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Sample records for mediates neutrophil activation

  1. Neutrophil-mediated damage to human vascular endothelium. Role of cytokine activation.

    PubMed Central

    Westlin, W. F.; Gimbrone, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    Cytokine activation of cultured human vascular endothelial cells renders them hyperadhesive for blood leukocytes. Co-incubation of freshly isolated, unstimulated human blood neutrophils with confluent cytokine-activated human endothelial monolayers for 90 minutes results in extensive endothelial detachment and destruction of monolayer integrity. In contrast, unactivated endothelial monolayers remain intact. Using this in vitro model, we have explored the neutrophil-effector mechanisms involved in this injury. Coincubation in the presence of a serine protease inhibitor (phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride) or specific elastase inhibitors (Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-chloromethyl ketone or alpha-1-protease inhibitor) markedly diminished injury. In contrast, scavengers or inhibitors of oxygen-derived free radicals (superoxide dismutase, catalase, mannitol, or sodium azide) were not protective. Purified human neutrophil elastase mimicked the effect of the neutrophils suggesting a key role for elastase in the neutrophil-mediated injury in this model. Interfering with direct neutrophil-endothelial cell contact by interposing a microporous barrier insert prevented endothelial cell detachment. Furthermore, this neutrophil-mediated detachment could be inhibited with interleukin-8, an action correlated with a decrease in neutrophil adhesion to activated endothelial monolayers. By defining the role of endothelial activation in neutrophil-mediated injury, this in vitro model may provide useful insights into potential therapeutic interventions designed to prevent disruption of the endothelial barrier function. Images Figure 1 Figure 6 PMID:8424450

  2. Mediators and molecular pathways involved in the regulation of neutrophil extracellular trap formation mediated by activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Carestia, Agostina; Kaufman, Tomás; Rivadeneyra, Leonardo; Landoni, Verónica Inés; Pozner, Roberto Gabriel; Negrotto, Soledad; D'Atri, Lina Paola; Gómez, Ricardo Martín; Schattner, Mirta

    2016-01-01

    In addition to being key elements in hemostasis and thrombosis, platelets amplify neutrophil function. We aimed to gain further insight into the stimuli, mediators, molecular pathways, and regulation of neutrophil extracellular trap formation mediated by human platelets. Platelets stimulated by lipopolysaccharide, a wall component of gram-negative bacteria, Pam3-cysteine-serine-lysine 4, a mimetic of lipopeptide from gram-positive bacteria, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, or physiologic platelet agonists promoting neutrophil extracellular trap formation and myeloperoxidase-associated DNA activity under static and flow conditions. Although P-selectin or glycoprotein IIb/IIIa were not involved, platelet glycoprotein Ib, neutrophil cluster of differentiation 18, and the release of von Willebrand factor and platelet factor 4 seemed to be critical for the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. The secretion of these molecules depended on thromboxane A(2) production triggered by lipopolysaccharide or Pam3-cysteine-serine-lysine 4 but not on high concentrations of thrombin. Accordingly, aspirin selectively inhibited platelet-mediated neutrophil extracellular trap generation. Signaling through extracellular signal-regulated kinase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and Src kinases, but not p38 or reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, was involved in platelet-triggered neutrophil extracellular trap release. Platelet-mediated neutrophil extracellular trap formation was inhibited by prostacyclin. Our results support a role for stimulated platelets in promoting neutrophil extracellular trap formation, reveal that an endothelium-derived molecule contributes to limiting neutrophil extracellular trap formation, and highlight platelet inhibition as a potential target for controlling neutrophil extracellular trap cell death. PMID:26320263

  3. IL-17 Promotes Neutrophil-Mediated Immunity by Activating Microvascular Pericytes and Not Endothelium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rebecca; Lauridsen, Holly M; Amezquita, Robert A; Pierce, Richard W; Jane-Wit, Dan; Fang, Caodi; Pellowe, Amanda S; Kirkiles-Smith, Nancy C; Gonzalez, Anjelica L; Pober, Jordan S

    2016-09-15

    A classical hallmark of acute inflammation is neutrophil infiltration of tissues, a multistep process that involves sequential cell-cell interactions of circulating leukocytes with IL-1- or TNF-activated microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) and pericytes (PCs) that form the wall of the postcapillary venules. The initial infiltrating cells accumulate perivascularly in close proximity to PCs. IL-17, a proinflammatory cytokine that acts on target cells via a heterodimeric receptor formed by IL-17RA and IL-17RC subunits, also promotes neutrophilic inflammation but its effects on vascular cells are less clear. We report that both cultured human ECs and PCs strongly express IL-17RC and, although neither cell type expresses much IL-17RA, PCs express significantly more than ECs. IL-17, alone or synergistically with TNF, significantly alters inflammatory gene expression in cultured human PCs but not ECs. RNA sequencing analysis identifies many IL-17-induced transcripts in PCs encoding proteins known to stimulate neutrophil-mediated immunity. Conditioned media from IL-17-activated PCs, but not ECs, induce pertussis toxin-sensitive neutrophil polarization, likely mediated by PC-secreted chemokines, and they also stimulate neutrophil production of proinflammatory molecules, including TNF, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-8. Furthermore, IL-17-activated PCs, but not ECs, can prolong neutrophil survival by producing G-CSF and GM-CSF, delaying the mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and caspase-9 activation. Importantly, neutrophils exhibit enhanced phagocytic capacity after activation by conditioned media from IL-17-treated PCs. We conclude that PCs, not ECs, are the major target of IL-17 within the microvessel wall and that IL-17-activated PCs can modulate neutrophil functions within the perivascular tissue space. PMID:27534549

  4. Human Neutrophil Peptides Mediate Endothelial-Monocyte Interaction, Foam Cell Formation, and Platelet Activation

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Kieran L.; Henriques, Melanie; Tabuchi, Arata; Han, Bing; Yang, Hong; Cheng, Wei-Erh; Tole, Soumitra; Yu, Hanpo; Luo, Alice; Charbonney, Emmanuel; Tullis, Elizabeth; Lazarus, Alan; Robinson, Lisa A.; Ni, Heyu; Peterson, Blake R.; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.; Slutsky, Arthur S.; Zhang, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Neutrophils are involved in the inflammatory responses during atherosclerosis. Human neutrophil peptides (HNPs) released from activated neutrophils exert immune modulating properties. We hypothesized that HNPs play an important role in neutrophil-mediated inflammatory cardiovascular responses in atherosclerosis. Methods and Results We examined the role of HNPs in endothelial-leukocyte interaction, platelet activation, and foam cell formation in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that stimulation of human coronary artery endothelial cells with clinically relevant concentrations of HNPs resulted in monocyte adhesion and transmigration; induction of oxidative stress in human macrophages, which accelerates foam cell formation; and activation and aggregation of human platelets. The administration of superoxide dismutase or anti-CD36 antibody reduced foam cell formation and cholesterol efflux. Mice deficient in double genes of low-density lipoprotein receptor and low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein (LRP), and mice deficient in a single gene of LRP8, the only LRP phenotype expressed in platelets, showed reduced leukocyte rolling and decreased platelet aggregation and thrombus formation in response to HNP stimulation. Conclusion HNPs exert proatherosclerotic properties that appear to be mediated through LRP8 signaling pathways, suggesting an important role for HNPs in the development of inflammatory cardiovascular diseases. PMID:21817096

  5. Adenoviral augmentation of elafin protects the lung against acute injury mediated by activated neutrophils and bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Simpson, A J; Wallace, W A; Marsden, M E; Govan, J R; Porteous, D J; Haslett, C; Sallenave, J M

    2001-08-01

    During acute pulmonary infection, tissue injury may be secondary to the effects of bacterial products or to the effects of the host inflammatory response. An attractive strategy for tissue protection in this setting would combine antimicrobial activity with inhibition of human neutrophil elastase (HNE), a key effector of neutrophil-mediated tissue injury. We postulated that genetic augmentation of elafin (an endogenous inhibitor of HNE with intrinsic antimicrobial activity) could protect the lung against acute inflammatory injury without detriment to host defense. A replication-deficient adenovirus encoding elafin cDNA significantly protected A549 cells against the injurious effects of both HNE and whole activated human neutrophils in vitro. Intratracheal replication-deficient adenovirus encoding elafin cDNA significantly protected murine lungs against injury mediated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vivo. Genetic augmentation of elafin therefore has the capacity to protect the lung against the injurious effects of both bacterial pathogens resistant to conventional antibiotics and activated neutrophils. PMID:11466403

  6. Neutrophil Elastase-mediated proteolysis activates the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-36 Receptor antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Macleod, Tom; Doble, Rosella; McGonagle, Dennis; Wasson, Christopher W.; Alase, Adewonuola; Stacey, Martin; Wittmann, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    The interleukin-36 receptor antagonist (IL-36Ra) which regulates IL-36α, -β and -γ is linked to psoriatic inflammation, especially loss-of-function mutations in pustular psoriasis subtypes. As observed with other IL-1 superfamily proteins, the IL-36 members require N-terminal cleavage for full biological activity but the mechanisms of IL-36Ra activation remain poorly defined. Using different blood leukocyte and skin resident cell preparations, and recombinant proteins, we have identified that neutrophil elastase, but not other neutrophil derived proteases, cleaves IL-36Ra into its highly active antagonistic form. The activity of this processed form of IL-36Ra was confirmed in human primary dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes and in skin equivalents. A significant dose dependent reduction of IL-36γ induced IL-8 and chemokine ligand 20 (CCL20) levels were detected following addition of the cleaved IL-36Ra compared to full length IL-36Ra. By activating IL-36Ra, the neutrophil derived protease can inhibit IL-36 induced chemokine production, including IL-8 and CCL20, and reduce further inflammatory cell infiltration. These findings strongly indicate neutrophil elastase to be a key enzyme in the biological function of IL-36Ra and that neutrophils can play a regulatory role in psoriatic inflammation with regard to balancing the pro-inflammatory activity of IL-36. PMID:27101808

  7. Hepatocyte injury by activated neutrophils in vitro is mediated by proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Harbrecht, B G; Billiar, T R; Curran, R D; Stadler, J; Simmons, R L

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study determined the mechanism used by neutrophils (PMNs) to induce hepatocellular injury. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Neutrophils have been shown to be potent mediators of cell and tissue injury and have been hypothesized to contribute to the hepatic injury that occurs after trauma and infection. Oxygen radical scavengers protect the liver in vivo from inflammatory injury and it has been suggested that PMNs are the source of these toxic oxygen radicals. The specific mechanism used by PMNs to produce hepatocellular damage, however, has not been determined. METHODS: Neutrophils were cultured in vitro with hepatocytes (HCs) and stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) to induce HC injury in the presence of oxygen radical scavengers and protease inhibitors. RESULTS: PMA induced a PMN-mediated HC injury that was dependent on the number of PMNs present and the concentration of PMA. Protease inhibitors reduced the extent of HC injury, while oxygen radical scavengers had no effect. Hydrogen peroxide, directly applied, was able to injure HCs, but only at concentrations greater than those that could be produced by PMA-stimulated PMNs. CONCLUSIONS: PMNs are cytotoxic to cultured HCs, predominantly due to the release of proteolytic enzymes, while HCs appear relatively resistant to oxidative injury. Involvement of neutrophil toxic oxygen radicals in hepatic damage in vivo may require impairment of HC antioxidant defenses or may involve injury to nonparenchymal liver cells with secondary effects on HCs. PMID:8342991

  8. Nucleotide chloramines and neutrophil-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bernofsky, C

    1991-03-01

    Hypochlorite is a reactive oxidant formed as an end product of the respiratory burst in activated neutrophils. It is responsible for killing bacteria and has been implicated in neutrophil-mediated tissue injury associated with the inflammatory process. Although hypochlorite is a potent cytotoxic agent, the primary mechanism by which it exerts its effect is unclear. This review examines evidence that the primary event in hypochlorite cytotoxicity is the loss of adenine nucleotides from the target cell. This loss appears to be mediated by the formation of adenine nucleotide chloramines which are reactive intermediates with a free radical character and are capable of forming stable ligands with proteins and nucleic acids. PMID:1848195

  9. Kinetics of LFA-1 mediated adhesion of human neutrophils to ICAM-1-role of E-selectin signaling post-activation.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    LFA-1 and Mac-1 are the two integrins involved in the arrest and firm adhesion of neutrophils. LFA-1 plays a role in the early stage of cell arrest while Mac-1 stabilizes firm adhesion. Here, we further elucidated the kinetics of LFA-1 activation and its role in mediating neutrophil adhesion to ICAM...

  10. Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein promotes complement activation for neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis on bacterial surface

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, H; Gogami, A; Miyagawa, Y; Nanbo, A; Murakami, Y; Baba, T; Nagasawa, S

    2001-01-01

    The neutrophil bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) has both bactericidal and lipopolysaccharide-neutralizing activities. The present study suggests that BPI also plays an important role in phagocytosis of Escherichia coli by neutrophils through promotion of complement activation on the bacterial surface. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that fluorescein-labelled E. coli treated with BPI were phagocytosed in the presence of serum at two- to five-fold higher levels than phagocytosis of the bacteria without the treatment. In contrast, phagocytosis of the fluoresceined bacteria with or without treatment by BPI did not occur at all in the absence of serum. The phagocytosis stimulated by BPI and serum was dose-dependent. The effect of BPI on phagocytosis in the presence of serum was not observed on Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus). Interestingly, the complement C3b/iC3b fragments were deposited onto the bacterial surface also as a function of the BPI concentration under conditions similar to those for phagocytosis. Furthermore, the BPI-promoted phagocytosis was blocked completely by anti-C3 F(ab′)2 and partially by anti-complement receptor (CR) type 1 and/or anti-CR type 3. These findings suggest that BPI accelerates complement activation to opsonize bacteria with complement-derived fragments, leading to stimulation of phagocytosis by neutrophils via CR(s). PMID:11529944

  11. Complement-mediated neutrophil activation in sepsis- and trauma-related adult respiratory distress syndrome. Clarification with radioaerosol lung scans

    SciTech Connect

    Tennenberg, S.D.; Jacobs, M.P.; Solomkin, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Complement-mediated neutrophil activation (CMNA) has been proposed as an important pathogenic mechanism causing acute microvascular lung injury in the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). To clarify the relationship between CMNA and evolving lung injury, we studied 26 patients with multiple trauma and sepsis within 24 hours of risk establishment for ARDS. Pulmonary alveolar-capillary permeability (PACP) was quantified as the clearance rate of a particulate radioaerosol. Seventeen patients (65%) had increased PACP (six developed ARDS) while nine (35%) had normal PACP (none developed ARDS; clearance rates of 3.4%/min and 1.5%/min, respectively). These patients, regardless of evidence of early lung injury, had elevated plasma C3adesArg levels and neutrophil chemotactic desensitization to C5a/C5adesArg. Plasma C3adesArg levels correlated weakly, but significantly, with PACP. Thus, CMNA may be a necessary, but not a sufficient, pathogenic mechanism in the evolution of ARDS.

  12. The activation of the cannabinoid receptor type 2 reduces neutrophilic protease-mediated vulnerability in atherosclerotic plaques

    PubMed Central

    Montecucco, Fabrizio; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; da Silva, Rafaela F.; Vuilleumier, Nicolas; Capettini, Luciano; Lenglet, Sébastien; Pagano, Sabrina; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Quintao, Silvia; Bertolotto, Maria; Pelli, Graziano; Galan, Katia; Pilet, Lucie; Kuzmanovic, Kristina; Burger, Fabienne; Pane, Bianca; Spinella, Giovanni; Braunersreuther, Vincent; Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Pende, Aldo; Viviani, Giorgio Luciano; Palombo, Domenico; Dallegri, Franco; Roux-Lombard, Pascale; Santos, Robson A.S.; Stergiopulos, Nikos; Steffens, Sabine; Mach, François

    2012-01-01

    Aims The activation of cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2)-mediated pathways might represent a promising anti-atherosclerotic treatment. Here, we investigated the expression of the endocannabinoid system in human carotid plaques and the impact of CB2 pharmacological activation on markers of plaque vulnerability in vivo and in vitro. Methods and results The study was conducted using all available residual human carotid tissues (upstream and downstream the blood flow) from our cohort of patients symptomatic (n = 13) or asymptomatic (n = 27) for ischaemic stroke. Intraplaque levels of 2-arachidonoylglycerol, anandamide N-arachidonoylethanolamine, N-palmitoylethanolamine, N-oleoylethanolamine, and their degrading enzymes (fatty acid amide hydrolase and monoacylglycerol lipase) were not different in human plaque portions. In the majority of human samples, CB1 (both mRNA and protein levels) was undetectable. In downstream symptomatic plaques, CB2 protein expression was reduced when compared with asymptomatic patients. In these portions, CB2 levels were inversely correlated (r = −0.4008, P = 0.0170) with matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9 content and positively (r = 0.3997, P = 0.0174) with collagen. In mouse plaques, CB2 co-localized with neutrophils and MMP-9. Treatment with the selective CB2 agonist JWH-133 was associated with the reduction in MMP-9 content in aortic root and carotid plaques. In vitro, pre-incubation with JWH-133 reduced tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α-mediated release of MMP-9. This effect was associated with the reduction in TNF-α-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in human neutrophils. Conclusion Cannabinoid receptor type 2 receptor is down-regulated in unstable human carotid plaques. Since CB2 activation prevents neutrophil release of MMP-9 in vivo and in vitro, this treatment strategy might selectively reduce carotid vulnerability in humans. PMID:22112961

  13. Neutrophil IL-1β processing induced by pneumolysin is mediated by the NLRP3/ASC inflammasome and caspase-1 activation, and is dependent on K+ efflux

    PubMed Central

    Karmakar, Mausita; Katsnelson, Michael; Malak, Hesham A.; Greene, Neil G.; Howell, Scott J.; Hise, Amy G.; Camilli, Andrew; Kadioglu, Aras; Dubyak, George R.; Pearlman, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Although neutrophils are the most abundant cells in acute infection and inflammation, relatively little attention has been paid to their role in inflammasome formation and IL-1β processing. In the current study, we investigated the mechanism by which neutrophils process IL-1β in response to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Using a murine model of S. pneumoniae corneal infection, we demonstrated a requirement for IL-1β in bacterial clearance, and showed that NLRP3, ASC and caspase-1 are essential for IL-1β production and bacterial killing in the cornea. Neutrophils in infected corneas had multiple specks with enzymatically active caspase-1 (FLICA-660+), and bone marrow neutrophils stimulated with heat killed S. pneumoniae (signal 1) and pneumolysin (signal 2) exhibited multiple specks after staining with FLICA-660, NLRP3 or ASC. High molecular weight ASC complexes were also detected, consistent with oligomer formation. Pneumolysin induced K+ efflux in neutrophils, and blocking K+ efflux inhibited caspase-1 activation and IL-1β processing; however, neutrophils did not undergo pyroptosis, indicating that K+ efflux and IL-1β processing is not a consequence of cell death. There was also no role for lysosomal destabilization or neutrophil elastase in pneumolysin mediated IL-1β processing in neutrophils. Together, these findings demonstrate an essential role for neutrophil derived IL-1β in S. pneumoniae infection, and elucidate the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in neutrophil cleavage and secretion of mature IL-1β. Given the ubiquitous presence of neutrophils in acute bacterial and fungal infections, these findings will have implications for other microbial diseases. PMID:25609842

  14. Promoting effect of neutrophils on lung tumorigenesis is mediated by CXCR2 and neutrophil elastase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor cells produce various cytokines and chemokines that attract leukocytes. Leukocytes can amplify parenchymal innate immune responses, and have been shown to contribute to tumor promotion. Neutrophils are among the first cells to arrive at sites of inflammation, and the increased number of tumor-associated neutrophils is linked to poorer outcome in patients with lung cancer. Results We have previously shown that COPD-like airway inflammation promotes lung cancer in a K-ras mutant mouse model of lung cancer (CC-LR). This was associated with severe lung neutrophilic influx due to the increased level of neutrophil chemoattractant, KC. To further study the role of neutrophils in lung tumorigenesis, we depleted neutrophils in CC-LR mice using an anti-neutrophil antibody. This resulted in a significant reduction in lung tumor number. We further selectively inhibited the main receptor for neutrophil chemo-attractant KC, CXCR2. Similarly, this resulted in suppression of neutrophil recruitment into the lung of CC-LR mice followed by significant tumor reduction. Neutrophil elastase (NE) is a potent elastolytic enzyme produced by neutrophils at the site of inflammation. We crossed the CC-LR mice with NE knock-out mice, and found that lack of NE significantly inhibits lung cancer development. These were associated with significant reduction in tumor cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Conclusion We conclude that lung cancer promotion by inflammation is partly mediated by activation of the IL-8/CXCR2 pathway and subsequent recruitment of neutrophils and release of neutrophil elastase. This provides a baseline for future clinical trials using the IL-8/CXCR2 pathway or NE inhibitors in patients with lung cancer. PMID:24321240

  15. Neutrophil-Mediated Phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    van Kessel, Kok P. M.; Bestebroer, Jovanka; van Strijp, Jos A. G.

    2014-01-01

    Initial elimination of invading Staphylococcus aureus from the body is mediated by professional phagocytes. The neutrophil is the major phagocyte of the innate immunity and plays a key role in the host defense against staphylococcal infections. Opsonization of the bacteria with immunoglobulins and complement factors enables efficient recognition by the neutrophil that subsequently leads to intracellular compartmentalization and killing. Here, we provide a review of the key processes evolved in neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis of S. aureus and briefly describe killing. As S. aureus is not helpless against the professional phagocytes, we will also highlight its immune evasion arsenal related to phagocytosis. PMID:25309547

  16. Exosomes Mediate LTB4 Release during Neutrophil Chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Ritankar; Tavakoli Tameh, Aidin; Parent, Carole A

    2016-01-01

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is secreted by chemotactic neutrophils, forming a secondary gradient that amplifies the reach of primary chemoattractants. This strategy increases the recruitment range for neutrophils and is important during inflammation. Here, we show that LTB4 and its synthesizing enzymes localize to intracellular multivesicular bodies that, upon stimulation, release their content as exosomes. Purified exosomes can activate resting neutrophils and elicit chemotactic activity in a LTB4 receptor-dependent manner. Inhibition of exosome release leads to loss of directional motility with concomitant loss of LTB4 release. Our findings establish that the exosomal pool of LTB4 acts in an autocrine fashion to sensitize neutrophils towards the primary chemoattractant, and in a paracrine fashion to mediate the recruitment of neighboring neutrophils in trans. We envision that this mechanism is used by other signals to foster communication between cells in harsh extracellular environments. PMID:26741884

  17. Exosomes Mediate LTB4 Release during Neutrophil Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Ritankar; Tavakoli Tameh, Aidin; Parent, Carole A.

    2016-01-01

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is secreted by chemotactic neutrophils, forming a secondary gradient that amplifies the reach of primary chemoattractants. This strategy increases the recruitment range for neutrophils and is important during inflammation. Here, we show that LTB4 and its synthesizing enzymes localize to intracellular multivesicular bodies that, upon stimulation, release their content as exosomes. Purified exosomes can activate resting neutrophils and elicit chemotactic activity in a LTB4 receptor-dependent manner. Inhibition of exosome release leads to loss of directional motility with concomitant loss of LTB4 release. Our findings establish that the exosomal pool of LTB4 acts in an autocrine fashion to sensitize neutrophils towards the primary chemoattractant, and in a paracrine fashion to mediate the recruitment of neighboring neutrophils in trans. We envision that this mechanism is used by other signals to foster communication between cells in harsh extracellular environments. PMID:26741884

  18. Interference of anti-inflammatory and anti-asthmatic drugs with neutrophil-mediated platelet activation: singularity of azelastine.

    PubMed Central

    Renesto, P.; Balloy, V.; Vargaftig, B. B.; Chignard, M.

    1991-01-01

    1. The capacity of various drugs (acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), ketoprofen, diclofenac, piroxicam, BW 755C, BW A4C, nedocromil sodium and azelastine) to inhibit human polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN)-mediated platelet activation was investigated. In this model, stimulated PMN release cathepsin G (Cat G), a serine proteinase which, in turn, induces platelet activation. 2. Among the different tested drugs, azelastine (100 microM for 1 min) was the only one able to prevent platelet aggregation. The cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors were all inactive, although used at effective concentrations as judged by inhibition of thromboxane B2 (TxB2) formation. Inhibition of platelet aggregation by azelastine was concentration-dependent, the range of active concentrations being of 20-70 microM. Release from platelets of 5-hydroxytryptamine was also inhibited at 30 microM and above, but never reached 100%. 3. The inhibition by azelastine is due to an effect on both cells. Indeed, beta-glucuronidase release from activated PMN and platelet activation by purified Cat G were both affected. 4. However, used at high concentrations (greater than 100 microM) azelastine was toxic since it released significant amounts of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from PMN and platelets. 5. These results show the capacity of azelastine, an anti-allergic and anti-asthmatic compound, to inhibit the cell-to-cell communication between PMN and platelets, an effect which may be relevant for its therapeutic efficacy or for a new application in diseases in which PMN and platelets are involved. PMID:1653073

  19. Human neutrophil elastase: mediator and therapeutic target in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Peter A; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2008-01-01

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) is present within atherosclerotic plaques where it contributes to matrix degradation and weakening of the vessel wall associated with the complications of aneurysm formation and plaque rupture. It is joined by other extracellular proteases in these actions but the broad range of substrates and potency of HNE coupled with the potential for rapid increases in HNE activity associated with neutrophil degranulation in acute coronary syndromes single this disruptive protease out as therapeutic target in atherosclerotic disease. This review summarises the role of HNE in neutrophil-mediated endothelial injury and the evidence for HNE as a mediator of atherosclerotic plaque development. The therapeutic potential of HNE neutralising antiproteases, alpha-1-antitrypsin and elafin, in atherosclerosis, is discussed. PMID:18289916

  20. Chemokine CXCL1 mediated neutrophil recruitment: Role of glycosaminoglycan interactions.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Kirti V; Poluri, Krishna Mohan; Dutta, Amit K; Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Troshkina, Anna; Garofalo, Roberto P; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL1/MGSA plays a pivotal role in the host immune response by recruiting and activating neutrophils for microbial killing at the tissue site. CXCL1 exists reversibly as monomers and dimers, and mediates its function by binding glycosaminoglycans (GAG) and CXCR2 receptor. We recently showed that both monomers and dimers are potent CXCR2 agonists, the dimer is the high-affinity GAG ligand, lysine and arginine residues located in two non-overlapping domains mediate GAG interactions, and there is extensive overlap between GAG and receptor-binding domains. To understand how these structural properties influence in vivo function, we characterized peritoneal neutrophil recruitment of a trapped monomer and trapped dimer and a panel of WT lysine/arginine to alanine mutants. Monomers and dimers were active, but WT was more active indicating synergistic interactions promote recruitment. Mutants from both domains showed reduced GAG heparin binding affinities and reduced neutrophil recruitment, providing compelling evidence that both GAG-binding domains mediate in vivo trafficking. Further, mutant of a residue that is involved in both GAG binding and receptor signaling showed the highest reduction in recruitment. We conclude that GAG interactions and receptor activity of CXCL1 monomers and dimers are fine-tuned to regulate neutrophil trafficking for successful resolution of tissue injury. PMID:27625115

  1. Blocking neutrophil integrin activation prevents ischemia–reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Yago, Tadayuki; Petrich, Brian G.; Zhang, Nan; Liu, Zhenghui; Shao, Bojing; Ginsberg, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil recruitment, mediated by β2 integrins, combats pyogenic infections but also plays a key role in ischemia–reperfusion injury and other inflammatory disorders. Talin induces allosteric rearrangements in integrins that increase affinity for ligands (activation). Talin also links integrins to actin and other proteins that enable formation of adhesions. Structural studies have identified a talin1 mutant (L325R) that perturbs activation without impairing talin’s capacity to link integrins to actin and other proteins. Here, we found that mice engineered to express only talin1(L325R) in myeloid cells were protected from renal ischemia–reperfusion injury. Dissection of neutrophil function in vitro and in vivo revealed that talin1(L325R) neutrophils had markedly impaired chemokine-induced, β2 integrin–mediated arrest, spreading, and migration. Surprisingly, talin1(L325R) neutrophils exhibited normal selectin-induced, β2 integrin–mediated slow rolling, in sharp contrast to the defective slow rolling of neutrophils lacking talin1 or expressing a talin1 mutant (W359A) that blocks talin interaction with integrins. These studies reveal the importance of talin-mediated activation of integrins for renal ischemia–reperfusion injury. They further show that neutrophil arrest requires talin recruitment to and activation of integrins. However, although neutrophil slow rolling requires talin recruitment to integrins, talin-mediated integrin activation is dispensable. PMID:26169939

  2. Cationic liposomes evoke proinflammatory mediator release and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) toward human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Hsu, Ching-Yun; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Chen, Chun-Han; Chang, Yuan-Ting; Fang, Jia-You

    2015-04-01

    Cationic liposomes are widely used as nanocarriers for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. The cationic components of liposomes can induce inflammatory responses. This study examined the effect of cationic liposomes on human neutrophil activation. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) or soyaethyl morpholinium ethosulfate (SME) was incorporated into liposomes as the cationic additive. The liposomes' cytotoxicity and their induction of proinflammatory mediators, intracellular calcium, and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) were investigated. The interaction of the liposomes with the plasma membrane triggered the stimulation of neutrophils. CTAB liposomes induced complete leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) at all concentrations tested, whereas SME liposomes released LDH in a concentration-dependent manner. CTAB liposomes proved to more effectively activate neutrophils compared with SME liposomes, as indicated by increased superoxide anion and elastase levels. Calcium influx increased 9-fold after treatment with CTAB liposomes. This influx was not changed by SME liposomes compared with the untreated control. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and immunofluorescence images indicated the presence of NETs after treatment with cationic liposomes. NETs could be quickly formed, within minutes, after CTAB liposomal treatment. In contrast to this result, NET formation was slowly and gradually increased by SME liposomes, within 4h. Based on the data presented here, it is important to consider the toxicity of cationic liposomes during administration in the body. This is the first report providing evidence of NET production induced by cationic liposomes. PMID:25731102

  3. Regulatory effect of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant, epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate on pulmonary neutrophil aggregation mediated by nuclear factor-κB in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongman; Zhao, Jiping; Xue, Guansheng; Wang, Junfei; Wu, Jinxiang; Wang, Donghui; Dong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the regulatory effect of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) and epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 (ENA-78) on pulmonary neutrophil (PMN) accumulation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mice, and the therapeutic effect of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), was investigated. BALB/c mice were divided into control, LPS and PDTC + LPS groups using a random number table. The phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was detected using a western blot, and the mRNA expression levels of CINC were evaluated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The expression of NF-κB, CINC and ENA-78 was detected using immunohistochemistry. The production of interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-10 in serum and broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The total number of leukocytes and proportion of PMNs in BALF was also determined. Following injection with LPS (20 mg/kg), the expression levels of p-NF-κB, CINC and ENA-78 were increased in lung tissue, and the expression levels of IL-8, IL-10 and the number of PMNs increased in serum and BALF. However, in comparison with the LPS group, the degree of lung injury was reduced in ARDS mice that were treated with PDTC. In addition, the expression level of p-NF-κB and the production of chemokines in lung tissue decreased in ARDS mice that were treated with PDTC, and the number of PMNs in BALF also decreased. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that the LPS-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB may result in the synthesis and release of CINC and ENA-78, which induce the accumulation of PMNs in the lung. Therefore, PDTC may be used to reduce the production of chemokines and cytokines, thereby decreasing the activation of PMNs in lung tissue and reducing the damage of lung tissue in ARDS. PMID:27602092

  4. Human filarial Wolbachia lipopeptide directly activates human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tamarozzi, F; Wright, H L; Johnston, K L; Edwards, S W; Turner, J D; Taylor, M J

    2014-10-01

    The host inflammatory response to the Onchocerca volvulus endosymbiont, Wolbachia, is a major contributing factor in the development of chronic pathology in humans (onchocerciasis/river blindness). Recently, the toll-like pattern recognition receptor motif of the major inflammatory ligands of filarial Wolbachia, membrane-associated diacylated lipoproteins, was functionally defined in murine models of pathology, including mediation of neutrophil recruitment to the cornea. However, the extent to which human neutrophils can be activated in response to this Wolbachia pattern recognition motif is not known. Therefore, the responses of purified peripheral blood human neutrophils to a synthetic N-terminal diacylated lipopeptide (WoLP) of filarial Wolbachia peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL) were characterized. WoLP exposure led to a dose-dependent activation of healthy, human neutrophils that included gross morphological alterations and modulation of surface expressed integrins involved in tethering, rolling and extravasation. WoLP exposure induced chemotaxis but not chemokinesis of neutrophils, and secretion of the major neutrophil chemokine, interleukin 8. WoLP also induced and primed the respiratory burst, and enhanced neutrophil survival by delay of apoptosis. These results indicate that the major inflammatory motif of filarial Wolbachia lipoproteins directly activates human neutrophils in vitro and promotes a molecular pathway by which human neutrophils are recruited to sites of Onchocerca parasitism. PMID:24909063

  5. Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin Expresses Antimicrobial Activity by Interfering with l-Norepinephrine-Mediated Bacterial Iron Acquisition▿

    PubMed Central

    Miethke, Marcus; Skerra, Arne

    2010-01-01

    l-norepinephrine (NE) is a neuroendocrine catecholamine that supports bacterial growth by mobilizing iron from a primary source such as holotransferrin to increase its bioavailability for cellular uptake. Iron complexes of NE resemble those of bacterial siderophores that are scavenged by human neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) as part of the innate immune defense. Here, we show that NGAL binds iron-complexed NE, indicating physiological relevance for both bacterial and human iron metabolism. The fluorescence titration of purified recombinant NGAL with the FeIII·(NE)3 iron complex revealed high affinity for this ligand, with a KD of 50.6 nM. In contrast, the binding protein FeuA of Bacillus subtilis, which is involved in the bacterial uptake of triscatecholate iron complexes, has a KD for FeIII·(NE)3 of 1.6 μM, indicating that NGAL is an efficient competitor. Furthermore, NGAL was shown to inhibit the NE-mediated growth of both E. coli and B. subtilis strains that either are capable or incapable of producing their native siderophores enterobactin and bacillibactin, respectively. These experiments suggest that iron-complexed NE directly serves as an iron source for bacterial uptake systems, and that NGAL can function as an antagonist of this iron acquisition process. Interestingly, a functional FeuABC uptake system was shown to be necessary for NE-mediated growth stimulation as well as its NGAL-dependent inhibition. This study demonstrates for the first time that human NGAL not only neutralizes pathogen-derived virulence factors but also can effectively scavenge an iron-chelate complex abundant in the host. PMID:20086155

  6. Cell Wall-Anchored Nuclease of Streptococcus sanguinis Contributes to Escape from Neutrophil Extracellular Trap-Mediated Bacteriocidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, Masanobu; Okahashi, Nobuo; Wada, Satoshi; Yamashiro, Takashi; Hayashi, Mikako; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis, a member of the commensal mitis group of streptococci, is a primary colonizer of the tooth surface, and has been implicated in infectious complications including bacteremia and infective endocarditis. During disease progression, S. sanguinis may utilize various cell surface molecules to evade the host immune system to survive in blood. In the present study, we discovered a novel cell surface nuclease with a cell-wall anchor domain, termed SWAN (streptococcal wall-anchored nuclease), and investigated its contribution to bacterial resistance against the bacteriocidal activity of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Recombinant SWAN protein (rSWAN) digested multiple forms of DNA including NET DNA and human RNA, which required both Mg2+ and Ca2+ for optimum activity. Furthermore, DNase activity of S. sanguinis was detected around growing colonies on agar plates containing DNA. In-frame deletion of the swan gene mostly reduced that activity. These findings indicated that SWAN is a major nuclease displayed on the surface, which was further confirmed by immuno-detection of SWAN in the cell wall fraction. The sensitivity of S. sanguinis to NET killing was reduced by swan gene deletion. Moreover, heterologous expression of the swan gene rendered a Lactococcus lactis strain more resistant to NET killing. Our results suggest that the SWAN nuclease on the bacterial surface contributes to survival in the potential situation of S. sanguinis encountering NETs during the course of disease progression. PMID:25084357

  7. mTOR Mediates IL-23 Induction of Neutrophil IL-17 and IL-22 Production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feidi; Cao, Anthony; Yao, Suxia; Evans-Marin, Heather L; Liu, Han; Wu, Wei; Carlsen, Eric D; Dann, Sara M; Soong, Lynn; Sun, Jiaren; Zhao, Qihong; Cong, Yingzi

    2016-05-15

    It has been shown recently that neutrophils are able to produce IL-22 and IL-17, which differentially regulate the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. However, it is still largely unknown how the neutrophil production of IL-22 and IL-17 is regulated, and their role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. In this study, we found that IL-23 promoted neutrophil production of IL-17 and IL-22. IL-23 stimulated the neutrophil expression of IL-23R as well as rorc and ahr. Retinoid acid receptor-related orphan receptor γ t and aryl-hydrocarbon receptor differentially regulated IL-23 induction of neutrophil IL-17 and IL-22. In addition, IL-23 induced the activation of mTOR in neutrophils. Blockade of the mTOR pathway inhibited IL-23-induced expression of rorc and ahr, as well as IL-17 and IL-22 production. By using a microbiota Ag-specific T cell-mediated colitis model, we demonstrated that depletion of neutrophils, as well as blockade of IL-22, resulted in a significant increase in the severity of colitis, thereby indicating a protective role of neutrophils and IL-22 in chronic colitis. Collectively, our data revealed that neutrophils negatively regulate microbiota Ag-specific T cell induction of colitis, and IL-23 induces neutrophil production of IL-22 and IL-17 through induction of rorc and ahr, which is mediated by the mTOR pathway. PMID:27067005

  8. Anti-inflammatory Effect of Methyl Gallate on Experimental Arthritis: Inhibition of Neutrophil Recruitment, Production of Inflammatory Mediators, and Activation of Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Correa, Luana Barbosa; Pádua, Tatiana Almeida; Seito, Leonardo Noboru; Costa, Thadeu Estevam Moreira Maramaldo; Silva, Magaiver Andrade; Candéa, André Luis Peixoto; Rosas, Elaine Cruz; Henriques, Maria G

    2016-06-24

    Methyl gallate (MG) is a prevalent phenolic acid in the plant kingdom, and its presence in herbal medicines might be related to its remarkable biological effects, such as its antioxidant, antitumor, and antimicrobial activities. Although some indirect evidence suggests anti-inflammatory activity for MG, there are no studies demonstrating this effect in animal models. Herein, we demonstrated that MG (0.7-70 mg/kg) inhibited zymosan-induced experimental arthritis in a dose-dependent manner. The oral administration of MG (7 mg/kg) attenuates arthritis induced by zymosan, affecting edema formation, leukocyte migration, and the production of inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, CXCL-1, LTB4, and PGE2). Pretreatment with MG inhibited in vitro neutrophil chemotaxis elicited by CXCL-1, as well as the adhesion of these cells to TNF-α-primed endothelial cells. MG also impaired zymosan-stimulated macrophages by inhibiting IL-6 and NO production, COX-2 and iNOS expression, and intracellular calcium mobilization. Thus, MG is likely to present an anti-inflammatory effect by targeting multiple cellular events such as the production of various inflammatory mediators, as well as leukocyte activation and migration. PMID:27227459

  9. Protein Kinase B (AKT) Mediates Phospholipase D Activation via ERK1/2 and Promotes Respiratory Burst Parameters in Formylpeptide-stimulated Neutrophil-like HL-60 Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Satyananda; Djerdjouri, Bahia; Raoul-Des-Essarts, Yannick; Dang, Pham My-Chan; El-Benna, Jamel; Périanin, Axel

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD), a major source of lipid second messengers (phosphatidic acid, diglycerides) in many cell types, is tightly regulated by protein kinases, but only a few of them have been identified. We show here that protein kinase B (AKT) is a novel major signaling effector of PLD activity induced by the formylpeptide f-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) in human neutrophil-like HL-60 cells (dHL-60 cells). AKT inhibition with the selective antagonist AKTib1/2 almost completely prevented fMLP-mediated activity of PLD, its upstream effector ERK1/2, but not p38 MAPK. Immunoprecipitation studies show that phosphorylated AKT, ERK, and PLD2 form a complex induced by fMLP, which can be prevented by AKTib1/2. In cell-free systems, AKT1 stimulated PLD activity via activation of ERK. AKT1 actually phosphorylated ERK2 as a substrate (Km 1 μm). Blocking AKT activation with AKTib1/2 also prevented fMLP- but not phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-mediated NADPH oxidase activation (respiratory burst, RB) of dHL-60 cells. Impaired RB was associated with defective membrane translocation of NADPH oxidase components p67phox and p47phox, ERK, AKT1, AKT2, but not AKT3. Depletion of AKT1 or AKT2 with antisense oligonucleotides further indicates a partial contribution of both isoforms in fMLP-induced activation of ERK, PLD, and RB, with a predominant role of AKT1. Thus, formylpeptides induce sequential activation of AKT, ERK1/2, and PLD, which represents a novel signaling pathway. A major primarily role of this AKT signaling pathway also emerges in membrane recruitment of NOX2 components p47phox, p67phox, and ERK, which may contribute to assembly and activation of the RB motor system, NADPH oxidase. PMID:20693286

  10. Mechanotransduction in neutrophil activation and deactivation.

    PubMed

    Ekpenyong, Andrew E; Toepfner, Nicole; Chilvers, Edwin R; Guck, Jochen

    2015-11-01

    Mechanotransduction refers to the processes through which cells sense mechanical stimuli by converting them to biochemical signals and, thus, eliciting specific cellular responses. Cells sense mechanical stimuli from their 3D environment, including the extracellular matrix, neighboring cells and other mechanical forces. Incidentally, the emerging concept of mechanical homeostasis,long term or chronic regulation of mechanical properties, seems to apply to neutrophils in a peculiar manner, owing to neutrophils' ability to dynamically switch between the activated/primed and deactivated/deprimed states. While neutrophil activation has been known for over a century, its deactivation is a relatively recent discovery. Even more intriguing is the reversibility of neutrophil activation and deactivation. We review and critically evaluate recent findings that suggest physiological roles for neutrophil activation and deactivation and discuss possible mechanisms by which mechanical stimuli can drive the oscillation of neutrophils between the activated and resting states. We highlight several molecules that have been identified in neutrophil mechanotransduction, including cell adhesion and transmembrane receptors, cytoskeletal and ion channel molecules. The physiological and pathophysiological implications of such mechanically induced signal transduction in neutrophils are highlighted as a basis for future work. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology. PMID:26211453

  11. Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis, superoxide production and calcium signaling of beta 2 integrin-deficient bovine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Sawada, C; Higuchi, H; Teraoka, H; Yamaguchi, M

    1997-01-01

    Fc receptor for immunoglobulin G-mediated phagocytosis, superoxide production and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) signaling of complement receptor type 3 (CR3)-deficient neutrophils from a heifer with leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) were compared to those of control heifers. The mean phagocytic activity of IgG-coated yeasts and aggregated bovine IgG (Agg-IgG)-induced superoxide production of CR3-deficient neutrophils were 10% and 77.9%, respectively, of those of control neutrophils. The [Ca2+]i signals in CR3-deficient neutrophils stimulated with Agg-IgG or concanavalin A were different with mean peak [Ca2+]i concentrations of 78% and 41.9%, respectively, of those of control neutrophils. These findings suggest that Fc receptor-mediated neutrophil functions are closely dependent on the presence of CR3 (CD11b/CD18) on the neutrophil cell surfaces. PMID:9343828

  12. Nitrite attenuated peroxynitrite and hypochlorite generation in activated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaoming; Ding, Yun; Lu, Naihao

    2016-03-15

    Oxidative stress is usually considered as an important factor to the pathogenesis of various diseases. Peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) and hypochlorite (OCl(-)) are formed in immune cells as a part of the innate host defense system, but excessive reactive oxygen species generation can cause progressive inflammation and tissue damage. It has been proven that through mediating nitric oxide (NO) homeostasis, inorganic nitrite (NO2(-)) shows organ-protective effects on oxidative stress and inflammation. However, the effects of NO2(-) on the function of immune cells were still not clear. The potential role of NO2(-) in modulating ONOO(-) and OCl(-) generation in neutrophil cells was investigated in this study. As an immune cell activator, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increased both ONOO(-) and OCl(-) production in neutrophils, which was significantly attenuated by NO2(-). NO2(-) reduced superoxide (O2(·-)) generation via a NO-dependent mechanism and increased NO formation in activated neutrophils, suggesting a crucial role of O2(·-) in NO2(-)-mediated reduction of ONOO(-). Moreover, the reduced effect of NO2(-) on OCl(-) production was attributed to that NO2(-) reduced H2O2 production in activated neutrophils without influencing the release of myeloperoxidase (MPO), thus limiting OCl(-) production by MPO/H2O2 system. Therefore, NO2(-) attenuates ONOO(-) and OCl(-) formation in activated neutrophils, opening a new direction to modulate the inflammatory response. PMID:26854590

  13. Comparative evaluation of assays for the measurement of bovine neutrophil oxidative burst activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During mastitis and other bacterial-mediated diseases of cattle, neutrophils play a critical role in the host innate immune response to infection. The bactericidal activity of neutrophils is mediated, in part, through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The objectives of the current stu...

  14. Neutrophils Self-Regulate Immune Complex-Mediated Cutaneous Inflammation through CXCL2.

    PubMed

    Li, Jackson LiangYao; Lim, Chun Hwee; Tay, Fen Wei; Goh, Chi Ching; Devi, Sapna; Malleret, Benoit; Lee, Bernett; Bakocevic, Nadja; Chong, Shu Zhen; Evrard, Maximilien; Tanizaki, Hideaki; Lim, Hwee Ying; Russell, Bruce; Renia, Laurent; Zolezzi, Francesca; Poidinger, Michael; Angeli, Veronique; St John, Ashley L; Harris, John E; Tey, Hong Liang; Tan, Suet Mien; Kabashima, Kenji; Weninger, Wolfgang; Larbi, Anis; Ng, Lai Guan

    2016-02-01

    Deposition of immune complexes (ICs) in tissues triggers acute inflammatory pathology characterized by massive neutrophil influx leading to edema and hemorrhage, and is especially associated with vasculitis of the skin, but the mechanisms that regulate this type III hypersensitivity process remain poorly understood. Here, using a combination of multiphoton intravital microscopy and genomic approaches, we re-examined the cutaneous reverse passive Arthus reaction and observed that IC-activated neutrophils underwent transmigration, triggered further IC formation, and transported these ICs into the interstitium, whereas neutrophil depletion drastically reduced IC formation and ameliorated vascular leakage in vivo. Thereafter, we show that these neutrophils expressed high levels of CXCL2, which further amplified neutrophil recruitment and activation in an autocrine and/or paracrine manner. Notably, CXCL1 expression was restricted to tissue-resident cell types, but IC-activated neutrophils may also indirectly, via soluble factors, modulate macrophage CXCL1 expression. Consistent with their distinct cellular origins and localization, only neutralization of CXCL2 but not CXCL1 in the interstitium effectively reduced neutrophil recruitment. In summary, our study establishes that neutrophils are able to self-regulate their own recruitment and responses during IC-mediated inflammation through a CXCL2-driven feed forward loop. PMID:26802238

  15. Activation of caspase 3 (CPP32)-like proteases is essential for TNF-alpha-induced hepatic parenchymal cell apoptosis and neutrophil-mediated necrosis in a murine endotoxin shock model.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, H; Fisher, M A; Lawson, J A; Simmons, C A; Farhood, A; Jones, D A

    1998-04-01

    Endotoxin (ET)-induced liver failure is characterized by parenchymal cell apoptosis and inflammation leading to liver cell necrosis. Members of the caspase family have been implicated in the signal transduction pathway of apoptosis. The aim of this study was to characterize ET-induced hepatic caspase activation and apoptosis and to investigate their effect on neutrophil-mediated liver injury. Treatment of C3Heb/FeJ mice with 700 mg/kg galactosamine (Gal) and 100 microg/kg Salmonella abortus equi ET increased caspase 3-like protease activity (Asp-Val-Glu-Asp-substrate) by 1730 +/- 140% at 6 h. There was a parallel enhancement of apoptosis (assessed by DNA fragmentation ELISA and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay). In contrast, activity of caspase 1 (IL-1beta-converting enzyme)-like proteases (Tyr-Val-Ala-Asp-substrate) did not change throughout the experiment. Caspase 3-like protease activity and apoptosis was not induced by Gal/ET in ET-resistant mice (C3H/HeJ). Furthermore, only murine TNF-alpha but not IL-1alphabeta increased caspase activity and apoptosis. Gal/ET caused neutrophil-dependent hepatocellular necrosis at 7 h (area of necrosis, 45 +/- 3%). Delayed treatment with the caspase 3-like protease inhibitor Z-Val-Ala-Asp-CH2F (Z-VAD) (10 mg/kg at 3 h) attenuated apoptosis by 81 to 88% and prevented liver cell necrosis (< or = 5%). Z-VAD had no effect on the initial inflammatory response, including the sequestration of neutrophils in sinusoids. However, Z-VAD prevented neutrophil transmigration and necrosis. Our data indicate that activation of the caspase 3 subfamily of cysteine proteases is critical for the development of parenchymal cell apoptosis. In addition, excessive hepatocellular apoptosis can be an important signal for transmigration of primed neutrophils sequestered in sinusoids. PMID:9531309

  16. NET amyloidogenic backbone in human activated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Pulze, L; Bassani, B; Gini, E; D'Antona, P; Grimaldi, A; Luini, A; Marino, F; Noonan, D M; Tettamanti, G; Valvassori, R; de Eguileor, M

    2016-03-01

    Activated human neutrophils produce a fibrillar DNA network [neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs)] for entrapping and killing bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses. Our results suggest that the neutrophil extracellular traps show a resistant amyloidogenic backbone utilized for addressing reputed proteins and DNA against the non-self. The formation of amyloid fibrils in neutrophils is regulated by the imbalance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cytoplasm. The intensity and source of the ROS signal is determinant for promoting stress-associated responses such as amyloidogenesis and closely related events: autophagy, exosome release, activation of the adrenocorticotrophin hormone/α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (ACTH/α-MSH) loop and synthesis of specific cytokines. These interconnected responses in human activated neutrophils, that have been evaluated from a morphofunctional and quantitative viewpoint, represent primitive, but potent, innate defence mechanisms. In invertebrates, circulating phagocytic immune cells, when activated, show responses similar to those described previously for activated human neutrophils. Invertebrate cells within endoplasmic reticulum cisternae produce a fibrillar material which is then assembled into an amyloidogenic scaffold utilized to convey melanin close to the invader. These findings, in consideration to the critical role played by NET in the development of several pathologies, could explain the structural resistance of these scaffolds and could provide the basis for developing new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in immunomediated diseases in which the innate branch of the immune system has a pivotal role. PMID:26462606

  17. Activation of bovine neutrophils by Brucella spp.

    PubMed

    Keleher, Lauren L; Skyberg, Jerod A

    2016-09-01

    Brucellosis is a globally important zoonotic infectious disease caused by gram negative bacteria of the genus Brucella. While many species of Brucella exist, Brucella melitensis, Brucella abortus, and Brucella suis are the most common pathogens of humans and livestock. The virulence of Brucella is largely influenced by its ability to evade host factors, including phagocytic killing mechanisms, which are critical for the host response to infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the bovine neutrophil response to virulent Brucella spp. Here, we found that virulent strains of smooth B. abortus, B. melitensis, B. suis, and virulent, rough, strains of Brucella canis possess similar abilities to resist killing by resting, or IFN-γ-activated, bovine neutrophils. Bovine neutrophils responded to infection with a time-dependent oxidative burst that varied little between Brucella spp. Inhibition of TAK1, or SYK kinase blunted the oxidative burst of neutrophils in response to Brucella infection. Interestingly, Brucella spp. did not induce robust death of bovine neutrophils. These results indicate that bovine neutrophils respond similarly to virulent Brucella spp. In addition, virulent Brucella spp., including naturally rough strains of B. canis, have a conserved ability to resist killing by bovine neutrophils. PMID:27436438

  18. Tempol inhibits neutrophil and hydrogen peroxide-mediated DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Hahn, S M; Mitchell, J B; Shacter, E

    1997-01-01

    Inflammatory conditions characterized by neutrophil activation are associated with a variety of chronic diseases. Reactive oxygen species are produced by activated neutrophils and produce DNA damage which may lead to tissue damage. Previous studies have shown that activated murine neutrophils induce DNA strand breaks in a target plasmacytoma cell, RIMPC 2394. We studied the effect of a water soluble nitroxide anti-oxidant, Tempol, on murine neutrophil induction of DNA strand breaks in this system. Murine neutrophils were isolated from the peritoneal cavity of BALB/cAn mice after an i.p. injection of pristane oil. Neutrophils were activated by the phorbol ester PMA and co-incubated with RIMPC 2394 cells. Control alkaline elution studies revealed progressive DNA strand breaks in RIMPC cells with time. The addition of Tempol to the incubation mixture prevented DNA damage in a dose dependent fashion. Five mM Tempol provided complete protection. Tempol protection against DNA strand breaks was similar for both stimulated neutrophils and exogenously added hydrogen peroxide. Measurement of hydrogen peroxide produced by stimulated neutrophils demonstrated that Tempol did not decrease hydrogen peroxide concentration. Oxidation of reduced metals, thereby interfering with the production of hydroxyl radical, is the most likely mechanism of nitroxide protection, although superoxide dismutase (SOD) like activity and scavenging of carbon-based free radicals may also account for a portion of the observed protection. The anti-oxidant activity of Tempol inhibited DNA damage by activated neutrophils. The nitroxides as a class of compounds may have a role in the investigation and modification of inflammatory conditions. PMID:9378367

  19. NFκB Is Persistently Activated in Continuously Stimulated Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Miskolci, Veronika; Rollins, Janet; Vu, Hai Yen; Ghosh, Chandra C; Davidson, Dennis; Vancurova, Ivana

    2007-01-01

    Increased activation of the transcription factor NFκB in the neutrophils has been associated with the pathogenesis of sepsis, acute lung injury (ALI), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), and other neutrophil-mediated inflammatory disorders. Despite recent progress in analyzing early NFκB activation in human neutrophils, activation of NFκB in persistently stimulated neutrophils has not been previously studied. Because it is the persistent NFκB activation that is thought to be involved in the host response to sepsis and the pathogenesis of ALI and BPD, we hypothesized that continuously stimulated human neutrophils may exhibit a late phase of NFκB activity. The goal of this study was to analyze the NFκB activation and expression of IκB and NFκB proteins during neutrophil stimulation with inflammatory signals for prolonged times. We demonstrate that neutrophil stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) induces, in addition to the early activation at 30–60 min, a previously unrecognized late phase of NFκB activation. In LPS-stimulated neutrophils, this NFκB activity typically had a biphasic character, whereas TNFα-stimulated neutrophils exhibited a continuous NFκB activity peaking around 9 h after stimulation. In contrast to the early NFκB activation that inversely correlates to the nuclear levels of IκBα, however, in continuously stimulated neutrophils, NFκB is persistently activated despite considerable levels of IκBα present in the nucleus. Our data suggest that NFκB is persistently activated in human neutrophils during neutrophil-mediated inflammatory disorders, and this persistent NFκB activity may represent one of the underlying mechanisms for the continuous production of proinflammatory mediators. PMID:17592547

  20. Single platelets seal neutrophil-induced vascular breaches via GPVI during immune-complex-mediated inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gros, Angèle; Syvannarath, Varouna; Lamrani, Lamia; Ollivier, Véronique; Loyau, Stéphane; Goerge, Tobias; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoît

    2015-08-20

    Platelets protect vascular integrity during inflammation. Recent evidence suggests that this action is independent of thrombus formation and requires the engagement of glycoprotein VI (GPVI), but it remains unclear how platelets prevent inflammatory bleeding. We investigated whether platelets and GPVI act primarily by preventing detrimental effects of neutrophils using models of immune complex (IC)-mediated inflammation in mice immunodepleted in platelets and/or neutrophils or deficient in GPVI. Depletion of neutrophils prevented bleeding in thrombocytopenic and GPVI(-/-) mice during IC-mediated dermatitis. GPVI deficiency did not modify neutrophil recruitment, which was reduced by thrombocytopenia. Neutrophil cytotoxic activities were reduced in thrombocytopenic and GPVI(-/-) mice during IC-mediated inflammation. Intravital microscopy revealed that in this setting, intravascular binding sites for platelets were exposed by neutrophils, and GPVI supported the recruitment of individual platelets to these spots. Furthermore, the platelet secretory response accompanying IC-mediated inflammation was partly mediated by GPVI, and blocking of GPVI signaling impaired the vasculoprotective action of platelets. Together, our results show that GPVI plays a dual role in inflammation by enhancing neutrophil-damaging activities while supporting the activation and hemostatic adhesion of single platelets to neutrophil-induced vascular breaches. PMID:26036804

  1. CXCL5 Drives Neutrophil Recruitment in TH17-Mediated GN

    PubMed Central

    Disteldorf, Erik M.; Krebs, Christian F.; Paust, Hans-Joachim; Turner, Jan-Eric; Nouailles, Geraldine; Tittel, André; Meyer-Schwesinger, Catherine; Stege, Gesa; Brix, Silke; Velden, Joachim; Wiech, Thorsten; Helmchen, Udo; Steinmetz, Oliver M.; Peters, Anett; Bennstein, Sabrina B.; Kaffke, Anna; Llanto, Chrystel; Lira, Sergio A.; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi; Stahl, Rolf A.K.; Kurts, Christian; Kaufmann, Stefan H.E.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil trafficking to sites of inflammation is essential for the defense against bacterial and fungal infections, but also contributes to tissue damage in TH17-mediated autoimmunity. This process is regulated by chemokines, which often show an overlapping expression pattern and function in pathogen- and autoimmune-induced inflammatory reactions. Using a murine model of crescentic GN, we show that the pathogenic TH17/IL-17 immune response induces chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 5 (CXCL5) expression in kidney tubular cells, which recruits destructive neutrophils that contribute to renal tissue injury. By contrast, CXCL5 was dispensable for neutrophil recruitment and effective bacterial clearance in a murine model of acute bacterial pyelonephritis. In line with these findings, CXCL5 expression was highly upregulated in the kidneys of patients with ANCA-associated crescentic GN as opposed to patients with acute bacterial pyelonephritis. Our data therefore identify CXCL5 as a potential therapeutic target for the restriction of pathogenic neutrophil infiltration in TH17-mediated autoimmune diseases while leaving intact the neutrophil function in protective immunity against invading pathogens. PMID:24904089

  2. Exercise, training and neutrophil microbicidal activity.

    PubMed

    Smith, J A; Telford, R D; Mason, I B; Weidemann, M J

    1990-06-01

    The concentration in human plasma of putative neutrophil-"priming" cytokines like endogenous pyrogens is known to increase significantly in response to moderate exercise (11). This is characteristic of an acute-phase response. The ability of blood neutrophils isolated from both trained and untrained human subjects (n = 11, 9) to produce microbicidal reactive oxygen species was determined using luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence both before and after one hour of aerobic exercise at 60% VO2max. Irrespective of training and stimulus concentration, exercise nearly always caused significant "priming" of the capacity of neutrophils to produce H2O2 and HOCl upon stimulation with opsonized zymosan (P less than 0.01); however, compared to their untrained counterparts, the activity of cells isolated from trained individuals was depressed about 50% at unit stimulus concentration, both before and after exercise (P less than 0.075), whilst remaining unaltered at saturating concentrations. Although neutrophil oxygenation activity is only one parameter that contributes to immunological status, regular episodes of moderate exercise may increase resistance to infection by priming the "killing capacity" of neutrophils. In contrast, prolonged periods of intensive training may lead to increased susceptibility to common infections by diminishing this activity. PMID:2115507

  3. Resistance to P. brasiliensis Experimental Infection of Inbred Mice Is Associated with an Efficient Neutrophil Mobilization and Activation by Mediators of Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sperandio, Felipe Fornias; Fernandes, Gisele Pesquero; Mendes, Ana Carolina Silvério Cerqueira; Bani, Giulia Maria de Alencar Castro; Calich, Vera Lucia Garcia; Burger, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic fungal infection, endemic in Brazil, that leads to severe morbidity and even mortality if not correctly treated. Patients may respond differently to PCM depending on the pattern of the acquired immune response developed. The onset of protective immune response is notably mediated by neutrophils (PMN) that play an important role through directly killing the fungi and also by interacting with other cell types to modulate the acquired protective immune response that may follow. In that way, this study aimed to present and compare different experimental models of PCM (intraperitoneal and subcutaneous) regarding PMN production and maturation inside femoral bone marrow and also PMN infiltration in peritoneal and subcutaneous exudates of resistant and susceptible mice. We also assessed the fungal colony forming units and the levels of soluble inflammatory mediators (LTB4, KC, IFN-γ, GM-CSF, and IL-10) inside subcutaneous air-pouches to compare the efficiency of the PMN present at this site in relation to the two main neutrophil functions: initial lysis of the invading pathogen and modulation of the acquired immune response. P. brasiliensis inoculated intraperitoneally was able to disseminate to the bone marrow of susceptible mice, causing a more marked alteration of PMN production and maturation than that observed after resistant mice infection by the same route. Subcutaneous air-pouch inoculation of P. brasiliensis elicited a controlled and limited infection that produced a PMN-rich exudate, thus favoring the study of the interaction between the fungus and the neutrophils. Susceptible mice produced higher numbers of PMN; however, these cells were less effective in killing the fungi. Inflammatory cytokines were more pronounced in resistant mice, which supports their PCM raised resistance. PMID:26819497

  4. Resistance to P. brasiliensis Experimental Infection of Inbred Mice Is Associated with an Efficient Neutrophil Mobilization and Activation by Mediators of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sperandio, Felipe Fornias; Fernandes, Gisele Pesquero; Mendes, Ana Carolina Silvério Cerqueira; Bani, Giulia Maria de Alencar Castro; Calich, Vera Lucia Garcia; Burger, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic fungal infection, endemic in Brazil, that leads to severe morbidity and even mortality if not correctly treated. Patients may respond differently to PCM depending on the pattern of the acquired immune response developed. The onset of protective immune response is notably mediated by neutrophils (PMN) that play an important role through directly killing the fungi and also by interacting with other cell types to modulate the acquired protective immune response that may follow. In that way, this study aimed to present and compare different experimental models of PCM (intraperitoneal and subcutaneous) regarding PMN production and maturation inside femoral bone marrow and also PMN infiltration in peritoneal and subcutaneous exudates of resistant and susceptible mice. We also assessed the fungal colony forming units and the levels of soluble inflammatory mediators (LTB4, KC, IFN-γ, GM-CSF, and IL-10) inside subcutaneous air-pouches to compare the efficiency of the PMN present at this site in relation to the two main neutrophil functions: initial lysis of the invading pathogen and modulation of the acquired immune response. P. brasiliensis inoculated intraperitoneally was able to disseminate to the bone marrow of susceptible mice, causing a more marked alteration of PMN production and maturation than that observed after resistant mice infection by the same route. Subcutaneous air-pouch inoculation of P. brasiliensis elicited a controlled and limited infection that produced a PMN-rich exudate, thus favoring the study of the interaction between the fungus and the neutrophils. Susceptible mice produced higher numbers of PMN; however, these cells were less effective in killing the fungi. Inflammatory cytokines were more pronounced in resistant mice, which supports their PCM raised resistance. PMID:26819497

  5. Activated neutrophils disrupt endothelial monolayer integrity by an oxygen radical-independent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan, J.M.; Schwartz, B.R.; Reidy, M.A.; Schwartz, S.M.; Ochs, H.D.; Harker, L.A.

    1985-02-01

    The effect of activated neutrophils on endothelial monolayer integrity in vitro has been measured by assessing the capacity of endothelial monolayers on polycarbonate filters to exclude /sup 125/I-albumin. Although formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP)-activated neutrophils failed to induce /sup 51/Cr-release or detachment after 4 hours of incubation with endothelial monolayers cultured in polystyrene wells, FMLP-activated neutrophils produced a marked increase in the passage of /sup 125/I-albumin across bovine aortic or pulmonary artery endothelial monolayers on polycarbonate filters. This effect was evident as early as 30 minutes following the addition of FMLP-activated neutrophils to the monolayer and reached 180% over control values at 2 hours (p . 0.001). Light and transmission electron microscopic examination of the polycarbonate filters exposed to FMLP-activated neutrophils revealed focal disruption of the endothelial monolayers. Chronic granulomatous disease neutrophils produced similar disruption of the endothelial monolayer at 2 hours. Moreover, catalase and superoxide dismutase failed to reduce significantly the neutrophil-mediated increase in /sup 125/I-albumin passage at 2 hours. Cell-free postsecretory supernatants of FMLP-activated neutrophils, leukotriene C4, and platelet activating factor did not induce a significant increase in /sup 125/I-albumin passage across the endothelial monolayers. Of note, FMLP-activated neutrophils from a patient with a congenital abnormality of neutrophil adhesion and chemotaxis did not induce disruption of the monolayer or increase /sup 125/I-albumin passage.

  6. TNFalpha-mediated plasminogen activation on neutrophils is involved in the high plasmin activity in mammary secretion of drying-off cows.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wen K; Yu, Ting C; Chen, Shuen E; Peh, Ho C; Liu, Wen B; Chen, Ming T; Nagahata, Hajime; Chang, Chai J

    2009-11-01

    Interactions between inflammatory cytokines and plasminogen (Pg) activation system on immune cells are yet to be established. In previous studies we reported a somatic cell-associated elevation of proteolytic activity in mammary secretion of drying-off goats and cows. The purposes of the present study were to examine the role of TNF-alpha in polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN)-associated Pg activation, and the significance of this activation pathway for overall plasmin (Pm) activity in mammary secretion of drying-off cows. Results of experiments in vitro showed that the spontaneous Pg activation observed on fresh preparations of bovine blood PMN was completely blocked by anti bovine TNF-alpha antibody, and was further up-regulated by exogenous bovine TNF-alpha. Monitoring the parameters of mammary secretion of drying-off cows revealed that both somatic cell counts and differential PMN ratio was significantly elevated at weeks 1, 2 and 3 of milk stasis. Nevertheless, specific activity of soluble Pm in mammary secretion increased and the level of 17-kDa TNF-alpha decreased immediately following milk stasis. Iimmunoblotting revealed that although both 26-kDa pro-TNF-alpha and 17-kDa TNF-alpha were consistently present in somatic cells of mammary secretion collected at weeks 0, 1, 2 and 3 of milk stasis, only 26-kDa pro-TNF-alpha was present in somatic cells of milk during lactation. In-vitro assay indicated that cell-free mammary secretion of drying-off cows exerted no Pg activation bioactivity towards bovine blood PMN. Altogether, the current study suggests the existence of an active TNF-alpha-Pg-Pm autocrine/paracrine loop on the massively infiltrated PMN inside udders of drying-off cows, which involves extensive binding and internalization of 17-kDa TNF-alpha on PMN and consequently activation of Pg, resulting in high Pm activity and low 17-kDa TNF-alpha level in mammary secretion. These coordinated mechanisms may play a role in the defence of drying-off mammary

  7. Intracellular mechanisms of hydroquinone toxicity on endotoxin-activated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hebeda, Cristina Bichels; Pinedo, Fernanda Júdice; Bolonheis, Simone Marques; Ferreira, Zulma F; Muscará, Marcelo Nicolas; Teixeira, Simone Aparecida; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli

    2012-11-01

    Circulating neutrophils promptly react to different substances in the blood and orchestrate the beginning of the innate inflammatory response. We have shown that in vivo exposure to hydroquinone (HQ), the most oxidative compound of cigarette smoke and a toxic benzene metabolite, affects circulating neutrophils, making them unresponsive to a subsequent bacterial infection. In order to understand the action of toxic molecular mechanisms on neutrophil functions, in vitro HQ actions on pro-inflammatory mediator secretions evoked by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were investigated. Neutrophils from male Wistar rats were cultured with vehicle or HQ (5 or 10 μM; 2 h) and subsequently incubated with LPS (5 μg/ml; 18 h). Hydroquinone treatment impaired LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO), tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 secretions by neutrophils. The toxic effect was not dependent on cell death, reduced expression of the LPS receptor or toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) or cell priming, as HQ did not induce reactive oxygen species generation or β(2)integrin membrane expression. The action of toxic mechanisms on cytokine secretion was dependent on reduced gene synthesis, which may be due to decreased nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) nuclear translocation. Conversely, this intracellular pathway was not involved in impaired NO production because HQ treatments only affected inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression and activity, suggesting posttranscriptional and/or posttranslational mechanisms of action. Altogether, our data show that HQ alters the action of different LPS-activated pathways on neutrophils, which may contribute to the impaired triggering of the host innate immune reaction detected during in vivo HQ exposure. PMID:22717997

  8. Neutrophil-derived Oxidants and Proteinases as Immunomodulatory Mediators in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Witko-Sarsat, V.

    1994-01-01

    Neutrophils generate potent microbicidal molecules via the oxygen-dependent pathway, leading to the generation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI), and via the non-oxygen dependent pathway, consisting in the release of serine proteinases and metalloproteinases stored in granules. Over the past years, the concept has emerged that both ROI and proteinases can be viewed as mediators able to modulate neutrophil responses as well as the whole inflammatory process. This is well illustrated by the oxidative regulation of proteinase activity showing that oxidants and proteinases acts is concert to optimize the microbicidal activity and to damage host tissues. ROI and proteinases can modify the activity of several proteins involved in the control of inflammatory process. Among them, tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-8, are elective targets for such a modulation. Moreover, ROI and proteinases are also able to modulate the adhesion process of neutrophils to endothelial cells, which is a critical step in the inflammatory process. PMID:18472951

  9. Nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis of neutrophils through caspase-8 and caspase-3-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Megha; Nagarkoti, Sheela; Awasthi, Deepika; Singh, Abhishek K; Chandra, Tulika; Kumaravelu, J; Barthwal, Manoj K; Dikshit, Madhu

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils play an indispensable role in killing of invading pathogens by enhancing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NO generation, and subsequently undergoing apoptosis. Unlike ROS/NOX2, role of NO/NOS still remains undefined in the apoptosis of neutrophils (PMNs) and the present study attempts to decipher the importance of NO/NOS in the neutrophil apoptosis. Prolonged treatment of human PMNs or mice bone marrow derived neutrophils (BMDN) with NO led to enhanced ROS generation, caspase-8/caspase-3 cleavage, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and finally cellular apoptosis. NO-induced ROS generation led to caspase-8 deglutathionylation and activation, which subsequently activated mitochondrial death pathway via BID (Bcl-2 family protein) cleavage. NO-mediated augmentation of caspase-8 and BID cleavage was significantly prevented in BMDN from neutrophil cytosolic factor-1 (NCF-1) knockout (KO) mice, implying the involvement of NOX2 in NO-induced apoptosis of PMNs. Furthermore, ROS, NO generation and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression were enhanced in a time-dependent manner in human PMNs and mice BMDN undergoing spontaneous apoptosis. Pharmacological and genetic ablation of iNOS in human PMNs and mice BMDN significantly reduced the levels of apoptosis. Impaired apoptosis of BMDN from iNOS KO mice was due to reduced caspase-8 activity which subsequently prevented caspase-3 and -9 activation. Altogether, our results suggest a crucial role of NO/iNOS in neutrophil apoptosis via enhanced ROS generation and caspase-8 mediated activation of mitochondrial death pathway. PMID:27584786

  10. Pneumolysin activates neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

    PubMed

    G Nel, J; Theron, A J; Durandt, C; Tintinger, G R; Pool, R; Mitchell, T J; Feldman, C; Anderson, R

    2016-06-01

    The primary objective of the current study was to investigate the potential of the pneumococcal toxin, pneumolysin (Ply), to activate neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation in vitro. Isolated human blood neutrophils were exposed to recombinant Ply (5-20 ng ml(-1) ) for 30-90 min at 37°C and NET formation measured using the following procedures to detect extracellular DNA: (i) flow cytometry using Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Ruby; (ii) spectrofluorimetry using the fluorophore, Sytox(®) Orange (5 μM); and (iii) NanoDrop(®) technology. These procedures were complemented by fluorescence microscopy using 4', 6-diamino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) (nuclear stain) in combination with anti-citrullinated histone monoclonal antibodies to visualize nets. Exposure of neutrophils to Ply resulted in relatively rapid (detected within 30-60 min), statistically significant (P < 0·05) dose- and time-related increases in the release of cellular DNA impregnated with both citrullinated histone and myeloperoxidase. Microscopy revealed that NETosis appeared to be restricted to a subpopulation of neutrophils, the numbers of NET-forming cells in the control and Ply-treated systems (10 and 20 ng ml(-1) ) were 4·3 (4·2), 14.3 (9·9) and 16·5 (7·5), respectively (n = 4, P < 0·0001 for comparison of the control with both Ply-treated systems). Ply-induced NETosis occurred in the setting of retention of cell viability, and apparent lack of involvement of reactive oxygen species and Toll-like receptor 4. In conclusion, Ply induces vital NETosis in human neutrophils, a process which may either contribute to host defence or worsen disease severity, depending on the intensity of the inflammatory response during pneumococcal infection. PMID:26749379

  11. Neutrophils prime a long-lived effector macrophage phenotype that mediates accelerated helminth expulsion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Wu, Wenhui; Millman, Ariel; Craft, Joshua F.; Chen, Eunice; Patel, Nirav; Boucher, Jean L.; Urban, Joseph F.; Kim, Charles C.; Gause, William C.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the role of innate cells in acquired resistance to the natural murine parasitic nematode, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. Macrophages obtained as late as 45 days after N. brasiliensis inoculation were able to transfer accelerated parasite clearance to naive recipients. Primed macrophages adhered to larvae in vitro and triggered increased mortality of parasites. Neutrophil depletion in primed mice abrogated the protective effects of transferred macrophages and inhibited their in vitro binding to larvae. Neutrophils in parasite-infected mice showed a distinct transcriptional profile and promoted alternatively activated M2 macrophage polarization through secretory factors including IL-13. Differentially activated neutrophils in the context of a type 2 immune response therefore prime a long-lived effector macrophage phenotype that directly mediates rapid nematode damage and clearance. PMID:25173346

  12. Neutrophil activator of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (NAM).

    PubMed

    Rollo, Ellen E; Hymowitz, Michelle; Schmidt, Cathleen E; Montana, Steve; Foda, Hussein; Zucker, Stanley

    2006-01-01

    We have isolated a novel soluble factor(s), neutrophil activator of matrix metalloproteinases (NAM), secreted by unstimulated normal human peripheral blood neutrophils that causes the activation of cell secreted promatrix metalloproteinase-2 (proMMP-2). Partially purified preparations of NAM have been isolated from the conditioned media of neutrophils employing gelatin-Sepharose chromatography and differential membrane filter centrifugation. NAM activity, as assessed by exposing primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) or HT1080 cells to NAM followed by gelatin zymography, was seen within one hour. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and hydroxamic acid derived inhibitors of MMPs (CT1746 and BB94) abrogated the activation of proMMP-2 by NAM, while inhibitors of serine and cysteine proteases showed no effect. NAM also produced an increase in TIMP-2 binding to HUVEC and HT1080 cell surfaces that was inhibited by TIMP-2, CT1746, and BB94. Time-dependent increases in MT1-MMP protein and mRNA were seen following the addition of NAM to cells. These data support a role for NAM in cancer dissemination. PMID:17086359

  13. Intravenous immunoglobulins modulate neutrophil activation and vascular injury through FcγRIII and SHP-1

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jung-Eun; Hidalgo, Andrés; Frenette, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Intravascular neutrophil recruitment and activation are a key pathogenic factor that contributes to vascular injury. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been shown to have a beneficial effect in systemic inflammatory disorders; however, the mechanisms underlying IVIG’s inhibitory effect on neutrophil recruitment and activation are not understood. Objective We studied the mechanisms by which IVIG exerts protection from neutrophil-mediated acute vascular injury. Methods and Results We examined neutrophil behavior in response to IVIG in vivo using real time intravital microscopy. We found that an antibody that blocks both FcγRIII and its inhibitory receptor counterpart, FcγRIIB, abrogated the inhibitory effect of IVIG on leukocyte recruitment and heterotypic RBC interactions with adherent leukocytes in wild-type mice. In the context of sickle cell disease, the blockade of both FcγRIIB and III abrogated the protective effect of IVIG on acute vaso-occlusive crisis caused by neutrophil recruitment and activation. Analysis of FcγRIIB- and FcγRIII-deficient mice revealed the predominant expression of FcγRIII on circulating neutrophils. FcγRIII mediated IVIG-triggered inhibition of leukocyte recruitment, circulating RBC capture, and enhanced Mac-1 activity, whereas FcγRIIB was dispensable. In addition, FcγRIII-induced IVIG anti-inflammatory activity in neutrophils was mediated by recruitment of Src homology 2 (SH2)-containing tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1). Indeed, the protective effect of IVIG on leukocyte recruitment and activation was abrogated in SHP-1-mutant mice. Conclusions FcγRIII, a classical activating receptor, has an unexpected inhibitory role on neutrophil adhesion and activation via recruitment of SHP-1 in response to IVIG. Our results identify SHP-1 as a therapeutic target in neutrophil-mediated vascular injury. PMID:22415018

  14. FMLP activates Ras and Raf in human neutrophils. Potential role in activation of MAP kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Worthen, G S; Avdi, N; Buhl, A M; Suzuki, N; Johnson, G L

    1994-01-01

    Chemoattractants bind to seven transmembrane-spanning, G-protein-linked receptors on polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) and induce a variety of functional responses, including activation of microtubule-associated protein (MAP) kinase. Although the pathways by which MAP kinases are activated in neutrophils are unknown, we hypothesized that activation of the Ras/Raf pathway leading to activation of MAP/ERK kinase (MEK) would be induced by the chemoattractant f-met-leu-phe. Human neutrophils exposed to 10 nM FMLP for 30 s exhibited an MAP kinase kinase activity coeluting with MEK-1. Immunoprecipitation of Raf-1 kinase after stimulation with FMLP revealed an activity that phosphorylated MEK, was detectable at 30 s, and peaked at 2-3 min. Immunoprecipitation of Ras from both intact neutrophils labeled with [32P]orthophosphate and electropermeabilized neutrophils incubated with [32P]GTP was used to determine that FMLP treatment was associated with activation of Ras. Activation of both Ras and Raf was inhibited by treatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin, indicating predominant linkage to the Gi2 protein. Although phorbol esters activated Raf, activation induced by FMLP appeared independent of protein kinase C, further suggesting that Gi2 was linked to Ras and Raf independent of phospholipase C and protein kinase C. Dibutyryl cAMP, which inhibits many neutrophil functional responses, blocked the activation of Raf by FMLP, suggesting that interruption of the Raf/MAP kinase pathway influences neutrophil responses to chemoattractants. These data suggest that Gi2-mediated receptor regulation of the Ras/Raf/MAP kinase pathway is a primary response to chemoattractants. Images PMID:8040337

  15. [Neutrophil activation by sea hydrobiont biopolymers].

    PubMed

    Zaporozhets, T S

    2003-01-01

    Biopolymers of sea hydrobionts such as mytilan, alpha-1,4;1,6-D-glycan isolated from the muntle of the mussel Crenomytilus grayanus; translam, beta-1,3;1,6-D-glucan isolated from the seaweed Laminaria cichorioides; fucoidan, a sulfated polysccharide isolated from the algae Fucus evanescens; zosterin, a pectin isolated from sea grass of the family Zosteraceae were comparatively studied. The mechanisms of the phagocyte activation were investigated and the dose-dependent ability of the biopolymers to increase in vitro adhesion of the intact cells and to restore the neutrophil functions at cyclophosphamide-induced immunodepression was detected. The neutrophil activation by mytilan, zosterin and fucoidan linked with the adhesion potentiation was shown to be associated with their ability to increase the number of the adhesion receptors and in particular CD116b on the cell surface. The lower potential of the neutrophils preincubated in vitro with high doses of translam beta-glucan could be due to blockade of the beta-glucan receptors participating in the complex multicomponent adhesion process. The use of the biopolymers of the sea hydrobionts of the glycobiological nature for modulation of the immunity processes provided rather convenient in vivo management of intracellular processes through direct and competing carbohydrate specific interactions of the modifiers with the membrane receptors and formation of active and inactive lectin-glycoligand and carbohydrate-carbohydrate complexes. PMID:15002173

  16. [Perfluorocarbon emulsions and other corpuscular systems influence on neutrophil activity].

    PubMed

    Shekhtman, D G; Safronova, V G; Sklifas, A N; Alovskaia, A A; Gapeev, A B; Obraztsov, V V; Chemeris, N K

    1997-01-01

    Influence of perfluorodecalin, perfluoromethilcyclohexylpiperidine, perfluorotributylamine emulsions on active oxygen form (AOF) generation by neutrophils has been studied. All investigated emulsions stabilized both proxanol 268 and egg yolk phospholipids inhibited PMA-stimulated neutrophil activity. Castor oil emulsion also inhibited the neutrophil activity. Neutrophil response for chemotactic peptide, was unchanged in the presence of all tested emulsions. We suppose that fast hydrophobic attachment of inert submicrone emulsion particles to cell surface provokes alteration of neutrophil plasma membrane function resulting in a decrease of AOF generation. PMID:9490112

  17. Neutrophil elastase processing of Gelatinase A is mediated by extracellular matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, A.; Banda, M.J.

    1995-07-18

    Gelatinase A (72-kDa type IV collagenase) is a metalloproteinase that is expressed by many cells in culture and is overexpressed by some tumor cells. It has been suggested that the serine proteinase neutrophil elastase might play a role iii the posttranslational processing of gelatinase A and that noncatalytic interactions between gelatinase A and components of the extracellular matrix might alter potential processing pathways. These questions were addressed with the use of gelatin substrate zymography, gelatinolytic activity assays, and amino acid sequence analysis. We found that neutrophil elastase does proteolytically modify gelatinase A by cleaving at a number of sites within gelatinase A. Sequential treatment of gelatinase A with 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate (APMA) and neutrophil elastase yielded an active gelatinase with a 4-fold increase in gelatinolytic activity. The increased gelatinolytic activity correlated with that of a 40-kDa fragment of gelatinase A. Matrix components altered the proteolytic modifications in gelatinase A that were mediated by neutrophil elastase. In the absence of gelatin, neutrophil elastase destructively degraded gelatinase A by hydrolyzing at least two bonds within the fibronectin-like gelatin-binding domain of gelatinase A. In the presence of gelatin, these two inactivating cleavage sites were protected, and cleavage at a site within the hemopexin-like carboxyl-terminal domain resulted in a truncated yet active gelatinase. The results suggest a regulatory role for extracellular matrix molecules in stabilizing gelatinase A fragments and in altering the availability of sites susceptible to destructive proteolysis by neutrophil elastase. 32 refs., 10 figs.

  18. Yersinia enterocolitica-mediated degradation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs).

    PubMed

    Möllerherm, Helene; Neumann, Ariane; Schilcher, Katrin; Blodkamp, Stefanie; Zeitouni, Nathalie E; Dersch, Petra; Lüthje, Petra; Naim, Hassan Y; Zinkernagel, Annelies S; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren

    2015-12-01

    Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation is described as a tool of the innate host defence to fight against invading pathogens. Fibre-like DNA structures associated with proteins such as histones, cell-specific enzymes and antimicrobial peptides are released, thereby entrapping invading pathogens. It has been reported that several bacteria are able to degrade NETs by nucleases and thus evade the NET-mediated entrapment. Here we studied the ability of three different Yersinia serotypes to induce and degrade NETs. We found that the common Yersinia enterocolitica serotypes O:3, O:8 and O:9 were able to induce NETs in human blood-derived neutrophils during the first hour of co-incubation. At later time points, the NET amount was reduced, suggesting that degradation of NETs has occurred. This was confirmed by NET degradation assays with phorbol-myristate-acetate-pre-stimulated neutrophils. In addition, we found that the Yersinia supernatants were able to degrade purified plasmid DNA. The absence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions, but not that of a protease inhibitor cocktail, completely abolished NET degradation. We therefore postulate that Y. enterocolitica produces Ca(2+)/Mg(2+)-dependent NET-degrading nucleases as shown for some Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:26459885

  19. A Combretastatin-Mediated Decrease in Neutrophil Concentration in Peripheral Blood and the Impact on the Anti-Tumor Activity of This Drug in Two Different Murine Tumor Models

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Anja Bille; Wittenborn, Thomas; Brems-Eskildsen, Anne Sofie; Laurberg, Tinne; Bertelsen, Lotte Bonde; Nielsen, Thomas; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Møller, Bjarne Kuno; Horsman, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    The vascular disrupting agent combretastatin A-4 disodium phosphate (CA4P) induces fluctuations in peripheral blood neutrophil concentration. Because neutrophils have the potential to induce both vascular damage and angiogenesis we analyzed neutrophil involvement in the anti-tumoral effects of CA4P in C3H mammary carcinomas in CDF1 mice and in SCCVII squamous cell carcinomas in C3H/HeN mice. Flow cytometry analyses of peripheral blood before and up to 144 h after CA4P administration (25 and 250 mg/kg) revealed a decrease 1 h after treatment, followed by an early (3–6 h) and a late (>72 h) increase in the granulocyte concentration. We suggest that the early increase (3–6 h) in granulocyte concentration was caused by the initial decrease at 1 h and found that the late increase was associated with tumor size, and hence independent of CA4P. No alterations in neutrophil infiltration into the C3H tumor after CA4P treatment (25 and 250 mg/kg) were found. Correspondingly, neutrophil depletion in vivo, using an anti-neutrophil antibody, followed by CA4P treatment (25 mg/kg) did not increase the necrotic fraction in C3H tumors significantly. However, by increasing the CA4P dose to 250 mg/kg we found a significant increase of 359% in necrotic fraction when compared to neutrophil-depleted mice; in mice with no neutrophil depletion CA4P induced an 89% change indicating that the presence of neutrophils reduced the effect of CA4P. In contrast, neither CA4P nor 1A8 affected the necrotic fraction in the SCCVII tumors significantly. Hence, we suggest that the initial decrease in granulocyte concentration was caused by non-tumor-specific recruitment of neutrophils and that neutrophils may attenuate CA4P-mediated anti-tumor effect in some tumor models. PMID:25299269

  20. C5a Mediates Peripheral Blood Neutrophil Dysfunction in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Andrew Conway; Kefala, Kallirroi; Wilkinson, Thomas S.; Dhaliwal, Kevin; Farrell, Lesley; Walsh, Tim; Mackenzie, Simon J.; Reid, Hamish; Davidson, Donald J.; Haslett, Chris; Rossi, Adriano G.; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Simpson, A. John

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Critically ill patients are highly susceptible to hospital-acquired infection. Neutrophil function in critical illness remains poorly understood. Objectives To characterize and define mechanisms of peripheral blood neutrophil (PBN) dysfunction in critically ill patients. To determine whether the inflamed lung contributes additional phagocytic impairment. Methods Prospective collection of blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with suspected ventilator-associated pneumonia and from age- and sex-matched volunteers; laboratory analysis of neutrophil functions. Measurements and Main Results Seventy-two patients and 21 volunteers were included. Phagocytic capacity of PBNs was 36% lower in patients than in volunteers (P < 0.0001). From several biologically plausible candidates only activated complement was significantly associated with impaired PBN phagocytosis (P < 0.0001). Phagocytosis was negatively correlated with serum C3a and positively correlated with expression of C5a receptor type 1 (CD88) on PBNs. C5a recapitulated impaired PBN phagocytosis and significantly down-regulated CD88 expression in vitro. C5a-mediated phagocytic impairment was prevented by blocking either CD88 or phosphoinositide 3-kinase, and completely reversed by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. C5a also impaired killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by, and migration of, PBNs, indicating that effects were not restricted to phagocytosis. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid leukocytes from patients also demonstrated significantly impaired function, and lavage supernatant reduced phagocytosis in healthy neutrophils by 43% (P = 0.0001). However, lavage fluid did not affect CD88 expression and lavage-mediated impairment of phagocytosis was not blocked by anti-CD88 antibody. Conclusions Critically ill patients have significant dysfunction of PBNs, which is mediated predominantly by activated complement. Further, profound complement-independent neutrophil dysfunction occurs

  1. S100A8/A9 Proteins Mediate Neutrophilic Inflammation and Lung Pathology during Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Radha; Monin, Leticia; Torres, Diana; Slight, Samantha; Mehra, Smriti; McKenna, Kyle C.; Fallert Junecko, Beth A.; Reinhart, Todd A.; Kolls, Jay; Báez-Saldaña, Renata; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Rodríguez-Reyna, Tatiana S.; Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Tessier, Phillipe; Roth, Johannes; Selman, Moisés; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Baquera-Heredia, Javier; Cumming, Bridgette; Kasprowicz, Victoria O.; Steyn, Adrie J. C.; Babu, Subash; Kaushal, Deepak; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Vogl, Thomas; Rangel-Moreno, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is the formation of granulomas. However, the immune factors that drive the formation of a protective granuloma during latent TB, and the factors that drive the formation of inflammatory granulomas during active TB, are not well defined. Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify the underlying immune mechanisms involved in formation of inflammatory granulomas seen during active TB. Methods: The immune mediators involved in inflammatory granuloma formation during TB were assessed using human samples and experimental models of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, using molecular and immunologic techniques. Measurements and Main Results: We demonstrate that in human patients with active TB and in nonhuman primate models of M. tuberculosis infection, neutrophils producing S100 proteins are dominant within the inflammatory lung granulomas seen during active TB. Using the mouse model of TB, we demonstrate that the exacerbated lung inflammation seen as a result of neutrophilic accumulation is dependent on S100A8/A9 proteins. S100A8/A9 proteins promote neutrophil accumulation by inducing production of proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines, and influencing leukocyte trafficking. Importantly, serum levels of S100A8/A9 proteins along with neutrophil-associated chemokines, such as keratinocyte chemoattractant, can be used as potential surrogate biomarkers to assess lung inflammation and disease severity in human TB. Conclusions: Our results thus show a major pathologic role for S100A8/A9 proteins in mediating neutrophil accumulation and inflammation associated with TB. Thus, targeting specific molecules, such as S100A8/A9 proteins, has the potential to decrease lung tissue damage without impacting protective immunity against TB. PMID:24047412

  2. Enhancement of neutrophil-mediated killing of Plasmodium falciparum asexual blood forms by fatty acids: importance of fatty acid structure.

    PubMed Central

    Kumaratilake, L M; Ferrante, A; Robinson, B S; Jaeger, T; Poulos, A

    1997-01-01

    Effects of fatty acids on human neutrophil-mediated killing of Plasmodium falciparum asexual blood forms were investigated by using a quantitative radiometric assay. The results showed that the antiparasitic activity of neutrophils can be greatly increased (>threefold) by short-term treatment with fatty acids with 20 to 24 carbon atoms and at least three double bonds. In particular, the n-3 polyenoic fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, and the n-6 fatty acid, arachidonic acid, significantly enhanced neutrophil antiparasitic activity. This effect was >1.5-fold higher than that induced by an optical concentration of the known agonist cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). At suboptimal concentrations, the combination of arachidonic acid and TNF-alpha caused a synergistic increase in neutrophil-mediated parasite killing. The fatty acid-induced effect was independent of the availability of serum opsonins but dependent on the structure of the fatty acids. The length of the carbon chain, degree of unsaturation, and availability of a free carboxyl group were important determinants of fatty acid activity. The fatty acids which increased neutrophil-mediated killing primed the enhanced superoxide radical generation of neutrophils in response to P. falciparum as detected by chemiluminescence. Scavengers of oxygen radicals significantly reduced the fatty acid-enhanced parasite killing, but cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitors had no effect. These findings have identified a new class of immunoenhancers that could be exploited to increase resistance against Plasmodium species. PMID:9317021

  3. Effects of CXC chemokines on neutrophil activation and sequestration in hepatic vasculature.

    PubMed

    Bajt, M L; Farhood, A; Jaeschke, H

    2001-11-01

    The initiating step of neutrophil-induced cytotoxicity in the liver is the recruitment of these phagocytes into sinusoids. The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy of systemic exposure with individual inflammatory mediators on neutrophil activation and sequestration in the hepatic vasculature of C3Heb/FeJ mice as assessed by flow cytometry and histochemistry, respectively. The CXC chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2; 20 microg/kg) induced a time-dependent upregulation of Mac-1 (318% at 4 h) and shedding of L-selectin (41% at 4 h). MIP-2 treatment caused a temporary increase of sinusoidal neutrophil accumulation at 0.5 h [97 +/- 6 polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN)/50 high-power fields (HPF)], which declined to baseline (8 +/- 2) at 4 h. The CXC chemokine KC was largely ineffective in activating neutrophils or recruiting them into the liver. Cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1alpha) and cobra venom factor substantially increased Mac-1 expression and L-selectin shedding on neutrophils and caused stable sinusoidal neutrophil accumulation (170-220 PMN/50 HPF). Only cytokines induced venular neutrophil margination. Thus CXC chemokines in circulation are less effective than cytokines or complement in activation of neutrophils and their recruitment into the hepatic vasculature in vivo. PMID:11668027

  4. Neutrophil-mediated oxidative burst and host defense are controlled by a Vav-PLCγ2 signaling axis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Daniel B.; Robertson, Charles M.; Bautista, Jhoanne; Mascarenhas, Francesca; Diacovo, M. Julia; Montgrain, Vivianne; Lam, Siu Kit; Cremasco, Viviana; Dunne, W. Michael; Faccio, Roberta; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Swat, Wojciech

    2007-01-01

    Oxidative burst, a critical antimicrobial mechanism of neutrophils, involves the rapid generation and release of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) by the NADPH oxidase complex. Genetic mutations in an NADPH oxidase subunit, gp91 (also referred to as NOX2), are associated with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), which is characterized by recurrent and life-threatening microbial infections. To combat such infections, ROIs are produced by neutrophils after stimulation by integrin-dependent adhesion to the ECM in conjunction with stimulation from inflammatory mediators, or microbial components containing pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In this report, we provide genetic evidence that both the Vav family of Rho GTPase guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and phospholipase C–γ2 (PLC-γ2) are critical mediators of adhesion-dependent ROI production by neutrophils in mice. We also demonstrated that Vav was critically required for neutrophil-dependent host defense against systemic infection by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 2 common pathogens associated with fatal cases of hospital-acquired pneumonia. We identified a molecular pathway in which Vav GEFs linked integrin-mediated signaling with PLC-γ2 activation, release of intracellular Ca2+ cations, and generation of diacylglycerol to control assembly of the NADPH oxidase complex and ROI production by neutrophils. Taken together, our data indicate that integrin-dependent signals generated during neutrophil adhesion contribute to the activation of NADPH oxidase by a variety of distinct effector pathways, all of which require Vav. PMID:17932569

  5. Neutrophil-mediated oxidative burst and host defense are controlled by a Vav-PLCgamma2 signaling axis in mice.

    PubMed

    Graham, Daniel B; Robertson, Charles M; Bautista, Jhoanne; Mascarenhas, Francesca; Diacovo, M Julia; Montgrain, Vivianne; Lam, Siu Kit; Cremasco, Viviana; Dunne, W Michael; Faccio, Roberta; Coopersmith, Craig M; Swat, Wojciech

    2007-11-01

    Oxidative burst, a critical antimicrobial mechanism of neutrophils, involves the rapid generation and release of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) by the NADPH oxidase complex. Genetic mutations in an NADPH oxidase subunit, gp91 (also referred to as NOX2), are associated with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), which is characterized by recurrent and life-threatening microbial infections. To combat such infections, ROIs are produced by neutrophils after stimulation by integrin-dependent adhesion to the ECM in conjunction with stimulation from inflammatory mediators, or microbial components containing pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In this report, we provide genetic evidence that both the Vav family of Rho GTPase guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and phospholipase C-gamma2 (PLC-gamma2) are critical mediators of adhesion-dependent ROI production by neutrophils in mice. We also demonstrated that Vav was critically required for neutrophil-dependent host defense against systemic infection by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 2 common pathogens associated with fatal cases of hospital-acquired pneumonia. We identified a molecular pathway in which Vav GEFs linked integrin-mediated signaling with PLC-gamma2 activation, release of intracellular Ca2+ cations, and generation of diacylglycerol to control assembly of the NADPH oxidase complex and ROI production by neutrophils. Taken together, our data indicate that integrin-dependent signals generated during neutrophil adhesion contribute to the activation of NADPH oxidase by a variety of distinct effector pathways, all of which require Vav. PMID:17932569

  6. Role of hydrogen peroxide in neutrophil-mediated destruction of cultured endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, S J; Young, J; LoBuglio, A F; Slivka, A; Nimeh, N F

    1981-01-01

    Human neutrophils stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate were able to destroy suspensions or monolayers of cultured human endothelial cells. Neutrophil-mediated cytotoxicity was related to phorbol myristate acetate concentration, time of incubation and neutrophil number. Cytolysis was prevented by the addition of catalase, while superoxide dismutase had no effect on cytotoxicity. The addition of the heme-enzyme inhibitors, azide or cyanide, markedly stimulated neutrophil-mediated damage while exogenous myeloperoxidase failed to stimulate cytolysis. Neutrophils isolated from patients with chronic granulomatous disease did not destroy the endothelial cell targets while myeloperoxidase-deficient neutrophils successfully mediated cytotoxicity. Endothelial cell damage mediated by the myeloperoxidase deficient cells was also inhibited by catalase but not superoxide dismutase. The addition of purified myeloperoxidase to the deficient cells did not stimulate cytotoxicity. Glucose-glucose oxidase, an enzyme system capable of generating hydrogen peroxide, could replace the neutrophil as the cytotoxic mediator. The addition of myeloperoxidase at low concentrations of glucose oxidase did not increase cytolysis, but at the higher concentrations of glucose oxidase it stimulated cytotoxicity. The destruction of endothelial cells by the glucose oxidase-myeloperoxidase system was inhibited by the addition of hypochlorous acid scavengers. In contrast, neutrophil-mediated cytolysis was not effectively inhibited by the hypochlorous acid scavengers. Based on these observations, we propose that human neutrophils can destroy cultured human endothelial cells by generating cytotoxic quantities of hydrogen peroxide. PMID:6268662

  7. Autoantibodies to Type VII Collagen Mediate Fcγ-Dependent Neutrophil Activation and Induce Dermal-Epidermal Separation in Cryosections of Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Sitaru, Cassian; Kromminga, Arno; Hashimoto, Takashi; Bröcker, Eva B.; Zillikens, Detlef

    2002-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita is an autoimmune subepidermal blistering disease associated with autoantibodies to type VII collagen, the major constituent of anchoring fibrils. Previous attempts to demonstrate the blister-inducing potential of autoantibodies to this protein have failed. To address this question, we used an in vitro model involving cryosections of human skin incubated with patients’ autoantibodies and leukocytes from healthy donors. We show that sera from 14 of 16 epidermolysis bullosa acquisita patients, in contrast to sera from healthy controls, induced dermal-epidermal separation in the cryosections. Recruitment and activation of neutrophils at the dermal-epidermal junction was necessary for split induction, whereas mononuclear cells were not required. Importantly, patients’ autoantibodies affinity-purified against a recombinant form of the noncollagenous 1 domain of type VII collagen retained their blister-inducing capacity in a dose-dependent manner, whereas patients’ IgG that was depleted of reactivity to type VII collagen lost this ability. Monoclonal antibody LH7.2 to the noncollagenous 1 domain of type VII collagen also induced subepidermal splits in the cryosections; F(ab′)2 fragments of autoantibodies to type VII collagen were not pathogenic. We demonstrate the capacity of autoantibodies to type VII collagen to trigger an Fcγ-dependent inflammation leading to split formation in cryosections of human skin. PMID:12107115

  8. Neutrophils mediate Salmonella Typhimurium clearance through the GBP4 inflammasome-dependent production of prostaglandins

    PubMed Central

    Tyrkalska, Sylwia D.; Candel, Sergio; Angosto, Diego; Gómez-Abellán, Victoria; Martín-Sánchez, Fátima; García-Moreno, Diana; Zapata-Pérez, Rubén; Sánchez-Ferrer, Álvaro; Sepulcre, María P.; Pelegrín, Pablo; Mulero, Victoriano

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are cytosolic molecular platforms that alert the immune system about the presence of infection. Here we report that zebrafish guanylate-binding protein 4 (Gbp4), an IFNγ-inducible GTPase protein harbouring a C-terminal CARD domain, is required for the inflammasome-dependent clearance of Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) by neutrophils in vivo. Despite the presence of the CARD domain, Gbp4 requires the universal inflammasome adaptor Asc for mediating its antibacterial function. In addition, the GTPase activity of Gbp4 is indispensable for inflammasome activation and ST clearance. Mechanistically, neutrophils are recruited to the infection site through the inflammasome-independent production of the chemokine (CXC motif) ligand 8 and leukotriene B4, and then mediate bacterial clearance through the Gbp4 inflammasome-dependent biosynthesis of prostaglandin D2. Our results point to GBPs as key inflammasome adaptors required for prostaglandin biosynthesis and bacterial clearance by neutrophils and suggest that transient activation of the inflammasome may be used to treat bacterial infections. PMID:27363812

  9. Neutrophils mediate Salmonella Typhimurium clearance through the GBP4 inflammasome-dependent production of prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Tyrkalska, Sylwia D; Candel, Sergio; Angosto, Diego; Gómez-Abellán, Victoria; Martín-Sánchez, Fátima; García-Moreno, Diana; Zapata-Pérez, Rubén; Sánchez-Ferrer, Álvaro; Sepulcre, María P; Pelegrín, Pablo; Mulero, Victoriano

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are cytosolic molecular platforms that alert the immune system about the presence of infection. Here we report that zebrafish guanylate-binding protein 4 (Gbp4), an IFNγ-inducible GTPase protein harbouring a C-terminal CARD domain, is required for the inflammasome-dependent clearance of Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) by neutrophils in vivo. Despite the presence of the CARD domain, Gbp4 requires the universal inflammasome adaptor Asc for mediating its antibacterial function. In addition, the GTPase activity of Gbp4 is indispensable for inflammasome activation and ST clearance. Mechanistically, neutrophils are recruited to the infection site through the inflammasome-independent production of the chemokine (CXC motif) ligand 8 and leukotriene B4, and then mediate bacterial clearance through the Gbp4 inflammasome-dependent biosynthesis of prostaglandin D2. Our results point to GBPs as key inflammasome adaptors required for prostaglandin biosynthesis and bacterial clearance by neutrophils and suggest that transient activation of the inflammasome may be used to treat bacterial infections. PMID:27363812

  10. Human neutrophil leukocyte elastase activity is inhibited by Phenol Red

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) activity in urine, sputum and nasal mucous is used as an indicator of inflammation due to viral or bacterial infection. However, bovine nasal mucous neutrophils collected, lysed and stored in Dulbecco's minimal medium containing Phenol Red, showed no NE activity with methox...

  11. Berberine in combination with yohimbine attenuates sepsis-induced neutrophil tissue infiltration and multiorgan dysfunction partly via IL-10-mediated inhibition of CCR2 expression in neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Faqiang; Yang, Duomeng; Tang, Xiangxu; Li, Hongmei; Lv, Xiuxiu; Lu, Daxiang; Wang, Huadong

    2016-06-01

    Infiltration of activated neutrophils into the vital organs contributes to the multiple organ dysfunctions in sepsis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of berberine in combination with yohimbine (BY) on neutrophil tissue infiltration and multiple organ damage during sepsis, and further elucidated the involved mechanisms. Sepsis was induced in mice by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). BY or CCR2 antagonist was administered 2h after CLP, and anti-IL-10 antibody (IL-10 Ab) or control IgG was injected intraperitoneally just before BY treatment. We found that IL-10 production was enhanced by BY therapy in septic mice. BY significantly attenuated neutrophil tissue infiltration and multiple organ injury in CLP-challenged mice, all of which were completely reversed by IL-10 Ab pretreatment. The levels of KC, MCP-1, MIP-1α and MIP-2 in the lung, liver and kidney were markedly increased 6h after CLP. BY reduced the tissue concentrations of these chemokines in septic mice, but IL-10 Ab pretreatment did not completely eliminate these inhibitory effects of BY. Particularly, dramatically increased CCR2 expression in circulating neutrophils of septic mice was reduced by BY and this effect was completely abolished by IL-10 Ab pretreatment. Furthermore, CCR2 antagonist also inhibited lung and renal injury and neutrophil infiltration in septic mice. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that BY therapy attenuates neutrophil tissue infiltration and multiple organ injury in septic mice, at least in part, via IL-10-mediated inhibition of CCR2 expression in circulating neutrophils. PMID:27082997

  12. Regulation of neutrophil apoptosis by modulation of PKB/Akt activation.

    PubMed

    Rane, Madhavi J; Klein, Jon B

    2009-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase, Akt, also known as PKB (Protein Kinase B) is one important signal transduction pathway that mediates the delay of neutrophil apoptosis caused by inflammatory mediators. Proteins controlled by the PKB/Akt pathway have been reported to prevent or reverse apoptotic-signaling pathways and regulate cell survival. In this review we discuss the role of PKB/Akt activation in the regulation of neutrophil activation during inflammation, and the importance of resolving the inflammatory response by inhibiting PKB/Akt activation and neutrophil survival. Furthermore, we introduce the concept of a dynamic Akt signal complex that is altered when an extracellular signal is initiated such that changes in protein-protein interactions within the Akt signal complex regulates Akt activity and cell survival. Various substrates of PKB/Akt as well as positive and negative regulators of PKB/Akt activation are discussed which in turn inhibit or enhance cellular survival. PMID:19273208

  13. Human neutrophil Fcγ receptors initiate and play specialized nonredundant roles in antibody-mediated inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Naotake; Asano, Kenichi; Lauterbach, Michael; Mayadas, Tanya N.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Antibody-antigen complex mediated inflammation is integral to the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. Mice deficient in the γ-chain of Fc-receptors are protected in IgG-mediated glomerulonephritis and the Arthus reaction and FcR-bearing mast cells and macrophages have been assigned primary roles in these processes. Here we demonstrate that neutrophil selective transgenic expression of the two uniquely human activating FcγRs, FcγRIIA and FcγRIIIB was sufficient to restore susceptibility to progressive anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis and the cutaneous Reverse Passive Arthus (RPA) reaction in γ-chain deficient mice. Both FcγRIIA and FcγRIIIB mediated robust neutrophil accumulation in tissues suggesting direct roles for these human receptors in IC-induced neutrophil recruitment, while FcγRIIA alone mediated organ injury. In an acute model of anti-GBM nephritis, both FcγRIIIB and FcγRIIA promoted initial neutrophil recruitment to glomerular immune-complexes (ICs) accessible to circulating cells, while FcγRIIA further sustained accumulation. In a model of soluble ICs deposited strictly within the post-capillary venules of the cremaster muscle, FcγRIIIB was solely responsible for converting initial selectin-dependent tethers to slow rolling and adhesion. However, in the cremaster RPA reaction, dependent on vascular and tissue accumulation of soluble ICs, FcγRIIA predominated in neutrophil recruitment that was dependent on G-protein coupled receptor activation. Thus, human FcγRs on neutrophils serve as the primary molecular links between ICs and immunological disease with FcγRIIA promoting tissue injury, and FcγRIIIB and FcγRIIA displaying specialized context-dependent functions in IC-induced neutrophil recruitment. PMID:18538590

  14. Ly6G-mediated depletion of neutrophils is dependent on macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Kevin W; Dekitani, Ken; Nielsen, Travis B; Pantapalangkoor, Paul; Spellberg, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated depletion of neutrophils is commonly used to study neutropenia. However, the mechanisms by which antibodies deplete neutrophils have not been well defined. We noticed that mice deficient in complement and macrophages had blunted neutrophil depletion in response to anti-Ly6G monoclonal antibody (MAb) treatment. In vitro, exposure of murine neutrophils to anti-Ly6G MAb in the presence of plasma did not result in significant depletion of cells, either in the presence or absence of complement. In vivo, anti-Ly6G-mediated neutrophil depletion was abrogated following macrophage depletion, but not complement depletion, indicating a requirement for macrophages to induce neutropenia by this method. These results inform the use and limitations of anti-Ly6G antibody as an experimental tool for depleting neutrophils in various immunological settings. PMID:26870635

  15. Prevention of neutrophil extravasation by α2-adrenoceptor-mediated endothelial stabilization.

    PubMed

    Herrera-García, Ada María; Domínguez-Luis, María Jesús; Arce-Franco, María; Armas-González, Estefanía; Álvarez de La Rosa, Diego; Machado, José David; Pec, Martina K; Feria, Manuel; Barreiro, Olga; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Díaz-González, Federico

    2014-09-15

    Adrenergic receptors are expressed on the surface of inflammation-mediating cells, but their potential role in the regulation of the inflammatory response is still poorly understood. The objectives of this work were to study the effects of α2-adrenergic agonists on the inflammatory response in vivo and to determine their mechanism of action. In two mouse models of inflammation, zymosan air pouch and thioglycolate-induced peritonitis models, the i.m. treatment with xylazine or UK14304, two α2-adrenergic agonists, reduced neutrophil migration by 60%. The α2-adrenergic antagonist RX821002 abrogated this effect. In flow cytometry experiments, the basal surface expression of L-selectin and CD11b was modified neither in murine nor in human neutrophils upon α2-agonist treatment. Similar experiments in HUVEC showed that UK14304 prevented the activation-dependent upregulation of ICAM-1. In contrast, UK14304 augmented electrical resistance and reduced macromolecular transport through a confluent HUVEC monolayer. In flow chamber experiments, under postcapillary venule-like flow conditions, the pretreatment of HUVECs, but not neutrophils, with α2-agonists decreased transendothelial migration, without affecting neutrophil rolling. Interestingly, α2-agonists prevented the TNF-α-mediated decrease in expression of the adherens junctional molecules, VE-cadherin, β-catenin, and plakoglobin, and reduced the ICAM-1-mediated phosphorylation of VE-cadherin by immunofluorescence and confocal analysis and Western blot analysis, respectively. These findings indicate that α2-adrenoceptors trigger signals that protect the integrity of endothelial adherens junctions during the inflammatory response, thus pointing at the vascular endothelium as a therapeutic target for the management of inflammatory processes in humans. PMID:25114107

  16. Characterization of a lipopolysaccharide mediated neutrophilic hepatitis model in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Rose, Robert; Banerjee, Atrayee; Ramaiah, Shashi K

    2007-01-01

    Several studies have investigated the role of neutrophils during endotoxin-mediated liver injury, yet the precise mechanism for endotoxin-mediated hepatic neutrophil transmigration is unknown. The primary objective of this study was to establish a reliable lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated necro-hepatitis model to investigate the mechanisms of hepatic neutrophil infiltration following LPS administration. Male Sprague Dawley rats were administered a single (5 or 10 mg kg(-1), i.v.) or repeated injection of LPS (10 mg kg(-1), i.v., 24 h apart) with appropriate controls (i.v. saline) and were killed at various time points following LPS injection. Significant hematologic changes included neutrophilia, elevation of the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio and toxic changes in neutrophils. Biochemical changes were observed in several liver (aspartate aminotransferase AST, gamma glutamyl transferase GGT) and kidney (blood urea nitrogen BUN) associated parameters generally at the earliest time points. Histopathology revealed a time-dependent neutrophil and mononuclear infiltration around the periportal areas in the single dose study and multifocal midzonal coagulative necrosis in the repeated dose study. The neutrophil adhesion molecule, CD 11b was up-regulated in single and repeat dose studies. Based on these studies, a reliable LPS-mediated hepatitis model with necrosis was developed by intravenous administration of LPS in a repeat dose fashion. Midzonal hepatic necrosis, peripheral neutrophilia, hepatic neutrophil infiltration and up-regulation of CD11b were the most significant and consistent markers of LPS mediated effects in this model. PMID:17370240

  17. miR-21-mediated decreased neutrophil apoptosis is a determinant of impaired coronary collateral growth in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hutcheson, Rebecca; Terry, Russell; Hutcheson, Brenda; Jadhav, Rashmi; Chaplin, Jennifer; Smith, Erika; Barrington, Robert; Proctor, Spencer D; Rocic, Petra

    2015-06-01

    Coronary collateral growth (CCG) is impaired in metabolic syndrome. microRNA-21 (miR-21) is a proproliferative and antiapoptotic miR, which we showed to be elevated in metabolic syndrome. Here we investigate whether impaired CCG in metabolic syndrome involved miR-21-mediated aberrant apoptosis. Normal Sprague-Dawley (SD) and metabolic syndrome [J. C. Russel (JCR)] rats underwent transient, repetitive coronary artery occlusion [repetitive ischemia (RI)]. Antiapoptotic Bcl-2, phospho-Bad, and Bcl-2/Bax dimers were increased on days 6 and 9 RI, and proapoptotic Bax and Bax/Bax dimers and cytochrome-c release concurrently decreased in JCR versus SD rats. Active caspases were decreased in JCR versus SD rats (~50%). Neutrophils increased transiently on day 3 RI in the collateral-dependent zone of SD rats but remained elevated in JCR rats, paralleling miR-21 expression. miR-21 downregulation by anti-miR-21 induced neutrophil apoptosis and decreased Bcl-2 and Bcl-2/Bax dimers (~75%) while increasing Bax/Bax dimers, cytochrome-c release, and caspase activation (~70, 400, and 400%). Anti-miR-21 also improved CCG in JCR rats (~60%). Preventing neutrophil infiltration with blocking antibodies resulted in equivalent CCG recovery, confirming a major role for deregulated neutrophil apoptosis in CCG impairment. Neutrophil and miR-21-dependent CCG inhibition was in significant part mediated by increased oxidative stress. We conclude that neutrophil apoptosis is integral to normal CCG and that inappropriate prolonged miR-21-mediated survival of neutrophils plays a major role in impaired CCG, in part via oxidative stress generation. PMID:25840830

  18. A Lipid Mediator Hepoxilin A3 Is a Natural Inducer of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Douda, David N.; Grasemann, Hartmut; Pace-Asciak, Cecil

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis airways are accompanied by inflammation, neutrophilia, and mucous thickening. Cystic fibrosis sputum contains a large amount of uncleared DNA contributed by neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation from neutrophils. The exact mechanisms of the induction of NETosis in cystic fibrosis airways remain unclear, especially in uninfected lungs of patients with early cystic fibrosis lung disease. Here we show that Hepoxilin A3, a proinflammatory eicosanoid, and the synthetic analog of Hepoxilin B3, PBT-3, directly induce NETosis in human neutrophils. Furthermore, we show that Hepoxilin A3-mediated NETosis is NADPH-oxidase-dependent at lower doses of Hepoxilin A3, while it is NADPH-oxidase-independent at higher doses. Together, these results demonstrate that Hepoxilin A3 is a previously unrecognized inducer of NETosis in cystic fibrosis lungs and may represent a new therapeutic target for treating cystic fibrosis and other inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:25784781

  19. Butyric acid stimulates bovine neutrophil functions and potentiates the effect of platelet activating factor.

    PubMed

    Carretta, M D; Hidalgo, A I; Burgos, J; Opazo, L; Castro, L; Hidalgo, M A; Figueroa, C D; Taubert, A; Hermosilla, C; Burgos, R A

    2016-08-01

    Increased short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production is associated with subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) and activation of inflammatory processes. In humans and rodents, SCFAs modulate inflammatory responses in the gut via free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2). In bovines, butyric acid is one of the most potent FFA2 agonists. Its expression in bovine neutrophils has recently been demonstrated, suggesting a role in innate immune response in cattle. This study aimed to evaluate if butyric acid modulates oxidative and non-oxidative functions or if it can potentiate other inflammatory mediators in bovine neutrophils. Our results showed that butyric acid can activate bovine neutrophils, inducing calcium (Ca(2+)) influx and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, two second messengers involved in FFA2 activation. Ca(2+) influx induced by butyric acid was dependent on the extracellular and intracellular Ca(2+) source and phospholipase C (PLC) activation. Butyric acid alone had no significant effect on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and chemotaxis; however, a priming effect on platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent inflammatory mediator, was observed. Butyric acid increased CD63 expression and induced the release of neutrophil granule markers matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and lactoferrin. Finally, we observed that butyric acid induced neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation without affecting cellular viability. These findings suggest that butyric acid, a component of the ruminal fermentative process, can modulate the innate immune response of ruminants. PMID:27288853

  20. Cefoperazone prevents the inactivation of alpha(1)-antitrypsin by activated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Dallegri, F; Dapino, P; Arduino, N; Bertolotto, M; Ottonello, L

    1999-09-01

    At sites of neutrophilic inflammation, tissue injury by neutrophil elastase is favored by phagocyte-induced hypochlorous acid-dependent inactivation of the natural elastase inhibitor alpha(1)-antitrypsin. In the present study, cefoperazone prevented alpha(1)-antitrypsin inactivation by neutrophils and reduced the recovery of hypochlorous acid from these cells. Moreover, the antibiotic reduced the free elastase activity in a neutrophil suspension supplemented with alpha(1)-antitrypsin without affecting the cells' ability to release elastase. These data suggest that the drug inactivates hypochlorous acid before its reaction with alpha(1)-antitrypsin, thereby permitting the antiprotease-mediated blockade of released elastase. In conclusion, cefoperazone appears to have the potential for limiting elastase-antielastase imbalances, attenuating the related tissue injury at sites of inflammation. PMID:10471586

  1. Cefoperazone Prevents the Inactivation of α1-Antitrypsin by Activated Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Dallegri, Franco; Dapino, Patrizia; Arduino, Nicoletta; Bertolotto, Maria; Ottonello, Luciano

    1999-01-01

    At sites of neutrophilic inflammation, tissue injury by neutrophil elastase is favored by phagocyte-induced hypochlorous acid-dependent inactivation of the natural elastase inhibitor α1-antitrypsin. In the present study, cefoperazone prevented α1-antitrypsin inactivation by neutrophils and reduced the recovery of hypochlorous acid from these cells. Moreover, the antibiotic reduced the free elastase activity in a neutrophil suspension supplemented with α1-antitrypsin without affecting the cells’ ability to release elastase. These data suggest that the drug inactivates hypochlorous acid before its reaction with α1-antitrypsin, thereby permitting the antiprotease-mediated blockade of released elastase. In conclusion, cefoperazone appears to have the potential for limiting elastase-antielastase imbalances, attenuating the related tissue injury at sites of inflammation. PMID:10471586

  2. The Novel Functions of the PLC/PKC/PKD Signaling Axis in G Protein-Coupled Receptor-Mediated Chemotaxis of Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuehua; Jin, Tian

    2015-01-01

    Chemotaxis, a directional cell migration guided by extracellular chemoattractant gradients, plays an essential role in the recruitment of neutrophils to sites of inflammation. Chemotaxis is mediated by the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathway. Extracellular stimuli trigger activation of the PLC/PKC/PKD signaling axis, which controls several signaling pathways. Here, we concentrate on the novel functions of PLC/PKC/PKD signaling in GPCR-mediated chemotaxis of neutrophils. PMID:26605346

  3. Tanshinone IIA Protects against Dextran Sulfate Sodium- (DSS-) Induced Colitis in Mice by Modulation of Neutrophil Infiltration and Activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaowei; He, Haiyue; Huang, Tingting; Lei, Zhen; Liu, Fuquan; An, Guangyu; Wen, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils play a critical role in the initiation and maintenance of intestinal inflammation. However, conventional neutrophil-targeted therapies can impair normal host defense. Tanshinone IIA has been recently revealed to act directly on neutrophils. Hence, we aimed at investigating whether Tanshinone IIA can protect against experimental colitis through modulation of neutrophils. We induced colitis in C57BL/6 mice by giving 3% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) orally, and meanwhile, we treated mice daily with Tanshinone IIA intraperitoneally. The severity of colitis was evaluated by calculating disease activity index (DAI) and histological parameters. Neutrophil infiltration and activation in the colons of mice were measured. Moreover, whether Tanshinone IIA has direct effects on neutrophil migration and activation was determined in vitro. Our data showed that Tanshinone IIA significantly ameliorated the severity of DSS-induced colitis in mice, evidenced by the reduced DAI and improved colonic inflammation. In addition, Tanshinone IIA decreased neutrophil infiltration of intestinal mucosa and activation and reduced colonic inflammatory cytokines in DSS-treated mice. Furthermore, Tanshinone IIA was demonstrated to significantly suppress neutrophil migration and activation. These results provide compelling evidence that Tanshinone IIA has a therapeutic potential for alleviating inflammatory colitis in mice, which is possibly mediated by the immunomodulation of neutrophils. PMID:26881040

  4. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity against IBR-infected bovine kidney cells by ruminant neutrophils: the role of lysosomal cationic protein.

    PubMed Central

    Thorne, K J; Norman, J M; Haydock, S F; Lammas, D A; Duffus, P H

    1984-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR)-infected bovine kidney cells (MDBK) by neutrophils was demonstrated. Neutrophils from bovine and sheep mammary exudate and peripheral blood, and also from human peripheral blood, were all active in the presence of anti-IBR antibody. The component of the ruminant neutrophil granules which was responsible for cytotoxicity appeared to be cationic protein since purified cationic protein lysed the virus-infected cells and heparin inhibited cytotoxicity. Human neutrophil cytotoxicity to herpes simplex virus (HSV)-infected human Chang liver cells was also inhibited by heparin. Human neutrophil cytotoxicity to IBR-infected bovine kidney cells did not appear to be mediated by cationic protein since it was inhibited by the chelators of oxidative intermediates DMSO, thiourea, tryptophane, benzoate and mannitol, and not by heparin. PMID:6092270

  5. Treatment with anti-RANKL antibody reduces infarct size and attenuates dysfunction impacting on neutrophil-mediated injury.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Federico; Crowe, Lindsey A; Roth, Aline; Burger, Fabienne; Lenglet, Sébastien; Braunersreuther, Vincent; Brandt, Karim J; Quercioli, Alessandra; Mach, François; Vallée, Jean-Paul; Montecucco, Fabrizio

    2016-05-01

    Selective pharmacological treatments targeting reperfusion injury produced modest protective effects and might be associated with immunosuppression. In order to identify novel and better-tolerated approaches, we focused on the neutralization of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand [RANKL], a cytokine recently shown to activate inflammatory cells (i.e. neutrophils) orchestrating post-infarction injury and repair. Myocardial ischemia (60min) and reperfusion injury was surgically induced in C57Bl/6 mice. In hearts and serum, RANKL was early upregulated during reperfusion. A "one-shot" injection with neutralizing anti-RANKL IgG during ischemia ameliorated myocardial infarct size and function, but not adverse remodeling (determined by Magnetic Resonance Imaging [MRI]) as compared to Vehicle or control IgG. These beneficial effects were accompanied in vivo by reduction in cardiac neutrophil infiltration, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and MMP-9 release. Anti-RANKL IgG treatment suppressed sudden peak of neutrophil granule products in mouse serum early after reperfusion onset. In vitro, RANK mRNA expression was detected in isolated mouse neutrophils. Co-incubation with neutralizing anti-RANKL IgG abrogated RANKL-induced mouse neutrophil degranulation and migration, suggesting a critical role of RANKL in neutrophil-mediated injury. Conversely, anti-RANKL IgG did not affect salvage pathways in cardiac cells (i.e. ERK p42/p44, Akt and STAT-3) or macrophage cardiac infiltration. Finally, treatment with anti-RANKL IgG showed no effect on B and T lymphocyte polarization (in serum, spleen and infarcted myocardium) and circulating chemokines as compared with Vehicle or control IgG. In conclusion, acute treatment with anti-RANKL IgG improved cardiac infarct size and function by potentially impacting on neutrophil-mediated injury and repair. PMID:27056420

  6. Mast Cell-Mediated Inhibition of Abdominal Neutrophil Inflammation by a PEGylated TLR7 Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Tomoko; Yao, Shiyin; Crain, Brian; Chan, Michael; Cottam, Howard B.; Lao, Fitzgerald; Carson, Dennis A.; Corr, Maripat

    2012-01-01

    Although the mechanisms for sustained chemokine gradients and recurring cell infiltration in sterile peritonitis have not been elucidated, toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been implicated. To abate the deleterious recruitment of neutrophils in sterile inflammation, we repeatedly administered a TLR7 ligand that hyposensitized to TLR7 and receptors that converged on the MyD88-signaling intermediary and reduced cellular infiltration in murine autoimmune models of multiple sclerosis and arthritis. To reduce potential adverse effects, a polyethylene glycol polymer was covalently attached to the parent compound (Tolerimod1). The proinflammatory potency of Tolerimod1 was 10-fold less than the unconjugated TLR7 ligand, and Tolerimod1 reduced neutrophil recruitment in chemically induced peritonitis and colitis. The effects of Tolerimod1 were mediated by the radioresistant cells in radiation chimeric mice and by mast cells in reconstituted mast cell-deficient mice (KitW-sh). Although the Tolerimod1 had weak proinflammatory agonist activity, it effectively reduced neutrophil recruitment in sterile peritoneal inflammation. PMID:22619481

  7. Systemic hypoxia enhances exercise-mediated bactericidal and subsequent apoptotic responses in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jong-Shyan; Chiu, Ya-Ting

    2009-10-01

    Phagocytosis and oxidative burst are critical host defense mechanisms in which neutrophils clear invading pathogens. Clearing phagocytic neutrophils by triggering apoptosis is an essential process for controlling inflammation. This study elucidates how various exercise bouts with/without hypoxia affected neutrophil bactericidal activity and subsequent apoptosis in humans. Fifteen sedentary males performed six distinct experimental tests in an air-conditioned normobaric hypoxia chamber: two normoxic exercises [strenuous exercise (SE; up to maximal O2 consumption) and moderate exercise (ME; 50% maximal O2 consumption for 30 min) while exposed to 21% O2], two hypoxic exercises (ME for 30 min while exposed to 12% and 15% O2), and two hypoxic exposures (resting for 30 min while exposed to 12% and 15% O2). The results showed that 1) plasma complement-C3a desArg/C4a desArg/C5a concentrations were increased, 2) expressions of L-selectin/lymphocyte functin-associated antigen-1/Mac-1/C5aR on neutrophils were enhanced, 3) phagocytosis of neutrophils to Esherichia coli and release of neutrophil oxidant products by E. coli were elevated, and 4) E. coli-induced phosphotidylserine exposure or caspase-3 activation of neutrophils were promoted immediately and 2 h after both 12% O2 exposure at rest and with ME as well as normoxic SE. Although neither normoxic ME nor breathing 15% O2 at rest influenced these complement- and neutrophil-related immune responses, ME at both 12% and 15% O2 resulted in enhanced complement activation in the blood, expressions of opsonic/complement receptors on neutrophils, or the bactericidal activity and apoptosis of neutrophils. Moreover, the increased neutrophil oxidant production and apoptosis by normoxic SE and hypoxic ME were ameliorated by treating neutrophils with diphenylene iodonium (a NADPH oxidase inhibitor). Therefore, we conclude that ME at 12-15% O2 enhances bactericidal capacity and facilitates the subsequent apoptosis of neutrophils. PMID

  8. Apolipoprotein B mediates the capacity of low density lipoprotein to suppress neutrophil stimulation by particulates.

    PubMed

    Terkeltaub, R; Martin, J; Curtiss, L K; Ginsberg, M H

    1986-11-25

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) inhibits phagocytosis of certain negatively charged particulates and also inhibits subsequent cellular secretory and oxidative responses to these particulates. In the present work, we have defined the structural features of LDL involved in this activity. Starch-heptane extraction depleted greater than 95% of neutral lipids but had little effect on the capacity of LDL to inhibit monosodium urate crystal- or polystyrene latex bead-induced neutrophil chemiluminescence (CL). Liposomes containing gamma-palmitoyl-beta-oleoylphosphatidylcholine (PC) with unesterified cholesterol (PC:cholesterol = 2:1), PC and sphingomyelin (PC:sphingomyelin = 2.3:1), or PC alone lacked the capacity to inhibit urate-induced CL. However, incorporation of apoB-100 into liposomes via cholate dialysis rendered them nearly as inhibitory for urate-induced neutrophil CL as LDL on a protein weight basis. Moreover, delipidated apoB-100, containing less than 3% residual phospholipid, inhibited neutrophil responses to urate crystals or latex beads (degranulation and superoxide anion release) in a stimulus-specific manner. Modifications of the lysine residues of apoB (e.g. acetylation) reduced both the capacity of LDL to inhibit urate crystal-induced CL and to bind to urate crystals. The effects of apoB lysine residue modification were reversible, proportional to the extent of modification, and were not attributable to alteration of the net charge of apoB. Thus, the apoB-100 of LDL both mediates and shares the capacity of native LDL to inhibit certain neutrophil responses to particulates. PMID:3096995

  9. 4-Methylcoumarin Derivatives Inhibit Human Neutrophil Oxidative Metabolism and Elastase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fuzissaki, Carolina N.; Andrade, Micássio F.; Azzolini, Ana Elisa C.S.; Taleb-Contini, Silvia H.; Vermelho, Roberta B.; Lopes, João Luis C.; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Increased neutrophil activation significantly contributes to the tissue damage in inflammatory illnesses; this phenomenon has motivated the search for new compounds to modulate their effector functions. Coumarins are natural products that are widely consumed in the human diet. We have evaluated the antioxidant and immunomodulator potential of five 4-methylcoumarin derivatives. We found that the 4-methylcoumarin derivatives inhibited the generation of reactive oxygen species by human neutrophils triggered by serum-opsonized zymosan or phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate; this inhibition occurred in a concentration-dependent manner, as revealed by lucigenin- and luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence assays. Cytotoxicity did not mediate this inhibitory effect. The 7,8-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin suppressed the neutrophil oxidative metabolism more effectively than the 6,7- and 5,7-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarins, but the 5,7- and 7,8-diacetoxy-4-methylcoumarins were less effective than their hydroxylated counterparts. An analysis of the biochemical pathways suggested that the 6,7- and 7,8-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarins inhibit the protein kinase C-mediated signaling pathway, but 5,7-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin, as well as 5,7- and 7,8-diacetoxy-4-methylcoumarins do not significantly interfere in this pathway of the activation of the human neutrophil oxidative metabolism. The 4-methylcoumarin derivatives bearing the catechol group suppressed the elastase and myeloperoxidase activity and reduced the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical the most strongly. Interestingly, the 5,7-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin scavenged hypochlorous acid more effectively than the o-dihydroxy-substituted 4-methylcoumarin derivatives, and the diacetoxylated 4-methylcoumarin derivatives scavenged hypochlorous acid as effectively as the 7,8-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin. The significant influence of small structural modifications in the inhibitory potential of 4-methylcoumarin derivatives on the

  10. Induction of CD18-mediated passage of neutrophils by Pasteurella haemolytica in pulmonary bronchi and bronchioles.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M R; Brogden, K A; Florance, A F; Kehrli, M E

    1999-02-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica is an important respiratory pathogen of cattle that incites extensive infiltrates of neutrophils into the lung. In addition to the parenchymal damage caused by factors released by P. haemolytica, neutrophils contribute to the pathologic changes in the lungs. Molecules which mediate neutrophil infiltration into the lungs during P. haemolytica pneumonia are poorly characterized. To determine whether the CD18 family (beta2-integrin) of leukocyte adhesion molecules mediates initial passage of neutrophils into the pulmonary bronchi and bronchioles of lungs infected with P. haemolytica, three Holstein calves homozygous for bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) (CD18-deficient neutrophils), and three age- and breed-matched control calves (normal CD18 expression) were inoculated with P. haemolytica A1 via a fiberoptic bronchoscope and euthanized at 2 h postinoculation. Sections of lung were stained for neutrophils, and the intensity of neutrophilic infiltration was determined by computerized image analysis. Significantly fewer (P < 0.05) neutrophils infiltrated the lumen, epithelium, and adventitia of bronchioles and bronchi in lungs of calves with BLAD compared to normal calves, which had dense infiltrates within these sites at 2 h postinoculation. The reduced infiltration in calves with BLAD occurred despite the presence of an extremely large number of neutrophils in peripheral blood that is typical for these calves. The large number of neutrophils in the blood of calves with BLAD is probably a physiologic response that can occur without microbial colonization, since one calf with BLAD that was raised under germ-free conditions had large numbers of neutrophils in the blood that were similar to those in a calf with BLAD that was raised conventionally. Neutrophil counts in the germ-free and conventionally reared calves with BLAD were much higher than those in the three normal calves raised under germ-free conditions. The work in this study

  11. Very-late-antigen-4 (VLA-4)-mediated brain invasion by neutrophils leads to interactions with microglia, increased ischemic injury and impaired behavior in experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Jens; Riek-Burchardt, Monika; Herz, Josephine; Doeppner, Thorsten R; König, Rebecca; Hütten, Heiko; Etemire, Eloho; Männ, Linda; Klingberg, Anika; Fischer, Thomas; Görtler, Michael W; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Reichardt, Peter; Schraven, Burkhart; Hermann, Dirk M; Reymann, Klaus G; Gunzer, Matthias

    2015-02-01

    Neuronal injury from ischemic stroke is aggravated by invading peripheral immune cells. Early infiltrates of neutrophil granulocytes and T-cells influence the outcome of stroke. So far, however, neither the timing nor the cellular dynamics of neutrophil entry, its consequences for the invaded brain area, or the relative importance of T-cells has been extensively studied in an intravital setting. Here, we have used intravital two-photon microscopy to document neutrophils and brain-resident microglia in mice after induction of experimental stroke. We demonstrated that neutrophils immediately rolled, firmly adhered, and transmigrated at sites of endothelial activation in stroke-affected brain areas. The ensuing neutrophil invasion was associated with local blood-brain barrier breakdown and infarct formation. Brain-resident microglia recognized both endothelial damage and neutrophil invasion. In a cooperative manner, they formed cytoplasmic processes to physically shield activated endothelia and trap infiltrating neutrophils. Interestingly, the systemic blockade of very-late-antigen-4 immediately and very effectively inhibited the endothelial interaction and brain entry of neutrophils. This treatment thereby strongly reduced the ischemic tissue injury and effectively protected the mice from stroke-associated behavioral impairment. Behavioral preservation was also equally well achieved with the antibody-mediated depletion of myeloid cells or specifically neutrophils. In contrast, T-cell depletion more effectively reduced the infarct volume without improving the behavioral performance. Thus, neutrophil invasion of the ischemic brain is rapid, massive, and a key mediator of functional impairment, while peripheral T-cells promote brain damage. Acutely depleting T-cells and inhibiting brain infiltration of neutrophils might, therefore, be a powerful early stroke treatment. PMID:25391494

  12. Neutrophilic oxidative stress mediates organic dust-induced pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Toby K; Chen, Michael; Allard, Benoit; Larsson, Kjell; Martin, James G; Adner, Mikael

    2016-01-15

    Airway exposure to organic dust (OD) from swine confinement facilities induces airway inflammation dominated by neutrophils and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). One important neutrophilic innate defense mechanism is the induction of oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that neutrophils exacerbate airway dysfunction following OD exposure by increasing oxidant burden. BALB/C mice were given intranasal challenges with OD or PBS (1/day for 3 days). Mice were untreated or treated with a neutrophil-depleting antibody, anti-Ly6G, or the antioxidant dimethylthiourea (DMTU) prior to OD exposure. Twenty-four hours after the final exposure, we measured airway responsiveness in response to methacholine (MCh) and collected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid to assess pulmonary inflammation and total antioxidant capacity. Lung tissue was harvested to examine the effect of OD-induced antioxidant gene expression and the effect of anti-Ly6G or DMTU. OD exposure induced a dose-dependent increase of airway responsiveness, a neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation, and secretion of keratinocyte cytokine. Depletion of neutrophils reduced OD-induced AHR. DMTU prevented pulmonary inflammation involving macrophages and neutrophils. Neutrophil depletion and DMTU were highly effective in preventing OD-induced AHR affecting large, conducting airways and tissue elastance. OD induced an increase in total antioxidant capacity and mRNA levels of NRF-2-dependent antioxidant genes, effects that are prevented by administration of DMTU and neutrophil depletion. We conclude that an increase in oxidative stress and neutrophilia is critical in the induction of OD-induced AHR. Prevention of oxidative stress diminishes neutrophil influx and AHR, suggesting that mechanisms driving OD-induced AHR may be dependent on neutrophil-mediated oxidant pathways. PMID:26545900

  13. Painting factor H onto mesenchymal stem cells protects the cells from complement- and neutrophil-mediated damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Qiu, Wen; Zhang, Lingjun; Fung, John; Lin, Feng

    2016-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are undergoing intensive testing in clinical trials as a promising new therapy for many inflammatory diseases and for regenerative medicine, but further optimization of current MSC-based therapies is required. In this study, we found that in addition to direct complement-mediated attack through the assembly of membrane attack complexes (MACs) that we and others have recently reported, of the released complement activation products, C5a, but not C3a, activates neutrophils in the blood to further damage MSCs through oxidative burst. In addition, we have developed a simple method for painting factor H, a native complement inhibitor, onto MSCs to locally inhibit complement activation on MSCs. MSCs painted with factor H are protected from both MAC- and neutrophil-mediated attack and are significantly more effective in inhibiting antigen-specific T cell responses than the mock-painted MSCs both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27343468

  14. Neutrophil swarming toward Cryptococcus neoformans is mediated by complement and leukotriene B4.

    PubMed

    Sun, Donglei; Shi, Meiqing

    2016-09-01

    Swarming behavior of neutrophils has been noticed in both sterile injury and infection models and the mechanisms are being unveiled. So far, no in vitro model has been established to study neutrophil swarming to microbes. In the current study, using live-cell imaging, we observed in vitro neutrophil swarming toward Cryptococcus neoformans, a fungal pathogen causing human meningoencephalitis. Complement C3 and CD11b expression are essential for neutrophils to form cell swarms surrounding C. neoformans. Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) was quickly released by neutrophils during their interactions with C. neoformans. Blockade of LTB4 synthesis inhibited the swarming response to C. neoformans. Importantly, blockade of LTB4 synthesis also significantly reduced neutrophil recruitment in the lung vasculature of mice infected intravenously with C. neoformans, demonstrating a critical role of LTB4 in intravascular neutrophil swarming during infection. Together, this is the first report of neutrophil dynamics of swarming toward a microorganism in vitro, mediated by complement and LTB4. PMID:27402276

  15. CD99 is a key mediator of the transendothelial migration of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Lou, Olivia; Alcaide, Pilar; Luscinskas, Francis W; Muller, William A

    2007-01-15

    Transendothelial migration of leukocytes is a critical event for inflammation, but the molecular regulation of this event is only beginning to be understood. PECAM (CD31) is a major mediator of monocyte and neutrophil transmigration, and CD99 was recently defined as a second mediator of the transmigration of monocytes. Expression of CD99 on the surface of circulating polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) is low compared with expression of CD99 on monocytes or expression of PECAM on PMN. We demonstrate here that, despite low expression of CD99, Fab of Abs against CD99 blocked over 80% of human neutrophils from transmigrating across HUVEC monolayers in an in vitro model of inflammation. Blocking CD99 on either the neutrophil or endothelial cell side resulted in a quantitatively equivalent block, suggesting a homophilic interaction between CD99 on the neutrophil and CD99 on the endothelial cell. Blocking CD99 and PECAM together resulted in additive effects, suggesting the two molecules work at distinct steps. Confocal microscopy confirmed that CD99-blocked neutrophils lodged in endothelial cell junctions at locations distal to PECAM-blocked neutrophils. The CD99-blocked PMN exhibited dynamic lateral movement within endothelial cell junctions, indicating that only the diapedesis step was blocked by interference with CD99. Anti-CD99 mAb also blocked PMN transmigration in a second in vitro model that incorporated shear stress. Taken together, the evidence demonstrates that PECAM and CD99 regulate distinct, sequential steps in the transendothelial migration of neutrophils during inflammation. PMID:17202377

  16. Neutrophil-Mediated Regulation of Innate and Adaptive Immunity: The Role of Myeloperoxidase

    PubMed Central

    Odobasic, Dragana; Kitching, A. Richard; Holdsworth, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are no longer seen as leukocytes with a sole function of being the essential first responders in the removal of pathogens at sites of infection. Being armed with numerous pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, these phagocytes can also contribute to the development of various autoimmune diseases and can positively or negatively regulate the generation of adaptive immune responses. In this review, we will discuss how myeloperoxidase, the most abundant neutrophil granule protein, plays a key role in the various functions of neutrophils in innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:26904693

  17. Stimulation of Fas signaling down-regulates activity of neutrophils from major trauma patients with SIRS.

    PubMed

    Paunel-Görgülü, Adnana; Lögters, Tim; Flohé, Sascha; Cinatl, Jindrich; Altrichter, Jens; Windolf, Joachim; Scholz, Martin

    2011-03-01

    Posttrauma apoptosis resistance of neutrophils (PMN) is related to overshooting immune responses, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ failure (MOF). Recently, we have shown that the apoptosis resistance in circulating PMN from severely injured patients which is known to be mediated by high serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines can be overcome by the activation of Fas death receptor. Here, we aimed to study whether stimulation of surface Fas leads to the inactivation of hyperactivated PMN from critically ill patients with SIRS. PMN from 23 multiple trauma patients (mean injury severity score (ISS) 34±1.9) were isolated at day 1 after admission to the trauma center. PMN from 17 volunteer blood donors served as controls. Neutrophil activity has been determined after ex vivo short (1 h) and long-term (4 h) stimulation of freshly isolated PMN with immobilized agonistic anti-Fas antibodies. We found neutrophil chemotactic migration in response to IL-8, phagocytosis and oxidative burst to be significantly inhibited in control cells already after short-term (1 h) Fas stimulation. In contrast, inactivation of trauma PMN by agonistic anti-Fas antibodies was found to be efficient only after long-term (4 h) incubation of cells with agonistic antibodies. Thus, in trauma PMN down-regulation of neutrophil activity seems to be delayed when compared to cells isolated from healthy controls, suggesting impaired susceptibility for Fas stimulation in these cells. Interestingly, whereas Fas-mediated inhibition of phagocytosis and oxidative burst could be prevented by the broad range caspase inhibitor t-butoxycarbonyl-aspartyl(O-methyl)-fluoromethyl ketone (BocD-fmk), the chemotactic activity in response to IL-8 was unaffected. In conclusion, we demonstrate that stimulation of neutrophil Fas does not only initiate apoptosis but also induces inhibition of neutrophil functions, partially by non-apoptotic signaling. PMID:20832139

  18. Macrophage-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor is involved in the neutrophil recruitment inhibitory activity present in the supernatants of LPS-stimulated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tavares-Murta, B. M.; Cunha, F. Q.; Dias-Baruffi, M.; Roque-Barreira, M. C.

    1996-01-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated the presence of a neutrophil recruitment inhibitory factor (NRIF) in the supernatants of LPS-stimulated macrophages. Recently, the purification of a 54 kDa protein, identified as the macrophage-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor (MNCF) was reported. Since NRIF and MNCF are obtained under the same conditions, and, since the intravenous administration of TNF-α and IL-8 inhibits neutrophil migration, we have investigated whether MNCF could be responsible for this inhibitory activity. After affinity chromatography of the macrophage supernatants on a D-galactose column, the inhibitory activity was recovered in both the unbound (D-gal−) and bound (D-gal+) fractions, with MNCF being found in the D-gal+ fraction. Further gel filtration of the latter on Superdex 75 yielded a single peak containing both activities. In a cytotoxicity assay, most of the TNF found in the crude supernatants was recovered in the D-gal− fraction. Furthermore, the incubation of the D-gal− fraction with anti-TNF-α plus anti-IL-8 antisera partially prevents its inhibitory effect on neutrophil migration, but had no effect on the D-gal+ activity. Overall, these results suggest that the D-gal− inhibitory effect is partially mediated by TNF-α and IL-8, and that MNCF accounts for the inhibition of neutrophil migration in vivo by the D-gal+ fraction. PMID:18475709

  19. Time profile of oxidative stress and neutrophil activation in ovine acute lung injury and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lange, Matthias; Szabo, Csaba; Traber, Daniel L; Horvath, Eszter; Hamahata, Atsumori; Nakano, Yoshimitsu; Traber, Lillian D; Cox, Robert A; Schmalstieg, Frank C; Herndon, David N; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei

    2012-05-01

    The formation of oxidative stress in the lung and activation of neutrophils are major determinants in the development of respiratory failure after acute lung injury and sepsis. However, the time changes of these pathogenic factors have not been sufficiently described. Twenty-four chronically instrumented sheep were subjected to cotton smoke inhalation injury and instillation of live Pseudomonas aeruginosa into both lungs. The sheep were euthanized at 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 h after injury. Additional sheep received sham injury and were euthanized after 24 h. Pulmonary function was assessed by determination of oxygenation index and pulmonary shunt fraction. In addition, lung tissue was harvested at the respective time points for the measurement of malondialdehyde, interleukin 6, poly(ADP ribose), myeloperoxidase, and alveolar polymorphonuclear neutrophil score. The injury induced severe respiratory failure that was associated with an early increase in lipid peroxidation and interleukin 6 expression. The injury further led to an increase in poly(ADP ribose) activity that reached its peak at 12 h after injury and declined afterward. In addition, progressive increases in markers of neutrophil accumulation in the lung were observed. The peak of neutrophil accumulation in the lung was associated with a severe depletion of circulating neutrophils. The results from our model may enhance the understanding of the pathophysiological alterations after acute lung injury and sepsis and thus be useful in exploring therapeutic interventions directed at modifying the expression or activation of inflammatory mediators. PMID:22266977

  20. A Scabies Mite Serpin Interferes with Complement-Mediated Neutrophil Functions and Promotes Staphylococcal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Swe, Pearl M.; Fischer, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Background Scabies is a contagious skin disease caused by the parasitic mite Sarcoptes scabiei. The disease is highly prevalent worldwide and known to predispose to secondary bacterial infections, in particular by Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. Reports of scabies patients co-infected with methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) pose a major concern for serious down-stream complications. We previously reported that a range of complement inhibitors secreted by the mites promoted the growth of S. pyogenes. Here, we show that a recently characterized mite serine protease inhibitor (SMSB4) inhibits the complement-mediated blood killing of S. aureus. Methodology/Principal Findings Blood killing of S. aureus was measured in whole blood bactericidal assays, counting viable bacteria recovered after treatment in fresh blood containing active complement and phagocytes, treated with recombinant SMSB4. SMSB4 inhibited the blood killing of various strains of S. aureus including methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive isolates. Staphylococcal growth was promoted in a dose-dependent manner. We investigated the effect of SMSB4 on the complement-mediated neutrophil functions, namely phagocytosis, opsonization and anaphylatoxin release, by flow cytometry and in enzyme linked immuno sorbent assays (ELISA). SMSB4 reduced phagocytosis of S. aureus by neutrophils. It inhibited the deposition of C3b, C4b and properdin on the bacteria surface, but did not affect the depositions of C1q and MBL. SMSB4 also inhibited C5 cleavage as indicated by a reduced C5b-9 deposition. Conclusions/Significance We postulate that SMSB4 interferes with the activation of all three complement pathways by reducing the amount of C3 convertase formed. We conclude that SMSB4 interferes with the complement-dependent killing function of neutrophils, thereby reducing opsonization, phagocytosis and further recruitment of neutrophils to the site of infection. As a consequence secreted scabies

  1. The impact of cationic solid lipid nanoparticles on human neutrophil activation and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs).

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Hung, Chi-Feng; Chen, Chun-Han; Fang, Jia-You

    2015-06-25

    Cationic solid lipid nanoparticles (cSLNs) are extensively employed as the nanocarriers for drug/gene targeting to tumors and the brain. Investigation into the possible immune response of cSLNs is still lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of cSLNs upon the activation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophil cells (PMNs). The cytotoxicity, pro-inflammatory mediators, Ca(2+) mobilization, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) as the indicators of PMN stimulation were examined in this work. The cSLNs presented a diameter of 195 nm with a zeta potential of 44 mV. The cSLNs could interact with the cell membrane to produce a direct membrane lysis and the subsequent cytotoxicity according to lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) elevation. The interaction of cSLNs with the membrane also triggered a Ca(2+) influx, followed by the induction of oxidative stress and degranulation. The cationic nanoparticles elevated the levels of superoxide anion and elastase by 24- and 9-fold, respectively. The PMN activation by cSLNs promoted the phosphorylation of p38 and Jun-N-terminal kinases (JNK) but not extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). The imaging of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and immunofluorescence demonstrated the production of NETs by cSLNs. This phenomenon was not significant for the neutral SLNs (nSLNs), although histones in NETs also increased after treatment of nSLNs. Our results suggest an important role of cSLNs in governing the activation of human neutrophils. PMID:25920576

  2. The small GTPase Rap1b negatively regulates neutrophil chemotaxis and transcellular diapedesis by inhibiting Akt activation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sachin; Xu, Juying; Kumar, Rupali Sani; Lakshmikanthan, Sribalaji; Kapur, Reuben; Kofron, Matthew; Chrzanowska-Wodnicka, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are the first line of cellular defense in response to infections and inflammatory injuries. However, neutrophil activation and accumulation into tissues trigger tissue damage due to release of a plethora of toxic oxidants and proteases, a cause of acute lung injury (ALI). Despite its clinical importance, the molecular regulation of neutrophil migration is poorly understood. The small GTPase Rap1b is generally viewed as a positive regulator of immune cell functions by controlling bidirectional integrin signaling. However, we found that Rap1b-deficient mice exhibited enhanced neutrophil recruitment to inflamed lungs and enhanced susceptibility to endotoxin shock. Unexpectedly, Rap1b deficiency promoted the transcellular route of diapedesis through endothelial cell. Increased transcellular migration of Rap1b-deficient neutrophils in vitro was selectively mediated by enhanced PI3K-Akt activation and invadopodia-like protrusions. Akt inhibition in vivo suppressed excessive Rap1b-deficient neutrophil migration and associated endotoxin shock. The inhibitory action of Rap1b on PI3K signaling may be mediated by activation of phosphatase SHP-1. Thus, this study reveals an unexpected role for Rap1b as a key suppressor of neutrophil migration and lung inflammation. PMID:25092872

  3. Dimethylfumarate Impairs Neutrophil Functions.

    PubMed

    Müller, Susen; Behnen, Martina; Bieber, Katja; Möller, Sonja; Hellberg, Lars; Witte, Mareike; Hänsel, Martin; Zillikens, Detlef; Solbach, Werner; Laskay, Tamás; Ludwig, Ralf J

    2016-01-01

    Host defense against pathogens relies on neutrophil activation. Inadequate neutrophil activation is often associated with chronic inflammatory diseases. Neutrophils also constitute a significant portion of infiltrating cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, for example, psoriasis and multiple sclerosis. Fumarates improve the latter diseases, which so far has been attributed to the effects on lymphocytes and dendritic cells. Here, we focused on the effects of dimethylfumarate (DMF) on neutrophils. In vitro, DMF inhibited neutrophil activation, including changes in surface marker expression, reactive oxygen species production, formation of neutrophil extracellular traps, and migration. Phagocytic ability and autoantibody-induced, neutrophil-dependent tissue injury ex vivo was also impaired by DMF. Regarding the mode of action, DMF modulates-in a stimulus-dependent manner-neutrophil activation using the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathways. For in vivo validation, mouse models of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, an organ-specific autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies to type VII collagen, were employed. In the presence of DMF, blistering induced by injection of anti-type VII collagen antibodies into mice was significantly impaired. DMF treatment of mice with clinically already-manifested epidermolysis bullosa acquisita led to disease improvement. Collectively, we demonstrate a profound inhibitory activity of DMF on neutrophil functions. These findings encourage wider use of DMF in patients with neutrophil-mediated diseases. PMID:26763431

  4. Neutrophil killing of human umbilical vein endothelial cells is oxygen radical-mediated and enhanced by TNF-. alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Dame, M.K.; Varani, J.; Weinberg, J.M.; Ward, P.A. )

    1991-03-11

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells are sensitive to killing by activated human neutrophils. Killing is inhibited in the presence of catalase and deferoxamine mesylate but not soybean trypsin inhibitor. Reagent hydrogen peroxide can substitute for activated neutrophils in producing endothelial cell injury. These data suggest that lethal injury is due to the production of oxygen radicals by activated neutrophils. In these respects, the human umbilical vein endothelial cells are similar to rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells in that pretreatment with TNF-{alpha} increases sensitivity to injury by activated neutrophils. In part, the increased endothelial cell sensitivity to killing by neutrophils may be due to up-regulation of surface adhesion molecules. However, it was observed that cells passaged more than two times in culture did not demonstrate increased killing after treatment with TNF-{alpha} while up-regulation of neutrophil adhesion could be detected through several additional passages. Although the human umbilical vein endothelial cells are qualitatively similar to rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells in their sensitivity to killing, they are quantitatively much more resistant. What accounts for the relative resistance of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells is not fully understood. In the rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells, killing is known to be dependent on an intraendothelial source of iron. Pre-treatment of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells with 8-hydroxyquinoline-bound iron increased their sensitivity to oxidant injury. These data suggest that the availability of iron within the human umbilical vein endothelial cells may be a limiting factor in sensitivity to oxygen radical-mediated injury.

  5. Wheat Germ Agglutinin Induces NADPH-Oxidase Activity in Human Neutrophils by Interaction with Mobilizable Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Anna

    1999-01-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), a lectin with specificity for N-acetylglucosamine and sialic acid, was investigated with respect to its ability to activate the NADPH-oxidase of in vivo-exudated neutrophils (obtained from a skin chamber), and the activity was compared to that of peripheral blood neutrophils. The exudate cells responded to WGA, by both releasing reactive oxygen species into the extracellular milieu and producing oxygen metabolites intracellularly. The peripheral blood cells were unresponsive. To mimic the in vivo-exuded neutrophils with regards to receptor exposure, peripheral blood neutrophils were induced to mobilize their granules and vesicles to varying degrees (in vitro priming), prior to challenge with WGA. The oxidative response to WGA increased with increasing levels of granule mobilization, and the receptor(s) could be shown to reside in the secretory vesicles and/or the gelatinase granules in resting neutrophils. Several WGA-binding glycoproteins were detected in subcellular fractions containing these organelles. The extra- and intracellular NADPH-oxidase responses showed differences in sialic acid dependency, indicating that these two responses are mediated by different receptor structures. PMID:10377127

  6. Neutrophil oxidative burst activates ATM to regulate cytokine production and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Harbort, C J; Soeiro-Pereira, Paulo Vitor; von Bernuth, Horst; Kaindl, Angela M; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Reichenbach, Janine; Roesler, Joachim; Zychlinsky, Arturo; Amulic, Borko

    2015-12-24

    Neutrophils play an essential role in the initial stages of inflammation by balancing pro- and antiinflammatory signals. Among these signals are the production of proinflammatory cytokines and the timely initiation of antiinflammatory cell death via constitutive apoptosis. Here we identify ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase as a modulator of these neutrophil functions. Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is a pleiotropic multisystem disorder caused by mutations in the gene-encoding ATM, a master regulator of the DNA damage response. In addition to progressive neurodegeneration and high rates of cancer, AT patients have numerous symptoms that can be linked to chronic inflammation. We report that neutrophils isolated from patients with AT overproduce proinflammatory cytokines and have a prolonged lifespan compared with healthy controls. This effect is partly mediated by increases in activation of p38 MAP kinase. Furthermore, we show that the oxidative burst, catalyzed by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, can activate ATM in neutrophils. Finally, activation of ATM and DNA damage signaling suppress cytokine production and can abrogate the overproduction of IL-8 in ROS-deficient cells. This reveals a novel mechanism for the regulation of cytokine production and apoptosis, establishing DNA damage as a downstream mediator of immune regulation by reactive oxygen species. We propose that deficiencies in the DNA damage response, like deficiencies in the oxidative burst seen in chronic granulomatous disease, could lead to pathologic inflammation. PMID:26491069

  7. Neutrophil oxidative burst activates ATM to regulate cytokine production and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Harbort, C. J.; Soeiro-Pereira, Paulo Vitor; von Bernuth, Horst; Kaindl, Angela M.; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Reichenbach, Janine; Roesler, Joachim; Zychlinsky, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils play an essential role in the initial stages of inflammation by balancing pro- and antiinflammatory signals. Among these signals are the production of proinflammatory cytokines and the timely initiation of antiinflammatory cell death via constitutive apoptosis. Here we identify ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase as a modulator of these neutrophil functions. Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is a pleiotropic multisystem disorder caused by mutations in the gene-encoding ATM, a master regulator of the DNA damage response. In addition to progressive neurodegeneration and high rates of cancer, AT patients have numerous symptoms that can be linked to chronic inflammation. We report that neutrophils isolated from patients with AT overproduce proinflammatory cytokines and have a prolonged lifespan compared with healthy controls. This effect is partly mediated by increases in activation of p38 MAP kinase. Furthermore, we show that the oxidative burst, catalyzed by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, can activate ATM in neutrophils. Finally, activation of ATM and DNA damage signaling suppress cytokine production and can abrogate the overproduction of IL-8 in ROS-deficient cells. This reveals a novel mechanism for the regulation of cytokine production and apoptosis, establishing DNA damage as a downstream mediator of immune regulation by reactive oxygen species. We propose that deficiencies in the DNA damage response, like deficiencies in the oxidative burst seen in chronic granulomatous disease, could lead to pathologic inflammation. PMID:26491069

  8. Hypohalous acid-modified human serum albumin induces neutrophil NADPH oxidase activation, degranulation, and shape change.

    PubMed

    Gorudko, Irina V; Grigorieva, Daria V; Shamova, Ekaterina V; Kostevich, Valeria A; Sokolov, Alexey V; Mikhalchik, Elena V; Cherenkevich, Sergey N; Arnhold, Jürgen; Panasenko, Oleg M

    2014-03-01

    Halogenated lipids, proteins, and lipoproteins formed in reactions with myeloperoxidase (MPO)-derived hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and hypobromous acid (HOBr) can contribute to the regulation of functional activity of cells and serve as mediators of inflammation. Human serum albumin (HSA) is the major plasma protein target of hypohalous acids. This study was performed to assess the potency of HSA modified by HOCl (HSA-Cl) and HOBr (HSA-Br) to elicit selected neutrophil responses. HSA-Cl/Br were found to induce neutrophil degranulation, generation of reactive oxygen intermediates, shape change, and actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Thus HSA-Cl/Br can initially act as a switch and then as a feeder of the "inflammatory loop" under oxidative stress. In HSA-Cl/Br-treated neutrophils, monoclonal antibodies against CD18, the β subunit of β2 integrins, reduced the production of superoxide anion radicals and hydrogen peroxide as well as MPO exocytosis, suggesting that CD18 contributed to neutrophil activation. HSA-Cl/Br-induced neutrophil responses were also inhibited by genistein, a broad-specificity tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and wortmannin, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, supporting the notion that activation of both tyrosine kinase and PI3K may play a role in neutrophil activation by HSA modified in MPO-dependent reactions. These results confirm the hypothesis that halogenated molecules formed in vivo via MPO-dependent reactions can be considered as a new class of biologically active substances potentially able to contribute to activation of myeloid cells in sites of inflammation and serve as inflammatory response modulators. PMID:24384524

  9. Human resistin promotes neutrophil proinflammatory activation and neutrophil extracellular trap formation and increases severity of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shaoning; Park, Dae Won; Tadie, Jean-Marc; Gregoire, Murielle; Deshane, Jessy; Pittet, Jean Francois; Abraham, Edward; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W

    2014-05-15

    Although resistin was recently found to modulate insulin resistance in preclinical models of type II diabetes and obesity, recent studies also suggested that resistin has proinflammatory properties. We examined whether the human-specific variant of resistin affects neutrophil activation and the severity of LPS-induced acute lung injury. Because human and mouse resistin have distinct patterns of tissue distribution, experiments were performed using humanized resistin mice that exclusively express human resistin (hRTN(+/-)(/-)) but are deficient in mouse resistin. Enhanced production of TNF-α or MIP-2 was found in LPS-treated hRtn(+/-/-) neutrophils compared with control Rtn(-/-/-) neutrophils. Expression of human resistin inhibited the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, a major sensor and regulator of cellular bioenergetics that also is implicated in inhibiting inflammatory activity of neutrophils and macrophages. In addition to the ability of resistin to sensitize neutrophils to LPS stimulation, human resistin enhanced neutrophil extracellular trap formation. In LPS-induced acute lung injury, humanized resistin mice demonstrated enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines, more severe pulmonary edema, increased neutrophil extracellular trap formation, and elevated concentration of the alarmins HMGB1 and histone 3 in the lungs. Our results suggest that human resistin may play an important contributory role in enhancing TLR4-induced inflammatory responses, and it may be a target for future therapies aimed at reducing the severity of acute lung injury and other inflammatory situations in which neutrophils play a major role. PMID:24719460

  10. Neutrophil-derived microparticles induce myeloperoxidase-mediated damage of vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Upon activation neutrophil releases microparticles - small plasma membrane vesicles that contain cell surface proteins and cytoplasmic matter, with biological activities. In this study we investigated the potential role of myeloperoxidase in the endothelial cell injury caused by neutrophil-derived microparticles. Results Microparticles were produced by activating human neutrophils with a calcium ionophore and characterized by flow cytometry and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Myeloperoxidase activity was measured by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Neutrophil microparticles-induced injuries and morphological alterations in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were evaluated by microscopy and flow cytometry. Neutrophil microparticles were characterized as structures bounded by lipid bilayers and were less than 1 μm in diameter. The microparticles also expressed CD66b, CD62L and myeloperoxidase, which are all commonly expressed on the surface of neutrophils, as well as exposition of phosphatidylserine. The activity of the myeloperoxidase present on the microparticles was confirmed by hypochlorous acid detection. This compound is only catalyzed by myeloperoxidase in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and chloride ion. The addition of sodium azide or taurine inhibited and reduced enzymatic activity, respectively. Exposure of HUVEC to neutrophil microparticles induced a loss of cell membrane integrity and morphological changes. The addition of sodium azide or myeloperoxidase-specific inhibitor-I consistently reduced the injury to the endothelial cells. Taurine addition reduced HUVEC morphological changes. Conclusions We have demonstrated the presence of active myeloperoxidase in neutrophil microparticles and that the microparticle-associated myeloperoxidase cause injury to endothelial cells. Hence, the microparticle-associated myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system may contribute to widespread endothelial cell damage

  11. Evidence that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and caspase-4 activation occur in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Binet, Francois; Chiasson, Sonia; Girard, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Apoptosis can result from activation of three major pathways: the extrinsic, the intrinsic, and the most recently identified endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated pathway. While the two former pathways are known to be operational in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), the existence of the ER stress-mediated pathway, generally involving caspase-4, has never been reported in these cells. Recently, we have documented that arsenic trioxide (ATO) induced apoptosis in human PMNs by a mechanism that needs to be further investigated. In this study, using immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, we present evidence of ER alterations in PMNs activated by the ER stress inducer arsenic trioxide (ATO). Several key players of the unfolded protein response, including GRP78, GADD153, ATF6, XBP1 and eIF2{alpha} are expressed and activated in PMNs treated with ATO or other ER stress inducers. Although caspase-4 is expressed and activated in neutrophils, treatment with a caspase-4 inhibitor did not attenuate the pro-apoptotic effect of ATO at a concentration that reverses caspase-4 processing and activation. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the ER stress-mediated apoptotic pathway operates in human neutrophils.

  12. IFNα enhances the production of IL-6 by human neutrophils activated via TLR8

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Maili; Arruda-Silva, Fabio; Bianchetto-Aguilera, Francisco; Finotti, Giulia; Calzetti, Federica; Scapini, Patrizia; Lunardi, Claudio; Cassatella, Marco A.; Tamassia, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we reported that human neutrophils produce biologically active amounts of IL-6 when incubated with agonists activating TLR8, a receptor recognizing viral single strand RNA. In this study, we demonstrate that IFNα, a cytokine that modulates the early innate immune responses toward viral and bacterial infections, potently enhances the production of IL-6 in neutrophils stimulated with R848, a TLR8 agonist. We also show that such an effect is not caused by an IFNα-dependent induction of TLR7 and its consequent co-activation with TLR8 in response to R848, but, rather, it is substantially mediated by an increased production and release of endogenous TNFα. The latter cytokine, in an autocrine manner, leads to an augmented synthesis of the IkBζ co-activator and an enhanced recruitment of the C/EBPβ transcription factor to the IL-6 promoter. Moreover, we show that neutrophils from SLE patients with active disease state, hence displaying an IFN-induced gene expression signature, produce increased amounts of both IL-6 and TNFα in response to R848 as compared to healthy donors. Altogether, data uncover novel effects that type I IFN exerts in TLR8-activated neutrophils, which therefore enlarge our knowledge on the various biological actions which type I IFN orchestrates during infectious and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26790609

  13. Platelet activating factor amplifies human neutrophil adherence to bovine endothelial cells: evidence for a lipoxygenase dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Damtew, B; Spagnuolo, P J

    1992-10-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) is a potent lipid mediator that induces the release of leukotrienes and prostaglandins from various cells and tissues. We examined the capacity of PAF alone and in combination with soluble stimuli to enhance eicosanoid synthesis and adherence of human neutrophils. Neutrophils were preincubated with PAF and washed before exposure to the soluble stimuli F-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP), calcium ionophore A23187, and phorbol myristate acetate. Preincubation of neutrophils with 1 microM PAF enhanced the release of both LTB4 and LTC4 in response to each of the three agonists, in contrast with the unprimed neutrophils. Priming was specific for PAF since lyso-PAF was inactive. Priming concentrations of PAF also augmented the adherence of neutrophils to endothelium in the presence of the soluble agonists A23187, phorbol myristate acetate, and FMLP. The priming effect of PAF on eicosanoid release and neutrophil adherence was shown to have similar time- and dose-dependent effects. Further, the priming effects of PAF on adherence could be reversed by preincubation of neutrophils with the lipoxygenase inhibitors nordihydroguiaretic acid and 5,8,11,14-ETYA but not by preincubation with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. These data demonstrate that PAF amplifies neutrophil adherence to endothelium through a lipoxygenase dependent mechanism. PMID:1330924

  14. Prevention of neutrophil-mediated injury to endothelial cells by perfluorochemical

    SciTech Connect

    Babbitt, D.G.; Forman, M.B.; Jones, R.; Bajaj, A.K.; Hoover, R.L. )

    1990-02-01

    Myocardial salvage after reperfusion may be limited by neutrophil-mediated microvascular damage. The effect of the perfluorochemical, Fluosol-DA, and its various components on neutrophil adherence, cytotoxicity, and proteolytic enzyme release was examined on sheep large and small vessel endothelial cells in vitro. Cells were studied under normoxic (N) and anoxic conditions (A). Various concentrations of Fluosol (10%, 25%, and 50%) significantly reduced neutrophil adherence under both experimental conditions (mean 22 +/- 3.25% versus 7 +/- 0.8% (N) and 20 +/- 3.2% versus 7.5 +/- 0.9% (A); P less than 0.01). The perfluorocarbons, perfluorodecalin (PFD), and perfluoro-tripropylamine (PFTP) in a 50 volume/percent concentration exhibited profound effects on adherence, particularly on cells subjected to anoxia (51% and 69% reduction in adherence, respectively; P less than 0.01). No effect on adherence was observed with other components, including the detergent, pluronic F68. A 25% reduction (P less than 0.02) in endothelial cytotoxicity was noted when neutrophils were preincubated with Fluosol. However, pretreatment of endothelial cells with Fluosol did not inhibit neutrophil adherence. Neutrophils stimulated with cytochalasin B and FMLP showed a significant reduction in lysozyme release after incubation with Fluosol (28 +/- 5% versus 17 +/- 4%; P less than 0.01). This study demonstrates that Fluosol significantly attenuates neutrophil adherence, cytotoxicity, and enzyme release in an in vitro model of microvascular injury. It also suggests that prevention of neutrophil-mediated microvascular damage may be an important mechanism whereby Fluosol enhances myocardial salvage after ischemia and reperfusion.

  15. High glucose modulates IL-6 mediated immune homeostasis through impeding neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Manjunath B; Lad, Apurva; Bharath Prasad, Alevoor S; Balakrishnan, Aswath; Ramachandra, Lingadakai; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu

    2013-07-11

    Neutrophils serve as an active constituent of innate immunity and are endowed with distinct ability for producing neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to eliminate pathogens. Earlier studies have demonstrated a dysfunction of the innate immune system in diabetic subjects leading to increased susceptibility to infections; however, the influence of hyperglycemic conditions on NETs is unknown. In the present study we demonstrate that (a) NETs are influenced by glucose homeostasis, (b) IL-6 is a potent inducer of energy dependent NET formation and (c) hyperglycemia mimics a state of constitutively active pro-inflammatory condition in neutrophils leading to reduced response to external stimuli making diabetic subjects susceptible to infections. PMID:23735697

  16. NETosing Neutrophils Activate Complement Both on Their Own NETs and Bacteria via Alternative and Non-alternative Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Joshua; Pluthero, Fred G.; Douda, David N.; Riedl, Magdalena; Cherry, Ahmed; Ulanova, Marina; Kahr, Walter H. A.; Palaniyar, Nades; Licht, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils deposit antimicrobial proteins, such as myeloperoxidase and proteases on chromatin, which they release as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Neutrophils also carry key components of the complement alternative pathway (AP) such as properdin or complement factor P (CFP), complement factor B (CFB), and C3. However, the contribution of these complement components and complement activation during NET formation in the presence and absence of bacteria is poorly understood. We studied complement activation on NETs and a Gram-negative opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA01, PAKwt, and PAKgfp). Here, we show that anaphylatoxin C5a, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), which activates NADPH oxidase, induce the release of CFP, CFB, and C3 from neutrophils. In response to PMA or P. aeruginosa, neutrophils secrete CFP, deposit it on NETs and bacteria, and induce the formation of terminal complement complexes (C5b–9). A blocking anti-CFP antibody inhibited AP-mediated but not non-AP-mediated complement activation on NETs and P. aeruginosa. Therefore, NET-mediated complement activation occurs via both AP- and non AP-based mechanisms, and AP-mediated complement activation during NETosis is dependent on CFP. These findings suggest that neutrophils could use their “AP tool kit” to readily activate complement on NETs and Gram-negative bacteria, such as P. aeruginosa, whereas additional components present in the serum help to fix non-AP-mediated complement both on NETs and bacteria. This unique mechanism may play important roles in host defense and help to explain specific roles of complement activation in NET-related diseases. PMID:27148258

  17. NETosing Neutrophils Activate Complement Both on Their Own NETs and Bacteria via Alternative and Non-alternative Pathways.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Joshua; Pluthero, Fred G; Douda, David N; Riedl, Magdalena; Cherry, Ahmed; Ulanova, Marina; Kahr, Walter H A; Palaniyar, Nades; Licht, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils deposit antimicrobial proteins, such as myeloperoxidase and proteases on chromatin, which they release as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Neutrophils also carry key components of the complement alternative pathway (AP) such as properdin or complement factor P (CFP), complement factor B (CFB), and C3. However, the contribution of these complement components and complement activation during NET formation in the presence and absence of bacteria is poorly understood. We studied complement activation on NETs and a Gram-negative opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA01, PAKwt, and PAKgfp). Here, we show that anaphylatoxin C5a, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), which activates NADPH oxidase, induce the release of CFP, CFB, and C3 from neutrophils. In response to PMA or P. aeruginosa, neutrophils secrete CFP, deposit it on NETs and bacteria, and induce the formation of terminal complement complexes (C5b-9). A blocking anti-CFP antibody inhibited AP-mediated but not non-AP-mediated complement activation on NETs and P. aeruginosa. Therefore, NET-mediated complement activation occurs via both AP- and non AP-based mechanisms, and AP-mediated complement activation during NETosis is dependent on CFP. These findings suggest that neutrophils could use their "AP tool kit" to readily activate complement on NETs and Gram-negative bacteria, such as P. aeruginosa, whereas additional components present in the serum help to fix non-AP-mediated complement both on NETs and bacteria. This unique mechanism may play important roles in host defense and help to explain specific roles of complement activation in NET-related diseases. PMID:27148258

  18. Glutathione peroxidase-deficient mice are more susceptible to neutrophil-mediated hepatic parenchymal cell injury during endotoxemia: importance of an intracellular oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, H; Ho, Y S; Fisher, M A; Lawson, J A; Farhood, A

    1999-02-01

    Neutrophils contribute to hepatocellular injury in a number of acute inflammatory reactions. However, the molecular mechanism of parenchymal cell injury remains controversial. To address the issue of whether or not reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important in the injury process, we used the galactosamine/endotoxin (Gal/ET) model of acute liver failure, which involves a neutrophil-mediated parenchymal cell injury. In C3Heb/FeJ mice, Gal/ET induced a significant increase of hepatic and plasma levels of glutathione disulfide (GSSG), an indicator of oxidant stress, selectively during the neutrophil-mediated injury phase. In glutathione peroxidase-deficient mice (Gpx1(-/-)), Gal/ET or Gal/tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) caused more severe neutrophil-mediated liver injury compared with wild-type animals. However, there was no significant difference in other critical parameters, e.g., activation of the transcription factor, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), parenchymal cell apoptosis, and neutrophil sequestration in the liver. Our results suggest that neutrophil-derived ROS are responsible for an intracellular oxidant stress in hepatocytes after Gal/ET treatment. Because of the higher susceptibility of Gpx1(-/-) mice to a neutrophil-mediated injury, we conclude that peroxides generated by neutrophils diffused into hepatocytes and contributed to parenchymal cell death in vivo. Thus, strengthening defense mechanisms against ROS in target cells can attenuate excessive inflammatory injury without affecting host defense reactions. PMID:9918921

  19. Effect of fluticasone propionate on neutrophil chemotaxis, superoxide generation, and extracellular proteolytic activity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Llewellyn-Jones, C. G.; Hill, S. L.; Stockley, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Corticosteroids are widely used in the treatment of many inflammatory conditions but the exact mode of action on neutrophil function is uncertain. Fluticasone propionate is a new topically active synthetic steroid which can be measured in body fluids and which undergoes first pass metabolism. METHODS--The effects of fluticasone propionate on the function of neutrophils isolated from normal, healthy control subjects and on the chemotactic activity of sputum sol phase were assessed. RESULTS--Preincubation of neutrophils with fluticasone propionate reduced the chemotactic response to 10(-8) mol/l F-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP) and to a 1:5 dilution of sputum sol phase in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, when fluticasone propionate was added to sputum from eight patients with stable chronic obstructive bronchitis the chemotactic activity of a 1:5 dilution of the sol phase fell from a mean (SE) value of 22.2 (1.21) cells/field to 19.6 (0.89), 17.1 (0.74), and 11.9 (0.6) cells field at 1 mumol/l, 10 mumol/l, and 100 mumol/l, respectively. In further experiments fluticasone propionate preincubated with neutrophils inhibited fibronectin degradation by resting cells and by cells stimulated by FMLP (15.2% inhibition of resting cells, 5.1% inhibition of stimulated cells with 1 mumol/l fluticasone propionate, 24% and 18.7% inhibition respectively at 100 mumol/l fluticasone propionate. Fluticasone propionate had no effect on generation of superoxide anion by resting or stimulated cells. CONCLUSIONS--These results indicate that fluticasone propionate has a direct suppressive effect on several aspects of neutrophil function and may suggest a role for this agent in the modulation of neutrophil mediated damage to connective tissue. PMID:8202875

  20. Dogs cast NETs too: Canine neutrophil extracellular traps in health and immune-mediated hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Unity; Kimura, Kayoko; Gray, Robert; Lueth, Paul; Bellaire, Bryan; LeVine, Dana

    2015-12-15

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are webs of DNA and protein with both anti-microbial and pro-thrombotic properties which have not been previously reported in dogs. To confirm dog neutrophils can form NETs, neutrophils were isolated from healthy dogs, and stimulated in vitro with 2μM, 8μM, 31μM, and 125μM platelet activating factor (PAF) or 0.03μM, 0.1μM, 0.4μM, 1.6μM and 6.4μM phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). Extracellular DNA was measured using the cell impermeable dye Sytox Green every hour for 4h. At 4h, extracellular DNA was significantly greater than non-stimulated cells at concentrations ≥31μM and ≥0.1μM for PAF and PMA, respectively. Cells stimulated with 31.25μM PAF reached maximal fluorescence by 1h, whereas maximal fluorescence was not achieved until 2h for cells stimulated with 0.1μM PMA. Immunofluorescent imaging using DAPI and anti-elastase antibody confirmed that extracellular DNA is released as NETs. As NETs have been implicated in thrombosis, nucleosomes, a marker correlated with NET formation, were measured in the serum of dogs with the thrombotic disorder primary immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) (n=7) and healthy controls (n=20) using a commercially available ELISA. NETs were significantly higher in IMHA cases than controls (median 0.12 and 0.90, respectively, p=0.01), but there were large positive interferences associated with hemolysis and icterus. In summary, the study is the first to describe NET generation by canine neutrophils and provides preliminary evidence that a marker associated with NETs is elevated in IMHA. However, this apparent elevation must be interpreted with caution due to the effect of interference, emphasizing the need for a more specific and robust assay for NETs in clinical samples. PMID:26574161

  1. Increased Nucleosomes and Neutrophil Activation Link to Disease Progression in Patients with Scrub Typhus but Not Murine Typhus in Laos

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Daniel H.; Stephan, Femke; Bulder, Ingrid; Wouters, Diana; van der Poll, Tom; Newton, Paul N.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity is essential in protection against rickettsial illnesses, but the role of neutrophils in these intracellular vasculotropic infections remains unclear. This study analyzed the plasma levels of nucleosomes, FSAP-activation (nucleosome-releasing factor), and neutrophil activation, as evidenced by neutrophil-elastase (ELA) complexes, in sympatric Lao patients with scrub typhus and murine typhus. In acute scrub typhus elevated nucleosome levels correlated with lower GCS scores, raised respiratory rate, jaundice and impaired liver function, whereas neutrophil activation correlated with fibrinolysis and high IL-8 plasma levels, a recently identified predictor of severe disease and mortality. Nucleosome and ELA complex levels were associated with a 4.8-fold and 4-fold increased risk of developing severe scrub typhus, beyond cut off values of 1,040 U/ml for nucleosomes and 275 U/ml for ELA complexes respectively. In murine typhus, nucleosome levels associated with pro-inflammatory cytokines and the duration of illness, while ELA complexes correlated strongly with inflammation markers, jaundice and increased respiratory rates. This study found strong correlations between circulating nucleosomes and neutrophil activation in patients with scrub typhus, but not murine typhus, providing indirect evidence that nucleosomes could originate from neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) degradation. High circulating plasma nucleosomes and ELA complexes represent independent risk factors for developing severe complications in scrub typhus. As nucleosomes and histones exposed on NETs are highly cytotoxic to endothelial cells and are strongly pro-coagulant, neutrophil-derived nucleosomes could contribute to vascular damage, the pro-coagulant state and exacerbation of disease in scrub typhus, thus indicating a detrimental role of neutrophil activation. The data suggest that increased neutrophil activation relates to disease progression and severe complications, and

  2. CXCR1-mediated neutrophil degranulation and fungal killing promote Candida clearance and host survival.

    PubMed

    Swamydas, Muthulekha; Gao, Ji-Liang; Break, Timothy J; Johnson, Melissa D; Jaeger, Martin; Rodriguez, Carlos A; Lim, Jean K; Green, Nathaniel M; Collar, Amanda L; Fischer, Brett G; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Perfect, John R; Alexander, Barbara D; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; Netea, Mihai G; Murphy, Philip M; Lionakis, Michail S

    2016-01-20

    Systemic Candida albicans infection causes high morbidity and mortality and is now the leading cause of nosocomial bloodstream infection in the United States. Neutropenia is a major risk factor for poor outcome in infected patients; however, the molecular factors that mediate neutrophil trafficking and effector function during infection are poorly defined. Using a mouse model of systemic candidiasis, we found that the neutrophil-selective CXC chemokine receptor Cxcr1 and its ligand, Cxcl5, are highly induced in the Candida-infected kidney, the target organ in the model. To investigate the role of Cxcr1 in antifungal host defense in vivo, we generated Cxcr1(-/-) mice and analyzed their immune response to Candida. Mice lacking Cxcr1 exhibited decreased survival with enhanced Candida growth in the kidney and renal failure. Increased susceptibility of Cxcr1(-/-) mice to systemic candidiasis was not due to impaired neutrophil trafficking from the blood into the infected kidney but was the result of defective killing of the fungus by neutrophils that exhibited a cell-intrinsic decrease in degranulation. In humans, the mutant CXCR1 allele CXCR1-T276 results in impaired neutrophil degranulation and fungal killing and was associated with increased risk of disseminated candidiasis in infected patients. Together, our data demonstrate a biological function for mouse Cxcr1 in vivo and indicate that CXCR1-dependent neutrophil effector function is a critical innate protective mechanism of fungal clearance and host survival in systemic candidiasis. PMID:26791948

  3. Ras regulates alveolar macrophage formation of CXC chemokines and neutrophil activation in streptococcal M1 protein-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songen; Hwaiz, Rundk; Rahman, Milladur; Herwald, Heiko; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2014-06-15

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) is associated with a high mortality rate. The M1 serotype of Streptococcus pyogenes is most frequently associated with STSS. Herein, we examined the role of Ras signaling in M1 protein-induced lung injury. Male C57BL/6 mice received the Ras inhibitor (farnesylthiosalicylic acid, FTS) prior to M1 protein challenge. Bronchoalveolar fluid and lung tissue were harvested for quantification of neutrophil recruitment, edema and CXC chemokine formation. Neutrophil expression of Mac-1 was quantified by use of flow cytometry. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine gene expression of CXC chemokines in alveolar macrophages. Administration of FTS reduced M1 protein-induced neutrophil recruitment, edema formation and tissue damage in the lung. M1 protein challenge increased Mac-1 expression on neutrophils and CXC chemokine levels in the lung. Inhibition of Ras activity decreased M1 protein-induced expression of Mac-1 on neutrophils and secretion of CXC chemokines in the lung. Moreover, FTS abolished M1 protein-provoked gene expression of CXC chemokines in alveolar macrophages. Ras inhibition decreased chemokine-mediated neutrophil migration in vitro. Taken together, our novel findings indicate that Ras signaling is a potent regulator of CXC chemokine formation and neutrophil infiltration in the lung. Thus, inhibition of Ras activity might be a useful way to antagonize streptococcal M1 protein-triggered acute lung injury. PMID:24704370

  4. Effects of MCI-186 upon neutrophil-derived active oxygens.

    PubMed

    Sumitomo, K; Shishido, N; Aizawa, H; Hasebe, N; Kikuchi, K; Nakamura, M

    2007-01-01

    Reactions of 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazoline-5-one (MCI-186) with hypochlorous acid and superoxide were analysed by spectrophotometry and mass spectrometry. The results were applied to the neutrophil system to evaluate the scavenging activity of neutrophil-derived active oxygen species by MCI-186. MCI-186 reacted rapidly with hypochlorous acid (1 x 10(6) M(-1)s(-1)) to form a chlorinated intermediate, followed by a slow conversion to a new spectrum. MCI-186 consumed 3 moles of hypochlorous acid and did not react with superoxide. The newly synthesized fluorescence probes, 2-[6-(4'-amino)-phenoxy-3H-xanthen-3-on-9-yl]benzoic acid (APF) and 2-[6-(4'-hydroxy)phenoxy-3H-anthen-3-on-9-yl]benzoic acid (HPF) successfully detected neutrophil-derived active oxygens (Setsukinai K, Urano Y, Kakinuma K, Majima HJ, Nagano T. Development of novel fluorescence probes that can reliably detect reactive oxygen species and distinguish specific species. J Biol Chem 2003; 278: 3170-3175). The rate constants for the reaction of hypochlorous acid with MCI-186 and fluorescence probes was in the order of MCI-186 > APF > HPF. Fluorescence due to the oxidation of APF and HPF was observed with the stimulated neutrophils. The result that the intensity from APF oxidation was higher than that from HPF oxidation is compatible with reports that APF selectively reacts with hypochlorous acid. Fluorescence due to oxidation of both APF and HPF decreased when the reactions were carried out in the presence of a fluorescence probe and MCI-186 in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that MCI-186 effectively scavenges neutrophil-derived hypochlorous acid and other active oxygens. PMID:17705989

  5. Complement factor H modulates the activation of human neutrophil granulocytes and the generation of neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Andrea E; Sándor, Noémi; Kárpáti, Éva; Józsi, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Factor H (FH) is a major inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement activation in plasma and on certain host surfaces. In addition to being a complement regulator, FH can bind to various cells via specific receptors, including binding to neutrophil granulocytes through complement receptor type 3 (CR3; CD11b/CD18), and modulate their function. The cellular roles of FH are, however, poorly understood. Because neutrophils are important innate immune cells in inflammatory processes and the host defense against pathogens, we aimed at studying the effects of FH on various neutrophil functions, including the generation of extracellular traps. FH co-localized with CD11b on the surface of neutrophils isolated from peripheral blood of healthy individuals, and cell-bound FH retained its cofactor activity and enhanced C3b degradation. Soluble FH supported neutrophil migration and immobilized FH induced cell spreading. In addition, immobilized but not soluble FH enhanced IL-8 release from neutrophils. FH alone did not trigger the cells to produce neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), but NET formation induced by PMA and by fibronectin plus fungal β-glucan were inhibited by immobilized, but not by soluble, FH. Moreover, in parallel with NET formation, immobilized FH also inhibited the production of reactive oxygen species induced by PMA and by fibronectin plus β-glucan. Altogether, these data indicate that FH has multiple regulatory roles on neutrophil functions. While it can support the recruitment of neutrophils, FH may also exert anti-inflammatory effects and influence local inflammatory and antimicrobial reactions, and reduce tissue damage by modulating NET formation. PMID:26938503

  6. Lectin-dependent neutrophil-mediated cytotoxicity. I. Characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Simchowitz, L; Schur, P H

    1976-01-01

    Isolated normal human peripheral neutrophils became cytotoxic to chicken red blood cells (CRBC) in the presence of phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A), a phenomenon which we have termed lectin-dependent neutrophilmediated cytotoxicity (LDNMC). Substantial cytotoxicity could be demonstrated by 1 h of incubation at 37 degrees. Isolated human peripheral lymphocytes were not cytotoxic to CRBC in the presence of these lectins, even after 18 h of incubation. Both PHA and Con A exhibited dose responses over a wide concentration range and displayed progressive, time-dependent cytotoxicity. Cytotoxicity for both PHA and Con A was greater at 37 degrees than at 22 degrees, and was undetectable at 4 degrees. CRBC as target cells were much more readily lysed than either sheep or human erythrocytes. Erythrophagocytosis did not appear to play a role. Images Figure 1 PMID:955680

  7. Catecholamine stress alters neutrophil trafficking and impairs wound healing by β2-adrenergic receptor-mediated upregulation of IL-6.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ho; Gorouhi, Farzam; Ramirez, Sandra; Granick, Jennifer L; Byrne, Barbara A; Soulika, Athena M; Simon, Scott I; Isseroff, R Rivkah

    2014-03-01

    Stress-induced hormones can alter the inflammatory response to tissue injury; however, the precise mechanism by which epinephrine influences inflammatory response and wound healing is not well defined. Here we demonstrate that epinephrine alters the neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN))-dependent inflammatory response to a cutaneous wound. Using noninvasive real-time imaging of genetically tagged PMNs in a murine skin wound, chronic, epinephrine-mediated stress was modeled by sustained delivery of epinephrine. Prolonged systemic exposure of epinephrine resulted in persistent PMN trafficking to the wound site via an IL-6-mediated mechanism, and this in turn impaired wound repair. Further, we demonstrate that β2-adrenergic receptor-dependent activation of proinflammatory macrophages is critical for epinephrine-mediated IL-6 production. This study expands our current understanding of stress hormone-mediated impairment of wound healing and provides an important mechanistic link to explain how epinephrine stress exacerbates inflammation via increased number and lifetime of PMNs. PMID:24121404

  8. Serum Amyloid A Induces NLRP-3-Mediated IL-1β Secretion in Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Migita, Kiyoshi; Izumi, Yasumori; Jiuchi, Yuka; Kozuru, Hideko; Kawahara, Chieko; Nakamura, Minoru; Nakamura, Tadashi; Agematsu, Kazunaga; Masumoto, Junya; Yasunami, Michio; Kawakami, Atsushi; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Serum amyloid A (SAA) is an acute phase reactant with significant immunological activities, including effects on cytokine synthesis and neutrophil chemotaxis. Neutrophils can also release cytokines with proinflammatory properties. IL-1β is a key proinflammatory cytokine, the secretion of which is controlled by inflammasome. We investigated the proinflammatory effects of SAA in vitro in relation to the NLRP3 inflammasome in neutrophils. Methodology/Principal Findings Human neutrophils isolated form healthy subjects were stimulated with serum amyloid A (SAA). The cellular supernatants were analyzed by western blot using anti-IL-1β or anti-caspase-1 antibodies. IL-1β or Nod-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) mRNA expressions were analyzed by real-time PCR or reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) method. SAA stimulation induced pro-IL-1β mRNA expression in neutrophils. Furthermore, SAA engaged the caspase-1-activating inflammasome, resulting in the production of active IL-1β. SAA-induced pro-IL-1β expression was marginally suppressed by the Syk specific inhibitor, R406, and SAA-induced pro-IL-1β processing in neutrophils was prevented by R406. Furthermore, SAA-induced NLRP3 mRNA expression was completely blocked by R406. Analysis of intracellular signaling revealed that SAA stimulation activated the tyrosine kinase Syk and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate that the innate neutrophil immune response against SAA involves a two-step activation process: an initial signal promoting expression of pro-IL-1β and a second signal involving Syk-dependent activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and caspase-1, allowing processing of pro-IL-1β and secretion of mature IL-1β. PMID:24846290

  9. Phosphoproteins and the activation of the neutrophil respiratory burst oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, N.; Curnutte, J.T.; Babior, B.M.

    1987-05-01

    The respiratory burst oxidase is a neutrophil enzyme that converts oxygen to O/sub 2//sup -/. It is dormant in resting cells but is activated when the cells are exposed to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). PMA also induces the incorporation of /sup 32/P into certain neutrophil proteins. To determine whether phosphorylation of these proteins is related to oxidase activation, protein phosphorylation was studied in patients with chronic granulomatous disease (GCD), a group of inherited conditions in which oxidase activity is missing. In normals, neutrophil activation by PMA is associated with the phosphorylation inter alia of 48K proteins at pI 7.3 and 7.8. There is also inconstant phosphorylation of a 48K protein at pI 6.8. In 4 patients with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), phosphorylation of pp48/6.8 and pp48/7.3 was absent, while in autosomal recessive CGD, phosphorylation of all 3 of these proteins was absent in 3 patients and significantly diminished in a fourth. These results suggest that the phosphorylation of these proteins is related to the activation of the respiratory burst oxidase. By peptide mapping, these 3 proteins appear to consist of a single peptide species whose pI variability may be due to post-translational modification. The only phosphoamino acid found in pp48/7.3 was phosphoserine.

  10. Neutrophils do not mediate the pathophysiological sequelae of Cryptosporidium parvum infection in neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Zadrozny, Leah M; Stauffer, Stephen H; Armstrong, Martha U; Jones, Samuel L; Gookin, Jody L

    2006-10-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a minimally invasive protozoal pathogen of intestinal epithelium that results in villus atrophy, mucosal lipid peroxidation, diarrhea, and diminished barrier function. Influx of neutrophils is a consistent feature of human and animal cryptosporidiosis, and yet their contribution to the pathological sequelae of infection has not been investigated. Accordingly, we used an established neonatal piglet model of C. parvum infection to examine the role of neutrophils in disease pathogenesis by inhibiting their recruitment and activation in vivo using a monoclonal anti-CD18 antibody. Infected piglets were treated daily with anti-CD18 or isotype control immunoglobulin G and euthanized at peak infection, at which time neutrophil infiltrates, lipid peroxidation, severity of infection, and intestinal barrier function were quantified. C. parvum infection resulted in a significant increase in mucosal neutrophil myeloperoxidase activity that was prevented by treatment of piglets with anti-CD18 antibody. Neutrophil recruitment was dependent on mucosal superoxide formation (prevented by treatment of infected piglets with superoxide dismutase). Neutrophils did not contribute to peroxynitrite formation or peroxidative injury of C. parvum-infected mucosa and had no impact on the severity of epithelial infection, villus atrophy, or diarrhea. The presence of neutrophils in C. parvum-infected mucosa was associated with enhanced barrier function that could not be attributed to mucosal elaboration of prostaglandins or stimulation of their synthesis. These studies are the first to demonstrate that neutrophilic inflammation arising in response to infection by a noninvasive epithelial pathogen results in physiologic rather than pathological effects in vivo. PMID:16988224

  11. Neutrophils Do Not Mediate the Pathophysiological Sequelae of Cryptosporidium parvum Infection in Neonatal Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Zadrozny, Leah M.; Stauffer, Stephen H.; Armstrong, Martha U.; Jones, Samuel L.; Gookin, Jody L.

    2006-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a minimally invasive protozoal pathogen of intestinal epithelium that results in villus atrophy, mucosal lipid peroxidation, diarrhea, and diminished barrier function. Influx of neutrophils is a consistent feature of human and animal cryptosporidiosis, and yet their contribution to the pathological sequelae of infection has not been investigated. Accordingly, we used an established neonatal piglet model of C. parvum infection to examine the role of neutrophils in disease pathogenesis by inhibiting their recruitment and activation in vivo using a monoclonal anti-CD18 antibody. Infected piglets were treated daily with anti-CD18 or isotype control immunoglobulin G and euthanized at peak infection, at which time neutrophil infiltrates, lipid peroxidation, severity of infection, and intestinal barrier function were quantified. C. parvum infection resulted in a significant increase in mucosal neutrophil myeloperoxidase activity that was prevented by treatment of piglets with anti-CD18 antibody. Neutrophil recruitment was dependent on mucosal superoxide formation (prevented by treatment of infected piglets with superoxide dismutase). Neutrophils did not contribute to peroxynitrite formation or peroxidative injury of C. parvum-infected mucosa and had no impact on the severity of epithelial infection, villus atrophy, or diarrhea. The presence of neutrophils in C. parvum-infected mucosa was associated with enhanced barrier function that could not be attributed to mucosal elaboration of prostaglandins or stimulation of their synthesis. These studies are the first to demonstrate that neutrophilic inflammation arising in response to infection by a noninvasive epithelial pathogen results in physiologic rather than pathological effects in vivo. PMID:16988224

  12. Effect of Antiretroviral Therapy on HIV-mediated Impairment of the Neutrophil Antimycobacterial Response

    PubMed Central

    Bangani, Nonzwakazi; Goliath, Rene; Kampmann, Beate; Wilkinson, Katalin A.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Martineau, Adrian R.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Experimental and epidemiological evidence suggests that neutrophils are important in the host response to tuberculosis. HIV infection, which increases the risk of tuberculosis, adversely affects neutrophil function. Objectives: To determine the impact of HIV and antiretroviral therapy on neutrophil antimycobacterial activity. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional comparison of neutrophil functions in 20 antiretroviral-naive HIV-infected and 20 HIV-uninfected individuals using luminescence-, flow cytometry–, and ELISA-based assays. We then conducted a prospective study in the HIV-infected individuals investigating these parameters during the first 6 months of antiretroviral therapy. Surface markers of neutrophil activation were investigated in a separate cohort using flow cytometry. Measurements and Main Results: HIV infection impaired control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by neutrophils (mean ratio of mycobacterial luminescence in neutrophil samples vs. serum controls at 1 hour in HIV-infected participants, 0.88 ± 0.13 vs. HIV-uninfected participants, 0.76 ± 0.14; P = 0.01; at 24 hours, 0.82 ± 0.13 vs. 0.71 ± 0.13; P = 0.01). The extent of impairment correlated with log[HIV viral load]. Neutrophil cell death after 24 hours’ incubation with M. tuberculosis was higher in the HIV-infected cohort (85.3 ± 11.8% vs. 57.9 ± 22.4% necrotic cells; P < 0.0001). Neutrophils from HIV-infected participants demonstrated significantly more CD62L-negative cells (median, 23.0 vs. 8.5%; P = 0.008) and CD16-negative cells (3.2 vs. 1.3%, P = 0.03). Antiretroviral therapy restored mycobacterial restriction and pattern of neutrophil death toward levels seen in HIV-uninfected persons. Conclusions: Neutrophils in antiretroviral-naive HIV-infected persons are hyperactivated, eliminate M. tuberculosis less effectively than in HIV-uninfected individuals, and progress rapidly to necrotic cell death. These factors are

  13. Hyperglycemia Impairs Neutrophil-Mediated Bacterial Clearance in Mice Infected with the Lyme Disease Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Javid, Ashkan; Zlotnikov, Nataliya; Pětrošová, Helena; Tang, Tian Tian; Zhang, Yang; Bansal, Anil K.; Ebady, Rhodaba; Parikh, Maitry; Ahmed, Mijhgan; Sun, Chunxiang; Newbigging, Susan; Kim, Yae Ram; Santana Sosa, Marianna; Glogauer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-insufficient type 1 diabetes is associated with attenuated bactericidal function of neutrophils, which are key mediators of innate immune responses to microbes as well as pathological inflammatory processes. Neutrophils are central to immune responses to the Lyme pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi. The effect of hyperglycemia on host susceptibility to and outcomes of B. burgdorferi infection has not been examined. The present study investigated the impact of sustained obesity-independent hyperglycemia in mice on bacterial clearance, inflammatory pathology and neutrophil responses to B. burgdorferi. Hyperglycemia was associated with reduced arthritis incidence but more widespread tissue colonization and reduced clearance of bacterial DNA in multiple tissues including brain, heart, liver, lung and knee joint. B. burgdorferi uptake and killing were impaired in neutrophils isolated from hyperglycemic mice. Thus, attenuated neutrophil function in insulin-insufficient hyperglycemia was associated with reduced B. burgdorferi clearance in target organs. These data suggest that investigating the effects of comorbid conditions such as diabetes on outcomes of B. burgdorferi infections in humans may be warranted. PMID:27340827

  14. Hyperglycemia Impairs Neutrophil-Mediated Bacterial Clearance in Mice Infected with the Lyme Disease Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Javid, Ashkan; Zlotnikov, Nataliya; Pětrošová, Helena; Tang, Tian Tian; Zhang, Yang; Bansal, Anil K; Ebady, Rhodaba; Parikh, Maitry; Ahmed, Mijhgan; Sun, Chunxiang; Newbigging, Susan; Kim, Yae Ram; Santana Sosa, Marianna; Glogauer, Michael; Moriarty, Tara J

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-insufficient type 1 diabetes is associated with attenuated bactericidal function of neutrophils, which are key mediators of innate immune responses to microbes as well as pathological inflammatory processes. Neutrophils are central to immune responses to the Lyme pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi. The effect of hyperglycemia on host susceptibility to and outcomes of B. burgdorferi infection has not been examined. The present study investigated the impact of sustained obesity-independent hyperglycemia in mice on bacterial clearance, inflammatory pathology and neutrophil responses to B. burgdorferi. Hyperglycemia was associated with reduced arthritis incidence but more widespread tissue colonization and reduced clearance of bacterial DNA in multiple tissues including brain, heart, liver, lung and knee joint. B. burgdorferi uptake and killing were impaired in neutrophils isolated from hyperglycemic mice. Thus, attenuated neutrophil function in insulin-insufficient hyperglycemia was associated with reduced B. burgdorferi clearance in target organs. These data suggest that investigating the effects of comorbid conditions such as diabetes on outcomes of B. burgdorferi infections in humans may be warranted. PMID:27340827

  15. Human Platelets Utilize Cycloxygenase-1 to Generate Dioxolane A3, a Neutrophil-activating Eicosanoid*

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Christine; Aldrovandi, Maceler; Uhlson, Charis; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Longhurst, Hilary J.; Warner, Timothy D.; Alam, Saydul; Slatter, David A.; Lauder, Sarah N.; Allen-Redpath, Keith; Collins, Peter W.; Murphy, Robert C.; Thomas, Christopher P.; O'Donnell, Valerie B.

    2016-01-01

    Eicosanoids are important mediators of fever, pain, and inflammation that modulate cell signaling during acute and chronic disease. We show by using lipidomics that thrombin-activated human platelets generate a new type of eicosanoid that both stimulates and primes human neutrophil integrin (Mac-1) expression, in response to formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine. Detailed characterization proposes a dioxolane structure, 8-hydroxy-9,11-dioxolane eicosatetraenoic acid (dioxolane A3, DXA3). The lipid is generated in nanogram amounts by platelets from endogenous arachidonate during physiological activation, with inhibition by aspirin in vitro or in vivo, implicating cyclooxygenase-1 (COX). Pharmacological and genetic studies on human/murine platelets revealed that DXA3 formation requires protease-activated receptors 1 and 4, cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), Src tyrosine kinases, p38 MAPK, phospholipase C, and intracellular calcium. From data generated by purified COX isoforms and chemical oxidation, we propose that DXA3 is generated by release of an intermediate from the active site followed by oxygenation at C8. In summary, a new neutrophil-activating platelet-derived lipid generated by COX-1 is presented that can activate or prime human neutrophils, suggesting a role in innate immunity and acute inflammation. PMID:27129261

  16. Human Platelets Utilize Cycloxygenase-1 to Generate Dioxolane A3, a Neutrophil-activating Eicosanoid.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Christine; Aldrovandi, Maceler; Uhlson, Charis; Marnett, Lawrence J; Longhurst, Hilary J; Warner, Timothy D; Alam, Saydul; Slatter, David A; Lauder, Sarah N; Allen-Redpath, Keith; Collins, Peter W; Murphy, Robert C; Thomas, Christopher P; O'Donnell, Valerie B

    2016-06-24

    Eicosanoids are important mediators of fever, pain, and inflammation that modulate cell signaling during acute and chronic disease. We show by using lipidomics that thrombin-activated human platelets generate a new type of eicosanoid that both stimulates and primes human neutrophil integrin (Mac-1) expression, in response to formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine. Detailed characterization proposes a dioxolane structure, 8-hydroxy-9,11-dioxolane eicosatetraenoic acid (dioxolane A3, DXA3). The lipid is generated in nanogram amounts by platelets from endogenous arachidonate during physiological activation, with inhibition by aspirin in vitro or in vivo, implicating cyclooxygenase-1 (COX). Pharmacological and genetic studies on human/murine platelets revealed that DXA3 formation requires protease-activated receptors 1 and 4, cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), Src tyrosine kinases, p38 MAPK, phospholipase C, and intracellular calcium. From data generated by purified COX isoforms and chemical oxidation, we propose that DXA3 is generated by release of an intermediate from the active site followed by oxygenation at C8. In summary, a new neutrophil-activating platelet-derived lipid generated by COX-1 is presented that can activate or prime human neutrophils, suggesting a role in innate immunity and acute inflammation. PMID:27129261

  17. Phosphatase Wip1 Masters IL-17-producing Neutrophil-mediated Colitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xuelian; Wang, Peng; Du, Junfeng; Yang, Fan; Tian, Yuan; Shen, Xiaofei; Yang, Tao; Zhang, Lianfeng; Zhao, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 (Wip1) is currently believed to be a promising drug target for cancer therapy. Our recent studies showed that deletion of Wip1 remarkably promoted neutrophil inflammatory response. Whether Wip1 is involved in the regulation of inflammatory bowel disease is unknown. In the present study, we found that Wip1 knockout (KO) mice were more susceptible to colitis induced by dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) than wild-type mice as substantiated by the lower mouse survival ratio, rapid bodyweight loss, increased disease activity index, shorter colon length, and more severe pathology of colons in Wip1KO mice. Using full bone marrow chimera mouse models, we demonstrated that Wip1 intrinsically controls inflammatory response of immune cells. Deletion of IL-17 (Wip1/IL-17 double KO mice) significantly rescued the pathology in Wip1KO mice. Neutrophils of DSS-treated wild-type and Wip1KO mice expressed significantly higher IL-17. After adoptive transfer of sorted Wip1KO or double KO neutrophils into IL-17KO mice, mice receiving double KO neutrophils were more resistant to DSS-induced colitis than mice receiving Wip1KO neutrophils. These data collectively indicate that Wip1 modulates host sensitivity to colitis by intrinsically regulating immune cells. The enhanced IL-17 expression in neutrophils contributed to the increased sensitivity and severity of colitis in Wip1KO mice. Thus, Wip1 may be used as a drug target to treat colitis. PMID:26950306

  18. Activation of human neutrophils by mycobacterial phenolic glycolipids

    PubMed Central

    Fäldt, J; Dahlgren, C; Karlsson, A; Ahmed, A M S; Minnikin, D E; Ridell, M

    1999-01-01

    The interaction between mycobacterial phenolic glycolipids (PGLs) and phagocytes was studied. Human neutrophils were allowed to interact with each of four purified mycobacterial PGLs and the neutrophil production of reactive oxygen metabolites was followed kinetically by luminol-/isoluminol-amplified chemiluminescence. The PGLs from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium kansasii, respectively, were shown to stimulate the production of oxygen metabolites, while PGLs from Mycobacterium marinum and Mycobacterium bovis BCG, respectively, were unable to induce an oxidative response. Periodate treatment of the M. tuberculosis PGL decreased the production of oxygen radicals, showing the importance of the PGL carbohydrate moiety for the interaction. The activation, however, could not be inhibited by rhamnose or fucose, indicating a complex interaction which probably involves more than one saccharide unit. This is in line with the fact that the activating PGLs from M. tuberculosis and M. kansasii contain tri- and tetrasaccharides, respectively, while the nonactivating PGLs from M. marinum and M. bovis BCG each contain a monosaccharide. The complement receptor 3 (CR3) has earlier been shown to be of importance for the phagocyte binding of mycobacteria, but did not appear to be involved in the activation of neutrophils by PGLs. The subcellular localization of the reactive oxygen metabolites formed was related to the way in which the glycolipids were presented to the cells. PMID:10540187

  19. Anesthetic agent propofol inhibits myeloid differentiation factor 88-dependent and independent signaling and mitigates lipopolysaccharide-mediated reactive oxygen species production in human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xuli; Lv, Fei; Fang, Bo; Liu, Song; Lv, Huangwei; He, Guannan; Ma, Hong; Cao, Yaming; Wang, Yue

    2014-12-01

    Engagement of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) can activate the myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/toll-interleukin-1-resistance domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) dependent pathways, inducing production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in neutrophils. Propofol (PPF) has both anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the molecular mechanism by which PPF influences human neutrophil function is yet to be elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the influence of PPF on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced reactive oxygen species production in human neutrophils. We isolated neutrophils from the peripheral blood of 10 healthy male donors. Neither 1 µg/ml LPS nor 10-150 μmol/L PPF influenced the rate of neutrophil apoptosis, but PPF significantly inhibited LPS-mediated reactive oxygen species production in a dose-dependent manner. PPF inhibited LPS-induced expression of MyD88, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6, and TRIF, but not the expression of interferon regulatory factor 3 or phosphorylation of p47(phox), p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase, and nuclear factor (NF)-κB, particularly in the neutrophils in which MyD88 or TRIF had been silenced by siRNA. The inhibitory effect of PPF on LPS-induced activation of p47(phox), p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase, and NF-κB was partially antagonized by over-expression of MyD88 or TRIF in neutrophils. These observations provide insights into the mechanisms responsible for the anti-inflammatory properties of PPF. PPF reduces LPS-induced production of reactive oxygen species in neutrophils via inhibiting expression of MyD88 and TRIF signaling. PMID:25446563

  20. Association of microparticles and neutrophil activation with decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Thom, Stephen R; Bennett, Michael; Banham, Neil D; Chin, Walter; Blake, Denise F; Rosen, Anders; Pollock, Neal W; Madden, Dennis; Barak, Otto; Marroni, Alessandro; Balestra, Costantino; Germonpre, Peter; Pieri, Massimo; Cialoni, Danilo; Le, Phi-Nga Jeannie; Logue, Christopher; Lambert, David; Hardy, Kevin R; Sward, Douglas; Yang, Ming; Bhopale, Veena B; Dujic, Zeljko

    2015-09-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a systemic disorder, assumed due to gas bubbles, but additional factors are likely to play a role. Circulating microparticles (MPs)--vesicular structures with diameters of 0.1-1.0 μm--have been implicated, but data in human divers have been lacking. We hypothesized that the number of blood-borne, Annexin V-positive MPs and neutrophil activation, assessed as surface MPO staining, would differ between self-contained underwater breathing-apparatus divers suffering from DCS vs. asymptomatic divers. Blood was analyzed from 280 divers who had been exposed to maximum depths from 7 to 105 meters; 185 were control/asymptomatic divers, and 90 were diagnosed with DCS. Elevations of MPs and neutrophil activation occurred in all divers but normalized within 24 h in those who were asymptomatic. MPs, bearing the following proteins: CD66b, CD41, CD31, CD142, CD235, and von Willebrand factor, were between 2.4- and 11.7-fold higher in blood from divers with DCS vs. asymptomatic divers, matched for time of sample acquisition, maximum diving depth, and breathing gas. Multiple logistic regression analysis documented significant associations (P < 0.001) between DCS and MPs and for neutrophil MPO staining. Effect estimates were not altered by gender, body mass index, use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, or emergency oxygen treatment and were modestly influenced by divers' age, choice of breathing gas during diving, maximum diving depth, and whether repetitive diving had been performed. There were no significant associations between DCS and number of MPs without surface proteins listed above. We conclude that MP production and neutrophil activation exhibit strong associations with DCS. PMID:26139218

  1. Intravenous Immunoglobulin Prevents Murine Antibody-Mediated Acute Lung Injury at the Level of Neutrophil Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Production

    PubMed Central

    Semple, John W.; Kim, Michael; Hou, Jing; McVey, Mark; Lee, Young Jin; Tabuchi, Arata; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.; Chai, Zhong-Wei; Lazarus, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a leading cause of transfusion-associated mortality that can occur with any type of transfusion and is thought to be primarily due to donor antibodies activating pulmonary neutrophils in recipients. Recently, a large prospective case controlled clinical study of cardiac surgery patients demonstrated that despite implementation of male donors, a high incidence of TRALI still occurred and suggested a need for additional interventions in susceptible patient populations. To examine if intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) may be effective, a murine model of antibody-mediated acute lung injury that approximates human TRALI was examined. When BALB/c mice were injected with the anti-major histocompatibility complex class I antibody 34-1-2s, mild shock (reduced rectal temperature) and respiratory distress (dyspnea) were observed and pre-treatment of the mice with 2 g/kg IVIg completely prevented these symptoms. To determine IVIg's usefulness to affect severe lung damage, SCID mice, previously shown to be hypersensitive to 34-1-2s were used. SCID mice treated with 34-1-2s underwent severe shock, lung damage (increased wet/dry ratios) and 40% mortality within 2 hours. Treatment with 2 g/kg IVIg 18 hours before 34-1-2s administration completely protected the mice from all adverse events. Treatment with IVIg after symptoms began also reduced lung damage and mortality. While the prophylactic IVIg administration did not affect 34-1-2s-induced pulmonary neutrophil accumulation, bone marrow-derived neutrophils from the IVIg-treated mice displayed no spontaneous ROS production nor could they be stimulated in vitro with fMLP or 34-1-2s. These results suggest that IVIg prevents murine antibody-mediated acute lung injury at the level of neutrophil ROS production and thus, alleviating tissue damage. PMID:22363629

  2. Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1–Dependent Neutrophil Adhesion to Endothelial Cells Induces Caveolae-Mediated Pulmonary Vascular Hyperpermeability

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guochang; Vogel, Stephen M.; Schwartz, David E.; Malik, Asrar B.; Minshall, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the role of caveolae in the mechanism of increased pulmonary vascular permeability and edema formation induced by the activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). We observed that the increase in lung vascular permeability induced by the activation of PMNs required caveolin-1, the caveolae scaffold protein. The permeability increase induced by PMN activation was blocked in caveolin-1 knockout mice and by suppressing caveolin-1 expression in rats. The response was also dependent on Src phosphorylation of caveolin-1 known to activate caveolae-mediated endocytosis in endothelial cells. To address the role of PMN interaction with endothelial cells, we used an intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 blocking monoclonal antibody. Preventing the ICAM-1–mediated PMN binding to endothelial cells abrogated Src phosphorylation of caveolin-1, as well as the increase in endothelial permeability. Direct ICAM-1 activation by crosslinking recapitulated these responses, suggesting that ICAM-1 activates caveolin-1 signaling responsible for caveolae-mediated endothelial hyperpermeability. Our results provide support for the novel concept that a large component of pulmonary vascular hyperpermeability induced by activation of PMNs adherent to the vessel wall is dependent on signaling via caveolin-1 and increased caveolae-mediated transcytosis. Thus, it is important to consider the role of the transendothelial vesicular permeability pathway that contributes to edema formation in developing therapeutic interventions against PMN-mediated inflammatory diseases such as acute lung injury. PMID:18511851

  3. Antioxidant, antimicrobial and neutrophil-modulating activities of herb extracts.

    PubMed

    Denev, Petko; Kratchanova, Maria; Ciz, Milan; Lojek, Antonin; Vasicek, Ondrej; Blazheva, Denitsa; Nedelcheva, Plamena; Vojtek, Libor; Hyrsl, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    The present study provides a comprehensive data on the antioxidant, antimicrobial and neutrophil-modulating activities of extracts from six medicinal plants--blackberry (Rubus fruticosus) leaves, chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) leaves, hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna) leaves, lady's mantle (Alchemilla glabra) aerial parts, meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria) aerial parts and raspberry (Rubus idaeus) leaves. In order to analyze the antioxidant activity of the herbs, several methods (ORAC, TRAP, HORAC and inhibition of lipid peroxidation) were used. Blackberry leaves and meadowsweet extracts revealed the highest antioxidant activities via all methods. All extracts studied blocked almost completely the opsonized zymosan particle-activated ROS production by neutrophils from human whole blood. On the other hand, the effect of extracts on phorbol myristate acetate-activated ROS production was much milder and even nonsignificant in the case of chokeberry leaves. This latter result suggests that extracts (apart from their antioxidative activity) interfere with the signaling cascade of phagocyte activation upstream of the protein kinase C activation. The antimicrobial activity of the investigated extracts against 11 human pathogens was investigated using three different methods. Meadowsweet and blackberry leaves extracts had the highest antimicrobial effect and the lowest minimal inhibiting concentrations (MICs) against the microorganisms tested. PMID:24945135

  4. Activated prostaglandin D2 receptors on macrophages enhance neutrophil recruitment into the lung

    PubMed Central

    Jandl, Katharina; Stacher, Elvira; Bálint, Zoltán; Sturm, Eva Maria; Maric, Jovana; Peinhaupt, Miriam; Luschnig, Petra; Aringer, Ida; Fauland, Alexander; Konya, Viktoria; Dahlen, Sven-Erik; Wheelock, Craig E.; Kratky, Dagmar; Olschewski, Andrea; Marsche, Gunther; Schuligoi, Rufina; Heinemann, Akos

    2016-01-01

    Background Prostaglandin (PG) D2 is an early-phase mediator in inflammation, but its action and the roles of the 2 D-type prostanoid receptors (DPs) DP1 and DP2 (also called chemoattractant receptor–homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells) in regulating macrophages have not been elucidated to date. Objective We investigated the role of PGD2 receptors on primary human macrophages, as well as primary murine lung macrophages, and their ability to influence neutrophil action in vitro and in vivo. Methods In vitro studies, including migration, Ca2+ flux, and cytokine secretion, were conducted with primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and neutrophils and freshly isolated murine alveolar and pulmonary interstitial macrophages. In vivo pulmonary inflammation was assessed in male BALB/c mice. Results Activation of DP1, DP2, or both receptors on human macrophages induced strong intracellular Ca2+ flux, cytokine release, and migration of macrophages. In a murine model of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation, activation of each PGD2 receptor resulted in aggravated airway neutrophilia, tissue myeloperoxidase activity, cytokine contents, and decreased lung compliance. Selective depletion of alveolar macrophages abolished the PGD2-enhanced inflammatory response. Activation of PGD2 receptors on human macrophages enhanced the migratory capacity and prolonged the survival of neutrophils in vitro. In human lung tissue specimens both DP1 and DP2 receptors were located on alveolar macrophages along with hematopoietic PGD synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme of PGD2 synthesis. Conclusion For the first time, our results show that PGD2 markedly augments disease activity through its ability to enhance the proinflammatory actions of macrophages and subsequent neutrophil activation. PMID:26792210

  5. NADPH Oxidase-dependent Generation of Lysophosphatidylserine Enhances Clearance of Activated and Dying Neutrophils via G2A*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Frasch, S. Courtney; Berry, Karin Zemski; Fernandez-Boyanapalli, Ruby; Jin, Hyun-Sun; Leslie, Christina; Henson, Peter M.; Murphy, Robert C.; Bratton, Donna L.

    2008-01-01

    Exofacial phosphatidylserine (PS) is an important ligand mediating apoptotic cell clearance by phagocytes. Oxidation of PS fatty acyl groups (oxPS) during apoptosis reportedly mediates recognition through scavenger receptors. Given the oxidative capacity of the neutrophil NADPH oxidase, we sought to identify oxPS signaling species in stimulated neutrophils. Using mass spectrometry analysis, only trace amounts of previously characterized oxPS species were found. Conversely, 18:1 and 18:0 lysophosphatidylserine (lyso-PS), known bioactive signaling phospholipids, were identified as abundant modified PS species following activation of the neutrophil oxidase. NADPH oxidase inhibitors blocked the production of lyso-PS in vitro, and accordingly, its generation in vivo by activated, murine neutrophils during zymosan-induced peritonitis was absent in mice lacking a functional NADPH oxidase (gp91phox-/-). Treatment of macrophages with lyso-PS enhanced the uptake of apoptotic cells in vitro, an effect that was dependent on signaling via the macrophage G2A receptor. Similarly, endogenously produced lyso-PS also enhanced the G2A-mediated uptake of activated PS-exposing (but non-apoptotic) neutrophils, raising the possibility of non-apoptotic mechanisms for removal of inflammatory cells during resolution. Finally, antibody blockade of G2A signaling in vivo prolonged zymosan-induced neutrophilia in wild-type mice, whereas having no effect in gp91phox-/- mice where lyso-PS are not generated. Taken together, we show that lyso-PS are modified PS species generated following activation of the NADPH oxidase and lyso-PS signaling through the macrophage G2A functions to enhance existing receptor/ligand systems for optimal resolution of neutrophilic inflammation. PMID:18824544

  6. Anti-inflammatory effects of Perilla frutescens in activated human neutrophils through two independent pathways: Src family kinases and Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Leu, Yann-Lii; Fang, Yu; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Sung, Wei-Che; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Chung, Pei-Jen; Lee, Ming-Chung; Kuo, Yu-Ting; Yang, Hsuan-Wu; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2015-01-01

    The leaves of Perilla frutescens (L.) Britt. have been traditionally used as an herbal medicine in East Asian countries to treat a variety diseases. In this present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of P. frutescens extract (PFE) on N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)-stimulated human neutrophils and the underlying mechanisms. PFE (1, 3, and 10 μg/ml) inhibited superoxide anion production, elastase release, reactive oxygen species formation, CD11b expression, and cell migration in fMLF-activated human neutrophils in dose-dependent manners. PFE inhibited fMLF-induced phosphorylation of the Src family kinases (SFKs), Src (Tyr416) and Lyn (Tyr396), and reduced their enzymatic activities. Both PFE and PP2 (a selective inhibitor of SFKs) reduced the phosphorylation of Burton’s tyrosine kinases (Tyr223) and Vav (Tyr174) in fMLF-activated human neutrophils. Additionally, PFE decreased intracellular Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]i), whereas PP2 prolonged the time required for [Ca2+]i to return to its basal level. Our findings indicated that PFE effectively regulated the inflammatory activities of fMLF-activated human neutrophils. The anti-inflammatory effects of PFE on activated human neutrophils were mediated through two independent signaling pathways involving SFKs (Src and Lyn) and mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. PMID:26659126

  7. Anti-inflammatory effects of Perilla frutescens in activated human neutrophils through two independent pathways: Src family kinases and Calcium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Leu, Yann-Lii; Fang, Yu; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Sung, Wei-Che; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Chung, Pei-Jen; Lee, Ming-Chung; Kuo, Yu-Ting; Yang, Hsuan-Wu; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2015-01-01

    The leaves of Perilla frutescens (L.) Britt. have been traditionally used as an herbal medicine in East Asian countries to treat a variety diseases. In this present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of P. frutescens extract (PFE) on N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)-stimulated human neutrophils and the underlying mechanisms. PFE (1, 3, and 10 μg/ml) inhibited superoxide anion production, elastase release, reactive oxygen species formation, CD11b expression, and cell migration in fMLF-activated human neutrophils in dose-dependent manners. PFE inhibited fMLF-induced phosphorylation of the Src family kinases (SFKs), Src (Tyr416) and Lyn (Tyr396), and reduced their enzymatic activities. Both PFE and PP2 (a selective inhibitor of SFKs) reduced the phosphorylation of Burton's tyrosine kinases (Tyr223) and Vav (Tyr174) in fMLF-activated human neutrophils. Additionally, PFE decreased intracellular Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)]i), whereas PP2 prolonged the time required for [Ca(2+)]i to return to its basal level. Our findings indicated that PFE effectively regulated the inflammatory activities of fMLF-activated human neutrophils. The anti-inflammatory effects of PFE on activated human neutrophils were mediated through two independent signaling pathways involving SFKs (Src and Lyn) and mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+). PMID:26659126

  8. Various Molecular Species of Diacylglycerol Hydroperoxide Activate Human Neutrophils via PKC Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kambayashi, Yasuhiro; Takekoshi, Susumu; Tanino, Yutaka; Watanabe, Keiichi; Nakano, Minoru; Hitomi, Yoshiaki; Takigawa, Tomoko; Ogino, Keiki; Yamamoto, Yorihiro

    2007-01-01

    We have proposed that diacylglycerol hydroperoxide-induced unregulated signal transduction causes oxidative stress-related diseases. In this study, we investigated which molecular species of diacylglycerol hydroperoxide activated human peripheral neutrophils. All diacylglycerol hydroperoxides, diacylglycerol hydroxides, and diacyglycerols tested in the present study induced superoxide production by neutrophils. The ability to activate neutrophils among molecular species containing the same fatty acid composition was as follows; diacylglycerol hydroperoxide>diacylglycerol hydroxide≥diacylglycerol. The diacylglycerol hydroperoxide composed of linoleate was a stronger activator for neutrophils than that composed of arachidonate. 1-Palmitoyl-2-linoleoylglycerol hydroperoxide (PLG-OOH) was the strongest stimulator for neutrophils. We reconfirmed that PLG-OOH activated protein kinase C (PKC) in neutrophils. PLG-OOH induced the phosphorylation of p47phox, a substrate of PKC and a cytosolic component of NADPH oxidase, in neutrophils, as did N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine or 4β-phorbol-12β-myristate-13α-acetate. Moreover, the time course of p47phox phosphorylation was comparable to that of superoxide production. These results suggest that PLG-OOH activated intracellular protein kinase C. PLG-OOH, produced via an uncontrolled process, can act as a biological second messenger to cause inflammatory disease from oxidative stress. PMID:18392102

  9. Gene Expression during the Generation and Activation of Mouse Neutrophils: Implication of Novel Functional and Regulatory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ericson, Jeffrey A.; Duffau, Pierre; Yasuda, Kei; Ortiz-Lopez, Adriana; Rothamel, Katherine; Rifkin, Ian R.; Monach, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Immunological Genome Project (ImmGen), gene expression was determined in unstimulated (circulating) mouse neutrophils and three populations of neutrophils activated in vivo, with comparison among these populations and to other leukocytes. Activation conditions included serum-transfer arthritis (mediated by immune complexes), thioglycollate-induced peritonitis, and uric acid-induced peritonitis. Neutrophils expressed fewer genes than any other leukocyte population studied in ImmGen, and down-regulation of genes related to translation was particularly striking. However, genes with expression relatively specific to neutrophils were also identified, particularly three genes of unknown function: Stfa2l1, Mrgpr2a and Mrgpr2b. Comparison of genes up-regulated in activated neutrophils led to several novel findings: increased expression of genes related to synthesis and use of glutathione and of genes related to uptake and metabolism of modified lipoproteins, particularly in neutrophils elicited by thioglycollate; increased expression of genes for transcription factors in the Nr4a family, only in neutrophils elicited by serum-transfer arthritis; and increased expression of genes important in synthesis of prostaglandins and response to leukotrienes, particularly in neutrophils elicited by uric acid. Up-regulation of genes related to apoptosis, response to microbial products, NFkB family members and their regulators, and MHC class II expression was also seen, in agreement with previous studies. A regulatory model developed from the ImmGen data was used to infer regulatory genes involved in the changes in gene expression during neutrophil activation. Among 64, mostly novel, regulatory genes predicted to influence these changes in gene expression, Irf5 was shown to be important for optimal secretion of IL-10, IP-10, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and TNF-α by mouse neutrophils in vitro after stimulation through TLR9. This data-set and its analysis using the ImmGen regulatory

  10. Diminished adhesion and activation of platelets and neutrophils with CD47 functionalized blood contacting surfaces.

    PubMed

    Finley, Matthew J; Rauova, Lubica; Alferiev, Ivan S; Weisel, John W; Levy, Robert J; Stachelek, Stanley J

    2012-08-01

    CD47 is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane protein that, through signaling mechanisms mediated by signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα1), functions as a biological marker of 'self-recognition'. We showed previously that inflammatory cell attachment to polymeric surfaces is inhibited by the attachment of biotinylated recombinant CD47 (CD47B). We test herein the hypothesis that CD47 modified blood conduits can reduce platelet and neutrophil activation under clinically relevant conditions. We appended a poly-lysine tag to the C-terminus of recombinant CD47 (CD47L) allowing for covalent linkage to the polymer. SIRPα1 expression was confirmed in isolated platelets. We then compared biocompatibility between CD47B and CD47L functionalized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) surfaces and unmodified control PVC surfaces. Quantitative and Qualitative analysis of blood cell attachment to CD47B and CD47L surfaces, via scanning electron microscopy, showed strikingly fewer platelets attached to CD47 modified surfaces compared to control. Flow cytometry analysis showed that activation markers for neutrophils (CD62L) and platelets (CD62P) exposed to CD47 modified PVC were equivalent to freshly acquired control blood, while significantly elevated in the unmodified PVC tubing. In addition, ethylene oxide gas sterilization did not inhibit the efficacy of the CD47 modification. In conclusion, CD47 modified PVC inhibits both the adhesion and activation of platelets and neutrophils. PMID:22613135

  11. Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein: From molecular pathogenesis to clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hua-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) was originally identified as a virulence factor of H. pylori for its ability to activate neutrophils to generate respiratory burst by releasing reactive oxygen species. Later on, HP-NAP was also found to be involved in the protection of H. pylori from DNA damage, supporting the survival of H. pylori under oxidative stress. This protein is highly conserved and expressed by virtually all clinical isolates of H. pylori. The majority of patients infected with H. pylori produced antibodies specific for HP-NAP, suggesting its important role in immunity. In addition to acting as a pathogenic factor by activating the innate immunity through a wide range of human leukocytes, including neutrophils, monocytes, and mast cells, HP-NAP also mediates adaptive immunity through the induction of T helper cell type I responses. The pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of HP-NAP not only make it play an important role in disease pathogenesis but also make it a potential candidate for clinical use. Even though there is no convincing evidence to link HP-NAP to a disease outcome, recent findings supporting the pathogenic role of HP-NAP will be reviewed. In addition, the potential clinical applications of HP-NAP in vaccine development, clinical diagnosis, and drug development will be discussed. PMID:24833859

  12. Evidence for the role of superoxide radicals in neutrophil-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Simchowitz, L; Spilberg, I

    1979-01-01

    Human peripheral neutrophils became cytotoxic to chicken red blood cells (CRBC) in the presence of lectins as assessed by release of 51chromium from labelled target cells. Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A), which caused time-dependent and dose-dependent cytotoxicity over a concentration range of 25--400 microgram/ml, also caused significant generation of superoxide radicals as measured by ferricytochrome C reduction. Pokeweed mitogen, which does not induce cytotoxicity over the same concentration range, was unable to promote superoxide generation by neutrophils. PHA-induced generation of superoxide paralleled and appeared to precede PHA-dependent cytotoxicity. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), which enzymatically destroys superoxide, caused moderate inhibition of PHA-dependent cytotoxicity over the concentration range of 100--500 microgram/ml whereas catalytically inactive enzyme had no effect. Incubation under oxygen-depleted conditions caused a marked decrease in both PHA-induced superoxide generation and cytotoxicity relative to that obtained with neutrophils incubated aerobically. These findings suggest a central role for superoxide radicals in causing target cell damage in this model of neutrophil-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:223976

  13. Immunoreceptors on neutrophils.

    PubMed

    van Rees, Dieke J; Szilagyi, Katka; Kuijpers, Taco W; Matlung, Hanke L; van den Berg, Timo K

    2016-04-01

    Neutrophils play a critical role in the host defense against infection, and they are able to perform a variety of effector mechanisms for this purpose. However, there are also a number of pathological conditions, including autoimmunity and cancer, in which the activities of neutrophils can be harmful to the host. Thus the activities of neutrophils need to be tightly controlled. As in the case of other immune cells, many of the neutrophil effector functions are regulated by a series of immunoreceptors on the plasma membrane. Here, we review what is currently known about the functions of the various individual immunoreceptors and their signaling in neutrophils. While these immunoreceptors allow for the recognition of a diverse range of extracellular ligands, such as cell surface structures (like proteins, glycans and lipids) and extracellular matrix components, they commonly signal via conserved ITAM or ITIM motifs and their associated downstream pathways that depend on the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues in proteins and/or inositol lipids. This allows for a balanced homeostatic regulation of neutrophil effector functions. Given the number of available immunoreceptors and their fundamental importance for neutrophil behavior, it is perhaps not surprising that pathogens have evolved means to evade immune responses through some of these pathways. Inversely, some of these receptors evolved to specifically recognize these pathogens. Finally, some interactions mediated by immunoreceptors in neutrophils have been identified as promising targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26976825

  14. Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin, a Novel Mineralocorticoid Biotarget, Mediates Vascular Profibrotic Effects of Mineralocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Tarjus, Antoine; Martínez-Martínez, Ernesto; Amador, Cristian; Latouche, Céline; El Moghrabi, Soumaya; Berger, Thorsten; Mak, Tak W; Fay, Renaud; Farman, Nicolette; Rossignol, Patrick; Zannad, Faiez; López-Andrés, Natalia; Jaisser, Frédéric

    2015-07-01

    Activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor has been shown to be deleterious in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). We have recently shown that lipocalin 2 (Lcn2), or neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), is a primary target of aldosterone/mineralocorticoid receptor in the cardiovascular system. Lcn2 is a circulating protein, which binds matrix metalloproteinase 9 and modulates its stability. We hypothesized that Lcn2 could be a mediator of aldosterone/mineralocorticoid receptor profibrotic effects in the cardiovascular system. Correlations between aldosterone and profibrotic markers, such as procollagen type I N-terminal peptide, were investigated in healthy subjects and subjects with abdominal obesity. The implication of Lcn2 in the mineralocorticoid pathway was studied using Lcn2 knockout mice subjected to a nephrectomy/aldosterone/salt (NAS) challenge for 4 weeks. In human subjects, NGAL/matrix metalloproteinase 9 was positively correlated with plasma aldosterone and fibrosis biomarkers. In mice, loss of Lcn2 prevented the NAS-induced increase of plasma procollagen type I N-terminal peptide, as well as the increase of collagen fibers deposition and collagen I expression in the coronary vessels and the aorta. The lack of Lcn2 also blunted the NAS-induced increase in systolic blood pressure. Ex vivo, treatment of human fibroblasts with recombinant Lcn2 induced the expression of collagen I and the profibrotic galectin-3 and cardiotrophin-1 molecules. Our results showed that Lcn2 plays a key role in aldosterone/mineralocorticoid receptor-mediated vascular fibrosis. The clinical data indicate that this may translate in human patients. Lcn2 is, therefore, a new biotarget in cardiovascular fibrosis induced by mineralocorticoid activation. PMID:25987661

  15. Neutrophil proteolytic activation cascades: a possible mechanistic link between chronic periodontitis and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Alfakry, Hatem; Malle, Ernst; Koyani, Chintan N; Pussinen, Pirkko J; Sorsa, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are chronic inflammatory diseases that affect a large segment of society. Coronary heart disease (CHD), the most common cardiovascular disease, progresses over several years and affects millions of people worldwide. Chronic infections may contribute to the systemic inflammation and enhance the risk for CHD. Periodontitis is one of the most common chronic infections that affects up to 50% of the adult population. Under inflammatory conditions the activation of endogenous degradation pathways mediated by immune responses leads to the release of destructive cellular molecules from both resident and immigrant cells. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their regulators can activate each other and play an important role in immune response via degrading extracellular matrix components and modulating cytokines and chemokines. The action of MMPs is required for immigrant cell recruitment at the site of inflammation. Stimulated neutrophils represent the major pathogen-fighting immune cells that upregulate expression of several proteinases and oxidative enzymes, which can degrade extracellular matrix components (e.g. MMP-8, MMP-9 and neutrophil elastase). The activity of MMPs is regulated by endogenous inhibitors and/or candidate MMPs (e.g. MMP-7). The balance between MMPs and their inhibitors is thought to mirror the proteolytic burden. Thus, neutrophil-derived biomarkers, including myeloperoxidase, may activate proteolytic destructive cascades that are involved in subsequent immune-pathological events associated with both periodontitis and CHD. Here, we review the existing studies on the contribution of MMPs and their regulators to the infection-related pathology. Also, we discuss the possible proteolytic involvement and role of neutrophil-derived enzymes as an etiological link between chronic periodontitis and CHD. PMID:26608308

  16. Epithelial neutrophil activating peptide-78: a novel chemotactic cytokine for neutrophils in arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, A E; Kunkel, S L; Harlow, L A; Mazarakis, D D; Haines, G K; Burdick, M D; Pope, R M; Walz, A; Strieter, R M

    1994-01-01

    We and others have shown that cells obtained from inflamed joints of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients produce interleukin-8, a potent chemotactic cytokine for neutrophils (PMNs). However, IL-8 accounted for only 40% of the chemotactic activity for PMNs found in these synovial fluids. Currently, we have examined the production of the novel PMN chemotactic cytokine, epithelial neutrophil activating peptide-78 (ENA-78), using peripheral blood, synovial fluid, and synovial tissue from 70 arthritic patients. RA ENA-78 levels were greater in RA synovial fluid (239 +/- 63 ng/ml) compared with synovial fluid from other forms of arthritis (130 +/- 118 ng/ml) or osteoarthritis (2.6 +/- 1.8 ng/ml) (P < 0.05). RA peripheral blood ENA-78 levels (70 +/- 26 ng/ml) were greater than normal peripheral blood levels (0.12 +/- 0.04 ng/ml) (P < 0.05). Anti-ENA-78 antibodies neutralized 42 +/- 9% (mean +/- SE) of the chemotactic activity for PMNs found in RA synovial fluids. Isolated RA synovial tissue fibroblasts in vitro constitutively produced significant levels of ENA-78, and this production was further augmented when stimulated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). In addition RA and osteoarthritis synovial tissue fibroblasts as well as RA synovial tissue macrophages were found to constitutively produce ENA-78. RA synovial fluid mononuclear cells spontaneously produced ENA-78, which was augmented in the presence of lipopolysaccharide. Immunohistochemical localization of ENA-78 from the synovial tissue of patients with arthritis or normal subjects showed that the predominant cellular source of this chemokine was synovial lining cells, followed by macrophages, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. Synovial tissue macrophages and fibroblasts were more ENA-78 immunopositive in RA than in normal synovial tissue (P < 0.05). These results, which are the first demonstration of ENA-78 in a human disease state, suggest that ENA-78 may play an important role in the recruitment of PMNs

  17. Degradation of Complement 3 by Streptococcal Pyrogenic Exotoxin B Inhibits Complement Activation and Neutrophil Opsonophagocytosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chih-Feng; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Tsao, Nina

    2008-01-01

    Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SPE B), a cysteine protease, is an important virulence factor in group A streptococcus (GAS) infection. The inhibition of phagocytic activity by SPE B may help prevent bacteria from being ingested. In this study, we examined the mechanism SPE B uses to enable bacteria to resist opsonophagocytosis. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we found that SPE B-treated serum impaired the activation of the classical, the lectin, and the alternative complement pathways. In contrast, C192S, a SPE B mutant lacking protease activity, had no effect on complement activation. Further study showed that cleavage of serum C3 by SPE B, but not C192S, blocked zymosan-induced production of reactive oxygen species in neutrophils as a result of decreased deposition of C3 fragments on the zymosan surface. Reconstitution of C3 into SPE B-treated serum unblocked zymosan-mediated neutrophil activation dose dependently. SPE B-treated, but not C192S-treated, serum also impaired opsonization of C3 fragments on the surface of GAS strain A20. Moreover, the amount of C3 fragments on the A20 cell surface, a SPE B-producing strain, was less than that on its isogenic mutant strain, SW507, after opsonization with normal serum. A20 opsonized with SPE B-treated serum was more resistant to neutrophil killing than A20 opsonized with normal serum, and SPE B-mediated resistance was C3 dependent. These results suggest a novel SPE B mechanism, one which degrades serum C3 and enables GAS to resist complement damage and opsonophagocytosis. PMID:18174338

  18. Helicobacter pylori neutrophil activating protein as target for new drugs against H. pylori inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Choli-Papadopoulou, Theodora; Kottakis, Filippos; Papadopoulos, Georgios; Pendas, Stefanos

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is among the most common human infections and the major risk factor for peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Within this work we present the implication of C-terminal region of H. pylori neutrophil activating protein in the stimulation of neutrophil activation as well as the evidence that the C-terminal region of H. pylori activating protein is indispensable for neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells, a step necessary to H. pylori inflammation. In addition we show that arabino galactan proteins derived from chios mastic gum, the natural resin of the plant Pistacia lentiscus var. Chia inhibit neutrophil activation in vitro. PMID:21677824

  19. A2B adenosine receptor activity is reduced in neutrophils from patients with systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bazzichi, Laura; Trincavelli, Letizia; Rossi, Alessandra; De Feo, Francesca; Lucacchini, Antonio; Bombardieri, Stefano; Martini, Claudia

    2005-01-01

    We conducted the present study to investigate protein expression and functioning of A2A and A2B adenosine receptors (ARs) in neutrophils of patients affected by systemic sclerosis (SSc). The presence of A2A and A2B ARs was assessed by immunoblotting using specific antibodies. Equilibrium A2A and A2B ARs binding parameters were evaluated by radioligand binding assay. Functional studies were conducted to investigate coupling of the A2B AR to the adenylyl cyclase pathway. This is the first report of the use of Western blot analysis to confirm the presence of A2A and A2B ARs in human neutrophils. No significant changes in A2A AR binding parameters or expression levels were detected between SSc patients and healthy control individuals. A significant decrease (65%) in the maximum density of A2B AR binding sites occurred in SSc neutrophils, whereas no changes in the affinity constant values were found. Moreover, a decrease in A2B AR mediated adenylyl cyclase activity was observed in patients with SSc. Our findings demonstrate the occurrence of selective alterations in A2B AR density and signalling in SSc. PMID:15743465

  20. A role for 12/15-lipoxygenase-derived proresolving mediators in postoperative ileus: protectin DX-regulated neutrophil extravasation.

    PubMed

    Stein, Kathy; Stoffels, Melissa; Lysson, Mariola; Schneiker, Bianca; Dewald, Oliver; Krönke, Gerhard; Kalff, Jörg C; Wehner, Sven

    2016-02-01

    Resolution of inflammation is an active counter-regulatory mechanism involving polyunsaturated fatty acid-derived proresolving lipid mediators. Postoperative intestinal motility disturbances, clinically known as postoperative ileus, occur frequently after abdominal surgery and are mediated by a complex inflammation of the intestinal muscularis externa. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that proresolving lipid mediators are involved in the resolution of postoperative ileus. In a standardized experimental model of postoperative ileus, we detected strong expression of 12/15-lipoxygenase within the postoperative muscularis externa of C57BL/6 mice, predominately located within CX3CR1(+)/Ly6C(+) infiltrating monocytes rather than Ly6G(+) neutrophils. Mass spectrometry analyses demonstrated that a 12/15-lipoxygenase increase was accompanied by production of docosahexaenoic acid-derived lipid mediators, particularly protectin DX and resolvin D2, and their common precursor 17-hydroxy docosahexaenoic acid. Perioperative administration of protectin DX, but not resolvin D2 diminished blood-derived leukocyte infiltration into the surgically manipulated muscularis externa and improved the gastrointestinal motility. Flow cytometry analyses showed impaired Ly6G(+)/Ly6C(+) neutrophil extravasation after protectin DX treatment, whereas Ly6G(-)/Ly6C(+) monocyte numbers were not affected. 12/15-lipoxygenase-deficient mice, lacking endogenous protectin DX synthesis, demonstrated increased postoperative leukocyte levels. Preoperative intravenous administration of a docosahexaenoic acid-rich lipid emulsion reduced postoperative leukocyte infiltration in wild-type mice but failed in 12/15-lipoxygenase-deficient mice mice. Protectin DX application reduced leukocyte influx and rescued 12/15-lipoxygenase-deficient mice mice from postoperative ileus. In conclusion, our results show that 12/15-lipoxygenase mediates postoperative ileus resolution via production of proresolving docosahexaenoic

  1. Neutrophil ageing is regulated by the microbiome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dachuan; Chen, Grace; Manwani, Deepa; Mortha, Arthur; Xu, Chunliang; Faith, Jeremiah J; Burk, Robert D; Kunisaki, Yuya; Jang, Jung-Eun; Scheiermann, Christoph; Merad, Miriam; Frenette, Paul S

    2015-09-24

    Blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils provide immune protection against pathogens, but may also promote tissue injury in inflammatory diseases. Although neutrophils are generally considered to be a relatively homogeneous population, evidence for heterogeneity is emerging. Under steady-state conditions, neutrophil heterogeneity may arise from ageing and replenishment by newly released neutrophils from the bone marrow. Aged neutrophils upregulate CXCR4, a receptor allowing their clearance in the bone marrow, with feedback inhibition of neutrophil production via the IL-17/G-CSF axis, and rhythmic modulation of the haematopoietic stem-cell niche. The aged subset also expresses low levels of L-selectin. Previous studies have suggested that in vitro-aged neutrophils exhibit impaired migration and reduced pro-inflammatory properties. Here, using in vivo ageing analyses in mice, we show that neutrophil pro-inflammatory activity correlates positively with their ageing whilst in circulation. Aged neutrophils represent an overly active subset exhibiting enhanced αMβ2 integrin activation and neutrophil extracellular trap formation under inflammatory conditions. Neutrophil ageing is driven by the microbiota via Toll-like receptor and myeloid differentiation factor 88-mediated signalling pathways. Depletion of the microbiota significantly reduces the number of circulating aged neutrophils and dramatically improves the pathogenesis and inflammation-related organ damage in models of sickle-cell disease or endotoxin-induced septic shock. These results identify a role for the microbiota in regulating a disease-promoting neutrophil subset. PMID:26374999

  2. Isolation, antimicrobial activities, and primary structures of hamster neutrophil defensins.

    PubMed Central

    Mak, P; Wójcik, K; Thogersen, I B; Dubin, A

    1996-01-01

    Hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) neutrophil granules contain at least four microbicidal peptides belonging to the defensin family. These compounds were purified from granule acid extracts by reverse-phase chromatography and termed HaNP-1 to -4 (hamster neutrophil peptide). HaNP-1 and HaNP-3 revealed the most bactericidal activity, with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 0.3 to 0.8 microg/ml for Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes strains. The HaNP-4 was always isolated in concentrations exceeding about 10 times the concentrations of other hamster peptides, but its antibacterial activity as well as that of HaNP-2 was relatively lower, probably as a result of conserved Arg residue substitutions. Other microorganisms were also tested, and generally, hamster defensins exhibited less potency against gram-negative bacteria. The amino acid sequence of hamster defensins showed a high percentage of identity to the sequence of mouse enteric defensins, reaching about 60% identical residues in the case of HaNP-3 and cryptdin 3. PMID:8890190

  3. Heterogeneity of functional responses in differentiated myeloid cell lines reveals EPRO cells as a valid model of murine neutrophil functional activation.

    PubMed

    Gaines, Peter; Chi, Jeffrey; Berliner, Nancy

    2005-05-01

    Mature neutrophils display multiple functional responses upon activation that include chemotaxis, adhesion to and transmigration across endothelial cells, phagocytosis, and pathogen destruction via potent microbicidal enzymes and reactive oxygen species. We are using myeloid cell line models to investigate the signaling pathways that govern neutrophil functional activation. To facilitate these studies, we have performed a direct comparison of functional responses of human and murine myeloid cell line models upon neutrophil differentiation. Our results show that EPRO cells, promyelocytes that undergo complete neutrophil maturation, demonstrate a full spectrum of functional responses, including respiratory burst, chemotaxis toward two murine chemokines, and phagocytosis. We also extend previous studies of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-induced 32Dcl3 cells, showing they demonstrate chemotaxis and phogocytosis but completely lack a respiratory burst as a result of the absent expression of a critical oxidase subunit, gp91(phox). Induced human leukemic NB4 and HL-60 cells display a respiratory burst and phagocytosis but have defective chemotaxis to multiple chemoattractants. We also tested each cell line for the ability to up-regulate cell-surface membrane-activated complex-1 (Mac-1) expression upon activation, a response mediating neutrophil adhesion and a surrogate marker for degranulation. We show that EPRO cells, but not 32Dcl3 or NB4, significantly increase Mac-1 surface expression upon functional activation. Together, these data show that EPRO and MPRO cells demonstrate complete, functional activation upon neutrophil differentiation, suggesting these promyelocytic models accurately reflect the functional capacity of mature murine neutrophils. PMID:15673544

  4. Combined anti CXC receptors 1 and 2 therapy is a promising anti-inflammatory treatment for respiratory diseases by reducing neutrophil migration and activation.

    PubMed

    Planagumà, A; Domènech, T; Pont, M; Calama, E; García-González, V; López, R; Aulí, M; López, M; Fonquerna, S; Ramos, I; de Alba, J; Nueda, A; Prats, N; Segarra, V; Miralpeix, M; Lehner, M D

    2015-10-01

    Neutrophil infiltration and activation in the lung are important pathophysiological features in COPD, severe asthma and bronchiectasis mostly mediated by CXCL8 and CXCL1 via CXCR1 and CXCR2. No thorough study to date has been performed to compare the anti-inflammatory effect profile of dual CXCR1/2 vs. selective CXCR2 antagonists in relevant human neutrophil assays and pulmonary inflammation models. Dual CXCR1/2 (SCH527123, diaminocyclobutandione-1) and selective CXCR2 (SB265610, thiopyrimidine-1) antagonist activity and receptor residence time were determined by [(35)S]GTPγS binding in human (h)- and guinea pig (gp)-CXCR1 and CXCR2 overexpressing membranes. h-neutrophil chemotaxis, degranulation and ROS production were established using CXCL8 or CXCL1 to evaluate dual CXCR1/2- or selective CXCR2-dependent activities. LPS-induced lung inflammation in gp was selected to assess in vivo potency. Dual CXCR1/2 antagonists blocked both CXCL8 and CXCL1-induced h-neutrophil functions and [(35)S]GTPγS binding. In contrary, selective CXCR2 antagonists displayed significantly reduced potency in CXCL8 -mediated h-neutrophil responses despite being active in CXCR2 assays. Upon LPS challenge in gp, administration of SCH527123 inhibited the increase of neutrophils in BALF, modestly reduced blood neutrophils and induced minor neutrophil accumulation in bone marrow. Differentiation of CXCR1/2 vs. CXCR2 antagonists could not be extended to in vivo due to differences in CXCR1 receptor homology between h and gp. Dual CXCR1/2 therapy may represent a promising anti-inflammatory treatment for respiratory diseases reducing more effectively neutrophil migration and activation in the lung than a CXCR2 selective treatment. However, the in vivo confirmation of this claim is still missing due to species differences in CXCR1. PMID:26271598

  5. Neutrophil-Derived Proteases in the Microenvironment of Pancreatic Cancer -Active Players in Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Klaus; Gaida, Matthias M.

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fibro-inflammatory microenvironment, consisting of activated pancreatic stellate cells, extracellular matrix proteins, and a variety of inflammatory cells, such as T cells, macrophages, or neutrophils. Tumor-infiltrating immune cells, which are found in nearly all cancers, including PDAC, often fail to eliminate the tumor, but conversely can promote its progression by altering the tumor microenvironment. Pancreatic cancer cells are able to attract polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) via tumor secreted chemokines and in human PDAC, PMN infiltrates can be observed in the vicinity of tumor cells and in the desmoplastic tumor stroma, which correlate with undifferentiated tumor growth and poor prognosis. The behavior of tumor-infiltrating neutrophils in the tumor micromilieu is not yet understood at a mechanistic level. It has been shown that PMN have the potential to kill tumor cells, either directly or by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, but on the other side various adverse effects of PMN, such as promotion of aggressive tumor growth with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and increased metastatic potential, have been described. Recent therapeutic approaches for PDAC focus not only the tumor cell itself, but also elements of the tumor microenvironment. Therefore, the role of PMN and their derived products (e.g. cytokines, proteases) as a new vein for a therapeutic target should be critically evaluated in this context. This review summarizes the current understanding of the interplay between proteases of tumor-infiltrating neutrophils and pancreatic tumor cells and elements of the desmoplastic stroma. PMID:26929737

  6. Unique role for ATG5 in neutrophil-mediated immunopathology during M. tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Kimmey, Jacqueline M; Huynh, Jeremy P; Weiss, Leslie A; Park, Sunmin; Kambal, Amal; Debnath, Jayanta; Virgin, Herbert W; Stallings, Christina L

    2015-12-24

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a major global health threat, replicates in macrophages in part by inhibiting phagosome-lysosome fusion, until interferon-γ (IFNγ) activates the macrophage to traffic M. tuberculosis to the lysosome. How IFNγ elicits this effect is unknown, but many studies suggest a role for macroautophagy (herein termed autophagy), a process by which cytoplasmic contents are targeted for lysosomal degradation. The involvement of autophagy has been defined based on studies in cultured cells where M. tuberculosis co-localizes with autophagy factors ATG5, ATG12, ATG16L1, p62, NDP52, BECN1 and LC3 (refs 2-6), stimulation of autophagy increases bacterial killing, and inhibition of autophagy increases bacterial survival. Notably, these studies reveal modest (~1.5-3-fold change) effects on M. tuberculosis replication. By contrast, mice lacking ATG5 in monocyte-derived cells and neutrophils (polymorponuclear cells, PMNs) succumb to M. tuberculosis within 30 days, an extremely severe phenotype similar to mice lacking IFNγ signalling. Importantly, ATG5 is the only autophagy factor that has been studied during M. tuberculosis infection in vivo and autophagy-independent functions of ATG5 have been described. For this reason, we used a genetic approach to elucidate the role for multiple autophagy-related genes and the requirement for autophagy in resistance to M. tuberculosis infection in vivo. Here we show that, contrary to expectation, autophagic capacity does not correlate with the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection. Instead, ATG5 plays a unique role in protection against M. tuberculosis by preventing PMN-mediated immunopathology. Furthermore, while Atg5 is dispensable in alveolar macrophages during M. tuberculosis infection, loss of Atg5 in PMNs can sensitize mice to M. tuberculosis. These findings shift our understanding of the role of ATG5 during M. tuberculosis infection, reveal new outcomes of ATG5 activity, and shed light on early events in innate

  7. Transient increase in phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol trisphosphate during activation of human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Traynor-Kaplan, A.E.; Thompson, B.L.; Harris, A.L.; Taylor, P.; Omann, G.M.; Sklar, L.A. )

    1989-09-15

    We recently showed that phosphatidylinositol trisphosphate (PIP3) was present in a unique lipid fraction generated in neutrophils during activation. Here, we demonstrate that the band containing this fraction isolated from thin layer chromatography consists primarily of PIP3 and that only small amounts of radiolabeled PIP3 exist prior to activation. In addition, high performance liquid chromatography of deacylated phospholipids from stimulated cells reveals an increase in a fraction eluting ahead of glycerophosphoinositol 4,5-P2. After removal of the glycerol we found that it coeluted with inositol 1,3,4-P3 when resubjected to high performance liquid chromatography. Thus, we have detected a second, novel form of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate in activated neutrophils, PI-(3,4)P2. The elevation of PIP3 through the formyl peptide receptor is blocked by pretreatment with pertussis toxin, implicating mediation of the increase in PIP3 by a guanosine triphosphate-binding (G) protein. The rise in PIP3 is not secondary to calcium elevation. Buffering the rise in intracellular calcium did not diminish the increase in PIP3. The elevation of PIP3 appears to occur during activation with physiological agonists, its level varying with the degree of activation. Leukotriene B4, which elicits many of the same responses as stimulation of the formyl peptide receptor but with minimal oxidant production, stimulates a much attenuated rise in PIP3. Isoproterenol, which inhibits oxidant production also reduces the rise in PIP3. Hence formation of PI(3,4)P2 and PIP3 (presumed to be PI(3,4,5)P3) correlates closely with the early events of neutrophil activation.

  8. Transient increase in phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol trisphosphate during activation of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Traynor-Kaplan, A E; Thompson, B L; Harris, A L; Taylor, P; Omann, G M; Sklar, L A

    1989-09-15

    We recently showed that phosphatidylinositol trisphosphate (PIP3) was present in a unique lipid fraction generated in neutrophils during activation. Here, we demonstrate that the band containing this fraction isolated from thin layer chromatography consists primarily of PIP3 and that only small amounts of radiolabeled PIP3 exist prior to activation. In addition, high performance liquid chromatography of deacylated phospholipids from stimulated cells reveals an increase in a fraction eluting ahead of glycerophosphoinositol 4,5-P2. After removal of the glycerol we found that it coeluted with inositol 1,3,4-P3 when resubjected to high performance liquid chromatography. Thus, we have detected a second, novel form of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate in activated neutrophils, PI-(3,4)P2. The elevation of PIP3 through the formyl peptide receptor is blocked by pretreatment with pertussis toxin, implicating mediation of the increase in PIP3 by a guanosine triphosphate-binding (G) protein. The rise in PIP3 is not secondary to calcium elevation. Buffering the rise in intracellular calcium did not diminish the increase in PIP3. The elevation of PIP3 appears to occur during activation with physiological agonists, its level varying with the degree of activation. Leukotriene B4, which elicits many of the same responses as stimulation of the formyl peptide receptor but with minimal oxidant production, stimulates a much attenuated rise in PIP3. Isoproterenol, which inhibits oxidant production also reduces the rise in PIP3. Hence formation of PI(3,4)P2 and PIP3 (presumed to be PI(3,4,5)P3) correlates closely with the early events of neutrophil activation. PMID:2549071

  9. Matrix metalloproteinase activation by free neutrophil elastase contributes to bronchiectasis progression in early cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Garratt, Luke W; Sutanto, Erika N; Ling, Kak-Ming; Looi, Kevin; Iosifidis, Thomas; Martinovich, Kelly M; Shaw, Nicole C; Kicic-Starcevich, Elizabeth; Knight, Darryl A; Ranganathan, Sarath; Stick, Stephen M; Kicic, Anthony

    2015-08-01

    Neutrophil elastase is the most significant predictor of bronchiectasis in early-life cystic fibrosis; however, the causal link between neutrophil elastase and airway damage is not well understood. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a crucial role in extracellular matrix modelling and are activated by neutrophil elastase. The aim of this study was to assess if MMP activation positively correlates with neutrophil elastase activity, disease severity and bronchiectasis in young children with cystic fibrosis.Total MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-7, MMP-9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-2 and TIMP-1 levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid collected from young children with cystic fibrosis during annual clinical assessment. Active/pro-enzyme ratio of MMP-9 was determined by gelatin zymography. Annual chest computed tomography imaging was scored for bronchiectasis.A higher MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio was associated with free neutrophil elastase activity. In contrast, MMP-2/TIMP-2 ratio decreased and MMP-1 and MMP-7 were not detected in the majority of samples. Ratio of active/pro-enzyme MMP-9 was also higher in the presence of free neutrophil elastase activity, but not infection. Across the study cohort, both MMP-9/TIMP-1 and active MMP-9 were associated with progression of bronchiectasis.Both MMP-9/TIMP-1 and active MMP-9 increased with free neutrophil elastase and were associated with bronchiectasis, further demonstrating that free neutrophil elastase activity should be considered an important precursor to cystic fibrosis structural disease. PMID:25929954

  10. Neutrophil-mediated killing of Dipetalonema viteae microfilariae: simultaneous presence of IgE, IgG antibodies and complement is required.

    PubMed Central

    Aime, N; Haque, A; Bonnel, B; Torpier, G; Capron, A

    1984-01-01

    Neutrophils from the peripheral washings of normal rats in the presence of sera obtained from rats immune to circulating microfilariae adhered to and killed the microfilariae of Dipetalonema viteae in vitro within 16-24 hr. No significant adherence or cytotoxicity was mediated by sera collected from animals with a high microfilaraemia or from normal rats. Ultrastructural studies show that neutrophils, which are bigger than microfilariae, can easily internalize the small larvae resulting in the disintegration of the parasite. Immunoadsorption and inhibition experiments showed that the adherence-promoting activity resides both in IgG and IgE classes of antibody. However, the mere participation of these two antibodies is not sufficient to effect neutrophil adherence towards microfilariae, the presence of complement is also required. Samples of fresh immune rat serum (fIRS) depleted in alternative pathway components of complement by treatment with zymosan A failed to mediate cell adherence to the parasite. fIRS inactivated for the classical pathway of complement by the chelating agent EGTA partially retains its activity in mediating cytotoxicity to microfilariae. The striking antigenic specificity of D. viteae antibodies was shown by their ability to mediate cytotoxicity only to D. viteae but not towards Brugia malayi microfilariae. Images Figure 2 PMID:6538183

  11. Application of intracellular alkaline phosphatase activity measurement in detection of neutrophil adherence in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bednarska, Katarzyna; Klink, Magdalena; Sulowska, Zofia

    2006-01-01

    We have proposed the use of the fluorimetric method with 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate (4-MUP) specific substrate for the alkaline phosphatase determination in the neutrophil adhesion assay. We provide evidence that the endogenous neutrophil alkaline phosphatase (NAP) activity evaluation is reliable to quantify neutrophil adhesion at a wide range of cell numbers (10(4)-10(6)). The results obtained by fluorimetric NAP activity test correlate to the results of adherence evaluated using the MTT reduction assay. The fluorimetric NAP activity test may be applied for resting as well as activated neutrophils without the risk of the activators interferences into the test. The alkaline phosphatase survey with the use of 4-MUP substrate is recommended herein as a sensitive, repeatable, simple, and reliable method of the neutrophil adherence determination in vitro. PMID:17047286

  12. Neutrophil Extracellular Trap-Associated Protein Activation of the NLRP3 Inflammasome Is Enhanced in Lupus Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kahlenberg, J. Michelle; Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Smith, Carolyne K.; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) represent an important defense mechanism against microorganisms. Clearance of NETs is impaired in a subset of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), while NETosis is increased in neutrophils and, particularly, in low-density granulocytes derived from lupus patients. NETs are toxic to the endothelium, expose immunostimulatory molecules, activate plasmacytoid dendritic cells and may participate in organ damage through incompletely characterized pathways. In order to better understand the role of NETs in fostering dysregulated inflammation, we examined inflammasome activation in response to NETs or to LL-37, an antibacterial protein externalized on the NETs. Both NETs and LL-37 activate caspase-1, the central enzyme of the inflammasome, in both human and murine macrophages, resulting in release of active IL-1β and IL-18. LL-37 activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome utilizes P2×7 receptor-mediated potassium efflux. NET and LL-37-mediated activation of the inflammasome is enhanced in macrophages derived from lupus patients. In turn, IL-18 is able to stimulate NETosis in human neutrophils. These results suggest that enhanced formation of NETs in lupus patients can lead to increased inflammasome activation in adjacent macrophages. This leads to release of inflammatory cytokines which further stimulate NETosis, resulting in a feed-forward inflammatory loop that could potentially lead to disease flares and/or organ damage. PMID:23267025

  13. Cationic additives in nanosystems activate cytotoxicity and inflammatory response of human neutrophils: lipid nanoparticles versus polymeric nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chang, Yuan-Ting; Fang, Jia-You

    2015-01-01

    This report compares the effect of lipid and polymeric nanoparticles upon human neutrophils in the presence of cationic surfactants. Nanostructured lipid carriers and poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoparticles were manufactured as lipid and polymeric systems, respectively. Some cytotoxic and proinflammatory mediators such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), elastase, O2•−, and intracellular Ca2+ were examined. The nanoparticles showed a size of 170–225 nm. Incorporation of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide or soyaethyl morpholinium ethosulfate, the cationic surfactant, converted zeta potential from a negative to a positive charge. Nanoparticles without cationic surfactants revealed a negligible change on immune and inflammatory responses. Cationic surfactants in both nanoparticulate and free forms induced cell death and the release of mediators. Lipid nanoparticles generally demonstrated a greater response compared to polymeric nanoparticles. The neutrophil morphology observed by electron microscopy confirmed this trend. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as the coating material showed more significant activation of neutrophils than soyaethyl morpholinium ethosulfate. Confocal microscope imaging displayed a limited internalization of nanoparticles into neutrophils. It is proposed that cationic nanoparticles interact with the cell membrane, triggering membrane disruption and the following Ca2+ influx. The elevation of intracellular Ca2+ induces degranulation and oxidative stress. The consequence of these effects is cytotoxicity and cell death. Caution should be taken when selecting feasible nanoparticulate formulations and cationic additives for consideration of applicability and toxicity. PMID:25609950

  14. Cationic additives in nanosystems activate cytotoxicity and inflammatory response of human neutrophils: lipid nanoparticles versus polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chang, Yuan-Ting; Fang, Jia-You

    2015-01-01

    This report compares the effect of lipid and polymeric nanoparticles upon human neutrophils in the presence of cationic surfactants. Nanostructured lipid carriers and poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoparticles were manufactured as lipid and polymeric systems, respectively. Some cytotoxic and proinflammatory mediators such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), elastase, O2(•-), and intracellular Ca(2+) were examined. The nanoparticles showed a size of 170-225 nm. Incorporation of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide or soyaethyl morpholinium ethosulfate, the cationic surfactant, converted zeta potential from a negative to a positive charge. Nanoparticles without cationic surfactants revealed a negligible change on immune and inflammatory responses. Cationic surfactants in both nanoparticulate and free forms induced cell death and the release of mediators. Lipid nanoparticles generally demonstrated a greater response compared to polymeric nanoparticles. The neutrophil morphology observed by electron microscopy confirmed this trend. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as the coating material showed more significant activation of neutrophils than soyaethyl morpholinium ethosulfate. Confocal microscope imaging displayed a limited internalization of nanoparticles into neutrophils. It is proposed that cationic nanoparticles interact with the cell membrane, triggering membrane disruption and the following Ca(2+) influx. The elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) induces degranulation and oxidative stress. The consequence of these effects is cytotoxicity and cell death. Caution should be taken when selecting feasible nanoparticulate formulations and cationic additives for consideration of applicability and toxicity. PMID:25609950

  15. The murine neutrophil NLRP3 inflammasome is activated by soluble but not particulate or crystalline agonists.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaiwen W; Bezbradica, Jelena S; Groß, Christina J; Wall, Adam A; Sweet, Matthew J; Stow, Jennifer L; Schroder, Kate

    2016-04-01

    Neutrophils express pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and regulate immune responses via PRR-dependent cytokine production. An emerging theme is that neutrophil PRRs often exhibit cell type-specific adaptations in their signalling pathways. This prompted us to examine inflammasome signalling by the PRR NLRP3 in murine neutrophils, in comparison to well-established NLRP3 signalling pathways in macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that while murine neutrophils can indeed signal via the NLRP3 inflammasome, neutrophil NLRP3 selectively responds to soluble agonists but not to the particulate/crystalline agonists that trigger NLRP3 activation in macrophages via phagolysosomal rupture. In keeping with this, alum did not trigger IL-1β production from human PMN, and the lysosomotropic peptide Leu-Leu-OMe stimulated only weak NLRP3-dependent IL-1β production from murine neutrophils, suggesting that lysosomal rupture is not a strong stimulus for NLRP3 activation in neutrophils. We validated our in vitro findings for poor neutrophil NLRP3 responses to particles in vivo, where we demonstrated that neutrophils do not significantly contribute to alum-induced IL-1β production in mice. In all, our studies highlight that myeloid cell identity and the nature of the danger signal can strongly influence signalling by a single PRR, thus shaping the nature of the resultant immune response. PMID:27062120

  16. Neutrophils lacking platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 exhibit loss of directionality and motility in CXCR2-mediated chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Stabach, Paul; Michaud, Michael; Madri, Joseph A

    2005-09-15

    Time-lapsed videomicroscopy was used to study the migration of platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1-deficient (PECAM-1(-/-)) murine neutrophils undergoing chemotaxis in Zigmond chambers containing IL-8, KC, or fMLP gradients. PECAM-1(-/-) neutrophils failed to translocate up the IL-8, KC, and fMLP gradients. Significant reductions in cell motility and cell spreading were also observed in IL-8 or KC gradients. In wild-type neutrophils, PECAM-1 and F-actin were colocalized at the leading fronts of polarized cells toward the gradient. In contrast, in PECAM-1(-/-) neutrophils, although F-actin also localized to the leading front of migrating cells, F-actin polymerization was unstable, and cycling was remarkably increased compared with that of wild-type neutrophils. This may be due to the decreased cytokine-induced mobilization of the actin-binding protein, moesin, into the cytoskeleton of PECAM-1(-/-) neutrophils. PECAM-1(-/-) neutrophils also exhibited intracellularly dislocalized Src homology 2 domain containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) and had less IL-8-induced SHP-1 phosphatase activity. These results suggest that PECAM-1 regulates neutrophil chemotaxis by modulating cell motility and directionality, in part through its effects on SHP-1 localization and activation. PMID:16148090

  17. Propensity of crocin to offset Vipera russelli venom induced oxidative stress mediated neutrophil apoptosis: a biochemical insight.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, M Sebastin; Sundaram, M Shanmuga; Sunitha, K; Jnaneshwari, S; Devaraja, S; Kemparaju, K; Girish, K S

    2016-01-01

    Viper envenomation results in inflammation at the bitten site as well as target organs. Neutrophils and other polymorphonuclear leukocytes execute inflammation resolving mechanism and will undergo apoptosis after completing the task. However, the target specific toxins induce neutrophil apoptosis at the bitten site and in circulation prior to their function, thus reducing their number. Circulating activated neutrophils are major source of inflammatory cytokines and leakage of reactive oxygen species (ROS)/other toxic intermediates resulting in aggravation of inflammatory response at the bitten/target site. Therefore, neutralization of venom induced neutrophil apoptosis reduces inflammation besides increasing the functional neutrophil population. Therefore, the present study investigates the venom induced perturbances in isolated human neutrophils and its neutralization by crocin (Crocus sativus) a potent antioxidant carotenoid. Human neutrophils on treatment with venom resulted in altered ROS generation, intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cyt-c translocation, caspase activation, phosphatidylserine externalization and DNA damage. On the other hand significant protection against oxidative stress and apoptosis were evidenced in crocin pre-treated groups. In conclusion the viper venom induces neutrophil apoptosis and results in aggravation of inflammation and tissue damage. The present study demands the necessity of an auxiliary therapy in addition to antivenin therapy to treat secondary/overlooked complications of envenomation. PMID:25149285

  18. Priming of Human Neutrophils Is Necessary for Their Activation by Extracellular DNA.

    PubMed

    Prikhodko, A S; Vitushkina, M V; Zinovkina, L A; Popova, E N; Zinovkin, R A

    2016-06-01

    Extracellular plasma DNA is thought to act as a damage-associated molecular pattern causing activation of immune cells. However, purified preparations of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA were unable to induce neutrophil activation in vitro. Thus, we examined whether granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) acting as a neutrophil priming agent can promote the activation of neutrophils by different types of extracellular DNA. GM-CSF pretreatment greatly increased p38 MAPK phosphorylation and promoted CD11b/CD66b expression in human neutrophils treated with mitochondrial and, to a lesser extent, with nuclear DNA. Our experiments clearly indicate that GM-CSF-induced priming of human neutrophils is necessary for their subsequent activation by extracellular DNA. PMID:27301289

  19. One-Step Chromatographic Purification of Helicobacter pylori Neutrophil-Activating Protein Expressed in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Kuo-Shun; Lin, Chih-Chang; Hung, Hsiao-Fang; Yang, Yu-Chi; Wang, Chung-An; Jeng, Kee-Ching; Fu, Hua-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP), a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), is capable of activating human neutrophils to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and secrete inammatory mediators. HP-NAP is a vaccine candidate, a possible drug target, and a potential in vitro diagnostic marker for H. pylori infection. HP-NAP has also been shown to be a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of allergic asthma and bladder cancer. Hence, an efficient way to obtain pure HP-NAP needs to be developed. In this study, one-step anion-exchange chromatography in negative mode was applied to purify the recombinant HP-NAP expressed in Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis). This purification technique was based on the binding of host cell proteins and/or impurities other than HP-NAP to DEAE Sephadex resins. At pH 8.0, almost no other proteins except HP-NAP passed through the DEAE Sephadex column. More than 60% of the total HP-NAP with purity higher than 91% was recovered in the flow-through fraction from this single-step DEAE Sephadex chromatography. The purified recombinant HP-NAP was further demonstrated to be a multimeric protein with a secondary structure of α-helix and capable of activating human neutrophils to stimulate ROS production. Thus, this one-step negative chromatography using DEAE Sephadex resin can efficiently yield functional HP-NAP from B. subtilis in its native form with high purity. HP-NAP purified by this method could be further utilized for the development of new drugs, vaccines, and diagnostics for H. pylori infection. PMID:23577158

  20. Neutrophil and Alveolar Macrophage-Mediated Innate Immune Control of Legionella pneumophila Lung Infection via TNF and ROS.

    PubMed

    Ziltener, Pascal; Reinheckel, Thomas; Oxenius, Annette

    2016-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular bacterium that lives in aquatic environments where it parasitizes amoeba. However, upon inhalation of contaminated aerosols it can infect and replicate in human alveolar macrophages, which can result in Legionnaires' disease, a severe form of pneumonia. Upon experimental airway infection of mice, L. pneumophila is rapidly controlled by innate immune mechanisms. Here we identified, on a cell-type specific level, the key innate effector functions responsible for rapid control of infection. In addition to the well-characterized NLRC4-NAIP5 flagellin recognition pathway, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are also essential for effective innate immune control of L. pneumophila. While ROS are essential for the bactericidal activity of neutrophils, alveolar macrophages (AM) rely on neutrophil and monocyte-derived TNF signaling via TNFR1 to restrict bacterial replication. This TNF-mediated antibacterial mechanism depends on the acidification of lysosomes and their fusion with L. pneumophila containing vacuoles (LCVs), as well as caspases with a minor contribution from cysteine-type cathepsins or calpains, and is independent of NLRC4, caspase-1, caspase-11 and NOX2. This study highlights the differential utilization of innate effector pathways to curtail intracellular bacterial replication in specific host cells upon L. pneumophila airway infection. PMID:27105352

  1. Neutrophil and Alveolar Macrophage-Mediated Innate Immune Control of Legionella pneumophila Lung Infection via TNF and ROS

    PubMed Central

    Ziltener, Pascal; Reinheckel, Thomas; Oxenius, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular bacterium that lives in aquatic environments where it parasitizes amoeba. However, upon inhalation of contaminated aerosols it can infect and replicate in human alveolar macrophages, which can result in Legionnaires’ disease, a severe form of pneumonia. Upon experimental airway infection of mice, L. pneumophila is rapidly controlled by innate immune mechanisms. Here we identified, on a cell-type specific level, the key innate effector functions responsible for rapid control of infection. In addition to the well-characterized NLRC4-NAIP5 flagellin recognition pathway, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are also essential for effective innate immune control of L. pneumophila. While ROS are essential for the bactericidal activity of neutrophils, alveolar macrophages (AM) rely on neutrophil and monocyte-derived TNF signaling via TNFR1 to restrict bacterial replication. This TNF-mediated antibacterial mechanism depends on the acidification of lysosomes and their fusion with L. pneumophila containing vacuoles (LCVs), as well as caspases with a minor contribution from cysteine-type cathepsins or calpains, and is independent of NLRC4, caspase-1, caspase-11 and NOX2. This study highlights the differential utilization of innate effector pathways to curtail intracellular bacterial replication in specific host cells upon L. pneumophila airway infection. PMID:27105352

  2. Monocytic cell differentiation from band-stage neutrophils under inflammatory conditions via MKK6 activation

    PubMed Central

    Köffel, René; Meshcheryakova, Anastasia; Warszawska, Joanna; Hennig, Annika; Wagner, Karin; Jörgl, Almut; Gubi, Daniela; Moser, Doris; Hladik, Anastasiya; Hoffmann, Ulrike; Fischer, Michael B.; van den Berg, Wim; Koenders, Marije; Scheinecker, Clemens; Gesslbauer, Bernhard; Knapp, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    During inflammation, neutrophils are rapidly mobilized from the bone marrow storage pool into peripheral blood (PB) to enter lesional sites, where most rapidly undergo apoptosis. Monocytes constitute a second wave of inflammatory immigrates, giving rise to long-lived macrophages and dendritic cell subsets. According to descriptive immunophenotypic and cell culture studies, neutrophils may directly “transdifferentiate” into monocytes/macrophages. We provide mechanistic data in human and murine models supporting the existence of this cellular pathway. First, the inflammatory signal–induced MKK6-p38MAPK cascade activates a monocyte differentiation program in human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor–dependent neutrophils. Second, adoptively transferred neutrophils isolated from G-CSF–pretreated mice rapidly acquired monocyte characteristics in response to inflammatory signals in vivo. Consistently, inflammatory signals led to the recruitment of osteoclast progenitor cell potential from ex vivo–isolated G-CSF–mobilized human blood neutrophils. Monocytic cell differentiation potential was retained in left-shifted band-stage neutrophils but lost in neutrophils from steady-state PB. MKK6-p38MAPK signaling in HL60 model cells led to diminishment of the transcription factor C/EBPα, which enabled the induction of a monocytic cell differentiation program. Gene profiling confirmed lineage conversion from band-stage neutrophils to monocytic cells. Therefore, inflammatory signals relayed by the MKK6-p38MAPK cascade induce monocytic cell differentiation from band-stage neutrophils. PMID:25214442

  3. Interactions between neutrophils and Leishmania braziliensis amastigotes facilitate cell activation and parasite clearance

    PubMed Central

    Carlsen, Eric D.; Jie, Zuliang; Liang, Yuejin; Henard, Calvin A.; Hay, Christie; Sun, Jiaren; de Matos Guedes, Herbert; Soong, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania braziliensis and Leishmania amazonensis are both causative agents of cutaneous leishmaniasis in South America. However, patient prognosis and the host immune response differ considerably depending on the infecting parasite species. The mechanisms underlying these differences appear to be multifactorial, with both host and parasite components contributing to disease outcome. Because neutrophils are a prominent component of the inflammatory infiltrate in chronic cutaneous, diffuse cutaneous, and mucocutaneous lesions, we examined neutrophil activation and microbicidal activity against amastigotes of L. amazonensis and L. braziliensis. We found that murine neutrophils internalized L. braziliensis amastigotes with greater efficiency than did L. amazonensis amastigotes. Additionally, L. braziliensis infection was a potent trigger for neutrophil activation, oxidative burst, degranulation, and production of IL-22 and IL-10, while L. amazonensis amastigotes poorly induced these responses. Finally, neutrophils were able to kill L. braziliensis amastigotes, especially when cells were activated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). L. amazonensis amastigotes, however, were highly resistant to neutrophil microbicidal mechanisms. This study reveals, for the first time, differential neutrophil responsiveness to distinct species of Leishmania amastigotes and highlights the complexity of neutrophil-amastigote interactions during chronic leishmaniasis. PMID:25766649

  4. Modelling c-Abl Signalling in Activated Neutrophils: the Anti-inflammatory Effect of Seliciclib.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Robert C; Radivoyevitch, Tomas

    2013-03-01

    When mammalian tissues are infected by bacteria or fungi, inflammatory cytokines are released that cause circulating neutrophils to invade the infected tissue. The cytosolic tyrosine kinase, c-Abl, in these tissue neutrophils is activated by TNFα. c-Abl then phosphorylates STAT transcription factors, which results in production of the antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1. The normally short-lived tissue neutrophils are then unable to enter apoptosis. c-Abl also causes release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from the mitochondria of the activated neutrophils. These ROS, and ROS generated by NADPH oxidase, are bactericidal agents of the innate immune system. In some inflammatory diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the invading neutrophils become permanently activated, and the resulting ROS overproduction causes severe tissue damage. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, seliciclib, blocks transcription through inhibition of cdk9. This results in a relatively rapid decline of antiapoptotic Mcl-1 transcripts in activated neutrophils, an increase in neutrophil apoptosis, and less ROS leakage and oxidative damage. We present here a model of neutrophil kinetics that simulates the principal pathways of c-Abl signalling and use it to explore possible treatment options for inflammatory lung disease. PMID:24765523

  5. Natural Product Anacardic Acid from Cashew Nut Shells Stimulates Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Production and Bactericidal Activity.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Andrew; Corriden, Ross; Gysler, Gabriela; Dahesh, Samira; Olson, Joshua; Raza Ali, Syed; Kunkel, Maya T; Lin, Ann E; Forli, Stefano; Newton, Alexandra C; Kumar, Geetha B; Nair, Bipin G; Perry, J Jefferson P; Nizet, Victor

    2016-07-01

    Emerging antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria is an issue of great clinical importance, and new approaches to therapy are urgently needed. Anacardic acid, the primary active component of cashew nut shell extract, is a natural product used in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions, including infectious abscesses. Here, we investigate the effects of this natural product on the function of human neutrophils. We find that anacardic acid stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species and neutrophil extracellular traps, two mechanisms utilized by neutrophils to kill invading bacteria. Molecular modeling and pharmacological inhibitor studies suggest anacardic acid stimulation of neutrophils occurs in a PI3K-dependent manner through activation of surface-expressed G protein-coupled sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors. Neutrophil extracellular traps produced in response to anacardic acid are bactericidal and complement select direct antimicrobial activities of the compound. PMID:27226531

  6. The Interleukin-17 Induced Activation and Increased Survival of Equine Neutrophils Is Insensitive to Glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Murcia, Ruby Yoana; Vargas, Amandine; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoids (GCs) are the most effective drugs for the treatment of human asthma. However, a subgroup of asthmatic patients with neutrophilic airway inflammation is insensitive to GCs. Interleukin-17 (IL-17), a cytokine upregulated in the airways of a subset of human asthmatic patients, contributes to the recruitment of neutrophils and induces a glucocorticoid resistance in human airway epithelial cells. We hypothesized that IL-17 similarly activates neutrophils and contributes to their persistence in the asthmatic airways in spite of glucocorticoid therapy. Objective To determine whether IL-17 directly activates neutrophils and whether this response is attenuated by GCs. Methods Neutrophils were isolated from the blood of horses and incubated in the presence of recombinant equine IL-17, LPS and dexamethasone. mRNA and protein expression of IL-17 receptors (IL-17RA/IL-17RC) were assessed by qPCR and immunoblot, respectively. Pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, cell viability and apoptosis were determined by qPCR, Trypan Blue exclusion test, and flow cytometry, respectively. Results Equine neutrophils express both IL-17RA and IL-17RC at the mRNA and protein levels. Neutrophil stimulation with IL-17 increases the mRNA expression of IL-8, which is not attenuated by dexamethasone (p = 0.409). Also, neutrophil viability is significantly increased (p<0.0001) by IL-17 in the presence of LPS when compared to LPS alone. Flow cytometry and light microscopy revealed that LPS-induced apoptosis is decreased by IL-17 (p = 0.02 and p = 0.006 respectively). Conclusion These results indicate that IL-17 directly activates equine neutrophils at 24 hours, and that the expression of IL-8 thus induced is not attenuated by GCs. Additionally, IL-17 increases neutrophil viability and decreases apoptosis. These findings suggest an important role of IL-17 in pulmonary persistence of neutrophils in the asthmatic airways. PMID:27138006

  7. Alarmins Link Neutrophils and Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, De; de la Rosa, Gonzalo; Tewary, Poonam; Oppenheim, Joost J.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophils are the first major population of leukocyte to infiltrate infected or injured tissues and are crucial for initiating host innate defense and adaptive immunity. Although the contribution of neutrophils to innate immune defense is mediated predominantly by phagocytosis and killing of microorganisms, neutrophils also participate in the induction of adaptive immune responses. At sites of infection and/or injury, neutrophils release numerous mediators upon degranulation or death, among these are alarmins which have a characteristic dual capacity to mobilize and activate antigen-presenting cells. We describe here how alarmins released by neutrophil degranulation and/or death can link neutrophils to dendritic cells by promoting their recruitment and activation, resulting in the augmentation of innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:19699678

  8. Neutrophilic and Pauci-immune Phenotypes in Severe Asthma.

    PubMed

    Panettieri, Reynold A

    2016-08-01

    Although 2 T-helper type 2 inflammation evokes airway hyperresponsiveness and narrowing, neutrophilic or pauci-immune asthma accounts for significant asthma morbidity. Viruses, toxicants, environmental tobacco smoke exposure, and bacterial infections induce asthma exacerbations mediated by neutrophilic inflammation or by structural cell (pauci-immune) mechanisms. Therapeutic challenges exist in the management of neutrophilic and pauci-immune phenotypes because both syndromes manifest steroid insensitivity. The recognition that neutrophil subsets exist and their functions are unique poses exciting opportunities to develop precise therapies. The conventional thought to target neutrophil activation or migration globally may explain why current drug development in neutrophilic asthma remains challenging. PMID:27401627

  9. Suppression of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell function by neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Dallegri, F; Dapino, P; Patrone, F; Sacchetti, C

    1991-01-01

    Peripheral blood neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) from healthy donors were found to inhibit the cytolytic efficiency of interleukin 2 (IL-2)-activated lymphocytes (LAK cells) in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory activity of PMN was not merely due to PMN acting as cold alternative targets, PMN ingestion of the label released by target cells or cell overcrowding in test wells. Heat-treated (50 degrees C, 30 min) lysates from PMN maintained their ability to inhibit LAK cell cytotoxicity, whereas PMN supernatants were completely ineffective. Oxidant scavengers (catalase, superoxide, dismutase) did not affect the PMN-mediated inhibition of LAK cell function. The results suggest that PMN contain heat-stable factor(s) able to suppress LAK cytotoxicity and potentially capable of limiting the therapeutic efficacy of IL-2 and/or LAK cells. PMID:1667940

  10. Galectin-9 Signaling through TIM-3 Is Involved in Neutrophil-Mediated Gram-Negative Bacterial Killing: An Effect Abrogated within the Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Carrascal, Isabel; Bergin, David A.; McElvaney, Oliver J.; McCarthy, Cormac; Banville, Nessa; Pohl, Kerstin; Hirashima, Mitsuomi; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Reeves, Emer P.; McElvaney, Noel G.

    2016-01-01

    The T cell Ig and mucin domain–containing molecule (TIM) family of receptors have emerged as potential therapeutic targets to correct abnormal immune function in chronic inflammatory conditions. TIM-3 serves as a functional receptor in structural cells of the airways and via the ligand galectin-9 (Gal-9) can modulate the inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to investigate TIM-3 expression and function in neutrophils, focusing on its potential role in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Results revealed that TIM-3 mRNA and protein expression values of circulating neutrophils were equal between healthy controls (n = 20) and people with CF (n = 26). TIM-3 was detected on resting neutrophil membranes by FACS analysis, and expression levels significantly increased post IL-8 or TNF-α exposure (p < 0.05). Our data suggest a novel role for TIM-3/Gal-9 signaling involving modulation of cytosolic calcium levels. Via TIM-3 interaction, Gal-9 induced neutrophil degranulation and primed the cell for enhanced NADPH oxidase activity. Killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was significantly increased upon bacterial opsonization with Gal-9 (p < 0.05), an effect abrogated by blockade of TIM-3 receptors. This mechanism appeared to be Gram-negative bacteria specific and mediated via Gal-9/ LPS binding. Additionally, we have demonstrated that neutrophil TIM-3/Gal-9 signaling is perturbed in the CF airways due to proteolytic degradation of the receptor. In conclusion, results suggest a novel neutrophil defect potentially contributing to the defective bacterial clearance observed in the CF airways and suggest that manipulation of the TIM-3 signaling pathway may be of therapeutic value in CF, preferably in conjunction with antiprotease treatment. PMID:24477913

  11. Kupffer cells and activation of endothelial TLR4 coordinate neutrophil adhesion within liver sinusoids during endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Braedon; Jenne, Craig N; Zhuo, Lisheng; Kimata, Koji; Kubes, Paul

    2013-12-01

    A key pathological feature of the systemic inflammatory response of sepsis/endotoxemia is the accumulation of neutrophils within the microvasculature of organs such as the liver, where they cause tissue damage and vascular dysfunction. There is emerging evidence that the vascular endothelium is critical to the orchestration of inflammatory responses to blood-borne microbes and microbial products in sepsis/endotoxemia. In this study, we aimed to understand the role of endothelium, and specifically endothelial TLR4 activation, in the regulation of neutrophil recruitment to the liver during endotoxemia. Intravital microscopy of bone marrow chimeric mice revealed that TLR4 expression by non-bone marrow-derived cells was required for neutrophil recruitment to the liver during endotoxemia. Furthermore, LPS-induced neutrophil adhesion in liver sinusoids was equivalent between wild-type mice and transgenic mice that express TLR4 only on endothelium (tlr4(-/-)Tie2(tlr4)), revealing that activation of endothelial TLR4 alone was sufficient to initiate neutrophil adhesion. Neutrophil arrest within sinusoids of endotoxemic mice requires adhesive interactions between neutrophil CD44 and endothelial hyaluronan. Intravital immunofluorescence imaging demonstrated that stimulation of endothelial TLR4 alone was sufficient to induce the deposition of serum-derived hyaluronan-associated protein (SHAP) within sinusoids, which was required for CD44/hyaluronan-dependent neutrophil adhesion. In addition to endothelial TLR4 activation, Kupffer cells contribute to neutrophil recruitment via a distinct CD44/HA/SHAP-independent mechanism. This study sheds new light on the control of innate immune activation within the liver vasculature during endotoxemia, revealing a key role for endothelial cells as sentinels in the detection of intravascular infections and coordination of neutrophil recruitment to the liver. PMID:24113769

  12. Effect of acute exercise on some haematological parameters and neutrophil functions in active and inactive subjects.

    PubMed

    Benoni, G; Bellavite, P; Adami, A; Chirumbolo, S; Lippi, G; Brocco, G; Cuzzolin, L

    1995-01-01

    In this work we studied the possible effects of acute exercise on some haematological parameters and on some functions of neutrophils in seven active and six inactive subjects. Physical exercise (10 min on a cycle ergometer at a heart rate of 150 beats.min-1) induced a significant increase in total leucocyte, lymphocyte and neutrophil concentrations in active subjects; serum iron and ferritin concentrations were lower in active compared to inactive subjects. Cellular adhesion, bactericidal activity and superoxide anion production did not change after exercise, while we also observed some differences between active and inactive subjects before exercise. In particular, the neutrophils from active subjects showed a significantly higher percentage of adhesion, higher bactericidal activity and lower superoxide anion production. In conclusion, the training induced changes in some neutrophil functions, while acute exercise influenced, overall, leucocyte concentrations. PMID:7768243

  13. Early membrane rupture events during neutrophil-mediated antibody-dependent tumor cell cytolysis.

    PubMed

    Kindzelskii, A L; Petty, H R

    1999-03-15

    Although cell-mediated cytolysis is a fundamental immune effector response, its mechanism remains poorly understood at the cellular level. In this report, we image for the first time transient ruptures, as inferred by cytoplasmic marker release, in tumor cell membranes during Ab-dependent cellular cytolysis. The cytosol of IgG-opsonized YAC tumor cells was labeled with tetra-methylrhodamine diacetate followed by the formation of tumor cell-neutrophil conjugates. We hypothesized that tumor cell cytolysis proceeds via a series of discrete membrane rupture/resealing events that contribute to marker release. To test this hypothesis, we occluded the fluorescence image of the labeled tumor cells by passing an opaque disk into a field-conjugated plane between the light source and the sample. Multiple small bursts of fluorescent label release from tumor cells could be detected using a photomultiplier tube. Similarly, multiple fluorescent plumes were observed at various sites around the perimeter of a target. These findings support a multihit model of target cytolysis and suggest that cytolytic release is not focused at specific sites. Cytolytic bursts were generally observed at 20-s intervals, which match the previously described reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate and superoxide release oscillation periods for neutrophils; we speculate that metabolic oscillations of the effector cell drive the membrane damage of the target. PMID:10092769

  14. Opa+ Neisseria gonorrhoeae Exhibits Reduced Survival in Human Neutrophils Via Src Family Kinase-Mediated Bacterial Trafficking Into Mature Phagolysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M. Brittany; Ball, Louise M.; Daily, Kylene P.; Martin, Jennifer N.; Columbus, Linda; Criss, Alison K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary During gonorrheal infection, there is a heterogeneous population of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) varied in their expression of opacity-associated (Opa) proteins. While Opa proteins are important for bacterial attachment and invasion of epithelial cells, Opa+ Gc has a survival defect after exposure to neutrophils. Here, we use constitutively Opa- and OpaD+ Gc in strain background FA1090 to show that Opa+ Gc is more sensitive to killing inside adherent, chemokine-treated primary human neutrophils due to increased bacterial residence in mature, degradative phagolysosomes that contain primary and secondary granule antimicrobial content. Although Opa+ Gc stimulates a potent oxidative burst, neutrophil killing of Opa+ Gc was instead attributable to non-oxidative components, particularly neutrophil proteases and the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein. Blocking interaction of Opa+ Gc with carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) or inhibiting Src family kinase signaling, which is downstream of CEACAM activation, enhanced the survival of Opa+ Gc in neutrophils. Src family kinase signaling was required for fusion of Gc phagosomes with primary granules to generate mature phagolysosomes. Conversely, ectopic activation of Src family kinases or coinfection with Opa+ Gc resulted in decreased survival of Opa- Gc in neutrophils. From these results, we conclude that Opa protein expression is an important modulator of Gc survival characteristics in neutrophils by influencing phagosome dynamics and thus bacterial exposure to neutrophils’ full antimicrobial arsenal. PMID:25346239

  15. Activated Neutrophils Are Associated with Pediatric Cerebral Malaria Vasculopathy in Malawian Children

    PubMed Central

    Feintuch, Catherine Manix; Saidi, Alex; Seydel, Karl; Chen, Grace; Goldman-Yassen, Adam; Mita-Mendoza, Neida K.; Kim, Ryung S.; Frenette, Paul S.; Taylor, Terrie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most patients with cerebral malaria (CM) sustain cerebral microvascular sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBCs). Although many young children are infected with P. falciparum, CM remains a rare outcome; thus, we hypothesized that specific host conditions facilitate iRBC cerebral sequestration. To identify these host factors, we compared the peripheral whole-blood transcriptomes of Malawian children with iRBC cerebral sequestration, identified as malarial-retinopathy-positive CM (Ret+CM), to the transcriptomes of children with CM and no cerebral iRBC sequestration, defined as malarial-retinopathy-negative CM (Ret-CM). Ret+CM was associated with upregulation of 103 gene set pathways, including cytokine, blood coagulation, and extracellular matrix (ECM) pathways (P < 0.01; false-discovery rate [FDR] of <0.05). Neutrophil transcripts were the most highly upregulated individual transcripts in Ret+CM patients. Activated neutrophils can modulate diverse host processes, including the ECM, inflammation, and platelet biology to potentially facilitate parasite sequestration. Therefore, we compared plasma neutrophil proteins and neutrophil chemotaxis between Ret+CM and Ret-CM patients. Plasma levels of human neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase, and proteinase 3, but not lactoferrin or lipocalin, were elevated in Ret+CM patients, and neutrophil chemotaxis was impaired, possibly related to increased plasma heme. Neutrophils were rarely seen in CM brain microvasculature autopsy samples, and no neutrophil extracellular traps were found, suggesting that a putative neutrophil effect on endothelial cell biology results from neutrophil soluble factors rather than direct neutrophil cellular tissue effects. Meanwhile, children with Ret-CM had lower levels of inflammation, higher levels of alpha interferon, and upregulation of Toll-like receptor pathways and other host transcriptional pathways, which may represent responses that do not favor

  16. TLR2 and TLR9 contribute to alcohol-mediated liver injury through induction of CXCL1 and neutrophil infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Yoon Seok; Zhang, Bi; Loomba, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Although previous studies reported the involvement of the TLR4-TRIF pathway in alcohol-induced liver injury, the role of TLR2 and TLR9 signaling in alcohol-mediated neutrophil infiltration and liver injury has not been elucidated. Since alcohol binge drinking is recognized to induce more severe form of alcohol liver disease, we used a chronic-binge ethanol-feeding model as a mouse model for early stage of alcoholic hepatitis. Whereas a chronic-binge ethanol feeding induced alcohol-mediated liver injury in wild-type mice, TLR2- and TLR9-deficient mice showed reduced liver injury. Induction of neutrophil-recruiting chemokines, including Cxcl1, Cxcl2, and Cxcl5, and hepatic neutrophil infiltration were increased in wild-type mice, but not in TLR2- and TLR9-deficient mice. In vivo depletion of Kupffer cells (KCs) by liposomal clodronate reduced liver injury and the expression of Il1b, but not Cxcl1, Cxcl2, and Cxcl5, suggesting that KCs are partly associated with liver injury, but not neutrophil recruitment, in a chronic-binge ethanol-feeding model. Notably, hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) produce high amounts of CXCL1 in ethanol-treated mice. The treatment with TLR2 and TLR9 ligands synergistically upregulated CXCL1 expression in hepatocytes. Moreover, the inhibitors for CXCR2, a receptor for CXCL1, and MyD88 suppressed neutrophil infiltration and liver injury induced by chronic-binge ethanol treatment. Consistent with the above findings, hepatic CXCL1 expression was highly upregulated in patients with alcoholic hepatitis. In a chronic-binge ethanol-feeding model, the TLR2 and TLR9-dependent MyD88-dependent pathway mediates CXCL1 production in hepatocytes and HSCs; the CXCL1 then promotes neutrophil infiltration into the liver via CXCR2, resulting in the development of alcohol-mediated liver injury. PMID:25930080

  17. Neutrophil activation during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and repair in mice and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Sharpe, Matthew R.; McGill, Mitchell R.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    Following acetaminophen (APAP) overdose there is an inflammatory response triggered by the release of cellular contents from necrotic hepatocytes into the systemic circulation which initiates the recruitment of neutrophils into the liver. It has been demonstrated that neutrophils do not contribute to APAP-induced liver injury, but their role and the role of NADPH oxidase in injury resolution are controversial. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to APAP overdose and neutrophil activation status was determined during liver injury and liver regeneration. Additionally, human APAP overdose patients (ALT: > 800 U/L) had serial blood draws during the injury and recovery phases for the determination of neutrophil activation. Neutrophils in the peripheral blood of mice showed an increasing activation status (CD11b expression and ROS priming) during and after the peak of injury but returned to baseline levels prior to complete injury resolution. Hepatic sequestered neutrophils showed an increased and sustained CD11b expression, but no ROS priming was observed. Confirming that NADPH oxidase is not critical to injury resolution, gp91{sup phox}−/− mice following APAP overdose displayed no alteration in injury resolution. Peripheral blood from APAP overdose patients also showed increased neutrophil activation status after the peak of liver injury and remained elevated until discharge from the hospital. In mice and humans, markers of activation, like ROS priming, were increased and sustained well after active liver injury had subsided. The similar findings between surviving patients and mice indicate that neutrophil activation may be a critical event for host defense or injury resolution following APAP overdose, but not a contributing factor to APAP-induced injury. - Highlights: • Neutrophil (PMN) function increases during liver repair after acetaminophen overdose. • Liver repair after acetaminophen (APAP)-overdose is not dependent on NADPH oxidase. • Human PMNs do not appear

  18. Oxidation of methionine residues in proteins of activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Fliss, H; Weissbach, H; Brot, N

    1983-01-01

    A simple assay for the detection of 35S-labeled methionine sulfoxide residues in proteins is described. The assay, which is based on the ability of CNBr to react with methionine but not with methionine sulfoxide, requires the prelabeling of cellular proteins with [35S]methionine. The assay was used to study the extent of methionine oxidation in newly synthesized proteins of both activated and quiescent human neutrophils. In cells undergoing a phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced respiratory burst, about 66% of all methionine residues in newly synthesized proteins were oxidized to the sulfoxide derivative, as compared with 9% in cells not treated with the phorbol ester. In contrast, quantitation of methionine sulfoxide content in the total cellular protein by means of amino acid analysis showed that only 22% of all methionine residues were oxidized in activated cells as compared with 9% in quiescent cells. It is proposed that methionine residues in nascent polypeptide chains are more susceptible to oxidation than those in completed proteins. PMID:6580633

  19. Mechanism of neutrophil activation and toxicity elicited by engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Helinor; Brown, David M; Kanase, Nilesh; Euston, Matthew; Gaiser, Birgit K; Robb, Calum T; Dyrynda, Elisabeth; Rossi, Adriano G; Brown, Euan R; Stone, Vicki

    2015-08-01

    The effects of nanomaterials (NMs) on biological systems, especially their ability to stimulate inflammatory responses requires urgent investigation. We evaluated the response of the human differentiated HL60 neutrophil-like cell line to NMs. It was hypothesised that NM physico-chemical characteristics would influence cell responsiveness by altering intracellular Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+]i and reactive oxygen species production. Cells were exposed (1.95-125 μg/ml, 24 h) to silver (Ag), zinc oxide (ZnO), titanium dioxide (TiO2), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) or ultrafine carbon black (ufCB) and cytotoxicity assessed (alamar blue assay). Relatively low (TiO2, MWCNTs, ufCB) or high (Ag, ZnO) cytotoxicity NMs were identified. Sub-lethal impacts of NMs on cell function were investigated for selected NMs only, namely TiO2, Ag and ufCB. Only Ag stimulated cell activation. Within minutes, Ag stimulated an increase in [Ca2+]i (in Fura-2 loaded cells), and a prominent inward ion current (assessed by electrophysiology). Within 2-4 h, Ag increased superoxide anion release and stimulated cytokine production (MCP-1, IL-8) that was diminished by Ca2+ inhibitors or trolox. Light microscopy demonstrated that cells had an activated phenotype. In conclusion NM toxicity was ranked; Ag>ufCB>TiO2, and the battery of tests used provided insight into the mechanism of action of NM toxicity to guide future testing strategies. PMID:25962642

  20. Obesity is Associated with More Activated Neutrophils in African American Male Youth

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojing; Su, Shaoyong; Wang, Xin; Barnes, Vernon; De Miguel, Carmen; Ownby, Dennis; Pollock, Jennifer; Snieder, Harold; Chen, Weiqin; Wang, Xiaoling

    2014-01-01

    Background There is emerging evidence suggesting the role of peripheral blood leukocytes in the pathogenesis of obesity and related diseases. However, few studies have taken a genome wide approach to investigating gene expression profiles in peripheral leukocytes between obese and lean individuals with the consideration of obesity related shifts in leukocyte types. Method We conducted this study in 95 African Americans of both genders (age 14-20, 46 lean and 49 obese). Complete blood count with differential test (CBC) was performed in whole blood. Genome wide gene expression analysis was obtained using Illumina HumanHT-12 V4 Beadchip with RNA extracted from peripheral leukocytes. Out of the 95 participants, 64 had neutrophils stored. The validation study was based on Real-time polymerase chain reaction with RNA extracted from purified neutrophils. Results CBC test suggested that in males, obesity was associated with increased neutrophil percentage (p=0.03). Genome wide gene expression analysis showed that in males, the majority of the most differentially expressed genes were related to neutrophil activation. Validation of the gene expression levels of ELANE (neutrophil elastase) and MPO (myeloperoxidase) in purified neutrophils demonstrated that the expression of these two genes – important biomarkers of neutrophils activation – were significantly elevated in obese males (p=0.01 and p=0.02, respectively). Conclusion The identification of increased neutrophil percentage and activation in obese African American males suggests that neutrophils play an essential role in the pathogenesis of obesity related disease. Further functional and mechanistic studies on neutrophils may contribute to the development of novel intervention strategies reducing the burden associated with obesity-related health problems. PMID:25388404

  1. Neutrophil transmigration mediated by the neutrophil-specific antigen CD177 is influenced by the endothelial S536N dimorphism of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Behnaz; Werth, Silke; Sachs, Ulrich J H; Newman, Debra K; Newman, Peter J; Santoso, Sentot

    2010-04-01

    The human neutrophil-specific adhesion molecule CD177 (also known as the NB1 alloantigen) becomes upregulated on the cell surface in a number of inflammatory settings. We recently showed that CD177 functions as a novel heterophilic counterreceptor for the endothelial junctional protein PECAM-1 (CD31), an interaction that is mediated by membrane-proximal PECAM-1 IgD 6, which is known to harbor an S(536)N single nucleotide polymorphism of two major isoforms V(98)N(536)G(643) and L(98)S(536)R(643) and a yet-to-be-determined region on CD177. In vitro transendothelial migration experiments revealed that CD177(+) neutrophils migrated significantly faster through HUVECs expressing the LSR, compared with the VNG, allelic variant of PECAM-1 and that this correlated with the decreased ability of anti-PECAM-1 Ab of ITIM tyrosine phosphorylation in HUVECs expressing the LSR allelic variant relative to the VNG allelic variant. Moreover, engagement of PECAM-1 with rCD177-Fc (to mimic heterophilic CD177 binding) suppressed Ab-induced tyrosine phosphorylation to a greater extent in cells expressing the LSR isoform compared with the VNG isoform, with a corresponding increased higher level of beta-catenin phosphorylation. These data suggest that heterophilic PECAM-1/CD177 interactions affect the phosphorylation state of PECAM-1 and endothelial cell junctional integrity in such a way as to facilitate neutrophil transmigration in a previously unrecognized allele-specific manner. PMID:20194726

  2. A Simple and Efficient Method to Detect Nuclear Factor Activation in Human Neutrophils by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Erick; Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in peripheral blood. These cells are the first to appear at sites of inflammation and infection, thus becoming the first line of defense against invading microorganisms. Neutrophils possess important antimicrobial functions such as phagocytosis, release of lytic enzymes, and production of reactive oxygen species. In addition to these important defense functions, neutrophils perform other tasks in response to infection such as production of proinflammatory cytokines and inhibition of apoptosis. Cytokines recruit other leukocytes that help clear the infection, and inhibition of apoptosis allows the neutrophil to live longer at the site of infection. These functions are regulated at the level of transcription. However, because neutrophils are short-lived cells, the study of transcriptionally regulated responses in these cells cannot be performed with conventional reporter gene methods since there are no efficient techniques for neutrophil transfection. Here, we present a simple and efficient method that allows detection and quantification of nuclear factors in isolated and immunolabeled nuclei by flow cytometry. We describe techniques to isolate pure neutrophils from human peripheral blood, stimulate these cells with anti-receptor antibodies, isolate and immunolabel nuclei, and analyze nuclei by flow cytometry. The method has been successfully used to detect NF-κB and Elk-1 nuclear factors in nuclei from neutrophils and other cell types. Thus, this method represents an option for analyzing activation of transcription factors in isolated nuclei from a variety of cell types. PMID:23603868

  3. Human neutrophils contain and bind high molecular weight kininogen.

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, E J; Schmaier, A H; Wachtfogel, Y T; Kaufman, N; Kucich, U; Colman, R W

    1989-01-01

    Because plasma kallikrein activates human neutrophils, and in plasma prekallikrein (PK) circulates complexed with high molecular weight kininogen (HMWK), we determined whether HMWK could mediate kallikrein's association with neutrophils. HMWK antigen (237 +/- 61 ng HMWK/10(8) neutrophils) was present in lysates of washed human neutrophils. Little if any plasma HMWK was tightly bound and nonexchangeable with the neutrophil surface. Human neutrophils were found to possess surface membrane-binding sites for HMWK but no internalization was detected at 37 degrees C. 125I-HMWK binding to neutrophils was dependent upon Zn2+. Binding of 125I-HMWK to neutrophils was specific and 90% reversible. 125I-HMWK binding to neutrophils was saturable with an apparent Kd of 9-18 nM and 40,000-70,000 sites per cell. Upon binding to neutrophils, 125I-HMWK was proteolyzed by human neutrophil elastase (HNE) into lower relative molecular mass derivatives. Furthermore, HMWK found in neutrophils also served as a cofactor for HNE secretion because neutrophils deficient in HMWK have reduced HNE secretion when stimulated in plasma deficient in HMWK or with purified kallikrein. These studies indicate that human neutrophils contain a binding site for HMWK that could serve to localize plasma or neutrophil HMWK on their surface to possibly serve as a receptor for kallikrein and to participate in HNE secretion by this enzyme. Images PMID:2738152

  4. Inflammatory response, neutrophil activation, and free radical production after acute myocardial infarction: effect of thrombolytic treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, D; Jackson, M; Nicoll, J J; Millar, A; Dawes, J; Muir, A L

    1990-01-01

    Activated neutrophils releasing proteolytic enzymes and oxygen free radicals have been implicated in extending myocardial injury after myocardial infarction. Neutrophil elastase was used as a marker of neutrophil activation and the non-peroxide diene conjugate of linoleic acid was used as an indicator of free radical activity in 32 patients after acute myocardial infarction; 17 were treated by intravenous thrombolysis. Patients with acute myocardial infarction had higher plasma concentrations of neutrophil elastase and the non-peroxide diene conjugated isomer of linoleic acid than normal volunteers or patients with stable ischaemic heart disease. Patients treated by thrombolysis had an early peak of neutrophil elastase at eight hours while those who had not been treated by thrombolysis showed a later peak 40 hours after infarction. The plasma concentration of non-peroxide conjugated diene of linoleic acid was highest 16 hours after the infarction irrespective of treatment by thrombolysis. Quantitative imaging with single photon emission tomography showed decreased uptake of indium-111 labelled neutrophils in the infarcted myocardium (as judged from technetium-99m pyrophosphate) in those who had received thrombolysis, suggesting a decreased inflammatory response. The results indicate increased neutrophil activation and free radical production after myocardial infarction; they also suggest that thrombolysis does not amplify the inflammatory response and may indeed suppress it. Images PMID:2317413

  5. DOCK2 is a Rac activator that regulates motility and polarity during neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Kunisaki, Yuya; Nishikimi, Akihiko; Tanaka, Yoshihiko; Takii, Ryosuke; Noda, Mayuko; Inayoshi, Ayumi; Watanabe, Ken-ichi; Sanematsu, Fumiyuki; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Sasaki, Takehiko; Fukui, Yoshinori

    2006-08-28

    Neutrophils are highly motile leukocytes, and they play important roles in the innate immune response to invading pathogens. Neutrophil chemotaxis requires Rac activation, yet the Rac activators functioning downstream of chemoattractant receptors remain to be determined. We show that DOCK2, which is a mammalian homologue of Caenorhabditis elegans CED-5 and Drosophila melanogaster Myoblast City, regulates motility and polarity during neutrophil chemotaxis. Although DOCK2-deficient neutrophils moved toward the chemoattractant source, they exhibited abnormal migratory behavior with a marked reduction in translocation speed. In DOCK2-deficient neutrophils, chemoattractant-induced activation of both Rac1 and Rac2 were severely impaired, resulting in the loss of polarized accumulation of F-actin and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3) at the leading edge. On the other hand, we found that DOCK2 associates with PIP3 and translocates to the leading edge of chemotaxing neutrophils in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent manner. These results indicate that during neutrophil chemotaxis DOCK2 regulates leading edge formation through PIP3-dependent membrane translocation and Rac activation. PMID:16943182

  6. Trace element landscape of resting and activated human neutrophils on the sub-micrometer level.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, M J; De Samber, B; Garrevoet, J; Vergucht, E; Vekemans, B; De Rycke, R; Björn, E; Sandblad, L; Wellenreuther, G; Falkenberg, G; Cloetens, P; Vincze, L; Urban, C F

    2015-06-01

    Every infection is a battle for trace elements. Neutrophils migrate first to the infection site and accumulate quickly to high numbers. They fight pathogens by phagocytosis and intracellular toxication. Additionally, neutrophils form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to inhibit extracellular microbes. Yet, neutrophil trace element characteristics are largely unexplored. We investigated unstimulated and phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated neutrophils using synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) on the sub-micron spatial resolution level. PMA activates pinocytosis, cytoskeletal rearrangements and the release of NETs, all mechanisms deployed by neutrophils to combat infection. By analyzing Zn, Fe, Cu, Mn, P, S, and Ca, not only the nucleus but also vesicular granules were identifiable in the elemental maps. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) revealed a neutrophil-specific composition of Zn, Fe, Cu, and Mn in comparison with J774 and HeLa cells, indicating a neutrophil-specific metallome complying with their designated functions. When investigating PMA-activated neutrophils, the SR-XRF analysis depicted typical subcellular morphological changes: the transformation of nucleus and granules and the emergence of void vacuoles. Mature NETs were evenly composed of Fe, P, S, and Ca with occasional hot spots containing Zn, Fe, and Ca. An ICP-MS-based quantification of NET supernatants revealed a NETosis-induced decrease of soluble Zn, whereas Fe, Cu, and Mn concentrations were only slightly affected. In summary, we present a combination of SR-XRF and ICP-MS as a powerful tool to analyze trace elements in human neutrophils. The approach will be applicable and valuable to numerous aspects of nutritional immunity. PMID:25832493

  7. Characterization of the PGE receptor subtype mediating inhibition of superoxide production in human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Talpain, E; Armstrong, R A; Coleman, R A; Vardey, C J

    1995-01-01

    1. The aims of this study were to characterize the EP receptor subtype mediating the inhibition of superoxide anion generation by formyl methionyl leucine phenylalanine (FMLP)-stimulated human neutrophils, and to test the hypothesis that adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) is the second messenger mediating the inhibition of the neutrophil by prostaglandin (PG)E2. 2. PGE2 (0.001-10 microM) inhibited FMLP (100 nM)-induced O2-generation from human peripheral blood neutrophils in a concentration-dependent manner, with an EC50 of 0.15 +/- 0.03 microM, and a maximum effect ranging from 36-84% (mean inhibition of 68.7 +/- 2.5%, n = 32). 3. The EP2-receptor agonists, misoprostol, 11-deoxy PGE1, AH13205 and butaprost, all at 10 microM, inhibited O2- generation, causing 95.5 +/- 2.9%, 56.8 +/- 5.2%, 37.1 +/- 6.6% and 18.9 +/- 4.4% inhibition respectively, the latter two being much less effective than PGE2. Similarly, the EP1-receptor agonist, 17-phenyl PGE2 (10 microM), and the EP3/EP1-receptor agonist, sulprostone (10 microM), also inhibited O2- generation, causing 32.2 +/- 7.0% and 15.3 +/- 3.4% inhibition respectively. 4. The non-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor, isobutyl methylxanthine (IBMX, 0.25 mM) inhibited the FMLP response by 54.5 +/- 5.0%. In addition, IBMX shifted concentration-effect curves for PGE2, misoprostol, 11-deoxy PGE1, butaprost, and AH 13205 to the left, to give EC50s of 0.04 +/- 0.03 (n = 13), 0.07 +/- 0.03 (n = 4), 0.08 +/- 0.03 (n = 4), 0.33 +/- 0.13 (n = 4) and 0.41 +/- 0.2 microM (n = 3) respectively, allowing equieffective concentration-ratios (EECs, PGE2 = 1) of 11.5, 5.3, 50.7 and 12.7 to be calculated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7606349

  8. Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone down-regulates CXC receptors through activation of neutrophil elastase.

    PubMed

    Manna, Sunil K; Sarkar, Abira; Sreenivasan, Yashin

    2006-03-01

    Considering the role of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in a large number of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases, the regulation of IL-8-mediated biological responses is important. Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH), a tridecapeptide, inhibits most forms of inflammation by an unknown mechanism. In the present study, we have found that alpha-MSH interacts predominantly with melanocortin-1 receptors and inhibits several IL-8-induced biological responses in macrophages and neutrophils. It down-regulated receptors for IL-8 but not for TNF, IL-4, IL-13 or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in neutrophils. It down-regulated CXCR type 1 and 2 but not mRNA levels. alpha-MSH did not inhibit IL-8 binding in purified cell membrane or affinity-purified CXCR. IL-8 or anti-CXCR Ab protected against alpha-MSH-mediated inhibition of IL-8 binding. The level of neutrophil elastase, a specific serine protease, but not cathepsin G or proteinase 3 increased in alpha-MSH-treated cells, and restoration of CXCR by specific neutrophil elastase or serine protease inhibitors indicates the involvement of elastase in alpha-MSH-induced down-regulation of CXCR. These studies suggest that alpha-MSH inhibits IL-8-mediated biological responses by down-regulating CXCR through induction of serine protease and that alpha-MSH acts as a potent immunomodulator in neutrophil-driven inflammatory distress. PMID:16479540

  9. TLR4-Dependent Secretion by Hepatic Stellate Cells of the Neutrophil-Chemoattractant CXCL1 Mediates Liver Response to Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R.; Shimizu-Albergine, Masami; Campbell, Jean S.; Crispe, Ian N.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims The gut microbiota significantly influences hepatic immunity. Little is known on the precise mechanism by which liver cells mediate recognition of gut microbes at steady state. Here we tested the hypothesis that a specific liver cell population was the sensor and we aimed at deciphering the mechanism by which the activation of TLR4 pathway would mediate liver response to gut microbiota. Methods Using microarrays, we compared total liver gene expression in WT versus TLR4 deficient mice. We performed in situ localization of the major candidate protein, CXCL1. With an innovative technique based on cell sorting, we harvested enriched fractions of KCs, LSECs and HSCs from the same liver. The cytokine secretion profile was quantified in response to low levels of LPS (1ng/mL). Chemotactic activity of stellate cell-derived CXCL1 was assayed in vitro on neutrophils upon TLR4 activation. Results TLR4 deficient liver had reduced levels of one unique chemokine, CXCL1 and subsequent decreased of neutrophil counts. Depletion of gut microbiota mimicked TLR4 deficient phenotype, i.e., decreased neutrophils counts in the liver. All liver cells were responsive to low levels of LPS, but hepatic stellate cells were the major source of chemotactic levels of CXCL1. Neutrophil migration towards secretory hepatic stellate cells required the TLR4 dependent secretion of CXCL1. Conclusions Showing the specific activation of TLR4 and the secretion of one major functional chemokine—CXCL1, the homolog of human IL-8-, we elucidate a new mechanism in which Hepatic Stellate Cells play a central role in the recognition of gut microbes by the liver at steady state. PMID:27002851

  10. Transformation of lupus-inducing drugs to cytotoxic products by activated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Jiang, X; Khursigara, G; Rubin, R L

    1994-11-01

    Drug-induced lupus is a serious side effect of certain medications, but the chemical features that confer this property and the underlying pathogenesis are puzzling. Prototypes of all six therapeutic classes of lupus-inducing drugs were highly cytotoxic only in the presence of activated neutrophils. Removal of extracellular hydrogen peroxide before, but not after, exposure of the drug to activated neutrophils prevented cytotoxicity. Neutrophil-dependent cytotoxicity required the enzymatic action of myeloperoxidase, resulting in the chemical transformation of the drug to a reactive product. The capacity of drugs to serve as myeloperoxidase substrates in vitro was associated with the ability to induce lupus in vivo. PMID:7973636

  11. Systemic neutrophil activation in a mouse model of ischemic stroke and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Helena; McKee, Dana; Ritter, Leslie

    2011-04-01

    As a natural response to injury and disease, neutrophils activate, adhere to the microvasculature, migrate into brain tissue, and release toxic substances such as reactive oxygen species and proteases. This neutrophil response occurs when blood flow is returned to brain tissue (reperfusion) after ischemic stroke. Thus, the presence of activated systemic neutrophils increases the potential for tissue injury during reperfusion after ischemic stroke. Although experiments in rat models suggest that activated neutrophils play a pivotal role in cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury, little is known about systemic neutrophil activation during reperfusion following ischemic stroke in a mouse model. The purpose of this study was to characterize systemic leukocyte responses and neutrophil CD11b expression 15-min and 24-hr post-reperfusion in a mouse model of ischemic stroke. The intraluminal filament method of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) with reperfusion or a sham procedure was performed in male C57Bl/6 mice. Automated leukocyte counts and manual white blood cell (WBC) differential counts were measured. Flow cytometry was used to assess systemic neutrophil surface CD11b expression. The data suggest that the damaging potential of systemic neutrophil activation begins as early as 15 min and remains evident at 24 hr after the initiation of reperfusion. In addition, because transgenic mouse models, bred on a C57Bl/6 background, are increasingly used to elucidate single mechanisms of reperfusion injury after ischemic stroke, findings from this study are foundational for future investigations examining the damaging potential of neutrophil responses post-reperfusion after ischemic stroke in genetically altered mouse models within this background strain. PMID:21044968

  12. Neutrophil P2X7 receptors mediate NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent IL-1β secretion in response to ATP

    PubMed Central

    Karmakar, Mausita; Katsnelson, Michael A.; Dubyak, George R.; Pearlman, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Although extracellular ATP is abundant at sites of inflammation, its role in activating inflammasome signalling in neutrophils is not well characterized. In the current study, we demonstrate that human and murine neutrophils express functional cell-surface P2X7R, which leads to ATP-induced loss of intracellular K+, NLRP3 inflammasome activation and IL-1β secretion. ATP-induced P2X7R activation caused a sustained increase in intracellular [Ca2+], which is indicative of P2X7R channel opening. Although there are multiple polymorphic variants of P2X7R, we found that neutrophils from multiple donors express P2X7R, but with differential efficacies in ATP-induced increase in cytosolic [Ca2+]. Neutrophils were also the predominant P2X7R-expressing cells during Streptococcus pneumoniae corneal infection, and P2X7R was required for bacterial clearance. Given the ubiquitous presence of neutrophils and extracellular ATP in multiple inflammatory conditions, ATP-induced P2X7R activation and IL-1β secretion by neutrophils likely has a significant, wide ranging clinical impact. PMID:26877061

  13. Neutrophil antimicrobial defense against Staphylococcus aureus is mediated by phagolysosomal but not extracellular trap-associated cathelicidin

    PubMed Central

    Jann, Naja J.; Schmaler, Mathias; Kristian, Sascha A.; Radek, Katherine A.; Gallo, Richard L.; Nizet, Victor; Peschel, Andreas; Landmann, Regine

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophils kill invading pathogens by AMPs, including cathelicidins, ROS, and NETs. The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus exhibits enhanced resistance to neutrophil AMPs, including the murine cathelicidin CRAMP, in part, as a result of alanylation of teichoic acids by the dlt operon. In this study, we took advantage of the hypersusceptible phenotype of S. aureus ΔdltA against cationic AMPs to study the impact of the murine cathelicidin CRAMP on staphylococcal killing and to identify its key site of action in murine neutrophils. We demonstrate that CRAMP remained intracellular during PMN exudation from blood and was secreted upon PMA stimulation. We show first evidence that CRAMP was recruited to phagolysosomes in infected neutrophils and exhibited intracellular activity against S. aureus. Later in infection, neutrophils produced NETs, and immunofluorescence revealed association of CRAMP with S. aureus in NETs, which similarly killed S. aureus wt and ΔdltA, indicating that CRAMP activity was reduced when associated with NETs. Indeed, the presence of DNA reduced the antimicrobial activity of CRAMP, and CRAMP localization in response to S. aureus was independent of the NADPH oxidase, whereas killing was partially dependent on a functional NADPH oxidase. Our study indicates that neutrophils use CRAMP in a timed and locally coordinated manner in defense against S. aureus. PMID:19638500

  14. Detection of Bidirectional Signaling During Integrin Activation and Neutrophil Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Stuart M.; Dixit, Neha; Simon, Scott I.

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil arrest and migration on inflamed endothelium is dependent upon a conformational shift in CD11a/CD18 (LFA-1) from a low to high affinity and clustered state which determines the strength and lifetime of bond formation with intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1). Cytoskeletal adaptor proteins kindlin-3 and talin-1 anchor clustered LFA-1 to the cytoskeleton and support the transition from neutrophil rolling to arrest. We employ microfluidic flow channels and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to evaluate the spatiotemporal regulation of LFA-1 affinity and bond formation that facilitate the transition from neutrophil rolling to arrest. Methodology is presented to correlate the relationship between integrin conformation, bond formation with ICAM-1, and cytoskeletal engagement and adhesion strengthening necessary to achieve a migratory phenotype. PMID:24504956

  15. Nimesulide as a downregulator of the activity of the neutrophil myeloperoxidase pathway. Focus on the histoprotective potential of the drug during inflammatory processes.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Dapino, P; Pastorino, G; Montagnani, G; Gatti, F; Guidi, G; Dallegri, F

    1993-01-01

    Neutrophils, recruited to tissue sites of inflammation, release a variety of oxidants and enzymes, which are responsible for tissue damage. Among the oxidants released are potent chlorinated compounds, such as hypochlorous acid and chloramines, which induce tissue cell damage and inactivate protease inhibitors, particularly alpha 1-antitrypsin, the specific inhibitor of neutrophil elastase. In studying a rational approach to the pharmacological control of neutrophil-mediated tissue injury, we investigated the activity of the anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide. This agent reduced the function of the myeloperoxidase pathway (which generates hypochlorous acid), by exerting a cell-directed inhibitory activity, as shown by measurement of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide production. Nimesulide also inactivated hypochlorous acid directly and protected alpha 1-antitrypsin from the neutrophil-mediated oxidation. Thus, neutrophil elastolytic activity may be attenuated by nimesulide-spared alpha 1-antitrypsin. The prevention of oxidative inactivation of alpha 1-antitrypsin by nimesulide strictly correlates with the drug's ability to suppress the extracellular availability of hypochlorous acid. Taken together, these data suggest that nimesulide may prevent tissue injury at sites of inflammation by maintaining natural host protective systems. PMID:7506191

  16. Fcγ and Complement Receptors and Complement Proteins in Neutrophil Activation in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Contribution to Pathogenesis and Progression and Modulation by Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Paoliello-Paschoalato, Adriana Balbina; Marchi, Larissa Fávaro; de Andrade, Micássio Fernandes; Kabeya, Luciana Mariko; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a highly disabling disease that affects all structures of the joint and significantly impacts on morbidity and mortality in RA patients. RA is characterized by persistent inflammation of the synovial membrane lining the joint associated with infiltration of immune cells. Eighty to 90% of the leukocytes infiltrating the synovia are neutrophils. The specific role that neutrophils play in the onset of RA is not clear, but recent studies have evidenced that they have an important participation in joint damage and disease progression through the release of proteolytic enzymes, reactive oxygen species (ROS), cytokines, and neutrophil extracellular traps, in particular during frustrated phagocytosis of immune complexes (ICs). In addition, the local and systemic activation of the complement system contributes to the pathogenesis of RA and other IC-mediated diseases. This review discusses (i) the participation of Fcγ and complement receptors in mediating the effector functions of neutrophils in RA; (ii) the contribution of the complement system and ROS-dependent and ROS-independent mechanisms to joint damage in RA; and (iii) the use of plant extracts, dietary compounds, and isolated natural compounds in the treatment of RA, focusing on modulation of the effector functions of neutrophils and the complement system activity and/or activation. PMID:26346244

  17. Neutrophil activation during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and repair in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Williams, C David; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Sharpe, Matthew R; McGill, Mitchell R; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    Following acetaminophen (APAP) overdose there is an inflammatory response triggered by the release of cellular contents from necrotic hepatocytes into the systemic circulation which initiates the recruitment of neutrophils into the liver. It has been demonstrated that neutrophils do not contribute to APAP-induced liver injury, but their role and the role of NADPH oxidase in injury resolution are controversial. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to APAP overdose and neutrophil activation status was determined during liver injury and liver regeneration. Additionally, human APAP overdose patients (ALT: >800 U/L) had serial blood draws during the injury and recovery phases for the determination of neutrophil activation. Neutrophils in the peripheral blood of mice showed an increasing activation status (CD11b expression and ROS priming) during and after the peak of injury but returned to baseline levels prior to complete injury resolution. Hepatic sequestered neutrophils showed an increased and sustained CD11b expression, but no ROS priming was observed. Confirming that NADPH oxidase is not critical to injury resolution, gp91(phox)⁻/⁻ mice following APAP overdose displayed no alteration in injury resolution. Peripheral blood from APAP overdose patients also showed increased neutrophil activation status after the peak of liver injury and remained elevated until discharge from the hospital. In mice and humans, markers of activation, like ROS priming, were increased and sustained well after active liver injury had subsided. The similar findings between surviving patients and mice indicate that neutrophil activation may be a critical event for host defense or injury resolution following APAP overdose, but not a contributing factor to APAP-induced injury. PMID:24440789

  18. Neutrophil Activation During Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity and Repair in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C. David; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Sharpe, Matthew R.; McGill, Mitchell R.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    Following acetaminophen (APAP) overdose there is an inflammatory response triggered by release of cellular contents from necrotic hepatocytes into systemic circulation which initiates the recruitment of neutrophils into the liver. It has been demonstrated that neutrophils do not contribute to APAP-induced liver injury, but their role and the role of NADPH oxidase in injury resolution is controversial. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to APAP overdose and neutrophil activation status was determined during liver injury and liver regeneration. Additionally, human APAP overdose patients (ALT: >800U/L) had serial blood draws during the injury and recovery phases for determination of neutrophil activation. Neutrophils in the peripheral blood of mice showed increasing activation status (CD11b expression and ROS priming) during and after the peak of injury but returned to baseline levels prior to complete injury resolution. Hepatic sequestered neutrophils showed an increased and sustained CD11b expression, but no ROS priming was observed. Confirming that NADPH oxidase is not critical to injury resolution, gp91phox-/- mice following APAP overdose displayed no alteration in injury resolution. Peripheral blood from APAP overdose patients also showed increased neutrophil activation status after the peak of liver injury and remained elevated until discharge from the hospital. In mice and humans, markers of activation, like ROS priming, were increased and sustained well after active liver injury had subsided. The similar findings between surviving patients and mice indicate neutrophil activation may be a critical event for host defense or injury resolution following APAP overdose, but not a contributing factor to APAP-induced injury. PMID:24440789

  19. Interleukin 17A promotes pneumococcal clearance by recruiting neutrophils and inducing apoptosis through a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent mechanism in acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhou, Aie; Zhang, Xuemei; Xiang, Yun; Huang, Yifei; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Yusi; Yin, Yibing; He, Yujuan

    2014-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a Gram-positive and human-restricted pathogen colonizing the nasopharynx with an absence of clinical symptoms as well as a major pathogen causing otitis media (OM), one of the most common childhood infections. Upon bacterial infection, neutrophils are rapidly activated and recruited to the infected site, acting as the frontline defender against emerging microbial pathogens via different ways. Evidence shows that interleukin 17A (IL-17A), a neutrophil-inducing factor, plays important roles in the immune responses in several diseases. However, its function in response to S. pneumoniae OM remains unclear. In this study, the function of IL-17A in response to S. pneumoniae OM was examined using an in vivo model. We developed a model of acute OM (AOM) in C57BL/6 mice and found that neutrophils were the dominant immune cells that infiltrated to the middle ear cavity (MEC) and contributed to bacterial clearance. Using IL-17A knockout (KO) mice, we found that IL-17A boosted neutrophil recruitment to the MEC and afterwards induced apoptosis, which was identified to be conducive to bacterial clearance. In addition, our observation suggested that the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was involved in the recruitment and apoptosis of neutrophils mediated by IL-17A. These data support the conclusion that IL-17A contributes to the host immune response against S. pneumoniae by promoting neutrophil recruitment and apoptosis through the p38 MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:24664502

  20. P-selectin mediates neutrophil rolling on histamine-stimulated endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, D. A.; Abbassi, O.; McIntire, L. V.; McEver, R. P.; Smith, C. W.

    1993-01-01

    In postcapillary venules, marginating neutrophils (PMNs) are often seen rolling along the vessel wall prior to stopping and emigrating. There is substantial evidence in vitro and in vivo that the adhesion receptors E- and L-selectin participate in this phenomenon on cytokine-stimulated endothelium, and recent evidence has shown that a closely related adhesion receptor, P-selectin, is capable of mediating neutrophil rolling on an artificial membrane. Here we demonstrate and characterize PMN rolling on monolayers of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) stimulated with histamine to induce surface expression of P-selectin. Peak association of PMNs with the HUVECs occurs 10 min after histamine stimulation, and at a postcapillary venular wall shear stress of 2.0 dyn/cm2 the rolling velocity is 14 microns/s. Approximately 95% of the PMNs roll on the endothelial cells, 5% adhere firmly, and none migrate beneath the endothelial monolayer. Monoclonal antibody (MAb) G1, which binds P-selectin and blocks its adhesive function, completely prevents association of the PMNs with histamine-stimulated HUVEC, whereas the nonblocking anti-P-selectin MAb S12 does not. Treatment of PMNs with the anti-L-selectin MAb DREG56 reduces PMN adherence by approximately 50%. Anti-CD54 MAb R6.5 and anti-CD18 MAb R15.7 have little effect on the number of PMNs rolling on the HUVECs but completely prevent PMNs from stopping and significantly increase rolling velocity. Nonblocking control MAbs for R6.5 (CL203) and R15.7 (CL18/1D1) lack these effects. Rolling adhesion of PMNs on histamine-stimulated HUVECs therefore appears to be completely dependent on endothelial cell P-selectin, with a minor adhesion-stabilizing contribution from intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and beta 2 integrins. The partial inhibition of rolling with DREG56 suggests that L-selectin may also play a role in neutrophil interactions with histamine-stimulated endothelium. We further characterize these interactions by

  1. Activation of Neutrophils via IP3 Pathway Following Exposure to Demodex-Associated Bacterial Proteins.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Fred; Banville, Nessa; Bergin, David A; Smedman, Christian; Paulie, Staffan; Reeves, Emer; Kavanagh, Kevin

    2016-02-01

    Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory condition that predominantly affects the skin of the face. Sera from rosacea patients display elevated reactivity to proteins from a bacterium (Bacillus oleronius) originally isolated from a Demodex mite from a rosacea patient suggesting a possible role for bacteria in the induction and persistence of this condition. This work investigated the ability of B. oleronius proteins to activate neutrophils and demonstrated activation via the IP3 pathway. Activated neutrophils displayed increased levels of IP1 production, F-actin formation, chemotaxis, and production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6 following stimulation by pure and crude B. oleronius protein preparations (2 μg/ml), respectively. In addition, neutrophils exposed to pure and crude B. oleronius proteins (2 μg/ml) demonstrated increased release of internally stored calcium (Ca(2+)), a hallmark of the IP3 pathway of neutrophil activation. Neutrophils play a significant role in the inflammation associated with rosacea, and this work demonstrates how B. oleronius proteins can induce neutrophil recruitment and activation. PMID:26433579

  2. Autocrine enhancement of leukotriene synthesis by endogenous leukotriene B4 and platelet-activating factor in human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, P. P.; McColl, S. R.; Braquet, P.; Borgeat, P.

    1994-01-01

    1. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4), two potent lipid mediators synthesized by activated neutrophils, are known to stimulate several neutrophil functional responses. In this study, we have determined that endogenous LTB4 and PAF exert autocrine effects on LT synthesis, as well as the underlying mechanism involved. 2. Pretreatment of neutrophils with either pertussis toxin (PT), or with receptor antagonists for LTB4 and PAF, resulted in an inhibition of LT synthesis induced by calcium ionophore, A23187. This inhibition was most marked at submaximal (100-300 nM) A23187 concentrations, whilst it was least at ionophore concentrations which induce maximal LT synthesis (1-3 microM). Thus newly-synthesized PAF and LTB4 can enhance LT synthesis induced by A23187 under conditions where the LT-generating system is not fully activated. 3. In recombinant human (rh) granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-primed neutrophils, LT synthesis in response to chemoattractants (fMet-Leu-Phe or rhC5a) was also significantly inhibited by the LTB4 receptor antagonist, and to a lesser extent by PAF receptor antagonists. 4. Further investigation revealed that LTB4 and/or PAF exert their effects on LT synthesis via an effect on arachidonic acid (AA) availability, as opposed to 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) activation. Indeed, the receptor antagonists, as well as PT, inhibited LT synthesis and AA release to a similar extent, whereas 5-LO activation (assessed with an exogenous 5-LO substrate) was virtually unaffected under the same conditions. Accordingly, we showed that addition of exogenous LTB4 could enhance AA availability in response to chemoattractant challenge in rhGM-CSF-primed cells, without significantly affecting the 5-LO activation status.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8019762

  3. The Fungal Exopolysaccharide Galactosaminogalactan Mediates Virulence by Enhancing Resistance to Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mark J.; Liu, Hong; Barker, Bridget M.; Snarr, Brendan D.; Gravelat, Fabrice N.; Al Abdallah, Qusai; Gavino, Christina; Baistrocchi, Shane R.; Ostapska, Hanna; Xiao, Tianli; Ralph, Benjamin; Solis, Norma V.; Lehoux, Mélanie; Baptista, Stefanie D.; Thammahong, Arsa; Cerone, Robert P.; Kaminskyj, Susan G. W.; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Fontaine, Thierry; Vinh, Donald C.; Filler, Scott G.; Sheppard, Donald C.

    2015-01-01

    Of the over 250 Aspergillus species, Aspergillus fumigatus accounts for up to 80% of invasive human infections. A. fumigatus produces galactosaminogalactan (GAG), an exopolysaccharide composed of galactose and N-acetyl-galactosamine (GalNAc) that mediates adherence and is required for full virulence. Less pathogenic Aspergillus species were found to produce GAG with a lower GalNAc content than A. fumigatus and expressed minimal amounts of cell wall-bound GAG. Increasing the GalNAc content of GAG of the minimally pathogenic A. nidulans, either through overexpression of the A. nidulans epimerase UgeB or by heterologous expression of the A. fumigatus epimerase Uge3 increased the amount of cell wall bound GAG, augmented adherence in vitro and enhanced virulence in corticosteroid-treated mice to levels similar to A. fumigatus. The enhanced virulence of the overexpression strain of A. nidulans was associated with increased resistance to NADPH oxidase-dependent neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in vitro, and was not observed in neutropenic mice or mice deficient in NADPH-oxidase that are unable to form NETs. Collectively, these data suggest that cell wall-bound GAG enhances virulence through mediating resistance to NETs. PMID:26492565

  4. Myeloperoxidase activity and the oxidized proteins in blood neutrophils of patients with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Muravlyova, Larissa; Molotov-Luchanskiy, Vilen; Bakirova, Ryszhan; Klyuyev, Dmitriy; Demidchik, Ludmila; Kolesnikova, Yevgeniya

    2014-10-01

    The main purpose of our investigation was to study myeloperoxidase activity and concentration of oxidized proteins in blood neutrophils of patients with ambulant pneumonia and secondary pneumonia which has arisen on a background of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Patients were divided into 2 groups. 17 patients with ambulant pneumonia moderate severity and respiratory insufficiency of grade 2 were included in the 1-st group. 20 COPD patients with secondary pneumonia moderate severity and with respiratory insufficiency of grade 2 were included in the 2-nd group. The control group consisted of 15 healthy subjects. The reactive protein carbonyl derivates, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and myeloperoxidase activity were detected in neutrophils. In neutrophils of 1-st group patients the augmentation of reactive protein carbonyl derivates was observed in comparison with healthy ones. In neutrophils of 2-nd group patients the slight decrease of reactive protein carbonyl derivates was observed in comparison with healthy ones (by 17%). In neutrophils of 2-nd group patients the significant increasing AOPP in comparison with healthy ones (p <0.01) and 1 group patients (p <0.05) was fixed. Myeloperoxidase activity was higher in neutrophils of 1-th group patients in comparison with healthy ones. In neutrophils of 2-nd group patients myeloperoxidase activity was higher in comparison with the same of 1 group patients (by 67%, p <0.05). Our results showed the different direction of oxidized proteins formation neutrophils of patients with primary and secondary pneumonia. Besides that the varied degree of myeloperoxidase activity was fixed. Our results require more detailed understanding because they can reflect peculiar mechanisms of pneumonia development and determine the characteristics of their progression. PMID:26461373

  5. Human neutrophil peptides: a novel potential mediator of inflammatory cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Kieran; Henriques, Melanie; Parker, Tom; Slutsky, Arthur S.; Zhang, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    The traditional view of atherosclerosis has recently been expanded from a predominantly lipid retentive disease to a coupling of inflammatory mechanisms and dyslipidemia. Studies have suggested a novel role for polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN)-dominant inflammation in the development of atherosclerosis. Human neutrophil peptides (HNPs), also known as α-defensins, are secreted and released from PMN granules upon activation and are conventionally involved in microbial killing. Current evidence suggests an important immunomodulative role for these peptides. HNP levels are markedly increased in inflammatory diseases including sepsis and acute coronary syndromes. They have been found within the intima of human atherosclerotic arteries, and their deposition in the skin correlates with the severity of coronary artery diseases. HNPs form complexes with LDL in solution and increase LDL binding to the endothelial surface. HNPs have also been shown to contribute to endothelial dysfunction, lipid metabolism disorder, and the inhibition of fibrinolysis. Given the emerging relationship between PMN-dominant inflammation and atherosclerosis, HNPs may serve as a link between them and as a biological marker and potential therapeutic target in cardiovascular diseases including coronary artery diseases and acute coronary syndromes. PMID:18805897

  6. ACTIVATED NEUTROPHILS INHIBIT PHAGOCYTOSIS BY HUMAN MONOCYTE CELLS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously reported the correlation of decreased phagocytosis of opsonized zymosan by sputum monocytic cells with the increase in sputum neutrophils in volunteers 6h after inhalation of endotoxin (20,000 EU) (Alexis, et al. JACI, 2003;112:353). To define whether an intrin...

  7. Decreased activity of neutrophils in the presence of diferuloylmethane (curcumin) involves protein kinase C inhibition.

    PubMed

    Jancinová, Viera; Perecko, Tomás; Nosál, Radomír; Kostálová, Daniela; Bauerová, Katarína; Drábiková, Katarína

    2009-06-10

    Diferuloylmethane (curcumin) has been shown to act beneficially in arthritis, particularly through downregulated expression of proinflammatory cytokines and collagenase as well as through the modulated activities of T lymphocytes and macrophages. In this study its impact on activated neutrophils was investigated both in vitro and in experimental arthritis. Formation of reactive oxygen species in neutrophils was recorded on the basis of luminol- or isoluminol-enhanced chemiluminescence. Phosphorylation of neutrophil protein kinases C alpha and beta II was assessed by Western blotting, using phosphospecific antibodies. Adjuvant arthritis was induced in Lewis rats by heat-killed Mycobacterium butyricum. Diferuloylmethane or methotrexate was administered over a period of 28 days after arthritis induction. Under in vitro conditions, diferuloylmethane (1-100 microM) reduced dose-dependently oxidant formation both at extra- and intracellular level and it effectively reduced protein kinase C activation. Adjuvant arthritis was accompanied by an increased number of neutrophils in blood and by a more pronounced spontaneous as well as PMA (phorbol myristate acetate) stimulated chemiluminescence. Whereas the arthritis-related alterations in neutrophil count and in spontaneous chemiluminescence were not modified by diferuloylmethane, the increased reactivity of neutrophils to PMA was less evident in diferuloylmethane-treated animals. The effects of diferuloylmethane were comparable with those of methotrexate. Diferuloylmethane was found to be a potent inhibitor of neutrophil functions both in vitro and in experimental arthritis. As neutrophils are considered to be cells with the greatest capacity to inflict damage within diseased joints, the observed effects could represent a further mechanism involved in the antirheumatic activity of diferuloylmethane. PMID:19371737

  8. In vitro activation of rat neutrophils and alveolar macrophages with IgA and IgG immune complexes. Implications for immune complex-induced lung injury.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, J. S.; Kunkel, S. L.; Johnson, K. J.; Ward, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    In the rat, both IgG and IgA immune complexes induce oxygen radical mediated lung injury that is partially complement-dependent. In vivo studies have suggested that the chief sources of oxygen radicals in IgG and IgA immune complex-induced lung injury are neutrophils and tissue macrophages, respectively. The current studies have been designed to provide additional insights into these two models of tissue injury. Preformed monoclonal IgG and IgA immune complexes stimulated dose-dependent O2-. and H2O2 production by alveolar macrophages. In contrast, neutrophils exhibited O2-. production and lysosomal enzyme secretion in response to IgG immune complexes, but not in response to IgA complexes. There is evidence that C5a significantly amplifies these responses. Purified human C5a enhanced the O2-. responses of neutrophils activated with IgG immune complexes and alveolar macrophages activated with either IgG or IgA immune complexes. Addition of C5a alone to neutrophils or alveolar macrophages had no direct stimulatory effect as measured by O2-. production. The observation that O2-. responses of immune complex-activated alveolar macrophages can be significantly enhanced by the presence of C5a and that C5a can also enhance O-2. responses of IgG immune complex-stimulated neutrophils suggests a potential amplification mechanism through which complement may participate in both IgG and IgA immune complex-induced lung injury. The present data corroborate in vivo studies which suggest that IgG immune complex lung injury is primarily neutrophil-mediated, whereas IgA complex lung injury is predominantly macrophage-mediated. PMID:2827492

  9. Lung inflammation promotes metastasis through neutrophil protease-mediated degradation of Tsp-1

    PubMed Central

    El Rayes, Tina; Catena, Raúl; Lee, Sharrell; Stawowczyk, Marcin; Joshi, Natasha; Fischbach, Claudia; Powell, Charles A.; Dannenberg, Andrew J.; Altorki, Nasser K.; Gao, Dingcheng; Mittal, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is inextricably associated with primary tumor progression. However, the contribution of inflammation to tumor outgrowth in metastatic organs has remained underexplored. Here, we show that extrinsic inflammation in the lungs leads to the recruitment of bone marrow-derived neutrophils, which degranulate azurophilic granules to release the Ser proteases, elastase and cathepsin G, resulting in the proteolytic destruction of the antitumorigenic factor thrombospondin-1 (Tsp-1). Genetic ablation of these neutrophil proteases protected Tsp-1 from degradation and suppressed lung metastasis. These results provide mechanistic insights into the contribution of inflammatory neutrophils to metastasis and highlight the unique neutrophil protease–Tsp-1 axis as a potential antimetastatic therapeutic target. PMID:26668367

  10. Observational Study of the Genetic Architecture of Neutrophil-Mediated Inflammatory Skin Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-11

    Other Specified Inflammatory Disorders of Skin or Subcutaneous Tissue; Pyoderma Gangrenosum; Erosive Pustular Dermatosis of the Scalp; Sweet's Syndrome; Behcet's Disease; Bowel-associated Dermatosis-arthritis Syndrome; Pustular Psoriasis; Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis; Keratoderma Blenorrhagicum; Sneddon-Wilkinson Disease; IgA Pemphigus; Amicrobial Pustulosis of the Folds; Infantile Acropustulosis; Transient Neonatal Pustulosis; Neutrophilic Eccrine Hidradenitis; Rheumatoid Neutrophilic Dermatitis; Neutrophilic Urticaria; Still's Disease; Erythema Marginatum; Unclassified Periodic Fever Syndromes / Autoinflammatory Syndromes; Dermatitis Herpetiformis; Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis; Bullous Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Inflammatory Epidermolysis Bullosa Aquisita; Neutrophilic Dermatosis of the Dorsal Hands (Pustular Vasculitis); Small Vessel Vasculitis Including Urticarial Vasculitis; Erythema Elevatum Diutinum; Medium Vessel Vasculitis

  11. Activated human valvular interstitial cells sustain interleukin-17 production to recruit neutrophils in infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chiou-Yueh; Shun, Chia-Tung; Kuo, Yu-Min; Jung, Chiau-Jing; Hsieh, Song-Chou; Chiu, Yen-Ling; Chen, Jeng-Wei; Hsu, Ron-Bin; Yang, Chia-Ju; Chia, Jean-San

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms that underlie valvular inflammation in streptococcus-induced infective endocarditis (IE) remain unclear. We previously demonstrated that streptococcal glucosyltransferases (GTFs) can activate human heart valvular interstitial cells (VIC) to secrete interleukin-6 (IL-6), a cytokine involved in T helper 17 (Th17) cell differentiation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that activated VIC can enhance neutrophil infiltration through sustained IL-17 production, leading to valvular damage. To monitor cytokine and chemokine production, leukocyte recruitment, and the induction or expansion of CD4(+) CD45RA(-) CD25(-) CCR6(+) Th17 cells, primary human VIC were cultured in vitro and activated by GTFs. Serum cytokine levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and neutrophils and Th17 cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in infected valves from patients with IE. The expression of IL-21, IL-23, IL-17, and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor C (Rorc) was upregulated in GTF-activated VIC, which may enhance the proliferation of memory Th17 cells in an IL-6-dependent manner. Many chemokines, including chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), were upregulated in GTF-activated VIC, which might recruit neutrophils and CD4(+) T cells. Moreover, CXCL1 production in VIC was induced in a dose-dependent manner by IL-17 to enhance neutrophil chemotaxis. CXCL1-expressing VIC and infiltrating neutrophils could be detected in infected valves, and serum concentrations of IL-17, IL-21, and IL-23 were increased in patients with IE compared to healthy donors. Furthermore, elevated serum IL-21 levels have been significantly associated with severe valvular damage, including rupture of chordae tendineae, in IE patients. Our findings suggest that VIC are activated by bacterial modulins to recruit neutrophils and that such activities might be further enhanced by the production of Th17-associated cytokines. Together, these factors can amplify

  12. An Infection-enhanced Oncolytic Adenovirus Secreting H. pylori Neutrophil-activating Protein with Therapeutic Effects on Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Mohanraj; Yu, Di; Wanders, Alkwin; Essand, Magnus; Eriksson, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is a major virulence factor involved in H. pylori infection. HP-NAP can mediate antitumor effects by recruiting neutrophils and inducing Th1-type differentiation in the tumor microenvironment. It therefore holds strong potential as a therapeutic gene. Here, we armed a replication-selective, infection-enhanced adenovirus with secretory HP-NAP, Ad5PTDf35-[Δ24-sNAP], and evaluated its therapeutic efficacy against neuroendocrine tumors. We observed that it could specifically infect and eradicate a wide range of tumor cells lines from different origin in vitro. Insertion of secretory HP-NAP did not affect the stability or replicative capacity of the virus and infected tumor cells could efficiently secrete HP-NAP. Intratumoral administration of the virus in nude mice xenografted with neuroendocrine tumors improved median survival. Evidence of biological HP-NAP activity was observed 24 hours after treatment with neutrophil infiltration in tumors and an increase of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and MIP2-α in the systemic circulation. Furthermore, evidence of Th1-type immune polarization was observed as a result of increase in IL-12/23 p40 cytokine concentrations 72 hours postvirus administration. Our observations suggest that HP-NAP can serve as a potent immunomodulator in promoting antitumor immune response in the tumor microenvironment and enhance the therapeutic effect of oncolytic adenovirus. PMID:23817216

  13. Neutrophil ageing is regulated by the microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dachuan; Chen, Grace; Manwani, Deepa; Mortha, Arthur; Xu, Chunliang; Faith, Jeremiah J.; Burk, Robert D.; Kunisaki, Yuya; Jang, Jung-Eun; Scheiermann, Christoph; Merad, Miriam; Frenette, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils provide immune protection against pathogens but also may promote tissue injury in inflammatory diseases1,2. Although neutrophils are generally considered as a relatively homogeneous population, evidence for heterogeneity is emerging3,4. Under steady-state conditions, neutrophil heterogeneity may arise from ageing and the replenishment by newly released neutrophils from the bone marrow5. Aged neutrophils up-regulate CXCR4, a receptor allowing their clearance in the bone marrow6,7, with feedback inhibition of neutrophil production via the IL17/G-CSF axis8, and rhythmic modulation of the haematopoietic stem cell niche5. The aged subset also expresses low levels of L-selectin (CD62L)5,9. Previous studies have suggested that in vitro-aged neutrophils exhibit impaired migration and reduced pro-inflammatory properties6,10. Here, we show using in vivo ageing analyses that the neutrophil pro-inflammatory activity correlates positively with their ageing in the circulation. Aged neutrophils represent an overly active subset exhibiting enhanced αMβ2 integrin (Mac-1) activation and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation under inflammatory conditions. Neutrophil ageing is driven by the microbiota via Toll-like receptors (TLRs)- and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (Myd88)-mediated signalling pathways. Depletion of the microbiota significantly reduces the number of circulating aged neutrophils and dramatically improves the pathogenesis and inflammation-related organ damage in models of sickle cell disease or endotoxin-induced septic shock. These results thus identify an unprecedented role for the microbiota in regulating a disease-promoting neutrophil subset. PMID:26374999

  14. Enhanced neutrophil activity is associated with shorter time to tumor progression in glioblastoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Afsar; Cederarv, Madeleine; Wolmer-Solberg, Nina; Tammik, Charlotte; Stragliotto, Giuseppe; Peredo, Inti; Fornara, Olesja; Xu, Xinling; Dzabic, Mensur; Taher, Chato; Skarman, Petra; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly malignant tumor with a poor outcome that is often positive for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). GBM patients often have excessive numbers of neutrophils and macrophages near and within the tumor. Here, we characterized the cytokine patterns in the blood of GBM patients with and without Valganciclovir treatment. Furthermore, we determined whether neutrophil activation is related to HCMV status and patient outcome. Blood samples for analyses of cytokines and growth factors were collected from 42 GBM patients at the time of diagnosis (n = 42) and at weeks 12 and 24 after surgery. Blood neutrophils of 28 GBM patients were examined for CD11b expression. The levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines—including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-17A, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, interferon-γ, interferon-α, tumor necrosis factor α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1were analyzed with a bead-based flow cytometry assay. During the first six months after surgery, neutrophil activity was increased in 12 patients and was unchanged or decreased in 16. Patients with increased neutrophil activity had enhanced IL-12p70, high grade HCMV and a shorter time to tumor progression (TTP) than patients without or decreased neutrophil activity (median TTP; 5.4 vs. 12 months, 95% confidence interval; 1.6–10 vs. 0.1–0.6, hazard ratio = 3 vs. 0.4, p = 0.004). The levels of IL-12p70 were significantly decreased in Valganciclovir treated patients (n = 22, T 12W vs. T 24W, p = 0.03). In conclusion, our findings suggest that neutrophil activation is an early sign of tumor progression in GBM patients. PMID:27057448

  15. Activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in human neutrophils by Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Figueroa, Erandi; Torres, Javier; Sánchez-Zauco, Norma; Contreras-Ramos, Alejandra; Alvarez-Arellano, Lourdes; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen

    2016-02-01

    TLRs and NLRs participate in the immune system recognition of Helicobacter pylori. However, little is known about the mechanisms leading to inflammasome activation by H. pylori and if NLRs in neutrophils are involved in the process. We studied how NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome components are involved in IL-1β maturation in human neutrophils in response to the infection and if they are dependent on T4SS (type IV secretion system) and TLRs. Human neutrophils were cultured and infected with the 26695 or the VirD4- H. pylori strains; the IL-1β concentration was analyzed by ELISA, and we also evaluated the activation of TLRs 2 and 4. The infection of neutrophils with both strains of H. pylori induced production of IL-1β and expression of the NLRP3 inflammasome components such as apoptosis-associated speck-like protein with CARD domain and NLRP3 protein. The infection also increased the activity of caspase-1, which is required for the maturation of IL-1β. Our study shows, for the first time, that H. pylori infection induces the expression and activation of components of NLRP3 inflammasomes in human neutrophils and that the activation is independent of a functional T4SS and TLR2 and TLR4. PMID:26610398

  16. Neutrophil elastase mediates acute pathogenesis and is a determinant of long-term behavioral recovery after traumatic injury to the immature brain

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Bridgette D; Trivedi, Alpa; Gimlin, Kayleen; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    While neutrophil elastase (NE), released by activated neutrophils, is a key mediator of secondary pathogenesis in adult models of brain ischemia and spinal cord injury, no studies to date have examined this protease in the context of the injured immature brain, where there is notable vulnerability resulting from inadequate antioxidant reserves and prolonged exposure to infiltrating neutrophils. We thus reasoned that NE may be a key determinant of secondary pathogenesis, and as such, adversely influence long-term neurological recovery. To address this hypothesis, wild-type (WT) and NE knockout (KO) mice were subjected to a controlled cortical impact at post-natal day 21, approximating a toddler-aged child. To determine if NE is required for neutrophil infiltration into the injured brain, and whether this protease contributes to vasogenic edema, we quantified neutrophil numbers and measured water content in the brains of each of these genotypes. While leukocyte trafficking was indistinguishable between genotypes, vasogenic edema was markedly attenuated in the NE KO. To determine if early pathogenesis is dependent on NE, indices of cell death (TUNEL and activated caspase-3) were quantified across genotypes. NE KO mice showed a reduction in these markers of cell death in the injured hippocampus, which corresponded to greater preservation of neuronal integrity as well as reduced expression of heme oxygenase-1, a marker of oxidative stress. WT mice, treated with a competitive inhibitor of NE at 2, 6 and 12 h post-injury, likewise showed a reduction in cell death and oxidative stress compared to vehicle-treated controls. We next examined the long-term behavioral and structural consequences of NE deficiency. NE KO mice showed an improvement in long-term spatial memory retention and amelioration of injury-induced hyperactivity. However, volumetric and stereological analyses found comparable tissue loss in the injured cortex and hippocampus independent of genotype. Further

  17. Neutrophil elastase mediates acute pathogenesis and is a determinant of long-term behavioral recovery after traumatic injury to the immature brain.

    PubMed

    Semple, Bridgette D; Trivedi, Alpa; Gimlin, Kayleen; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J

    2015-02-01

    While neutrophil elastase (NE), released by activated neutrophils, is a key mediator of secondary pathogenesis in adult models of brain ischemia and spinal cord injury, no studies to date have examined this protease in the context of the injured immature brain, where there is notable vulnerability resulting from inadequate antioxidant reserves and prolonged exposure to infiltrating neutrophils. We thus reasoned that NE may be a key determinant of secondary pathogenesis, and as such, adversely influence long-term neurological recovery. To address this hypothesis, wild-type (WT) and NE knockout (KO) mice were subjected to a controlled cortical impact at post-natal day 21, approximating a toddler-aged child. To determine if NE is required for neutrophil infiltration into the injured brain, and whether this protease contributes to vasogenic edema, we quantified neutrophil numbers and measured water content in the brains of each of these genotypes. While leukocyte trafficking was indistinguishable between genotypes, vasogenic edema was markedly attenuated in the NE KO. To determine if early pathogenesis is dependent on NE, indices of cell death (TUNEL and activated caspase-3) were quantified across genotypes. NE KO mice showed a reduction in these markers of cell death in the injured hippocampus, which corresponded to greater preservation of neuronal integrity as well as reduced expression of heme oxygenase-1, a marker of oxidative stress. WT mice, treated with a competitive inhibitor of NE at 2, 6 and 12h post-injury, likewise showed a reduction in cell death and oxidative stress compared to vehicle-treated controls. We next examined the long-term behavioral and structural consequences of NE deficiency. NE KO mice showed an improvement in long-term spatial memory retention and amelioration of injury-induced hyperactivity. However, volumetric and stereological analyses found comparable tissue loss in the injured cortex and hippocampus independent of genotype. Further

  18. Diminished nitric oxide generation from neutrophils suppresses platelet activation in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Abrantes, Daniele C; Brunini, Tatiana M C; Matsuura, Cristiane; Mury, Wanda Vianna; Corrêa, Carolina R; Santos, Sérgio F; Ormonde do Carmo, Monique B O; Mendes-Ribeiro, Antônio Cláudio

    2015-03-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is a complex clinical condition associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and thrombosis leading to cardiovascular events. The aim of this study was to investigate in detail the NO pathway in neutrophils obtained from hemodialysis patients and its association with platelet function and oxidative status. Fifteen CRF patients on hemodialysis and fifteen controls were included in this study. Laboratory and experimental evaluations were performed after hemodialysis in CRF patients. We evaluated L-[³H] arginine transport, NO synthase (NOS) activity, amino acid concentration in neutrophils, and expressions of NOS isoforms and p47(phox) by western blotting. Platelet aggregation was analyzed in the presence or absence of neutrophils. Oxidative status was measured through glutathione peroxidase, catalase activities, protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation, and DNA/RNA oxidation in serum. Basal NOS activity (pmol/10⁶ cells/min) was impaired in CRF patients on hemodialysis (0.33 ± 0.17) compared to controls (0.65 ± 0.12), whereas the expression of NOS isoforms remained unaltered. L-Arginine transport into neutrophils was similar in CRF patients on hemodialysis and controls. In addition, intracellular concentration of L-arginine was increased fourfold in the patient group. Systemic oxidative stress markers were not affected by CRF. On the other hand, NADPH oxidase subunit p47(phox) in neutrophils was overexpressed in CRF. In the presence of neutrophils, there was a reduction time-dependent in platelet aggregation in both groups with no difference between them. This data suggest that reduced basal generation of NO by neutrophils in CRF patients on hemodialysis occurs independently of L-arginine bioavailability and is able to suppress platelet activation. PMID:25524601

  19. Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 in Neutrophil Activation and Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Michalick, Laura; Tang, Christine; Tabuchi, Arata; Goldenberg, Neil; Dan, Qinghong; Awwad, Khader; Wang, Liming; Erfinanda, Lasti; Nouailles, Geraldine; Witzenrath, Martin; Vogelzang, Alexis; Lv, Lu; Lee, Warren L; Zhang, Haibo; Rotstein, Ori; Kapus, Andras; Szaszi, Katalin; Fleming, Ingrid; Liedtke, Wolfgang B; Kuppe, Hermann; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2016-03-01

    The cation channel transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 4 is expressed in endothelial and immune cells; however, its role in acute lung injury (ALI) is unclear. The functional relevance of TRPV4 was assessed in vivo, in isolated murine lungs, and in isolated neutrophils. Genetic deficiency of TRPV4 attenuated the functional, histological, and inflammatory hallmarks of acid-induced ALI. Similar protection was obtained with prophylactic administration of the TRPV4 inhibitor, GSK2193874; however, therapeutic administration of the TRPV4 inhibitor, HC-067047, after ALI induction had no beneficial effect. In isolated lungs, platelet-activating factor (PAF) increased vascular permeability in lungs perfused with trpv4(+/+) more than with trpv4(-/-) blood, independent of lung genotype, suggesting a contribution of TRPV4 on blood cells to lung vascular barrier failure. In neutrophils, TRPV4 inhibition or deficiency attenuated the PAF-induced increase in intracellular calcium. PAF induced formation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids by neutrophils, which, in turn, stimulated TRPV4-dependent Ca(2+) signaling, whereas inhibition of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid formation inhibited the Ca(2+) response to PAF. TRPV4 deficiency prevented neutrophil responses to proinflammatory stimuli, including the formation of reactive oxygen species, neutrophil adhesion, and chemotaxis, putatively due to reduced activation of Rac. In chimeric mice, however, the majority of protective effects in acid-induced ALI were attributable to genetic deficiency of TRPV4 in parenchymal tissue, whereas TRPV4 deficiency in circulating blood cells primarily reduced lung myeloperoxidase activity. Our findings identify TRPV4 as novel regulator of neutrophil activation and suggest contributions of both parenchymal and neutrophilic TRPV4 in the pathophysiology of ALI. PMID:26222277

  20. Interleukin-27 (IL-27) Mediates Susceptibility to Visceral Leishmaniasis by Suppressing the IL-17-Neutrophil Response.

    PubMed

    Quirino, Gustavo F S; Nascimento, Manuela S L; Davoli-Ferreira, Marcela; Sacramento, Lais A; Lima, Mikhael H F; Almeida, Roque P; Carregaro, Vanessa; Silva, João Santana

    2016-08-01

    The relationship established between Leishmania infantum and the vertebrate host can lead to a self-healing infection or to the manifestation of visceral leishmaniasis, a chronic systemic infection associated with high rates of mortality. We hypothesized that regulatory cytokines, such as interleukin-27 (IL-27), play a role in susceptibility to L. infantum infection. IL-27 is a heterodimeric cytokine composed of IL-27p28 and EBi3 subunits which, when combined, bind to IL-27R, leading to STAT-1 and -3 activation, playing a role in the regulation of the immune response. We observed in this work that IL-27 regulates the Th1/Th17 profiles in a mouse model of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by L. infantum We showed here that the pathogen recognition by endosomal Toll-like receptors triggers a type I interferon (IFN) response, which acts through the type I IFN receptor and interferon regulatory factor 1 to induce IL-27 production by macrophages. Furthermore, IL-27 plays a major regulatory role in vivo, because Ebi3(-/-) mice can efficiently control parasite replication despite reduced levels of IFN-γ compared to wild-type mice. On the other hand, the absence of Ebi3 leads to exacerbated IL-17A production in the infected organs as well as in a coculture system, suggesting a direct regulatory action of IL-27 during L. infantum infection. As a consequence of exacerbated IL-17A in Ebi3(-/-) mice, a greater neutrophil influx was observed in the target organs, playing a role in parasite control. Thus, this work unveiled the molecular steps of IL-27 production after L. infantum infection and demonstrated its regulatory role in the IL-17A-neutrophil axis. PMID:27245409

  1. Cxcl8 (Interleukin-8) mediates neutrophil recruitment and behavior in the zebrafish inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Sofia; Reyes-Aldasoro, Constantino C.; Candel, Sergio; Renshaw, Stephen A.; Mulero, Victoriano; Calado, Ângelo

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils play a pivotal role in the innate immune response. The small cytokine CXCL8 (also known as interleukin-8 or IL-8) is known to be one of the most potent chemoattractant molecules which, among several other functions, is responsible for guiding neutrophils through the tissue matrix until they reach sites of injury. Unlike mice and rats that lack a CXCL8 homologue, zebrafish has two distinct CXCL8 homologues: Cxcl8-l1 and Cxcl8-l2. Cxcl8-l1 is known to be up-regulated under inflammatory conditions caused by bacterial or chemical insult but until now, the role of Cxcl8s in neutrophil recruitment has not been studied. Here, we show that both Cxcl8 genes are up-regulated in response to an acute inflammatory stimulus, and that both are crucial for normal neutrophil recruitment to the wound and normal resolution of inflammation. Additionally, we have analyzed neutrophil migratory behavior through tissues to the site of injury in vivo, using open-access phagocyte tracking software, PhagoSight. Surprisingly, we observed that in the absence of these chemokines, the speed of the neutrophils migrating to the wound was significantly increased in comparison to control neutrophils, although the directionality was not affected. Our analysis suggests that zebrafish may possess a sub-population of neutrophils whose recruitment to inflamed areas occurs independently of Cxcl8 chemokines. Moreover, we report that Cxcl8-l2 signaled through Cxcr2 for inducing neutrophil recruitment. Our study, therefore, confirms the zebrafish as an excellent in vivo model to shed light on the roles of CXCL8 in neutrophil biology. PMID:23509368

  2. Curcumin increases gelatinase activity in human neutrophils by a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Francis; Girard, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin has been found to possess anti-inflammatory activities and neutrophils, key players in inflammation, were previously found to be important targets to curcumin in a few studies. For example, curcumin was found to induce apoptosis in neutrophils by a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent mechanism. However, the role of curcumin on the biology of neutrophils is still poorly defined. To study the role of curcumin on neutrophil degranulation and to determine the role of p38 MAPK, human neutrophils were freshly isolated from healthy individuals and incubated in vitro with curcumin. Degranulation was studied at three levels: surface expression of granule markers by flow cytometry; release of matrix metallopeptidase-9 (MMP-9 or gelatinase B) enzyme into supernatants by Western blot; and gelatinase B activity by zymography. Activation of p38 MAPK was studied by monitoring its tyrosine phosphorylation levels by western blot and its role by the utilization of a pharmacological inhibitor. The results indicate that curcumin increased the cell surface expression of CD35 (secretory vesicle), CD63 (azurophilic granules), and CD66b (gelatinase granules) in neutrophils. Also, curcumin increased the release and enzymatic activity of gelatinase B in the extracellular milieu and activated p38 MAP kinase in these cells. However, in contrast to fMLP, curcumin-induced enzymatic activity and secretion of gelatinase B were not reversed by use of a p38 inhibitor. Finally, it was found that curcumin was able to enhance phagocytosis. Taken together, the results here demonstrate that curcumin induced degranulation in human neutrophils and that the increased gelatinase activity is not dependent on p38 MAPK activation. Therefore, degranulation is another human neutrophil function that could be modulated by curcumin, as well as phagocytosis. PMID:24926560

  3. Noninvasive In Vivo Quantification of Neutrophil Elastase Activity in Acute Experimental Mouse Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kossodo, Sylvie; Zhang, Jun; Groves, Kevin; Cuneo, Garry J.; Handy, Emma; Morin, Jeff; Delaney, Jeannine; Yared, Wael; Rajopadhye, Milind; Peterson, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a neutrophil elastase-specific near-infrared fluorescence imaging agent, which, combined with fluorescence molecular tomographic imaging, allowed us to detect and quantify neutrophil elastase activity in vivo, in real time, and noninvasively in an acute model of lung injury (ALI). Significantly higher fluorescent signal was quantified in mice with LPS/fMLP-induced ALI as compared to healthy controls, correlating with increases in the number of bronchoalveolar lavage cells, neutrophils, and elastase activity. The agent was significantly activated ex vivo in lung sections from ALI but not from control mice, and this activation was ablated by the specific inhibitor sivelestat. Treatment with the specific inhibitor sivelestat significantly reduced lung signal in mice with ALI. These results underscore the unique ability of fluorescence molecular imaging to quantify specific molecular processes in vivo, crucial for understanding the mechanisms underlying disease progression and for assessing and monitoring novel pharmacological interventions. PMID:21941648

  4. Wortmannin and 1-butanol block activation of a novel family of protein kinases in neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ding, J; Badwey, J A

    1994-07-11

    Neutrophils contain four uncharacterized protein kinases with molecular masses of ca. 69, 63, 49 and 40 kDa that are rapidly activated upon stimulation of these cells with the chemoattractant fMet-Leu-Phe [Ding, J. and Badwey, J.A. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 17326-17333]. We now report that wortmannin and 1-butanol block activation of all four of these kinases. These reagents are known to inhibit superoxide generation in neutrophils stimulated with this agonist. Wortmannin inhibits phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and blocks activation of phospholipase D, whereas 1-butanol can reduce the generation of phosphatidate in cells by serving as a substrate for phospholipase D. These data suggest that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and phospholipase D may be involved in the activation of several novel protein kinases in neutrophils and that one or more of these kinases is/are involved in superoxide release. PMID:8034030

  5. Activity determination, kinetic analyses and isoenzyme identification of gamma glutamyltransferase in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Sener, Azize; Yardimci, Turay

    2005-05-31

    Gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT, EC 2.3.2.2) which hydrolyzes glutathione (GSH), is required for the maintenance of normal intracellular GSH concentration. GGT is a membrane enzyme present in leukocytes and platelets. Its activity has also been observed in human neutrophils. In this study, GGT was purified from Triton X-100 solubilized neutrophils and its kinetic parameters were determined. For kinetic analyses of transpeptidation reaction, gamma-glutamyl p-nitroanilide was used as the substrate and glycylglycine as the acceptor. Apparent K(m) values were determined as 1.8 mM for gamma-glutamyl p-nitroanilide and 16.9 mM for glycylglycine. The optimum pH of GGT activity was 8.2 and the optimum temperature was 37 degrees C. It had thermal stability with 58 % relative activity at 56 degrees C for 30 min incubation. L-serine, in the presence of borate, was detected as the competitive inhibitor. Bromcresol green inhibited neutrophil GGT activity as a noncompetitive inhibitor. The neutrophils seem to contain only the isoenzyme that is present in platelets. We characterized the kinetic properties and compared the type of the isoenzyme of neutrophil GGT with platelet GGT via polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) under a standard set of conditions. PMID:15943911

  6. The LPS-induced neutrophil recruitment into rat air pouches is mediated by TNFα: likely macrophage origin

    PubMed Central

    Arreto, C-D.; Dumarey, C.; Nahori, M-A.; Vargaftig, B. B.

    1997-01-01

    The role of resident cells during the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neutrophil recruitment into rat air pouches was investigated. In this model, LPS (Escherichia coli, O55: B5 strain; 2–2000 ng) induced a dose– and time-dependent neutrophil recruitment accompanied by the generation of a tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα)-like activity. Dexamethasone (0.05–5 mug) and cycloheximide (6 ng), injected 2 h before LPS into the pouches, inhibited the neutrophil recruitment and the generation of the TNFα-like activity, while the H1-receptor antagonist mepyramine (1 and 4 mg/kg, i.p., 0.5 h before LPS) and the PAF-receptor antagonist WEB 2170 (0.05 and 1 mg/kg, i.p., 0.5 h before LPS) had no effect. Purified alveolar macrophages (AM) were used to replenish the pouches of cycloheximide-treated recipient rats. AM provided by PBS-treated animals led to the recovery of the LPS-induced neutrophil recruitment and of the TNFα-like formation contrasting with those from cycloheximide-treated animals (1 mg/kg, i.p.). When delivered in situ, liposome-encapsulated clodronate, a macrophage depletor, significantly impaired both the LPSinduced neutrophil recruitment and the TNFα-like activity. An anti-murine TNFα polyclonal antibody (0.5 h before LPS) was also effective. These results emphasize the pivotal role of macrophages for LPS-induced neutrophil recruitment via the formation of TNFα. PMID:18472868

  7. Proteinase 3–dependent caspase-3 cleavage modulates neutrophil death and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Loison, Fabien; Zhu, Haiyan; Karatepe, Kutay; Kasorn, Anongnard; Liu, Peng; Ye, Keqiang; Zhou, Jiaxi; Cao, Shannan; Gong, Haiyan; Jenne, Dieter E.; Remold-O’Donnell, Eileen; Xu, Yuanfu; Luo, Hongbo R.

    2014-01-01

    Caspase-3–mediated spontaneous death in neutrophils is a prototype of programmed cell death and is critical for modulating physiopathological inflammatory responses; however, the underlying regulatory pathways remain ill defined. Here we determined that in aging neutrophils, the cleavage and activation of caspase-3 is independent of the canonical caspase-8– or caspase-9–mediated pathway. Instead, caspase-3 activation was mediated by serine protease proteinase 3 (PR3), which is present in the cytosol of aging neutrophils. Specifically, PR3 cleaved procaspase-3 at a site upstream of the canonical caspase-9 cleavage site. In mature neutrophils, PR3 was sequestered in granules and released during aging via lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP), leading to procaspase-3 cleavage and apoptosis. Pharmacological inhibition or knockdown of PR3 delayed neutrophil death in vitro and consistently delayed neutrophil death and augmented neutrophil accumulation at sites of inflammation in a murine model of peritonitis. Adoptive transfer of both WT and PR3-deficient neutrophils revealed that the delayed death of neutrophils lacking PR3 is due to an altered intrinsic apoptosis/survival pathway, rather than the inflammatory microenvironment. The presence of the suicide protease inhibitor SERPINB1 counterbalanced the protease activity of PR3 in aging neutrophils, and deletion of Serpinb1 accelerated neutrophil death. Taken together, our results reveal that PR3-mediated caspase-3 activation controls neutrophil spontaneous death. PMID:25180606

  8. Mast cells mediate neutrophil recruitment and vascular leakage through the NLRP3 inflammasome in histamine-independent urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yuumi; Saito, Megumu; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Kim, Yun-Gi; Murakami, Makoto; Núñez, Gabriel; Matsue, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Urticarial rash observed in cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) caused by nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain–leucine-rich repeats containing pyrin domain 3 (NLRP3) mutations is effectively suppressed by anti–interleukin (IL)-1 treatment, suggesting a pathophysiological role of IL-1β in the skin. However, the cellular mechanisms regulating IL-1β production in the skin of CAPS patients remain unclear. We identified mast cells (MCs) as the main cell population responsible for IL-1β production in the skin of CAPS patients. Unlike normal MCs that required stimulation with proinflammatory stimuli for IL-1β production, resident MCs from CAPS patients constitutively produced IL-1β. Primary MCs expressed inflammasome components and secreted IL-1β via NLRP3 and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain when stimulated with microbial stimuli known to activate caspase-1. Furthermore, MCs expressing disease-associated but not wild-type NLRP3 secreted IL-1β and induced neutrophil migration and vascular leakage, the histological hallmarks of urticarial rash, when transplanted into mouse skin. Our findings implicate MCs as IL-1β producers in the skin and mediators of histamine-independent urticaria through the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:19364881

  9. Endothelial cell activation leads to neutrophil transmigration as supported by the sequential roles of ICAM-2, JAM-A, and PECAM-1.

    PubMed

    Woodfin, Abigail; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; Imhof, Beat A; Dejana, Elisabetta; Engelhardt, Britta; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2009-06-11

    Leukocyte transmigration is mediated by endothelial cell (EC) junctional molecules, but the associated mechanisms remain unclear. Here we investigate how intercellular adhesion molecule-2 (ICAM-2), junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A), and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) mediate neutrophil transmigration in a stimulus-dependent manner (eg, as induced by interleukin-1beta [IL-1beta] but not tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-alpha]), and demonstrate their ability to act in sequence. Using a cell-transfer technique, transmigration responses of wild-type and TNF-alpha p55/p75 receptor-deficient leukocytes (TNFR(-/-)) through mouse cremasteric venules were quantified by fluorescence intravital microscopy. Whereas wild-type leukocytes showed a normal transmigration response to TNF-alpha in ICAM-2(-/-), JAM-A(-/-), and PECAM-1(-/-) recipient mice, TNFR(-/-) leukocytes exhibited a reduced transmigration response. Hence, when the ability of TNF-alpha to directly stimulate neutrophils is blocked, TNF-alpha-induced neutrophil transmigration is rendered dependent on ICAM-2, JAM-A, and PECAM-1, suggesting that the stimulus-dependent role of these molecules is governed by the target cell being activated. Furthermore, analysis of the site of arrest of neutrophils in inflamed tissues from ICAM-2(-/-), JAM-A(-/-), and PECAM-1(-/-) mice demonstrated that these molecules act sequentially to mediate transmigration. Collectively, the findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms of action of key molecules implicated in leukocyte transmigration. PMID:19211506

  10. The Matricellular Protein CCN1 Mediates Neutrophil Efferocytosis in Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Joon-Il; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Lau, Lester F.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil infiltration constitutes the first step in wound healing, although their timely clearance by macrophage engulfment, or efferocytosis, is critical for efficient tissue repair. However, the specific mechanism for neutrophil clearance in wound healing remains undefined. Here we uncover a key role for CCN1 in neutrophil efferocytosis by acting as a bridging molecule that binds phosphatidylserine, the “eat-me” signal on apoptotic cells, and integrins αvβ3/αvβ5 in macrophages to trigger efferocytosis. Both knockin mice expressing a mutant CCN1 that is unable to bind αvβ3/αvβ5 and mice with Ccn1 knockdown are defective in neutrophil efferocytosis, resulting in exuberant neutrophil accumulation and delayed healing. Treatment of wounds with CCN1 accelerates neutrophil clearance in both Ccn1 knockin mice and diabetic Leprdb/db mice, which suffer from neutrophil persistence and impaired healing. These findings establish CCN1 as a critical opsonin in skin injury and suggest a therapeutic potential for CCN1 in certain types of non-healing wounds. PMID:26077348

  11. Effects of Neutrophils on Cefazolin Activity and Penicillin-Binding Proteins in Staphylococcus aureus Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Bamberger, David M.; Herndon, Betty L.; Fitch, Jeffrey; Florkowski, Aaron; Parkhurst, Vera

    2002-01-01

    Bacteria survive within abscesses despite antimicrobial therapy, usually necessitating drainage. Our previous work showed that bacterial killing is diminished within the neutrophils of animals with abscesses. To further assess the role of neutrophils in Staphylococcus aureus survival and the poor activities of β-lactams in abscesses, tissue cage abscess-bearing rats were given polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN)-depleting antibody prior to and several times following inoculation of the tissue cages with S. aureus. Cefazolin (300 mg/kg of body weight/day) was administered to all animals in appropriately divided doses. After 7 days of antimicrobial therapy, the 17 animals that received anti-PMN serum had significantly fewer abscess neutrophils than the 18 controls and fewer abscess bacteria (5.55 versus 3.79 log10 CFU/ml [P = 0.04]) than the 18 controls. The data were consistent with the premise that cefazolin is more effective in abscesses depleted of neutrophils. To investigate further, S. aureus was incubated with rat peritoneal neutrophils; and bacterial cell membrane proteins were isolated, labeled with biotinylated ampicillin, separated by electrophoresis, blotted onto nitrocellulose, and stained for biotin reactivity. PBP 2 expression was consistently and significantly decreased after a brief, nonkilling PMN exposure. These experiments showed that PMN depletion enhanced the activity of cefazolin in the abscess milieu. Furthermore, altered bacterial cell wall cefazolin targets may be the mechanism by which the PMN diminishes antimicrobial activity, suggesting the importance of the staphylococcus-PMN interaction in the outcome of established infections. PMID:12183241

  12. Neutrophils counteract autophagy-mediated anti-inflammatory mechanisms in alveolar macrophage: role in posthemorrhagic shock acute lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zongmei; Fan, Liyan; Li, Yuehua; Zou, Zui; Scott, Melanie J; Xiao, Guozhi; Li, Song; Billiar, Timothy R; Wilson, Mark A; Shi, Xueyin; Fan, Jie

    2014-11-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major component of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome after hemorrhagic shock (HS) resulting from major surgery and trauma. The increased susceptibility in HS patients to the development of ALI suggests not yet fully elucidated mechanisms that enhance proinflammatory responses and/or suppress anti-inflammatory responses in the lung. Alveolar macrophages (AMϕ) are at the center of the pathogenesis of ALI after HS. We have previously reported that HS-activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) interact with macrophages to influence inflammation progress. In this study, we explore a novel function of PMNs regulating AMϕ anti-inflammatory mechanisms involving autophagy. Using a mouse "two-hit" model of HS/resuscitation followed by intratracheal injection of muramyl dipeptide, we demonstrate that HS initiates high mobility group box 1/TLR4 signaling, which upregulates NOD2 expression in AMϕ and sensitizes them to subsequent NOD2 ligand muramyl dipeptide to augment lung inflammation. In addition, upregulated NOD2 signaling induces autophagy in AMϕ, which negatively regulates lung inflammation through feedback suppression of NOD2-RIP2 signaling and inflammasome activation. Importantly, we further demonstrate that HS-activated PMNs that migrate in alveoli counteract the anti-inflammatory effect of autophagy in AMϕ, possibly through NAD(P)H oxidase-mediated signaling to enhance I-κB kinase γ phosphorylation, NF-κB activation, and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain protein 3 inflammasome activation, and therefore augment post-HS lung inflammation. These findings explore a previously unidentified complexity in the mechanisms of ALI, which involves cell-cell interaction and receptor cross talk. PMID:25267975

  13. Bruton’s Tyrosine Kinase Mediates FcγRIIa/Toll-Like Receptor–4 Receptor Crosstalk in Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Krupa, Agnieszka; Fudala, Rafal; Florence, Jon M.; Tucker, Torry; Allen, Timothy C.; Standiford, Theodore J.; Luchowski, Rafal; Fol, Marek; Rahman, Moshiur; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2013-01-01

    Previous observations by our laboratory indicate that the presence of anti–IL-8 autoantibody:IL-8 immune complexes in lung fluids from patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) comprises an important prognostic indicator in the development and ultimate outcome of ALI/ARDS. We also showed that these complexes display proinflammatory activity toward neutrophils through the engagement of FcγRIIa receptors. Because sepsis is one of the most common risk factors for ALI/ARDS, the initial goal of our present study involved investigating the effects of LPS on the expression of FcγRIIa receptors in neutrophils. Our results indicate that LPS triggers an increase in the expression of FcγRIIa on the neutrophil surface, which leads to shortening of the molecular distance between FcγRIIa and Toll-like receptor–4 (TLR4). When such neutrophils are stimulated with anti–IL-8:IL-8 complexes, the TLR4 cascade becomes activated via the engagement of FcγRIIa. The underlying molecular mechanism has been subsequently examined and involves Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk). In conclusion, our study reveals the existence of Btk-dependent molecular cooperation between FcγRIIa and TLR4 signaling cascades in LPS-“primed” human neutrophils. Furthermore, we used fluorescence lifetime imaging to study the interactions between TLR4 and FcγRIIa in human alveolar neutrophils from patients with ALI/ARDS. The results from these experiments confirm the existence of the molecular cooperation between TLR4 and FcγRIIa. PMID:23239500

  14. Monoclonal antibodies to antigens on human neutrophils, activated T lymphocytes, and acute leukemia blast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miterev, G.Yu.; Burova, G.F.; Puzhitskaya, M.S.; Danilevich, S.V.; Bulycheva, T.I.

    1987-11-01

    The authors describe the production of two mouse hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies to antigenic determinants of the surface membranes of human neutrophils, activated T lymphocytes, and acute leukemic blast cells. The degree of lymphocyte stimulation was estimated from incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine with parallel microculture. Monoclonal antibodies of supernatants of hybridoma cultures shown here reacted in both immunofluorescence test and cytotoxicity test with surface membrane antigens on the majority of neutrophils and PHA-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy subjects, but did not give positive reactions with unactivated lymphocytes, adherent monocytes, erythrocytes, and alloantigen-stimulated lymphocytes.

  15. Evaluation of endotoxin (LPS) activity in bovine blood using neutrophil dependent chemiluminescence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of a neutrophil chemiluminescence-based assay for the measurement of LPS stimulatory activity in bovine whole blood. The assay is based on the capacity for LPS to trigger the respiratory oxidative burst activity (RBA) of autologous neutroph...

  16. The physiological role and pharmacological potential of nitric oxide in neutrophil activation.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, R

    2001-08-01

    There is contention over whether human neutrophils produce physiologically significant levels of nitric oxide (NO) during inflammatory reactions. Nevertheless, regardless of its cell source, NO does exert regulatory effects on neutrophil function. Depending on experimental conditions, NO can either inhibit or enhance neutrophil activation, in both cases probably acting through cyclic GMP. The explanation for these apparently contradictory findings may be that the effect depends upon the concentration of NO: low concentrations of NO being stimulatory and high concentrations inhibitory. Nitrite, produced at high concentrations from NO during inflammation, can react with neutrophil myeloperoxidase-derived hypochlorous acid (HOCl) to form the active oxidant nitryl chloride, a species capable of nitrating tyrosine and tyrosyl residues on proteins. Whether nitryl chloride acts to limit or amplify the oxidant effects of myeloperoxidase is not yet clear, although formation of nitrotyrosine has been linked with nitration of phagocytosed bacteria. Clearly, a better understanding of the inflammatory effects of NO on neutrophils is needed before the therapeutic potential of NO donors or inhibitors in inflammation can be realised. PMID:11515815

  17. Chromatin remodelling and autocrine TNFα are required for optimal interleukin-6 expression in activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Maili; Aguilera, Francisco Bianchetto; Castellucci, Monica; Rossato, Marzia; Costa, Sara; Lunardi, Claudio; Ostuni, Renato; Girolomoni, Giampiero; Natoli, Gioacchino; Bazzoni, Flavia; Tamassia, Nicola; Cassatella, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    Controversy currently exists about the ability of human neutrophils to produce IL-6. Here, we show that the chromatin organization of the IL-6 genomic locus in human neutrophils is constitutively kept in an inactive configuration. However, we also show that upon exposure to stimuli that trigger chromatin remodelling at the IL-6 locus, such as ligands for TLR8 or, less efficiently, TLR4, highly purified neutrophils express and secrete IL-6. In TLR8-activated neutrophils, but not monocytes, IL-6 expression is preceded by the induction of a latent enhancer located 14 kb upstream of the IL-6 transcriptional start site. In addition, IL-6 induction is potentiated by endogenous TNFα, which prolongs the synthesis of the IκBζ co-activator and sustains C/EBPβ recruitment and histone acetylation at IL-6 regulatory regions. Altogether, these data clarify controversial literature on the ability of human neutrophils to generate IL-6 and uncover chromatin-dependent layers of regulation of IL-6 in these cells. PMID:25616107

  18. G-CSF and Neutrophils Are Nonredundant Mediators of Murine Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Gabrielle L; Cornish, Ann L; Murphy, Jane; Pang, Ee Shan; Lim, Lyndell L; Campbell, Ian K; Scalzo-Inguanti, Karen; Chen, Xiangting; McMenamin, Paul G; Maraskovsky, Eugene; McKenzie, Brent S; Wicks, Ian P

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a regulator of neutrophil production, function, and survival. Herein, we investigated the role of G-CSF in a murine model of human uveitis-experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis. Experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis was dramatically reduced in G-CSF-deficient mice and in anti-G-CSF monoclonal antibody-treated, wild-type (WT) mice. Flow cytometric analysis of the ocular infiltrate in WT mice with experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis showed a mixed population, comprising neutrophils, macrophages, and T cells. The eyes of G-CSF-deficient and anti-G-CSF monoclonal antibody-treated WT mice had minimal neutrophil infiltrate, but no change in other myeloid-derived inflammatory cells. Antigen-specific T-cell responses were maintained, but the differentiation of pathogenic type 17 helper T cells in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis was reduced with G-CSF deficiency. We show that G-CSF controls the ocular neutrophil infiltrate by modulating the expression of C-X-C chemokine receptors 2 and 4 on peripheral blood neutrophils, as well as actin polymerization and migration. These data reveal an integral role for G-CSF-driven neutrophil responses in ocular autoimmunity, operating within and outside of the bone marrow, and also identify G-CSF as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of human uveoretinitis. PMID:26718978

  19. Clearance of Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage is T cell dependent and mediated through interleukin-17A expression and neutrophil influx.

    PubMed

    Archer, Nathan K; Harro, Janette M; Shirtliff, Mark E

    2013-06-01

    The anterior nares of humans are the major reservoir for Staphylococcus aureus colonization. Approximately 20% of the healthy human population is persistently and 80% is intermittently colonized with S. aureus in the nasal cavity. Previous studies have shown a strong causal connection between S. aureus nasal carriage and increased risk of nosocomial infection, as well as increased carriage due to immune dysfunction. However, the immune responses that permit persistence or mediate clearance of S. aureus on the nasal mucosa are fundamentally undefined. In this study, we developed a carriage model in C57BL/6J mice and showed that clearance begins 14 days postinoculation. In contrast, SCID mice that have a deficient adaptive immune response are unable to eliminate S. aureus even after 28 days postinoculation. Furthermore, decolonization was found to be T cell mediated but B cell independent by evaluating carriage clearance in T-cell receptor β/δ (TCR-β/δ) knockout (KO) and IgH-μ KO mice, respectively. Upregulation of the cytokines interleukin 1β (IL-1β), KC (also termed CXC ligand 1 [CXCL1]), and IL-17A occurred following inoculation with intranasal S. aureus. IL-17A production was crucial for clearance, since IL-17A-deficient mice were unable to effectively eliminate S. aureus carriage. Subsequently, cell differential counts were evaluated from nasal lavage fluid obtained from wild-type and IL-17A-deficient colonized mice. These counts displayed IL-17A-dependent neutrophil migration. Antibody-mediated depletion of neutrophils in colonized mice caused reduced clearance compared to that in isotype-treated controls. Our data suggest that the Th17-associated immune response is required for nasal decolonization. This response is T cell dependent and mediated via IL-17A production and neutrophil influx. Th17-associated immune responses may be targeted for strategies to mitigate distal infections originating from persistent S. aureus carriage in humans. PMID:23529621

  20. Biologic therapy improves psoriasis by decreasing the activity of monocytes and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Keiichi; Umezawa, Yoshinori; Yamagiwa, Akisa; Saeki, Hidehisa; Kondo, Makoto; Gabazza, Esteban C; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Mizutani, Hitoshi

    2014-08-01

    Therapy with monoclonal antibodies to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the interleukin (IL)-12/23 p40 subunit has significantly improved the clinical outcome of patients with psoriasis. These antibodies inhibit the effects of the target cytokines and thus the major concern during their use is the induction of excessive immunosuppression. Recent studies evaluating the long-term efficacy and safety of biologic therapy in psoriasis have shown no significant appearance of serious adverse effects including infections and malignancies. However, the immunological consequence and the mechanism by which the blockade of a single cytokine by biologics can successfully control the activity of psoriasis remain unclear. In the current study, we investigated the effect of biologic therapy on cytokine production of various lymphocytes and on the activity of monocytes and neutrophils in psoriatic patients. Neutrophils, monocytes and T cells were purified from heparinized peripheral venous blood by Ficoll density gradient centrifugation, and γ-interferon, TNF-α and IL-17 production from lymphocytes was measured by flow cytometer. The activation maker of neutrophils and the activated subsets of monocytes were also analyzed. Biologic therapy induced no significant changes in the cytokine production by lymphocytes from the skin and gut-homing T cells. However, neutrophil activity and the ratio of activated monocyte population increased in severely psoriatic patients were normalized in psoriatic patients receiving biologic therapy. The present study showed that biologic therapy ameliorates clinical symptoms and controls the immune response in patients with psoriasis. PMID:25099154

  1. Activation and regulation of arachidonic acid release in rabbit peritoneal neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, W.

    1988-01-01

    Arachidonic acid release in rabbit neutrophils can be enhanced by the addition of chemotactic fMet-Leu-Phe, platelet-activating factor, PAF, or the calcium ionophore A23187. Over 80% of the release ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid comes from phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol. The release is dose-dependent and increases with increasing concentration of the stimulus. The A23187-induced release increases with increasing time of the stimulation. ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid release, but not the rise in the concentration of intracellular calcium, is inhibited in pertussis toxin-treated neutrophils stimulated with PAF. The ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid released by A23187 is potentiated while that release by fMET-Leu-Phe or PAF is inhibited in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, PMA, treated rabbit neutrophils. The protein kinase C inhibitor 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine, H-7, has no effect on the potentiation by PMA of the A23187-induced release, it prevents the inhibition by PMA of the release produced by PAF or fMet-Leu-Phe. In addition, PMA increases arachidonic acid release in H-7-treated cells stimulated with fMet-Leu-Phe. The diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59022 increases the level of diacylglycerol in neutrophils stimulated with fMet-Leu-Phe. Furthermore, R59022 potentiates ({sup 3}H) arachidonic acid release produced by fMet-Leu-Phe. This potentiation is not inhibited by H-7, in fact, it is increased in H-7-treated neutrophils.

  2. Design of a Selective Substrate and Activity Based Probe for Human Neutrophil Serine Protease 4.

    PubMed

    Kasperkiewicz, Paulina; Poreba, Marcin; Snipas, Scott J; Lin, S Jack; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Salvesen, Guy S; Drag, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Human neutrophil serine protease 4 (NSP4), also known as PRSS57, is a recently discovered fourth member of the neutrophil serine proteases family. Although its biological function is not precisely defined, it is suggested to regulate neutrophil response and innate immune reactions. To create optimal substrates and visualization probes for NSP4 that distinguish it from other NSPs we have employed a Hybrid Combinatorial Substrate Library approach that utilizes natural and unnatural amino acids to explore protease subsite preferences. Library results were validated by synthesizing individual substrates, leading to the identification of an optimal substrate peptide. This substrate was converted to a covalent diphenyl phosphonate probe with an embedded biotin tag. This probe demonstrated high inhibitory activity and stringent specificity and may be suitable for visualizing NSP4 in the background of other NSPs. PMID:26172376

  3. Evaluation of NAD(P)-Dependent Dehydrogenase Activities in Neutrophilic Granulocytes by the Bioluminescent Method.

    PubMed

    Savchenko, A A

    2015-09-01

    Bioluminescent method for measurements of the neutrophilic NAD(P)-dependent dehydrogenases (lactate dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase, NADP-dependent decarboxylating malate dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase, and glucose- 6-phosphate dehydrogenase) is developed. The sensitivity of the method allows minimization of the volume of biological material for measurements to 104 neutrophils per analysis. The method is tried in patients with diffuse purulent peritonitis. Low levels of NADPH synthesis enzymes and high levels of enzymes determining the substrate flow by the Krebs cycle found in these patients can lead to attenuation of functional activity of cells. PMID:26468025

  4. Intracellular signalling during neutrophil recruitment.

    PubMed

    Mócsai, Attila; Walzog, Barbara; Lowell, Clifford A

    2015-08-01

    Recruitment of leucocytes such as neutrophils to the extravascular space is a critical step of the inflammation process and plays a major role in the development of various diseases including several cardiovascular diseases. Neutrophils themselves play a very active role in that process by sensing their environment and responding to the extracellular cues by adhesion and de-adhesion, cellular shape changes, chemotactic migration, and other effector functions of cell activation. Those responses are co-ordinated by a number of cell surface receptors and their complex intracellular signal transduction pathways. Here, we review neutrophil signal transduction processes critical for recruitment to the site of inflammation. The two key requirements for neutrophil recruitment are the establishment of appropriate chemoattractant gradients and the intrinsic ability of the cells to migrate along those gradients. We will first discuss signalling steps required for sensing extracellular chemoattractants such as chemokines and lipid mediators and the processes (e.g. PI3-kinase pathways) leading to the translation of extracellular chemoattractant gradients to polarized cellular responses. We will then discuss signal transduction by leucocyte adhesion receptors (e.g. tyrosine kinase pathways) which are critical for adhesion to, and migration through the vessel wall. Finally, additional neutrophil signalling pathways with an indirect effect on the neutrophil recruitment process, e.g. through modulation of the inflammatory environment, will be discussed. Mechanistic understanding of these pathways provide better understanding of the inflammation process and may point to novel therapeutic strategies for controlling excessive inflammation during infection or tissue damage. PMID:25998986

  5. Myeloperoxidase deficiency induces MIP-2 production via ERK activation in zymosan-stimulated mouse neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Tateno, N; Matsumoto, N; Motowaki, T; Suzuki, K; Aratani, Y

    2013-05-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), a major constituent of neutrophils, catalyzes the production of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chloride anion. We have previously reported that MPO-deficient (MPO(-/-)) neutrophils produce greater amount of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) in vitro than do wild type when stimulated with zymosan. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms governing the up-regulation of MIP-2 production in the mutant neutrophils. Interestingly, we found that zymosan-induced production of MIP-2 was blocked by pre-treatment with U0126, an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and with BAY11-7082, an inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Western blot analysis indicated that U0126 also inhibited the phosphorylation of p65 subunit of NF-κB (p65), indicating that MIP-2 was produced via the ERK/NF-κB pathway. Intriguingly, we found that ERK1/2, p65, and alpha subunit of inhibitor of κB (IκBα) in the MPO(-/-) neutrophils were phosphorylated more strongly than in the wild type when stimulated with zymosan. Exogenous H2O2 treatment in addition to zymosan stimulation enhanced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 without affecting the zymosan-induced MIP-2 production. In contrast, exogenous HOCl inhibited the production of MIP-2 as well as IκBα phosphorylation without affecting ERK activity. The zymosan-induced production of MIP-2 in the wild-type neutrophils was enhanced by pre-treatment of the MPO inhibitor 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that both lack of HOCl and accumulation of H2O2 due to MPO deficiency contribute to the up-regulation of MIP-2 production in mouse neutrophils stimulated with zymosan. PMID:23438680

  6. Essential roles for platelets during neutrophil-dependent or lymphocyte-mediated defense against bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Dongxia; Sun, Chengming; Bao, Cuixia; Yi, Maoli; Xing, Li; Luo, Deyan

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidence from animal models suggests that platelets may participate in a wide variety of processes including the immune response against infection. More than 200 whole blood samples from patients and healthy controls were run in the System XE-5000 analyzer, and plasma fractions were separated for the following tests by ELISA, Luminex and light scattering. We describe two mechanisms by which platelets may contribute to immune function against various bacterial pathogens based on increased mean platelet volume in gram-positive bacterial infections and increased platelet counts in gram-negative bacterial infections. Gram-negative bacteria activate platelets to recruit neutrophils, which participate in the immune response against infection. During this process, fractalkine, macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, interleukin-17A, tumor necrosis factor-α and platelet-activating factor were higher in patients infected with Escherichia coli; additionally, giant platelets were observed under the microscope. Meanwhile, we found that platelets played a different role in gram-positive bacterial infections. Specifically, they could actively adhere to gram-positive bacteria in circulation and transfer them to immune sites to promote antibacterial lymphocyte expansion. During this process, complement C3 and factor XI were more highly expressed in patients infected with Staphylococcus aureus; additionally, we detected more small platelets under the microscope. Platelets participate in the immune response against both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, although the mechanisms differ. These results will help us understand the complex roles of platelets during infections, and direct our use of antibiotics based on clinical platelet data. PMID:26588444

  7. Inflammatory chemoreceptor cross-talk suppresses leukotriene B4 receptor 1-mediated neutrophil calcium mobilization and chemotaxis after trauma.

    PubMed

    Tarlowe, Michael H; Kannan, K B; Itagaki, Kiyoshi; Adams, John M; Livingston, David H; Hauser, Carl J

    2003-08-15

    G protein-coupled chemoattractants recruit neutrophils (PMN) to sites of injury and infection. The leukotrienes (LT) and CXC chemokines (CXC) and their receptors (BLT1/BLT2 and CXCR1/CXCR2) are all known to play roles in these responses. Each system has been studied separately in vitro, but in vivo they act concurrently, and the clinical interactions between the two systems are unstudied. We prospectively studied calcium mobilization and chemotactic responses to LTB(4) in PMN from major trauma patients. The responses of the high affinity BLT1 receptor were suppressed at the 3-day postinjury time point, but recovered by 1 wk. Trauma patients had transient elevations of plasma LT and CXC levels. Functional deficits identical with those in trauma PMN were reproduced in vitro by exposing healthy PMN to CXCs at the elevated plasma concentrations found. Functional responses to LTB(4) were suppressed by cross-talk with CXC and BLT2 receptors that desensitize BLT1. Since the suppression of intracellular calcium mobilization was prominent, we also studied the role of suppressed cell calcium mobilization in the defective chemotactic responses to LTB(4). We noted that PMN chemotaxis to LTB(4) showed far more dependence on store-operated calcium entry than on the release of cellular calcium stores, and that store-operated calcium responses to BLT1 activation were markedly inhibited during the same time period as was chemotaxis. The intermittent release of inflammatory mediators after injury can blunt PMN responses to LTs by suppressing BLT1 as well as downstream calcium entry. Diminished LT receptor activity due to cross-talk with CXC receptors can inhibit PMN recruitment to infective sites. This may predispose injured patients to septic complications. PMID:12902512

  8. PAD4 mediated histone hypercitrullination induces heterochromatin decondensation and chromatin unfolding to form neutrophil extracellular trap-like structures

    PubMed Central

    Leshner, Marc; Wang, Shu; Lewis, Carrie; Zheng, Han; Chen, Xiangyun Amy; Santy, Lorraine; Wang, Yanming

    2012-01-01

    NETosis, the process wherein neutrophils release highly decondensed chromatin called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), has gained much attention as an alternative means of killing bacteria. In vivo, NETs are induced by bacteria and pro-inflammatory cytokines. We have reported that peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4), an enzyme that converts Arg or monomethyl-Arg to citrulline in histones, is essential for NET formation. The areas of extensive chromatin decondensation along the NETs were rich in histone citrullination. Here, upon investigating the effect of global citrullination in cultured cells, we discovered that PAD4 overexpression in osteosarcoma U2OS cells induces extensive chromatin decondensation independent of apoptosis. The highly decondensed chromatin is released to the extracellular space and stained strongly by a histone citrulline-specific antibody. The structure of the decondensed chromatin is reminiscent of NETs but is unique in that it occurs without stimulation of cells with pro-inflammatory cytokines and bacteria. Furthermore, histone citrullination during chromatin decondensation can dissociate heterochromatin protein 1 beta (HP1β) thereby offering a new molecular mechanism for understanding how citrullination regulates chromatin function. Taken together, our study suggests that PAD4 mediated citrullination induces chromatin decondensation, implicating its essential role in NET formation under physiological conditions in neutrophils. PMID:23060885

  9. Dual function of Ccr5 during Langat virus encephalitis - Reduction of neutrophil-mediated CNS inflammation and increase in T cell-mediated viral clearance

    PubMed Central

    Michlmayr, Daniela; Bardina, Susana V.; Rodriguez, Carlos A.; Pletnev, Alexander G.; Lim, Jean K.

    2016-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is a vector-transmitted flavivirus that causes potentially fatal neurological infection. There are thousands of cases reported annually, and despite the availability of an effective vaccine, the incidence of TBEV is increasing worldwide. Importantly, up to thirty percent of affected individuals will develop long-term neurologic sequelae. We investigated the role of chemokine receptor Ccr5 in a mouse model of TBEV infection using the naturally attenuated tick-borne flavivirus, Langat virus (LGTV). Ccr5-deficient mice presented with an increase in viral replication within the CNS and decreased survival during LGTV encephalitis when compared to wild type (WT) controls. This enhanced susceptibility was due to the temporal lag in lymphocyte migration into the CNS. Adoptive transfer of WT T cells, but not Ccr5-deficient T cells, was able to significantly improve survival outcome in LGTV-infected Ccr5-deficient mice. Concomitantly, a significant increase in neutrophil migration into the CNS in LGTV-infected Ccr5−/− mice was documented at the late stage of infection. Antibody-mediated depletion of neutrophils in Ccr5−/− mice resulted in a significant improvement in mortality, a decrease in viral load, and a decrease in overall tissue damage in the CNS when compared to isotype control-treated mice. Ccr5 is crucial in not only directing T cells towards the LGTV-infected brain, but also in suppressing neutrophil-mediated inflammation within the CNS. PMID:27183602

  10. Dual Function of Ccr5 during Langat Virus Encephalitis: Reduction in Neutrophil-Mediated Central Nervous System Inflammation and Increase in T Cell-Mediated Viral Clearance.

    PubMed

    Michlmayr, Daniela; Bardina, Susana V; Rodriguez, Carlos A; Pletnev, Alexander G; Lim, Jean K

    2016-06-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is a vector-transmitted flavivirus that causes potentially fatal neurologic infection. There are thousands of cases reported annually, and despite the availability of an effective vaccine, the incidence of TBEV is increasing worldwide. Importantly, up to 30% of affected individuals develop long-term neurologic sequelae. We investigated the role of chemokine receptor Ccr5 in a mouse model of TBEV infection using the naturally attenuated tick-borne flavivirus Langat virus (LGTV). Ccr5-deficient mice presented with an increase in viral replication within the CNS and decreased survival during LGTV encephalitis compared with wild-type controls. This enhanced susceptibility was due to the temporal lag in lymphocyte migration into the CNS. Adoptive transfer of wild-type T cells, but not Ccr5-deficient T cells, significantly improved survival outcome in LGTV-infected Ccr5-deficient mice. Concomitantly, a significant increase in neutrophil migration into the CNS in LGTV-infected Ccr5(-/-) mice was documented at the late stage of infection. Ab-mediated depletion of neutrophils in Ccr5(-/-) mice resulted in a significant improvement in mortality, a decrease in viral load, and a decrease in overall tissue damage in the CNS compared with isotype control-treated mice. Ccr5 is crucial in directing T cells toward the LGTV-infected brain, as well as in suppressing neutrophil-mediated inflammation within the CNS. PMID:27183602

  11. Gene delivery of the elastase inhibitor elafin protects macrophages from neutrophil elastase-mediated impairment of apoptotic cell recognition.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Peter A; Devitt, Andrew; Kotelevtsev, Yuri; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2004-09-10

    The resolution of inflammation is dependent on recognition and phagocytic removal of apoptotic cells by macrophages. Receptors for apoptotic cells are sensitive to degradation by human neutrophil elastase (HNE). We show in the present study that HNE cleaves macrophage cell surface CD14 and in so doing, reduces phagocytic recognition of apoptotic lymphocytic cells (Mutu 1). Using an improved method of adenovirus-mediated transfection of macrophages with the HNE inhibitor elafin, we demonstrate that elafin overexpression prevents CD14 cleavage and restores apoptotic cell recognition by macrophages. This approach of genetic modification of macrophages could be used to restore apoptotic cell recognition in inflammatory conditions. PMID:15358543

  12. In vitro neutrophil migration requires protein kinase c-delta (δ-PKC) mediated MARCKS (Myristoylated Alanine Rich C-Kinase Substrate) phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Eui Jae; Adler, Kenneth B.; Jones, Samuel L.

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulated release of neutrophil reactive oxygen species and proteolytic enzymes contributes to both acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Therefore, molecular regulators of these processes are potential targets for new anti-inflammatory therapies. We have shown previously that MARCKS (Myristoylated Alanine Rich C-Kinase Substrate), a well-known PKC substrate protein, is a key regulator of neutrophil functions. In the current study we investigate the role of PKC-mediated MARCKS phosphorylation in neutrophil migration and adhesion in vitro. We report that treatment of human neutrophils with the δ-PKC inhibitor rottlerin significantly attenuates fMLF induced MARCKS phosphorylation (IC50 = 5.709 μM), adhesion (IC50 = 8.4 uM) and migration (IC50 = 6.7 uM); while α-, β- and ζ-PKC inhibitors had no significant effect. We conclude that δ-PKC mediated MARCKS phosphorylation is essential for human neutrophil migration and adhesion in vitro. These results implicate δ-PKC mediated MARCKS phosphorylation as a key step in the inflammatory response of neutrophils. PMID:25515270

  13. Potent inhibition of human neutrophil activations by bractelactone, a novel chalcone from Fissistigma bracteolatum

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yang-Chang; Sureshbabu, Munisamy; Fang, Yao-Ching; Wu, Yi-Hsiu; Lan, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Fang-Rong; Chang, Ya-Wen; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2013-02-01

    Fissistigma bracteolatum is widely used in traditional medicine to treat inflammatory diseases. However, its active components and mechanisms of action remain unclear. In this study, (3Z)-6,7-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-3-(phenylmethylidene)-5-(3-phenylpropanoyl) -1-benzofuran-2(3H) (bractelactone), a novel chalcone from F. bracteolatum, showed potent inhibitory effects against superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup ·−}) production, elastase release, and CD11b expression in formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP)-induced human neutrophils. However, bractelactone showed only weak inhibition of phorbol myristate acetate-caused O{sub 2}{sup ·−} production. The peak cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) was unaltered by bractelactone in FMLP-induced neutrophils, but the decay time of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was significantly shortened. In a calcium-free solution, changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} caused by the addition of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} were inhibited by bractelactone in FMLP-activated cells. In addition, bractelactone did not alter the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, JNK, or AKT or the concentration of cAMP. These results suggest that bractelactone selectively inhibits store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). In agreement with this concept, bractelactone suppressed sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} changes in thapsigargin-activated neutrophils. Furthermore, bractelactone did not alter FMLP-induced formation of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effects of bractelactone, an active ingredient of F. bracteolatum, in human neutrophils are through the selective inhibition of SOCE. Highlights: ► Bractelactone isolated from Fissistigma bracteolatum. ► Bractelactone inhibited FMLP-induced human neutrophil activations. ► Bractelactone had no effect on IP3 formation. ► Bractelactone did not alter MAPKs, AKT, and cAMP pathways. ► Bractelactone inhibited store-operated calcium entry.

  14. ICAM-2 mediates neutrophil transmigration in vivo: evidence for stimulus specificity and a role in PECAM-1-independent transmigration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Miao-Tzu; Larbi, Karen Y; Scheiermann, Christoph; Woodfin, Abigail; Gerwin, Nicole; Haskard, Dorian O; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2006-06-15

    ICAM-2 has been implicated in leukocyte transmigration in vitro, but there is little in vivo evidence to support this. To address this, neutrophil migration was investigated in ICAM-2-deficient mice (KO) and in wild-type (WT) mice treated with an anti-ICAM-2 blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb) (3C4). In a peritonitis model, IL-1beta-induced accumulation of neutrophils was significantly reduced in mice treated with 3C4 (51% inhibition) and in KO mice (41% inhibition). In contrast, TNF-alpha- or thioglycolate-induced responses were not suppressed in KO mice. Analysis of IL-1beta-induced leukocyte responses in cremasteric venules of KO animals by intravital microscopy indicated a defect in transmigration (44% inhibition) but not rolling or adhesion. As found before, TNF-alpha-induced leukocyte transmigration was unaltered in the KO mice. WT mice treated with the anti-ICAM-2 mAb also exhibited a selective reduction in leukocyte transmigration in response to IL-1beta while an anti-ICAM-1 mAb inhibited both leukocyte adhesion and transmigration. Interestingly, mAb 3C4 significantly suppressed IL-1beta-induced neutrophil transmigration in PE-CAM-1 KO animals in the peritonitis model but not in the cremaster muscle. The findings provide direct evidence for the involvement of ICAM-2 in neutrophil transmigration in vivo, though this role appears to be stimulus specific. Furthermore, ICAM-2 appears capable of mediating PECAM-1-independent leukocyte transmigration. PMID:16469869

  15. Platelets enhance neutrophil transendothelial migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Platelets are increasingly recognized as important mediators of inflammation in addition to thrombosis. While platelets have been shown to promote neutrophil (PMN) adhesion to endothelium in various inflammatory models, it is unclear whether platelets enhance neutrophil transmigration across inflame...

  16. The anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide inhibits neutrophil adherence to and migration across monolayers of cytokine-activated endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dapino, P; Ottonello, L; Dallegri, F

    1994-01-01

    Neutrophil migration through the microvascular endothelium represents a fundamental event for the cell accumulation at sites of tissue injury. Owing to their capacity to modify the structural and functional characteristics of endothelial cells, inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) play a pivotal role in directing circulating neutrophils away from the bloodstream to the interstitial tissue. In order to study neutrophil transendothelial migration, human umbilical vein endothelial cells were grown to confluence on the polycarbonate filter of two-compartment migration chambers. Pretreatment of the endothelial cell monolayers with TNF alpha for 4 h resulted in rapid migration of approximately 50% of subsequently added neutrophils across the layers. In contrast, < 10% of added neutrophils penetrated untreated endothelial monolayers. Using TNF alpha-treated endothelium, neutrophil transmigration was inhibited by the methane sulfonanilide anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide. Moreover, neutrophil adherence to TNF alpha-treated endothelial monolayers, cultured in microtiter wells, was markedly reduced by nimesulide. A linear correlation between the drug-dependent inhibition of neutrophil transmigration and neutrophil adherence was found. Finally, nimesulide did not interfere with the TNF alpha ability to convert resting endothelium into a pro-adhesive and pro-locomotory cell layer. The data suggest that nimesulide reduces neutrophil transendothelial migration primarily by limiting the cell anchorage to the TNF alpha-activated endothelium. Therefore, the drug has the potential to down-regulate neutrophil extravasation and, in turn, the burden of neutrophil oxidants and proteases leading to tissue injury at sites of inflammation. PMID:7824814

  17. Role of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Signaling in Regulating Neutrophil Antifungal Activity and the Oxidative Burst During Respiratory Fungal Challenge.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Shinji; Jhingran, Anupam; Dhingra, Sourabh; Salem, Anand; Cramer, Robert A; Hohl, Tobias M

    2016-04-15

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that plays a critical role in regulating myeloid cell host defense. In this study, we demonstrated that GM-CSF signaling plays an essential role in antifungal defense against Aspergillus fumigatus. Mice that lack the GM-CSF receptor β chain (GM-CSFRβ) developed invasive hyphal growth and exhibited impaired survival after pulmonary challenge with A. fumigatus conidia. GM-CSFRβ signaling regulated the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to infected lungs, but not the recruitment of effector neutrophils. Cell-intrinsic GM-CSFRβ signaling mediated neutrophil and inflammatory monocyte antifungal activity, because lung GM-CSFRβ(-/-) leukocytes exhibited impaired conidial killing compared with GM-CSFRβ(+/+) counterparts in mixed bone marrow chimeric mice. GM-CSFRβ(-/-) neutrophils exhibited reduced (hydrogenated) nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity in vivo. Conversely, administration of recombinant GM-CSF enhanced neutrophil NADPH oxidase function, conidiacidal activity, and lung fungal clearance in A. fumigatus-challenged mice. Thus, our study illustrates the functional role of GM-CSFRβ signaling on lung myeloid cell responses against inhaled A. fumigatus conidia and demonstrates a benefit for systemic GM-CSF administration. PMID:26908736

  18. Phosphotidylserine exposure and neutrophil extracellular traps enhance procoagulant activity in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    He, Zhangxiu; Si, Yu; Jiang, Tao; Ma, Ruishuang; Zhang, Yan; Cao, Muhua; Li, Tao; Yao, Zhipeng; Zhao, Lu; Fang, Shaohong; Yu, Bo; Dong, Zengxiang; Thatte, Hemant S; Bi, Yayan; Kou, Junjie; Yang, Shufen; Piao, Daxun; Hao, Lirong; Zhou, Jin; Shi, Jialan

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-associated thromboembolic event often lacks precise aetiology. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) towards the hypercoagulable state in IBD. We demonstrated that the levels of PS exposed MPs and the sources of MP-origin, platelets, erythrocytes, leukocytes and cultured endothelial cells (ECs) were higher in IBD groups than in healthy controls using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Wright-Giemsa and immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the elevated NETs were released by activated IBD neutrophils or by control neutrophils treated with IBD sera obtained from patients with the active disease. MPs and MP-origin cells in IBD groups, especially in active stage, markedly shortened coagulation time and had increased levels of fibrin, thrombin and FXa production as assessed by coagulation function assays. Importantly, we found that on stimulated ECs, PS rich membranes provided binding sites for FXa and FVa, promoting fibrin formation while TNF blockage or IgG depletion attenuated this effect. Treatment of control neutrophils with TNF and isolated IgG from PR3-ANCA-positive active IBD patients also resulted in the release of NETs. Blockade of PS with lactadherin prolonged coagulation time, decreased fibrin formation to control levels, and inhibited the procoagulant enzymes production in the MPs and MP-origin cells. NET cleavage by DNase I partly decreased PCA in IBD or stimulated neutrophils. Our study reveals a previously unrecognised link between hypercoagulable state and PS exposure or NETs, and may further explain the epidemiological association of thrombosis within IBD patients. PMID:26660948

  19. Alkalinity of neutrophil phagocytic vacuoles is modulated by HVCN1 and has consequences for myeloperoxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Levine, Adam P; Duchen, Michael R; de Villiers, Simon; Rich, Peter R; Segal, Anthony W

    2015-01-01

    The NADPH oxidase of neutrophils, essential for innate immunity, passes electrons across the phagocytic membrane to form superoxide in the phagocytic vacuole. Activity of the oxidase requires that charge movements across the vacuolar membrane are balanced. Using the pH indicator SNARF, we measured changes in pH in the phagocytic vacuole and cytosol of neutrophils. In human cells, the vacuolar pH rose to ~9, and the cytosol acidified slightly. By contrast, in Hvcn1 knock out mouse neutrophils, the vacuolar pH rose above 11, vacuoles swelled, and the cytosol acidified excessively, demonstrating that ordinarily this channel plays an important role in charge compensation. Proton extrusion was not diminished in Hvcn1-/- mouse neutrophils arguing against its role in maintaining pH homeostasis across the plasma membrane. Conditions in the vacuole are optimal for bacterial killing by the neutral proteases, cathepsin G and elastase, and not by myeloperoxidase, activity of which was unphysiologically low at alkaline pH. PMID:25885273

  20. ICAM-1 mediates surface contact between neutrophils and keratocytes following corneal epithelial abrasion in the mouse

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corneal epithelial abrasion elicits an inflammatory response involving neutrophil (PMN) recruitment from the limbal vessels into the corneal stroma. These migrating PMNs make surface contact with collagen and stromal keratocytes. Using mice deficient in PMN integrin CD18, we previously showed that P...

  1. Activated human neutrophil response to perfluorocarbon nanobubbles: oxygen-dependent and -independent cytotoxic responses.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Fang, Chia-Lang; Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A; Yang, Li-Jia; Fang, Jia-You

    2011-06-10

    Nanobubbles, a type of nanoparticles with acoustically active properties, are being utilized as diagnostic and therapeutic nanoparticles to better understand, detect, and treat human diseases. The objective of this work was to prepare different nanobubble formulations and investigate their physicochemical characteristics and toxic responses to N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-activated human neutrophils. The nanobubbles were prepared using perfluoropentane and coconut oil as the respective core and shell, with soybean phosphatidylcholine (SPC) and/or cationic surfactants as the interfacial layers. The cytotoxic effect of the nanobubbles on neutrophils was determined by extracellular O₂(.)⁻ release, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and elastase release. Particle sizes of the nanobubbles with different percentages of perfluorocarbon, oil, and surfactants in ranged 186-432 nm. The nanobubbles were demonstrated to inhibit the generation of superoxide and intracellular ROS. The cytotoxicity of nanobubbles may be mainly associated with membrane damage, as indicated by the high LDH leakage. Systems with Forestall (FE), a cationic surfactant, or higher SPC contents exhibited the greatest LDH release by 3-fold compared to the control. The further addition of an oil component reduced the cytotoxicity induced by the nanobubbles. Exposure to most of the nanobubble formulations upregulated elastase release by activated neutrophils. Contrary to this result, stearylamine (SA)-containing systems slightly but significantly suppressed elastase release. FE and SA in a free form caused stronger responses by neutrophils than when they were incorporated into nanobubbles. In summary, exposure to nanobubbles resulted in a formulation-dependent toxicity toward human neutrophils that was associated with both oxygen-dependent and -independent pathways. Clinicians should therefore exercise caution when using nanobubbles in patients

  2. Insulin Treatment Directly Restores Neutrophil Phagocytosis and Bactericidal Activity in Diabetic Mice and Thereby Improves Surgical Site Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Hidekazu; Fujino, Keiichi; Nakashima, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Yoritsuna; Miyazaki, Hiromi; Hamada, Koji; Ono, Satoshi; Iwaya, Keiichi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Seki, Shuhji; Tanaka, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial infections, including surgical site infections (SSI), are a common and serious complication of diabetes. Staphylococcus aureus, which is eliminated mainly by neutrophils, is a major cause of SSI in diabetic patients. However, the precise mechanisms by which diabetes predisposes to staphylococcal infection are not fully elucidated. The effect of insulin on this infection is also not well understood. We therefore investigated the effect of insulin treatment on SSI and neutrophil function in diabetic mice. S. aureus was inoculated into the abdominal muscle in diabetic db/db and high-fat-diet (HFD)-fed mice with or without insulin treatment. Although the diabetic db/db mice developed SSI, insulin treatment ameliorated the infection. db/db mice had neutrophil dysfunction, such as decreased phagocytosis, superoxide production, and killing activity of S. aureus; however, insulin treatment restored these functions. Ex vivo treatment (coincubation) of neutrophils with insulin and euglycemic control by phlorizin suggest that insulin may directly activate neutrophil phagocytic and bactericidal activity independently of its euglycemic effect. However, insulin may indirectly restore superoxide production by neutrophils through its euglycemic effect. HFD-fed mice with mild hyperglycemia also developed more severe SSI by S. aureus than control mice and had impaired neutrophil phagocytic and bactericidal activity, which was improved by insulin treatment. Unlike db/db mice, in HFD mice, superoxide production was increased in neutrophils and subsequently suppressed by insulin treatment. Glycemic control by insulin also normalized the neutrophil superoxide-producing capability in HFD mice. Thus, insulin may restore neutrophil phagocytosis and bactericidal activity, thereby ameliorating SSI. PMID:23027538

  3. Venous levels of shear support neutrophil-platelet adhesion and neutrophil aggregation in blood via P-selectin and beta2-integrin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konstantopoulos, K.; Neelamegham, S.; Burns, A. R.; Hentzen, E.; Kansas, G. S.; Snapp, K. R.; Berg, E. L.; Hellums, J. D.; Smith, C. W.; McIntire, L. V.; Simon, S. I.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After activation, platelets adhere to neutrophils via P-selectin and beta2-integrin. The molecular mechanisms and adhesion events in whole blood exposed to venous levels of hydrodynamic shear in the absence of exogenous activation remain unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: Whole blood was sheared at approximately 100 s(-1). The kinetics of neutrophil-platelet adhesion and neutrophil aggregation were measured in real time by flow cytometry. P-selectin was upregulated to the platelet surface in response to shear and was the primary factor mediating neutrophil-platelet adhesion. The extent of neutrophil aggregation increased linearly with platelet adhesion to neutrophils. Blocking either P-selectin, its glycoprotein ligand PSGL-1, or both simultaneously by preincubation with a monoclonal antibody resulted in equivalent inhibition of neutrophil-platelet adhesion (approximately 30%) and neutrophil aggregation (approximately 70%). The residual amount of neutrophil adhesion was blocked with anti-CD11b/CD18. Treatment of blood with prostacyclin analogue ZK36374, which raises cAMP levels in platelets, blocked P-selectin upregulation and neutrophil aggregation to baseline. Complete abrogation of platelet-neutrophil adhesion required both ZK36374 and anti-CD18. Electron microscopic observations of fixed blood specimens revealed that platelets augmented neutrophil aggregation both by forming bridges between neutrophils and through contact-mediated activation. CONCLUSIONS: The results are consistent with a model in which venous levels of shear support platelet adherence to neutrophils via P-selectin binding PSGL-1. This interaction alone is sufficient to mediate neutrophil aggregation. Abrogation of platelet adhesion and aggregation requires blocking Mac-1 in addition to PSGL-1 or P-selectin. The described mechanisms are likely of key importance in the pathogenesis and progression of thrombotic disorders that are exacerbated by leukocyte-platelet aggregation.

  4. ICAM-1-activated Src and eNOS signaling increase endothelial cell surface PECAM-1 adhesivity and neutrophil transmigration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoquan; Place, Aaron T; Chen, Zhenlong; Brovkovych, Viktor M; Vogel, Stephen M; Muller, William A; Skidgel, Randal A; Malik, Asrar B; Minshall, Richard D

    2012-08-30

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) extravasation requires selectin-mediated tethering, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1)-dependent firm adhesion, and platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1)-mediated transendothelial migration. An important unanswered question is whether ICAM-1-activated signaling contributes to PMN transmigration mediated by PECAM-1. We tested this concept and the roles of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and Src activated by PMN ligation of ICAM-1 in mediating PECAM-1-dependent PMN transmigration. We observed that lung PMN infiltration in vivo induced in carrageenan-injected WT mice was significantly reduced in ICAM-1(-/-) and eNOS(-/-) mice. Crosslinking WT mouse ICAM-1 expressed in human endothelial cells (ECs), but not the phospho-defective Tyr(518)Phe ICAM-1 mutant, induced SHP-2-dependent Src Tyr530 dephosphorylation that resulted in Src activation. ICAM-1 activation also stimulated phosphorylation of Akt (p-Ser473) and eNOS (p-Ser1177), thereby increasing NO production. PMN migration across EC monolayers was abolished in cells expressing the Tyr(518)Phe ICAM-1 mutant or by pretreatment with either the Src inhibitor PP2 or eNOS inhibitor L-NAME. Importantly, phospho-ICAM-1 induction of Src signaling induced PECAM-1 Tyr686 phosphorylation and increased EC surface anti-PECAM-1 mAb-binding activity. These results collectively show that ICAM-1-activated Src and eNOS signaling sequentially induce PECAM-1-mediated PMN transendothelial migration. Both Src and eNOS inhibition may be important therapeutic targets to prevent or limit vascular inflammation. PMID:22806890

  5. Prevention of vascular inflammation by nanoparticle targeting of adherent neutrophils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenjia; Li, Jing; Cho, Jaehyung; Malik, Asrar B.

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases such as acute lung injury and ischaemic tissue injury are caused by the adhesion of a type of white blood cell--polymorphonuclear neutrophils--to the lining of the circulatory system or vascular endothelium and unchecked neutrophil transmigration. Nanoparticle-mediated targeting of activated neutrophils on vascular endothelial cells at the site of injury may be a useful means of directly inactivating neutrophil transmigration and hence mitigating vascular inflammation. Here, we report a method employing drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles, which efficiently deliver drugs into neutrophils adherent to the surface of the inflamed endothelium. Using intravital microscopy of tumour necrosis factor-α-challenged mouse cremaster post-capillary venules, we demonstrate that fluorescently tagged albumin nanoparticles are largely internalized by neutrophils adherent to the activated endothelium via cell surface Fcɣ receptors. Administration of albumin nanoparticles loaded with the spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, piceatannol, which blocks `outside-in' β2 integrin signalling in leukocytes, detached the adherent neutrophils and elicited their release into the circulation. Thus, internalization of drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles into neutrophils inactivates the pro-inflammatory function of activated neutrophils, thereby offering a promising approach for treating inflammatory diseases resulting from inappropriate neutrophil sequestration and activation.

  6. Effects of Docosahexaenoic Supplementation and In Vitro Vitamin C on the Oxidative and Inflammatory Neutrophil Response to Activation

    PubMed Central

    Capó, Xavier; Martorell, Miquel; Sureda, Antoni; Tur, Josep Antoni; Pons, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effects of diet supplementation with docosahexaenoic (DHA) and in vitro vitamin C (VitC) at physiological concentrations on oxidative and inflammatory neutrophil response to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Fifteen male footballers ingested a beverage enriched with DHA or a placebo for 8 weeks in a randomized double-blind study. Neutrophils were isolated from blood samples collected in basal conditions at the end of nutritional intervention. Neutrophils were cultured for 2 hours at 37°C in (a) control media, (b) media with PMA, and (c) media with PMA + VitC. PMA induces neutrophil degranulation with increased extracellular myeloperoxidase and catalase activities, nitric oxide production, expression of the inflammatory genes cyclooxygenase-2, nuclear factor κβ, interleukin 8 and tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin 6 production. DHA diet supplementation boosts the exit of CAT from neutrophils but moderates the degranulation of myeloperoxidase granules induced by PMA. VitC facilitates azurophilic degranulation of neutrophils and increases gene expression of myeloperoxidase induced by PMA. VitC and DHA diet supplementation prevent PMA effects on inflammatory gene expression, although together they do not produce additional effects. DHA diet supplementation enhances antioxidant defences and anti-inflammatory neutrophil response to in vitro PMA activation. VitC facilitates neutrophil degranulation but prevents an inflammatory response to PMA. PMID:25960826

  7. Pharmacological Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Activation Attenuates Neutrophil Recruitment by a Mechanism Dependent on Nicotinic Receptor and the Spleen.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rangel L; Castanheira, Fernanda V; Figueiredo, Jozi G; Bassi, Gabriel S; Ferreira, Sérgio H; Cunha, Fernando Q; Cunha, Thiago M; Kanashiro, Alexandre

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the effect of beta-adrenergic receptor activation on neutrophil migration in experimental peritonitis elucidating the neuroimmune components involved such as nicotinic receptors and the spleen. Mice pre-treated with mecamylamine (nicotinic antagonist) and propranolol (beta-adrenergic antagonist) or splenectomized animals were treated with isoproterenol (beta-adrenergic agonist) prior to intraperitoneal injection of carrageenan. After 4 h, the infiltrating neutrophils and the local cytokine/chemokine levels were evaluated in the peritoneal lavage. The effect of isoproterenol on neutrophil chemotaxis was investigated in a Boyden chamber. Isoproterenol inhibited neutrophil trafficking, reducing the cytokine/chemokine release and neutrophil chemotaxis. Surprisingly, the isoproterenol effect on neutrophil migration was totally reverted by splenectomy and mecamylamine pre-treatment. In contrast, the inhibitory effect of nicotine on neutrophil migration was abrogated only by splenectomy but not by propranolol pre-treatment. Collectively, our data show that beta-adrenergic receptor activation regulates the acute neutrophil recruitment via splenic nicotinic receptor. PMID:27262431

  8. Role of activated neutrophils in chest trauma-induced septic acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Perl, Mario; Hohmann, Christoph; Denk, Stephanie; Kellermann, Philipp; Lu, Dapeng; Braumüller, Sonja; Bachem, Max G; Thomas, Jörg; Knöferl, Markus W; Ayala, Alfred; Gebhard, Florian; Huber-Lang, Markus S

    2012-07-01

    More than 50% of severely injured patients have chest trauma. Second insults frequently result in acute lung injury (ALI), with sepsis being the main underlying condition. We aimed to develop a standardized, reproducible, and clinically relevant double-hit mouse model of ALI induced by chest trauma and polymicrobial sepsis and to investigate the pathophysiologic role of activated neutrophils. Lung contusion was applied to C57Bl/6 mice via a focused blast wave. Twenty-four hours later, sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture. For polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) depletion, animals received intravenous injections of PMN-depleting antibody. In response to blunt chest trauma followed by sepsis as well as after sepsis alone, a significant local and systemic inflammatory response with increased cytokine/chemokine levels in lung and plasma was observed. In contrast, lung apoptosis was markedly elevated only after a double hit. Intra-alveolar neutrophils and total bronchoalveolar lavage protein concentrations were markedly increased following isolated chest trauma or the combined insult, but not after sepsis alone. Lung myeloperoxidase activity was enhanced only in response to the double hit accompanied by histological disruption of the alveolar architecture, lung congestion, and marked cellular infiltrates. Neutrophil depletion significantly diminished lung interleukin 1β and interleukin 6 concentrations and reduced the degree of septic ALI. Here we have established a novel and highly reproducible mouse model of chest trauma-induced septic ALI characterizing a clinical relevant double-hit scenario. In particular, the depletion of neutrophils substantially mitigated the extent of lung injury, indicating a pathomechanistic role for neutrophils in chest trauma-induced septic ALI. PMID:22552016

  9. Antithrombin Attenuates Vascular Leakage via Inhibiting Neutrophil Activation in Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rehberg, Sebastian; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Sousse, Linda E.; Jonkam, Collette; Zhu, Yong; Traber, Lillian D.; Cox, Robert A.; Prough, Donald S.; Traber, Daniel L.; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that restoration of antithrombin plasma concentrations attenuates vascular leakage by inhibiting neutrophil activation through syndecan-4 receptor inhibition in an established ovine model of acute lung injury. Design Randomized controlled laboratory experiment. Setting University animal research facility. Subjects Eighteen chronically instrumented sheep. Interventions Following combined burn and smoke inhalation injury (40% of total body surface area, third-degree flame burn; 4 × 12 breaths of cold cotton smoke), chronically instrumented sheep were randomly assigned to receive an IV infusion of 6 IU/kg/hr recombinant human antithrombin III or normal saline (n = 6 each) during the 48-hour study period. In addition, six sham animals (not injured, continuous infusion of vehicle) were used to obtain reference values for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Measurements and Main Results Compared to control animals, recombinant human antithrombin III reduced the number of neutrophils per hour in the pulmonary lymph (p < 0.01 at 24 and 48 hr), alveolar neutrophil infiltration (p = 0.04), and pulmonary myeloperoxidase activity (p = 0.026). Flow cytometric analysis revealed a significant reduction of syndecan-4-positive neutrophils (p = 0.002 vs control at 24 hr). Treatment with recombinant human antithrombin III resulted in a reduction of pulmonary nitrosative stress (p = 0.002), airway obstruction (bronchi: p = 0.001, bronchioli: p = 0.013), parenchymal edema (p = 0.044), and lung bloodless wet-to-dry-weight ratio (p = 0.015). Clinically, recombinant human antithrombin III attenuated the increased pulmonary transvascular fluid flux (12–48 hr: p ≤ 0.001 vs control each) and the deteriorated pulmonary gas exchange (12–48 hr: p < 0.05 vs control each) without increasing the risk of bleeding. Conclusions The present study provides evidence for the interaction between antithrombin and neutrophils in vivo, its pathophysiological

  10. Commensal microbiota stimulate systemic neutrophil migration through induction of serum amyloid A.

    PubMed

    Kanther, Michelle; Tomkovich, Sarah; Xiaolun, Sun; Grosser, Melinda R; Koo, Jaseol; Flynn, Edward J; Jobin, Christian; Rawls, John F

    2014-07-01

    Neutrophils serve critical roles in inflammatory responses to infection and injury, and mechanisms governing their activity represent attractive targets for controlling inflammation. The commensal microbiota is known to regulate the activity of neutrophils and other leucocytes in the intestine, but the systemic impact of the microbiota on neutrophils remains unknown. Here we utilized in vivo imaging in gnotobiotic zebrafish to reveal diverse effects of microbiota colonization on systemic neutrophil development and function. The presence of a microbiota resulted in increased neutrophil number and myeloperoxidase expression, and altered neutrophil localization and migratory behaviours. These effects of the microbiota on neutrophil homeostasis were accompanied by an increased recruitment of neutrophils to injury. Genetic analysis identified the microbiota-induced acute phase protein serum amyloid A (Saa) as a host factor mediating microbial stimulation of tissue-specific neutrophil migratory behaviours. In vitro studies revealed that zebrafish cells respond to Saa exposure by activating NF-κB, and that Saa-dependent neutrophil migration requires NF-κB-dependent gene expression. These results implicate the commensal microbiota as an important environmental factor regulating diverse aspects of systemic neutrophil development and function, and reveal a critical role for a Saa-NF-κB signalling axis in mediating neutrophil migratory responses. PMID:24373309

  11. DAMPs-activated neutrophil extracellular trap exacerbates sterile inflammatory liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hai; Tohme, Samer; Al-Khafaji, Ahmed B; Tai, Sheng; Loughran, Patricia; Chen, Li; Wang, Shu; Kim, Jiyun; Billiar, Timothy; Wang, Yanming; Tsung, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Innate immunity plays a crucial role in the response to sterile inflammation such as liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. The initiation of liver I/R injury results in the release of damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which trigger innate immune and inflammatory cascade via pattern recognition receptors. Neutrophils are recruited to the liver after I/R and contribute to the organ damage, innate immune and inflammatory responses. Formation of neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) has been recently found in response to various stimuli. However, the role of NETs during liver I/R injury remains unknown. We show that NETs form in the sinusoids of ischemic liver lobes in vivo. This was associated with increased NET markers, serum level of myeloperoxidase (MPO)-DNA complexes and tissue level of citrullinated-histone H3 compared to control mice. Treatment with peptidyl-arginine-deiminase (PAD) 4 inhibitor or DNase I significantly protected hepatocytes and reduced inflammation after liver I/R as evidenced by inhibition of NET formation, indicating the pathophysiological role of NETs in liver I/R injury. In vitro, NETs increase hepatocyte death and induce Kupffer cells to release proinflammatory cytokines. DAMPs, such as HMGB1 and histones, released by injured hepatocytes stimulate NET formation through Toll-like receptor (TLR4)- and TLR9-MyD88 signaling pathways. After neutrophil depletion in mice, the adoptive transfer of TLR4 knockout (KO) or TLR9 KO neutrophils confers significant protection from liver I/R injury with significant decrease in NET formation. In addition, we found inhibition of NET formation by PAD4 inhibitor or DNase I reduces HMGB1 and histone-mediated liver I/R injury. Conclusion DAMPs released during liver I/R promotes NET formation through TLRs signaling pathway. Development of NETs subsequently exacerbates organ damage and initiates inflammatory responses during liver I/R. PMID:25855125

  12. The Anti-Apoptotic Effect of Respiratory Syncytial Virus on Human Peripheral Blood Neutrophils is Mediated by a Monocyte Derived Soluble Factor

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Christopher M; Plant, Karen; Newton, Susan; Hobson, Lynsey; Whyte, Moira K.B; Everard, Mark L

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) causes annual epidemics of respiratory disease particularly affecting infants. The associated airway inflammation is characterized by an intense neutrophilia. This neutrophilic inflammation appears to be responsible for much of the pathology and symptoms. Previous work from our group had shown that there are factors within the airways of infants with RSV bronchiolitis that inhibit neutrophil apoptosis. This study was undertaken to determine if RSV can directly affect neutrophil survival. Neutrophils were isolated from citrated venous blood (collected from healthy adult volunteers) by discontinuous plasma: Percoll gradient centrifugation and, in some experiments, further purified by negative immunomagnetic bead selection. The effect of RSV on neutrophil survival was measured by Annexin V-PE /To-Pro-3 staining and by morphological changes, using Dif-Quick staining of cytospins. Inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis was observed in neutrophils isolated by standard plasma:Percoll gradient when exposed to RSV but not in ultra pure neutrophil preparations. Adding monocytes back to ultra purified preparations restored the effect. The inhibition of apoptosis was observed with both active and UV inactivated virus. The effect is dependent on a soluble factor and appears to be dependent on CD14 receptors on the monocytes. PMID:22046209

  13. Chimaeric Lym-1 monoclonal antibody-mediated cytolysis by neutrophils from G-CSF-treated patients: stimulation by GM-CSF and role of Fc gamma -receptors.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Epstein, A L; Mancini, M; Tortolina, G; Dapino, P; Dallegri, F

    2001-08-01

    Chimaeric Lym-1 (chLym-1) is a monoclonal antibody generated by fusing the variable region genes of murine Lym-1 to human gamma1 and kappa constant regions. Owing to its selectivity and avidity for human malignant B cells, it is an attractive candidate for developing immune-interventions in B-lymphomas. In the attempt to identify rational bases for optimizing potential chLym-1 related therapeutic approaches, we studied the ability of this ch-mAb to trigger neutrophil-mediated Raji cell cytolysis in cooperation with two neutrophil-related cytokines, G-CSF and GM-CSF. ChLym-1 triggered low levels of cytolysis by normal neutrophils but induced consistent cytolysis in neutrophils from individuals treated with G-CSF. When exposed to GM-CSF, neutrophils from subjects treated with G-CSF became potent effectors, also leading to 75% lysis. By using mAbs specific for distinct FcgammaRs, normal neutrophils were inhibited by mAb IV.3, suggesting the intervention of FcgammaRII, constitutively expressed on the cells. On the other hand, neutrophils from patients treated with G-CSF were inhibited by mAb IV.3 plus mAb 197, a finding consistent with a cooperative intervention of FCgammaRII and G-CSF-induced FcgammaRI. The anti-FcgammaRIII mAb 3G8 promoted significant enhancement of the neutrophil cytolytic efficiency. Therefore, neutrophil FcgammaRIII behaves as a down-regulator of the cytolytic potential. The present findings suggest new attempts to develop mAb-based and G-CSF/GM-CSF combined immune-interventions in B lymphomas. PMID:11487281

  14. Chimaeric Lym-1 monoclonal antibody-mediated cytolysis by neutrophils from G-CSF-treated patients: stimulation by GM-CSF and role of Fcγ-receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ottonello, L; Epstein, A L; Mancini, M; Tortolina, G; Dapino, P; Dallegri, F

    2001-01-01

    Chimaeric Lym-1 (chLym-1) is a monoclonal antibody generated by fusing the variable region genes of murine Lym-1 to human γ1 and κ constant regions. Owing to its selectivity and avidity for human malignant B cells, it is an attractive candidate for developing immune-interventions in B-lymphomas. In the attempt to identify rational bases for optimizing potential chLym-1 related therapeutic approaches, we studied the ability of this ch-mAb to trigger neutrophil-mediated Raji cell cytolysis in cooperation with two neutrophil-related cytokines, G-CSF and GM-CSF. ChLym-1 triggered low levels of cytolysis by normal neutrophils but induced consistent cytolysis in neutrophils from individuals treated with G-CSF. When exposed to GM-CSF, neutrophils from subjects treated with G-CSF became potent effectors, also leading to 75% lysis. By using mAbs specific for distinct FcγRs, normal neutrophils were inhibited by mAb IV.3, suggesting the intervention of FcγRII, constitutively expressed on the cells. On the other hand, neutrophils from patients treated with G-CSF were inhibited by mAb IV.3 plus mAb 197, a finding consistent with a cooperative intervention of FCγRII and G-CSF-induced FcγRI. The anti-FcγRIII mAb 3G8 promoted significant enhancement of the neutrophil cytolytic efficiency. Therefore, neutrophil FcγRIII behaves as a down-regulator of the cytolytic potential. The present findings suggest new attempts to develop mAb-based and G-CSF/GM-CSF combined immune-interventions in B lymphomas. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11487281

  15. Beta-hydroxybutyrate abrogates formation of bovine neutrophil extracellular traps and bactericidal activity against mammary pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Grinberg, Navit; Elazar, Sharon; Rosenshine, Ilan; Shpigel, Nahum Y

    2008-06-01

    Escherichia coli is an important bacterial species isolated from bovine mastitis. The rate of neutrophil recruitment into the mammary gland and their bactericidal activity largely affect the severity and outcome of the disease. Ketosis is a common metabolic disease, and affected dairy cows are known to have increased risk for mastitis and other infectious conditions. The disease is associated with high blood and milk levels of beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA), previously shown to negatively affect neutrophil function by unknown mechanisms. We show here that the mammary pathogenic E. coli strain P4 activates normal bovine neutrophils to form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are highly bactericidal against this organism. Preincubation of these neutrophils with increasing concentrations (0.1 to 8 mmol/liter) of BHBA caused a fivefold decrease of E. coli P4 phagocytosis, though intracellular killing was unaffected. Furthermore, BHBA caused a 10-fold decrease in the NETs formed by E. coli P4-activated neutrophils and a similar decrease in NET bactericidal activity against this organism. These negative effects of BHBA on bovine neutrophils might explain the increased susceptibility of ketotic cows to mastitis and other infectious conditions. PMID:18411287

  16. Anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY antibodies promote bacterial opsonization and augment the phagocytic activity of polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Kim; Christophersen, Lars; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Moser, Claus; Høiby, Niels

    2016-07-01

    Moderation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) as part of a critical defense against invading pathogens may offer a promising therapeutic approach to supplement the antibiotic eradication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in non-chronically infected cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We have observed that egg yolk antibodies (IgY) harvested from White leghorn chickens that target P. aeruginosa opsonize the pathogen and enhance the PMN-mediated respiratory burst and subsequent bacterial killing in vitro. The effects on PMN phagocytic activity were observed in different Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, including clinical isolates from non-chronically infected CF patients. Thus, oral prophylaxis with anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY may boost the innate immunity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the CF setting by facilitating a rapid and prompt bacterial clearance by PMNs. PMID:26901841

  17. Tumor cell lysis by activated human neutrophils: analysis of neutrophil-delivered oxidative attack and role of leukocyte function-associated antigen 1.

    PubMed

    Dallegri, F; Ottonello, L; Ballestrero, A; Dapino, P; Ferrando, F; Patrone, F; Sacchetti, C

    1991-02-01

    The lysis of tumor cells, and other nucleated mammalian cells, by neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) triggered by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) represents a widely used model system to dissect the PMN cytolytic armamentarium, potentially responsible for the cell damage at tissue sites of PMN activation. Although oxidants are generally considered to be instrumental in the target lysis by PMNs, the mediators actually involved remain a matter of controversy. Moreover, other factors potentially crucial to the lysis have not been clearly identified. In order to reexamine the determinants of the cytolytic process, we studied the events underlying the PMA-triggered PMN-delivered attack against two different targets, selected on the basis of preliminary experiments (B lymphoblastoid Daudi cells and erythroleukemic K 562 cells). The results suggest that the lysis is promoted by hypochlorous acid (HOCl) or a compound with characteristics very similar to HOCl itself. No evidence was obtained for the intervention or contribution of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl (OH.) radicals, and the major HOCl-derived chloramines. PMNs appeared to use 35% of the generated H2O2 to produce HOCl, while the remainder appears to be consumed by PMNs themselves and target cells as well. Moreover, PMNs and target cells coaggregated at an early step of the cytolytic reaction, through a process efficiently prevented by a monoclonal antibody (MoAb J-90) directed against leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1). The inhibition of the PMN-target aggregation by the MoAb J-90 resulted in the impairment of the lysis, despite a normal generation of HOCl. Thus, the data demonstrate that the PMA-triggered lysis of tumor target cells by PMNs requires at least two events, occurring simultaneously: the LFA-1-mediated effector-target adherence and the PMN production of HOCl. The intervention of the LFA-1-mediated PMN-target adherence in the PMA-triggered lysis is likely to allow PMNs to

  18. Inactivated pepsin inhibits neutrophil activation by Fcgamma-receptor-dependent and independent stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kustiawan, Iwan; Derksen, Ninotska; Rispens, Theo

    2016-08-01

    Pepsin is widely used to produce F(ab')2 fragments of immunoglobulin G (IgG). In many cases, at least part of the pepsin will remain present in the F(ab')2 preparation, albeit in (irreversibly) inactivated form. Here we report on a potent immunomodulatory effect of irreversibly inactivated pepsin on activated human neutrophils. Degranulation, induced by coated IgG or via cytochalasin B/N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe, was measured by quantifying elastase release, and was found to be inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by inactivated pepsin. Since a number of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) products are also treated by limited digestion with pepsin, we investigated if pepsin would be present in quantities large enough to inhibit neutrophil activation. The amounts of pepsin detected in three different pepsin-treated IVIg products were found to be too low to induce an effect, at least in an in vitro setting. PMID:27368805

  19. Cytoprotection against neutrophil-delivered oxidant attack by antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Dallegri, F; Dapino, P; Pastorino, G; Sacchetti, C

    1991-11-27

    In the present study we have investigated the effect of six antibiotics (penicillin G, ceftazidime, cephotaxime, cephoperazon, ampicillin and piperacillin) on the neutrophil cytolytic activity by using a system constituted of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-triggered neutrophils and 51Cr-labelled lymphoblastoid Daudi target cells. The results demonstrate that five of these drugs (ceftazidime, cephotaxime, cephoperazon, ampicillin and piperacillin) are capable of inhibiting the neutrophil cytolytic activity by inactivating the hypochlorous acid (HOCl) generated extracellularly by the myeloperoxidase pathway and crucial to the target cell lysis. Penicillin G had no effect on neutrophil-mediated cytolysis. Thus, these data demonstrate that ceftazidime, cephotaxime, cephoperazon, ampicillin and piperacillin lower the neutrophil-mediated target cell damage by a HOCl-scavenging mechanism, suggesting a possible cytoprotective role for these drugs during infections. PMID:1662510

  20. Retinoid agonist Am80-enhanced neutrophil bactericidal activity arising from granulopoiesis in vitro and in a neutropenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wanjing; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Li, Lin; Mittal, Rahul; Zhang, Xiaokun; Shudo, Koichi; He, Qiaojun; Prasadarao, Nemani V; Wu, Lingtao

    2013-02-01

    Despite advances in the therapeutic use of recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to promote granulopoiesis of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), neutropenia remains one of the most serious complications of cancer chemotherapy. We discovered that retinoid agonist Am80 (tamibarotene) is more potent than G-CSF in coordinating neutrophil differentiation and immunity development. Am80-induced neutrophils (AINs) either in vitro or in neutropenic mouse model displayed strong bactericidal activities, similar to those of human peripheral blood neutrophils (PBNs) or mouse peripheral blood neutrophils (MPBNs) but markedly greater than did G-CSF–induced neutrophils (GINs). In contrast to GINs but similar to PBNs, the enhanced bacterial killing by AINs accompanied both better granule maturation and greater coexpression of CD66 antigen with the integrin β2 subunit CD18. Consistently, anti-CD18 antibody neutralized Am80-induced bactericidal activities of AINs. These studies demonstrate that Am80 is more effective than G-CSF in promoting neutrophil differentiation and bactericidal activities, probably through coordinating the functional interaction of CD66 with CD18 to enhance the development of neutrophil immunity during granulopoiesis. Our findings herein suggest a molecular rationale for developing new therapy against neutropenia using Am80 as a cost-effective treatment option. PMID:23243275

  1. Retinoid agonist Am80-enhanced neutrophil bactericidal activity arising from granulopoiesis in vitro and in a neutropenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wanjing; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Li, Lin; Mittal, Rahul; Zhang, Xiaokun; Shudo, Koichi; He, Qiaojun; Prasadarao, Nemani V.

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in the therapeutic use of recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to promote granulopoiesis of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), neutropenia remains one of the most serious complications of cancer chemotherapy. We discovered that retinoid agonist Am80 (tamibarotene) is more potent than G-CSF in coordinating neutrophil differentiation and immunity development. Am80-induced neutrophils (AINs) either in vitro or in neutropenic mouse model displayed strong bactericidal activities, similar to those of human peripheral blood neutrophils (PBNs) or mouse peripheral blood neutrophils (MPBNs) but markedly greater than did G-CSF–induced neutrophils (GINs). In contrast to GINs but similar to PBNs, the enhanced bacterial killing by AINs accompanied both better granule maturation and greater coexpression of CD66 antigen with the integrin β2 subunit CD18. Consistently, anti-CD18 antibody neutralized Am80-induced bactericidal activities of AINs. These studies demonstrate that Am80 is more effective than G-CSF in promoting neutrophil differentiation and bactericidal activities, probably through coordinating the functional interaction of CD66 with CD18 to enhance the development of neutrophil immunity during granulopoiesis. Our findings herein suggest a molecular rationale for developing new therapy against neutropenia using Am80 as a cost-effective treatment option. PMID:23243275

  2. Acetaminophen prevents oxidative burst and delays apoptosis in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Marisa; Costa, Vera M; Ribeiro, Daniela; Couto, Diana; Porto, Graça; Carvalho, Félix; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2013-05-23

    Acetaminophen is a frequently prescribed over-the-counter drug to reduce fever and pain in the event of inflammatory process. As neutrophils are relevant cells in inflammatory processes, the putative interaction of acetaminophen with these cells, if present, would be of paramount importance. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of acetaminophen in human neutrophils' oxidative burst and lifespan in vitro. The obtained results demonstrate that acetaminophen efficiently modulates neutrophils' oxidative burst in phorbol myristate acetate-activated neutrophils, in a concentration-dependent manner, at in vivo relevant concentrations. It was clearly demonstrated that acetaminophen is a strong scavenger of HOCl and H2O2, which probably contributed to the effect observed in neutrophils. Acetaminophen also induced the depletion of glutathione in stimulated neutrophils, suggesting its transformation into a reactive intermediate. Obtained results further revealed that acetaminophen affects programmed cell death of human neutrophils, resulting in a delay of previously stimulated neutrophils-mediated apoptosis. Overall, our data suggested that acetaminophen has considerable potential to be included in anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategies, by preventing biological damage induced by an excessive production of reactive species generated in activated neutrophils and by extending the lifespan of neutrophils, favoring the elimination of pathogens, thus contributing to tissue healing and resolution of inflammation. PMID:23518321

  3. Chronic Inflammation and Neutrophil Activation as Possible Causes of Joint Diseases in Ballet Dancers

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Leandro da Silva; Santos, Vinicius Coneglian; de Moura, Nivaldo Ribeiro; Dermargos, Alexandre; Cury-Boaventura, Maria Fernanda; Gorjão, Renata; Pithon-Curi, Tania Cristina; Hatanaka, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we investigated the effects of a ballet class on the kinetic profiles of creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities, cytokines, complement component 3 (C3), and the concentrations of immunoglobulin (Ig), IgA and IgM, in ballerinas. We also verified neutrophil death and ROS release. Blood samples were taken from 13 dancers before, immediately after, and 18 hours after a ballet class. The ballet class increased the plasma activities of CK-total (2.0-fold) immediately after class, while the activities of CK-cardiac muscle (1.0-fold) and LDH (3.0-fold) were observed to increase 18 hours after the class. Levels of the TNF-α, IL-1β, IgG, and IgA were not affected under the study conditions. The exercise was found to induce neutrophil apoptosis (6.0-fold) 18 hours after the ballet class. Additionally, immediately after the ballet class, the neutrophils from the ballerinas were found to be less responsive to PMA stimulus. Conclusion. Ballet class was found to result in inflammation in dancers. The inflammation caused by the ballet class remained for 18 hours after the exercise. These findings are important in preventing the development of chronic lesions that are commonly observed in dancers, such as those with arthritis and synovitis. PMID:24701035

  4. Oxidation of propylthiouracil to reactive metabolites by activated neutrophils. Implications for agranulocytosis.

    PubMed

    Waldhauser, L; Uetrecht, J

    1991-01-01

    Propylthiouracil (PTU) is associated with idiosyncratic agranulocytosis that may be due to reactive metabolites generated from oxidative metabolism by neutrophils. Therefore, the metabolism of PTU was investigated in activated neutrophils. Three oxidized metabolites were observed on HPLC: PTU-disulfide, propyluracil-2-sulfinate, and propyluracil-2-sulfonate (PTU-SO3-). No metabolism was detected in cells that had not been activated. Metabolism was inhibited by sodium azide and by catalase. The same products were produced by myeloperoxidase (MPO) in an MPO/H2O2/Cl- system. PTU inhibited its own metabolism; however, complete conversion to PTU-SO3- could be achieved with optimal PTU concentrations. MPO/H2O2 without Cl- produced only slight metabolism. The PTU-sulfenyl chloride is a postulated intermediate. In the absence of chloride, oxidation might proceed through propyluracil-2-sulfenic acid. The sulfenyl chloride and PTU-SO3- are both chemically reactive with sulfhydryl compounds such as N-acetylcysteine. Such reactive metabolites, generated by activated neutrophils, may be involved in hypersensitivity reactions associated with PTU, such as agranulocytosis. PMID:1676636

  5. [The mechanism of bactericidal activity in phagosomes of neutrophils].

    PubMed

    Murav'ev, R A; But, P G; Fomina, V A; Rogovin, V V

    2002-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase plays the key role in antimicrobial of phagocytes. This enzyme uses hydrogen peroxide and chloride to catalyze hypochlorous acid formation. HOCl is the most probable agent in the oxygen-dependent bactericidal activity in the phagocyte phagosome. Chlorination markers indicate HOCl generation in the quantities lethal for bacteria. Enzymatic assay for myeloperoxidase indicates proceeding of other reactions involved in bactericidal activity. Superoxide integrates many activities of this kind and is important for physiological function of myeloperoxidase. Elucidation of phagosomes biochemistry can help us to understand why certain pathogens survive in such unfavorable environment. PMID:12180008

  6. Neutrophil's weapons in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Bobryshev, Yuri V; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2015-12-01

    Neutrophils are important components of immunity associated with inflammatory responses against a broad spectrum of pathogens. These cells could be rapidly activated by proinflammatory stimuli and migrate to the inflamed and infected sites where they release a variety of cytotoxic molecules with antimicrobial activity. Neutrophil antibacterial factors include extracellular proteases, redox enzymes, antimicrobial peptides, and small bioactive molecules. In resting neutrophils, these factors are stored in granules and released upon activation during degranulation. These factors could be also secreted in a neutrophil-derived microparticle-dependent fashion. Neutrophils exhibit a unique property to produce neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) composed of decondensed chromatin and granular proteins to catch and kill bacteria. Neutrophil-released factors are efficient in inactivation and elimination of pathogens through oxidation-dependent or independent damage of bacterial cells, inactivation and neutralization of virulence factors and other mechanisms. However, in chronic atherosclerosis-associated inflammation, protective function of neutrophils could be impaired and misdirected against own cells. This could lead to deleterious effects and progressive vascular injury. In atherogenesis, a pathogenic role of neutrophils could be especially seen in early stages associated with endothelial dysfunction and induction of vascular inflammation and in late atherosclerosis associated with plaque rupture and atherothrombosis. Assuming a prominent impact of neutrophils in cardiovascular pathology, developing therapeutic strategies targeting neutrophil-specific antigens could have a promising clinical potential. PMID:26551083

  7. Mechanism of arachidonic acid liberation in platelet-activating factor-stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, S.; Suganuma, A.; Sato, M.; Tohmatsu, T.; Nozawa, Y. )

    1989-08-15

    Upon stimulation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with platelet-activating factor (PAF), arachidonic acid (AA) is released from membrane phospholipids. The mechanism for AA liberation, a key step in the synthesis of biologically active eicosanoids, was investigated. PAF was found to elicit an increase in the cytoplasmic level of free Ca2+ as monitored by fluorescent indicator fura 2. When (3H) AA-labeled neutrophils were exposed to PAF, the enhanced release of AA was observed with a concomitant decrease of radioactivity in phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine fractions. The inhibitors of phospholipase A2, mepacrine and 2-(p-amylcinnamoyl)-amino-4-chlorobenzoic acid, effectively suppressed the liberation of (3H)AA from phospholipids, indicating that liberation of AA is mainly catalyzed by the action of phospholipase A2. The extracellular Ca2+ is not required for AA release. However, intracellular Ca2+ antagonists, TMB-8 and high dose of quin 2/AM drastically reduced the liberation of AA induced by PAF, indicating that Ca2+ is an essential factor for phospholipase A2 activation. PAF raised the fluorescence of fura 2 at concentrations as low as 8 pM which reached a maximal level about 8 nM, whereas more than nM order concentrations of PAF was required for the detectable release of (3H)AA. Pretreatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin resulted in complete abolition of AA liberation in response to PAF. However, the fura 2 response to PAF was not effectively inhibited by toxin treatment. In human neutrophil homogenate and membrane preparations, guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) stimulated AA release and potentiated the action of PAF. Guanosine 5'-O-(thiodiphosphate) inhibited the effects of guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate).

  8. Visualization of Signaling Molecules During Neutrophil Recruitment in Transgenic Mice Expressing FRET Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Rei; Kamioka, Yuji; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2016-01-01

    A number of chemical mediators regulate neutrophil recruitment to inflammatory sites either positively or negatively. Although the actions of each chemical mediator on the intracellular signaling networks controlling cell migration have been studied with neutrophils cultured in vitro, how such chemical mediators act cooperatively or counteractively in vivo remains largely unknown. To understand the mechanisms regulating neutrophil recruitment to the inflamed intestine in vivo, we recently generated transgenic mice expressing biosensors based on FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) and set up two-photon excitation microscopy to observe the gastrointestinal tract in living mice. By measuring FRET in neutrophils, we showed activity changes of protein kinases in the neutrophils recruited to inflamed intestines. In this chapter, we describe the protocol used to visualize the protein kinase activities in neutrophils of the inflamed intestine of transgenic mice expressing the FRET biosensors. PMID:27246030

  9. Endothelial cell activation leads to neutrophil transmigration as supported by the sequential roles of ICAM-2, JAM-A, and PECAM-1

    PubMed Central

    Woodfin, Abigail; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; Imhof, Beat A.; Dejana, Elisabetta; Engelhardt, Britta

    2009-01-01

    Leukocyte transmigration is mediated by endothelial cell (EC) junctional molecules, but the associated mechanisms remain unclear. Here we investigate how intercellular adhesion molecule-2 (ICAM-2), junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A), and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) mediate neutrophil transmigration in a stimulus-dependent manner (eg, as induced by interleukin-1β [IL-1β] but not tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α]), and demonstrate their ability to act in sequence. Using a cell-transfer technique, transmigration responses of wild-type and TNF-α p55/p75 receptor-deficient leukocytes (TNFR−/−) through mouse cremasteric venules were quantified by fluorescence intravital microscopy. Whereas wild-type leukocytes showed a normal transmigration response to TNF-α in ICAM-2−/−, JAM-A−/−, and PECAM-1−/− recipient mice, TNFR−/− leukocytes exhibited a reduced transmigration response. Hence, when the ability of TNF-α to directly stimulate neutrophils is blocked, TNF-α–induced neutrophil transmigration is rendered dependent on ICAM-2, JAM-A, and PECAM-1, suggesting that the stimulus-dependent role of these molecules is governed by the target cell being activated. Furthermore, analysis of the site of arrest of neutrophils in inflamed tissues from ICAM-2−/−, JAM-A−/−, and PECAM-1−/− mice demonstrated that these molecules act sequentially to mediate transmigration. Collectively, the findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms of action of key molecules implicated in leukocyte transmigration. PMID:19211506

  10. Ambroxol inhibits neutrophil respiratory burst activated by alpha chain integrin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Peroni, D G; Moser, S; Gallo, G; Pigozzi, R; Tenero, L; Zanoni, L; Boner, A L; Piacentini, G L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the possible anti-oxidant effect(s) of Ambroxol on neutrophils activated by ligand-binding of the drug with membrane-associated adhesion integrin CD11a and to estimate dose-response changes in oxygen free radical production. The amount of free radical production by anti-CD11a- and anti-CD4-coated neutrophils stimulated with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and challenged with increasing concentration of Ambroxol, was evaluated within a time frame of 90 minutes. A significant dose-dependent effect response of Ambroxol on O2‾ production by cells coated with anti-CD11a antibody was observed. This preliminary study opens a new perspective on the therapeutic role of Ambroxol as an antioxidant drug and for its potential use in controlling oxidative stress, particularly in leukocyte-dependent inflammation. PMID:24355223

  11. Leptin as a uremic toxin interferes with neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, Luciano; Gnerre, Paola; Bertolotto, Maria; Mancini, Marina; Dapino, Patrizia; Russo, Rodolfo; Garibotto, Giacomo; Barreca, Tommaso; Dallegri, Franco

    2004-09-01

    Leptin is a pleiotropic molecule involved in energy homeostasis, hematopoiesis, inflammation, and immunity. Hypoleptinemia characterizing starvation has been strictly related to increased susceptibility to infection secondary to malnutrition. Nevertheless, ESRD is characterized by high susceptibility to bacterial infection despite hyperleptinemia. Defects in neutrophils play a crucial role in the infectious morbidity, and several uremic toxins that are capable of depressing neutrophil functions have been identified. Only a few and contrasting reports about leptin and neutrophils are available. This study provides evidence that leptin inhibits neutrophil migration in response to classical chemoattractants. Moreover, serum from patients with ESRD inhibits migration of normal neutrophils in response to N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine with a strict correlation between serum leptin levels and serum ability to suppress neutrophil locomotion. Finally, the serum inhibitory activity can be effectively prevented by immune depletion of leptin. The results also show, however, that leptin by itself is endowed with chemotactic activity toward neutrophils. The two activities-inhibition of the cell response to chemokines and stimulation of neutrophil migration-could be detected at similar concentrations. On the contrary, neutrophils exposed to leptin did not display detectable [Ca(2+)](i) mobilization, oxidant production, or beta(2)-integrin upregulation. The results demonstrate that leptin is a pure chemoattractant devoid of secretagogue properties that are capable of inhibiting neutrophil chemotaxis to classical neutrophilic chemoattractants. Taking into account the crucial role of neutrophils in host defense, the leptin-mediated ability of ERSD serum to inhibit neutrophil chemotaxis appears as a potential mechanism that contributes to the establishment of infections in ERSD. PMID:15339985

  12. Generation and secretion of eosinophilotactic activity from human polymorphonuclear neutrophils by various mechanisms of cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    König, W; Frickhofen, N; Tesch, H

    1979-01-01

    An eosinophil chemotactic factor(s) (ECF) can be generated from human polymorphonuclear neutrophils by the calcium ionophore, phagocytosis, arachidonic acid and hypotonic lysis. In kinetic studies it is observed that peak ECF activity is released prior to the maximum of lysosomal enzyme release with the calcium ionophore, phagocytosis and arachidonic acid, while under conditions of hypotonic exposure ECF activity appears after the maximum of enzyme release. The ECF obtained by hypotonic exposure shows a fluctuating pattern with sharp peaks and steep fall-offs in activity. The ECF-release for each stimulus is temperature dependent; extracellular calcium is required when the ionophore or phagocytosis are used as stimuli, while with arachidonic acid and hypotonic exposure no extracellular calcium is necessary for ECF-release. On Sephadex G-25 each preparation of ECF eluted in the low molecular weight range at approximately 500 daltons. Eosinophils can be deactivated and cross-deactivated with the various ECF-preparations indicating either a molecular identity or a common mode of action on eosinophils. PMID:437847

  13. Ursolic Acid Inhibits Superoxide Production in Activated Neutrophils and Attenuates Trauma-Hemorrhage Shock-Induced Organ Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Shen, Hsin-I; Liu, Fu-Chao; Tsai, Hsin-I; Wu, Yang-Chang; Chang, Fang-Rong; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil activation is associated with the development of organ injury after trauma–hemorrhagic shock. In the present study, ursolic acid inhibited the superoxide anion generation and elastase release in human neutrophils. Administration of ursolic acid attenuated trauma–hemorrhagic shock-induced hepatic and lung injuries in rats. In addition, administration of ursolic acid attenuated the hepatic malondialdehyde levels and reduced the plasma aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels after trauma–hemorrhagic shock. In conclusion, ursolic acid, a bioactive natural compound, inhibits superoxide anion generation and elastase release in human neutrophils and ameliorates trauma–hemorrhagic shock-induced organ injury in rats. PMID:25360589

  14. PEGylated single-walled carbon nanotubes activate neutrophils to increase production of hypochlorous acid, the oxidant capable of degrading nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasova, Irina I.; Vakhrusheva, Tatyana V.; Sokolov, Alexey V.; Kostevich, Valeria A.; Gusev, Alexandr A.; Gusev, Sergey A.; Melnikova, Viktoriya I.; Lobach, Anatolii S.

    2012-10-01

    Perspectives for the use of carbon nanotubes in biomedical applications depend largely on their ability to degrade in the body into products that can be easily cleared out. Carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (c-SWCNTs) were shown to be degraded by oxidants generated by peroxidases in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. In the present study we demonstrated that conjugation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to c-SWCNTs does not interfere with their degradation by peroxidase/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system or by hypochlorite. Comparison of different heme-containing proteins for their ability to degrade PEG-SWCNTs has led us to conclude that the myeloperoxidase (MPO) product hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is the major oxidant that may be responsible for biodegradation of PEG-SWCNTs in vivo. MPO is secreted mainly by neutrophils upon activation. We hypothesize that SWCNTs may enhance neutrophil activation and therefore stimulate their own biodegradation due to MPO-generated HOCl. PEG-SWCNTs at concentrations similar to those commonly used in in vivo studies were found to activate isolated human neutrophils to produce HOCl. Both PEG-SWCNTs and c-SWCNTs enhanced HOCl generation from isolated neutrophils upon serum-opsonized zymosan stimulation. Both types of nanotubes were also found to activate neutrophils in whole blood samples. Intraperitoneal injection of a low dose of PEG-SWCNTs into mice induced an increase in percentage of circulating neutrophils and activation of neutrophils and macrophages in the peritoneal cavity, suggesting the evolution of an inflammatory response. Activated neutrophils can produce high local concentrations of HOCl, thereby creating the conditions favorable for degradation of the nanotubes. -- Highlights: ► Myeloperoxidase (MPO) product hypochlorous acid is able to degrade CNTs. ► PEGylated SWCNTs stimulate isolated neutrophils to produce hypochlorous acid. ► SWCNTs are capable of activating neutrophils in blood samples. ► Activation of

  15. Proteinase 3 and neutrophil elastase enhance inflammation in mice by inactivating antiinflammatory progranulin

    PubMed Central

    Kessenbrock, Kai; Fröhlich, Leopold; Sixt, Michael; Lämmermann, Tim; Pfister, Heiko; Bateman, Andrew; Belaaouaj, Azzaq; Ring, Johannes; Ollert, Markus; Fässler, Reinhard; Jenne, Dieter E.

    2008-01-01

    Neutrophil granulocytes form the body’s first line of antibacterial defense, but they also contribute to tissue injury and noninfectious, chronic inflammation. Proteinase 3 (PR3) and neutrophil elastase (NE) are 2 abundant neutrophil serine proteases implicated in antimicrobial defense with overlapping and potentially redundant substrate specificity. Here, we unraveled a cooperative role for PR3 and NE in neutrophil activation and noninfectious inflammation in vivo, which we believe to be novel. Mice lacking both PR3 and NE demonstrated strongly diminished immune complex–mediated (IC-mediated) neutrophil infiltration in vivo as well as reduced activation of isolated neutrophils by ICs in vitro. In contrast, in mice lacking just NE, neutrophil recruitment to ICs was only marginally impaired. The defects in mice lacking both PR3 and NE were directly linked to the accumulation of antiinflammatory progranulin (PGRN). Both PR3 and NE cleaved PGRN in vitro and during neutrophil activation and inflammation in vivo. Local administration of recombinant PGRN potently inhibited neutrophilic inflammation in vivo, demonstrating that PGRN represents a crucial inflammation-suppressing mediator. We conclude that PR3 and NE enhance neutrophil-dependent inflammation by eliminating the local antiinflammatory activity of PGRN. Our results support the use of serine protease inhibitors as antiinflammatory agents. PMID:18568075

  16. Purified and Recombinant Hemopexin: Protease Activity and Effect on Neutrophil Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tian; Liu, Jialin; Huang, Feng; van Engelen, Tjitske SR; Thundivalappil, Sujatha R; Riley, Frank E; Super, Michael; Watters, Alexander L; Smith, Ann; Brinkman, Nathan; Ingber, Donald E; Warren, H Shaw

    2016-01-01

    Infusion of the heme-binding protein hemopexin has been proposed as a novel approach to decrease heme-induced inflammation in settings of red blood cell breakdown, but questions have been raised as to possible side effects related to protease activity and inhibition of chemotaxis. We evaluated protease activity and effects on chemotaxis of purified plasma hemopexin obtained from multiple sources as well as a novel recombinant fusion protein Fc-hemopexin. Amidolytic assay was performed to measure the protease activity of several plasma-derived hemopexin and recombinant Fc-hemopexin. Hemopexin was added to the human monocyte culture in the presence of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and also injected into mice intravenously (i.v.) 30 min before inducing neutrophil migration via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of thioglycolate. Control groups received the same amount of albumin. Protease activity varied widely between hemopexins. Recombinant Fc-hemopexin bound heme, inhibited the synergy of heme with LPS on tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production from monocytes, and had minor but detectable protease activity. There was no effect of any hemopexin preparation on chemotaxis, and purified hemopexin did not alter the migration of neutrophils into the peritoneal cavity of mice. Heme and LPS synergistically induced the release of LTB4 from human monocytes, and hemopexin blocked this release, as well as chemotaxis of neutrophils in response to activated monocyte supernatants. These results suggest that hemopexin does not directly affect chemotaxis through protease activity, but may decrease heme-driven chemotaxis and secondary inflammation by attenuating the induction of chemoattractants from monocytes. This property could be beneficial in some settings to control potentially damaging inflammation induced by heme. PMID:26772775

  17. α-enolase Causes Pro-Inflammatory Activation of Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells and Primes Neutrophils through Plasmin Activation of Protease-Activated Receptor-2

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Ashley; Tucker, Nicole; Kelher, Marguerite R.; Khan, Samina Y.; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Wohlauer, Max; Hansen, Kirk; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Sauaia, Angels; Banerjee, Anirban; Moore, Ernest E.; Silliman, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory activation of vascular endothelium leading to increased surface expression of adhesion molecules and neutrophil (PMN) sequestration and subsequent activation is paramount in the development of acute lung (ALI) and organ injury in injured patients. We hypothesize that α-enolase, which accumulates in injured patients primes PMNs and causes pro-inflammatory activation of endothelial cells leading to PMN-mediated cytotoxicity. Methods Proteomic analyses of field plasma samples from injured vs. healthy patients was used for protein identification. Human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) were incubated with α-enolase or thrombin, and ICAM-1 surface expression was measured by flow cytometry. A two-event in vitro model of PMN cytotoxicity HMVECs activated with α-enolase, thrombin, or buffer was used as targets for lysophosphatidylcholine-primed or buffer-treated PMNs. The PMN priming activity of α-enolase was completed, and lysates from both PMNs and HMVECs were immunoblotted for protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and PAR-2 and co-precipitation of α-enolase with PAR-2 and plasminogen/plasmin. Results α-enolase increased 10.8-fold in injured patients (p<0.05). Thrombin and α-enolase significantly increased ICAM-1 surface expression on HMVECs, which was inhibited by anti-proteases, induced PMN adherence, and served as the first event in the two-event model of PMN cytotoxicity. α-enolase co-precipitated with PAR-2 and plasminogen/plasmin on HMVECs and PMNs and induced PMN priming, which was inhibited by tranexamic acid, and enzymatic activity was not required. We conclude that α-enolase increases post-injury and may activate pulmonary endothelial cells and prime PMNs through plasmin activity and PAR-2 activation. Such pro-inflammatory endothelial activation may predispose to PMN-mediated organ injury. PMID:25944790

  18. Neutrophil MiRNA-128-3p is Decreased During Active Phase of Granulo-matosis with Polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Surmiak, Marcin; Hubalewska-Mazgaj, Magdalena; Wawrzycka-Adamczyk, Katarzyna; Musiał, Jacek; Sanak, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis is a rare chronic inflammatory disease. In this multisystem autoimmune disorder neutrophils cause small vessels necrosis and infiltrate perivascular tissue to form granulomas. Progression of the disease is evaluated by the symptoms score and by a titer of anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies. Despite glucocorticoid and immunosuppressive therapy, prognosis is complicated by chronic renal insufficiency, hearing loss and skin ulceration. In this preliminary study we tested the hypothesis that altered neutrophil expression of miRNAs can contribute to the cell activation, extracellular traps formation and decreased apoptosis. First we compared a profile of 728 miRNAs expressed in circulating neutrophils of patients with active disease and matched healthy donors. Subsequently, candidate miRNAs were quantified in neutrophils from 16 subjects with active disease, 16 asymptomatic patients at the remission and in 16 healthy controls. Out of 11 candidate miRNAs, only miR-128-3p was both biologically (relative quantity < 30% control or remission patients) and statistically (p<0.01) decreased in the cells during active stage of the disease. This miRNA correlated with a clinical score of the disease well. A set of 10 transcripts involved in the mechanism of the disease was quantified from the same neutrophils RNA. Relative expression of MMP9 was higher in neutrophils from the patients with active disease and correlated negatively with miR-128-3p. The opposite finding was present for MTA1 transcripts. Despite surprisingly scarce changes in the expression of neutrophil miRNAs, miR-128-3p is the best candidate for deciphering etiology of granulomatosis with polyangiitis. PMID:27047256

  19. Neutrophil MiRNA-128-3p is Decreased During Active Phase of Granulo-matosis with Polyangiitis.

    PubMed

    Surmiak, Marcin; Hubalewska-Mazgaj, Magdalena; Wawrzycka-Adamczyk, Katarzyna; Musiał, Jacek; Sanak, Marek

    2015-10-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis is a rare chronic inflammatory disease. In this multisystem autoimmune disorder neutrophils cause small vessels necrosis and infiltrate perivascular tissue to form granulomas. Progression of the disease is evaluated by the symptoms score and by a titer of anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies. Despite glucocorticoid and immunosuppressive therapy, prognosis is complicated by chronic renal insufficiency, hearing loss and skin ulceration. In this preliminary study we tested the hypothesis that altered neutrophil expression of miRNAs can contribute to the cell activation, extracellular traps formation and decreased apoptosis. First we compared a profile of 728 miRNAs expressed in circulating neutrophils of patients with active disease and matched healthy donors. Subsequently, candidate miRNAs were quantified in neutrophils from 16 subjects with active disease, 16 asymptomatic patients at the remission and in 16 healthy controls. Out of 11 candidate miRNAs, only miR-128-3p was both biologically (relative quantity < 30% control or remission patients) and statistically (p<0.01) decreased in the cells during active stage of the disease. This miRNA correlated with a clinical score of the disease well. A set of 10 transcripts involved in the mechanism of the disease was quantified from the same neutrophils RNA. Relative expression of MMP9 was higher in neutrophils from the patients with active disease and correlated negatively with miR-128-3p. The opposite finding was present for MTA1 transcripts. Despite surprisingly scarce changes in the expression of neutrophil miRNAs, miR-128-3p is the best candidate for deciphering etiology of granulomatosis with polyangiitis. PMID:27047256

  20. Activated protein C inhibits neutrophil migration in allergic asthma: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J Daan; Berger, Marieke; Majoor, Christof J; Kager, Liesbeth M; Meijers, Joost C M; Terpstra, Sanne; Nieuwland, Rienk; Boing, Anita N; Lutter, René; Wouters, Diana; van Mierlo, Gerard J; Zeerleder, Sacha S; Bel, Elisabeth H; van't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F; van der Zee, Jaring S; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-12-01

    Asthma patients show evidence of a procoagulant state in their airways, accompanied by an impaired function of the anticoagulant protein C system. We aimed to study the effect of recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC) in allergic asthma patients.We conducted a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, proof-of-concept study in house dust mite (HDM) allergic asthma patients. Patients were randomised to receive intravenous rhAPC (24 µg·kg(-1)·h(-1); n=12) or placebo (n=12) for 11 h. 4 h after the start of infusion, a first bronchoscopy was performed to challenge one lung segment with saline (control) and a contralateral segment with a combination of HDM extract and lipopolysaccharide (HDM+LPS), thereby mimicking environmental house dust exposure. A second bronchoscopy was conducted 8 h after intrabronchial challenge to obtain bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF).rhAPC did not influence HDM+LPS induced procoagulant changes in the lung. In contrast, rhAPC reduced BALF leukocyte counts by 43% relative to placebo, caused by an inhibitory effect on neutrophil influx (64% reduction), while leaving eosinophil influx unaltered. rhAPC also reduced neutrophil degranulation products in the airways.Intravenous rhAPC attenuates HDM+LPS-induced neutrophil migration and protein release in allergic asthma patients by an effect that does not rely on coagulation inhibition. PMID:26381519

  1. In Vitro Oxidation of Collagen Promotes the Formation of Advanced Oxidation Protein Products and the Activation of Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Bochi, Guilherme Vargas; Torbitz, Vanessa Dorneles; de Campos, Luízi Prestes; Sangoi, Manuela Borges; Fernandes, Natieli Flores; Gomes, Patrícia; Moretto, Maria Beatriz; Barbisan, Fernanda; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica; Moresco, Rafael Noal

    2016-04-01

    The accumulation of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) has been linked to several pathological conditions. Here, we investigated collagen as a potential source for AOPP formation and determined the effects of hypochlorous acid (HOCl)-treated collagen (collagen-AOPPs) on human neutrophil activity. We also assessed whether alpha-tocopherol could counteract these effects. Exposure to HOCl increased the levels of collagen-AOPPs. Collagen-AOPPs also stimulated the production of AOPPs, nitric oxide (NO), superoxide radicals (O2 (-)), and HOCl by neutrophils. Collagen-AOPPs induced apoptosis and decreased the number of viable cells. Alpha-tocopherol prevented the formation of collagen-AOPPs, strongly inhibited the collagen-AOPP-induced production of O2 (-) and HOCl, and increased the viability of neutrophils. Our results suggest that collagen is an important protein that interacts with HOCl to form AOPPs, and consequently, collagen-AOPP formation is related to human neutrophil activation and cell death. PMID:26920846

  2. The Effects of Plantago major on the Activation of the Neutrophil Respiratory Burst.

    PubMed

    Reina, Elaine; Al-Shibani, Nouf; Allam, Eman; Gregson, Karen S; Kowolik, Michael; Windsor, L Jack

    2013-10-01

    Plantago major is a common plant that grows worldwide in temperate zones and is found in fields, lawns, and on the roadsides. Its leaves and seeds have been used in almost all parts of the world for centuries as a wound healer, analgesic, antioxidant, and antibiotic, as well as an immune system modulator, antiviral, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory agent. Baicalein and aucubin are the two most biologically active components of P. major, and both have been shown to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Neutrophils have a pivotal role in wound healing and inflammation. Their principal mechanism of host defense is the killing of pathogens via the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro effects of P. major extract, baicalein, and aucubin on human neutrophil respiratory burst activity. The cytotoxicity of the agents was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. A standard luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) assay was utilized to monitor the respiratory burst of the neutrophils after exposure to P. major extract and its two active ingredients, baicalein and aucubin. Three replicates per group were included in each of the three runs of the experiments and analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for statistical analysis. P. major and baicalein were not toxic to the cells at any of the concentrations examined. Aucubin was toxic to the cells only at the highest concentration tested (P = 0.0081). However, genistein was toxic to the cells at all of the concentrations examined except for the lowest concentration of 16.9 μg/ml (P = 0.985). P. major (-0.10 ± 0.11), aucubin (0.06 ± 0.16), baicalein (-0.10 ± 0.11), and genistein (-0.18 ± 0.07) all significantly (P < 0.0001) inhibited ROS production from the neutrophils. P. major extract inhibited neutrophil ROS production, as did aucubin and baicalein. Therefore, these components should be investigated further with relation to

  3. Mechanism of neutrophil recruitment to the lung after pulmonary contusion.

    PubMed

    Hoth, J Jason; Wells, Jonathan D; Hiltbold, Elizabeth M; McCall, Charles E; Yoza, Barbara K

    2011-06-01

    Blunt chest trauma resulting in pulmonary contusion is a common but poorly understood injury. We previously demonstrated that lung contusion activates localized and systemic innate immune mechanisms and recruits neutrophils to the injured lung. We hypothesized that the innate immune and inflammatory activation of neutrophils may figure prominently in the response to lung injury. To investigate this, we used a model of pulmonary contusion in the mouse that is similar to that observed clinically in humans and evaluated postinjury lung function and pulmonary neutrophil recruitment. Comparisons were made between injured mice with and without neutrophil depletion. We further examined the role of chemokines and adhesion receptors in neutrophil recruitment to the injured lung. We found that lung injury and resultant physiological dysfunction after contusion were dependent on the presence of neutrophils in the alveolar space. We show that CXCL1, CXCL2/3, and CXCR2 are involved in neutrophil recruitment to the lung after injury and that intercellular adhesion molecule 1 is locally expressed and actively participates in this process. Injured gp91-deficient mice showed improved lung function, indicating that oxidant production by neutrophil NADPH oxidase mediates lung dysfunction after contusion. These data suggest that both neutrophil presence and function are required for lung injury after lung contusion. PMID:21330942

  4. Neutrophils exposed to A. phagocytophilum under shear stress fail to fully activate, polarize, and transmigrate across inflamed endothelium.

    PubMed

    Schaff, U Y; Trott, K A; Chase, S; Tam, K; Johns, J L; Carlyon, J A; Genetos, D C; Walker, N J; Simon, S I; Borjesson, D L

    2010-07-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an obligate intracellular bacterium that has evolved mechanisms to hijack polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) receptors and signaling pathways to bind, infect, and multiply within the host cell. E-selectin is upregulated during inflammation and is a requisite endothelial receptor that supports PMN capture, rolling, and activation of integrin-mediated arrest. Ligands expressed by PMN that mediate binding to endothelium via E-selectin include sialyl Lewis x (sLe(x))-expressing ligands such as P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and other glycolipids and glycoproteins. As A. phagocytophilum is capable of binding to sLe(x)-expressing ligands expressed on PMN, we hypothesized that acute bacterial adhesion to PMN would subsequently attenuate PMN recruitment during inflammation. We assessed the dynamics of PMN recruitment and migration under shear flow in the presence of a wild-type strain of A. phagocytophilum and compared it with a strain of bacteria that binds to PMN independent of PSGL-1. Acute bacterial engagement with PMN resulted in transient PMN arrest and minimal PMN polarization. Although the wild-type pathogen also signaled activation of beta2 integrins and elicited a mild intracellular calcium flux, downstream signals including PMN transmigration and phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were inhibited. The mutant strain bound less well to PMN and failed to activate beta2 integrins and induce a calcium flux but did result in decreased PMN arrest and polarization that may have been partially mediated by a suppression of p38 MAPK activation. This model suggests that A. phagocytophilum binding to PMN under shear flow during recruitment to inflamed endothelium interferes with normal tethering via E-selectin and navigational signaling of transendothelial migration. PMID:20392928

  5. Moesin regulates neutrophil rolling velocity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Masanori; Hirata, Takako

    2016-01-01

    During inflammation, the selectin-induced slow rolling of neutrophils on venules cooperates with chemokine signaling to mediate neutrophil recruitment into tissues. Previous studies identified P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and CD44 as E-selectin ligands that activate integrins to induce slow rolling. We show here that in TNF-α-treated cremaster muscle venules, slow leukocyte rolling was impaired in mice deficient in moesin, a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family. Accordingly, neutrophil recruitment in a peritonitis model was decreased in moesin-deficient mice when chemokine signaling was blocked with pertussis toxin. These results suggest that moesin contributes to the slow rolling and subsequent recruitment of neutrophils during inflammation. PMID:27131737

  6. Group A Streptococcus Secreted Esterase Hydrolyzes Platelet-Activating Factor to Impede Neutrophil Recruitment and Facilitate Innate Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinquan; Garcia, Cristiana C.; Feng, Wenchao; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Hilmer, Jonathan; Tavares, Luciana P.; Layton, Arthur W.; Quinn, Mark T.; Bothner, Brian; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Lei, Benfang

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of host defense against invading organisms. Thus, pathogens have developed virulence mechanisms to evade the innate immune system. Here, we report a novel means for inhibition of neutrophil recruitment by Group A Streptococcus (GAS). Deletion of the secreted esterase gene (designated sse) in M1T1 GAS strains with (MGAS5005) and without (MGAS2221) a null covS mutation enhances neutrophil ingress to infection sites in the skin of mice. In trans expression of SsE in MGAS2221 reduces neutrophil recruitment and enhances skin invasion. The sse deletion mutant of MGAS5005 (ΔsseMGAS5005) is more efficiently cleared from skin than the parent strain. SsE hydrolyzes the sn-2 ester bond of platelet-activating factor (PAF), converting biologically active PAF into inactive lyso-PAF. KM and kcat of SsE for hydrolysis of 2-thio-PAF were similar to those of the human plasma PAF acetylhydrolase. Treatment of PAF with SsE abolishes the capacity of PAF to induce activation and chemotaxis of human neutrophils. More importantly, PAF receptor-deficient mice significantly reduce neutrophil infiltration to the site of ΔsseMGAS5005 infection. These findings identify the first secreted PAF acetylhydrolase of bacterial pathogens and support a novel GAS evasion mechanism that reduces phagocyte recruitment to sites of infection by inactivating PAF, providing a new paradigm for bacterial evasion of neutrophil responses. PMID:22496650

  7. Improved viability and activity of neutrophils differentiated from HL-60 cells by co-culture with adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yoon Shin; Lim, Goh-Woon; Cho, Kyung-Ah; Woo, So-Youn; Shin, Meeyoung; Yoo, Eun-Sun; Chan Ra, Jeong; Ryu, Kyung-Ha

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neutropenia is a principal complication of cancer treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-culture of neutrophils with AD-MSC retained cell survival and proliferation and inhibited neutrophil apoptosis under serum starved conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD-MSC increased functions of neutrophil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD-MSC promoted the viability of neutrophils by enhancing respiratory burst through the expression of IFN-{alpha}, G-CSF, and TGF-{beta}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD-MSC can be used to improve immunity for neutropenia treatment. -- Abstract: Neutropenia is a principal complication of cancer treatment. We investigated the supportive effect of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs) on the viability and function of neutrophils. Neutrophils were derived from HL-60 cells by dimethylformamide stimulation and cultured with or without AD-MSCs under serum-starved conditions to evaluate neutrophil survival, proliferation, and function. Serum starvation resulted in the apoptosis of neutrophils and decreased cell survival. The co-culture of neutrophils and AD-MSCs resulted in cell survival and inhibited neutrophil apoptosis under serum-starved conditions. The survival rate of neutrophils was prolonged up to 72 h, and the expression levels of interferon (IFN)-{alpha}, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta} in AD-MSCs were increased after co-culture with neutrophils. AD-MSCs promoted the viability of neutrophils by inhibiting apoptosis as well as enhancing respiratory burst, which could potentially be mediated by the increased expression of IFN-{alpha}, G-CSF, and TGF-{beta}. Thus, we conclude that the use of AD-MSCs may be a promising cell-based therapy for increasing immunity by accelerating neutrophil function.

  8. Hevein, an allergenic lectin from rubber latex, activates human neutrophils' oxidative burst.

    PubMed

    Rojas, E; Llinas, P; Rodríguez-Romero, A; Hernández, C; Linares, M; Zenteno, E; Lascurain, R

    2001-04-01

    Hevein is an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) specific lectin that has been hypothesized to participate in the IgE-mediated allergic reactions in patients with latex allergy. In this work we assessed the specificity and biological effect of hevein purified from rubber latex on human leukocytes, using epifluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Purified human granulocytes were stimulated in vitro with hevein, and production of oxidative radicals was measured by reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium formazan. Histochemical staining and flow cytometry showed that hevein recognizes specifically monocytes (CD14+) and neutrophils (CD16+), but not lymphoid cells. Hevein induced oxidative response in purified granulocytes; this effect was 1.3-1.5-fold higher than the effect observed with the lectin WGA (wheat germ agglutinin), or other lectins with different sugar specificity. The induced reactions and cellular recognition by hevein were inhibited with GlcNAc and its oligomers; as well as by glycoproteins containing tri-and tetra-antennary N-glycosydically linked glycans. Our findings suggest that neutrophils are the main target for latex hevein; this lectin induces production of oxidative radicals, which seem to play an important role in tissue damage during latex allergy. PMID:11788802

  9. Neutral serine proteases of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kettritz, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs) exercise tissue-degrading and microbial-killing effects. The spectrum of NSP-mediated functions grows continuously, not least because of methodological progress. Sensitive and specific FRET substrates were developed to study the proteolytic activity of each NSP member. Advanced biochemical methods are beginning to characterize common and specific NSP substrates. The resulting novel information indicates that NSPs contribute not only to genuine inflammatory neutrophil functions but also to autoimmunity, metabolic conditions, and cancer. Tight regulatory mechanisms control the proteolytic potential of NSPs. However, not all NSP functions depend on their enzymatic activity. Proteinase-3 (PR3) is somewhat unique among the NSPs for PR3 functions as an autoantigen. Patients with small-vessel vasculitis develop autoantibodies to PR3 that bind their target antigens on the neutrophil surface and trigger neutrophil activation. These activated cells subsequently contribute to vascular necrosis with life-threatening multiorgan failure. This article discusses various aspects of NSP biology and highlights translational aspects with strong clinical implications. PMID:27558338

  10. Comparative evaluation of the role of the adhesion molecule CD177 in neutrophil interactions with platelets and endothelium.

    PubMed

    Pliyev, Boris K; Menshikov, Mikhail

    2012-09-01

    Neutrophil-specific glycoprotein CD177 is expressed on a subset of human neutrophils and has been shown to be a counter-receptor for platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1, CD31). Previous studies have demonstrated that the interaction of CD177 with endothelial PECAM-1 supports neutrophil transendothelial migration resulting in preferential transmigration of the CD177-expressing neutrophil subset. As PECAM-1 is also abundantly expressed on platelets, we addressed a follow-up suggestion that CD177/PECAM-1 adhesive interaction may mediate platelet-neutrophil interactions and CD177-positive neutrophils may have a competitive advantage over CD177-negative neutrophils in binding platelets. Here, we report that CD177-positive and CD177-negative neutrophils do not differ significantly in their capacity to form platelet-neutrophil conjugates as assayed in whole blood and in mixed preparations of isolated platelets and neutrophils. Under flow conditions, neither platelet nor neutrophil activation resulted in preferential binding of platelets to CD177-expressing neutrophils. Furthermore, no significant difference was found in the ability of both neutrophil subsets to adhere to and migrate across surface-adherent activated platelets, whereas predominantly CD177-positive neutrophils migrated across HUVEC monolayers. In addition, we demonstrated that S(536) N dimorphism of PECAM-1, which affects CD177/PECAM-1 interaction, did not influence the equal capacity of the two neutrophil subsets to interact with platelets but influenced significantly the transendothelial migration of CD177-expressing neutrophils. Thus, CD177/PECAM-1 adhesive interaction, while contributing to neutrophil-endothelial cell interaction in neutrophil transendothelial migration, does not contribute to or is redundant in platelet-neutrophil interactions. PMID:22690867

  11. In vivo hydroquinone exposure alters circulating neutrophil activities and impairs LPS-induced lung inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, André Luiz Teroso; Shimada, Ana Lúcia Borges; Hebeda, Cristina Bichels; de Oliveira, Tiago Franco; de Melo Loureiro, Ana Paula; Filho, Walter Dos Reis Pereira; Santos, Alcinéa Meigikos Dos Anjos; de Lima, Wothan Tavares; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli

    2011-10-01

    Hydroquinone (HQ) is an environmental contaminant which causes immune toxicity. In this study, the effects of exposure to low doses of HQ on neutrophil mobilization into the LPS-inflamed lung were investigated. Male Swiss mice were exposed to aerosolized vehicle (control) or 12.5, 25 or 50ppm HQ (1h/day for 5 days). One hour later, oxidative burst, cell cycle, DNA fragmentation and adhesion molecules expressions in circulating neutrophils were determined by flow cytometry, and plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured by HPLC. Also, 1h later the last exposures, inflammation was induced by LPS inhalation (0.1mg/ml/10min) and 3h later, the numbers of leukocytes in peripheral blood and in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were determined using a Neubauer chamber and stained smears; adhesion molecules expressed on lung microvessel endothelial cells were quantified by immunohistochemistry; myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was measured in the lung tissue by colorimetric assay; and cytokines in the BALF were determined by ELISA. In vivo HQ exposure augmented plasma MDA levels and oxidative activity of neutrophils, but did not cause alterations in cell cycle and DNA fragmentation. Under these conditions, the number of circulating leukocytes was not altered, but HQ exposure reduced LPS-induced neutrophil migration into the alveolar space, as these cells remained in the lung tissue. The impaired neutrophil migration into BALF may not be dependent on reduced cytokines secretions in the BALF and lung endothelial adhesion molecules expressions. However, HQ exposure increased the expression of β(2) and β(3) integrins and platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) in neutrophils, which were not further enhanced by fMLP in vitro stimulation, indicating that HQ exposure activates circulating neutrophils, impairing further stimulatory responses. Therefore, it has been shown, for the first time, that neutrophils are target of lower levels of in vivo HQ

  12. Neutrophil-mediated protection of cultured human vascular endothelial cells from damage by growing Candida albicans hyphae

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.E. Jr.; Rotrosen, D.; Fontaine, J.W.; Haudenschild, C.C.; Diamond, R.D.

    1987-05-01

    Interactions were studied between human neutrophils and cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells invaded by Candida albicans. In the absence of neutrophils, progressive Candida germination and hyphal growth extensively damaged endothelial cell monolayers over a period of 4 to 6 hours, as determined both by morphological changes and release of /sup 51/Cr from radiolabeled endothelial cells. Monolayers were completely destroyed and replaced by hyphae after 18 hours of incubation. In contrast, when added 2 hours after the monolayers had been infected with Candida, neutrophils selectively migrated toward and attached to hyphae at points of hyphal penetration into individual endothelial cells (observed by time-lapse video-microscopy). Attached neutrophils spread over hyphal surfaces both within and beneath the endothelial cells; neutrophil recruitment to initial sites of leukocyte-Candida-endothelial cell interactions continued throughout the first 60 minutes of observation. Neutrophil spreading and stasis were observed only along Candida hyphae and at sites of Candida-endothelial cell interactions. These events resulted in 58.0% killing of Candida at 2 hours and subsequent clearance of Candida from endothelial cell monolayers, as determined by microcolony counts and morphological observation. On introduction of additional neutrophils to yield higher ratios of neutrophils to endothelial cells (10 neutrophils:1 endothelial cell), neutrophil migration toward hyphal elements continued. Despite retraction or displacement of occasional endothelial cells by invading Candida and neutrophils, most endothelial cells remained intact, viable, and motile as verified both by morphological observations and measurement of /sup 51/Cr release from radiolabeled monolayers.

  13. Neutrophils prime a long-lived effector macrophage phenotype that mediates accelerated helminth expulsion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The innate immune cell populations that mediate metazoan parasite expulsion remain largely undefined. We examined the role of innate cells in the immune response to the nematode parasite Nippostrongylus brasiliensis hypothesizing that they may mediate the markedly accelerated CD4+ T cell-independen...

  14. Proteomic Analysis of Neutrophil Priming by PAF.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Elaine N; Neves, Anne C D; Santos, Karina C; Uribe, Carlos E; Souza, Paulo E N; Correa, José R; Castro, Mariana S; Fontes, Wagner

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils are the main cells of the innate immunity inflammatory response. Several factors can activate or stimulate neutrophils, including platelet-activating factor (PAF), a lipid mediator. Some authors consider the activation induced by PAF priming because it triggers limited production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and it amplifies the response of the cell to a subsequent activator. The stimulation is reversible, which is critical for modulating the inflammatory response. Exacerbated inflammatory responses lead to serious diseases, such as systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), among others. Characterizing the stimulation of neutrophils during the possible reversion or prevention of an exaggerated inflammatory response is critical for the development of control strategies. In this study, a proteomic approach was used to identify 36 proteins that differ in abundance between quiescent neutrophils and PAFstimulated neutrophils. The identified proteins were associated with increased DNA repair processes, calcium flux, protein transcription, cytoskeleton alterations that facilitate migration and degranulation, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines and proteins that modulate the inflammatory response. Some of the identified proteins have not been previously reported in neutrophils. PMID:26631175

  15. Investigation of the role of nitric oxide and cyclic GMP in both the activation and inhibition of human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Wanikiat, P; Woodward, D F; Armstrong, R A

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the role of nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic GMP in chemotaxis and superoxide anion generation (SAG) by human neutrophils, by use of selective inhibitors of NO and cyclic GMP pathways. In addition, inhibition of neutrophil chemotaxis by NO releasing compounds and increases in neutrophil nitrate/nitrite and cyclic GMP levels were examined. The ultimate aim of this work was to resolve the paradox that NO both activates and inhibits human neutrophils. A role for NO as a mediator of N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced chemotaxis was supported by the finding that the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NMMA (500 μM) inhibited chemotaxis; EC50 for fMLP 28.76±5.62 and 41.13±4.77 pmol/106 cells with and without L-NMMA, respectively. Similarly the NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO (100 μM) inhibited chemotaxis; EC50 for fMLP 19.71±4.23 and 31.68±8.50 pmol/106 cells with and without carboxy-PTIO, respectively. A role for cyclic GMP as a mediator of chemotaxis was supported by the finding that the guanylyl cyclase inhibitor LY 83583 (100 μM) completely inhibited chemotaxis and suppressed the maximal response; EC50 for fMLP 32.53±11.18 and 85.21±15.14 pmol/106 cells with and without LY 83583, respectively. The same pattern of inhibition was observed with the G-kinase inhibitor KT 5823 (10 μM); EC50 for fMLP 32.16±11.35 and >135 pmol/106 cells with and without KT 5823, respectively. The phosphatase inhibitor, 2,3-diphosphoglyceric acid (DPG) (100 μM) which inhibits phospholipase D, attenuated fMLP-induced chemotaxis; EC50 for fMLP 19.15±4.36 and 61.52±16.2 pmol/106 cells with and without DPG, respectively. Although the NOS inhibitors L-NMMA and L-canavanine (500 μM) failed to inhibit fMLP-induced SAG, carboxy-PTIO caused significant inhibition (EC50 for fMLP 36.15±7.43 and 86.31±14.06 nM and reduced the maximal response from 22.14±1.5 to 9.8±1.6 nmol O2−/106 cells/10 min with and without

  16. Neutrophilic Cathepsin C Is Maturated by a Multistep Proteolytic Process and Secreted by Activated Cells during Inflammatory Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hamon, Yveline; Legowska, Monika; Hervé, Virginie; Dallet-Choisy, Sandrine; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain; Vanderlynden, Lise; Demonte, Michèle; Williams, Rich; Scott, Christopher J; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Heuzé-Vourc'h, Nathalie; Lalmanach, Gilles; Jenne, Dieter E; Lesner, Adam; Gauthier, Francis; Korkmaz, Brice

    2016-04-15

    The cysteine protease cathepsin C (CatC) activates granule-associated proinflammatory serine proteases in hematopoietic precursor cells. Its early inhibition in the bone marrow is regarded as a new therapeutic strategy for treating proteolysis-driven chronic inflammatory diseases, but its complete inhibition is elusive in vivo Controlling the activity of CatC may be achieved by directly inhibiting its activity with a specific inhibitor or/and by preventing its maturation. We have investigated immunochemically and kinetically the occurrence of CatC and its proform in human hematopoietic precursor cells and in differentiated mature immune cells in lung secretions. The maturation of proCatC obeys a multistep mechanism that can be entirely managed by CatS in neutrophilic precursor cells. CatS inhibition by a cell-permeable inhibitor abrogated the release of the heavy and light chains from proCatC and blocked ∼80% of CatC activity. Under these conditions the activity of neutrophil serine proteases, however, was not abolished in precursor cell cultures. In patients with neutrophilic lung inflammation, mature CatC is found in large amounts in sputa. It is secreted by activated neutrophils as confirmed through lipopolysaccharide administration in a nonhuman primate model. CatS inhibitors currently in clinical trials are expected to decrease the activity of neutrophilic CatC without affecting those of elastase-like serine proteases. PMID:26884336

  17. CD8+IL-17+ T Cells Mediate Neutrophilic Airway Obliteration in T-bet–Deficient Mouse Lung Allograft Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Dodd-o, Jeffrey M.; Coon, Tiffany A.; Miller, Hannah L.; Ganguly, Sudipto; Popescu, Iulia; O'Donnell, Christopher P.; Cardenes, Nayra; Levine, Melanie; Rojas, Mauricio; Weathington, Nathaniel M.; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Yutong; McDyer, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Acute cellular rejection is a known risk factor for the development of obliterative bronchiolitis, which limits the long-term survival of lung transplant recipients. However, the T cell effector mechanisms in both of these processes remain incompletely understood. Using the mouse orthotopic lung transplant model, we investigated whether C57BL/6 T-bet−/− recipients of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched BALB/c lung grafts develop rejection pathology and allospecific cytokine responses that differ from wild-type mice. T-bet−/− recipients demonstrated vigorous allograft rejection at 10 days, characterized by neutrophilic inflammation and predominantly CD8+ T cells producing allospecific IL-17 and/or IFN-γ, in contrast to IFN-γ–dominant responses in WT mice. CD4+ T cells produced IL-17 but not IFN-γ responses in T-bet−/− recipients, in contrast to WT controls. Costimulation blockade using anti-CD154 Ab significantly reduced allospecific CD8+IFN-γ+ responses in both T-bet−/− and WT mice but had no attenuating effect on lung rejection pathology in T-bet−/− recipients or on the development of obliterative airway inflammation that occurred only in T-bet−/− recipients. However, neutralization of IL-17A significantly attenuated costimulation blockade–resistant rejection pathology and airway inflammation in T-bet−/− recipients. In addition, CXCL1 (neutrophil chemokine) was increased in T-bet−/− allografts, and IL-17 induced CXCL1 from mouse lung epithelial cells in vitro. Taken together, our data show that T-bet–deficient recipients of complete MHC-mismatched lung allografts develop costimulation blockade–resistant rejection characterized by neutrophilia and obliterative airway inflammation that is predominantly mediated by CD8+IL-17+ T cells. Our data support T-bet–deficient mouse recipients of lung allografts as a viable animal model to study the immunopathogenesis of small airway injury in lung transplantation

  18. Activation of TAK1 by Chemotactic and Growth Factors, and Its Impact on Human Neutrophil Signaling and Functional Responses.

    PubMed

    Sylvain-Prévost, Stéphanie; Ear, Thornin; Simard, François A; Fortin, Carl F; Dubois, Claire M; Flamand, Nicolas; McDonald, Patrick P

    2015-12-01

    The MAP3 kinase, TAK1, is known to act upstream of IKK and MAPK cascades in several cell types, and is typically activated in response to cytokines (e.g., TNF, IL-1) and TLR ligands. In this article, we report that in human neutrophils, TAK1 can also be activated by different classes of inflammatory stimuli, namely, chemoattractants and growth factors. After stimulation with such agents, TAK1 becomes rapidly and transiently activated. Blocking TAK1 kinase activity with a highly selective inhibitor (5z-7-oxozeaenol) attenuated the inducible phosphorylation of ERK occurring in response to these stimuli but had little or no effect on that of p38 MAPK or PI3K. Inhibition of TAK1 also impaired MEKK3 (but not MEKK1) activation by fMLF. Moreover, both TAK1 and the MEK/ERK module were found to influence inflammatory cytokine expression and release in fMLF- and GM-CSF-activated neutrophils, whereas the PI3K pathway influenced this response independently of TAK1. Besides cytokine production, other responses were found to be under TAK1 control in neutrophils stimulated with chemoattractants and/or GM-CSF, namely, delayed apoptosis and leukotriene biosynthesis. Our data further emphasize the central role of TAK1 in controlling signaling cascades and functional responses in primary neutrophils, making it a promising target for therapeutic intervention in view of the foremost role of neutrophils in several chronic inflammatory conditions. PMID:26491199

  19. Phospholipase A{sub 2} is involved in the mechanism of activation of neutrophils by polychlorinated biphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Tithof, P.K.; Schiamberg, E.; Ganey, P.E.; Peters-Golden, M.

    1996-01-01

    Aroclor 1242, a mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), activates neutrophils to produce superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) by a mechanism that involves phospholipase C-dependent hydrolysis of membrane phosphoinositides; however, subsequent signal transduction mechanisms are unknown. This study determines whether phospholipase A{sub 2}-dependent release of arachidonic acid is involved in PCB-induced O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production. O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production was measured in vitro in glycogen-elicited, rat neutrophils in the presence and absence of the inhibitors of phospholipase A{sub 2}: quinacrine, 4-bromophenacyl bromide (BPB), and manoalide. All three agents significantly decreased the amount of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} detected during stimulation of neutrophils with Aroclor 1242. Similar inhibition occurred when neutrophils were activated with the classical stimuli, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) or phorbol myristate acetate. The effects of BPB and manoalide were not a result of cytotoxicity or other nonspecific effects. Significant release of {sup 3}H-arachidonic acid preceded O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production in neutrophils stimulated with Aroclor 1242 or fMLP. Manoalide, at a concentration that abolished O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production, also inhibited the release of {sup 3}H-arachidonate. Aspirin, zileuton, or WEB 2086 did not affect Aroclor 1242-induced O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production, suggesting that eicosanoids and platelet-activating factor are not needed for neutrophil activation by PCBs. Activation of phos-pholipase A{sub 2} and O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production do not appear to involve the Ah receptor. These data suggest that Aroclor 1242 stimulates neutrophils to produce O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} by a mechanism that involves phospholipase A{sub 2}-dependent release of arachiodonic acid. 49 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. EsiB, a Novel Pathogenic Escherichia coli Secretory Immunoglobulin A-Binding Protein Impairing Neutrophil Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pastorello, Ilaria; Rossi Paccani, Silvia; Rosini, Roberto; Mattera, Rossella; Ferrer Navarro, Mario; Urosev, Dunja; Nesta, Barbara; Lo Surdo, Paola; Del Vecchio, Mariangela; Rippa, Valentina; Bertoldi, Isabella; Gomes Moriel, Danilo; Laarman, Alexander J.; van Strijp, Jos A. G.; Daura, Xavier; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Serino, Laura; Soriani, Marco

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this study, we have characterized the functional properties of a novel Escherichia coli antigen named EsiB (E. coli secretory immunoglobulin A-binding protein), recently reported to protect mice from sepsis. Gene distribution analysis of a panel of 267 strains representative of different E. coli pathotypes revealed that esiB is preferentially associated with extraintestinal strains, while the gene is rarely found in either intestinal or nonpathogenic strains. These findings were supported by the presence of anti-EsiB antibodies in the sera of patients affected by urinary tract infections (UTIs). By solving its crystal structure, we observed that EsiB adopts a superhelical fold composed of Sel1-like repeats (SLRs), a feature often associated with bacterial proteins possessing immunomodulatory functions. Indeed, we found that EsiB interacts with secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) through a specific motif identified by an immunocapturing approach. Functional assays showed that EsiB binding to SIgA is likely to interfere with productive FcαRI signaling, by inhibiting both SIgA-induced neutrophil chemotaxis and respiratory burst. Indeed, EsiB hampers SIgA-mediated signaling events by reducing the phosphorylation status of key signal-transducer cytosolic proteins, including mitogen-activated kinases. We propose that the interference with such immune events could contribute to the capacity of the bacterium to avoid clearance by neutrophils, as well as reducing the recruitment of immune cells to the infection site. PMID:23882011

  1. ISOLATION OF MOUSE NEUTROPHILS

    PubMed Central

    Swamydas, Muthulekha; Luo, Yi; Dorf, Martin E.; Lionakis, Michail S.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils represent the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Indeed, patients with inherited and acquired qualitative and quantitative neutrophil defects are at high risk for developing bacterial and fungal infections and suffering adverse outcomes from these infections. Therefore, research aiming at defining the molecular factors that modulate neutrophil effector function under homeostatic conditions and during infection is essential for devising strategies to augment neutrophil function and improve the outcome of infected individuals. This unit describes a reproducible density gradient centrifugation-based protocol that can be applied in any laboratory to harvest large numbers of highly enriched and highly viable neutrophils from the bone marrow of mice both at the steady state and following infection with Candida albicans as described in UNIT 19.6. In another protocol, we also present a method that combines gentle enzymatic tissue digestion with a positive immunomagnetic selection technique or Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to harvest highly pure and highly viable preparations of neutrophils directly from mouse tissues such as the kidney, the liver or the spleen. Finally, methods for isolating neutrophils from mouse peritoneal fluid and peripheral blood are included. Mouse neutrophils isolated by these protocols can be used for examining several aspects of cellular function ex vivo including pathogen binding, phagocytosis and killing, neutrophil chemotaxis, oxidative burst, degranulation and cytokine production, and for performing neutrophil adoptive transfer experiments. PMID:26237011

  2. Annexin II mediates the neutrophil elastase-stimulated exocytosis of mucin 5ac.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rui; Li, Qi; Zhou, Xiangdong; Perelman, Juliy M; Kolosov, Victor P

    2014-01-01

    The overexpression and hypersecretion of mucus is a hallmark of several chronic pulmonary inflammatory diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma and cystic fibrosis. Mucin 5ac (MUC5AC) is a major component of airway mucus. Annexin II (ANXII) has been reported to be expressed in various cells and is associated with the fusion of secretory vesicles. Neutrophil elastase (NE) is present at high concentrations in the airway surface fluid in patients with cystic fibrosis and various other severe diseases. However, the role of ANXII in NE-induced secretion of MUC5AC granules remains unclear. It was determined that NE upregulates the transcription and protein synthesis of ANXII in 16HBE human bronchial epithelial cells. Following stimulation with NE, ANXII is recruited to the cell membrane, as visualised by cell immunochemistry and laser confocal microscopy, and the redistribution of ANXII is inhibited by the protein kinase-C (PKC) inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I. Conversely, depleting endogenous ANXII decreases MUC5AC secretion into the cell culture supernatant and increases the levels of intracellular MUC5AC protein. The data indicated that ANXII is associated with the secretion of MUC5AC granules. PMID:24247640

  3. Calcium mobilization and phosphoinositide turnover in fluoride-activated human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Strnad, C.F.; Wong, K.

    1986-05-01

    Fluoride ion, at concentrations above 10 mM, has been found to activate a superoxide production response in human neutrophils which is strongly dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium. In an attempt to further explore the calcium requirement of fluoride-induced neutrophil activation, intracellular calcium concentrations were monitored through use of the fluorescent calcium probe, Quin 2. Fluoride ion, at concentrations between 10 and 20 mM, was found to elicit a rise in intracellular calcium levels which was characterized by a lag period of 4 to 10 min and a prolonged duration of action (greater than 20 min). In contrast, the chemotactic peptide, formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), induced a rise in intracellular calcium concentration which peaked within 1 min. Preincubation of cells with 1 ..mu..g/ml pertussis toxin resulted in inhibition of the FMLP-induced response, but not that elicited by fluoride. Furthermore, anion exchange chromatography indicated that inositol phosphate accumulation occurred in fluoride-treated cells in association with calcium mobilization. Recent evidence suggests that the FMLP receptor is coupled to phospholipase C and phosphoinositide turnover through a guanine nucleotide binding protein susceptible to inhibition by pertussis toxin. Present results suggest that fluoride ion may serve to activate this protein in a manner resistant to inhibition by pertussis toxin.

  4. Familial autoinflammation with neutrophilic dermatosis reveals a regulatory mechanism of pyrin activation.

    PubMed

    Masters, Seth L; Lagou, Vasiliki; Jéru, Isabelle; Baker, Paul J; Van Eyck, Lien; Parry, David A; Lawless, Dylan; De Nardo, Dominic; Garcia-Perez, Josselyn E; Dagley, Laura F; Holley, Caroline L; Dooley, James; Moghaddas, Fiona; Pasciuto, Emanuela; Jeandel, Pierre-Yves; Sciot, Raf; Lyras, Dena; Webb, Andrew I; Nicholson, Sandra E; De Somer, Lien; van Nieuwenhove, Erika; Ruuth-Praz, Julia; Copin, Bruno; Cochet, Emmanuelle; Medlej-Hashim, Myrna; Megarbane, Andre; Schroder, Kate; Savic, Sinisa; Goris, An; Amselem, Serge; Wouters, Carine; Liston, Adrian

    2016-03-30

    Pyrin responds to pathogen signals and loss of cellular homeostasis by forming an inflammasome complex that drives the cleavage and secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Mutations in the B30.2/SPRY domain cause pathogen-independent activation of pyrin and are responsible for the autoinflammatory disease familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). We studied a family with a dominantly inherited autoinflammatory disease, distinct from FMF, characterized by childhood-onset recurrent episodes of neutrophilic dermatosis, fever, elevated acute-phase reactants, arthralgia, and myalgia/myositis. The disease was caused by a mutation in MEFV, the gene encoding pyrin (S242R). The mutation results in the loss of a 14-3-3 binding motif at phosphorylated S242, which was not perturbed by FMF mutations in the B30.2/SPRY domain. However, loss of both S242 phosphorylation and 14-3-3 binding was observed for bacterial effectors that activate the pyrin inflammasome, such as Clostridium difficile toxin B (TcdB). The S242R mutation thus recapitulated the effect of pathogen sensing, triggering inflammasome activation and IL-1β production. Successful therapy targeting IL-1β has been initiated in one patient, resolving pyrin-associated autoinflammation with neutrophilic dermatosis. This disease provides evidence that a guard-like mechanism of pyrin regulation, originally identified for Nod-like receptors in plant innate immunity, also exists in humans. PMID:27030597

  5. Activity of lung neutrophils and matrix metalloproteinases in cyclophosphamide-treated mice with experimental sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, Mark; Carmel, Julie; Kaplan, Viktoria; Livne, Erella; Krausz, Michael M

    2004-01-01

    Sepsis in patients receiving chemotherapy may result in acute respiratory distress syndrome, despite decreased number of blood neutrophils [polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs)]. In the present study, we investigated the correlation of cyclophosphamide (CY)-induced neutropenia with the destructive potential of lung PMN in respect to formation of septic acute lung injury (ALI). Mice were treated with 250 mg/kg of CY or saline (control) and subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham operation. ALI was verified by histological examination. Lung PMNs and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were assessed by flow cytometry and gelatin zymography. CLP in CY-treated mice induced a typical lung injury. Despite profound neutropenia, CY treatment did not attenuate CLP-induced ALI. This might relate to only a partial suppression of PMN: CY has significantly reduced PMN influx into the lungs (P = 0.008) and suppressed their oxidative metabolism, but had no suppressive effect on degranulation (P = 0.227) and even induced MMP-9 activity (P = 0.0003). In CY-untreated animals, peak of CLP-induced ALI coincided with massive PMN influx (P = 0.013), their maximal degranulation (P = 0.014) and activation of lung MMP-9 (P = 0.002). These findings may indicate an important role of the residual lung PMN and activation of MMP-9 in septic lung injury during CY chemotherapy. PMID:15255968

  6. Oxidized LDL induced extracellular trap formation in human neutrophils via TLR-PKC-IRAK-MAPK and NADPH-oxidase activation.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Deepika; Nagarkoti, Sheela; Kumar, Amit; Dubey, Megha; Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Pathak, Priya; Chandra, Tulika; Barthwal, Manoj Kumar; Dikshit, Madhu

    2016-04-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) formation was initially linked with host defence and extracellular killing of pathogens. However, recent studies have highlighted their inflammatory potential. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) has been implicated as an independent risk factor in various acute or chronic inflammatory diseases including systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). In the present study we investigated effect of oxLDL on NETs formation and elucidated the underlying signalling mechanism. Treatment of oxLDL to adhered PMNs led to a time and concentration dependent ROS generation and NETs formation. OxLDL induced free radical formation and NETs release were significantly prevented in presence of NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibitors suggesting role of NOX activation in oxLDL induced NETs release. Blocking of both toll like receptor (TLR)-2 and 6 significantly reduced oxLDL induced NETs formation indicating requirement of both the receptors. We further identified Protein kinase C (PKC), Interleukin-1 receptor associated kinase (IRAKs), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway as downstream intracellular signalling mediators involved in oxLDL induced NETs formation. OxLDL components such as oxidized phospholipids (lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and oxidized 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (oxPAPC)) were most potent NETs inducers and might be crucial for oxLDL mediating NETs release. Other components like, oxysterols, malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) were however less potent as compared to oxidized phospholipids. This study thus demonstrates for the first time that treatment of human PMNs with oxLDL or its various oxidized phopholipid component mediated NETs release, implying their role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases such as SIRS. PMID:26774674

  7. Ascorbic acid supplementation diminishes microparticle elevations and neutrophil activation following SCUBA diving.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Barak, Otto F; Dujic, Zeljko; Madden, Dennis; Bhopale, Veena M; Bhullar, Jasjeet; Thom, Stephen R

    2015-08-15

    Predicated on evidence that diving-related microparticle generation is an oxidative stress response, this study investigated the role that oxygen plays in augmenting production of annexin V-positive microparticles associated with open-water SCUBA diving and whether elevations can be abrogated by ascorbic acid. Following a cross-over study design, 14 male subjects ingested placebo and 2-3 wk later ascorbic acid (2 g) daily for 6 days prior to performing either a 47-min dive to 18 m of sea water while breathing air (∼222 kPa N2/59 kPa O2) or breathing a mixture of 60% O2/balance N2 from a tight-fitting face mask at atmospheric pressure for 47 min (∼40 kPa N2/59 kPa O2). Within 30 min after the 18-m dive in the placebo group, neutrophil activation, and platelet-neutrophil interactions occurred, and the total number of microparticles, as well as subgroups bearing CD66b, CD41, CD31, CD142 proteins or nitrotyrosine, increased approximately twofold. No significant elevations occurred among divers after ingesting ascorbic acid, nor were elevations identified in either group after breathing 60% O2. Ascorbic acid had no significant effect on post-dive intravascular bubble production quantified by transthoracic echocardiography. We conclude that high-pressure nitrogen plays a key role in neutrophil and microparticle-associated changes with diving and that responses can be abrogated by dietary ascorbic acid supplementation. PMID:26084697

  8. Neutrophil-mediated transport of liposomes across the Madin Darby canine kidney epithelial cell monolayer.

    PubMed

    Cho, M J; Scieszka, J F; Cramer, C T; Thompson, D P; Vidmar, T J

    1989-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery to peripheral blood neutrophils (PMNs) should be of therapeutic potential in various disease states. In addition, substances taken up by PMNs in the circulation may be delivered to an extravascular site via the naturally occurring cell infiltration. The present study employs an in vitro chemotaxis model to test whether particulate drug carriers such as liposomes can be transported across a cellular barrier by migrating PMNs. The system contained 10(7) human PMNs/ml, 0.3-micron liposomes at a total lipid concentration of 2.5 mM, and 10% autologous human serum in the apical side of a confluent Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cell monolayer of 4.71 cm2. The MDCK cells were grown on a polycarbonate membrane with 3-micron pores without any extracellular matrix, and 10(-7) M f-Met-Leu-Phe was added to the basolateral side as a trigger of chemotaxis. The aqueous phase of the reverse-phase evaporation vesicles (REVs) contained lucifer yellow CH (LY) and [14C]sucrose. The lipid bilayer of the REVs was spiked with [3H]dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). Transmission electron micrographs showed that, in response to the formyl peptide, PMNs adhered to the apical surface of MDCK cells, emigrated across the MDCK cell layer, passed through the 3-micron pores in the polycarbonate membrane, and finally, appeared in the bottom well. Epifluorescence micrographs showed that most, if not all, of the migrated PMNs contained punctate fluorescence derived from LY. Transport data over a 3.5-hr period indicated that those markers that appeared in the basal side were indeed transported by phagocytosis of REVs by PMNs and that intact serum was an essential component in the process.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2717523

  9. Major histocompatibility complex class II (DR) antigen and costimulatory molecules on in vitro and in vivo activated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Sandilands, Gavin P; McCrae, Jame; Hill, Kathryn; Perry, Martin; Baxter, Derek

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that normal human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) contain cytoplasmic ‘stores’ of three key molecules normally associated with antigen presentation and T-cell costimulation, i.e. major histocompatibility complex class II (DR) antigen, CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2). These cytoplasmic molecules were found to translocate to the cell surface within a few minutes following cross-linking (X-L) of Mac-1: an early neutrophil activation signal. In this study we have compared X-L of Mac −1 in parallel with four other well documented in vitro neutrophil activators: phorbol myristate acetate, N-formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine, lipopolysaccharide, and phagocytosis of immunoglobulin G–Latex particles. In addition, we have used paired samples of neutrophils obtained from peripheral blood (as a control) and synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis as a source of in vivo activated cells. With the exception of phagocytosis, all activators resulted in the rapid (within 30 min) generation of two populations of activated neutrophils (designated P1 and P2) based on flow-cytometry measurements of size, granularity and phenotype. Significant up-regulation of DR and costimulatory molecules was observed, predominantly on P2 cells, with all activators except phagocytosis. CD80 and CD86 were noted to respond to the various activation signals in a different pattern suggesting that their intracellular granule location may be different. Dual-staining confocal laser microscopy studies showed that CD80 is largely confined to secretory vesicles (SVs) while CD86 appears to have a much wider distribution being found in SVs and within secondary (specific) and primary (azurophilic) granules. Increased surface expression of these antigens was also observed on P2 synovial fluid neutrophils appearing as large heterogeneous clusters on the cell surface when visualized by confocal laser microscopy. PMID:17034427

  10. Photodynamic Therapy Using Intra-Articular Photofrin for Murine MRSA Arthritis: Biphasic Light Dose Response for Neutrophil-Mediated Antibacterial Effect

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Masamitsu; Kinoshita, Manabu; Yoshihara, Yasuo; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi; Seki, Shuhji; Nemoto, Koichi; Hamblin, Michael R.; Morimoto, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective Bacterial arthritis does not respond well to antibiotics and moreover multidrug resistance is spreading. We previously tested photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated by systemic Photofrin® in a mouse model of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) arthritis, but found that neutrophils were killed by PDT and therefore the infection was potentiated. Study Design/Materials and Methods The present study used an intra-articular injection of Photofrin® and optimized the light dosimetry in order to maximize bacterial killing and minimize killing of host neutrophils. MRSA (5 × 107 CFU) was injected into the mouse knee followed 3 days later by 1 μg of Photofrin® and 635-nm diode laser illumination with a range of fluences within 5 minutes. Synovial fluid was sampled 6 hours or 1–3, 5, and 7 days after PDT to determine MRSA colony-forming units (CFU), neutrophil numbers, and levels of cytokines. Results A biphasic light dose response was observed with the greatest reduction of MRSA CFU seen with a fluence of 20 J cm−2, whereas lower antibacterial efficacy was observed with fluences that were either lower or higher. Consistent with these results, a significantly higher concentration of macrophage inflammatory protein-2, a CXC chemokine, and greater accumulation of neutrophils were seen in the infected knee joint after PDT with a fluence of 20 J cm−2 compared to fluences of 5 or 70 J cm−2. Conclusion PDT for murine MRSA arthritis requires appropriate light dosimetry to simultaneously maximize bacterial killing and neutrophil accumulation into the infected site, while too little light does not kill sufficient bacteria and too much light kills neutrophils and damages host tissue as well as bacteria and allows bacteria to grow unimpeded by host defense. PMID:21412806

  11. Are Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Playing a Role in the Parasite Control in Active American Tegumentary Leishmaniasis Lesions?

    PubMed Central

    Morgado, Fernanda Nazaré; Nascimento, Michelle T. C.; Saraiva, Elvira M.; de Oliveira-Ribeiro, Carla; Madeira, Maria de Fátima; da Costa-Santos, Marcela; Vasconcellos, Erica C. F.; F. Pimentel, Maria Ines; Rosandiski Lyra, Marcelo; Schubach, Armando de Oliveira; Conceição-Silva, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been described as a network of extracellular fibers composed by DNA, histones and various proteins/enzymes. Studies have demonstrated that NETs could be responsible for the trapping and elimination of a variety of infectious agents. In order to verify the presence of NETs in American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) and their relationship with the presence of amastigotes we evaluated active cutaneous lesions of 35 patients before treatment by the detection of parasites, neutrophils (neutrophil elastase) and histones through immunohistochemistry and confocal immunofluorescence. Intact neutrophils could be detected in all ATL lesions. NETs were present in 27 patients (median 1.1; range from 0.1 to 23.5/mm2) with lesion duration ranging from one to seven months. NETs were in close proximity with neutrophils (r = 0.586; p = 0.0001) and amastigotes (r = 0.710; p = 0.0001). Two patterns of NET formation were detected: small homogeneously distributed networks observed in all lesions; and large structures that could be visualized at a lower magnification in lesions presenting at least 20% of neutrophils. Lesions presenting the larger NET formation showed high parasite detection. A correlation between NET size and the number of intact amastigotes was observed (p=0.02). As we detected an association between NET and amastigotes, our results suggest that neutrophil migration and NET formation could be stimulated and maintained by stimuli derived from the parasite burden/parasite antigen in the extracellular environment. The observation of areas containing only antigens not intermingled with NETs (elastase and histone) suggests that the involvement of these structures in the control of parasite burden is a dynamic process in which the formation of NETs is exhausted with the destruction of the parasites. Since NETs were also associated with granulomas, this trapping would favor the activity of macrophages in order to control the parasite

  12. JAM-A mediates neutrophil transmigration in a stimulus-specific manner in vivo: evidence for sequential roles for JAM-A and PECAM-1 in neutrophil transmigration.

    PubMed

    Woodfin, Abigail; Reichel, Christoph Andreas; Khandoga, Andrej; Corada, Monica; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; Scheiermann, Christoph; Haskard, Dorian O; Dejana, Elisabetta; Krombach, Fritz; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2007-09-15

    Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) is a transmembrane protein expressed at tight junctions of endothelial and epithelial cells and on the surface of platelets and leukocytes. The role of JAM-A in leukocyte transmigration in vivo was directly investigated by intravital microscopy using both a JAM-A-neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) (BV-11) and JAM-A-deficient (knockout [KO]) mice. Leukocyte transmigration (but not adhesion) through mouse cremasteric venules as stimulated by interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta) or ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury was significantly reduced in wild-type mice treated with BV-11 and in JAM-A KO animals. In contrast, JAM-A blockade/genetic deletion had no effect on responses elicited by leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) or platelet-activating factor (PAF). Furthermore, using a leukocyte transfer method and mice deficient in endothelial-cell JAM-A, evidence was obtained for the involvement of endothelial-cell JAM-A in leukocyte transmigration mediated by IL-1beta. Investigation of the functional relationship between JAM-A and PECAM-1 (CD31) determined that dual blockade/deletion of these proteins does not lead to an inhibitory effect greater than that seen with blockade/deletion of either molecule alone. The latter appeared to be due to the fact that JAM-A and PECAM-1 can act sequentially to mediate leukocyte migration through venular walls in vivo. PMID:17505016

  13. Azurocidin, a natural antibiotic from human neutrophils: expression, antimicrobial activity, and secretion.

    PubMed

    Almeida, R P; Vanet, A; Witko-Sarsat, V; Melchior, M; McCabe, D; Gabay, J E

    1996-06-01

    The azurophil granules of human PMN contain four antibiotic proteins, the serprocidins, which have extensive homology to one another and to serine proteases. Azurocidin, a member of this family, is a 29-kDa glycoprotein with broad spectrum antimicrobial activity and chemotactic activity toward monocytes. Insect cells transfected with a baculovirus vector carrying azurocidin cDNA produced a recombinant azurocidin protein. We purified the recombinant azurocidin protein from the culture medium of the infected cells and showed that it retained the antimicrobial activity of the native neutrophil-derived molecule. In addition, we present evidence that a 49-amino-acid region of the recombinant azurocidin protein is required for its secretion from insect cells. PMID:8776752

  14. Enhancement of neutrophil autophagy by an IVIG preparation against multidrug-resistant bacteria as well as drug-sensitive strains

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Hidemasa; Kitamura, Naoko; Yamamoto, Sho; Higuchi, Takeshi; Takematsu, Hiromu; Kamikubo, Yasuhiko; Kondo, Tadakazu; Yamashita, Kouhei; Sasada, Masataka; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Adachi, Souichi

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy occurs in human neutrophils after the phagocytosis of multidrug-resistant bacteria and drug-sensitive strains, including Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The present study detected autophagy by immunoblot analysis of LC3B conversion, by confocal scanning microscopic examination of LC3B aggregate formation and by transmission electron microscopic examination of bacteria-containing autophagosomes. Patients with severe bacterial infections are often treated with IVIG alongside antimicrobial agents. Here, we showed that IVIG induced neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis of multidrug-resistant strains. Compared with untreated neutrophils, neutrophils exposed to IVIG showed increased levels of bacterial cell killing, phagocytosis, O2− release, MPO release, and NET formation. IVIG also increased autophagy in these cells. Inhibiting the late phase of autophagy (fusion of lysosomes with autophagosomes) with bafilomycin A1-reduced, neutrophil-mediated bactericidal activity. These findings indicate that autophagy plays a critical role in the bactericidal activity mediated by human neutrophils. Furthermore, the autophagosomes within the neutrophils contained bacteria only and their organelles only, or both bacteria and their organelles, a previously undocumented observation. Taken together, these results suggest that the contents of neutrophil autophagosomes may be derived from specific autophagic systems, which provide the neutrophil with an advantage. Thus, IVIG promotes the neutrophil-mediated killing of multidrug-resistant bacteria as well as drug-sensitive strains. PMID:25908735

  15. Salivary Thromboxane A2-Binding Proteins from Triatomine Vectors of Chagas Disease Inhibit Platelet-Mediated Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs) Formation and Arterial Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mizurini, Daniella M.; Aslan, Jorgeane S.; Gomes, Tainá; Ma, Dongying; Francischetti, Ivo M. B.; Monteiro, Robson Q.

    2015-01-01

    Background The saliva of blood-feeding arthropods contains a notable diversity of molecules that target the hemostatic and immune systems of the host. Dipetalodipin and triplatin are triatomine salivary proteins that exhibit high affinity binding to prostanoids, such as TXA2, thus resulting in potent inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation in vitro. It was recently demonstrated that platelet-derived TXA2 mediates the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), a newly recognized link between inflammation and thrombosis that promote thrombus growth and stability. Methodology/Principal Findings This study evaluated the ability of dipetalodipin and triplatin to block NETs formation in vitro. We also investigated the in vivo antithrombotic activity of TXA2 binding proteins by employing two murine models of experimental thrombosis. Remarkably, we observed that both inhibitors abolished the platelet-mediated formation of NETs in vitro. Dipetalodipin and triplatin significantly increased carotid artery occlusion time in a FeCl3-induced injury model. Treatment with TXA2-binding proteins also protected mice from lethal pulmonary thromboembolism evoked by the intravenous injection of collagen and epinephrine. Effective antithrombotic doses of dipetalodipin and triplatin did not increase blood loss, which was estimated using the tail transection method. Conclusions/Significance Salivary TXA2-binding proteins, dipetalodipin and triplatin, are capable to prevent platelet-mediated NETs formation in vitro. This ability may contribute to the antithrombotic effects in vivo. Notably, both molecules inhibit arterial thrombosis without promoting excessive bleeding. Our results provide new insight into the antihemostatic effects of TXA2-binding proteins and may have important significance in elucidating the mechanisms of saliva to avoid host’s hemostatic responses and innate immune system. PMID:26110417

  16. GDF-15 inhibits integrin activation and mouse neutrophil recruitment through the ALK-5/TGF-βRII heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Artz, Annette; Butz, Stefan; Vestweber, Dietmar

    2016-07-28

    Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) is the first cytokine known to counteract chemokine-induced activation of leukocyte integrins. We showed recently that this activity dampens neutrophil recruitment into inflamed tissue and is required for survival of myocardial infarction in mice. The receptor responsible for this GDF-15-triggered anti-inflammatory mechanism on myeloid cells is not known. Here, we identify this receptor as transforming growth factor β receptor I (TGF-βRI) (activin receptor-like kinase 5 [ALK-5]) and TGF-β receptor II (TGF-βRII). We show that interference with these receptors by small-molecule inhibitors, antibodies, or small interfering RNA, blocked the GDF-15 effect on leukocyte integrin activation. Likewise, gene inactivation of each of the 2 receptors in neutrophils isolated from conditional gene-deficient mice abolished the inhibitory effect of GDF-15 on CXCL1-induced β2-integrin activation and neutrophil diapedesis. Rapid neutrophil arrest induced by CXCL1 in vivo was inhibited by GDF-15 in an ALK-5 and TGF-βRII dependent way. As for GDF-15 gene-deficient mice, we found that extravasation of neutrophils deficient for ALK-5 or TGF-βRII was strongly increased in the interleukin-1β inflamed cremaster. The inhibitory effects of GDF-15 on neutrophil integrin activation and in vivo neutrophil arrest were also found for TGF-β1. Mechanistically, GDF-15 and TGF-β1 interfered with integrin activation by inhibiting the activation of Ras-related protein 1 (Rap-1), an effect that depended on CalDAG- guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1 (GEF1) and cell division control protein 42 homolog. We conclude that both GDF-15 and TGF-β1 counteract chemokine-induced integrin activation on neutrophils via the ALK-5/TGF-βRII heterodimer. This represents a novel, rapid anti-inflammatory activity of the 2 TGF-β receptors and of TGF-β1. PMID:27235139

  17. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor does not enhance phagocytosis or microbicidal activity of human mature polymorphonuclear neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Shimono, N; Okada, K; Takeda, D; Eguchi, K; Misumi, H; Sawae, Y; Niho, Y

    1994-01-01

    The direct effects of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) on mature polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in vitro were studied with regard to chemotaxis, superoxide production, and phagocytosis and microbicidal activity against the following viable microorganisms: Staphylococcus aureus, serum-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. Recombinant hG-CSF (rhG-CSF) acted as a chemoattractant for human PMNs in a dose-dependent manner. The chemotactic response of PMNs to N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) was not enhanced by rhG-CSF at any of the concentrations used. rhG-CSF did not induce the generation of superoxide by itself. However, rhG-CSF was able to prime human PMNs and to enhance O2- release stimulated by FMLP in a dose-dependent manner. rhg-CSF did not enhance phagocytosis or killing of the three species of microorganisms by normal PMNs. With PMNs obtained from patients who had hematological disorders or solid tumors, no enhancement of the microbicidal activity was observed in most cases. Microbial killing mediated by PMNs depended on the ratio of PMNs to target organisms. We concluded from these facts that the most important effect of rhG-CSF was to increase the number of the peripheral PMNs and not to enhance the functions of mature PMNs. PMID:8556501

  18. Leishmania inhibitor of serine peptidase prevents TLR4 activation by neutrophil elastase promoting parasite survival in murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Marilia S.; Reis, Flavia C. G.; Azevedo-Pereira, Ricardo L.; Morrison, Lesley S.; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Lima, Ana Paula C. A.

    2011-01-01

    Leishmania major is a protozoan parasite that causes skin ulcerations in cutaneous leishmaniasis. In the mammalian host, the parasite resides in professional phagocytes and has evolved to avoid killing by macrophages. We identified L. major genes encoding inhibitors of serine peptidases, ISPs, which are orthologues of bacterial ecotins and found that ISP2 inhibits trypsin-fold S1A family peptidases. Here we show that L. major mutants deficient in ISP2 and ISP3 (Δisp2/3) trigger higher phagocytosis by macrophages through a combined action of the complement type-3 receptor (CR3), toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and unregulated activity of neutrophil elastase (NE), leading to parasite killing. While all three components are required to mediate enhanced parasite uptake, only TLR4 and NE are necessary to promote parasite killing after infection. We found that the production of superoxide by macrophages in the absence of ISP2 is the main mechanism controlling the intracellular infection. Furthermore, we show that NE modulates macrophage infection in vivo, and that the lack of ISP leads to reduced parasite burdens at later stages of the infection. Our findings support the hypothesis that ISPs function to prevent the activation of TLR4 by NE during the Leishmania-macrophage interaction in order to promote parasite survival and growth. PMID:21098233

  19. The LTB4-BLT1 Axis Mediates Neutrophil Infiltration and Secondary Injury in Experimental Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Saiwai, Hirokazu; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Yamada, Hisakata; Kumamaru, Hiromi; Harada, Akihito; Okano, Hideyuki; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Okada, Seiji

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic injury in the central nervous system induces inflammation; however, the role of this inflammation is controversial. Precise analysis of the inflammatory cells is important to gain a better understanding of the inflammatory machinery in response to neural injury. Here, we demonstrated that leukotriene B4 plays a significant role in mediating leukocyte infiltration after spinal cord injury. Using flow cytometry, we revealed that neutrophil and monocyte/macrophage infiltration peaked 12 hours after injury and was significantly suppressed in leukotriene B4 receptor 1 knockout mice. Similar findings were observed in mice treated with a leukotriene B4 receptor antagonist. Further, by isolating each inflammatory cell subset with a cell sorter, and performing quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, we demonstrated the individual contributions of more highly expressed subsets, ie, interleukins 6 and 1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and FasL, to the inflammatory reaction and neural apoptosis. Inhibition of leukotriene B4 suppressed leukocyte infiltration after injury, thereby attenuating the inflammatory reaction, sparing the white matter, and reducing neural apoptosis, as well as inducing better functional recovery. These findings are the first to demonstrate that leukotriene B4 is involved in the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury through the amplification of leukocyte infiltration, and provide a potential therapeutic strategy for traumatic spinal cord injury. PMID:20304963

  20. Purification, composition, and activity of two bactenecins, antibacterial peptides of bovine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Gennaro, R; Skerlavaj, B; Romeo, D

    1989-10-01

    Extracts of granules of bovine neutrophils are known to exhibit a marked antibacterial activity in vitro. By a simple, two-step chromatographic procedure, we have resolved two peptide components of the antibacterial system. They were named Bac-5 and Bac-7 from the general term bactenecin and had molecular masses of about 5 and 7 kilodaltons, respectively. Over 45 and 20% of the amino acid residues in the two bactenecins are proline and arginine, respectively. The remaining amino acids are mainly hydrophobic (isoleucine, leucine, and phenylalanine). Both Bac-5 and Bac-7 efficiently kill Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. They also arrest the growth of Enterobacter cloacae (MICs, 25 to 200 micrograms/ml) but not of Proteus vulgaris, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus agalactiae (MIC, greater than 200 micrograms/ml). Finally, Bac-7 but not Bac-5 has MICs of less than or equal to 200 micrograms/ml for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus epidermidis. From the comparison between the efficient bactericidal concentrations in vitro and the estimated content of bactenecins in neutrophils (125 ng of Bac-5 and Bac-7 each per 10(6) cells), it is reasonable to conclude that the two cationic peptides may exert a major role in host defense against at least some microorganisms. PMID:2777377

  1. Attenuated viral hepatitis in Trem1-/- mice is associated with reduced inflammatory activity of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kozik, Jan-Hendrik; Trautmann, Tanja; Carambia, Antonella; Preti, Max; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Krech, Till; Wiegard, Christiane; Heeren, Joerg; Herkel, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    TREM1 (Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells 1) is a pro-inflammatory receptor expressed by phagocytes, which can also be released as a soluble molecule (sTREM1). The roles of TREM1 and sTREM1 in liver infection and inflammation are not clear. Here we show that patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection manifest elevated serum levels of sTREM1. In mice, experimental viral hepatitis induced by infection with Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus (LCMV)-WE was likewise associated with increased sTREM1 in serum and urine, and with increased TREM1 and its associated adapter molecule DAP12 in the liver. Trem1-/- mice showed accelerated clearance of LCMV-WE and manifested attenuated liver inflammation and injury. TREM1 expression in the liver of wild-type mice was mostly confined to infiltrating neutrophils, which responded to LCMV by secretion of CCL2 and TNF-α, and release of sTREM1. Accordingly, the production of CCL2 and TNF-α was decreased in the livers of LCMV-infected Trem1-/- mice, as compared to LCMV-infected wildtype mice. These findings indicate that TREM1 plays a role in viral hepatitis, in which it seems to aggravate the immunopathology associated with viral clearance, mainly by increasing the inflammatory activity of neutrophils. PMID:27328755

  2. A New Chemiluminescent Method for Evaluation of the Functional Activity of Neutrophils in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Proskurnina, E V; Sozarukova, M M; Polimova, A M; Prudnikova, M A; Ametov, A S; Vladimirov, Yu A

    2016-06-01

    Functional activity of neutrophils was evaluated by the chemiluminescent method with successive double stimulation by soluble stimuli with different mechanisms of action: phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) and phormyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenilalanine (fMLP). The study was carried out in 26 patients receiving oral sugar-reducing therapy. In addition to the functional activity of neutrophils, the levels of TBA reactive products, inflammation markers, blood clotting values, and biochemical parameters were measured. The results showed mainly reduction of the granulocytic component of the immune system in the patients. PMID:27388632

  3. Impaired neutrophil activity and increased susceptibility to bacterial infection in mice lacking glucose-6-phosphatase–β

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Yuk Yin; Kim, So Youn; Yiu, Wai Han; Pan, Chi-Jiunn; Jun, Hyun-Sik; Ruef, Robert A.; Lee, Eric J.; Westphal, Heiner; Mansfield, Brian C.; Chou, Janice Y.

    2007-01-01

    Neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are common in many diseases, although their etiology is often unclear. Previous views held that there was a single ER enzyme, glucose-6-phosphatase–α (G6Pase-α), whose activity — limited to the liver, kidney, and intestine — was solely responsible for the final stages of gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis, in which glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) is hydrolyzed to glucose for release to the blood. Recently, we characterized a second G6Pase activity, that of G6Pase-β (also known as G6PC), which is also capable of hydrolyzing G6P to glucose but is ubiquitously expressed and not implicated in interprandial blood glucose homeostasis. We now report that the absence of G6Pase-β led to neutropenia; defects in neutrophil respiratory burst, chemotaxis, and calcium flux; and increased susceptibility to bacterial infection. Consistent with this, G6Pase-β–deficient (G6pc3–/–) mice with experimental peritonitis exhibited increased expression of the glucose-regulated proteins upregulated during ER stress in their neutrophils and bone marrow, and the G6pc3–/– neutrophils exhibited an enhanced rate of apoptosis. Our results define a molecular pathway to neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction of previously unknown etiology, providing a potential model for the treatment of these conditions. PMID:17318259

  4. Myeloperoxidase Stimulates Neutrophil Degranulation.

    PubMed

    Grigorieva, D V; Gorudko, I V; Sokolov, A V; Kostevich, V A; Vasilyev, V B; Cherenkevich, S N; Panasenko, O M

    2016-08-01

    Myeloperoxidase, heme enzyme of azurophilic granules in neutrophils, is released into the extracellular space in the inflammation foci. In neutrophils, it stimulates a dose-dependent release of lactoferrin (a protein of specific granules), lysozyme (a protein of specific and azurophilic granules), and elastase (a protein of azurophilic granules). 4-Aminobenzoic acid hydrazide, a potent inhibitor of peroxidase activity of myeloperoxidase, produced no effect on neutrophil degranulation. Using signal transduction inhibitors (genistein, methoxyverapamil, wortmannin, and NiCl2), we demonstrated that myeloperoxidase-induced degranulation of neutrophils resulted from enzyme interaction with the plasma membrane and depends on activation of tyrosine kinases, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K), and calcium signaling. Myeloperoxidase modified by oxidative/halogenation stress (chlorinated and monomeric forms of the enzyme) lost the potency to activate neutrophil degranulation. PMID:27597056

  5. Effects of cytochalasin B on the intrcellular bactericidal activity of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Okuda, K

    1975-06-01

    Cytochalasin B (CB) is known to have some inhibitory effects on cytokinesis, single-cell movement, bacterial uptake by phagocytes, and many other processes. The effects of CB on intraleukocytic bactericidal activities in human leukocytes were studied, and the results were summarized as follows. (i) CB inhibited the early stage of the intracellular bactericidal activity of human leukocytes against Streptococcus pyogenes D58 (group A). The effect was rapidly eliminated by rinsing the CB solution. (ii) In the late stage of the intracellular bactericidal process, however, CB possessed no effect against S. pyogenes D58 (group A) and Staphylococcus aureus 209P. (iii) CB also inhibited the translocation of myeloperoxidase granules to the phagosomes of human neutrophils. PMID:1155917

  6. Granzyme B-expressing neutrophils correlate with bacterial load in granulomas from Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Joshua T.; Maiello, Pauline; Sun, Tao; Via, Laura E.; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The role of neutrophils in tuberculosis (TB), and whether neutrophils express granzyme B (grzB), a pro-apoptotic enzyme associated with cytotoxic T cells, is controversial. We examined neutrophils in peripheral blood (PB) and lung granulomas of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cynomolgus macaques and humans to determine whether mycobacterial products or pro-inflammatory factors induce neutrophil grzB expression. We found large numbers of grzB-expressing neutrophils in macaque and human granulomas and these cells contained more grzB+ granules than T cells. Higher neutrophil, but not T cell, grzB expression correlated with increased bacterial load. Although unstimulated PB neutrophils lacked grzB expression, grzB expression increased upon exposure to M. tuberculosis bacilli, M. tuberculosis culture filtrate protein or lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli. Perforin is required for granzyme-mediated cytotoxicity by T cells, but was not observed in PB or granuloma neutrophils. Nonetheless, stimulated PB neutrophils secreted grzB as determined by enzyme-linked immunospot assays. Purified grzB was not bactericidal or bacteriostatic, suggesting secreted neutrophil grzB acts on extracellular targets, potentially enhancing neutrophil migration through extracellular matrix and regulating apoptosis or activation in other cell types. These data indicate mycobacterial products and the pro-inflammatory environment of granulomas up-regulates neutrophil grzB expression and suggests a previously unappreciated aspect of neutrophil biology in TB. PMID:25653138

  7. Oxidative response of neutrophils to platelet-activating factor is altered during acute ruminal acidosis induced by oligofructose in heifers

    PubMed Central

    Concha, Claudia; Carretta, María Daniella; Alarcón, Pablo; Conejeros, Ivan; Gallardo, Diego; Hidalgo, Alejandra Isabel; Tadich, Nestor; Cáceres, Dante Daniel; Hidalgo, María Angélica

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is one of the main mechanisms used to kill microbes during innate immune response. D-lactic acid, which is augmented during acute ruminal acidosis, reduces platelet activating factor (PAF)-induced ROS production and L-selectin shedding in bovine neutrophils in vitro. This study was conducted to investigate whether acute ruminal acidosis induced by acute oligofructose overload in heifers interferes with ROS production and L-selectin shedding in blood neutrophils. Blood neutrophils and plasma were obtained by jugular venipuncture, while ruminal samples were collected using rumenocentesis. Lactic acid from plasma and ruminal samples was measured by HPLC. PAF-induced ROS production and L-selectin shedding were measured in vitro in bovine neutrophils by a luminol chemiluminescence assay and flow cytometry, respectively. A significant increase in ruminal and plasma lactic acid was recorded in these animals. Specifically, a decrease in PAF-induced ROS production was observed 8 h after oligofructose overload, and this was sustained until 48 h post oligofructose overload. A reduction in PAF-induced L-selectin shedding was observed at 16 h and 32 h post oligofructose overload. Overall, the results indicated that neutrophil PAF responses were altered in heifers with ruminal acidosis, suggesting a potential dysfunction of the innate immune response. PMID:25013355

  8. Neutrophil priming occurs in a sequential manner and can be visualized in living animals by monitoring IL-1β promoter activation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yi; Matsushima, Hironori; Ohtola, Jennifer A.; Geng, Shuo; Lu, Ran; Takashima, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Rapid enhancement of phagocyte functionality is a hallmark of neutrophil priming. GeneChip analyses unveiled elevated CD54, dectin-2, and IL-1β mRNA expression by neutrophils isolated from inflammatory sites. In fact, CD54 and dectin-2 protein expression was detected on neutrophils recovered from skin, peritoneal and lung inflammation lesions, but not on those in bone marrow or peripheral blood. Neutrophils elevated CD54 and dectin-2 mRNA during migration in Boyden chambers and acquired CD54 and dectin-2 surface expression after subsequent exposure to GM-CSF. Neutrophils purified from IL-1β promoter-driven DsRed transgenic mice acquired DsRed signals during cell migration or exposure to GM-CSF. CD54 and dectin-2 were expressed by DsRed+ (but not DsRed–) neutrophils in GM-CSF-supplemented culture, and neutrophils recovered from inflammatory sites exhibited strong DsRed signals. The dynamic process of neutrophil priming was then studied in chemically induced inflammatory skin lesions by monitoring DsRed expression under confocal microscopy. A majority (>80%) of Ly6G+ neutrophils expressed DsRed, and those DsRed+/Ly6G+ cells exhibited crawling motion with a higher velocity compared to the DsRed–/Ly6G+ counterpart. This is the first report showing motile behaviors of primed neutrophils in living animals. We propose that neutrophil priming occurs in a sequential manner with rapid enhancement of phagocyte functionality followed by CD54 and dectin-2 mRNA and protein expression, IL-1β promoter activation, and accelerated motility. Not only do these findings provide a new conceptual framework for our understanding of the process of neutrophil priming, they also unveil new insights into the pathophysiology of many inflammatory disorders characterized by neutrophil infiltration. PMID:25527787

  9. Protein kinase C activity is not involved in N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-induced phospholipase D activation in human neutrophils, but is essential for concomitant NADPH oxidase activation: studies with a staurosporine analogue with improved selectivity for protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Kessels, G C; Krause, K H; Verhoeven, A J

    1993-06-15

    Stimulation of human neutrophils by the receptor agonist N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) results in a respiratory burst, catalysed by an NADPH oxidase. Concomitantly, phospholipase D (PLD) is activated. To investigate the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in these neutrophil responses, we have compared the effects of staurosporine and a structural analogue of staurosporine (cgp41251), that reflects a higher selectivity towards PKC [Meyer, Regenass, Fabbro, Alteri, Rösel, Müller, Caravatti and Matter (1989) Int. J. Cancer 43, 851-856]. Both staurosporine and cgp41251 dose-dependently inhibited the production of superoxide induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Both compounds also caused inhibition of the fMLP-induced respiratory burst, but with a lower efficacy during the initiation phase of this response. This latter observation cannot be taken as evidence against PKC involvement in the activation of the respiratory burst, because pretreatment of neutrophils with ionomycin before PMA stimulation also results in a lower efficacy of inhibition. Activation of PLD by fMLP was enhanced in the presence of staurosporine, but not in the presence of cgp41251. Enhancement of PLD activation was also observed in the presence of H-89, an inhibitor of cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Both staurosporine and H-89 reversed the dibutyryl-cyclic-AMP-induced inhibition of PLD activation, whereas cgp41251 was without effect. These results indicate that the potentiating effect of staurosporine on PLD activation induced by fMLP does not reflect a feedback inhibition by PKC activation, but instead a feedback inhibition by PKC activation. Taken together, our results indicate that in human neutrophils: (i) PKC activity is not essential for fMLP-induced activation of PLD; (ii) PKC activity does play an essential role in the activation of the respiratory burst by fMLP, other than mediating or modulating PLD activation; (iii) there exists a negative

  10. Neutrophils in cancer development and progression: Roles, mechanisms, and implications (Review).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Wen; Yuan, Xiao; Fu, Min; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils are predominant immune cells that protect the host from microbial infection. The roles of neutrophils in tumor have long been ignored due to their short life span and terminal differentiation phenotype. In recent years, emerging evidence indicates that neutrophils have phenotypic and functional plasticity. Neutrophils eliminate malignant cells by releasing the antimicrobial and cytotoxic contents in their granules or secreting immune mediators to recruit and activate other antitumor effector cells. On the contrary, tumor derived factors can convert neutrophils into a pro-tumor phenotype. Neutrophils have been shown to facilitate tumorigenesis, promote tumor growth and metastasis, stimulate tumor angiogenesis, and mediate immunosuppression. The number of neutrophils in blood and tumor tissues of cancer patients is associated with disease progression and patient outcome. In this review, we summarize the recent progress of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of cancer with an emphasis on neutrophil polarization. Better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the dichotomy of neutrophils will not only shed light on their roles in cancer but also provide new approaches for cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27573431

  11. Human neutrophil Fc receptor-mediated adhesion under flow: a hollow fibre model of intravascular arrest.

    PubMed

    D'Arrigo, C; Candal-Couto, J J; Greer, M; Veale, D J; Woof, J M

    1995-04-01

    Human polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) were found to adhere to a novel model of blood vessel wall-associated IgG. The internal surfaces of cellulose acetate hollow fibres, of comparable internal diameter to small blood vessels, were coated with normal serum human IgG, heat-aggregated IgG (HAIgG), laminin or fibrinogen. Under conditions of flow mimicking those in a small vessel, PMN were found to adhere markedly only to immunoglobulin-coated fibres. Arrest on HAIgG was inhibited by excess soluble IgG but not by bovine serum albumin (BSA), demonstrating that the adhesion was IgG-specific and presumably mediated by Fc gamma R on the PMN surface. Pre-adsorption of serum components onto HAIgG-coated fibres enhanced PMN arrest, due most probably to fixation of complement components by immobilized HAIgG, resulting in additional potential to entrap PMN via complement receptors such as CR3. Treatment of PMN with the regulatory neuropeptide substance P also enhanced adhesion to HAIgG-coated fibres and caused increased surface expression of Fc gamma RI, Fc gamma RII and Fc gamma RIII. A mouse cell line derived from L cells, hR4C6, stably transfected with human Fc gamma RII, was found to adhere under flow to HAIgG-coated fibres, whilst untransfected parent L cells did not. This adhesion was similarly inhibited by excess soluble IgG, confirming the capability of Fc gamma R to mediate cell arrest. The study strongly suggests that Fc gamma R may play an important role in intravascular PMN arrest and we speculate that in inflammatory diseases PMN may adhere via Fc gamma R to immobilized immunoglobulin on the vascular endothelium, with subsequent degranulation and tissue damage. PMID:7535210

  12. Role of G-CSF in monophosphoryl lipid A-mediated augmentation of neutrophil functions after burn injury.

    PubMed

    Bohannon, Julia K; Luan, Liming; Hernandez, Antonio; Afzal, Aqeela; Guo, Yin; Patil, Naeem K; Fensterheim, Benjamin; Sherwood, Edward R

    2016-04-01

    Infection is the leading cause of death in severely burned patients that survive the acute phase of injury. Neutrophils are the first line of defense against infections, but hospitalized burn patients frequently cannot mount an appropriate innate response to infection. Thus, immune therapeutic approaches aimed at improving neutrophil functions after burn injury may be beneficial. Prophylactic treatment with the TLR4 agonist monophosphoryl lipid A is known to augment resistance to infection by enhancing neutrophil recruitment and facilitating bacterial clearance. This study aimed to define mechanisms by which monophosphoryl lipid A treatment improves bacterial clearance and survival in a model of burn-wound sepsis. Burn-injured mice were treated with monophosphoryl lipid A or vehicle, and neutrophil mobilization was evaluated in the presence or absence ofPseudomonas aeruginosainfection. Monophosphoryl lipid A treatment induced significant mobilization of neutrophils from the bone marrow into the blood and sites of infection. Neutrophil mobilization was associated with decreased bone marrow neutrophil CXCR4 expression and increased plasma G-CSF concentrations. Neutralization of G-CSF before monophosphoryl lipid A administration blocked monophosphoryl lipid A-induced expansion of bone marrow myeloid progenitors and mobilization of neutrophils into the blood and their recruitment to the site of infection. G-CSF neutralization ablated the enhanced bacterial clearance and survival benefit endowed by monophosphoryl lipid A in burn-wound-infected mice. Our findings provide convincing evidence that monophosphoryl lipid A-induced G-CSF facilitates early expansion, mobilization, and recruitment of neutrophils to the site of infection after burn injury, allowing for a robust immune response to infection. PMID:26538529

  13. Type I IFNs induce anti-tumor polarization of tumor associated neutrophils in mice and human.

    PubMed

    Andzinski, Lisa; Kasnitz, Nadine; Stahnke, Stephanie; Wu, Ching-Fang; Gereke, Marcus; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Schilling, Bastian; Brandau, Sven; Weiss, Siegfried; Jablonska, Jadwiga

    2016-04-15

    The importance of tumor associated neutrophils (TANs) in cancer development is in the meantime well established. Numerous of clinical data document the adverse prognostic effects of neutrophil infiltration in solid tumors. However, certain tumor therapies need functional neutrophils to be effective, suggesting altered neutrophil polarization associated with different outcomes for cancer patients. Therefore, modulation of neutrophilic phenotypes represents a potent therapeutic option, but factors mediating neutrophil polarization are still poorly defined. In this manuscript we provide evidence that type I IFNs alter neutrophilic phenotype into anti-tumor, both in mice and human. In the absence of IFN-β, pro-tumor properties, such as reduced tumor cytotoxicity with low neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) expression, low ICAM1 and TNF-α expression, dominated neutrophil phenotypes in primary lesion and premetastatic lung. Interestingly, such neutrophils have significantly prolonged life-span. Notably, interferon therapy in mice altered TAN polarization towards anti-tumor N1. Similar changes in neutrophil activation could be observed in melanoma patients undergoing type I IFN therapy. Altogether, these data highlight the therapeutic potential of interferons, suggesting optimization of its clinical use as potent anti-tumor agent. PMID:26619320

  14. Evaluation of the Microbicidal Activity and Cytokines/Chemokines Profile Released by Neutrophils from HTLV-1-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Caroline A.; Cardoso, Thiago M.; Giudice, Angela; Porto, Aurélia F.; Santos, Silvane B.; Carvalho, Edgar M.; Bacellar, Olívia

    2011-01-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) induces activation and spontaneous proliferation of T cells with production of type-1 pro-inflammatory cytokines. It modifies the immune response to other antigens and increases susceptibility to infectious diseases. However, little is known about innate immunity in HTLV-1 infection. HTLV-1-infected individuals have higher spontaneous neutrophil activation than HTLV-1-seronegative individuals, as shown by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) assay. This study was conducted to evaluate neutrophil function in HTLV-1-infected individuals. Participants in the study included 18 HTLV-1-infected individuals and 14 HTLV-1-seronegative controls. We evaluated the ability of neutrophils (PMNs) to control a parasite infection, to produce peroxynitrite, cytokines and chemokines and to express activation markers in cultures when stimulated with LPS or infected with Leishmania. When compared with the control group, there was no difference in the percentage of PMNs infected with Leishmania or in the number of amastigotes/100 PMNs in HTLV-1-infected individuals. The microbicidal activity of the PMNs and the levels of CXCL8 and CCL4 released by these cells did not show a difference between HTLV-1-infected individuals and the control group. In both the HTLV-1 group and the control group, infection with Leishmania or stimulation of PMNs led to cellular activation. These observations suggest that neutrophils from HTLV-1-infected individuals have preserved their ability to become activated and to produce chemokines and peroxynitrite after stimulation and that the susceptibility to infection by intracellular Leishmania amazonensis in HTLV-1-infected individuals does not depend on impairment of neutrophil function. PMID:21595736

  15. A taurine-supplemented vegan diet may blunt the contribution of neutrophil activation to acute coronary events.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F

    2004-01-01

    Neutrophils are activated in the coronary circulation during acute coronary events (unstable angina and myocardial infarction), often prior to the onset of ischemic damage. Moreover, neutrophils infiltrate coronary plaque in these circumstances, and may contribute to the rupture or erosion of this plaque, triggering thrombosis. Activated neutrophils secrete proteolytic enzymes in latent forms which are activated by the hypochlorous acid (HOCl) generated by myeloperoxidase. These phenomena may help to explain why an elevated white cell count has been found to be an independent coronary risk factor. Low-fat vegan diets can decrease circulating leukocytes--neutrophils and monocytes--possibly owing to down-regulation of systemic IGF-I activity. Thus, a relative neutropenia may contribute to the coronary protection afforded by such diets. However, vegetarian diets are devoid of taurine - the physiological antagonist of HOCl--and tissue levels of this nutrient are relatively low in vegetarians. Taurine has anti-atherosclerotic activity in animal models, possibly reflecting a role for macrophage-derived myeloperoxidase in the atherogenic process. Taurine also has platelet-stabilizing and anti-hypertensive effects that presumably could reduce coronary risk. Thus, it is proposed that a taurine-supplemented low-fat vegan diet represents a rational strategy for diminishing the contribution of activated neutrophils to acute coronary events; moreover, such a regimen would work in a number of other complementary ways to promote cardiovascular health. Moderate alcohol consumption, the well-tolerated drug pentoxifylline, and 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors--zileuton, boswellic acids, fish oil--may also have potential in this regard. PMID:15288360

  16. Vaccination against canine leishmaniosis increases the phagocytic activity, nitric oxide production and expression of cell activation/migration molecules in neutrophils and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Marcela L; Costa-Pereira, Christiane; Alves, Marina Luiza Rodrigues; Marteleto, Bruno H; Ribeiro, Vitor M; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Giunchetti, Rodolfo C; Martins-Filho, Olindo A; Araújo, Márcio S S

    2016-04-15

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is transmitted by phlebotomine sandfly vectors and domestic dogs serve as a reservoir. The elimination of seropositive dogs has been a recommended strategy for managing the disease in Brazil. A protective canine vaccine would be an important tool for controlling the disease, reducing the parasites available to sandfly vectors and, consequently, reducing the number of human VL cases. Leishmune(®) is an anti-canine Leishmaniosis (VL Canine) vaccine produced by Zoetis (Pfizer, Brazil) that was commercially available in Brazil until 2014. The main goal of the present study was to investigate the protective immunological events induced by vaccination with Leishmune(®) in the time frame of one year. Healthy, non-vaccinated dogs and dogs of 1, 6 and 10 months post-vaccination were evaluated. Results showed that Leishmune(®) induced an increase in phagocytic activity of neutrophils and monocytes and also increased NO production. Immunological events were correlated with functional responses, as high levels of IgG and an increase of the receptor Fcγ were detected. Vaccination induced an increased expression of TLR (2, 4, 5, 9), integrin (CD29, CD49f), activation (MHCII) and co-stimulatory (CD80, CD81) molecules by neutrophils and monocytes. Vaccination led to decrease of IL-4 and an increase of IL-8 production by monocytes and higher IFN-γ and IL-17 production by T-cells. The results suggested that Leishmune(®) was able to induce a long-lasting change in immune response, mediated by supportive immunological events that may be participating in protective immunity against CL. PMID:26995719

  17. Plasma ATP is required for neutrophil activation in a mouse sepsis model

    PubMed Central

    Sumi, Yuka; Woehrle, Tobias; Chen, Yu; Bao, Yi; Li, Xiaoou; Yao, Yongli; Inoue, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Junger, Wolfgang G.

    2014-01-01

    Our previous work has shown that polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) require cellular ATP release and autocrine purinergic signaling for their activation. Here we studied in a mouse model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) whether sepsis affects this purinergic signaling process and thereby alters PMN responses after sepsis. Using high performance liquid chromatography, we found that plasma ATP, ADP, and AMP concentrations increased up to 6 fold during the first 8 h after CLP, reaching top levels that were significantly higher than those in sham control animals without CLP. While leukocyte and PMN counts in sham animals increased significantly after 4 h, these blood cell counts decreased in sepsis animals. CD11b expression on the cell surface of PMN of septic animals was significantly higher compared to sham and untreated control animals. These findings suggest increased PMN activation and sequestration of PMN from the circulation after sepsis. Plasma ATP levels correlated with CD11b expression, suggesting that increased ATP concentrations in plasma contribute to PMN activation. We found that treatment of septic mice with the ATP receptor antagonist suramin diminished CD11b expression, indicating that plasma ATP contributs to PMN activation by stimulating P2 receptors of PMN. Increased PMN activation can protect the host from invading microorganisms. However, increased PMN activation can also be detrimental by promoting secondary organ damage. We conclude that pharmacological targeting of P2 receptors may allow modulation of PMN responses in sepsis. PMID:24675414

  18. Innate immune adaptor MyD88 mediates neutrophil recruitment and myocardial injury after ischemia-reperfusion in mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Zhao, Huailong; Xu, Xinhua; Buys, Emmanuel S; Raher, Michael J; Bopassa, Jean C; Thibault, Helene; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Schmidt, Ulrich; Chao, Wei

    2008-09-01

    MyD88 is an adaptor protein critical for innate immune response against microbial infection and in certain noninfectious tissue injury. The present study examined the role of MyD88 in myocardial inflammation and injury after ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). I/R was produced by coronary artery ligation for 30 min followed by reperfusion. The ratios of area at risk to left ventricle (LV) were similar between wild-type (WT) and MyD88-deficient (MyD88-/-) mice. However, 24 h after I/R, the ratios of myocardial infarction to area at risk were 58% less in MyD88(-/-) than in WT mice (14 +/- 2% vs. 33 +/- 6%, P = 0.01). Serial echocardiographic studies demonstrated that there was no difference in baseline LV contractile function between the two groups. Twenty-four hours after I/R, LV ejection fraction (EF) and fractional shortening (FS) in WT mice were reduced by 44% and 62% (EF, 51 +/- 2%, and FS, 22 +/- 1%, P < 0.001), respectively, and remained depressed on the seventh day after I/R. In comparison, EF and FS in MyD88(-/-) mice were 67 +/- 3% and 33 +/- 2%, respectively, after I/R (P < 0.001 vs. WT). Similarly, LV function, as demonstrated by invasive hemodynamic measurements, was better preserved in MyD88(-/-) compared with WT mice after I/R. Furthermore, when compared with WT mice, MyD88(-/-) mice subjected to I/R had a marked decrease in myocardial inflammation as demonstrated by attenuated neutrophil recruitment and decreased expression of the proinflammatory mediators keratinocyte chemoattractant, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and ICAM-1. Taken together, these data suggest that MyD88 modulates myocardial inflammatory injury and contributes to myocardial infarction and LV dysfunction during I/R. PMID:18660455

  19. [Neutrophilic functional heterogeneity].

    PubMed

    2006-02-01

    Blood neutrophilic functional heterogeneity is under discussion. The neutrophils of one subpopulation, namely killer neutrophils (Nk), potential phagocytes, constitute a marginal pool and a part of the circulating pool, intensively produce active oxygen forms (AOF) and they are adherent to the substrate. The neutrophils of another subpopulation, cager neutrophils (Nc), seem to perform a transport function of delivering foreign particles to the competent organs, to form about half of the circulating pool, to produce APC to a lesser extent, exclusively for self-defense and, probably, in usual conditions, to fail to interact with substrate. Analysis of the experimental findings suggests that the phylogenetic age of Nk is older than that of Nc and Nk has predominantly a tendency to spontaneous apoptosis under physiological conditions. PMID:16610631

  20. Single-dose intravenous gammaglobulin can stabilize neutrophil Mac-1 activation in sickle cell pain crisis

    PubMed Central

    Manwani, Deepa; Chen, Grace; Carullo, Veronica; Serban, Stelian; Olowokure, Olugbenga; Jang, Jungeun; Huggins, Matthew; Cohen, Hillel W.; Billett, Henny; Atweh, George F.; Frenette, Paul S.; Shi, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) decreases neutrophil adhesion to endothelium and red blood cell-neutrophil interactions in sickle cell mice undergoing vaso-occlusion. In this Phase I clinical trial of sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients admitted with pain crisis, we evaluated the status of adhesion molecules on neutrophils in control and IVIG-treated subjects pre- and post-infusion up to 800 mg/kg, the same dose used in murine studies. Mac-1 function significantly decreased from baseline in the low-dose IVIG (200–400 mg/kg) cohorts. IVIG-related adverse events may have occurred in the high-dose (600–800 mg/kg) cohorts. There were no significant increases in neutrophil and leukocyte counts, suggesting that IVIG may more selectively inhibit Mac-1 function as opposed to neutrophil adhesion. This study provides the first in-human validation of pre-clinical murine studies that IVIG can decrease Mac-1 function. PMID:25616042

  1. Neutrophils in cancer.

    PubMed

    Treffers, Louise W; Hiemstra, Ida H; Kuijpers, Taco W; van den Berg, Timo K; Matlung, Hanke L

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in cancer. This does not only relate to the well-established prognostic value of the presence of neutrophils, either in the blood or in tumor tissue, in the context of cancer progression or for the monitoring of therapy, but also to their active role in the progression of cancer. In the current review, we describe what is known in general about the role of neutrophils in cancer. What is emerging is a complex, rather heterogeneous picture with both pro- and anti-tumorigenic roles, which apparently differs with cancer type and disease stage. Furthermore, we will discuss the well-known role of neutrophils as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and also on the role of neutrophils as important effector cells during antibody therapy in cancer. It is clear that neutrophils contribute substantially to cancer progression in multiple ways, and this includes both direct effects on the cancer cells and indirect effect on the tumor microenvironment. While in many cases neutrophils have been shown to promote tumor progression, for instance by acting as MDSC, there are also protective effects, particularly when antibody immunotherapy is performed. A better understanding of the role of neutrophils is likely to provide opportunities for immunomodulation and for improving the treatment of cancer patients. PMID:27558343

  2. Sub-cellular localisation of alkaline phosphatase activity in the cytoplasm of tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) neutrophils and eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Hulme-Moir, K Lisa; Clark, Phillip

    2011-07-15

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) has been used in studies of neutrophil morphology and function as a marker for identifying different granule populations. In human neutrophils, ALP is found within secretory vesicles, a rapidly mobilisable vesicle population important for upregulating membrane receptors during early activation. Intra-cellular ALP activity in the heterophils of rabbits and guinea pigs, in contrast, is found only in secondary granules. The neutrophils and eosinophils of tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii) have previously been reported to contain large amounts of ALP activity when stained using routine cytochemical techniques. To define the subcellular location of ALP in this species, cell suspensions were examined using cerium chloride cytochemistry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). ALP was found in 2 distinct cytoplasmic compartments. One compartment displayed morphology consistent with a subpopulation of secondary granules while a second tubulo-vesicular population appeared similar to the secretory vesicles of human neutrophils. Thin tubular vesicles containing ALP were also identified within the cytoplasm of tammar wallaby eosinophils. Large numbers of ALP-containing vesicles have not been recognised previously in eosinophils and this may represent a novel cytoplasmic compartment. In both cell types, ALP-containing structures showed alteration in morphology following stimulation with N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) and PMA. PMID:21596444

  3. Neutrophil elastase activity in differentiating HL-60 promyelocytes is decreased by culture with ethanol and elastase deficient neutrophils are produced in alcoholics

    SciTech Connect

    Sachs, C.; Christianson, R.; Pratt, P.; Lynn, W.

    1987-05-01

    Serum-free culture of HL-60 in the presence of recombinant Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor in four days elicits a five-fold increase in esterolytic neutrophil elastase (NE) like activity measured with methoxy-succinyl-ala-ala-pro-val p-nitroanilide and purified NE standard but does not cause terminal differentiation. Simultaneous exposure to 0.2, 0.4, or 0.6% (vol./vol.) ethanol blocks this increase in NE activity. Exposure to 0.85% ethanol promotes terminal differentiation to elastase-deficient granulocytes which as been described using DMSO. To ascertain if ethanol may have similar effects on granulocytic differentiation in vivo, they compared oxidase and elastase activities of PMN's in male alcoholics on a binge (ethanol > 200 mg/dl.). In 29 patients an average of 872 (+/- 237) (SD) ng./10/sup 6/ PMN's of active NE was found compared to 1571 (+/- 177) in 13 controls. Patients admitted for treatment of alcoholism had similar NE activity in 3-4 days, showed a slight increase in activity within one week and had NE activity comparable to controls within 2-3 weeks. These findings support the previous observation that smoking related emphysema is less prevalent and severe in patients who regularly consume alcohol. They conclude that ethanol may visibly alter responsiveness of promyelocytic precursors to regulatory differentiating factors.

  4. The role of neutrophils in inflammation resolution.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hefin R; Robb, Calum T; Perretti, Mauro; Rossi, Adriano G

    2016-04-01

    The fundamental role played by neutrophils for an efficient, acute inflammatory response has long been appreciated, with the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms largely elucidated over the past decades. However, more recent work suggests that the biological functions exerted by this fascinating leucocyte are somewhat more extensive than previously acknowledged. Here we discuss how extravasated neutrophils govern the initiation of the resolution phase of inflammation by enabling activation of pro-resolving circuits to ensure the safe conclusion of the inflammatory response. The neutrophil 'alarm bell' on resolution is effected through release of soluble mediators as well as apoptotic bodies and other vesicles, which, in turn, can inform and modify the microenvironment ultimately leading to termination of the inflammatory response coinciding with re-establishment of tissue homeostasis and functionality. PMID:27021499

  5. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Targets Pathways Extrinsic to Bone Marrow Cells to Enhance Neutrophil Recruitment during Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Teske, Sabine; Bohn, Andrea A.; Hogaboam, Jason P.; Lawrence, B. Paige

    2010-01-01

    There is growing evidence that neutrophils influence host resistance during influenza virus infection; however, factors that regulate neutrophil migration to the lung during viral infection are unclear. Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) by the pollutant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD or dioxin) results in an increased number of neutrophils in the lung after influenza virus infection. The mechanism of AhR-mediated neutrophilia does not involve elevated levels of soluble neutrophil chemoattractants, upregulated adhesion molecules on pulmonary neutrophils, delayed neutrophil apoptosis, or increased vascular damage. In this study, we determined whether AhR activation increases neutrophil numbers systemically or only in the infected lung, and whether AhR-regulated events within the hematopoietic system underlie the dioxin-induced increase in pulmonary neutrophils observed during influenza virus infection. We report here that AhR activation does not increase neutrophil numbers systemically or increase neutrophil production in hematopoietic tissue, suggesting that the elevated number of neutrophils is restricted to the site of antigen challenge. The generation of CD45.2AhR−/− → CD45.1AhR+/+ bone marrow chimeric mice demonstrates that even when hematopoietic cells lack the AhR, TCDD treatment still results in twice as many pulmonary neutrophils compared with control-treated, infected CD45.2AhR−/− → CD45.1AhR+/+ chimeric mice. This finding reveals that AhR-mediated events extrinsic to bone marrow–derived cells affect the directional migration of neutrophils to the infected lung. These results suggest that the lung contains important and heretofore overlooked targets of AhR regulation, unveiling a novel mechanism for controlling neutrophil recruitment to the infected lung. PMID:18007012

  6. Modification of cystatin C activity by bacterial proteinases and neutrophil elastase in periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamson, M; Wikström, M; Potempa, J; Renvert, S; Hall, A

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To study the interaction between the human cysteine proteinase inhibitor, cystatin C, and proteinases of periodontitis associated bacteria. METHODS: Gingival crevicular fluid samples were collected from discrete periodontitis sites and their cystatin C content was estimated by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The interaction between cystatin C and proteolytic enzymes from cultured strains of the gingival bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was studied by measuring inhibition of enzyme activity against peptidyl substrates, by detection of break down patterns of solid phase coupled and soluble cystatin C, and by N-terminal sequence analysis of cystatin C products resulting from the interactions. RESULTS: Gingival crevicular fluid contained cystatin C at a concentration of approximately 15 nM. Cystatin C did not inhibit the principal thiol stimulated proteinase activity of P gingivalis. Instead, strains of P gingivalis and P intermedia, but not A actinomycetemcomitans, released cystatin C modifying proteinases. Extracts of five P gingivalis and five P intermedia strains all hydrolysed bonds in the N-terminal region of cystatin C at physiological pH values. The modified cystatin C resulting from incubation with one P gingivalis strain was isolated and found to lack the eight most N-terminal residues. The affinity of the modified inhibitor for cathepsin B was 20-fold lower (Ki 5 nM) than that of full length cystatin C. A 50 kDa thiol stimulated proteinase, gingipain R, was isolated from P gingivalis and shown to be responsible for the Arg8-bond hydrolysis in cystatin C. The cathepsin B inhibitory activity of cystatin C incubated with gingival crevicular fluid was rapidly abolished after Val10-bond cleavage by elastase from exudate neutrophils, but cleavage at the gingipain specific Arg8-bond was also demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS: The physiological control of cathepsin B activity is impeded in

  7. Regulation of platelet-activating factor synthesis in human neutrophils by MAP kinases.

    PubMed

    Baker, Paul R S; Owen, John S; Nixon, Andrew B; Thomas, Leslie N; Wooten, Rhonda; Daniel, Larry W; O'Flaherty, Joseph T; Wykle, Robert L

    2002-10-21

    Human neutrophils (PMN) are potentially a major source of platelet-activating factor (PAF) produced during inflammatory responses. The stimulated synthesis of PAF in PMN is carried out by a phospholipid remodeling pathway involving three enzymes: acetyl-CoA:lyso-PAF acetyltransferase (acetyltransferase), type IV phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)) and CoA-independent transacylase (CoA-IT). However, the coordinated actions and the regulatory mechanisms of these enzymes in PAF synthesis are poorly defined. A23187 has been widely used to activate the remodeling pathway, but it has not been shown how closely its actions mimic those of physiological stimuli. Here we address this important problem and compare responses of the three remodeling enzymes and PAF synthesis by intact cells. In both A23187- and N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-stimulated PMN, acetyltransferase activation is blocked by SB 203580, a p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, but not by PD 98059, which blocks activation of the ERKs. In contrast, either agent attenuated cPLA(2) activation. Correlating with these results, SB 203580 decreased stimulated PAF formation by 60%, whereas PD 98059 had little effect. However, the combination of both inhibitors decreased PAF formation to control levels. Although a role for CoA-IT in PAF synthesis is recognized, we did not detect activation of the enzyme in stimulated PMN. CoA-IT thus appears to exhibit full activity in resting as well as stimulated cells. We conclude that the calcium ionophore A23187 and the receptor agonist fMLP both act through common pathways to stimulate PAF synthesis, with p38 MAP kinase regulating acetyltransferase and supplementing ERK activation of cPLA(2). PMID:12379481

  8. A phospholipase A₂ from Bothrops asper snake venom activates neutrophils in culture: expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and PGE₂ biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Vanessa; Gutiérrez, José María; Amaral, Rafaela Bacci; Lomonte, Bruno; Purgatto, Eduardo; Teixeira, Catarina

    2011-02-01

    In this study, the production of prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) and up-regulation in cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway induced by a phospholipase A₂ (PLA₂), myotoxin-III (MT-III), purified from Bothrops asper snake venom, in isolated neutrophils were investigated. The arachidonic acid (AA) production and the participation of intracellular PLA₂s (cytosolic PLA₂ and Ca(2+)-independent PLA₂) in these events were also evaluated. MT-III induced COX-2, but not COX-1 gene and protein expression in neutrophils and increased PGE₂ levels. Pretreatment of neutrophils with COX-2 and COX-1 inhibitors reduced PGE₂ production induced by MT-III. Arachidonyl trifluoromethyl ketone (AACOCF₃), an intracellular PLA₂ inhibitor, but not bromoenol lactone (BEL), an iPLA₂ inhibitor, suppressed the MT-III-induced AA and PGE₂ release. In conclusion, MT-III directly stimulates neutrophils inducing COX-2 mRNA and protein expression followed by production of PGE₂. COX-2 isoform is preeminent over COX-1 for production of PGE₂ stimulated by MT-III. PGE₂ and AA release by MT-III probably is related to cPLA₂ activation. PMID:21147147

  9. Donor antibodies to HNA-3a implicated in TRALI reactions prime neutrophils and cause PMN-mediated damage to human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells in a two-event in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Silliman, Christopher C; Curtis, Brian R; Kopko, Patricia M; Khan, Samina Y; Kelher, Marguerite R; Schuller, Randy M; Sannoh, Baindu; Ambruso, Daniel R

    2007-02-15

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. Antibodies to HNA-3a are commonly implicated in TRALI. We hypothesized that HNA-3a antibodies prime neutrophils (PMNs) and cause PMN-mediated cytotoxicity through a two-event pathogenesis. Isolated HNA-3a+ or HNA-3a- PMNs were incubated with plasma containing HNA-3a antibodies implicated in TRALI, and their ability to prime the oxidase was measured. Human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) were activated with endotoxin or buffer, HNA-3a+ or HNA-3a- PMNs were added, and the coculture was incubated with plasma+/-antibodies to HNA-3a. PMN-mediated damage was measured by counting viable HMVECs/mm2. Plasma containing HNA-3a antibodies primed the fMLP-activated respiratory burst of HNA-3a+, but not HNA-3a-, PMNs and elicited PMN-mediated damage of LPS-activated HMVECs when HNA-3a+, but not HNA-3a-, PMNs were used. Thus, antibodies to HNA-3a primed PMNs and caused PMN-mediated HMVEC cytotoxicity in a two-event model identical to biologic response modifiers implicated in TRALI. PMID:17038531

  10. Review of the neutrophil response to Bordetella pertussis infection.

    PubMed

    Eby, Joshua C; Hoffman, Casandra L; Gonyar, Laura A; Hewlett, Erik L

    2015-12-01

    The nature and timing of the neutrophil response to infection with Bordetella pertussis is influenced by multiple virulence factors expressed by the bacterium. After inoculation of the host airway, the recruitment of neutrophils signaled by B. pertussis lipooligosaccharide (LOS) is suppressed by pertussis toxin (PTX). Over the next week, the combined activities of PTX, LOS and adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) result in production of cytokines that generate an IL-17 response, promoting neutrophil recruitment which peaks at 10-14 days after inoculation in mice. Arriving at the site of infection, neutrophils encounter the powerful local inhibitory activity of ACT, in conjunction with filamentous hemagglutinin. With the help of antibodies, neutrophils contribute to clearance of B. pertussis, but only after 28-35 days in a naïve mouse. Studies of the lasting, antigen-specific IL-17 response to infection in mice and baboons has led to progress in vaccine development and understanding of pathogenesis. Questions remain about the mediators that coordinate neutrophil recruitment and the mechanisms by which neutrophils overcome B. pertussis virulence factors. PMID:26432818

  11. Proteins derived from neutrophil extracellular traps may serve as self-antigens and mediate organ damage in autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Jason S.; Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in circulation and represent one of the first lines of defense against invading pathogens. Neutrophils possess a vast arsenal of antimicrobial proteins, which can be released from the cell by a death program termed NETosis. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are web-like structures consisting of decondensed chromatin decorated with granular and cytosolic proteins. Both exuberant NETosis and impaired clearance of NETs have been implicated in the organ damage of autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), small vessel vasculitis (SVV), and psoriasis. NETs may also represent an important source of modified autoantigens in SLE and SVV. Here, we review the autoimmune diseases linked to NETosis, with a focus on how modified proteins externalized on NETs may trigger loss of immune tolerance and promote organ damage. PMID:23248629

  12. Inhibition by recombinant SLPI and half-SLPI (Asn55-Ala107) of elastase and cathepsin G activities: consequence for neutrophil-platelet cooperation.

    PubMed Central

    Renesto, P.; Balloy, V.; Kamimura, T.; Masuda, K.; Imaizumi, A.; Chignard, M.

    1993-01-01

    1. The capacity of recombinant human secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) to inhibit human leukocyte elastase (HLE) and cathepsin G (Cat G) was investigated and compared with a recombinant truncated form (carboxyl-terminal domain, Asn55-Ala107) called 1/2 SLPI. 2. Both compounds were efficient when tested against enzymatic activities of purified HLE and Cat G indicating that the HLE- and Cat G-inhibitory sites were preserved in the truncated form. SLPI and 1/2 SLPI also affected platelet activation induced by 0.2 microM Cat G (IC50 = 112 +/- 13 nM for SLPI and 280 +/- 12 nM for 1/2 SLPI). 3. The effects of SLPI and 1/2 SLPI were then tested against polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN)-mediated platelet activation, a cell-to-cell interaction mediated by HLE and Cat G released from PMN. In this experimental system, addition of SLPI or 1/2 SLPI before N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) led to the inhibition of the resulting platelet activation. As was the case for Cat G enzymatic activity and Cat G-induced platelet activation, SLPI was more efficient than 1/2 SLPI (IC50 = 676 +/- 69 nM vs 1121 +/- 150 nM). 4. The ratio of the IC50 against PMN-mediated platelet activation compared to purified Cat G-mediated platelet activation was 6.03 for SLPI and 4.32 for 1/2 SLPI. This difference may be due to the smaller size of the truncated form which could allow this molecule to diffuse more easily between PMN and platelets.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8097952

  13. Endothelium and the effect of activated neutrophils on arterial smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sotnikova, Ruzena

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the involvement of the endothelium in the effects of neutrophils (PMNL) on phenylephrine-precontracted isolated rings of the rat thoracic aorta and to compare their effects with those of peroxynitrite (ONOO−) and hypochlorous acid (HOCl). Activated PMNL-induced contraction of the precontracted aorta was prevented by the blockade of NO-synthase and by endothelium removal. In the endothelium-free preparations, the effect of PMNL reappeared in the presence of sodium nitroprusside. The effect of ONOO– and HOCl significantly differed from that of activated PMNL both in the presence and absence of the endothelium. It is therefore likely that neither ONOO– nor HOCl generated by transformation of superoxide anion radical (O2•–) produced by PMNL is involved in their action. Reduction of the relaxant effect of nitric oxide derived from the endothelium by O2•– seems to be the keystone mechanism in generation of PMNL-induced contraction. PMID:27486359

  14. Iron-chelating agent, deferasirox, inhibits neutrophil activation and extracellular trap formation.

    PubMed

    Kono, Mari; Saigo, Katsuyasu; Yamamoto, Shiori; Shirai, Kohei; Iwamoto, Shuta; Uematsu, Tomoko; Takahashi, Takayuki; Imoto, Shion; Hashimoto, Makoto; Minami, Yosuke; Wada, Atsushi; Takenokuchi, Mariko; Kawano, Seiji

    2016-10-01

    Iron-chelating agents, which are frequently prescribed to transfusion-dependent patients, have various useful biological effects in addition to chelation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by neutrophils can cause pulmonary endothelial cell damage, which can lead to acute lung injury (ALI). We previously reported that deferasirox (DFS), an iron-chelating agent, inhibits phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced ROS production in neutrophils, in vitro. Here, we investigate whether DFS inhibits vacuolization in neutrophils and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. Human neutrophils were incubated with DFS and stimulated with PMA or fMLP. Human neutrophils were separated from heparinized peripheral blood using density gradient centrifugation, and subsequently incubated with DFS. After 10 minutes, neutrophils were stimulated by PMA or fMLP. Vacuole formation was observed by electron microscopy. For observing NET formations using microscopes, immunohistological analyses using citrullinated histone H3 and myeloperoxidase antibodies, and SYTOX Green (an impermeable DNA detection dye) staining, were conducted. NET formation was measured as the quantity of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), using the AccuBlue Broad Range dsDNA Quantitation Kit. DFS (50 μmol/L) inhibited vacuole formation in the cytoplasm and NET formation. Additionally, 5-100 μmol/L concentration of DFS inhibited the release of dsDNA in a dose-independent manner. We demonstrate that DFS inhibits not only ROS production but also vacuolization and NET formation in neutrophils. These results suggest the possibility of protective effects of DFS against NET-related adverse effects, including ALI and thrombosis. PMID:27333499

  15. Innate immune adaptor MyD88 mediates neutrophil recruitment and myocardial injury after ischemia-reperfusion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Feng , Yan; Zhao, Huailong; Xu, Xinhua; Buys, Emmanuel S.; Raher, Michael J.; Bopassa, Jean C.; Thibault, Helene; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Schmidt, Ulrich; Chao, Wei

    2008-01-01

    MyD88 is an adaptor protein critical for innate immune response against microbial infection and in certain noninfectious tissue injury. The present study examined the role of MyD88 in myocardial inflammation and injury after ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). I/R was produced by coronary artery ligation for 30 min followed by reperfusion. The ratios of area at risk to left ventricle (LV) were similar between wild-type (WT) and MyD88-deficient (MyD88−/−) mice. However, 24 h after I/R, the ratios of myocardial infarction to area at risk were 58% less in MyD88−/− than in WT mice (14 ± 2% vs. 33 ± 6%, P = 0.01). Serial echocardiographic studies demonstrated that there was no difference in baseline LV contractile function between the two groups. Twenty-four hours after I/R, LV ejection fraction (EF) and fractional shortening (FS) in WT mice were reduced by 44% and 62% (EF, 51 ± 2%, and FS, 22 ± 1%, P < 0.001), respectively, and remained depressed on the seventh day after I/R. In comparison, EF and FS in MyD88−/− mice were 67 ± 3% and 33 ± 2%, respectively, after I/R (P < 0.001 vs. WT). Similarly, LV function, as demonstrated by invasive hemodynamic measurements, was better preserved in MyD88−/− compared with WT mice after I/R. Furthermore, when compared with WT mice, MyD88−/− mice subjected to I/R had a marked decrease in myocardial inflammation as demonstrated by attenuated neutrophil recruitment and decreased expression of the proinflammatory mediators keratinocyte chemoattractant, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and ICAM-1. Taken together, these data suggest that MyD88 modulates myocardial inflammatory injury and contributes to myocardial infarction and LV dysfunction during I/R. PMID:18660455

  16. TREM-like transcript 2 is stored in human neutrophil primary granules and is up-regulated in response to inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kimberly A; King, R Glenn; Sestero, Christine M; Justement, Louis B

    2016-07-01

    The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell locus encodes a family of receptors that is emerging as an important class of molecules involved in modulating the innate immune response and inflammation. Of the 4 conserved members, including triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 and 2 and triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell-like transcripts 1 and 2, relatively little is known about triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell-like transcript 2 expression and function, particularly in humans. In this study, experiments were performed to determine if triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell-like transcript 2 expression is conserved between mouse and human, demonstrating that human triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell-like transcript 2 is expressed on cells of the lymphoid, as well as myeloid/granuloid lineages, similar to murine triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell-like transcript 2. Consistent with studies in the mouse, triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell-like transcript 2 expression is up-regulated in response to inflammatory mediators on human neutrophils. Importantly, it was shown that triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell-like transcript 2, in resting human neutrophils, is predominantly localized to intracellular vesicles, including secretory vesicles and primary granules; with the majority of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell-like transcript 2 stored in primary granules. In contrast to other primary granule proteins, triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell-like transcript 2 is not expelled on neutrophil extracellular traps but is retained in the plasma membrane following primary granule exocytosis. In summary, these findings establish that triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell-like transcript 2 expression is conserved between species and is likely to be important in regulating neutrophil antimicrobial function following primary granule exocytosis. PMID:26753760

  17. Lack of activity of 15-epi-lipoxin A4 on FPR2/ALX and CysLT1 receptors in interleukin-8-driven human neutrophil function

    PubMed Central

    Planagumà, A; Domenech, T; Jover, I; Ramos, I; Sentellas, S; Malhotra, R; Miralpeix, M

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophil recruitment and survival are important control points in the development and resolution of inflammatory processes. 15-epi-lipoxin (LX)A4 interaction with formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2)/ALX receptor is suggested to enhance anti-inflammatory neutrophil functions and mediate resolution of airway inflammation. However, it has been reported that 15-epi-LXA4 analogues can also bind to cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 (CysLT1) and that the CysLT1 antagonist MK-571 binds to FPR2/ALX, so cross-reactivity between FPR2/ALX and CysLT1 ligands cannot be discarded. It is not well established whether the resolution properties reported for 15-epi-LXA4 are mediated through FPR2/ALX, or if other receptors such as CysLT1 may also be involved. Evaluation of specific FPR2/ALX ligands and CysLT1 antagonists in functional biochemical and cellular assays were performed to establish a role for both receptors in 15-epi-LXA4-mediated signalling and function. In our study, a FPR2/ALX synthetic peptide (WKYMVm) and a small molecule FPR2/ALX agonist (compound 43) induced FPR2/ALX-mediated signalling, enhancing guanosine triphosphate-gamma (GTPγ) binding and decreasing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels, whereas 15-epi-LXA4 was inactive. Furthermore, 15-epi-LXA4 showed neither binding affinity nor signalling towards CysLT1. In neutrophils, 15-epi-LXA4 showed a moderate reduction of interleukin (IL)-8-mediated neutrophil chemotaxis but no effect on neutrophil survival was observed. In addition, CysLT1 antagonists were inactive in FPR2/ALX signalling or neutrophil assays. In conclusion, 15-epi-LXA4 is not a functional agonist or an antagonist of FPR2/ALX or CysLT1, shows no effect on IL-8-induced neutrophil survival and produces only moderate inhibition in IL-8-mediated neutrophil migration. Our data do not support an anti-inflammatory role of 15-epi-LXA4- FPR2/ALX interaction in IL-8-induced neutrophil inflammation. PMID:23607720

  18. Tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of a new mitogen-activated protein (MAP)-kinase cascade in human neutrophils stimulated with various agonists.

    PubMed Central

    Nahas, N; Molski, T F; Fernandez, G A; Sha'afi, R I

    1996-01-01

    The presence of a novel 38 kDa protein that is tyrosine phosphorylated in human neutrophils, a terminally differentiated cell, upon stimulation of these cells with low concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in combination with serum has been demonstrated. This 38 kDa protein was identified as the mammalian homologue of HOG1 in yeast, the p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. This conclusion is based on the experimental findings that anti-phosphotyrosine (anti-PY) antibody immunoprecipitates a 38 kDa protein that is recognized by anti-p38 MAP kinase antibody, and conversely, anti-p38 MAP kinase antibody immunoprecipitates a 38 kDa protein that can be recognized by anti-PY antibody. Moreover, this tyrosine phosphorylated protein is found associated entirely with the cytosol. It was also found that this p38 MAP kinase is activated following stimulation of these cells with low concentrations of LPS in combination with serum. This conclusion is based on three experimental findings. First, soluble fractions isolated from LPS-stimulated cells phosphorylate heat shock protein 27 (hsp27) in an in vitro assay, and this effect is not inhibited by protein kinase C and protein kinase A inhibitor peptides. This effect is similar to the effect produced by the commercially available phosphorylated and activated MAPKAP kinase-2 (MAP kinase activated protein kinase-2). Secondly, a 27 kDa protein that aligns with a protein recognized by anti-hsp27 antibody is phosphorylated upon LPS stimulation of intact human neutrophils prelabelled with radioactive phosphate. Lastly, immune complex protein kinase assays, using [gamma-32P]ATP and activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) as substrates, showed increased p38 MAP kinase activity from LPS-stimulated human neutrophils. The phosphorylation and activation of this p38 MAP kinase can be affected by both G-protein-coupled receptors such as platelet-activating factor (PAF) and non-G-protein-coupled receptors such as the cytokine

  19. Formation of the Ca2+-activated photoprotein obelin from apo-obelin and mRNA inside human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, A K; Patel, A K; Razavi, Z S; McCapra, F

    1988-01-01

    1. A method has been developed to incorporate the apoprotein of the Ca2+-activated photoprotein obelin, and mRNA purified from the hydroid Obelia, into the cytoplasm of intact human neutrophils. This was based on internal release from pH-sensitive immunoliposomes taken up initially by phagocytosis. 2. Addition of the prosthetic group of obelin, coelenterazine, to these cells containing apo-obelin or Obelia mRNA resulted in formation of active Ca2+-activated obelin. 3. The obelin formed within the neutrophils responded to the chemotactic peptide N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (1 microM) and to the membrane attack complex of complement (C5B6789n). 4. The formation of the apo-obelin from mRNA within neutrophils was inhibited by over 80% in the absence of added amino acids, and by over 90% by the protein-synthesis inhibitor puromycin (100 micrograms/ml). 5. The translation of Obelia mRNA inside cells provides a method for circumventing consumption of Ca2+-activated photoproteins during cell activation or injury, and for monitoring protein synthesis in living cells. PMID:3421897

  20. Regulation of membrane associated protein kinase C activity by guanine nucleotide in rabbit peritoneal neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.K.; Devanney, J.F.

    1986-03-05

    Addition of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) (0.1 ..mu..g/ml) or guanosine-5'-0-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP..gamma..S) (10..mu..M) to the membrane fraction from rabbit peritoneal neutrophils results in an increase of phosphorylation of several membrane proteins. To test whether membrane associated protein kinase C is involved in the activation, histone is added to the membrane as a substrate for protein kinase C. Phosphorylation of histone is determined by counting the gel pieces containing histone IIIS after separation from other membrane components by SDS-gel electrophoresis. In the presence of CaC12 (20 ..mu..M), GTP..gamma..S (10 ..mu..M) or PMA (0.1 ..mu..g/ml) stimulates the phosphorylation of histone IIIS (40% to 70% increase). To achieve this effect calcium is required for GTP..gamma..S but not for PMA. The effect of GTP..gamma..S but not PMA is inhibited in membranes obtained from cells pretreated with pertussis toxin. Membrane protein kinase C is solubilized with Triton X-100 (1%) and then applied to a DEAE-52 cellulose column chromatography. Two peaks of protein kinase C activity are observed. Peak one is eluted at 40 mM NaCl, peak two is eluted at 140 mM NaCl. The activity of peak one is stimulated with phosphatidylserine (PS) and PMA but not with PS and calcium. The activity of peak two is stimulated with either PS and PMA or PS and calcium. The results suggest that GTP binding protein is involved in the activation of membrane associated protein kinase C and the kinase may exist in two forms, calcium sensitive and calcium insensitive.

  1. Modulation of signalling in neutrophils activated by a chemotactic peptide: calcium regulates diacyl glycerol metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Korchak, H.M.; Vosshall, L.B.; Lundquist, K.F.

    1987-05-01

    Neutrophils activated by ligands such as the chemotactic peptide f-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP) generate superoxide anion (O/sub 2//sup -/) and release specific and azurophil granule contents. The signalling for this response is thought to involve both elevated cytosolic Ca and protein kinase C activity. Receptor-occupation triggers a phospholipase C to cleave phosphatidyl inositol 4,5 bisphosphate (PIP/sub 2/) yielding inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate, (IP/sub 3/), a trigger for intracellular Ca release, and diacyl glycerol (DG), which together with Ca activates protein kinase C. The DG can be metabolized to phosphatidic acid (PA). FMLP triggered a rapid increase in cytosolic Ca (fura-2). Loading cells with MAPTAM, and intracellular Ca buffer, suppressed this Ca transient in FMLP activated cells and inhibited O/sub 2//sup -/ generation to 12.5% of control, beta-glucuronidase release to 40.3% of control and lysozyme release to 55.1% of control. FMLP triggered a prompt decrease in PIP/sub 2/ in cells pre-labelled with /sup 32/P or /sup 3/H-inositol and an increase in PA and release of /sup 3/H-IP/sub 3/. A rapid increase in /sup 14/C-DG levels was also observed in /sup 14/C-glycerol pre-loaded cells activated by FMLP. Suppression of the Ca transient by buffering with MAPTAM inhibited elevation of /sup 14/C-DG. Breakdown of PIP/sub 2/ was not inhibited and elevation of /sup 32/P-PA was enhanced in MAPTAM loaded cells. Conversely, 200nM ionomycin which elevated cytosolic Ca to an equivalent level to 10/sup -7/M FMLP, triggered a rise in /sup 14/C-DG but not in PA.

  2. Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif phosphorylation during engulfment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by the neutrophil-restricted CEACAM3 (CD66d) receptor.

    PubMed

    McCaw, Shannon E; Schneider, Jutta; Liao, Edward H; Zimmermann, Wolfgang; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2003-08-01

    Gonorrhea is characterized by a purulent urethral or cervical discharge consisting primarily of neutrophils associated with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. These interactions are facilitated by gonococcal colony opacity-associated (Opa) protein binding to host cellular CEACAM receptors. Of these, CEACAM3 is restricted to neutrophils and contains an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) reminiscent of that found within certain phagocytic Fc receptors. CEACAM3 was tyrosine phosphorylated by a Src family kinase-dependent process upon infection by gonococci expressing CEACAM-specific Opa proteins. This phosphorylation was necessary for efficient bacterial uptake; however, a less efficient uptake process became evident when kinase inhibitors or mutagenesis of the ITAM were used to prevent phosphorylation. Ligated CEACAM3 was recruited to a cytoskeleton-containing fraction, intense foci of polymerized actin were evident where bacteria attached to HeLa-CEACAM3, and disruption of polymerized actin by cytochalasin D blocked all bacterial uptake by these cells. These data support a model whereby CEACAM3 can mediate the Opa-dependent uptake of N. gonorrhoeae via either an efficient, ITAM phosphorylation-dependent process that resembles phagocytosis or a less efficient, tyrosine phosphorylation-independent mechanism. PMID:12864848

  3. Real-time detection of implant-associated neutrophil responses using a formyl peptide receptor-targeting NIR nanoprobe

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Weng, Hong; Tang, Ewin N; Nair, Ashwin; Davé, Digant P; Tang, Liping

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in implant-mediated inflammation and infection. Unfortunately, current methods which monitor neutrophil activity, including enzyme measurements and histological evaluation, require many animals and cannot be used to accurately depict the dynamic cellular responses. To understand the neutrophil interactions around implant-mediated inflammation and infection it is critical to develop methods which can monitor in vivo cellular activity in real time. In this study, formyl peptide receptor (FPR)-targeting near-infrared nanoprobes were fabricated. This was accomplished by conjugating near-infrared dye with specific peptides having a high affinity to the FPRs present on activated neutrophils. The ability of FPR-targeting nanoprobes to detect and quantify activated neutrophils was assessed both in vitro and in vivo. As expected, FPR-targeting nanoprobes preferentially accumulated on activated neutrophils in vitro. Following transplantation, FPR-targeting nanoprobes preferentially accumulated at the biomaterial implantation site. Equally important, a strong relationship was observed between the extent of fluorescence intensity in vivo and the number of recruited neutrophils at the implantation site. Furthermore, FPR-targeting nanoprobes may be used to detect and quantify the number of neutrophils responding to a catheter-associated infection. The results show that FPR-targeting nanoprobes may serve as a powerful tool to monitor and measure the extent of neutrophil responses to biomaterial implants in vivo. PMID:22619542

  4. Chemotactic and enzyme-releasing activity of amphipathic proteins for neutrophils. A possible role for protease in chemotaxis on substratum-bound protein gradients.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, P C; Bradley, G R

    1981-01-01

    The purified amphipathic proteins, alpha s 1-casein, beta-casein, and alkali-denatured serum albumin were studied for chemotactic and enzyme-releasing effects on human neutrophil leucocytes. Evidence for chemotaxis both in fluid-phase gradients and on solid-phase gradients was obtained using visual assays. In fluid-phase gradients, neutrophils showed good orientation to gradient sources of these proteins at concentrations of 10(-4) to 10(-5) M. Solid-phase gradients of casein and of denatured albumin were prepared on glass coverslips, and the locomotion of neutrophils attached to these coverslips was filmed by time-lapse cinematography. Displacement of neutrophils towards the highest concentration of substratum-bound protein was observed, suggesting that neutrophils can show true chemotaxis on a solid-phase gradient. All three proteins induced enzyme release from neutrophils in the absence of cytochalasin B. Lysozyme release was equivalent to that released by stimulation with formyl methionyl peptide in the presence of cytochalasin B, but the proteins stimulated a smaller release of beta-glucuronidase than the peptide. The proteins stimulated release of neutrophil proteases which were able to digest both casein and denatured albumin extracellularly. It is suggested that this proteolytic activity may assist locomotion of neutrophils, especially on solid-phase protein gradients, by cleaving membrane-attached protein, thus both freeing cell-surface receptors and allowing the cell to detach itself from the substratum and continue movement. Images Figure 1 PMID:7016748

  5. Therapeutic effect of ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid on neutrophilic lung inflammation and sepsis is mediated by Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyun Ha; Sadikot, Ruxana T; Joo, Myungsoo

    2016-06-01

    Kaurenoic acid (ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid: KA) is a key constituent found in the roots of Aralia continentalis Kitagawa (Araliaceae), a remedy to treat patients with inflammatory diseases in traditional Asian medicine. Since KA activates Nrf2, a key anti-inflammatory factor, at the cellular level, we explored a possible therapeutic usage of KA against neutrophilic inflammatory lung disease such as acute lung injury (ALI). Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to C57BL/6 mice induced lung inflammation as in ALI. 2 h after i.p. LPS, intratracheal (i.t.) delivery of KA (0.3, 3, or 30 μg/kg body weight) improved lung structure and significantly suppressed neutrophil infiltrations to mouse lungs, with concomitant reduction of myeloperoxidase activity and of the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes. While activating Nrf2 and expressing Nrf2-dependent genes in mouse lungs, KA did not significantly suppress neutrophil lung inflammation in Nrf2 KO mice. In a mouse model of sepsis, a major cause of ALI, single i.t. KA (3 μg/kg) 2 h after the onset of sepsis significantly decreased the mortality of mice. Together, these results suggest that KA has a therapeutic potential against inflammatory lung disease, the effect of which is associated with Nrf2 activation. PMID:27133718

  6. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Activation of Dendritic Cells and Neutrophils Depends on the Dose and Time of Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bay, Boon Huat

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the ability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) to activate DC and neutrophils and modulate T cell activation and the impact of bacterial dose on these responses. Murine bone marrow derived DC or neutrophils were stimulated with LGG at ratios of 5 : 1, 10 : 1, and 100 : 1 (LGG : cells) and DC maturation (CD40, CD80, CD86, CD83, and MHC class II) and cytokine production (IL-10, TNF-α, and IL-12p70) were examined after 2 h and 18 h coculture and compared to the ability of BCG (the present immunotherapeutic agent for bladder cancer) to stimulate these cells. A 2 h exposure to 100 : 1 (high dose) or an 18 h exposure to 5 : 1 or 10 : 1 (low dose), LGG : cells, induced the highest production of IL-12 and upregulation of CD40, CD80, CD86, and MHC II on DC. In DCs stimulated with LGG activated neutrophils IL-12 production decreased with increasing dose. LGG induced 10-fold greater IL-12 production than BCG. T cell IFNγ and IL-2 production was significantly greater when stimulated with DC activated with low dose LGG. In conclusion, DC or DC activated with neutrophils exposed to low dose LGG induced greater Th1 polarization in T cells and this could potentially exert stronger antitumor effects. Thus the dose of LGG used for immunotherapy could determine treatment efficacy. PMID:27525288

  7. Human neutrophils are activated by a peptide fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin B presumably via formyl peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Goy, Sebastian D; Olling, Alexandra; Neumann, Detlef; Pich, Andreas; Gerhard, Ralf

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium difficile may induce antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and, in severe cases, pseudomembranous colitis characterized by tremendous neutrophil infiltration. All symptoms are caused by two exotoxins: TcdA and TcdB. We describe here the activation of isolated human blood neutrophils by TcdB and, moreover, by toxin fragments generated by limited proteolytical digestion. Kinetics and profiles of TcdB-induced rise in intracellular-free Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species production were similar to that induced by fMLF, which activates the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) recognizing formylated bacterial peptide sequences. Transfection assays with the FPR-1 isoform hFPR26 in HEK293 cells, heterologous desensitization experiments and FPR inhibition via cyclosporine H strongly suggest activation of cells via FPR-1. Domain analyses revealed that the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain of TcdB is a potent activator of FPR pointing towards an additional mechanism that might contribute to pathogenesis. This pro-inflammatory ligand effect can be triggered even by cleaved and, thus, non-cytotoxic toxin. In summary, we report (i) a ligand effect on neutrophils as completely new molecular mode of action, (ii) pathogenic potential of truncated or proteolytically cleaved 'non-cytotoxic' fragments and (iii) an interaction of the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain instead of the C-terminal receptor binding domain of TcdB with target cells. PMID:25529763

  8. Incidence of mastitis and activity of milk neutrophils in Tharparkar cows reared under semi-arid conditions.

    PubMed

    Alhussien, Mohanned; Manjari, P; Mohammed, Seid; Sheikh, Aasif Ahmad; Reddi, Srinu; Dixit, Satpal; Dang, Ajay K

    2016-08-01

    Rearing of indigenous Tharparkar (TP) cows (native of arid Thar deserts) under high humid conditions (>75 % humidity) has increased the incidence of mammary infections in them. A study was undertaken to see the number, activity, and expression of milk neutrophils isolated from healthy and mastitic cows. There was a significant (P < 0.05) influx in milk somatic cell counts (SCC) and neutrophils in sub-clinical and clinical mastitis cows. No change was observed in the phagocytic activity (PA) of milk neutrophils between healthy and sub-clinical mastitis (SCM) cows, but these activities decreased significantly (P < 0.05) in clinical cases. Chemotactic activity showed a significant difference between all the groups. Lactose varied significantly (P < 0.05) between healthy, sub-clinical, and clinical mastitis (CM) cows. Expression of chemokine receptor (CXCR1) was more in mastitis cows and also higher as compared to CXCR2. No change was observed in cluster of differentiation molecule (CD62L) among all the three groups of TP cows. Expression of interleukin (IL-8) and CD11b was low in healthy cows, increased significantly (P < 0.05) in both sub-clinical and mastitis cows. This study indicates that low producing TP cows are also prone to mammary infections when reared under semi-arid conditions. PMID:27154217

  9. Tumor Exosomal RNAs Promote Lung Pre-metastatic Niche Formation by Activating Alveolar Epithelial TLR3 to Recruit Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanfang; Gu, Yan; Han, Yanmei; Zhang, Qian; Jiang, Zhengping; Zhang, Xiang; Huang, Bo; Xu, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Jianming; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-08-01

    The pre-metastatic niche educated by primary tumor-derived elements contributes to cancer metastasis. However, the role of host stromal cells in metastatic niche formation and organ-specific metastatic tropism is not clearly defined. Here, we demonstrate that lung epithelial cells are critical for initiating neutrophil recruitment and lung metastatic niche formation by sensing tumor exosomal RNAs via Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3). TLR3-deficient mice show reduced lung metastasis in the spontaneous metastatic models. Mechanistically, primary tumor-derived exosomal RNAs, which are enriched in small nuclear RNAs, activate TLR3 in lung epithelial cells, consequently inducing chemokine secretion in the lung and promoting neutrophil recruitment. Identification of metastatic axis of tumor exosomal RNAs and host lung epithelial cell TLR3 activation provides potential targets to control cancer metastasis to the lung. PMID:27505671

  10. Sulphonamides as anti-inflammatory agents: old drugs for new therapeutic strategies in neutrophilic inflammation?

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Dapino, P; Scirocco, M C; Balbi, A; Bevilacqua, M; Dallegri, F

    1995-03-01

    1. It is well known that neutrophils act as mediators of tissue injury in a variety of inflammatory diseases. Their histotoxic activity is presently thought to involve proteinases and oxidants, primarily hypochlorous acid (HOCl). This oxidant is also capable of inactivating the specific inhibitor of neutrophil elastase (alpha 1-antitrypsin), thereby favouring digestion of the connective matrix. 2. In the present work, we found that sulphanilamide and some sulphanilamide-related anti-inflammatory drugs such as dapsone, nimesulide and sulphapyridine reduce the availability of HOCl in the extracellular microenvironment of activated neutrophils and prevent the inactivation of alpha 1-antitrypsin by these cells in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of each drug to prevent alpha 1-antitrypsin from inactivation by neutrophils correlates significantly with its capacity to reduce the recovery of HOCl from neutrophils. Five other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were completely ineffective. 3. Therefore, sulphanilamide-related drugs, i.e. dapsone, nimesulide and sulphapyridine, have the potential to reduce the bioavailability of neutrophil-derived HOCl and, in turn, to favour the alpha 1-antitrypsin-dependent control of neutrophil elastolytic activity. These drugs appear as a well-defined group of agents which are particularly prone to attenuate neutrophil histotoxicity. They can also be viewed as a previously unrecognized starting point for the development of new compounds in order to plan rational therapeutic strategies for controlling tissue injury during neutrophilic inflammation. PMID:7736703

  11. N-Formyl peptides drive mitochondrial damage associated molecular pattern induced neutrophil activation through ERK1/2 and P38 MAP kinase signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Hazeldine, Jon; Hampson, Peter; Opoku, Francis Adusei; Foster, Mark; Lord, Janet M

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injury results in a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), a phenomenon characterised by the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines into the circulation and immune cell activation. Released from necrotic cells as a result of tissue damage, damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are thought to initiate the SIRS response by activating circulating immune cells through surface expressed pathogen recognition receptors. Neutrophils, the most abundant leucocyte in human circulation, are heavily implicated in the initial immune response to traumatic injury and have been shown to elicit a robust functional response to DAMP stimulation. Here, we confirm that mitochondrial DAMPs (mtDAMPs) are potent activators of human neutrophils and show for the first time that signalling through the mitogen-activated-protein-kinases p38 and extracellular-signal-related-kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) is essential for this response. At 40 and/or 100 μg/ml, mtDAMPs activated human neutrophils, indicated by a significant reduction in the surface expression of L-selectin, and triggered a number of functional responses from both resting and tumour necrosis factor-α primed neutrophils, which included reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, degranulation, secretion of interleukin-8 and activation of p38 and ERK1/2 MAPKs. Pre-treatment of neutrophils with Cyclosporin H, a selective inhibitor of formyl peptide receptor-1 (FPR-1), significantly inhibited mtDAMP-induced L-selectin shedding as well as p38 and ERK1/2 activation, suggesting that N-formyl peptides are the main constituents driving mtDAMP-induced neutrophil activation. Indeed, no evidence of L-selectin shedding or p38 and ERK1/2 activation was observed in neutrophils challenged with mitochondrial DNA alone. Interestingly, pharmacological inhibition of p38 or ERK1/2 either alone or in combination significantly inhibited L-selectin shedding and IL-8 secretion by mtDAMP-challenged neutrophils, revealing for the first time

  12. Cellular Mechanisms Underlying Eosinophilic and Neutrophilic Airway Inflammation in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Vatrella, Alessandro; Busceti, Maria Teresa; Gallelli, Luca; Calabrese, Cecilia; Terracciano, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a phenotypically heterogeneous chronic disease of the airways, characterized by either predominant eosinophilic or neutrophilic, or even mixed eosinophilic/neutrophilic inflammatory patterns. Eosinophilic inflammation can be associated with the whole spectrum of asthma severity, ranging from mild-to-moderate to severe uncontrolled disease, whereas neutrophilic inflammation occurs mostly in more severe asthma. Eosinophilic asthma includes either allergic or nonallergic phenotypes underlying immune responses mediated by T helper (Th)2 cell-derived cytokines, whilst neutrophilic asthma is mostly dependent on Th17 cell-induced mechanisms. These immune-inflammatory profiles develop as a consequence of a functional impairment of T regulatory (Treg) lymphocytes, which promotes the activation of dendritic cells directing the differentiation of distinct Th cell subsets. The recent advances in the knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying asthmatic inflammation are contributing to the identification of novel therapeutic targets, potentially suitable for the implementation of future improvements in antiasthma pharmacologic treatments. PMID:25878402

  13. Cellular mechanisms underlying eosinophilic and neutrophilic airway inflammation in asthma.

    PubMed

    Pelaia, Girolamo; Vatrella, Alessandro; Busceti, Maria Teresa; Gallelli, Luca; Calabrese, Cecilia; Terracciano, Rosa; Maselli, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a phenotypically heterogeneous chronic disease of the airways, characterized by either predominant eosinophilic or neutrophilic, or even mixed eosinophilic/neutrophilic inflammatory patterns. Eosinophilic inflammation can be associated with the whole spectrum of asthma severity, ranging from mild-to-moderate to severe uncontrolled disease, whereas neutrophilic inflammation occurs mostly in more severe asthma. Eosinophilic asthma includes either allergic or nonallergic phenotypes underlying immune responses mediated by T helper (Th)2 cell-derived cytokines, whilst neutrophilic asthma is mostly dependent on Th17 cell-induced mechanisms. These immune-inflammatory profiles develop as a consequence of a functional impairment of T regulatory (Treg) lymphocytes, which promotes the activation of dendritic cells directing the differentiation of distinct Th cell subsets. The recent advances in the knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying asthmatic inflammation are contributing to the identification of novel therapeutic targets, potentially suitable for the implementation of future improvements in antiasthma pharmacologic treatments. PMID:25878402

  14. Chemokine Regulation of Neutrophil Infiltration of Skin Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yingjun; Richmond, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Efficient recruitment of neutrophils to an injured skin lesion is an important innate immune response for wound repair. Defects in neutrophil recruitment lead to impaired wound healing. Recent Advances: Chemokines and chemokine receptors are known to regulate neutrophil recruitment. Recent research advances reveal more mechanistic details about the regulation of chemokines and chemokine receptors on neutrophil egress from bone marrow, transmigration into the wound site, spatial navigation toward the necrotic skin tissue, and apoptosis-induced clearance by efferocytosis. Critical Issues: Skin injury triggers local and systemic alterations in the expression of multiple chemotactic molecules and the magnitude of chemokine receptor-mediated signaling. The responses of a number of CXC and CX3C chemokines and their receptors closely associate with the temporal and spatial recruitment of neutrophils to wound sites during the inflammatory phase and promote the clearance of necrotic neutrophils during the transition into the proliferative phase. Functional aberrancy in these chemokines and chemokine receptor systems is recognized as one of the important mechanisms underlying the pathology of impaired wound healing. Future Directions: Future research should aim to investigate the therapeutic modulation of neutrophil activity through the targeting of specific chemokines or chemokine receptors in the early inflammatory phase to improve clinical management of wound healing. PMID:26543677

  15. Effect of activation on adhesion of flowing neutrophils to cultured endothelium: time course and inhibition by a calcium channel blocker (nitrendipine).

    PubMed Central

    Perry, I.; Buttrum, S. M.; Nash, G. B.

    1993-01-01

    1. Adhesion of neutrophils to vascular endothelium plays an important role in inflammation and thrombosis. Modulation of adhesion may be therapeutic in these conditions. 2. A flow model was used to quantify adhesion of neutrophils to human cultured umbilical vein endothelial cells. The time course of the neutrophil response to activation by N-formyl-methionyl-leucylphenylalanine (fMLP, 10(-7) M) was studied and the inhibitory effects of the calcium-channel blockers, nitrendipine and nifedipine, were investigated. 3. Neutrophils adhered firmly to the endothelial cells without rolling, but initial attachment was highly dependent on shear stress; doubling the stress from 0.05 to 0.1Pa decreased the number of neutrophils adhering by over 80%. 4. Adhesion rapidly increased after activation of neutrophils by fMLP, peaking at 1-3 min post-treatment, and then decreased over the next 10-12 min. A monoclonal antibody to the beta 2-integrin component CD18 inhibited adhesion by over 80% for activated or unactivated cells. 5. The Ca-channel blocker, nitrendipine, but not nifedipine, significantly inhibited the fMLP-induced increase of adhesion in a dose-dependent manner (10(-8) to 10(-6) M). Dihydropyridines may be useful agents for modifying neutrophil function. PMID:7905773

  16. Modulation of Neutrophil Function by a Secreted Mucinase of Escherichia coli O157∶H7

    PubMed Central

    Szabady, Rose L.; Lokuta, Mary A.; Walters, Kevin B.; Huttenlocher, Anna; Welch, Rodney A.

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157∶H7 is a human enteric pathogen that causes hemorrhagic colitis which can progress to hemolytic uremic syndrome, a severe kidney disease with immune involvement. During infection, E. coli O157∶H7 secretes StcE, a metalloprotease that promotes the formation of attaching and effacing lesions and inhibits the complement cascade via cleavage of mucin-type glycoproteins. We found that StcE cleaved the mucin-like, immune cell-restricted glycoproteins CD43 and CD45 on the neutrophil surface and altered neutrophil function. Treatment of human neutrophils with StcE led to increased respiratory burst production and increased cell adhesion. StcE-treated neutrophils exhibited an elongated morphology with defective rear detachment and impaired migration, suggesting that removal of the anti-adhesive capability of CD43 by StcE impairs rear release. Use of zebrafish embryos to model neutrophil migration revealed that StcE induced neutrophil retention in the fin after tissue wounding, suggesting that StcE modulates neutrophil-mediated inflammation in vivo. Neutrophils are crucial innate effectors of the antibacterial immune response and can contribute to severe complications caused by infection with E. coli O157∶H7. Our data suggest that the StcE mucinase can play an immunomodulatory role by directly altering neutrophil function during infection. StcE may contribute to inflammation and tissue destruction by mediating inappropriate neutrophil adhesion and activation. PMID:19247439

  17. NMR structure and dynamics of monomeric neutrophil-activating peptide 2.

    PubMed Central

    Young, H; Roongta, V; Daly, T J; Mayo, K H

    1999-01-01

    Neutrophil-activating peptide 2 (NAP-2), which demonstrates a range of proinflammatory activities, is a 72-residue protein belonging to the alpha-chemokine family. Although NAP-2, like other alpha-chemokines, is known to self-associate into dimers and tetramers, it has been shown that the monomeric form is physiologically active. Here we investigate the solution structure of monomeric NAP-2 by multi-dimensional 1H-NMR and 15N-NMR spectroscopy and computational modelling. The NAP-2 monomer consists of an amphipathic, triple-stranded, anti-parallel beta-sheet on which is folded a C-terminal alpha-helix and an aperiodic N-terminal segment. The backbone fold is essentially the same as that found in other alpha-chemokines. 15N T1, T2 and nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) have been measured for backbone NH groups and used in a model free approach to calculate order parameters and conformational exchange terms that map out motions of the backbone. N-terminal residues 1 to 17 and the C-terminus are relatively highly flexible, whereas the beta-sheet domain forms the most motionally restricted part of the fold. Conformational exchange occurring on the millisecond time scale is noted at the top of the C-terminal helix and at proximal residues from beta-strands 1 and 2 and the connecting loop. Dissociation to the monomeric state is apparently responsible for increased internal mobility in NAP-2 compared with dimeric and tetrameric states in other alpha-chemokines. PMID:10051427

  18. Increased oxidative activity in human blood neutrophils and monocytes after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Bao, Feng; Bailey, Christopher S; Gurr, Kevin R; Bailey, Stewart I; Rosas-Arellano, M Patricia; Dekaban, Gregory A; Weaver, Lynne C

    2009-02-01

    Traumatic injury can cause a systemic inflammatory response, increasing oxidative activity of circulating leukocytes and potentially exacerbating the original injury, as well as causing damage to initially unaffected organs. Although the importance of intraspinal inflammation after human spinal cord injury is appreciated, the role of the systemic inflammatory response to this injury is not widely recognised. We investigated oxidative activity of blood leukocytes from nine cord-injured subjects and six trauma controls (bone fractures without CNS injury) at 6 h-2 weeks after injury, comparing values to those of ten uninjured subjects. Neutrophil and monocyte free radical production, evaluated by flow cytometry, increased significantly more in cord injury subjects than in trauma controls (6-fold vs 50% increases). In leukocyte homogenates, the concentration of free radicals increased significantly more in cord injury subjects (2-fold) than in the trauma controls (1.6-fold) as did activity of myeloperoxidase (2.3-fold vs. 1.7-fold). Moreover, in homogenates and blood smears, expression of the NADPH oxidase subunit gp91(phox) and of the oxidative enzyme, inducible nitric oxide synthetase was 20-25% greater in cord injury subjects than in trauma controls. Expression of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF-kappaB and of cyclooxygenase-2 increased similarly after both injuries. Finally, aldehyde products of tissue-damaging lipid peroxidation also increased significantly more in the plasma of spinal cord injury subjects than in trauma controls (2.6 fold vs. 1.9-fold). Spinal cord injury causes a particularly intense systemic inflammatory response. Limiting this response briefly after cord injury should protect the spinal cord and tissues/organs outside the CNS from secondary damage. PMID:19056384

  19. The role of neutrophils in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Jordan, J E; Zhao, Z Q; Vinten-Johansen, J

    1999-09-01

    Reperfusion of ischemic myocardium is necessary to salvage tissue from eventual death. However, reperfusion after even brief periods of ischemia is associated with pathologic changes that represent either an acceleration of processes initiated during ischemia per se, or new pathophysiological changes that were initiated after reperfusion. This 'reperfusion injury' shares many characteristics with inflammatory responses in the myocardium. Neutrophils feature prominently in this inflammatory component of postischemic injury. Ischemia-reperfusion prompts a release of oxygen free radicals, cytokines and other proinflammatory mediators that activate<