian; Guo, Zhonglu

    2015-03-02

    Transition-metal-oxide based resistance random access memory (RRAM) is a promising candidate for next-generation universal non-volatile memories. Searching and designing appropriate materials used in the memories becomes an urgent task. Here, a structure with the TaO{sub 2} formula was predicted using evolutionary algorithms in combination with first-principles calculations. This triclinic structure (T-TaO{sub 2}) is both energetically and dynamically more favorable than the commonly believed rutile structure (R-TaO{sub 2}). The metal-insulator transition (MIT) between metallic R-TaO{sub 2} and T-TaO{sub 2} (band gap: 1.0 eV) is via a Peierls distortion, which makes TaO{sub 2} a potential candidate for RRAM. The energy barrier for the reversible phase transition is 0.19 eV/atom and 0.23 eV/atom, respectively, suggesting low power consumption for the resistance switch. The present findings about the MIT as the resistance-switch mechanism in Ta-O system will stimulate experimental work to fabricate tantalum oxides based RRAM.

  2. Effects of different dopants on switching behavior of HfO2-based resistive random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Ning; Pang, Hua; Wu, Wei

    2014-10-01

    In this study the effects of doping atoms (Al, Cu, and N) with different electro-negativities and ionic radii on resistive switching of HfO2-based resistive random access memory (RRAM) are systematically investigated. The results show that forming voltages and set voltages of Al/Cu-doped devices are reduced. Among all devices, Cu-doped device shows the narrowest device-to-device distributions of set voltage and low resistance. The effects of different dopants on switching behavior are explained with deferent types of CFs formed in HfO2 depending on dopants: oxygen vacancy (Vo) filaments for Al-doped HfO2 devices, hybrid filaments composed of oxygen vacancies and Cu atoms for Cu-doped HfO2 devices, and nitrogen/oxygen vacancy filaments for N-doped HfO2 devices. The results suggest that a metal dopant with a larger electro-negativity than host metal atom offers the best comprehensive performance.

  3. Realization of a reversible switching in TaO2 polymorphs via Peierls distortion for resistance random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Linggang; Zhou, Jian; Guo, Zhonglu; Sun, Zhimei

    2015-03-01

    Transition-metal-oxide based resistance random access memory (RRAM) is a promising candidate for next-generation universal non-volatile memories. Searching and designing appropriate materials used in the memories becomes an urgent task. Here, a structure with the TaO2 formula was predicted using evolutionary algorithms in combination with first-principles calculations. This triclinic structure (T-TaO2) is both energetically and dynamically more favorable than the commonly believed rutile structure (R-TaO2). The metal-insulator transition (MIT) between metallic R-TaO2 and T-TaO2 (band gap: 1.0 eV) is via a Peierls distortion, which makes TaO2 a potential candidate for RRAM. The energy barrier for the reversible phase transition is 0.19 eV/atom and 0.23 eV/atom, respectively, suggesting low power consumption for the resistance switch. The present findings about the MIT as the resistance-switch mechanism in Ta-O system will stimulate experimental work to fabricate tantalum oxides based RRAM.

  4. Mediator facilitates transcriptional activation and dynamic long-range contacts at the IgH locus during class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Claudepierre, Anne-Sophie; Robert, Isabelle; Rocha, Pedro P; Raviram, Ramya; Schiavo, Ebe; Heyer, Vincent; Bonneau, Richard; Luo, Vincent M; Reddy, Janardan K; Borggrefe, Tilman; Skok, Jane A; Reina-San-Martin, Bernardo

    2016-03-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination (CSR) is initiated by the transcription-coupled recruitment of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to Ig switch regions (S regions). During CSR, the IgH locus undergoes dynamic three-dimensional structural changes in which promoters, enhancers, and S regions are brought to close proximity. Nevertheless, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we show that Med1 and Med12, two subunits of the mediator complex implicated in transcription initiation and long-range enhancer/promoter loop formation, are dynamically recruited to the IgH locus enhancers and the acceptor regions during CSR and that their knockdown in CH12 cells results in impaired CSR. Furthermore, we show that conditional inactivation of Med1 in B cells results in defective CSR and reduced acceptor S region transcription. Finally, we show that in B cells undergoing CSR, the dynamic long-range contacts between the IgH enhancers and the acceptor regions correlate with Med1 and Med12 binding and that they happen at a reduced frequency in Med1-deficient B cells. Our results implicate the mediator complex in the mechanism of CSR and are consistent with a model in which mediator facilitates the long-range contacts between S regions and the IgH locus enhancers during CSR and their transcriptional activation. PMID:26903242

  5. Beyond the random coil: stochastic conformational switching in intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ucheor B; McCann, James J; Weninger, Keith R; Bowen, Mark E

    2011-04-13

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) participate in critical cellular functions that exploit the flexibility and rapid conformational fluctuations of their native state. Limited information about the native state of IDPs can be gained by the averaging over many heterogeneous molecules that is unavoidable in ensemble approaches. We used single molecule fluorescence to characterize native state conformational dynamics in five synaptic proteins confirmed to be disordered by other techniques. For three of the proteins, SNAP-25, synaptobrevin and complexin, their conformational dynamics could be described with a simple semiflexible polymer model. Surprisingly, two proteins, neuroligin and the NMDAR-2B glutamate receptor, were observed to stochastically switch among distinct conformational states despite the fact that they appeared intrinsically disordered by other measures. The hop-like intramolecular diffusion found in these proteins is suggested to define a class of functionality previously unrecognized for IDPs. PMID:21481779

  6. Correcting treatment effect for treatment switching in randomized oncology trials with a modified iterative parametric estimation method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Chen, Cong

    2016-09-20

    In randomized oncology trials, patients in the control arm are sometimes permitted to switch to receive experimental drug after disease progression. This is mainly due to ethical reasons or to reduce the patient dropout rate. While progression-free survival is not usually impacted by crossover, the treatment effect on overall survival can be highly confounded. The rank-preserving structural failure time (RPSFT) model and iterative parametric estimation (IPE) are the main randomization-based methods used to adjust for confounding in the analysis of overall survival. While the RPSFT has been extensively studied, the properties of the IPE have not been thoroughly examined and its application is not common. In this manuscript, we clarify the re-censoring algorithm needed for IPE estimation and incorporate it into a method we propose as modified IPE (MIPE). We compared the MIPE and RPSFT via extensive simulations and then walked through the analysis using the modified IPE in a real clinical trial. We provided practical guidance on bootstrap by examining the performance in estimating the variance and confidence interval for the MIPE. Our results indicate that the MIPE method with the proposed re-censoring rule is an attractive alternative to the RPSFT method. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26919271

  7. Highly reliable switching via phase transition using hydrogen peroxide in homogeneous and multi-layered GaZnO(x)-based resistive random access memory devices.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Pyo; Yoon, Doo Hyun; Tak, Young Jun; Lee, Heesoo; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2015-06-01

    Here, we propose an effective method for improving the resistive switching characteristics of solution-processed gallium-doped zinc oxide (GaZnO(x)) resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices using hydrogen peroxide. Our results imply that solution processed GaZnO(x) RRAM devices could be one of the candidates for the development of low cost RRAM. PMID:25947353

  8. RNase L Cleavage Products Promote Switch from Autophagy to Apoptosis by Caspase-Mediated Cleavage of Beclin-1

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Mukherjee, Sushovita; Manivannan, Praveen; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy and apoptosis share regulatory molecules enabling crosstalk in pathways that affect cellular homeostasis including response to viral infections and survival of tumor cells. Ribonuclease L (RNase L) is an antiviral endonuclease that is activated in virus-infected cells and cleaves viral and cellular single-stranded RNAs to produce small double-stranded RNAs with roles in amplifying host responses. Activation of RNase L induces autophagy and apoptosis in many cell types. However, the mechanism by which RNase L mediates crosstalk between these two pathways remains unclear. Here we show that small dsRNAs produced by RNase L promote a switch from autophagy to apoptosis by caspase-mediated cleavage of Beclin-1, terminating autophagy. The caspase 3-cleaved C-terminal fragment of Beclin-1 enhances apoptosis by translocating to the mitochondria along with proapoptotic protein, Bax, and inducing release of cytochrome C to the cytosol. Cleavage of Beclin-1 determines switch to apoptosis since expression of caspase-resistant Beclin-1 inhibits apoptosis and sustains autophagy. Moreover, inhibiting RNase L-induced autophagy promotes cell death and inhibiting apoptosis prolongs autophagy in a cross-inhibitory mechanism. Our results demonstrate a novel role of RNase L generated small RNAs in cross-talk between autophagy and apoptosis that impacts the fate of cells during viral infections and cancer. PMID:26263979

  9. RNase L Cleavage Products Promote Switch from Autophagy to Apoptosis by Caspase-Mediated Cleavage of Beclin-1.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Mukherjee, Sushovita; Manivannan, Praveen; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy and apoptosis share regulatory molecules enabling crosstalk in pathways that affect cellular homeostasis including response to viral infections and survival of tumor cells. Ribonuclease L (RNase L) is an antiviral endonuclease that is activated in virus-infected cells and cleaves viral and cellular single-stranded RNAs to produce small double-stranded RNAs with roles in amplifying host responses. Activation of RNase L induces autophagy and apoptosis in many cell types. However, the mechanism by which RNase L mediates crosstalk between these two pathways remains unclear. Here we show that small dsRNAs produced by RNase L promote a switch from autophagy to apoptosis by caspase-mediated cleavage of Beclin-1, terminating autophagy. The caspase 3-cleaved C-terminal fragment of Beclin-1 enhances apoptosis by translocating to the mitochondria along with proapoptotic protein, Bax, and inducing release of cytochrome C to the cytosol. Cleavage of Beclin-1 determines switch to apoptosis since expression of caspase-resistant Beclin-1 inhibits apoptosis and sustains autophagy. Moreover, inhibiting RNase L-induced autophagy promotes cell death and inhibiting apoptosis prolongs autophagy in a cross-inhibitory mechanism. Our results demonstrate a novel role of RNase L generated small RNAs in cross-talk between autophagy and apoptosis that impacts the fate of cells during viral infections and cancer. PMID:26263979

  10. Optofluidic guiding, valving, switching and mixing based on plasmonic heating in a random gold nanoisland substrate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiajie; Kang, Zhiwen; Wang, Guanghui; Loo, Jacky Fong Chuen; Kong, Siu Kai; Ho, Ho-Pui

    2015-06-01

    We present a versatile optofluidic flow manipulation scheme based on plasmonic heating in a random gold nanoisland substrate (Au-NIS). With its highly efficient conversion of optical power to hydrodynamic actuation, the reported substrate is used for laser-controlled optofluidic manipulation. It is the first time that microfluidic flow guiding, valving, and mixing within the same functional substrate has been realised. Plasmonic heating provides power for guiding the sample flow inside a microfluidic channel at controlled speed and transport of small particles or living cells is demonstrated. We have also made a laser-actuated microfluidic valve through controlling the surface wettability of the sample/Au-NIS interface. When the laser power density is sufficiently high to generate a bubble, localized convection around the bubble can lead to efficient sample mixing within a microfluidic chamber. The reported Au-NIS scheme practically offers a programmable functional surface on which users have the freedom to control the wetting characteristics with a focused laser beam. We have verified that this optofluidic approach induces insignificant degradation in cell viability. The reported scheme therefore offers a wide range of application possibilities in microfluidics and biomedical engineering, particularly those operated under a low Reynolds number. PMID:25963226

  11. Switch-mediated activation and retargeting of CAR-T cells for B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, David T.; Mazagova, Magdalena; Hampton, Eric N.; Cao, Yu; Ramadoss, Nitya S.; Hardy, Ian R.; Schulman, Andrew; Du, Juanjuan; Wang, Feng; Singer, Oded; Ma, Jennifer; Nunez, Vanessa; Shen, Jiayin; Woods, Ashley K.; Wright, Timothy M.; Schultz, Peter G.; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Young, Travis S.

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy has produced impressive results in clinical trials for B-cell malignancies. However, safety concerns related to the inability to control CAR-T cells once infused into the patient remain a significant challenge. Here we report the engineering of recombinant antibody-based bifunctional switches that consist of a tumor antigen-specific Fab molecule engrafted with a peptide neo-epitope, which is bound exclusively by a peptide-specific switchable CAR-T cell (sCAR-T). The switch redirects the activity of the bio-orthogonal sCAR-T cells through the selective formation of immunological synapses, in which the sCAR-T cell, switch, and target cell interact in a structurally defined and temporally controlled manner. Optimized switches specific for CD19 controlled the activity, tissue-homing, cytokine release, and phenotype of sCAR-T cells in a dose-titratable manner in a Nalm-6 xenograft rodent model of B-cell leukemia. The sCAR–T-cell dosing regimen could be tuned to provide efficacy comparable to the corresponding conventional CART-19, but with lower cytokine levels, thereby offering a method of mitigating cytokine release syndrome in clinical translation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this methodology is readily adaptable to targeting CD20 on cancer cells using the same sCAR-T cell, suggesting that this approach may be broadly applicable to heterogeneous and resistant tumor populations, as well as other liquid and solid tumor antigens. PMID:26759369

  12. An engineered small RNA-mediated genetic switch based on a ribozyme expression platform

    PubMed Central

    Klauser, Benedikt; Hartig, Jörg S.

    2013-01-01

    An important requirement for achieving many goals of synthetic biology is the availability of a large repertoire of reprogrammable genetic switches and appropriate transmitter molecules. In addition to engineering genetic switches, the interconnection of individual switches becomes increasingly important for the construction of more complex genetic networks. In particular, RNA-based switches of gene expression have become a powerful tool to post-transcriptionally program genetic circuits. RNAs used for regulatory purposes have the advantage to transmit, sense, process and execute information. We have recently used the hammerhead ribozyme to control translation initiation in a small molecule-dependent fashion. In addition, riboregulators have been constructed in which a small RNA acts as transmitter molecule to control translation of a target mRNA. In this study, we combine both concepts and redesign the hammerhead ribozyme to sense small trans-acting RNAs (taRNAs) as input molecules resulting in repression of translation initiation in Escherichia coli. Importantly, our ribozyme-based expression platform is compatible with previously reported artificial taRNAs, which were reported to act as inducers of gene expression. In addition, we provide several insights into key requirements of riboregulatory systems, including the influences of varying transcriptional induction of the taRNA and mRNA transcripts, 5′-processing of taRNAs, as well as altering the secondary structure of the taRNA. In conclusion, we introduce an RNA-responsive ribozyme-based expression system to the field of artificial riboregulators that can serve as reprogrammable platform for engineering higher-order genetic circuits. PMID:23585277

  13. Switch-mediated activation and retargeting of CAR-T cells for B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, David T; Mazagova, Magdalena; Hampton, Eric N; Cao, Yu; Ramadoss, Nitya S; Hardy, Ian R; Schulman, Andrew; Du, Juanjuan; Wang, Feng; Singer, Oded; Ma, Jennifer; Nunez, Vanessa; Shen, Jiayin; Woods, Ashley K; Wright, Timothy M; Schultz, Peter G; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Young, Travis S

    2016-01-26

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy has produced impressive results in clinical trials for B-cell malignancies. However, safety concerns related to the inability to control CAR-T cells once infused into the patient remain a significant challenge. Here we report the engineering of recombinant antibody-based bifunctional switches that consist of a tumor antigen-specific Fab molecule engrafted with a peptide neo-epitope, which is bound exclusively by a peptide-specific switchable CAR-T cell (sCAR-T). The switch redirects the activity of the bio-orthogonal sCAR-T cells through the selective formation of immunological synapses, in which the sCAR-T cell, switch, and target cell interact in a structurally defined and temporally controlled manner. Optimized switches specific for CD19 controlled the activity, tissue-homing, cytokine release, and phenotype of sCAR-T cells in a dose-titratable manner in a Nalm-6 xenograft rodent model of B-cell leukemia. The sCAR-T-cell dosing regimen could be tuned to provide efficacy comparable to the corresponding conventional CART-19, but with lower cytokine levels, thereby offering a method of mitigating cytokine release syndrome in clinical translation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this methodology is readily adaptable to targeting CD20 on cancer cells using the same sCAR-T cell, suggesting that this approach may be broadly applicable to heterogeneous and resistant tumor populations, as well as other liquid and solid tumor antigens. PMID:26759369

  14. Power- and Low-Resistance-State-Dependent, Bipolar Reset-Switching Transitions in SiN-Based Resistive Random-Access Memory.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungjun; Park, Byung-Gook

    2016-12-01

    A study on the bipolar-resistive switching of an Ni/SiN/Si-based resistive random-access memory (RRAM) device shows that the influences of the reset power and the resistance value of the low-resistance state (LRS) on the reset-switching transitions are strong. For a low LRS with a large conducting path, the sharp reset switching, which requires a high reset power (>7 mW), was observed, whereas for a high LRS with small multiple-conducting paths, the step-by-step reset switching with a low reset power (<7 mW) was observed. The attainment of higher nonlinear current-voltage (I-V) characteristics in terms of the step-by-step reset switching is due to the steep current-increased region of the trap-controlled space charge-limited current (SCLC) model. A multilevel cell (MLC) operation, for which the reset stop voltage (V STOP) is used in the DC sweep mode and an incremental amplitude is used in the pulse mode for the step-by-step reset switching, is demonstrated here. The results of the present study suggest that well-controlled conducting paths in a SiN-based RRAM device, which are not too strong and not too weak, offer considerable potential for the realization of low-power and high-density crossbar-array applications. PMID:27518231

  15. Reducing operation voltages by introducing a low-k switching layer in indium–tin-oxide-based resistance random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Fu-Yuan; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Chang, Ting-Chang; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Pan, Chih-Hung; Lin, Chih-Yang; Chen, Po-Hsun; Chen, Min-Chen; Huang, Hui-Chun; Lo, Ikai; Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Sze, Simon M.

    2016-06-01

    In this letter, we inserted a low dielectric constant (low-k) or high dielectric constant (high-k) material as a switching layer in indium–tin-oxide-based resistive random-access memory. After measuring the two samples, we found that the low-k material device has very low operating voltages (‑80 and 110 mV for SET and RESET operations, respectively). Current fitting results were then used with the COMSOL software package to simulate electric field distribution in the layers. After combining the electrical measurement results with simulations, a conduction model was proposed to explain resistance switching behaviors in the two structures.

  16. Effect of embedded metal nanocrystals on the resistive switching characteristics in NiN-based resistive random access memory cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Min Ju; Kim, Hee-Dong; Man Hong, Seok; Hyun Park, Ju; Su Jeon, Dong; Geun Kim, Tae

    2014-03-07

    The metal nanocrystals (NCs) embedded-NiN-based resistive random access memory cells are demonstrated using several metal NCs (i.e., Pt, Ni, and Ti) with different physical parameters in order to investigate the metal NC's dependence on resistive switching (RS) characteristics. First, depending on the electronegativity of metal, the size of metal NCs is determined and this affects the operating current of memory cells. If metal NCs with high electronegativity are incorporated, the size of the NCs is reduced; hence, the operating current is reduced owing to the reduced density of the electric field around the metal NCs. Second, the potential wells are formed by the difference of work function between the metal NCs and active layer, and the barrier height of the potential wells affects the level of operating voltage as well as the conduction mechanism of metal NCs embedded memory cells. Therefore, by understanding these correlations between the active layer and embedded metal NCs, we can optimize the RS properties of metal NCs embedded memory cells as well as predict their conduction mechanisms.

  17. Resistance switching behavior of ZnO resistive random access memory with a reduced graphene oxide capping layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Cheng-Li; Chang, Wei-Yi; Huang, Yen-Lun; Juan, Pi-Chun; Wang, Tse-Wen; Hung, Ke-Yu; Hsieh, Cheng-Yu; Kang, Tsung-Kuei; Shi, Jen-Bin

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we investigate the characteristics of ZnO resistive random access memory (RRAM) with a reduced graphene oxide (rGO) capping layer and the polarity effect of the SET/RESET bias on the RRAM. The rGO film insertion enhances the stability of the current-voltage (I-V) switching curve and the superior resistance ratio (˜105) of high-resistance state (HRS) to low-resistance state (LRS). Using the appropriate polarity of the SET/RESET bias applied to the rGO-capped ZnO RRAM enables the oxygen ions to move mainly at the interface of the rGO and ZnO films, resulting in the best performance. Presumably, the rGO film acts as an oxygen reservoir and enhances the easy in and out motion of the oxygen ions from the rGO film. The rGO film also prevents the interaction of oxygen ions and the Al electrode, resulting in excellent performance. In a pulse endurance test, the rGO-capped ZnO RRAM reveals superior endurance of up to 108 cycles over that of the ZnO RRAM without rGO insertion (106 cycles).

  18. Cu impurity in insulators and in metal-insulator-metal structures: Implications for resistance-switching random access memories

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Sumeet C. Meade, Roy; Sandhu, Gurtej S.

    2015-02-07

    We present numerical results from atomistic simulations of Cu in SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, with an emphasis on the thermodynamic, kinetic, and electronic properties. The calculated properties of Cu impurity at various concentrations (9.91 × 10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3} and 3.41 × 10{sup 22 }cm{sup −3}) in bulk oxides are presented. The metal-insulator interfaces result in up to a ∼4 eV reduction in the formation energies relative to the crystalline bulk. Additionally, the importance of Cu-Cu interaction in lowering the chemical potential is introduced. These concepts are then discussed in the context of formation and stability of localized conductive paths in resistance-switching Random Access Memories (RRAM-M). The electronic density of states and non-equilibrium transmission through these localized paths are studied, confirming conduction by showing three orders of magnitude increase in the electron transmission. The dynamic behavior of the conductive paths is investigated with atomistic drift-diffusion calculations. Finally, the paper concludes with a molecular dynamics simulation of a RRAM-M cell that attempts to combine the aforementioned phenomena in one self-consistent model.

  19. Magnetoelectric assisted 180° magnetization switching for electric field addressable writing in magnetoresistive random-access memory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiguang; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Yaojin; Li, Yanxi; Luo, Haosu; Li, Jiefang; Viehland, Dwight

    2014-08-26

    Magnetization-based memories, e.g., hard drive and magnetoresistive random-access memory (MRAM), use bistable magnetic domains in patterned nanomagnets for information recording. Electric field (E) tunable magnetic anisotropy can lower the energy barrier between two distinct magnetic states, promising reduced power consumption and increased recording density. However, integration of magnetoelectric heterostructure into MRAM is a highly challenging task owing to the particular architecture requirements of each component. Here, we show an epitaxial growth of self-assembled CoFe2O4 nanostripes with bistable in-plane magnetizations on Pb(Mg,Nb)O3-PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) substrates, where the magnetic switching can be triggered by E-induced elastic strain effect. An unprecedented magnetic coercive field change of up to 600 Oe was observed with increasing E. A near 180° magnetization rotation can be activated by E in the vicinity of the magnetic coercive field. These findings might help to solve the 1/2-selection problem in traditional MRAM by providing reduced magnetic coercive field in E field selected memory cells. PMID:25093903

  20. Calculation of energy-barrier lowering by incoherent switching in spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Munira, Kamaram; Visscher, P. B.

    2015-05-07

    To make a useful spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) device, it is necessary to be able to calculate switching rates, which determine the error rates of the device. In a single-macrospin model, one can use a Fokker-Planck equation to obtain a low-current thermally activated rate ∝exp(−E{sub eff}/k{sub B}T). Here, the effective energy barrier E{sub eff} scales with the single-macrospin energy barrier KV, where K is the effective anisotropy energy density and V the volume. A long-standing paradox in this field is that the actual energy barrier appears to be much smaller than this. It has been suggested that incoherent motions may lower the barrier, but this has proved difficult to quantify. In the present paper, we show that the coherent precession has a magnetostatic instability, which allows quantitative estimation of the energy barrier and may resolve the paradox.

  1. HIF-mediated metabolic switching in bladder outlet obstruction mitigates the relaxing effect of mitochondrial inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Mari; Uvelius, Bengt; Albinsson, Sebastian; Swärd, Karl

    2014-05-01

    Prior work demonstrated increased levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in the bladder following outlet obstruction, associated with bladder growth and fibrosis. Here we hypothesized that HIF induction in outlet obstruction also switches energetic support of contraction from mitochondrial respiration to glycolysis. To address this hypothesis, we created infravesical outlet obstruction in female Sprague-Dawley rats and examined HIF induction and transcriptional activation. HIF-1α increased after 6 weeks of outlet obstruction as assessed by western blotting and yet transcription factor-binding site analysis indicated HIF activation already at 10 days of obstruction. Accumulation HIF-2α and of Arnt2 proteins were found at 10 days, providing an explanation for the lack of correlation between HIF-1α protein and transcriptional activation. HIF signature targets, including Slc2a1, Tpi1, Eno1 and Ldha increased in obstructed compared with sham-operated bladders. The autophagy markers Bnip3 and LC3B-II were also increased at 6 week of obstruction, but electron microscopy did not support mitophagy. Mitochondria were, however, remodeled with increased expression of Cox4 compared with other markers. In keeping with a switch toward glycolytic support of contraction, we found that relaxation by the mitochondrial inhibitor cyanide was reduced in obstructed bladders. This was mimicked by organ culture with the HIF-inducer dimethyloxalylglycine, which also upregulated expression of Ldha. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that HIF activation in outlet obstruction involves mechanisms beyond the accumulation of HIF-1α protein and that it results in a switch of the energetic support of contraction to anaerobic glycolysis. This metabolic adaptation encompasses increased expression of glucose transporters and glycolytic enzymes combined with mitochondrial remodeling. Together, these changes uphold contractility when mitochondrial respiration is limited. PMID

  2. Chromatin remodelling and antisense-mediated up-regulation of the developmental switch gene eud-1 control predatory feeding plasticity.

    PubMed

    Serobyan, Vahan; Xiao, Hua; Namdeo, Suryesh; Rödelsperger, Christian; Sieriebriennikov, Bogdan; Witte, Hanh; Röseler, Waltraud; Sommer, Ralf J

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has been suggested to act through developmental switches, but little is known about associated molecular mechanisms. In the nematode Pristionchus pacificus, the sulfatase eud-1 was identified as part of a developmental switch controlling mouth-form plasticity governing a predatory versus bacteriovorous mouth-form decision. Here we show that mutations in the conserved histone-acetyltransferase Ppa-lsy-12 and the methyl-binding-protein Ppa-mbd-2 mimic the eud-1 phenotype, resulting in the absence of one mouth-form. Mutations in both genes cause histone modification defects and reduced eud-1 expression. Surprisingly, Ppa-lsy-12 mutants also result in the down-regulation of an antisense-eud-1 RNA. eud-1 and antisense-eud-1 are co-expressed and further experiments suggest that antisense-eud-1 acts through eud-1 itself. Indeed, overexpression of the antisense-eud-1 RNA increases the eud-1-sensitive mouth-form and extends eud-1 expression. In contrast, this effect is absent in eud-1 mutants indicating that antisense-eud-1 positively regulates eud-1. Thus, chromatin remodelling and antisense-mediated up-regulation of eud-1 control feeding plasticity in Pristionchus. PMID:27487725

  3. Chromatin remodelling and antisense-mediated up-regulation of the developmental switch gene eud-1 control predatory feeding plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Serobyan, Vahan; Xiao, Hua; Namdeo, Suryesh; Rödelsperger, Christian; Sieriebriennikov, Bogdan; Witte, Hanh; Röseler, Waltraud; Sommer, Ralf J.

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has been suggested to act through developmental switches, but little is known about associated molecular mechanisms. In the nematode Pristionchus pacificus, the sulfatase eud-1 was identified as part of a developmental switch controlling mouth-form plasticity governing a predatory versus bacteriovorous mouth-form decision. Here we show that mutations in the conserved histone-acetyltransferase Ppa-lsy-12 and the methyl-binding-protein Ppa-mbd-2 mimic the eud-1 phenotype, resulting in the absence of one mouth-form. Mutations in both genes cause histone modification defects and reduced eud-1 expression. Surprisingly, Ppa-lsy-12 mutants also result in the down-regulation of an antisense-eud-1 RNA. eud-1 and antisense-eud-1 are co-expressed and further experiments suggest that antisense-eud-1 acts through eud-1 itself. Indeed, overexpression of the antisense-eud-1 RNA increases the eud-1-sensitive mouth-form and extends eud-1 expression. In contrast, this effect is absent in eud-1 mutants indicating that antisense-eud-1 positively regulates eud-1. Thus, chromatin remodelling and antisense-mediated up-regulation of eud-1 control feeding plasticity in Pristionchus. PMID:27487725

  4. EZH2 phosphorylation by JAK3 mediates a switch to noncanonical function in natural killer/T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yan, Junli; Li, Boheng; Lin, Baohong; Lee, Pei Tsung; Chung, Tae-Hoon; Tan, Joy; Bi, Chonglei; Lee, Xue Ting; Selvarajan, Viknesvaran; Ng, Siok-Bian; Yang, Henry; Yu, Qiang; Chng, Wee-Joo

    2016-08-18

    The best-understood mechanism by which EZH2 exerts its oncogenic function is through polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated gene repression, which requires its histone methyltransferase activity. However, small-molecule inhibitors of EZH2 that selectively target its enzymatic activity turn out to be potent only for lymphoma cells with EZH2-activating mutation. Intriguingly, recent discoveries, including ours, have placed EZH2 into the category of transcriptional coactivators and thus raised the possibility of noncanonical signaling pathways. However, it remains unclear how EZH2 switches to this catalytic independent function. In the current study, using natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NKTL) as a disease model, we found that phosphorylation of EZH2 by JAK3 promotes the dissociation of the PRC2 complex leading to decreased global H3K27me3 levels, while it switches EZH2 to a transcriptional activator, conferring higher proliferative capacity of the affected cells. Gene expression data analysis also suggests that the noncanonical function of EZH2 as a transcriptional activator upregulates a set of genes involved in DNA replication, cell cycle, biosynthesis, stemness, and invasiveness. Consistently, JAK3 inhibitor was able to significantly reduce the growth of NKTL cells, in an EZH2 phosphorylation-dependent manner, whereas various compounds recently developed to inhibit EZH2 methyltransferase activity have no such effect. Thus, pharmacological inhibition of JAK3 activity may provide a promising treatment option for NKTL through the novel mechanism of suppressing noncanonical EZH2 activity. PMID:27297789

  5. Antisense COOLAIR mediates the coordinated switching of chromatin states at FLC during vernalization.

    PubMed

    Csorba, Tibor; Questa, Julia I; Sun, Qianwen; Dean, Caroline

    2014-11-11

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been proposed to play important roles in gene regulation. However, their importance in epigenetic silencing and how specificity is determined remain controversial. We have investigated the cold-induced epigenetic switching mechanism involved in the silencing of Arabidopsis thaliana Flowering Locus C (FLC), which occurs during vernalization. Antisense transcripts, collectively named COOLAIR, are induced by prolonged cold before the major accumulation of histone 3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), characteristic of Polycomb silencing. We have found that COOLAIR is physically associated with the FLC locus and accelerates transcriptional shutdown of FLC during cold exposure. Removal of COOLAIR disrupted the synchronized replacement of H3K36 methylation with H3K27me3 at the intragenic FLC nucleation site during the cold. Consistently, genetic analysis showed COOLAIR and Polycomb complexes work independently in the cold-dependent silencing of FLC. Our data reveal a role for lncRNA in the coordinated switching of chromatin states that occurs during epigenetic regulation. PMID:25349421

  6. Antisense COOLAIR mediates the coordinated switching of chromatin states at FLC during vernalization

    PubMed Central

    Csorba, Tibor; Questa, Julia I.; Sun, Qianwen; Dean, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been proposed to play important roles in gene regulation. However, their importance in epigenetic silencing and how specificity is determined remain controversial. We have investigated the cold-induced epigenetic switching mechanism involved in the silencing of Arabidopsis thaliana FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), which occurs during vernalization. Antisense transcripts, collectively named COOLAIR, are induced by prolonged cold before the major accumulation of histone 3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), characteristic of Polycomb silencing. We have found that COOLAIR is physically associated with the FLC locus and accelerates transcriptional shutdown of FLC during cold exposure. Removal of COOLAIR disrupted the synchronized replacement of H3K36 methylation with H3K27me3 at the intragenic FLC nucleation site during the cold. Consistently, genetic analysis showed COOLAIR and Polycomb complexes work independently in the cold-dependent silencing of FLC. Our data reveal a role for lncRNA in the coordinated switching of chromatin states that occurs during epigenetic regulation. PMID:25349421

  7. Tunable switch mediated shikimate biosynthesis in an engineered non-auxotrophic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Pengfei; Su, Tianyuan; Wang, Qian; Liang, Quanfeng; Qi, Qingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Shikimate is a key intermediate in the synthesis of neuraminidase inhibitors. Compared with traditional methods, microbial production of shikimate has the advantages of environmental friendliness, low cost, feed stock renewability, and product selectivity and diversity. Despite these advantages, shikimate kinase I and II respectively encoded by aroK and aroL are inactivated in most shikimate microbial producers, thus requiring the addition of aromatic compounds during the fermentation process. To overcome this problem, we constructed a non-auxotrophic, shikimate-synthesising strain of Escherichia coli. By inactivation of repressor proteins, blocking of competitive pathways and overexpression of key enzymes, we increased the shikimate production of wild-type E. coli BW25113 to 1.73 g/L. We then designed a tunable switch that can conditionally decrease gene expression and substituted it for the original aroK promoters. Expression of aroK in the resulting P-9 strain was maintained at a high level during the growth phase and then reduced at a suitable time by addition of an optimal concentration of inducer. In 5-L fed-batch fermentation, strain P-9 produced 13.15 g/L shikimate without the addition of any aromatic compounds. The tunable switch developed in this study is an efficient tool for regulating indispensable genes involved in critical metabolic pathways. PMID:27406890

  8. Hepatitis C virus RNA: molecular switches mediated by long-range RNA–RNA interactions?

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sumangala; Stefanovic, Snezana; Mihailescu, Mihaela Rita

    2013-01-01

    Multiple conserved structural cis-acting regulatory elements have been recognized both in the coding and untranslated regions (UTRs) of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome. For example, the cis-element 5BSL3.2 in the HCV-coding region has been predicted to use both its apical and internal loops to interact with the X RNA in the 3′-UTR, with the IIId domain in the 5′-UTR and with the Alt sequence in the coding region. Additionally, the X RNA region uses a palindromic sequence that overlaps the sequence required for the interaction with 5BSL3.2, to dimerize with another HCV genome. The ability of the 5BSL3.2 and X RNA regions to engage in multi-interactions suggests the existence of one or more molecular RNA switches which may regulate different steps of the HCV life cycle. In this study, we used biophysical methods to characterize the essential interactions of these HCV cis-elements at the molecular level. Our results indicate that X RNA interacts with 5BSL3.2 and another X RNA molecule by adopting two different conformations and that 5BSL3.2 engages simultaneously in kissing interactions using its apical and internal loops. Based on these results, we propose a mode of action for possible molecular switches involving the HCV RNA. PMID:23275555

  9. Inflammatory pain hypersensitivity mediated by phenotypic switch in myelinated primary sensory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Simona; Doubell, Tim P.; Leslie, Tabi; Woolf, Clifford J.

    1996-11-01

    PAIN is normally evoked only by stimuli that are sufficiently intense to activate high-threshold Aδ and C sensory fibres, which relay the signal to the spinal cord. Peripheral inflammation leads to profoundly increased pain sensitivity: noxious stimuli generate a greater response and stimuli that are normally innocuous elicit pain. Inflammation increases the sensitivity of the peripheral terminals of Aδ and C fibres at the site of inflammation1. It also increases the excitability of spinal cord neurons2,3, which now amplify all sensory inputs including the normally innocuous tactile stimuli that are conveyed by low-threshold Aβ fibres. This central sensitization has been attributed to the enhanced activity of C fibres4, which increase the excitability of their postsynaptic targets by releasing glutamate and the neuropeptide substance P5-7. Here we show that inflammation results in Aβ fibres also acquiring the capacity to increase the excitability of spinal cord neurons. This is due to a phenotypic switch in a subpopulation of these fibres so that they, like C-fibres, now express substance P. Aβ fibres thus appear to contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity by switching their phenotype to one resembling pain fibres, thereby enhancing synaptic transmission in the spinal cord and exaggerating the central response to innocuous stimuli.

  10. Inflammatory pain hypersensitivity mediated by phenotypic switch in myelinated primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Neumann, S; Doubell, T P; Leslie, T; Woolf, C J

    1996-11-28

    Pain is normally evoked only by stimuli that are sufficiently intense to activate high-threshold A(delta) and C sensory fibres, which relay the signal to the spinal cord. Peripheral inflammation leads to profoundly increased pain sensitivity: noxious stimuli generate a greater response and stimuli that are normally innocuous elicit pain. Inflammation increases the sensitivity of the peripheral terminals of A(delta) and C fibres at the site of inflammation. It also increases the excitability of spinal cord neurons, which now amplify all sensory inputs including the normally innocuous tactile stimuli that are conveyed by low-threshold A(beta) fibres. This central sensitization has been attributed to the enhanced activity of C fibres, which increase the excitability of their postsynaptic targets by releasing glutamate and the neuropeptide substance P. Here we show that inflammation results in A(beta) fibres also acquiring the capacity to increase the excitability of spinal cord neurons. This is due to a phenotypic switch in a subpopulation of these fibres so that they, like C-fibres, now express substance P. A(beta) fibres thus appear to contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity by switching their phenotype to one resembling pain fibres, thereby enhancing synaptic transmission in the spinal cord and exaggerating the central response to innocuous stimuli. PMID:8934522

  11. Sustained Resistive Switching in a Single Cu:7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane Nanowire: A Promising Material for Resistive Random Access Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basori, Rabaya; Kumar, Manoranjan; Raychaudhuri, Arup K.

    2016-06-01

    We report a new type of sustained and reversible unipolar resistive switching in a nanowire device made from a single strand of Cu:7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (Cu:TCNQ) nanowire (diameter <100 nm) that shows high ON/OFF ratio (~103), low threshold voltage of switching (~3.5 V) and large cycling endurance (>103). This indicates a promising material for high density resistive random access memory (ReRAM) device integration. Switching is observed in Cu:TCNQ single nanowire devices with two different electrode configuration: symmetric (C-Pt/Cu:TCNQ/C-Pt) and asymmetric (Cu/Cu:TCNQ/C-Pt), where contacts connecting the nanowire play an important role. This report also developed a method of separating out the electrode and material contributions in switching using metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) device model along with a direct 4-probe resistivity measurement of the nanowire in the OFF as well as ON state. The device model was followed by a phenomenological model of current transport through the nanowire device which shows that lowering of potential barrier at the contacts likely occur due to formation of Cu filaments in the interface between nanowire and contact electrodes. We obtain quantitative agreement of numerically analyzed results with the experimental switching data.

  12. A simple device unit consisting of all NiO storage and switch elements for multilevel terabit nonvolatile random access memory.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Ahn, Seung-Eon; Lee, Chang Bum; Kim, Chang-Jung; Jeon, Sanghun; Chung, U-In; Yoo, In-Kyeong; Park, Gyeong-Su; Han, Seungwu; Hwang, In Rok; Park, Bae-Ho

    2011-11-01

    Present charge-based silicon memories are unlikely to reach terabit densities because of scaling limits. As the feature size of memory shrinks to just tens of nanometers, there is insufficient volume available to store charge. Also, process temperatures higher than 800 °C make silicon incompatible with three-dimensional (3D) stacking structures. Here we present a device unit consisting of all NiO storage and switch elements for multilevel terabit nonvolatile random access memory using resistance switching. It is demonstrated that NiO films are scalable to around 30 nm and compatible with multilevel cell technology. The device unit can be a building block for 3D stacking structure because of its simple structure and constituent, high performance, and process temperature lower than 300 °C. Memory resistance switching of NiO storage element is accompanied by an increase in density of grain boundary while threshold resistance switching of NiO switch element is controlled by current flowing through NiO film. PMID:21988144

  13. Sustained Resistive Switching in a Single Cu:7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane Nanowire: A Promising Material for Resistive Random Access Memory.

    PubMed

    Basori, Rabaya; Kumar, Manoranjan; Raychaudhuri, Arup K

    2016-01-01

    We report a new type of sustained and reversible unipolar resistive switching in a nanowire device made from a single strand of Cu:7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (Cu:TCNQ) nanowire (diameter <100 nm) that shows high ON/OFF ratio (~10(3)), low threshold voltage of switching (~3.5 V) and large cycling endurance (>10(3)). This indicates a promising material for high density resistive random access memory (ReRAM) device integration. Switching is observed in Cu:TCNQ single nanowire devices with two different electrode configuration: symmetric (C-Pt/Cu:TCNQ/C-Pt) and asymmetric (Cu/Cu:TCNQ/C-Pt), where contacts connecting the nanowire play an important role. This report also developed a method of separating out the electrode and material contributions in switching using metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) device model along with a direct 4-probe resistivity measurement of the nanowire in the OFF as well as ON state. The device model was followed by a phenomenological model of current transport through the nanowire device which shows that lowering of potential barrier at the contacts likely occur due to formation of Cu filaments in the interface between nanowire and contact electrodes. We obtain quantitative agreement of numerically analyzed results with the experimental switching data. PMID:27245099

  14. Sustained Resistive Switching in a Single Cu:7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane Nanowire: A Promising Material for Resistive Random Access Memory

    PubMed Central

    Basori, Rabaya; Kumar, Manoranjan; Raychaudhuri, Arup K.

    2016-01-01

    We report a new type of sustained and reversible unipolar resistive switching in a nanowire device made from a single strand of Cu:7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (Cu:TCNQ) nanowire (diameter <100 nm) that shows high ON/OFF ratio (~103), low threshold voltage of switching (~3.5 V) and large cycling endurance (>103). This indicates a promising material for high density resistive random access memory (ReRAM) device integration. Switching is observed in Cu:TCNQ single nanowire devices with two different electrode configuration: symmetric (C-Pt/Cu:TCNQ/C-Pt) and asymmetric (Cu/Cu:TCNQ/C-Pt), where contacts connecting the nanowire play an important role. This report also developed a method of separating out the electrode and material contributions in switching using metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) device model along with a direct 4-probe resistivity measurement of the nanowire in the OFF as well as ON state. The device model was followed by a phenomenological model of current transport through the nanowire device which shows that lowering of potential barrier at the contacts likely occur due to formation of Cu filaments in the interface between nanowire and contact electrodes. We obtain quantitative agreement of numerically analyzed results with the experimental switching data. PMID:27245099

  15. Total synthesis of marinomycin A using salicylate as a molecular switch to mediate dimerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, P. Andrew; Huang, Mu-Hua; Lawler, Michael J.; Maroto, Sergio

    2012-08-01

    Antibiotics play a significant role in human health because of their ability to treat life-threatening bacterial infections. The growing problems with antibiotic resistance have made the development of new antibiotics a World Health Organization priority. Marinomycin A is a member of a new class of bis-salicylate-containing polyene macrodiolides, which have potent antibiotic activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. Herein, we describe a triply convergent synthesis of this agent using the salicylate as a novel molecular switch for the chemoselective construction of the macrodiolide. This strategy raises new questions regarding the biosynthetic role of the salicylate and its potential impact on the mechanism of action of these types of agents. For instance, in contrast to penicillin, which enhances the electrophilicity of the cyclic amide through ring strain, salicylates reduce the electrophilicity of the aryl ester through an intramolecular resonance-assisted hydrogen bond to provide an amide surrogate.

  16. ERRs Mediate a Metabolic Switch Required for Somatic Cell Reprogramming to Pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Kida, Yasuyuki S; Kawamura, Teruhisa; Wei, Zong; Sogo, Takahiro; Jacinto, Sandra; Shigeno, Asako; Kushige, Hiroko; Yoshihara, Eiji; Liddle, Christopher; Ecker, Joseph R; Yu, Ruth T; Atkins, Annette R; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M

    2015-05-01

    Cell metabolism is adaptive to extrinsic demands; however, the intrinsic metabolic demands that drive the induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) program remain unclear. Although glycolysis increases throughout the reprogramming process, we show that the estrogen-related nuclear receptors (ERRα and ERRγ) and their partnered co-factors PGC-1α and PGC-1β are transiently induced at an early stage, resulting in a burst of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) activity. Upregulation of ERRα or ERRγ is required for the OXPHOS burst in both human and mouse cells, respectively, as well as iPSC generation itself. Failure to induce this metabolic switch collapses the reprogramming process. Furthermore, we identify a rare pool of Sca1(-)/CD34(-) sortable cells that is highly enriched in bona fide reprogramming progenitors. Transcriptional profiling confirmed that these progenitors are ERRγ and PGC-1β positive and have undergone extensive metabolic reprogramming. These studies characterize a previously unrecognized, ERR-dependent metabolic gate prior to establishment of induced pluripotency. PMID:25865501

  17. ERRs Mediate a Metabolic Switch Required for Somatic Cell Reprogramming to Pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Yasuyuki S.; Kawamura, Teruhisa; Wei, Zong; Sogo, Takahiro; Jacinto, Sandra; Shigeno-Kamitsuji, Asako; Yoshihara, Eiji; Liddle, Christopher; Ecker, Joseph R.; Yu, Ruth T.; Atkins, Annette R.; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cell metabolism is adaptive to extrinsic demands, however the intrinsic metabolic demands that drive the induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) program remain unclear. While glycolysis increases throughout the reprogramming process, we show that the estrogen related nuclear receptors (ERRα and γ) and their partnered co-factors PGC-1α and β, are transiently induced at an early stage resulting in a burst of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) activity. Up-regulation of ERRα or γ is required for both the OXPHOS burst in human and mouse cells, respectively, as well as iPSC generation itself. Failure to induce this metabolic switch collapses the reprogramming process. Furthermore, we identify a rare pool of Sca1−/CD34− sortable cells that is highly enriched in bona fide reprogramming progenitors. Transcriptional profiling confirmed that these progenitors are ERRγ and PGC-1β positive and have undergone extensive metabolic reprogramming. These studies characterize a previously unrecognized, ERR-dependent metabolic gate prior to establishment of induced pluripotency. PMID:25865501

  18. Coping Mediates Outcome Following a Randomized Group Intervention for HIV-Positive Bereaved Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nathan Grant; Tarakeshwar, Nalini; Hansen, Nathan B.; Kochman, Arlene; Sikkema, Kathleen J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mechanisms responsible for the beneficial psychological effects of a coping-focused group intervention for HIV-positive individuals who had lost loved ones to AIDS. Data from 235 HIV-positive men and women enrolled in a randomized controlled clinical trial testing a coping-focused group intervention were analyzed using a multiple-indicator-multiple-cause (MIMIC) structural equation model. Results revealed that the effects of the intervention on decreases in depression and grief were mediated by decreases in avoidant coping. Specifically, participants in the intervention condition decreased their use of avoidant coping. Decreases in avoidant coping, in turn, were related to decreased depression and grief. The results of this study help to validate the use of coping-focused interventions for HIV-positive bereaved individuals. PMID:19152338

  19. Rapid neural circuit switching mediated by synaptic plasticity during neural morphallactic regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lybrand, Zane R; Zoran, Mark J

    2012-09-01

    The aquatic oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus (Lumbriculidae), undergoes a rapid regenerative transformation of its neural circuits following body fragmentation. This type of nervous system plasticity, called neural morphallaxis, involves the remodeling of the giant fiber pathways that mediate rapid head and tail withdrawal behaviors. Extra- and intracellular electrophysiological recordings demonstrated that changes in cellular properties and synaptic connections underlie neurobehavioral plasticity during morphallaxis. Sensory-to-giant interneuron connections, undetectable prior to body injury, emerged within hours of segment amputation. The appearance of functional synaptic transmission was followed by interneuron activation, coupling of giant fiber spiking to motor outputs and overt segmental shortening. The onset of morphallactic plasticity varied along the body axis and emerged more rapidly in segments closer to regions of sensory field overlap between the two giant fiber pathways. The medial and lateral giant fibers were simultaneously activated during a transient phase of network remodeling. Thus, synaptic plasticity at sensory-to-giant interneuron connections mediates escape circuit morphallaxis in this regenerating annelid worm. PMID:22021133

  20. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-Mediated Transformation of Valsa mali: An Efficient Tool for Random Insertion Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Caixia; Guan, Xiangnan; Wang, Hanyan; Li, Guifang; Dong, Xiangli; Wang, Guoping

    2013-01-01

    Valsa mali is a causal agent of apple and pear trees canker disease, which is a destructive disease that causes serious economic losses in eastern Asia, especially in China. The lack of an efficient transformation system for Valsa mali retards its investigation, which poses difficulties to control the disease. In this research, a transformation system for this pathogen was established for the first time using A. tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT), with the optimal transformation conditions as follows: 106/mL conidia suspension, cocultivation temperature 22°C, cocultivation time 72 hours, and 200 μM acetosyringone (AS) in the inductive medium. The average transformation efficiency was 1015.00 ± 37.35 transformants per 106 recipient conidia. Thirty transformants were randomly selected for further confirmation and the results showed the presence of T-DNA in all hygromycin B resistant transformants and also revealed random and single gene integration with genetic stability. Compared with wild-type strain, those transformants exhibited various differences in morphology, conidia production, and conidia germination ability. In addition, pathogenicity assays revealed that 14 transformants had mitigated pathogenicity, while one had enhanced infection ability. The results suggest that ATMT of V. mali is a useful tool to gain novel insight into this economically important pathogen at molecular levels. PMID:24381526

  1. Switching operation and degradation of resistive random access memory composed of tungsten oxide and copper investigated using in-situ TEM

    PubMed Central

    Arita, Masashi; Takahashi, Akihito; Ohno, Yuuki; Nakane, Akitoshi; Tsurumaki-Fukuchi, Atsushi; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy (in-situ TEM) was performed to investigate the switching operation of a resistive random access memory (ReRAM) made of copper, tungsten oxide and titanium nitride (Cu/WOx/TiN). In the first Set (Forming) operation to initialize the device, precipitation appeared inside the WOx layer. It was presumed that a Cu conducting filament was formed, lowering the resistance (on-state). The Reset operation induced a higher resistance (the off-state). No change in the microstructure was identified in the TEM images. Only when an additional Reset current was applied after switching to the off-state could erasure of the filament be seen (over-Reset). Therefore, it was concluded that structural change relating to the resistance switch was localized in a very small area around the filament. With repeated switching operations and increasing operational current, the WOx/electrode interfaces became indistinct. At the same time, the resistance of the off-state gradually decreased. This is thought to be caused by Cu condensation at the interfaces because of leakage current through the area other than through the filament. This will lead to device degradation through mechanisms such as endurance failure. This is the first accelerated aging test of ReRAM achieved using in-situ TEM. PMID:26611856

  2. Switching operation and degradation of resistive random access memory composed of tungsten oxide and copper investigated using in-situ TEM.

    PubMed

    Arita, Masashi; Takahashi, Akihito; Ohno, Yuuki; Nakane, Akitoshi; Tsurumaki-Fukuchi, Atsushi; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy (in-situ TEM) was performed to investigate the switching operation of a resistive random access memory (ReRAM) made of copper, tungsten oxide and titanium nitride (Cu/WOx/TiN). In the first Set (Forming) operation to initialize the device, precipitation appeared inside the WOx layer. It was presumed that a Cu conducting filament was formed, lowering the resistance (on-state). The Reset operation induced a higher resistance (the off-state). No change in the microstructure was identified in the TEM images. Only when an additional Reset current was applied after switching to the off-state could erasure of the filament be seen (over-Reset). Therefore, it was concluded that structural change relating to the resistance switch was localized in a very small area around the filament. With repeated switching operations and increasing operational current, the WOx/electrode interfaces became indistinct. At the same time, the resistance of the off-state gradually decreased. This is thought to be caused by Cu condensation at the interfaces because of leakage current through the area other than through the filament. This will lead to device degradation through mechanisms such as endurance failure. This is the first accelerated aging test of ReRAM achieved using in-situ TEM. PMID:26611856

  3. Switching operation and degradation of resistive random access memory composed of tungsten oxide and copper investigated using in-situ TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Masashi; Takahashi, Akihito; Ohno, Yuuki; Nakane, Akitoshi; Tsurumaki-Fukuchi, Atsushi; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2015-11-01

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy (in-situ TEM) was performed to investigate the switching operation of a resistive random access memory (ReRAM) made of copper, tungsten oxide and titanium nitride (Cu/WOx/TiN). In the first Set (Forming) operation to initialize the device, precipitation appeared inside the WOx layer. It was presumed that a Cu conducting filament was formed, lowering the resistance (on-state). The Reset operation induced a higher resistance (the off-state). No change in the microstructure was identified in the TEM images. Only when an additional Reset current was applied after switching to the off-state could erasure of the filament be seen (over-Reset). Therefore, it was concluded that structural change relating to the resistance switch was localized in a very small area around the filament. With repeated switching operations and increasing operational current, the WOx/electrode interfaces became indistinct. At the same time, the resistance of the off-state gradually decreased. This is thought to be caused by Cu condensation at the interfaces because of leakage current through the area other than through the filament. This will lead to device degradation through mechanisms such as endurance failure. This is the first accelerated aging test of ReRAM achieved using in-situ TEM.

  4. Temperature-independent switching rates for a random telegraph signal in a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Scofield, John H.; Borland, Nick; Fleetwood, D. M.

    2000-05-29

    We have observed discrete random telegraph signals (RTSs) in the drain voltages of three, nominally 1.25 {mu}mx1.25 {mu}m, enhancement-mode p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor transistors operated in strong inversion in their linear regimes with constant drain-current and gate-voltage bias, for temperatures ranging from 4.2 to 300 K. The switching rates for all RTSs observed above 30 K were thermally activated. The switching rate for the only RTS observed below 30 K was thermally activated above 30 K but temperature independent below 10 K. This response is consistent with a crossover from thermal activation to tunneling at low temperatures. Implications are discussed for models of change exchange between the Si and the near-interfacial SiO{sub 2}. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Cu(2+)-mediated fluorescence switching of gold nanoclusters for the selective detection of clioquinol.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Chang, Yong; Zhang, Pu; Lie, Shao Qing; Gao, Peng Fei; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2015-12-21

    It is of great significance to sense clioquinol (CQ) in a simple and fast way because of its potential application in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. In this contribution, we proposed a Cu(2+)-mediated fluorescence switchable strategy to detect CQ by taking bovine serum albumin (BSA) protected gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) as probes. It was found that the strong red fluorescence of BSA-protected AuNCs at 610 nm could be effectively quenched by Cu(2+) (off state) and reversibly recovered by CQ (on state) owing to the specific coordination of CQ and Cu(2+). Under the optimal conditions, there was a good linear relationship between the off-on efficiency (Eoff-on) and the amount of CQ in the range of 1-12 μM (R(2) = 0.9902), with a detection limit of 0.63 μM (3σ). The "turn off-on" mode and the fast and unique complexation of CQ and Cu(2+) endow AuNCs with high specificity for CQ sensing. The proposed strategy is label-free, fast and selective, which is applicable to the analysis of CQ in cream with satisfactory results. PMID:26567905

  6. Allopregnanolone as a Mediator of Affective Switching in Reproductive Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Crystal Edler; Schmidt, Peter J.; Rubinow, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Reproductive mood disorders, including premenstrual dysphoria (PMD) and postpartum depression (PPD), are characterized by affective dysregulation that occurs during specific reproductive states. The occurrence of illness onset during changes in reproductive endocrine function has generated interest in the role of gonadal steroids in the pathophysiology of reproductive mood disorders, yet the mechanisms by which the changing hormone milieu triggers depression in susceptible women remain poorly understood. Objectives This review focuses on one of the neurosteroid metabolites of progesterone – allopregnanolone (ALLO) – that acutely regulates neuronal function and may mediate affective dysregulation that occurs concomitant with changes in reproductive endocrine function. We describe the role of the ‘neuroactive’ steroids estradiol and progesterone in reproductive endocrine-related mood disorders to highlight the potential mechanisms by which ALLO might contribute to their pathophysiology. Finally, using existing data, we test the hypothesis that changes in ALLO levels may trigger affective dysregulation in susceptible women. Results Although there is no reliable evidence that basal ALLO levels distinguish those with PMD or PPD from those without, existing animal models suggest potential mechanisms by which specific reproductive states may unmask susceptibility to affective dysregulation. Consistent with these models, initially euthymic women with PMD and those with a history of PPD show a negative association between depressive symptoms and circulating ALLO levels following progesterone administration. Conclusions Existing animal models and our own preliminary data suggest that ALLO may play an important role in the pathophysiology of reproductive mood disorders by triggering affective dysregulation in susceptible women. PMID:24846476

  7. Nanos-mediated repression of hid protects larval sensory neurons after a global switch in sensitivity to apoptotic signals.

    PubMed

    Bhogal, Balpreet; Plaza-Jennings, Amara; Gavis, Elizabeth R

    2016-06-15

    Dendritic arbor morphology is a key determinant of neuronal function. Once established, dendrite branching patterns must be maintained as the animal develops to ensure receptive field coverage. The translational repressors Nanos (Nos) and Pumilio (Pum) are required to maintain dendrite growth and branching of Drosophila larval class IV dendritic arborization (da) neurons, but their specific regulatory role remains unknown. We show that Nos-Pum-mediated repression of the pro-apoptotic gene head involution defective (hid) is required to maintain a balance of dendritic growth and retraction in class IV da neurons and that upregulation of hid results in decreased branching because of an increase in caspase activity. The temporal requirement for nos correlates with an ecdysone-triggered switch in sensitivity to apoptotic stimuli that occurs during the mid-L3 transition. We find that hid is required during pupariation for caspase-dependent pruning of class IV da neurons and that Nos and Pum delay pruning. Together, these results suggest that Nos and Pum provide a crucial neuroprotective regulatory layer to ensure that neurons behave appropriately in response to developmental cues. PMID:27256879

  8. Evaluation of Biomarkers of Exposure in Smokers Switching to a Carbon-Heated Tobacco Product: A Controlled, Randomized, Open-Label 5-Day Exposure Study

    PubMed Central

    Haziza, Christelle; Weitkunat, Rolf; Magnette, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tobacco harm reduction aims to provide reduced risk alternatives to adult smokers who would otherwise continue smoking combustible cigarettes (CCs). This randomized, open-label, three-arm, parallel-group, single-center, short-term confinement study aimed to investigate the effects of exposure to selected harmful and potentially harmful constituents (HPHCs) of cigarette smoke in adult smokers who switched to a carbon-heated tobacco product (CHTP) compared with adult smokers who continued to smoke CCs and those who abstained from smoking for 5 days. Methods: Biomarkers of exposure to HPHCs, including nicotine and urinary excretion of mutagenic material, were measured in 24-hour urine and blood samples in 112 male and female Caucasian smokers switching from CCs to the CHTP ad libitum use. Puffing topography was assessed during product use. Results: Switching to the CHTP or smoking abstinence (SA) resulted in marked decreases from baseline to Day 5 in all biomarkers of exposure measured, including carboxyhemoglobin (43% and 55% decrease in the CHTP and SA groups, respectively). The urinary excretion of mutagenic material was also markedly decreased on Day 5 compared with baseline (89% and 87% decrease in the CHTP and SA groups, respectively). No changes in biomarkers of exposure to HPHCs or urinary mutagenic material were observed between baseline and Day 5 in the CC group. Conclusions: Our results provide clear evidence supporting a reduction in the level of exposure to HPHCs of tobacco smoke in smokers who switch to CHTP under controlled conditions, similar to that observed in SA. Implications: The reductions observed in biomarkers of exposure to HPHCs of tobacco smoke in this short-term study could potentially also reduce the incidence of cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases in those smokers who switch to a heated tobacco product. PMID:26817490

  9. Testing Mediators of Intervention Effects in Randomized Controlled Trials: An Evaluation of Two Eating Disorder Prevention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stice, Eric; Presnell, Katherine; Gau, Jeff; Shaw, Heather

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigated mediators hypothesized to account for the effects of 2 eating disorder prevention programs using data from 355 adolescent girls who were randomized to a dissonance or a healthy weight intervention or an active control condition. The dissonance intervention produced significant reductions in outcomes (body…

  10. Improvement in Personal Meaning Mediates the Effects of a Life Review Intervention on Depressive Symptoms in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerhof, Gerben J.; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T.; van Beljouw, Ilse M. J.; Pot, Anne Margriet

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to assess the impact of a life review intervention on personal meaning in life and the mediating effect of personal meaning on depressive symptoms as the primary outcome of this form of indicated prevention. Design and Methods: A multicenter randomized controlled trial was conducted with one group of older…

  11. Effects of Joint Attention Mediated Learning for Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorders: An Initial Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schertz, Hannah H.; Odom, Samuel L.; Baggett, Kathleen M.; Sideris, John H.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine effects of the Joint Attention Mediated Learning (JAML) intervention on acquisition of joint attention and other early social communication competencies for toddlers with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Twenty-three parents and their toddlers were randomly assigned to JAML or a control condition.…

  12. Compact biocompatible quantum dots via RAFT-mediated synthesis of imidazole-based random copolymer ligand

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenhao; Greytak, Andrew B.; Lee, Jungmin; Wong, Cliff R.; Park, Jongnam; Marshall, Lisa F.; Jiang, Wen; Curtin, Peter N.; Ting, Alice Y.; Nocera, Daniel G.; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2010-01-01

    We present a new class of polymeric ligands for quantum dot (QD) water solubilization to yield biocompatible and derivatizable QDs with compact size (~10-12 nm diameter), high quantum yields (>50%), excellent stability across a large pH range (pH 5-10.5), and low nonspecific binding. To address the fundamental problem of thiol instability in traditional ligand exchange systems, the polymers here employ a stable multidentate imidazole binding motif to the QD surface. The polymers are synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT)-mediated polymerization to produce molecular weight controlled monodisperse random copolymers from three types of monomers that feature imidazole groups for QD binding, polyethylene glycol (PEG) groups for water solubilization, and either primary amines or biotin groups for derivatization. The polymer architecture can be tuned by the monomer ratios to yield aqueous QDs with targeted surface functionalities. By incorporating amino-PEG monomers, we demonstrate covalent conjugation of a dye to form a highly efficient QD-dye energy transfer pair as well as covalent conjugation to streptavidin for high-affinity single molecule imaging of biotinylated receptors on live cells with minimal non-specific binding. The small size and low serum binding of these polymer-coated QDs also allow us to demonstrate their utility for in-vivo imaging of the tumor microenvironment in live mice. PMID:20025223

  13. Brief Report: Switch to Ritonavir-Boosted Atazanavir Plus Raltegravir in Virologically Suppressed Patients With HIV-1 Infection: A Randomized Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    van Lunzen, Jan; Pozniak, Anton; Gatell, Jose M.; Antinori, Andrea; Serrano, Oscar; Baakili, Adyb; Osiyemi, Olayemi; Sevinsky, Heather; Girard, Pierre-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: This open-label, multinational, pilot study randomized (1:2 ratio) adults with HIV-1 RNA <40 copies per milliliter and nucleos(t)ide-related safety/tolerability issues to switch to ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (ATV/r) plus tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine (n = 37) or the nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitor-sparing regimen of ATV/r plus raltegravir (RAL) (n = 72). At 24 weeks, 35/37 (94.6%) and 58/72 (80.6%) of patients, respectively, maintained virological suppression, the primary endpoint, and 1 (2.7%) and 7 (9.7%), respectively, experienced virological rebound. Corresponding 48-week proportions were 86.5%, 69.4%, 2.7%, and 12.5%, respectively. Adherence was lower and treatment discontinuation was higher with ATV/r+RAL. In conclusion, switching to ATV/r+RAL resulted in a higher virological rebound rate than switching to ATV/r plus tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine. PMID:26605505

  14. Brief Report: Switch to Ritonavir-Boosted Atazanavir Plus Raltegravir in Virologically Suppressed Patients With HIV-1 Infection: A Randomized Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    van Lunzen, Jan; Pozniak, Anton; Gatell, Jose M; Antinori, Andrea; Klauck, Isabelle; Serrano, Oscar; Baakili, Adyb; Osiyemi, Olayemi; Sevinsky, Heather; Girard, Pierre-Marie

    2016-04-15

    This open-label, multinational, pilot study randomized (1:2 ratio) adults with HIV-1 RNA <40 copies per milliliter and nucleos(t)ide-related safety/tolerability issues to switch to ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (ATV/r) plus tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine (n = 37) or the nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitor-sparing regimen of ATV/r plus raltegravir (RAL) (n = 72). At 24 weeks, 35/37 (94.6%) and 58/72 (80.6%) of patients, respectively, maintained virological suppression, the primary endpoint, and 1 (2.7%) and 7 (9.7%), respectively, experienced virological rebound. Corresponding 48-week proportions were 86.5%, 69.4%, 2.7%, and 12.5%, respectively. Adherence was lower and treatment discontinuation was higher with ATV/r+RAL. In conclusion, switching to ATV/r+RAL resulted in a higher virological rebound rate than switching to ATV/r plus tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine. PMID:26605505

  15. Cell Signaling Switches HOX-PBX Complexes from Repressors to Activators of Transcription Mediated by Histone Deacetylases and Histone Acetyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Maya; Rambaldi, Isabel; Yang, Xiang-Jiao; Featherstone, Mark S.

    2000-01-01

    The Hoxb1 autoregulatory element comprises three HOX-PBX binding sites. Despite the presence of HOXB1 and PBX1, this enhancer fails to activate reporter gene expression in retinoic acid-treated P19 cell monolayers. Activation requires cell aggregation in addition to RA. This suggests that HOX-PBX complexes may repress transcription under some conditions. Consistent with this, multimerized HOX-PBX binding sites repress reporter gene expression in HEK293 cells. We provide a mechanistic basis for repressor function by demonstrating that a corepressor complex, including histone deacetylases (HDACs) 1 and 3, mSIN3B, and N-CoR/SMRT, interacts with PBX1A. We map a site of interaction with HDAC1 to the PBX1 N terminus and show that the PBX partner is required for repression by the HOX-PBX complex. Treatment with the deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A not only relieves repression but also converts the HOX-PBX complex to a net activator of transcription. We show that this activation function is mediated by the recruitment of the coactivator CREB-binding protein by the HOX partner. Interestingly, HOX-PBX complexes are switched from transcriptional repressors to activators in response to protein kinase A signaling or cell aggregation. Together, our results suggest a model whereby the HOX-PBX complex can act as a repressor or activator of transcription via association with corepressors and coactivators. The model implies that cell signaling is a direct determinant of HOX-PBX function in the patterning of the animal embryo. PMID:11046157

  16. Structural basis of the mercury(II)-mediated conformational switching of the dual-function transcriptional regulator MerR

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Chiang; Lin, Li-Ying; Zou, Xiao-Wei; Huang, Chieh-Chen; Chan, Nei-Li

    2015-01-01

    The mer operon confers bacterial resistance to inorganic mercury (Hg2+) and organomercurials by encoding proteins involved in sensing, transport and detoxification of these cytotoxic agents. Expression of the mer operon is under tight control by the dual-function transcriptional regulator MerR. The metal-free, apo MerR binds to the mer operator/promoter region as a repressor to block transcription initiation, but is converted into an activator upon Hg2+-binding. To understand how MerR interacts with Hg2+ and how Hg2+-binding modulates MerR function, we report here the crystal structures of apo and Hg2+-bound MerR from Bacillus megaterium, corresponding respectively to the repressor and activator conformation of MerR. To our knowledge, the apo-MerR structure represents the first visualization of a MerR family member in its intact and inducer-free form. And the Hg2+-MerR structure offers the first view of a triligated Hg2+-thiolate center in a metalloprotein, confirming that MerR binds Hg2+ via trigonal planar coordination geometry. Structural comparison revealed the conformational transition of MerR is coupled to the assembly/disassembly of a buried Hg2+ binding site, thereby providing a structural basis for the Hg2+-mediated functional switching of MerR. The pronounced Hg2+-induced repositioning of the MerR DNA-binding domains suggests a plausible mechanism for the transcriptional regulation of the mer operon. PMID:26150423

  17. Contribution of Central μ-Receptors to Switching Pulmonary C-Fibers-Mediated Rapid Shallow Breathing into An Apnea by Fentanyl in Anesthetized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenxiong; Zhang, Cancan; Zhuang, Jianguo; Xu, Fadi

    2012-01-01

    Our previous study has shown that activating peripheral μ-receptors is necessary for switching the bronchopulmonary C-fibers (PCFs)-mediated rapid shallow breathing (RSB) into an apnea by systemic administration of fentanyl. The brainstem nuclei, such as the medial nucleus tractus solitarius (mNTS) and the Pre-Botzinger Complex (PBC), are required for completing the PCF-mediated respiratory reflexes. Moreover, these areas contain abundant μ-receptors and their activation prolongs expiratory duration (TE). Thus, we asked if central μ-receptors, especially those in the mNTS and PBC, are involved in fully expressing this RSB-apnea switch by fentanyl. In anesthetized rats, the cardiorespiratory responses to right atrial injection of phenylbiguanide (PBG, 3–6 μg/kg) were repeated after: 1) fentanyl (iv), a μ-receptor agonist, alone (8 μg/kg, iv); 2) fentanyl following microinjection of naloxone methiodide (NXM, an opioid receptor antagonist) into the cisterna magna (10 μg/4 μl); 3) the bilateral mNTS (10 mM, 20 nl); or 4) PBC (10 mM, 20 nl). Our results showed that PBG shortened TE by 37 ± 6 % (RSB, from 0.41 ± 0.05 to 0.26 ± 0.03 s, P < 0.01), but it markedly prolonged TE by 5.8-fold (an apnea, from 0.50 ± 0.04 s to 2.9 ± 0.57 s, P < 0.01) after fentanyl (iv). Pretreatment with NXM injected into the cisterna magna or the PBC, but not the mNTS, prevented the fentanyl-induced switch. This study, along with our previous results mentioned above, suggests that although peripheral μ-receptors are essential for triggering the fentanyl-induced switch, central μ-receptors, especially those in the PBC, are required to fully exhibit such switch. PMID:22759907

  18. Safety and feasibility of switching from phenytoin to levetiracetam monotherapy for glioma-related seizure control following craniotomy: a randomized phase II pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lim, Daniel A; Tarapore, Phiroz; Chang, Edward; Burt, Marlene; Chakalian, Lenna; Barbaro, Nicholas; Chang, Susan; Lamborn, Kathleen R; McDermott, Michael W

    2009-07-01

    Seizures are common in patients with gliomas, and phenytoin (PHT) is frequently used to control tumor-related seizures. PHT, however, has many undesirable side effects (SEs) and drug interactions with glioma chemotherapy. Levetiracetam (LEV) is a newer antiepileptic drug (AED) with fewer SEs and essentially no drug interactions. We performed a pilot study testing the safety and feasibility of switching patients from PHT to LEV monotherapy for postoperative control of glioma-related seizures. Over a 13-month period, 29 patients were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to initiate LEV therapy within 24 h of surgery or to continue PHT therapy. 6 month follow-up data were available for 15 patients taking LEV and for 8 patients taking PHT. In the LEV group, 13 patients (87%) were seizure-free. In the PHT group, 6 patients (75%) were seizure-free. Reported SEs at 6 months was as follows (%LEV/%PHT group): dizziness (0/14), difficulty with coordination (0/29), depression (7/14) lack of energy or strength (20/43), insomnia (40/43), mood instability (7/0). The pilot data presented here suggest that it is safe to switch patients from PHT to LEV monotherapy following craniotomy for supratentorial glioma. A large-scale, double-blinded, randomized control trial of LEV versus PHT is required to determine seizure control equivalence and better assess differences in SEs. PMID:19169651

  19. The role of internal structure in the anomalous switching dynamics of metal-oxide/polymer resistive random access memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Paulo R. F.; Kiazadeh, Asal; De Leeuw, Dago M.; Meskers, Stefan C. J.; Verbakel, Frank; Taylor, David M.; Gomes, Henrique L.

    2013-04-01

    The dynamic response of a non-volatile, bistable resistive memory fabricated in the form of Al2O3/polymer diodes has been probed in both the off- and on-state using triangular and step voltage profiles. The results provide insight into the wide spread in switching times reported in the literature and explain an apparently anomalous behaviour of the on-state, namely the disappearance of the negative differential resistance region at high voltage scan rates which is commonly attributed to a "dead time" phenomenon. The off-state response follows closely the predictions based on a classical, two-layer capacitor description of the device. As voltage scan rates increase, the model predicts that the fraction of the applied voltage, Vox, appearing across the oxide decreases. Device responses to step voltages in both the off- and on-state show that switching events are characterized by a delay time. Coupling such delays to the lower values of Vox attained during fast scan rates, the anomalous observation in the on-state that, device currents decrease with increasing voltage scan rate, is readily explained. Assuming that a critical current is required to turn off a conducting channel in the oxide, a tentative model is suggested to explain the shift in the onset of negative differential resistance to lower voltages as the voltage scan rate increases. The findings also suggest that the fundamental limitations on the speed of operation of a bilayer resistive memory are the time- and voltage-dependences of the switch-on mechanism and not the switch-off process.

  20. Sitagliptin versus mitiglinide switched from mealtime dosing of a rapid-acting insulin analog in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized, parallel-group study

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Yumie; Takamura, Toshinari; Kita, Yuki; Takazakura, Akiko; Kato, Ken-ichiro; Isobe, Yuki; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We determined the feasibility of substituting sitagliptin or mitiglinide for bolus insulin injection therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods 60 patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled and randomized to switch from mealtime dosing of a rapid-acting insulin analog to either sitagliptin or mitiglinide for 16 weeks. Results Body weight, body mass index, and waist circumference decreased significantly in both groups at the end of the study. Mitiglinide significantly increased fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels at the end of the study from 146.5±36.3 to 168.0±38.8 mg/dL, whereas sitagliptin did not affect FPG. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and 1,5-anhydroglucitol increased significantly in both groups. The C peptide immunoreactivity (CPR) responses after arginine were diminished in both groups. γ-GTP and triglycerides increased, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and adiponectin decreased, in the sitagliptin group, but not in the mitiglinide group. Mean Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire scores improved significantly in both groups. Patients whose mean total daily doses of rapid-acting insulin analog were 16.6 and 17.8 units were switched to sitagliptin and mitiglinide, respectively, without a change in the HbA1c level. Total insulin doses/body weight predicted changes in HbA1c only in the sitagliptin group, but not in the mitiglinide group. Use of >0.27 IU/kg of a rapid-acting insulin analog predicted an increase in HbA1c after switching to sitagliptin. The CPR index (CPI) was also a predictor for a change in HbA1c in the sitagliptin group, but not in the mitiglinide group; patients with a CPI<1.4 developed a worse HbA1c after switching to sitagliptin. Conclusions Sitagliptin may predominantly act on FPG, whereas mitiglinide may act on postprandial plasma glucose to achieve glycemic control after switching from a bolus insulin regimen. Additional therapy to sitagliptin or mitiglinide is clearly required to obtain

  1. Adjusting for confounding effects of treatment switching in a randomized phase II study of dabrafenib plus trametinib in BRAF V600+ metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Latimer, Nicholas R; Amonkar, Mayur M; Stapelkamp, Ceilidh; Sun, Peng

    2015-12-01

    Patients with BRAF V600E mutation-positive melanoma who were assigned to 150 mg dabrafenib twice daily combined with 2 mg trametinib once daily in a phase I/II study showed a median overall survival (OS) of 23.8 months, compared with 20.2 months for patients assigned to dabrafenib alone [hazard ratio (HR)=0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.43-1.24; data cutoff March 2013], on the basis of an intention-to-treat analysis. Because patients assigned to dabrafenib monotherapy were allowed to switch to combination therapy upon disease progression, we attempted to adjust for confounding effects on OS. Randomization-based adjustment methods, Rank Preserving Structural Failure Time Models and the Iterative Parameter Estimation algorithm, were used. Two analyses, 'treatment group' (assumes that treatment effect continues beyond treatment discontinuation) and 'on treatment' (assumes that the treatment effect disappears upon treatment discontinuation), were used to test assumptions on the durability of the treatment effect. A total of 45/54 (83%) patients assigned to dabrafenib monotherapy switched to the trametinib/dabrafenib combination. Adjusted OS HRs ranged from 0.47 to 0.50, depending on the analysis, compared with the unadjusted OS HR of 0.73. CIs continued to cross 1.00; thus, adjusted estimates did not provide statistically significant evidence of a treatment benefit on survival. Reduction of HRs after adjusting for the effect of treatment switching suggests that the intention-to-treat analysis underestimates the effect of dabrafenib plus trametinib on OS, although several factors, such as small trial size and methodological assumptions, affect the certainty of the conclusions. PMID:26340744

  2. Interfacial Electrode-Driven Enhancement of the Switching Parameters of a Copper Oxide-Based Resistive Random-Access Memory Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangani, L. D. Varma; Kumar, Ch. Ravi; Krishna, M. Ghanashyam

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of an Au/Cu x O/Au bipolar resistive random-access memory device are reported. It is demonstrated that switching parameters of this device structure can be enhanced by introducing an interfacial Al layer between the Au top electrode and the Cu x O-based dielectric layer. The set and reset voltages are, respectively, between -2.5 V to -6.0 V and +1.2 V to +3.0 V for the Al-based device. In contrast, the range of values are -0.5 V to -2.5 V and +0.5 V to +1.5 V for the set and reset voltages in the absence of Al. The Al-based device has a higher low resistance state value of 5-6 KΩ as compared to the 0.3-0.5 KΩ for the Au-based device, which leads to a 12 times lower power dissipation factor and lower reset current of 370 μA. Endurance studies carried out over 50 switching cycles show less than 2% variation in both the low resistance and high resistance values. The conduction is ohmic at low values of bias and non-ohmic at higher bias voltage which shows that the enhanced behaviour is a result of the formation of an insulating aluminum oxide layer at the Al-Cu x O interface.

  3. Resistive switching and electrical control of ferromagnetism in a Ag/HfO₂/Nb:SrTiO₃/Ag resistive random access memory (RRAM) device at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shaoqing; Zhu, Gengchang; Xie, Jihao; Bu, Jianpei; Qin, Hongwei; Hu, Jifan

    2016-02-10

    Electrically induced resistive switching and modulated ferromagnetism are simultaneously found in a Ag/HfO2/Nb:SrTiO3/Ag resistive random access memory device at room temperature. The bipolar resistive switching (RS) can be controlled by the modification of a Schottky-like barrier with an electron injection-trapped/detrapped process at the interface of HfO2-Nb:SrTiO3. The multilevel RS transition can be observed in the reset process with larger negative voltage sweepings, which is connected to the different degree of electron detrapping in the interfacial depletion region of the HfO2 layer during the reset process. The origin of the electrical control of room-temperature ferromagnetism may be connected to the change of density of oxygen vacancies in the HfO2 film. The multilevel resistance states and the electric field controlled ferromagnetism have potential for applications in ultrahigh-density storage and magnetic logic device. PMID:26761365

  4. Total ionizing dose effect of γ-ray radiation on the switching characteristics and filament stability of HfOx resistive random access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Runchen; Yu, Shimeng; Gonzalez Velo, Yago; Chen, Wenhao; Holbert, Keith E.; Kozicki, Michael N.; Barnaby, Hugh

    2014-05-05

    The total ionizing dose (TID) effect of gamma-ray (γ-ray) irradiation on HfOx based resistive random access memory was investigated by electrical and material characterizations. The memory states can sustain TID level ∼5.2 Mrad (HfO{sub 2}) without significant change in the functionality or the switching characteristics under pulse cycling. However, the stability of the filament is weakened after irradiation as memory states are more vulnerable to flipping under the electrical stress. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was performed to ascertain the physical mechanism of the stability degradation, which is attributed to the Hf-O bond breaking by the high-energy γ-ray exposure.

  5. The reason for the increased threshold switching voltage of SiO2 doped Ge2Sb2Te5 thin films for phase change random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Seung Wook; Lee, Jong Ho; Ahn, Young Bae; Kim, Choon Hwan; Yang, Bong Seob; Kim, Gun Hwan; Kim, Soo Gil; Lee, Se-Ho; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Kim, Hyeong Joon

    2009-09-01

    This study examined the threshold switching voltage (VT) of 150 nm thick SiO2 doped Ge2Sb2Te5 (SGST) films for phase change random access memory applications. The VT of the SGST films increased from ˜0.9 V (for GST) to ˜1.5 V with increasing SiO2 content. The optical band gap and Urbach edge of the SGST films were similar regardless of the SiO2 concentration. The dielectric constant decreased by ˜37% and the electrical resistivity increased by ˜19%. The increase in VT of SGST films is associated with an effective increase in electric field and the decreased generation rate caused by impact ionization.

  6. Multi-step resistive switching behavior of Li-doped ZnO resistance random access memory device controlled by compliance current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chun-Cheng; Tang, Jian-Fu; Su, Hsiu-Hsien; Hong, Cheng-Shong; Huang, Chih-Yu; Chu, Sheng-Yuan

    2016-06-01

    The multi-step resistive switching (RS) behavior of a unipolar Pt/Li0.06Zn0.94O/Pt resistive random access memory (RRAM) device is investigated. It is found that the RRAM device exhibits normal, 2-, 3-, and 4-step RESET behaviors under different compliance currents. The transport mechanism within the device is investigated by means of current-voltage curves, in-situ transmission electron microscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is shown that the ion transport mechanism is dominated by Ohmic behavior under low electric fields and the Poole-Frenkel emission effect (normal RS behavior) or Li+ ion diffusion (2-, 3-, and 4-step RESET behaviors) under high electric fields.

  7. Internal resistor of multi-functional tunnel barrier for selectivity and switching uniformity in resistive random access memory

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this research, we analyzed the multi-functional role of a tunnel barrier that can be integrated in devices. This tunnel barrier, acting as an internal resistor, changes its resistance with applied bias. Therefore, the current flow in the devices can be controlled by a tunneling mechanism that modifies the tunnel barrier thickness for non-linearity and switching uniformity of devices. When a device is in a low-resistance state, the tunnel barrier controls the current behavior of the device because most of the bias is applied to the tunnel barrier owing to its higher resistance. Furthermore, the tunnel barrier induces uniform filament formation during set operation with the tunnel barrier controlling the current flow. PMID:25114654

  8. Reproducible resistive switching in nonstoichiometric nickel oxide films grown by rf reactive sputtering for resistive random access memory applications

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jae-Wan; Park, Jong-Wan; Kim, Dal-Young; Lee, Jeon-Kook

    2005-09-15

    Ni{sub 1-{delta}}O binary oxide films were deposited on Pt/Ti/SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates by radio-frequency reactive magnetron sputtering. The NiO-based metal-oxide-metal structures were fabricated for measurement of electrical properties. The electrical properties of the Pt/Ni{sub 1-{delta}}O/Pt structure as a function of growth temperature were investigated. The growth temperature was varied from room temperature to 400 deg. C. From all samples, negative resistance phenomenon and nonvolatile memory switching behavior were observed. The ratios between the high-resistance state (OFF state) and the low-resistance state (ON state) were larger than. 10{sup 2}. As the growth temperature was increased, both SET and RESET voltages increased due to the decrease of defects in nickel oxide films. On the basis of x-ray diffraction patterns, we confirmed that the defects in Ni{sub 1-{delta}}O film decreased with increasing the growth temperature due to sufficient diffusion and redistribution of adatoms. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy analysis revealed that the nickel oxide films were Ni deficient and that Ni had three different Ni bond states caused by various defects in nickel oxide films. In order to investigate the influence of the upper limit of SET current (i.e., Compliance SET current), the compliance SET current was varied from 1 to 50 mA. This result showed that the ON-state current and the RESET voltage were strongly dependent on the magnitude of the compliance SET current. As the compliance SET current was increased, both the ON-state current and the RESET voltage increased due to the increase of the conducting path. The results suggest that the resistance switching behavior is related to the formation and fracture of the conducting path which is composed of defects in the nickel oxide film.

  9. A Comparison of Single Sample and Bootstrap Methods to Assess Mediation in Cluster Randomized Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pituch, Keenan A.; Stapleton, Laura M.; Kang, Joo Youn

    2006-01-01

    A Monte Carlo study examined the statistical performance of single sample and bootstrap methods that can be used to test and form confidence interval estimates of indirect effects in two cluster randomized experimental designs. The designs were similar in that they featured random assignment of clusters to one of two treatment conditions and…

  10. Longitudinal mediators of a randomized prevention program effect on cortisol for youth from parentally-bereaved families

    PubMed Central

    Luecken, Linda J.; Hagan, Melissa J.; Sandler, Irwin N.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Ayers, Tim S.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We recently reported that a randomized controlled trial of a family-focused intervention for parentally-bereaved youth predicted higher cortisol output 6 years later relative to a control group of bereaved youth (Luecken et al., 2010). The current study evaluated longitudinal mediators of the preventive intervention effect on cortisol 6 years later. Method Parentally bereaved children (N=139; mean age 11.4, SD = 2.4; age range = 8-16 years; 54% male; 61% Caucasian, 17% Hispanic, 7% African American, 15% other ethnicities) were randomly assigned to the 12-week preventive intervention (n=78) or a self-study control (n=61) condition. Six years later (mean age 17.5, SD 2.4), cortisol was sampled as youth participated in a parent-child conflict interaction task. Using 4 waves of data across the 6 years, longitudinal mediators of the program impact on cortisol were evaluated. Results Program-induced increases in positive parenting, decreases in child exposure to negative life events, and lower externalizing symptoms significantly mediated the intervention effect on cortisol 6 years later. Conclusions An intervention targeting improved parenting and reduced child exposure to additional life stressors following the death of a parent may have long-term neuroendocrine effects. PMID:23529870

  11. SCFCdc4 Enables Mating Type Switching in Yeast by Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-Mediated Elimination of the Ash1 Transcriptional Repressor▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingquan; Larsen, Brett; Ricicova, Marketa; Orlicky, Stephen; Tekotte, Hille; Tang, Xiaojing; Craig, Karen; Quiring, Adam; Le Bihan, Thierry; Hansen, Carl; Sicheri, Frank; Tyers, Mike

    2011-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mother cells switch mating types between a and α forms, whereas daughter cells do not. This developmental asymmetry arises because the expression of the HO endonuclease, which initiates the interconversion of a and α mating type cassettes, is extinguished by the daughter-specific Ash1 transcriptional repressor. When daughters become mothers in the subsequent cell cycle, Ash1 must be eliminated to enable a new developmental state. Here, we report that the ubiquitin ligase SCFCdc4 mediates the phosphorylation-dependent elimination of Ash1. The inactivation of SCFCdc4 stabilizes Ash1 in vivo, and consistently, Ash1 binds to and is ubiquitinated by SCFCdc4 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner in vitro. The mutation of a critical in vivo cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) phosphorylation site (Thr290) on Ash1 reduces its ubiquitination and rate of degradation in vivo and decreases the frequency of mating type switching. Ash1 associates with active Cdc28 kinase in vivo and is targeted to SCFCdc4 in a Cdc28-dependent fashion in vivo and in vitro. Ash1 recognition by Cdc4 appears to be mediated by at least three phosphorylation sites that form two redundant diphosphorylated degrons. The phosphorylation-dependent elimination of Ash1 by the ubiquitin-proteasome system thus underpins developmental asymmetry in budding yeast. PMID:21098119

  12. A randomized, split-face clinical trial of Q-switched alexandrite laser versus Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in the treatment of bilateral nevus of Ota.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiang; Li, Yong; Jiang, Xian

    2016-01-01

    Different types of Q-switched (QS) lasers have been used successfully to treat nevus of Ota. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical efficacy and complication of QS alexandrite (QS Alex) laser versus QS neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) (QS Nd:YAG) laser for bilateral nevus of Ota. Seventeen patients with bilateral nevus of Ota were treated randomly with QS Alex in one half of face and QS Nd:YAG in the other half with an interval of at least 3 months between each. Subjective assessment was made by both patients and dermatologists. Patients were also examined for evidence of complications. All patients experienced improvement (p < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the two sides (p > 0.05). The pain after a short period of laser therapy was more severe for QS Alex than for QS Nd:YAG laser. Vesicles developed in 1 patient after QS Alex therapy. Both QS Alex laser and QS Nd:YAG laser were equally effective at improving bilateral nevus of Ota. Patients tolerate QS Nd:YAG laser better than QS Alex laser. PMID:25968166

  13. Screen-time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home (SWITCH): A randomized controlled trial study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Approximately one third of New Zealand children and young people are overweight or obese. A similar proportion (33%) do not meet recommendations for physical activity, and 70% do not meet recommendations for screen time. Increased time being sedentary is positively associated with being overweight. There are few family-based interventions aimed at reducing sedentary behavior in children. The aim of this trial is to determine the effects of a 24 week home-based, family oriented intervention to reduce sedentary screen time on children's body composition, sedentary behavior, physical activity, and diet. Methods/Design The study design is a pragmatic two-arm parallel randomized controlled trial. Two hundred and seventy overweight children aged 9-12 years and primary caregivers are being recruited. Participants are randomized to intervention (family-based screen time intervention) or control (no change). At the end of the study, the control group is offered the intervention content. Data collection is undertaken at baseline and 24 weeks. The primary trial outcome is child body mass index (BMI) and standardized body mass index (zBMI). Secondary outcomes are change from baseline to 24 weeks in child percentage body fat; waist circumference; self-reported average daily time spent in physical and sedentary activities; dietary intake; and enjoyment of physical activity and sedentary behavior. Secondary outcomes for the primary caregiver include change in BMI and self-reported physical activity. Discussion This study provides an excellent example of a theory-based, pragmatic, community-based trial targeting sedentary behavior in overweight children. The study has been specifically designed to allow for estimation of the consistency of effects on body composition for Māori (indigenous), Pacific and non-Māori/non-Pacific ethnic groups. If effective, this intervention is imminently scalable and could be integrated within existing weight management programs. Trial

  14. Decrease in hnRNP A/B expression during erythropoiesis mediates a pre-mRNA splicing switch.

    PubMed

    Hou, Victor C; Lersch, Robert; Gee, Sherry L; Ponthier, Julie L; Lo, Annie J; Wu, Michael; Turck, Chris W; Koury, Mark; Krainer, Adrian R; Mayeda, Akila; Conboy, John G

    2002-11-15

    A physiologically important alternative pre-mRNA splicing switch, involving activation of protein 4.1R exon 16 (E16) splicing, is required for the establishment of proper mechanical integrity of the erythrocyte membrane during erythropoiesis. Here we identify a conserved exonic splicing silencer element (CE(16)) in E16 that interacts with hnRNP A/B proteins and plays a role in repression of E16 splicing during early erythropoiesis. Experiments with model pre-mRNAs showed that CE(16) can repress splicing of upstream introns, and that mutagenesis or replacement of CE(16) can relieve this inhibition. An affinity selection assay with biotinylated CE(16) RNA demonstrated specific binding of hnRNP A/B proteins. Depletion of hnRNP A/B proteins from nuclear extract significantly increased E16 inclusion, while repletion with recombinant hnRNP A/B restored E16 silencing. Most importantly, differentiating mouse erythroblasts exhibited a stage-specific activation of the E16 splicing switch in concert with a dramatic and specific down-regulation of hnRNP A/B protein expression. These findings demonstrate that natural developmental changes in hnRNP A/B proteins can effect physiologically important switches in pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:12426391

  15. Decrease in hnRNP A/B expression during erythropoiesis mediates a pre-mRNA splicing switch

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Victor C.; Lersch, Robert; Gee, Sherry L.; Ponthier, Julie L.; Lo, Annie J.; Wu, Michael; Turck, Chris W.; Koury, Mark; Krainer, Adrian R.; Mayeda, Akila; Conboy, John G.

    2002-01-01

    A physiologically important alternative pre-mRNA splicing switch, involving activation of protein 4.1R exon 16 (E16) splicing, is required for the establishment of proper mechanical integrity of the erythrocyte membrane during erythropoiesis. Here we identify a conserved exonic splicing silencer element (CE16) in E16 that interacts with hnRNP A/B proteins and plays a role in repression of E16 splicing during early erythropoiesis. Experiments with model pre-mRNAs showed that CE16 can repress splicing of upstream introns, and that mutagenesis or replacement of CE16 can relieve this inhibition. An affinity selection assay with biotinylated CE16 RNA demonstrated specific binding of hnRNP A/B proteins. Depletion of hnRNP A/B proteins from nuclear extract significantly increased E16 inclusion, while repletion with recombinant hnRNP A/B restored E16 silencing. Most importantly, differentiating mouse erythroblasts exhibited a stage-specific activation of the E16 splicing switch in concert with a dramatic and specific down-regulation of hnRNP A/B protein expression. These findings demonstrate that natural developmental changes in hnRNP A/B proteins can effect physiologically important switches in pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:12426391

  16. Decrease in hnRNP A/B expression during erythropoiesis mediates a pre-mRNA splicing switch

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Victor C.; Lersch, Robert; Gee, Sherry L.; Ponthier, Julie L.; Lo, Annie J.; Wu, Michael; Turck, Chris W.; Koury, Mark; Krainer, Adrian R.; Mayeda, Akila; Conboy, John G.

    2002-10-17

    A physiologically important alternative pre-mRNA splicing switch, involving activation of protein 4.1R exon 16 (E16) splicing, is required for establishing proper mechanical integrity of the erythrocyte membrane during erythropoiesis. Here we identify a conserved exonic splicing silencer element (CE16) in E16 that interacts with hnRNP A/B proteins and plays a role in repression of E16 splicing during early erythropoiesis. Experiments with model pre-mRNAs showed that CE16 can repress splicing of upstream introns, and that mutagenesis or replacement of CE16 can relieve this inhibition. An affinity selection assay with biotinylated CE16 RNA demonstrated specific binding of hnRNP A/B proteins. Depletion of hnRNP A/B proteins from nuclear extract significantly increased E16 inclusion, while repletion with recombinant hnRNP A/B restored E16 silencing. Most importantly, differentiating mouse erythroblasts exhibited a stage-specific activation of the E16 splicing switch in concert with a drama tic and specific down-regulation of hnRNP A/B protein expression. These findings demonstrate that natural developmental changes in hnRNP A/B proteins can effect physiologically important switches in pre-mRNA splicing.

  17. Do savings mediate changes in adolescents’ future orientation and health-related outcomes? Findings from randomized experiment in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Karimli, Leyla; Ssewamala, Fred M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This present study tests the proposition that an economic strengthening intervention for families caring for AIDS-orphaned adolescents would positively affect adolescent future orientation and psychosocial outcomes through increased asset-accumulation (in this case, by increasing family savings). Methods Using longitudinal data from the cluster-randomized experiment we ran generalized estimating equation (GEE) models with robust standard errors clustering on individual observations. To examine whether family savings mediate the effect of the intervention on adolescents’ future orientation and psychosocial outcomes, analyses were conducted in three steps: (1) testing the effect of intervention on mediator; (2) testing the effect of mediator on outcomes, controlling for the intervention; and (3) testing the significance of mediating effect using Sobel-Goodman method. Asymmetric confidence intervals for mediated effect were obtained through bootstrapping—to address the assumption of normal distribution. Results Results indicate that participation in a matched Child Savings Account program improved adolescents’ future orientation and psychosocial outcomes by reducing hopelessness, enhancing self-concept, and improving adolescents’ confidence about their educational plans. However, the positive intervention effect on adolescent future orientation and psychosocial outcomes was not transmitted through saving. In other words, participation in the matched Child Savings Account program improved adolescent future orientation and psychosocial outcomes regardless of its impact on reported savings. Conclusions Further research is necessary to understand exactly how participation in economic strengthening interventions, for example, those that employ matched Child Savings Accounts, shape adolescent future orientation and psychosocial outcomes: what, if not savings, transmits the treatment effect and how? PMID:26271162

  18. Conceptualizing and Testing Random Indirect Effects and Moderated Mediation in Multilevel Models: New Procedures and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Daniel J.; Preacher, Kristopher J.; Gil, Karen M.

    2006-01-01

    The authors propose new procedures for evaluating direct, indirect, and total effects in multilevel models when all relevant variables are measured at Level 1 and all effects are random. Formulas are provided for the mean and variance of the indirect and total effects and for the sampling variances of the average indirect and total effects.…

  19. Randomized trial of group interventions to reduce HIV/STD risk and change theoretical mediators among detained adolescents.

    PubMed

    Schmiege, Sarah J; Broaddus, Michelle R; Levin, Michael; Bryan, Angela D

    2009-02-01

    Criminally involved adolescents engage in high levels of risky sexual behavior and alcohol use, and alcohol use may contribute to lack of condom use. Detained adolescents (n = 484) were randomized to (1) a theory-based sexual risk reduction intervention (GPI), (2) the GPI condition with a group-based alcohol risk reduction motivational enhancement therapy component (GPI + GMET), or (3) an information-only control (INFO). All interventions were presented in same-sex groups in single sessions lasting from 2 to 4 hr. Changes to putative theoretical mediators (attitudes, perceived norms, self-efficacy, and intentions) were measured immediately following intervention administration. The primary outcomes were risky sexual behavior and sexual behavior while drinking measured 3 months later (65.1% retention). The GPI + GMET intervention demonstrated superiority over both other conditions in influencing theoretical mediators and over the INFO control in reducing risky sexual behavior. Self-efficacy and intentions were significant mediators between condition and later risky sexual behavior. This study contributes to an understanding of harm reduction among high-risk adolescents and has implications for understanding circumstances in which the inclusion of GMET components may be effective. PMID:19170452

  20. Hypoxia induces cardiac fibroblast proliferation and phenotypic switch: a role for caveolae and caveolin-1/PTEN mediated pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yao; Chu, Ming; Hong, Jian; Shang, Jingping

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac fibrosis following myocardial infarction (MI) results in heart failure. Caveolin-1, the main structural protein of caveolae, regulates signal transduction pathways controlling cell proliferation and apoptosis. Meanwhile, low phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) activity enhances the PI3K/Akt signal pathway to induce cell proliferation. But whether caveolin-1 and PTEN activation regulates cardiac fibroblast proliferation and contributes to cardiac fibrosis from ischemic injury is incompletely understood. This study investigates whether hypoxia inducing cardiac fibroblast proliferation and phenotypic switch is caveolin-dependent. Methods We used in vitro and in vivo models of ischemic injury, immunohistochemical staining, and cell proliferation assays to address this hypothesis. Results We found that MI induced collagen deposition and cardiac dysfunction. After MI, mice displayed reduced caveolin-1 and PTEN expression and increased α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression in the infarct zone. Qualitative and quantitative analyses indicated that caveolin-1 expression was lowest at 7 days after MI, accompanied by increased collagen deposition and attenuated cardiac function. We cultured cardiac fibroblasts of mice were in hypoxia or normoxia conditions for 12, 24 and 48 hours. At all the time points, caveolin-1 and PTEN expression were gradually reduced, whereas, α-SMA was gradually increased. We also observed that cell viability was increased at 12 and 24 h after hypoxia then lightly decreased at 48 h. Additionally, disruption of caveolae with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) enhanced p-Akt and α-SMA expression and fibroblast proliferation and phenotypic switch. Conclusions These findings suggest a key role for caveolae, perhaps through the caveolin-1/PTEN signaling pathway, in cardiac fibroblast proliferation and phenotypic switch under hypoxia. PMID:25364523

  1. Self-selection effects and modulation of TaOx resistive switching random access memory with bottom electrode of highly doped Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Muxi; Fang, Yichen; Wang, Zongwei; Pan, Yue; Li, Ming; Cai, Yimao; Huang, Ru

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a TaOx resistive switching random access memory (RRAM) device with operation-polarity-dependent self-selection effect by introducing highly doped silicon (Si) electrode, which is promising for large-scale integration. It is observed that with highly doped Si as the bottom electrode (BE), the RRAM devices show non-linear (>103) I-V characteristic during negative Forming/Set operation and linear behavior during positive Forming/Set operation. The underling mechanisms for the linear and non-linear behaviors at low resistance states of the proposed device are extensively investigated by varying operation modes, different metal electrodes, and Si doping type. Experimental data and theoretical analysis demonstrate that the operation-polarity-dependent self-selection effect in our devices originates from the Schottky barrier between the TaOx layer and the interfacial SiOx formed by reaction between highly doped Si BE and immigrated oxygen ions in the conductive filament area.

  2. Modulation of surface trap induced resistive switching by electrode annealing in individual PbS micro/nanowire-based devices for resistance random access memory.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jianping; Cheng, Baochang; Wu, Fuzhang; Su, Xiaohui; Xiao, Yanhe; Guo, Rui; Lei, Shuijin

    2014-12-10

    Bipolar resistive switching (RS) devices are commonly believed as a promising candidate for next generation nonvolatile resistance random access memory (RRAM). Here, two-terminal devices based on individual PbS micro/nanowires with Ag electrodes are constructed, whose electrical transport depends strongly on the abundant surface and bulk trap states in micro/nanostructures. The surface trap states can be filled/emptied effectively at negative/positive bias voltage, respectively, and the corresponding rise/fall of the Fermi level induces a variation in a degenerate/nondegenerate state, resulting in low/high resistance. Moreover, the filling/emptying of trap states can be utilized as RRAM. After annealing, the surface trap state can almost be eliminated completely; while most of the bulk trap states can still remain. In the devices unannealed and annealed at both ends, therefore, the symmetrical back-to-back Fowler-Nordheim tunneling with large ON/OFF resistance ratio and Poole-Frenkel emission with poor hysteresis can be observed under cyclic sweep voltage, respectively. However, a typical bipolar RS behavior can be observed effectively in the devices annealed at one end. The acquirement of bipolar RS and nonvolatile RRAM by the modulation of electrode annealing demonstrates the abundant trap states in micro/nanomaterials will be advantageous to the development of new type electronic components. PMID:25398100

  3. Nuclear factor-κB mediates the phenotype switching of airway smooth muscle cells in a murine asthma model

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Chen; Zhang, Jian; Su, Meiping; Fan, Xiujun

    2015-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) phenotype modulation, characterized by reversible switching between contractile and proliferative phenotypes, is considered to contribute to airway proliferative diseases such as allergic asthma. Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) has been reported as a key regulator for the occurrence and development of asthma. However, little is known regarding its role in ASM cell phenotypic modulation. To elucidate the role of NF-κB in regulating ASM cells phenotypic modulation, we investigated the effects of NF-κB on ASM cells contractile marker protein expression, and its impact on proliferation and apoptosis. We found that chronic asthma increased the activation of NF-κB in the primary murine ASM cells with a concomitant marked decrease in the expression of contractile phenotypic marker protein including smooth muscle alpha-actin (α-SMA). Additionally, we used the normal ASM cells under different processing to build the phenotype switching when we found the activation of NF-κB. Meanwhile, the expression of α-SMA in asthma was significantly increased by the NF-κB blocker. NF-κB blocker also suppressed asthma mouse ASM cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis. These findings highlight a novel role for the NF-κB in murine ASM cell phenotypic modulation and provide a potential target for therapeutic intervention for asthma. PMID:26722396

  4. Polycrystalline nanowires of gadolinium-doped ceria via random alignment mediated by supercritical carbon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Woo; Ahn, Jae-Pyoung

    2013-01-01

    This study proposes a seed/template-free method that affords high-purity semiconducting nanowires from nanoclusters, which act as basic building blocks for nanomaterials, under supercritical CO2 fluid. Polycrystalline nanowires of Gd-doped ceria (Gd-CeO2) were formed by CO2-mediated non-oriented attachment of the nanoclusters resulting from the dissociation of single-crystalline aggregates. The unique formation mechanism underlying this morphological transition may be exploited for the facile growth of high-purity polycrystalline nanowires. PMID:23572061

  5. Inhibition of Cancer Cell Proliferation by PPARγ is Mediated by a Metabolic Switch that Increases Reactive Oxygen Species Levels

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Nishi; Kollipara, Rahul K.; Singh, Dinesh K.; Sudderth, Jessica; Hu, Zeping; Nguyen, Hien; Wang, Shan; Humphries, Caroline G.; Carstens, Ryan; Huffman, Kenneth E.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Kittler, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The nuclear receptor peroxisome-proliferation activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), a transcriptional master regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism, inhibits the growth of several common cancers including lung cancer. In this study, we show that the mechanism by which activation of PPARγ inhibits proliferation of lung cancer cells is based on metabolic changes. We found that treatment with the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone triggers a metabolic switch that inhibits pyruvate oxidation and reduces glutathione levels. These PPARγ-induced metabolic changes result in a marked increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels that lead to rapid hypophosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (RB) and cell cycle arrest. The antiproliferative effect of PPARγ activation can be prevented by suppressing pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) or β-oxidation of fatty acids in vitro and in vivo. Our proposed mechanism also suggests that metabolic changes can rapidly and directly inhibit cell cycle progression of cancer cells by altering ROS levels. PMID:25264247

  6. Inhibition of cancer cell proliferation by PPARγ is mediated by a metabolic switch that increases reactive oxygen species levels.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Nishi; Kollipara, Rahul K; Singh, Dinesh K; Sudderth, Jessica; Hu, Zeping; Nguyen, Hien; Wang, Shan; Humphries, Caroline G; Carstens, Ryan; Huffman, Kenneth E; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Kittler, Ralf

    2014-10-01

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome-proliferation-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), a transcriptional master regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism, inhibits the growth of several common cancers, including lung cancer. In this study, we show that the mechanism by which activation of PPARγ inhibits proliferation of lung cancer cells is based on metabolic changes. We found that treatment with the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone triggers a metabolic switch that inhibits pyruvate oxidation and reduces glutathione levels. These PPARγ-induced metabolic changes result in a marked increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels that lead to rapid hypophosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (RB) and cell-cycle arrest. The antiproliferative effect of PPARγ activation can be prevented by suppressing pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) or β-oxidation of fatty acids in vitro and in vivo. Our proposed mechanism also suggests that metabolic changes can rapidly and directly inhibit cell-cycle progression of cancer cells by altering ROS levels. PMID:25264247

  7. Multidimensional set switching.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Sowon; Andersen, George J; Kramer, Arthur F

    2003-06-01

    The present study examined the organization of preparatory processes that underlie set switching and, more specifically, switch costs. On each trial, subjects performed one of two perceptual judgment tasks, color or shape discrimination. Subjects also responded with one of two different response sets. The task set and/or the response set switched from one to the other after 2-6 repeated trials. Response set, task set, and double set switches were performed in both blocked and randomized conditions. Subjects performed with short (100-msec) and long (800-msec) preparatory intervals. Task and response set switches had an additive effect on reaction times (RTs) in the blocked condition. Such a pattern of results suggests a serial organization of preparatory processes when the nature of switches is predictable. However, task and response set switches had an underadditive effect on RTs in the random condition when subjects performed with a brief cue-to-target interval. This pattern of results suggests overlapping task and response set preparation. These findings are discussed in terms of strategic control of preparatory processes in set switching. PMID:12921431

  8. Size-dependent resistive switching properties of the active region in nickel nitride-based crossbar array resistive random access memory.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Dong; Yun, Min Ju; Hong, Seok Man; Kim, Tae Geun

    2014-12-01

    The size-dependent resistive switching (RS) properties of the active region in a 1 x 1 NiN-based crossbar array (CBA) resistive random access memory (ReRAM) are investigated in the range of 2 x 2 μm2 to 8 x 8 μm2. In the forming test, the forming voltage is reduced by decreasing the cell size of the active region. Compared to the 8 x 8 μm2 CBA ReRAM, the forming voltage of the 2 x 2 μm2 CBA ReRAM was reduced from 8 V to 6.2 V. In addition, V(SET/RESET) and the current for the reset operation are reduced in the current-voltage (I-V) results by reducing the cell size, while the current at a high-resistance state (HRS) is increased. As a result, the current ratio between the HRS and a low-resistance state (LRS) is reduced. On the other hand, the variation of V(SET) for I-V curves repetitively acquired 100 times is decreased by decreasing the cell size in the reliability test. Further, the current at the HRS for the 2 x 2 μm2 CBA ReRAM is the most stable with the smallest current variation for 1000 s in the retention test. These results show that reducing the active region in the CBA ReRAM structure is effective for improving the reliability of ReRAM cells because it reduces the operating voltage and current as well as the variation of V(SET) and the current at the HRS. PMID:25971015

  9. Androgens regulate prostate cancer cell growth via an AMPK-PGC-1α-mediated metabolic switch.

    PubMed

    Tennakoon, J B; Shi, Y; Han, J J; Tsouko, E; White, M A; Burns, A R; Zhang, A; Xia, X; Ilkayeva, O R; Xin, L; Ittmann, M M; Rick, F G; Schally, A V; Frigo, D E

    2014-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy among men in industrialized countries, accounting for the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Although we now know that the androgen receptor (AR) is important for progression to the deadly advanced stages of the disease, it is poorly understood what AR-regulated processes drive this pathology. Here we demonstrate that AR regulates prostate cancer cell growth via the metabolic sensor 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a kinase that classically regulates cellular energy homeostasis. In patients, activation of AMPK correlated with prostate cancer progression. Using a combination of radiolabeled assays and emerging metabolomic approaches, we also show that prostate cancer cells respond to androgen treatment by increasing not only rates of glycolysis, as is commonly seen in many cancers, but also glucose and fatty acid oxidation. Importantly, this effect was dependent on androgen-mediated AMPK activity. Our results further indicate that the AMPK-mediated metabolic changes increased intracellular ATP levels and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α)-mediated mitochondrial biogenesis, affording distinct growth advantages to the prostate cancer cells. Correspondingly, we used outlier analysis to determine that PGC-1α is overexpressed in a subpopulation of clinical cancer samples. This was in contrast to what was observed in immortalized benign human prostate cells and a testosterone-induced rat model of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Taken together, our findings converge to demonstrate that androgens can co-opt the AMPK-PGC-1α signaling cascade, a known homeostatic mechanism, to increase prostate cancer cell growth. The current study points to the potential utility of developing metabolic-targeted therapies directed toward the AMPK-PGC-1α signaling axis for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:24186207

  10. Biomechanical insult switches PEA-15 activity to uncouple its anti-apoptotic function and promote erk mediated tissue remodeling.

    PubMed

    Exler, Rachel E; Guo, Xiaoxin; Chan, Darren; Livne-Bar, Izhar; Vicic, Nevena; Flanagan, John G; Sivak, Jeremy M

    2016-01-15

    Biomechanical insult contributes to many chronic pathological processes, yet the resulting influences on signal transduction mechanisms are poorly understood. The retina presents an excellent mechanotransduction model, as mechanical strain on sensitive astrocytes of the optic nerve head (ONH) is intimately linked to chronic tissue remodeling and excavation by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and apoptotic cell death. However, the mechanism by which these effects are induced by biomechanical strain is unclear. We previously identified the small adapter protein, PEA-15 (phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes), through proteomic analyses of human ONH astrocytes subjected to pathologically relevant biomechanical insult. Under resting conditions PEA-15 is regulated through phosphorylation of two key serine residues to inhibit extrinsic apoptosis and ERK1/2 signaling. However, we surprisingly observed that biomechanical insult dramatically switches PEA-15 phosphorylation and function to uncouple its anti-apoptotic activity, and promote ERK1/2-dependent MMP-2 and MMP-9 secretion. These results reveal a novel cell autonomous mechanism by which biomechanical strain rapidly modifies this signaling pathway to generate altered tissue injury responses. PMID:26615958

  11. C-type lectin-like receptor LOX-1 promotes dendritic cell-mediated class-switched B cell responses.

    PubMed

    Joo, HyeMee; Li, Dapeng; Dullaers, Melissa; Kim, Tae-Whan; Duluc, Dorothee; Upchurch, Katherine; Xue, Yaming; Zurawski, Sandy; Le Grand, Roger; Liu, Yong-Jun; Kuroda, Marcelo; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon

    2014-10-16

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a pattern-recognition receptor for a variety of endogenous and exogenous ligands. However, LOX-1 function in the host immune response is not fully understood. Here, we report that LOX-1 expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells promotes humoral responses. On B cells LOX-1 signaling upregulated CCR7, promoting cellular migration toward lymphoid tissues. LOX-1 signaling on DCs licensed the cells to promote B cell differentiation into class-switched plasmablasts and led to downregulation of chemokine receptor CXCR5 and upregulation of chemokine receptor CCR10 on plasmablasts, enabling their exit from germinal centers and migration toward local mucosa and skin. Finally, we found that targeting influenza hemagglutinin 1 (HA1) subunit to LOX-1 elicited HA1-specific protective antibody responses in rhesus macaques. Thus, LOX-1 expressed on B cells and DC cells has complementary functions to promote humoral immune responses. PMID:25308333

  12. A σE-Mediated Temperature Gauge Controls a Switch from LuxR-Mediated Virulence Gene Expression to Thermal Stress Adaptation in Vibrio alginolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Dan; Guo, Min; Yang, Minjun; Zhang, Yuanxing; Zhou, Xiaohui; Wang, Qiyao

    2016-01-01

    In vibrios, the expression of virulence factors is often controlled by LuxR, the master quorum-sensing regulator. Here, we investigate the interplay between LuxR and σE, an alternative sigma factor, during the control of virulence-related gene expression and adaptations to temperature elevations in the zoonotic pathogen Vibrio alginolyticus. An rpoE null V. alginolyticus mutant was unable to adapt to various stresses and was survival-deficient in fish. In wild type V. alginolyticus, the expression of LuxR-regulated virulence factors increased as the temperature was increased from 22°C to 37°C, but mutants lacking σE did not respond to temperature, indicating that σE is critical for the temperature-dependent upregulation of virulence genes. Further analyses revealed that σE binds directly to -10 and -35 elements in the luxR promoter that drive its transcription. ChIP assays showed that σE binds to the promoter regions of luxR, rpoH and rpoE at high temperatures (e.g., 30°C and 37°C). However, at higher temperatures (42°C) that induce thermal stress, σE binding to the luxR promoter decreased, while its binding to the rpoH and rpoE promoters was unchanged. Thus, the temperature-dependent binding of σE to distinct promoters appears to underlie a σE-controlled switch between the expression of virulence genes and adaptation to thermal stress. This study illustrates how a conserved temperature response mechanism integrates into quorum-sensing circuits to regulate both virulence and stress adaptation. PMID:27253371

  13. A σE-Mediated Temperature Gauge Controls a Switch from LuxR-Mediated Virulence Gene Expression to Thermal Stress Adaptation in Vibrio alginolyticus.

    PubMed

    Gu, Dan; Guo, Min; Yang, Minjun; Zhang, Yuanxing; Zhou, Xiaohui; Wang, Qiyao

    2016-06-01

    In vibrios, the expression of virulence factors is often controlled by LuxR, the master quorum-sensing regulator. Here, we investigate the interplay between LuxR and σE, an alternative sigma factor, during the control of virulence-related gene expression and adaptations to temperature elevations in the zoonotic pathogen Vibrio alginolyticus. An rpoE null V. alginolyticus mutant was unable to adapt to various stresses and was survival-deficient in fish. In wild type V. alginolyticus, the expression of LuxR-regulated virulence factors increased as the temperature was increased from 22°C to 37°C, but mutants lacking σE did not respond to temperature, indicating that σE is critical for the temperature-dependent upregulation of virulence genes. Further analyses revealed that σE binds directly to -10 and -35 elements in the luxR promoter that drive its transcription. ChIP assays showed that σE binds to the promoter regions of luxR, rpoH and rpoE at high temperatures (e.g., 30°C and 37°C). However, at higher temperatures (42°C) that induce thermal stress, σE binding to the luxR promoter decreased, while its binding to the rpoH and rpoE promoters was unchanged. Thus, the temperature-dependent binding of σE to distinct promoters appears to underlie a σE-controlled switch between the expression of virulence genes and adaptation to thermal stress. This study illustrates how a conserved temperature response mechanism integrates into quorum-sensing circuits to regulate both virulence and stress adaptation. PMID:27253371

  14. A Developmental Switch of Gene Expression in the Barley Seed Mediated by HvVP1 (Viviparous-1) and HvGAMYB Interactions.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Zamira; Iglesias-Fernández, Raquel; Martínez, Manuel; Rubio-Somoza, Ignacio; Díaz, Isabel; Carbonero, Pilar; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesús

    2016-04-01

    The accumulation of storage compounds in the starchy endosperm of developing cereal seeds is highly regulated at the transcriptional level. These compounds, mainly starch and proteins, are hydrolyzed upon germination to allow seedling growth. The transcription factor HvGAMYB is a master activator both in the maturation phase of seed development and upon germination, acting in combination with other transcription factors. However, the precise mechanism controlling the switch from maturation to germination programs remains unclear. We report here the identification and molecular characterization of Hordeum vulgare VIVIPAROUS1 (HvVP1), orthologous to ABA-INSENSITIVE3 from Arabidopsis thaliana HvVP1 transcripts accumulate in the endosperm and the embryo of developing seeds at early stages and in the embryo and aleurone of germinating seeds up to 24 h of imbibition. In transient expression assays, HvVP1 controls the activation of Hor2 and Amy6.4 promoters exerted by HvGAMYB. HvVP1 interacts with HvGAMYB in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in the plant nuclei, hindering its interaction with other transcription factors involved in seed gene expression programs, like BPBF. Similarly, this interaction leads to a decrease in the DNA binding of HvGAMYB and the Barley Prolamine-Box binding Factor (BPBF) to their target sequences. Our results indicate that the HvVP1 expression pattern controls the full Hor2 expression activated by GAMYB and BPBF in the developing endosperm and the Amy6.4 activation in postgerminative reserve mobilization mediated by GAMYB. All these data demonstrate the participation of HvVP1 in antagonistic gene expression programs and support its central role as a gene expression switch during seed maturation and germination. PMID:26858366

  15. A pH-Mediated Topological Switch within the N-Terminal Domain of Human Caveolin-3.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Hun; Schlebach, Jonathan P; Lu, Zhenwei; Peng, Dungeng; Reasoner, Kaitlyn C; Sanders, Charles R

    2016-06-01

    Caveolins mediate the formation of caveolae, which are small omega-shaped membrane invaginations involved in a variety of cellular processes. There are three caveolin isoforms, the third of which (Cav3) is expressed in smooth and skeletal muscles. Mutations in Cav3 cause a variety of human muscular diseases. In this work, we characterize the secondary structure, dynamics, and topology of the monomeric form of the full-length lipidated protein. Cav3 consists of a series of membrane-embedded or surface-associated helical elements connected by extramembrane connecting loops or disordered domains. Our results also reveal that the N-terminal domain undergoes a large scale pH-mediated topological rearrangement between soluble and membrane-anchored forms. Considering that roughly one-third of pathogenic mutations in Cav3 influence charged residues located in this domain, we hypothesize that this transition is likely to be relevant to the molecular basis of Cav3-linked diseases. These results provide insight into the structure of Cav3 and set the stage for mechanistic investigations of the effects of pathogenic mutations. PMID:27276265

  16. Src, a Molecular Switch Governing Gain Control of Synaptic Transmission Mediated by N-methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xian-Min; Salter, Michael W.

    1999-07-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is a principal subtype of glutamate receptor mediating fast excitatory transmission at synapses in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and other regions of the central nervous system. NMDA receptors are crucial for the lasting enhancement of synaptic transmission that occurs both physiologically and in pathological conditions such as chronic pain. Over the past several years, evidence has accumulated indicating that the activity of NMDA receptors is regulated by the protein tyrosine kinase, Src. Recently it has been discovered that, by means of up-regulating NMDA receptor function, activation of Src mediates the induction of the lasting enhancement of excitatory transmission known as long-term potentiation in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Also, Src has been found to amplify the up-regulation of NMDA receptor function that is produced by raising the intracellular concentration of sodium. Sodium concentration increases in neuronal dendrites during high levels of firing activity, which is precisely when Src becomes activated. Therefore, we propose that the boost in NMDA receptor function produced by the coincidence of activating Src and raising intracellular sodium may be important in physiological and pathophysiological enhancement of excitatory transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and elsewhere in the central nervous system.

  17. B cell Rab7 mediates induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression and class-switching in T-dependent and T-independent antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Pone, Egest J; Lam, Tonika; Lou, Zheng; Wang, Rui; Chen, Yuhui; Liu, Dongfang; Edinger, Aimee L; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Class switch DNA recombination (CSR) is central to the maturation of the Ab response because it diversifies Ab effector functions. Like somatic hypermutation, CSR requires activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), whose expression is restricted to B cells, as induced by CD40 engagement or dual TLR-BCR engagement (primary CSR-inducing stimuli). By constructing conditional knockout Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) mice, we identified a B cell-intrinsic role for Rab7, a small GTPase involved in intracellular membrane functions, in mediating AID induction and CSR. Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) mice displayed normal B and T cell development and were deficient in Rab7 only in B cells undergoing Igh(C)γ(1-cre) Iγ1-Sγ1-Cγ1-cre transcription, as induced--like Igh germline Iγ1-Sγ1-Cγ1 and Iε-Sε-Cε transcription--by IL-4 in conjunction with a primary CSR-inducing stimulus. These mice could not mount T-independent or T-dependent class-switched IgG1 or IgE responses while maintaining normal IgM levels. Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) B cells showed, in vivo and in vitro, normal proliferation and survival, normal Blimp-1 expression and plasma cell differentiation, as well as intact activation of the noncanonical NF-κB, p38 kinase, and ERK1/2 kinase pathways. They, however, were defective in AID expression and CSR in vivo and in vitro, as induced by CD40 engagement or dual TLR1/2-, TLR4-, TLR7-, or TLR9-BCR engagement. In Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) B cells, CSR was rescued by enforced AID expression. These findings, together with our demonstration that Rab7-mediated canonical NF-κB activation, as critical to AID induction, outline a novel role of Rab7 in signaling pathways that lead to AID expression and CSR, likely by promoting assembly of signaling complexes along intracellular membranes. PMID:25740947

  18. A Parent-Mediated Intervention that Targets Responsive Parental Behaviors Increases Attachment Behaviors in Children with ASD: Results from a Randomized Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siller, Michael; Swanson, Meghan; Gerber, Alan; Hutman, Ted; Sigman, Marian

    2014-01-01

    The current study is a randomized clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of Focused Playtime Intervention (FPI) in a sample of 70 children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. This parent-mediated intervention has previously been shown to significantly increase responsive parental communication (Siller et al. in "J Autism Dev Disord"…

  19. Resistive switching mechanisms in random access memory devices incorporating transition metal oxides: TiO2, NiO and Pr0.7Ca0.3MnO3.

    PubMed

    Magyari-Köpe, Blanka; Tendulkar, Mihir; Park, Seong-Geon; Lee, Hyung Dong; Nishi, Yoshio

    2011-06-24

    Resistance change random access memory (RRAM) cells, typically built as MIM capacitor structures, consist of insulating layers I sandwiched between metal layers M, where the insulator performs the resistance switching operation. These devices can be electrically switched between two or more stable resistance states at a speed of nanoseconds, with long retention times, high switching endurance, low read voltage, and large switching windows. They are attractive candidates for next-generation non-volatile memory, particularly as a flash successor, as the material properties can be scaled to the nanometer regime. Several resistance switching models have been suggested so far for transition metal oxide based devices, such as charge trapping, conductive filament formation, Schottky barrier modulation, and electrochemical migration of point defects. The underlying fundamental principles of the switching mechanism still lack a detailed understanding, i.e. how to control and modulate the electrical characteristics of devices incorporating defects and impurities, such as oxygen vacancies, metal interstitials, hydrogen, and other metallic atoms acting as dopants. In this paper, state of the art ab initio theoretical methods are employed to understand the effects that filamentary types of stable oxygen vacancy configurations in TiO(2) and NiO have on the electronic conduction. It is shown that strong electronic interactions between metal ions adjacent to oxygen vacancy sites results in the formation of a conductive path and thus can explain the 'ON' site conduction in these materials. Implication of hydrogen doping on electroforming is discussed for Pr(0.7)Ca(0.3)MnO(3) devices based on electrical characterization and FTIR measurements. PMID:21572196

  20. Bortezomib in late antibody-mediated kidney transplant rejection (BORTEJECT Study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite major advances in transplant medicine, improvements in long-term kidney allograft survival have not been commensurate with those observed shortly after transplantation. The formation of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) and ongoing antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) processes may critically contribute to late graft loss. However, appropriate treatment for late AMR has not yet been defined. There is accumulating evidence that the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib may substantially affect the function and integrity of alloantibody-secreting plasma cells. The impact of this agent on the course of late AMR has not so far been systematically investigated. Methods/design The BORTEJECT Study is a randomized controlled trial designed to clarify the impact of intravenous bortezomib on the course of late AMR. In this single-center study (nephrological outpatient service, Medical University Vienna) we plan an initial cross-sectional DSA screening of 1,000 kidney transplant recipients (functioning graft at ≥180 days; estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) >20 ml/minute/1.73 m2). DSA-positive recipients will be subjected to kidney allograft biopsy to detect morphological features consistent with AMR. Forty-four patients with biopsy-proven AMR will then be included in a double-blind placebo-controlled intervention trial (1:1 randomization stratified for eGFR and the presence of T-cell-mediated rejection). Patients in the active group will receive two cycles of bortezomib (4 × 1.3 mg/m2 over 2 weeks; 3-month interval between cycles). The primary end point will be the course of eGFR over 24 months (intention-to-treat analysis). The sample size was calculated according to the assumption of a 5 ml/minute/1.73 m2 difference in eGFR slope (per year) between the two groups (alpha: 0.05; power: 0.8). Secondary endpoints will be DSA levels, protein excretion, measured glomerular filtration rate, transplant and patient survival, and the development of

  1. Regulation of Wheat Seed Dormancy by After-Ripening Is Mediated by Specific Transcriptional Switches That Induce Changes in Seed Hormone Metabolism and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Yuri; Jordan, Mark C.; Kamiya, Yuji; Seo, Mitsunori; Ayele, Belay T.

    2013-01-01

    Treatments that promote dormancy release are often correlated with changes in seed hormone content and/or sensitivity. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of after-ripening (seed dry storage) in triggering hormone related changes and dormancy decay in wheat (Triticum aestivum), temporal expression patterns of genes related to abscisic acid (ABA), gibberellin (GA), jasmonate and indole acetic acid (IAA) metabolism and signaling, and levels of the respective hormones were examined in dormant and after-ripened seeds in both dry and imbibed states. After-ripening mediated developmental switch from dormancy to germination appears to be associated with declines in seed sensitivity to ABA and IAA, which are mediated by transcriptional repressions of PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2C, SNF1-RELATED PROTEIN KINASE2, ABA INSENSITIVE5 and LIPID PHOSPHATE PHOSPHTASE2, and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR and RELATED TO UBIQUITIN1 genes. Transcriptomic analysis of wheat seed responsiveness to ABA suggests that ABA inhibits the germination of wheat seeds partly by repressing the transcription of genes related to chromatin assembly and cell wall modification, and activating that of GA catabolic genes. After-ripening induced seed dormancy decay in wheat is also associated with the modulation of seed IAA and jasmonate contents. Transcriptional control of members of the ALLENE OXIDE SYNTHASE, 3-KETOACYL COENZYME A THIOLASE, LIPOXYGENASE and 12-OXOPHYTODIENOATE REDUCTASE gene families appears to regulate seed jasmonate levels. Changes in the expression of GA biosynthesis genes, GA 20-OXIDASE and GA 3-OXIDASE, in response to after-ripening implicate this hormone in enhancing dormancy release and germination. These findings have important implications in the dissection of molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of seed dormancy in cereals. PMID:23437172

  2. Regulation of wheat seed dormancy by after-ripening is mediated by specific transcriptional switches that induce changes in seed hormone metabolism and signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aihua; Gao, Feng; Kanno, Yuri; Jordan, Mark C; Kamiya, Yuji; Seo, Mitsunori; Ayele, Belay T

    2013-01-01

    Treatments that promote dormancy release are often correlated with changes in seed hormone content and/or sensitivity. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of after-ripening (seed dry storage) in triggering hormone related changes and dormancy decay in wheat (Triticum aestivum), temporal expression patterns of genes related to abscisic acid (ABA), gibberellin (GA), jasmonate and indole acetic acid (IAA) metabolism and signaling, and levels of the respective hormones were examined in dormant and after-ripened seeds in both dry and imbibed states. After-ripening mediated developmental switch from dormancy to germination appears to be associated with declines in seed sensitivity to ABA and IAA, which are mediated by transcriptional repressions of PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2C, SNF1-RELATED PROTEIN KINASE2, ABA INSENSITIVE5 and LIPID PHOSPHATE PHOSPHTASE2, and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR and RELATED TO UBIQUITIN1 genes. Transcriptomic analysis of wheat seed responsiveness to ABA suggests that ABA inhibits the germination of wheat seeds partly by repressing the transcription of genes related to chromatin assembly and cell wall modification, and activating that of GA catabolic genes. After-ripening induced seed dormancy decay in wheat is also associated with the modulation of seed IAA and jasmonate contents. Transcriptional control of members of the ALLENE OXIDE SYNTHASE, 3-KETOACYL COENZYME A THIOLASE, LIPOXYGENASE and 12-OXOPHYTODIENOATE REDUCTASE gene families appears to regulate seed jasmonate levels. Changes in the expression of GA biosynthesis genes, GA 20-OXIDASE and GA 3-OXIDASE, in response to after-ripening implicate this hormone in enhancing dormancy release and germination. These findings have important implications in the dissection of molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of seed dormancy in cereals. PMID:23437172

  3. Robust intestinal homeostasis relies on cellular plasticity in enteroblasts mediated by miR-8–Escargot switch

    PubMed Central

    Antonello, Zeus A; Reiff, Tobias; Ballesta-Illan, Esther; Dominguez, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is remarkably robust despite perturbations and demand uncertainty. Here, we investigate the basis of such robustness using novel tracing methods that allow simultaneously capturing the dynamics of stem and committed progenitor cells (called enteroblasts) and intestinal cell turnover with spatiotemporal resolution. We found that intestinal stem cells (ISCs) divide “ahead” of demand during Drosophila midgut homeostasis. Their newborn enteroblasts, on the other hand, take on a highly polarized shape, acquire invasive properties and motility. They extend long membrane protrusions that make cell–cell contact with mature cells, while exercising a capacity to delay their final differentiation until a local demand materializes. This cellular plasticity is mechanistically linked to the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) programme mediated by escargot, a snail family gene. Activation of the conserved microRNA miR-8/miR-200 in “pausing” enteroblasts in response to a local cell loss promotes timely terminal differentiation via a reverse MET by antagonizing escargot. Our findings unveil that robust intestinal renewal relies on hitherto unrecognized plasticity in enteroblasts and reveal their active role in sensing and/or responding to local demand. PMID:26077448

  4. Robust intestinal homeostasis relies on cellular plasticity in enteroblasts mediated by miR-8-Escargot switch.

    PubMed

    Antonello, Zeus A; Reiff, Tobias; Ballesta-Illan, Esther; Dominguez, Maria

    2015-08-01

    The intestinal epithelium is remarkably robust despite perturbations and demand uncertainty. Here, we investigate the basis of such robustness using novel tracing methods that allow simultaneously capturing the dynamics of stem and committed progenitor cells (called enteroblasts) and intestinal cell turnover with spatiotemporal resolution. We found that intestinal stem cells (ISCs) divide "ahead" of demand during Drosophila midgut homeostasis. Their newborn enteroblasts, on the other hand, take on a highly polarized shape, acquire invasive properties and motility. They extend long membrane protrusions that make cell-cell contact with mature cells, while exercising a capacity to delay their final differentiation until a local demand materializes. This cellular plasticity is mechanistically linked to the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) programme mediated by escargot, a snail family gene. Activation of the conserved microRNA miR-8/miR-200 in "pausing" enteroblasts in response to a local cell loss promotes timely terminal differentiation via a reverse MET by antagonizing escargot. Our findings unveil that robust intestinal renewal relies on hitherto unrecognized plasticity in enteroblasts and reveal their active role in sensing and/or responding to local demand. PMID:26077448

  5. A senescence secretory switch mediated by PI3K/AKT/mTOR activation controls chemoprotective endothelial secretory responses.

    PubMed

    Bent, Eric H; Gilbert, Luke A; Hemann, Michael T

    2016-08-15

    Cancer therapy targets malignant cells that are surrounded by a diverse complement of nonmalignant stromal cells. Therapy-induced damage of normal cells can alter the tumor microenvironment, causing cellular senescence and activating cancer-promoting inflammation. However, how these damage responses are regulated (both induced and resolved) to preserve tissue homeostasis and prevent chronic inflammation is poorly understood. Here, we detail an acute chemotherapy-induced secretory response that is self-limiting in vitro and in vivo despite the induction of cellular senescence. We used tissue-specific knockout mice to demonstrate that endothelial production of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 promotes chemoresistance and show that the chemotherapeutic doxorubicin induces acute IL-6 release through reactive oxygen species-mediated p38 activation in vitro. Doxorubicin causes endothelial senescence but, surprisingly, without a typical senescence secretory response. We found that endothelial cells repress senescence-associated inflammation through the down-regulation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling and that reactivation of this pathway restores senescence-associated inflammation. Thus, we describe a mechanism by which damage-associated paracrine secretory responses are restrained to preserve tissue homeostasis and prevent chronic inflammation. PMID:27566778

  6. Fasting induces a subcutaneous-to-visceral fat switch mediated by microRNA-149-3p and suppression of PRDM16.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hanying; Zheng, Shasha; Garcia-Ruiz, Daniel; Hou, Dongxia; Wei, Zhe; Liao, Zhicong; Li, Limin; Zhang, Yujing; Han, Xiao; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Li, Jing; Jiang, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Visceral adiposity is strongly associated with metabolic disease risk, whereas subcutaneous adiposity is comparatively benign. However, their relative physiological importance in energy homeostasis remains unclear. Here, we show that after 24-h fasting, the subcutaneous adipose tissue of mice acquires key properties of visceral fat. During this fast-induced 'visceralization', upregulation of miR-149-3p directly targets PR domain containing 16 (PRDM16), a key coregulatory protein required for the 'browning' of white fat. In cultured inguinal preadipocytes, overexpression of miR-149-3p promotes a visceral-like switch during cell differentiation. Mice deficient in miR-149-3p display an increase in whole-body energy expenditure, with enhanced thermogenesis of inguinal fat. However, a visceral-like adipose phenotype is observed in inguinal depots overexpressing miR-149-3p. These results indicate that in addition to the capacity of 'browning' to defend against hypothermia during cold exposure, the subcutaneous adipose depot is also capable of 'whitening' to preserve energy during fasting, presumably to maintain energy balance, via miR-149-3p-mediated regulation of PRDM16. PMID:27240637

  7. Fasting induces a subcutaneous-to-visceral fat switch mediated by microRNA-149-3p and suppression of PRDM16

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hanying; Zheng, Shasha; Garcia-Ruiz, Daniel; Hou, Dongxia; Wei, Zhe; Liao, Zhicong; Li, Limin; Zhang, Yujing; Han, Xiao; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Li, Jing; Jiang, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Visceral adiposity is strongly associated with metabolic disease risk, whereas subcutaneous adiposity is comparatively benign. However, their relative physiological importance in energy homeostasis remains unclear. Here, we show that after 24-h fasting, the subcutaneous adipose tissue of mice acquires key properties of visceral fat. During this fast-induced ‘visceralization', upregulation of miR-149-3p directly targets PR domain containing 16 (PRDM16), a key coregulatory protein required for the ‘browning' of white fat. In cultured inguinal preadipocytes, overexpression of miR-149-3p promotes a visceral-like switch during cell differentiation. Mice deficient in miR-149-3p display an increase in whole-body energy expenditure, with enhanced thermogenesis of inguinal fat. However, a visceral-like adipose phenotype is observed in inguinal depots overexpressing miR-149-3p. These results indicate that in addition to the capacity of ‘browning' to defend against hypothermia during cold exposure, the subcutaneous adipose depot is also capable of ‘whitening' to preserve energy during fasting, presumably to maintain energy balance, via miR-149-3p-mediated regulation of PRDM16. PMID:27240637

  8. Sequential Effects in Deduction: Cost of Inference Switch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milan, Emilio G.; Moreno-Rios, Sergio; Espino, Orlando; Santamaria, Carlos; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The task-switch paradigm has helped psychologists gain insight into the processes involved in changing from one activity to another. The literature has yielded consistent results about switch cost reconfiguration (abrupt offset in regular task-switch vs. gradual reduction in random task-switch; endogenous and exogenous components of switch cost;…

  9. Influence of carbon content on the copper-telluride phase formation and on the resistive switching behavior of carbon alloyed Cu-Te conductive bridge random access memory cells

    SciTech Connect

    Devulder, Wouter De Schutter, Bob; Detavernier, Christophe; Opsomer, Karl; Franquet, Alexis; Meersschaut, Johan; Muller, Robert; Van Elshocht, Sven; Jurczak, Malgorzata; Goux, Ludovic; Belmonte, Attilio

    2014-02-07

    In this paper, we investigate the influence of the carbon content on the Cu-Te phase formation and on the resistive switching behavior in carbon alloyed Cu{sub 0.6}Te{sub 0.4} based conductive bridge random access memory (CBRAM) cells. Carbon alloying of copper-tellurium inhibits the crystallization, while attractive switching behavior is preserved when using the material as Cu-supply layer in CBRAM cells. The phase formation is first investigated in a combinatorial way. With increasing carbon content, an enlargement of the temperature window in which the material stays amorphous was observed. Moreover, if crystalline phases are formed, subsequent phase transformations are inhibited. The electrical switching behavior of memory cells with different carbon contents is then investigated by implementing them in 580 μm diameter dot TiN/Cu{sub 0.6}Te{sub 0.4}-C/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si memory cells. Reliable switching behavior is observed for carbon contents up to 40 at. %, with a resistive window of more than 2 orders of magnitude, whereas for 50 at. % carbon, a higher current in the off state and only a small resistive window are present after repeated cycling. This degradation can be ascribed to the higher thermal and lower drift contribution to the reset operation due to a lower Cu affinity towards the supply layer, leading cycle-after-cycle to an increasing amount of Cu in the switching layer, which contributes to the current. The thermal diffusion of Cu into Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} under annealing also gives an indication of the Cu affinity of the source layer. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy was used to investigate this migration depth in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} before and after annealing, showing a higher Cu, Te, and C migration for high carbon contents.

  10. Src Subfamily Kinases Regulate Nuclear Export and Degradation of Transcription Factor Nrf2 to Switch Off Nrf2-mediated Antioxidant Activation of Cytoprotective Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Niture, Suryakant K.; Jain, Abhinav K.; Shelton, Phillip M.; Jaiswal, Anil K.

    2011-01-01

    Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) is a nuclear transcription factor that in response to chemical and radiation stress regulates coordinated induction of a battery of cytoprotective gene expressions leading to cellular protection. In this study, we investigated the role of Src kinases in the regulation of Nrf2 and downstream signaling. siRNA-mediated inhibition of Fyn, Src, Yes, and Fgr, but not Lyn, in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1 cells, led to nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and up-regulation of Nrf2 downstream gene expression. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts with combined deficiency of Fyn/Src/Yes/Fgr supported results from siRNA. In addition, steady-state overexpression of Fyn, Src, and Yes phosphorylated Nrf2Tyr568 that triggered nuclear export and degradation of Nrf2 and down-regulation of Nrf2 downstream gene expression. Exposure of cells to antioxidant, oxidant, or UV radiation increased nuclear import of Fyn, Src, and Yes kinases, which phosphorylated Nrf2Tyr568 resulting in nuclear export and degradation of Nrf2. Further analysis revealed that stress-activated GSK3β acted upstream to the Src kinases and phosphorylated the Src kinases, leading to their nuclear localization and Nrf2 phosphorylation. The overexpression of Src kinases in Hepa-1 cells led to decreased Nrf2, increased apoptosis, and decreased cell survival. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient in Src kinases showed nuclear accumulation of Nrf2, induction of Nrf2 and downstream gene expression, reduced apoptosis, and increased cell survival. The studies together demonstrate that Src kinases play a critical role in nuclear export and degradation of Nrf2, thereby providing a negative feedback mechanism to switch off Nrf2 activation and restore normal cellular homeostasis. PMID:21690096

  11. Switch wear leveling

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hunter; Sealy, Kylee; Gilchrist, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    An apparatus for switch wear leveling includes a switching module that controls switching for two or more pairs of switches in a switching power converter. The switching module controls switches based on a duty cycle control technique and closes and opens each switch in a switching sequence. The pairs of switches connect to a positive and negative terminal of a DC voltage source. For a first switching sequence a first switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than a second switch of the pair of switches. The apparatus includes a switch rotation module that changes the switching sequence of the two or more pairs of switches from the first switching sequence to a second switching sequence. The second switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than the first switch of the pair of switches during the second switching sequence.

  12. Two-step polarization switching mediated by a nonpolar intermediate phase in Hf0.4Zr0.6O2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Min Hyuk; Kim, Han Joon; Lee, Young Hwan; Kim, Yu Jin; Moon, Taehwan; Kim, Keum Do; Hyun, Seung Dam; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2016-07-01

    The broken ferroelectric hysteresis loop achieved from a Hf0.4Zr0.6O2 film was interpreted based on the first order phase transition theory. The two-step polarization switching, which was expected from the theory, could be observed by dynamic pulse switching measurement. The variations in the interfacial capacitance values along with switching time and number of switching cycles could also be estimated from the pulse switching test. Being different from the one-step polarization switching in other ferroelectric films, two-step polarization switching produced two slanted plateau regions where the estimated interfacial capacitance values were different from each other. This could be understood based on the quantitative model of the two-step polarization switching with the involvement of an intermediate nonpolar phase. The Hf0.4Zr0.6O2 film was changed from antiferroelectric-like to ferroelectric-like with the increasing number of electric field cycles, which could be induced by the field driven phase change.

  13. Two-step polarization switching mediated by a nonpolar intermediate phase in Hf0.4Zr0.6O2 thin films.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Hyuk; Kim, Han Joon; Lee, Young Hwan; Kim, Yu Jin; Moon, Taehwan; Kim, Keum Do; Hyun, Seung Dam; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2016-07-21

    The broken ferroelectric hysteresis loop achieved from a Hf0.4Zr0.6O2 film was interpreted based on the first order phase transition theory. The two-step polarization switching, which was expected from the theory, could be observed by dynamic pulse switching measurement. The variations in the interfacial capacitance values along with switching time and number of switching cycles could also be estimated from the pulse switching test. Being different from the one-step polarization switching in other ferroelectric films, two-step polarization switching produced two slanted plateau regions where the estimated interfacial capacitance values were different from each other. This could be understood based on the quantitative model of the two-step polarization switching with the involvement of an intermediate nonpolar phase. The Hf0.4Zr0.6O2 film was changed from antiferroelectric-like to ferroelectric-like with the increasing number of electric field cycles, which could be induced by the field driven phase change. PMID:26726129

  14. Mediating factors of a school-based multi-component smoking prevention intervention: the LdP cluster randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Carreras, G; Bosi, S; Angelini, P; Gorini, G

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate factors mediating the effects of Luoghi di Prevenzione (LdP) smoking prevention intervention based on social competence and social influence approaches, and characterized by peer-led school-based interventions, out-of-school workshops, school lessons, and by enforcing the school anti-smoking policy. Students aged 14-15 years in 13 secondary schools in Reggio Emilia, Italy (989 students) were randomly assigned to the LdP intervention or a control condition. The baseline and follow-up surveys were carried out before and 18 months after the intervention, respectively.The outcomes were cigarette daily and frequent smoking and smoking at school. Multilevel multiple mediation analyses were carried out in order to study effect mediation. The mediators were normative perception, positive and negative beliefs, refusal skills for smoking, social acceptability perception, risk perception, smoking knowledge and awareness about dangers of second-hand smoking.The intervention effects were explained by the social influence component through the mediator refusal skills for smoking. The programme also showed to significantly increase risk perception and smoking knowledge, even though these mediators had no effect on smoking. Moreover, LdP intervention directly reduced smoking in school areas. Future interventions should maintain and strengthen the LdP social influence component and the part regarding the school anti-smoking policy. PMID:27288347

  15. Analysis of Individual Social-ecological Mediators and Moderators and Their Ability to Explain Effect of a Randomized Neighborhood Walking Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Yvonne L; Carlson, Nichole E

    2009-01-01

    Background Using data from the SHAPE trial, a randomized 6-month neighborhood-based intervention designed to increase walking activity among older adults, this study identified and analyzed social-ecological factors mediating and moderating changes in walking activity. Methods Three potential mediators (social cohesion, walking efficacy, and perception of neighborhood problems) and minutes of brisk walking were assessed at baseline, 3-months, and 6-months. One moderator, neighborhood walkability, was assessed using an administrative GIS database. The mediating effect of change in process variables on change in brisk walking was tested using a product-of-coefficients test, and we evaluated the moderating effect of neighborhood walkability on change in brisk walking by testing the significance of the interaction between walkability and intervention status. Results Only one of the hypothesized mediators, walking efficacy, explained the intervention effect (product of the coefficients (95% CI) = 8.72 (2.53, 15.56). Contrary to hypotheses, perceived neighborhood problems appeared to suppress the intervention effects (product of the coefficients (95% CI = -2.48, -5.6, -0.22). Neighborhood walkability did not moderate the intervention effect. Conclusion Walking efficacy may be an important mediator of lay-lead walking interventions for sedentary older adults. Social-ecologic theory-based analyses can support clinical interventions to elucidate the mediators and moderators responsible for producing intervention effects. PMID:19643024

  16. Switching of localized surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles on a GeSbTe film mediated by nanoscale phase change and modification of surface morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Hira, T.; Homma, T.; Uchiyama, T.; Kuwamura, K.; Saiki, T.

    2013-12-09

    As a platform for active nanophotonics, localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) switching via interaction with a chalcogenide phase change material (GeSbTe) was investigated. We performed single-particle spectroscopy of gold nanoparticles placed on a GeSbTe thin film. By irradiation with a femtosecond pulsed laser for amorphization and a continuous wave laser for crystallization, significant switching behavior of the LSPR band due to the interaction of GeSbTe was observed. The switching mechanism was explained in terms of both a change in the refractive index and a modification of surface morphology accompanying volume expansion and reduction of GeSbTe.

  17. Autocrine CSF1R signaling mediates switching between invasion and proliferation downstream of TGFβ in claudin-low breast tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Patsialou, Antonia; Wang, Yarong; Pignatelli, Jeanine; Chen, Xiaoming; Entenberg, David; Oktay, Maja; Condeelis, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Patient data suggest that colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF1) and its receptor (CSF1R) play critical roles during breast cancer progression. We have previously shown that in human breast tumors expressing both CSF1 and CSF1R, invasion in vivo is dependent both on a paracrine interaction with tumor-associated macrophages and an autocrine regulation of CSF1R in the tumor cells themselves. Although the role of the paracrine interaction between tumor cells and macrophages has been extensively studied, very little is known about the mechanism by which the autocrine CSF1R signaling contributes to tumor progression. We show here that breast cancer patients of the claudin-low subtype have significantly increased expression of CSF1R. Using a panel of breast cancer cells lines, we confirm that CSF1R expression is elevated and regulated by TGFβ specifically in claudin-low cell lines. Abrogation of autocrine CSF1R signaling in MDA-MB-231 xenografts (a claudin-low cell line) leads to increased tumor size by enhanced proliferation, but significantly reduced invasion, dissemination and metastasis. Indeed, we show that proliferation and invasion are oppositely regulated by CSF1R downstream of TGFβ only in claudin-low cells lines. Intravital multiphoton imaging revealed that inhibition of CSF1R in the tumor cells leads to decreased in vivo motility and a more cohesive morphology. We show that, both in vitro and in vivo, CSF1R inhibition results in a reversal of claudin-low marker expression by significant upregulation of luminal keratins and tight junction proteins such as claudins. Finally, we show that artificial overexpression of claudins in MDA-MB-231 cells is sufficient to tip the cells from an invasive state to a proliferative state. Our results suggest that autocrine CSF1R signaling is essential in maintaining low claudin expression and that it mediates a switch between the proliferative and the invasive state in claudin-low tumor cells downstream of TGFβ. PMID:25088194

  18. Commentary on "Mediation analysis without sequential ignorability: Using baseline covariates interacted with random assignment as instrumental variables" by Dylan Small.

    PubMed

    Ogburn, Elizabeth L

    2012-01-01

    I applaud Dr. Small for advancing causal mediation analysis and thank the editors for the opportunity to comment on this valuable article. Small's project was to relax and test the assumptions on which a previously proposed model relies; in the second half of this discussion I will assess those assumptions and others on which the model hinges. But first I will review the various schools of mediation analysis and situate the estimand considered by Small within the somewhat esoteric domain of mediation estimands. PMID:25435642

  19. Optical switches and switching methods

    DOEpatents

    Doty, Michael

    2008-03-04

    A device and method for collecting subject responses, particularly during magnetic imaging experiments and testing using a method such as functional MRI. The device comprises a non-metallic input device which is coupled via fiber optic cables to a computer or other data collection device. One or more optical switches transmit the subject's responses. The input device keeps the subject's fingers comfortably aligned with the switches by partially immobilizing the forearm, wrist, and/or hand of the subject. Also a robust nonmetallic switch, particularly for use with the input device and methods for optical switching.

  20. A large-scale in vivo RNAi screen to identify genes involved in Notch-mediated follicle cell differentiation and cell cycle switches

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Dongyu; Soylemez, Muhammed; Calvin, Gabriel; Bornmann, Randy; Bryant, Jamal; Hanna, Cameron; Huang, Yi-Chun; Deng, Wu-Min

    2015-01-01

    During Drosophila oogenesis, follicle cells sequentially undergo three distinct cell-cycle programs: the mitotic cycle, endocycle, and gene amplification. Notch signaling plays a central role in regulating follicle-cell differentiation and cell-cycle switches; its activation is essential for the mitotic cycle/endocycle (M/E) switch. Cut, a linker between Notch signaling and cell-cycle regulators, is specifically downregulated by Notch during the endocycle stage. To determine how signaling pathways coordinate during the M/E switch and to identify novel genes involved in follicle cell differentiation, we performed an in vivo RNAi screen through induced knockdown of gene expression and examination of Cut expression in follicle cells. We screened 2205 RNAi lines and found 33 genes regulating Cut expression during the M/E switch. These genes were confirmed with the staining of two other Notch signaling downstream factors, Hindsight and Broad, and validated with multiple independent RNAi lines. We applied gene ontology software to find enriched biological meaning and compared our results with other publications to find conserved genes across tissues. Specifically, we found earlier endocycle entry in anterior follicle cells than those in the posterior, identified that the insulin-PI3K pathway participates in the precise M/E switch, and suggested Nejire as a cofactor of Notch signaling during oogenesis. PMID:26205122

  1. A large-scale in vivo RNAi screen to identify genes involved in Notch-mediated follicle cell differentiation and cell cycle switches.

    PubMed

    Jia, Dongyu; Soylemez, Muhammed; Calvin, Gabriel; Bornmann, Randy; Bryant, Jamal; Hanna, Cameron; Huang, Yi-Chun; Deng, Wu-Min

    2015-01-01

    During Drosophila oogenesis, follicle cells sequentially undergo three distinct cell-cycle programs: the mitotic cycle, endocycle, and gene amplification. Notch signaling plays a central role in regulating follicle-cell differentiation and cell-cycle switches; its activation is essential for the mitotic cycle/endocycle (M/E) switch. Cut, a linker between Notch signaling and cell-cycle regulators, is specifically downregulated by Notch during the endocycle stage. To determine how signaling pathways coordinate during the M/E switch and to identify novel genes involved in follicle cell differentiation, we performed an in vivo RNAi screen through induced knockdown of gene expression and examination of Cut expression in follicle cells. We screened 2205 RNAi lines and found 33 genes regulating Cut expression during the M/E switch. These genes were confirmed with the staining of two other Notch signaling downstream factors, Hindsight and Broad, and validated with multiple independent RNAi lines. We applied gene ontology software to find enriched biological meaning and compared our results with other publications to find conserved genes across tissues. Specifically, we found earlier endocycle entry in anterior follicle cells than those in the posterior, identified that the insulin-PI3K pathway participates in the precise M/E switch, and suggested Nejire as a cofactor of Notch signaling during oogenesis. PMID:26205122

  2. Defect-mediated relaxation in the random tiling phase of a binary mixture: Birth, death and mobility of an atomic zipper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tondl, Elisabeth; Ramsay, Malcolm; Harrowell, Peter; Widmer-Cooper, Asaph

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the mechanism of defect-mediated relaxation in a dodecagonal square-triangle random tiling phase exhibited by a simulated binary mixture of soft discs in 2D. We examine the internal transitions within the elementary mobile defect (christened the "zipper") that allow it to move, as well as the mechanisms by which the zipper is created and annihilated. The structural relaxation of the random tiling phase is quantified and we show that this relaxation is well described by a model based on the distribution of waiting times for each atom to be visited by the diffusing zipper. This system, representing one of the few instances where a well defined mobile defect is capable of structural relaxation, can provide a valuable test case for general theories of relaxation in complex and disordered materials.

  3. Defect-mediated relaxation in the random tiling phase of a binary mixture: Birth, death and mobility of an atomic zipper

    SciTech Connect

    Tondl, Elisabeth; Ramsay, Malcolm; Harrowell, Peter; Widmer-Cooper, Asaph

    2014-03-14

    This paper describes the mechanism of defect-mediated relaxation in a dodecagonal square-triangle random tiling phase exhibited by a simulated binary mixture of soft discs in 2D. We examine the internal transitions within the elementary mobile defect (christened the “zipper”) that allow it to move, as well as the mechanisms by which the zipper is created and annihilated. The structural relaxation of the random tiling phase is quantified and we show that this relaxation is well described by a model based on the distribution of waiting times for each atom to be visited by the diffusing zipper. This system, representing one of the few instances where a well defined mobile defect is capable of structural relaxation, can provide a valuable test case for general theories of relaxation in complex and disordered materials.

  4. A Parent-Mediated Intervention That Targets Responsive Parental Behaviors Increases Attachment Behaviors in Children with ASD: Results from a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Meghan; Gerber, Alan; Hutman, Ted; Sigman, Marian

    2015-01-01

    The current study is a randomized clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of Focused Playtime Intervention (FPI) in a sample of 70 children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. This parent-mediated intervention has previously been shown to significantly increase responsive parental communication (Siller et al. in J Autism Dev Disord 43:540–555, 2013a). The current analyses focus on children’s attachment related outcomes. Results revealed that children who were randomly assigned to FPI showed bigger increases in attachment-related behaviors, compared to children assigned to the control condition. Significant treatment effects of FPI were found for both an observational measure of attachment-related behaviors elicited during a brief separation-reunion episode and a questionnaire measure evaluating parental perceptions of child attachment. The theoretical and clinical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:24488157

  5. Resistive switching and electrical control of ferromagnetism in a Ag/HfO2/Nb:SrTiO3/Ag resistive random access memory (RRAM) device at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Shaoqing; Zhu, Gengchang; Xie, Jihao; Bu, Jianpei; Qin, Hongwei; Hu, Jifan

    2016-02-01

    Electrically induced resistive switching and modulated ferromagnetism are simultaneously found in a Ag/HfO2/Nb:SrTiO3/Ag resistive random access memory device at room temperature. The bipolar resistive switching (RS) can be controlled by the modification of a Schottky-like barrier with an electron injection-trapped/detrapped process at the interface of HfO2-Nb:SrTiO3. The multilevel RS transition can be observed in the reset process with larger negative voltage sweepings, which is connected to the different degree of electron detrapping in the interfacial depletion region of the HfO2 layer during the reset process. The origin of the electrical control of room-temperature ferromagnetism may be connected to the change of density of oxygen vacancies in the HfO2 film. The multilevel resistance states and the electric field controlled ferromagnetism have potential for applications in ultrahigh-density storage and magnetic logic device.

  6. ION SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Cook, B.

    1959-02-10

    An ion switch capable of transferring large magnitudes of power is described. An ion switch constructed in accordance with the invention includes a pair of spaced control electrodes disposed in a highly evacuated region for connection in a conventional circuit to control the passing of power therethrough. A controllable ionic conduction path is provided directiy between the control electrodes by a source unit to close the ion switch. Conventional power supply means are provided to trigger the source unit and control the magnitude, durations and pulse repetition rate of the aforementioned ionic conduction path.

  7. Doxycycline-mediated effects on persistent symptoms and systemic cytokine responses post-neuroborreliosis: a randomized, prospective, cross-over study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Persistent symptoms after treatment of neuroborreliosis (NB) are well-documented, although the causative mechanisms are mainly unknown. The effect of repeated antibiotic treatment has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to determine whether: (1) persistent symptoms improve with doxycycline treatment; (2) doxycycline has an influence on systemic cytokine responses, and; (3) improvement of symptoms could be due to doxycycline-mediated immunomodulation. Methods/Design 15 NB patients with persistent symptoms ≥6 months post-treatment were double-blindly randomized to receive 200 mg of doxycycline or a placebo for three weeks. After a six-week wash-out period, a cross-over with a three-week course of a placebo or doxycycline was conducted. The primary outcome measures were improvement of persistent symptoms assessed by neurological examinations, a symptom severity score and estimation of the quality of life. The secondary outcome measure was changes in systemic cytokine responses. Results All 15 patients finished the study. No doxycycline-mediated improvement of post-treatment symptoms or quality of life was observed. Nor could any doxycycline-mediated changes in systemic cytokine responses be detected. The study was completed without any serious adverse events. Discussion No doxycycline-mediated improvement of post-treatment symptoms or quality of life was observed. Nor could any doxycycline-mediated changes in systemic cytokine responses be detected. The study was completed without any serious adverse events. To conclude, in this pilot study, doxycycline-treatment did not lead to any improvement of either the persistent symptoms or quality of life in post-NB patients. Accordingly, doxycycline does not seem to be the optimal treatment of diverse persistent symptoms post-NB. However, the results need to be confirmed in larger studies. Trial registration NCT01205464 (clinicaltrials.gov) PMID:22876748

  8. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  9. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  10. Randomized Trial of Group Interventions to Reduce HIV/STD Risk and Change Theoretical Mediators among Detained Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmiege, Sarah J.; Broaddus, Michelle R.; Levin, Michael; Bryan, Angela D.

    2009-01-01

    Criminally involved adolescents engage in high levels of risky sexual behavior and alcohol use, and alcohol use may contribute to lack of condom use. Detained adolescents (n = 484) were randomized to (1) a theory-based sexual risk reduction intervention (GPI), (2) the GPI condition with a group-based alcohol risk reduction motivational enhancement…

  11. The challenges of incorporating random animal-mediated nitrogen transfers in process-based modelling of grazed agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animals are well known to be important in lateral transfers of nitrogen within the farm boundary. Those transfers can be categorised into those that are: (a) primarily random and small-scale dung and urine patches within a grazed paddock, (b) larger and systematic transfers resulting from preferred...

  12. Enhanced stability of complementary resistance switching in the TiN/HfOx/TiN resistive random access memory device via interface engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. Z.; Ang, D. S.; Yew, K. S.; Wang, X. P.

    2016-02-01

    This study shows that a majority (70%) of TiN/HfOx/TiN devices exhibit failed complementary resistance switching (CRS) after forming. In conjunction with the consistent observation of a large non-polar reset loop in the first post-forming voltage-sweep measurement, it is proposed that breakdown of the TiN/HfOx interfacial oxide layers (crucial in enabling CRS) and the accompanied formation of Ti filaments (due to Ti migration from the TiN cathode into the breakdown path) resulted in CRS failure and the observed non-polar reset behavior. This hypothesis is supported by the significant reduction or complete elimination of the large non-polar reset and CRS failure in devices with a thin Al2O3 layer incorporated at the TiN-cathode/HfOx or both TiN/HfOx interfaces. The higher breakdown field of the thin Al2O3 enables it to sustain the forming voltage until the forming process is interrupted, thus enabling CRS via oxygen exchange with the adjacent vacancy-type filament formed in the HfOx.

  13. Intrinsic defect-mediated conduction and resistive switching in multiferroic BiFeO3 thin films epitaxially grown on SrRuO3 bottom electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji Hye; Jeon, Ji Hoon; Yoon, Chansoo; Lee, Sangik; Kim, Yeon Soo; Oh, Tae Joon; Kim, Young Heon; Park, Jinsu; Song, Tae Kwon; Park, Bae Ho

    2016-03-01

    We report the impact of intrinsic defects in epitaxial BiFeO3 films on charge conduction and resistive switching of Pt/BiFeO3/SrRuO3 capacitors, although the BiFeO3 films show very similar ferroelectric domain types probed by piezoresponse force microscopy. Capacitors with p-type Bi-deficient and n-type Bi-rich BiFeO3 films exhibit switchable diode and conventional bipolar resistive switching behaviors, respectively. Both the capacitors show good retention properties with a high ON/OFF ratio of >100 in Bi-deficient films and that of >1000 in Bi-rich films. The present investigation advances considerably understanding of interface control through defect engineering of BiFeO3 thin films for non-volatile memory application.

  14. Optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    An optical switching device (10) is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber (16) or a second glass fiber (14) may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber (18). Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system (26, 28, 30). In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber (16) is reflected by a planar mirror (36) into the third glass fiber (18). In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber (14) passes directly into the third glass fiber (18). The planar mirror (36) is attached to a rotatable table (32) which is rotated to provide the optical switching.

  15. A new nano-worm structure from gold-nanoparticle mediated random curving of zinc oxide nanorods.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Veeradasan; Hashim, Uda; Gopinath, Subash C B; Haarindraprasad, R; Poopalan, P; Liu, Wei-Wen; Ravichandran, M; Balakrishnan, S R; Ruslinda, A R

    2016-04-15

    Creating novel nanostructures is a primary step for high-performance analytical sensing. Herein, a new worm like nanostructure with Zinc Oxide-gold (ZnO/Au) hybrid was fabricated through an aqueous hydrothermal method, by doping Au-nanoparticle (AuNP) on the growing ZnO lattice. During ZnO growth, fine tuning the solution temperature expedites random curving of ZnO nanorods and forms nano-worms. The nano-worms which were evidenced by morphological, physical and structural analyses, revealed elongated structures protruding from the surface (length: 1 µm; diameter: ~100 nm). The appropriate peaks for the face centred cubic gold were (111) and (200), as seen from X-ray diffractogram. The strong interrelation between Au and ZnO was manifested by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The combined surface area increment from the nanoparticle radii and ZnO nanorod random curving gives raise an enhancement in detection sensitivity by increasing bio-loading. 'Au-decorated hybrid nano-worm' was immobilized with a probe DNA from Vibrio Cholera and duplexed with a target which was revealed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Our novel Au-decorated hybrid nano-worm is suitable for high-performance bio-sensing, as evidenced by impedance spectroscopy, having higher-specificity and attained femtomolar (10 fM) sensitivity. Further, higher stability, reproducibility and regeneration on this sensing surface were demonstrated. PMID:26584078

  16. Switching Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation's D60T transistors are used primarily as switching devices for controlling high power in electrical circuits. It enables reduction in the number and size of circuit components and promotes more efficient use of energy. Wide range of application from a popcorn popper to a radio frequency generator for solar cell production.

  17. Ames Lab 101: Ultrafast Magnetic Switching

    SciTech Connect

    Jigang Wang

    2013-04-08

    Ames Laboratory physicists have found a new way to switch magnetism that is at least 1000 times faster than currently used in magnetic memory technologies. Magnetic switching is used to encode information in hard drives, magnetic random access memory and other computing devices. The discovery potentially opens the door to terahertz and faster memory speeds.

  18. Ames Lab 101: Ultrafast Magnetic Switching

    ScienceCinema

    Jigang Wang

    2013-06-05

    Ames Laboratory physicists have found a new way to switch magnetism that is at least 1000 times faster than currently used in magnetic memory technologies. Magnetic switching is used to encode information in hard drives, magnetic random access memory and other computing devices. The discovery potentially opens the door to terahertz and faster memory speeds.

  19. Switch for serial or parallel communication networks

    DOEpatents

    Crosette, D.B.

    1994-07-19

    A communication switch apparatus and a method for use in a geographically extensive serial, parallel or hybrid communication network linking a multi-processor or parallel processing system has a very low software processing overhead in order to accommodate random burst of high density data. Associated with each processor is a communication switch. A data source and a data destination, a sensor suite or robot for example, may also be associated with a switch. The configuration of the switches in the network are coordinated through a master processor node and depends on the operational phase of the multi-processor network: data acquisition, data processing, and data exchange. The master processor node passes information on the state to be assumed by each switch to the processor node associated with the switch. The processor node then operates a series of multi-state switches internal to each communication switch. The communication switch does not parse and interpret communication protocol and message routing information. During a data acquisition phase, the communication switch couples sensors producing data to the processor node associated with the switch, to a downlink destination on the communications network, or to both. It also may couple an uplink data source to its processor node. During the data exchange phase, the switch couples its processor node or an uplink data source to a downlink destination (which may include a processor node or a robot), or couples an uplink source to its processor node and its processor node to a downlink destination. 9 figs.

  20. Switch for serial or parallel communication networks

    DOEpatents

    Crosette, Dario B.

    1994-01-01

    A communication switch apparatus and a method for use in a geographically extensive serial, parallel or hybrid communication network linking a multi-processor or parallel processing system has a very low software processing overhead in order to accommodate random burst of high density data. Associated with each processor is a communication switch. A data source and a data destination, a sensor suite or robot for example, may also be associated with a switch. The configuration of the switches in the network are coordinated through a master processor node and depends on the operational phase of the multi-processor network: data acquisition, data processing, and data exchange. The master processor node passes information on the state to be assumed by each switch to the processor node associated with the switch. The processor node then operates a series of multi-state switches internal to each communication switch. The communication switch does not parse and interpret communication protocol and message routing information. During a data acquisition phase, the communication switch couples sensors producing data to the processor node associated with the switch, to a downlink destination on the communications network, or to both. It also may couple an uplink data source to its processor node. During the data exchange phase, the switch couples its processor node or an uplink data source to a downlink destination (which may include a processor node or a robot), or couples an uplink source to its processor node and its processor node to a downlink destination.

  1. Long-term moderate calorie restriction inhibits inflammation without impairing cell-mediated immunity: a randomized controlled trial in non-obese humans

    PubMed Central

    Meydani, Simin N.; Das, Sai K.; Pieper, Carl F.; Lewis, Michael R.; Klein, Sam; Dixit, Vishwa D.; Gupta, Alok K.; Villareal, Dennis T.; Bhapkar, Manjushri; Huang, Megan; Fuss, Paul J.; Roberts, Susan B.; Holloszy, John O.; Fontana, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) inhibits inflammation and slows aging in many animal species, but in rodents housed in pathogen-free facilities, CR impairs immunity against certain pathogens. However, little is known about the effects of long-term moderate CR on immune function in humans. In this multi-center, randomized clinical trial to determine CR's effect on inflammation and cell-mediated immunity, 218 healthy non-obese adults (20-50 y), were assigned 25% CR (n=143) or an ad-libitum (AL) diet (n=75), and outcomes tested at baseline, 12, and 24 months of CR. CR induced a 10.4% weight loss over the 2-y period. Relative to AL group, CR reduced circulating inflammatory markers, including total WBC and lymphocyte counts, ICAM-1 and leptin. Serum CRP and TNF-α concentrations were about 40% and 50% lower in CR group, respectively. CR had no effect on the delayed-type hypersensitivity skin response or antibody response to vaccines, nor did it cause difference in clinically significant infections. In conclusion, long-term moderate CR without malnutrition induces a significant and persistent inhibition of inflammation without impairing key in vivo indicators of cell-mediated immunity. Given the established role of these pro-inflammatory molecules in the pathogenesis of multiple chronic diseases, these CR-induced adaptations suggest a shift toward a healthy phenotype. PMID:27410480

  2. Antigenic Variation in Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Involves a Highly Structured Switching Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Recker, Mario; Buckee, Caroline O.; Serazin, Andrew; Kyes, Sue; Pinches, Robert; Christodoulou, Zóe; Springer, Amy L.; Gupta, Sunetra; Newbold, Chris I.

    2011-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria, fungi, and protozoa achieve chronic infection through an immune evasion strategy known as antigenic variation. In the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, this involves transcriptional switching among members of the var gene family, causing parasites with different antigenic and phenotypic characteristics to appear at different times within a population. Here we use a genome-wide approach to explore this process in vitro within a set of cloned parasite populations. Our analyses reveal a non-random, highly structured switch pathway where an initially dominant transcript switches via a set of switch-intermediates either to a new dominant transcript, or back to the original. We show that this specific pathway can arise through an evolutionary conflict in which the pathogen has to optimise between safeguarding its limited antigenic repertoire and remaining capable of establishing infections in non-naïve individuals. Our results thus demonstrate a crucial role for structured switching during the early phases of infections and provide a unifying theory of antigenic variation in P. falciparum malaria as a balanced process of parasite-intrinsic switching and immune-mediated selection. PMID:21408201

  3. Effect of hawthorn standardized extract on flow mediated dilation in prehypertensive and mildly hypertensive adults: a randomized, controlled cross-over trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hawthorn extract has been used for cardiovascular diseases for centuries. Recent trials have demonstrated its efficacy for the treatment of heart failure, and the results of several small trials suggest it may lower blood pressure. However, there is little published evidence to guide its dosing. The blood pressure lowering effect of hawthorn has been linked to nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between hawthorn extract dose and brachial artery flow mediated dilation (FMD), an indirect measure of nitric oxide release. Methods We used a four-period cross-over design to evaluate brachial artery FMD in response to placebo or hawthorn extract (standardized to 50 mg oligomeric procyanidin per 250 mg extract). Randomly sequenced doses of hawthorn extract (1000 mg, 1500 mg, and 2500 mg) and placebo were assigned to each participant. Doses were taken twice daily for 3 1/2 days followed by FMD and a 4-day washout before proceeding to the next dosing period. Results Twenty-one prehypertensive or mildly hypertensive adults completed the study. There was no evidence of a dose-response effect for our main outcome (FMD percent) or any of our secondary outcomes (absolute change in brachial artery diameter and blood pressure). Most participants indicated that if given evidence that hawthorn could lower their blood pressure, they would be likely to use it either in conjunction with or instead of lifestyle modification or anti-hypertensive medications. Conclusion We found no evidence of a dose-response effect of hawthorn extract on FMD. If hawthorn has a blood pressure lowering effect, it is likely to be mediated via an NO-independent mechanism. Trial Registration This trial has been registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, a service of the U.S. National Institutes of Health: NCT01331486. PMID:22458601

  4. Defect mediated optical emission of randomly oriented ZnO nanorods and unusual rectifying behavior of Schottky nanojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayan, Sayan; Mohanta, Dambarudhar

    2011-09-01

    We report on the interrelation of optical emission of randomly oriented ZnO nanorod system with the carrier transport properties of Ag/ZnO nanorod-based rectifying junctions. The ZnO nanorods, exhibiting a hexagonal wurtzite phase, were fabricated by a cost-effective rapid thermal annealing process and at different annealing temperatures. The photoluminescence spectra of the as grown samples have revealed various Zn and O related native defects (e.g., vacancies, interstitials etc.) located at ˜400, 428, 491, and 535 nm. As evident from the I-V characteristic curves, though all the Ag/ZnO nanojunctions show Schottky behavior, the nanorods grown at a temperature of 550 °C and 650 °C are characterized by very large ideality factors of respective values 35.4 and 33.2, apart from displaying unusually high reverse currents. Whereas, the samples grown at 450 °C and 750 °C show usual rectifying nature having relatively lower ideality factors (18.4 and 12.2), along with low leakage-current under reverse biasing. The enhancement or suppression of the reverse currents can be attributed to the eventual lowering or raising of the Schottky barrier heights which result from the variation in the native defect states of various ZnO nanorod systems. Correlating optical events and electrical response through native defects would find scope in assessing figure of merit and sensitivity while making rectifying nanojunctions and single electron devices.

  5. Gastric electrical stimulation treatment of type 2 diabetes: effects of implantation versus meal-mediated stimulation. A randomized blinded cross-over trial.

    PubMed

    Lebovitz, Harold E; Ludvik, Bernhard; Kozakowski, Jaroslaw; Tarnowski, Wieslaw; Zelewski, Mateusz; Yaniv, Irit; Schwartz, Tse'ela

    2015-07-14

    Gastric electrical stimulation with the implanted DIAMOND device has been shown to improve glycemic control and decrease weight and systolic blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral antidiabetic agents. The objective of this study was to determine if device implantation alone (placebo effect) contributes to the long-term metabolic benefits of DIAMOND(®) meal-mediated gastric electrical stimulation in patients with type 2 diabetes. The study was a 48 week randomized, blinded, cross-over trial in university centers comparing glycemic improvement of DIAMOND(®) implanted patients with type 2 diabetic with no activation of the electrical stimulation (placebo) versus meal-mediated activation of the electrical signal. The endpoint was improvement in glycemic control (HbA1c) from baseline to 24 and 48 weeks. In period 1 (0-24 weeks), equal improvement in HbA1c occurred independent of whether the meal-mediated electrical stimulation was turned on or left off (HbA1c -0.80% and -0.85% [-8.8 and -9.0 mmol/mol]). The device placebo improvement proved to be transient as it was lost in period 2 (25-48 weeks). With electrical stimulation turned off, HbA1c returned toward baseline values (8.06 compared to 8.32%; 64.2 to 67.4 mmol/mol, P = 0.465). In contrast, turning the electrical stimulation on in period 2 sustained the decrease in HbA1c from baseline (-0.93%, -10.1mmol/mol, P = 0.001) observed in period 1. The results indicate that implantation of the DIAMOND device causes a transient improvement in HbA1c which is not sustained beyond 24 weeks. Meal-mediated electrical stimulation accounts for the significant improvement in HbA1c beyond 24 weeks. PMID:26177957

  6. Gastric electrical stimulation treatment of type 2 diabetes: effects of implantation versus meal-mediated stimulation. A randomized blinded cross-over trial

    PubMed Central

    Lebovitz, Harold E; Ludvik, Bernhard; Kozakowski, Jaroslaw; Tarnowski, Wieslaw; Zelewski, Mateusz; Yaniv, Irit; Schwartz, Tse’ela

    2015-01-01

    Gastric electrical stimulation with the implanted DIAMOND device has been shown to improve glycemic control and decrease weight and systolic blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral antidiabetic agents. The objective of this study was to determine if device implantation alone (placebo effect) contributes to the long-term metabolic benefits of DIAMOND® meal-mediated gastric electrical stimulation in patients with type 2 diabetes. The study was a 48 week randomized, blinded, cross-over trial in university centers comparing glycemic improvement of DIAMOND® implanted patients with type 2 diabetic with no activation of the electrical stimulation (placebo) versus meal-mediated activation of the electrical signal. The endpoint was improvement in glycemic control (HbA1c) from baseline to 24 and 48 weeks. In period 1 (0–24 weeks), equal improvement in HbA1c occurred independent of whether the meal-mediated electrical stimulation was turned on or left off (HbA1c −0.80% and −0.85% [−8.8 and −9.0 mmol/mol]). The device placebo improvement proved to be transient as it was lost in period 2 (25–48 weeks). With electrical stimulation turned off, HbA1c returned toward baseline values (8.06 compared to 8.32%; 64.2 to 67.4 mmol/mol, P = 0.465). In contrast, turning the electrical stimulation on in period 2 sustained the decrease in HbA1c from baseline (−0.93%, −10.1mmol/mol, P = 0.001) observed in period 1. The results indicate that implantation of the DIAMOND device causes a transient improvement in HbA1c which is not sustained beyond 24 weeks. Meal-mediated electrical stimulation accounts for the significant improvement in HbA1c beyond 24 weeks. PMID:26177957

  7. PAWR-mediated suppression of BCL2 promotes switching of 3-azido withaferin A (3-AWA)-induced autophagy to apoptosis in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Rah, Bilal; Rasool, Reyaz ur; Nayak, Debasis; Yousuf, Syed Khalid; Mukherjee, Debaraj; Kumar, Lekha Dinesh; Goswami, Anindya

    2015-01-01

    An active medicinal component of plant origin with an ability to overcome autophagy by inducing apoptosis should be considered a therapeutically active lead pharmacophore to control malignancies. In this report, we studied the effect of concentration-dependent 3-AWA (3-azido withaferin A) sensitization to androgen-independent prostate cancer (CaP) cells which resulted in a distinct switching of 2 interrelated conserved biological processes, i.e. autophagy and apoptosis. We have observed 3 distinct parameters which are hallmarks of autophagy in our studies. First, a subtoxic concentration of 3-AWA resulted in an autophagic phenotype with an elevation of autophagy markers in prostate cancer cells. This led to a massive accumulation of MAP1LC3B and EGFP-LC3B puncta coupled with gradual degradation of SQSTM1. Second, higher toxic concentrations of 3-AWA stimulated ER stress in CaP cells to turn on apoptosis within 12 h by elevating the expression of the proapoptotic protein PAWR, which in turn suppressed the autophagy-related proteins BCL2 and BECN1. This inhibition of BECN1 in CaP cells, leading to the disruption of the BCL2-BECN1 interaction by overexpressed PAWR has not been reported so far. Third, we provide evidence that pawr-KO MEFs exhibited abundant autophagy signs even at toxic concentrations of 3-AWA underscoring the relevance of PAWR in switching of autophagy to apoptosis. Last but not least, overexpression of EGFP-LC3B and DS-Red-BECN1 revealed a delayed apoptosis turnover at a higher concentration of 3-AWA in CaP cells. In summary, this study provides evidence that 3-AWA is a strong anticancer candidate to abrogate protective autophagy. It also enhanced chemosensitivity by sensitizing prostate cancer cells to apoptosis through induction of PAWR endorsing its therapeutic potential. PMID:25803782

  8. The Role of Response Repetition in Task Switching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Stephen; Mari-Beffa, Paloma

    2008-01-01

    When switching between tasks, participants are sometimes required to use different response sets for each task. Thus, task switch and response set switch are confounded. In 5 experiments, the authors examined transitions of response within a linear 4-finger arrangement. A random baseline condition was compared with the cuing of specific response…

  9. Cdk5-mediated inhibition of APC/C-Cdh1 switches on the cyclin D1-Cdk4-pRb pathway causing aberrant S-phase entry of postmitotic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Veas-Pérez de Tudela, Miguel; Maestre, Carolina; Delgado-Esteban, María; Bolaños, Juan P.; Almeida, Angeles

    2015-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that regulates cell cycle progression in proliferating cells. To enter the S-phase, APC/C must be inactivated by phosphorylation of its cofactor, Cdh1. In post-mitotic cells such as neurons APC/C-Cdh1 complex is highly active and responsible for the continuous degradation of mitotic cyclins. However, the specific molecular pathway that determines neuronal cell cycle blockade in post-mitotic neurons is unknown. Here, we show that activation of glutamatergic receptors in rat cortical primary neurons endogenously triggers cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (Cdk5)-mediated phosphorylation of Cdh1 leading to its cytoplasmic accumulation and disassembly from the APC3 core protein, causing APC/C inactivation. Conversely, pharmacological or genetic inhibition of Cdk5 promotes Cdh1 ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Furthermore, we show that Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation and inactivation of Cdh1 leads to p27 depletion, which switches on the cyclin D1-cyclin-dependent kinase-4 (Cdk4)-retinoblastoma protein (pRb) pathway to allow the S-phase entry of neurons. However, neurons do not proceed through the cell cycle and die by apoptosis. These results indicate that APC/C-Cdh1 actively suppresses an aberrant cell cycle entry and death of neurons, highlighting its critical function in neuroprotection. PMID:26658992

  10. EDITORIAL: Molecular switches at surfaces Molecular switches at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinelt, Martin; von Oppen, Felix

    2012-10-01

    -assembled monolayers of azobenzene photoswitches with trifluoromethyl and cyano end groupsDaniel Brete, Daniel Przyrembel, Christian Eickhoff, Robert Carley, Wolfgang Freyer, Karsten Reuter, Cornelius Gahl and Martin Weinelt Reversible electron-induced cis-trans isomerization mediated by intermolecular interactionsCh Lotze, Y Luo, M Corso, K J Franke, R Haag and J I Pascual Transport properties of graphene functionalized with molecular switchesNiels Bode, Eros Mariani and Felix von Oppen

  11. Nerve Growth Factor Mediates a Switch in Intracellular Signaling for PGE2-Induced Sensitization of Sensory Neurons from Protein Kinase A to Epac

    PubMed Central

    Vasko, Michael R.; Habashy Malty, Ramy; Guo, Chunlu; Duarte, Djane B.; Zhang, Yihong; Nicol, Grant D.

    2014-01-01

    We examined whether nerve growth factor (NGF), an inflammatory mediator that contributes to chronic hypersensitivity, alters the intracellular signaling that mediates the sensitizing actions of PGE2 from activation of protein kinase A (PKA) to exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epacs). When isolated sensory neurons are grown in the absence of added NGF, but not in cultures grown with 30 ng/ml NGF, inhibiting protein kinase A (PKA) activity blocks the ability of PGE2 to augment capsaicin-evoked release of the neuropeptide CGRP and to increase the number of action potentials (APs) evoked by a ramp of current. Growing sensory neurons in culture in the presence of increasing concentrations of NGF increases the expression of Epac2, but not Epac1. An intradermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant into the rat hindpaw also increases the expression of Epac2, but not Epac1 in the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord: an effect blocked by intraplantar administration of NGF antibodies. Treating cultures grown in the presence of 30 ng/ml NGF with Epac1siRNA significantly reduced the expression of Epac1, but not Epac2, and did not block the ability of PGE2 to augment capsaicin-evoked release of CGRP from sensory neurons. Exposing neuronal cultures grown in NGF to Epac2siRNAreduced the expression of Epac2, but not Epac1 and prevented the PGE2-induced augmentation of capsaicin and potassium-evoked CGRP release in sensory neurons and the PGE2-induced increase in the number of APs generated by a ramp of current. In neurons grown with no added NGF, Epac siRNAs did not attenuate PGE2-induced sensitization. These results demonstrate that NGF, through increasing Epac2 expression, alters the signaling cascade that mediates PGE2-induced sensitization of sensory neurons, thus providing a novel mechanism for maintaining PGE2-induced hypersensitivity during inflammation. PMID:25126967

  12. Direct repeat-mediated DNA deletion of the mating type MAT1-2 genes results in unidirectional mating type switching in Sclerotinia trifoliorum

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liangsheng; Jardini, Teresa M.; Chen, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The necrotrophic fungal pathogen Sclerotinia trifoliorum exhibits ascospore dimorphism and unidirectional mating type switching - self-fertile strains derived from large ascospores produce both self-fertile (large-spores) and self-sterile (small-spores) offsprings in a 4:4 ratio. The present study, comparing DNA sequences at MAT locus of both self-fertile and self-sterile strains, found four mating type genes (MAT1-1-1, MAT1-1-5, MAT1-2-1 and MAT1-2-4) in the self-fertile strain. However, a 2891-bp region including the entire MAT1-2-1 and MAT1-2-4 genes had been completely deleted from the MAT locus in the self-sterile strain. Meanwhile, two copies of a 146-bp direct repeat motif flanking the deleted region were found in the self-fertile strain, but only one copy of this 146-bp motif (a part of the MAT1-1-1 gene) was present in the self-sterile strain. The two direct repeats were believed to be responsible for the deletion through homologous intra-molecular recombination in meiosis. Tetrad analyses showed that all small ascospore-derived strains lacked the missing DNA between the two direct repeats that was found in all large ascospore-derived strains. In addition, heterokaryons at the MAT locus were observed in field isolates as well as in laboratory derived isolates. PMID:27255676

  13. Direct repeat-mediated DNA deletion of the mating type MAT1-2 genes results in unidirectional mating type switching in Sclerotinia trifoliorum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liangsheng; Jardini, Teresa M; Chen, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The necrotrophic fungal pathogen Sclerotinia trifoliorum exhibits ascospore dimorphism and unidirectional mating type switching - self-fertile strains derived from large ascospores produce both self-fertile (large-spores) and self-sterile (small-spores) offsprings in a 4:4 ratio. The present study, comparing DNA sequences at MAT locus of both self-fertile and self-sterile strains, found four mating type genes (MAT1-1-1, MAT1-1-5, MAT1-2-1 and MAT1-2-4) in the self-fertile strain. However, a 2891-bp region including the entire MAT1-2-1 and MAT1-2-4 genes had been completely deleted from the MAT locus in the self-sterile strain. Meanwhile, two copies of a 146-bp direct repeat motif flanking the deleted region were found in the self-fertile strain, but only one copy of this 146-bp motif (a part of the MAT1-1-1 gene) was present in the self-sterile strain. The two direct repeats were believed to be responsible for the deletion through homologous intra-molecular recombination in meiosis. Tetrad analyses showed that all small ascospore-derived strains lacked the missing DNA between the two direct repeats that was found in all large ascospore-derived strains. In addition, heterokaryons at the MAT locus were observed in field isolates as well as in laboratory derived isolates. PMID:27255676

  14. The SAGA Deubiquitination Module Promotes DNA Repair and Class Switch Recombination through ATM and DNAPK-Mediated γH2AX Formation.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Shaliny; Haddad, Dania; Li, Conglei; Le, Michael X; Ling, Alexanda K; So, Clare C; Nepal, Rajeev M; Gommerman, Jennifer L; Yu, Kefei; Ketela, Troy; Moffat, Jason; Martin, Alberto

    2016-05-17

    Class switch recombination (CSR) requires activation-induced deaminase (AID) to instigate double-stranded DNA breaks at the immunoglobulin locus. DNA breaks activate the DNA damage response (DDR) by inducing phosphorylation of histone H2AX followed by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair. We carried out a genome-wide screen to identify CSR factors. We found that Usp22, Eny2, and Atxn7, members of the Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyltransferase (SAGA) deubiquitination module, are required for deubiquitination of H2BK120ub following DNA damage, are critical for CSR, and function downstream of AID. The SAGA deubiquitinase activity was required for optimal irradiation-induced γH2AX formation, and failure to remove H2BK120ub inhibits ATM- and DNAPK-induced γH2AX formation. Consistent with this effect, these proteins were found to function upstream of various double-stranded DNA repair pathways. This report demonstrates that deubiquitination of histone H2B impacts the early stages of the DDR and is required for the DNA repair phase of CSR. PMID:27160905

  15. Impaired lymphoid chemokine-mediated migration due to a block on the chemokine receptor switch in human cytomegalovirus-infected dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Moutaftsi, Magdalena; Brennan, Paul; Spector, Stephen A; Tabi, Zsuzsanna

    2004-03-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) migration from the site of infection to the site of T-cell priming is a crucial event in the generation of antiviral T-cell responses. Here we present to our knowledge the first functional evidence that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) blocks the migration of infected monocyte-derived DCs toward lymphoid chemokines CCL19 and CCL21. DC migration is blocked by viral impairment of the chemokine receptor switch at the level of the expression of CCR7 molecules. The inhibition occurs with immediate-early-early kinetics, and viral interference with NF-kappaB signaling is likely to be at least partially responsible for the lack of CCR7 expression. DCs which migrate from the infected cultures are HCMV antigen negative, and consequently they do not stimulate HCMV-specific CD8(+) T cells, while CD4(+)-T-cell activation is not impaired. Although CD8(+) T cells can also be activated by alternative antigen presentation mechanisms, the spatial segregation of naive T cells and infected DCs seems a potent mechanism of delaying the generation of primary CD8(+)-T-cell responses and aiding early viral spread. PMID:14990723

  16. Impaired Lymphoid Chemokine-Mediated Migration due to a Block on the Chemokine Receptor Switch in Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moutaftsi, Magdalena; Brennan, Paul; Spector, Stephen A.; Tabi, Zsuzsanna

    2004-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) migration from the site of infection to the site of T-cell priming is a crucial event in the generation of antiviral T-cell responses. Here we present to our knowledge the first functional evidence that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) blocks the migration of infected monocyte-derived DCs toward lymphoid chemokines CCL19 and CCL21. DC migration is blocked by viral impairment of the chemokine receptor switch at the level of the expression of CCR7 molecules. The inhibition occurs with immediate-early-early kinetics, and viral interference with NF-κB signaling is likely to be at least partially responsible for the lack of CCR7 expression. DCs which migrate from the infected cultures are HCMV antigen negative, and consequently they do not stimulate HCMV-specific CD8+ T cells, while CD4+-T-cell activation is not impaired. Although CD8+ T cells can also be activated by alternative antigen presentation mechanisms, the spatial segregation of naive T cells and infected DCs seems a potent mechanism of delaying the generation of primary CD8+-T-cell responses and aiding early viral spread. PMID:14990723

  17. The Ets-1 transcription factor is required for Stat1-mediated T-bet expression and IgG2a class switching in mouse B cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hai Vu; Mouly, Enguerran; Chemin, Karine; Luinaud, Romain; Despres, Raymonde; Fermand, Jean-Paul; Arnulf, Bertrand; Bories, Jean-Christophe

    2012-05-01

    In response to antigens and cytokines, mouse B cells undergo class-switch recombination (CSR) and differentiate into Ig-secreting cells. T-bet, a T-box transcription factor that is up-regulated in lymphocytes by IFN-γ or IL-27, was shown to regulate CSR to IgG2a after T cell-independent B-cell stimulations. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling this process remain unclear. In the present study, we show that inactivation of the Ets-1 transcription factor results in a severe decrease in IgG2a secretion in vivo and in vitro. No T-bet expression was observed in Ets-1-deficient (Ets-1(-/-)) B cells stimulated with IFN-γ and lipopolysaccharide, and forced expression of T-bet in these cells rescued IgG2a secretion. Furthermore, we identified a transcriptional enhancer in the T-bet locus with an activity in B cells that relies on ETS-binding sites. After IFN-γ stimulation of Ets-1(-/-) B cells, activated Stat1, which forms a complex with Ets-1 in wild-type cells, no longer binds to the T-bet enhancer or promotes histone modifications at this site. These results demonstrate that Ets-1 is critical for IgG2a CSR and acts as an essential cofactor for Stat1 in the regulation of T-bet expression in B cells. PMID:22438254

  18. Dynamic recruitment of Ets1 to both nucleosome-occupied and -depleted enhancer regions mediates a transcriptional program switch during early T-cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cauchy, Pierre; Maqbool, Muhammad A.; Zacarias-Cabeza, Joaquin; Vanhille, Laurent; Koch, Frederic; Fenouil, Romain; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Santana, Maria A.; Griffon, Aurélien; Imbert, Jean; Moraes-Cabé, Carolina; Bories, Jean-Christophe; Ferrier, Pierre; Spicuglia, Salvatore; Andrau, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Ets1 is a sequence-specific transcription factor that plays an important role during hematopoiesis, and is essential for the transition of CD4−/CD8− double negative (DN) to CD4+/CD8+ double positive (DP) thymocytes. Using genome-wide and functional approaches, we investigated the binding properties, transcriptional role and chromatin environment of Ets1 during this transition. We found that while Ets1 binding at distal sites was associated with active genes at both DN and DP stages, its enhancer activity was attained at the DP stage, as reflected by levels of the core transcriptional hallmarks H3K4me1/3, RNA Polymerase II and eRNA. This dual, stage-specific ability reflected a switch from non-T hematopoietic toward T-cell specific gene expression programs during the DN-to-DP transition, as indicated by transcriptome analyses of Ets1−/− thymic cells. Coincidentally, Ets1 associates more specifically with Runx1 in DN and with TCF1 in DP cells. We also provide evidence that Ets1 predominantly binds distal nucleosome-occupied regions in DN and nucleosome-depleted regions in DP. Finally and importantly, we demonstrate that Ets1 induces chromatin remodeling by displacing H3K4me1-marked nucleosomes. Our results thus provide an original model whereby the ability of a transcription factor to bind nucleosomal DNA changes during differentiation with consequences on its cognate enhancer activity. PMID:26673693

  19. Dynamic recruitment of Ets1 to both nucleosome-occupied and -depleted enhancer regions mediates a transcriptional program switch during early T-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cauchy, Pierre; Maqbool, Muhammad A; Zacarias-Cabeza, Joaquin; Vanhille, Laurent; Koch, Frederic; Fenouil, Romain; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Santana, Maria A; Griffon, Aurélien; Imbert, Jean; Moraes-Cabé, Carolina; Bories, Jean-Christophe; Ferrier, Pierre; Spicuglia, Salvatore; Andrau, Jean-Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Ets1 is a sequence-specific transcription factor that plays an important role during hematopoiesis, and is essential for the transition of CD4(-)/CD8(-) double negative (DN) to CD4(+)/CD8(+) double positive (DP) thymocytes. Using genome-wide and functional approaches, we investigated the binding properties, transcriptional role and chromatin environment of Ets1 during this transition. We found that while Ets1 binding at distal sites was associated with active genes at both DN and DP stages, its enhancer activity was attained at the DP stage, as reflected by levels of the core transcriptional hallmarks H3K4me1/3, RNA Polymerase II and eRNA. This dual, stage-specific ability reflected a switch from non-T hematopoietic toward T-cell specific gene expression programs during the DN-to-DP transition, as indicated by transcriptome analyses of Ets1(-/-) thymic cells. Coincidentally, Ets1 associates more specifically with Runx1 in DN and with TCF1 in DP cells. We also provide evidence that Ets1 predominantly binds distal nucleosome-occupied regions in DN and nucleosome-depleted regions in DP. Finally and importantly, we demonstrate that Ets1 induces chromatin remodeling by displacing H3K4me1-marked nucleosomes. Our results thus provide an original model whereby the ability of a transcription factor to bind nucleosomal DNA changes during differentiation with consequences on its cognate enhancer activity. PMID:26673693

  20. The effect of HMB supplementation on body composition, fitness, hormonal and inflammatory mediators in elite adolescent volleyball players: a prospective randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Portal, Shawn; Zadik, Zvi; Rabinowitz, Jonathan; Pilz-Burstein, Ruty; Adler-Portal, Dana; Meckel, Yoav; Cooper, Dan M; Eliakim, Alon; Nemet, Dan

    2011-09-01

    The use of ergogenic nutritional supplements is becoming inseparable from competitive sports. β-Hydroxy-β-Methylbutyric acid (HMB) has recently been suggested to promote fat-free mass (FFM) and strength gains during resistance training in adults. In this prospective randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, we studied the effect of HMB (3 g/day) supplementation on body composition, muscle strength, anaerobic and aerobic capacity, anabolic/catabolic hormones and inflammatory mediators in elite, national team level adolescent volleyball players (13.5-18 years, 14 males, 14 females, Tanner stage 4-5) during the first 7 weeks of the training season. HMB led to a significant greater increase in FFM by skinfold thickness (56.4 ± 10.2 to 56.3 ± 8.6 vs. 59.3 ± 11.3 to 61.6 ± 11.3 kg in the control and HMB group, respectively, p < 0.001). HMB led to a significant greater increase in both dominant and non-dominant knee flexion isokinetic force/FFM, measured at fast (180°/sec) and slow (60°/sec) angle speeds, but had no significant effect on knee extension and elbow flexion and extension. HMB led to a significant greater increase in peak and mean anaerobic power determined by the Wingate anaerobic test (peak power: 15.5 ± 1.6 to 16.2 ± 1.2 vs. 15.4 ± 1.6 to 17.2 ± 1.2 watts/FFM, mean power: 10.6 ± 0.9 to 10.8 ± 1.1 vs. 10.7 ± 0.8 to 11.8 ± 1.0 watts/FFM in control and HMB group, respectively, p < 0.01), with no effect on fatigue index. HMB had no significant effect on aerobic fitness or on anabolic (growth hormone, IGF-I, testosterone), catabolic (cortisol) and inflammatory mediators (IL-6 and IL-1 receptor antagonist). HMB supplementation was associated with greater increases in muscle mass, muscle strength and anaerobic properties with no effect on aerobic capacity suggesting some advantage for its use in elite adolescent volleyball players during the initial phases of the training season. These effects were not accompanied by hormonal and

  1. Effectiveness, Mediators, and Effect Predictors of Internet Interventions for Chronic Cancer-Related Fatigue: The Design and an Analysis Plan of a 3-Armed Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bruggeman-Everts, Fieke Z; Van der Lee, Marije L; Van de Schoot, Rens; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam MR

    2015-01-01

    Background Internet interventions offer advantages that especially cancer survivors who suffer from fatigue could benefit from. Given the growing number of such patients, Internet interventions could supplement and strengthen currently available health care. Objective This paper describes the design and analysis plan that will be used to study 2 Internet interventions aimed at reducing severe fatigue in cancer survivors: a mobile ambulant activity feedback therapy supported through a weekly email by a physiotherapist and a weekly Web- and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy supported online by a psychologist. The data resulting from this trial will be used to (1) investigate the effectiveness, (2) investigate potential mediators of these interventions, and (3) explore participant characteristics that can predict the effect of these interventions. Methods A 3-armed randomized controlled trial is proposed that compares both Internet interventions with an active control condition that solely consists of receiving psycho-educational emails. The intervention period is 9 weeks for all 3 conditions. Six months after baseline, participants in the control condition can choose to follow 1 of the 2 experimental Internet interventions. Outcomes are measured in terms of fatigue severity, mental health, and self-perceived work ability. All are Web-assessed at baseline, 2 weeks after the intervention period, and at 6 and 12 months after baseline. Fatigue severity, mindfulness, physical activity, expectations and credibility of the intervention, therapeutic working alliance, sleep quality, and sense of control over fatigue are assessed 3 times during the intervention period for identifying mediators of the interventions. Recruitment is performed nationally throughout the Netherlands through patient organizations and their websites, newspapers, and by informing various types of health professionals. All participants register at an open-access website. We aim at including 330 cancer

  2. An 8-Week Randomized, Double-Blind Trial Comparing Efficacy, Safety, and Tolerability of 3 Vilazodone Dose-Initiation Strategies Following Switch From SSRIs and SNRIs in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rele, Shilpa; Millet, Robert; Kim, Sungman; Paik, Jong-Woo; Kim, Seonghwan; Masand, Prakash S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Vilazodone, a selective and potent 5-HT1A partial agonist and 5-HT reuptake inhibitor, has been approved for treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults. The primary objective of the study was to compare the efficacy and tolerability of switching to 3 different doses of vilazodone from an equivalent dose range of generic selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) in adult subjects with MDD. Method: This was an 8-week, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, 3-arm trial to compare vilazodone 10 mg/d, 20 mg/d, and 40 mg/d as starting doses. Data were collected from December 2012 to December 2013. There was no washout phase, prior medications were stopped at the baseline visit, and vilazodone was started the next day in adults with MDD (DSM-IV criteria). The 10-mg/d and 20-mg/d dose was increased to 40 mg/d by week 3 and week 1, respectively, and the 40-mg/d initiation dose continued unchanged. The primary efficacy measure was change in Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) score between the 3 dose groups. The secondary efficacy measures were changes in Clinical Global Impressions–Severity (CGI-S), CGI-Improvement (CGI-I), and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS) scores. Safety measures were obtained by spontaneously reported adverse events, vital signs recording, and laboratory tests. Multivariate tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: Seventy subjects were randomized, and 60 subjects completed the study (n = 20 in each group). Overall, there was a significant reduction in MADRS score from baseline (26.08 ± 1.1) to week 8 (9.86 ± 1.2) in the entire sample (P < .001). Similarly, there was a significant improvement in CGI-S (P < .001), CGI-I (P < .001) and HDRS (P < .001) scores from baseline to the end of the trial. There were no significant differences between the 3 vilazodone dose-initiation groups in changes in MADRS scores (P = .95) or changes in CGI

  3. A BTLA-mediated bait and switch strategy permits Listeria expansion in CD8α(+) DCs to promote long-term T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuanming; Zhang, Xunmin; Sun, Yonglian; Tu, Tony; Fu, May Lynne; Miller, Mendy; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2014-07-01

    Listeria monocytogenes infected CD8α(+) DCs in the spleen are essential for CD8(+) T cell generation. CD8α(+) DCs are also necessary for Listeria expansion and dissemination within the host. The mechanisms that regulate CD8α(+) DCs to allow Listeria expansion are unclear. We find that activating the B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA), a coinhibitory receptor for T cells, suppresses, while blocking BTLA enhances, both the primary and memory CD8 T cell responses against Listeria. Btla(-/-) mice have lower effector and memory CD8(+) T cells while paradoxically also being more resistant to Listeria. Although bacterial entry into Btla(-/-) CD8α(+) DCs is unaffected, Listeria fails to expand within these cells. BTLA signaling limits Fas/FasL-mediated suppression of Listeria expansion within CD8α(+) DCs to more effectively alert adaptive immune cells. This study uncovers a BTLA-mediated strategy used by the host that permits Listeria proliferation to enable increasing T cell responses for long-term protection. PMID:25011109

  4. A randomized controlled trial of liraglutide versus insulin detemir plus sitagliptin: Effective switch from intensive insulin therapy to the once-daily injection in patients with well-controlled type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuichiro; Nakamura, Akinobu; Kondo, Yoshinobu; Hamano, Kumiko; Satoh, Shinobu; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of liraglutide versus insulin detemir plus sitagliptin in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes treated with a basal-bolus insulin regimen. In this multicenter, open-label trial, 90 patients whose diabetes had been controlled well or moderately (glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c ] ≤ 7.3%) with basal-bolus insulin regimen were randomly assigned to a liraglutide group or a detemir group and were followed up for 24 weeks. The primary end point was HbA1c change from baseline to 24 weeks. Of the 90 enrolled patients, 82 completed this trial. At 24 weeks, the mean changes in HbA1c from baseline were 0.1% ± 0.9% versus 0.3% ± 0.8% in the liraglutide versus detemir groups, respectively (P = .46). The "overall" satisfaction score for the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire changed from 25.2 ± 7.4 to 29.9 ± 5.3 (P < .001) and from 26.4 ± 6.1 to 28.3 ± 6.4 (P = .12) in the liraglutide and detemir groups, respectively. Although the mean change difference in HbA1c between both groups was not significant, switching from a basal-bolus insulin regimen to liraglutide once daily improved patient satisfaction levels without loss of glycemic control. PMID:25677642

  5. Nanoelectromechanical contact switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Owen Y.; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2012-05-01

    Nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switches are similar to conventional semiconductor switches in that they can be used as relays, transistors, logic devices and sensors. However, the operating principles of NEM switches and semiconductor switches are fundamentally different. These differences give NEM switches an advantage over semiconductor switches in some applications -- for example, NEM switches perform much better in extreme environments -- but semiconductor switches benefit from a much superior manufacturing infrastructure. Here we review the potential of NEM-switch technologies to complement or selectively replace conventional complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology, and identify the challenges involved in the large-scale manufacture of a representative set of NEM-based devices.

  6. HTLV-I Tax-Mediated Inactivation of Cell Cycle Checkpoints and DNA Repair Pathways Contribute to Cellular Transformation: “A Random Mutagenesis Model”

    PubMed Central

    Nicot, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    To achieve cellular transformation, most oncogenic retroviruses use transduction by proto-oncogene capture or insertional mutagenesis, whereby provirus integration disrupts expression of tumor suppressors or proto-oncogenes. In contrast, the Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-I) has been classified in a separate class referred to as “transactivating retroviruses”. Current views suggest that the viral encoded Tax protein transactivates expression of cellular genes leading to deregulated growth and transformation. However, if Tax-mediated transactivation was indeed sufficient for cellular transformation, a fairly high frequency of infected cells would eventually become transformed. In contrast, the frequency of transformation by HTLV-I is very low, likely less than 5%. This review will discuss the current understanding and recent discoveries highlighting critical functions of Tax in cellular transformation. HTLV-I Tax carries out essential functions in order to override cell cycle checkpoints and deregulate cellular division. In addition, Tax expression is associated with increased DNA damage and genome instability. Since Tax can inhibit multiple DNA repair pathways and stimulate unfaithful DNA repair or bypass checkpoints, these processes allow accumulation of genetic mutations in the host genome. Given this, a “Random Mutagenesis” transformation model seems more suitable to characterize the oncogenic activities of HTLV-I. PMID:26835512

  7. An Interleukin-6 Receptor-dependent Molecular Switch Mediates Signal Transduction of the IL-27 Cytokine Subunit p28 (IL-30) via a gp130 Protein Receptor Homodimer*

    PubMed Central

    Garbers, Christoph; Spudy, Björn; Aparicio-Siegmund, Samadhi; Waetzig, Georg H.; Sommer, Jan; Hölscher, Christoph; Rose-John, Stefan; Grötzinger, Joachim; Lorenzen, Inken; Scheller, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    IL-27 consists of the cytokine subunit p28 and the non-signaling α-receptor EBI3. p28 was shown to additionally act via the non-signaling membrane-bound IL-6 α-receptor (IL-6R) as an agonistic cytokine but also as a gp130 β-receptor antagonist, leading to inhibition of IL-6 signaling. Here, we developed a strategy for bacterial expression, purification, and refolding of murine p28. We show that p28 did not interfere with IL-6- or IL-27-induced signaling, indicating that p28 has no antagonistic properties. Moreover, we demonstrate that murine p28 acts as an agonistic cytokine via the murine and human IL-6R, indicating that p28 exhibits no species specificity. p28 was able to induce p28-trans-signaling via the soluble IL-6R (sIL-6R), a characteristic property that was initially described for trans-signaling of IL-6 via the sIL-6R. Of notice, p28/sIL-6R trans-signaling was inhibited by the IL-6 trans-signaling antagonist, soluble gp130. At higher concentrations, p28 but not IL-6 was able to induce signaling even in the absence of IL-6R or EBI3. Although IL-27 signals via a heterodimer of the β-receptor chains gp130 and Wsx-1, p28/IL-6R specifically recruits two gp130 β-receptor chains for signal transduction. The binding of p28 to a gp130/Wsx-1 heterodimer or a gp130 homodimer is highly selective and controlled by a novel molecular switch induced by EBI3 or IL-6R, respectively. PMID:23209286

  8. Bilingual Language Switching and the Frontal Lobes: Modulatory Control in Language Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuter, Renata; Humphreys, Glyn; Rumiati, Raffaella

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the brain mechanisms mediating the switching of languages in bilingual subjects. To ascertain the brain mechanisms mediating the control of language switching, switching was examined in a bilingual patient with frontal lobe damage and impaired control processes. (Author/VWL)

  9. Escape from p53-mediated tumor surveillance in neuroblastoma: switching off the p14(ARF)-MDM2-p53 axis.

    PubMed

    Van Maerken, T; Vandesompele, J; Rihani, A; De Paepe, A; Speleman, F

    2009-12-01

    A primary failsafe program against unrestrained proliferation and oncogenesis is provided by the p53 tumor suppressor protein, inactivation of which is considered as a hallmark of cancer. Intriguingly, mutations of the TP53 gene are rarely encountered in neuroblastoma tumors, suggesting that alternative p53-inactivating lesions account for escape from p53 control in this childhood malignancy. Several recent studies have shed light on the mechanisms by which neuroblastoma cells circumvent the p53-driven antitumor barrier. We review here these mechanisms for evasion of p53-mediated growth control and conclude that deregulation of the p14(ARF)-MDM2-p53 axis seems to be the principal mode of p53 inactivation in neuroblastoma, opening new perspectives for targeted therapeutic intervention. PMID:19779493

  10. Self-Induced Switchings between Multiple Space-Time Patterns on Complex Networks of Excitable Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansmann, Gerrit; Lehnertz, Klaus; Feudel, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    We report on self-induced switchings between multiple distinct space-time patterns in the dynamics of a spatially extended excitable system. These switchings between low-amplitude oscillations, nonlinear waves, and extreme events strongly resemble a random process, although the system is deterministic. We show that a chaotic saddle—which contains all the patterns as well as channel-like structures that mediate the transitions between them—is the backbone of such a pattern-switching dynamics. Our analyses indicate that essential ingredients for the observed phenomena are that the system behaves like an inhomogeneous oscillatory medium that is capable of self-generating spatially localized excitations and that is dominated by short-range connections but also features long-range connections. With our findings, we present an alternative to the well-known ways to obtain self-induced pattern switching, namely, noise-induced attractor hopping, heteroclinic orbits, and adaptation to an external signal. This alternative way can be expected to improve our understanding of pattern switchings in spatially extended natural dynamical systems like the brain and the heart.